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Sample records for adult epileptic patients

  1. Psychosocial Functioning of Adult Epileptic and MS Patients and Adult Normal Controls on the WPSI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Siang-Yang

    1986-01-01

    Psychosocial functioning of adult epileptic outpatients as assessed by the Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI) was compared to that of adult multiple sclerosis (MS) outpatients and normal subjects. When only valid WPSI profiles were considered, the only significant finding was that the epilepsy group and the MS group had more…

  2. Counselling the Epileptic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Barry

    1983-01-01

    Today, most epileptics can participate freely in a wide range of activities. However, their epilepsy does create some special problems. The degree to which they participate in sports is governed by their degree of seizure control, as are their employment opportunities and driving privileges. Epilepsy does not appear to be a major stress factor in marriage as long as the spouse is knowledgeable about the condition. Epileptic women usually have normal pregnancies though their relative risks are perhaps double those for the non-epileptic population. Children of epileptic women have about four times the general population's risk of seizure but the absolute level of risk is not high. PMID:21286585

  3. Bioavailability of diazepam after intravenous, oral and rectal administration in adult epileptic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, S; Oxley, J; Richens, A

    1982-01-01

    1 The absorption of single doses of diazepam in six adult epileptic subjects following intravenous, oral and rectal administration were studied in order to evaluate the usefulness of the latter in emergency situations in the adult. 2 Diazepam tablets (Valium, Roche) and rectal solution (Valium solution for intravenous administration) produced similar peak serum concentrations after delays of 15-90 min. 3 Two suppository formulations showed statistically significant differences in absorption characteristics. 4 Serum diazepam levels above 400 ng ml-1 (suggested to be necessary for a satisfactory anticonvulsant effect) were reached in only a few subjects after rectal doses of 10-20 mg of solution, and then usually after a delay of over 2 h. PMID:7059446

  4. Dental problems in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Zioło, Anna; Mielnik-Błaszczak, Maria

    2004-01-01

    On the grounds of literature and own clinical experience, pathological changes in epilepitic patients have been described. Dental management procedures in these patients have also been presented. The unquestionable importance of prophylaxis, which may markedly minimize the impact of epilepsy on the incidence of mouth diseases, has been emphasised. It has also been stated that epileptic patients should receive specialised and integrated dental treatment.

  5. [A national framework for educational programs in epileptic patients, children and adults].

    PubMed

    Prévos-Morgant, M; Petit, J; Grisoni, F; André-Obadia, N; Auvin, S; Derambure, P

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disease with a wide range of presentations occurring at any age. It affects the patient's quality of life, implying a need for numerous healthcare services. Therapeutic education programs (TEPs) are designed to match patient age, disease course, and individual learning abilities. In France, these programs are proposed by the national health authorities (Superior Health Authority), and authorized by the Regional Health Agencies. Two years ago, a Therapeutic Education Programs Commission (TEPC), supported by the French League against Epilepsy (FLAE), was created. The goal was to bring together representative healthcare professionals in a working group in order to standardize practices. This led to the creation of a national reference of healthcare skills specific for children and adults with epilepsy. Five tables, for five "life periods", outline the framework of this professional reference tool. Program personalization, an essential part of TEPs, is necessary to develop a creative atmosphere. This slow process is specific to the various stages of life and can be influenced by the occurrence of various handicaps. Family and caregivers make key contributions to the process. The national framework for therapeutic education in epilepsy serves as a central crossroad where professions can find essential information to create or adapt their own TEPs. In the near future, regional experiences will be documented and collected for regular updates. This professional therapeutic education network will help promote therapeutic education programs and facilitate standard practices. Finally, several TEP files and tools will be shared on the FLAE website available for professional access. Today, the group's goal is to achieve national deployment of this "referential" framework. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Water intoxication in epileptic patients receiving carbamazepine.

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, E; Garratt, A; Hebdige, S; Richens, A

    1978-01-01

    Plasma sodium and osmolality were determined in 80 adult epileptic patients receiving chronic treatment with carbamazepine and in 50 control patients treated with other anticonvulsant drugs. Mean plasma osmolality was significantly lower in the carbamazepine-treated patients but mean plasma sodium did not differ in the two groups. Hyponatraemia was found in five of the carbamazine-treated patients and hypo-osmolality in six. None of the control patients had hyponatraemia and only one had a borderline low osmolality. Three of the 13 patients receiving carbamazepine alone were hyponatraemic. Plasma sodium concentration correlated negatively with both daily carbamazepine dose and serum carbamazepine level. Free water clearance after an oral water load was determined in six patients on carbamazepine alone and in six normal subjects not receiving drug therapy. The capacity of some of the patients to excrete the water load was found to be grossly impaired. PMID:681958

  7. Nutritional Aspects of Treatment in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    SOLTANI, Danesh; GHAFFAR POUR, Majid; TAFAKHORI, Abbas; SARRAF, Payam; BITARAFAN, Sama

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by interruption of normal neuronal functions that is manifested by behavioral disorders, changing of awareness level, and presence of some sensory, autonomic and motor symptoms or signs. It is resulted from many different causes. Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are considered to manage epileptic attacks. Some of them change metabolism and absorption of many nutrients. Therefore, epileptic patients may be in higher risk of nutrient deficiency and its unwelcome effects. In the present paper, we intend to review the relationship between nutrition and epilepsy in two aspects. In one aspect we discuss the nutritional status in epileptic patients, the causes of nutritional deficiencies and the way of compensation of the nutrient deficiencies. It will guide these patients to have a healthy life. In another aspect we explain the role of some nutrients and specific diets in management of epileptic attacks. It can help to better control of epileptic attacks in these patients. PMID:27375750

  8. Nutritional Aspects of Treatment in Epileptic Patients.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Danesh; Ghaffar Pour, Majid; Tafakhori, Abbas; Sarraf, Payam; Bitarafan, Sama

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by interruption of normal neuronal functions that is manifested by behavioral disorders, changing of awareness level, and presence of some sensory, autonomic and motor symptoms or signs. It is resulted from many different causes. Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are considered to manage epileptic attacks. Some of them change metabolism and absorption of many nutrients. Therefore, epileptic patients may be in higher risk of nutrient deficiency and its unwelcome effects. In the present paper, we intend to review the relationship between nutrition and epilepsy in two aspects. In one aspect we discuss the nutritional status in epileptic patients, the causes of nutritional deficiencies and the way of compensation of the nutrient deficiencies. It will guide these patients to have a healthy life. In another aspect we explain the role of some nutrients and specific diets in management of epileptic attacks. It can help to better control of epileptic attacks in these patients.

  9. Epileptic Encephalopathies in Adults and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kural, Zekiye; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are motor-mental retardations or cognitive disorders secondary to epileptic seizures or epileptiform activities. Encephalopaties due to brain damage, medications, or systemic diseases are generally not in the scope of this definition, but they may rarely accompany the condition. Appropriate differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures as well as subclinical electroencephalographic discharges are crucial for management of seizures and epileptiform discharges and relative regression of cognitive deterioration in long-term followup. Proper antiepileptic drug, hormonal treatment, or i.v. immunoglobulin choice play major role in prognosis. In this paper, we evaluated the current treatment approaches by reviewing clinical electrophysiological characteristics of epileptic encephalopathies. PMID:23056934

  10. Prosthetic management of an epileptic patient.

    PubMed

    Akeredolu, P A; Temisanren, O T; Danesi, M A

    2005-12-01

    This case report illustrates the problems of tooth loss in an epileptic patient. The patient presented with a broken denture following a seizure. She gave a history of breaking and swallowing her dentures during seizures. Before presentation she had worn five upper removable partial dentures. An upper removable partial denture with increased thickness of the acrylic palatal was fabricated and fitted satisfactorily. The patient was taught how to insert and remove the prosthesis as quickly as possible. Epileptic patients can use dentures but run the risk of frequently breaking and swallowing them during seizures. The risk can be reduced if patients and relatives are taught how to remove the dentures prior to or during seizures.

  11. Cortical silent period following transcranial magnetic stimulation in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Ertaş, N K; Gül, G; Altunhalka, A; Kirbas, D

    2000-09-01

    Cortical silent period (SP) following transcranial magnetic stimulation is mainly due to cortical inhibitory mechanisms. SP may have a value for detecting inhibitory mechanisms in epileptic patients with or without treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of both the epilepsy and the antiepileptic medication on these inhibitory mechanisms. The subgroups studied consisted of (a) normal subjects, (b) unmedicated epileptic patients, (c) epileptic patients with uncontrolled seizures under medication, (d) epileptic patients with controlled seizures under medication. SP following transcranial magnetic stimulation was measured in all subjects. The SP values from shortest to the longest were in the following order: 1) normal subjects; 2) epileptic patients with controlled seizures under medication; 3) unmedicated epileptic patients; 4) epileptic patients with uncontrolled seizures under medication. Our findings probably indicate the enhanced interictal inhibitory mechanisms in epilepsy which is resistant to antiepileptic medication.

  12. Is sudden unexplained death in adult epileptic patients associated with geomagnetic disturbances at the day of death or the 4 days before?

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Ralf; Beblo, Martin; May, Theodor W; Burmester, Luise

    2002-09-06

    Geomagnetic disturbances are controversially discussed as risk factor for sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). An autopsy-based cohort of 39 adult patients with definite SUDEP were compared to 102 epileptic patients with known cause of death (KCD), who died between 1981 and 1992. Most of them had suffered from therapy-resistant epilepsies, predominantly characterized by generalized tonic-clonic seizures (about 70%). We analyzed an international geomagnetic index, the mean planetary daily amplitude (Ap), and the appearance of storm sudden commencement (SSC) at the individual day of decease and the 4 days before (and after). The SUDEP and KCD patients did not substantially differ with respect to the Ap values (Mann-Whitney test; P>0.2) and frequency of SSC (Fisher test; P>0.2) at death or the 4 premortem days. In addition, Ap values above 50 nanoTesla, postulated as critical threshold by other authors, showed no significant difference between SUDEP and KCD group for the day of death (5.1 versus 3.9%) or the 4 days before (5.1 versus 11.8%) (Fisher test; P>0.2). Consequently, the current data did not support the hypothesis that geomagnetic activities may act as a relevant risk factor for SUDEP.

  13. Psychological approach of non-epileptic to epileptic patients: the dynamics of attitude changes during hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejczak, J; Owczarek, K; Majkowski, J

    1999-09-01

    Measures of interpersonal relations of non-epileptic patients to epileptic patients were studied in search of answers to two questions: what is the initial attitude of non-epileptic patients to epileptic patients; and, do any changes in attitude occur during time spent together in hospital? In order to study these personal relations, a formal analysis of preferences was carried out. Twenty-two non-epileptic patients admitted to the Neurology and Epileptology Department, Medical Centre for Postgraduate Education, Warsaw were studied. Subjects were asked to rank-order (from 1 to 9 points) suggested ways of distributing the profits of a hypothetical joint (e.g., with a room-mate) money-earning venture. The experimental procedure for each patient was repeated for all three room-mates. Preferences were assessed three times - the day after admission to hospital, after 11 days and after 21 days in hospital. Following this procedure, it was possible to trace the dynamics of the patients' interpersonal relations. The data were correlated (Spearman's r(s)) and submitted to analysis of variance (MANOVA) with repeated measures. Analysis of the attitudes of patients with non-epileptic neurological disorders towards epileptic patients revealed a dynamic tendency - from negative (measures one and partly two) to positive attitudes after three weeks spent together in hospital (measure three).

  14. Factors associated with hopelessness in epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Pompili, Maurizio; Serafini, Gianluca; Innamorati, Marco; Montebovi, Franco; Lamis, Dorian A; Milelli, Mariantonietta; Giuliani, Manuela; Caporro, Matteo; Tisei, Paolo; Lester, David; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo; Buttinelli, Carla

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate factors related to hopelessness in a sample of epileptic patients, including measures of depression and quality of life (QOL). METHODS: Sixty-nine participants were administered the following psychometric instruments: Beck Depression Inventory-II, Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), and QOL in Epilepsy (QOLIE)-89. Patients were dichotomized into two categories: those affected by epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures vs those having epilepsy with partial seizures. RESULTS: The groups differed on the QOLIE Role Limitation/Emotional dimension. Patients with generalized seizures reported more limitations in common social/role activities related to emotional problems than patients with other types of epilepsy (89.57 ± 25.49 vs 72.86 ± 36.38; t63 = -2.16; P < 0.05). All of the respondents reported moderate to severe depression, and 21.7% of patients with generalized seizures and 28.6% of patients with other diagnoses had BHS total scores ≥ 9 indicating a higher suicidal risk. The study did not control for years of the illness. CONCLUSION: Patients with generalized seizures reported more limitations in common social/role activities related to emotional problems compared to patients with other types of seizures. Patients at increased suicide risk as evaluated by the BHS were older than those who had a lower suicidal risk. Future studies are required to further investigate the impact of hopelessness on the outcome of epileptic patients. PMID:25540729

  15. Clinical characteristics and epilepsy outcomes following surgery caused by focal cortical dysplasia (type IIa) in 110 adult epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuqiang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Che, Ningwei; Qin, Huamin; Liu, Shuping; Wu, Xinling; Wei, Minghai; Cheng, Huakun; Yin, Jian

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of surgical intervention of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) IIa on the outcome of epilepsy, and to evaluate the prognostic factors of seizure freedom. Patient data from epilepsy surgeries were retrospectively reviewed at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University between 2007 and 2015. A total of 110 patients with a definite pathological diagnosis of FCD IIa were included. Moreover, the clinical characteristics, seizure outcome and quality of life in adults with FCD IIa were evaluated. The Engel seizure outcome achievements were class I in 72, class II in 20, class III in 11 and class IV in 7 patients. In addition, the Engel seizure outcome was relevant with the resection range of the lesions (P=0.028). The assessments of electrocorticography (ECoG) patterns and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are relevant to determining the extent of the resection, which may influence the surgery outcome (P=0.001 and P=0.023). Using multivariate regression analyses, the extent of resection, seizure frequency, preoperative ECoG and location of resection were the most important risk factors for seizure recurrence. The results of quality of life in epilepsy-10 scoring revealed that the quality of life improved significantly following surgery (P<0.01). Moreover, surgical intervention, EcoG, MRI positioning and complete resection helped to have improved seizure control, relief of anxiety and quality of life. All these observations strongly recommend an early consideration of epilepsy surgery in FCD IIa patients.

  16. Juvenile and adult-onset psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Emami, Mehrdad

    2013-09-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) tend to begin in adolescence and young adulthood, although the seizures can occur in a wide range of ages. In the current study, we investigated the age of onset in patients with PNES and tried to determine the correlation between the age of onset and the demographic and clinical characteristics and factors potentially predisposing to PNES. In this cross-sectional study, all patients with a clinical diagnosis of PNES were recruited at the outpatient epilepsy clinic at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from 2008 to 2012. We dichotomized the patients into two groups; those with age of onset below 18 years (juvenile), and those with age of onset at 18-55 years (adult-onset). We studied the demographic and clinical characteristics and factors potentially predisposing to PNES between these two groups. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi square and Fisher's Exact tests and Mann-Whitney U test. Fifty-seven patients with juvenile and 129 people with adult-onset PNES were studied. Demographic characteristics of these two groups were not different significantly. Seizure characteristics and semiology in these two groups were not significantly different either. However, factors potentially predisposing to PNES were significantly different between these two groups. History of being abused, academic failure, epilepsy or family history of epilepsy were more frequently observed in juvenile PNES, while medical comorbidities were more frequent among patients with adult-onset PNES. Age of onset of PNES is not correlated with the clinical manifestations; however, factors potentially predisposing to PNES are significantly different in patients with juvenile compared to those with adult-onset PNES. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Clinical approach to the first epileptic crisis in adults].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo Alfonso; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel Ernesto

    2014-04-16

    Seizures are one of the main reasons for visits to emergency and neurology. Represent a traumatic event with potential medical and social consequences. A first epileptic seizure, can be the initial manifestation of malignancy, systemic disorder or infection, but can also be the first manifestation of epilepsy. The misdiagnosis of symptomatic seizures and unprovoked seizure, significantly affects prognosis and patient outcomes. The aim of this review is to examine the general concepts that enable successful diagnostic and therapeutic approach to the patient presenting with a first epileptic seizure.

  18. Diagnostic value of spontaneous afternoon sleep in epilepsy: polysomnographic study of 96 epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Tartara, A; Manni, R

    1986-01-01

    An early afternoon polysomnographic recording was performed in 112 epileptic patients in order to better define their epileptic disease. 96 subjects (85.7%) slept spontaneously and sleep EEG tracing resulted in diagnostically useful data in 47.8% of cases, a significantly higher percentage than that obtained from tests performed in basal conditions. EEG activation, mostly linked to light NREM sleep stages, was greater in infanto-juvenile subjects than in adults.

  19. Doublecortin expression in the normal and epileptic adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y W J; Curtis, M A; Gibbons, H M; Mee, E W; Bergin, P S; Teoh, H H; Connor, B; Dragunow, M; Faull, R L M

    2008-12-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a neurological disorder associated with spontaneous recurrent complex partial seizures and hippocampal sclerosis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported in animal models of MTLE, increased neurogenesis has not been reported in the hippocampus of adult human MTLE cases. Here we showed that cells expressing doublecortin (Dcx), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in migrating neuroblasts, were present in the hippocampus and temporal cortex of the normal and MTLE adult human brain. In particular, increased numbers of Dcx-positive cells were observed in the epileptic compared with the normal temporal cortex. Importantly, 56% of Dcx-expressing cells in the epileptic temporal cortex coexpressed both the proliferative cell marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and early neuronal marker, TuJ1, suggesting that they may be newly generated neurons. A subpopulation of Dcx-positive cells in the epileptic temporal cortex also coexpressed the mature neuronal marker, NeuN, suggesting that epilepsy may promote the generation of new neurons in the temporal cortex. This study has identified, for the first time, a novel population of Dcx-positive cells in the adult human temporal cortex that can be upregulated by epilepsy and thus, raises the possibility that these cells may have functional significance in the pathophysiology of epilepsy.

  20. Epileptic and nonepileptic features in patients with early onset epileptic encephalopathy and STXBP1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Milh, Mathieu; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Chouchane, Mondher; Kaminska, Anna; Laroche, Cécile; Barthez, Marie Anne; Gitiaux, Cyril; Bartoli, Céline; Borges-Correia, Ana; Cacciagli, Pierre; Mignon-Ravix, Cécile; Cuberos, Hélène; Chabrol, Brigitte; Villard, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    STXBP1 (MUNC18-1) mutations have been associated with various types of epilepsies, mostly beginning early in life. To refine the phenotype associated with STXBP1 aberrations in early onset epileptic syndromes, we studied this gene in a cohort of patients with early onset epileptic encephalopathy. STXBP1 was screened in a multicenter cohort of 52 patients with early onset epilepsy (first seizure observed before the age of 3 months), no cortical malformation on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and negative metabolic screening. Three groups of patients could be distinguished in this cohort: (1) Ohtahara syndromes (n = 38); (2) early myoclonic encephalopathies (n = 7); and (3) early onset epileptic encephalopathies that did not match any familiar syndrome (n = 7). None of the patients displayed any cortical malformation on brain MRI and all were screened through multiple video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings for a time period spanning from birth to their sixth postnatal month. Subsequently, patients had standard EEG or video-EEG recordings. We found five novel STXBP1 mutations in patients for whom video-EEG recordings could be sampled from the beginning of the disease. All patients with a mutation displayed Ohtahara syndrome, since most early seizures could be classified as epileptic spasms and since the silent EEG periods were on average shorter than bursts. However, each patient in addition displayed a particular clinical and EEG feature: In two patients, early seizures were clonic, with very early EEG studies exhibiting relatively low amplitude bursts of activity before progressing into a typical suppression-burst pattern, whereas the three other patients displayed epileptic spasms associated with typical suppression-burst patterns starting from the early recordings. Epilepsy dramatically improved after 6 months and finally disappeared before the end of the first year of life for four patients; the remaining one patient had few seizures until 18

  1. The biological effects of magnetic stimulation in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Anninos, P A; Tsagas, N; Jacobson, J I; Kotini, A

    1999-09-01

    The magnetoencephalogram (MEG) is the magnetic activity emitted by the brain, which can be measured using a superconductive quantum interference device (SQUID). This is a totally non-invasive method for localizing functional healthy, epileptic and other CNS brain disorders. Using the MEG brain activity recorded from epileptic patients we were able to obtain a mapping technique characterized by the ISO-spectral amplitude of scalp distribution of the MEG Fourier power spectrum. In addition, by utilizing the above recorded MEG activity we energize an electronic device, which emits back to the abnormal brain points of the epileptic patients magnetic fields with proper frequencies and intensities. Using this method we present here in more detail three randomly selected epileptic patients in which application of external magnetic fields of low intensities and frequencies produced a substantial attenuation of their abnormal brain activity. Furthermore, we present a statistical analysis of 50 randomly selected epileptic patients who underwent magnetic stimulation for the treatment of their seizures and we found that the anticonvulsant response to magnetic stimulation was statistically significant (chi 2 = 6.55, df = 1, p < 0.02). Our findings indicate that the use of low external magnetic fields produce substantial attenuation in seizure activity in epileptic patients and therefore it may open new ways in the future for management of epileptic activity.

  2. Drug therapy of epileptic seizures among adult epileptic outpatients of University of Gondar Referral and Teaching Hospital, Gondar, North West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birru, Eshetie Melese; Shafi, Miftah; Geta, Mestayet

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the practice of pharmacotherapy of epilepsy and its treatment outcomes in adult epileptic outpatients at the University of Gondar Referral and Teaching Hospital, Gondar, North West Ethiopia. Methods An institution based, retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from the medical charts of 336 adult epileptic patients at the outpatient epileptic clinic of Neurology Department of University of Gondar Teaching Hospital from May 2014 to April 2015. Reviewing follow-up information from the medical charts was used to evaluate antiepileptic drug (AED) prescribing patterns and treatment outcome. Data were collected by using data collection format and analyzed using SPSS software version 16. Results The most common type of seizure diagnosed was generalized tonic–clonic seizure (n=245, 72.91%). Monotherapy with an AED accounted for 80.35% of the cases, whereas dual therapy and polytherapy with three AED combinations accounted for 16.37% and 3.28%, respectively. The most frequently prescribed AED was phenobarbitone (62.47%) followed by carbamazepine (17.91%). From the total epileptic cases, 277 (82.4%) had well-controlled seizure status in the last three consecutive months. Conclusion Most of the patients were maintained by monotherapy, and largely this was by the older antiepileptic drug, phenobarbitone. Considering the development of pharmacotherapy of epilepsy and other patient related factors, the standard treatment guideline for Ethiopia needs to be revised periodically. PMID:28053533

  3. Complementary treatment of psychotic and epileptic patients in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Razali, Salleh Mohd; Yassin, Azhar Mohd

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this article is to describe and compare the use of traditional/complementary medicine (T/CM) among psychotic (schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorder) and epileptic Malay patients in peninsular Malaysia. There were 60 patients in each group. T/CM consultation was uniformly spread across all levels of education and social status. We could not find a single over-riding factor that influenced the decision to seek T/CM treatment because the decision to seek such treatment was complex and the majority of decisions were made by others. Fifty-three patients (44.2%), consisting of 37 (61.7%) psychotic and 16 (26.7%) epileptic patients had consulted Malay traditional healers (bomoh) and/or homeopathic practitioners in addition to modern treatment; of these, only three had consulted bomoh and homeopathic practitioners at the same time. The use of T/CM was significantly higher in psychotic than in epileptic Malay patients.

  4. Quality of life in epileptic patients compared with healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Ali; Salarilak, Shaker; Lotfabadi, Pegah; Kiani, Fereshte; Rajabi, Abdolhalim; Mansori, Kamyar; Moosavi Jahromi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder that has a great impact on people’s lives. Patients with epilepsy are at increased risk for poor Quality of Life (QoL). The objective of this study was to evaluate the QoL of epileptic patients in comparison to healthy persons. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 52 epileptic patients from Golbu region in Neyshabur (a city in northeast of Iran). Using Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scale, the data were collected between April and Jun 2012. Every patient were compared with two healthy persons. Epileptic and healthy persons were similar for age, sex and local residence. Pearson’s correlation coefficient and t-independent test applied for data analysis through SPSS v. 16 software. Results: Of 52 epileptic patients, 24 were female (46.2%) and 28 were male (53.8%). The mean±SD age of epileptic patients was 40.92±20.33yr (Rang: 15-86yr). The total mean score of SF- 36 in patient group was 55.88 and in healthy group 68.52and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Among the different subscales of SF-36 in epileptic patients, the highest and the lowest mean scores were found for social functioning and general health subscales, respectively. The mean scores in patient group in comparison to healthy group were lower in all subscales of SF-36 and these differences were statistically significant in all domains (except role limitations due to physical problems domain and role limitations due to emotional problems domain). Conclusion: The study showed that epilepsy disease has an important role in QoL of patients, thus some interventional programs are necessary to improve their QOL. PMID:27493932

  5. Transient epileptic amnesia: clinical report of a cohort of patients.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Quaranta, Davide; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-07-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia is a seizure disorder, usually with onset in the middle-elderly and good response to low dosages of antiepileptic drugs. We describe the clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), and neuroimaging features of 11 patients with a temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by amnesic seizures as the sole or the main symptom. We outline the relevance of a detailed clinical history to recognize amnesic seizures and to avoid the more frequent misdiagnoses. Moreover, the response to monotherapy was usually good, although the epileptic disorder was symptomatic of acquired lesions in the majority of patients.

  6. Epileptic drivers--a study of 1,089 patients.

    PubMed

    Beaussart, M; Beaussart-Defaye, J; Lamiaux, J M; Grubar, J C

    1997-01-01

    A longitudinal study of 1,089 epileptic patients followed up by the same specialist between 1965-1991, allowed close observation of the seizures occurring to the patient at the wheel and their consequences and to relate them to detailed epileptological criteria. The results show road accidents caused by epileptic seizures are few and most of them are minor. The repatriation of risks between patients is very uneven. The quality of the neuro-psychic inter-critical state as well as the patients' degree of compliance seem to be more reliable risk indicators than some more traditional criteria like the length of remission between seizures. Although seizures occur more frequently in patients suffering from Complex Partial seizures as opposed to other forms of epileptic seizures, the differences between patients with epilepsy lies mostly in their behaviour and in their own representation of the risks. There is a need for a body of rules and regulations serving as an official framework regulating the driving test. This widely circulated document should take into account the multiplicity of cases, including the small number of patients thought to be dangerous. Its mode of application should allow doctors as well as patients to opt for a realistic attitude based on decision-making criteria involving a thorough knowledge of epilepsy as well as a thorough knowledge of the psychological characteristics of the patient concerned.

  7. Occurrence of oral trauma in young epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Gerreth, K; Gerreth, P

    2014-03-01

    People with reduced efficiency, as well as those who experience seizures, are prone to traumatic injuries within the facial skeleton. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of traumatic injuries of the oral cavity in epileptic children and youths from special-care schools. The study was carried out in children and youths with intellectual disability attending special-care schools in the city of Poznan (Poland). The study group comprised 63 epileptic students (31 female and 32 male), aged 6-20 years. Information on disease prevalence was obtained from medical records. The control group consisted of 63 students (23 female and 40 male), aged 7-20 years, not suffering from epilepsy, randomly selected from individuals in the same schools. The examination included assessment of dental traumatic injuries (crown fracture or traumatic tooth loss). For statistical analysis relating to differences in the occurrence of injuries of teeth between epileptic subjects and control group, the chi- square test was used, but in case of a low number of observations, chi-square with Yates's correction. Crown's fracture of permanent teeth was reported in 10 subjects (15.9% of all patients), which involved 13 permanent incisors. Tooth loss as a result of the injury was seen only in one 14-year-old subject. However, in the control group, symptoms of crown's fracture were found in six permanent teeth in 4 patients (6.4% of all subjects). It is necessary to provide appropriate dental care to epileptic patients because of the risk of injuries and the need for a special prosthodontic rehabilitation.

  8. Novel STXBP1 mutations in 2 patients with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Mafalda; Rocha, Ruben; Biskup, Saskia; Leão, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    The authors describe 2 patients with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by 2 novel mutations involving the STXBP1 gene. The authors suggest that in spite of the rarity of STXBP1 mutations, molecular analysis of STXBP1 gene should be performed in patients with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, after exclusion of ARX mutations in male patients and CDKL5 mutations in female patients. The potential mechanisms explaining the variable clinical phenotypes caused by STXBP1 mutations are discussed and the designation of early-onset epileptic encephalopathies, including an updated genetic classification, is proposed to encompass the epileptic encephalopathies beginning in the first 6 months of life.

  9. Phenytoin dose adjustment in epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mawer, G. E.; Mullen, P. W.; Rodgers, Margaret; Robins, A. J.; Lucas, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    1 A preliminary survey showed that many outpatients with partially controlled epilepsy had serum concentrations of phenytoin below the recommended therapeutic range (10-20 μg/ml). A phenytoin tolerance test was devised with the intention of predicting a more adequate daily dose for such a patient. 2 Fifteen patients were each given an oral test dose of 600 mg phenytoin sodium and the serum concentration of phenytoin was measured at intervals over 48 h; the concentration rose during the first 4 h and decayed between 12-48 h as an almost linear function of time. 3 The serum concentration/time curves were fitted by an interative computer program based on the Michaelis-Menten equation. The mean saturated rate of elimination of phenytoin was 435 mg/day and the serum concentration (Km) corresponding with 50% saturation was 3.8 μg/ml. The mean calculated dose of phenytoin sodium required for a steady state serum concentration of 10-20 μg/ml was 345-400 mg/day. 4 The Michaelis-Menten principle was used to predict steady state serum phenytoin concentrations in individual patients receiving daily doses of phenytoin sodium adjusted by steps of 100 mg. The serum concentrations tended to be either too low or too high. The steep relationship between phenytoin concentration and dose indicates that when the concentration reaches 5-10 μg/ml it is then appropriate to adjust dose by small steps of about 25 mg. PMID:22454904

  10. Phenytoin dose adjustment in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Mawer, G E; Mullen, P W; Rodgers, M; Robins, A J; Lucas, S B

    1974-04-01

    1 A preliminary survey showed that many outpatients with partially controlled epilepsy had serum concentrations of phenytoin below the recommended therapeutic range (10-20 μg/ml). A phenytoin tolerance test was devised with the intention of predicting a more adequate daily dose for such a patient. 2 Fifteen patients were each given an oral test dose of 600 mg phenytoin sodium and the serum concentration of phenytoin was measured at intervals over 48 h; the concentration rose during the first 4 h and decayed between 12-48 h as an almost linear function of time. 3 The serum concentration/time curves were fitted by an interative computer program based on the Michaelis-Menten equation. The mean saturated rate of elimination of phenytoin was 435 mg/day and the serum concentration (K(m)) corresponding with 50% saturation was 3.8 μg/ml. The mean calculated dose of phenytoin sodium required for a steady state serum concentration of 10-20 μg/ml was 345-400 mg/day. 4 The Michaelis-Menten principle was used to predict steady state serum phenytoin concentrations in individual patients receiving daily doses of phenytoin sodium adjusted by steps of 100 mg. The serum concentrations tended to be either too low or too high. The steep relationship between phenytoin concentration and dose indicates that when the concentration reaches 5-10 μg/ml it is then appropriate to adjust dose by small steps of about 25 mg.

  11. [Differences in the management of epileptic seizures between the elderly and younger adults treated in an emergency department].

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alonso, C; Matias-Guiu, J A; Castillo, C; Fuentes-Ferrer, M E; Gonzalez-Del Castillo, J; Martin-Sanchez, F J

    2014-09-16

    To study the differences in the management and short-term outcomes of adult patients treated in an emergency service for epileptic seizures, depending on whether they are elderly or not. This observational retrospective cohort study included all the patients over 15 years of age who were treated for epileptic seizures in the hospital emergency department of a tertiary and university hospital between 1 September and 31 December 2011. The variables collected were acute treatment and follow-up at 30 days after the index event in the emergency department. Altogether the sample included 114 patients with a mean age of 46.4 years (interquartile range: 32.6-74.3 years), of whom 34 (29.8%) were aged 65 years or over. The group of elderly persons presented a first epileptic episode (p = 0.001), with unknown precipitating factor (p = 0.02), structural causation (p < 0.001), a computerised tomography scan carried out in the emergency department (p < 0.001), establishment of preventive antiepileptic drug regime in the emergency department (p = 0.001) and a prolonged hospital stay (p = 0.002) more frequently than the younger adults. Following a multivariable analysis, being elderly was an independent factor associated to a greater need for specific complementary tests (odds ratio = 3.7; 95% confidence interval = 1.3-10.3) and pharmacological intervention in the emergency department (odds ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.4-8.1). There were no statistically significant differences in the results between the two groups at 30 days in terms of return visits (p = 0.316) and mortality (p = 0.087). The treatment of epileptic seizures in the elderly in the emergency department is complex, if compared with younger adults, thereby making it necessary to use a greater amount of hospital resources.

  12. Atlanto Axial Rotatory Dislocation in Adults: A Rare Complication of an Epileptic Seizure—Case Report

    PubMed Central

    TARANTINO, Roberto; DONNARUMMA, Pasquale; MAROTTA, Nicola; MISSORI, Paolo; VIOZZI, Ilaria; LANDI, Alessandro; DELFINI, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Atlanto Axial Rotatory Dislocations (AARDs) are a heterogeneous group of post-traumatic pathologies typical of the pediatric age, and rare in adults. We describe the case of a 34-year-old woman, developing Atlanto Axial Rotatory Fixation (AARF) after a generalized tonic-clonic epileptic seizure, an extremely rare traumatic cause never described in literature. AARF was detected only 1 month after the accident and nonsurgical treatment was attempted at the beginning. The patient underwent surgery only 2 months after the accident. The best treatment should be conservative reduction within 1 month; when it is not possible, it is advisable to perform surgery as soon as possible. C1–C2 fixation with Harm's technique is the gold standard for fixed luxations. Delay of treatment makes intraoperative reduction more difficult and increase the establishment of the chronic permanent change of neck muscles and ligaments. PMID:24201098

  13. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling approach in investigating phenobarbital pharmacokinetic interactions in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Vučićević, Katarina; Jovanović, Marija; Golubović, Bojana; Kovačević, Sandra Vezmar; Miljković, Branislava; Martinović, Žarko; Prostran, Milica

    2015-02-01

    The present study aimed to establish population pharmacokinetic model for phenobarbital (PB), examining and quantifying the magnitude of PB interactions with other antiepileptic drugs concomitantly used and to demonstrate its use for individualization of PB dosing regimen in adult epileptic patients. In total 205 PB concentrations were obtained during routine clinical monitoring of 136 adult epilepsy patients. PB steady state concentrations were measured by homogeneous enzyme immunoassay. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling (NONMEM) was applied for data analyses and evaluation of the final model. According to the final population model, significant determinant of apparent PB clearance (CL/F) was daily dose of concomitantly given valproic acid (VPA). Typical value of PB CL/F for final model was estimated at 0.314 l/h. Based on the final model, co-therapy with usual VPA dose of 1000 mg/day, resulted in PB CL/F average decrease of about 25 %, while 2000 mg/day leads to an average 50 % decrease in PB CL/F. Developed population PB model may be used in estimating individual CL/F for adult epileptic patients and could be applied for individualizing dosing regimen taking into account dose-dependent effect of concomitantly given VPA.

  14. Do epileptic seizures predict outcome in patients with oligodendroglioma?

    PubMed

    Mirsattari, Seyed M; Chong, Jaron J R; Hammond, Robert R; Megyesi, Joseph F; Macdonald, David R; Lee, Donald H; Cairncross, J Gregory

    2011-03-01

    Many patients with an oligodendroglioma (OD) experience seizures, some of which become refractory to anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). This study aims (1) to quantify the rate of seizures and medically refractory epilepsy in patients with ODs; and (2) to determine if there is any association between short-term and long-term survival, and the presence and drug-responsiveness of seizures. A retrospective review was conducted of the medical records of patients who had been pathologically identified as having an OD at the London Health Sciences Centre or the London Regional Cancer Program in London, Ontario from January 1996 to July 2008. Deaths were ascertained by reviewing all hospital records. Survival analysis was performed. One-hundred sixty-six patients met inclusion criteria. Epileptic seizures were the presenting feature or occurred as part of the initial manifestation of the OD in 75.3% of patients, with 90.4% (n=150) experiencing at least one seizure and 76.5% developing epilepsy over the course of observation. Of the 150 patients with seizures, 23 experienced a single seizure (13.9% of the 166), whereas 127 patients experienced multiple seizures (76.5%). In those with multiple seizures, the epilepsy was refractory to drug treatment slightly more than half the time (54.3%). Survival analysis demonstrated consistently superior survival among those with a single seizure. Those without seizures had the worst survival rates over the first few years post-diagnosis; but then no further deaths occurred. Survival among those with refractory seizures tended to be better than among those whose seizures were drug responsive, over the first 10 years post-diagnosis. Seizures are common and may influence survival in patients with oligodendogliomas. Those who experience just one seizure appear to do best. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [The influence of epileptic predisposition on clinical features of schizophrenia in patients after delirium tremens].

    PubMed

    Dvirskiĭ, A A

    2001-01-01

    153 patients with schizophrenia in combination with alcoholic delirium were examined. Latent epilepsy has been found in 36 patients (23.5%). The basis of the epileptic seizures during alcoholic delirium was hereditary epileptic predisposition. Frequency of the progredient course was high while that of the favourable--recurrent course of schizophrenia was low in these cases.

  16. Epilepsy and the dental management of the epileptic patient.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Peter L; Eden, Oleksandra

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to educate oral healthcare providers on the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy and seizure disorders. It also shows the impact of epilepsy on the oral cavity and provides suggestions on the dental management of epileptic patients. Epilepsy and seizure disorders affect 1.5 million Americans. The disease is caused by a number of genetic, physiologic, and infectious disorders as well as trauma. Treatment is primarily pharmaceutical but can also be surgical. The disease itself and the pharmaceutical management often have an impact on the oral cavity. Primary management considerations are the provision of good periodontal care and the restoration of the teeth with stable, strong restorations. With proper understanding of patients with epilepsy and seizure disorders and their medical treatment, the dental care team can safely and effectively render dental care that will benefit the patient and minimize the risk of oral health problems in the future.

  17. Noninvasive Dynamic Imaging of Seizures in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tyvaert, Louise; LeVan, Pierre; Dubeau, Francois; Gotman, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are due to abnormal synchronized neuronal discharges. Techniques measuring electrical changes are commonly used to analyze seizures. Neuronal activity can be also defined by concomitant hemodynamic and metabolic changes. Simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG)-functional MRI (fMRI) measures noninvasively with a high-spatial resolution BOLD changes during seizures in the whole brain. Until now, only a static image representing the whole seizure was provided. We report in 10 focal epilepsy patients a new approach to dynamic imaging of seizures including the BOLD time course of seizures and the identification of brain structures involved in seizure onset and discharge propagation. The first activation was observed in agreement with the expected location of the focus based on clinical and EEG data (three intracranial recordings), thus providing validity to this approach. The BOLD signal preceded ictal EEG changes in two cases. EEG-fMRI may detect changes in smaller and deeper structures than scalp EEG, which can only record activity form superficial cortical areas. This method allowed us to demonstrate that seizure onset zone was limited to one structure, thus supporting the concept of epileptic focus, but that a complex neuronal network was involved during propagation. Deactivations were also found during seizures, usually appearing after the first activation in areas close or distant to the activated regions. Deactivations may correspond to actively inhibited regions or to functional disconnection from normally active regions. This new noninvasive approach should open the study of seizure generation and propagation mechanisms in the whole brain to groups of patients with focal epilepsies. PMID:19507156

  18. Psychological and behavioural treatments for adults with non-epileptic attack disorder.

    PubMed

    Martlew, Jayne; Pulman, Jennifer; Marson, Anthony G

    2014-02-11

    inclusion and extracted data. Outcomes included reduction in seizure frequency and improvements in quality of life. Twelve studies, with a total of 343 participants, met our inclusion criteria (four RCTs and eight before and after non-controlled studies). Of the four RCTs, one examined patients with non-epileptic seizures and three had a mixed diagnosis (pseudoseizures, conversion disorder and somatisation disorder). Most of the non-randomised studies used non-epileptic seizure patients exclusively. Overall, five studies examined the effectiveness of psychotherapy, three examined CBT, two investigated hypnosis, one assessed paradoxical intention and one had a mixed intervention design. We classified two included studies as low risk of bias, one as unclear and nine as high risk of bias. Meta-analysis could not be undertaken due to the heterogeneity of design and interventions. Most included studies reported improved outcomes for the intervention under investigation. One RCT investigating the effectiveness of CBT in this patient group found a significant reduction in seizure frequency compared to controls (P < 0.001). There is little reliable evidence to support the use of any treatment, including CBT, in the treatment of non-epileptic seizures. Further randomised controlled trials of CBT and other interventions are needed.

  19. Drug interaction between valproic acid and carbapenems in patients with epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ren; Lin, Chih-Hsiang; Hsiao, Shu-Chen; Chen, Nai-Ching; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chen, Shang-Der; Lu, Yan-Ting; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2017-03-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used antiepileptic drug (AED). When carbapenems are concomitantly used with VPA, the serum levels of VPA may decrease and aggravate seizures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk factors associated with decreased serum VPA levels and clinical outcome in patients being treated with a combination of carbapenems and VPA. Fifty-four adult patients who were treated with VPA for epileptic seizures concomitant with carbapenems for the treatment of infections were evaluated in this study. Serum VPA levels were measured before and during combination therapy with VPA and carbapenems, and the change in serum VPA levels was calculated. The risk factors related to the decrease in serum VPA levels and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Our results show that VPA concentrations were reduced to subtherapeutic levels after the introduction of carbapenems. The reduction in VPA concentrations was found within 24 hours of the start of treatment with carbapenems. VPA levels continuously declined while the combination of treatments was used, which aggravated epileptic seizures in 48% of the patients. Renal disease and enzyme-inducing AEDs were risk factors that contributed to the severity of reduced serum VPA levels during combined treatment with carbapenems. This study suggests that clinicians need to be aware of the reduction of VPA concentrations to subtherapeutic levels and the aggravation of seizures while patients are treated with a combination of carbapenems and VPA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  20. Quality measures in neurology consult care for epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    de la Morena Vicente, M A; Ballesteros Plaza, L; Martín García, H; Vidal Díaz, B; Anaya Caravaca, B; Pérez Martínez, D A

    2014-06-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequently observed diseases in neurology outpatient care. We analysed our hospital's implementation of the 8 epilepsy quality measures proposed by the American Academy of Neurology: documented seizure types and seizure frequency, aetiology of epilepsy or the epilepsy syndrome, review of EEG, MRI, or CT results, counselling about antiepileptic drug side effects, surgical therapy referral for intractable epilepsy, and counselling about epilepsy-specific safety issues and for women of childbearing age. In most cases, the first four quality measures were documented correctly. In 66% of the cases, doctors had asked about any adverse drug effects during every visit. Almost all patients with intractable epilepsy had been informed about surgical options or referred to a surgical centre of reference for an evaluation at some point, although referrals usually took place more than 3 years after the initial proposal. Safety issues had been explained to 37% of the patients and less than half of women of childbearing age with epilepsy had received counselling regarding contraception and pregnancy at least once a year. The care we provide is appropriate according to many of the quality measures, but we must deliver more counselling and information necessary for the care of epileptic patients in different stages of life. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. An improvement in cognitive function following polypharmacy reduction in a group of epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Ludgate, J; Keating, J; O'Dwyer, R; Callaghan, N

    1985-06-01

    18 epileptic patients on polypharmacy were assessed, using a battery of psychometric tests including the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Benton Visual Retention Test and Alertness and Concentration tests. The same patients were reassessed one year later following a trial to reduce their polypharmacy. The results for 12 patients whose treatment was reduced to monotherapy were statistically analysed, using the Wilcoxon Matched Pairs Test. Significant changes were found on a number of test scores which included Full Scale WAIS I.Q., W.A.I.S. Performance I.Q., Digit Symbol, Block Design and Object Assembly, Benton Visual Retention Test Error Score and Concentration Test Score. The other tests showed no improvement over baseline. The results point to the improvement in some areas of cognitive function which follows a reduction in polypharmacy to monotherapy.

  2. [Epileptic seizures during childbirth in a patient with idiopathic generalised epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Voermans, N C; Zwarts, M J; Renier, W O; Bloem, B R

    2005-06-18

    During her first pregnancy, a 37-year-old woman with idiopathic generalised epilepsy that was adequately controlled with lamotrigine experienced a series of epileptic seizures following an elective caesarean section. The attacks were terminated with diazepam. The following day, she developed EEG-confirmed status epilepticus, for which midazolam was administered intravenously. No further attacks were observed and the patient was later discharged in good condition with a healthy newborn son. She remained on lamotrigine therapy. At the end of her second pregnancy, the patient again experienced tonic-clonic seizures. The dosage of lamotrigine was increased and the patient received clonazepam intravenously, but a new seizure quickly occurred. Following an emergency caesarean section with midazolam treatment, a healthy daughter was born. No further attacks were observed. This case history illustrates the occurrence of adult idiopathic generalised epilepsy and highlights the problems that can arise late in pregnancy and during childbirth.

  3. Comparative study of nonlinear properties of EEG signals of normal persons and epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Investigation of the functioning of the brain in living systems has been a major effort amongst scientists and medical practitioners. Amongst the various disorder of the brain, epilepsy has drawn the most attention because this disorder can affect the quality of life of a person. In this paper we have reinvestigated the EEGs for normal and epileptic patients using surrogate analysis, probability distribution function and Hurst exponent. Results Using random shuffled surrogate analysis, we have obtained some of the nonlinear features that was obtained by Andrzejak et al. [Phys Rev E 2001, 64:061907], for the epileptic patients during seizure. Probability distribution function shows that the activity of an epileptic brain is nongaussian in nature. Hurst exponent has been shown to be useful to characterize a normal and an epileptic brain and it shows that the epileptic brain is long term anticorrelated whereas, the normal brain is more or less stochastic. Among all the techniques, used here, Hurst exponent is found very useful for characterization different cases. Conclusion In this article, differences in characteristics for normal subjects with eyes open and closed, epileptic subjects during seizure and seizure free intervals have been shown mainly using Hurst exponent. The H shows that the brain activity of a normal man is uncorrelated in nature whereas, epileptic brain activity shows long range anticorrelation. PMID:19619290

  4. Treatment with phenobarbital and monitoring of epileptic patients in rural Mali.

    PubMed Central

    Nimaga, K.; Desplats, D.; Doumbo, O.; Farnarier, G.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of phenobarbital treatment for epileptic patients in rural Mali. METHODS: Epileptic patients were treated at home with phenobarbital at daily dosages ranging from 50 mg for children to 200 mg for adults and their condition was monitored. Advice was given to patients, their families, and the village authorities in order to achieve compliance. An uninterrupted supply of generic phenobarbital was provided and a rural physician made two follow-up visits to each village to ensure that the drug was taken in the correct doses. The physician gave information to the population, distributed the phenobarbital in sufficient quantities to cover the periods between visits, and monitored the patients' responses to treatment. During the first year the physician visited the patients every two months. The frequency of visits was subsequently reduced to once every four months. FINDINGS: In the six months preceding treatment the average rate of seizures among patients exceeded four per month. After a year of treatment, 80.2% of the patients experienced no seizures for at least five months. A total of 15.7% of patients experienced a reduction in seizures. In many cases no further seizures occurred and there were improvements in physical health, mental health and social status. There were very few side-effects and no cases of poisoning were reported. The cost of treatment per patient per year was 7 US dollars for generic phenobarbital and 8.4 US dollars for logistics. CONCLUSION: Low doses of phenobarbital were very effective against epilepsy. However, there is an urgent need for programmes involving increased numbers of physicians in rural areas and, at the national level, for the inclusion of epilepsy treatment in the activities of health care facilities. Internationally, an epilepsy control programme providing free treatment should be developed. PMID:12163916

  5. Patient-specific connectivity pattern of epileptic network in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cheng; An, Dongmei; Yao, Dezhong; Gotman, Jean

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that focal epilepsy may involve the dysfunction of a brain network in addition to the focal region. To delineate the characteristics of this epileptic network, we collected EEG/fMRI data from 23 patients with frontal lobe epilepsy. For each patient, EEG/fMRI analysis was first performed to determine the BOLD response to epileptic spikes. The maximum activation cluster in the frontal lobe was then chosen as the seed to identify the epileptic network in fMRI data. Functional connectivity analysis seeded at the same region was also performed in 63 healthy control subjects. Nine features were used to evaluate the differences of epileptic network patterns in three connection levels between patients and controls. Compared with control subjects, patients showed overall more functional connections between the epileptogenic region and the rest of the brain and higher laterality. However, the significantly increased connections were located in the neighborhood of the seed, but the connections between the seed and remote regions actually decreased. Comparing fMRI runs with interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) and without IEDs, the patient-specific connectivity pattern was not changed significantly. These findings regarding patient-specific connectivity patterns of epileptic networks in FLE reflect local high connectivity and connections with distant regions differing from those of healthy controls. Moreover, the difference between the two groups in most features was observed in the strictest of the three connection levels. The abnormally high connectivity might reflect a predominant attribute of the epileptic network, which may facilitate propagation of epileptic activity among regions in the network.

  6. Recurrent occurrences of CDKL5 mutations in patients with epileptic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Kimura, Nobusuke; Mogami, Yukiko; Usui, Daisuke; Takayama, Rumiko; Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) is recognized as one of the genes responsible for epileptic encephalopathy. We identified CDKL5 mutations in five Japanese patients (one male and four female) with epileptic encephalopathy. Although all mutations were of de novo origin, they were located in the same positions as previously reported pathogenic mutations. These recurrent occurrences of de novo mutations in the same loci may indicate hot spots of nucleotide alteration. PMID:27081548

  7. COALESCENCE OF DEEP AND SUPERFICIAL EPILEPTIC FOCI INTO LARGER DISCHARGE UNITS IN ADULT RAT NEOCORTEX

    PubMed Central

    SERAFINI, RUGGERO; ANDRADE, RODRIGO; LOEB, JEFFREY A.

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of neuronal hyper-synchrony that can involve both neocortical and hippocampal brain regions. While much is known about the network properties of the hippocampus little is known of how epileptic neocortical hyper-synchrony develops. We aimed at characterizing the properties of epileptic discharges of a neocortical epileptic focus. We established a multi-electrode-array method to record the spatial patterns of epileptiform potentials in acute adult rat brain slices evoked by 4-Aminopyridine in the absence of magnesium. Locations of discharges mapped to two anatomical regions over the somatosensory cortex and over the lateral convexity separated by a gap at a location matching the dysgranular zone. Focal epileptiform discharges were recorded in superficial and deep neocortical layers but over superficial layers, they exhibited larger surface areas. They were often independent even when closely spaced to one another but they became progressively coupled resulting in larger zones of coherent discharge. The gradual coupling of multiple, independent, closely spaced, spatially restricted, focal discharges between deep and superficial neocortical layers represents a possible mechanism of the development of an epileptogenic zone. PMID:25701714

  8. Clinical study of seven patients with special syndrome of post-epileptic dysfunction persisting over 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Yang, N; Wang, B-G; Zeng, W-Y; Zhong, Y; Cai, X-S; Zheng, L-Q; Wu, Z-Y; Wang, F

    2014-01-01

    Todd's paralysis is the most common complication after epileptic seizures, especially status epilepticus, but other disabilities deriving from the postictal state are poorly understood. There is relatively little information on the underlying parameters that affect clinical features of post-epileptic dysfunction. The aim of this paper is to investigate clinical features of special post-epileptic dysfunction persisting over 24 hours. Seven patients with special syndromes of post-epileptic dysfunction were retrospectively analyzed and the related literature was reviewed. Six patients with post-epileptic dysfunction experienced status epilepticus. Of the seven patients, six had underlying structural brain lesions. Post-epileptic dysfunction has different syndromes, including post-epileptic paralysis, post-epileptic aphasia, cognitive disorder, gaze palsy and hemianopsia. The duration of the dysfunction in these patients lasted from 2 days to 3 months. The great majority of patients with post-epileptic dysfunction experience status epilepticus and have underlying structural brain lesions. Post-epileptic dysfunction includes various syndromes and can last from several days to 3 months with a good prognosis.

  9. Synaptic Reorganization of the Perisomatic Inhibitory Network in Hippocampi of Temporal Lobe Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wittner, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    GABAergic inhibition and particularly perisomatic inhibition play a crucial role in controlling the firing properties of large principal cell populations. Furthermore, GABAergic network is a key element in the therapy attempting to reduce epileptic activity. Here, we present a review showing the synaptic changes of perisomatic inhibitory neuronal subtypes in the hippocampus of temporal lobe epileptic patients, including parvalbumin- (PV-) containing and cannabinoid Type 1 (CB1) receptor-expressing (and mainly cholecystokinin-positive) perisomatic inhibitory cells, known to control hippocampal synchronies. We have examined the synaptic input of principal cells in the dentate gyrus and Cornu Ammonis region in human control and epileptic hippocampi. Perisomatic inhibitory terminals establishing symmetric synapses were found to be sprouted in the dentate gyrus. Preservation of perisomatic input was found in the Cornu Ammonis 1 and Cornu Ammonis 2 regions, as long as pyramidal cells are present. Higher density of CB1-immunostained terminals was found in the epileptic hippocampus of sclerotic patients, especially in the dentate gyrus. We concluded that both types of (PV- and GABAergic CB1-containing) perisomatic inhibitory cells are mainly preserved or showed sprouting in epileptic samples. The enhanced perisomatic inhibitory signaling may increase principal cell synchronization and contribute to generation of epileptic seizures and interictal spikes. PMID:28116310

  10. Oxidative Stress Measurement and Prediction of Epileptic Seizure in Children and Adults With Severe Motor and Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Masahito; Satomura, Shigeko; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Ito, Etsuro; Kyotani, Shojiro

    2016-01-01

    Background The medical care of severe motor and intellectual disabilities (SMID) depends on the empirical medical care. Epileptic seizure specific to SMID is difficult to suppress using anti-epileptic drugs, and its tendency to persist for long periods poses an issue. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between epileptic seizure in cases with SMID and oxidative stress in the living body by examining endogenous antioxidants, the degree of oxidation (reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs)), and the biological antioxidant potential (BAP) as indicators. Methods Target patients were 43 SMID epilepsy patients. Blood was sampled before breakfast and medication. As for the specimen, d-ROMs and BAP were measured using the free radical analyzer. Results The present study did not reveal any correlation between endogenous antioxidants (albumin) and the frequency of epileptic seizures. On the other hand, d-ROMs were correlated with the frequency of epileptic seizure. In particular, strong correlations between the frequency of epileptic seizures and the d-ROMs/BAP ratio as well as the BAP/d-ROMs ratio were noted. Conclusions These results indicate that the use of d-ROMs and BAP as biomarkers can provide a tool for predicting the prognosis of epileptic seizures in patients with SMID. PMID:27222671

  11. Common variants of APOE are associated with anti-epileptic drugs resistance in Han Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiao-E; Qu, Jian; Long, Hong-Yu; Long, Li-Li; Qu, Qiang; Li, Xiang-Ming; Yang, Li-Ming; Xiao, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/aim of the study: Apolipoprotein E (APOE) has been implicated as one of the susceptibility genes for some subtypes of epilepsy and may be related to anti-epileptic drugs resistance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible association between APOE variants and the anti-epileptic drugs resistance in Chinese population. APOE gene rs429358 and rs7412 variants were genotyped for ϵ2, ϵ3, ϵ4 alleles using amplification refractory mutation system in 480 subjects including 207 anti-epileptic drugs-resistant patients and 273 drug-responsive patients. We found that the frequency of APOE gene rs429358 C allele in the drug resistant patients is higher than that in the drug-responsive patients (14.98% vs. 10.1%, OR = 1.25[1.02 - 1.52], p = 0.017). Moreover, according to the two variants, we analyzed the distributions of -ϵ4 and +ϵ4 alleles of APOE gene and found that there were higher frequencies of +ϵ4 allele in drug-resistant epileptic patients than that in drug-responsive patients (31.8% vs. 13.2%, OR = 1.15[1.05 - 1.25], p = 0.002). Our study demonstrated that APOE rs429358 variant C allele and ϵ4 allele were associated with the anti-epileptic drugs resistance in Han Chinese patients.

  12. Seroepidemiological study of Toxoplasma gondii infection in a population of Iranian epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Babaie, Jalal; Sayyah, Mohammad; Gharagozli, Kourosh; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Golkar, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders. Underlying cause of epilepsy is unknown in 60 % of the patients. Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite which is capable of forming tissue cysts in brain of chronically infected hosts including humans. Some epidemiological studies suggested an association between toxoplasmosis and acquisition of epilepsy. In this study we determined seroprevalence of latent Toxoplasma infection in a population of Iranian epileptic patients. Participants were classified in three groups as Iranian epileptic patients (IEP, n = 414), non-epileptic patients who had other neurologic disorders (NEP, n = 150), and healthy people without any neurologic disorders (HP, n = 63). The presence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies and IgG titer in the sera were determined by ELISA method. Anti-T. gondii IgG seroprevalence obtained 35.3 %, 34.7 % and 38.1 % in IEP, NEP and HP, respectively. The seroprevalence rate was not significantly different among the three groups (P = 0.88). Anti-T. gondii IgG titer was 55.7 ± 78, 52.4 ± 74 and 69.7 ± 92 IU/ml in IEP, NEP and HP, respectively. There was not any statistically significant difference in the antibody titer between the study groups (P = 0.32). The rate of T. gondii infection in epileptic patients was not higher than non-epileptic patients and healthy people in the Iranian population.

  13. Management of a high risk epileptic patient under conscious sedation: A multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Chellathurai, Burnice Nalina Kumari; Thiagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Jayakumaran, SelvaKumar; Devadoss, Pradeep; Elavazhagan

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy, characterized by the risk of recurrent seizures, is a chronic disease that afflicts about 5% of the world's population. The main dental problems associated with epileptic patients include gingival hyperplasia, minor oral injuries, tooth trauma, and prosthodontic problems, which require the dental treatment. Stress and fear are the most common triggering factors for the epilepsy in dental chair. Therefore, a more appropriate method of treating such epileptic patients may be warranted. Conscious sedation is a technique of providing good anesthesia and analgesia to patients, the main advantage of which is the patient's rapid return to presentation levels. Midazolam used as a sedative agent has anticonvulsant properties. This case report highlights a case requiring multiple dental procedures carried out in a high risk epileptic patient under conscious sedation. PMID:27041847

  14. Management of a high risk epileptic patient under conscious sedation: A multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Chellathurai, Burnice Nalina Kumari; Thiagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Jayakumaran, SelvaKumar; Devadoss, Pradeep; Elavazhagan

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy, characterized by the risk of recurrent seizures, is a chronic disease that afflicts about 5% of the world's population. The main dental problems associated with epileptic patients include gingival hyperplasia, minor oral injuries, tooth trauma, and prosthodontic problems, which require the dental treatment. Stress and fear are the most common triggering factors for the epilepsy in dental chair. Therefore, a more appropriate method of treating such epileptic patients may be warranted. Conscious sedation is a technique of providing good anesthesia and analgesia to patients, the main advantage of which is the patient's rapid return to presentation levels. Midazolam used as a sedative agent has anticonvulsant properties. This case report highlights a case requiring multiple dental procedures carried out in a high risk epileptic patient under conscious sedation.

  15. Hippocampal body changes in pure partial onset sleep and pure partial onset waking epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Motamedi, Mahmood; Zandieh, Ali; Hajimirzabeigi, Alireza; Tahsini, Majid; Vakhshiteh, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Elham

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate for the first time the hippocampal changes in patients with pure sleep and pure waking epilepsy. A total of 35 patients with pure partial onset sleep epilepsy and 35 patients with pure partial onset waking epilepsy matched for age and sex ratio were enrolled. MR images were analyzed to determine hippocampal body changes. Rounding ratio of hippocampal body was defined as short axis divided by long axis and hippocampal bodies with ratios ≥ 0.70 were considered rounded. Hippocampal sclerosis and atrophy were found in nine (25.7 %) and seven (20.0 %) patients with pure sleep epilepsy, and in 12 (34.3 %) and 11 (31.4 %) patients with pure waking epilepsy, respectively (P > 0.05 for the comparison between sleep and waking epilepsy). However, proportion of subjects with rounded hippocampal bodies (15, 42.9 % vs. 3, 8.6 % for patients with sleep and waking epilepsy, respectively) and rounding ratios of both left and right hippocampal bodies (0.66 ± 0.13 and 0.61 ± 0.12, respectively for left and right hippocampal bodies in sleep epileptic patients vs. 0.57 ± 0.11 and 0.55 ± 0.11, respectively for left and right hippocampal bodies in waking epileptic patients) were increased in patients with sleep epilepsy (P < 0.05). Further, in sleep epileptic patients with left sided hippocampal body rounding, epileptiform discharges were more readily lateralized to the left temporal lobe (P < 0.05). In conclusion, hippocampal sclerosis and atrophy are not different between pure partial onset sleep and waking epileptic patients. However, rounding ratio and frequency of hippocampal body rounding are increased in sleep epileptic patients.

  16. The role of antiepileptic drugs in free radicals generation and antioxidant levels in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Eldin, Essam Eldin Mohamed Nour; Elshebiny, Hosam Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Tarek Mostafa; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed Abdel-Azim; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2016-01-01

    Many risk factors are encountered during the pathogenesis of epilepsy. In this study, the effect of seizure frequency on free radical generation and antioxidants levels in epileptic patients was evaluated. This study was carried out on 15 healthy controls (GI) and 60 epileptic patients treated with mono- or poly-therapy of carbamazepine, valproic acid, or phenytoin. The treated epileptic patients were divided into 2 main groups according to the seizure frequency: controlled seizure patients GII (n = 30) and uncontrolled seizure patients GIII (n = 30). GII included the GIIA subgroup (n = 15) which had been seizure free for more than 12 months and the GIIB subgroup (n = 15) which had been seizure free for a period from 6 to12 months. GIII included GIIIA (n = 15) and GIIIB (n = 15) for patients which had a seizure frequency of less than and more than four times/month, respectively. In comparison to the control group (GI), the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde/creatinine ratio were significantly increased in GIIB, GIIIA, and GIIIB, while vitamins A and E levels were significantly decreased in GIIIB. Serum NO levels had significant negative correlations with serum vitamin E in the GIIA and GIIB groups, and with vitamin A in the GIIIA and GIIIB groups. However, serum NO had positive correlation with urinary MDA/Cr ratio. The imbalance between free radical generation and antioxidant system in epileptic patients may be a factor in seizure frequency.

  17. Severe Anti-epileptic Drug-induced Gingival Overgrowth in a Physically Disabled Patient.

    PubMed

    Kaomongkolgit, R; Tantanapornkul, W; Jittapiromsak, N; Ngamwannagul, P; Sriaroon, P

    2015-05-08

    Anti-epileptic drugs are considered to be the main drugs associated with gingival overgrowth. The co-administration of phenytoin and other anti-epileptic drugs, which increases the risk of phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth, has been previously reported. However, no report has been done considering the new generation of anti-epileptic drug topiramate and its association with gingival overgrowth. High levels of dental plaque and calculus have also been reported as being a critical risk factor in the development and severity of drug-induced gingival overgrowth. Thus, this case report highlights the occurrence of severe gingival overgrowth and generalized periodontitis in a physically disabled patient with epilepsy who had been taking phenytoin and topiramate drugs for 10 years. It also emphasizes the importance for both medical and dental professionals to reduce the severity and impact of drug-induced gingival overgrowth.

