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Sample records for adult family homes

  1. Unpacking the impact of older adults' home death on family care-givers' experiences of home.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Christine; Turner, Mary; Blake, Susan; Brearley, Sarah; Seamark, David; Thomas, Carol; Wang, Xu; Payne, Sheila

    2016-03-01

    Public Health England (2013) survey data indicates that while the place of death is geographically uneven across England, given a choice, many older people nearing end of life would prefer to die at home. There is, however, a growing critique that policies designed to support home death fail to understand the needs and preferences of older people and the impact on family carers. Such policies also make assumption about within whose home the home death takes place. Hence, there are major gaps in our understanding of firstly, where and how care work undertaken by family members within domestic settings takes place; and secondly, how it can create tensions between home and care that fundamentally disrupt the physical and socio-emotional meaning of home for family carers, impacting on their sense of home post-death. This can have consequences for their own well-being. In this paper we draw on interview data from our 'Unpacking the Home' study to elicit an in-depth understanding of how facilitating a home death can create an ambiguity of place for family carers, where the issues faced by them in caring for a dying older person at home, and the home death itself, can fundamentally reshape the meaning and sense of home. PMID:26916987

  2. Food and Nutrition Practices and Education Needs in Florida's Adult Family Care Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Wendy J.; Ford, Amanda L.; Gal, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    A statewide survey was carried out to determine food and nutrition practices and education needs of Florida's adult family care homes (AFCHs). The 30-item survey included questions on food and nutrition education, supplement use, and menu planning. Infrequent use of menus and nutrition supplements was reported. A strong need was indicated for…

  3. Mixed Methods Research of Adult Family Care Home Residents and Informal Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanty, Guy C.; Hibel, James

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a mixed methods approach used to explore the experiences of adult family care home (AFCH) residents and informal caregivers (IC). A rationale is presented for using a mixed methods approach employing the sequential exploratory design with this poorly researched population. The unique challenges attendant to the sampling…

  4. Boomerang families and failure-to-launch: Commentary on adult children living at home.

    PubMed

    Burn, Katherine; Szoeke, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    With a shifting economic climate and changes in social norms, young adults are increasingly reported to be living with their parents, either through delayed launch or by launch and return. For young adults grappling with financial and domestic independence, the family home can represent a safe haven; however, living with parents can also pose a threat to autonomy and self-image as they strive for adult status. Parents, on the other hand, are often beleaguered by the economic and emotional demands of their dependent adult children and struggle to maintain their own independence. The roles and expectations of both parties need to be redefined in order to achieve optimal household functioning. PMID:26597141

  5. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  6. Policy Changes in Medicare Home Health Care: Challenges to Providing Family-Centered, Community-Based Care for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2009-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) established new reimbursement systems in the Medicare home health fee-for-service benefit. Reimbursements were reduced to 1993 levels and per-beneficiary capitated limits were introduced for the first time. This article analyzes the impact of these changes on chronically ill older adults and their families.…

  7. Adult Roles & Responsibilities. Home Economics Family Life Course. Grades 11-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for developing a home economics family life course to assist students in improving the quality of individual and family life. The course contains 12 units that cover the following topics: self-awareness, wheel of life, dating, mate selection, engagement, marriage, money management, parenting, crisis…

  8. Health Profile of Aging Family Caregivers Supporting Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaki, Kiyoshi; Hsieh, Kelly; Heller, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    The health status of 206 female caregivers supporting adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities at home was investigated using objective (i.e., presence of chronic health conditions and activity limitations) and subjective (i.e., self-perceived health status) health measures compared with those of women in the general population in 2…

  9. Marriage and Family Life. Vocational Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Donna

    These course materials, designed to be used with students in the 11th and 12th grades and for adult students, are intended to provide basic knowledge of family life and adult living. The one-semester home economics course focuses on basic marriage and family skills, life choices, parenthood, and family changes. The guide contains 4 sections and 10…

  10. Mom and pop versus the big boys: adult family homes as providers of Medicaid-funded residential care.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Susan C; Sullivan, Jean H; Sales, Anne E B; Gray, Shelly L

    2009-01-01

    This paper compares assisted living apartments (ALs), adult residential care facilities (ARCs), and small adult family homes (AFHs) for Medicaid residents in Washington State, with particular emphasis on the settings, staffing, services, and policies of AFHs. We targeted for enrollment all residents entering an AFH, ARC, or AL setting on Medicaid/state funding in a three-county area of Washington State. We obtained information on 199 settings, interviewing administrative and direct care providers. AFHs are smaller than ARCs and ALs and less likely to be part of a chain, with no significant difference in staffing ratios of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. Sixty-four percent of AFH residents were receiving public funds compared to 32% of AL residents. AFHs report admitting residents with more activities of daily living needs, health conditions, and behavior problems. They are less likely to have autonomy-related policies, and they provide more services and fewer activities. While attention should continue to be paid to staff supports, policy and practice should support the continued role of AFHs, which are of special interest because of their potential to provide more homelike, less costly care but with possible trade-offs compared to larger facilities.

  11. Families Learning Together: At Home and in the Community. Building Adult Knowledge and Children's Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Home and School Inst., Washington, DC.

    The curriculum presented in this document involves a set of learning activities whereby parents can help children increase school achievement. The program emphasizes the idea that when families learn together a bridge of shared knowledge and caring is established between generations. Numerous activities, called "recipes for learning," make use of…

  12. Healthy Family 2009: Practicing Healthy Adult Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Practicing Healthy Adult Living Past Issues / Winter ... diabetes, or if heart disease runs in your family, begin checking cholesterol at age 20. Colorectal Cancer : ...

  13. Strong Families, Tidy Houses, and Children's Values in Adult Life: Are "Chaotic", "Crowded" and "Unstable" Homes Really so Bad?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flouri, Eirini

    2009-01-01

    Chaotic home systems have been linked with children's adverse psychological and academic outcomes. But, as they represent a departure from the suburban ideal of space, order, and family cohesiveness and stability, they should also be linked with low support for survival values. Using longitudinal data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70)…

  14. Families, Homes and Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Phillip G.

    2005-01-01

    The findings from a study of how Green families construct and practise versions of an environmental ethic and ecopolitic in the home are suggestive of how environmental education in schools might be revised. In this study, the green home proved to be a very different form of environmental education and practice of sustainability. Children's…

  15. Family identification: a beneficial process for young adults who grow up in homes affected by parental intimate partner violence

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Catherine M.; Muldoon, Orla T.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to parental intimate partner violence (parental IPV) is a complex trauma. Research within social psychology establishes that identification with social groups impacts positively on how we appraise, respond to and recover from traumatic events. IPV is also a highly stigmatized social phenomenon and social isolation is a major factor for families affected by IPV, yet strong identification with the family group may act as a beneficial psychological resource to young people who grew up in homes affected by IPV. The current study, an online survey of 355 students (Mage = 20, 70% female), investigated if a psychosocial process, specifically identification with the family, may influence the relationship between the predictor, exposure to parental IPV, and outcomes, global self-esteem and state anxiety. Mediation analysis suggests that identification with the family has a positive influence on the relationship between exposure to parental IPV and psychological outcomes; exposure to parental IPV results in reduced family identification, but when family identification is strong it results in both reduced anxiety and increased self-esteem for young people. The findings highlight the importance of having a strong sense of belonging to the extended family for young people who were exposed to parental IPV, thus has implications for prevention, intervention, and social policy. PMID:26379582

  16. Family identification: a beneficial process for young adults who grow up in homes affected by parental intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Catherine M; O'Donnell, Aisling T; Muldoon, Orla T

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to parental intimate partner violence (parental IPV) is a complex trauma. Research within social psychology establishes that identification with social groups impacts positively on how we appraise, respond to and recover from traumatic events. IPV is also a highly stigmatized social phenomenon and social isolation is a major factor for families affected by IPV, yet strong identification with the family group may act as a beneficial psychological resource to young people who grew up in homes affected by IPV. The current study, an online survey of 355 students (M age = 20, 70% female), investigated if a psychosocial process, specifically identification with the family, may influence the relationship between the predictor, exposure to parental IPV, and outcomes, global self-esteem and state anxiety. Mediation analysis suggests that identification with the family has a positive influence on the relationship between exposure to parental IPV and psychological outcomes; exposure to parental IPV results in reduced family identification, but when family identification is strong it results in both reduced anxiety and increased self-esteem for young people. The findings highlight the importance of having a strong sense of belonging to the extended family for young people who were exposed to parental IPV, thus has implications for prevention, intervention, and social policy.

  17. Family identification: a beneficial process for young adults who grow up in homes affected by parental intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Catherine M; O'Donnell, Aisling T; Muldoon, Orla T

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to parental intimate partner violence (parental IPV) is a complex trauma. Research within social psychology establishes that identification with social groups impacts positively on how we appraise, respond to and recover from traumatic events. IPV is also a highly stigmatized social phenomenon and social isolation is a major factor for families affected by IPV, yet strong identification with the family group may act as a beneficial psychological resource to young people who grew up in homes affected by IPV. The current study, an online survey of 355 students (M age = 20, 70% female), investigated if a psychosocial process, specifically identification with the family, may influence the relationship between the predictor, exposure to parental IPV, and outcomes, global self-esteem and state anxiety. Mediation analysis suggests that identification with the family has a positive influence on the relationship between exposure to parental IPV and psychological outcomes; exposure to parental IPV results in reduced family identification, but when family identification is strong it results in both reduced anxiety and increased self-esteem for young people. The findings highlight the importance of having a strong sense of belonging to the extended family for young people who were exposed to parental IPV, thus has implications for prevention, intervention, and social policy. PMID:26379582

  18. Adult and Family Living. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide for teachers is designed for use with 11th- and 12th-grade students who have had no more than 1 year of vocational home economics. It focuses on providing young adults with the knowledge and skills they need for healthy and positive adult and family lives. It includes 27 units in 8 sections as follows: (1) personal…

  19. Engaging Families in In-Home Family Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ronald W.; Koley, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Boys Town has created a program called In-Home Family Services to deliver help to families in stress. In-home family intervention programs have become widely used to help more families who are at risk and experiencing difficulties with a wide range of problems including domestic violence, child behavior problems, parent-child and family…

  20. Family and home characteristics correlate with mold in homes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously, we demonstrated that infants exposed to higher Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value homes were more likely to develop asthma by age seven. The purpose of this analysis was to determine what family and home characteristics were associated with higher ER...

  1. Family Perceptions of Geriatric Foster Family and Nursing Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Rose, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Relatives (N=62) of matched pairs of patients in geriatric foster homes and nursing homes rated care provided to their relatives. Significantly more foster family patients had positive pre-placement attitudes than did nursing home patients. Upon follow-up, relatives of foster patients reported seeing more patient improvement, satisfaction,…

  2. Independent Living: A Study of Rehabilitation of Physically Handicapped Adults Living in Foster Homes; Social Work Intervention in the Adaptation to Family Environment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Howard D.

    As an alternative to unnecessary inpatient care of adults with orthopedic disabilities, the Independent Living Project (ILP) placed persons who were institutionalized without need and persons who were living in the community under unsatisfactory circumstances in foster homes. Information is presented on the intake procedures, homefinding…

  3. Home and Family Living Laboratory Curriculum Guide. 1975 Developmental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Patricia, Ed.

    Presented is the curriculum guide from the Home and Family Living Laboratory, a project of the Child Development Center (St. Paul, Minnesota) which serves educable mentally retarded and trainable mentally retarded teenagers and young adults. It is explained that the laboratory setting is a house (next to the school building) which accommodates 12…

  4. Home visits in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovicz, Difat; Srivastava, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed There has been a decline in family physicians providing home visits to housebound patients. Objective of program To increase family medicine residents’ exposure to home visits; their comfort and skills in providing home visits; and their willingness to provide home visits after graduation. Program description Between 2000 and 2010, each family practice resident at St Joseph’s Health Centre Family Medicine Teaching Unit in Toronto, Ont, was assigned at least 1 housebound patient to care for longitudinally over 2 years; the rationale for this was to increase the sense of “ownership” and responsibility among residents for their assigned homebound patients. Starting in 2003, until the program’s conclusion in 2010, residents were asked to fill out surveys before and after the program to assess their comfort with and confidence in providing home visits, as well as their satisfaction with the program. Survey responses were analyzed for changes over the course of residency training. A total of 85 residents completed the home visit teaching program between 2003 and 2010 inclusive. Conclusion While residents’ willingness to provide home visits did not increase over the course of residency, their confidence in making housecalls did increase. There was also a trend toward increased confidence among residents in working with community agencies. Thus, having home visit patients be a part of resident practices might play an important role in increasing the likelihood that future family physicians will continue to care for their patients when those patients are no longer ambulatory. PMID:26052599

  5. Dying at Home: Can Families Cope?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hine, Virginia H.

    1979-01-01

    Examines five considerations involved in decision for home death: (1) sources of moral support necessary for family; (2) kinds of professional aid available; (3) special equipment necessary; (4) necessary nursing skills; and (5) basic information about death. (Author)

  6. Genetics Home Reference: familial cylindromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the skin (skin appendages), such as hair follicles and sweat glands . People with familial cylindromatosis typically ... are now generally believed to begin in hair follicles. Individuals with familial cylindromatosis occasionally develop other types ...

  7. The Resource Home: A Service to Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, C. Derek; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Available from: Canadian Association for the Mentally Retarded, Kinsmen National Institute on Mental Retardation Building, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Downsview, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada. A resource home in Saskatoon, Canada, for families of mentally handicapped children provides planned holiday relief for natural and foster families,…

  8. Genetics Home Reference: familial hyperaldosteronism

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Advocacy Resources (1 link) Hormone Health Network: Primary Hyperaldosteronism Genetic Testing Registry (2 links) Familial hyperaldosteronism type 3 Hyperaldosteronism, familial, type I ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (3 links) ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: familial dysautonomia

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure and body temperature. It also affects the sensory nervous system, which controls activities related to the ... and cold. Familial dysautonomia is also called hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy, type III. Problems related to ...

  10. Kansas Adult Care Home Aide Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornelli, Linda K.; Bartel, Myrna J.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by instructors whose responsibility it is to prepare persons to provide basic direct care for residents living in adult care homes. Addressed in the individual units of part I (which contains information to be covered in the first 40 hours of training) are the following topics: working in an adult care…

  11. Science Learning at Home: Involving Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Elizabeth Outlaw; Heaton, Emily T.; Heslop, Karen; Kixmiller, Kassandra

    2009-01-01

    Families' involvement in their children's science learning at home has numerous benefits, especially when they support children's self-initiated investigations. In a position statement on parental involvement in science education, the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA 2009) stresses the role of parents in the daily reinforcement of…

  12. Development and Families: Implications for Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Eloise

    1985-01-01

    This article integrates literature from such diverse sources as population, agriculture, women in development, macro-economics, and health studies to document the changes that have occurred in families in the last 20-25 years. Program issues for the home economics profession are considered in light of these changes. (CT)

  13. The Nature of Staff - Family Interactions in Nursing Homes: Staff Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Ammarell, Natalie; Bailey, Donald; Corazzini, Kirsten; Piven, Mary L.; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2008-01-01

    Each year thousands of older adults are admitted to nursing homes. Following admission, nursing home staff and family members must interact and communicate with each other. This study examined relationship and communication patterns between nursing home staff members and family members of nursing home residents, as part of a larger multi-method comparative case study. Here, we report on 6- month case studies of two nursing homes where in-depth interviews, shadowing experiences, and direct observations were completed. Staff members from both nursing homes described staff-family interactions as difficult, problematic and time consuming, yet identified strategies that when implemented consistently, influenced the staff-family interaction positively. Findings suggest explanatory processes in staff-family interactions, while pointing toward promising interventions. PMID:19649311

  14. Take-Home Video for Adult Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yule, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    In the past, it has not been possible to "teach oneself to read" at home, because learners could not read the books to teach them. Videos and interactive compact discs have changed that situation and challenge current assumptions of the pedagogy of literacy. This article describes an experimental adult literacy project using video technology. …

  15. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  16. Making the Transition from Traditional to Home Schooling: Home School Family Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Kenneth Vance; Burroughs, Susie

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the motivations of families that operate home schools. Four intact, religiously conservative families were interviewed and observed over one year. Findings showed that families were motivated by multiple factors to leave traditional schooling and begin home schooling. Additionally, the motivations to home school influenced the…

  17. Home Visiting Processes: Relations with Family Characteristics and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Carla A.; Roggman, Lori A.; Green, Beth; Chazan-Cohen, Rachel; Korfmacher, Jon; McKelvey, Lorraine; Zhang, Dong; Atwater, Jane B.

    2013-01-01

    Variations in dosage, content, and family engagement with Early Head Start (EHS) home visiting services were examined for families participating in the EHS Research and Evaluation Project. Families were grouped by characteristics of maternal age, maternal ethnicity, and level of family risk. All home visiting variables were related differentially…

  18. Older Adults' Perceptions of Home Telehealth Services

    PubMed Central

    Brenčič, Maja Makovec; Trkman, Peter; de Leonni Stanonik, Mateja

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The success of home telemedicine depends on end-user adoption, which has been slow despite rapid advances in technological development. This study focuses on an examination of significant factors that may predict the successful adoption of home telemedicine services (HTS) among older adults. Based on previous studies in the fields of remote patient monitoring, assisted living technologies, and consumer health information technology acceptance, eight factors were identified as a framework for qualitative testing. Twelve focus groups were conducted with an older population living in both urban and rural environments. The results reveal seven predictors that play an important role in perceptions of HTS: perceived usefulness, effort expectancy, social influence, perceived security, computer anxiety, facilitating conditions, and physicians' opinion. The results provide important insights in the field of older adults' acceptance of HTS, with guidelines for the strategic planning, developing, and marketing of HTS for the graying market. PMID:23931702

  19. Older adults challenged financially when adult children move home.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Steven P; Padilla-Frausto, D Imelda

    2014-02-01

    This policy brief looks at the financial burdens imposed on older Californians when adult children return home, often due to a crisis not of their own making, to live with their parents. The findings show that on average in California, the amount of money that older adults need in order to maintain a minimally decent standard of living while supporting one adult child in their home increases their expenses by a minimum of 50 percent. Low-income older adults are usually on fixed incomes, so helping an adult child can provide the child with a critical safety net but at the cost of the parents' own financial well-being. Policy approaches to assisting this vulnerable population of older adults include implementing reforms to increase Supplemental Security Income (SSI), improving the availability of affordable housing, assuring that all eligible nonelderly adults obtain health insurance through health care reform's expansion of Medi-Cal and subsidies, and increasing food assistance through SNAP and senior meal programs. PMID:24804354

  20. Home on the Range: Host Families for Developmental Disabilities in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Teresa; Potts, Bridget; Fortune, Jon; Cobb, Ginny L.; Fortune, Barbara

    This report describes the outcomes of a Wyoming program that provides host families for individuals with developmental disabilities. Host families work with certified Medicaid providers of home and community-based services for people with developmental disabilities and provide residential habilitation to an adult who is accepted as a member of…

  1. Take-home video for adult literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yule, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    In the past, it has not been possible to "teach oneself to read" at home, because learners could not read the books to teach them. Videos and interactive compact discs have changed that situation and challenge current assumptions of the pedagogy of literacy. This article describes an experimental adult literacy project using video technology. The language used is English, but the basic concepts apply to any alphabetic or syllabic writing system. A half-hour cartoon video can help adults and adolescents with learning difficulties. Computer-animated cartoon graphics are attractive to look at, and simplify complex material in a clear, lively way. This video technique is also proving useful for distance learners, children, and learners of English as a second language. Methods and principles are to be extended using interactive compact discs.

  2. Family carers providing support to a person dying in the home setting: A narrative literature review

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Sara M; King, Claire; Turner, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study is based on people dying at home relying on the care of unpaid family carers. There is growing recognition of the central role that family carers play and the burdens that they bear, but knowledge gaps remain around how to best support them. Aim: The aim of this study is to review the literature relating to the perspectives of family carers providing support to a person dying at home. Design: A narrative literature review was chosen to provide an overview and synthesis of findings. The following search terms were used: caregiver, carer, ‘terminal care’, ‘supportive care’, ‘end of life care’, ‘palliative care’, ‘domiciliary care’ AND home AND death OR dying. Data sources: During April–May 2013, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Pubmed, Cochrane Reviews and Citation Indexes were searched. Inclusion criteria were as follows: English language, empirical studies and literature reviews, adult carers, perspectives of family carers, articles focusing on family carers providing end-of-life care in the home and those published between 2000 and 2013. Results: A total of 28 studies were included. The overarching themes were family carers’ views on the impact of the home as a setting for end-of-life care, support that made a home death possible, family carer’s views on deficits and gaps in support and transformations to the social and emotional space of the home. Conclusion: Many studies focus on the support needs of people caring for a dying family member at home, but few studies have considered how the home space is affected. Given the increasing tendency for home deaths, greater understanding of the interplay of factors affecting family carers may help improve community services. PMID:25634635

  3. Smoking and Secondhand Smoke Exposure at Home Were Associated with Poor Perceived Family Well-Being: Findings of FAMILY Project

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Man Ping; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Wan, Alice; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To investigate the associations of cigarette smoking and secondhand (SHS) exposure at home with family well-being among Chinese adults in Hong Kong. Methods Telephone surveys were conducted among 3043 randomly selected adults (response rate 70%) in 2010 and 2012 to monitor family health information and tobacco use in Hong Kong. Family well-being was measured using three questions of perceived family harmony, happiness and health (3Hs) with responses ranging from 0–10 and a higher score indicating better family well-being. Smoking status, nicotine dependence, quitting behaviours and SHS exposure at home were recorded. Multiple linear regressions were used to calculate β-coefficients for individual family 3Hs component and an overall composite score representing family well-being. Results Compared with never smokers, current smokers reported lower levels of family harmony (adjusted β = -0.15, 95% CI: -0.35 to -0.10), happiness (adjusted β = -0.12, 95% CI: -0.28 to -0.02), health (adjusted β = -0.15, 95% CI: -0.30 to -0.03) and overall family well-being (adjusted β = -0.17, 95% CI: -0.32 to -0.06). Quit attempt and intention to quit were not associated with family well-being. SHS exposure at home was associated with lower levels of family harmony (adjusted β = -0.17, 95% CI: -0.30 to -0.07), happiness (adjusted β = -0.19, 95% CI: -0.32 to -0.08), health (adjusted β = -0.13, 95% CI: -0.26 to -0.03) and family well-being (adjusted β = -0.19, 95% CI: -0.32 to -0.09). Conclusions Smoking and SHS exposure at home were associated with the lower levels of perceived family well-being. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the results. PMID:27560663

  4. Minimum Standards Required for Licensing of Day Care Family Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Human Services, Little Rock. Div. of Social Services.

    State licensing requirements for day care family homes in Arkansas are collected in this publication. Contents focus on the licensing authority, definition of a family day care home and application requirements, administration, personnel, program and activities, discipline and guidance, records, food service and nutrition, building and grounds,…

  5. Investigating Home Primes and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Marlena; Schiffman, Jay

    2014-01-01

    The process of prime factor splicing to generate home primes raises opportunity for conjecture and exploration. The notion of "home primes" is relatively new in the chronicle of mathematics. Heleen (1996-97) first described a procedure called "prime factor splicing" (PFS). The exploration of home primes is interesting and…

  6. Observational Learning among Older Adults Living in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Colleen D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate learning by older adults living in nursing homes through observational learning based on Bandura's (1977) social learning theory. This quantitative study investigated if older adults could learn through observation. The nursing homes in the study were located in the midwestern United States. The…

  7. Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families: Childhood Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Stephen J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Used retrospective accounts to compare adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs), adults who experienced stressful events in childhood not involving parental alcoholism (A-D+), and adults with no reported dysfunction in family of origin (A-D-) with regard to dysfunctional roles adopted as children. Dysfunctional role adoption was more frequent in ACOA…

  8. The home observation assessment method (HOAM): real-time naturalistic observation of families in their homes.

    PubMed

    Steinglass, P

    1979-09-01

    The Home Observation Assessment Method (HOAM) is a new method developed to carry out objective coding of family interaction over extended time periods in a home setting. It is a computer-compatible coding system that permits on-line data reduction of interactional variables emphasizing contextual and structural dimensions of family behavior. To date, the HOAM has been applied to the study of 31 families observed for a total of over 250 sessions. Initial analysis of data from these sessions indicates that coder reliability is high and that the HOAM successfully measures dimensions of family behavior independent of architectural aspects of the home setting. Preliminary findings also indicate that although families differ dramatically along the interactional dimensions measured by the HOAM, all families studied spent remarkably little time in decision-making behavior, suggesting that behavior in the home is predominantly "maintenance-oriented."