  18. Frequency of Toxoplasma and Toxocara Sp. Antibodies in Epileptic Patients, in South Western Iran

    PubMed Central

    ALLAHDIN, Sudabeh; KHADEMVATAN, Shahram; RAFIEI, Abdollah; MOMEN, Aliakbar; RAFIEI, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective Epilepsy is a disorder of the brain characterized by an enduring predisposition to generate seizures. Infectious agents are mentioned in its etiology. With identifying and appropriate treatment of these infectious agents, preventing their secondary outcomes, including seizure is possible. This study was conducted to determine frequency of anti-Toxoplasma antibodies (IgG, IgM) and anti-Toxocara antibody (IgG) in epileptic patients. Materials & Methods Study sample consisted of 141 epileptic patients and 144 healthy people. After obtaining informed consents and completing demographic questionnaire, serum samples were taken from participants. The diagnostic test of Toxoplasma IgG & IgM and Toxocara antibodies was performed under the same conditions using ELISA method in a qualified private laboratory. Samples from patients and control groups with positive ELISA test in terms of anti-Toxocara antibody were also used for confirmatory Western blot test. Result According to ELISA results, 28 (19.85%) epileptic patients and 2(1.38%) of healthy people had anti-Toxocara antibodies (P<001), while 39 (30.46%) of the control group people and 14.18% of patients had anti-Toxoplsma antibodies (P=0.001). Conclusion Frequency of anti-Toxoplasma gondii is lower in epileptic than healthy individuals and this result is contrary to investigations that have reported higher levels of this antibody in such patient groups. ELISA results for Toxocara showed that the frequency of anti-Toxocara antibody in epileptic patients might empower the probability that this parasite may cause central nervous system damage. Western blotting has high specificity and is a proper confirmative method for diagnosis of toxocariasis. PMID:26664439

  19. Verbal Memory Compensation: Application to Left and Right Temporal Lobe Epileptic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresson, Christel; Lespinet-Najib, Veronique; Rougier, Alain; Claverie, Bernard; N'Kaoua, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the compensatory impact of cognitive aids on left and right temporal lobe epileptic patients suffering from verbal memory disorders, who were candidates for surgery. Cognitive aids are defined in the levels-of-processing framework and deal with the depth of encoding, the elaboration of information, and the use of retrieval…

  20. Verbal Memory Compensation: Application to Left and Right Temporal Lobe Epileptic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresson, Christel; Lespinet-Najib, Veronique; Rougier, Alain; Claverie, Bernard; N'Kaoua, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the compensatory impact of cognitive aids on left and right temporal lobe epileptic patients suffering from verbal memory disorders, who were candidates for surgery. Cognitive aids are defined in the levels-of-processing framework and deal with the depth of encoding, the elaboration of information, and the use of retrieval…

  1. Epileptic seizures in Neuro-Behcet disease: why some patients develop seizure and others not?

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Semercioglu, Sencer; Ucler, Serap; Erdal, Abidin; Inan, Levent E

    2015-03-01

    Behcet disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder. Neuro BD (NBD) is seen in approximately 5% of all patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency, type and prognosis of epileptic seizures in different forms of NBD. All files of 42 patients with NBD were evaluated between 2006 and 2012, retrospectively. The demographic data, the presentation of NBD, clinical findings including seizures, EEG and neuroimaging findings were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 35.02±8.43 years. Thirty (71.4%) patients were male; the remaining 12 of them were female. Twenty-four patients had brainstem lesions; 16 patients had cerebral venous thrombosis. Spinal cord involvement was seen in two patients. Seven patients had epileptic seizures (six partial onset seizures with or without secondary generalization). Six of them had cerebral sinus thrombosis (CVT). Four patients had a seizure as the first symptom of the thrombosis. One patient had late onset seizure due to chronic venous infarct. The other patient with seizure had brainstem involvement. The remaining was diagnosed as epilepsy before the determination of NBD. CVT seen in BD seems to be the main risk factor for epileptic seizures in patients with NBD. The prognosis is usually good especially in patients with CVT. Epileptic seizures in patients with brainstem involvement may be an indicator for poor prognosis. Superior sagittal thrombosis or cortical infarct would be predictor of seizures occurrence because of the high ratio in patients with seizures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Topiramate-induced paresthesia is more frequently reported by migraine than epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Behnaz; Shafiei, Kaveh; Azizpour, Iman

    2016-04-01

    Topiramate is an approved and effective drug in migraine prophylaxis. Paresthesia is the most commonly reported side effect. The primary objective of this study was to compare the frequency of topiramate-induced paresthesia in migraine headache to epileptic patients. Patients with migraine without aura and epilepsy were enrolled in this observational study. All cases were interviewed by telephone about their history of paresthesia. Confounding factors were controlled through logistic regression. The odds ratio of developing topiramate-induced paresthesia in migraine compared to epilepsy patients was 3.4. Three factors were independent contributors to developing topiramate-induced paresthesia: female sex (odds ratio 2.1), topiramate dosage (odds ratio 0.3) and duration of therapy. Our findings indicate an independent association between migraine and development of paresthesia. Migraineurs were more likely than epileptic patients to report paresthesia as topiramate adverse effects. Female sex, treatment duration and topiramate dosage contribute significantly to subsequent development of paresthesia.

  3. Mobile phone emission increases inter-hemispheric functional coupling of electroencephalographic α rhythms in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Tombini, Mario; Buffo, Paola; Assenza, Giovanni; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Benvenga, Antonella; Babiloni, Claudio; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2012-05-01

    It has been reported that GSM electromagnetic fields (GSM-EMFs) of mobile phones modulate - after a prolonged exposure - inter-hemispheric synchronization of temporal and frontal resting electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in normal young and elderly subjects (Vecchio et al., 2007, 2010). Here we tested the hypothesis that this can be even more evident in epileptic patients, who typically suffer from abnormal mechanisms governing synchronization of rhythmic firing of cortical neurons. Eyes-closed resting EEG data were recorded in ten patients affected by focal epilepsy in real and sham exposure conditions. These data were compared with those obtained from 15 age-matched normal subjects of the previous reference studies. The GSM device was turned on (45 min) in the "GSM" condition and was turned off (45 min) in the other condition ("sham"). The mobile phone was always positioned on the left side in both patients and control subjects. Spectral coherence evaluated the inter-hemispheric synchronization of EEG rhythms at the following frequency bands: delta (about 2-4 Hz), theta (about 4-6 Hz), alpha1 (about 6-8 Hz), alpha2 (about 8-10 Hz), and alpha3 (about 10-12 Hz). The effects on the patients were investigated comparing the inter-hemispheric EEG coherence in the epileptic patients with the control group of subjects evaluated in the previous reference studies. Compared with the control subjects, epileptic patients showed a statistically significant higher inter-hemispheric coherence of temporal and frontal alpha rhythms (about 8-12 Hz) in the GSM than "Sham" condition. These results suggest that GSM-EMFs of mobile phone may affect inter-hemispheric synchronization of the dominant (alpha) EEG rhythms in epileptic patients. If confirmed by future studies on a larger group of epilepsy patients, the modulation of the inter-hemispheric alpha coherence due to the GSM-EMFs could have clinical implications and be related to changes in cognitive-motor function.

  4. Virtual car accidents of epilepsy patients, interictal epileptic activity, and medication.

    PubMed

    Nirkko, Arto C; Bernasconi, Corrado; von Allmen, Andreas; Liechti, Christian; Mathis, Johannes; Krestel, Heinz

    2016-05-01

    To investigate effects of interictal epileptic activity (IEA) and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on reactivity and aspects of the fitness to drive for epilepsy patients. Forty-six adult patients with demonstration of focal or generalized bursts of IEA in electroencephalography (EEG) readings within 1 year prior to inclusion irrespective of medication performed a car driving computer test or a single light flash test (39 patients performed both). Reaction times (RTs), virtual crashes, or lapses (RT ≥ 1 s in the car or flash test) were measured in an IEA burst-triggered fashion during IEA and compared with RT-measurements during unremarkable EEG findings in the same session. IEA prolonged RTs both in the flash and car test (p < 0.001) in individual patients up to 200 ms. Generalized IEA with spike/waves (s/w) had the largest effect on RT prolongation (p < 0.001, both tests), whereas mean RT during normal EEG, age, gender, and number of AEDs had no effect. The car test was better than the flash test in detecting RT prolongations (p = 0.030). IEA increased crashes/lapses >26% in sessions with generalized IEA with s/w. The frequency of IEA-associated RT >1 s exceeded predictions (p < 0.001) based on simple RT shift, suggesting functional impairment beyond progressive RT prolongation by IEA. The number of AEDs correlated with prolonged RTs during normal EEG (p < 0.021) but not with IEA-associated RT prolongation or crashes/lapses. IEA prolonged RTs to varying extents, dependent on IEA type. IEA-associated RTs >1 s were more frequent than predicted, suggesting beginning cerebral decompensation of visual stimulus processing. AEDs somewhat reduced psychomotor speed, but it was mainly the IEA that contributed to an excess of virtual accidents. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Cognitive functions of epileptic patients on monotherapy with phenobarbitone and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Bigarella, M M; Mäder, M J; Doro, M P; Gorz, A M; Marcourakis, T; Tsanaclis, L; Bittencourt, P R

    1991-06-01

    Quantitative measurements have indicated that heredity, cerebral damage, psycho-social aspects, ictal and inter-ictal phenomena and antiepileptic drugs may interfere in the cognitive dysfunction of epileptic patients. In the present study objective methods included immediate and late recall and recognition of pictures, Stroop test and auditory selection. Twenty patients with symptomatic localized epilepsy aged 17-52 years (27 +/- 10, mean +/- sd) were compared to age and socially matched healthy controls. Patients were on therapeutic serum concentrations (25 +/- 12 mu/ml) of phenobarbitone and had active epilepsy with 1.94 generalized tonic-clonic, 0.85 simple partial and 6.28 complex partial seizures monthly (means). Patients performed worse than controls in all 6 tests (p less than 0.05 to p less than 0.001), indicating a generalized cognitive deficit related to seizures and/or barbiturate therapy. We suggest further studies should be carried out in populations with uniform monotherapeutic regimens and epileptic syndromes in order to isolate factors related to the cognitive dysfunction of epileptic patients.

  6. PRRT2 Mutations Are Related to Febrile Seizures in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Zheng-Wen; Qu, Jian; Zhang, Ying; Mao, Chen-Xue; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Deng, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Bo-Ting; Yin, Ji-Ye; Long, Hong-Yu; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies reported that the proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) gene was identified to be related to paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), infantile convulsions with PKD, PKD with migraine and benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE). The present study explores whether the PRRT2 mutation is a potential cause of febrile seizures, including febrile seizures plus (FS+), generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and Dravet syndrome (DS); thus, it may provide a new drug target for personalized medicine for febrile seizure patients. We screened PRRT2 exons in a cohort of 136 epileptic patients with febrile seizures, including FS+, GEFS+ and DS. PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 25 out of 136 (18.4%) febrile seizures in epileptic patients. Five loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified: c.649delC (p.R217Efs*12), c.649_650insC (p.R217Pfs*8), c.412C>G (p.Pro138Ala), c.439G>C (p.Asp147His) and c.623C>A (p.Ser208Tyr). PRRT2 variants were probably involved in the etiology of febrile seizures in epileptic patients. PMID:25522171

  7. Epileptic seizure in a patient with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator: Quo vadis right ventricular lead?

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Horst; Rozhnev, Andrey; Kleine-Katthöfer, Peter; Kranig, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    The case of a 77-year-old man admitted for suspected epileptic seizure is reported. Patient history showed implantation of a single-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after cardiac arrest in 2007 with replacement in 2012 due to battery depletion; the patient reported no previous syncope, unconsciousness or seizures. Interrogation records of the ICD showed five ventricular tachyarrhythmia episodes that corresponded to the "seizure". Further examination revealed incorrect position of the RV-lead. Diagnosis was a provoked epileptic seizure due to undersensing of ventricular tachycardia because of improper ICD lead implantation in the coronary sinus. Treatment consisted of implantation of a new device with an additional ICD lead into the right ventricle.

  8. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on the serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nuan; Yu, Chun-Yu

    2016-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurodegenerative disease with an increasing morbidity. Clinical treatment of epilepsy includes symptomatic treatment, etiological treatment, surgery and prevention. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients, and to examine the correlation between these effects and secondary cerebrovascular events. A total of 68 epileptic patients, diagnosed between May 2012 and May 2014, were included in the present study. The study included 8 cases of autonomic seizures, 10 cases of absence seizures, 13 cases of complex partial seizures, 28 cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and 9 cases of simple partial seizures. The patients received appropriate AED treatment according to the characteristics of epileptic seizure and the treatment guidance. The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients, and the differences in the secondary cerebrovascular events in these patients after 1 year follow-up were analyzed. The difference in the AEDs used by various epileptic patients was statistically significant (P<0.05). The proportion of AED monotherapy in the autonomic seizure group and petit mal group was highest, and the proportion of two AED in combination with the psychomotor seizure, grand mal and simple partial seizure groups was highest. The serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients following treatment were significantly lower than those prior to treatment (P<0.05). The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these groups following treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The difference in the incidence of cerebrovascular events in these groups at follow up was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The multifactorial logistic regression analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were the independent risk factors for epilepsy with secondary

  9. Usefulness of MEG magnetometer for spike detection in patients with mesial temporal epileptic focus.

    PubMed

    Enatsu, R; Mikuni, N; Usui, K; Matsubayashi, J; Taki, J; Begum, T; Matsumoto, R; Ikeda, A; Nagamine, T; Fukuyama, H; Hashimoto, N

    2008-07-15

    The present study investigated the sensitivity of magnetoencephalography (MEG) for spikes depending on sensor type in patients with mesial temporal epileptic focus. We recorded MEG in 6 patients with mesial temporal epileptic focus using two sensor types (magnetometer and gradiometer) simultaneously. The number of spikes detected and the corresponding equivalent current dipole (ECD) parameters (distance from the coordinated head center (radius), and dipole moment) were evaluated with respect to sensor type. Among 426 MEG 'consensus spikes' determined by 3 reviewers, 378 spikes satisfied the predetermined criteria for source localization. Comparing ECD parameters, spikes detected by magnetometer alone displayed a smaller radius and larger dipole moment than those detected by gradiometer alone. Spikes estimated in the mesial temporal area were more frequently detected by magnetometer alone (38.5%) than by gradiometer alone (11.5%), whereas spikes in the lateral temporal area were detected less by magnetometer alone (3.7%) than by gradiometer alone (53.9%). The present results suggest that a magnetometer is advantageous for spike detection in patients with mesial temporal epileptic focus. This also implies the higher sensitivity of magnetometer for deep sources.

  10. Metabolic alteration transients during paroxysmal activity in an epileptic patient with fixation-off sensitivity: a case study.

    PubMed

    Giove, Federico; Garreffa, Girolamo; Peca, Stefano; Carní, Marco; Macrì, Maria Antonietta; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Vaudano, Anna Elisabetta; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Prencipe, Massimiliano; Bozzao, Luigi; Pantano, Patrizia; Colonnese, Claudio; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate short-time metabolic variations related to continuous epileptic activity elicited by fixation-off sensitivity (FOS). Time-resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed on a patient on whom previous clinical findings clearly indicated presence of FOS. The epileptic focus was localized with a simultaneous electroencephalographic and functional magnetic resonance imaging study. The results showed a linear increase of the sum of glutamate and glutamine with time of paroxysmal activity in epileptic focus and much greater concentration of choline-containing compounds in focus than in the contralateral side.

  11. Classifying normal and abnormal status based on video recordings of epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhen, Xiantong; Liu, Xianzeng; Ouyang, Gaoxiang

    2014-01-01

    Based on video recordings of the movement of the patients with epilepsy, this paper proposed a human action recognition scheme to detect distinct motion patterns and to distinguish the normal status from the abnormal status of epileptic patients. The scheme first extracts local features and holistic features, which are complementary to each other. Afterwards, a support vector machine is applied to classification. Based on the experimental results, this scheme obtains a satisfactory classification result and provides a fundamental analysis towards the human-robot interaction with socially assistive robots in caring the patients with epilepsy (or other patients with brain disorders) in order to protect them from injury.

  12. Non-Attendance of Treatment Review Visits among Epileptic Patients in a Rural District, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Dewa, Evans; Nyati-Jokomo, Zibusiso; Mafaune, Patron T.; Muteti, Shamiso; Maradzika, Julita

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common condition reported through the psychiatric returns surveillance system in Gokwe South District. Review visits attendance is crucial to the successful control of seizures among epilepsy patients. We sought out to establish the attendance pattern of epileptic patients, prevalence of non-attendance and the associated factors. An analytic cross-sectional study was conducted where consenting respondents (N=110) were selected randomly from the district epilepsy register. Interviewer-administered questionnaires were used to collect data. Odds ratios were calculated to determine associations. Logistic regression analysis was done to identify independent risk factors and to control for confounding variables. A total of 110 epileptic patients were included in the study. The patients missed treatment review visits ranging from 1 to 11 of the expected 12 visits between June 2011 and June 2012. Most (70.9%) missed at least 2 visits in a 12month period while 46.4% missed 2 or more consecutive visits. Knowledge of treatment duration [prevalence odds ratio (POR) 0.24 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.74)] and high risk perception [POR 0.14 (95% CI: 0.06-0.33)] were associated with a lower likelihood of missing review visits. Barriers such as shortage of drugs [POR 7.09 (95% CI: 3.00-16.72)] and long distances to health facilities [POR 6.63 (95% CI: 2.63-16.76)] were associated with high likelihood of missing two or more review visits consecutively. Shortage of drugs [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 6.7336 (95% CI: 1.8538-24.4581)] and higher risk perception [AOR 0.1948 (95% CI: 0.0625-0.6071)] remained significant on logistic regression analysis. A high number of epileptic patients miss their review visits mainly owing to shortage of drugs, and long distances from health facilities.

  13. K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-norepinephrine release in human brain slices from epileptic and non-epileptic patients is differentially modulated by gabapentin and pinacidil.

    PubMed

    Freiman, Thomas M; Surges, Rainer; Kukolja, Juraj; Heinemeyer, Jan; Klar, Maximilian; van Velthoven, Vera; Zentner, Josef

    2006-06-01

    The modulation of K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-norepinephrine ([(3)H]-NE) release by gabapentin (GBP) and pinacidil (PIN), a known K(ATP) agonist, was examined in human brain slices. We compared the pharmacological effects on NE-release in human epileptic neocortex and epileptic hippocampus to non-epileptic neocortex. GBP (100 microM) decreased [(3)H]-NE release by 22% in non-epileptic neocortical slices, whereas this inhibition was absent in slices from epileptic hippocampus and epileptic neocortex. PIN (10 microM) also reduced [(3)H]-NE release by 30% in non-epileptic neocortical slices and only by 5% in epileptic hippocampal slices. The blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels by omega-conotoxins MVIIA and MVIIC (0.1 microM) reduced [(3)H]-NE release in epileptic and non-epileptic neocortical slices to the same extend. The data show a marked reduction in K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-NE release by GBP and PIN in epileptic hippocampus and neocortex, suggesting an alteration of K(ATP) channel function, whereas the effects of the calcium channel modulators omega-conotoxins MVIIA and MVIIC are similar in both epileptic and non-epileptic neocortex.

  14. The role of doctor and patient in the construction of the pseudo-epileptic attack disorder.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, W; van Domburg, P

    2000-01-01

    Periodic attacks of uncertain origin, where the clinical presentation resembles epilepsy but there is no evidence of a somatic disease, are called Pseudo-Epilepsy or Pseudo-Epileptic Attack Disorder (PEAD). PEAD may be called a 'non-disease', i.e. a disorder on the fringes of established disease patterns, because it lacks a rational pathophysiological explanation. The first aim of this article is to criticize the idea, common in medical science, that diseases are real entities which exist separately from the patient, waiting to be discovered by the doctor. We argue that doctor and patient construct a disease, and that the construction of the disease PEAD includes many normative evaluations. The second aim is to provide insight into the suffering of patients with PEAD. We focus on three aspects of the patient, identity, autonomy and responsibility. We present some characteristic descriptions of (pseudo-)epileptic attacks by Fjodor Dostoevsky, Gustave Flaubert and Thomas Mann. We argue that diagnosing PEAD reduces a meaningful life event into an insignificant, though intriguing, medical phenomenon, and that the patient will not benefit from being diagnosed as having PEAD.

  15. Non-traumatic Thoracic Vertebral Compression Fractures Occurred in a Young Epileptic Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mimata, Yoshikuni; Sato, Kotaro; Oikawa, Ryunosuke; Doita, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The occurrence of non-traumatic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) in a healthy young male is very rare. We present a rare case of non-traumatic thoracic VCFs in a young epileptic patient. Case Report: A 19-year-old healthy male experienced severe back pain. There had been no significant traumatic event. A radiograph of the spine showed collapsed vertebra at Th6 and Th7 and magnetic resonance image of the spine showed intensity changes at Th6, Th7 and Th8. Bone mineral density (BMD) at the radius was low and urine N-terminal telopeptide (NTx) was very high. The patient was diagnosed with VCFs caused by low BMD. The patient had a medical history of epilepsy and had taken valproate for thirteen years. We instructed the patient to stop taking valproate and to begin taking bisphosphonate. As a result, urine NTx became normal. Conclusion: It was previously reported that valproate reduced BMD in epileptic children and reduction in BMD increased with the duration of valproate therapy. We propose that regular BMD screening and measurement of bone metabolic markers should be conducted for all patients taking long-term antiepileptic drugs to prevent BMD loss and associated fractures. PMID:28116280

  16. Effect of enzyme inducing anticonvulsants on ethosuximide pharmacokinetics in epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    GIACCONE, M.; BARTOLI, A.; GATTI, G.; MARCHISELLI, R.; PISANI, F.; LATELLA, M.A.; PERUCCA, E.

    1996-01-01

    1To assess the effect of enzyme inducing anticonvulsants on ethosuximide pharmacokinetics, plasma ethosuximide concentrations after a single oral dose (500 mg) of the drug were compared in 12 healthy control subjects and 10 epileptic patients receiving chronic therapy with phenobarbitone, phenytoin and/or carbamazepine. 2Compared with controls, epileptic patients showed markedly shorter ethosuximide half-lives (29.0±7.8 vs 53.7±14.3 h, means±s.d., P<0.001) and higher apparent oral clearance (CL/ F) values (15.3±3.8 vs 9.2±1.9 ml kg−1 h−1, P<0.001). The apparent volume of distribution ( V/F) of ethosuximide was slighty lower in the patients than in controls (0.6±0.1 vs 0.7±0.1 l kg−1, P<0.05). 3These findings provide evidence that ethosuximide elimination is increased by enzyme inducing anticonvulsants, the effect probably being mediated by stimulation of cytochrome CYP3A activity. 4The enhancement of ethosuximide clearance in patients comedicated with enzyme inducing anticonvulsants is likely to be clinically relevant. Higher ethosuximide dosages will be required to achieve therapeutic drug concentrations in these patients. PMID:8799524

  17. [Effects of lobectomy on the auditory mid-latency response in temporal lobe epileptic patients].

    PubMed

    Báez-Martín, M M; Cabrera-Abreu, I

    Auditory mid-latency response (MLR) has been studied in temporal lobe epileptic patients in order to evaluate the relationship between the different components of this evoked response and their probable generators in the most rostral part of auditory pathway. MLR was studied in eight patients with temporal lobe epilepsy before lobectomy, and 1, 6 and 12 months after the surgical treatment, and eight healthy subjects matched for age and gender. Recording electrodes were placed in Cz, T3 and T4 according to the international 10-20 system. Comparisons were carried out in terms of peak to peak amplitude, latency and interpeak intervals of the main components (Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon test). Epileptic patients showed statistically significant prolonged latency of all components, and increased Pa-Pb interpeak interval duration respect to control group. No significant variations were found in the amplitude of the studied components. There were no differences between left and right lobotomized patients. However, a marked tendency to the shortening of latency was observed in the left group after the surgical treatment. The differences between the pre-surgical records of patients and controls reflect an impaired activity in the generating areas for MLR components. There appears to be a trend to a different behaviour after right or left lobectomy, probably related to the extension of the removed tissue.

  18. 'Epileptic', 'epileptic person' or 'person with epilepsy'? Bringing quantitative and qualitative evidence on the views of UK patients and carers to the terminology debate.

    PubMed

    Noble, Adam J; Robinson, Abbey; Snape, Darlene; Marson, Anthony G

    2017-02-01

    How to refer to someone with epilepsy is a divisive topic. Arguments for and against different approaches, including traditional adjective labels, disability-first labels, and person-first terms have been presented. The preferences of those with epilepsy and their family and friends have, though, never been determined. This study provides this information for the first time. Via epilepsy interest groups and organizations in the UK and Republic of Ireland, 638 patients and 333 significant others completed an online survey. Three distinct phrases were presented: "They're epileptic" (traditional label), "They're an epileptic person" (disability-first) and "That person has epilepsy" (person-first). Participants identified which they preferred and explained their choices. Patients' median age was 39, with 69% having experienced seizures in the prior 12months. Significant others were typically parents. Most (86.7%) patients and significant others (93.4%) favored the person-first term. Traditional and disability-first terms were "Disliked"/"Strongly disliked". Regression found it was not possible to reliably distinguish between participants favoring the different terms on the basis of demographics. Qualitative analysis of answers to open-ended questions, however, revealed most favored person-first terminology as by not including the word 'epileptic' and by affirming personhood before disability, it was felt to less likely restrict a listener's expectations or evoke the condition's negative association. It was also considered to suggest the person being referred to might have some mastery over their condition. The findings indicate consensus amongst these key stakeholders others for the use of person-first terminology in English. A truly informed debate on the topic can now begin. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A patient with epileptic psychosis who had rare acute episodic symptoms☆

    PubMed Central

    Horinouchi, Toru; Oyanagi, Yuka; Umemoto, Yuka; Hosokawa, Yoshiyuki; Honma, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Shigehiro

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of a 38-year-old woman with temporal lobe epilepsy and epileptic psychoses. The psychoses consisted of three rare symptoms that were “a distortion in the sense of time,” “what should be there disappears,” and “the next scene is supposed to be in a particular way.” There have been few reports that included these symptoms; therefore, we report the course of this patient in detail. PMID:25667891

  20. [The structural and functional neurovisualization in patients with epileptic seizures in cerebro-vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Bazilevich, S N; Odinak, M M; Dyskin, D E; Krasakov, I V; Fokin, V A; P'ianov, I V; Dekan, V S; Okol'zin, A V; Pozdniakov, A V; Stanzhevskiĭ, A A

    2008-01-01

    The results of the dynamic study of patients with epileptic seizures in chronic and acute cerebral vascular pathology are presented. Various methods of structural and functional neurovisualization--magnetic resonance tomography using perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography were used. Based on the results obtained in the study, the authors discuss etiopathogenetic variants of the development of these seizures and new possible approaches to the complex treatment besides the administration of antiepileptic medications.

  1. Characterization of a de novo SCN8A mutation in a patient with epileptic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    de Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Meisler, Miriam H.; Brilstra, Eva H.; van Berkestijn, Frederique M.C.; van ‘t Slot, Ruben; van Lieshout, Stef; Nijman, Isaac J; O'Brien, Janelle E.; Hammer, Michael F.; Estacion, Mark; Waxman, Stephen G.; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recently, de novo SCN8A missense mutations have been identified as a rare dominant cause of epileptic encephalopathies. Functional studies on the first described case demonstrated gain-of-function effects of the mutation. We describe a novel de novo mutation of SCN8A in a patient with epileptic encephalopathy, and functional characterization of the mutant protein. Design Whole exome sequencing was used to discover the variant. We generated a mutant cDNA, transfected HEK293 cells, and performed Western blotting to assess protein stability. To study channel functional properties, patch-clamp experiments were carried out in transfected neuronal ND7/23 cells. Results The proband exhibited seizure onset at 6 months of age, diffuse brain atrophy, and more profound developmental impairment than the original case. The mutation p.Arg233Gly in the voltage sensing transmembrane segment D1S4 was present in the proband and absent in both parents. This mutation results in a temperature-sensitive reduction in protein expression as well as reduced sodium current amplitude and density and a relative increased response to a slow ramp stimulus, though this did not result in an absolute increased current at physiological temperatures. Conclusion The new de novo SCN8A mutation is clearly deleterious, resulting in an unstable protein with reduced channel activity. This differs from the gain-of-function attributes of the first SCN8A mutation in epileptic encephalopathy, pointing to heterogeneity of mechanisms. Since Nav1.6 is expressed in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons, a differential effect of a loss-of-function of Nav1.6 Arg223Gly on inhibitory interneurons may underlie the epilepsy phenotype in this patient. PMID:25239001

  2. Thalamocortical relationship in epileptic patients with generalized spike and wave discharges — A multimodal neuroimaging study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Clara Huishi; Sha, Zhiyi; Mundahl, John; Liu, Sa; Lu, Yunfeng; Henry, Thomas R.; He, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Unlike focal or partial epilepsy, which has a confined range of influence, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) often affects the whole or a larger portion of the brain without obvious, known cause. It is important to understand the underlying network which generates epileptic activity and through which epileptic activity propagates. The aim of the present study was to investigate the thalamocortical relationship using non-invasive imaging modalities in a group of IGE patients. We specifically investigated the roles of the mediodorsal nuclei in the thalami and the medial frontal cortex in generating and spreading IGE activities. We hypothesized that the connectivity between these two structures is key in understanding the generation and propagation of epileptic activity in brains affected by IGE. Using three imaging techniques of EEG, fMRI and EEG-informed fMRI, we identified important players in generation and propagation of generalized spike-and-wave discharges (GSWDs). EEG-informed fMRI suggested multiple regions including the medial frontal area near to the anterior cingulate cortex, mediodorsal nuclei of the thalamus, caudate nucleus among others that related to the GSWDs. The subsequent seed-based fMRI analysis revealed a reciprocal cortical and bi-thalamic functional connection. Through EEG-based Granger Causality analysis using (DTF) and adaptive DTF, within the reciprocal thalamocortical circuitry, thalamus seems to serve as a stronger source in driving cortical activity from initiation to the propagation of a GSWD. Such connectivity change starts before the GSWDs and continues till the end of the slow wave discharge. Thalamus, especially the mediodorsal nuclei, may serve as potential targets for deep brain stimulation to provide more effective treatment options for patients with drug-resistant generalized epilepsy. PMID:26448912

  3. Biclustering EEG data from epileptic patients treated with vagus nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busygin, Stanislav; Boyko, Nikita; Pardalos, Panos M.; Bewernitz, Michael; Ghacibeh, Georges

    2007-11-01

    We present a pilot study of an application of consistent biclustering to analyze scalp EEG data obtained from epileptic patients undergoing treatment with a vagus nerve stimulator (VNS). The ultimate goal of this study is to develop a physiologic marker for optimal VNS parameters (e.g. output current, signal frequency, etc.) using measures of scalp EEG signals. A time series of STLmax values was computed for each scalp EEG channel recorded from two epileptic patients and used as a feature of the two datasets. The averaged samples from stimulation periods were then separated from averaged samples from non-stimulation periods by feature selection performed within the consistent biclustering routine. The obtained biclustering results allow us to assume that signals from certain parts of the brain consistently change their characteristics when VNS is switched on and could provide a basis for desirable VNS stimulation parameters. A physiologic marker of optimal VNS effect could greatly reduce the cost, time, and risk of calibrating VNS stimulation parameters in newly implanted patients compared to the current method of clinical response.

  4. Characterization of language and phonological working memory in patients with myoclonic astatic epileptic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Marisa Tomoe Hebihara; Kutscher, Kellen; Frizzo, Ana Cláudia Figueiredo; Isaac, Myrian de Lima; Fernandes, Regina Maria França; Funayama, Carolina Araújo Rodrigues

    2010-02-01

    The course of myoclonic astatic epileptic syndrome (MAES) is variable and little information is available about cortical functions in the presence of the disease. The objective of the present study was to assess the phonological working memory (PWM) and the verbal language of six patients between 8 and 18 years old, on treatment for at least 5 years, and good control of seizures, diagnosed in the Service of Epilepsy of Hospital of Clinics of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo University in Brazil. The Test of Repetition of Meaningless Words was used to assess PWM. Video-recorded of language samples were collected during spontaneous and directed activities for the study of verbal language and pragmatics. A qualitative analysis showed that all patients presented deficits in the execution of the PWM test and only one patient showed poor mastery of all aspects studied. These finds contribute to strategies of treatment for language problems of patients with MAES, focusing on PWA.

  5. Correlation between secondary thrombosis in epileptic patients and serum levels of folate and vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Huang, Hong-Li; Wang, Nuan; Pang, Xiao-Hu

    2016-10-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic brain dysfunction syndrome and nervous system disease whose pathogenesis remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to analyze the correlation between secondary thrombosis and the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in epileptic patients, as well as to determine whether the supplementation of folate and vitamin B12 was associated with a decreased incidence of thrombosis, and provide the basis for novel clinical treatment. A total of 37 patients, diagnosed as epileptic with secondary thrombosis between April 2012 and April 2014, were included in the treatment group. A total of 37 epileptic patients without secondary thrombosis were included in the control group. The serum levels of homocysteine, folate and vitamin B12 in the two groups and in the epileptic patients with intracranial thrombosis or peripheral thrombosis were compared. According to the Guidance of Epilepsy, the patients in the two groups were administered antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with the supplementation of folate tablet (0.4 mg/day) and vitamin B12 tablet (100 µg/day). These indicators and the incidence of thrombosis in the two groups were compared after 1 year. The serum levels of homocysteine in the two groups were higher than normal, and the levels in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group. The serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The Pearson correlation analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were not associated with the serum level of homocysteine (P>0.05). The logistic regression analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were independent risk factors for epilepsy with secondary thrombosis [folate: odds ratio (OR)=0.635, P=0.038; vitamin B12: OR=0.418, P=0.042]. The differences in the serum levels of homocysteine, folate and

  6. Epileptic homocide: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gunn, J

    1978-05-01

    This case report augments a paper published in 1971 (Gunn and Fenton) in which it was indicated that automatic behaviour is a rare explanation for the crimes of epileptic patients. It was claimed that although two possible "automatic" crimes were committed by two epileptic patients among the 46 male epileptics at Broadmoor there were no such crimes committed by any of the 158 male epileptic prisoners who came into a national sample. Since then it has become clear that one man serving life imprisonment, exluded from the epileptic prisoner sample in 1967 because of a doubt about his diagnosis, is definitely epileptic and probably killed his wife during an epileptic attack or its immediate sequela.

  7. Concurrent administration of the MMPI-2 and PAI in a sample of patients with epileptic or non-epileptic seizures: implications for an inpatient epilepsy monitoring unit.

    PubMed

    Gale, Shawn D; Hill, Stacy W

    2012-10-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-second edition (MMPI-2) and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) are commonly used in the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) to evaluate personality characteristics and mood-related symptoms in those individuals being evaluated for epileptic seizures (ES) or psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES). A direct comparison of these measures through concurrent administration to the same group has not been carried out. Both measures were administered to 40 patients (17 ES and 23 PNES). Logistic regression suggested the optimal predictive model for EMU discharge diagnosis included subscales from each measure, which outperformed either measure separately. Combining the conversion (SOM-C) and health concerns (SOM-H) subscales from the PAI and the hysteria subscale (Hy) from the MMPI-2 resulted in 85% overall classification accuracy, 86.7% sensitivity, and 82.4% specificity. Variability in the literature regarding the predictive utility of these measures may stem from the possibility that they measure different aspects of PNES. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Treating Lennox–Gastaut syndrome in epileptic pediatric patients with third-generation rufinamide

    PubMed Central

    Gresham, Jessica; Eiland, Lea S; Chung, Allison M

    2010-01-01

    Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a rare but debilitating pediatric epileptic encephalopathy characterized by multiple intractable seizure types. Treatment of LGS is challenging because of the small number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which are effective for this syndrome, as well as the need for polytherapy in the majority of patients. This review focuses on the treatment of LGS with rufinamide, a recently approved third-generation AED with reported efficacy as adjunctive therapy for LGS. All relevant papers identified through a PubMed search on the treatment of LGS with rufinamide were reviewed. To date, the literature suggests improvements in seizure frequency for pediatric patients with LGS on rufinamide. Rufinamide appears to be especially effective for atonic or drop attack seizures. Rufinamide also displays a favorable adverse event profile compared with the older anticonvulsants, as well as a minimal number of drug interactions, making it a promising option for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with LGS. PMID:20957124

  9. Treating Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in epileptic pediatric patients with third-generation rufinamide.

    PubMed

    Gresham, Jessica; Eiland, Lea S; Chung, Allison M

    2010-10-05

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a rare but debilitating pediatric epileptic encephalopathy characterized by multiple intractable seizure types. Treatment of LGS is challenging because of the small number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which are effective for this syndrome, as well as the need for polytherapy in the majority of patients. This review focuses on the treatment of LGS with rufinamide, a recently approved third-generation AED with reported efficacy as adjunctive therapy for LGS. All relevant papers identified through a PubMed search on the treatment of LGS with rufinamide were reviewed. To date, the literature suggests improvements in seizure frequency for pediatric patients with LGS on rufinamide. Rufinamide appears to be especially effective for atonic or drop attack seizures. Rufinamide also displays a favorable adverse event profile compared with the older anticonvulsants, as well as a minimal number of drug interactions, making it a promising option for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with LGS.

  10. [The role of the nurse in the patient education of young epileptic patients].

    PubMed

    Danse, Marion; Goujon, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    An epileptic seizure in a child is a major source of anxiety and turns the family's everyday life upside down. Through therapeutic education, the nurse guides the families towards the autonomous management of the seizures, antiepileptic treatments, adaptations to daily life and potential comorbidities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Does valproate therapy in epileptic patients contribute to changing atherosclerosis risk factors? The role of lipids and free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Płonka-Półtorak, Elżbieta; Zagrodzki, Paweł; Kryczyk-Kozioł, Jadwiga; Westermarck, Tuomas; Kaipainen, Pekka; Kaski, Markus; Atroshi, Faik

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to demonstrate the relationship between the valproate (VPA) treatment versus lipid and serum free fatty acids (FFAs) profiles to be the potential atherosclerosis risk factor in epileptic patients. Fasting blood samples were taken from 21 adult VPA-treated patients and 21 controls. The profiles of lipids, FFAs, clinical parameters and body mass index (BMI) were evaluated. No significant differences between the study group and controls were found for any of the studied parameters. However, significant differences in the total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), triglycerides, the CHOL/HDL (high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol) ratio, and Atherogenic Index of Plasma were observed for overweight patients when compared to those of normal weight. Patients with uncontrolled epilepsy tended to have significantly lower palmitic acid level than seizure-free patients. Oleic acid was found to be positively correlated with VPA concentration for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, and with the dose corrected VPA concentration for all the patients. The acid was however negatively correlated with stearic acid for both the controls and the patients with uncontrolled epilepsy. PLS method revealed CHOL, LDL, triglycerides and myristic acid to be positively interrelated for the whole group under the study, whereas these parameters were found to be negatively correlated with VPA concentration, and positively with BMI. Furthermore, high sensitivity C-reactive protein was found to be negatively correlated with palmitic acid levels. Overweight VPA-treated patients are exposed to higher risk of atherosclerosis. Alterations in FFAs are likely to depend on seizures control, and on VPA levels. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  12. Refractory epileptic seizures due to vitamin B6 deficiency in a patient with Parkinson's disease under duodopa® therapy.

    PubMed

    Skodda, Sabine; Müller, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) infusion for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) has been suspected to provoke polyneuropathy in conjunction with vitamin B6, B12 and folate deficiency and elevated homocysteine levels. We describe a PD patient under LCIG therapy developing refractory epileptic seizures obviously promoted by vitamin B6 deficiency.

  13. Slow spindles' cortical generators overlap with the epileptogenic zone in temporal epileptic patients: an electrical source imaging study.

    PubMed

    Del Felice, Alessandra; Arcaro, Chiara; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Fiaschi, Antonio; Manganotti, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether temporal epileptic patients and normal volunteers display similar sleep spindles' cortical generators as determined by electrical source imaging (ESI), and whether such generators overlap in epilepsy patients with the epileptogenic zone identified by ESI. Twelve healthy subjects and twelve temporal lobe pharmaco-resistant epileptic patients underwent a 256-channel EEG recording during a daytime nap. Sleep spindles were analyzed off line, distinguishing slow (10-12 Hz) and fast (12-14 Hz) ones, and the final averaged signal was projected onto a MNI (Montreal Neurological Institute) space to localize cortical generators. The same procedure was performed for averaged epileptic spikes, obtaining their cortical source. Intra- and inter-group statistical analyses were conducted. Multiple, concomitant generators were detected in both populations for slow and fast spindles. Slow spindles in epileptics displayed higher source amplitude in comparison to healthy volunteers (Z=0.001), as well as a preferential localization over the affected temporal cortices (p=0.039). Interestingly, at least one of slow spindles' generators overlapped with the epileptogenic zone. Slow spindles, but not fast ones, in temporal epilepsy are mainly generated by the affected temporal lobe. These results point to the strict relation between sleep and epilepsy and to the possible cognitive implications of spikes arising from memory-encoding brain structures. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dissociative experiences and quality of life in patients with non-epileptic attack disorder.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, James W; Ali, Fizzah; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2012-11-01

    Dissociative experiences are commonly reported by patients with non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD). This cross-sectional study examined the prevalence and characteristics of dissociative experiences in patients with NEAD and assessed their association with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Fifty-three patients diagnosed with NEAD were consecutively recruited (70.0% female, mean age=42 years, 22.0% with comorbid epilepsy) from a specialist neuropsychiatric clinic. Our sample reported high levels of dissociative experiences, with 36.7% of patients scoring ≥30 on the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). Significant negative correlations were found between total DES scores and HRQoL, as measured by the QOLIE-31 questionnaire (r=-0.64, p<0.001). This association remained significant when accounting for symptoms of depression and anxiety, other psychiatric comorbidities, and attack frequency and severity. These findings suggest a high prevalence of dissociative experiences in this patient population, highlighting the importance of routinely screening patients for dissociative symptoms and their impact on patients' lives.

  15. Seizure, Fit or Attack? The Use of Diagnostic Labels by Patients with Epileptic or Non-Epileptic Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the use of diagnostic labels such as "seizure", "attack", "fit", and "blackout" by patients who experience seizures. While previous research on patients' preferences for diagnostic terminology has relied on questionnaires, we assess patients' own preferences and their responses to a doctor's use of different labels…

  16. Seizure, Fit or Attack? The Use of Diagnostic Labels by Patients with Epileptic or Non-Epileptic Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the use of diagnostic labels such as "seizure", "attack", "fit", and "blackout" by patients who experience seizures. While previous research on patients' preferences for diagnostic terminology has relied on questionnaires, we assess patients' own preferences and their responses to a doctor's use of different labels…

  17. Differential effects of valproic acid and enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants on nimodipine pharmacokinetics in epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tartara, A.; Galimberti, C.A.; Manni, R.; Parietti, L.; Zucca, C.; Baasch, H.; Caresia, L.; Mück, W.; Barzaghi, N.; Gatti, G.; Perucca, E.

    1991-01-01

    1 The single dose pharmacokinetics of orally administered nimodipine (60 mg) were investigated in normal subjects and in two groups of epileptic patients receiving chronic treatment with hepatic microsomal enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, phenobarbitone or phenytoin) and sodium valproate, respectively. 2 Compared with the values found in the control group, mean areas under the plasma nimodipine concentration curve were lowered by about seven-fold (P < 0.01) in patients taking enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants and increased by about 50% (P < 0.05) in patients taking sodium valproate. 3 Nimodipine half-lives were shorter in enzyme-induced patients than in controls (3.9 ± 2.0 h vs 9.1 ± 3.4 h, means ± s.d., P < 0.01), but this difference could be artifactual since in the patients drug concentrations declined rapidly below the limit of assay, thus preventing identification of a possible slower terminal phase. In valproate-treated patients, half-lives (8.2 ± 1.8 h) were similar to those found in controls. PMID:1777370

  18. An incident case-referent study of epileptic seizures in adults.

    PubMed

    Forsgren, L; Nyström, L

    1990-01-01

    An epidemiological community-based study of incident cases with non-provoked epileptic seizures, using case-referent methodology, was carried out to explore possible risk factors for epileptic seizures. 83 cases, between 17 and 74 years of age, of whom 67.4% had seizures of localized onset, were compared with 2 age- and sex-matched referents. Higher birth weight, movement disabilities, mental retardation, head trauma, brain tumor, depression, a period of unemployment during the previous 6 months and a history of epilepsy in relatives were more common in cases than in referent subjects. No difference was found in the socioeconomic factors investigated, except that the cases belonged to smaller households. Prematurity, home or hospital birth, parents' age at birth of cases or referents, febrile convulsions in relatives, various infections including meningitis and encephalitis, cerebrovascular disease, and alcohol, tobacco, sleep and nutritional habits were not found to be associated with development of seizures. The recent life events investigated, at home or at work, occurred as often in cases as in referents, except that significantly fewer cases had received any increase in salary during the last 6 months. The relationship between depression and development of seizures should be explored further. Moreover, the possibility of false negative results should be considered because of the sample size.

  19. Long-term treatment of epilepsy: open multicenter trial with progabide in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Musch, B; Cambier, J; Loiseau, P; Fournier, V; Beaussart, M; Benoit, C; Broglin, D; Cenraud, M; Chatel, M; Deville, M C

    1987-01-01

    A long-term open multicenter trial was carried out in 15 European centers with therapy-resistant epileptics to evaluate the efficacy and safety of progabide, a new antiepileptic GABA receptor agonist; 187 patients, suffering from partial epilepsy (57%), primary generalized epilepsy (20%), secondary generalized epilepsy (21%), and unclassified generalized epilepsy (2%), participated in the study. All patients had a total seizure frequency higher than one per month in spite of standard antiepileptic medication; 46% had a mean partial seizure frequency from daily to weekly. Progabide was administered at a mean daily dose of 30.5 mg/kg/day as an add-on to the standard antiepileptic drugs up to one year in 115 patients; 37 patients (19.8%) dropped out because of reasons which were not drug-related (bad compliance, lost to follow-up); in 12 patients (6.5%) progabide was withdrawn for side effects and in 20 (10.7%) for lack of efficacy. 71.3% of patients treated for one year (62% considering the 'cumulative' number of patients) experienced more than a 50% reduction in seizure frequency. This reduction was equally present in patients with partial epilepsy (63.9%) and with generalized epilepsy (62.2% of patients with primary and 57.1% with secondary generalized epilepsy). No signs of tolerance phenomena to the antiepileptic effect of progabide were observed. No side effects were reported in 56.7% of the patients. Clinical side effects were mild and transient, leading to progabide discontinuation in 6.5% of the patients only; an increase in SGPT was observed in 5.7% of the patients, these increases were transient and without any clinical symptom.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Assessment of colour vision in epileptic patients exposed to single-drug therapy.

    PubMed

    López, L; Thomson, A; Rabinowicz, A L

    1999-01-01

    Diplopia, blurred vision and colour disturbances are well-known side effects associated with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue colour test (F-100) is an accepted and sensitive tool to detect changes in colour perception. To determine the impact of AEDs upon colour vision, we evaluated 37 consecutive patients with complex partial seizures exposed to monotherapy with phenytoin (PHT, carbamazepine (CBZ) or valproic acid (VPA). All had normal IQ and no congenital disturbances in colour vision or ocular diseases. Twenty normal controls were used for statistical analysis. Thirteen patients were exposed to PHT, 12 to CBZ and 12 to VPA. Visual colour perception was impaired in 30/37 (82%) of the study group. The most significant abnormality was detected in the blue-yellow axis in 10/13 patients exposed to PHT (p < 0.02) and in 8/12 treated with CBZ (p < 0.009). In 8/12 patients taking VPA, no significant abnormality was observed (p < 0.06). None of the studied patients complained of colour vision disturbances. Our findings strongly support the negative effect of AEDs upon colour vision discrimination, most likely due to changes at the retinal processing level. F-100 proved to be very useful to assess early toxicity due to AEDs.

  1. The bumetanide prodrug BUM5, but not bumetanide, potentiates the antiseizure effect of phenobarbital in adult epileptic mice.

    PubMed

    Erker, Thomas; Brandt, Claudia; Töllner, Kathrin; Schreppel, Philipp; Twele, Friederike; Schidlitzki, Alina; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The loop diuretic bumetanide has been reported to potentiate the antiseizure activity of phenobarbital in rodent models of neonatal seizures, most likely as a result of inhibition of the chloride importer Na-K-Cl cotransporter isoform 1 (NKCC1) in the brain. In view of the intractability of neonatal seizures, the preclinical findings prompted a clinical trial in neonates on bumetanide as an add-on to phenobarbital, which, however, had to be terminated because of ototoxicity and lack of efficacy. We have recently shown that bumetanide penetrates only poorly into the brain, so that we developed lipophilic prodrugs such as BUM5, the N,N-dimethylaminoethylester of bumetanide, which penetrate more easily into the brain and are converted to bumetanide. In the present study, we used a new strategy to test whether BUM5 is more potent than bumetanide in potentiating the antiseizure effect of phenobarbital. Adult mice were made epileptic by pilocarpine, and the antiseizure effects of bumetanide, BUM5, and phenobarbital alone or in combination were determined by the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test. In nonepileptic mice, only phenobarbital exerted seizure threshold-increasing activity, and this was not potentiated by the NKCC1 inhibitors. In contrast, a marked potentiation of phenobarbital by BUM5, but not bumetanide, was determined in epileptic mice. Thus, bumetanide is not capable of potentiating phenobarbital's antiseizure effect in an adult mouse model, which, however, can be overcome by using the prodrug BUM5. These data substantiate that BUM5 is a promising tool compound for target validation and proof-of-concept studies on the role of NKCC1 in brain diseases. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Smell and taste acuity in epileptic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Campanella, G; Filla, A; De Michele, G

    1978-01-01

    Taste and smell acuity were determined in 50 normal subjects and 48 epileptic patients by means of Henkin's method. Smell detection thresholds are greatly reduced in epileptic patients, mainly those suffering from partial seizures with complex symptomatology. Epileptic patients show also a reduced threshold for sweet and bitter taste. Age, sex and antiepileptic drugs do not affect taste and smell acuity. The significance of these findings in the pathogenesis of epileptic seizures is discussed.

  3. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment.

  4. Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Germain, Blair; Maria, Bernard L

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies encompass a heterogeneous group of epilepsy syndromes that manifest with cognitive, behavioral, and neurologic deficits, seizures that are often intractable and multiform, aggressive electroencephalographic paroxysmal activity, and sometimes early death. As more is learned about the etiologies and manifestations of epileptic encephalopathies, progress has been made toward better treatment options. However, there is still a great need for further randomized controlled trials and research to help create clinically effective therapies. The 2015 Neurobiology of Disease in Children symposium, held in conjunction with the 44th annual meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to (1) describe the clinical concerns involving diagnosis and treatment, (2) review the current status of understanding in the pathogenesis of epileptic encephalopathy, (3) discuss clinical management and therapies for epileptic encephalopathy, and (4) define future directions of research. This article summarizes the presentations and includes an edited transcript of question-and-answer sessions.

  5. The diagnosis of epileptic and non-epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Irene A W; de Krom, Marc C T F M; Kessels, Fons G H; Lodder, Jan; Troost, Jaap; Twellaar, Mascha; van Merode, Tiny; Knottnerus, André J

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this prospective population-based study was to systematically define a cluster of diagnostic items which can assist in the early identification and classification of epileptic and non-epileptic seizures. A cohort of patients aged > or =14 years, suspected with a first epileptic seizure, were included in this study. A team of neurologists evaluated and classified all cases. Diagnostic items for epileptic and non-epileptic seizures were identified using logistic regression analysis. Three hundred and fifty cases entered this study. Distinctive features for epileptic seizures were postictal confusion (OR 0.09), an epileptiform EEG pattern (OR 0.02), and abnormal neuroimaging findings (OR 0.07), whereas for non-epileptic seizures of organic origin there was a history of hypertension (OR 7.5), and provoking factors (OR 13.4) such as exercise and warmth. Diagnostic items for seizures of non-organic origin were a history of febrile seizures (OR 5.8), treatment by a psychologist or psychiatrist (OR 9.1), and presentiment of the seizure (OR 3.7) such as a feeling of choking and palpitations. A separate analysis for the patients who were systematically investigated provided some additional diagnostic items for the different subgroups of patients. For instance, back arching during the seizure for the patients with seizures of non-organic origin and female sex for the patients with non-epileptic seizures of organic origin.

  6. Religious experiences in epileptic patients with a focus on ictus-related episodes.

    PubMed

    Ogata, A; Miyakawa, T

    1998-06-01

    Two hundred thirty-four epileptic patients were examined for ictus-related religious experiences. Of the 234 cases, three (1.3%) were found to have had such religious experiences. All three cases had temporal lobe epilepsy with post-ictal psychosis, while one exhibited a simple partial seizure. At the same time, interictal experiences with hyperreligiosity were recognized in all three cases. The incidence of religious experiences while in a state of post-ictal psychosis was 27.3%, which is regarded as high, indicating some influence by the religions that the patients had faith in. Patients who had ictus-related or interictal religious experiences did not believe solely in Buddhism, a traditional religion in Japan, but rather in a combination of Buddhism and Shintoism, new Christian sect, contemporary Japanese religions and/or other folk beliefs. This indicates that these experiences had some connection not only with the personality characteristic of temporal lobe epilepsy, but also with the general lack of religious conviction and activity in Japan. In addition, the cases having ictus-related religious experiences also had interictal religious experiences and an interaction was seen between them. In this paper, the importance of taking bio-psycho-social aspects into consideration is pointed out in the discussion of epilepsy and religion.

  7. Simultaneous impairment of neuronal and metabolic function of mutated gephyrin in a patient with epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dejanovic, Borislav; Djémié, Tania; Grünewald, Nora; Suls, Arvid; Kress, Vanessa; Hetsch, Florian; Craiu, Dana; Zemel, Matthew; Gormley, Padhraig; Lal, Dennis; Myers, Candace T; Mefford, Heather C; Palotie, Aarno; Helbig, Ingo; Meier, Jochen C; De Jonghe, Peter; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Schwarz, Guenter

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic inhibition is essential for shaping the dynamics of neuronal networks, and aberrant inhibition plays an important role in neurological disorders. Gephyrin is a central player at inhibitory postsynapses, directly binds and organizes GABAA and glycine receptors (GABAARs and GlyRs), and is thereby indispensable for normal inhibitory neurotransmission. Additionally, gephyrin catalyzes the synthesis of the molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) in peripheral tissue. We identified a de novo missense mutation (G375D) in the gephyrin gene (GPHN) in a patient with epileptic encephalopathy resembling Dravet syndrome. Although stably expressed and correctly folded, gephyrin-G375D was non-synaptically localized in neurons and acted dominant-negatively on the clustering of wild-type gephyrin leading to a marked decrease in GABAAR surface expression and GABAergic signaling. We identified a decreased binding affinity between gephyrin-G375D and the receptors, suggesting that Gly375 is essential for gephyrin-receptor complex formation. Surprisingly, gephyrin-G375D was also unable to synthesize MoCo and activate MoCo-dependent enzymes. Thus, we describe a missense mutation that affects both functions of gephyrin and suggest that the identified defect at GABAergic synapses is the mechanism underlying the patient's severe phenotype.

  8. On the nose: Olfactory disturbances in patients with transient epileptic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Savage, Sharon A; Butler, Christopher R; Milton, Fraser; Han, Yang; Zeman, Adam Z

    2017-01-01

    While olfactory hallucinations are relatively rare in epilepsy, a high prevalence (up to 42%) has been reported in one form - Transient Epileptic Amnesia (TEA). TEA is characterized by recurring amnestic seizures and is commonly associated with persistent interictal memory deficits. Despite reports of changes in smell, olfactory ability has not been objectively assessed in this group. The aim of this study was to measure olfactory ability in patients with TEA and explore whether olfactory symptoms relate to other clinical variables. Fifty-five participants with TEA were recruited from The Impairment of Memory in Epilepsy project database. The presence of olfactory symptoms was obtained via case notes and clinical interview. Participants completed questionnaires to evaluate their olfaction and memory function subjectively. Olfactory ability was measured using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). TEA participants' performance was compared to 50 matched healthy control participants. A subset of TEA participants (n=26) also completed a battery of memory tests including standard neuropsychological measures, and assessment of accelerated long-term forgetting and autobiographical memory. Olfactory hallucinations were reported in 55% of patients with TEA. A significant reduction in smell identification (UPSIT) was found between patients with TEA and healthy controls (p<0.001). Epilepsy variables, including history of olfactory hallucinations, were not predictive of olfactory ability. Patients reported ongoing memory difficulties and performed below normative values on objective tests. While no correlation was found between objective measures of memory and olfactory performance, subjective complaints of route finding difficulty was associated with UPSIT score. Impairments in odor identification are common in patients with TEA and exceed changes that occur in normal aging. Olfactory hallucinations occurs in approximately half of patients with TEA

  9. [Ecological executive function characteristics and effects of executive function on quality of life in young adult epileptics].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lanlan; Zhou, Nong

    2014-05-06

    To explore the characteristics of ecological executive function in young adults with idiopathic or probably symptomatic epilepsy and examine the effects of executive function on quality of life. Fifty-five epileptics (EP) and 39 matched healthy controls (HC) aged 18-44 years at our hospital were selected. The differences in ecological executive function and quality of life were compared between two groups with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-adult version (BRIEF-A) and QOLIE-31. Comparing with controls, the epileptics yielded higher scores significantly on most subscales of BRIEF-A (P < 0.05), including total score [(55 ± 9) vs (48 ± 7)], inhibition [(54 ± 7) vs (48 ± 7)], emotion control [(56 ± 8) vs (49 ± 7)], self-monitor [(54 ± 10) vs (47 ± 7)], initiation [(51 ± 10) vs (46 ± 9)], working memory [(56 ± 10) vs (50 ± 9)], planning [(53 ± 10) vs (47 ± 7)], behavioral regulation index (BRI) and metacognition index (MI). Pearson's correlation test showed that the total score of QOLIE-31 had significantly negative correlations with the scores of BRIEF-A, such as global executive composite (GEC), behavioral regulation index (BRI), metacogniton index (MI), inhibition, emotional control, monitoring, initiation and working memory (r = -0.284- -0.457, P < 0.05). Moreover, seizure control and seizure type were also related with the total score of QOLIE-31(r = -0.302, r = 0.268, P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that emotional control in BRIEF-A was related with seizure worry and cognitive function in QOLIE-31(t = -2.137, t = -2.427, P < 0.05) . Behavioral regulation index (BRI) was closely related with emotional well-being in QOLIE-31(t = -2.148, P < 0.05). Also, working memory was related with cognitive function, overall quality of life and total score in QOLIE-31(t = -3.138, -3.564, -2.948, P < 0.05). And inhibition was related with energy, social function and total score in QOLIE-31(t = -3.007, -3.580, -2.191, P

  10. The relationship between pharmacokinetic parameters of carbamazepine and therapeutic response in epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Hassine, Anis; Laouani, Aicha; Amor, Sana Ben; Nouira, Manel; Ammou, Sofiène Ben

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prescribed dose and carbamazepine plasma concentration to achieve the optimal therapeutic efficacy are highly variable from one patient to the other. Our study aimed to determine whether biological parameters may be used as plasma markers that can individually adjust the carbamazepine dose necessary to optimize therapeutic efficacy. Material and methods Ninety-four epileptic patients under carbamazepine monotherapy and who have never used combination therapy were recruited from the consecutive admissions at the Department of Neurology “CHU Sahloul” of Sousse Central Hospital in Tunisia from February 2010 to April 2011. The patients were monitored for epilepsy for three years on average. Carbamazepine and 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine concentrations were analyzed through high-performance liquid chromatography. Simultaneously, therapeutic efficacy was assessed through the annual number of seizures in each patient. Results Our results showed the absence of any significant correlations between specific dose (mg/kg/day), carbamazepine plasma concentrations and therapeutic efficacy (r = 0.0025, p = 0.30; r = 0.1584, p = 0.38 respectively), whereas both plasma 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine concentration and 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine to plasma carbamazepine ratio were closely correlated with therapeutic efficacy (r = 0.34, p = 0.03; r = 0.45, p = 0.008 respectively). The optimum therapeutic response was observed among patients who simultaneously had a plasma concentration of 0.8 μg/ml of metabolite and 5.5 μg/ml of carbamazepine. Conclusions The results suggest that plasma levels of both carbamazepine and of 10,11-epoxide-carbamazepine must be set to achieve an optimum therapeutic response.

  11. Comparison of the health-related quality of life between epileptic patients with partial and generalized seizure

    PubMed Central

    Ashjazadeh, Nahid; Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Ayoobzadehshirazi, Anaheed; Sadraii, Nazanin; Hadi, Negin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is defined as recurrent unprovoked febrile seizures, which cause disability in patients. This study aims to assess the health-related quality-of-life (QOL) in epileptic patients in Fars Province, southern Iran. Methods:One-hundred epileptic patients, above 18 years, referred to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences affiliated clinics, were included. The QOL of patients with generalized and partial seizure were assessed using the Iranian valid and reliable Sf-36 questionnaire. Patients’ socio-demographic and their disease features were also compared with each other using a questionnaire. Results: In partial epilepsy group (n = 24), the married patients in social functioning (SF) aspect of QOL (64.42 ± 14.29) (P = 0.024), the patients on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) monotherapy in both physical functioning (PF) (88.75 ± 11.57) (P = 0.030) and SF (75.00 ± 6.68) (P = 0.022) aspects, the employed patients in PF aspect of QOL (P = 0.023) (91.87 ± 8.83) and those with high income in mental health aspect of QOL (P = 0.036 and correlation coefficient = 0.413) got better scores compared with the partial epileptic patients who were single, on polytherapy, unemployed and had low to moderate income. In generalized epilepsy group (n = 76), patients on AEDs monotherapy in PF aspect of QOL (P = 0.025) (78.33 ± 24.36) and employed patients in vitality aspect (P = 0.023) (57.00 ± 28.25) had better scores. Data were analyzed using SPSS for windows. Conclusion: Epilepsy can affect patient’s life in a number of ways such as their lives, marriage, occupation, and education. We can encourage patients to find a partner, continue higher education and try to find a job. PMID:25295153

  12. The impact of conveying the diagnosis when using a biopsychosocial approach: A qualitative study among adolescents and young adults with NES (non-epileptic seizures).