  9. Math out of School: Families' Math Game Playing at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Marlene

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of an approach to involving families in regular integration of math into home life, addressing the following: When families are given math-related games unconnected with children's school, does what parents believe impact the extent to which their families play the games, and how do parents describe their…

  10. Home Education in Quebec: Family First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brabant, Christine; Bourdon, Sylvain; Jutras, France

    2003-01-01

    In Canada, until now, no studies have focused on the practice of home education in the francophone province of Quebec. While the home-educating population in that province is tangible, it has remained largely unknown. Quebec's distinctive character on three fronts-- political, historical and cultural--make the application of results from the rare…

  11. Family and Consumer Science (Home Economics) Education References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholl, Jan

    This document lists a total of 141 family and consumer science (home economics) references that were gleaned from popular press periodicals dating from December 1, 1994, to December 15, 1995. The references are organized by the following categories: child development, consumerism, grooming and clothing care, home environment, personal…

  12. Home Education: Characteristics of Its Families and Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladin, Earl Wade

    This study of the characteristics of home schooling is based on returned questionnaires of 37 questions each, mailed to a random sample of 416 drawn from 6,850 families listed in the Bob Jones University Press home school mailing list. The 253 returned questionnaires, representing a 62% reponse, provided data on the characteristics of these…

  13. Paraprofessionals in Home Economics Programs for Low-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leidenfrost, Nancy B.; And Others

    This booklet was developed as a guide for home economists who are responsible for teaching paraprofessionals (individuals who usually have no college degree and are trained and supervised by county home economists) how to teach low-income families. The content is in seven short sections: (1) Planning the Program discusses available resources,…

  14. LOW INCOME FAMILY, TRAINING NEEDS OF HOME DEMONSTRATION EXTENSION AGENTS, HOME ECONOMICS CURRICULUM CONSTRUCTION, EDUCATION 685.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MANN, OPAL H.

    A STUDY WAS MADE OF THE NEED FOR EXTENSION WORK WITH LOW INCOME FAMILIES IN EASTERN KENTUCKY (APPALACHIA) AND OF THE PROBLEMS AND TRAINING NEEDS OF HOME DEMONSTRATION EXTENSION AGENTS WHO WORK WITH THESE FAMILIES. THE AGENTS FELT THEY HAD A RESPONSIBILITY TO HELP LOW INCOME FAMILIES IN BUDGETING TIME, EFFORT, AND RESOURCES TO MEET MINIMUM…

  15. The Primary Theme Club. Home & Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This cross-curricular primary unit helps teachers and students get to know one another. Students collect information about their families, then create bulletin boards, class albums, graphs, and art projects. One activity is for students to invite their families into the classroom to share their projects and feast on traditional family foods. (SM)

  16. Family Smoking, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke at Home and Family Unhappiness in Children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Jiu; Ho, Sai Yin; Au, Wing Man; Wang, Man Ping; Lam, Tai Hing

    2015-11-13

    Tobacco use adversely affects many aspects of well-being and is disliked by non-smokers. However, its association with family happiness is unknown. We investigated the associations of family unhappiness with smoking in family members and secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure at home in Hong Kong children. In a school-based survey in 2012-2013, 1238 primary school students (mean age 8.5 years, standard deviation 0.9; 42.6% boys) reported family smoking, SHS exposure at home and whether their families had any unpleasant experience caused by smoking or SHS in the past 30 days (tobacco-related unpleasant experience), and rated the overall level of happiness in their families (family unhappiness). Multivariable logistic regression was used to study the associations of tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness with family smoking and SHS exposure at home. Tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness were reported by 27.5% and 16.5% of students. Unpleasant experience was more strongly associated with family smoking than SHS exposure at home. Family unhappiness was associated with both family smoking (odds ratio 2.37; 95% confidence interval 1.51-3.71) and SHS exposure at home (1.82; 1.39-2.40). These results suggest a previously neglected possible impact of tobacco use on family happiness.

  17. Family Smoking, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke at Home and Family Unhappiness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Jiu; Ho, Sai Yin; Au, Wing Man; Wang, Man Ping; Lam, Tai Hing

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco use adversely affects many aspects of well-being and is disliked by non-smokers. However, its association with family happiness is unknown. We investigated the associations of family unhappiness with smoking in family members and secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure at home in Hong Kong children. In a school-based survey in 2012–2013, 1238 primary school students (mean age 8.5 years, standard deviation 0.9; 42.6% boys) reported family smoking, SHS exposure at home and whether their families had any unpleasant experience caused by smoking or SHS in the past 30 days (tobacco-related unpleasant experience), and rated the overall level of happiness in their families (family unhappiness). Multivariable logistic regression was used to study the associations of tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness with family smoking and SHS exposure at home. Tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness were reported by 27.5% and 16.5% of students. Unpleasant experience was more strongly associated with family smoking than SHS exposure at home. Family unhappiness was associated with both family smoking (odds ratio 2.37; 95% confidence interval 1.51–3.71) and SHS exposure at home (1.82; 1.39–2.40). These results suggest a previously neglected possible impact of tobacco use on family happiness. PMID:26580642

  18. Family Smoking, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke at Home and Family Unhappiness in Children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Jiu; Ho, Sai Yin; Au, Wing Man; Wang, Man Ping; Lam, Tai Hing

    2015-11-01

    Tobacco use adversely affects many aspects of well-being and is disliked by non-smokers. However, its association with family happiness is unknown. We investigated the associations of family unhappiness with smoking in family members and secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure at home in Hong Kong children. In a school-based survey in 2012-2013, 1238 primary school students (mean age 8.5 years, standard deviation 0.9; 42.6% boys) reported family smoking, SHS exposure at home and whether their families had any unpleasant experience caused by smoking or SHS in the past 30 days (tobacco-related unpleasant experience), and rated the overall level of happiness in their families (family unhappiness). Multivariable logistic regression was used to study the associations of tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness with family smoking and SHS exposure at home. Tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness were reported by 27.5% and 16.5% of students. Unpleasant experience was more strongly associated with family smoking than SHS exposure at home. Family unhappiness was associated with both family smoking (odds ratio 2.37; 95% confidence interval 1.51-3.71) and SHS exposure at home (1.82; 1.39-2.40). These results suggest a previously neglected possible impact of tobacco use on family happiness. PMID:26580642

  19. Local Medicaid home- and community-based services spending and nursing home admissions of younger adults.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kali S; Keohane, Laura; Mor, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    We used fixed-effect models to examine the relationship between local spending on home- and community-based services (HCBSs) for cash-assisted Medicaid-only disabled (CAMOD) adults and younger adult admissions to nursing homes in the United States during 2001 through 2008, with control for facility and market characteristics and secular trends. We found that increased CAMOD Medicaid HCBS spending at the local level is associated with decreased admissions of younger adults to nursing homes. Our findings suggest that states' efforts to expand HCBS for this population should continue.

  20. Local Medicaid Home- and Community-Based Services Spending and Nursing Home Admissions of Younger Adults

    PubMed Central

    Keohane, Laura; Mor, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    We used fixed-effect models to examine the relationship between local spending on home- and community-based services (HCBSs) for cash-assisted Medicaid-only disabled (CAMOD) adults and younger adult admissions to nursing homes in the United States during 2001 through 2008, with control for facility and market characteristics and secular trends. We found that increased CAMOD Medicaid HCBS spending at the local level is associated with decreased admissions of younger adults to nursing homes. Our findings suggest that states’ efforts to expand HCBS for this population should continue. PMID:25211711

  1. Home Away from Home: A Toolkit for Planning Home Visiting Partnerships with Family, Friend, and Neighbor Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Staub, Christine; Schmit, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Home visiting is one tool used to prevent child abuse and improve child well-being by providing education and services in families' homes through parent education and connection to community resources. This toolkit provides state policymakers and advocates with strategies for extending and expanding access to state- or federally-funded home…

  2. Medical Conditions and Healthcare Utilization among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Group Homes in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Joel M.; Botuck, Shelly; Damiani, Marco R.; Levy, Philip H.; Dern, Thomas A.; Freeman, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    The shift in living situations for adults with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (IDDD) from family homes to group homes has raised questions about their healthcare needs and access to appropriate healthcare services. This study was undertaken to describe the disability characteristics and medical conditions in a sample of adults…

  3. Home environmental problems and physical function in Taiwanese older adults.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Wu, Shwu-Chong; Chang, Wen-Chiung; Chen, Ching-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Environmental hazards play an important role in the disablement process. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between home environmental problems and personal physical function. Data were based on a two-stage nationwide survey and evaluation on the needs of long-term care in Taiwan. A total of 10,596 individuals aged 65 and over were included in this study. These participants were identified with physical or cognitive problems at the screening interview and further evaluated at the second interview on health condition, functional status, needs of long-term care, and home environmental problems. Six items of environmental hazards were assessed at the participants' homes with direct observation. The prevalence rates of home environmental problems were similar among older adults with different levels of physical function. No grab bars (79.6-85.1%) and no protections against slip (81.9-92.8%) in the bathroom were two commonly present hazards in older adults' homes. Older adults with a higher income (Odds ratio=OR=0.75), without income information (OR=0.78) or living with other persons (OR=0.74) were less likely to experience environmental problems at home. Results from this study revealed that home environment condition was associated with factors other than personal disabling conditions for the elderly. Modifying home environment, especially the bathroom, should be attached with great importance for physically disabled older adults. PMID:19124167

  4. Examining Claims of Family Process Differences Ensuing from the Choice to Home-School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Mark H.; Harper, James M.; Call, Matthew L.; Bird, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Advocates of home-schooling claim a variety of positive educational and familial outcomes. Research is needed to examine possible effects of home-schooling on family relationships. We investigated family environment differences between home-schooling and public-schooling families matched in terms of family-centric orientation. Family cohesion was…

  5. A Strong Start for Families: Voluntary Home Visiting in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Now, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Home visiting programs are voluntary, family-centered programs that match new and expectant parents with trained professionals who provide ongoing, individualized support during critical points throughout pregnancy and a child's first year(s) of life. By reaching families early in their transition into parenthood, and linking them with needed…

  6. Everyday Life in Distance Education: One Family's Home Schooling Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Nicole C.

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a narrative portrait of one family enrolled in a school of distance education in Queensland, Australia. Most of the families own or manage sheep and/or beef grazing properties, and their children receive their education by correspondence papers and daily UHF radio lessons. The students complete their school work at home with a…

  7. Home Food Preservation among Families with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenz, Lorraine J.; Sawicki, Marjorie A.; Elliott, Michael; White, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine preservation practices, perceived barriers, and likelihood of parents with young children to home preserve food in the future. Implications of this research relate to family and consumer sciences professionals who endeavor to improve fruit and vegetable intake and provide resources to families and…

  8. Families and nursing home placements: a cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, M H; Mullavey-O'Byrne, C; Clemson, L

    2001-01-01

    With the aging of many populations, health care workers and families increasingly find themselves jointly involved in situations involving decisions about nursing home placements. How each approaches such situations is affected by beliefs and assumptions about the role of family members in the care of family members and the decision making process. This paper explores the responses of people from four cultural groups living in Australia (Anglo-Celtic Australian, Chinese, Greek, Lebanese) to a critical incident scenario about a Russian family in Australia faced with such a decision. The responses to this scenario were remarkably similar across the four cultural groups. All saw making such a decision as difficult, but the reasons for the difficulty suggest some interesting cross-cultural distinctions. Some groups viewed care of a family member more in terms of a social and role obligation while others addressed it as a personal responsibility. To not care for elderly parents in the home was accompanied by a sense of guilt among some respondents and a sense of public social shame among others. Ambivalence about nursing homes and placing a family member in a nursing home, culture change and cross-generational differences, and roles and role support were other important themes. The results are consistent with other data analysed in conjunction with the Intercultural Interaction Project. The findings from this research suggests a need to examine more closely the beliefs and assumptions associated with nursing home placements and one way to help students and health professionals to do so. PMID:14617978

  9. Home Visiting Family Support Programs: Benefits of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Home Visiting Campaign, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The federally funded, locally administered Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program sponsors family support programs that are often called "home visiting" because they take place in the homes of at-risk families. These families often lack support, experience, and knowledge of basic parenting skills. Because children…

  10. Bringing Instructional Strategies Home: Reaching Families Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtiss, Sarah L.; Pearson, Jamie N.; Akamoglu, Yusuf; Fisher, Kim W.; Snodgrass, Melinda R.; Meyer, Lori E.; Meadan, Hedda; Halle, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Online family education can be challenging but rewarding for both families and practitioners. Parents of children with disabilities are integral in fostering children's early development and in promoting independence across the life span. Practitioners and parents working collaboratively can enhance this development. Collaboration between parents…

  11. Effects of Green House nursing homes on residents' families.

    PubMed

    Lum, Terry Y; Kane, Rosalie A; Cutler, Lois J; Yu, Tzy-Chyi

    2008-01-01

    A longitudinal quasi-experimental study with two comparison groups was conducted to test the effects of a Green House (GH) nursing home program on residents' family members. The GHs are individual residences, each serving 10 elders, where certified nursing assistant (CNA)-level resident assistants form primary relationships with residents and family, family is encouraged to visits, and professionals adapted their roles to support the model. GH family were somewhat less involved in providing assistance to their residents although family contact did not differ among the settings at any time period. GH family were more satisfied with their resident's care and with their own experience as family members, and had no greater family burden. Issues in studying family outcomes are discussed as well as implications for roles of various personnel, including social service and activities staff in a GH model.

  12. Family and neighborhood disadvantage, home environment, and children's school readiness.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Lieny; Buettner, Cynthia K; Hur, Eunhye

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations between family socioeconomic risk, neighborhood disadvantage, and children's school readiness. A sample of 420 children from 48 early childcare programs yielded multi-informant data. The average age was 55.3 months (SD = 6.4), with 38% of children being Black, non-Hispanic, Hispanic, or other minority race (American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander). One third (32.4%) of the parents had annual incomes less than $30,000. We used multilevel structural equation modeling to test direct and indirect associations among family socioeconomic risk and neighborhood disadvantage and children's cognitive and social-emotional development through home learning environment and parental depression. Children with a greater number of family socioeconomic risks and a higher level of neighborhood disadvantage demonstrated lower scores on cognitive skills. The degree of family socioeconomic risk was indirectly associated with children's cognitive ability through parents' cognitive stimulation at home. Parents who had more family socioeconomic risks and neighborhood disadvantage reported more depressive symptoms, which, in turn, suggested children's greater probability of having social-emotional problems. In other words, home learning environments explained associations between family socioeconomic disadvantage and children's cognitive skills, while parental depression explained associations between family/neighborhood disadvantages and children's social-emotional problems. Results suggest the importance of intervention or prevention strategies for parents to improve cognitive stimulation at home and to reduce depressive symptoms.

  13. Enhancing family physician capacity to deliver quality palliative home care

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Denise; Howell, Doris; Brazil, Kevin; Howard, Michelle; Taniguchi, Alan

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Family physicians face innumerable challenges to delivering quality palliative home care to meet the complex needs of end-of-life patients and their families. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To implement a model of shared care to enhance family physicians’ ability to deliver quality palliative home care, particularly in a community-based setting. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Family physicians in 3 group practices (N = 21) in Ontario’s Niagara West region collaborated with an interprofessional palliative care team (including a palliative care advanced practice nurse, a palliative medicine physician, a bereavement counselor, a psychosocial-spiritual advisor, and a case manager) in a shared-care partnership to provide comprehensive palliative home care. Key features of the program included systematic and timely identification of end-of-life patients, needs assessments, symptom and psychosocial support interventions, regular communication between team members, and coordinated care guided by outcome-based assessment in the home. In addition, educational initiatives were provided to enhance family physicians’ knowledge and skills. CONCLUSION Because of the program, participants reported improved communication, effective interprofessional collaboration, and the capacity to deliver palliative home care, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to end-of-life patients in the community. PMID:19074714

  14. Aging Parents with Adult Mentally Retarded Children: Family Risk Factors and Sources of Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Krauss, Marty Wyngaarden

    1989-01-01

    Predictors of 4 indices of well-being (physical health, life satisfaction, burden, and parenting stress) were examined among 203 aging mothers of mentally retarded adults living at home. Predictive variables examined include maternal characteristics, retarded adult's characteristics, family social climate, mother's social support network, and…

  15. Vocational Home Economics Education Handbook for Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Margaret R.

    Intended to give assistance to the vocational home economics teacher in providing a program of continuing education for out-of-school youths and adults, the programs contained in this handbook are designed to assist participants in their life role as homemaker, wage earner, consumer, and parent. The handbook provides an overview of adult education…

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial isolated hyperparathyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... bloodstream. In people with familial isolated hyperparathyroidism , the production of excess parathyroid hormone is caused by tumors ... a cancerous tumor called parathyroid carcinoma. Because the production of excess parathyroid hormone is caused by abnormalities ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: familial glucocorticoid deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... familial glucocorticoid deficiency type 1 lead to defective trafficking of the receptor to the cell surface. J ... short stature, and natural killer cell deficiency in humans. J Clin Invest. 2012 Mar;122(3):814- ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: familial atrial fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibrillation also increases the risk of stroke and sudden death. Complications of familial atrial fibrillation can occur at ... beats , increasing the risk of syncope, stroke, and sudden death. Most cases of atrial fibrillation are not caused ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: multiple familial trichoepithelioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the skin (skin appendages), such as hair follicles and sweat glands. People with multiple familial trichoepithelioma ... round tumors called trichoepitheliomas, which arise from hair follicles. Trichoepitheliomas are generally noncancerous (benign) but occasionally develop ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: familial paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... DYSKINESIA 2 Sources for This Page Bruno MK, Lee HY, Auburger GW, Friedman A, Nielsen JE, Lang ... Citation on PubMed GeneReview: Familial Paroxysmal Nonkinesigenic Dyskinesia Lee HY, Xu Y, Huang Y, Ahn AH, Auburger ...

  1. A Home for the Whole Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Laurie and Jeff Schutz can't imagine how they ever survived. It was not that long ago that the Schutz family of five was living in an 1,100 square foot, two bedroom house. Under normal circumstances, this would have been cramped for any family. The Schutzes, however, have a son with cerebral palsy. Laurie Schutz had about as normal a first-time…

  2. Supporting Family Engagement in Home Visiting with the Family Map Inventories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyzer, Angela; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; McKelvey, Lorraine; Swindle, Taren

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and usefulness of a universal screening tool, the Family Map Inventory (FMI), to assess family strengths and needs in a home visiting program. The FMI has been used successfully by center-based early childcare programs to tailor services to family needs and build on existing strengths. Home…

  3. STEM learning activity among home-educating families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning was studied among families in a group of home-educators in the Pacific Northwest. Ethnographic methods recorded learning activity (video, audio, fieldnotes, and artifacts) which was analyzed using a unique combination of Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) and Mediated Action (MA), enabling analysis of activity at multiple levels. Findings indicate that STEM learning activity is family-led, guided by parents' values and goals for learning, and negotiated with children to account for learner interests and differences, and available resources. Families' STEM education practice is dynamic, evolves, and influenced by larger societal STEM learning activity. Parents actively seek support and resources for STEM learning within their home-school community, working individually and collectively to share their funds of knowledge. Home-schoolers also access a wide variety of free-choice learning resources: web-based materials, museums, libraries, and community education opportunities (e.g. afterschool, weekend and summer programs, science clubs and classes, etc.). A lesson-heuristic, grounded in Mediated Action, represents and analyzes home STEM learning activity in terms of tensions between parental goals, roles, and lesson structure. One tension observed was between 'academic' goals or school-like activity and 'lifelong' goals or everyday learning activity. Theoretical and experiential learning was found in both activity, though parents with academic goals tended to focus more on theoretical learning and those with lifelong learning goals tended to be more experiential. Examples of the National Research Council's science learning strands (NRC, 2009) were observed in the STEM practices of all these families. Findings contribute to the small but growing body of empirical CHAT research in science education, specifically to the empirical base of family STEM learning practices at home. It also fills a

  4. Called home: The creation of family life.

    PubMed

    Hutch, R A

    1992-09-01

    Engendering family life is a spiritual process (theosis) based on human ethological constants of gender difference and generational turnover. Recent studies on ethnicity suggest that such a process retrieves a primordial sense of the human species as a whole, "humankind." Families, especially in this broad sense, link together the living and the dead and, at their best, morally empower individuals who link their destinies to such a vision of creation and human health. Reference is made to work on human strengths and speciation by Erik Erikson and to that on maternal thinking by Sara Ruddick. A political program by which an ideology of "familism" can be made is offered.

  5. Called home: The creation of family life.

    PubMed

    Hutch, R A

    1992-09-01

    Engendering family life is a spiritual process (theosis) based on human ethological constants of gender difference and generational turnover. Recent studies on ethnicity suggest that such a process retrieves a primordial sense of the human species as a whole, "humankind." Families, especially in this broad sense, link together the living and the dead and, at their best, morally empower individuals who link their destinies to such a vision of creation and human health. Reference is made to work on human strengths and speciation by Erik Erikson and to that on maternal thinking by Sara Ruddick. A political program by which an ideology of "familism" can be made is offered. PMID:24271052

  6. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    PubMed

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  7. A Home Health Care System for Family Doctor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamabe, Ryuji; Taketa, Norihiro

    We propose a constitution technique of small-scale Home Health Care system for family doctor that has been developed by applying various API of JAVA. One function is vital data transmission which allows a family doctor to check the data of elderly persons with ease via Internet. Vital data is encrypted and transmitted for the purpose of security. The other function is telecommunication with voice and face image for care consulting.

  8. Express Yourself: Beginning at Home with Family Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucknam, Julie Alsip

    2001-01-01

    Explores the use of family stories within art education. Discusses how students can find stories at home and the importance of finding one's self-identity through stories. Focuses on how students in a college art appreciation course create masks for story telling. Includes examples of student work. (CMK)

  9. Housing & Home Furnishings Curriculum Guide. Energy and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Jane S.; Morris, Carol

    This curriculum guide on housing and home furnishings, covering one of the five content areas of the Energy and the Family Curriculum Guide, has been designed to provide learning experiences and identify resources that can be used to develop units of study related to energy usage and conservation. The guide is intended for use in comprehensive…

  10. Learning at Home: Families' Educational Media Use in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rideout, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The Joan Ganz Cooney Center has conducted a national survey of more than 1500 parents of children ages 2-10 to find out how much of children's media time is devoted to educational content, platform by platform, age by age. "Learning at Home: Families' Educational Media Use in America" is the first comprehensive analysis of parents'…

  11. Family Day Care: How to Provide it in Your Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Betsy

    Tips, recommendations, ideas, and background information are offered to providers of family day care. After a brief discussion of licensing and registration and a listing of learning activities for young children at home, additional learning activities and materials are described that are considered appropriate for infants, toddlers, preschool…

  12. Biliteracy in the Home: Practices among Mexicano Families in Chicago.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, Marcia

    One segment of a larger study examined literacy activities occurring within the homes of immigrant families in Chicago's Mexican-American community. During the first year and a half of fieldwork, literacy practices seemed minimal and infrequent. However, further analysis indicated that such practices were occurring, and were woven into the fabric…

  13. Children's Home Environments: Understanding the Role of Family Structure Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowaleski-Jones, Lori; Dunifon, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the 1996 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) merged mother-child sample, we investigate the impact of two family events, parental divorce and the birth of a sibling, on the cognitive stimulation and emotional support provided to children in the home. We use fixed-effect regression techniques to control for unmeasured…

  14. Rings 'N Things, Home and Family Education: 2618.01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Gail

    Prepared for high school students, this course in Home and Family Education focuses upon the attitudes, events and ceremonies, both traditional and contemporary, surrounding engagement and marriage in our society. The course addresses itself to nine behavioral outcomes that should result from the multimedia resources and learning activities…

  15. No Home, No Family: Homeless Children in Rural Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ronald K.; Johnson, Alice K.; Bremseth, Michael D.; Tracy, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Statewide study of 455 Ohio children who received family preservation or reunification services found that the homeless child was more likely to be a child of color, to be younger, to have problems maintaining a bond with parents, and to be in a relative's home, and less likely to have behavior problems or successful service outcomes. Contains 22…

  16. [Family competence, an ally in patient home care].