    PubMed

    Karterud, Hilde Nordahl; Risør, Mette Bech; Haavet, Ole Rikard

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the impact of using a biopsychosocial approach to explain the diagnosis of non-epileptic seizures (NES). Semi-structured interviews of eleven adolescents and young adults who had participated in an inpatient follow-up stay of the diagnosis were used. The interviews were taped, transcribed, and analysed using systematic text condensation. Three key themes were identified:1."Threatened self-image": Patients initially perceived their diagnosis as being purely psychological. As they did not accept that they had mental disorders, they interpreted this as frightening and threatening, and resisted the diagnosis.2."Being believed and belief in oneself": Participants had many experiences of being suspected by healthcare providers of staging their seizures. Some had even begun to have doubts themselves as to whether the attacks were voluntary or not. Explaining that unconscious processes are involved in NES contributed towards increasing patients' feelings of being believed, and thereby acceptance of the diagnosis.3."Getting an explanation that makes sense": Some participants identified connections between their personal histories and their seizures and became seizure-free. Others found that the explanatory models gave personal meaning, but did not become seizure-free, while a few continued to doubt whether NES was the correct diagnosis. Being believed was the most elemental factor for coping with the condition. Using a biopsychosocial approach to explain the diagnosis may facilitate identification with the explanatory models, and thus acceptance of the diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Progress in autoimmune epileptic encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, S.; Vincent, A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Autoimmune epileptic encephalopathy is a potentially treatable neurological syndrome characterized by the coexistence of a neuronal antibody in the CSF and serum. Patients present with combinations of seizures, neuropsychiatric features, movement disorder and cognitive decline, but some patients have isolated seizures either at first presentation or during their illness. This review summarises our current understanding of the roles of specific neuronal antibodies in epilepsy-related syndromes and aims to aid the clinician in diagnosis and treatment. Recent findings Antigen discovery methods in three neuroimmunology centres independently identified antibodies to different subunits of the GABAA receptor; high levels of these antibodies were found mainly in patients with severe refractory seizures. These and other antibodies were also found in a proportion (<10%) of children and adults with epilepsy. A clinical study comparing immunotherapy in patients with autoantibodies or without an identified target antigen found neuroinflammatory features were predictive of a therapeutic response. New in-vitro and in-vivo studies, and spontaneous animal models, have confirmed the pathogenicity and epileptogenicity of neuronal antibodies and their relevance to other mammals. Summary Neuronal antibodies are an important cause of autoimmune epileptic encephalopathy, early recognition is important as there may be an underlying tumour, and early treatment is associated with a better outcome. In the absence of an antibody, the clinician should adopt a pragmatic approach and consider a trial of immunotherapy when other causes have been excluded. PMID:26886357

  14. Effects of anticonvulsants and inactivity on bone disease in epileptics

    PubMed Central

    Murchison, Lilian E.; Bewsher, P. D.; Chesters, Marion; Gilbert, J.; Catto, G.; Law, Elizabeth; McKay, E.; Ross, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    No significant biochemical or radiological features of vitamin D deficiency were found in groups of juvenile and adult epileptics and control groups of non-epileptic patients in hospitals for the mentally retarded. There was evidence of hepatic enzyme induction in patients on anticonvulsants, in that urinary D-glucaric acid concentration and excretion were raised. No effect was found of prolonged anticonvulsant therapy on bone densitometry, but in children immobility was closely associated with decreased bone density. The evidence suggests that disuse osteoporosis is the major bone disease in these mentally retarded children. PMID:1161672

  15. Epileptic Patients are at Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmias: A Novel Approach using QT-nomogram, Tachogram, and Cardiac Restitution Plots

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nimer, Marwan S.; Al-Mahdawi, Sura A.; Abdullah, Namir M.; Al-Mahdawi, Akram

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sudden death is reported in patients who had a history of epilepsy and some authors believed that is due to cardiac arrhythmias. Objectives: This study aimed to predict that the epileptic patients are at risk of serious cardiac arrhythmias by QT-nomogram, tachogram (Lorenz), and cardiac restitution plots. Methods: A total number of 71 healthy subjects (Group I) and 64 newly diagnosed epileptic patients (Group II) were recruited from Al-Yarmouk and Baghdad Teaching hospitals in Baghdad from March 2015 to July 2015 and included in this study. The diagnosis of epilepsy achieved clinically, electroencephalograph record and radio-images including computerized tomography and magnetic image resonance. At the time of entry into the study, an electrocardiography (ECG) was done, and the determinants of each ECG record were calculated. The QT-nomogram, tachogram, and cardiac restitution plots were used to identify the patients at risk of cardiac arrhythmias. Results: Significant prolonged corrected QT corrected (QTc) and JT corrected intervals were observed in female compared with male at age ≥50 years while the TQ interval was significantly prolonged in males of Group II. Eight patients of Group II had a significant pathological prolonged QTc interval compared with undetectable finding in Group I. QT nomogram did not disclose significant findings while the plots of Lorenz and restitution steepness disclose that the patients of Group II were vulnerable to cardiac arrhythmias. Abnormal ECG findings were observed in the age extremities (≤18 years and ≥50 years) in Group II compared with Group I. Conclusion: Utilization of QT-nomogram, restitution steepness, and tachogram plots is useful tools for detection subclinical vulnerable epileptic patient with cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:28149075

  16. Weakened functional connectivity in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) converges on basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Barzegaran, Elham; Carmeli, Cristian; Rossetti, Andrea O; Frackowiak, Richard S; Knyazeva, Maria G

    2016-03-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are involuntary paroxysmal events that are unaccompanied by epileptiform EEG discharges. We hypothesised that PNES are a disorder of distributed brain networks resulting from their functional disconnection.The disconnection may underlie a dissociation mechanism that weakens the influence of unconsciously presented traumatising information but exerts maladaptive effects leading to episodic failures of behavioural control manifested by psychogenic 'seizures'. To test this hypothesis, we compared functional connectivity (FC) derived from resting state high-density EEGs of 18 patients with PNES and 18 age-matched and gender-matched controls. To this end, the EEGs were transformed into source space using the local autoregressive average inverse solution. FC was estimated with a multivariate measure of lagged synchronisation in the θ, α and β frequency bands for 66 brain sites clustered into 18 regions. A multiple comparison permutation test was applied to deduce significant between-group differences in inter-regional and intraregional FC. The significant effect of PNES-a decrease in lagged FC between the basal ganglia and limbic, prefrontal, temporal, parietal and occipital regions-was found in the α band. We believe that this finding reveals a possible neurobiological substrate of PNES, which explains both attenuation of the effect of potentially disturbing mental representations and the occurrence of PNES episodes. By improving understanding of the aetiology of this condition, our results suggest a potential refinement of diagnostic criteria and management principles. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Effects of Vitamin E on seizure frequency, electroencephalogram findings, and oxidative stress status of refractory epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Mehvari, Jafar; Motlagh, Fataneh Gholami; Najafi, Mohamad; Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza Aghaye; Naeini, Amirmansour Alavi; Zare, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been a frequent finding in epileptic patients receiving antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In this study, the influence of Vitamin E on the antiseizure activity and redox state of patients treated with carbamazepine, sodium valproate, and levetiracetam has been investigated. This double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out on 65 epileptic patients with chronic antiepileptic intake. The subjects received 400 IU/day of Vitamin E or placebo for 6 months. Seizure frequency, electroencephalogram (EEG), and redox state markers were measured monthly through the study. Total antioxidant capacity, catalase and glutathione were significantly higher in Vitamin E received group compared with controls (P < 0.05) whereas malodialdehyde levels did not differ between two groups (P < 0.07). Vitamin E administration also caused a significant decrease in the frequency of seizures (P < 0.001) and improved EEG findings (P = 0.001). Of 32 patients in case group, the positive EEG decreased in 16 patients (50%) whereas among 33 patients in control group only 4 patients (12.1%) showed decreased positive EEG. The results of this preliminary study indicate that coadministration of antioxidant Vitamin E with AEDs improves seizure control and reduces oxidative stress.

  18. Effects of Vitamin E on seizure frequency, electroencephalogram findings, and oxidative stress status of refractory epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehvari, Jafar; Motlagh, Fataneh Gholami; Najafi, Mohamad; Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza Aghaye; Naeini, Amirmansour Alavi; Zare, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has been a frequent finding in epileptic patients receiving antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In this study, the influence of Vitamin E on the antiseizure activity and redox state of patients treated with carbamazepine, sodium valproate, and levetiracetam has been investigated. Materials and Methods: This double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out on 65 epileptic patients with chronic antiepileptic intake. The subjects received 400 IU/day of Vitamin E or placebo for 6 months. Seizure frequency, electroencephalogram (EEG), and redox state markers were measured monthly through the study. Results: Total antioxidant capacity, catalase and glutathione were significantly higher in Vitamin E received group compared with controls (P < 0.05) whereas malodialdehyde levels did not differ between two groups (P < 0.07). Vitamin E administration also caused a significant decrease in the frequency of seizures (P < 0.001) and improved EEG findings (P = 0.001). Of 32 patients in case group, the positive EEG decreased in 16 patients (50%) whereas among 33 patients in control group only 4 patients (12.1%) showed decreased positive EEG. Conclusion: The results of this preliminary study indicate that coadministration of antioxidant Vitamin E with AEDs improves seizure control and reduces oxidative stress. PMID:27099849

  19. Status epilepticus in epileptic patients. Related syndromes, precipitating factors, treatment and outcome in a video-EEG population-based study.

    PubMed

    Di Bonaventura, C; Mari, F; Vanacore, N; Fattouch, J; Zarabla, A; Berardelli, A; Manfredi, M; Prencipe, M; Giallonardo, A T

    2008-09-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is frequently observed in epileptic patients. We reviewed a series of video-EEG documented SE to define the characteristics of SE in this population. Retrospective evaluation of 50 epileptic patients with SE, revision of the electro-clinical data and therapies, and definition of the semeiological subtypes, aetiology, outcome and related epileptic syndromes. We identified 28 convulsive (19 focal and 9 generalized) and 22 non-convulsive (8 focal and 14 generalized) SE patients. In 13 patients, SE was situation-related (poor compliance, AED reduction, worsening seizures). In the remaining 37 patients, SE was related to the natural history of epilepsy (progression of underlying pathologies or intrinsic expression of epileptic syndromes); in these last cases, our results show a higher occurrence in cryptogenic frontal epilepsy (p=0.01). We identified two subgroups according to the duration of the event, i.e. SE lasting <12h and SE lasting >12h. Our results showed a worse response to therapy in SE lasting >12h (p=0.01), a better response to therapy in non-convulsive SE than in convulsive SE (p<0.05) and a relationship at statistical significance limit between a poor response to therapy/worse outcome and symptomatic epileptic syndromes (p=0.06). SE in epileptic patients has a wide spectrum of electro-clinical features. It may be related to the withdrawal or reduction of AEDs, or may even be the expression of the evolution of epileptic syndromes. Response to therapy is dependent on early diagnosis and therapy.

  20. [Knowledge, attitudes and practise of the general practitioners with the epileptic patients: qualitative research with 11 semi-structured interviews].

    PubMed

    Gélineau, A Chartier; Grimaud, J; de Toffol, B

    2008-02-01

    Studies on how general practitioners follow epileptic patients are few and far between. This is surprising, since for these patients, the general practitioner is the first person to be consulted in the context of the current standardised treatment pathway. Our goal was to describe and analyze general practitioners' knowledge, attitudes and habits concerning medical, psychological and social care of epileptic patients. We applied a qualitative method using semi-structured interviews with 11 general practitioners in the Eure-et-Loir, an administrative district in France. The interviews were recorded, with full transcripts being written and analyzed by themes. The results revealed great variability in care practices and in the perception general practitioners have of epilepsy. They report not knowing enough about the illness. They perceive clearly the anxiety of patients and their families, but exert little medical, psychiatric or social impact on patients. Treatment of the disease is at the core of the general practitioner's relationship with the patient. If attitudes towards epilepsy are to be changed, relevant knowledge and correct practices remain to be implemented. Demand for training is currently centred on treatment but it would be helpful to introduce inter-disciplinary training on standardisation of practices and more detailed correspondence with neurologists.

  1. Descriptive Analysis of Epileptic Seizures and Problem Behavior in Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Celeste; Yoder, Paul J.; Kennedy, Craig H.

    2006-01-01

    We studied possible relations between seizures and problem behavior in 3 adults with developmental disabilities. Each person was observed for between 56 and 92 days to record occurrences of seizures and problem behavior. Results of our descriptive analysis indicated an association between seizures and problem behavior for each participant. For…

  2. Investigation of Anti-Toxocara Antibodies in Epileptic Patients and Comparison of Two Methods: ELISA and Western Blotting

    PubMed Central

    Zibaei, Mohammad; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Bahrami, Parviz; Sadjjadi, Seyed Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between Toxocara infection and epilepsy was previously demonstrated by several case-control studies and case reports. These previous studies were often based on the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens, which are not specific due to cross-reactivity with other parasitic infections such as ascariasis, trichuriasis, and anisakiasis. An immunoblot analysis is highly specific and can detect low levels of Toxocara antibodies. Therefore, this assay may be useful in the identification of toxocariasis in epileptic patients. We examined patients who had epilepsy and healthy subjects for seropositivity for Toxocara infection by ELISA and Western blotting. Out of 85 epileptic patients, 10 (11.8%) and 3 (3.5%) persons exhibited Toxocara immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies responses by ELISA and by both techniques, respectively. Moreover, in the healthy group (n = 85), 3 (3.5%) persons were positive by ELISA, but none was detected by Western blotting. This study indicates that Toxocara infection is a risk factor for epilepsy in Iran. These findings strongly suggest the need to perform Western blotting immunodiagnosis, as well as the ELISA using Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens, to improve diagnosis of human toxocariasis in patients with epilepsy. PMID:23710354

  3. A preliminary investigation on the possible association between diminished copper availability and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in epileptic patients treated with valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients treated with valproic acid (VPA) present a high incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (around 61%). Several recent studies suggest that low copper stores could be associated with NAFLD, and a significant decrease of copper availability in VPA-treated patients has been described. Design and methods In 101 adult epileptic patients treated with valproic acid in monotherapy (n = 75) and polytherapy (n = 26) the copper availability was evaluated using the specific oxidase activity of ceruloplasmin (activity per unit mass of enzyme protein) and the copper/ceruloplasmin ratio. Copper deficiency was supposed in the cases in which this biochemical variable was smaller than the lower reference limit (333 U/g). Results The differences between the groups of patients with ceruloplasmin oxidase activity smaller or greater than 333 U/g for the serum levels of aminotransferases, gamma-glutamyltransferase, butyrylcholinesterase, cholesterol, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein, and the APRI and FIB-4 liver fibrosis scores were not statistically significant. Most patients (93%) had low APRI and FIB-4 scores, suggesting absence of significant liver fibrosis. Conclusions The results obtained do not confirm the hypothesis of an association between diminished copper availability and NAFLD in patients treated with valproic acid. PMID:21190397

  4. Patient-Specific Detection of Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by Arterial Spin Labeling in Drug-Resistant Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Del Felice, Alessandra; Pizzini, Francesca Benedetta; Arcaro, Chiara; Formaggio, Emanuela; Mai, Roberto; Chappell, Michael; Beltramello, Alberto; Manganotti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological and hemodynamic data can be integrated to accurately and precisely identify the generators of abnormal electrical activity in drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for quantitative noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), can provide a direct measure of variations in cerebral perfusion associated with the epileptic focus. In this study, we aimed to confirm the ASL diagnostic value in the identification of the epileptogenic zone, as compared to electrical source imaging (ESI) results, and to apply a template-based approach to depict statistically significant CBF alterations. Standard video-electroencephalography (EEG), high-density EEG, and ASL were performed to identify clinical seizure semiology and noninvasively localize the epileptic focus in 12 drug-resistant focal epilepsy patients. The same ASL protocol was applied to a control group of 17 healthy volunteers from which a normal perfusion template was constructed using a mixed-effect approach. CBF maps of each patient were then statistically compared to the reference template to identify perfusion alterations. Significant hypo- and hyperperfused areas were identified in all cases, showing good agreement between ASL and ESI results. Interictal hypoperfusion was observed at the site of the seizure in 10/12 patients and early postictal hyperperfusion in 2/12. The epileptic focus was correctly identified within the surgical resection margins in the 5 patients who underwent lobectomy, all of which had good postsurgical outcomes. The combined use of ESI and ASL can aid in the noninvasive evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients. PMID:25946055

  5. Diurnal patterns and relationships between physiological and self-reported stress in patients with epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Barbora; Harris, Peter R; Reuber, Markus

    2017-05-01

    Patients with epilepsy and those with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) experience high levels of stress and stress is one of the most frequently self-identified seizure precipitants. Although stress is a multifaceted phenomenon, few studies have systematically examined its different components in patients with seizures. The aim of this study was therefore to describe diurnal patterns of psychological and physiological measures of stress in patients with epilepsy and patients with PNES, and explore their relationships to each other in order to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying stress and seizure occurrence in these patients. A range of stress markers including self-reported stress, salivary cortisol, and heart rate variability (HRV) were explored in adult patients with refractory epilepsy (N=22) and those with PNES (N=23) undergoing three- to five-day video-telemetry. A diurnal pattern was observed in the physiological measures, characterized by higher levels of physiological arousal in the mornings and lower levels at night in both patients with epilepsy and PNES. The physiological measures (cortisol and HRV) were associated with each other in patients with epilepsy; no close relationship was found with self-reported stress in either of the two patient groups. The findings contribute to and expand on previous studies of the patterns of stress in patients with seizures. The results also indicate a discrepancy between patients' physiological responses and their subjective stress perceptions, suggesting that simple self-reports cannot be used as a proxy of physiological arousal in patients with seizures and stress. Stress in these patient groups should be studied using a combination of complementary measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effects of Mozart's music on interictal activity in epileptic patients: systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dastgheib, Samaneh Sadat; Layegh, Parvaneh; Sadeghi, Ramin; Foroughipur, Mohsen; Shoeibi, Ali; Gorji, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Mozart's music has been shown to have promising effects on nervous system functions. In this study, the effects of Mozart's work on epilepsy were reviewed. Articles were obtained from a variety of sources. The results of 12 studies were extracted. Three different meta-analyses were performed to examine (i) the percentage of patients who had changes in their interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) by music therapy; and the changes of IEDs (ii) during and (iii) after exposure to Mozart's music. Data analysis indicated that 84% of patients listening to Mozart's music showed a significant decrease in IEDs. In addition, IEDs were decreased during (31.24%) and after (23.74%) listening to Mozart's compositions. A noteworthy response to music therapy in patients with a higher intelligence quotient, generalized or central discharges, and idiopathic epilepsy was demonstrated. The effect of Mozart's music on epilepsy seems to be significant. However, more randomized control studies are needed to determine its clinical efficacy.

  7. [ECG characteristics in epilepsy of homo- and heterospecific hereditary origin and schizophrenia with latent epileptic predisposition].

    PubMed

    Dvirskiĭ, A G; Shevtsov, A G; Glasner, A K; Dubrovin, Iu B; Krut'ko, Iu A; Svaĭdan, S

    1991-01-01

    The EEG data were compared among 260 epileptic patients, including 94 patients loaded with schizophrenia, 71 patients loaded with epilepsy, 95 patients without revealed hereditary loading with mental diseases, and among 32 schizophrenics in whom epileptic seizures could be seen during insulin therapy. Hereditary loading with epilepsy or schizophrenia in epileptic patients together with latent epileptic schizophrenia ++predisposition influence the characteristics of the electroencephalogram.

  8. Lateral asymmetry of eye movements in temporal lobe epileptic patients with unilateral foci.

    PubMed

    Sonobe, N; Kanno, M; Ito, M; Uchiyama, M; Takahashi, Y; Yashima, Y; Kumashiro, H

    1991-12-01

    Eye movements in response to visual stimuli (Benton Visual Retention Test) were examined in 22 temporal lobe epileptics (TLEs), 10 primary generalized epileptics (PGEs), and 20 normal controls. In the normal controls, the percent fixation time on the left peripheral figure was higher than that on the right peripheral figure, a tendency also found in the PGEs. In TLEs with right-sided foci, the percent fixation time on the left peripheral figure was higher than that on the right peripheral figure, the direction of asymmetry found in the normal controls and PGEs. However, when calculated as laterality indices (the degree of asymmetry) TLEs with right-sided foci were significantly more negative than those of both the normal controls and PGEs. In TLEs with left sided foci, the percent fixation time on the right peripheral figure tended to be higher than that on the left peripheral figure, an asymmetry which differed significantly from the normal controls, PGEs and the TLEs with right-sided foci. The results here showed that TLEs with unilateral foci had distinct eye movements which varied with the laterality of the lesion in the direction of functional overactivation of the epileptogenic hemisphere.

  9. Altered Expression of CXCL13 and CXCR5 in Intractable Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients and Pilocarpine-Induced Epileptic Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruohan; Ma, Limin; Huang, Hao; Ou, Shu; Yuan, Jinxian; Xu, Tao; Yu, Xinyuan; Liu, Xi; Yang, Juan; Chen, Yangmei; Peng, Xi

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of epilepsy are still unclear. Recent studies have indicated that inflammatory processes occurring in the brain are involved in a common and crucial mechanism in epileptogenesis. C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 13 (CXCL13) and its only receptor, C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 5 (CXCR5), are highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and participate in inflammatory responses. The present study aimed to assess the expression of CXCL13 and CXCR5 in the brain tissues of both patients with intractable epilepsy (IE) and a rat model (lithium-pilocarpine) of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to identify possible roles of the CXCL13-CXCR5 signaling pathway in epileptogenesis. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), immunohistochemical, double-labeled immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses were performed in this study. CXCL13 and CXCR5 mRNA expression and protein levels were found to be significantly up-regulated in the TLE patients and TLE rats. Further, CXCL13 and CXCR5 protein levels were altered during the different epileptic phases after onset of status epilepticus (SE) in the pilocarpine model rats, including the acute phase (6, 24, and 72 h), latent phase (7 and 14 days) and chronic phase (30 and 60 days groups). Moreover, double-labeled immunofluorescence analysis revealed that CXCL13 was mainly expressed in the cytomembranes and cytoplasm of neurons and astrocytes, while CXCR5 was mainly expressed in the cytomembranes and cytoplasm of neurons. Thus, the CXCL13-CXCR5 signaling pathway may play a possible pathogenic role in IE. CXCL13 and CXCR5 may represent potential biomarkers of brain inflammation in epileptic patients.

  10. Transient epileptic amnesia: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A

    2014-02-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is a distinctive syndrome and comprises episodic transient amnesia with an epileptic basis, without impairment of other aspects of cognitive function. Additional interictal memory deficits are common in TEA. An epileptic origin, after other etiologies have been excluded, should be considered and carefully investigated in patients complaining of isolated memory disturbances, particularly with recurrent short-lasting amnesic attacks. In all suspected cases of epilepsy, a detailed clinical history is of paramount importance, but ancillary tests including EEG and MRI could be very helpful. Transient epileptic amnesia is typically a benign and treatable condition. Future studies should investigate the exact mechanism(s) of this unique syndrome.

  11. The Investigation of Insulin Resistance in Two Groups of Epileptic Patients Treated with Sodium Valproate and Carbamazepine

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Bazooyar, Bahareh; Zare, Mohammad; Aghaghazvini, Mohammad Reza; Ansari, Behnaz; Rajaei, Ali; Dashti, Masoumeh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug for therapy of generalized and focal epilepsies. Cross-sectional studies have suggested that valproate treatment may be associated with hyperinsulinemia. We decided to investigate hyperinsulinemia as a health-threatening side effect of VPA in Iranian epileptic patients. Materials and Methods: Body mass index (BMI), lipid profile, fasting serum insulin, fasting blood glucose (FBS), and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured in 30 VPA-treated epileptic patients and 30 controls (CBZ-treated). The Chi-square test, t-test, and Pearson correlation test were used. Results: BMI was higher in VPA group than in control group (25.7 ± 3.5 > 21.7 ± 4.1) (0.000 < 0.05). Prevalence of obesity was 16.6% in VPA group that was almost the same and even lower than general Iranian population. Serum triglyceride (TG) (150 ± 77.2) was higher than CBZ group (114 ± 35.2) (P = 0.023 < 0.05). However, serum high-density lipoprotein level was lower in VPA group than controls (45.2 ± 11.7 < 54.4 ± 13.9) (P = 0.008 < 0.05). Serum insulin, FBS, HOMA-IR, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein did not demonstrate statistically significant differences between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Despite the majority of previous studies that are against VPA and according to our study, VPA could be prescribed safely and it may not cause IR and its complications. PMID:28401072

  12. Carbamazepine pharmacokinetics are not affected by zonisamide: in vitro mechanistic study and in vivo clinical study in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Levy, Rene H; Bergen, Donna; Garnett, William; Rosenfeld, William; Mather, Gary; Shah, Jaymin; Grundy, John S

    2004-11-01

    Carbamazepine is metabolized by CYP3A4 and several other cytochrome P450 enzymes. The potential effects of zonisamide on carbamazepine pharmacokinetics (PK) have not been well characterized, with contradictory literature reports. Hence, an in vitro study was designed to evaluate the cytochrome P450 inhibition spectrum of zonisamide using human liver microsomes. Further, an in vivo steady-state study was performed to measure the effect of zonisamide on carbamazepine PK in epileptic patients, and monitor zonisamide PK. In vitro human liver microsomes were incubated with zonisamide (200, 600 or 1000 microM) in the presence of appropriate probe substrates to assess selected cytochrome P450 activities. In vivo, the effect of zonisamide, up to 400 mg/day, on the steady-state PK of carbamazepine and carbamazepine-epoxide (CBZ-E) was studied in 18 epileptic patients. In vitro, zonisamide did not inhibit CYP1A2 and 2D6, and only weakly inhibited CYP2A6, 2C9, 2C19, and 2E1. The estimated Ki for zonisamide inhibition of CYP3A4 was 1076 microM, 12 times higher than typical unbound therapeutic serum zonisamide concentrations. In vivo, no statistically significant differences were observed for mean Cmax, Tmax, and AUC0-12 of total and free carbamazepine and CBZ-E measured before and after zonisamide administration (300-400 mg/day for 14 days). However, CBZ-E renal clearance was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced by zonisamide. The observed mean zonisamide t1/2 (36.3h), relative to approximately 65 h reported in subjects on zonisamide monotherapy, reflects known CYP3A4 induction by carbamazepine. Based on the lack of clinically relevant in vitro and in vivo effects, adjustment of carbamazepine dosing should not be required with concomitant zonisamide administration.

  13. Depression, traumatic dissociation and epileptic-like phenomena.

    PubMed

    Bob, Petr; Susta, Marek; Pavlat, Josef; Hynek, Karel; Raboch, Jiri

    2005-08-01

    According to recent findings trauma and stress are important etiological factors in pathogenesis of depression. As characteristic features of depressive cognition have been reported intrusive thoughts and memory disturbances similar to posttraumatic symptoms known in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder or dissociative disorders. Hypothetically is also suggested a close relationship of traumatic dissociation and epileptic-like phenomena. In the clinical study were assessed 70 adult people with a diagnosis of depression and 50 healthy controls. In the assessment were used 6 measures for symptoms of dissociation, depression, traumatic stress and psychosenzoric symptoms of epileptic origin (the so-called complex partial seizure-like symptoms). Reported data show that a great number of depressive patients who met the cut-off score for dissociative disorders (34.2%, N=24) had significantly higher traumatization, depression, subjectively experienced stress and complex partial seizure-like symptoms than the whole group of patients and the controls. Most significant traumatization has been found in patients who met the cut-off score of psychosenzoric epileptic-like symptoms which is characteristic for the epilepsy spectrum disorder (5.7%, N=4). Significant correlations of these assessed symptoms suggest close relationship between traumatic stress and dissociation in depression. This close relationship of dissociative symptomatology and traumatic stress also implicates an important role of dissociative processes in depression as a typical manifestation of depressive cognition. Assessed relationship between traumatic distress and complex partial seizure-like symptoms suggests a possible role of epileptic-like phenomena in dissociative states related to depression. Assessed relationship between traumatization, depression and epileptic-like phenomena in the patients who met cut-off score for epilepsy spectrum disorder can contribute to the problem of indication of

  14. [A case of a pediatric patient with tuberous sclerosis (Bourneville-Pringle disease) and frequent epileptic seizure for intensive dental treatment under general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mimura, Shinichiro; Kikura, Mutsuhito; Itagaki, Taiga; Inokuma, Mie; Iwamoto, Tatsuaki; Kawakubo, Atsushi; Hirano, Kazuhiro; Sato, Shigehito

    2006-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (Bourneville-Pringle disease) is a rare disease with a triad of mental retardation, epilepsy, and facial spot. Management of the patients with tuberous sclerosis under general anesthesia has been previously reported. However, there are few case reports about management under general anesthesia of a pediatric patient with tuberous sclerosis with frequent epileptic seizure. Here, we report a case of a pediatric patient with tuberous sclerosis and frequent epileptic seizure who underwent intensive dental treatment under general anesthesia with careful management of epilepsy. The patient was discharged on the day of surgery without any complications. In this case report, we discussed the appropriate assessment of the complications of tuberous sclerosis; such as, of central nervous, circulatory, respiratory, endocrine, and urinary systems including the management of general anesthesia.

  15. Attachment style, relationship quality, and psychological distress in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures versus epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Green, Becky; Norman, Paul; Reuber, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Psychopathology levels are elevated in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and those with epilepsy. However, patients with PNES report higher rates of trauma and neglect, poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and an increased prevalence of insecure attachment. We examined to what extent attachment style and relationship quality with their main informal carer impact on levels of HRQoL, depression, and anxiety in patients with PNES versus those with epilepsy. Consecutive patients with PNES (N=23) and epilepsy (N=72) completed questionnaires about attachment style, quality of their relationship with their main informal carer, seizure severity, HRQoL, depression, and anxiety. Patients with PNES reported higher levels of anxiety and depression and lower HRQoL than those with epilepsy. PNES: No significant correlations were found with HRQoL but depression correlated positively with attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety, and relationship conflict. Anxiety correlated positively with attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety, and relationship conflict, and negatively with relationship depth and support. Epilepsy: HRQoL correlated negatively with seizure severity, depression, anxiety, attachment avoidance, and attachment anxiety. Depression correlated positively with attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety, and relationship conflict. Anxiety correlated positively with seizure severity, attachment avoidance, and attachment anxiety. Correlations between measures of relationship quality and anxiety were stronger in patients with PNES versus those with epilepsy (zs=2.66 to 2.97, ps<0.004). Attachment style and relationship quality explained larger amounts of variance in depression (45%) and anxiety (60%) in the patients with PNES than those with epilepsy (16% and 13%). Levels of anxiety and depression were higher in patients with PNES than those with epilepsy. Interpersonal problems were much more closely associated with anxiety and depression in

  16. Health related quality of life in patients admitted for video-electroencephalography monitoring diagnosed with epilepsy or psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Yerdelen, Deniz; Altintas, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    To determine the health related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with epilepsy or psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES). This cross-sectional study was carried out between December 2010 and December 2014 in the Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Adana, Turkey. Patients who were admitted for video-electroencephalography monitoring and diagnosed of epileptic seizures or PNES were asked to complete a questionnaire from the World Health Organization Quality of Life, and psychiatric comorbidities were diagnosed using the structured clinical interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition. Patients with epilepsy and PNES were found to have similar HRQOL in physical, psychological, social, and environmental domains. However, the percentage of comorbid psychiatric disorders were higher in patients with PNES than patients with epilepsy. Patients with epilepsy and PNES have similar HRQOL, and PNES are resistant to the standard medical therapies used for the treatment of epileptic seizures. The direct lifetime cost of undiagnosed PNES may be of equal with intractable epilepsy. A better understanding of the impact of PNES manifestations and epilepsy would help to provide appropriate clinical, psychological and social care.

  17. Population pharmacokinetic analysis for 10-monohydroxy derivative of oxcarbazepine in pediatric epileptic patients shows no difference between Japanese and other ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Ikuo; Bouillon, Thomas; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hikoe; Hirota, Takashi; Fink, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Oxcarbazepine is an anti-epileptic drug, which is almost completely metabolized by cytosolic enzymes in the liver to the active 10-monohyroxy metabolite (MHD) following oral administration. The pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of MHD were evaluated in pediatric epileptic patients and a possible ethnic difference in PK of MHD between Japanese and non-Japanese pediatric patients was assessed. A non-linear mixed effect modeling approach was used to determine the PK of MHD. A one-compartment population model with first-order absorption appropriately described the PK of MHD. No clinically relevant differences were found for using body surface area or weight to explain between-patient variability, therefore the final model included the effects of body weight on apparent clearance (CL/F) and apparent volume of distribution (V/F) of MHD, and in addition, the effect of 3 concomitant anti-epileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin) on CL/F of MHD. Inclusion of ethnicity as a covariate in the final model, concluded no ethnic difference with respect to CL/F of MHD between Japanese and non-Japanese patients. Hence, oxcarbazepine can be generally applied using the same dosage and administration for the treatment of partial onset seizures in pediatric patients, regardless of ethnicity.

  18. Emotion processing and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: A cross-sectional comparison of patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Barbora; Howlett, Stephanie; Baker, Roger; Reuber, Markus

    2015-07-01

    This exploratory study aimed to examine emotion-processing styles in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES), compared to healthy individuals, and to explore associations of emotion processing with other psychological measures and seizure frequency, using the new Emotional Processing Scale (EPS-25), which had not previously been used in this patient group. Fifty consecutive patients with PNES referred for psychotherapy completed a set of self-report questionnaires, including the Emotional Processing Scale (EPS-25), Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation (CORE-10), Short Form-36 (SF-36), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15), and Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ). Responses on the EPS-25 were compared to data from 224 healthy controls. Patients with PNES had greater emotion processing deficits across all dimensions of the EPS-25 than healthy individuals (suppression/unprocessed emotion/unregulated emotion/avoidance/impoverished emotional experience). Impaired emotion processing was highly correlated with psychological distress, more frequent and severe somatic symptoms, and a more threatening understanding of the symptoms. Emotion processing problems were also associated with reduced health-related quality of life on the mental health (but not the physical health) component of the SF-36. The unregulated emotions sub-scale of the EPS was associated with lower seizure frequency. The results showed clear impairments of emotion processing in patients with PNES compared to healthy individuals, which were associated with greater psychological distress and reduced mental health functioning. These findings seem to support the face validity of the EPS-25 as a measure for PNES patients and its potential as a tool to assess the effectiveness of psychological interventions. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel CDKL5 Mutations in Czech Patients with Phenotypes of Atypical Rett Syndrome and Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Záhoráková, D; Langová, M; Brožová, K; Laštůvková, J; Kalina, Z; Rennerová, L; Martásek, P

    2016-01-01

    The X-linked CDKL5 gene, which encodes cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 protein, has been implicated in early-onset encephalopathy and atypical Rett syndrome with early-onset seizures. The CDKL5 protein is a kinase required for neuronal development and morphogenesis, but its precise functions are still largely unexplored. Individuals with CDKL5 mutations present with severe global developmental delay, intractable epilepsy, and Rett-like features. A clear genotype-phenotype correlation has not been established due to an insufficient number of reported cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the CDKL5 gene in Czech patients with early-onset seizures and Rett-like features. We performed mutation screening in a cohort of 83 individuals using high-resolution melting analysis, DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification. Molecular analyses revealed heterozygous pathogenic mutations in three girls with severe intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy starting at the age of two months. All three identified mutations, c.637G>A, c.902_977+29del105, and c.1757_1758delCT, are novel, thus significantly extending the growing spectrum of known pathogenic CDKL5 sequence variants. Our results support the importance of genetic testing of the CDKL5 gene in patients with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy and Rett-like features with early-onset seizures. This is the first study referring to molecular defects of CDKL5 in Czech cases.

  20. Calcification of the pineal gland: relationship to laterality of the epileptic foci in patients with complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1992-01-01

    The right and left temporal lobes differ from each other with respect to the rate of intrauterine growth, the timing of maturation, rate of aging, anatomical organization, neurochemistry, metabolic rate, electroencephalographic measures, and function. These functional differences between the temporal lobes underlies the different patterns of psychopathology and endocrine reproductive disturbances noted in patients with temporolimbic epilepsy. The right hemisphere has greater limbic and reticular connections than the left. Since the pineal gland receives direct innervation from the limbic system and the secretion of melatonin is influenced by an input from the reticular system, I propose that lesions in the right temporal lobe have a greater impact on pineal melatonin functions as opposed to those in the left dominant temporal lobe. Consequently, since calcification of the pineal gland is thought to reflect past secretory activity of the gland, I predicted a higher prevalence of pineal calcification (PC) in epileptic patients with right temporal lobe as opposed to those with left temporal lobe foci. To investigate this hypothesis, the prevalence of PC on CT scan was studied in a sample of 70 patients (43 men, 27 women, mean age: 29.2 years, range 9-58; SD = 10.1) with complex partial seizures, of whom 49 (70.0%) had a right temporal lobe focus. PC was present in 51 patients (72.8%) and was unrelated to any of the historical and demographic data surveyed. In the patients with a focus in the right temporal lobe, PC was present in 46 cases (93.8%) as compared to 5 of 21 patients (23.8%) with left temporal lobe foci.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Enhanced slow waves at the periphery of human epileptic foci.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Ruggero; Loeb, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    Experimental epilepsy foci are surrounded by an enhanced inhibition zone. We looked for evidence of peripheral inhibition in human epilepsy foci by analyzing the waveforms of discharges. The sharp-wave of an epileptic discharge is thought to reflect EPSP synchronization, and the subsequent slow-wave to reflect inhibition. Ratios of amplitudes of the sharp- and slow-waves in human EEGs may show how excitatory and inhibitory processes relate to discharge spread implicating peripheral inhibition in human epilepsy, too. In electrocorticography from 10 adult patients we compared amplitudes of sharp-waves and of slow-waves and their ratios in each electrodes as a function of their distance from the highest sharp-wave electrode. Sharp-wave amplitude decreases as a function of electrode distance from the highest sharp-wave electrode, but the slow-wave voltage exhibits a slight increase. The ratio slow-wave/sharp-wave increases several-fold within 2-3 cm from the highest sharp-wave electrode. In human cortex epileptic discharges at the periphery of a focus exhibit a prevalent slow-wave consistent with a possible local enhanced inhibition. Waveform analysis of electrocorticography epileptic discharges suggests the presence in human neocortex of surround inhibition, a basic mechanism limiting the spread of epileptic activity, long studied in experimental models. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Multimodality localization of epileptic foci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desco, Manuel; Pascau, Javier; Pozo, M. A.; Santos, Andres; Reig, Santiago; Gispert, Juan D.; Garcia-Barreno, Pedro

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents a multimodality approach for the localization of epileptic foci using PET, MRI and EEG combined without the need of external markers. Mutual Information algorithm is used for MRI-PET registration. Dipole coordinates (provided by BESA software) are projected onto the MRI using a specifically developed algorithm. The four anatomical references used for electrode positioning (nasion, inion and two preauricular points) are located on the MRI using a triplanar viewer combined with a surface-rendering tool. Geometric transformation using deformation of the ideal sphere used for dipole calculations is then applied to match the patient's brain size and shape. Eight treatment-refractory epileptic patients have been studied. The combination of the anatomical information from the MRI, hipoperfusion areas in PET and dipole position and orientation helped the physician in the diagnosis of epileptic focus location. Neurosurgery was not indicated for patients where PET and dipole results were inconsistent; in two cases it was clinically indicated despite the mismatch, showing a negative follow up. The multimodality approach presented does not require external markers for dipole projection onto the MRI, this being the main difference with previous methods. The proposed method may play an important role in the indication of surgery for treatment- refractory epileptic patients.

  3. Comparison between two scoring systems of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure in left and right temporal lobe epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jean; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2008-01-01

    The Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure (ROCF) is probably one of the most popular measurement instruments of visuoconstructional abilities and nonverbal memory. It is frequently part of neuropsychological test protocols in epilepsy surgery centers. In this study we compared the traditional scoring system of the ROCF developed by Taylor (1998) with a qualitative system that assesses spatial-relational errors devised by Loring et al. [Loring, D. W., Lee, G. P., & Meador, K. J. (1988). Revising the Rey-Osterrieth: Rating right hemisphere recall. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 3, 239-247] in a sample of left and right temporal lobe epilepsy patients undergoing pre-surgical evaluation. We investigated whether the relational-spatial scoring system would be more sensitive to right-sided memory deficits than the traditional Taylor version. There was no difference in the copy phase of the ROCF between the clinical and control groups. There was a significant difference between the control and the clinical groups when the 30-min delayed recall drawings were scored with the Taylor system. However, this system failed to find differences between left and right temporal lobe epileptic patients. On the other hand, comparisons with the qualitative scoring criteria used by Loring et al. [Loring, D. W., Lee, G. P., & Meador, K. J. (1988). Revising the Rey-Osterrieth: Rating right hemisphere recall. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 3, 239-247] revealed that right temporal lobe patients made more spatial-relational errors than patients with left-sided foci. Frequency distribution of these scores for all the three groups and sensitivity and specificity to correctly classify right temporal lobe patients are presented. This investigation demonstrated that applying qualitative, material-specific scoring criteria improves temporal lobe epilepsy presurgical protocols.

  4. Vagus nerve stimulation balanced disrupted default-mode network and salience network in a postsurgical epileptic patient

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kailiang; Chai, Qi; Qiao, Hui; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Tinghong; Meng, Fangang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, treatment of intractable epilepsy has become more challenging, due to an increase in resistance to antiepileptic drugs, as well as diminished success following resection surgery. Here, we present the case of a 19-year old epileptic patient who received vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) following unsuccessful left parietal–occipital lesion-resection surgery, with results indicating an approximate 50% reduction in seizure frequency and a much longer seizure-free interictal phase. Materials and methods Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we measured the changes in resting-state brain networks between pre-VNS treatment and 6 months post-VNS, from the perspective of regional and global variations, using regional homogeneity and large-scale functional connectives (seeding posterior cingulate cortex and anterior cingulate cortex), respectively. Results After 6 months of VNS therapy, the resting-state brain networks were slightly reorganized in regional homogeneity, mainly in large-scale functional connectivity, where excessive activation of the salience network was suppressed, while at the same time the suppressed default-mode network was activated. Conclusion With regard to resting-state brain networks, we propose a hypothesis based on this single case study that VNS acts on intractable epilepsy by modulating the balance between salience and default-mode networks through the integral hub of the anterior cingulate cortex. PMID:27785033

  5. Can cortical silent period and motor threshold be practical parameters in the comparison of patients with generalized epilepsy and patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures?.

    PubMed

    İpekdal, İlker H; Karadaş, Ömer; Ulaş, Ümit H; Vural, Okay

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the cortical excitability of patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs) and that of patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNESs). Patients were classified into groups according to their electroencephalogram (EEG) findings and seizure types: group 1 = GTCS with an abnormal EEG, group 2 = GTCS with a normal EEG and group 3 = PNES with a normal EEG. The control group included healthy volunteers with normal EEGs. Cortical silent period (CSP) and motor threshold (MT) were measured for all groups and the results were compared. CSPs were significantly prolonged in groups 1 and 2 when compared with group 3 and the control group. No differences were found between the MT measurements of all groups. The prolongation of CSP may demonstrate the differences between the pathophysiological mechanisms of GTCS and those of PNES. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Transient epileptic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Adam; Butler, Christopher

    2010-12-01

    Case reports over the past 100 years have raised the possibility that epilepsy can manifest itself in episodes of amnesia. Recent research has established that this is indeed the case, and indicates that characteristic varieties of interictal memory disturbance co-occur with this form of epilepsy. Transient epileptic amnesia is a distinctive syndrome of temporal lobe epilepsy principally affecting middle-aged people, giving rise to recurrent, brief attacks of amnesia, often occurring on waking. It is associated with novel forms of interictal memory disturbance: accelerated long-term forgetting, remote memory impairment, especially affecting autobiographical memory, and topographical memory impairment. The seizure focus lies in the medial temporal lobes. The seizures respond promptly to treatment, whereas the interictal impairments generally persist. Further work is required to establish whether the interictal memory impairment is due to physiological or structural disturbance. Transient epileptic amnesia is an under-recognized but treatable cause of transient memory impairment. Accelerated long-term forgetting and autobiographical amnesia, which are invisible to standard memory tests, help to explain the discrepancy between normal test performance and prominent memory complaints among patients with epilepsy. Further investigation of these forms of memory impairment promises to shed light on processes of human memory.

  7. Plic-1, a new target in repressing epileptic seizure by regulation of GABAAR function in patients and a rat model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujiao; Li, Zengyou; Gu, Juan; Zhang, Yanke; Wang, Wei; Shen, Hui; Chen, Guojun; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunction of γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors (GABAARs) is a prominent factor affecting intractable epilepsy. Plic-1, an ubiquitin-like protein enriched in the inhibitory synapses connecting GABAARs and the ubiquitin protease system (UPS), plays a key role in the modification of GABAAR functions. However, the relationship between Plic-1 and epileptogenesis is not known. In the present study, we aimed to investigate Plic-1 levels in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, as well as the role of Plic-1 in regulating onset and progression of epilepsy in animal models. We found that Plic-1 expression was significantly decreased in patients with epilepsy as well as pilocarpine- and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced rat epileptic models. Intrahippocampal injection of the PePα peptide, which disrupts Plic-1 binding to GABAARs, significantly shortened the latency of seizure onset, and increased the seizure severity and duration in these two epileptic models. Overexpressed Plic-1 through lentivirus transfection into a PTZ model resulted in a reduction in both seizure severity and generalized tonic-clonic seizure duration. Whole-cell clamp recordings revealed that the PePα peptide decreased miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) whereas overexpressed Plic-1 increased mIPSCs in the pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. These effects can be blocked by picrotoxin, a GABAAR inhibitor. Our results indicate that Plic-1 plays an important role in managing epileptic seizures by enhancing seizure inhibition through regulation of GABAARs at synaptic sites.

  8. Antibodies against peptides of NMDA-type GluR in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with epileptic spasms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Araya, Nami; Oboshi, Taikan; Watanabe, Hirokazu; Tsukamoto, Kazuki; Yamaguchi, Tokito; Yoshitomi, Shinsaku; Nasu, Hirosato; Ikeda, Hiroko; Otani, Hideyuki; Imai, Katsumi; Shigematsu, Hideo; Inoue, Yushi

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the contribution of antibodies against N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor (GluR) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the clinical features of patients with epileptic spasms (ES). CSF samples were collected from 33 patients with ES with median (range) age 1.8 (0.2-8.5) years. Thirty patients without ES with 3.5 (0.5-7.0) years were also studied as disease controls. The CSF levels of antibodies against peptides of NMDA-type GluR subunits (GluN2B & GluN1) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The levels of antibodies against the n-terminal of GluN2B (GluN2B-NT2), c-terminal of GluN2B (GluN2B-CT) and n-terminal of GluN1 (GluN1-NT), were significantly higher in patients with ES than in disease controls (p < 0.01, p < 0.01 & p = 0.03). Levels of antibodies to GluN2B-NT2 & CT were not related with ACTH therapy nor conventional CSF factors (cell counts, protein level, etc). Levels of antibodies to GluN2B-NT2 & CT showed evidence of correlation within a linear regression model with intervals from the onset to the examination of CSF until 25 months (p = 0.01 & p = 0.01). The correlation was significant in patients with unknown cause (p = 0.01). Five of 33 patients (four unknown cause & one chromosomal anomaly) had higher level of antibodies to GluN2B-NT2 exceeding mean + 1 SD of all ES patients, and they had poor motor (score 0) and cognitive outcomes (score 0 or 1). The CSF level of antibodies against GluN2B in ES patients with unknown cause was estimated to increase after onset. We hypothesize that some ES patients may have immune process after the onset of ES. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical Profile and Changes of Serum Lipid Levels in Epileptic Patients after Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ken; Sawada, Masahiro; Morioka, Harumi; Kyuzen, Maya; Ebina, Junya; Nagasawa, Junpei; Yanagihashi, Masaru; Miura, Ken; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Hirayama, Takehisa; Takazawa, Takanori; Kano, Osamu; Kawabe, Kiyokazu; Iwasaki, Yasuo

    2017-03-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may increase development of dyslipidemia and cerebrovascular disease (CVD). We examined the clinical profile and changes of serum lipid levels after AED monotherapy in patients with poststroke epilepsy (PSE) after cerebral infarction (CI). Medical records were reviewed in consecutive 2144 CI patients. Monotherapy of valproate, carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), zonisamide, levetiracetam, or lamotrigine was performed in PSE patients. Serum lipid levels were measured before and at 3 months after AED treatment. The prevalence of PSE was 7.0% in CI patients. The TOAST etiology disclosed large-artery atherosclerosis in 68 patients (45%), cardioembolism in 63 patients (42%), and undetermined cause in 19 patients (13%). CVD risk profile showed obesity of 18 patients (12%), current smoker of 30 patients (20%), hypertension of 75 patients (50%), diabetes mellitus of 32 patients (21%), dyslipidemia of 15 patients (10%), and atrial fibrillation of 63 patients (42%). CBZ or PHT administration increased serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels significantly compared to baseline and AED-untreated controls. Those levels were not increased significantly in other AED and control groups. Serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglyceride levels did not differ statistically in all groups. The prevalence of post-CI epilepsy was 7.0%. The pathogenesis contributed to atherothrombosis and cardioembolism. CBZ or PHT administration increased serum TC and LDL-C significantly. Thus, we should pay more attention to serum lipid levels in patients receiving cytochrome P450 (CYP)-induced AEDs, and might considerer switching to non-CYP-induced AEDs in patients with unfavorable serum lipid changes. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. RSE prediction by EEG patterns in adult GCSE patients.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fei; Su, Yingying; Chen, Weibi; Gao, Ran; Zhang, Yunzhou; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Hong; Gao, Daiquan

    2013-07-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) can predict mortality in status epilepticus (SE) patients. However, we consider that the prediction for refractory status epilepticus (RSE) after SE initial treatment is more significant than long-term prognosis of SE. The objective of this study is to detect some predictive EEG patterns for RSE. Pooled data derived from two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were prospectively analyzed in adult generalized convulsive status epilepticus (GCSE) patients. Etiology, GCSE duration and EEG patterns are three factors which were statistically different between non-RSE and RSE groups. However, when we introduced these factors into multivariable logistic regression model, only EEG pattern was an independent risk factor for RSE prediction. Comparing with rhythmic fast activities background (RFAB) pattern, there were positive correlations between interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), periodic epileptic discharges/subtle status epilepticus (PEDs/subtle SE) patterns and RSE incidence respectively. There was an increased risk of RSE incidence accompanied with IEDs and PEDs/subtle SE patterns appearance. Clinicians should adjust anti-epileptic strategies with the aid of these EEG patterns in order to reduce RSE incidence. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. MDR-1 and MRP2 Gene Polymorphisms in Mexican Epileptic Pediatric Patients with Complex Partial Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Santiago, David; Feria-Romero, Iris Angélica; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Rayo-Mares, Dario; Fagiolino, Pietro; Vázquez, Marta; Escamilla-Núñez, Consuelo; Grijalva-Otero, Israel; López-García, Miguel Angel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Although the Pgp efflux transport protein is overexpressed in resected tissue of patients with epilepsy, the presence of polymorphisms in MDR1/ABCB1 and MRP2/ABCC2 in patients with antiepileptic-drugs resistant epilepsy (ADR) is controversial. The aim of this study was to perform an exploratory study to identify nucleotide changes and search new and reported mutations in patients with ADR and patients with good response (CTR) to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a rigorously selected population. We analyzed 22 samples In Material and Methods, from drug-resistant patients with epilepsy and 7 samples from patients with good response to AEDs. Genomic DNA was obtained from leukocytes. Eleven exons in both genes were genotyped. The concentration of drugs in saliva and plasma was determined. The concentration of valproic acid in saliva was lower in ADR than in CRT. In ABCB1, five reported SNPs and five unreported nucleotide changes were identified; rs2229109 (GA) and rs2032582 (AT and AG) were found only in the ADR. Of six SNPs associated with the ABCC2 that were found in the study population, rs3740066 (TT) and 66744T > A (TG) were found only in the ADR. The strongest risk factor in the ABCB1 gene was identified as the TA genotype of rs2032582, whereas for the ABCC2 gene the strongest risk factor was the T allele of rs3740066. The screening of SNPs in ACBC1 and ABCC2 indicates that the Mexican patients with epilepsy in this study display frequently reported ABCC1 polymorphisms; however, in the study subjects with a higher risk factor for drug resistance, new nucleotide changes were found in the ABCC2 gene. Thus, the population of Mexican patients with AED-resistant epilepsy (ADR) used in this study exhibits genetic variability with respect to those reported in other study populations; however, it is necessary to explore this polymorphism in a larger population of patients with ADR. PMID:25346718

  12. MDR-1 and MRP2 Gene Polymorphisms in Mexican Epileptic Pediatric Patients with Complex Partial Seizures.

    PubMed

    Escalante-Santiago, David; Feria-Romero, Iris Angélica; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Rayo-Mares, Dario; Fagiolino, Pietro; Vázquez, Marta; Escamilla-Núñez, Consuelo; Grijalva-Otero, Israel; López-García, Miguel Angel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Although the Pgp efflux transport protein is overexpressed in resected tissue of patients with epilepsy, the presence of polymorphisms in MDR1/ABCB1 and MRP2/ABCC2 in patients with antiepileptic-drugs resistant epilepsy (ADR) is controversial. The aim of this study was to perform an exploratory study to identify nucleotide changes and search new and reported mutations in patients with ADR and patients with good response (CTR) to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a rigorously selected population. We analyzed 22 samples In Material and Methods, from drug-resistant patients with epilepsy and 7 samples from patients with good response to AEDs. Genomic DNA was obtained from leukocytes. Eleven exons in both genes were genotyped. The concentration of drugs in saliva and plasma was determined. The concentration of valproic acid in saliva was lower in ADR than in CRT. In ABCB1, five reported SNPs and five unreported nucleotide changes were identified; rs2229109 (GA) and rs2032582 (AT and AG) were found only in the ADR. Of six SNPs associated with the ABCC2 that were found in the study population, rs3740066 (TT) and 66744T > A (TG) were found only in the ADR. The strongest risk factor in the ABCB1 gene was identified as the TA genotype of rs2032582, whereas for the ABCC2 gene the strongest risk factor was the T allele of rs3740066. The screening of SNPs in ACBC1 and ABCC2 indicates that the Mexican patients with epilepsy in this study display frequently reported ABCC1 polymorphisms; however, in the study subjects with a higher risk factor for drug resistance, new nucleotide changes were found in the ABCC2 gene. Thus, the population of Mexican patients with AED-resistant epilepsy (ADR) used in this study exhibits genetic variability with respect to those reported in other study populations; however, it is necessary to explore this polymorphism in a larger population of patients with ADR.

  13. [Ictus emeticus. Vomiting as epileptic manifestation].

    PubMed

    Nakken, K O

    1996-01-30

    Autonomic and visceral phenomena are well-known manifestations of epileptic seizures, but recurrent vomiting as ictal epileptic events are less known. Three patients with ictus emeticus, i.e. with nausea and vomiting as their main ictal symptoms, are described. Vomiting is a complex symptom preceded by several phenomena in the gastrointestinal tract and transmitted by the vagal nerve to the vomiting centre in the lateral reticular formation of the medulla oblongata. This autonomic centre in the brain stem is influenced by several cerebral structures. There is both experimental and clinical evidence to support the hypothesis that epileptic disturbances in the insula and the mesial temporal structures are responsible for ictus emeticus.

  14. A comparative study of the relative enzyme inducing properties of anticonvulsant drugs in epileptic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, E; Hedges, A; Makki, K A; Ruprah, M; Wilson, J F; Richens, A

    1984-01-01

    The antipyrine clearance and the urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (D-GA) were determined in 122 patients receiving chronic anticonvulsant drug treatment and in 21 drug-free control subjects. Patients treated with carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (DPH), primidone (PMD) and phenobarbitone (PB), either alone or in combination, showed higher values of antipyrine clearance and excreted larger amounts of D-GA as compared to controls. While antipyrine clearance values did not differ significantly from one drug group to another, D-GA excretion was significantly higher in patients treated with CBZ than in those treated with DPH. In patients treated with sodium valproate antipyrine clearance did not differ from control values. There was a trend for D-GA excretion to be higher in these patients but the difference was not statistically significant. Significant positive correlations were found between the dosage of CBZ, DPH, PMD and PB and both indices of enzyme induction. These data demonstrate a dose-dependent degree of enzyme induction in patients receiving therapeutic doses of these anticonvulsants. The relative potency at average dose levels for antipyrine clearance was PB (1), DPH (0.92), CBZ (0.84), PMD (0.82) and for log D-GA excretion was PB (1), CBZ (0.96), PMD (0.95), DPH (0.90). PMID:6435654

  15. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe.

  16. The influence of CYP2C8*3 on carbamazepine serum concentration in epileptic pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, DD; Milovanovic, JR; Radovanovic, M; Radosavljevic, I; Obradovic, S; Jankovic, S; Milovanovic, D

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of CYP2C8 variants *3 and *5, as well as their effect on carbamazepine pharmacokinetic properties, in 40 epileptic pediatric patients on carbamazepine treatment. Genotyping was conducted using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and allele-specific (AS)-PCR methods, and steady-state carbamazepine plasma concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The CYP2C8 *3 and *5 polymorphisms were found at frequencies of 17.5 and 0.0%, respectively. After dose adjustment, there was a difference in daily dose in CYP2C8*3 carriers compared to non carriers [mean ± standard deviation (SD): 14.19 ± 5.39 vs. 15.46 ± 4.35 mg/kg; p = 0.5]. Dose-normalized serum concentration of carbamazepine was higher in CYP2C8*3 (mean ± SD: 0.54 ± 0.18 vs. 0.43 ± 0.11 mg/mL, p = 0.04), and the observed correlation between weight-adjusted carbamazepine dose and carbamazepine concentration after dose adjustment was significant only in CYP2C8*3 non carriers (r = 0.52, p = 0.002). However, the population pharmacokinetic analysis failed to demonstrate any significant effect of CYP2C8 *3 polymorphism on carbamazepine clearance [CL L/h = 0.215 + 0.0696*SEX+ 0.000183*DD]. The results indicated that the CYP2C8*3 polymorphism might not be of clinical importance for epilepsy treatment in pediatric populations. PMID:27785404

  17. Vagal stimulation for control of complex partial seizures in medically refractory epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Wilder, B J; Uthman, B M; Hammond, E J

    1991-01-01

    Chronic intermittent stimulation of the vagus nerve is a new method currently being tested for the treatment of medically intractable complex partial seizures (CPS). We have studied the effects of vagal stimulation in nine patients with CPS for 4-16 months to determine its safety and efficacy. With the patients maintained on constant dosages of antiepileptic drugs, we recorded the electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram, and performed clinical laboratory tests and gastric analysis over a 6-week baseline period. The neurocybernetic prosthesis (NCP) was then implanted and connected to two spiral electrodes wound around the left vagus nerve. After a 4-week placebo period, vagal stimulation was started. Stimulation parameters were increased stepwise at monthly intervals until patients were being stimulated for 30-second periods at 20-50 Hz with 1-2 mA of current at 250-500 microseconds pulses. A second 4-week placebo period was added 3 months after the implantation. Thereafter, vagal stimulation was resumed and self-stimulation with magnetic activation was allowed for a 1-minute period at the onset of an aura. Six patients had a significant reduction in the frequency, intensity, or duration of seizures. All patients tolerated the implantation and stimulation well and none reported pain, discomfort, or important changes in their daily activities, sleep habits, eating, swallowing, or breathing. There were no remarkable changes in blood pressure or heart rate.

  18. Real-Time Management of Multimodal Streaming Data for Monitoring of Epileptic Patients.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllopoulos, Dimitrios; Korvesis, Panagiotis; Mporas, Iosif; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios

    2016-03-01

    New generation of healthcare is represented by wearable health monitoring systems, which provide real-time monitoring of patient's physiological parameters. It is expected that continuous ambulatory monitoring of vital signals will improve treatment of patients and enable proactive personal health management. In this paper, we present the implementation of a multimodal real-time system for epilepsy management. The proposed methodology is based on a data streaming architecture and efficient management of a big flow of physiological parameters. The performance of this architecture is examined for varying spatial resolution of the recorded data.

  19. Effects of vagus nerve stimulation on cortical excitability in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, V; Oliviero, A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Meglio, M; Colicchio, G; Barba, C; Papacci, F; Tonali, P A

    2004-06-22

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is used as adjunctive treatment for medically refractory epilepsy, but little is known about its mechanisms of action. The effects of VNS on the excitatory and inhibitory circuits of the motor cortex were evaluated in five patients with epilepsy using single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Patients were examined with the stimulator on and off. VNS determined a selective and pronounced increase in the inhibition produced by paired-pulse TMS with no effects on the excitability by single-pulse TMS.

  20. A comparison of the effects of propofol and nitrous oxide on the electroencephalogram in epileptic patients during conscious sedation for dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Oei-Lim, V L; Kalkman, C J; Bouvy-Berends, E C; Posthumus Meyjes, E F; Makkes, P C; Vermeulen-Cranch, D M; Odoom, J A; van Wezel, H B; Bovill, J G

    1992-11-01

    The influence of sedative doses of propofol or nitrous oxide on the electroencephalogram was studied in 11 mentally handicapped patients with treated epilepsy undergoing dental procedures. At one session, propofol was titrated to achieve conscious sedation. The mean (+/- SD) dose requirements were 5.5 +/- 1.1 mg.kg-1.h-1. In six patients, the electroencephalogram was unchanged during propofol administration. In three patients, there was a decrease in epileptic activity, and in two patients, paroxysmal discharges disappeared. At another session, nitrous oxide was administered by nasal mask. The mean (+/- SD) concentration of nitrous oxide needed was 43.6% +/- 4.8%. The electroencephalogram did not change in nine patients, whereas in two patients epileptic activity decreased. There were no clinical epileptoid or other adverse manifestations during any treatment or up to 48 h thereafter. The results of the present study suggest that propofol or nitrous oxide can be administered in subanesthetic doses for conscious sedation in mentally handicapped patients with treated epilepsy.

  1. Determining the disease management process for epileptic patients: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Nazafarin; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Zare, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy exposes patients to many physical, social, and emotional challenges. Thus, it seems to portray a complex picture and needs holistic care. Medical treatment and psychosocial part of epilepsy remain central to managing and improving the patient's qualify of life through team efforts. Some studies have shown the dimensions of self-management, but its management process of epilepsy patients, especially in Iran, is not clear. This study aimed to determine the disease management process in patients with epilepsy in Iran. Materials and Methods: This qualitative approach and grounded theory study was conducted from January 2009 to February 2012 in Isfahan city (Iran). Thirty-two participants were recruited by the goal-oriented, and snowball sample selection and theoretical sampling methods. After conducting a total of 43 in-depth interviews with the participants, the researchers reached data saturation. Data were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin method. Results: With a focus on disease management process, researchers found three main themes and seven sub-themes as a psychosocial process (PSP). The main themes were: perception of threat to self-identity, effort to preserve self-identity, and burn out. The psychosocial aspect of the disease generated one main variable “the perception of identity loss” and one central variable “searching for self-identity.” Conclusions: Participants attributed threat to self-identity and burn out to the way their disease was managed requiring efforts to preserve their identity. Recommendations consist of support programs and strategies to improve the public perception of epilepsy in Iran, help patients accept their condition and preserve self-identity, and most importantly, enhance medical management of epilepsy. PMID:26985223

  2. Determining the disease management process for epileptic patients: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Nazafarin; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Zare, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy exposes patients to many physical, social, and emotional challenges. Thus, it seems to portray a complex picture and needs holistic care. Medical treatment and psychosocial part of epilepsy remain central to managing and improving the patient's qualify of life through team efforts. Some studies have shown the dimensions of self-management, but its management process of epilepsy patients, especially in Iran, is not clear. This study aimed to determine the disease management process in patients with epilepsy in Iran. This qualitative approach and grounded theory study was conducted from January 2009 to February 2012 in Isfahan city (Iran). Thirty-two participants were recruited by the goal-oriented, and snowball sample selection and theoretical sampling methods. After conducting a total of 43 in-depth interviews with the participants, the researchers reached data saturation. Data were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin method. With a focus on disease management process, researchers found three main themes and seven sub-themes as a psychosocial process (PSP). The main themes were: perception of threat to self-identity, effort to preserve self-identity, and burn out. The psychosocial aspect of the disease generated one main variable "the perception of identity loss" and one central variable "searching for self-identity." Participants attributed threat to self-identity and burn out to the way their disease was managed requiring efforts to preserve their identity. Recommendations consist of support programs and strategies to improve the public perception of epilepsy in Iran, help patients accept their condition and preserve self-identity, and most importantly, enhance medical management of epilepsy.