    PubMed

    Siboni Amsellem, Johana

    2016-01-01

    Systemic therapy allows collective awareness with respect to a designated individual problematic. This approach, which can take place at the family home, allows everyone to exploit possible areas of expression and speak freely. Account of a mobile unit care in Paris. PMID:27157195

  17. Separation anxiety in families with emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Kins, Evie; Soenens, Bart; Beyers, Wim

    2013-06-01

    In several developmental theories, separation anxiety has been identified as an important feature of close interpersonal relationships. Most often, separation anxiety has been examined in the context of mother-child dyads in infancy. Increasingly, however, it is recognized that separation anxiety is also relevant in other relationships (e.g., the father-child relationship) and in later developmental periods (e.g., adolescence and emerging adulthood). The present study aimed to investigate separation anxiety at the family level in families with emerging adults. By using the Social Relations Model, we aimed to determine the extent to which the actor, the partner, their specific relationships, and the family contribute to separation anxiety in dyadic family relationships. A total of 119 Belgian two-parent families with an emerging adult participated in a round-robin design, in which family members reported on their feelings of separation anxiety toward each other. Findings showed that separation anxiety can be represented as a personal characteristic (i.e., an actor effect) and as a specific feature of the mother-child dyad. Further, findings indicate that separation anxiety is also characteristic of the father-mother marital relationship and of the family climate as a whole. Implications for the meaning of separation anxiety and clinical practice are discussed.

  18. Heat-loss factors for single-family homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, M.

    1981-05-01

    Home heat-loss factors are developed for 220 locations in the contiguous United States. Heat-loss factors serve as a basic input to a solar economic performance model (EASE III). Maximum allowable static building (residence) heat-loss factors (specified in Btu/Degree Days/sq ft of residence units) are estimated by using the Model Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction. Heat-loss factors are estimated for three single-family residence types: a ranch-style slab, on-grade, single-story home; a two story home built over a full unheated basement; and a single story home built over a partially heated basement. Procedures and parameters used in the estimation of the heat-loss factors are described in detail. Estimated values for the heat-loss factors are presented for each of the three-residence types in all 220 regions.

  19. Transnational Older Adults and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treas, Judith

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the international migration patterns and the family lives of older adults. Informants (N = 54) reported that they came to the United States to help out their grown children with housekeeping, child care, and domestic economizing. They described how they strategically navigated U.S. immigration laws choosing to…

  20. Recognizing familial myeloid leukemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Nickels, Eric M.; Soodalter, Jesse; Churpek, Jane E.

    2013-01-01

    Germline testing for familial cases of myeloid leukemia in adults is becoming more common with the recognition of multiple genetic syndromes predisposing people to bone marrow disease. Currently, Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments approved testing exists for several myeloid leukemia predisposition syndromes: familial platelet disorder with propensity to acute myeloid leukemia (FPD/AML), caused by mutations in RUNX1; familial AML with mutated CEBPA; familial myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia with mutated GATA2; and the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, including dyskeratosis congenita, a disease of abnormal telomere maintenance. With the recognition of additional families with a genetic component to their leukemia, new predisposition alleles will likely be identified. We highlight how to recognize and manage these cases as well as outline the characteristics of the major known syndromes. We look forward to future research increasing our understanding of the scope of inherited myeloid leukemia syndromes. PMID:23926458

  1. Family therapy with single, young adults.

    PubMed

    Haber, J

    1981-01-01

    Family therapy with the single, young adult can be successfully carried out using the Bowen family systems theory when the process is staged over time. The therapist who has gone back into his or her own family of origin can be of greatest help as a "coach" to the client in this ongoing process. The therapist assists the client in a process of orderly differentiation that enables the client to develop a more solid sense of self. Reactive distance and emotional cut-offs are modified as solutions to anxiety. More personal, flexible family, peer, and work relationships are promoted. The client's initial presenting problems diminish as he/she comes to terms with his/her ultimate aloneness and self-responsibility, and begins to accept family members as they are and relationships with them for what they can be. PMID:6917974

  2. Family therapy with single, young adults.

    PubMed

    Haber, J

    1981-01-01

    Family therapy with the single, young adult can be successfully carried out using the Bowen family systems theory when the process is staged over time. The therapist who has gone back into his or her own family of origin can be of greatest help as a "coach" to the client in this ongoing process. The therapist assists the client in a process of orderly differentiation that enables the client to develop a more solid sense of self. Reactive distance and emotional cut-offs are modified as solutions to anxiety. More personal, flexible family, peer, and work relationships are promoted. The client's initial presenting problems diminish as he/she comes to terms with his/her ultimate aloneness and self-responsibility, and begins to accept family members as they are and relationships with them for what they can be.

  3. Home Improvements: Within-Family Associations between Income and the Quality of Children's Home Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearing, Eric; Taylor, Beck A.

    2007-01-01

    Within-family associations between changes in income and changes in the home environment during infancy and early childhood were examined using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n = 1364). Linear and nonlinear (i.e., semilog) specifications were estimated for…

  4. Family Relationships From Adolescence to Early Adulthood: Changes in the Family System Following Firstborns’ Leaving Home

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2010-01-01

    This study charted the course of parent-child and sibling relationships from early adolescence to early adulthood and examined how these relationships changed following firstborns’ departure from their parents’ home for the first time. Data were drawn from a 10-year longitudinal study of family relationships. Participants included mothers, fathers, and first- and second-born children from 184, White, working and middle class families. Multilevel models revealed declines in parent-child conflict, acceptance, and sibling negativity, and increases or U-shaped patterns in sibling and parent-child intimacy over time. Birth order X leaving home interactions revealed that firstborns’ leaving home related to changes in family relationship qualities for both first- and second-borns, with relationships improving for firstborns and no changes or declines in relationship quality for second-borns. Overall, the results highlight the inter-relatedness of family subsystems. PMID:21765625

  5. Perceptions of familial caregivers of elder adults.

    PubMed

    Sayles-Cross, S

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated perceptions of 139 familial caregivers of elder adults to answer the question "Is there a significant relationship between appraisal, social distance and the cost of caring for an elder family member?" The cost of caring was analyzed in five dimensions (personal-social restrictions, physical-emotional health, value, care recipient as provocateur and economic cost). Caregivers reported concern for their well-being, feelings of disgust/anger, high social distance and coping by accepting and holding back. Not only were significant relationships found, but caregivers emerged as an at-risk population.

  6. Declarations of Independence: Home School Families' Perspectives on Education, the Common Good, and Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Kenneth V.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the perspectives of home school families regarding the rights, interests, and responsibilities of family and state over education. These families viewed the common good differently than critics of home schooling. They believed the diversity of curriculum and worldview in their home schools positively impacts the common good by…

  7. "Waiting to go home": narratives of homelessness, housing and home among older adults with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Lydia P

    2014-04-01

    This study used thematic narrative analysis to develop an understanding of how older adults with ongoing symptoms of schizophrenia who have experienced homelessness understand and express their life course and present-time narratives of homelessness, housing, and home. Findings were developed from 26 individual interviews with five study participants and 33 systematic field observations of their homes, treatment environments and neighborhoods. Presentation of the participants' narratives illuminates how participants experienced shared challenges in unique ways and the meaning they assigned to experiences of homelessness, housing and home, particularly in regard to identity and ongoing challenges. While all participants were housed, housing did not equate to a sense of being home. Implications for social work practice and policy, and directions for future research, are discussed.

  8. Home Remedy Use Among African American and White Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Sara A; Sandberg, Joanne C; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Altizer, Kathryn P; Arcury, Thomas A

    2015-06-01

    Home remedy use is an often overlooked component of health self-management, with a rich tradition, particularly among African Americans and others who have experienced limited access to medical care or discrimination by the health care system. Home remedies can potentially interfere with biomedical treatments. This study documented the use of home remedies among older rural adults, and compared use by ethnicity (African American and white) and gender. A purposeful sample of 62 community-dwelling adults ages 65+ from rural North Carolina was selected. Each completed an in-depth interview, which probed current use of home remedies, including food and non-food remedies, and the symptoms or conditions for use. Systematic, computer-assisted analysis was used to identify usage patterns. Five food and five non-food remedies were used by a large proportion of older adults. African American elders reported greater use than white elders; women reported more use for a greater number of symptoms than men. Non-food remedies included long-available, over-the-counter remedies (e.g., Epsom salts) for which "offlabel" uses were reported. Use focused on alleviating common digestive, respiratory, skin, and musculoskeletal symptoms. Some were used for chronic conditions in lieu of prescription medications. Home remedy use continues to be a common feature of the health self-management of older adults, particularly among African Americans, though at lower levels than previously reported. While some use is likely helpful or benign, other use has the potential to interfere with medical management of disease. Health care providers should be aware of the use of remedies by their patients. PMID:26543255

  9. Home Remedy Use Among African American and White Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Sandberg, Joanne C.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Altizer, Kathryn P.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Home remedy use is an often overlooked component of health self-management, with a rich tradition, particularly among African Americans and others who have experienced limited access to medical care or discrimination by the health care system. Home remedies can potentially interfere with biomedical treatments. This study documented the use of home remedies among older rural adults, and compared use by ethnicity (African American and white) and gender. A purposeful sample of 62 community-dwelling adults ages 65+ from rural North Carolina was selected. Each completed an in-depth interview, which probed current use of home remedies, including food and non-food remedies, and the symptoms or conditions for use. Systematic, computer-assisted analysis was used to identify usage patterns. Five food and five non-food remedies were used by a large proportion of older adults. African American elders reported greater use than white elders; women reported more use for a greater number of symptoms than men. Non-food remedies included long-available, over-the-counter remedies (e.g., Epsom salts) for which “off-label” uses were reported. Use focused on alleviating common digestive, respiratory, skin, and musculoskeletal symptoms. Some were used for chronic conditions in lieu of prescription medications. Home remedy use continues to be a common feature of the health self-management of older adults, particularly among African Americans, though at lower levels than previously reported. While some use is likely helpful or benign, other use has the potential to interfere with medical management of disease. Health care providers should be aware of the use of remedies by their patients. PMID:26543255

  10. The Communication Experiences of Adult Deaf People within their Family during Childhood in Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadjikakou, Kika; Nikolaraizi, Magda

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the personal communication memories and experiences of adult deaf people during their childhoods in their homes. In order to obtain relevant information in depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty four Cypriot deaf individuals between the ages of 19 to 54 years with different family and school…

  11. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Home Environment and Home Social Behavior Data from the Elementary School Success Profile for Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegmann, Kate M.; Thompson, Aaron M.; Bowen, Natasha K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to test the factor structure and scale quality of data provided by caregivers about the home environment and child behavior at home using the Elementary School Success Profile (ESSP) for Families. The ESSP for Families is one component of the ESSP, an online social-environmental assessment that also collects…

  12. Carer Reports of Health Status among Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities in Taiwan Living at Home and in Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, K.-Y.; Hsieh, K.; Heller, T.; Davidson, P. W.; Janicki, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to assess the health status of a cohort of adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) residing in family homes or institutions in Taiwan and to examine whether morbidity varied with age, sex, existing diagnosis [Down syndrome (DS), seizures, cerebral palsy (CP), intellectual disability…

  13. Virtual Visits in Home Health Care for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Husebø, Anne Marie Lunde

    2014-01-01

    Background. This review identifies the content of virtual visits in community nursing services to older adults and explores the manner in which service users and the nurses use virtual visits. Design. An integrative literature review. Method. Data collection comprised a literature search in three databases: Cinahl, Medline, and PubMed. In addition, a manual search of reference lists and expert consultation were performed. A total of 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. The articles were reviewed in terms of study characteristics, service content and utilization, and patient and health care provider experience. Results. Our review shows that in most studies the service is delivered on a daily basis and in combination with in-person visits. The findings suggest that older home-dwelling patients can benefit from virtual visits in terms of enhanced social inclusion and medication compliance. Service users and their nurses found virtual visits satisfactory and suitable for care delivery in home care to the elderly. Evidence for cost-saving benefits of virtual visits was not found. Conclusions. The findings can inform the planning of virtual visits in home health care as a complementary service to in-person visits, in order to meet the increasingly complex needs of older adults living at home. PMID:25506616

  14. Korean Families in America: Their Family Language Policies and Home-Language Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyun-Sook

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the family language policies (FLP) of Korean American parents and how the language practice, management, and ideology components of their FLP and demographic variables predict maintenance of the home language. Results of a large-scale (N = 480) survey show that different sets of FLP and demographic variables contributed to a…

  15. Family Relationships from Adolescence to Early Adulthood: Changes in the Family System following Firstborns' Leaving Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2011-01-01

    This study charted the course of parent-child and sibling relationships from early adolescence to early adulthood and examined how these relationships changed following firstborns' departure from their parents' home for the first time. Data were drawn from a 10-year longitudinal study of family relationships. Participants included mothers,…

  16. Does Family-Centered Out-of-Home Care Work? Comparison of a Family-Centered Approach and Traditional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Cathleen A.; Pierce, Lois

    2004-01-01

    This research assessed the effectiveness of a family-centered approach to out-of-home care in reunifying children with their families by comparing differential exit rates of children whose families received family-centered services with children whose families received routine child welfare services. The sample included 472 children who were in…

  17. Differences in Home Food and Activity Environments between Obese and Healthy Weight Families of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Richard E.; Scharf, Cynthia; Filigno, Stephanie S.; Saelens, Brian E.; Stark, Lori J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop and test a home food and activity instrument to discriminate between the home environments of obese and healthy weight preschool children. Design: A modified questionnaire about home environments was tested as an observation tool. Setting: Family homes. Participants: A total of 35 obese children with at least 1 obese…

  18. Materials to prepare hospice families for dying in the home.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Karen A; Kirchhoff, Karin T; Finster, Mark P; Cleary, James F

    2008-09-01

    Many changes occur in the final hours of life. Family members of those dying at home need to be prepared for these changes, both to understand what is happening and to provide care. The objectives of this study were to describe (1) the written materials used by hospices to prepare families for dying in the home setting and (2) the content of such materials. Questionnaires were sent to 400 randomly selected hospices, of which 170 responded (45.3%) sending their written materials. The most frequently used publications were Gone from My Sight (n = 118 or 69.4%), Final Gifts (n = 44 or 25.9%) and Caregiving (n = 14 or 8.2%). Half (56.5%) of the hospices used other publications and a majority (n = 87 or 51.2%) used multiple publications. Materials were given to the families by nurses (78.2%) or social workers (67.6%). More than 90% of the hospices had materials that addressed the following signs of impending death: decreased fluid intake, decreased food intake, breathing pattern changes, cold extremities, mottling, increased sleeping, changes at the moment of death, audible secretions, urinary output changes, disorientation, incontinence, overall decline and restlessness. Seven signs were addressed less than 30% of the time; pain (28.2%), dyspnea (19.4%), bed-bound state (18.2%), skin changes (18.2%), vital sign changes (17.1%), surge of energy (11.8%) and mandibular breathing (5.9%). Hospice staff should know the content of the materials offered by their agency so they can verbally address the gaps between the written materials and family needs.

  19. Cigarette Smoking among African American Youth from Single Mother Homes: Examining the Roles of Maternal Smoking and Positive Parenting within an Extended Family Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Sarah E.; Zalot, Alecia A.; Jones, Deborah J.

    2007-01-01

    The current study examined the main and interactive effects of three family context variables, maternal smoking, positive parenting behavior, and the quality of the mother's relationship with another adult or family member who assists with parenting (i.e., coparent), and adolescent smoking among African American youth from single mother homes. The…

  20. Home-School Partnerships with Culturally Diverse Families: Challenges and Solutions for School Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttal, Ena Vazquez; Li, Chieh; Kaplan, Jason P.

    2006-01-01

    Home-school partnership is one of the important contributors to every child's learning. The changing demographics of the United States present an urgent need for home-school partnership with culturally diverse families. Traditional family involvement practices are challenged when working with multicultural families. The authors propose an…

  1. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  2. Families and Futures 2000. A Resource for Planning Comprehensive Home and Family Life Education Programs. Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    This curriculum guide is the first step in a total home and family life curriculum revision in the state of Washington aimed at helping students solve problems and study issues that have an impact on home and family life. The guide contains two model, nonsequential, comprehensive courses that may be adopted or adapted by school districts. The…

  3. Home Healthcare and Family Responsibility: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Talk and Text

    PubMed Central

    Funk,, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses how families' roles and responsibility for care are constructed within home health (in contrast to the responsibility of home health). A discourse analysis informed by a critical theoretical approach was used to analyze qualitative interviews with 13 home health managers and clinical leaders in British Columbia, alongside home care documents. When referring to family involvement, there was an emphasis on the importance of supporting a client's choice to stay at home. Government and agency documents describe family members as primary providers, with home health having a supplementary role. Agencies seek to avoid “substituting” for family care. Family responsibility is characterized as having both moral and structural value. Nonetheless, some participants advocated flexibility and recognized potential caregiving challenges. Data provide examples of how agency expectations are communicated to clients and families and become embedded within practice and policy. Findings are viewed within the broader organizational context as representing the “responsibilization” of support. PMID:24289942

  4. Family Histories and Multiple Transitions Among Homeless Young Adults: Pathways to Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Schmitz, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the early family histories of homeless young adults, the types and number of transitions they experienced, and their pathways to the street. Intensive qualitative interviews were audio taped and transcribed with 40 homeless young adults 19 to 21 years of age in the Midwest. Findings show that family backgrounds were generally characterized by substance use, child maltreatment, and witnessing violence, all of which provide social context for understanding why so many of these young people opted to leave home in search of an alternative living situation. The current findings also reveal that while some young adults ran away from home as adolescents, others were “pushed out” (i.e., told to leave), or removed by state agencies. Current study findings illustrate that young adults’ trajectories are marked by multiple living arrangements such as home, foster care, detention facility, and drug rehabilitation. Overall, study results show that young adults’ family histories place them on trajectories for early independence marked by multiple transitions and numerous living situations, culminating in a lack of a permanent residence to call home. PMID:24151346

  5. Work-Family Planning Attitudes among Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basuil, Dynah A.; Casper, Wendy J.

    2012-01-01

    Using social learning theory as a framework, we explore two sets of antecedents to work and family role planning attitudes among emerging adults: their work-family balance self-efficacy and their perceptions of their parents' work-to-family conflict. A total of 187 college students completed a questionnaire concerning their work-family balance…

  6. Early Educational Intervention, Early Cumulative Risk, and the Early Home Environment as Predictors of Young Adult Outcomes within a High-Risk Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pungello, Elizabeth P.; Kainz, Kirsten; Burchinal, Margaret; Wasik, Barbara H.; Sparling, Joseph J.; Ramey, Craig T.; Campbell, Frances A.

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which early educational intervention, early cumulative risk, and the early home environment were associated with young adult outcomes was investigated in a sample of 139 young adults (age 21) from high-risk families enrolled in randomized trials of early intervention. Positive effects of treatment were found for education attainment,…

  7. Seasonal variation and homes: understanding the social experiences of older adults.

    PubMed

    Perry, Tam E

    2014-01-01

    There has been limited research on the importance of seasons in the lives of older adults. Previous research has highlighted seasonal fluctuations in physical functioning--including limb strength, range of motion, and cardiac death--the spread of influenza in seasonal migration patterns. In addition, older adults experience isolation for various reasons, such as decline of physical and cognitive ability, lack of transportation, and lack of opportunities for social interaction. There has been much attention paid to the social isolation of older adults, yet little analysis about how the isolation changes throughout the year. Based on findings from an ethnographic study of older adults (n = 81), their family members (n = 49), and supportive professionals (n = 46) as they embark on relocation from their homes, this study analyzes the processes of moving for older adults. It examines the seasonal fluctuations of social isolation because of the effect of the environment on the social experiences of older adults. Isolation occurs because of the difficulty inclement weather causes on social interactions and mobility. The article concludes with discussion of the ways that research and practice can be designed and implemented to account for seasonal variation.

  8. Impact of a Home Leisure Educational Program for Older Adults Who Have Had a Stroke (Home Leisure Educational Program).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nour, Kareen; Desrosiers, Johanne; Gauthier, Pierre; Carbonneau, Helene

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of leisure education for older adults having difficulty adjusting psychologically after a stroke. Participants received either an experimental home leisure education program (intervention group) or a friendly home visit (control group) after discharge from rehabilitation. The intervention group performed significantly…

  9. Home Management in the Context of Family Studies: Appraisal and Clarification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churaman, Charlotte Vandiver

    1974-01-01

    The background and content of home management is clarified and its contribution to an integrated approach to family studies is elaborated. Problems in bridging the gaps in the broad applied field of family studies are discussed. (Author)

  10. The Family Life Education Needs of Midlife and Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Sharon M.; Morris Michael Lane

    2003-01-01

    Using a life course perspective, reports the findings from a needs assessment for midlife and older adults regarding family life education. A sample of 264 adults aged 50 and older indicated interest in 29 family life education topics. The highest rated topics were nutrition and health, fitness and exercise, and positive aspects of aging.…

  11. Survey of Home Visiting Programs for Abused and Neglected Children and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasik, Barbara Hanna; Roberts, Richard N.

    1994-01-01

    This report on a survey of 224 home visitation programs that provide services for abused and neglected children and their families presents data on program characteristics, characteristics of home visits, credentials of home visitors, and program documentation procedures. Programs reported that training in parenting skills and parent coping were…

  12. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pigg, Scott; Cautley, Dan; Francisco, Paul; Hawkins, Beth A; Brennan, Terry M

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  13. Metaphors of Adult Education: Beyond Penance toward Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Russell F., II

    1991-01-01

    Focus group interviews with 18 adults in a weekend degree program produced metaphoric themes. Adult education was compared to "blessing" or "penance"; the primary difference between traditional and adult education was seen as a "juggling act"; and "addiction to learning" appeared to be a motivator. The metaphor of family was considered ideal for…

  14. Hospice family members’ perceptions and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L.; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the fact that more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had two research questions; 1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared to family members of community dwelling hospice patients? 2) What are family members’ perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? Methods This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family member of hospice patients residing in the community. Results Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n=176) with family members of community dwelling hospice patients (n=267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. Conclusion These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for

  15. Family and Related Service Partnerships in Home Computer Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parette, Howard P.; Anderson, Cindy L.

    2001-01-01

    Provides a review of literature related to perceptions of home computers held by various cultural groups. Argues that families vary in their degree of involvement in working with professionals to make decisions about home computers. Describes training as a primary support required by many families to ensure effective implementation of home…

  16. Understanding Self-Determination and Families of Young Children with Disabilities in Home Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherson, Mary Jane; Cook, Christine C.; Erwin, Elizabeth J.; Weigel, Cindy J.