  3. Clinical review of genetic epileptic encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Grace J.; Asher, Y. Jane Tavyev; Graham, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are a frequently encountered finding in patients seen for clinical genetics evaluations. The differential diagnosis for the cause of seizures is quite diverse and complex, and more than half of all epilepsies have been attributed to a genetic cause. Given the complexity of such evaluations, we highlight the more common causes of genetic epileptic encephalopathies and emphasize the usefulness of recent technological advances. The purpose of this review is to serve as a practical guide for clinical geneticists in the evaluation and counseling of patients with genetic epileptic encephalopathies. Common syndromes will be discussed, in addition to specific seizure phenotypes, many of which are refractory to anti-epileptic agents. Divided by etiology, we overview the more common causes of infantile epileptic encephalopathies, channelopathies, syndromic, metabolic, and chromosomal entities. For each condition, we will outline the diagnostic evaluation and discuss effective treatment strategies that should be considered. PMID:22342633

  4. Adherence to Treatment and Factors Affecting Adherence of Epileptic Patients at Yirgalem General Hospital, Southern Ethiopia: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hasiso, Temesgen Yohannes; Desse, Tigestu Alemu

    2016-01-01

    Background Non adherence of epileptic patients to antiepileptic medication often leads to an increased risk of seizures and worsening of disease, death and increased health care costs. Objective to assess adherence to treatment and factors affecting adherence of epileptic patients at Yirgalem General Hospital, Southern Ethiopia. Methods and Materials We conducted a cross-sectional study on epileptic patients from February 9 to 22, 2015. Data were collected from patients ≥18 years old. Adherence was measured using the eight-item Morisky’s medication adherence scale. All consecutive patients coming to epilepsy clinic during the study period were interviewed until the calculated sample size (210) was obtained. We collected patient demographics, perception about epilepsy and adherence to medication(s). We used chi-square tests and a binary logistic regression model for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was considered at P<0.05. Results out of a total of 210 participants, 194 were willing to participate and were studied. Of the 194 participants, 109 (56.2%) were males. The mean age of the participants was 33.62±11.44 years; range 18 to 66 years. The majority, 123(63.41%), of the participants were taking two antiepileptic medications. Sixty two (32%) of the participants were adherent to their treatment. The most common reported reasons for non-adherence were forgetfulness 49(75.4%) and run out of pills 7(10.8%). Factors that affect medication adherence are epilepsy treatment for <1 year (P = 0.011), epilepsy treatment for 1–3 years (P = 0.002), epilepsy treatment for 3–5 years (P = 0.007), being married (P = 0.006), grade 9–12 education (P = 0.028), college or university education (P = 0.002) and absence of co-morbidity (P = 0.008). Conclusions The rate of adherence observed in this study was low. The most common reason for non- adherence was forgetfulness. Therefore, the hospital should devise strategies to improve adherence of epileptic patients

  5. Fixed Drug Eruption in an Epileptic Patient Previously Receiving Treatment With Phenytoin for Seven Years.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Keaton S; Suda, Katie J; Hamilton, Leslie A

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old African American female presented with severe left thigh pain of unknown etiology. She had a past medical history of generalized seizure disorder treated with phenytoin for 7 years without incident. During admission a nurse witnessed a seizure, and consequently loading and maintenance doses of phenytoin were administered to obtain a therapeutic serum concentration. The patient had a history of noncompliance with multiple subtherapeutic phenytoin levels. Subsequently, unifocal blue discolored spots appeared, progressing to a bullous component that was positive for skin sloughing. Drug-induced fixed drug eruption was diagnosed and attributed to phenytoin. Clinicians should be cognizant of drug-induced fixed drug eruption in patients just initiated and those receiving long-term treatment with phenytoin. The administration rate of phenytoin may be associated with the development of fixed drug eruption.

  6. Favorable outcome of epileptic blindness in children.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eli; Barak, Shai

    2003-01-01

    Acute blindness is a rare presentation of epileptic seizures, referring to loss of sight without loss of consciousness associated with electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptic discharges, mainly representing an ictal phase but also either pre- or postictal. We report a series of 14 children with documented epileptic blindness, describing the accompanying fits and thereafter the response to therapy to resolve the blindness and control associated seizures. All patients experienced episodes of acute complete visual obscuration lasting for 1 to 10 minutes. Seven patients hadaccompanying generalized seizures, with a photosensitive response recorded in three of them. All of these seven children were treated with valproic acid, regaining full vision, and six of them became seizure free. Three patients with acute blindness who had accompanying focal motor seizures and unilateral temporooccipital posterior epileptic discharges were treated with carbamazepine regained full vision and complete seizure control. Four additional children had the constellation of migrainous headaches, focal motor phenomena, and complete blindness, along with occipital discharges compatible with Gastaut syndrome, benign childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms. All four patients were started on carbamazepine and became asymptomatic. Our overall experience suggests that epileptic blindness in children is associated with a favorable outcome when promptly diagnosed and treated appropriately, resulting in complete resolution of blindness in all children and satisfactory control of seizures in most of them. We therefore recommend performing a prompt EEG in any child presenting with acute visual obscuration, even in the absence of other epileptic phenomena.

  7. Influence of Marital Status on the Quality of Life of Chinese Adult Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Li; Gu, Xiang-Min; Hao, Bao-Yun; Wang, Shan; Chen, Ze-Jie; Ding, Cheng-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a chronic disorder characterized by recurrent seizures and has significant psychological and social consequence for everyday living. Epilepsy affects various aspects of ones’ social life. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of marital status on the quality of life of adult Chinese patients with epilepsy. Methods: This study surveyed 805 Chinese adults who have been clinically diagnosed with epilepsy for longer than 1 year in 11 hospitals in Beijing. In this survey, 532 (66.1%) participants were married. All of them completed the case report form with enquiries on demographic data, social factors, and illness. The marriage status of adult epileptic quality of life was the dependent variable, and demographic data and clinical data were independent variables, analyzed through the multiple linear regression analysis methods. The patients’ quality of life was assessed using the Quality of Life in patients with Epilepsy-31 items (QOLIE-31) questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 items (PHQ-9), and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 items (GAD-7). Results: The PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores in the unmarried group (PHQ-9 = 6.0 and GAD-7 = 5.0) were significantly higher than that of the married group (PHQ-9 = 4.0 and GAD-7 =3.0). The scores of married adult patients with epilepsy on QOLIE (61.8 ± 15.3) and social function (70.9 ± 22.7) were higher than the scores of the unmarried patients aged between 20 and 44 years. The scores of married adult epileptics on the QOLIE (58.4 ± 14.6) and the energy/fatigue (62.1 ± 20.4) were higher than the scores of the unmarried patients (QOLIE = 58.4 ± 14.6 and the energy/fatigue = 62.1 ± 20.4) aged between 45 and 59 years. For the adult epilepsy patients, depression, anxiety, seizures within the last year, disease course, medical expense category, and marriage* age are negatively correlated with the quality of life. Occupation, educational level, and average monthly income are closely

  8. Differentiating epileptic from non-epileptic high frequency intracerebral EEG signals with measures of wavelet entropy.

    PubMed

    Mooij, Anne H; Frauscher, Birgit; Amiri, Mina; Otte, Willem M; Gotman, Jean

    2016-12-01

    To assess whether there is a difference in the background activity in the ripple band (80-200Hz) between epileptic and non-epileptic channels, and to assess whether this difference is sufficient for their reliable separation. We calculated mean and standard deviation of wavelet entropy in 303 non-epileptic and 334 epileptic channels from 50 patients with intracerebral depth electrodes and used these measures as predictors in a multivariable logistic regression model. We assessed sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) based on a probability threshold corresponding to 90% specificity. The probability of a channel being epileptic increased with higher mean (p=0.004) and particularly with higher standard deviation (p<0.0001). The performance of the model was however not sufficient for fully classifying the channels. With a threshold corresponding to 90% specificity, sensitivity was 37%, PPV was 80%, and NPV was 56%. A channel with a high standard deviation of entropy is likely to be epileptic; with a threshold corresponding to 90% specificity our model can reliably select a subset of epileptic channels. Most studies have concentrated on brief ripple events. We showed that background activity in the ripple band also has some ability to discriminate epileptic channels. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Synchronization analysis of cultured epileptic human astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazsi, Gabor; Cornell-Bell, Ann; Neiman, Alexander; Moss, Frank

    2001-03-01

    Astrocyte cultures from severely epileptic patients were cultured, and the fluctuations of the intracellular calcium ion concentration were visualized using the fluorescent dye Fluo-3. The resulting image sequences were analyzed by methods of stochastic synchronization. Increased synchronization was observed in the epileptic tissues, when compared to normal tissues from rats. The more pathological the tissue, the more synchronized the calcium oscillations. The results might lead to a better understanding of intracellular calcium dynamics and could help drug development.

  10. Electroencephalographic source imaging: a prospective study of 152 operated epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Brodbeck, Verena; Spinelli, Laurent; Lascano, Agustina M.; Wissmeier, Michael; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Vulliemoz, Serge; Pollo, Claudio; Schaller, Karl; Michel, Christoph M.

    2011-01-01

    Electroencephalography is mandatory to determine the epilepsy syndrome. However, for the precise localization of the irritative zone in patients with focal epilepsy, costly and sometimes cumbersome imaging techniques are used. Recent small studies using electric source imaging suggest that electroencephalography itself could be used to localize the focus. However, a large prospective validation study is missing. This study presents a cohort of 152 operated patients where electric source imaging was applied as part of the pre-surgical work-up allowing a comparison with the results from other methods. Patients (n = 152) with >1 year postoperative follow-up were studied prospectively. The sensitivity and specificity of each imaging method was defined by comparing the localization of the source maximum with the resected zone and surgical outcome. Electric source imaging had a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 88% if the electroencephalogram was recorded with a large number of electrodes (128–256 channels) and the individual magnetic resonance image was used as head model. These values compared favourably with those of structural magnetic resonance imaging (76% sensitivity, 53% specificity), positron emission tomography (69% sensitivity, 44% specificity) and ictal/interictal single-photon emission-computed tomography (58% sensitivity, 47% specificity). The sensitivity and specificity of electric source imaging decreased to 57% and 59%, respectively, with low number of electrodes (<32 channels) and a template head model. This study demonstrated the validity and clinical utility of electric source imaging in a large prospective study. Given the low cost and high flexibility of electroencephalographic systems even with high channel counts, we conclude that electric source imaging is a highly valuable tool in pre-surgical epilepsy evaluation. PMID:21975586

  11. Human Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Grafted into the Adult Epileptic Brain Restrain Seizures in Rat Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haejin; Yun, Seokhwan; Kim, Il-Sun; Lee, Il-Shin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Soo Chul; Kim, Won-Joo; Park, Kook In

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) because this can suppress spontaneous recurrent seizures in animal models. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of human neural stem/progenitor cells (huNSPCs) for treating TLE, we transplanted huNSPCs, derived from an aborted fetal telencephalon at 13 weeks of gestation and expanded in culture as neurospheres over a long time period, into the epileptic hippocampus of fully kindled and pilocarpine-treated adult rats exhibiting TLE. In vitro, huNSPCs not only produced all three central nervous system neural cell types, but also differentiated into ganglionic eminences-derived γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons and released GABA in response to the depolarization induced by a high K+ medium. NSPC grafting reduced behavioral seizure duration, afterdischarge duration on electroencephalograms, and seizure stage in the kindling model, as well as the frequency and the duration of spontaneous recurrent motor seizures in pilocarpine-induced animals. However, NSPC grafting neither improved spatial learning or memory function in pilocarpine-treated animals. Following transplantation, grafted cells showed extensive migration around the injection site, robust engraftment, and long-term survival, along with differentiation into β-tubulin III+ neurons (∼34%), APC-CC1+ oligodendrocytes (∼28%), and GFAP+ astrocytes (∼8%). Furthermore, among donor-derived cells, ∼24% produced GABA. Additionally, to explain the effect of seizure suppression after NSPC grafting, we examined the anticonvulsant glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) levels in host hippocampal astrocytes and mossy fiber sprouting into the supragranular layer of the dentate gyrus in the epileptic brain. Grafted cells restored the expression of GDNF in host astrocytes but did not reverse the mossy fiber sprouting, eliminating the latter as potential mechanism. These results suggest that human fetal

  12. Human fetal brain-derived neural stem/progenitor cells grafted into the adult epileptic brain restrain seizures in rat models of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haejin; Yun, Seokhwan; Kim, Il-Sun; Lee, Il-Shin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Soo Chul; Kim, Won-Joo; Park, Kook In

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) because this can suppress spontaneous recurrent seizures in animal models. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of human neural stem/progenitor cells (huNSPCs) for treating TLE, we transplanted huNSPCs, derived from an aborted fetal telencephalon at 13 weeks of gestation and expanded in culture as neurospheres over a long time period, into the epileptic hippocampus of fully kindled and pilocarpine-treated adult rats exhibiting TLE. In vitro, huNSPCs not only produced all three central nervous system neural cell types, but also differentiated into ganglionic eminences-derived γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons and released GABA in response to the depolarization induced by a high K+ medium. NSPC grafting reduced behavioral seizure duration, afterdischarge duration on electroencephalograms, and seizure stage in the kindling model, as well as the frequency and the duration of spontaneous recurrent motor seizures in pilocarpine-induced animals. However, NSPC grafting neither improved spatial learning or memory function in pilocarpine-treated animals. Following transplantation, grafted cells showed extensive migration around the injection site, robust engraftment, and long-term survival, along with differentiation into β-tubulin III+ neurons (∼34%), APC-CC1+ oligodendrocytes (∼28%), and GFAP+ astrocytes (∼8%). Furthermore, among donor-derived cells, ∼24% produced GABA. Additionally, to explain the effect of seizure suppression after NSPC grafting, we examined the anticonvulsant glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) levels in host hippocampal astrocytes and mossy fiber sprouting into the supragranular layer of the dentate gyrus in the epileptic brain. Grafted cells restored the expression of GDNF in host astrocytes but did not reverse the mossy fiber sprouting, eliminating the latter as potential mechanism. These results suggest that human fetal

  13. Gamma-oscillations modulated by picture naming and word reading: Intracranial recording in epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Helen C.; Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Brown, Erik C.; Juhasz, Csaba; Rothermel, Robert; Hoechstetter, Karsten; Shah, Aashit; Mittal, Sandeep; Fuerst, Darren; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2011-01-01

    Objective We measured cortical gamma-oscillations in response to visual-language tasks consisting of picture naming and word reading in an effort to better understand human visual-language pathways. Methods We studied six patients with focal epilepsy who underwent extraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) recording. Patients were asked to overtly name images presented sequentially in the picture naming task and to overtly read written words in the reading task. Results Both tasks commonly elicited gamma-augmentation (maximally at 80–100 Hz) on ECoG in the occipital, inferior-occipital-temporal and inferior-Rolandic areas, bilaterally. Picture naming, compared to reading task, elicited greater gamma-augmentation in portions of pre-motor areas as well as occipital and inferior-occipital-temporal areas, bilaterally. In contrast, word reading elicited greater gamma-augmentation in portions of bilateral occipital, left occipital-temporal and left superior-posterior-parietal areas. Gamma-attenuation was elicited by both tasks in portions of posterior cingulate and ventral premotor-prefrontal areas bilaterally. The number of letters in a presented word was positively correlated to the degree of gamma-augmentation in the medial occipital areas. Conclusions Gamma-augmentation measured on ECoG identified cortical areas commonly and differentially involved in picture naming and reading tasks. Longer words may activate the primary visual cortex for the more peripheral field. Significance The present study increases our understanding of the visual-language pathways. PMID:21498109

  14. Comparison of triphasic waves and epileptic discharges in one patient with genetic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Peter W; Schlattman, Dan K

    2012-10-01

    Genetic epilepsies with generalized spike-wave complexes (GSWCs) and encephalopathy triphasic waves (TWs) may resemble each other and have three phases per complex. Electroencephalographic (EEG) interpretation is subjective, and EEGers have noted "TWs" in cases labeled nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). Direct comparison of both wave forms under the same conditions is rarely possible. In a single patient with generalized spike waves who developed hepatic TWs, morphologic characteristics of both were compared, and it was found that GSWCs have higher frequency first, second, and third phases; steeper phase 2 slope; and briefer after-going slow waves maximal at F3 to F4. Total complex duration was approximately 0.12 seconds. The TWs had dominant high-voltage phases 2 and 3 located more posteriorly, in the frontocentral region, lasting an average of approximately 0.32 seconds. These morphologic distinctions may help differentiate TWs from GSWCs.

  15. John Hall and his epileptic patients--epilepsy management in early 17th century England.

    PubMed

    Betts, T; Betts, H

    1998-10-01

    John Hall, a physician, practised in Stratford in the early 17th century and was the son-in-law of William Shakespeare. During his career he kept records of his patients (in Latin) which he may have been preparing for publication when he died. Despite his instruction for them to be destroyed some were later translated into English and published by another physician. The case records were popular and have recently been reprinted with a commentaryl. We have searched the case records for descriptions of epilepsy and examined the treatments offered (and the attitudes to) this condition in early 17th century England. Treatment consisted of standard remedies ('fumes' of hartshorn and extracts of peony) related to the Galenic system of medicine, plus individual remedies. Interestingly, there is no evidence that the condition was stigmatized.

  16. [Lateralization of the epileptic process and psychology].

    PubMed

    Preiss, J; Kristof, M

    1989-04-01

    In a group of 70 patients with a unilateral epileptic process in the temporal limbic structures, localized in the left half of the brain in 38 patients (26 men, 12 women) and in the right half of the brain in 32 patients (17 men, 15 women) the lateralization of motor functions, asymmetry of emotional mimicry, conjugated deviation of the eye bulbs, intellect, memory, psychomotor rate and personality (laterality test of Matĕjcek--Zlab, Wechsler's intellect and memory scale, Benton, Stroop, VAROS, SUPOS, DSF, Washington Psychosocial--Seizure Inventory WPSI was investigated. Patient with a left-sided epileptic process had only insignificantly lower contact with psychiatry (31.6% as compared with 40.6%). Significantly lower contacts with psychiatry were recorded in 35 patients with a predominance of emotional mimicry (while smiling) on the left (25.0% as compared with 47.1%, p less than 0.05) and particularly significantly low in 18 patients with a combination of signs left-sided epileptic process + predominance of emotional mimicry on the left + deviation of the eyeballs on the right (mathematical stimulus) + genotypical righthandedness (16.7% as compared with 42.3%, p less than 0.025). Men with a left-sided epileptic process displayed a significantly greater anxiety, in women this trend was only indicated. Four women with a left-sided epileptic process anticipating regulation of behaviour was typical, for women with a right-sided epileptic process lower autoregulating inhibitions. A left-sided epileptic process had significantly more often a favourable course of epilepsy (in 65.8% as compared with 25.0%, p less than 0.005). In psychological tests, however, the differentiating criteria were much more than the course of the disease invalid pension, contact with psychiatry and subjective need of assistance from a psychiatrist or psychologist.

  17. Wavelet analysis of epileptic spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Was, Ziemowit; Kozik, Andrzej; West, Bruce J.

    2003-05-01

    Interictal spikes and sharp waves in human EEG are characteristic signatures of epilepsy. These potentials originate as a result of synchronous pathological discharge of many neurons. The reliable detection of such potentials has been the long standing problem in EEG analysis, especially after long-term monitoring became common in investigation of epileptic patients. The traditional definition of a spike is based on its amplitude, duration, sharpness, and emergence from its background. However, spike detection systems built solely around this definition are not reliable due to the presence of numerous transients and artifacts. We use wavelet transform to analyze the properties of EEG manifestations of epilepsy. We demonstrate that the behavior of wavelet transform of epileptic spikes across scales can constitute the foundation of a relatively simple yet effective detection algorithm.

  18. Increased odds and predictive rates of MMPI-2-RF scale elevations in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and observed sex differences.

    PubMed

    Del Bene, Victor A; Arce Rentería, Miguel; Maiman, Moshe; Slugh, Mitch; Gazzola, Deana M; Nadkarni, Siddhartha S; Barr, William B

    2017-07-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) is a self-report instrument, previously shown to differentiate patients with epileptic seizures (ES) and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES). At present, the odds of MMPI-2-RF scale elevations in PNES patients, as well as the diagnostic predictive value of such scale elevations, remain largely unexplored. This can be of clinical utility, particularly when a diagnosis is uncertain. After looking at mean group differences, we applied contingency table derived odds ratios to a sample of ES (n=92) and PNES (n=77) patients from a video EEG (vEEG) monitoring unit. We also looked at the positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV), as well as the false discovery rate (FDR) and false omission rate (FOR) for scales found to have increased odds of elevation in PNES patients. This was completed for the overall sample, as well as the sample stratified by sex. The odds of elevations related to somatic concerns, negative mood, and suicidal ideation in the PNES sample ranged from 2 to 5 times more likely. Female PNES patients had 3-6 times greater odds of such scale elevations, while male PNES patients had odds of 5-15 times more likely. PPV rates ranged from 53.66% to 84.62%, while NPV rates ranged from 47.52% to 90.91%. FDR across scales ranged from 15.38% to 50%, while the FOR ranged from 9.09% to 52.47%. Consistent with prior research, PNES patients have greater odds of MMPI-2-RF scale elevations, particularly related to somatic concerns and mood disturbance. Female PNES patients endorsed greater emotional distress, including endorsement of suicide related items. Elevations of these scales could aid in differentiating PNES from ES patients, although caution is warranted due to the possibility of both false positives and the incorrect omissions of PNES cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epileptic phenomena in bismuth toxic encephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Buge, A; Supino-Viterbo, V; Rancurel, G; Pontes, C

    1981-01-01

    Seventy patients admitted to hospital with bismuth encephalopathy had repeated clinical and EEG examinations. All the patients exhibited myoclonic jerks, but no paroxysmal features ever appeared on EEG. Computed tomography showed cortical hyperdensities. Seizures were observed in 22 patients, but epileptic EEG patterns appeared only when the bismuth blood level was below 1500 microgram/1. It is suggested that a high cortical intracellular bismuth concentration induces a "cortical inhibition" which causes suppression of physiological electrical brain activity, the absence of EEG paroxysmal phenomena during myoclonic jerks, and explains the rarity of epileptic seizures. Images PMID:7205307

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character.

  1. Epileptic seizure induced by fennel essential oil.

    PubMed

    Skalli, Souad; Soulaymani Bencheikh, Rachida

    2011-09-01

    An epileptic seizure is reported in a 38-year-old woman, known to be an epileptic patient. Although she was under antiepileptic treatment and had well-controlled epilepsy, she developed a typical generalised tonic-clonic seizure and remained unconscious for 45 minutes following ingestion of a number of cakes containing an unknown quantity of fennel essential oil. Involuntary diarrhoea accompanied her epileptic seizure. This reported case recalls the fact that fennel essential oil can induce seizures and that this oil should probably be avoided by patients with epilepsy. Labelling of products with fennel essential oil should refer to the risk of seizures, particularly for patients with epilepsy. An awareness programme should involve all stakeholders affected by this issue.

  2. Regenerative Endodontics for Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    He, Ling; Kim, Sahng G; Gong, Qimei; Zhong, Juan; Wang, Sainan; Zhou, Xuedong; Ye, Ling; Ling, Junqi; Mao, Jeremy J

    2017-09-01

    The goal of endodontics is to save teeth. Since inception, endodontic treatments are performed to obturate disinfected root canals with inert materials such as gutta-percha. Although teeth can be saved after successful endodontic treatments, they are devitalized and therefore susceptible to reinfections and fractures. The American Association of Endodontists (AAE) has made a tremendous effort to revitalize disinfected immature permanent teeth in children and adolescents with diagnoses including pulp necrosis or apical periodontitis. The American Dental Association (ADA) in 2011 issued several clinical codes for regenerative endodontic procedures or apical revascularization in necrotic immature permanent teeth in children and adolescents. These AAE and ADA initiatives have stimulated robust interest in devising a multitude of tissue engineering approaches for dental pulp and dentin regeneration. Can the concept of regenerative endodontics be extended to revitalize mature permanent teeth with diagnoses including irreversible pulpitis and/or pulp necrosis in adults? The present article was written not only to summarize emerging findings to revitalize mature permanent teeth in adult patients but also to identify challenges and strategies that focus on realizing the goal of regenerative endodontics in adults. We further present clinical cases and describe the biological basis of potential regenerative endodontic procedures in adults. This article explores the frequently asked question if regenerative endodontic therapies should be developed for dental pulp and/or dentin regeneration in adults, who consist of the great majority of endodontic patients. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epileptic fits under intravenous midazolam sedation.

    PubMed

    Robb, N D

    1996-09-07

    A case is presented of a patient who suffered from recurrent epileptic fits while being treated under intravenous sedation with midazolam. Those using sedation are advised to beware of the patient who gives a history of fits being provoked in the dental environment.

  4. Weather as a risk factor for epileptic seizures: A case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Rakers, Florian; Walther, Mario; Schiffner, Rene; Rupprecht, Sven; Rasche, Marius; Kockler, Michael; Witte, Otto W; Schlattmann, Peter; Schwab, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    Most epileptic seizures occur unexpectedly and independently of known risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of patients' perception that weather is a risk factor for epileptic seizures. Using a hospital-based, bidirectional case-crossover study, 604 adult patients admitted to a large university hospital in Central Germany for an unprovoked epileptic seizure between 2003 and 2010 were recruited. The effect of atmospheric pressure, relative air humidity, and ambient temperature on the onset of epileptic seizures under temperate climate conditions was estimated. We found a close-to-linear negative correlation between atmospheric pressure and seizure risk. For every 10.7 hPa lower atmospheric pressure, seizure risk increased in the entire study population by 14% (odds ratio [OR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.28). In patients with less severe epilepsy treated with one antiepileptic medication, seizure risk increased by 36% (1.36, 1.09-1.67). A high relative air humidity of >80% increased seizure risk in the entire study population by up to 48% (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.11-1.96) 3 days after exposure in a J-shaped association. High ambient temperatures of >20°C decreased seizure risk by 46% in the overall study population (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32-0.90) and in subgroups, with the greatest effects observed in male patients (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.14-0.74). Low atmospheric pressure and high relative air humidity are associated with an increased risk for epileptic seizures, whereas high ambient temperatures seem to decrease seizure risk. Weather-dependent seizure risk may be accentuated in patients with less severe epilepsy. Our results require further replication across different climate regions and cohorts before reliable clinical recommendations can be made. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome.

  6. Intractable epileptic spasms in a patient with Pontocerebellar hypoplasia: Severe phenotype of type 2 or another subtype?

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Debopam; Willis, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) involves a diverse range of etiologies including a group of single gene disorders. Mutations in the tRNA splicing endonuclease complex (TSEN) 54 gene can be responsible for PCH type 2, 4 and 5. The more common and less severe PCH 2 phenotype is caused by homozygosity for the common missense mutation A307S, while the severe phenotype seen in type 4 and 5 is caused by compound heterozygosity of the A307S mutation along with a nonsense or splice site mutation. Report: We report a 4- month-old girl who presented with epileptic spasms that remained intractable to several antiepileptic medications. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) brain showed fairly severe hypoplasia with superimposed atrophy of the cerebellum and brainstem with prominent extra-axial fluid spaces. Extensive metabolic testing was negative. Commercial testing for PCH via TSEN54 gene revealed missense mutation of Ala307Ser. A novel sequence variant, designated c.17_40 del, was also found and was predictive of an in-frame deletion of eight amino acids. Follow-up over 2 years revealed intractable epileptic spasms, progressive microcephaly and development of prominent choreoathetosis. Conclusion: This case report describes a rare case of PCH with overlapping features of the less severe PCH2 and the more severe PCH4/5 phenotype. It also adds another new entity in the list of genetic conditions where West syndrome and pontocerebellar hypoplasia can be seen together, emphasizing the need for further investigations of the genotype-phenotype correlation of mutations in order to advance our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanism in these rare conditions. PMID:27570394

  7. Rufinamide in refractory childhood epileptic encephalopathies other than Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coppola, G; Grosso, S; Franzoni, E; Veggiotti, P; Zamponi, N; Parisi, P; Spalice, A; Habetswallner, F; Fels, A; Verrotti, A; D'Aniello, A; Mangano, S; Balestri, A; Curatolo, P; Pascotto, A

    2011-02-01

    To report on the first multicenter Italian experience with rufinamide as adjunctive drug in children, adolescents and young adults with refractory childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathies other than Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Thirty-eight patients (19 males, 19 females), aged between 4 and 34 (mean 13.7 ± 8.3, median 12.5), all affected by different types of childhood-onset refractory epileptic encephalopathies other than Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, were treated with rufinamide as adjunctive drug for a mean period of 11.4 months (range 3-26 months). Fifteen of 38 patients (39.5%) had a ≥ 50% seizure reduction in countable seizures. Complete seizure freedom was achieved in one of these patients (2.6%). Three patients (7.9%) had a 25-49% seizure reduction, whilst seizure frequency remained unchanged in 15 (39.5%) and increased in five patients (13.1%). Eleven patients (28.9%) reported adverse side effects. Vomiting was reported in five patients (13.1%); drowsiness, decreased appetite and irritability with migraine manifested in other four patients. They were transient and mild in all cases. Rufinamide may be an effective and well-tolerated adjunctive drug for the treatment of refractory childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathies other than Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Rufinamide was most effective in patients with drop-attacks and (bi)frontal spike-wave discharges. © 2010 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2010 EFNS.

  8. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  9. Harnessing Gene Expression Networks to Prioritize Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy Genes

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Karen L.; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets. PMID:25014031

  10. [Semiology and propagation of epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Gellner, A-K; Fritsch, B

    2013-06-01

    The evaluation of episodic seizure-like symptoms is a common challenge in the neurologist's daily routine. The clinical signs (semiology) are the most important puzzle pieces to distinguish epileptic seizures from other episodic entities. Due to the often far-reaching health and social consequences of the diagnosis of epilepsy, the early and rigorous assessment of episodic symptoms by means of the patient history is important. This assessment is based on knowledge of the association of certain semiologies with epileptic syndromes and brain regions; however, certain limitations and pitfalls have to be considered. Typical propagation pathways of seizure activity determine the serial occurrence of semiological features and provide supplementary information.

  11. Pathophysiology of epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Lado, Fred A; Rubboli, Guido; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Capovilla, Pippo; Avanzini, Giuliano; Moshé, Solomon L

    2013-11-01

    The application of metabolic imaging and genetic analysis, and now the development of appropriate animal models, has generated critical insights into the pathogenesis of epileptic encephalopathies. In this article we present ideas intended to move from the lesions associated with epileptic encephalopathies toward understanding the effects of these lesions on the functioning of the brain, specifically of the cortex. We argue that the effects of focal lesions may be magnified through the interaction between cortical and subcortical structures, and that disruption of subcortical arousal centers that regulate cortex early in life may lead to alterations of intracortical synapses that affect a critical period of cognitive development. Impairment of interneuronal function globally through the action of a genetic lesion similarly causes widespread cortical dysfunction manifesting as increased delta slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and as developmental delay or arrest clinically. Finally, prolonged focal epileptic activity during sleep (as occurring in the syndrome of continuous spike-wave in slow sleep, or CSWSS) might interfere with local slow wave activity at the site of the epileptic focus, thereby impairing the neural processes and, possibly, the local plastic changes associated with learning and other cognitive functions. Seizures may certainly add to these pathologic processes, but they are likely not necessary for the development of the cognitive pathology. Nevertheless, although seizures may be either a consequence or symptom of the underlying lesion, their effective treatment can improve outcomes as both clinical and experimental studies may suggest. Understanding their substrates may lead to novel, effective treatments for all aspects of the epileptic encephalopathy phenotype.

  12. Influence of paroxysmal activity on background synchronization in epileptic recordings.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Jesús; Sola, Rafael G; Ortega, Guillermo J

    2014-02-15

    The presence of spikes and sharp waves in recordings of epileptic patients contaminates background signal synchronization. When estimating functional connectivity between extended cortical areas, the influence of epileptic spikes in specific areas should be considered; however, this step is sometimes overlooked. We present a simple method for quantifying the influence of epileptic activity on background signal synchronization. Standard synchronization measures were calculated for both pure correlated Gaussian signals and correlated Gaussian signals with different levels of epileptic spikes in order to determine the influence of epileptic activity on synchronization estimates. Synchronization from invasive epileptic recordings (e.g., depth electrodes) displays a much higher bias due to epileptic activity than superficial electrodes. Moreover, statistical methods such as mutual information are more affected by spike presence than phase synchronization methods. The influence of spikes is far greater at low values of background synchronization. The information provided by this procedure makes it possible to differentiate true background synchronization from spike synchronization. Thus, our procedure serves as a guide for analyzing synchronization and functional connectivity calculations in epileptic recordings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Spread of epileptic activity in human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, John

    1997-03-01

    For many patients with medically refractory epilepsy surgical resection of the site of seizure onset (epileptic focus) offers the best hope for cure. Determination of the nature of seizure propagation should lead to improved methods for locating the epileptic focus (and hence reduce patient morbidity) and possibly to new treatment modalities directed at blocking seizure spread. Theoretical studies of neural networks emphasize the role of traveling waves for the propagation of activity. However, the nature of seizure propagation in human brain remains poorly characterized. The spread of epileptic activity in patients undergoing presurgical evaluation for epilepsy surgery was measured by placing subdural grids of electrodes (interelectrode spacings of 3-10 mm) over the frontal and temporal lobes. The exact location of each electrode relative to the surface of the brain was determined using 3--D MRI imaging techniques. Thus it is possible to monitor the spread of epileptic activity in both space and time. The observations are discussed in light of models for seizure propagation.

  14. Treatment of epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    McTague, Amy; Cross, J Helen

    2013-03-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy is defined as a condition where the epileptic activity itself may contribute to the severe neurological and cognitive impairment seen, over and above that which would be expected from the underlying pathology alone. The epilepsy syndromes at high risk of this are a disparate group of conditions characterized by epileptic seizures that are difficult to treat and developmental delay. In this review, we discuss the ongoing debate regarding the significance of inter-ictal discharges and the impact of the seizures themselves on the cognitive delay or regression that is a common feature of these syndromes. The syndromes also differ in many ways and we provide a summary of the key features of the early-onset epileptic encephalopathies including Ohtahara and West syndromes in addition to later childhood-onset syndromes such as Lennox Gastaut and Doose syndromes. An understanding of the various severe epilepsy syndromes is vital to understanding the rationale for treatment. For example, the resolution of hypsarrhythmia in West syndrome is associated with an improvement in cognitive outcome and drives treatment choice, but the same cannot be applied to frequent inter-ictal discharges in Lennox Gastaut syndrome. We discuss the evidence base for treatment where it is available and describe current practice where it is not. For example, in West syndrome there is some evidence for preference of hormonal treatments over vigabatrin, although the choice and duration of hormonal treatment remains unclear. We describe the use of conventional and newer anti-epileptic medications in the various syndromes and discuss which medications should be avoided. Older possibly forgotten treatments such as sulthiame and potassium bromide also have a role in the severe epilepsies of childhood. We discuss hormonal treatment with particular focus on the treatment of West syndrome, continuous spike wave in slow wave sleep (CSWS)/electrical status epilepticus in slow wave

  15. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Epileptic Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Ji Yeon; Byeon, Jung Hye; Eun, Baik-Lin; Rhie, Young Jun; Seo, Won Hee

    2012-01-01

    It is well-known that the prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is higher in epileptic children than in the general pediatric population. The aim of this study was to compare the accompaniment of ADHD in epileptic children with well-controlled seizures and no significant intellectual disability with that in healthy controls. We included epileptic children between the ages of 6 and 12 yr visiting our clinic for six consecutive months and controls without significant medical or psychiatric illnesses. We excluded patients with intellectual disability or persistent seizures during the recent three months. The diagnosis of ADHD was based on the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV). After exclusion of 84 patients, we enrolled 102 (54.8%) children (mean age, 9.4 ± 2.0 yr). Seven (7 of 102, 6.9%) were diagnosed with ADHD. As compared to control group (4 of 110, 3.6%), there was no difference in ADHD accompaniment (P = 0.29). No difference was observed in ADHD accompaniment according to seizure type and epilepsy syndrome. In conclusion, the accompaniment of ADHD in epileptic children with well-controlled seizures and no intellectual disability may not differ from that of the general pediatric population. PMID:23091322

  16. Comparing maximum autonomic activity of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and epileptic seizures using heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Jesper; Beniczky, Sándor; Johansen, Peter; Sidenius, Per; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    The semiology of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) can resemble epileptic seizures, and differentiation between epileptic seizures with no EEG-correlate and PNES can be challenging even for trained experts. Therefore, there has been a search for a quantitative measure, other than EEG and semiology that could distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures. We used ECG to measure heart rate variability (HRV) in order to compare maximum autonomic activity of epileptic seizures and PNES. These comparisons could potentially serve as biomarkers for distinguishing these types of clinical episodes. Forty-nine epileptic seizures from 17 patients and 24 PNES from 7 patients with analyzable ECG were recorded during long-term video-EEG monitoring. Moving windows of 100 R-R intervals throughout each seizure were used to find maximum values of Cardiac Sympathetic Index (CSI) (sympathetic tonus) and minimum values of Cardiac Vagal Index (CVI), Root-Mean-Square-of-Successive-Differences (RMSSD) and HF-power (parasympathetic tonus). In addition, non-seizure recordings of each patient were used to compare HRV-parameters between the groups. The maximum CSI for epilepsy seizures were higher than PNES (P=0.015). The minimum CVI, minimum RMSSD and HF-power did not show significant difference between epileptic seizures and PNES (P=0.762; P=0.152; P=0.818). There were no statistical difference of non-seizure HRV-parameters between the PNES and epilepsy patients. We found the maximum sympathetic activity accompanying the epileptic seizures to be higher, than that during the PNES. However, the great variation of autonomic response within both groups makes it difficult to use these HRV-measures as a sole measurement in distinguishing epileptic seizures from PNES. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Occupational health problems in epileptics].

    PubMed

    Romankow, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    From the point of view of occupational medicine some questions are important for epileptics; amongst others: falling, behavior during the paroxysm, shift work dependence of attack, behaviour after an epileptic episode. Occupational capacity depends on the process of epileptic episodes and their frequency. The development of neurology has rendered numerous cures from epilepsy, but the the occupational stigma is difficult in many professions--electrical engineering, working with machinery, milling machines and others. In some professions a care must be taken when hiring epileptics--for instance professions with a fall hazard, jobs connected with public transport or involving crane or excavator operation.

  18. Vomiting as an ictal manifestation of epileptic seizures and syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotopoulos, C P

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four out of 900 adult and children patients with epilepsy, were found to have vomiting during an ictus. All the 24 patients were children before puberty with a similar clinical pattern consisting of partial seizures which were mainly nocturnal. Ictal vomiting was always concurrent with other epileptic manifestations, more often deviation of the eyes and impairment of consciousness. The initial part of the ictus was short or prolonged for hours with frequent "marching" to hemi-convulsions and generalised seizures. Seventeen of the 24 children suffered from benign childhood epilepsies (BCE) with complete remission in long follow-up. A significantly higher association was found between ictal vomiting and the syndrome of BCE with occipital spikes (p less than 0.001) but not with centro-temporal spikes (p less than 0.2). The recognition of this association may have important theoretical implications. On clinical grounds, it may prevent unnecessary investigations and undue concern. PMID:3148690

  19. Rufinamide for the treatment of epileptic spasms.

    PubMed

    Olson, H E; Loddenkemper, T; Vendrame, M; Poduri, A; Takeoka, M; Bergin, A M; Libenson, M H; Duffy, F H; Rotenberg, A; Coulter, D; Bourgeois, B F; Kothare, S V

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of rufinamide for treatment of epileptic spasms. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated with rufinamide for epileptic spasms from January 2009 to March 2010. Age, presence of hypsarrhythmia, change in seizure frequency following rufinamide initiation, and side effects were assessed. Patients who had a ≥ 50% reduction in spasm frequency were considered responders. Of all 107 children treated with rufinamide during the study period, 38 (36%) had epileptic spasms. Median patient age was 7 years (range: 17 months to 23). One patient had hypsarrhythmia at the time of treatment with rufinamide, and 9 other patients had a history of hypsarrhythmia. Median starting dose of rufinamide was 9 mg/kg/day (range: 2-18) and median final treatment dose was 39 mg/kg/day (range: 8-92). All patients were receiving concurrent antiepileptic drug therapy, with the median number of antiepileptic drugs being 3 (range: 2-6). Median duration of follow-up since starting rufinamide was 171 days (range: 10-408). Responder rate was 53%. Median reduction in spasm frequency was 50% (interquartile range=-56 to 85%, P<0.05). Two patients (5%) achieved a >99% reduction in spasms. Rufinamide was discontinued in 7 of 38 patients (18%) because of lack of efficacy, worsening seizures, or other side effects. Minor side effects were reported in 14 of 38 patients (37%). Rufinamide appears to be a well-tolerated and efficacious adjunctive therapeutic option for children with epileptic spasms. A prospective study is warranted to validate our observations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Quantitative evaluation of inhibitory effects of epileptic spikes on theta rhythms in the network of hippocampal CA3 and entorhinal cortex in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Ge, Man-Ling; Guo, Jun-Dan; Chen, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Ji-Chang; Fu, Xiao-Xuan; Chen, Yu-Min

    2017-02-25

    Epileptic spike is an indicator of hyper-excitability and hyper-synchrony in the neural networks. The inhibitory effects of spikes on theta rhythms (4-8 Hz) might be helpful to understand the mechanism of epileptic damage on the cognitive functions. To quantitatively evaluate the inhibitory effects of spikes on theta rhythms, intracerebral electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings with both sporadic spikes (SSs) and spike-free transient period between adjacent spikes were selected in 4 patients in the status of rapid eyes movement (REM) sleep with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) under the pre-surgical monitoring. The electrodes of hippocampal CA3 and entorhinal cortex (EC) were employed, since CA3 and EC built up one of key loops to investigate cognition and epilepsy. These SSs occurred only in CA3, only in EC, or in both CA3 and EC synchronously. Theta power was respectively estimated around SSs and during the spike-free transient period by Gabor wavelet transform and Hilbert transform. The intermittent extent was then estimated to represent for the loss of theta rhythms during the spike-free transient period. The following findings were obtained: (1) The prominent rhythms were in theta frequency band; (2) The spikes could transiently reduce theta power, and the inhibitory effect was severer around SSs in both CA3 and EC synchronously than that around either SSs only in EC or SSs only in CA3; (3) During the spike-free transient period, theta rhythms were interrupted with the intermittent theta rhythms left and theta power level continued dropping, implying the inhibitory effect was sustained. Additionally, the intermittent extent of theta rhythms was converged to the inhibitory extent around SSs; (4) The average theta power level during the spike-free transient period might not be in line with the inhibitory extent of theta rhythms around SSs. It was concluded that the SSs had negative effects on theta rhythms transiently and directly, the inhibitory effects aroused by

  1. [Psychogenic non epileptic events and frontal lobe seizures].

    PubMed

    Epstein, Ana J; Thomson, Alfredo E

    2010-01-01

    The distinction between epilepsy and psychogenic non epileptic events or seizures (PNES) has been made since the middle of the first millennium (B.C.) Psychogenic non epileptic seizures (PNES) resemble epileptic seizures presenting as paroxysmal, involuntary, time-limited alterations in behaviour, motor activity, autonomic function, consciousness, or sensation. However, unlike epilepsy, NES do not result from epileptogenic pathology and are not accompanied by an epileptiform pattern during an ictal electroencephalogram (EEG). This article reviews the concept of psychogenic non epileptic events, its contemporary assessment including diagnostic and therapeutic issues, as well as the complexity related to various nosological topics. The PNES are a hallmark of an ancient illness, hysteria, which wanders between the somatoform and the dissociative disorders in the contemporary classification systems. With the availability of video electroencephalography (video-EEG), it has been possible to define more strictly the limits between epileptic and non epileptic disorders, avoiding unnecessary and even iatrogenic and invasive treatments. We also describe the clinical presentation and diagnosis of frontal lobe seizures, especially those that might be mistakenly diagnosed as psychogenic events. The frontal lobes are the largest cortical region from which seizures can arise; complex and/ or bizarre behavioural clinical presentations are frequent. In addition, some patients with epilepsy can also present non epileptic events.

  2. A three phase hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction for quantification of lamotrigine in plasma of epileptic patients by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Barros, Luiza Saldanha Ribeiro; Carrão, Daniel Blascke; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo Moraes; de Gaitani, Cristiane Masetto

    2016-10-01

    A three phase hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction technique combined with capillary electrophoresis was developed to quantify lamotrigine (LTG) in plasma samples. The analyte was extracted from 4.0 mL of a basic donor phase (composed of 0.5 mL of plasma and 3.5 mL of sodium phosphate solution pH 9.0) through a supported liquid membrane composed of 1-octanol immobilized in the pores of the hollow fiber, and to an acidic acceptor phase (hydrochloric acid solution pH 4.0) placed in the lumen of the fiber. The extraction was carried out for 30 min at 500 rpm. The eletrophoretic analysis was carried out in 130 mmol/L MES buffer, pH 5.0 with a constant voltage of +15 kV and 20°C. Sample injections were performed for 10 s, at a pressure of 0.5 psi. The detection was performed at 214 nm for both LTG and the internal standard lidocaine. Under the optimized conditions, the method showed a limit of quantification of 1.0 μg/mL and was linear over the plasmatic concentration range of 1.0-20.0 μg/mL. Finally, the validated method was applied for the quantification of LTG in plasma samples of epileptic patients.

  3. Prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of patients diagnosed with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    PubMed

    Myers, Lorna; Vaidya-Mathur, Urmi; Lancman, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are treated with psychotherapy, the effectiveness of most psychotherapeutic modalities remains understudied. In this treatment series of 16 patients dually diagnosed with PNES and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we evaluated the effect of prolonged exposure therapy (PE) on reduction of PNES. Secondary measures included Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Post-Traumatic Disorder Diagnostic Scale (PDS). Subjects diagnosed with video EEG-confirmed PNES and PTSD confirmed through neuropsychological testing and clinical interview were treated with traditional PE psychotherapy with certain modifications for the PNES. Treatment was conducted over the course of 12-15 weekly sessions. Seizure frequency was noted in each session by examining the patients' seizure logs, and mood and PTSD symptomatology was assessed at baseline and on the final session. Eighteen subjects enrolled, and 16 (88.8%) completed the course of treatment. Thirteen of the 16 (81.25%) therapy completers reported no seizures by their final PE session, and the other three reported a decline in seizure frequency (Z=-3.233, p=0.001). Mean scores on scales of depression (M=-13.56, SD=12.27; t (15)=-4.420, p<0,001) and PTSD symptoms (M=-17.1875, SD=13.01; t (15)=-5.281, p<0.001) showed significant improvement from baseline to final session. Longitudinal seizure follow up in 14 patients revealed that gains made on the final session were maintained at follow-up (Z=-1.069 p=0.285). Prolonged exposure therapy for patients dually diagnosed with PNES and PTSD reduced the number of PNES and improved mood and post traumatic symptomatology. Follow-up revealed that gains made in seizure control on the last day of treatment were maintained over time. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epileptic seizure after treatment with thiocolchicoside

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Giavina-Bianchi, Mara; Tanno, Luciana Kase; Ensina, Luis Felipe Chiaverini; Motta, Antôno Abílio; Kalil, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Background: Adverse drug reactions are important determinants of inpatient and outpatient morbidity. Thiocolchicoside is a semisynthetic derivate of naturally occurring colchicoside, which is largely used in humans as a centrally acting muscle relaxant. Epileptic seizures after thiocolchicoside intake have been reported in individuals with a history of epilepsy, acute brain injury or possible blood–brain barrier disruption. Case report: We report the case of a 66-year-old male patient presenting a sudden epileptic seizure temporally related to the intake of thiocolchicoside for muscle contracture and pain. The probably causes of the seizures were thiocolchicoside intake and cerebral microhemorrhages attributed to cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Discussion: Drugs only rarely cause focal seizures. Our case indicates that thiocolchicoside can precipitate seizures in predisposed patients, and that its use should be avoided in patients with brain diseases (and therefore lower seizure thresholds) or blood–brain barrier disruption. This information should be provided in the drug package insert. PMID:19707540

  5. Surgical Treatment of Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fridley, J.; Reddy, G.; Curry, D.; Agadi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric epileptiform encephalopathies are a group of neurologically devastating disorders related to uncontrolled ictal and interictal epileptic activity, with a poor prognosis. Despite the number of pharmacological options for treatment of epilepsy, many of these patients are drug resistant. For these patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, motor and/or neuropsychological deterioration is common. To prevent these secondary consequences, surgery is often considered as either a curative or a palliative option. Magnetic resonance imaging to look for epileptic lesions that may be surgically treated is an essential part of the workup for these patients. Many surgical procedures for the treatment of epileptiform encephalopathies have been reported in the literature. In this paper the evidence for these procedures for the treatment of pediatric epileptiform encephalopathies is reviewed. PMID:24288601

  6. [Liposteroid therapy for refractory epileptic spasms].

    PubMed

    Shimono, Kuriko Kagitani; Imai, Katsumi; Idoguchi, Rie; Kamio, Noriko; Okinaga, Takeshi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2003-11-01

    Liposteroid was administered intravenously to 6 patients with refractory epileptic spasms. In one case, the spasms initially disappeared but then reappeared after three months. Another case had a transient and slight decrease of epileptic spasms. In the only patient in whom spasms disappeared, EEG abnormalities were greatly improved with diffuse spikes and waves changing into focal spikes. Two cases displayed hyperexcitability, insomnia and acting out behavior, and the therapy was discontinued in one of them. One case had appetite loss and another showed an increase in tonic seizures. No patient had serious adverse effects such as infection, edema, subdural hematoma and brain shrinkage. Although liposteroid therapy has been recommended as an easy, useful and safe alternative for ACTH, we found considerable adverse effects and only a small effect on refractory spasms, and conclude that the regimen should be modified.

  7. Causative factors for suicide attempts by overdose in epileptics.

    PubMed

    Mendez, M F; Lanska, D J; Manon-Espaillat, R; Burnstine, T H

    1989-10-01

    We investigated possible causative factors for the high epileptic suicide rate by reviewing the cases of 22 patients with idiopathic epilepsy found among 711 patients hospitalized for a suicide attempt by overdose. Suicide attempts occurred with increased seizure activity in one epileptic; otherwise, no relationships were found with seizure-related variables. When matched by age, sex, and race with 44 nonepileptic controls from the same population, the epileptics had more borderline personality disorders with multiple impulsive suicide attempts (45.5% vs 13.6%), more psychotic disturbances, including command hallucinations (31.8% vs 9.1%), fewer adjustment disorders (18.2% vs 45.5%), and a comparable frequency of depression (13.6% vs 25%). We conclude that suicide attempts in epileptics are primarily associated with interictal psychopathologic factors, such as borderline personality disorder and psychosis, rather than with specific psychosocial stressors, seizure variables, or anticonvulsant medications.

  8. [Transient epileptic amnesia].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Yoshizaki, Takahito

    2016-03-01

    Transient amnesia is one of common clinical phenomenon of epilepsy that are encountered by physicians. The amnestic attacks are often associated with persistent memory disturbances. Epilepsy is common among the elderly, with amnesia as a common symptom and convulsions relatively uncommon. Therefore, amnesia due to epilepsy can easily be misdiagnosed as dementia. The term 'transient epileptic amnesia (TEA)' was introduced in the early 1990s by Kapur, who highlighted that amnestic attacks caused by epilepsy can be similar to those occurring in 'transient global amnesia', but are distinguished by features brevity and recurrence. In 1998, Zeman et al. proposed diagnostic criteria for TEA.

  9. [Consensus clinical practice guidelines of the Sociedad Andaluza de Epilepsia for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with their first epileptic seizure in emergencies].

    PubMed

    Serrano-Castro, P J; Sánchez-Alvarez, J C; Cañadillas-Hidalgo, F M; Galán-Barranco, J M; Moreno-Alegre, V; Mercadé-Cerdá, J M

    Epileptic seizures are the cause of between 0.3 and 1.2% of all visits to hospital emergency departments. Twenty-five per cent of patients visit after having their first seizure. Such an impact seems to justify the development of a health care protocol. Our proposal is to draw up a set of implicit evidence-based consensus practice guidelines, to use Liberati's nomenclature, concerning aspects related to the diagnostic procedure and recommended therapeutic management of patients with a first seizure who are being attended in an emergency department. A selective search was conducted on PubMed-Medline for quality scientific information on the subject using scientific evidence filters. This search was completed in other scientific evidence search engines, such as Tripdatabase, Biblioteca Cochrane Plus or DARE. The selected references were analysed and discussed by the authors, and the available evidence and any recommendations that could be drawn from it were collected. A total of 47 primary documents and 10 practice guidelines or protocols related with the proposed topic were identified. The recommendations were inserted in the text explicitly. The diagnostic and therapeutic protocol for all paroxysmal phenomena in emergencies consists of three successive phases: diagnosis of the cause of the epilepsy, integration of the significance of the seizure within the clinical context, and designing the therapeutic scheme. Each phase will depend on the outcomes of the previous one as a decision algorithm. The fundamental tools in each phase are: patient record and examination (phase 1), and complementary tests (phase 2). They are then used to produce a therapeutic decision scheme.

  10. Understanding Genotypes and Phenotypes in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Ingo; Tayoun, Abou Ahmad N.

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are severe often intractable seizure disorders where epileptiform abnormalities contribute to a progressive disturbance in brain function. Often, epileptic encephalopathies start in childhood and are accompanied by developmental delay and various neurological and non-neurological comorbidities. In recent years, this concept has become virtually synonymous with a group of severe childhood epilepsies including West syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, Dravet syndrome, and several other severe childhood epilepsies for which genetic factors are increasingly recognized. In the last 5 years, the field has seen a virtual explosion of gene discovery, raising the number of bona fide genes and possible candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathies to more than 70 genes, explaining 20-25% of all cases with severe early-onset epilepsies that had otherwise no identifiable causes. This review will focus on the phenotypic variability as a characteristic aspect of genetic epilepsies. For many genetic epilepsies, the phenotypic presentation can be broad, even in patients with identical genetic alterations. Furthermore, patients with different genetic etiologies can have seemingly similar clinical presentations, such as in Dravet syndrome. While most patients carry mutations in SCN1A, similar phenotypes can be seen in patients with mutations in PCDH19, CHD2, SCN8A, or in rare cases GABRA1 and STXBP1. In addition to the genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, both benign phenotypes and severe encephalopathies have been recognized in an increasing number of genetic epilepsies, raising the question whether these conditions represent a fluid continuum or distinct entities. PMID:27781027

  11. Localizing epileptic seizure onsets with Granger causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bhim M.; Epstein, Charles M.; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2013-09-01

    Accurate localization of the epileptic seizure onset zones (SOZs) is crucial for successful surgery, which usually depends on the information obtained from intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) recordings. The visual criteria and univariate methods of analyzing IEEG recordings have not always produced clarity on the SOZs for resection and ultimate seizure freedom for patients. Here, to contribute to improving the localization of the SOZs and to understanding the mechanism of seizure propagation over the brain, we applied spectral interdependency methods to IEEG time series recorded from patients during seizures. We found that the high-frequency (>80 Hz) Granger causality (GC) occurs before the onset of any visible ictal activity and causal relationships involve the recording electrodes where clinically identifiable seizures later develop. These results suggest that high-frequency oscillatory network activities precede and underlie epileptic seizures, and that GC spectral measures derived from IEEG can assist in precise delineation of seizure onset times and SOZs.

  12. A 1.83 μJ/Classification, 8-Channel, Patient-Specific Epileptic Seizure Classification SoC Using a Non-Linear Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Bin Altaf, Muhammad Awais; Yoo, Jerald

    2016-02-01

    A non-linear support vector machine (NLSVM) seizure classification SoC with 8-channel EEG data acquisition and storage for epileptic patients is presented. The proposed SoC is the first work in literature that integrates a feature extraction (FE) engine, patient specific hardware-efficient NLSVM classification engine, 96 KB SRAM for EEG data storage and low-noise, high dynamic range readout circuits. To achieve on-chip integration of the NLSVM classification engine with minimum area and energy consumption, the FE engine utilizes time division multiplexing (TDM)-BPF architecture. The implemented log-linear Gaussian basis function (LL-GBF) NLSVM classifier exploits the linearization to achieve energy consumption of 0.39 μ J/operation and reduces the area by 28.2% compared to conventional GBF implementation. The readout circuits incorporate a chopper-stabilized DC servo loop to minimize the noise level elevation and achieve noise RTI of 0.81 μ Vrms for 0.5-100 Hz bandwidth with an NEF of 4.0. The 5 × 5 mm (2) SoC is implemented in a 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process consuming 1.83 μ J/classification for 8-channel operation. SoC verification has been done with the Children's Hospital Boston-MIT EEG database, as well as with a specific rapid eye-blink pattern detection test, which results in an average detection rate, average false alarm rate and latency of 95.1%, 0.94% (0.27 false alarms/hour) and 2 s, respectively.

  13. Accelerated Long-Term Forgetting Can Become Apparent Within 3–8 Hours of Wakefulness in Patients With Transient Epileptic Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Accelerated long-term forgetting (ALF) is typically defined as a memory disorder in which information that is learned and retained normally over standard intervals (∼30 min) is forgotten at an abnormally rapid rate thereafter. ALF has been reported, in particular, among patients with transient epileptic amnesia (TEA). Previous work in TEA has revealed ALF 24 hr - 1 week after initial memory acquisition. It is unclear, however, if ALF observed 24 hr after acquisition reflects (a) an impairment of sleep consolidation processes taking place during the first night’s sleep, or (b) an impairment of daytime consolidation processes taking place during the day of acquisition. Here we focus on the daytime-forgetting hypothesis of ALF in TEA by tracking in detail the time course of ALF over the day of acquisition, as well as over 24 hr and 1 week. Method: Eleven TEA patients who showed ALF at 1 week and 16 matched controls learned 4 categorical word lists on the morning of the day of acquisition. We subsequently probed word-list retention 30 min, 3 hr, and 8 hr postacquisition (i.e., over the day of acquisition), as well as 24-hr and 1-week post acquisition. Results: ALF became apparent in the TEA group over the course of the day of acquisition 3–8 hr after learning. No further forgetting was observed over the first night in either group. Conclusions: The results of this study show that ALF in TEA can result from a deficit in memory consolidation occurring within hours of learning without a requirement for intervening sleep. PMID:25089646

  14. Focal epileptic seizures mimicking sleep paralysis.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Carlo Andrea; Ossola, Maria; Colnaghi, Silvia; Arbasino, Carla

    2009-03-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a common parasomnia. The diagnostic criteria for SP, as reported in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, are essentially clinical, as electroencephalography (EEG)-polysomnography (PSG) is not mandatory. We describe a subject whose sleep-related events fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SP, even though her visual hallucinations were elementary, repetitive and stereotyped, thus differing from those usually reported by patients with SP. Video/EEG-PSG documented the focal epileptic nature of the SP-like episodes.

  15. Mitochondrial epilepsy in pediatric and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J; Zarrouk Mahjoub, S

    2013-09-01

    Few data are available about the difference between epilepsy in pediatric mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and adult MIDs. This review focuses on the differences between pediatric and adult mitochondrial epilepsy with regard to seizure type, seizure frequency, and underlying MID. A literature search via Pubmed using the keywords 'mitochondrial', 'epilepsy', 'seizures', 'adult', 'pediatric', and all MID acronyms, was carried out. Frequency of mitochondrial epilepsy strongly depends on the type of MID included and is higher in pediatric compared to adult patients. In pediatric patients, mitochondrial epilepsy is more frequent due to mutations in nDNA-located than mtDNA-located genes and vice versa in adults. In pediatric patients, mitochondrial epilepsy is associated with a syndromic phenotype in half of the patients and in adults more frequently with a non-syndromic phenotype. In pediatric patients, focal seizures are more frequent than generalized seizures and vice versa in adults. Electro-clinical syndromes are more frequent in pediatric MIDs compared to adult MIDs. Differences between pediatric and adult mitochondrial epilepsy concern the onset of epilepsy, frequency of epilepsy, seizure type, type of electro-clinical syndrome, frequency of syndromic versus non-syndromic MIDs, and the outcome. To optimize management of mitochondrial epilepsy, it is essential to differentiate between early and late-onset forms. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Toward Epileptic Brain Region Detection Based on Magnetic Nanoparticle Patterning.

    PubMed

    Pedram, Maysam Z; Shamloo, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2015-09-22

    Resection of the epilepsy foci is the best treatment for more than 15% of epileptic patients or 50% of patients who are refractory to all forms of medical treatment. Accurate mapping of the locations of epileptic neuronal networks can result in the complete resection of epileptic foci. Even though currently electroencephalography is the best technique for mapping the epileptic focus, it cannot define the boundary of epilepsy that accurately. Herein we put forward a new accurate brain mapping technique using superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs). The main hypothesis in this new approach is the creation of super-paramagnetic aggregates in the epileptic foci due to high electrical and magnetic activities. These aggregates may improve tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that results in improving the resection of epileptic foci. In this paper, we present the mathematical models before discussing the simulation results. Furthermore, we mimic the aggregation of SPMNs in a weak magnetic field using a low-cost microfabricated device. Based on these results, the SPMNs may play a crucial role in diagnostic epilepsy and the subsequent treatment of this disease.

  17. De novo KCNB1 mutations in epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Torkamani, Ali; Bersell, Kevin; Jorge, Benjamin S; Bjork, Robert L; Friedman, Jennifer R; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Cohen, Julie; Gupta, Siddharth; Naidu, Sakkubai; Vanoye, Carlos G; George, Alfred L; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated increased load of de novo copy number variants or single nucleotide variants in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders, including epileptic encephalopathies, intellectual disability, and autism. We searched for de novo mutations in a family quartet with a sporadic case of epileptic encephalopathy with no known etiology to determine the underlying cause using high-coverage whole exome sequencing (WES) and lower-coverage whole genome sequencing. Mutations in additional patients were identified by WES. The effect of mutations on protein function was assessed in a heterologous expression system. We identified a de novo missense mutation in KCNB1 that encodes the KV 2.1 voltage-gated potassium channel. Functional studies demonstrated a deleterious effect of the mutation on KV 2.1 function leading to a loss of ion selectivity and gain of a depolarizing inward cation conductance. Subsequently, we identified 2 additional patients with epileptic encephalopathy and de novo KCNB1 missense mutations that cause a similar pattern of KV 2.1 dysfunction. Our genetic and functional evidence demonstrate that KCNB1 mutation can result in early onset epileptic encephalopathy. This expands the locus heterogeneity associated with epileptic encephalopathies and suggests that clinical WES may be useful for diagnosis of epileptic encephalopathies of unknown etiology. © 2014 American Neurological Association.

  18. De Novo KCNB1 Mutations in Epileptic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bjork, Robert L.; Friedman, Jennifer R.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Cohen, Julie; Gupta, Siddharth; Naidu, Sakkubai; Vanoye, Carlos G.; George, Alfred L.; Kearney, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have demonstrated increased load of de novo copy number variants (CNVs) or single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders, including epileptic encephalopathies, intellectual disability and autism. Methods We searched for de novo mutations in a family quartet with a sporadic case of epileptic encephalopathy with no known etiology to determine the underlying cause using high coverage whole exome sequencing (WES) and lower coverage whole genome sequencing (WGS). Mutations in additional patients were identified by WES. The effect of mutations on protein function was assessed in a heterologous expression system. Results We identified a de novo missense mutation in KCNB1 that encodes the KV2.1 voltage-gated potassium channel. Functional studies demonstrated a deleterious effect of the mutation on KV2.1 function leading to a loss of ion selectivity and gain of a depolarizing inward cation conductance. Subsequently, we identified two additional patients with epileptic encephalopathy and de novo KCNB1 missense mutations that cause a similar pattern of KV2.1 dysfunction. Interpretation Our genetic and functional evidence demonstrate that KCNB1 mutation can result in early onset epileptic encephalopathy. This expands the locus heterogeneity associated with epileptic encephalopathies and suggests that clinical WES may be useful for diagnosis of epileptic encephalopathies of unknown etiology. PMID:25164438

  19. Toward Epileptic Brain Region Detection Based on Magnetic Nanoparticle Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Pedram, Maysam Z.; Shamloo, Amir; Alasty, Aria; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Resection of the epilepsy foci is the best treatment for more than 15% of epileptic patients or 50% of patients who are refractory to all forms of medical treatment. Accurate mapping of the locations of epileptic neuronal networks can result in the complete resection of epileptic foci. Even though currently electroencephalography is the best technique for mapping the epileptic focus, it cannot define the boundary of epilepsy that accurately. Herein we put forward a new accurate brain mapping technique using superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs). The main hypothesis in this new approach is the creation of super-paramagnetic aggregates in the epileptic foci due to high electrical and magnetic activities. These aggregates may improve tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that results in improving the resection of epileptic foci. In this paper, we present the mathematical models before discussing the simulation results. Furthermore, we mimic the aggregation of SPMNs in a weak magnetic field using a low-cost microfabricated device. Based on these results, the SPMNs may play a crucial role in diagnostic epilepsy and the subsequent treatment of this disease. PMID:26402686

  20. Epileptic networks studied with EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Gotman, Jean

    2008-01-01

    It is not easy to determine the location of the cerebral generators and the other brain regions that may be involved at the time of an epileptic spike seen in the scalp EEG. The possibility to combine EEG recording with functional MRI scanning (fMRI) opens the opportunity to uncover the regions of the brain showing changes in metabolism and blood flow in response to epileptic spikes seen in the EEG. These regions are presumably involved in the abnormal neuronal activity at the origin of epileptic discharges. This paper reviews the methodology involved in performing such studies, including the special techniques required for recording the EEG inside the scanner and the statistical issues in analyzing the fMRI signal. We then discuss the results obtained in patients with different types of focal epileptic disorders and in patients with primary generalized epilepsy. The results in general indicate that interictal epileptic discharges may affect brain areas well beyond the presumed region in which they are generated. The noninvasive nature of this method opens new horizons in the investigation of brain regions involved and affected by epileptic discharges.