    2008-01-01

    This article is about emergent self-determination for young children with disabilities in their home environments. The purpose of this study was to better understand family and home characteristics and how they influence the ways in which families can support the development of self-determination for their children with disabilities. Thirty…

  17. Those Who Care: A Report on Approved Family Day Home Providers in Alberta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Malcolm; LaGrange, Annette

    This study examines the characteristics and work environments of approved family day home providers in Alberta. Family day home agency coordinators from across Alberta completed questionnaires, as did approved providers who contracted with 12 agencies in central Alberta. Typical providers were married, had children, and had lived in their present…

  18. More than Memories: Studying Home Movies and the Families Who Made Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhrich, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Unfairly viewed as poorly made and unwatchable, home movies actually constitute a wide variety of events and images that make them an invaluable and largely unexplored resource for scholars and researchers. The images captured in home movies--first birthdays, parades, vacations, family gatherings, etc.--were originally made by family members to…

  19. A Research Review: The Importance of Families and the Home Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Parents are a child's first educator. A child's family and home environment has a strong impact on his/her language and literacy development and educational achievement. This impact is stronger during the child's early years but continues throughout their school years. Many background variables affect the impact of the family and home environment…

  20. Home Visiting for At-Risk Preschoolers: A Successful Model for Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nievar, M. Angela; Jacobson, A.; Dier, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) program promotes school readiness by providing services directly to parents through home visitation. This study describes the outcomes of the HIPPY program for Latino immigrant families in a large Southwestern city. A quasi-experimental design compared 48 families on the program…

  1. ADULT EDUCATION IN FAMILY BUSINESS PRACTICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DRAPER, ARGEN H.

    IN A STUDY OF FAMILY MONEY MANAGEMENT, A QUESTIONNAIRE WAS COMPLETED BY WIVES IN 94 FAMILIES SELECTED AT RANDOM FROM THOSE WHO HAD USED THE SERVICES OF THE EXTENSION OFFICE IN DEAF SMITH COUNTY, TEXAS. ONLY ONE FAMILY IN THE STUDY FOLLOWED ALL OF THE 16 SPECIFIED BUSINESS PRACTICES. IT WAS FOUND THAT, IN GENERAL, FAMILIES WERE FOLLOWING SPECIFIED…

  2. Changes in Adult, Child, and Family Functioning among Participants in a Family Treatment Drug Court.

    PubMed

    Cosden, Merith; Koch, Lauren M

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral changes for 76 adults and 115 children from 62 families participating in a Family Treatment Drug Court (FTDC), in either residential or outpatient settings, were studied. Improvements in psychosocial functioning were calculated using a reliable change index (RCI) for family, adult, and child measures. Among outcomes, significant improvements in family functioning were noted and associated with improvements in child development and the likelihood of reunification. Support for FTDCs and implications for future practice and research are discussed. PMID:26827466

  3. Home Visiting: Strengthening Families by Promoting Parenting Success. Policy Brief No. 23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This practice/policy brief focuses on early childhood home visiting as a place-based family strengthening strategy that supports parent/caregivers as a key influence on the lives of young children. ("Place-based family strengthening" means that "children do better when their families are strong, and families do better when they live in communities…

  4. Willingness of older adults to share data and privacy concerns after exposure to unobtrusive in-home monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Boise, Linda; Wild, Katherine; Mattek, Nora; Ruhl, Mary; Dodge, Hiroko H.; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Older adult participants in the Intelligent Systems for Assessment of Aging Changes study (ISAAC) carried out by the Oregon Center for Aging and Technology (ORCATECH) were surveyed regarding their attitudes about unobtrusive home monitoring and computer use at baseline and after one year (n=119). The survey was part of a longitudinal study using in-home sensor technology to detect cognitive changes and other health problems. Our primary objective was to measure willingness to share health or activity data with one’s doctor or family members and concerns about privacy or security of monitoring over one year of study participation. Differences in attitudes of participants with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) compared to those with normal cognition were also examined. A high proportion (over 72%) of participants reported acceptance of in-home and computer monitoring and willingness to have data shared with their doctor or family members. However, a majority (60%) reported concerns related to privacy or security; these concerns increased after one year of participation. Few differences between participants with MCI and those with normal cognition were identified. Findings suggest that involvement in this unobtrusive in-home monitoring study may have raised awareness about the potential privacy risks of technology. Still, results show high acceptance, stable over time, of sharing information from monitoring systems with family members and doctors. Our findings have important implications for the deployment of technologies among older adults in research studies as well as in the general community. PMID:23525351

  5. Teaching Family Communication Concepts through Family Stories: An Analysis of Stories and Rituals in David Bradley's "Harvest Home"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixson, Marcia D.

    2006-01-01

    In this activity, students will be able to apply the concepts of stories and rituals to an analysis of the ritual in the short story "Harvest Home" by David Bradley, gaining understanding of how stories and rituals affect and reflect family values, power structures and identities. "Harvest Home" talks about the rituals involved in a…

  6. Video home training as a method of supporting family life control.

    PubMed

    Häggman-Laitila, Arja; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Friis, Leila; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe video home training as a method of early support in problems of family life control. Answers were sought to the following questions: how does a family counsellor use video home training to support families' own resources and family life control, and what are the uses and benefits of video home training from parents' perspective? The data consisted of the videotaped counselling sessions and family service plans for five families, and were analysed using the general method of analysing photographs and video material developed by anthropologist-photographers. Video home training as a method in supporting family life control consisted of goal-orientated reflection by parents on videotaped episodes of their everyday family life under the guidance of a family counsellor. The process of videotaping family life, in-depth analysis of the videotapes, recognition of instances of successful interaction, and search for new alternatives gave participants a feeling that it would be possible for them to make their everyday life fluent and functional. The findings show that video home training helped the families to gain better control over their family life. PMID:12519255

  7. The Shift in Existential Life Situations of Adult Children to Parents with Dementia Relocated to Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Høgsnes, Linda; Norbergh, Karl-Gustaf; Danielson, Ella; Melin-Johansson, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous research describes spouses and adult children of people with dementia as a homogeneous group using one term: family caregivers. Recent research shows that the needs and experiences of spouses and adult children differ, therefore they cannot be studied as a homogeneous group. Aims: The aim of the study was to describe the shift in existential life situations of adult children of a parent with dementia relocated to nursing homes. Design: This is a qualitative study with an interpretive approach. Methods: Face-to-face interviews were held with 11 adult children aged 48-65 years. The interviews lasted 30–60 minutes and data were analysed using interpretive content analysis. Findings: The adult children described how they experienced their life situation before and after their parents’ relocation. Before relocation they described feelings of powerlessness, loneliness in their responsibilities, loss and guilt. After relocation they had feelings of freedom, ongoing responsibility, living with loss and having a new relationship with death. Conclusion: The most important finding in our study was that adult children developed a different relationship with death than before the parent became affected by dementia. It is essential that healthcare staff understand and address the adult children’s existential life situations and the suffering they are experiencing. Healthcare staff need to be conscious about adult children’s needs for support to address their existential life situations before and after their parents relocate to nursing homes.

  8. The Shift in Existential Life Situations of Adult Children to Parents with Dementia Relocated to Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Høgsnes, Linda; Norbergh, Karl-Gustaf; Danielson, Ella; Melin-Johansson, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous research describes spouses and adult children of people with dementia as a homogeneous group using one term: family caregivers. Recent research shows that the needs and experiences of spouses and adult children differ, therefore they cannot be studied as a homogeneous group. Aims: The aim of the study was to describe the shift in existential life situations of adult children of a parent with dementia relocated to nursing homes. Design: This is a qualitative study with an interpretive approach. Methods: Face-to-face interviews were held with 11 adult children aged 48-65 years. The interviews lasted 30–60 minutes and data were analysed using interpretive content analysis. Findings: The adult children described how they experienced their life situation before and after their parents’ relocation. Before relocation they described feelings of powerlessness, loneliness in their responsibilities, loss and guilt. After relocation they had feelings of freedom, ongoing responsibility, living with loss and having a new relationship with death. Conclusion: The most important finding in our study was that adult children developed a different relationship with death than before the parent became affected by dementia. It is essential that healthcare staff understand and address the adult children’s existential life situations and the suffering they are experiencing. Healthcare staff need to be conscious about adult children’s needs for support to address their existential life situations before and after their parents relocate to nursing homes. PMID:27651850

  9. [Support of the family with schizophrenia in case of home hospice care].

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Kayo; Watanabe, Miyako; Kawagoe, Koh

    2013-08-01

    There are various types of families of terminally-ill cancer patients, and care for the family should therefore be individualized. In cases where the primary caregivers have schizophrenia, caring for the patients at home might cause a serious burden to a family. From this aspect, two patients who were cared for by family with schizophrenia were reviewed. Four important factors were obtained. First, assessment of psychiatric conditions of the family collaborating with the psychiatrist or public health nurse; second, confirmation of the patients'/family's wills concerning living through death at home; third, death education given to a family; and fourth, efficient collaboration with social services by an other organization. It was considered that these factors would constitute a model for providing home hospice care to a family with schizophrenia. PMID:23986065

  10. Evaluating Fidelity in Home-Visiting Programs a Qualitative Analysis of 1058 Home Visit Case Notes from 105 Families

    PubMed Central

    Saïas, Thomas; Lerner, Emilie; Greacen, Tim; Simon-Vernier, Elodie; Emer, Alessandra; Pintaux, Eléonore; Guédeney, Antoine; Dugravier, Romain; Tereno, Susana; Falissard, Bruno; Tubach, Florence; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Objective Implementation fidelity is a key issue in home-visiting programs as it determines a program’s effectiveness in accomplishing its original goals. This paper seeks to evaluate fidelity in a 27-month program addressing maternal and child health which took place in France between 2006 and 2011. Method To evaluate implementation fidelity, home visit case notes were analyzed using thematic qualitative and computer-assisted linguistic analyses. Results During the prenatal period, home visitors focused on the social components of the program. Visitors discussed the physical changes in pregnancy, and psychological and social environment issues. Discussing immigration, unstable employment and financial related issues, family relationships and dynamics and maternity services, while not expected, were found in case notes. Conversely, health during pregnancy, early child development and postpartum mood changes were not identified as topics within the prenatal case notes. During the postnatal period, most components of the intervention were addressed: home visitors observed the mother’s adaptation to the baby; routine themes such as psychological needs and medical-social networks were evaluated; information on the importance of social support and on adapting the home environment was given; home visitors counseled on parental authority, and addressed mothers’ self-esteem issues; finally, they helped to find child care, when necessary. Some themes were not addressed or partially addressed: health education, child development, home environment, mother’s education plans and personal routine, partner support and play with the child. Other themes were not expected, but found in the case notes: social issues, mother-family relationship, relation with services, couple issues, quality of maternal behavior and child’s language development. Conclusions In this program, home visitors experienced difficulties addressing some of the objectives because they gave precedence

  11. "Family Comes First!" Relationships with family and friends in Italian emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Meeus, Wim

    2014-12-01

    We conducted two studies to examine relationships with family and friends in Italian emerging adults, paying attention to the potential moderating role of gender and occupational status. In Study I, we aimed at capturing emerging adults' perspective on interactions with both family and friends by means of a qualitative approach. Participants were 39 emerging adults (51% males), who were interviewed individually or within a focus group. In Study II, we sought to examine how family and friend importance to identity were related to life satisfaction through a quantitative approach. Participants were 474 (47.3% males) emerging adults who filled a self-report questionnaire. Overall, findings indicated solid family ties and a strong impact of family importance to identity for life satisfaction. Results were independent of gender and occupational status (university students vs. workers). Thus, findings highlighted that in the Italian context young people's transition to adulthood is strongly intertwined with family relationships.

  12. Complex home care: Part 2- family annual income, insurance premium, and out-of-pocket expenses.

    PubMed

    Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Yadrich, Donna Macan; Ross, Vicki M; Smith, Carol E; Clements, Faye; Williams, Arthur R

    2010-01-01

    Annual costs paid by families for intravenous infusion of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) health insurance premiums, deductibles, co-payments for health services, and the wide range of out-of-pocket home health care expenses are significant. The costs of managing complex chronic care at home cannot be completely understood until all out-of-pocket costs have been defined, described, and tabulated. Non-reimbursed and out-of-pocket costs paid by families over years for complex chronic care negatively impact the financial stability of families. National health care reform must take into account the long-term financial burdens of families caring for those with complex home care. Any changes that may increase the out-of-pocket costs or health insurance costs to these families can also have a negative long-term impact on society when greater numbers of patients declare bankruptcy or qualify for medical disability.