  1. Does transcranial stimulation for motor evoked potentials (TcMEP) worsen seizures in epileptic patients following spinal deformity surgery?

    PubMed

    Salem, Khalid M I; Goodger, Laura; Bowyer, Katherine; Shafafy, Masood; Grevitt, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the effect of Transcranial Motor Evoked Potentials (TcMEP) in increasing the severity or frequency of post-operative seizures in patients undergoing deformity corrective spine surgery with a known history of seizures pre-operatively. The information on all patients with history of epilepsy/seizures who underwent spinal TcMEP cord monitoring for deformity correction surgery was retrospectively collected through a review of the hospital notes. The benefits of TcMEP in the early detection of potential cord ischemia were deemed by the operating surgeon to outweigh the increased risks of seizures, tongue biting, etc. Data on age, gender, pre-operative diagnosis, curve type, intra-operative monitoring alerts, duration of hospital stay, and post-operative in-hospital seizures were collected. Additionally, the patients were contacted following discharge and data on any change in the frequency of the seizures or an alteration in seizure-related medication post-operatively was also collected. The records of 449 consecutively monitored patients were reviewed and 12 (2.7 %) patients with a history of seizures pre-operatively were identified. The mean age was 23 (9-59) years, 7 females, 11 scoliosis corrections (4 neuromuscular, 1 degenerative, 6 idiopathic adolescent), and one sagittal balance correction surgery. Intra-operatively, all patients had TcMEP monitoring, were catheterised, and had no neuromonitoring alerts or record of tongue biting or laceration. Post-operatively, the mean hospital stay was 12 (4-25) days with no recorded seizures. At a mean of 23 (12-49) months post-discharge, none of the patients reported a worsening of seizures (pattern or frequency) or required an alteration in the seizure-related medications. TcMEP does not appear to trigger intra-operative or post-operative seizures and is not associated with deterioration in the seizure control of patients suffering seizures pre-operatively.

  2. Convulsive Syncope Induced by Ventricular Arrhythmia Masquerading as Epileptic Seizures: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sabu, John; Regeti, Kalyani; Mallappallil, Mary; Kassotis, John; Islam, Hamidul; Zafar, Shoaib; Khan, Rafay; Ibrahim, Hiyam; Kanta, Romana; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla; Nai, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    It is important but difficult to distinguish convulsive syncope from epileptic seizure in many patients. We report a case of a man who presented to emergency department after several witnessed seizure-like episodes. He had a previous medical history of systolic heart failure and automated implantable converter defibrillator (AICD) in situ. The differential diagnoses raised were epileptic seizures and convulsive syncope secondary to cardiac arrhythmia. Subsequent AICD interrogation revealed ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (v-tach/fib). Since convulsive syncope and epileptic seizure share many similar clinical features, early diagnosis is critical for choosing the appropriate management and preventing sudden cardiac death in patients with presumed epileptic seizure. PMID:27429683

  3. Comparisons of childhood trauma, alexithymia, and defensive styles in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures vs. epilepsy: Implications for the etiology of conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Marcia J; Dwivedi, Alok K; Privitera, Michael D; Isaacs, Kelly; Hughes, Cynthia; Bowman, Michelle

    2013-08-01

    It has been theorized that conversion disorder is the result of emotion that cannot be experienced consciously as feeling states or put into words (i.e., alexithymia), but there is little confirming empirical evidence. We sought to characterize subjects with conversion disorder compared to subjects with a distinct medical illness, using the model of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) vs. epilepsy (ES), on measures of childhood traumatic experience, alexithymia and maturity of psychological defensive strategies. All subjects admitted to the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center were offered self-report questionnaires (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 and Response Evaluation Measure-71) at the outset of evaluation. Diagnosis of each subject was confirmed by video-EEG and we compared subjects with PNES to those with ES on these measures. 82 subjects had ES AND 96 had PNES. Those with PNES were significantly more likely to have experienced childhood trauma in all domains (p=.005 to p=.05), and were significantly more likely to have alexithymia (p=.0267). There was a significant difference in the capacity to identify feelings, and a trend towards significance in capacity to describe feelings. There were no differences in defensive styles between the two groups. PNES diagnosis was associated with female sex, higher alexithymia scores and higher rates of childhood trauma, but not with differences in defensive styles compared to ES. These findings add empirical evidence for theories regarding the cause of conversion disorder and may aid in the design of prospective treatment trials in patients with conversion disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Continuous monitoring of electrodermal activity during epileptic seizures using a wearable sensor.

    PubMed

    Poh, Ming-Zher; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Swenson, Nicholas C; Goyal, Shubhi; Madsen, Joseph R; Picard, Rosalind W

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel method for monitoring sympathetic nervous system activity during epileptic seizures using a wearable sensor measuring electrodermal activity (EDA). The wearable sensor enables long-term, continuous EDA recordings from patients. Preliminary results from our pilot study suggest that epileptic seizures induce a surge in EDA. These changes are greater in generalized tonic-clonic seizures and reflect a massive sympathetic discharge. This paper offers a new approach for investigating the relationship between epileptic seizures and autonomic alterations.

  5. Upregulation of liprin-α1 protein in the temporal neocortex of intractable epileptic patients and experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huan; Wang, Linyuan; Xiao, Fei; Huang, Zuchun; Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Chunlei; Han, Yanbing; Tao, Shuxin; Yang, Hui; Wang, Xuefeng

    2011-08-01

    Intractable epilepsy (IE) patients have synaptic dysfunction. However, the exact mechanism of synaptic function needs further elucidation. The aim of this study was to use immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting to investigate the expression of the Liprin-α1 protein, one of the synapse-associated proteins, in human IE brain tissues and experimental rats and to discuss the possible role of Liprin-α1 in IE. We selected 30 temporal neocortical tissue samples from patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and 10 histologically normal temporal lobes from controls. Fifty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into seven groups; one control group and six groups with epilepsy induced by lithium-pilocarpine administration. Temporal lobe tissues were taken from controls and from rats at 1, 3, 7, 14, 30, and 60 days postseizure. Liprin-α1 was mainly expressed in neurons of human controls and TLE patients and was significantly higher in TLE patients than in controls. Liprin-α1 was also expressed in neurons of control and experimental rats and it was significantly higher in experimental rats than in the control group. The expression of Liprin-α1 in animals in the experimental group gradually increased from Days 1 to 30 postseizure induction and reached a stable level when spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) appeared. These results suggest that an increased expression of Liprin-α1 in the brain may be associated with human IE.

  6. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  7. Constrained fixed-fulcrum reverse shoulder arthroplasty improves functional outcome in epileptic patients with recurrent shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Higgs, Deborah; Bayley, J I L; Lambert, Simon M

    2016-07-18

    To report the results of fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability in patients with epilepsy. A retrospective review was conducted at a single facility. Cases were identified using a computerized database and all clinic notes and operative reports were reviewed. All patients with epilepsy and recurrent shoulder instability were included for study. Between July 2003 and August 2011 five shoulders in five consecutive patients with epilepsy underwent fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty for recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The mean duration of epilepsy in the cohort was 21 years (range, 5-51) and all patients suffered from grand mal seizures. Mean age at the time of surgery was 47 years (range, 32-64). The cohort consisted of four males and one female. Mean follow-up was 4.7 years (range, 4.3-5 years). There were no further episodes of instability, and no further stabilisation or revision procedures were performed. The mean Oxford shoulder instability score improved from 8 preoperatively (range, 5-15) to 30 postoperatively (range, 16-37) (P = 0.015) and the mean subjective shoulder value improved from 20 (range, 0-50) preoperatively to 60 (range, 50-70) postoperatively (P = 0.016). Mean active forward elevation improved from 71° preoperatively (range, 45°-130°) to 100° postoperatively (range, 80°-90°) and mean active external rotation improved from 15° preoperatively (range, 0°-30°) to 40° (20°-70°) postoperatively. No cases of scapular notching or loosening were noted. Fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty should be considered for the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability in patients with epilepsy.

  8. Constrained fixed-fulcrum reverse shoulder arthroplasty improves functional outcome in epileptic patients with recurrent shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Higgs, Deborah; Bayley, J I L; Lambert, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report the results of fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability in patients with epilepsy. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted at a single facility. Cases were identified using a computerized database and all clinic notes and operative reports were reviewed. All patients with epilepsy and recurrent shoulder instability were included for study. Between July 2003 and August 2011 five shoulders in five consecutive patients with epilepsy underwent fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty for recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The mean duration of epilepsy in the cohort was 21 years (range, 5-51) and all patients suffered from grand mal seizures. RESULTS: Mean age at the time of surgery was 47 years (range, 32-64). The cohort consisted of four males and one female. Mean follow-up was 4.7 years (range, 4.3-5 years). There were no further episodes of instability, and no further stabilisation or revision procedures were performed. The mean Oxford shoulder instability score improved from 8 preoperatively (range, 5-15) to 30 postoperatively (range, 16-37) (P = 0.015) and the mean subjective shoulder value improved from 20 (range, 0-50) preoperatively to 60 (range, 50-70) postoperatively (P = 0.016). Mean active forward elevation improved from 71° preoperatively (range, 45°-130°) to 100° postoperatively (range, 80°-90°) and mean active external rotation improved from 15° preoperatively (range, 0°-30°) to 40° (20°-70°) postoperatively. No cases of scapular notching or loosening were noted. CONCLUSION: Fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty should be considered for the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability in patients with epilepsy. PMID:27458554

  9. Psychosocial conditions in adults with Crouzon syndrome: a follow-up study of 31 Swedish patients.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sara; Tovetjärn, Robert; Maltese, Giovanni; Sahlin, Per-Erik; Tarnow, Peter; Kölby, Lars

    2014-08-01

    Crouzon syndrome presents with craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, exophtalmus, and sometimes hampered neuropsychological development. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the quality of life for adult patients with Crouzon syndrome. Forty patients with Crouzon syndrome born before 1990 could be identified. A questionnaire addressing education, employment, social relations, and quality-of-life was used. A matched control group was created for comparison. Logistic regression, correcting for the influence of age and sex, was used to compare patients and controls. Thirty-one patients and 285 controls answered the questionnaire. The level of education was lower in patients than in controls (p < 0.015). Patients were less often married or had a partner (p = 0.059), had fewer children of their own (p = 0.004), and had less experience of a sexual relationship (p < 0.001). The difference in housing was not significant, and only one patient lived in a care centre and three patients required a personal assistant to manage activities of daily living. The patients' estimation of their somatic health was equal to that of the controls, but the patients more often used anti-epileptic medication (p = 0.003). Periods of depressive mood were more common in patients (p = 0.001), but there was no difference between the groups regarding a general positive attitude to life. In conclusion, patients with Crouzon syndrome often have intellectual and social shortcomings that negatively affect their lives. However, the range of abilities is wide in this group.

  10. Increased expression of histone deacetylases 2 in temporal lobe epilepsy: a study of epileptic patients and rat models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Fenghua; Wang, Liang; Yin, Huan; Zhou, Chunlei; Wang, Xuefeng

    2012-02-01

    Histone deacetylases 2 (HDAC2) is expressed in the central nervous system; it has multiple functions in neural plasticity. However, we do not know if HDAC2 is also involved in the pathology of epilepsy. Here we report that HDAC2 was expressed in the brain tissues of both control and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients. Results from immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry showed that HDAC2 was primarily located in the nucleus and that TLE patients exhibit significantly more HDAC2 positive cells than control. Western blotting showed that HDAC2 protein levels were significantly higher in TLE than in control brain. Moreover, in the rat model of TLE, there was a sustained enhancement of HDAC2 expression in rat models of TLE. HDAC2 was significantly increased in both the acute (1 day) and chronic (60 days) animals compared with control group. These results suggest that HDAC2 play an important role in the pathogenesis of human TLE.

  11. Potential relationships between transaminase abnormality and valproic acid clearance or serum carnitine concentrations in Japanese epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shuji; Seo, Takayuki; Hagiwara, Takashi; Ueda, Kentaro; Yamauchi, Tsuyuko; Nagata, Shiro; Ando, Yukio; Ishitsu, Takateru; Nakagawa, Kazuko

    2008-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the determinants of mild liver injury are prerequisites for more severe idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. This study verified whether the possible risk factors for rare idiosyncratic valproic acid (VPA)-induced hepatotoxicity, VPA clearance and/or serum carnitine concentrations are common to those for a mild elevation in transaminases in VPA-treated patients. VPA clearance was calculated in 172 Japanese patients with epilepsy, using a non-linear mixed-effects regression program. Carnitine concentrations were determined in a subset of 60 patients. The relationships between VPA clearance, carnitine concentration and levels of transaminases and ammonia were evaluated by Pearson's correlation coefficients. The final model of VPA apparent clearance (CL/F) was as follows: CL/F (L h(-1) = 0.012 x (BW/40)(0.34) x dose(0.55) x 0.90(gender) x 1.32(PHT) x 1.11(CBZ) x 1.12(PB), where BW = total body weight (kg); gender = 1 if female, 0 if male; PHT/CBZ/PB = 1 if phenytoin, carbamazepine, or phenobarbital, respectively, is coadministrated, otherwise 0. Either a higher VPA clearance or acyl/free carnitine ratio and a lower total and/or free carnitine concentration, but not VPA concentration, were associated with the mild elevation in transaminases or ammonia. These results support the initial hypothesis, while also helping to clarify the mechanism of severe idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity with VPA.

  12. [Childhood-onset epileptic blindness--clinical correlates and outcomes].

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eli; Ravid, Sarit; Andraus, Jameel

    2004-01-01

    Acute blindness is a rare presentation of epileptic disorders referring to loss of sight without loss of consciousness corroborating with epileptic discharges recorded on the EEG. We summarized the pertinent literature on childhood-onset epileptic blindness. We also report on our overall experience with 26 children having developed epileptic amaurosis. This includes descriptions of the associated seizures. EEG abnormalities and reports on the response to anti-epileptic therapy as regards to resolution of blindness and control of associated seizures. Our data for children with epileptic blindness is similar to previous reports regarding the reported duration of blindness and associated seizures, as well as the overall response to therapy and outcome. In our study, 25 children experienced acute episodes of complete visual obscuration lasting for 1-10 minutes and one 4-month-old infant had blindness from birth, representing status epilepticus amauroticus. Ten patients had accompanying generalized seizures, with a photosensitive response recorded in three cases. All of these children were treated with valproic acid regaining full vision and eight became seizure free. Ten children had accompanying focal motor seizures and unilateral temporo-posterior epileptic discharges recorded on EEG and two additional cases had isolated blindness and focal discharges. All 12 children were treated with carbamazepine, regaining full vision and complete seizure control in eleven. One infant with status epilepticus amauroticus since birth, secondary to a persistent epileptic focus over the right central-posterior areas, regained full vision following resection of an area of cortical dysplasia at the age of 8 months. Four additional children had the constellation of migraine headaches, focal motor seizures and complete blindness along with occipital EEG discharges, compatible with the syndrome of late-onset benign childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms (Gastaut syndrome). They were

  13. Correlation Between IL-10 and microRNA-187 Expression in Epileptic Rat Hippocampus and Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Alsharafi, Walid A.; Xiao, Bo; Abuhamed, Mutasem M.; Bi, Fang-Fang; Luo, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence is emerging that microRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators in controlling neuroinflammatory responses that are known to play a potential role in the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The aim of the present study was to investigate the dynamic expression pattern of interleukin (IL)-10 as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and miR-187 as a post-transcriptional inflammation-related miRNA in the hippocampus of a rat model of status epilepticus (SE) and patients with TLE. We performed a real-time quantitative PCR and western blot on rat hippocampus 2 h, 7 days, 21 days and 60 days following pilocarpine-induced SE, and on hippocampus obtained from TLE patients and normal controls. To detect the relationship between IL-10 and miR-187 on neurons, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and IL-10-stimulated neurons were performed. Furthermore, we identified the effect of antagonizing miR-187 by its antagomir on IL-10 secretion. Here, we reported that IL-10 secretion and miR-187 expression levels are inversely correlated after SE. In patients with TLE, the expression of IL-10 was also significantly upregulated, whereas miR-187 expression was significantly downregulated. Moreover, miR-187 expression was significantly reduced following IL-10 stimulation in an IL-10–dependent manner. On the other hand, antagonizing miR-187 promoted the production of IL-10 in hippocampal tissues of rat model of SE. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of miR-187 in the physiological regulation of IL-10 anti-inflammatory responses and elucidate the role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of TLE. Therefore, modulation of the IL-10 / miR-187 axis may be a new therapeutic approach for TLE. PMID:26696826

  14. In vivo detection of epileptic brain tissue using static fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Nitin; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Ragheb, John; Mehta, Rupal; Jayakar, Prasanna; Yong, William; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2013-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are used to detect histopathological abnormalities of an epileptic brain in a human subject study. Static diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra are acquired from normal and epileptic brain areas, defined by electrocorticography (ECoG), from pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Biopsy specimens are taken from the investigated sites within an abnormal brain. Spectral analysis reveals significant differences in diffuse reflectance spectra and the ratio of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra from normal and epileptic brain areas defined by ECoG and histology. Using these spectral differences, tissue classification models with accuracy above 80% are developed based on linear discriminant analysis. The differences between the diffuse reflectance spectra from the normal and epileptic brain areas observed in this study are attributed to alterations in the static hemodynamic characteristics of an epileptic brain, suggesting a unique association between the histopathological and the hemodynamic abnormalities in an epileptic brain.

  15. Consciousness in Non-Epileptic Attack Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reuber, M.; Kurthen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) is one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. Impairment of consciousness is the key feature of non-epileptic attacks (NEAs). The first half of this review summarises the clinical research literature featuring observations relating to consciousness in NEAD. The second half places this evidence in the wider context of the recent discourse on consciousness in neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. We argue that studies of consciousness should not only distinguish between the ‘level’ and ‘content’ of consciousness but also between ‘phenomenal consciousness’ (consciousness of states it somehow “feels to be like”) and ‘access consciousness’ (having certain ‘higher’ cognitive processes at one’s disposal). The existing evidence shows that there is a great intra- and interindividual variability of NEA experience. However, in most NEAs phenomenal experience – and, as a precondition for that experience, vigilance or wakefulness – is reduced to a lesser degree than in those epileptic seizures involving impairment of consciousness. In fact, complete loss of “consciousness” is the exception rather than the rule in NEAs. Patients, as well as external observers, may have a tendency to overestimate impairments of consciousness during the seizures. PMID:21447903

  16. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  17. Hypnotic induction of an epileptic seizure: a brief communication.

    PubMed

    Bryant, R A; Somerville, E

    1995-07-01

    This case study investigated the utility of hypnosis to precipitate a seizure in a patient with refractory epilepsy. The patient was twice administered a hypnotic induction and a suggestion to age regress to a day when he was distressed and suffered repeated seizures. The patient did not respond to the first hypnotic suggestion; however, an epileptic seizure was observed in the second hypnotic session. Videorecording and subdural electroencephalograph recording confirmed that he suffered an epileptic seizure. Postexperimental inquiry revealed that the patient used deliberate cognitive strategies to avoid seizure onset in the first session but adopted a more constructive cognitive style in the second session. Findings are discussed in terms of emotions, hypnosis, and cognitive style as mediating factors in the experimental precipitation of epileptic seizures.

  18. Occurrence and clinical features of epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysmal events in five children with Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Filloux, Francis M; Carey, John C; Krantz, Ian D; Ekstrand, Jeffrey J; Candee, Meghan S

    2012-05-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare, sporadic genetic disorder caused by tetrasomy 12p mosaicism associated with a supernumerary isochromosome. Craniofacial dysmorphism, learning impairment and seizures are considered characteristic. However, little is known of the seizure and epilepsy patterns seen in PKS. To better define the occurrence and nature of epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysmal events in PKS, we describe our experience with 5 patients and compare their features with data from a larger cohort of PKS patients ascertained via a web-based parental questionnaire. Three of the 5 patients have had definite epileptic seizures, and one other has had paroxysmal events as yet not clarified. Four of the 5 have also had either non-epileptic paroxysmal events or episodes of uncertain nature. In those with epilepsy, all have had some period of relatively refractory seizures, all have required more than one antiepileptic drug, but none experienced status epilepticus. Only one of the patients with epilepsy (the oldest) has gone into remission. In two of the four with non-epileptic events, video-electroencephalographic monitoring has been valuable in clarifying the nature of the events. EEG characteristics include a slow dominant frequency as well as generalized and focal epileptiform features. Brain MRI findings can be normal but are variable. These specific findings correspond well to information reported by parents in a larger cohort of 51 individuals with PKS. Better understanding of the nature of epileptic and non-epileptic events in PKS will result from a more detailed analysis of objective data obtained from this larger cohort, and from deeper understanding of the molecular impact of 12p tetrasomy in selected cell lines.

  19. Occurrence and clinical features of epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysmal events in five children with Pallister–Killian syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Filloux, Francis M.; Carey, John C.; Krantz, Ian D.; Ekstrand, Jeffrey J.; Candee, Meghan S.

    2013-01-01

    Pallister–Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare, sporadic genetic disorder caused by tetrasomy 12p mosaicism associated with a supernumerary isochromosome. Craniofacial dysmorphism, learning impairment and seizures are considered characteristic. However, little is known of the seizure and epilepsy patterns seen in PKS. To better define the occurrence and nature of epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysmal events in PKS, we describe our experience with 5 patients and compare their features with data from a larger cohort of PKS patients ascertained via a web-based parental questionnaire. Three of the 5 patients have had definite epileptic seizures, and one other has had paroxysmal events as yet not clarified. Four of the 5 have also had either non-epileptic paroxysmal events or episodes of uncertain nature. In those with epilepsy, all have had some period of relatively refractory seizures, all have required more than one antiepileptic drug, but none experienced status epilepticus. Only one of the patients with epilepsy (the oldest) has gone into remission. In two of the four with non-epileptic events, video-electroencephalographic monitoring has been valuable in clarifying the nature of the events. EEG characteristics include a slow dominant frequency as well as generalized and focal epileptiform features. Brain MRI findings can be normal but are variable. These specific findings correspond well to information reported by parents in a larger cohort of 51 individuals with PKS. Better understanding of the nature of epileptic and non-epileptic events in PKS will result from a more detailed analysis of objective data obtained from this larger cohort, and from deeper understanding of the molecular impact of 12p tetrasomy in selected cell lines. PMID:22349688

  20. Are geomagnetic disturbances a risk factor for the sudden unexplained death of epileptic children?

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Ralf; May, Theodor W; Beblo, Martin; Gruhn, Ludwig F

    2003-09-01

    The relationship between geomagnetic disturbances (with amplitudes above 50 nT) and the sudden unexplained death (SUD) of epileptic adults has been controversial up to now. In an autopsy-based cohort study (from 1964 to 1992) 15 epileptic children with SUD aged 1-14 years were compared to 63 epileptic children whose cause of death was known (KCD). The time of death as well as two international geomagnetic indices were assessed: Bartels' planetary 3-h signs (Kp) for the time of death and 2 h before, and the mean planetary daily amplitudes (Ap) on the day of death and on the 4 critical days before (and on the 4 post-mortem days as a control). Among the 15 SUD patients 9 died between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. (universal time) whereas the KCD group showed an approximately uniform distribution of the time of death ( P = 0.026, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test). The Kp signs at death and 2 h before as well as the Ap indices at death and for the 4 pre-mortem days or after were not different in comparisons between the SUD and the KCD group ( P > 0.2, Mann-Whitney test). Furthermore the frequency of sudden storm commencement at death and for the 4 days before revealed no deviation of the SUD (26.7%) from the KCD group (23.8%) ( P > 0.2, Fisher test). The results do not support the hypothesis that geomagnetic disturbances are a risk factor for the sudden unexplained death of epileptic children.

  1. In vivo measurements of limbic glutamate and GABA concentrations in epileptic patients during affective and cognitive tasks: A microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Robert J; Gjini, Klevest; Modur, Pradeep; Meier, Kevin T; Nadasdy, Zoltan; Robinson, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Limbic system structures such as the amygdala (AMG) and the hippocampus (HIPP) are involved in affective and cognitive processing. However, because of the limitations in noninvasive technology, absolute concentrations of the neurotransmitters underlying limbic system engagement are not known. Here, we report changes in the concentrations of the neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the HIPP and the AMG of patients with nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy undergoing surgery for intracranial subdural and depth electrode implantation. We utilized an in-vivo microdialysis technique while subjects were engaged in cognitive tasks with or without emotional content. The performance of an emotion learning task (EmoLearn) was associated with a significant increase in the concentration of glutamate in the HIPP when images with high valence content were processed, as compared to its concentration while processing images with low valence. In addition, significantly decreased levels of glutamate were found in the AMG when images with predominantly low valence content were processed, as compared to its concentration at baseline. The processing of face stimuli with anger/fear content (FaceMatch task) was accompanied with significantly decreased concentrations of GABA in the AMG and HIPP compared to its levels at the baseline. The processing of shapes on the other hand was accompanied with a significantly decreased concentration of the glutamate in the AMG as well as in the HIPP compared to the baseline. Finally, the performance of a nondeclarative memory task (weather prediction task-WPT) was associated with relatively large and opposite changes in the GABA levels compared to the baseline in the AMG (decrease) and the HIPP (increase). These data are relevant for showing an involvement of the amygdala and the hippocampus in emotional processing and provide additional neurochemical clues towards a more refined model of the functional circuitry of the

  2. Suicide-related behaviors in older patients with new anti-epileptic drug use: data from the VA hospital system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently linked antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure to suicide-related behaviors based on meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. We examined the relationship between suicide-related behaviors and different AEDs in older veterans receiving new AED monotherapy from the Veterans Health Administration (VA), controlling for potential confounders. Methods VA and Medicare databases were used to identify veterans 66 years and older, who received a) care from the VA between 1999 and 2004, and b) an incident AED (monotherapy) prescription. Previously validated ICD-9-CM codes were used to identify suicidal ideation or behavior (suicide-related behaviors cases), epilepsy, and other conditions previously associated with suicide-related behaviors. Each case was matched to controls based on prior history of suicide-related behaviors, year of AED prescription, and epilepsy status. Results The strongest predictor of suicide-related behaviors (N = 64; Controls N = 768) based on conditional logistic regression analysis was affective disorder (depression, anxiety, or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); Odds Ratio 4.42, 95% CI 2.30 to 8.49) diagnosed before AED treatment. Increased suicide-related behaviors were not associated with individual AEDs, including the most commonly prescribed AED in the US - phenytoin. Conclusion Our extensive diagnostic and treatment data demonstrated that the strongest predictor of suicide-related behaviors for older patients newly treated with AED monotherapy was a previous diagnosis of affective disorder. Additional, research using a larger sample is needed to clearly determine the risk of suicide-related behaviors among less commonly used AEDs. PMID:20064226

  3. [Neurophysiological markers of generalized and focal epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Kravtsova, E Yu; Shulakova, K V

    To identify neurophysiological markers of focal and generalized epileptic seizures in the inter-epileptic period. Sixty-four patients, including 36 with isolated generalized tonic-clonic seizures and 28 with focal seizures, were examined. The control group consisted of 27 healthy people. EEG-video monitoring and bioelectric activity analysis of the brain during wakefulness and day sleep, spectral EEG analysis, quantitative and quality indicators of sleep were used. In generalized epileptic seizures, alpha rhythm is predominantly recorded in the left hemisphere. In wakefulness, the focal epileptiform activity develops during the first two stages of day sleep. In focal epileptic seizures, delta and beta-2 rhythms were recorded in the left hemisphere, regional epileptiform changes are aggravated during the 1st and 2nd stages of slow sleep initiated in the frontal regions. A focal component of the epileptiform activity in the inter-epileptic period in patients with different types of seizures should be taken into account in examination and treatment planning of patients who had difficulties with the diagnosis of epilepsy type.

  4. A Novel Dynamic Update Framework for Epileptic Seizure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minghui; Hong, Xiaojun; Han, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizure prediction is a difficult problem in clinical applications, and it has the potential to significantly improve the patients' daily lives whose seizures cannot be controlled by either drugs or surgery. However, most current studies of epileptic seizure prediction focus on high sensitivity and low false-positive rate only and lack the flexibility for a variety of epileptic seizures and patients' physical conditions. Therefore, a novel dynamic update framework for epileptic seizure prediction is proposed in this paper. In this framework, two basic sample pools are constructed and updated dynamically. Furthermore, the prediction model can be updated to be the most appropriate one for the prediction of seizures' arrival. Mahalanobis distance is introduced in this part to solve the problem of side information, measuring the distance between two data sets. In addition, a multichannel feature extraction method based on Hilbert-Huang transform and extreme learning machine is utilized to extract the features of a patient's preseizure state against the normal state. At last, a dynamic update epileptic seizure prediction system is built up. Simulations on Freiburg database show that the proposed system has a better performance than the one without update. The research of this paper is significantly helpful for clinical applications, especially for the exploitation of online portable devices. PMID:25050381

  5. Impaired picture recognition in transient epileptic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Michaela; Hoefeijzers, Serge; Zeman, Adam; Butler, Christopher; Della Sala, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is an epileptic syndrome characterized by recurrent, brief episodes of amnesia. Transient epileptic amnesia is often associated with the rapid decline in recall of new information over hours to days (accelerated long-term forgetting - 'ALF'). It remains unknown how recognition memory is affected in TEA over time. Here, we report a systematic study of picture recognition in patients with TEA over the course of one week. Sixteen patients with TEA and 16 matched controls were presented with 300 photos of everyday life scenes. Yes/no picture recognition was tested 5min, 2.5h, 7.5h, 24h, and 1week after picture presentation using a subset of target pictures as well as similar and different foils. Picture recognition was impaired in the patient group at all test times, including the 5-minute test, but it declined normally over the course of 1week. This impairment was associated predominantly with an increased false alarm rate, especially for similar foils. High performance on a control test indicates that this impairment was not associated with perceptual or discrimination deficits. Our findings suggest that, at least in some TEA patients with ALF in verbal recall, picture recognition does not decline more rapidly than in controls over 1week. However, our findings of an early picture recognition deficit suggest that new visual memories are impoverished after minutes in TEA. This could be the result of deficient encoding or impaired early consolidation. The early picture recognition deficit observed could reflect either the early stages of the process that leads to ALF or a separable deficit of anterograde memory in TEA. Lastly, our study suggests that at least some patients with TEA are prone to falsely recognizing new everyday visual information that they have not in fact seen previously. This deficit, alongside their ALF in free recall, likely affects everyday memory performance.

  6. Is there anything distinctive about epileptic deja vu?

    PubMed

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Zeman, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Déjà vu can occur as an aura of temporal lobe epilepsy and in some psychiatric conditions but is also common in the general population. It is unclear whether any clinical features distinguish pathological and physiological forms of déjà vu. 50 epileptic patients with ictal déjà vu, 50 non-epileptic patients attending general neurology clinics and 50 medical students at Edinburgh University were recruited. Data were collected on demographic factors, the experience of déjà vu using a questionnaire based on Sno's Inventory for Déjà Vu Experiences Assessment, symptoms of anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale as well as seizure characteristics, anti-epileptic medications, handedness, EEG and neuroimaging findings for epileptic patients. 73.5% of neurology patients, 88% of students and (by definition) all epilepsy patients had experienced déjà vu. The experience of déjà vu itself was similar in the three groups. Epileptic déjà vu occurred more frequently and lasted somewhat longer than physiological déjà vu. Epilepsy patients were more likely to report prior fatigue and concentrated activity, associated derealisation, olfactory and gustatory hallucinations, physical symptoms such as headaches, abdominal sensations and fear. After controlling for study group, anxiety and depression scores were not associated with déjà vu frequency. Déjà vu is common and qualitatively similar whether it occurs as an epileptic aura or normal phenomenon. However ictal déjà vu occurs more frequently and is accompanied by several distinctive features. It is distinguished primarily by 'the company it keeps'.

  7. Relations between epileptic seizures and headaches.

    PubMed

    Gameleira, Fernando Tenório; Ataíde, Luiz; Raposo, Maria Cristina Falcão

    2013-10-01

    To describe headaches in patients with epilepsy and try to identify relations between epileptic seizures and headaches. Cross-sectional study, with 304 patients from the epilepsy out-patient section of University Hospital of Federal University of Alagoas (Brazil) between February 2007 and February 2008. The presence of headaches and their relationships with the epileptic seizures were analyzed. Frequent seizures were associated with a greater tendency of occurrence of headaches (odds ratio=1.6 times, p=0.077). Headaches occurred in 66.1% of the cases. The highest occurrence was of migraine (32.9% of the patients), followed by tension-type headaches (9.2%). Two syndromes with a continuum epilepsy-migraine in the same seizure are worth mentioning: migralepsy in 6.6% and epilepgraine in 10.2% of the patients with epilepsy. A high prevalence of headaches in patients with epilepsy was observed, with emphasis on hybrid crises of epilepsy and migraine. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting Epileptic Seizures in Advance

    PubMed Central

    Moghim, Negin; Corne, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6–0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG) data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling), is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity) of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance. PMID:24911316

  9. Inflammation in Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Shandra, Oleksii; Moshé, Solomon L; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2017-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is an infantile epileptic encephalopathy that manifests with infantile spasms (IS), hypsarrhythmia (in ~60% of infants), and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. The etiologies of WS can be structural-metabolic pathologies (~60%), genetic (12%-15%), or of unknown origin. The current treatment options include hormonal treatment (adrenocorticotropic hormone and high-dose steroids) and the GABA aminotransferase inhibitor vigabatrin, while ketogenic diet can be given as add-on treatment in refractory IS. There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets and more effective treatments for WS. Theories about the role of inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis and treatment of WS have emerged, being supported by both clinical and preclinical data from animal models of WS. Ongoing advances in genetics have revealed numerous genes involved in the pathogenesis of WS, including genes directly or indirectly involved in inflammation. Inflammatory pathways also interact with other signaling pathways implicated in WS, such as the neuroendocrine pathway. Furthermore, seizures may also activate proinflammatory pathways raising the possibility that inflammation can be a consequence of seizures and epileptogenic processes. With this targeted review, we plan to discuss the evidence pro and against the following key questions. Does activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain cause epilepsy in WS and does it contribute to the associated comorbidities and progression? Can activation of certain inflammatory pathways be a compensatory or protective event? Are there interactions between inflammation and the neuroendocrine system that contribute to the pathogenesis of WS? Does activation of brain inflammatory signaling pathways contribute to the transition of WS to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Are there any lead candidates or unexplored targets for future therapy development for WS targeting inflammation? © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Detecting Epileptic Regions Based on Global Brain Connectivity Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Andrew; Venkataraman, Archana; Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Liu, Hesheng; Tanaka, Naoro; Madsen, Joseph; Golland, Polina

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to detect epileptic regions based on functional connectivity differences between individual epilepsy patients and a healthy population. Our model assumes that the global functional characteristics of these differences are shared across patients, but it allows for the epileptic regions to vary between individuals. We evaluate the detection performance against intracranial EEG observations and compare our approach with two baseline methods that use standard statistics. The baseline techniques are sensitive to the choice of thresholds, whereas our algorithm automatically estimates the appropriate model parameters and compares favorably with the best baseline results. This suggests the promise of our approach for pre-surgical planning in epilepsy. PMID:24505654

  11. Detecting epileptic regions based on global brain connectivity patterns.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Andrew; Venkataraman, Archana; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Liu, Hesheng; Tanaka, Naoro; Madsen, Joseph; Golland, Polina

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to detect epileptic regions based on functional connectivity differences between individual epilepsy patients and a healthy population. Our model assumes that the global functional characteristics of these differences are shared across patients, but it allows for the epileptic regions to vary between individuals. We evaluate the detection performance against intracranial EEG observations and compare our approach with two baseline methods that use standard statistics. The baseline techniques are sensitive to the choice of thresholds, whereas our algorithm automatically estimates the appropriate model parameters and compares favorably with the best baseline results. This suggests the promise of our approach for pre-surgical planning in epilepsy.

  12. Uncommon T12 Burst Fracture after an Epileptic Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Akiki

    2011-01-01

    People having an epileptic crisis present to the hospital with an altered mental status and generalised fatigue. The most common orthopaedic pathology associated to epilepsy is the undiagnosed posterior shoulder dislocation. These same patients often complain from back pain that is often neglected and misdiagnosed as muscular contracture following the epilepsy crisis. We describe here the case of a patient who presented after here epilepsy crisis with back pain. Investigations revealed an uncommon burst fracture that needed a surgical treatment. Conclusion. Back pain after an epileptic crisis should be investigated more seriously with an adequate clinical examination and a minimum of a radiography of the back. PMID:23198223

  13. Uncommon t12 burst fracture after an epileptic crisis.

    PubMed

    Alian, Akiki

    2011-01-01

    People having an epileptic crisis present to the hospital with an altered mental status and generalised fatigue. The most common orthopaedic pathology associated to epilepsy is the undiagnosed posterior shoulder dislocation. These same patients often complain from back pain that is often neglected and misdiagnosed as muscular contracture following the epilepsy crisis. We describe here the case of a patient who presented after here epilepsy crisis with back pain. Investigations revealed an uncommon burst fracture that needed a surgical treatment. Conclusion. Back pain after an epileptic crisis should be investigated more seriously with an adequate clinical examination and a minimum of a radiography of the back.

  14. Population pharmacokinetics of micafungin in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Gumbo, Tawanda; Hiemenz, John; Ma, Lei; Keirns, James J; Buell, Donald N; Drusano, George L

    2008-03-01

    We performed population pharmacokinetic analysis of micafungin in adult patients treated with doses between 12.5 and 200 mg/day. Our analysis identified a breakpoint patient weight of 66.3 kg above which serum clearance increased by approximately 50%. Patients with weight >66.3 kg may need larger doses to achieve similar exposures to those <66.3 kg. However, the clinical implications are still unknown.

  15. Global Interactions Analysis of Epileptic ECoG Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Guillermo J.; Sola, Rafael G.; Pastor, Jesús

    2007-05-01

    Localization of the epileptogenic zone is an important issue in epileptology, even though there is not a unique definition of the epileptic focus. The objective of the present study is to test ultrametric analysis to uncover cortical interactions in human epileptic data. Correlation analysis has been carried out over intraoperative Electro-Corticography (ECoG) data in 2 patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Recordings were obtained using a grid of 20 electrodes (5×4) covering the lateral temporal lobe and a strip of either 4 or 8 electrodes at the mesial temporal lobe. Ultrametric analysis was performed in the averaged final correlation matrices. By using the matrix of linear correlation coefficients and the appropriate metric distance between pairs of electrodes time series, we were able to construct Minimum Spanning Trees (MST). The topological connectivity displayed by these trees gives useful and valuable information regarding physiological and pathological information in the temporal lobe of epileptic patients.

  16. Complex dynamics of epileptic EEG.

    PubMed

    Kannathal, N; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan K; Choo Min, Lim

    2004-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) - the recorded representation of electrical activity of the brain contain useful information about the state of the brain. Recent studies indicate that nonlinear methods can extract valuable information from neuronal dynamics. We compare the dynamical properties of EEG signals of healthy subjects with epileptic subjects using nonlinear time series analysis techniques. Chaotic invariants like correlation dimension (D2) , largest Lyapunov exponent (lambda1), Hurst exponent (H) and Kolmogorov entropy (K) are used to characterize the signal. Our study showed clear differences in dynamical properties of brain electrical activity of the normal and epileptic subjects with a confidence level of more than 90%. Furthermore to support this claim fractal dimension (FD) analysis is performed. The results indicate reduction in value of FD for epileptic EEG indicating reduction in system complexity.

  17. The Adult Diabetic Patient: An Education Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    finding that he/she, too, must care for sicker patients. To better prepare these patients for life after discharge, patient education must be initiated as...admitted, patient education often begins at the physicians’ office. This paper explores diabetes mellitus in relation to concepts of self-care and adult...betting foj.L eduuation and iio.w, wore ofteni, patient education and follow-up sercvices- a:leL beiny p~rovided on ani outpatient bcdtsis" (p. 36) . Thet

  18. Epileptic spasms in epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures (Doose syndrome).

    PubMed

    Pittau, Francesca; Korff, Christian M; Nordli, Douglas R

    2016-09-01

    To describe the occurrence of epileptic spasms in epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures (EMAS) or Doose syndrome. Case descriptions of patients with EMAS and epileptic spasms. Diagnosis of EMAS was performed according to the following criteria: (1) onset of myoclonic, myoclonic-atonic, or atonic seizures at between 7 months and 6 years of age; (2) normal development before onset of epilepsy; (3) absence of structural cerebral abnormalities on MRI; (4) presence of generalized spike-waves or polyspike-waves on EEG; and (5) exclusion of other myoclonic epilepsies. Four patients with EMAS were included. For each of them, epileptic spasms were documented by video interpretation, or video-EEG when available. Our description of epileptic spasms in four patients with EMAS enlarges the spectrum of seizures that may be observed in this syndrome, as well as the number of epilepsy syndromes which may involve epileptic spasms. This evidence suggests that the presence of epileptic spasms is consistent with a diagnosis of EMAS; epileptic spasms should therefore not be considered a seizure type that excludes diagnosis of this epilepsy syndrome. The prognostic significance of epileptic spasms associated with EMAS remains unknown.

  19. Neuropsychological approaches to epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Melissa; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Gobbi, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Commission report on classification and terminology indicates that "diagnosing an individual as having an encephalopathic course requires demonstration of a failure to develop as expected relative to the same-aged peers or to regress in abilities." In this chapter, basing our discussion on the theoretical framework of neuroconstructivism, on the latest results deriving from functional neuroimaging and on the concept of system epilepsy, we use continuous spike-waves during slow-wave sleep (CSWS) as an example of how non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep spikes interfere with the organization and consolidation of neuropsychological networks in the sensitive phase of development, affecting also interconnected systems. Indeed, recent discoveries show that the normal overnight downscaling of slow wave activity (SWA) from the first to the last hours of sleep is absent in electrical status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) patients, thus impairing the neural process and possibly the local plastic changes associated with learning and other cognitive functions. Moreover, specific patterns of spike-induced activation (especially in perisylvian and/or prefrontal areas) and deactivation of default mode network (DMN) have been shown in patients with CSWS. Consequently, to date, we may conceive that the possible mechanisms underlying neuropsychological disorders in encephalopathic epilepsy (EE) may be double, since NREM sleep interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) induce both a pathologic activation in epileptogenic areas and a pathologic deactivation of DMN beyond the epileptogenic zone. The growing body of literature on the effects of ESES in CSWS provides us with increasing knowledge on the complexity of brain development and a better understanding of plasticity, enlightening the pathogenesis of damage on developing neuropsychological functions. Finally, the need for an individually tailored interpretation of the neuropsychological

  20. Astrocytes in the epileptic brain.

    PubMed

    Wetherington, Jonathon; Serrano, Geidy; Dingledine, Ray

    2008-04-24

    The roles that astrocytes play in the evolution of abnormal network excitability in chronic neurological disorders involving brain injury, such as acquired epilepsy, are receiving renewed attention due to improved understanding of the molecular events underpinning the physiological functions of astrocytes. In epileptic tissue, evidence is pointing to enhanced chemical signaling and disrupted linkage between water and potassium balance by reactive astrocytes, which together conspire to enhance local synchrony in hippocampal microcircuits. Reactive astrocytes in epileptic tissue both promote and oppose seizure development through a variety of specific mechanisms; the new findings suggest several novel astrocyte-related targets for drug development.

  1. Astrocytes in the Epileptic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wetherington, Jonathon; Serrano, Geidy; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The roles that astrocytes play in the evolution of abnormal network excitability in chronic neurological disorders involving brain injury, such as acquired epilepsy, are receiving renewed attention due to improved understanding of the molecular events underpinning the physiological functions of astrocytes. In epileptic tissue, evidence is pointing to enhanced chemical signaling and disrupted linkage between water and potassium balance by reactive astrocytes, which together conspire to enhance local synchrony in hippocampal microcircuits. Reactive astrocytes in epileptic tissue both promote and oppose seizure development through a variety of specific mechanisms; the new findings suggest several novel astrocyte-related targets for drug development. PMID:18439402

  2. [Non-epileptic motor paroxysmal phenomena in wakefulness in childhood].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Víctor L; Arberas, Claudia L

    2013-09-06

    Paroxysmal events in childhood are a challenge for pediatric neurologists, given its highly heterogeneous clinical manifestations, often difficult to distinguish between phenomena of epileptic seizure or not. The non-epileptic paroxysmal episodes are neurological phenomena, with motor, sensory symptoms, and/or sensory impairments, with or without involvement of consciousness, epileptic phenomena unrelated, so no electroencephalographic correlative expression between or during episodes. From the clinical point of view can be classified into four groups: motor phenomena, syncope, migraine (and associated conditions) and acute psychiatric symptoms. In this paper we analyze paroxysmal motor phenomena in awake children, dividing them according to their clinical manifestations: extrapyramidal episodes (paroxysmal kinesiogenic, non kinesiogenic and not related to exercise dyskinesias, Dopa responsive dystonia) and similar symptoms of dystonia (Sandifer syndrome); manifestations of startle (hyperekplexia); episodic eye and head movements (benign paroxysmal tonic upward gaze nistagmus deviation); episodic ataxia (familial episodic ataxias, paroxysmal benign vertigo); stereotyped and phenomena of self-gratification; and myoclonic events (benign myoclonus of early infancy). The detection of these syndromes will, in many cases, allow an adequate genetic counseling, initiate a specific treatment and avoid unnecessary additional studies. Molecular studies have demonstrated a real relationship between epileptic and non-epileptic basis of many of these entities and surely the identification of the molecular basis and understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in many of them allow us, in the near future will benefit our patients.

  3. The ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Ville, Dorothée; Chiron, Catherine; Laschet, Jacques; Dulac, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Hormonal therapy or ketogenic diet often permits overcoming the challenging periods of many epileptic encephalopathies (West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes and encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep), but relapse affects over 20% of patients. We report here a monocenter pilot series of 42 consecutive patients in whom we combined oral steroids with the ketogenic diet for corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent epileptic encephalopathy. We retrospectively evaluated the effect on seizure frequency, interictal spike activity, neuropsychological course, and steroid treatment course. Twenty-three patients had West syndrome (WS), 13 had encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep (CSWS), and six others had miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. All patients succeeded to reach 0.8 to 1.6g/l ketone bodies in the urine following the usual KD regimen. For at least 6 months, 14/42 responded to the addition of the ketogenic diet: 4/23 with WS, 8/13 with CSWS, and 2/6 with miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. The addition of the KD allowed withdrawing steroids in all responders. Among them, 10/15 had been patients with steroid-dependent epileptic encephalopathy and 4/27 patients with steroid-resistant epileptic encephalopathy. Therefore, the ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies. Patients presenting with steroid-dependent CSWS seem to be the best candidates.

  4. Giant Intradural Mucocele in a Patient with Adult Onset Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Kechagias, E.; Georgakoulias, N.; Ioakimidou, C.; Kyriazi, S.; Kontogeorgos, G.; Seretis, A.

    2009-01-01

    A rare case of mucopyocele in a patient who presented with epileptic seizures is reported. The computed tomography scan (CT) and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an intradural extension of a giant fronto-ethmoidal mucopyocele, eroding the cribriform plate and compressing both frontal lobes. The lesion was removed by craniotomy with elimination of the mass effect and reconstruction of the anterior skull base. An intracranial-intradural mucopyocele is an extremely rare cause of generalized convulsion as a presenting symptom, with only 6 cases reported in the literature. The total removal of the lesion associated with anterior fossa reconstruction is the treatment of choice. PMID:20847833

  5. [Clinical presentation and diagnosis of epileptic auras].

    PubMed

    Barletova, E I; Kremenchugskaia, M R; Mukhin, K Iu; Glukhova, L Iu; Mironov, M B

    2012-01-01

    To define clinical presentations of visual auras and to reveal their clinical, encephalographic and neuroimaging correlates, we examined 23 patients, aged from 5 to 25 years (mean 14±6 years), with focal forms of epilepsy. Patients had visual auras regardless of the etiology of epilepsy which developed immediately before epileptic seizures or were isolated. Patients had simple or complex visual hallucinations, the former occurring more frequently, visual illusions and ictal amaurosis. Positive visual phenomena were noted more frequently than negative ones. In most of the patients, visual hallucinations were associated with the pathological activity in cortical occipital regions of the brain and, in some cases, in temporal and parietal regions. The different pathologies (developmental defects, post-ischemic, atrophic and other disturbances) identified by MRI were found in a half of patients.

  6. Imaging DC MEG Fields Associated with Epileptic Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, B. J.; Bowyer, S. M.; Moran, J. E.; Jenrow, K.; Tepley, N.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive brain imaging modality, with high spatial and temporal resolution, used to evaluate and quantify the magnetic fields associated with neuronal activity. Complex partial epileptic seizures are characterized by hypersynchronous neuronal activity believed to arise from a zone of epileptogenesis. This study investigated the characteristics of direct current (DC) MEG shifts arising at epileptic onset. MEG data were acquired with rats using a six-channel first order gradiometer system. Limbic status epilepticus was induced by IA (femoral) administration of kainic acid. DC-MEG shifts were observed at the onset of epileptic spike train activity and status epilepticus. Epilepsy is also being studied in patients undergoing presurgical mapping from the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Henry Ford Hospital using a whole head Neuromagnetometer. Preliminary data analysis shows that DC-MEG waveforms, qualitatively similar to those seen in the animal model, are evident prior to seizure activity in human subjects.

  7. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy for children with epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Pera, Maria Carmela; Randazzo, Giovanna; Masnada, Silvia; Dontin, Serena Donetti; De Giorgis, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of children affected by epileptic encephalopathy was to evaluate seizure frequency, electroencephalographic pattern and neuropsychological status, before and after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. Eleven children with epileptic encephalopathy were administered one cycle of intravenous methylprednisolone (15-30 mg/kg/day for three consecutive days, once a month for four months) in addition to constant dosages of their regular antiepileptic drugs. The treatment resulted in statistically significant reductions of generalized slow spike-and-wave discharges (p<0.0028) and seizure frequency (p<0.013), which persisted even after methylprednisolone pulse therapy was stopped. A globally positive outcome was noted in 9/11 patients (81.8%). This methylprednisolone treatment regimen did not cause significant or persistent adverse effects. We suggest that children with epileptic encephalopathy without an underlying structural lesion could be the best candidates for intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  8. Detecting and localizing the foci in human epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Boccaletti, Stefano; Pomyalov, Anna; Procaccia, Itamar; Towle, Vernon L.

    2007-12-01

    We consider the electrical signals recorded from a subdural array of electrodes placed on the pial surface of the brain for chronic evaluation of epileptic patients before surgical resection. A simple and computationally fast method to analyze the interictal phase synchrony between such electrodes is introduced and developed with the aim of detecting and localizing the foci of the epileptic seizures. We evaluate the method by comparing the results of surgery to the localization predicted here. We find an indication of good correspondence between the success or failure in the surgery and the agreement between our identification and the regions actually operated on.

  9. Transient epileptic amnesia--a clinical update and a reformulation.

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, N

    1993-01-01

    While absence attacks and complex partial seizures have been well documented in patients with epilepsy, the delineation of pure episodes of memory loss without additional clinical manifestations remains poorly characterised. The recently described condition of transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is critically examined, and four new cases are described, in each of which there were episodes of pure memory loss which subsequently proved to be epileptic in origin. The anatomical and pathophysiological basis of TEA is presumed to be similar to transient global amnesia (TGA), that is, it is likely to be primarily hippocampal in origin, but with more variable involvement of limbic and adjacent temporal lobe neocortical structures. PMID:8229029

  10. Adult Patients' Experiences of Nursing Care Dependence.

    PubMed

    Piredda, Michela; Matarese, Maria; Mastroianni, Chiara; D'Angelo, Daniela; Hammer, Marilyn J; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2015-09-01

    Care dependence can be associated with suffering and humiliation. Nurses' awareness of patients' perception of care dependence is crucial to enable them in helping the dependent persons. This study aimed to describe adult patients' experience of nursing care dependence. A metasynthesis was conducted to integrate qualitative findings from 18 studies published through December 2014 on adult patients' experiences of care dependency. Procedures included the Johanna Briggs Institute approach for data extraction, quality appraisal, and integration of findings. The experience of dependence revealed the concept of the embodied person, particularly in relation to care of the physical body. The relationship between the individual and nurses within the context of care had a major impact for dependent patients. When the care relation was perceived as positive, the experience led to the development of the person in finding new balances in life, but when it was perceived as negative, it increased patient' suffering. Care dependence is manifested mostly as bodily dependence and is consistent with its relational nature. The nurse-patient relationship is important to the dependent patients' experience. A greater understanding of patients' experiences of dependence is crucial to enable nurses in improving care and decreasing patient suffering. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. The adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Baum, V C

    1996-02-01

    In adults with congenital heart disease who are confronted with noncardiac surgery, perioperative risks can be reduced, often appreciably, when problems inherent to this patient population are anticipated. The first necessity is to clarify the diagnosis and to be certain that appropriate information is obtained from a cardiologist with adequate knowledge of congenital heart disease in adults. Physiology and anatomy can vary significantly among patients who superficially carry identical diagnoses. Elective noncardiac surgery should be preceded by clinical assessment including review of clinical and laboratory data and securing the results of necessary diagnostic studies. Preoperative assessment should be performed far enough in advance of the anticipated date of surgery to allow critical assessment of the data and potential discussions with colleagues. Appropriate cardiovascular laboratory studies to be obtained or reviewed include electrocardiograms, chest radiographs, echocardiograms, and cardiac catheterization data, which may include specialized intracardiac electrophysiologic testing. Congenital heart disease in adults is a new and evolving area of special interest and expertise in cardiovascular medicine. Multidisciplinary centers for the care of these patients are being developed. The 22nd Bethesda Conference recommended that these centers include among their consultants anesthesiologists with special expertise in managing patients with congenital heart disease. These anesthesiologists can have the option of serving either as the attending anesthesiologists when patients require noncardiac surgery or as consultants and resource individuals to other anesthesiologists.

  12. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.; Eisenstadt, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  13. Epileptic Seizure Forewarning by Nonlinear Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.

    2002-04-19

    This report describes work that was performed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (Contractor) and a commercial participant, VIASYS Healthcare Inc. (formerly Nicolet Biomedical, Inc.). The Contractor has patented technology that forewarns of impending epileptic events via scalp electroencephalograph (EEG) data and successfully demonstrated this technology on 20 datasets from the Participant under pre-CRADA effort. This CRADA sought to bridge the gap between the Contractor's existing research-class software and a prototype medical device for subsequent commercialization by the Participant. The objectives of this CRADA were (1) development of a combination of existing computer hardware and Contractor-patented software into a clinical process for warning of impending epileptic events in human patients, and (2) validation of the epilepsy warning methodology. This work modified the ORNL research-class FORTRAN for forewarning to run under a graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI-FORTRAN software subsequently was installed on desktop computers at five epilepsy monitoring units. The forewarning prototypes have run for more than one year without any hardware or software failures. This work also reported extensive analysis of model and EEG datasets to demonstrate the usefulness of the methodology. However, the Participant recently chose to stop work on the CRADA, due to a change in business priorities. Much work remains to convert the technology into a commercial clinical or ambulatory device for patient use, as discussed in App. H.

  14. Fractal Dimension in Epileptic EEG Signal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthayakumar, R.

    greater speed and the criterion to choose the maximum and minimum values for time intervals. Comparisons with the other waveform fractal dimension algorithms are also demonstrated. In order to discriminate the Healthy and the Epileptic EEGs, an improved method of Multifractal Measure such as Generalized Fractal Dimensions (GFD) is also proposed. Finally we conclude that there are significant differences between the Healthy and Epileptic Signals in the designed method than the GFD through graphical and statistical tools. The improved multifractal measure is very efficient technique to analyze the EEG Signals and to compute the state of illness of the Epileptic patients.

  15. Imaging adult patients with Fontan circulation.

    PubMed

    Ginde, Salil; Goot, Benjamin H; Frommelt, Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Survival after the Fontan procedure for palliation of single ventricle congenital heart disease has improved. However, adults with Fontan circulation are at risk for several complications including heart failure, thromboembolism, and protein-losing enteropathy. This review discusses the role of noninvasive imaging for surveillance and early detection of anatomic and functional abnormalities of the Fontan circulation that can impact the risk for Fontan failure over time. Echocardiography is the first-line imaging modality for the adult Fontan patient. Use of established techniques, such as tissue Doppler imaging, and newer techniques, such as myocardial deformation and three-dimensional imaging, has improved the ability of echocardiography to serially assess ventricular and valvular function in this population. Strain imaging, in particular, is effective for early detection of subclinical ventricular dysfunction, is reproducible and can be incorporated into a routine clinical echocardiography protocol. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging complements echocardiography and overcomes the limitation of poor acoustic windows in adult patients, especially with regards to visualizing the cavopulmonary anastomoses and pulmonary arteries. High resolution imaging with CMR provides reliable assessment of ventricular size and function. Novel techniques utilizing CMR, such as computational fluid dynamics, have provided important insights into Fontan fluid dynamics, and the impact of Fontan geometry on flow efficiency through the circulation. Recent advances in echocardiography and CMR have improved detection of structural and functional abnormalities in adults with Fontan circulation and are essential in monitoring for complications in this growing population.

  16. [Difficult situations in radiotherapy: agitated adult patients].

    PubMed

    Noël, S; Noël, G

    2013-10-01

    The causes of agitation in adult patients are numerous. Agitation may cause difficulty or impossibility to initiate the radiotherapy technique but also can lead to accidents harmful to patients. However, the decision to not irradiate agitated patients may lead to a loss of curability chance or chance to palliate symptoms. Before taking such a decision, thinking about the possibilities available to calm the patient should be undertaken with the patient and the referring practitioners to attempt to make this therapy if it is considered major in the management of cancer. In all cases, current adaptations of radiotherapy should be used to deliver an effective radiation of a suitable time and safely. It is notable that the medical literature is extremely rare on this subject. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Drug utilization pattern of anti-epileptic drugs: a pharmacoepidemiologic study in Oman.

    PubMed

    Hanssens, Y; Deleu, D; Al Balushi, K; Al Hashar, A; Al-Zakwani, I

    2002-10-01

    To get an insight into the type and aetiology of epileptic seizures; to describe the drug utilization pattern of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) for the treatment of various forms of epileptic seizures in this tertiary referral centre in Oman; and to compare our drug utilization pattern with that from other countries. In addition, the tolerability of AEDs and the use of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) were evaluated. In a 6-month study, all epileptic patients aged 14 and above who were prescribed an AED were considered for analysis. Demographic data, type and aetiology of epileptic seizures, AED data, tests performed and adverse drug reaction (ADR) data were collected. A total of 1039 prescriptions originated from 488 epileptic patients. The age ranged from 14 to 77 years (median, 24 years). Generalized tonic-clonic seizures (51%) of idiopathic/cryptogenic origin (83%) were the most common type and aetiology of epileptic seizures, respectively. An average of 1.34 AEDs per patient was prescribed with 78% of patients being on monotherapy. Sodium valproate (49%) was the most frequently prescribed AED, followed by carbamazepine (44%), phenytoin (12%) and lamotrigine (11%). Ten patients suffered an ADR and phenobarbital followed by carbamazepine were most commonly the subject of TDM. Unlike the results in most other studies, generalized seizures represented the majority of epileptic seizures. The selection of the AEDs corresponded well with their known efficacy profiles for specific epileptic seizure types. Monotherapy was the type of therapy most frequently used, and sodium valproate and carbamazepine were the most commonly used AEDs.

  18. Similar semiology of epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures recorded during stereo-EEG.

    PubMed

    Ostrowsky-Coste, Karine; Montavont, Alexandra; Keo-Kosal, Pascale; Guenot, Marc; Chatillon, Claude-Edouard; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    We report two adolescents with refractory seizure disorders in whom both epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) were recorded with intracerebral EEG. The ictal phenomenology of epileptic seizures (ES) and PNES, consisting of hypermotor attacks in the first patient and left-sided painful episodes in the second patient, proved remarkably similar in both cases, highlighting the difficulties which can arise with the distinction of epileptic seizures and PNES based on ictal phenomenology alone. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Psychogenic non epileptic seizures: a review].

    PubMed

    Auxéméry, Y; Hubsch, C; Fidelle, G

    2011-04-01

    This paper summarizes the recent literature on the phenomena of psychogenic non epileptic seizures (PNES). DEFINITION AND EPIDEMIOLOGY: PNES are, as altered movement, sensation or experience, similar to epilepsy, but caused by a psychological process. Although in the ICD-10, PNES belong to the group of dissociative disorders, they are classified as somatoform disorders in the DSM-IV. That represents a challenging diagnosis: the mean latency between manifestations and diagnosis remains as long as 7 years. It has been estimated that between 10 and 30% of patients referred to epilepsy centers have paroxysmal events that despite looking like epileptic episodes are in fact non-epileptic. Many pseudo epileptic seizures have received the wrong diagnosis of epilepsy being treated with anticonvulsants. The prevalence of epilepsy in PNES patients is higher than in the general population and epilepsy may be a risk factor for PNES. It has been considered that 65 to 80% of PNES patients are young females but a new old men subgroup has been recently described. POSITIVE DIAGNOSIS AND PSYCHIATRIC COMORBIDITIES: Even if clinical characteristics of seizures were defined as important in the diagnosis algorithm, this point of view could be inadequate because of its lack of sensitivity. Because neuron-specific enolase, prolactin and creatine kinase are not reliable and able to validate the diagnosis, video electroencephalography monitoring (with or without provocative techniques) is currently the gold standard for the differential diagnosis of ES, and PNES patients with pseudoseizures have high rates of psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, somatoform symptoms, dissociative disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder. We found evidence for correlations between childhood trauma, history of childhood abuse, PTSD, and PNES diagnoses. PNES could also be hypothesized of a dissociative phenomena generated by childhood trauma. Some authors report that PNES can be associated with

  20. Apneas observed in trisomy 18 neonates should be differentiated from epileptic apneas.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Tatsuya; Kubota, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Masaharu; Asada, Hideyuki; Matsusawa, Kaname; Hattori, Tetsuo; Kato, Yuichi; Negoro, Tamiko

    2015-03-01

    Many children with trisomy 18 have apneas from the neonatal period. It has been reported that some children with trisomy 18 have epilepsy, including epileptic apneas. However, no previous report has described epileptic apneas in trisomy 18 neonates. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of neonates with trisomy 18 who were born at Anjo Kosei Hospital between July 2004 and October 2013 and investigated whether they had epileptic apneas during the neonatal period and whether antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were effective for treating them. We identified 16 patients with trisomy 18. Nine patients who died within 3 days of birth were excluded. Five of the remaining seven patients had apneas. All five patients underwent electroencephalograms (EEGs) to assess whether they suffered epileptic apneas. Three of the five patients had EEG-confirmed seizures. In two patients, the apneas corresponded to ictal discharges. In one patient, ictal discharges were recorded when she was under mechanical ventilation, but no ictal discharges that corresponded to apneas were recorded after she was extubated. AEDs were effective for treating the apneas and stabilizing the SpO2 in all three patients. Among neonates with trisomy 18 who lived longer than 3 days, three of seven patients had EEG-confirmed seizures. AEDs were useful for treating their epileptic apneas and stabilizing their SpO2. Physicians should keep epileptic apneas in mind when treating apneas in neonates with trisomy 18.

  1. Selective changes in inhibition as determinants for limited hyperexcitability in the insular cortex of epileptic rats

    PubMed Central

    Bortel, Aleksandra; Longo, Daniela; de Guzman, Philip; Dubeau, François; Biagini, Giuseppe; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The insular cortex (IC) is involved in the generalization of epileptic discharges in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), whereas seizures originating in the IC can mimic the epileptic phenotype seen in some patients with TLE. However, few studies have addressed the changes occurring in the IC in TLE animal models. Here, we analyzed the immunohistochemical and electrophysiological properties of IC networks in non-epileptic control and pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats. Neurons identified with a neuron-specific nuclear protein antibody showed similar counts in the two types of tissue but parvalbumin- and neuropeptide Y-positive interneurons were significantly decreased (parvalbumin, approximately −35%; neuropeptide Y, approximately −38%; P < 0.01) in the epileptic IC. Nonadapting neurons were seen more frequently in the epileptic IC during intracellular injection of depolarizing current pulses. In addition, single-shock electrical stimuli elicited network-driven epileptiform responses in 87% of epileptic and 22% of non-epileptic control neurons (P < 0.01) but spontaneous postsynaptic potentials had similar amplitude, duration and intervals of occurrence in the two groups. Finally, pharmacologically isolated, GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials had more negative reversal potential (P < 0.01) and higher peak conductance (P < 0.05) in epileptic tissue. These data reveal moderate increased network excitability in the IC of pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats. We propose that this limited degree of hyperexcitability originates from the loss of parvalbumin- and neuropeptide Y-positive interneurons that is compensated by an increased drive for GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition. PMID:20497472

  2. Mozart's music in children with drug-refractory epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Toro, Annacarmela; Operto, Francesca Felicia; Ferrarioli, Giuseppe; Pisano, Simone; Viggiano, Andrea; Verrotti, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    Mozart's sonata for two pianos in D major, K448, has been shown to decrease interictal EEG discharges and recurrence of clinical seizures in both adults and young patients. In this prospective, open-label study, we evaluated the effect of listening to a set of Mozart's compositions, according to the Tomatis method, on sleep quality and behavioral disorders, including auto-/hetero-aggression, irritability, and hyperactivity, in a group of children and adolescents with drug-resistant epilepsy. The study group was composed of 11 outpatients (7 males and 4 females), between 1.5years and 21years of age (mean age: 11.9years), all suffering from drug-resistant epileptic encephalopathy (n=11). All of them had a severe/profound intellectual disability associated with cerebral palsy. During the study period, each patient had to listen to a set of Mozart's compositions 2h per day for fifteen days for a total of 30h, which could be distributed over the day depending on the habits and compliance of each patient. The music was filtered by a device preferably delivering higher sound frequencies (>3000Hz) according to the Tomatis principles. The antiepileptic drug therapy remained unchanged throughout the study period. During the 15-day music therapy, 2 out of 11 patients had a reduction of 50-75% in seizure recurrence, and 3 out of 12 patients had a reduction of 75-89%. Overall, 5 (45.4%) out of 11 patients had a ≥50% reduction in the total number of seizures, while the percentage decrease of the total seizure number (11/11) compared with baseline was -51.5% during the 15-day music therapy and -20.7% in the two weeks after the end of treatment. All responders also had an improvement in nighttime sleep and daytime behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epileptic syndrome in systemic lupus erythematosus and neuronal autoantibody associations.

    PubMed

    Kampylafka, E I; Alexopoulos, H; Fouka, P; Moutsopoulos, H M; Dalakas, M C; Tzioufas, A G

    2016-10-01

    We investigated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with epilepsy, a major and organic neurological symptom. Our aim was to test patients for the autoimmune epilepsy-associated antibodies anti-GAD, anti-NMDAR, anti-AMPAR1/2, anti-GABABR and anti-VGKC. We tested sera from ten SLE patients with current or previous episodes of epileptic seizures. In addition, sera were tested for staining on primary hippocampal neurons. The patients' clinical and neuroimaging profile, disease activity and accumulated damage scores and therapeutic regimens administered were recorded, and correlations were evaluated. Patients were negative for all anti-neuronal autoantibodies tested, and showed no staining on primary hippocampal cells, which suggests the absence of autoantibodies against neuronal cell surface antigens. Epileptic seizures were all tonic-clonic, and all patients had high disease activity (mean SLE Damage Acticity Index score 19.3 ± 7.3). Six patients had minor or no brain magnetic resonance imaging findings, and three had major findings. 9/10 patients received immunosuppression for 5 ± 4 months, while anti-convulsive treatment was administered to all patients (4.2 ± 3 years). Our results suggest that the majority of SLE-related epileptic seizures cannot be attributed to the action of a single antibody against neuronal antigens. Studies with larger neuropsychiatric SLE populations and stricter inclusion criteria are necessary to verify these findings.

  4. Absence status seen in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Hasan H; Demir, Caner F; Cura, Hasan S

    2013-07-01

    Absence status epilepticus (ASE) is a type of nonconvulsive status epilepticus in which continuous or recurrent generalized epileptiform discharges are associated with a varying grade of consciousness impairment. Absence status epilepticus may be obtained during progress of many epileptic syndromes, in several metabolic disturbances and related to use of several drugs. Absence status epilepticus is generally seen in childhood; rarely it can be seen in adulthood. In this paper, the case which has never diagnosed until now in spite of many absence seizures for years, applied for absence seizures to our clinic and diagnosed for juvenile absence epilepsy, has been discussed.

  5. Absence status seen in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Hasan H.; Demir, Caner F.; Cura, Hasan S.

    2013-01-01

    Absence status epilepticus (ASE) is a type of nonconvulsive status epilepticus in which continuous or recurrent generalized epileptiform discharges are associated with a varying grade of consciousness impairment. Absence status epilepticus may be obtained during progress of many epileptic syndromes, in several metabolic disturbances and related to use of several drugs. Absence status epilepticus is generally seen in childhood; rarely it can be seen in adulthood. In this paper, the case which has never diagnosed until now in spite of many absence seizures for years, applied for absence seizures to our clinic and diagnosed for juvenile absence epilepsy, has been discussed. PMID:24250182

  6. Frequency interactions in human epileptic brain.

    PubMed

    Cotic, Marija; Zalay, Osbert; Valiante, Taufik; Carlen, Peter L; Bardakjian, Berj L

    2011-01-01

    We have used two algorithms, wavelet phase coherence (WPC) and modulation index (MI) analysis to study frequency interactions in the human epileptic brain. Quantitative analyses were performed on intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) segments from three patients with neocortical epilepsy. Interelectrode coherence was measured using WPC and intraelectrode frequency interactions were analyzed using MI. WPC was performed on electrode pairings and the temporal evolution of phase couplings in the following frequency ranges: 1-4 Hz, 4-8 Hz, 8-13 Hz, 13-30 Hz and 30-100 Hz was studied. WPC was strongest in the 1-4 Hz frequency range during both seizure and non-seizure activities; however, WPC values varied minimally between electrode pairings. The 13-30 Hz band showed the lowest WPC values during seizure activity. MI analysis yielded two prominent patterns of frequency-specific activity, during seizure and non-seizure activities, which were present across all patients.

  7. Dravet syndrome as epileptic encephalopathy: evidence from long-term course and neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Catarino, Claudia B; Liu, Joan Y W; Liagkouras, Ioannis; Gibbons, Vaneesha S; Labrum, Robyn W; Ellis, Rachael; Woodward, Cathy; Davis, Mary B; Smith, Shelagh J; Cross, J Helen; Appleton, Richard E; Yendle, Simone C; McMahon, Jacinta M; Bellows, Susannah T; Jacques, Thomas S; Zuberi, Sameer M; Koepp, Matthias J; Martinian, Lillian; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Thom, Maria; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2011-10-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epilepsy syndrome of infantile onset, frequently caused by SCN1A mutations or deletions. Its prevalence, long-term evolution in adults and neuropathology are not well known. We identified a series of 22 adult patients, including three adult post-mortem cases with Dravet syndrome. For all patients, we reviewed the clinical history, seizure types and frequency, antiepileptic drugs, cognitive, social and functional outcome and results of investigations. A systematic neuropathology study was performed, with post-mortem material from three adult cases with Dravet syndrome, in comparison with controls and a range of relevant paediatric tissue. Twenty-two adults with Dravet syndrome, 10 female, were included, median age 39 years (range 20-66). SCN1A structural variation was found in 60% of the adult Dravet patients tested, including one post-mortem case with DNA extracted from brain tissue. Novel mutations were described for 11 adult patients; one patient had three SCN1A mutations. Features of Dravet syndrome in adulthood include multiple seizure types despite polytherapy, and age-dependent evolution in seizure semiology and electroencephalographic pattern. Fever sensitivity persisted through adulthood in 11 cases. Neurological decline occurred in adulthood with cognitive and motor deterioration. Dysphagia may develop in or after the fourth decade of life, leading to significant morbidity, or death. The correct diagnosis at an older age made an impact at several levels. Treatment changes improved seizure control even after years of drug resistance in all three cases with sufficient follow-up after drug changes were instituted; better control led to significant improvement in cognitive performance and quality of life in adulthood in two cases. There was no histopathological hallmark feature of Dravet syndrome in this series. Strikingly, there was remarkable preservation of neurons and interneurons in the neocortex and hippocampi of Dravet adult post

  8. Dravet syndrome as epileptic encephalopathy: evidence from long-term course and neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Catarino, Claudia B.; Liu, Joan Y.W.; Liagkouras, Ioannis; Gibbons, Vaneesha S.; Labrum, Robyn W.; Ellis, Rachael; Woodward, Cathy; Davis, Mary B.; Smith, Shelagh J.; Cross, J. Helen; Appleton, Richard E.; Yendle, Simone C.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Bellows, Susannah T.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Martinian, Lillian; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Thom, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epilepsy syndrome of infantile onset, frequently caused by SCN1A mutations or deletions. Its prevalence, long-term evolution in adults and neuropathology are not well known. We identified a series of 22 adult patients, including three adult post-mortem cases with Dravet syndrome. For all patients, we reviewed the clinical history, seizure types and frequency, antiepileptic drugs, cognitive, social and functional outcome and results of investigations. A systematic neuropathology study was performed, with post-mortem material from three adult cases with Dravet syndrome, in comparison with controls and a range of relevant paediatric tissue. Twenty-two adults with Dravet syndrome, 10 female, were included, median age 39 years (range 20–66). SCN1A structural variation was found in 60% of the adult Dravet patients tested, including one post-mortem case with DNA extracted from brain tissue. Novel mutations were described for 11 adult patients; one patient had three SCN1A mutations. Features of Dravet syndrome in adulthood include multiple seizure types despite polytherapy, and age-dependent evolution in seizure semiology and electroencephalographic pattern. Fever sensitivity persisted through adulthood in 11 cases. Neurological decline occurred in adulthood with cognitive and motor deterioration. Dysphagia may develop in or after the fourth decade of life, leading to significant morbidity, or death. The correct diagnosis at an older age made an impact at several levels. Treatment changes improved seizure control even after years of drug resistance in all three cases with sufficient follow-up after drug changes were instituted; better control led to significant improvement in cognitive performance and quality of life in adulthood in two cases. There was no histopathological hallmark feature of Dravet syndrome in this series. Strikingly, there was remarkable preservation of neurons and interneurons in the neocortex and hippocampi of Dravet adult post

  9. Increased rates of intermittent rhythmic delta and theta activity in the electroencephalographies of adult patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Endres, Dominique; Maier, Simon; Feige, Bernd; Mokhtar, Nora Bel; Nickel, Kathrin; Goll, Peter; Meyer, Simon A; Matthies, Swantje; Ebert, Dieter; Philipsen, Alexandra; Perlov, Evgeniy; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2017-10-01

    Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder. In subgroups of patients with a (para)epileptic pathomechanism, this might be due to intermittent rhythmic delta or theta activity (IRDA/IRTA). Using a fully data-driven analysis, we compared the IRDA/IRTA rates in the resting electroencephalography (EEG) results of 97 adult patients with ADHD and 30 control subjects. The IRDA/IRTA rates before hyperventilation (HV) and for HV difference (difference between IRDA/IRTA rate after and before HV) were compared between groups using a linear model. We detected significantly increased rates of IRDA/IRTA before HV (F=4.209, p=0.042) in patients with ADHD but no significant difference between the groups for HV-difference (F=2.46, p=0.119). The increased IRDA/IRTA rates before HV in the group with ADHD might lead to (para)epileptic short-term effects (e.g., impulsivity) via local area network inhibition, and to long-term effects (e.g., cognitive deficits) via connectivistic brain restructuring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  11. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  12. Predictive factors for relapse of epileptic spasms after adrenocorticotropic hormone therapy in West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yumiko; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Endoh, Fumika; Ohtsuka, Yoko; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether serial electroencephalographic (EEG) findings can predict relapse of epileptic spasms after synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy in patients with West syndrome (WS). Thirty-nine WS patients (8 cryptogenic and 31 symptomatic) were included in this study. These patients received ACTH therapy for the first time and were regularly followed up for more than three years at our hospital. Sixteen patients (41.0%) showed seizure relapse (relapse group) and 23 patients (59.0%) did not show relapse (non-relapse group). We used survival analysis to investigate the influence of etiology and presence of epileptic discharges after the ACTH therapy on seizure outcome. Immediately after the ACTH therapy, etiology was associated with seizure outcome (p=0.003). In the early stage (1 month after the ACTH therapy), only the presence of epileptic discharges (p=0.001) had a significant association with seizure outcome, regardless of etiology. Because all relapsed patients were in the symptomatic group, we performed the same statistical analysis on symptomatic WS patient data only. We found that the group with no epileptic discharges on EEG showed a significantly higher seizure-free rate than those with epileptic discharges in the early stage (p=0.0091). This study demonstrated that serial EEG findings after ACTH therapy are significantly related to relapse of epileptic spasms. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Epileptic palatal myoclonus

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, W.O.; Sperling, M.R.; Jacobstein, J.G. )

    1991-08-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is usually caused by lesions of the brainstem. The authors report a case of PM of focal cortical origin in a patient with epilepsia partialis continua. The PM sometimes occurred in isolation, and at other times was accompanied by unilateral face, neck, and arm twitching. This was documented by both EEG and SPECT.

  14. Trauma injury in adult underweight patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Lai, Wei-Hung; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the injury characteristics, severity, and outcome between underweight and normal-weight patients hospitalized for the treatment of all kinds of trauma injury. This study was based on a level I trauma center Taiwan. The detailed data of 640 underweight adult trauma patients with a body mass index (BMI) of <18.5 kg/m2 and 6497 normal-weight adult patients (25 > BMI ≥ 18.5 kg/m2) were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and independent Student's t-test were performed to compare the differences. Propensity score matching with logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of underweight on mortality. Underweight patients presented a different bodily injury pattern and a significantly higher rate of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU) than did normal-weight patients; however, no significant differences in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, injury severity score (ISS), in-hospital mortality, and hospital length of stay were found between the two groups. However, further analysis of the patients stratified by two major injury mechanisms (motorcycle accident and fall injury) revealed that underweight patients had significantly lower GCS scores (13.8 ± 3.0 vs 14.5 ± 2.0, P = 0.020), but higher ISS (10.1 ± 6.9 vs 8.4 ± 5.9, P = 0.005), in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.69–11.35; P = 0.006), and ICU admittance rate (24.1% vs 14.3%, P = 0.007) than normal-weight patients in the fall accident group, but not in the motorcycle accident group. However, after propensity score matching, logistic regression analysis of well-matched pairs of patients with either all trauma, motorcycle accident, or fall injury did not show a significant influence of underweight on mortality. Exploratory data analysis revealed that underweight patients

  15. Ketogenic diet efficacy in the treatment of intractable epileptic spasms.

    PubMed

    Kayyali, Husam R; Gustafson, Megan; Myers, Tara; Thompson, Lindsey; Williams, Michelle; Abdelmoity, Ahmad

    2014-03-01

    To determine the efficacy of the ketogenic diet in controlling epileptic spasms after failing traditional antiepileptic medication therapy. This is a prospective, case-based study of all infants with epileptic spasms who were referred for treatment with the ketogenic diet at our hospital between 2009 and 2012. All subjects continued to have epileptic spasms with evidence of hypsarrhythmia or severe epileptic encephalopathy on electroencephalography despite appropriate medication treatments. The diet efficacy was assessed through clinic visits, phone communications, and electroencephalography. Quality of life improvement was charted based on the caregiver's perspective. Twenty infants (15 males) were included in the study. The mean age at seizure onset was 4.5 months. Age at ketogenic diet initiation was 0.3 to 2.9 years (mean 1.20, standard deviation 0.78). Fifteen patients had epileptic spasms of unknown etiology; three had perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, one had lissencephaly, and one had STXBP1 mutation. Fifteen infants failed to respond to adrenocorticotropin hormone and/or vigabatrin before going on the ketogenic diet. Three months after starting the diet, >50% seizure reduction was achieved in 70% of patients (95% CI 48-86). These results were maintained at 6- and 12-month intervals. All eight of the patients followed for 24 months had >50% seizure reduction (95% CI 63-100). At least 90% seizure reduction was reported in 20% of patients at 3 months (95% CI 7-42), 22% (95% CI 8-46) at 6 months, and 35% (95% CI 17-59) at 12 months. The majority of patients (63%) achieved improvement of their spasms within 1 month after starting the diet. Sixty percent of patients had electroencephalographic improvement. All caregivers reported improvement of the quality of life at the 3-month visit (95% confidence interval 81-100). This ratio was 94% at 6 months (95% CI 72-99) and 82% at 12 months (95% CI 58-95). The ketogenic diet is a safe and potentially

  16. Effect of epileptic seizures on the cerebrospinal fluid--A systematic retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Jobs, Catherine; Brettschneider, Johannes; Hoppner, Anselm C; Kerling, Frank; Fauser, Susanne

    2015-08-01

    Analyses of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are obligatory when epileptic seizures manifest for the first time in order to exclude life-threatening causes or treatable diseases such as acute infections or autoimmune encephalitis. However, there are only few systematic investigations on the effect of seizures themselves on CSF parameters and the significance of these parameters in differential diagnosis. CSF samples of 309 patients with epileptic and 10 with psychogenic seizures were retrospectively analyzed. CSF samples were collected between 1999 and 2008. Cell counts, the albumin quotient, lactate and Tau-protein levels were determined. Findings were correlated with seizure types, seizure etiology (symptomatic, cryptogenic, occasional seizure), and seizure duration. Pathological findings were only observed in patients with epileptic but not with psychogenic seizures. The lactate concentration was elevated in 14%, the albumin quotient in 34%, and the Tau protein level in 36% of CSF samples. Cell counts were only slightly elevated in 6% of patients. Different seizure types influenced all parameters except for the cell count: In status epilepticus highest, in simple partial seizures lowest values were seen. Symptomatic partial and generalized epileptic seizures had significantly higher Tau-protein levels than cryptogenic partial seizures. In patients with repetitive and occasional epileptic seizures, higher Tau-protein levels were seen than in those with psychogenic seizures. Duration of epileptic seizures was positively correlated with the albumin quotient, lactate and Tau-protein levels. High variability of investigated CSF parameters within each subgroup rendered a clear separation between epileptic and psychogenic seizures impossible. Elevated cell counts are infrequently observed in patients with epileptic seizures and should therefore not uncritically be interpreted as a postictal phenomenon. However, blood-CSF barrier disruption, increased glucose metabolism

  17. Syndrome of Electrical Status Epilepticus During Sleep: Epileptic Encephalopathy Related to Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Qiao; Zhang, Wei-Na; Hu, Lin-Yan; Liu, Meng-Jia; Zou, Li-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep is an age-related and self-limited disorder. The present study analyzed the etiology, demographics, and pathogenesis of patients with electrical status epilepticus during sleep to provide information on the diagnosis and therapy of this syndrome. The etiologies of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep in patients admitted in Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital from 2009 to 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were classified into the genetic, structural-metabolic, and unknown groups according to the etiology. Demographics and clinical characteristics of all the patients were then analyzed and compared among groups. The etiologies of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep in 75 patients mainly included benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, Landau-Kleffner syndrome, polymicrogyria, and migration disorders. Age at onset of epilepsy did not show a specific pattern, but age at onset of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep was concentrated at age 6-9 years. The mean age at onset of epilepsy in the genetic group was significantly older than that in the structural-metabolic group (P < 0.05). Age at onset of epileptic encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during sleep did not significantly differ between the two groups. Electrical status epilepticus during sleep is an epileptic encephalopathy related to brain development and presents an age-dependent occurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Medical management of epileptic seizures: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Anand K; Khandker, Nabil; Kurczewski, Lisa; Brophy, Gretchen M

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic illnesses. This condition afflicts 2.9 million adults and children in the US, leading to an economic impact amounting to $15.5 billion. Despite the significant burden epilepsy places on the population, it is not very well understood. As this understanding continues to evolve, it is important for clinicians to stay up to date with the latest advances to provide the best care for patients. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 15 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), with many more currently in development. Other advances have been achieved in terms of diagnostic modalities like electroencephalography technology, treatment devices like vagal nerve and deep-brain stimulators, novel alternate routes of drug administration, and improvement in surgical techniques. Specific patient populations, such as the pregnant, elderly, those with HIV/AIDS, and those with psychiatric illness, present their own unique challenges, with AED side effects, drug interactions, and medical–psychiatric comorbidities adding to the conundrum. The purpose of this article is to review the latest literature guiding the management of acute epileptic seizures, focusing on the current challenges across different practice settings, and it discusses studies in various patient populations, including the pregnant, geriatric, those with HIV/AIDS, comatose, psychiatric, and “pseudoseizure” patients, and offers possible evidence-based solutions or the expert opinion of the authors. Also included is information on newer AEDs, routes of administration, and significant AED-related drug-interaction tables. This review has tried to address only some of these issues that any practitioner who deals with the acute management of seizures may encounter. The document also highlights the numerous avenues for new research that would help practitioners optimize epilepsy management. PMID:26966367

  19. Mechanisms of physiological and epileptic HFO generation

    PubMed Central

    Jefferys, John G.R.; de la Prida, Liset Menendez; Wendling, Fabrice; Bragin, Anatol; Avoli, Massimo; Timofeev, Igor; Lopes da Silva, Fernando H.

    2016-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFO) have a variety of characteristics: band-limited or broad-band, transient burst-like phenomenon or steady-state. HFOs may be encountered under physiological or under pathological conditions (pHFO). Here we review the underlying mechanisms of oscillations, at the level of cells and networks, investigated in a variety of experimental in vitro and in vivo models. Diverse mechanisms are described, from intrinsic membrane oscillations to network processes involving different types of synaptic interactions, gap junctions and ephaptic coupling. HFOs with similar frequency ranges can differ considerably in their physiological mechanisms. The fact that in most cases the combination of intrinsic neuronal membrane oscillations and synaptic circuits are necessary to sustain network oscillations is emphasized. Evidence for pathological HFOs, particularly fast ripples, in experimental models of epilepsy and in human epileptic patients is scrutinized. The underlying mechanisms of fast ripples are examined both in the light of animal observations, in vivo and in vitro, and in epileptic patients, with emphasis on single cell dynamics. Experimental observations and computational modeling have led to hypotheses for these mechanisms, several of which are considered here, namely the role of out-of-phase firing in neuronal clusters, the importance of strong excitatory AMPA-synaptic currents and recurrent inhibitory connectivity in combination with the fast time scales of IPSPs, ephaptic coupling and the contribution of interneuronal coupling through gap junctions. The statistical behaviour of fast ripple events can provide useful information on the underlying mechanism and can help to further improve classification of the diverse forms of HFOs. PMID:22420980

  20. Association of RASgrf1 methylation with epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xinwei; Zhou, Ji Xiu; Zhu, Binglin; Luo, Jing; Wang, Xuefeng; Xiao, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation, one of the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation, has been suggested to be related with epilepsy. RASgrf1 is a paternally imprinted gene and has a differentially methylated region (DMR) at the promoter that can silence gene expression. We have previously observed the down-regulation of RASgrf1 in the temporal neocortex of epilepsy patients and in the hippocampus of epileptic animals. Here, we further explored the dynamic change (1-day acute period, 10-day latent period and 45-day chronic phase) of DNA methylation and RASgrf1 expression after acute epileptic seizures in kainic acid (KA)-treated mice, and we observed the impact of N-phthalyl-L-tryptophan (RG108), a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, on an acute epileptic model by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), western blotting, and bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP). The results directly showed that the methylation of the RASgrf1 promoter gradually increased and reached a maximal level at the latent period, with subsequent suppression of RASgrf1 mRNA and protein expression levels, which reached a minimum level in the chronic phase. RG108 inhibited the increased methylation of the RASgrf1 gene, with significant inhibition occurring at the latent period, and restored RASgrf1 expression levels in the chronic phase. In addition, we demonstrated that RG108 could suppress acute epileptic seizures in KA-treated mice and epileptic discharges in 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-treated hippocampal slices. These findings demonstrate that RASgrf1 is closely associated with epilepsy via the aberrant methylation of RASgrf1, and regulating the methylation status of relevant genes might be an intriguing topic in future research on epilepsy. PMID:28611277

  1. Clinical phenotypes in adult patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Stefano; Lonni, Sara; Dore, Simone; McDonnell, Melissa J; Goeminne, Pieter C; Dimakou, Katerina; Fardon, Thomas C; Rutherford, Robert; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Chalmers, James D

    2016-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a heterogeneous disease. This study aimed at identifying discrete groups of patients with different clinical and biological characteristics and long-term outcomes.This was a secondary analysis of five European databases of prospectively enrolled adult outpatients with bronchiectasis. Principal component and cluster analyses were performed using demographics, comorbidities, and clinical, radiological, functional and microbiological variables collected during the stable state. Exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during a 3-year follow-up were recorded. Clusters were externally validated in an independent cohort of patients with bronchiectasis, also investigating inflammatory markers in sputum.Among 1145 patients (median age 66 years; 40% male), four clusters were identified driven by the presence of chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosaor other pathogens and daily sputum: "Pseudomonas" (16%), "Other chronic infection" (24%), "Daily sputum" (33%) and "Dry bronchiectasis" (27%). Patients in the four clusters showed significant differences in terms of quality of life, exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during follow-up. In the validation cohort, free neutrophil elastase activity, myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-1β levels in sputum were significantly different among the clusters.Identification of four clinical phenotypes in bronchiectasis could favour focused treatments in future interventional studies designed to alter the natural history of the disease.

  2. Should we stop saying "epileptic"? A comparison of the effect of the terms "epileptic" and "person with epilepsy".

    PubMed

    Noble, Adam J; Marson, Anthony G

    2016-06-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of using "epileptic" as a noun to describe someone with epilepsy have long been debated. Recent high-profile recommendations have stated that the term should not be used, including in English, as it perpetuates stigma. This decision was largely informed by a Brazilian Global Campaign Against Epilepsy study that reported experimental evidence indicating that, with students, the label evokes more negative attitudes than "person with epilepsy". The generalizability of this effect to different countries/cultures, and thus the justification for the recommendations, has never been tested. We replicated the Brazilian study in the UK, in English, while also addressing methodological limitations. It was powered to detect the effects reported by the Brazilian study, with 234 students completing a survey regarding epilepsy attitudes. Half were randomized to Group 1 and half to Group 2. In Group 1, patients were referred to as "people/person with epilepsy" within the attitudinal measures, while in Group 2 they were referred to as "epileptic/s". Measures included translations of the questions used in the Brazilian study and the Attitudes and Beliefs about Living with Epilepsy scale. Participants' epilepsy familiarity and knowledge were also assessed. The two groups were comparable in characteristics. A comparison of their responses to the attitude measures revealed no statistically significant or meaningful differences. In this English replication, the word "epileptic" did not provoke more negative attitudes. This suggests that the effect reported by the Brazilian study might be culturally dependent. Methodological limitations to that study might also be relevant. Our results have implications for the global debate about how negative attitudes towards epilepsy might be addressed. Simply not saying "epileptic" may not promote the positive attitudes towards epilepsy that had been expected. To know how to best refer to those with epilepsy, evidence

  3. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria) and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies). Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category. PMID:23762547

  4. Grammatical Evolution for Features of Epileptic Oscillations in Clinical Intracranial Electroencephalograms.

    PubMed

    Smart, Otis; Tsoulos, Ioannis G; Gavrilis, Dimitris; Georgoulas, George

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents grammatical evolution (GE) as an approach to select and combine features for detecting epileptic oscillations within clinical intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recordings of patients with epilepsy. Clinical iEEG is used in preoperative evaluations of a patient who may have surgery to treat epileptic seizures. Literature suggests that pathological oscillations may indicate the region(s) of brain that cause epileptic seizures, which could be surgically removed for therapy. If this presumption is true, then the effectiveness of surgical treatment could depend on the effectiveness in pinpointing critically diseased brain, which in turn depends on the most accurate detection of pathological oscillations. Moreover, the accuracy of detecting pathological oscillations depends greatly on the selected feature(s) that must objectively distinguish epileptic events from average activity, a task that visual review is inevitably too subjective and insufficient to resolve. Consequently, this work suggests an automated algorithm that incorporates grammatical evolution (GE) to construct the most sufficient feature(s) to detect epileptic oscillations within the iEEG of a patient. We estimate the performance of GE relative to three alternative methods of selecting or combining features that distinguish an epileptic gamma (~65-95 Hz) oscillation from normal activity: forward sequential feature-selection, backward sequential feature-selection, and genetic programming. We demonstrate that a detector with a grammatically evolved feature exhibits a sensitivity and selectivity that is comparable to a previous detector with a genetically programmed feature, making GE a useful alternative to designing detectors.

  5. Grammatical Evolution for Features of Epileptic Oscillations in Clinical Intracranial Electroencephalograms

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Otis; Tsoulos, Ioannis G.; Gavrilis, Dimitris; Georgoulas, George

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents grammatical evolution (GE) as an approach to select and combine features for detecting epileptic oscillations within clinical intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recordings of patients with epilepsy. Clinical iEEG is used in preoperative evaluations of a patient who may have surgery to treat epileptic seizures. Literature suggests that pathological oscillations may indicate the region(s) of brain that cause epileptic seizures, which could be surgically removed for therapy. If this presumption is true, then the effectiveness of surgical treatment could depend on the effectiveness in pinpointing critically diseased brain, which in turn depends on the most accurate detection of pathological oscillations. Moreover, the accuracy of detecting pathological oscillations depends greatly on the selected feature(s) that must objectively distinguish epileptic events from average activity, a task that visual review is inevitably too subjective and insufficient to resolve. Consequently, this work suggests an automated algorithm that incorporates grammatical evolution (GE) to construct the most sufficient feature(s) to detect epileptic oscillations within the iEEG of a patient. We estimate the performance of GE relative to three alternative methods of selecting or combining features that distinguish an epileptic gamma (~65-95 Hz) oscillation from normal activity: forward sequential feature-selection, backward sequential feature-selection, and genetic programming. We demonstrate that a detector with a grammatically evolved feature exhibits a sensitivity and selectivity that is comparable to a previous detector with a genetically programmed feature, making GE a useful alternative to designing detectors. PMID:21607200

  6. Content analysis of subjective experiences in partial epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Mirja; Valli, Katja; Revonsuo, Antti; Wedlund, Jan-Eric

    2008-01-01

    A new content analysis method for systematically describing the phenomenology of subjective experiences in connection with partial epileptic seizures is described. Forty patients provided 262 descriptions of subjective experience relative to their partial epileptic seizures. The results revealed that subjective experiences during seizures consist mostly of sensory and bodily sensations, hallucinatory experiences, and thinking. The majority of subjective experiences during seizures are bizarre and distorted; nevertheless, the patients are able to engage in adequate behavior. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study for which detailed subjective seizure descriptions were collected immediately after each seizure and the first study in which the content of verbal reports of subjective experiences during seizures, including both the ictal and postictal experiences, has been analyzed in detail.

  7. [Clinical trial with a new anti-epileptic: barbexaclone].

    PubMed

    Bragatti, J H; Caleffi, G H; Prenna, F J

    1977-09-01

    A new anti-epileptic agent (barbexaclone) was tried in 48 patients suffering from epilepsy and presenting a total of 67 types of crises. All the patients were considered "bad cases" because either by the intensity of the epileptic manifestations or by their refractoriness to the usual medications. The results, similar to others already published, could be considered as good for grand mal epilepsy both for those convulsions occurring during either the sleeping or waking hours and suggest further observations in focal crises. Though not considered as a first line medication in petit mal seizuras the drug gave excellent results when used as an adjuvant in the supression of absences and the annulation of convulsant effects of some drugs used in petit mal. No toxic reactions were noted, and the side effects, which were never very intense, tended to disappear in the majority of cases with continued use of the drug.

  8. Altered Intermittent Rhythmic Delta and Theta Activity in the Electroencephalographies of High Functioning Adult Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Dominique; Maier, Simon; Feige, Bernd; Posielski, Nicole A.; Nickel, Kathrin; Ebert, Dieter; Riedel, Andreas; Philipsen, Alexandra; Perlov, Evgeniy; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2017-01-01

    Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often associated with epilepsy. Previous studies have also shown increased rates of electroencephalographic (EEG) alteration in ASD patients without epilepsy. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of intermittent rhythmic delta and theta activity (IRDA/IRTA) events between high-functioning adult patients with ASD and matched healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Routine EEG records of 19 ASD patients and 19 matched controls were screened for IRDA/IRTA using a fully data driven analysis with fixed thresholds. IRDA/IRTA rates before and after hyperventilation (HV) as well as the HV-induced difference in IRDA/IRTA rates (HV difference) were analyzed. For inter-group measures, we used the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results: Significantly increased HV difference was detected in the ASD group (p = 0.0497). However, the groups showed no difference in IRDA/IRTA rates before HV (p = 0.564) and after HV (p = 0.163). Conclusions: The lack of any group differences regarding IRDA/IRTA before HV might be related to the fact that we only studied non-secondary high-functioning autism in a small sample of epilepsy-free adult patients. A significantly increased HV difference might be regarded as a marker of subtle neuronal network instability possibly causing short-term disturbances via local area network inhibition and long-term effects via epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:28265243

  9. Assisting sexually abused adults. Practical guide to interviewing patients.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, M. M.; Bethune, C.

    1996-01-01

    Millions of adults have been sexually abused. Patients often confide in their family physicians concerning their abuse. Physicians must understand their own issues surrounding sexual abuse and its sequelae before they attempt to treat sexually abused patients. The PLISSIT model offers a practical guide for assisting abused adult patients. PMID:8924817

  10. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.; Clapp, Ned E.; Daw, C. Stuart; Lawkins, William F.

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming.

  11. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Day, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming. 76 figs.

  12. Transient epileptic amnesia: Update on a slowly emerging epileptic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Felician, O; Tramoni, E; Bartolomei, F

    2015-03-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is a recently individualized, late-onset, pharmaco-sensitive form of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with recurrent episodes of acute memory loss, but also interictal memory disturbances characterized by autobiographical and topographical memory impairment and a long-term consolidation deficit. In this article, we review the main clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of TEA, discuss its putative neuroanatomical substrate and mechanisms, common features and how it differs from related concepts, with the overall aim to defend the idea that TEA deserves to be recognized as a distinct epilepsy syndrome. While the pathophysiological basis remains largely unknown, emotional and/or dysimmune factors may have a potential influence. Most importantly, the concept of TEA is highly relevant to tertiary epilepsy and memory clinics, but also to routine neurology practice, leading to an adequate diagnosis and management of epilepsy-related, acute and long-standing memory deficits.

  13. Clinical magnetic resonance volumetry of the hippocampus in 58 epileptic dogs.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Masanori; Fujita, Michio; Orima, Hiromitsu

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal atrophy, which is a component of hippocampal sclerosis and recognized commonly in human intractable epilepsy, is controversial in canine epilepsy. We examined the hippocampal volume in 58 epileptic dogs and 35 control dogs using magnetic resonance (MR) images, and calculated the relative hippocampal volume asymmetry of the right and left hippocampus. Subjectively, there were visible MR imaging abnormalities in seven of the 58 epileptic dogs (12%). The hippocampel volume asymmetric ratio of epileptic dogs (5.84 +/- 4.47%) was significantly greater than that of control dogs (1.62 +/- 0.88%). Using a cutoff threshold asymmetric ratio of 6% that is indicated in human epilepsy, 28 epileptic dogs (48%) were characterized as having unilateral hippocampus atrophy. The hippocampal volume asymmetry ratio cannot be used to detect bilateral atrophy. In conclusion, although less frequent than that observed in human epilepsy patients, hippocampal atrophy may occur in canine epilepsy.

  14. An acardiac acephalic monster following in-utero anti-epileptic drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Kutlay, B; Bayramoglu, S; Kutlar, A I; Yesildaglar, N

    1996-04-01

    Acardia, the absence of the heart, is one of the rarest medical anomalies. The exact mechanism which causes this anomaly is still unknown. The authors report the acardiac acephalic fetus of an epileptic mother who was on primidone therapy. The mother who received no antenatal care stopped taking primidone (her sole medication) in the third month of pregnancy with the fear of delivering a malformed baby and had three convulsions until delivery. This is the first reported case of acardia associated with anti-epileptic medication. The cause of the anomaly in this patient may be an unknown genetic defect, the maternal epileptic disorder, the convulsions, the anti-epileptic medication, or a combination of these factors.

  15. [Diagnosis and treatment of non-triggered single epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Juarez, I E; Moreno, J; Ladino, L D; Castro, N; Hernandez-Vanegas, L; Burneo, J G; Hernandez-Ronquillo, L; Tellez-Zenteno, J F

    2016-08-16

    Epileptic seizures are one of the main reasons for neurological visits in an emergency department. Convulsions represent a traumatic event for the patient and the family, with significant medical and social consequences. Due to their prevalence and impact, the initial management is of vital importance. Although following the first epileptic seizure, early recurrence diminishes after establishing treatment with antiepileptic drugs, the forecast for developing epilepsy and long-term outcomes are not altered by any early intervention. Detailed questioning based on the symptoms of the convulsions, the patient's medical history and a full electroencephalogram and neuroimaging study make it possible to define the risk of recurrence of the seizure and the possible diagnosis of epilepsy. Epileptic abnormalities, the presence of old or new potentially epileptogenic brain lesions, as well as nocturnal seizures, increase the risk of recurrence. Physicians must assess each patient on an individual basis to determine the most suitable treatment, and explain the risk of not being treated versus the risk that exists if treatment with antiepileptic drugs is established.

  16. Oral health status in epileptic children.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Taskin; Tan, Huseyin

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the oral hygiene status and dental treatment requirements in children with epilepsy. The treatment group consisted of 211 children with epilepsy (120 boys and 91 girls, 4-15 years old, mean age 7.85 + or - 2.98 years). The control group consisted of healthy children, matched by age and gender. Clinical features of the patients were obtained from hospital records. Clinical examinations were conducted, under standard light, using a plane buccal mirror, a dental probe and air drying to evaluate caries experience and to record the periodontal health of each child. Statistical analysis was performed using chi(2) test, Fisher exact test and anova. The number of decayed and missing teeth, the degree of abrasion and periodontal indexes were significantly worse in patients with epilepsy, compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Gingival enlargement was documented in 42% of patients on valproate monotherapy compared to only in 16% of patients on phenobarbital. Dental caries and halitosis were the most common oral disorders. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures often cause minor oral injuries and traumatized anterior teeth. Epileptic children are at an increased risk of developing caries and gingivitis compared with healthy subjects.

  17. Lateral positioning for critically ill adult patients.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Nicky; Bucknall, Tracey; Faraone, Nardene M

    2016-05-12

    Critically ill patients require regular body position changes to minimize the adverse effects of bed rest, inactivity and immobilization. However, uncertainty surrounds the effectiveness of lateral positioning for improving pulmonary gas exchange, aiding drainage of tracheobronchial secretions and preventing morbidity. In addition, it is unclear whether the perceived risk levied by respiratory and haemodynamic instability upon turning critically ill patients outweighs the respiratory benefits of side-to-side rotation. Thus, lack of certainty may contribute to variation in positioning practice and equivocal patient outcomes. To evaluate effects of the lateral position compared with other body positions on patient outcomes (mortality, morbidity and clinical adverse events) in critically ill adult patients. (Clinical adverse events include hypoxaemia, hypotension, low oxygen delivery and global indicators of impaired tissue oxygenation.) We examined single use of the lateral position (i.e. on the right or left side) and repeat use of the lateral position (i.e. lateral positioning) within a positioning schedule. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1950 to 23 May 2015), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1937 to 23 May 2015), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (1984 to 23 May 2015), Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1901 to 23 May 2015), Web of Science (1945 to 23 May 2015), Index to Theses in Great Britain and Ireland (1950 to 23 May 2015), Trove (2009 to 23 May 2015; previously Australasian Digital Theses Program (1997 to December 2008)) and Proquest Dissertations and Theses (2009 to 23 May 2015; previously Proquest Digital Dissertations (1980 to 23 May 2015)). We handsearched the reference lists of potentially relevant reports and two nursing journals. We included randomized and quasi-randomized trials examining effects of

  18. Synchrony in Normal and Focal Epileptic Brain: The Seizure Onset Zone is Functionally Disconnected

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Christopher P.; Hu, Sanqing; Stead, Matt; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Bower, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Synchronization of local and distributed neuronal assemblies is thought to underlie fundamental brain processes such as perception, learning, and cognition. In neurological disease, neuronal synchrony can be altered and in epilepsy may play an important role in the generation of seizures. Linear cross-correlation and mean phase coherence of local field potentials (LFPs) are commonly used measures of neuronal synchrony and have been studied extensively in epileptic brain. Multiple studies have reported that epileptic brain is characterized by increased neuronal synchrony except possibly prior to seizure onset when synchrony may decrease. Previous studies using intracranial electroencephalography (EEG), however, have been limited to patients with epilepsy. Here we investigate neuronal synchrony in epileptic and control brain using intracranial EEG recordings from patients with medically resistant partial epilepsy and control subjects with intractable facial pain. For both epilepsy and control patients, average LFP synchrony decreases with increasing interelectrode distance. Results in epilepsy patients show lower LFP synchrony between seizure-generating brain and other brain regions. This relative isolation of seizure-generating brain underlies the paradoxical finding that control patients without epilepsy have greater average LFP synchrony than patients with epilepsy. In conclusion, we show that in patients with focal epilepsy, the region of epileptic brain generating seizures is functionally isolated from surrounding brain regions. We further speculate that this functional isolation may contribute to spontaneous seizure generation and may represent a clinically useful electrophysiological signature for mapping epileptic brain. PMID:20926610

  19. Intermittent phase synchronization in human epileptic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, Olga I.; Koloskova, Anastasya D.; Zhuravlev, Maksim O.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2017-03-01

    We found the intermittent phase synchronization in human epileptic brain. We show that the phases of the synchronous behavior are observed both during the epileptic seizures and in the fields of the background activity of the brain. We estimate the degree of intermittent phase synchronization in both considered cases and found that the epileptic seizures are characterized by the higher degree of synchronization in comparison with the fields of background activity. For estimation of synchronization degree the modification of the method for estimation of zero conditional Lyapunov exponent from time series proposed in [PRE 92 (2015) 012913] has been used.

  20. Rufinamide: a new anti-epileptic medication.

    PubMed

    Hakimian, Shahin; Cheng-Hakimian, Andrea; Anderson, Gail D; Miller, John W

    2007-08-01

    Rufinamide (1-[2,6-difluorobenzyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxamide) is a new anti-epileptic drug with a novel triazole derivative structure. The suspected mechanism of action is limitation of sodium-dependent action potentials, thought to result in a membrane stabilizing effect. Rufinamide is extensively metabolized in the liver by non-CYP450 enzymes with an elimination half-life of 8 - 12 h. Three randomized, placebo-controlled trials have shown that rufinamide is effective against partial seizures in adults. Efficacy in the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe, disabling childhood onset epilepsy syndrome, was shown in a single, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. It has recently been approved for treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in Europe. In the US it is under regulatory review. Most common adverse effects are somnolence, fatigue, dizziness, dipolopia, nausea and ataxia. Rufinamide has shown promise as adjunctive treatment for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and may have some role in localization related epilepsies as well.

  1. The offspring of epileptic mother.

    PubMed

    Tamer, S K; Misra, S; Jaiswal, S

    1996-01-01

    The offspring of an epileptic mother is an issue-currently getting attention because of its several implications. A complex interaction between epilepsy during pregnancy and its adverse impact on foetus, labor, neonate, congenital malformation, psychosocial and medico-social concern and treatment challenges of such cases is increasingly being realised. Some of the significant observations has been reviewed extensively in this article. Maternal epilepsy is likely to adversely affect the off-spring at its various stages of development amounting to increased morbidity and mortality. Increased seizure frequency during pregnancy with resultant increased risk is well documented but its mechanism is poorly understood. Low apgar score, increased still birth rates (1.3 to 14%) in offspring of epileptic mother (OEM) is reported. So also, the neonatal and perinatal deaths are twice more common in OEMS than normal control. Small for dates, and prematurity in OEM is reported to be 7 to 10% and 4-11% respectively. Adverse impact on labor and delivery like preclampsia, abruptio placentae, polyhydramnios, assisted delivery, cesarean section and IUGR poses particular challenges to the obstetrician. Pediatrician's alertness is needed to anticipate and deal with the bleeding manifestation due to deficiency of Vit-K dependent clotting factors and various anticonvulsant drug (AED) withdrawal symptoms. Significant risk of developing congenital malformation is the result of epilepsy perse and the AED used during pregnancy. AED exposure leads to other distinct clinical syndromes, the orofacial clefts and cardiac anomalies being the commonest manifestation. Epilepsy in mother but not in father has significant adverse impact. Management strategies in the context of available observation has been discussed.

  2. Assortative mixing in functional brain networks during epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialonski, Stephan; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    We investigate assortativity of functional brain networks before, during, and after one-hundred epileptic seizures with different anatomical onset locations. We construct binary functional networks from multi-channel electroencephalographic data recorded from 60 epilepsy patients; and from time-resolved estimates of the assortativity coefficient, we conclude that positive degree-degree correlations are inherent to seizure dynamics. While seizures evolve, an increasing assortativity indicates a segregation of the underlying functional network into groups of brain regions that are only sparsely interconnected, if at all. Interestingly, assortativity decreases already prior to seizure end. Together with previous observations of characteristic temporal evolutions of global statistical properties and synchronizability of epileptic brain networks, our findings may help to gain deeper insights into the complicated dynamics underlying generation, propagation, and termination of seizures.

  3. Connectivity of epileptic brain regions in wake and sleep.

    PubMed

    Klimes, Petr; Duque, Juliano J; Jurak, Pavel; Halamek, Josef; Worrell, Gregory A

    2015-08-01

    Focal epileptic brain is characterized by a region of pathological tissue seizure onset zone (SOZ) - the pathologic tissue generating seizures. During the interictal period (nonseizure) the SOZ is characterized by epileptiform activity - interictal spikes & high-frequency oscillations (HFO). The SOZ also exhibits hyper-synchrony and functional disconnection from the surrounding areas. Recent studies have described the synchrony inside the SOZ and surrounding tissue for just small sets of patients (2-4) and without any distinction in behavioral states. Wake and sleep cycles can, however, have a significant influence on SOZ activity. Here we show the results of connectivity analysis in three fundamental areas of the epileptic brain - inside SOZ, outside SOZ and bridging areas in 7 patients during wake and sleep. We observed increased synchrony inside SOZ and decreased synchrony on its edges (bridging areas) in specific frequency bands. We also detected significant differences of synchrony levels between wake and sleep periods in HFO frequencies. Our results provide additional insight into the properties of SOZ connectivity. Knowledge of these principles may prove useful for SOZ localization and understanding epileptic brain function in general.

  4. Acquired epileptic opercular syndrome related to a heterozygous deleterious substitution in GRIN2A.

    PubMed

    Sculier, Claudine; Tilmant, Anne-Sophie; De Tiège, Xavier; Giurgea, Sanda; Paquier, Philippe; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Lesca, Gaetan; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2017-08-23

    Epileptic encephalopathies with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep (CSWS) are characterized by cognitive or language impairment, and are occasionally associated with pathogenic variants of the GRIN2A gene. In these disorders, speech dysfunction could be either related to cerebral dysfunction caused by the GRIN2A deleterious variant or intense interictal epileptic activity. Here, we present a patient with apraxia of speech, clearly linked to severity of epilepsy, carrying a GRIN2A variant. A 6-year-old boy developed acute regression of expressive language following epileptic seizures, leading to complete mutism, at which time EEG revealed CSWS. MEG showed bilateral superior parietal and opercular independent CSWS onsets and PET with fluorodeoxyglucose demonstrated significant increase in relative glucose metabolism in bilateral superior parietal regions. Corticosteroids induced a regression of CSWS together with impressive improvement in speech abilities. This case supports the hypothesis of a triggering role for epileptic discharges in speech deterioration observed in children carrying a deleterious variant of GRIN2A. When classic antiepileptic drugs fail to control epileptic activity, corticosteroids should be considered. Multimodal functional neuroimaging suggests a role for opercular and superior parietal areas in acquired epileptic opercular syndrome. [Published with video sequences on www.epilepticdisorders.com].

  5. Dietary intake and nutritional status in cancer patients; comparing adults and older adults.

    PubMed

    Gómez Valiente da Silva, Henyse; Fonseca de Andrade, Camila; Bello Moreira, Annie Seixas

    2014-04-01

    Evaluate the nutrient intake and nutritional status of food in cancer patients admitted to a university hospital, with comparison of adult and older adult age category. Cross-sectional study. This study involved cancer patients admitted to a hospital in 2010. Dietary habits were collected using a Brazilian food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided in two groups: adults or older adults and in 4-cancer category: hematologic, lung, gastrointestinal and others. Body Mass Index evaluated nutritional status. A total of 86 patients with a mean age of 56.5 years, with 55% males and 42% older adults were evaluated. The older adult category had a higher frequency of being underweight (24.4% vs 16.3%, p < 0.01) and a lower frequency of being overweight (7% vs. 15.1%, p < 0.01) than adults. Both, adult and older adults had a high frequency of smoking, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity. The older adults had lower consumption of calories, intake of iron and folic acid. Inadequacy of vitamin intake was observed in both groups; respectively, 52%, 43%, 95%, 76% and 88% for Vitamin A, C, D, E and folic acid. The older adults had a higher folic acid and calcium inadequacy than the adults (97% vs 82%, p <0.01; 88% vs 72%, p < 0.01). There was no association of micronutrient intake with cancer, nor with nutritional status. The food intake, macro and micronutrients ingestion is insufficient among cancer individuals. Food intake of older adults was inferior, when compared to the adult category. There was a high prevalence of BMI excess in the adult group and a worst nutritional status in the older adult category. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves during sleep: the need for transition from childhood to adulthood medical care appears to be related to etiology.

    PubMed

    de Saint-Martin, Anne; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Valenti-Hirsch, Maria Paola; Hirsch, Edouard

    2014-08-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous diffuse spike-waves during slow-wave sleep (ECSWS) presents clinically with infrequent nocturnal focal seizures, atypical absences related to secondary bilateral synchrony, negative myoclonia, and atonic and rare generalized tonic-clonic seizures. The unique electroencephalography (EEG) pattern found in ECSWS consists of continuous, diffuse, bilateral spike-waves during slow-wave sleep. Despite the eventual disappearance of clinical seizures and EEG abnormalities by adolescence, the prognosis is guarded in most cases because of neuropsychological and behavioral deficits. ECSWS has a heterogeneous etiology (genetic, structural, and unknown). Because epilepsy and electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities in epileptic encephalopathy with continuous diffuse spike-waves during slow-wave sleep (ECSWS) are self-limited and age related, the need for ongoing medical care and transition to adult care might be questioned. For adolescents in whom etiology remains unknown (possibly genetic) and who experience the disappearance of seizures and EEG abnormalities, there is rarely need for long-term neurologic follow-up, because often a relatively normal cognitive and social evolution follows. However, the majority of patients with structural and possibly "genetic syndromic" etiologies will have persistent cognitive deficits and will need suitable socioeducative care. Therefore, the transition process in ECSWS will depend mainly on etiology and its related features (epileptic active phase duration, and cognitive and behavioral evolution) and revolve around neuropsychological and social support rather than medical and pharmacologic follow-up. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Non epileptic paroxysmal events in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Tatlı, Burak; Güler, Serhat

    2017-01-01

    Non epileptic paroxysmal events are recurrent movement disorders with acute onset and ending, which may mimic epilepsy. The duration, place, timing of the attacks, and state of conciousness may confuse pediatricians about the diagnosis of epilepsy and non epileptic paroxysmal events. The key point in the diagnosis is taking an accurate and detailed history. Wrong diagnosis can give rise to anxiety of both the family and the child, interruptions in the child’s education, limitations in career planning, and irreversible damages in the long term. The diagnosis can prevent unnecessary drug use and psychological damage. This review aims to discuss the clinical findings, treatment, and differential diagnoses of non epileptic paroxysmal events, and to increase awareness about non epileptic paroxysmal events among pediatricians. PMID:28747835

  8. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  9. Immune response in the eye following epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Ahl, Matilda; Avdic, Una; Skoug, Cecilia; Ali, Idrish; Chugh, Deepti; Johansson, Ulrica Englund; Ekdahl, Christine T

    2016-06-27

    Epileptic seizures are associated with an immune response in the brain. However, it is not known whether it can extend to remote areas of the brain, such as the eyes. Hence, we investigated whether epileptic seizures induce inflammation in the retina. Adult rats underwent electrically induced temporal status epilepticus, and the eyes were studied 6 h, 1, and 7 weeks later with biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses. An additional group of animals received CX3CR1 antibody intracerebroventricularly for 6 weeks after status epilepticus. Biochemical analyses and immunohistochemistry revealed no increased cell death and unaltered expression of several immune-related cytokines and chemokines as well as no microglial activation, 6 h post-status epilepticus compared to non-stimulated controls. At 1 week, again, retinal cytoarchitecture appeared normal and there was no cell death or micro- or macroglial reaction, apart from a small decrease in interleukin-10. However, at 7 weeks, even if the cytoarchitecture remained normal and no ongoing cell death was detected, the numbers of microglia were increased ipsi- and contralateral to the epileptic focus. The microglia remained within the synaptic layers but often in clusters and with more processes extending into the outer nuclear layer. Morphological analyses revealed a decrease in surveying and an increase in activated microglia. In addition, increased levels of the chemokine KC/GRO and cytokine interleukin-1β were found. Furthermore, macroglial activation was noted in the inner retina. No alterations in numbers of phagocytic cells, infiltrating macrophages, or vascular pericytes were observed. Post-synaptic density-95 cluster intensity was reduced in the outer nuclear layer, reflecting seizure-induced synaptic changes without disrupted cytoarchitecture in areas with increased microglial activation. The retinal gliosis was decreased by a CX3CR1 immune modulation known to reduce gliosis within epileptic foci

  10. Efficacy of Attribution Retraining on Mental Health of Epileptic Children

    PubMed Central

    Pourmohamadreza Tajrishi, Masoume; Abbasi, Saeid; Najafi Fard, Tahereh; Yousefi, Saheb; Mohammadi Malek Abadi, Athar; Delavar Kasmaei, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy affects children’s quality of life and leads to social and mental problems. Promoting the mental health of children, especially epileptic ones, and preventing problems affecting them constitute major concerns for every country. Mental health promotion requires intervention programs. Objectives: We sought to assess the efficacy of attribution retraining on the mental health of epileptic children. Patients and Methods: The present study is a semi-experimental investigation with a pretest and posttest design and includes a control group. Thirty children, comprising 17 boys and 13 girls, were selected randomly from the Iranian epilepsy association in Tehran and assigned to experimental and control groups. They answered to the general health questionnaire (Goldberg and Hiller, 1979). The experimental group participated in 11 training sessions (twice a week; 45 minutes for each session) and received attribution retraining. The data were analyzed using the multiple analysis of covariance. Results: The findings showed that the experimental group, in comparison with the control group, experienced a reduction in physical symptoms, anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction, and depression and an increase in mental health significantly (P < 0.01) after the training sessions. There were no significant differences, however, between the two groups at 6 weeks’ follow-up. Conclusions: Attribution retraining improved mental health in the epileptic children in our study. It, therefore, seems to be an appropriate intervention for promoting the mental health of children. PMID:26568854

  11. [Portable Epileptic Seizure Monitoring Intelligent System Based on Android System].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wu, Shufeng; Yang, Chunlin; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Yu, Tao; Lu, Chengbiao; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    The clinical electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring systems based on personal computer system can not meet the requirements of portability and home usage. The epilepsy patients have to be monitored in hospital for an extended period of time, which imposes a heavy burden on hospitals. In the present study, we designed a portable 16-lead networked monitoring system based on the Android smart phone. The system uses some technologies including the active electrode, the WiFi wireless transmission, the multi-scale permutation entropy (MPE) algorithm, the back-propagation (BP) neural network algorithm, etc. Moreover, the software of Android mobile application can realize the processing and analysis of EEG data, the display of EEG waveform and the alarm of epileptic seizure. The system has been tested on the mobile phones with Android 2. 3 operating system or higher version and the results showed that this software ran accurately and steadily in the detection of epileptic seizure. In conclusion, this paper provides a portable and reliable solution for epileptic seizure monitoring in clinical and home applications.

  12. Extracorporeal respiratory support in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Romano, Thiago Gomes; Mendes, Pedro Vitale; Park, Marcelo; Costa, Eduardo Leite Vieira

    2017-01-01

    In patients with severe respiratory failure, either hypoxemic or hypercapnic, life support with mechanical ventilation alone can be insufficient to meet their needs, especially if one tries to avoid ventilator settings that can cause injury to the lungs. In those patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), which is also very effective in removing carbon dioxide from the blood, can provide life support, allowing the application of protective lung ventilation. In this review article, we aim to explore some of the most relevant aspects of using ECMO for respiratory support. We discuss the history of respiratory support using ECMO in adults, as well as the clinical evidence; costs; indications; installation of the equipment; ventilator settings; daily care of the patient and the system; common troubleshooting; weaning; and discontinuation. RESUMO Em pacientes com insuficiência respiratória grave (hipoxêmica ou hipercápnica), o suporte somente com ventilação mecânica pode ser insuficiente para suas necessidades, especialmente quando se tenta evitar o uso de parâmetros ventilatórios que possam causar danos aos pulmões. Nesses pacientes, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, oxigenação extracorpórea por membrana), que também é muito eficaz na remoção de dióxido de carbono do sangue, pode manter a vida, permitindo o uso de ventilação pulmonar protetora. No presente artigo de revisão, objetivamos explorar alguns dos aspectos mais relevantes do suporte respiratório por ECMO. Discutimos a história do suporte respiratório por ECMO em adultos; evidências clínicas; custos; indicações; instalação do equipamento; parâmetros ventilatórios; cuidado diário do paciente e do sistema; solução de problemas comuns; desmame e descontinuação.

  13. Mean daily plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin, leu-enkephalin, ACTH, cortisol, and DHEAS in epileptic patients with complex partial seizures evolving to generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Marek, Bogdan; Kajdaniuk, Dariusz; Kos-Kudła, Beata; Kapustecki, Janusz; Swietochowska, Elzbieta; Ostrowska, Zofia; Siemińska, Lucyna; Nowak, Mariusz; Głogowska-Szelag, Joanna; Borgiel-Marek, Halina; Ciesielska-Kopacz, Nelly; Foltyn, Wanda; Pierzchała, Krystyna; Krysiak, Robert; Bienek, Radosław

    2010-01-01

    A multitude of mechanisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. To assess mean daily plasma concentrations of ACTH, cortisol, DHEAS, leu-enkephalin, and beta-endorphin in epileptic patients with complex partial seizures evolving to tonic-clonic in relation to frequency of seizure occurrence (groups with seizure occurrences - several per week and several per year) and duration of the disease (groups less than and more than 10 years). We decided to analyse mean daily values of beta-endorphin and leu-enkephalin because of significant differences in concentrations of these substances in blood during the day. The study was performed on 17 patients (14 males + 3 females; mean age 31.8 yrs) treated with carbamazepine (300-1800 mg/day). The control group consisted of six age-matched healthy volunteers. Blood was collected at 8 a.m., 2 p.m., 8 p.m., and 2 a.m. Intergroup analysis was performed with the use of ANOVA Kruskal-Wallis test. Mean daily concentrations of ACTH and cortisol in the blood of the patients with epilepsy were higher in comparison with those of the healthy volunteers, independently of the frequency of seizures and duration of the disease. Mean daily concentrations of beta-endorphin in the blood of the patients with epilepsy were higher in the groups of patients with more severe clinical course of disease (with more frequently occurring epilepsy seizures and longer duration of the disease) in comparison with healthy subjects. Mean daily concentrations of leu-enkephalin in the blood of the patients with epilepsy were higher in the group of patients with short duration of the disease in comparison with the group with long duration of the disease. 1. Pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity is observed in patients with clinically active epilepsy, independently of the frequency of seizures and duration of the disease. 2. Changes in endogenous opioid system activity are related to the clinical activity of epilepsy - beta-endorphin concentrations

  14. [Clinical features of patients with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis].

    PubMed

    Szalmás, Orsolya; Nagy-Vince, Melinda; Dankó, Katalin; Farkas, Flóra

    2015-09-13

    Juvenile and adult dermatomysitis are chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory myopathies characterized by progressive proximal muscle weakness and typical skin symptoms. To compare the symptoms, laboratory and serological findings, treatment and disease course in children and adults suffering from dermatomyositis. In this retrospective study, juvenile and adult dermatomyositis groups were formed. There were 27 patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (mean age, 8.7 years; mean follow-up time: 104.6 months) and 30 adult patients (mean age, 50.3; mean follow-up time: 58.1 months). In patients with juvenile dermatomyositis, treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and cyclosporine A were more frequent as compared to adult patients. Acute onset of the disease was more frequent in adult patients than in those with juvenile disease. In children symptoms of the disease developed gradually. The findings confirm previously published data showing that there are differences between juvenile and adult patients with dermatomyositis. The authors recommend to follow the patients regularly after reaching remission to avoid bad patient compliance and decrease the number and severity of relapses.

  15. Exploring Adult Care Experiences and Barriers to Transition in Adult Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bemrich-Stolz, CJ; Halanych, JH; Howard, TH; Hilliard, LM; Lebensburger, JD

    2015-01-01

    Background Young adults with sickle cell anemia are at high risk for increased hospitalization and death at the time of transition to adult care. This may be related to failure of the transition system to prepare young adults for the adult healthcare system. This qualitative study was designed to identify factors related to transition that may affect the health of adults with sickle cell anemia. Procedure Ten patients currently treated in an adult hematology clinic participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews to describe their experience transitioning from pediatric to adult care and differences in adult and pediatric healthcare systems. Results Participants were generally unprepared for the adult healthcare system. Negative issues experienced by participants included physician mistrust, difficulty with employers, keeping insurance, and stress in personal relationships. Positive issues experienced by participants included improved self efficacy with improved self care and autonomy. Conclusions In the absence of a formalized transition program, adults with sickle cell anemia experience significant barriers to adult care. In addition to medical history review and identification of an adult provider, transition programs should incorporate strategies to navigate the adult medical system, insurance and relationships as well as encouraging self efficacy. PMID:26900602

  16. Nonlinear times series analysis of epileptic human electroencephalogram (EEG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dingzhou

    The problem of seizure anticipation in patients with epilepsy has attracted significant attention in the past few years. In this paper we discuss two approaches, using methods of nonlinear time series analysis applied to scalp electrode recordings, which is able to distinguish between epochs temporally distant from and just prior to, the onset of a seizure in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. First we describe a method involving a comparison of recordings taken from electrodes adjacent to and remote from the site of the seizure focus. In particular, we define a nonlinear quantity which we call marginal predictability. This quantity is computed using data from remote and from adjacent electrodes. We find that the difference between the marginal predictabilities computed for the remote and adjacent electrodes decreases several tens of minutes prior to seizure onset, compared to its value interictally. We also show that these difl'crcnc es of marginal predictability intervals are independent of the behavior state of the patient. Next we examine the please coherence between different electrodes both in the long-range and the short-range. When time is distant from seizure onsets ("interictally"), epileptic patients have lower long-range phase coherence in the delta (1-4Hz) and beta (18-30Hz) frequency band compared to nonepileptic subjects. When seizures approach (''preictally"), we observe an increase in phase coherence in the beta band. However, interictally there is no difference in short-range phase coherence between this cohort of patients and non-epileptic subjects. Preictally short-range phase coherence also increases in the alpha (10-13Hz) and the beta band. Next we apply the quantity marginal predictability on the phase difference time series. Such marginal predictabilities are lower in the patients than in the non-epileptic subjects. However, when seizure approaches, the former moves asymptotically towards the latter.

  17. [THE PROPAGATION AND SEMIOLOGY OF FOCAL EPILEPTIC SEIZURES. CASES CONNECTED TO THE INSULA. THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS].

    PubMed

    Balogh, Attila; Balogh, Attila

    2016-01-30

    The developing of diagnostical examinations in epileptology provides new challenges in seizure semiology. On the analysis of seizures it is important to examine the mechanisms of their propagation. The brain connectivity (based on the neuroimaging), the shadowing of the movement of excessive neuronal activity (based on computerized EEG and MEG methods), the cognition of the physiological and pathological brain networks are the footstone of the epileptic seizure propagation. The investigators prove, by means of case demonstrations of the role of the network nodes and the role of the epileptic hubs in the seizure symptomatology. The preoperative, intra and postoperative data are analised of three insular and one parietal epileptic patients in point of view of their seizure symptomes. Complex neuroimaging, noninvasive and invasive electrophysiology, intensive long-term video-EEG monitoring, computerized EEG analysis, fuctional mapping, intraoperative corticography were used. The etiology were confirmed with hystology. It is observed that on seizure semiology our patients plays the insula a double role. In some cases, it is the focus of insular seizures with their symptoms difficult to identify. However, in the majority of cases and as a consequence of its rich neural connections, the insula has a peculiar property in the evolution of the symptomatogenic features of seizures. This observations are developing new relationships between the mechanism of seizure propagation and its semiological consequences. On epileptological point of view there are brain structures which has peculiar role in the "designe" of propagation of the epileptic excitement. The numerous new methods in neuroimaging and neurophysiology allowed the connectomical examination of the epileptic networks. The role of the epileptic diathesis is approachable with the metholdology of the brain connectivity. Theoretically the node of the epileptic network consist of the potential pathes where the localised

  18. A case report of stellate ganglion block in the treatment of epileptic pain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengtao; Zhu, Yangzi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Stellate ganglion blocks have been shown to provide effective pain relief in a number of different conditions, but no one had reported stellate ganglion blocks for the treatment of epileptic pain. We describe a case report of the successful use of stellate ganglion block in the treatment of epileptic pain in the patient. Patient concerns: A 8-year-old girl who had experienced severe paroxysmal pain in her right upper limb. Diagnoses: She was diagnosed as drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Interventions: The patient received stellate ganglion blocks with lidocaine for 2 courses with 2 weeks in a course of treatment and oral carbamazepine once a day. Outcomes: Carbamazepine dosage gradually tapered until stop and epileptic pain attacks become less and less, eventually disappear. Lessons: Stellate ganglion block may be an effective treatment of intractable partial epilepsy. However, more research is now needed to verify the validity. PMID:28178147

  19. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  20. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  1. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  2. Origin and Propagation of Epileptic Spasms Delineated on Electrocorticography

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Eishi; Juhász, Csaba; Shah, Aashit; Muzik, Otto; Chugani, Diane C.; Shah, Jagdish; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Purpose Ictal electrographic changes were analyzed on intracranial electrocorticography (ECoG) in children with medically refractory epileptic spasms to assess the dynamic changes of ictal discharges associated with spasms and their relation to interictal epileptiform activity and neuroimaging findings. Methods We studied a consecutive series of 15 children (age 0.4 to 13 years; nine girls) with clusters of epileptic spasms recorded on prolonged intracranial subdural ECoG recordings, which were being performed for subsequent cortical resection, and in total, 62 spasms were analyzed by using quantitative methods. Results Spasms were associated with either a “leading” spike followed by fast-wave bursts (type I: 42 events analyzed quantitatively) or fast-wave bursts without a “leading” spike (type II: 20 events analyzed quantitatively). Twenty-three of the 42 type I spasms but none of the 20 type II spasms were preceded by a focal seizure. A “leading” spike had a focal origin in all 42 type I spasms and involved the pre- or postcentral gyrus within 0.1 s in 37 of these spasms. A leading spike was associated with interictal spike activity >1/min in 40 of 42 type I spasms and originated within 2 cm from a positron emission tomography glucose hypometabolic region in all but two type I spasms. Failure to resect the cortex showing a leading spike was associated with poor surgical outcome (p = 0.01; Fisher’s exact probability test). Fast-wave bursts associated with spasms involved neocortical regions extensively at least in two lobes within 1.28 s in all 62 spasms and involved the pre- or postcentral gyrus in 53 of 62 spasms. Conclusions Epileptic spasms may be triggered by a focal neocortical impulse in a subset of patients, and a leading spike, if present, might be used as a marker of the trigger zone for epileptic spasms. Rapidly emerging widespread fast-wave bursts might explain the clinical semiology of epileptic spasms. PMID:16026561

  3. Gaussian mixture model for the identification of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures using a wearable accelerometer sensor.

    PubMed

    Kusmakar, Shitanshu; Muthuganapathy, Ramanathan; Yan, Bernard; O'Brien, Terence J; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2016-08-01

    Any abnormal hypersynchronus activity of neurons can be characterized as an epileptic seizure (ES). A broad class of non-epileptic seizures is comprised of Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES). PNES are paroxysmal events, which mimics epileptic seizures and pose a diagnostic challenge with epileptic seizures due to their clinical similarities. The diagnosis of PNES is done using video-electroencephalography (VEM) monitoring. VEM being a resource intensive process calls for alternative methods for detection of PNES. There is now an emerging interest in the use of accelerometer based devices for the detection of seizures. In this work, we present an algorithm based on Gaussian mixture model (GMM's) for the identification of PNES, ES and normal movements using a wrist-worn accelerometer device. Features in time, frequency and wavelet domain are extracted from the norm of accelerometry signal. All events are then classified into three classes i.e normal, PNES and ES using a parametric estimate of the multivariate normal probability density function. An algorithm based on GMM's allows us to accurately model the non-epileptic and epileptic movements, thus enhancing the overall predictive accuracy of the system. The new algorithm was tested on data collected from 16 patients and showed an overall detection accuracy of 91% with 25 false alarms.

  4. Brain abscess caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Deetjen, Philipp; Maurer, Christoph; Rank, Andreas; Berlis, Ansgar; Schubert, Sören; Hoffmann, Reinhard

    2014-02-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum is a fastidious bacterium usually residing in the female genitourinary tract. We present an exceedingly complicated case of a brain abscess secondary to mastoiditis by U. urealyticum in an adult hypogammaglobulinemic patient after rituximab treatment 3 years earlier.

  5. Transient Epileptic Amnesia with Preserved Consciousness: a Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soohyun; Lee, Wong-Woo; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Jong-Moo; Kim, Byung-Kun; Kwon, Ohyun; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2017-06-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is defined as recurrent ictal and interictal transient memory disturbances typically occurring upon waking. Patients with TEA usually cannot remember the episodes. Electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities are usually localized on the dominant or bilateral temporal lobes. Here we report two cases of TEA with atypical features. The patients could remember the episodes afterwards, and abnormal discharges on EEG were detected in the temporal lobes of the non-dominant hemisphere. We suggest that confinement of epileptic discharge to the non-dominant temporal lobe can lead to partial preservation of consciousness during seizure attacks that produce transient amnesia.

  6. Canine and feline epileptic seizures and the lunar cycle: 2,507 seizures (2000-2008).

    PubMed

    Browand-Stainback, Laura; Levesque, Donald; McBee, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures in 211 canine and feline patients diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy were evaluated for temporal significance in relation to the lunar cycle. Seizure counts were compared among each of the eight individual lunar phases, among each of eight exact lunar phase dates, and by percent of lunar illumination using generalized estimating equations. No statistical significance was found in any of these comparisons excluding a relationship between the onset of epileptic seizures and the phases of the moon. Alteration in anticonvulsant treatment or monitoring of canine and feline patients with idiopathic epilepsy at large was not warranted based on the lunar cycle.

  7. Epileptic networks are strongly connected with and without the effects of interictal discharges.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Giannina R; Grouiller, Frédéric; Centeno, Maria; Carmichael, David W; Abela, Eugenio; Wiest, Roland; Korff, Christian; Seeck, Margitta; Michel, Christoph; Pittau, Francesca; Vulliemoz, Serge

    2016-07-01

    Epilepsy is increasingly considered as the dysfunction of a pathologic neuronal network (epileptic network) rather than a single focal source. We aimed to assess the interactions between the regions that comprise the epileptic network and to investigate their dependence on the occurrence of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). We analyzed resting state simultaneous electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) recordings in 10 patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy with multifocal IED-related blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses and a maximum t-value in the IED field. We computed functional connectivity (FC) maps of the epileptic network using two types of seed: (1) a 10-mm diameter sphere centered in the global maximum of IED-related BOLD map, and (2) the independent component with highest correlation to the IED-related BOLD map, named epileptic component. For both approaches, we compared FC maps before and after regressing out the effect of IEDs in terms of maximum and mean t-values and percentage of map overlap. Maximum and mean FC maps t-values were significantly lower after regressing out IEDs at the group level (p < 0.01). Overlap extent was 85% ± 12% and 87% ± 12% when the seed was the 10-mm diameter sphere and the epileptic component, respectively. Regions involved in a specific epileptic network show coherent BOLD fluctuations independent of scalp EEG IEDs. FC topography and strength is largely preserved by removing the IED effect. This could represent a signature of a sustained pathologic network with contribution from epileptic activity invisible to the scalp EEG. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. The Contribution of Raised Intraneuronal Chloride to Epileptic Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsa, Hannah; Merricks, Edward M.; Codadu, Neela K.; Cunningham, Mark O.; Deisseroth, Karl; Racca, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Altered inhibitory function is an important facet of epileptic pathology. A key concept is that GABAergic activity can become excitatory if intraneuronal chloride rises. However, it has proved difficult to separate the role of raised chloride from other contributory factors in complex network phenomena, such as epileptic pathology. Therefore, we asked what patterns of activity are associated with chloride dysregulation by making novel use of Halorhodopsin to load clusters of mouse pyramidal cells artificially with Cl−. Brief (1–10 s) activation of Halorhodopsin caused substantial positive shifts in the GABAergic reversal potential that were proportional to the charge transfer during the illumination and in adult neocortical pyramidal neurons decayed with a time constant of τ = 8.0 ± 2.8s. At the network level, these positive shifts in EGABA produced a transient rise in network excitability, with many distinctive features of epileptic foci, including high-frequency oscillations with evidence of out-of-phase firing (Ibarz et al., 2010). We show how such firing patterns can arise from quite small shifts in the mean intracellular Cl− level, within heterogeneous neuronal populations. Notably, however, chloride loading by itself did not trigger full ictal events, even with additional electrical stimulation to the underlying white matter. In contrast, when performed in combination with low, subepileptic levels of 4-aminopyridine, Halorhodopsin activation rapidly induced full ictal activity. These results suggest that chloride loading has at most an adjunctive role in ictogenesis. Our simulations also show how chloride loading can affect the jitter of action potential timing associated with imminent recruitment to an ictal event (Netoff and Schiff, 2002). PMID:25995461

  9. Patient-centered care in adult trauma intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Gwendolyn L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover unique aspects of caring for adult trauma intensive care unit patients with respect to implementing patient-centered care. The concept of patient-centered care has been discussed since 2000, but the actual implementation is currently becoming the focus of health care. The Institute of Medicine defined patient-centered care as "providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions" in the 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm report. Discussion and documentation of patient centered-care of the intensive care trauma patient population are limited and yield no results for publication search. This article explores the concept of delivering patient-centered care specifically in a trauma adult intensive care unit.

  10. The Lombrosian prejudice in medicine. The case of epilepsy. Epileptic psychosis. Epilepsy and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Granieri, Enrico; Fazio, Patrik

    2012-02-01

    In the nineteenth century, epilepsy became subject of experimental research. Lombroso established a relationship between epilepsy and criminality believing in the existence of epileptoid traits and atavism. He tried to demonstrate the common origin of epilepsy, criminality, and genius; factors deteriorating the CNS would act upon centers, which control behavior and ethics. This impairment would cause a lack of control on the lower nervous centers, reducing restraints of instincts and criminal behavior. He described developmental frontal cortex lesions in epileptic patients (today Taylor's dysplasia) and these observations supported the erroneous conviction of a relationship between criminality and epilepsy. Neurological, behavioral, and criminological sciences analyzed Lombroso's doctrine, whereas it was controversial that epileptic patients should be prone to violent actions and aggressive behavior. Today, there is an international panel of experts on epilepsy, which suggests five relevant criteria to determine if a crime committed with aggressiveness could result from epileptic seizures.

  11. Application of rare variant transmission disequilibrium tests to epileptic encephalopathy trio sequence data.

    PubMed

    2017-06-01

    The classic epileptic encephalopathies, including infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), are severe seizure disorders that usually arise sporadically. De novo variants in genes mainly encoding ion channel and synaptic proteins have been found to account for over 15% of patients with IS or LGS. The contribution of autosomal recessive genetic variation, however, is less well understood. We implemented a rare variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) to search for autosomal recessive epileptic encephalopathy genes in a cohort of 320 outbred patient-parent trios that were generally prescreened for rare metabolic disorders. In the current sample, our rare variant transmission disequilibrium test did not identify individual genes with significantly distorted transmission over expectation after correcting for the multiple tests. While the rare variant transmission disequilibrium test did not find evidence of a role for individual autosomal recessive genes, our current sample is insufficiently powered to assess the overall role of autosomal recessive genotypes in an outbred epileptic encephalopathy population.

  12. Epileptic activity in Alzheimer's disease: causes and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Vossel, Keith A; Tartaglia, Maria C; Nygaard, Haakon B; Zeman, Adam Z; Miller, Bruce L

    2017-04-01

    Epileptic activity is frequently associated with Alzheimer's disease; this association has therapeutic implications, because epileptic activity can occur at early disease stages and might contribute to pathogenesis. In clinical practice, seizures in patients with Alzheimer's disease can easily go unrecognised because they usually present as non-motor seizures, and can overlap with other symptoms of the disease. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, seizures can hasten cognitive decline, highlighting the clinical relevance of early recognition and treatment. Some evidence indicates that subclinical epileptiform activity in patients with Alzheimer's disease, detected by extended neurophysiological monitoring, can also lead to accelerated cognitive decline. Treatment of clinical seizures in patients with Alzheimer's disease with select antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), in low doses, is usually well tolerated and efficacious. Moreover, studies in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease suggest that certain classes of AEDs that reduce network hyperexcitability have disease-modifying properties. These AEDs target mechanisms of epileptogenesis involving amyloid β and tau. Clinical trials targeting network hyperexcitability in patients with Alzheimer's disease will identify whether AEDs or related strategies could improve their cognitive symptoms or slow decline.

  13. Concepts of Connectivity and Human Epileptic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Louis; Daunizeau, Jean; Walker, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    This review attempts to place the concept of connectivity from increasingly sophisticated neuroimaging data analysis methodologies within the field of epilepsy research. We introduce the more principled connectivity terminology developed recently in neuroimaging and review some of the key concepts related to the characterization of propagation of epileptic activity using what may be called traditional correlation-based studies based on EEG. We then show how essentially similar methodologies, and more recently models addressing causality, have been used to characterize whole-brain and regional networks using functional MRI data. Following a discussion of our current understanding of the neuronal system aspects of the onset and propagation of epileptic discharges and seizures, we discuss the most advanced and ambitious framework to attempt to fully characterize epileptic networks based on neuroimaging data. PMID:21472027

  14. Epileptic seizures and EEG features in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Karuta, Simone Carreiro; Silva, Izabella Celidônio Bertoldo; Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; Bandeira, Márcia; Janz, Loris; Löhr, Alfredo

    2008-09-01

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus is more incident in female affecting different systems including the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to check the incidence of seizures and electroencephalographic features in these patients. It was analyzed all patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus referred to the Pequeno Príncipe Hospital in Curitiba, PR, Brazil, in the year of 2007. The patients were submitted to EEG and subdivided into two groups according to the presence or absence of epileptic seizures. Mann-Whitney statistical test was used. Forty-nine cases were included, there were 73.45% female, with an age between 3 and 28 years (micro=17.00 years; s=5.01 years). Seizures (13/26.50%) were the most frequent manifestation followed by headache (13/26.50%) and ischemic stroke (6/12.25%). Cerebral vasculites were the most frequent alteration in neuroimage. The abnormalities of EEG were characterized by asymmetry of the electric cerebral activity, diffuse disorganized background activity, focal epileptiform discharges in the right central-temporal region, generalized paroxysmal of 3 Hz spike-waves, and bursts of theta-delta slowness activity in the right parietal-occiptal region. The statistic analysis showed no significantly difference between age of onset of symptoms and the risk of seizures (p 0.675) as well as between time of the disease and the risk of seizures (p 0.436). Neurologic manifestations, in special epileptic seizures, are frequent in systemic lupus erythematosus. Age of onset of symptoms and the time of disease did not increase the risk of epileptic seizures in this disease.

  15. Long-term Effectiveness of Antiepileptic Drug Monotherapy in Partial Epileptic Patients: A 7-year Study in an Epilepsy Center in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Lang, Sen-Yang; Wang, Xiang-Qing; Shi, Xiao-Bing; Ma, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jia-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to choose an appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED) to manage partial epilepsy. Traditional AEDs, such as carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproate (VPA), have been proven to have good therapeutic effects. However, in recent years, a variety of new AEDs have increasingly been used as first-line treatments for partial epilepsy. As the studies regarding the effectiveness of new drugs and comparisons between new AEDs and traditional AEDs are few, it is determined that these are areas in need of further research. Accordingly, this study investigated the long-term effectiveness of six AEDs used as monotherapy in patients with partial epilepsy. Methods: This is a retrospective, long-term observational study. Patients with partial epilepsy who received monotherapy with one of six AEDs, namely, CBZ, VPA, topiramate (TPM), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), or levetiracetam (LEV), were identified and followed up from May 2007 to October 2014, and time to first seizure after treatment, 12-month remission rate, retention rate, reasons for treatment discontinuation, and adverse effects were evaluated. Results: A total of 789 patients were enrolled. The median time of follow-up was 56.95 months. CBZ exhibited the best time to first seizure, with a median time to first seizure of 36.06 months (95% confidential interval: 30.64–44.07). CBZ exhibited the highest 12-month remission rate (85.55%), which was significantly higher than those of TPM (69.38%, P = 0.006), LTG (70.79%, P = 0.001), LEV (72.54%, P = 0.005), and VPA (73.33%, P = 0.002). CBZ, OXC, and LEV had the best retention rate, followed by LTG, TPM, and VPA. Overall, adverse effects occurred in 45.87% of patients, and the most common adverse effects were memory problems (8.09%), rashes (7.76%), abnormal hepatic function (6.24%), and drowsiness (6.24%). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that CBZ, OXC, and LEV are relatively effective in managing focal epilepsy as measured by time to first seizure

  16. Long-term Effectiveness of Antiepileptic Drug Monotherapy in Partial Epileptic Patients: A 7-year Study in an Epilepsy Center in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fei; Lang, Sen-Yang; Wang, Xiang-Qing; Shi, Xiao-Bing; Ma, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jia-Tang

    2015-11-20

    It is important to choose an appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED) to manage partial epilepsy. Traditional AEDs, such as carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproate (VPA), have been proven to have good therapeutic effects. However, in recent years, a variety of new AEDs have increasingly been used as first-line treatments for partial epilepsy. As the studies regarding the effectiveness of new drugs and comparisons between new AEDs and traditional AEDs are few, it is determined that these are areas in need of further research. Accordingly, this study investigated the long-term effectiveness of six AEDs used as monotherapy in patients with partial epilepsy. This is a retrospective, long-term observational study. Patients with partial epilepsy who received monotherapy with one of six AEDs, namely, CBZ, VPA, topiramate (TPM), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), or levetiracetam (LEV), were identified and followed up from May 2007 to October 2014, and time to first seizure after treatment, 12-month remission rate, retention rate, reasons for treatment discontinuation, and adverse effects were evaluated. A total of 789 patients were enrolled. The median time of follow-up was 56.95 months. CBZ exhibited the best time to first seizure, with a median time to first seizure of 36.06 months (95% confidential interval: 30.64-44.07). CBZ exhibited the highest 12-month remission rate (85.55%), which was significantly higher than those of TPM (69.38%, P = 0.006), LTG (70.79%, P = 0.001), LEV (72.54%, P = 0.005), and VPA (73.33%, P = 0.002). CBZ, OXC, and LEV had the best retention rate, followed by LTG, TPM, and VPA. Overall, adverse effects occurred in 45.87% of patients, and the most common adverse effects were memory problems (8.09%), rashes (7.76%), abnormal hepatic function (6.24%), and drowsiness (6.24%). This study demonstrated that CBZ, OXC, and LEV are relatively effective in managing focal epilepsy as measured by time to first seizure, 12-month remission rate, and retention

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in neurological disorders with epileptic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zsurka, Gábor; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2010-12-01

    A broad variety of mutations of the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear genes that lead to the impairment of mitochondrial respiratory chain or mitochondrial ATP synthesis have been associated with epileptic phenotypes. Additionally, evidence for an impaired mitochondrial function in seizure focus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and Ammon's horn sclerosis, as well as, animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy has been accumulated. This implies a direct pathogenic role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the process of epileptogenesis and seizure generation in certain forms of epilepsy.

  18. [Specificities of the epileptic women (oral contraceptives, pregnancy)].

    PubMed

    Dupont, Sophie

    2011-03-01

    The enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs such as carbamazepine, phenytoin, barbiturates, oxcarbazepine do not allow oral contraceptives. The pregnancy must be planned. Every patient in childbearing age should be informed by her practitioner. The rule is to optimize the antiepileptic treatment before the pregnancy: less drugs, less dosages. This optimization will depend on the epileptic syndrome and the nature of the treatment. Valproate of sodium should be avoided, if possible, during pregnancy. Preconceptional supplementation by folic acid should be considered. Antiepileptic drugs monitoring is required during pregnancy. Natural delivery with peridural anaesthesiology is mandatory. The breast feeding must be considered individually. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Intensive care of the adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Allan, Catherine K

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of congenital heart disease in the adult population has increased out of proportion to that of the pediatric population as survival has improved, and adult congenital heart disease patients make up a growing percentage of pediatric and adult cardiac intensive care unit admissions. These patients often develop complex multiorgan system disease as a result of long-standing altered cardiac physiology, and many require reoperation during adulthood. Practitioners who care for these patients in the cardiac intensive care unit must have a strong working knowledge of the pathophysiology of complex congenital heart disease, and a full team of specialists must be available to assist in the care of these patients. This chapter will review some of the common multiorgan system effects of long-standing congenital heart disease (eg, renal and hepatic dysfunction, coagulation abnormalities, arrhythmias) as well as some of the unique cardiopulmonary physiology of this patient population.

  20. Contribution of EEG/fMRI to the definition of the epileptic focus.

    PubMed

    Pittau, Francesca; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2012-05-08

    To evaluate the clinical relevance of EEG/fMRI in patients with focal epilepsy, by assessing the information it adds to the scalp EEG in the definition of the epileptic focus. Forty-three patients with focal epilepsy were studied with EEG/fMRI using a 3-T scanner. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes related to interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) were classified as concordant or not concordant with the scalp EEG spike field and as contributory if the BOLD signal provided additional information to the scalp EEG about the epileptic focus or not contributory if it did not. We considered patients having intracerebral EEG or a focal lesion on MRI as having independent validation. Thirty-three patients had at least 3 IEDs during the EEG/fMRI acquisition (active EEG), and all had a BOLD response. In 29 of 33 (88%) patients, the BOLD response was concordant, and in 21 of 33 (64%) patients, the BOLD response was contributory. Fourteen patients had an independent validation: in 12 of these 14, the BOLD responses were validated and in 2 they were invalidated. A BOLD response was present in all patients with active EEG, and more specific localization of the epileptic focus was gained from EEG/fMRI in half of the patients who were scanned, when compared with scalp EEG alone. This study demonstrates that EEG/fMRI, in the context of a clinical practice, may contribute to the localization of the interictal epileptic generator in patients with focal epilepsy.

  1. Cross-sectional study of the hospital management of adult patients with a suspected seizure (EPIC2)

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Jon Mark; Dudhill, Hannah; Shewan, Jane; Mason, Sue; Grünewald, Richard A; Reuber, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of patients taken to hospital by emergency ambulance after a suspected seizure. Design Quantitative cross-sectional retrospective study of a consecutive series of patients. Setting An acute hospital trust in a large city in England. Participants In 2012–2013, the regions’ ambulance service managed 605 481 emergency incidents, 74 141/605 481 originated from Sheffield (a large city in the region), 2121/74 141 (2.9%) were suspected seizures and 178/2121 occurred in May 2012. We undertook detailed analysis of the medical records of the 91/178 patients who were transported to the city’s acute hospital. After undertaking a retrospective review of the medical records, the best available aetiological explanation for the seizures was determined. Results The best available aetiological explanation for 74.7% (68/91) of the incidents was an epileptic seizure, 11.0% (10/91) were psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and 9.9% (9/91) were cardiogenic events. The epileptic seizures fall into the following four categories: first epileptic seizure (13.2%, 12/91), epileptic seizure with a historical diagnosis of epilepsy (30.8%, 28/91), recurrent epileptic seizures without a historical diagnosis of epilepsy (20.9%, 19/91) and acute symptomatic seizures (9.9%, 9/91). Of those with seizures (excluding cardiogenic events), 2.4% (2/82) of patients were seizing on arrival in the Emergency Department (ED), 19.5% (16/82) were postictal and 69.5% (57/82) were alert. 63.4% (52/82) were discharged at the end of their ED attendance and 36.5% (19/52) of these had no referral or follow-up. Conclusions Most suspected seizures are epileptic seizures but this is a diagnostically heterogeneous group. Only a small minority of patients require emergency medical care but most are transported to hospital. Few patients receive expert review and many are discharged home without referral to a specialist leaving them at

  2. Preictal Dynamics of EEG Complexity in Intracranially Recorded Epileptic Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Bob, Petr; Roman, Robert; Svetlak, Miroslav; Kukleta, Miloslav; Chladek, Jan; Brazdil, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Recent findings suggest that neural complexity reflecting a number of independent processes in the brain may characterize typical changes during epileptic seizures and may enable to describe preictal dynamics. With respect to previously reported findings suggesting specific changes in neural complexity during preictal period, we have used measure of pointwise correlation dimension (PD2) as a sensitive indicator of nonstationary changes in complexity of the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Although this measure of complexity in epileptic patients was previously reported by Feucht et al (Applications of correlation dimension and pointwise dimension for non-linear topographical analysis of focal onset seizures. Med Biol Comput. 1999;37:208–217), it was not used to study changes in preictal dynamics. With this aim to study preictal changes of EEG complexity, we have examined signals from 11 multicontact depth (intracerebral) EEG electrodes located in 108 cortical and subcortical brain sites, and from 3 scalp EEG electrodes in a patient with intractable epilepsy, who underwent preoperative evaluation before epilepsy surgery. From those 108 EEG contacts, records related to 44 electrode contacts implanted into lesional structures and white matter were not included into the experimental analysis. The results show that in comparison to interictal period (at about 8–6 minutes before seizure onset), there was a statistically significant decrease in PD2 complexity in the preictal period at about 2 minutes before seizure onset in all 64 intracranial channels localized in various brain sites that were included into the analysis and in 3 scalp EEG channels as well. Presented results suggest that using PD2 in EEG analysis may have significant implications for research of preictal dynamics and prediction of epileptic seizures. PMID:25415671

  3. Aspartic acid aminotransferase activity is increased in actively spiking compared with non-spiking human epileptic cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Kish, S J; Dixon, L M; Sherwin, A L

    1988-01-01

    Increased concentration of the excitatory neurotransmitter aspartic acid in actively spiking human epileptic cerebral cortex was recently described. In order to further characterise changes in the aspartergic system in epileptic brain, the behaviour of aspartic acid aminotransferase (AAT), a key enzyme involved in aspartic acid metabolism has now been examined. Electrocorticography performed during surgery was employed to identify cortical epileptic spike foci in 16 patients undergoing temporal lobectomy for intractable seizures. Patients with spontaneously spiking lateral temporal cortex (n = 8) were compared with a non-spiking control group (n = 8) of patients in whom the epileptic lesions were confined to the hippocampus sparing the temporal convexity. Mean activity of AAT in spiking cortex was significantly elevated by 16-18%, with aspartic acid concentration increased by 28%. Possible explanations for the enhanced AAT activity include increased proliferation of cortical AAT-containing astrocytes at the spiking focus and/or a generalised increase in neuronal or extraneuronal metabolism consequent to the ongoing epileptic discharge. It is suggested that the data provide additional support for a disturbance of central excitatory aspartic acid mechanisms in human epileptic brain. PMID:2898010

  4. Psychosocial impact of cancer on adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Yasmin Abdul; Ghafoor, Zahra Abdul; Masood, Nehal; Mehmood, Talha; Awan, Safia; Ansar, Tooba; Mirza, Murtaza; Rashid, Uzma Abdul

    2012-09-01

    To explore the effects of cancer on psychosocial aspects of Pakistani patients and their families, assessing the need for interventions to improve their quality of life. A prospective, Cross-sectional study was performed on 200 patients visiting the oncology outpatient facility of AKUH from December 2010 to May 2011 through an interview. Responses were recorded on pre-designed questionnaires including FACT-G QOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General Quality Of Life) component. Out of the 200 patients 52 (26%) were males and 148 (74%) were females. Mean age was 51.8 +/- 14.2 years. Breast cancer accounted for the commonest cancer in females 116 (58%) and lung in males 30 (15%), 100 (50%) patients were currently undergoing chemotherapy. In all 148 (74%) patients were well aware of their diagnosis and were able to cope better and 142 (71%) were well supported by families (majority being financially stable). Major financial impact was found in 42 (21%) cases. Religious/spiritual help was sought by 138 (69%) patients predominantly females- 113 (76%) and 22 (11%) patients consulted a psychiatrist; 20 (94%) subjects of this group felt this intervention was helpful. Responses regarding effect on the patient's sexual life were poor and 126 (63%) denied answering the question. In our study one third of cancer patients were found to be depressed mainly affecting those who were receiving multimodality treatment or facing financial issues. Religious help was the main coping strategy for them.

  5. Adult-onset amenorrhea: a study of 262 patients.

    PubMed

    Reindollar, R H; Novak, M; Tho, S P; McDonough, P G

    1986-09-01

    A series of 262 patients with amenorrhea of adult onset are reported. Hypothalamic suppression followed by inappropriate positive feedback, and then hyperprolactinemia and ovarian failure are the most frequently encountered etiologies. Other etiologies are diverse and numerically less frequent. Amenorrhea after use of oral contraceptives, or postpill amenorrhea, occurred in 77 (29%) of all patients. The average age of presentation, prior menstrual history, associated morbidity, and subsequent reproductive potential of each diagnostic group are reported. Adult-onset amenorrhea has a less significant impact on future wellbeing than was reported for a similar-sized group of patients whose amenorrhea developed as a result of pubertal aberrancy.

  6. [Bacterial parotitis in an immunocompromised patient in adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Vassal, O; Bernet, C; Wallet, F; Friggeri, A; Piriou, V

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial parotitis is a common childhood disease with a favorable outcome. Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently involved pathogen. Clinical presentation in adult patients can be misleading, Onset occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities, making diagnosis difficult--particularly in ICU. Different pathogens are found in adults with worse outcomes observed. We report here the case of a critically ill patient and discuss diagnosis and management of bacterial parotitis. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Stimulus-induced reflex epileptic spasms in 5p- syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kentaro; Saito, Yoshiaki; Yokoyama, Atushi; Nishimura, Yoko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Here we describe two patients with 5p- syndrome who suffered from epilepsy characterised by stimulus-induced epileptic spasms manifesting as head nodding. In patient 1, a series of spasms were exclusively triggered by eating, and were associated with diffuse high-voltage slow waves on ictal EEG, particularly presenting as a positive slow potential at the left mid-temporal area. Clusters of sharp waves with negative polarity emerged in the same area during the inter-spasm periods during eating. In patient 2, spasms were provoked by either eating or micturition. Ictal EEG of clustered spasms after micturition showed positive slow or triphasic waves, which correlated with each spasm, over the bifrontal and vertex areas. These findings suggest that the focal cortical areas act as trigger regions in reflex epilepsies, and that a spasm-generator responsible for the execution of reflex spasms exists either in other cortical areas or in the subcortical structures. Although epilepsy is an unusual complication of 5p- syndrome, this syndrome may have a propensity to develop reflex epilepsy, particularly epileptic spasms. However, identification of responsible genes and their roles in this phenotype requires further investigations.

  8. Coexistence of Epileptic Nocturnal Wanderings and an Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro; Díaz-Galviz, John L.; García-Reyna, Juan Carlos; Ávila-Ordoñez, Mario U.

    2007-01-01

    Episodic nocturnal wanderings (ENWs) have rarely been associated with gross abnormalities of brain structures. We describe the case of a patient with ENWs in coexistence with an arachnoid cyst (AC). The patient was a 15-year-old boy who presented with nocturnal attacks characterized by complex motor behaviors. An MRI revealed a left temporal cyst and a SPECT Tc99 scan showed left temporal hypoperfusion and bilateral frontal hyperperfusion, more evident on the right side. During an all-night polysomnographic recording with audiovisual monitoring, dystonic posture followed by sleepwalking-like behavior was documented. The sleepwalking-like behavior was preceded by a spike discharge over the left frontocentral region with contralateral projection and secondary generalization during stage 2 sleep. Treatment with levetiracetam produced a striking remission of seizures. This supports a conservative management of an AC, considering that it may be an incidental finding. In epileptic patients, an AC may not necessarily be related to the location of the seizure focus. Citation: Jiménez-Genchi A; Díaz-Galviz JL; García-Reyna JC et al. Coexistence of epileptic nocturnal wanderings and an arachnoid cyst. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(4):399-401. PMID:17694730

  9. Long-term variability of global statistical properties of epileptic brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnert, Marie-Therese; Elger, Christian E.; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the influence of various pathophysiologic and physiologic processes on global statistical properties of epileptic brain networks. We construct binary functional networks from long-term, multichannel electroencephalographic data recorded from 13 epilepsy patients, and the average shortest path length and the clustering coefficient serve as global statistical network characteristics. For time-resolved estimates of these characteristics we observe large fluctuations over time, however, with some periodic temporal structure. These fluctuations can—to a large extent—be attributed to daily rhythms while relevant aspects of the epileptic process contribute only marginally. Particularly, we could not observe clear cut changes in network states that can be regarded as predictive of an impending seizure. Our findings are of particular relevance for studies aiming at an improved understanding of the epileptic process with graph-theoretical approaches.

  10. Long-term variability of importance of brain regions in evolving epileptic brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Christian; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the temporal and spatial variability of the importance of brain regions in evolving epileptic brain networks. We construct these networks from multiday, multichannel electroencephalographic data recorded from 17 epilepsy patients and use centrality indices to assess the importance of brain regions. Time-resolved indications of highest importance fluctuate over time to a greater or lesser extent, however, with some periodic temporal structure that can mostly be attributed to phenomena unrelated to the disease. In contrast, relevant aspects of the epileptic process contribute only marginally. Indications of highest importance also exhibit pronounced alternations between various brain regions that are of relevance for studies aiming at an improved understanding of the epileptic process with graph-theoretical approaches. Nonetheless, these findings may guide new developments for individualized diagnosis, treatment, and control.

  11. Complex phase synchronization in epileptic seizures: Evidence for a devil's staircase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Velazquez, J. L.; Garcia Dominguez, L.; Wennberg, R.

    2007-01-01

    We describe multifrequency phase synchronization in epileptic seizures. Using magnetoencephalographic recordings from three patients suffering generalized seizures, the evidence is presented that, in addition to the commonly studied 1:1 frequency locking, there exists complex multifrequency coordination that, in some cases, follows a classical “devil’s staircase.” Within the limitations of observing this phenomenon in a clinical experimental setting, these observations reveal that in pathological brain activity, complex frequency locking can be found similar to that identified in certain pathological cardiac re-entrant arrhythmias. This may suggest the existence of similar re-entrant mechanisms active in cerebral neocortex during epileptic seizures.

  12. Displacement of avulsed tooth into soft tissue of chin resulting from epileptic attack trauma.

    PubMed

    Karasu, Hakan Alpay; Uyanik, Lokman Onur; Koçyiğit, Ismail Doruk

    2005-04-01

    Maxillofacial trauma is the main cause of emergency admittance to dental clinics. Mental retardation and epileptic status are important factors in an increase in the risk of dental injuries. Tooth avulsion, which is the total displacement of a tooth out of its socket, is an infrequently observed entity. Maxillary central incisors are the most commonly affected teeth. The case of a patient with severe dental injury resulting from an epileptic attack is presented. He had several teeth avulsed and displacement of a tooth into the soft tissue of the chin.

  13. [Research advances in circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Qi; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The time phase of epileptic seizures has attracted more and more attention. Epileptic seizures have their own circadian rhythm. The same type of epilepsy has different seizure frequencies in different time periods and states (such as sleeping/awakening state and natural day/night cycle). The circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures has complex molecular and endocrine mechanisms, and currently there are several hypotheses. Clarification of the circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures and prevention and administration according to such circadian rhythm can effectively control seizures and reduce the adverse effects of drugs. The research on the circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures provides a new idea for the treatment of epilepsy.

  14. Patient-Centered Outcomes in Older Adults with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Wendy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Older adults have the highest incidence of new-onset epilepsy, yet there is a lack of self-management interventions to ensure that this population achieves desirable outcomes. In order to develop patient-centered interventions for older adults with epilepsy, self-management outcomes of importance to these patients must first be explored. The purpose of this study was to describe what outcomes older adults diagnosed with epilepsy late in life hope to achieve in self-managing their condition. Method Qualitative description was used. 20 older adults took part in semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results Six themes emerged--Maintaining Normalcy, We Want to be Involved, Well-Equipped, Seizure Freedom, Fitting Epilepsy in with Other Conditions, Incongruence with Provider Goals. Conclusion These results add to the extant literature, and provide knowledge on which patient-centered epilepsy self-management interventions can be developed. In addition, these results can inform the development of a patient-centered outcome measure for older adults with epilepsy. Such a measure could be used in conjunction with existing measures related to disease status (seizure frequency, etc.) to ensure that outcomes pertinent to both patients and providers are targeted and measured. PMID:24838071

  15. Epileptic seizure classifications of single-channel scalp EEG data using wavelet-based features and SVM.

    PubMed

    Janjarasjitt, Suparerk

    2017-02-13

    In this study, wavelet-based features of single-channel scalp EEGs recorded from subjects with intractable seizure are examined for epileptic seizure classification. The wavelet-based features extracted from scalp EEGs are simply based on detail and approximation coefficients obtained from the discrete wavelet transform. Support vector machine (SVM), one of the most commonly used classifiers, is applied to classify vectors of wavelet-based features of scalp EEGs into either seizure or non-seizure class. In patient-based epileptic seizure classification, a training data set used to train SVM classifiers is composed of wavelet-based features of scalp EEGs corresponding to the first epileptic seizure event. Overall, the excellent performance on patient-dependent epileptic seizure classification is obtained with the average accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of, respectively, 0.9687, 0.7299, and 0.9813. The vector composed of two wavelet-based features of scalp EEGs provide the best performance on patient-dependent epileptic seizure classification in most cases, i.e., 19 cases out of 24. The wavelet-based features corresponding to the 32-64, 8-16, and 4-8 Hz subbands of scalp EEGs are the mostly used features providing the best performance on patient-dependent classification. Furthermore, the performance on both patient-dependent and patient-independent epileptic seizure classifications are also validated using tenfold cross-validation. From the patient-independent epileptic seizure classification validated using tenfold cross-validation, it is shown that the best classification performance is achieved using the wavelet-based features corresponding to the 64-128 and 4-8 Hz subbands of scalp EEGs.

  16. Low bone mineral density in adult patients with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Jadwiga; Bohdanowicz-Pawlak, Anna; Waszczuk, Ewa; Jakubowska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Calcium and vitamin D malabsorption in coeliac disease (CD) predispose to skeletal demineralisation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of bone mineral density (BMD) and calcium deficiencies in adult patients with CD and assess whether a gluten-free diet is sufficiently effective for BMD restoration. BMD and biochemical parameters of bone and mineral metabolism were measured in 35 adult CD patients receiving (19) or not receiving (16) a gluten-free diet (GFD) and in 36 controls. Then the CD patients were treated with a GFD and calcium (1.0 g/day) plus alfacalcidol (0.25-1 μg/day) for one year. Reduced BMD was diagnosed in 57-77% of the patients. Mean calcaemia, calciuria, and 25(OH) vitamin D were lower, but serum PTH and bone-turnover markers (ALP, osteocalcin, ICTP) were significantly higher in the CD patients than in the controls. In the patients on the diet (GFD(+)), BMD was higher than in the GFD(-) patients, but lower than in the controls. The biochemical parameters were normal in the GFD(+) patients except for diminished calciuria. Mean BMD after one year of treatment significantly increased (p < 0.05), mostly in the lumbar spine (mean: 7.3%), but decreased in five patients who did not strictly adhere to the GFD. Deficiencies in calcium, vitamin D, and BMD are very common in adult CD patients. Gluten avoidance increased BMD, although the values remained markedly lower in several patients. Because of chronic calcium deficiency despite GFD, calcium and vitamin D supplementation in most adult CD patients is proposed.

  17. Factors associated with epileptic seizure of cavernous malformations in the central nervous system in West China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Chen, Ming-Wan; Si, Yang; Li, Jin-Mei; Zhou, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the factors associated with preoperative and postoperative epileptic seizure in patients with cavernous malformations (CMs). Methods: A total of 52 consecutive patients from January 2009 to June 2011 who underwent surgical treatment in West China Hospital of Sichuan University due to CMs and confirmed by histopathology were retrospectively reviewed.Patients were divided into two groups (epilepsy-group and non-epilepsy group) according to clinical presentation. Other clinical data, treatment procedure, and follow-up information were collected. Engel classification was used to evaluate seizure outcome. Results: Low birth weight, temporal lobe involvement and cortical lesion showed significant difference between two groups (p=0.017, 0.003 and 0.025 respectively). Cortical lesion highly increased risk for preoperative epileptic seizure (OR=10.48; 95% CI 1.61-68.23). After a mean follow-up of 2.1 years, 77.8% of epileptic patients achieved Engel class I. Temporal lobe involvement, lesion size < 2.5cm and surgery within one year of symptom onset were found associated with better seizure outcome (p=0.016, 0.012 and 0.050). Temporal lobe involvement significantly decreased the risk for postoperative epileptic seizure (OR=0.038; 95% CI 0.002-0.833). Application of ECoG made no significant difference to seizure outcome (p=0.430). Most patients need continuing medication therapy after surgery. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of patient with CMs is satisfactory in most cases and temporal lobe involvement usually predict favourable postoperative seizure outcome whether under the monitoring of ECoG or not. Thus, epileptic patients with CMs should be considered for surgical treatment especially when cortical brain layer or temporal lobe was involved. PMID:24353703

  18. Neurophysiological activity underlying altered brain metabolism in epileptic encephalopathies with CSWS.

    PubMed

    De Tiège, Xavier; Trotta, Nicola; Op de Beeck, Marc; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Marty, Brice; Wens, Vincent; Nonclercq, Antoine; Goldman, Serge; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the neurophysiological correlate of altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism observed in children with epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves during sleep (CSWS) by using a multimodal approach combining time-sensitive magnetic source imaging (MSI) and positron emission tomography with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). Six patients (4 boys and 2 girls, age range: 4-8 years, 3 patients with Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), 3 patients with atypical rolandic epilepsy (ARE)) were investigated by FDG-PET and MSI at the acute phase of CSWS. In all patients, the onset(s) of spike-waves discharges were associated with significant focal hypermetabolism. The propagation of epileptic discharges to other brain areas was associated with focal hypermetabolism (five patients), hypometabolism (one patient) or the absence of any significant metabolic change (one patient). Interestingly, most of the hypometabolic areas were not involved in the epileptic network per se. This study shows that focal hypermetabolism observed at the acute phase of CSWS are related to the onset or propagation sites of spike-wave discharges. Spike-wave discharges propagation can be associated to other types of metabolic changes, suggesting the occurrence of various neurophysiological mechanisms at the cellular level. Most of the hypometabolic areas are not involved in the epileptic network as such and are probably related to a mechanism of remote inhibition. These findings highlight the critical value of combining FDG-PET with time-sensitive functional neuroimaging approaches such as MSI to assess CSWS epileptic network when surgery is considered as a therapeutic approach.

  19. [Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Fukujima, M M; Cardeal, J O; Lima, J G

    1996-06-01

    Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke. Clinical features of 35 patients with ischemic stroke who developed epilepsy (Group 1) were compared with those of 35 patients with ischemic stroke without epilepsy (Group 2). The age of the patients did not differ between the groups. There were more men than women and more white than other races in both groups. Diabetes melitus, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, previous stroke, migraine, Chagas disease, cerebral embolism of cardiac origin and use of oral contraceptive did not differ between the groups. Smokers and alcohol users were more frequent in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Most patients of Group 1 presented with hemiparesis; none presented cerebellar or brainstem involvement. Perhaps strokes in smokers have some different aspects, that let them more epileptogenic than in non smokers.

  20. [Relational models and psychopathology of epileptics in a group-psychotherapy perspective (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bergonzi, P; Ferro, F M; Mazza, S; Zolo, P

    1976-01-01

    Epileptic patients show a large range of psychopathologic manifestations, both from a qualitative point of view (even with an exact reference to the nature and the site of lesion) and from a quantitative point of view (from the so-called characterial attitude to the psychotic developments). Perhaps all these alterations of psychiatric interest have a common denominator because, after all, they arise from the sum of two essential moments: the experience of the critical event on the one hand, and the interactive network between the patient and those who are present to his critical manifestations on the other. In particular this complex relational psychopathology needs several therapeutic interventions which are to be complementary and concordant so that they may give satisfactory results of psychosocial reinsertion. We think that the model of intervention to be preferred for its effectiveness is that drawn from group-psychotherapy tecniques: the model in which "psychoanalysis meets sociology (Foulkes) seems to be particularly specific to this problem because it concerns the microsocial and investigates (and, by means of the conduction, it resolves) distorted ways of communication and conflictual dynamic interactions. We followed some epileptics in the group-community of the neurological department of a general hospital (of course with other mental, not epileptic, patients). These preliminary studies lead us to point out the theoretical reasons and the practical justifications of such possible management of the psychological manifestations of epileptic patients.

  1. Magnetoencephalography in pediatric neurology and in epileptic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Verrotti, Alberto; Pizzella, Vittorio; Trotta, Daniela; Madonna, Laura; Chiarelli, Francesco; Romani, Gian Luca

    2003-04-01

    In recent years, great advances in the knowledge of neuromagnetism have permitted the application of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices to the pathophysiologic study of the human brain. In particular, in pediatric neurology, the integration of biomagnetism with magnetic resonance imaging and other techniques for medical imaging have allowed for precise neuromagnetic measurements of the human brain. The more frequently used technique is magnetoencephalography. Recent data have illustrated the usefulness of magnetoencephalography in mapping activity of sensory and motor areas and in studying the spatiotemporal pattern of brain activation specific to somatosensory function. Moreover, magnetoencephalography is an important tool to localize epileptic activity; magnetic source imaging superimposes magnetoencephalographic localizations on the magnetic resonance imaging and yields improved spatial resolution as compared with surface electroencephalography. The role of magnetoencephalography in evaluating patients with epilepsy continues to evolve; in fact, it seems to be very useful in the localization of the epileptogenic zone in patients with partial epilepsy. This application of magnetoencephalography is essential in the selection of epileptic children candidates to surgical treatment of seizures.

  2. Modeling the Complex Dynamics and Changing Correlations of Epileptic Events

    PubMed Central

    Wulsin, Drausin F.; Fox, Emily B.; Litt, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy can manifest short, sub-clinical epileptic “bursts” in addition to full-blown clinical seizures. We believe the relationship between these two classes of events—something not previously studied quantitatively—could yield important insights into the nature and intrinsic dynamics of seizures. A goal of our work is to parse these complex epileptic events into distinct dynamic regimes. A challenge posed by the intracranial EEG (iEEG) data we study is the fact that the number and placement of electrodes can vary between patients. We develop a Bayesian nonparametric Markov switching process that allows for (i) shared dynamic regimes between a variable number of channels, (ii) asynchronous regime-switching, and (iii) an unknown dictionary of dynamic regimes. We encode a sparse and changing set of dependencies between the channels using a Markov-switching Gaussian graphical model for the innovations process driving the channel dynamics and demonstrate the importance of this model in parsing and out-of-sample predictions of iEEG data. We show that our model produces intuitive state assignments that can help automate clinical analysis of seizures and enable the comparison of sub-clinical bursts and full clinical seizures. PMID:25284825

  3. Characterization of ictal slow waves in epileptic spasms.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryoko; Saito, Yoshiaki; Okumura, Akihisa; Abe, Shinpei; Saito, Takashi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-12-01

    We characterized the clinico-neurophysiological features of epileptic spasms, particularly focusing on high-voltage slow waves during ictal EEG. We studied 22 patients with epileptic spasms recorded during digital video-scalp EEG, including five individuals who still had persistent spasms after callosotomy. We analysed the duration, amplitude, latency to onset of electromyographic bursts, and distribution of the highest positive and negative peaks of slow waves in 352 spasms. High-voltage positive slow waves preceded the identifiable muscle contractions of spasms. The mean duration of these positive waves was 569±228 m, and the mean latency to electromyographic onset was 182±127 m. These parameters varied markedly even within a patient. The highest peak of the positive component was distributed in variable regions, which was not consistent with the location of lesions on MRI. The peak of the negative component following the positivity was distributed in the neighbouring or opposite areas of the positive peak distribution. No changes were evident in the pre- or post-surgical distributions of the positive peak, or in the interhemispheric delay between both hemispheres, in individuals with callosotomy. Our data imply that ictal positive slow waves are the most common EEG changes during spasms associated with a massive motor component. Plausible explanations for these widespread positive slow waves include the notion that EEG changes possibly reflect involvement of both cortical and subcortical structures.

  4. [Cystic fibrosis in adults: study of 111 patients].

    PubMed

    de Gracia, Javier; Alvarez, Antonio; Mata, Fernando; Guarner, Luisa; Vendrell, Montserrat; Gadtner, Silvia; Cobos, Nicolás

    2002-11-09

    Our goal was to establish the clinical and genetic characteristics of patients diagnosed with adult-onset cystic fibrosis (CF). This was a retrospective observational descriptive comparative study of CF patients according to their age at the time of diagnosis. All adult patients (> 16 years old) attended in our CF Unit until November 2001 were included in the study. Those patients diagnosed of CF at their childhood (< 16 years old) were categorized as Group A patients, and those diagnosed in adulthood (>= 16 years old) were categorized as group B patients. Anthropometric parameters, respiratory and digestive clinical abnormalities, chest and abdominal radiological exams, sputum bacteriology, respiratory function and genetic tests were evaluated. Statistical analysis between groups was performed by comparing chi square test for qualitative values and the Student t test for quantitative values. One hundred and eleven patients (60 women, mean age 28, range 16-69 years) out of a total sample of 245 (45.3%) patients attended at the CF unit were enrolled in the study. Group A included 61 patients (32 women; mean age 23) and group B included 50 patients (28 women; mean age 32). The comparative study between both groups showed that patients in group B were older, had a higher weight and less incidence of initial digestive abnormalities, pancreatic insufficiency, malnutrition, hepatic disease, chronic bronchial colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, admissions, lung transplantation and deaths due to CF. On the contrary, these patients had a higher incidence of pancreatitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis at diagnosis and better respiratory function test parameters. The sweat test was negative in 4 patients of group B and 1 of group A. The genetic study showed 31 different CF mutations, from which only 10 were observed in group B. CF can also be diagnosed in adult age. Patients diagnosed in adulthood have less digestive abnormalities, better lung function and

  5. Assessment of motivation and psychological characteristics of adult orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Pabari, Sona; Moles, David R; Cunningham, Susan J

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, the demand for adult orthodontic treatment has grown rapidly; yet there is a paucity of information on this subgroup of patients. It is well known that understanding the psychological characteristics and motives of any patient is fundamental and that these factors might affect patient satisfaction and adherence with treatment. There is therefore a need for clinicians to improve their understanding of this subgroup to enhance the patient's experience of treatment delivery and to increase the potential for a successful treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to develop a measure for the assessment of motivating factors and psychological characteristics of adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This study involved the qualitative development of a valid patient-centered questionnaire to assess motivating factors for adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This was achieved through semi-structured in-depth interviews; key themes were identified and used to construct a questionnaire assessing motivation for treatment. This was then combined with 3 previously validated questionnaires to measure self-esteem, anxiety or depression, and body image and facial body image. The questionnaire was distributed to 172 adult orthodontic patients at different stages of treatment in a large teaching hospital in the United Kingdom. In addition, the self-esteem, body image, and facial body image scores were compared with data on orthognathic patients from the same hospital and with data from members of the general public. Desire to straighten the teeth and improve the smile were the key motivating factors for the adult group studied. Other motives included to improve the bite, improve facial appearance, and close (dental) spacing. With respect to the psychological characteristics of self-esteem, body image, and facial body image, the adult orthodontic group was comparable with the general public. However, differences were noted when comparing data from the adult

  6. Acne in the adult female patient: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Kamangar, Faranak; Shinkai, Kanade

    2012-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common reason why adult women present to dermatologists and can be a clinical challenge to treat. It may also be an important sign of an underlying endocrine disease such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Although standard acne therapies can be successfully used to treat acne in adult female patients, hormonal treatment is a safe and effective therapeutic option that may provide an opportunity to better target acne in this population, even when other systemic therapies have failed. In this article, a practical approach to the adult female patient with acne will be reviewed to enhance the dermatologist's ability to use hormonal acne therapies and to better identify and evaluate patients with acne in the setting of a possible endocrine disorder.

  7. Crisis homes for adult psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Freiesleben, Michael; Foldager, Leslie

    2008-05-01

    Inspired by the Crisis Home programme in Madison, we have adapted and evaluated the programme at the Community Mental Health (CMH) Centre in Tønder, Denmark. Procedures and schedules from the Crisis Home programme were applied in this open trial. Questionnaire data concerning satisfaction with the stay and registration data concerning the admissions and bed days two years before and two years after the first stay were obtained. During four years, 52 different patients had a total of 187 stays in a crisis home. Twenty (38.5%) of the patients were attached to the ACT team. The average duration of the stays was 4.0 days. The number of readmissions and bed days after the first stay showed a significant downward tendency for the subgroup of patients with a more severe mental disorder, but not for the whole group. The patients, the crisis homes families and the referrers were very satisfied with the programme and the treatment. Crisis home stays represent a quality improvement in the treatment package, especially for patients with a more severe mental disorder. Further documentation will require a controlled study.

  8. Lifetime Increased Risk of Adult Onset Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hsu-Sheng; Tu, Hung-Pin; Hong, Chien-Hui; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis. Atopic dermatitis (AD) causes intense itching and impaired quality of life. Previous studies have shown that patients with classical early-onset AD tend to develop food allergy and that 10% of adults with food allergies have concomitant AD. However, it is not known whether late-onset food allergy leads to adult-onset AD, a recently recognized disease entity. Using an initial cohort of one-million subjects, this study retrospectively followed-up 2851 patients with food allergy (age > 12 years) for 14 years and compared them with 11,404 matched controls. While 2.8% (81) of the 2851 food allergy patients developed AD, only 2.0% (227) of the 11,404 controls developed AD. Multivariate regression analysis showed that food allergy patients were more likely to develop AD (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.49, p < 0.0001). Controls had a 1.99% risk of developing AD, while food allergy patients had a significantly higher risk (7.18% and 3.46% for patients with ≥3 and <3 food allergy claims, respectively) of developing adult-onset AD. This is the first study to describe the chronological and dose-dependent associations between food allergy in adolescence and the development of adult-onset AD. PMID:28035995

  9. Participation of family members and quality of patient care - the perspective of adult surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Gröndahl, Weronica; Katajisto, Jouko; Nurminen, Matti; Suhonen, Riitta

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the participation of family members in the care of Finnish adult surgical patients and the connection of the participation with the quality of patient care as perceived by surgical patients. The family members of adult surgical patients are important. Earlier studies vary concerning the nature of participation, its meaning and the connection of participation with patient-centred quality of care. In this study, we aim to produce new knowledge about adult surgical patients whose family members have participated in their care. This was a cross-sectional descriptive survey study. The data were collected among adult surgical patients (N = 481) before being discharged home from hospital with two instruments: the Good Nursing Care scale and the Received Knowledge of Hospital Patients. Based on the results, most adult surgical patients report that family members participate in their care. Participation was connected with received knowledge and preconditions of care, which are components of the quality of patient care. In future, testing of different solutions for improving the participation of surgical patients' family members in patient care should be implemented. Furthermore, the preconditions of family members' participation in care and the concept of participation should be analysed to emphasise the active role of family members. The results emphasised the importance of family members for the patients in surgical care. Family members' participation is connected with the quality of patient care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Dreaming during anaesthesia in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Kate; Skrzypek, Hannah

    2007-09-01

    Dreaming during anaesthesia is defined as any recalled experience (excluding awareness) that occurred between induction of anaesthesia and the first moment of consciousness upon emergence. Dreaming is a commonly-reported side-effect of anaesthesia. The incidence is higher in patients who are interviewed immediately after anaesthesia (approximately 22%) than in those who are interviewed later (approximately 6%). A minority of dreams, which include sensory perceptions obtained during anaesthesia, provide evidence of near-miss awareness. These patients may have risk factors for awareness and this type of dreaming may be prevented by depth of anaesthesia monitoring. Most dreaming however, occurs in younger, fitter patients, who have high home dream recall, who receive propofol-based anaesthesia and who emerge rapidly from anaesthesia. Their dreams are usually short and pleasant, are related to work, family and recreation, are not related to inadequate anaesthesia and probably occur during recovery. Dreaming is a common, fascinating, usually pleasant and harmless phenomenon.

  11. The immunocompromised adult patient and surgery.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Keith E

    2008-09-01

    The perioperative management of immunosuppressed patients remains relatively unsophisticated. Rational management involves understanding the normal immune response to injury as modified by the preexisting or imposed abnormalities that immunosuppressed patients manifest on the basis of their disease and/or treatment. Patients with cancer, infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and having had an organ transplant are extreme examples of disordered immunity and it is important to understand the effects of their diseases and treatments. In the future, however, more appropriate management will require anticipation and appreciation of frequent preoperative immunotherapy, a more complete understanding of the immunological response to anesthesia and surgery, the ability to assess immune reserve and stratify risk within the context of that profile, and a better knowledge of the immunological effect of anesthetic agents.

  12. Budget impact analysis of adjunctive therapy with lacosamide for partial-onset epileptic seizures in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to compute the budget impact of lacosamide, a new adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures in epilepsy patients from 16 years of age who are uncontrolled and having previously used at least three anti-epileptic drugs from a Belgian healthcare payer perspective. The budget impact analysis compared the 'world with lacosamide' to the 'world without lacosamide' and calculated how a change in the mix of anti-epileptic drugs used to treat uncontrolled epilepsy would impact drug spending from 2008 to 2013. Data on the number of patients and on the market shares of anti-epileptic drugs were taken from Belgian sources and from the literature. Unit costs of anti-epileptic drugs originated from Belgian sources. The budget impact was calculated from two scenarios about the market uptake of lacosamide. The Belgian target population is expected to increase from 5333 patients in 2008 to 5522 patients in 2013. Assuming that the market share of lacosamide increases linearly over time and is taken evenly from all other anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide increases from €5249 (0.1% of reference drug budget) in 2008 to €242,700 (4.7% of reference drug budget) in 2013. Assuming that 10% of patients use standard AED therapy plus lacosamide, the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide is around €800,000-900,000 per year (or 16.7% of the reference drug budget). Adjunctive therapy with lacosamide would raise drug spending for this patient population by as much as 16.7% per year. However, this budget impact analysis did not consider the fact that lacosamide reduces costs of seizure management and withdrawal. The literature suggests that, if savings in other healthcare costs are taken into account, adjunctive therapy with lacosamide may be cost saving.

  13. [ADHD: Burden of Disease According to Subtypes in Adult Patients].

    PubMed

    Retz-Junginger, Petra; Rösler, Michael; Giesen, Lisa Katharina; Philipp-Wiegmann, Florence; Römer, Konstanze; Zinnow, Toivo; Retz, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    In consideration of ADHD subtype we assessed burden of disease of adult ADHD patients and neuroticism. 511 adult ADHD patients were enrolled in the study. We measured ADHD symptoms categorically and dimensionally by the "Homburger ADHS-Skalen für Erwachsene (HASE)". All participants rated their ADHD associated level of suffering. To assess personality traits, the psychometric instrument NEO-PI-R was used. In patients with higher levels of neuroticism, there was no significant difference in the level of suffering between the ADHD subtypes. In the group of ADHD patients which scored low on the neuroticism scale, ADHD combined patients are significant more affected compared to the predominantly hyperactive-impulsive or the predominantly inattentive type. These results underline the hypothesis that the burden of disease is not only related to the level of ADHD symptoms and subtype but also moderated by neuroticism. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Adipsic diabetes insipidus in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Martín; Hannon, Mark J; Thompson, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    Adipsic diabetes insipidus (ADI) is a very rare disorder, characterized by hypotonic polyuria due to arginine vasopressin (AVP) deficiency and failure to generate the sensation of thirst in response to hypernatraemia. As the sensation of thirst is the key homeostatic mechanism that prevents hypernatraemic dehydration in patients with untreated diabetes insipidus (DI), adipsia leads to failure to respond to aquaresis with appropriate fluid intake. This predisposes to the development of significant hypernatraemia, which is the typical biochemical manifestation of adipsic DI. A literature search was performed to review the background, etiology, management and associated complications of this rare condition. ADI has been reported to occur in association with clipping of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm following subarachnoid haemorrhage, major hypothalamic surgery, traumatic brain injury and toluene exposure among other conditions. Management is very difficult and patients are prone to marked changes in plasma sodium concentration, in particular to the development of severe hypernatraemia. Associated hypothalamic disorders, such as severe obesity, sleep apnoea and thermoregulatory disorders are often observed in patients with ADI. The management of ADI is challenging and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Prognosis is variable; hypothalamic complications lead to early death in some patients, but recent reports highlight the possibility of recovery of thirst.

  15. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  16. Intravenous lipids in adult surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Klek, Stanislaw; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is considered an essential element of the perioperative management of surgical patients. It is recommended in patients who require nutritional therapy but in whom the enteral route is contraindicated, not recommended or non-feasible. The new generation of lipid emulsions (LEs) based on olive and fish oils are safe and may improve clinical outcome in surgical patients. The increased provision of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil-containing LEs seems to be associated with fewer infectious complications and shorter ICU and hospital stays following major abdominal surgery. Increased provision of olive oil in the absence of fish oil may also exert beneficial effects, but a clear conclusion on this is limited due to the low number of available studies. Hence, at the moment, the evidence supports the use of n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acid-enriched LEs as a part of the parenteral nutrition regimen for selected groups of patients, such as those with major surgical trauma or those undergoing extended resections or liver transplantation.

  17. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients. PMID:27956899

  18. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major.

    PubMed

    Vlychou, Marianna; Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients.

  19. Epileptic Seizure Prediction Using a New Similarity Index for Chaotic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknazar, Hamid; Nasrabadi, Ali Motie

    Epileptic seizures are generated by abnormal activity of neurons. The prediction of epileptic seizures is an important issue in the field of neurology, since it may improve the quality of life of patients suffering from drug resistant epilepsy. In this study a new similarity index based on symbolic dynamic techniques which can be used for extracting behavior of chaotic time series is presented. Using Freiburg EEG dataset, it is found that the method is able to detect the behavioral changes of the neural activity prior to epileptic seizures, so it can be used for prediction of epileptic seizure. A sensitivity of 63.75% with 0.33 false positive rate (FPR) in all 21 patients and sensitivity of 96.66% with 0.33 FPR in eight patients were achieved using the proposed method. Moreover, the method was evaluated by applying on Logistic and Tent map with different parameters to demonstrate its robustness and ability in determining similarity between two time series with the same chaotic characterization.

  20. Exploring two novel cases of suspected ictal epileptic headache, a rare form of paediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Coci, Emanuele G; Riedel, Joachim

    2017-05-01

    Ictal epileptic headache (IEH) is a rare and underestimated epileptic form, characterised by epileptiform discharges and headache attacks without any other ictal sensory-motor manifestations. IEH is difficult to diagnose, because the epileptiform discharges have to be registered during the headache attack and the headache has to disappear after the intravenous administration of an anti-epileptic drug, according to the last diagnostic criteria. This study explored the clinical, neuro-physiological and therapeutic features of IEH in the paediatric population. We analysed two novel cases of adolescent female patients with chronic headache and a long history of unsuccessful analgesic oral therapy and without any other ictal sensory-motor events. We also reviewed the entire literature on paediatric IEH. The clinical history and diagnostic process led us to highly suspect IEH in both patients, and the successful therapy with oral anti-epileptic drugs, namely topiramate and ethosuximide, which resolved the chronic headache, enforced our diagnostic hypothesis. Our literature review highlighted the rarity of IEH clinical reports, particularly in the paediatric population, mainly due to the stringent diagnostic criteria. Our study sheds further light on IEH in the paediatric population and on the importance of diagnostic electroencephalograms in the clinical management of paediatric patients suffering from chronic headache. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Intellectual functioning of adolescent and adult patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Christina M T; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Snellen, Wim M; Sternheim, Lot C; Hoek, Hans W; Danner, Unna N

    2017-05-01

    Intelligence is a known vulnerability marker in various psychiatric disorders. In eating disorders (ED) intelligence has not been studied thoroughly. Small-scale studies indicate that intelligence levels might be above general population norms, but larger scale studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine intellectual functioning in ED patients and associations with severity of the disorder. Wechsler's Full scale IQ (FSIQ), Verbal IQ (VIQ) and Performance IQ (PIQ) of 703 adolescent and adult ED patients were compared with population norms. Exploratory analyzes were performed on associations between IQ and both somatic severity (BMI and duration of the disorder) and psychological/behavioral severity (Eating Disorder Inventory [EDI-II] ratings) of the ED. Mean IQ's were significantly higher than population means and effect-sizes were small-to-medium (d = .28, .16 and .23 for VIQ, PIQ, and FSIQ). No linear associations between IQ and BMI were found, but the most severely underweight adult anorexia nervosa (AN) patients (BMI ≤ 15) had higher VIQ (107.7) than the other adult AN patients (VIQ 102.1). In adult AN patients PIQ was associated with psychological/behavioral severity of the ED. Our findings suggest that, in contrast with other severe mental disorders where low intelligence is a risk factor, higher than average intelligence might increase the vulnerability to develop an ED. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:481-489). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Jantina C; Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H; Bel, Elisabeth H D; Ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-04-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×10(9) L(-1)) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×10(9) L(-1)) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7-8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice.

  3. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  4. Neurophysiological investigations for the diagnosis of non-epileptic attack disorder in neuropsychiatry services: from safety standards to improved effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Seri, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The discipline of clinical neuropsychiatry currently provides specialised services for a number of conditions that cross the traditional boundaries of neurology and psychiatry, including non-epileptic attack disorder. Neurophysiological investigations have an important role within neuropsychiatry services, with video-electroencephalography (EEG) telemetry being the gold standard investigation for the differential diagnosis between epileptic seizures and non-epileptic attacks. This article reviews existing evidence on best practices for neurophysiology investigations, with focus on safety measures for video-EEG telemetry. We conducted a systematic literature review using the PubMed database in order to identify the scientific literature on the best practices when using neurophysiological investigations in patients with suspected epileptic seizures or non-epileptic attacks. Specific measures need to be implemented for video-EEG telemetry to be safely and effectively carried out by neuropsychiatry services. A confirmed diagnosis of non-epileptic attack disorder following video-EEG telemetry carried out within neuropsychiatry units has the inherent advantage of allowing diagnosis communication and implementation of treatment strategies in a timely fashion, potentially improving clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness significantly. The identified recommendations set the stage for the development of standardised guidelines to enable neuropsychiatry services to implement streamlined and evidence-based care pathways.

  5. Compulsive versifying after treatment of transient epileptic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Woollacott, Ione O C; Fletcher, Phillip D; Massey, Luke A; Pasupathy, Amirtha; Rossor, Martin N; Caine, Diana; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Compulsive production of verse is an unusual form of hypergraphia that has been reported mainly in patients with right temporal lobe seizures. We present a patient with transient epileptic amnesia and a left temporal seizure focus, who developed isolated compulsive versifying, producing multiple rhyming poems, following seizure cessation induced by lamotrigine. Functional neuroimaging studies in the healthy brain implicate left frontotemporal areas in generating novel verbal output and rhyme, while dysregulation of neocortical and limbic regions occurs in temporal lobe epilepsy. This case complements previous observations of emergence of altered behavior with reduced seizure frequency in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Such cases suggest that reduced seizure frequency has the potential not only to stabilize or improve memory function, but also to trigger complex, specific behavioral alterations.

  6. Compulsive versifying after treatment of transient epileptic amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Woollacott, Ione O. C.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Massey, Luke A.; Pasupathy, Amirtha; Rossor, Martin N.; Caine, Diana; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Compulsive production of verse is an unusual form of hypergraphia that has been reported mainly in patients with right temporal lobe seizures. We present a patient with transient epileptic amnesia and a left temporal seizure focus, who developed isolated compulsive versifying, producing multiple rhyming poems, following seizure cessation induced by lamotrigine. Functional neuroimaging studies in the healthy brain implicate left frontotemporal areas in generating novel verbal output and rhyme, while dysregulation of neocortical and limbic regions occurs in temporal lobe epilepsy. This case complements previous observations of emergence of altered behavior with reduced seizure frequency in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Such cases suggest that reduced seizure frequency has the potential not only to stabilize or improve memory function, but also to trigger complex, specific behavioral alterations. PMID:25157425

  7. Hemispherectomy in adults patients with severe unilateral epilepsy and hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuli; Zhang, Guojun; Li, Yunlin; Ding, Chengyun; Yu, Tao; Wang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Shaohui; He, Sailin

    2013-09-01

    To study postoperative seizure control of hemispherectomy in adults with epilepsy and evaluate changes of movement and speech function, intelligence quotient (IQ) and quality of life (QOL) after hemispherectomy. We retrospectively analyzed 25 adults who presented severe unilateral epilepsy and hemiplegia and underwent anatomic or functional hemispherectomy in between 2006 and 2011. Surgical outcomes, including seizure-control at last follow-up, changes of aphasia quotient, hemiplegic side motor function, IQ and QOL from pre-operative to 2 years follow-up, were investigated. Results were statistically analyzed with SPSS 18.0. Nine functional hemispherectomies and 16 anatomic hemispherectomies were performed. Ninety-two percent of patients were seizure-free and 8% displayed Engel II grade seizure control after the procedure. Impaired movement function was present in 9 (36%) adults' upper limbs and 5 (20%) patients' lower limbs. The patients with age at seizure onset <3 years showed improvement in mean motor function of the upper limbs. Impaired speech was seen in 7 patients with left hemispherectomies. There was an overall improvement in the mean aphasia quotient and significant difference was found in amount of change in aphasia quotients between patients with different ages of onset. All of the patients' postoperative scores of overall QOL, full IQ, verbal IQ and performance IQ improved compared with pretreatment scores and those improvements were not associated with patient's age at seizure onset or surgical approach. However, significant difference was found in change of verbal IQ between patients with right hemispherectomies and those with left hemispherectomies. Surgical complications included a single case of hydrocephalus, and 6 transient complications. Hemispherectomy presented good seizure control and improvement in QOL and IQ, and impairment on motor and speech function were mild. Furthermore, patients with early seizure onset could maintain movement

  8. Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases: General concepts and presentation in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Ruiz-Ortiz, Estíbaliz; Yagüe, Jordi

    2017-09-15

    Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases (AIFD) are rare disorders characterized by an uncontrolled increase of the systemic inflammatory response, which is caused by mutations in genes involved in inflammatory pathways. Over the last few years, new genes and proteins responsible for new monogenic AIFD have been identified and a substantial improvement in their treatment has been achieved. Monogenic AIFD manifestations typically begin during childhood, but they can also occur in adults. Compared to pediatric patients, adults usually present with a less severe disease and fewer long-term complications. In addition, patients with adult-onset disease carry low-penetrance mutations more often than pathogenic variants. A late-onset of AIFD may be occasionally associated with the presence of somatic mutations. In this study, we review the most frequent monogenic AIFD, and others recently described, which may occur during adulthood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Movement disorders in adult patients with classical galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Carecchio, Miryam; Bhatia, Kailash P; Kojovic, Maja; Parees, Isabel; Chandrashekar, Hoskote S; Footitt, Emma J; Burke, Derek; Edwards, Mark J; Lachmann, Robin H L; Murphy, Elaine

    2013-06-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism leading to toxic accumulation of galactose and derived metabolites. It presents with acute systemic complications in the newborn. Galactose restriction resolves these symptoms, but long-term complications, such as premature ovarian failure and neurological problems including motor dysfunction, may occur despite adequate treatment. The objective of the current study was to determine the frequency and phenotype of motor problems in adult patients with classical galactosemia. In this cross-sectional study, adult patients with a biochemically confirmed diagnosis of galactosemia attending our clinic were assessed with an interview and neurological examination and their notes retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified according to the presence/absence of motor dysfunction on examination. Patients with motor dysfunction were further categorized according to the presence/absence of reported motor symptoms. Forty-seven patients were included. Thirty-one patients showed evidence of motor dysfunction including: tremor (23 patients), dystonia (23 patients), cerebellar signs (6 patients), and pyramidal signs (4 patients). Tremor and dystonia were often combined (16 patients). Thirteen patients reported motor symptoms, with 8 describing progressive worsening. Symptomatic treatment was effective in 4 of 5 patients. Nonmotor neurological features (cognitive, psychiatric, and speech disorders) and premature ovarian failure were more frequent in patients with motor dysfunction. Motor dysfunction is a common complication of classical galactosemia, with tremor and dystonia the most frequent findings. Up to one third of patients report motor symptoms and may benefit from appropriate treatment. Progressive worsening is not uncommon and may suggest ongoing brain damage in a subset of patients.

  10. Mapping Epileptic Activity: Sources or Networks for the Clinicians?

    PubMed Central

    Pittau, Francesca; Mégevand, Pierre; Sheybani, Laurent; Abela, Eugenio; Grouiller, Frédéric; Spinelli, Laurent; Michel, Christoph M.; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizures of focal origin are classically considered to arise from a focal epileptogenic zone and then spread to other brain regions. This is a key concept for semiological electro-clinical correlations, localization of relevant structural lesions, and selection of patients for epilepsy surgery. Recent development in neuro-imaging and electro-physiology and combinations, thereof, have been validated as contributory tools for focus localization. In parallel, these techniques have revealed that widespread networks of brain regions, rather than a single epileptogenic region, are implicated in focal epileptic activity. Sophisticated multimodal imaging and analysis strategies of brain connectivity patterns have been developed to characterize the spatio-temporal relationships within these networks by combining the strength of both techniques to optimize spatial and temporal resolution with whole-brain coverage and directional connectivity. In this paper, we review the potential clinical contribution of these functional mapping techniques as well as invasive electrophysiology in human beings and animal models for characterizing network connectivity. PMID:25414692

  11. The quantitative measurement of consciousness during epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Nani, Andrea; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of consciousness is a fundamental element in the classification of epileptic seizures. It is, therefore, of great importance for clinical practice to develop instruments that enable an accurate and reliable measurement of the alteration of consciousness during seizures. Over the last few years, three psychometric scales have been specifically proposed to measure ictal consciousness: the Ictal Consciousness Inventory (ICI), the Consciousness Seizure Scale (CSS), and the Responsiveness in Epilepsy Scale--versions I and II (RES-I and RES-II). The ICI is a self-report psychometric instrument which retrospectively assesses ictal consciousness along the dimensions of the level/arousal and contents/awareness. The CSS has been used by clinicians to quantify the impairment of consciousness in order to establish correlations with the brain mechanisms underlying alterations of consciousness during temporal lobe seizures. The most recently developed observer-rated instrument is the RES-I, which has been used to assess responsiveness during epileptic seizures in patients undergoing video-EEG. The implementation of standardized psychometric tools for the assessment of ictal consciousness can complement clinical observations and contribute to improve accuracy in seizure classification. © 2013.

  12. Nutritional profile of adult patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, L; Delibasic, M; Peta, V; Turkulov, V; De Lorenzo, A; Medić-Stojanoska, M

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated gluten dependent enteropathy induced by ingestion of gluten, characterized by intestinal malabsorption and subtotals or total atrophy of intestinal villi. The predominant consequence of CD in untreated patients, is malnutrition as a result of malabsorption. Moreover, several and increasing extra-intestinal clinical manifestations have been described in the CD patients. Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves nutritional status, inducing an increase in fat and bone compartments, but does not completely normalize body composition and nutritional deficiencies. An early and accurate evaluation of nutritional status can be of the pivotal step in the clinical management of the adult CD patients. The aim of this review is to present the most important and recent data on nutritional and metabolic features in the CD adult patients, the related implications and the effects of the GFD on these conditions.

  13. High-flow nasal cannula therapy for adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Lin, Ling; Pan, Konghan; Zhou, Jiancang

    2016-01-01

    High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy has several physiological advantages over traditional oxygen therapy devices, including decreased nasopharyngeal resistance, washing out of the nasopharyngeal dead space, generation of positive pressure in the pharynx, increasing alveolar recruitment in the lungs, humidification of the airways, increased fraction of inspired oxygen and improved mucociliary clearance. Recently, the use of HFNC in treating adult critical illness patients has significantly increased, and it is now being used in many patients with a range of different disease conditions. However, there are no established guidelines to direct the safe and effective use of HFNC for these patients. This review article summarizes the available published literature on the positive physiological effects, mechanisms of action, and the clinical applications of HFNC, compared with traditional oxygen therapy devices. The available literature suggests that HFNC oxygen therapy is an effective modality for the early treatment of critically adult patients. PMID:27698207

  14. Epileptic prodromes: are they nonconvulsive status epilepticus?

    PubMed

    Alving, Jørgen; Beniczky, Sándor

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess how frequently prodromes occur in an adult patient group from a tertiary referral epilepsy centre and to investigate the EEG changes during the prodromes. 578 consecutive patients were interviewed on subjective phenomena, experiences heralding the seizures, for at least 30min before the start of the seizure. EEGs were recorded during the prodromes. Ten out of 490 included patients had prodromes (2%). We were able to record EEG during prodromes in 6 patients. Three patients had EEG changes corresponding to nonconvulsive status epilepticus. Three patients had unrevealing EEG recordings during prodromes. Our results suggest that at least in a part of the patients, the prodromes are actually ictal phenomena, and should be treated as nonconvulsive status epilepticus. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Patient-specific FDG dosimetry for adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Erin

    Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in Positron Emission Tomography, with applications in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Despite its routine use worldwide, the radiation absorbed dose estimates from FDG have been based primarily on data obtained from two dogs studied in 1977 and 11 adults (most likely males) studied in 1982. In addition, the dose estimates calculated for FDG have been centered on the adult male, with little or no mention of variations in the dose estimates due to sex, age, height, weight, nationality, diet, or pathological condition. Through an extensive investigation into the Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema for calculating absorbed doses, I have developed a simple patient-specific equation; this equation incorporates the parameters necessary for alterations to the mathematical values of the human model to produce an estimate more representative of the individual under consideration. I have used this method to determine the range of absorbed doses to FDG from the collection of a large quantity of biological data obtained in adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants. Therefore, a more accurate quantification of the dose to humans from FDG has been completed. My results show that per unit administered activity, the absorbed dose from FDG is higher for infants compared to adults, and the dose for adult women is higher than for adult men. Given an injected activity of approximately 3.7 MBq kg-1, the doses for adult men, adult women, and full-term newborns would be on the order of 5.5, 7.1, and 2.8 mSv, respectively. These absorbed doses are comparable to the doses received from other nuclear medicine procedures.

  16. Facilitation of epileptic activity during sleep is mediated by high amplitude slow waves.

    PubMed

    Frauscher, Birgit; von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Avoli, Massimo; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2015-06-01

    Epileptic discharges in focal epilepsy are frequently activated during non-rapid eye movement sleep. Sleep slow waves are present during this stage and have been shown to include a deactivated ('down', hyperpolarized) and an activated state ('up', depolarized). The 'up' state enhances physiological rhythms, and we hypothesize that sleep slow waves and particularly the 'up' state are the specific components of non-rapid eye movement sleep that mediate the activation of epileptic activity. We investigated eight patients with pharmaco-resistant focal epilepsies who underwent combined scalp-intracerebral electroencephalography for diagnostic evaluation. We analysed 259 frontal electroencephalographic channels, and manually marked 442 epileptic spikes and 8487 high frequency oscillations during high amplitude widespread slow waves, and during matched control segments with low amplitude widespread slow waves, non-widespread slow waves or no slow waves selected during the same sleep stages (total duration of slow wave and control segments: 49 min each). During the slow waves, spikes and high frequency oscillations were more frequent than during control segments (79% of spikes during slow waves and 65% of high frequency oscillations, both P ∼ 0). The spike and high frequency oscillation density also increased for higher amplitude slow waves. We compared the density of spikes and high frequency oscillations between the 'up' and 'down' states. Spike and high frequency oscillation density was highest during the transition from the 'up' to the 'down' state. Interestingly, high frequency oscillations in channels with normal activity expressed a different peak at the transition from the 'down' to the 'up' state. These results show that the apparent activation of epileptic discharges by non-rapid eye movement sleep is not a state-dependent phenomenon but is predominantly associated with specific events, the high amplitude widespread slow waves that are frequent, but not

  17. Facilitation of epileptic activity during sleep is mediated by high amplitude slow waves

    PubMed Central

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Avoli, Massimo; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Epileptic discharges in focal epilepsy are frequently activated during non-rapid eye movement sleep. Sleep slow waves are present during this stage and have been shown to include a deactivated (‘down’, hyperpolarized) and an activated state (‘up’, depolarized). The ‘up’ state enhances physiological rhythms, and we hypothesize that sleep slow waves and particularly the ‘up’ state are the specific components of non-rapid eye movement sleep that mediate the activation of epileptic activity. We investigated eight patients with pharmaco-resistant focal epilepsies who underwent combined scalp-intracerebral electroencephalography for diagnostic evaluation. We analysed 259 frontal electroencephalographic channels, and manually marked 442 epileptic spikes and 8487 high frequency oscillations during high amplitude widespread slow waves, and during matched control segments with low amplitude widespread slow waves, non-widespread slow waves or no slow waves selected during the same sleep stages (total duration of slow wave and control segments: 49 min each). During the slow waves, spikes and high frequency oscillations were more frequent than during control segments (79% of spikes during slow waves and 65% of high frequency oscillations, both P ∼ 0). The spike and high frequency oscillation density also increased for higher amplitude slow waves. We compared the density of spikes and high frequency oscillations between the ‘up’ and ‘down’ states. Spike and high frequency oscillation density was highest during the transition from the ‘up’ to the ‘down’ state. Interestingly, high frequency oscillations in channels with normal activity expressed a different peak at the transition from the ‘down’ to the ‘up’ state. These results show that the apparent activation of epileptic discharges by non-rapid eye movement sleep is not a state-dependent phenomenon but is predominantly associated with specific events, the high amplitude widespread slow

  18. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  19. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  20. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  1. Evolving networks in the human epileptic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnertz, Klaus; Ansmann, Gerrit; Bialonski, Stephan; Dickten, Henning; Geier, Christian; Porz, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Network theory provides novel concepts that promise an improved characterization of interacting dynamical systems. Within this framework, evolving networks can be considered as being composed of nodes, representing systems, and of time-varying edges, representing interactions between these systems. This approach is highly attractive to further our understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological dynamics in human brain networks. Indeed, there is growing evidence that the epileptic process can be regarded as a large-scale network phenomenon. We here review methodologies for inferring networks from empirical time series and for a characterization of these evolving networks. We summarize recent findings derived from studies that investigate human epileptic brain networks evolving on timescales ranging from few seconds to weeks. We point to possible pitfalls and open issues, and discuss future perspectives.

  2. Neuro-anatomical differences among epileptic and non-epileptic déjà-vu.

    PubMed

    Labate, Angelo; Cerasa, Antonio; Mumoli, Laura; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Aguglia, Umberto; Quattrone, Aldo; Gambardella, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Dèjà-vù (DV) can occur as a seizure of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and in almost 80% of healthy individuals. The remarkable similarity between epileptic DV and DV in healthy individuals raises the possibility that DV might sometimes be an ictal phenomenon in apparently normal individuals. Thus, we studied a group of healthy subjects versus individuals with benign MTLE (bMTLE) both experiencing DV. 63 individuals with epilepsy patients with bMTLE and 39 healthy controls at Catanzaro University were recruited. Participants completed the Inventory for Déjà Vu (DV) Experiences Assessment (IDEA) test, underwent awake and asleep electroencephalogram, MRI of the brain using a 3T scanner and whole brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM). bMTLE patients with DV and without DV were also matched for the presence of hippocampal sclerosis. Our controls had no history of neurological or psychiatric illness, epilepsy or history of febrile convulsions. Neurological and cognitive examinations were normal. Electroencephalographic procedures were unremarkable in all controls. In bMTLE group, the direct comparison of VBM between individuals with epilepsy with DV versus those without DV revealed abnormal anatomical changes in the left hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and visual cortex. The VBM of healthy controls with DV showed abnormal anatomical changes only in the left insular cortex. Our VBM results demonstrated different morphologic patterns in individuals with epilepsy and control subjects experiencing DV, involving the memory circuit in bMTLE patients and cerebral regions in the emotional network in healthy controls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Autism and behavior in adult patients with Dravet syndrome (DS).

    PubMed

    Berkvens, J J L; Veugen, I; Veendrick-Meekes, M J B M; Snoeijen-Schouwenaars, F M; Schelhaas, H J; Willemsen, M H; Tan, I Y; Aldenkamp, A P

    2015-06-01

    Autism and behavioral characteristics in adults with Dravet syndrome (DS) have rarely been systematically studied. Three scales were used to assess the outcomes of DS in adulthood in terms of autism and behavior. All the adult patients with DS, nine male and four female, aged between 18 and 60 years, living at the Epilepsy Center Kempenhaeghe in The Netherlands were included in the study. In addition, the past medical history of each patient was systematically screened for diagnoses like autism, Pervasive Development Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), hyperactivity, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and self-mutilation. Information concerning past and current use of psychoactive drugs was also evaluated. Eight patients (61.5%) were classified as having autism spectrum disorder (ASD) according to the AVZ-R or according to the medical record. Self-mutilation was seen in four patients (30.8%), hyperactivity in none. Three patients (23.1%) currently used psychoactive drugs. Autism spectrum disorders persist in adult patients with DS, while certain characteristics associated with behavioral problems, such as hyperactivity or use of psychoactive medication, seem to be less prominent than in childhood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Vitamin-Responsive Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    PubMed Central

    Agadi, Satish; Quach, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Untreated epileptic encephalopathies in children may potentially have disastrous outcomes. Treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) often may not control the seizures, and even if they do, this measure is only symptomatic and not specific. It is especially valuable to identify potential underlying conditions that have specific treatments. Only a few conditions have definitive treatments that can potentially modify the natural course of disease. In this paper, we discuss the few such conditions that are responsive to vitamin or vitamin derivatives. PMID:23984056

  5. Regularity and Matching Pursuit feature extraction for the detection of epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Z-Flores, Emigdio; Trujillo, Leonardo; Sotelo, Arturo; Legrand, Pierrick; Coria, Luis N

    2016-06-15

    The neurological disorder known as epilepsy is characterized by involuntary recurrent seizures that diminish a patient's quality of life. Automatic seizure detection can help improve a patient's interaction with her/his environment, and while many approaches have been proposed the problem is still not trivially solved. In this work, we present a novel methodology for feature extraction on EEG signals that allows us to perform a highly accurate classification of epileptic states. Specifically, Hölderian regularity and the Matching Pursuit algorithm are used as the main feature extraction techniques, and are combined with basic statistical features to construct the final feature sets. These sets are then delivered to a Random Forests classification algorithm to differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic readings. Several versions of the basic problem are tested and statistically validated producing perfect accuracy in most problems and 97.6% accuracy on the most difficult case. A comparison with recent literature, using a well known database, reveals that our proposal achieves state-of-the-art performance. The experimental results show that epileptic states can be accurately detected by combining features extracted through regularity analysis, the Matching Pursuit algorithm and simple time-domain statistical analysis. Therefore, the proposed method should be considered as a promising approach for automatic EEG analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Neural networks with periodogram and autoregressive spectral analysis methods in detection of epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Kiymik, M Kemal; Subasi, Abdulhamit; Ozcalik, H Riza

    2004-12-01

    Approximately 1% of the people in the world suffer from epilepsy. Careful analyses of the electroencephalograph (EEG) records can provide valuable insight and improved understanding of the mechanisms causing epileptic disorders. Predicting the onset of epileptic seizure is an important and difficult biomedical problem, which has attracted substantial attention of the intelligent computing community over the past two decades. The purpose of this work was to investigate the performance of the periodogram and autoregressive (AR) power spectrum methods to extract classifiable features from human electroencephalogram (EEG) by using artificial neural networks (ANN). The feedforward ANN system was trained and tested with the backpropagation algorithm using a large data set of exemplars. We present a method for the automatic comparison of epileptic seizures in EEG, allowing the grouping of seizures having similar overall patterns. Each channel of the EEG is first broken down into segments having relatively stationary characteristics. Features are then calculated for each segment, and all segments of all channels of the seizures of a patient are grouped into clusters of similar morphology. This clustering allows labeling of every EEG segment. Examples from 5 patients with scalp electrodes illustrate the ability of the method to group seizures of similar morphology. It was observed that ANN classification of EEG signals with AR preprocessing gives better results, and these results can also be used for the deduction of epileptic seizure.

  7. Ictal epileptic headache: a review of current literature and differentiation from migralepsy and other epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Saitowitz, Zacharry; Flamini, Robert; Berenson, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Ictal headaches are increasingly becoming the focus of research as more data demonstrate headaches existing as a sole manifestation of an epileptic event. Due to the difficulty in diagnosing the event as an epileptic phenomenon as opposed to a migraine, the condition is often misdiagnosed. This paper seeks to review the current published literature on ictal epileptic headaches as well as provide differentiation between ictal headaches and similarly presenting conditions. In doing so, we hope to improve the diagnosis of ictal headaches and thus improve patient care. We review two case studies that exemplify the potential of multiple conditions with comparable symptoms to ictal headaches, and discuss how to differentiate the variable diagnoses. As of the writing of this paper, there is no universally agreed upon set of features of ictal headaches; however, reviewing the current literature, there do seem to be several features that should be noted when treating patients. More research on the pathophysiology of ictal epileptic headaches needs to be done before the condition can be fully understood. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  8. Clinical and electrographic findings in epileptic vertigo and dizziness

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Han; Robinson, Karen A.; Kaplan, Peter W.; Newman-Toker, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Seizures can cause vestibular symptoms, even without obvious epileptic features. We sought to characterize epileptic vertigo or dizziness (EVD) to improve differentiation from nonepileptic causes, particularly when vestibular symptoms are the sole manifestation. Methods: We conducted a systematic review with electronic (Medline) and manual search for English-language studies (1955–2014). Two independent reviewers selected studies. Study/patient characteristics were abstracted. We defined 3 study population types: (1) seizures, some experiencing vertigo/dizziness (disease cohort); (2) vertigo/dizziness, some due to seizures (symptom cohort); (3) vertigo/dizziness due to seizures in all patients (EVD-only cohort). Results: We identified 84 studies describing 11,354 patients (disease cohort = 8,129; symptom cohort = 2,965; EVD-only cohort = 260). Among 1,055 EVD patients in whom a distinction could be made, non-isolated EVD was present in 8.5%, isolated EVD in 0.8%. Thorough diagnostic workups (ictal EEG, vestibular testing, and brain MRI to exclude other causes) were rare (<0.1%). Ictal EEG was reported in 487 (4.3%), formal neuro-otologic assessment in 1,107 (9.7%). Localized EEG abnormalities (n = 350) were most frequently temporal (79.8%) and uncommonly parietal (11.8%). Duration of episodic vestibular symptoms varied, but was very brief (<30 seconds) in 69.6% of isolated EVD and 6.9% of non-isolated EVD. Conclusions: Non-isolated EVD is much more prevalent than isolated EVD, which appears to be rare. Diagnostic evaluations for EVD are often incomplete. EVD is primarily associated with temporal lobe seizures; whether this reflects greater epidemiologic prevalence of temporal lobe seizures or a tighter association with dizziness/vertigo presentations than with other brain regions remains unknown. Consistent with clinical wisdom, isolated EVD spells often last just seconds, although many patients experience longer spells. PMID:25795644

  9. Food hypersensitivity among adult patients: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R; Delgado, J; Quiralte, J; Blanco, C; Carrillo, T

    1996-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity (FH) is lesser frequent among adult patients than in childhood. Foods implicated in hypersensitivity reactions vary with sociocultural and diet habits from a geographic place to other. We studied 142 adult patients sensitized to foods, among 7698 patients visited at our Outpatient Clinic. Hundred and twenty patients referred clinical symptoms after consumption of one or more foods consistently. From the latest, 107 patients (89.2%) were atopics (92 of them sensitizes to dust mites) and 54 (45%) referred atopic familiar background. Most frequent recorded symptoms were: urticaria/angioedema 84 cases (70%), oral syndrome 65 (54%), asthma 48 (37%) and anaphylaxis 33 patients (27.5%). Shellfish sensitization occurred in 50 patients, fresh fruits in 33 and nuts in 29 cases. Shrimp (48 patients), squid (33), kiwi (14), papaya (14), avocado (13) and banana (12 cases) were the most frequent causes of FH. Significant statistical association between foods and inhalants was observed for fresh fruits and latex (p < 0.001), fresh fruits and pollens (p < 0.01), and shellfish and Blatta germanica (p < 0.001). Prevalence of FH among patients at our Area is around 1.6%. Tropical fruits, as other kind of fruits, seem to share common IgE-epitopes to pollens. High prevalence of shellfish and cockroach hypersensitivity could be more easily developed by previous domestic mites sensitization.

  10. [Diagnosis and therapy of adult patients with facial asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kuroda, Shingo

    2009-09-01

    The goal of orthodontic treatment is to improve the patient's life by enhancing dental and jaw functions and dentofacial esthetics [Graber TM, et al., Orthodontics current principles and techniques. 4(e) ed. St Louis: Elsevier, 2005.]. Harmonious occlusion is achieved following improvements of malocclusion via orthodontic treatment [Ehmer U and Broll P, Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 1992;7:153-159. Throckmorton GS, et al., J Prosthet Dent 1984;51:252-261.]. Perfect facial symmetry is extremely rare, and normal faces have a degree of asymmetry. Patients with dentofacial deformity more frequently have asymmetry of the face and jaws. There was a relationship between the type of malocclusion and the prevalence of asymmetry; 28% of the Class III group, but 40% to 42% of the Class I, Class II and long face groups respectively, were asymmetric [Severt TR and Proffit WR, Int J Adult Orthod Orthogn Surg 1997;12:171-176.]; therefore, facial asymmetry is a common complaint among orthodontic patients. Treatment of severe facial asymmetry in adults consists mainly of surgically repositioning the maxilla or the mandible [Bardinet E, et al., Orthod Fr 2002;73:243-315. Guyuron B, Clin Plast Surg 1989;16:795-801. Proffit WR, et al., Contemporary treatment of dentofacial deformity. 2003. St Louis: Mosby, 2003:574-644.], however, new methods, i.e. orthodontic tooth movement with implant anchorage, have recently been introduced [Costa A, et al., Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 1998;3:201-209. Creekmore TD and Eklund MK, J Clin Orthod 1983;17:266-269. Miyawaki S,et al., Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2003;124:373-378. Park HS, et al., J Clin Orthod 2001;35:417-422. Roberts WE, et al., Angle Orthod 1989;59:247-256.], and various treatment options can be chosen in patients with facial asymmetry. In this article, we describe the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with facial asymmetry.

  11. Localization of focal epileptic discharges using functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Liu, Hesheng; Sepulcre, Jorge; Tanaka, Naoaki; Buckner, Randy L.; Madsen, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    Object In patients with medically refractory epilepsy the accurate localization of the seizure onset zone is critical for successful surgical treatment. The object of this study was to investigate whether the degree of coupling of spontaneous brain activity as measured with functional connectivity MR imaging (fcMR imaging) can accurately identify and localize epileptic discharges. Methods The authors studied 6 patients who underwent fcMR imaging presurgical mapping and subsequently underwent invasive electroencephalography. Results Focal regions of statistically significant increases in connectivity were identified in 5 patients when compared with an ad hoc normative sample of 300 controls. The foci identified by fcMR imaging overlapped the epileptogenic areas identified by invasive encephalography in all 5 patients. Conclusions These results suggest that fcMR imaging may provide an effective high–spatial resolution and noninvasive method of localizing epileptic discharges in patients with refractory epilepsy. PMID:21351832

  12. Can structural or functional changes following traumatic brain injury in the rat predict the epileptic outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Sandy R; Cardamone, Lisa; Liu, Ying R; Hogan, R. Edward; Maccotta, Luigi; Wright, David K; Zheng, Ping; Koe, Amelia; Gregoire, Marie-Claude; Williams, John P; Hicks, Rodney J; Jones, Nigel C; Myers, Damian E; O’Brien, Terence J; Bouilleret, Viviane

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) occurs in a proportion of traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases, significantly compounding the disability, risk of injury, and death for sufferers. To date, predictive biomarkers for PTE have not been identified. This study used the lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI) rat model of TBI to investigate whether structural, functional, and behavioral changes post-TBI relate to the later development of PTE. Methods Adult male Wistar rats underwent LFPI or sham-injury. Serial MR and PET imaging, and behavioral analyses were performed over six months post-injury. Rats were then implanted with recording electrodes and monitored for two consecutive weeks using video-EEG to assess for PTE. Of the LFPI rats, 52% (n=12) displayed spontaneous recurring seizures and/or epileptic discharges on the video-EEG recordings. Key findings MRI volumetric and signal analysis of changes in cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and amygdala, 18F-FDG PET analysis of metabolic function, and behavioral analysis of cognitive and emotional changes, at one week, one month, three months, and six months post-LFPI, all failed to identify significant differences on univariate analysis between the epileptic and non-epileptic groups. However, hippocampal surface shape analysis using high dimensional mapping-large deformation identified significant changes in the ipsilateral hippocampus at one week post-injury relative to baseline that differed between rats that would go onto become epileptic versus those who did not. Furthermore, a multivariate logistic regression model that incorporated the one week, one month, and three month 18F-FDG PET parameters from the ipsilateral hippocampus was able to correctly predict the epileptic outcome in all of the LFPI cases. As such, these subtle changes in the ipsilateral hippocampus at acute phases after LFPI may be related to PTE and require further examination. Significance These findings suggest PTE may be independent of

  13. Pallister-Killian syndrome: an unusual cause of epileptic spasms.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carpintero, Rocio; McLellan, Ailsa; Parmeggiani, Lucio; Cockwell, Annette E; Ellis, Richard J; Cross, J Helen; Eckhardt, Susan; Guerrini, Renzo

    2005-11-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare, sporadic, genetic disorder characterized by dysmorphic features, learning disability, and epilepsy. It is caused by a mosaic supernumerary isochromosome 12p (i[12p]). The i(12p) is rarely found in peripheral blood but it is present in skin fibroblasts. Recognition is essential for cytogenetic diagnosis. We describe a male aged 2 years 6 months and a female aged 11 years with PKS and epileptic spasms (ES). This type of seizure is not unusual in patients with brain malformations and with severe developmental delay, but it is sometimes difficult to recognize without video-electroencephalogram studies and could be mistaken for other types of seizure or behavioural manifestations. In these two patients with PKS, spasms had late onset, persisted beyond infancy, and were drug resistant. Clinicians should be aware of this possibility in PKS, which appears to be a rare cause of ES.

  14. Classification of high frequency oscillations in epileptic intracerebral EEG.

    PubMed

    Jrad, Nisrine; Kachenoura, Amar; Merlet, Isabelle; Nica, Anca; Benar, Christian G; Wendling, Fabrice

    2015-08-01

    High Frequency Oscillations (HFOs 40-500 Hz), recorded from intracerebral electroencephalography (iEEG) in epileptic patients, are categorized into four distinct sub-bands (Gamma, High-Gamma, Ripples and Fast Ripples). They have recently been used as a reliable biomarker of epileptogenic zones. The objective of this paper is to investigate the possibility of discriminating between the different classes of HFOs which physiological/pathological value is critical for diagnostic but remains to be clarified. The proposed method is based on the definition of a relevant feature vector built from energy ratios (computed using Wavelet Transform-WT) in a-priori-defined frequency bands. It makes use of a multiclass Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and is applied to iEEG signals recorded in patients candidate to epilepsy surgery. Results obtained from bootstrap on training/test datasets indicate high performances in terms of sensitivity and specificity.

  15. Limited efficacy of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of highly refractory epileptic spasms.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shaun A; Shin, Ji Hyun; Shih, Evan J; Murata, Kristina K; Sewak, Sarika; Kezele, Michele E; Sankar, Raman; Matsumoto, Joyce H

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that the ketogenic diet is effective in the treatment of epileptic spasms, even in refractory cases. However, there has been very limited demonstration of prompt and complete (video-EEG confirmed) response. We set out to describe our center's experience with the ketogenic diet in the treatment of children with highly refractory epileptic spasms, with rigorous seizure outcome assessment. Children treated with the ketogenic diet for epileptic spasms between April, 2010 and June, 2014 were retrospectively identified. Seizure burden was tabulated at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, and 12-months of ketogenic diet exposure. Adverse events were similarly ascertained. We identified a cohort of 22 consecutive patients who received ketogenic diet therapy, with median age of onset of epileptic spasms of 5.2 (IQR 2.0-9.0) months, with diet initiation beginning a median of 26.4 (12.5-38.7) months after onset, and following a median of 7 (IQR 5-7) treatment failures. Only 2 patients exhibited a complete response during ketogenic diet exposure, and response was more reasonably attributed to alternative therapies in both cases. A modest early reduction in seizure frequency was not sustained beyond 1 month of diet exposure. The diet was well tolerated, and continued in 6 patients with subjective and/or partial response. In contrast to prior studies reporting substantial efficacy of the ketogenic diet, our findings suggest limited efficacy, albeit in a highly refractory cohort. Prospective studies in both refractory and new-onset populations, with both video-EEG confirmation of response and rigorous cognitive outcome assessment, would be of great value to more clearly define the utility of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of epileptic spasms. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes in adult liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Alempijevic, Tamara; Milutinovic, Aleksandra Sokic; Kovacevic, Nada

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is an important serine protease inhibitor in humans. Hereditary alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) affects lungs and liver. Liver disease caused by AATD in paediatric patients has been previously well documented. However, the association of liver disease with alpha-1-antitrypsin gene polymorphisms in adults is less clear. Therefore, we aimed to study AAT polymorphisms in adults with liver disease. We performed a case-control study. AAT polymorphisms were investigated by isoelectric focusing in 61 patients with liver cirrhosis and 9 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The control group consisted of 218 healthy blood donors. A significant deviation of observed and expected frequency of AAT phenotypes from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (chi-square = 34.77, df 11, P = 0.000) in the patient group was caused by a higher than expected frequency of Pi ZZ homozygotes (f = 0.0143 and f = 0.0005, respectively, P = 0.000). In addition, Pi M homozygotes were more frequent in patients than in controls (63% and 46%, respectively, P = 0.025). Our study results show that Pi ZZ homozygosity in adults could be associated with severe liver disease. Presence of Pi M homozygosity could be associated with liver disease via some mechanism different from Z allele-induced liver damage through accumulation of AAT polymers. PMID:19961268

  17. Pneumococci Can Persistently Colonize Adult Patients with Chronic Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, A.; Balsalobre, L.; Marti, S.; Calatayud, L.; De la Campa, A. G.; Brueggemann, A. B.; Liñares, J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae plays an important role in causing acute exacerbations in patients with chronic respiratory disease. However, few data are available regarding pneumococcal persistence in adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Fifty pneumococci recovered from sputum samples (1995 to 2010) from 13 adult patients with ≥3 episodes of acute exacerbation or pneumonia, with the same serotype and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern, were studied. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) loci, penicillin-binding protein (PBP) genes (pbp2x, pbp1a, pbp2b), and the quinolone-resistant determining regions (QRDRs) of parC, parE, and gyrA were PCR amplified and sequenced. The average time between the first and last episode was 582 days (standard deviation [SD], ±362). All but two patients received multiple courses of β-lactam treatment, and all persistent strains were resistant to penicillin; however, the PBP sequences were stable over time apart from one variable nucleotide in pbp2x, observed among pneumococci isolated from three patients. In contrast, 7/11 patients treated with fluoroquinolones had fluoroquinolone-resistant pneumococci. In three patients, the initially fluoroquinolone-susceptible strain developed resistance after fluoroquinolone therapy, and in the remaining four patients, the persistent strain was fluoroquinolone resistant from the first episode. QRDR changes involved in fluoroquinolone resistance were frequently observed in persistent strains after fluoroquinolone treatment; however, the PBP sequences and MLST genotypes of these strains were stable over time. PMID:23052300

  18. [Eye contact in adult patients with Asperger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Roy, M; Wolfgang, D

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear if individuals with autism spectrum disorders rarely hold direct eye contact because eyes are unimportant for them, or if it is actively avoided. The aim of the current investigation was to gain a better understanding for their views on direct eye contact by exploring adult patients with Asperger syndrome. 63 adult patients with Asperger syndrome (28 females, 35 males, 21 - 62 years old) were explored about using and sensing direct eye contact by means of a standardised questionnaire. 87 % of investigated patients depict direct eye contact as being disagreeable. They describe it as arduous and distracting. Therefore they mostly actively avoid direct eye contact. The here gained knowledge about aversion towards direct eye contact in individuals with autism should lead to a stronger understanding and acceptance of this problem in the non-autistic population. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Diagnosis and Management of Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Puneet; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies refer to a group of disorders in which the unremitting epileptic activity contributes to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and these can worsen over time leading to progressive cerebral dysfunction. Several syndromes have been described based on their electroclinical features (age of onset, seizure type, and EEG pattern). This review briefly describes the clinical evaluation and management of commonly encountered epileptic encephalopathies in children. PMID:23970964

  20. Optimal serum phenylalanine for adult patients with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yoshiyuki; Nagasaka, Hironori

    2013-12-01

    High serum phenylalanine in adult patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) causes neuropsychological and psychosocial problems that can be resolved by phenylalanine-restricted diet. Therefore, PKU patients must continue to adhere to phenylalanine-restricted diet for life, although the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life has yet to be established. The purpose of this review was to establish the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life of PKU patients. We evaluated oxidative stress status, nitric oxide metabolism, cholesterol-derived oxysterols, vitamin D and bone status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adult PKU patients according to serum phenylalanine level. Oxidative stress increased markedly at serum phenylalanine of 700-800 μmol/L. Serum phenylalanine higher than 700-850 μmol/L correlated with the disturbance of nitric oxide regulatory system. Adult PKU patients had poor vitamin D status and exhibited predominance of bone resorption over bone formation. In the brain, the levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a marker of brain cholesterol elimination, were low at serum phenylalanine levels exceeding 650 μmol/L. MRI studies showed high signal intensity in deep white matter on T2-weighted and FLAIR images of PKU patients with serum phenylalanine greater than 500 μmol/L, with decreased apparent diffusion coefficients. Changes in most parameters covering the entire body organs in adult PKU were almost acceptable below 700-800 μmol/L of phenylalanine level. However, the optimal serum phenylalanine level should be 500 μmol/L or less in later life for the brain to be safe. © 2013.

  1. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-08

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI.

  2. Gene Panel Testing in Epileptic Encephalopathies and Familial Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Rikke S.; Larsen, Line H.G.; Johannesen, Katrine M.; Talvik, Inga; Talvik, Tiina; Vaher, Ulvi; Miranda, Maria J.; Farooq, Muhammad; Nielsen, Jens E.K.; Svendsen, Lene Lavard; Kjelgaard, Ditte B.; Linnet, Karen M.; Hao, Qin; Uldall, Peter; Frangu, Mimoza; Tommerup, Niels; Baig, Shahid M.; Abdullah, Uzma; Born, Alfred P.; Gellert, Pia; Nikanorova, Marina; Olofsson, Kern; Jepsen, Birgit; Marjanovic, Dragan; Al-Zehhawi, Lana I.K.; Peñalva, Sofia J.; Krag-Olsen, Bente; Brusgaard, Klaus; Hjalgrim, Helle; Rubboli, Guido; Pal, Deb K.; Dahl, Hans A.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several genes have been causally associated with epilepsy. However, making a genetic diagnosis in a patient can still be difficult, since extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity has been observed in many monogenic epilepsies. This study aimed to analyze the genetic basis of a wide spectrum of epilepsies with age of onset spanning from the neonatal period to adulthood. A gene panel targeting 46 epilepsy genes was used on a cohort of 216 patients consecutively referred for panel testing. The patients had a range of different epilepsies from benign neonatal seizures to epileptic encephalopathies (EEs). Potentially causative variants were evaluated by literature and database searches, submitted to bioinformatic prediction algorithms, and validated by Sanger sequencing. If possible, parents were included for segregation analysis. We identified a presumed disease-causing variant in 49 (23%) of the 216 patients. The variants were found in 19 different genes including SCN1A, STXBP1, CDKL5, SCN2A, SCN8A, GABRA1, KCNA2, and STX1B. Patients with neonatal-onset epilepsies had the highest rate of positive findings (57%). The overall yield for patients with EEs was 32%, compared to 17% among patients with generalized epilepsies and 16% in patients with focal or multifocal epilepsies. By the use of a gene panel consisting of 46 epilepsy genes, we were able to find a disease-causing genetic variation in 23% of the analyzed patients. The highest yield was found among patients with neonatal-onset epilepsies and EEs. PMID:27781031

  3. Resetting of brain dynamics: epileptic versus psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Balu; Faith, Aaron; Vlachos, Ioannis; Roth, Austin; Williams, Korwyn; Noe, Katie; Drazkowski, Joe; Tapsell, Lisa; Sirven, Joseph; Iasemidis, Leon

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of differential diagnosis of patients with epileptic seizures (ES) and patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) through an advanced analysis of the dynamics of the patients' scalp EEGs. The underlying principle was the presence of resetting of brain's preictal spatiotemporal entrainment following onset of ES and the absence of resetting following PNES. Long-term (days) scalp EEGs recorded from five patients with ES and six patients with PNES were analyzed. It was found that: (1) Preictal entrainment of brain sites was reset at ES (P<0.05) in four of the five patients with ES, and not reset (P=0.28) in the fifth patient. (2) Resetting did not occur (p>0.1) in any of the six patients with PNES. These preliminary results in patients with ES are in agreement with our previous findings from intracranial EEG recordings on resetting of brain dynamics by ES and are expected to constitute the basis for the development of a reliable and supporting tool in the differential diagnosis between ES and PNES. Finally, we believe that these results shed light on the electrophysiology of PNES by showing that occurrence of PNES does not assist patients in overcoming a pathological entrainment of brain dynamics. This article is part of a Supplemental Special Issue entitled The Future of Automated Seizure Detection and Prediction.

  4. Coronary Arteriovenous Fistulas in Adult Patients: Surgical Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Albeyoglu, Sebnem; Aldag, Mustafa; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Sargin, Murat; Oz, Tugba Kemaloglu; Kutlu, Hakan; Dagsali, Sabri

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical and anatomic characteristics of coronary arteriovenous fistulas in adult patients who underwent open cardiac surgery and to review surgical management and outcomes. Methods Twenty-one adult patients (12 female, 9 male; mean age: 56.1±7.9 years) who underwent surgical treatment for coronary arteriovenous fistulas were retrospectively included in this study. Coronary angiography, chest X-ray, electrocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography were preoperatively performed in all patients. Demographic and clinical data were also collected. Postoperative courses of all patients were monitored and postoperative complications were noted. Results A total of 25 coronary arteriovenous fistulas were detected in 21 patients; the fistulas originated mainly from left anterior descending artery (n=9, 42.8%). Four (19.4%) patients had bilateral fistulas originating from both left anterior descending and right coronary artery. The main drainage site of coronary arteriovenous fistulas was the pulmonary artery (n=18, 85.7%). Twelve (57.1%) patients had isolated coronary arteriovenous fistulas and 4 (19.4%), concomitant coronary artery disease. Twenty (95.3%) of all patients were symptomatic. Seventeen patients were operated on with and 4 without cardiopulmonary bypass. There was no mortality. Three patients had postoperative atrial fibrillation. One patient had pericardial effusion causing cardiac tamponade who underwent reoperation. Conclusion The decision of surgical management should be made on the size and the anatomical location of coronary arteriovenous fistulas and concomitant cardiac comorbidities. Surgical closure with ligation of coronary arteriovenous fistulas can be performed easily with on-pump or off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, even in asymptomatic patients to prevent fistula related complications with very low risk of mortality and morbidity.

  5. Epileptic laughter: 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Talvik, Inga; Vibo, Riina; Liik, Maarika; Haldre, Sulev; Talvik, Tiina

    2012-01-01

    Two cases of gelastic epilepsy in a 6-year-old girl with attacks of mirthful laughter and a 38-year-old male patient with episodes of laughter without any positive emotions are presented. Temporal lobe epilepsy was diagnosed in the first case and possible frontal lobe epilepsy in the second case. It is concluded that that this rare form of epilepsy can be difficult to diagnose and treat, and can clinically be accompanied by urinary incontinence.

  6. The epileptic spectrum in the congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome. CBPS Multicenter Collaborative Study.

    PubMed

    Kuzniecky, R; Andermann, F; Guerrini, R

    1994-03-01

    We studied the frequency, clinical and EEG characteristics, and outcome of the epileptic syndrome in 31 patients with a congenital neurologic syndrome characterized by pseudobulbar palsy, cognitive deficits, and bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria. Seizures were present in 27 of 31 patients (87%) and usually began between the ages of 4 and 12 years; they commonly consisted of atypical absence, atonic/tonic, and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Partial attacks were present in 26%. EEG demonstrated generalized spike and wave abnormalities and, less frequently, multifocal discharges, predominantly in centro-parietal regions. Seizures were poorly controlled in 65%, with the remaining patients well controlled. Seven patients underwent callosotomy, which resulted in seizure improvement. This study indicates that the epileptic spectrum in this syndrome is broad but follows predictable patterns. Callosotomy is a valuable treatment strategy in those with intractable drop attacks.

  7. The spectrum of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and comorbidities seen in an epilepsy monitoring unit.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Udaya; Briggs, Belinda; Lowenstern, David; D'Souza, Wendyl

    2011-03-01

    We sought to study characteristics of patients presenting with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES), with and without major psychiatric comorbidity. A total of 39 patients who were diagnosed with PNES in a tertiary care setting were studied, and those patients with and without axis I psychiatric disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) were compared. The mean time in confirming the diagnosis was 9 years. More than half the patients were taking anti-epileptic medications when they presented for video-electroencephalographic monitoring. The mean monitoring time required to capture a PNES was 0.6 days. Comorbid chronic medical conditions were found in 38.5% and axis I-psychiatric diagnoses in 48.7%. There were no significant differences in characteristics between those with and without major psychiatric comorbidities.

  8. Epileptic Seizure Detection in Eeg Signals Using Multifractal Analysis and Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthayakumar, R.; Easwaramoorthy, D.

    2013-06-01

    This paper explores the three different methods to explicitly recognize the healthy and epileptic EEG signals: Modified, Improved, and Advanced forms of Generalized Fractal Dimensions (GFD). The newly proposed scheme is based on GFD and the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) for analyzing the EEG signals. First EEG signals are decomposed into approximation and detail coefficients using DWT and then GFD values of the original EEGs, approximation and detail coefficients are computed. Significant differences are observed among the GFD values of the healthy and epileptic EEGs allowing us to classify seizures with high accuracy. It is shown that the classification rate is very less accurate without DWT as a preprocessing step. The proposed idea is illustrated through the graphical and statistical tools. The EEG data is further tested for linearity by using normal probability plot and we proved that epileptic EEG had significant nonlinearity whereas healthy EEG distributed normally and similar to Gaussian linear process. Therefore, we conclude that the GFD and the wavelet decomposition through DWT are the strong indicators of the state of illness of epileptic patients.

  9. Modeling epileptic brain states using EEG spectral analysis and topographic mapping.

    PubMed

    Direito, Bruno; Teixeira, César; Ribeiro, Bernardete; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Sales, Francisco; Dourado, António

    2012-09-30

    Changes in the spatio-temporal behavior of the brain electrical activity are believed to be associated to epileptic brain states. We propose a novel methodology to identify the different states of the epileptic brain, based on the topographic mapping of the time varying relative power of delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency sub-bands, estimated from EEG. Using normalized-cuts segmentation algorithm, points of interest are identified in the topographic mappings and their trajectories over time are used for finding out relations with epileptogenic propagations in the brain. These trajectories are used to train a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), which models the different epileptic brain states and the transition among them. Applied to 10 patients suffering from focal seizures, with a total of 30 seizures over 497.3h of data, the methodology shows good results (an average point-by-point accuracy of 89.31%) for the identification of the four brain states--interictal, preictal, ictal and postictal. The results suggest that the spatio-temporal dynamics captured by the proposed methodology are related to the epileptic brain states and transitions involved in focal seizures.

  10. Unique medical issues in adult patients with mucopolysaccharidoses.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John; Berger, Kenneth I; Borgo, Andrea; Braunlin, Elizabeth A; Burton, Barbara K; Ghotme, Kemel A; Kircher, Susanne G; Molter, David; Orchard, Paul J; Palmer, James; Pastores, Gregory M; Rapoport, David M; Wang, Raymond Y; White, Klane

    2016-10-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses are a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by deficiencies in enzymes involved in the sequential degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) leading to substrate accumulation in various tissues and organs. GAG accumulation can cause growth retardation and progressive damage to respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, nervous, gastrointestinal, auditory, and visual systems. In the past, few people with severe phenotypic mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) reached adulthood. However, better methods for diagnosis, multi-disciplinary care, and new therapies have extended lifespan, leading to an increasing number of patients surviving beyond childhood. The growing number of adult MPS patients poses significant challenges for clinicians who may not be familiar with the clinical manifestations of MPS. In addition, as new interventions have changed the natural history of these disorders, it is difficult to anticipate both the impact on life expectancy and other complications that may occur as these patients age. Because the MPS disorders are multi-organ diseases, their management requires a coordinated multi-disciplinary approach. Here we discuss the unique pattern of medical issues and multi-organ involvement in adult patients with MPS and identify the challenges that are associated with management of MPS. This review is based on information from an expert investigator meeting with MPS specialists held October 2-4, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland, as well as on current literature searches focusing on MPS and adults.

  11. Neuropsychological Assessment of Adult Patients with Shunted Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Bakar, Emel Erdogan

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study is planned to determine the neurocognitive difficulties of hydrocephalic adults. Methods The research group contained healthy adults (control group, n : 15), and hydrocephalic adults (n : 15). Hydrocephalic group consisted of patients with idiopathic aquaduct stenosis and post-meningitis hydrocephalus. All patients were followed with shunted hydrocephalus and not gone to shunt revision during last two years. They were chosen from either asymptomatic or had only minor symptoms without motor and sensorineural deficit. A neuropsychological test battery (Raven Standart Progressive Matrices, Bender-Gestalt Test, Cancellation Test, Clock Drawing Test, Facial Recognition Test, Line Orientation Test, Serial Digit Learning Test, Stroop Color Word Interference Test-TBAG Form, Verbal Fluency Test, Verbal Fluency Test, Visual-Aural Digit Span Test-B) was applied to all groups. Results Neuropsychological assessment of hydrocephalic patients demonstrated that they had poor performance on visual, semantic and working memory, visuoconstructive and frontal functions, reading, attention, motor coordination and executive function of parietal lobe which related with complex and perseverative behaviour. Eventually, these patients had significant impairment on the neurocognitive functions of their frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. On the other hand, the statistical analyses performed on demographic data showed that the aetiology of the hydrocephalus, age, sex and localization of the shunt (frontal or posterior parietal) did not affect the test results. Conclusion This prospective study showed that adult patients with hydrocephalus have serious neuropsychological problems which might be directly caused by the hydrocephalus; and these problems may cause serious adaptive difficulties in their social, cultural, behavioral and academic life. PMID:20379471

  12. ACG Clinical Guideline: Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A; DiBaise, John K; Mullin, Gerard E; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-03-01

    The value of nutrition therapy for the adult hospitalized patient is derived from the outcome benefits achieved by the delivery of early enteral feeding. Nutritional assessment should identify those patients at high nutritional risk, determined by both disease severity and nutritional status. For such patients if they are unable to maintain volitional intake, enteral access should be attained and enteral nutrition (EN) initiated within 24-48 h of admission. Orogastric or nasogastric feeding is most appropriate when starting EN, switching to post-pyloric or deep jejunal feeding only in those patients who are intolerant of gastric feeds or at high risk for aspiration. Percutaneous access should be used for those patients anticipated to require EN for >4 weeks. Patients receiving EN should be monitored for risk of aspiration, tolerance, and adequacy of feeding (determined by percent of goal calories and protein delivered). Intentional permissive underfeeding (and even trophic feeding) is appropriate temporarily for certain subsets of hospitalized patients. Although a standard polymeric formula should be used routinely in most patients, an immune-modulating formula (with arginine and fish oil) should be reserved for patients who have had major surgery in a surgical ICU setting. Adequacy of nutrition therapy is enhanced by establishing nurse-driven enteral feeding protocols, increasing delivery by volume-based or top-down feeding strategies, minimizing interruptions, and eliminating the practice of gastric residual volumes. Parenteral nutrition should be used in patients at high nutritional risk when EN is not feasible or after the first week of hospitalization if EN is not sufficient. Because of their knowledge base and skill set, the gastroenterologist endoscopist is an asset to the Nutrition Support Team and should participate in providing optimal nutrition therapy to the hospitalized adult patient.

  13. [Electroencephalography for patient with epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is the primary means by which epileptic activity in the brain is measured. The frequency of epileptic discharges is influenced by vigilance and biological rhythms. When checking for epileptic activity using EEG, measurements must be repeated and recordings made during sleep are recommended if epileptic discharges do not readily appear. Epileptic discharges must be classified as generalized or focal discharges, and discriminated from non-epileptic discharges such as vertex sharp transients, positive occipital sharp transients, 14 & 6 positive spike discharge, and artifacts. Attention should be paid to small sharp spikes, 6Hz spike and slow wave, focal slow waves, and generalized rhythmic slow waves, which should all be considered variants of epileptic activity. EEG provides information regarding focal and generalized brain dysfunction in addition to epileptic activity. Because the misreading of EEG may negatively affect the lives of patients, reading the EEG correctly is quite important.

  14. The Effectiveness of the Latarjet Procedure for Shoulder Instability in Patients with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ersen, A; Bayram, S; Birisik, F; Atalar, A C; Demirhan, M

    2017-10-04

    Powerful contractions during epileptic seizures may cause shoulder dislocation and instability. The aim of the study is to evaluate the functional and radiographic results of the Latarjet procedure for anterior shoulder dislocation in patients with epilepsy and compare the functional results of these patients with the results of patients without epilepsy. Is latarjet procedure effective in epileptic patients as non-epileptic patients with anterior shoulder instability? 11 shoulders of 9 patients with epileptic seizures causing anterior shoulder instability were evaluated retrospectively. All patients had a Latarjet procedure after neurologic evaluation and treatment arrangement. Epileptic seizures after the operation and shoulder dislocation after a seizure were investigated. For functional evaluation, ROWE, ASES and Constant scores were utilized whereas standard X-Ray views were used for radiologic evaluation. The results of epileptic patients with Latarjet procedure were compared with non-epileptic patients (53 patients, 54 shoulders) for anterior shoulder instability. Three (33%) of the 9 epileptic patients had recurrent seizures after Latarjet procedure, whereas 1 of the 11 shoulders (9%) had dislocation after an epileptic seizure. Functional scores were found to be significantly improved in epileptic (p<0.001) and non- epileptic patients (p<0.001). No significant differences for functional results were found between epileptic and non-epileptic patients after Latarjet procedure for anterior instability (p>0.05). One shoulder of 11 in the patients with epilepsy group (9%) and one shoulder of the 54 shoulders non-epileptic patients group (1.8%) had a redislocation. The rate of postoperative redislocation was significantly higher in patients with epilepsy (p: 0,008). Epileptic patients have a high rate of recurrent seizures even with proper medical treatment. Significant functional improvements and shoulder stability may be achieved after Latarjet procedure in

  15. Hypernatraemia in an adult in-patient population.

    PubMed Central

    Long, C. A.; Marin, P.; Bayer, A. J.; Shetty, H. G.; Pathy, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    We report a retrospective study of hypernatraemia (serum sodium concentration greater than 150 mmol/l) in an adult in-patient population of a health district during one year. The incidence was 0.3% with at least 60% of cases developing after hospital admission, mainly in elderly patients. Dehydration appeared to be the major cause, with the use of diuretics, depressed conscious level or febrile illness implicated in a majority. Most patients had more than one contributory factor and iatrogenic causes were common. Associated illnesses were often severe and the in-hospital mortality was high (54%) regardless of age. Hypernatraemia in hospitalized patients should be largely avoidable and there is a need for greater awareness of the importance of active maintenance of hydration in susceptible patients. PMID:1924049

  16. Ebstein's anomaly in adult patients over 50 years of age.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Yoshitake, Kiyonobu; Matsuo, Atsutoshi; Tayama, Kei-Ichiro; Hida, Satoru; Mito, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital heart disease of the tricuspid valve, and less than 5% of patients with EA survive beyond the age of 50. We report two unoperated cases of EA in adult patients aged over 50 years. Two patients, a 70-year-old Japanese woman and a 59-year-old Chinese woman, were referred to us for tachyarrhythmias. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated apical displacement (>8 mm/m(2) body surface area) of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve from the atrioventricular ring with tricuspid regurgitation in both patients. The former suddenly expired 20 months later after suffering from repetitive supraventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or heart failure, and the latter is alive with minimal signs of heart failure 12 months after the diagnosis of EA. Although the natural history of EA is extremely variable, these two patients are exceptional in that they tolerated EA well for over 50 years without any surgical intervention.

  17. Trichotillomania and Non-Epileptic Seizures as Sleep-Related Dissociative Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Angulo-Franco, Melina; Bush-Martínez, Alejandra; Nenclares-Portocarrero, Alejandro; Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of non-epileptic seizures (NES) and trichotillomania during sleep is rare. We describe the case of an adult woman with a personal history of childhood maltreatment and psychiatric morbidity (major depression, trichotillomania, and conversion disorder), who was referred to the sleep unit because of nocturnal hair-pulling and psychomotor agitation during sleep. An all-night PSG recording with audiovisual monitoring documented seven episodes of trichotillomania and one NES, all of which arose from unequivocal wakefulness. Improvement of nocturnal behaviors was observed after long-term psychotherapy. This case illustrates that nocturnal trichotillomania and NES may be symptoms of a sleep-related dissociative disorder. Citation: Angulo-Franco M, Bush-Martínez A, Nenclares-Portocarrero A, Jiménez-Genchi A. Trichotillomania and non-epileptic seizures as sleep-related dissociative phenomena. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):271–273. PMID:25515284

  18. Managing body image difficulties of adult cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cororve Gingeret, Michelle; Teo, Irene; Epner, Daniel E

    2014-03-01

    Body image is a critical psychosocial issue for patients with cancer because they often undergo significant changes to appearance and functioning. The primary purpose of this review article was to identify empirically-supported approaches to treat body image difficulties of adult cancer patients that can be incorporated into high-quality comprehensive cancer care. An overview was provided of theoretical models of body image relevant to cancer patients, and findings were presented from published literature on body image and cancer from 2003 to 2013. These data were integrated with information from the patient-doctor communication literature to delineate a practical approach for assessing and treating body image concerns of adult cancer patients. Body image difficulties were found across