  13. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home palliative care services for adults with advanced illness and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Barbara; Calanzani, Natalia; Curiale, Vito; McCrone, Paul; Higginson, Irene J

    2013-01-01

    Background Extensive evidence shows that well over 50% of people prefer to be cared for and to die at home provided circumstances allow choice. Despite best efforts and policies, one-third or less of all deaths take place at home in many countries of the world. Objectives 1. To quantify the effect of home palliative care services for adult patients with advanced illness and their family caregivers on patients' odds of dying at home; 2. to examine the clinical effectiveness of home palliative care services on other outcomes for patients and their caregivers such as symptom control, quality of life, caregiver distress and satisfaction with care; 3. to compare the resource use and costs associated with these services; 4. to critically appraise and summarise the current evidence on cost-effectiveness. Search methods We searched 12 electronic databases up to November 2012. We checked the reference lists of all included studies, 49 relevant systematic reviews, four key textbooks and recent conference abstracts. We contacted 17 experts and researchers for unpublished data. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series (ITSs) evaluating the impact of home palliative care services on outcomes for adults with advanced illness or their family caregivers, or both. Data collection and analysis One review author assessed the identified titles and abstracts. Two independent reviewers performed assessment of all potentially relevant studies, data extraction and assessment of methodological quality. We carried out meta-analysis where appropriate and calculated numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNTBs) for the primary outcome (death at home). Main results We identified 23 studies (16 RCTs, 6 of high quality), including 37,561 participants and 4042 family caregivers, largely with advanced cancer but also congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive

  14. Supporting Individuals within Their Families or in Homes of Their Own: The CAP-MR/DD Program in Raleigh, North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoultz, Bonnie

    Findings are presented from a site visit to a Raleigh, North Carolina, program that provides in-home support to children and adults with severe disabilities and their families. The program, the Wake County Community Alternatives Program for Persons with Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities, is administered by the North Carolina Department…

  15. Hope and burden among Latino families of adults with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Mercedes; Barrio, Concepción; Yamada, Ann-Marie

    2013-12-01

    This study examined hope and family burden among Latino families of individuals with schizophrenia. The sample consisted of 54 family members, one family member per outpatient adult recruited from public mental health programs in a diverse urban community. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that the family member's increased hope for the patient's future would be associated with decreased family burden beyond effects explained by the patient's length of illness and severity of symptoms. Results supported the study hypothesis. Family hope for the patient's future was associated with four of five types of family burden. Findings point to the prominent role of hope as a source of resilience for Latino families dealing with severe mental illness of a loved one. PMID:24329411

  16. Hope and Burden among Latino Families of Adults with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    HERNANDEZ, MERCEDES; BARRIO, CONCEPCIÓN; YAMADA, ANN-MARIE

    2016-01-01

    This study examined hope and family burden among Latino families of individuals with schizophrenia. The sample consisted of 54 family members, one family member per outpatient adult recruited from public mental health programs in a diverse urban community. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to test the hypothesis that the family member’s increased hope for the patient’s future would be associated with decreased family burden beyond effects explained by the patient’s length of illness and severity of symptoms. Results supported the study hypothesis. Family hope for the patient’s future was associated with four of five types of family burden. Findings point to the prominent role of hope as a source of resilience for Latino families dealing with severe mental illness of a loved one. PMID:24329411

  17. Life Satisfaction among Young Adults from Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Stephan M.; Peterson, Gary W.

    1988-01-01

    Examined possible predictors of life satisfaction among 322 low-income young adults from rural Appalachia. Both objective and subjective conditions of life were predictors of life satisfaction: financial resources, self-esteem, and proximity to childhood home were positive predictors; frustrations about limited job opportunities and community size…

  18. Homes of low-income minority families with asthmatic children have increased condition issues

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Christina E.; Nazir, Niaman; Daley, Christine M.; DiDonna, Anita; Choi, Won S.; Barnes, Charles S.; Rosenwasser, Lanny J.

    2014-01-01

    The home is increasingly associated with asthma. It acts both as a reservoir of asthma triggers and as a refuge from seasonal outdoor allergen exposure. Racial/ethnic minority families with low incomes tend to reside in neighborhoods with low housing quality. These families also have higher rates of asthma. This study explores the hypothesis that black and Latino urban households with asthmatic children experienced more home mechanical, structural condition–related areas of concern than white households with asthmatic children. Participant families (n = 140) took part in the Kansas City Safe and Healthy Homes Program, had at least one asthmatic child, and met income qualifications of no more than 80% of local median income; many were below 50%. Families self-identified their race. Homes were assessed by environmental health professionals using a standard set of criteria and a specific set of on-site and laboratory sampling and analyses. Homes were given a score for areas of concern between 0 (best) and 53 (worst). The study population self-identified as black (46%), non-Latino white (26%), Latino (14.3%), and other (12.9%). Mean number of areas of concern were 18.7 in Latino homes, 17.8 in black homes, 13.3 in other homes, and 13.2 in white homes. Latino and black homes had significantly more areas of concern. White families were also more likely to be in the upper portion of the income. In this set of 140 low-income homes with an asthmatic child, households of minority individuals had more areas of condition concerns and generally lower income than other families. PMID:25584914

  19. Homes of low-income minority families with asthmatic children have increased condition issues.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Christina M; Ciaccio, Christina E; Nazir, Niaman; Daley, Christine M; DiDonna, Anita; Choi, Won S; Barnes, Charles S; Rosenwasser, Lanny J

    2014-01-01

    The home is increasingly associated with asthma. It acts both as a reservoir of asthma triggers and as a refuge from seasonal outdoor allergen exposure. Racial/ethnic minority families with low incomes tend to reside in neighborhoods with low housing quality. These families also have higher rates of asthma. This study explores the hypothesis that black and Latino urban households with asthmatic children experienced more home mechanical, structural condition-related areas of concern than white households with asthmatic children. Participant families (n = 140) took part in the Kansas City Safe and Healthy Homes Program, had at least one asthmatic child, and met income qualifications of no more than 80% of local median income; many were below 50%. Families self-identified their race. Homes were assessed by environmental health professionals using a standard set of criteria and a specific set of on-site and laboratory sampling and analyses. Homes were given a score for areas of concern between 0 (best) and 53 (worst). The study population self-identified as black (46%), non-Latino white (26%), Latino (14.3%), and other (12.9%). Mean number of areas of concern were 18.7 in Latino homes, 17.8 in black homes, 13.3 in other homes, and 13.2 in white homes. Latino and black homes had significantly more areas of concern. White families were also more likely to be in the upper portion of the income. In this set of 140 low-income homes with an asthmatic child, households of minority individuals had more areas of condition concerns and generally lower income than other families. PMID:25584914

  20. Protecting Young Children: Identifying Family Substance Use and Risks in the Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conners-Burrow, Nicola A.; Johnson, Danya; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; McKelvey, Lorraine; Bokony, Patti A.; Bradley, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the usefulness of a screening process implemented in the context of a Head Start home visit and compares families who screened positive for substance abuse with those who did not on an array of child and family indicators important for healthy child development. The sample included 1,105 low-income families with preschool-age…

  1. Home Literacy Beliefs and Practices among Low-Income Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Heather S.; Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Pollard-Durodola, Sharolyn; Saenz, Laura M.; Soares, Denise A.; Resendez, Nora; Zhu, Leina; Hagan-Burke, Shanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore within-group patterns of variability in the home literacy environments (HLEs) of low-income Latino families using latent profile analysis. Participants were (N = 193) families of Latino preschoolers enrolled in a larger study. In the fall of 2012, mothers filled out a family literacy practices inventory, a…

  2. Creating Taxonomies to Improve School-Home Connections with Families of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linse, Caroline Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Families of culturally and linguistically diverse pupils often do not participate fully in their children's school-based education. The purpose of this article is to introduce taxonomies as a means to examine and improve school practices and levels of responsiveness to families whose home language is not English, so that families feel more…

  3. Impact of Home-Based Family Therapy on Maternal and Child Outcomes in Disadvantaged Adolescent Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherniss, Cary; Herzog, Elaine

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates the effects of home-based family therapy on 116 high- risk teenage mothers and their children. Subjects received case management, supportive counseling and some received family therapy. Twelve-month follow-up indicated family therapy subjects improved parenting and became less welfare dependent. No significant difference was found at 24…

  4. Training Home Economics Program Assistants to Work with Low Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouls, Janalyce; And Others

    These materials are designed to present ideas for developing a program for training nonprofessional workers to help low income families to raise their aspirations, develop pride in homemaking, improve homemaking skills, have a more satisfying home and family life, improve the health of family members, gain knowledge to help children develop, and…

  5. Family Relationships in Realistic Young Adult Fiction, 1987 to 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Cathie

    The purpose of this study was to determine how parents and family relationships are characterized in realistic young adult fiction. A random sample of 20 realistic young adult novels was selected from the American Library Association's Best Lists for the years 1987-1991. A content analysis of the novels focused on the following: (1) whether…

  6. Differences in home food and activity environments between obese and healthy weight families of preschool children

    PubMed Central

    Boles, Richard E.; Scharf, Cynthia; Filigno, Stephanie S.; Saelens, Brian E.; Stark, Lori J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a home food and activity instrument to discriminate between the home environments of obese and healthy weight preschool children. Design A modified questionnaire about home environments was tested as an observation tool. Setting Family homes. Participants Thirty-five obese children with at least one obese caregiver were compared to forty-seven healthy weight children with no obese caregivers. Main Outcome Measures Home observation assessments were conducted to evaluate the availability of devices supporting activity behaviors and foods based on availability, accessibility, and readiness to be eaten. Analysis Agreement statistics were conducted to analyze psychometrics and MANOVAs were conducted to assess group differences, significance, P < .05. Results Home observations showed acceptable agreement statistics between independent coders across food and activity items. Families of obese preschoolers were significantly less likely to have fresh vegetables available or accessible in the home, were more likely to have a TV in the obese child’s bedroom and had fewer physical activity devices compared to healthy weight preschoolers. Conclusions and Implications Families of young children live in home environments that were discriminatively characterized based on home observations. Future tool refinement will further clarify the impact of the home environment on early growth. PMID:23380192

  7. Family interventions to improve diabetes outcomes for adults

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Arshiya A.; Benitez, Amanda; Quinn, Michael T.; Burnet, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-care is a critical aspect of disease management for adults with diabetes. Since family members can play a vital role in a patient’s disease management, involving them in self-care interventions may positively influence patients’ diabetes outcomes. We systematically reviewed family-based interventions for adults with diabetes published from 1994 to 2014 and assessed their impact on patients’ diabetes outcomes and the extent of family involvement. We found 26 studies describing family-based diabetes interventions for adults. Interventions were conducted across a range of patient populations and settings. The degree of family involvement varied across studies. We found evidence for improvement in patients’ self-efficacy, perceived social support, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes self-care across the studies. Owing to the heterogeneity of the study designs, types of interventions, reporting of outcomes, and family involvement, it is difficult to determine how family participation in diabetes interventions may affect patients’ clinical outcomes. Future studies should clearly describe the role of family in the intervention, assess quality and extent of family participation, and compare patient outcomes with and without family involvement. PMID:26250784

  8. Family Science Activities for Adult Basic and Literacy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Action Southwest, Waynesburg, PA.

    A staff development project created a series of family science activities to be used in adult basic and literacy education (ABLE) and family literacy programs and a training guide for staff and volunteers. The training guide provides background principles and concepts for science activities. The activities identify materials and indicate ways the…

  9. Nursing Home Life: A Guide for Residents and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC.

    This guide represents part of AARP's comprehensive consumer education effort in the area of long-term care. The purpose of the guide is to provide information for consumers as they look for a nursing home, arrange for admission, and adjust to life in the home after admission. Section 1 introduces the guide. Section 2 describes how to assess needs,…

  10. [In-home respite for the families of Alzheimer's patients].

    PubMed

    Lucet, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    An innovative and unique model of respite and support at home for people with Alzheimer's and their carers has been created. The quality of the service provided is based on the principle of home assistance, 24 hours a day and for several consecutive days, provided by a single specialised care assistant.

  11. Leaving home in Slovenia: a quantitative exploration of residential independence among young adults.

    PubMed

    Kuhar, Metka; Reiter, Herwig

    2014-12-01

    The present paper analyzes and contextualizes the phenomenon of prolonged co-residence of parents and young adult children in Slovenia. It analyzes the process of moving out or staying at home on the basis of a subsample of young people between 19 and 29 who are no longer at school included in the representative Slovenian field survey Youth 2010. Young people still living in the household of their parents or (legal) guardians are compared with those who have already left. The analysis considers factors associated with the status transitions from youth to adulthood; the demographic, social and economic background; and the perception of the parent-child relationship quality and parenting style by the children. Our findings point to the importance of possibilities for independent housing and the economic capacity of young people and their family. The most important factor behind moving out seems to be a stable partnership.

  12. Identifying Inefficient Single-Family Homes With Utility Bill Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, S.; Krarti, M.; Bianchi, M.; Roberts, D.

    2010-08-01

    Differentiating between energy-efficient and inefficient single-family homes on a community scale helps identify and prioritize candidates for energy-efficiency upgrades. Prescreening diagnostic procedures can further retrofit efforts by providing efficiency information before a site-visit is conducted. We applied the prescreening diagnostic to a simulated community of homes in Boulder, Colorado and analyzed energy consumption data to identify energy-inefficient homes.

  13. Later life care planning conversations for older adults and families.

    PubMed

    Stolee, Paul; Zaza, Christine; Sharratt, Michael T

    2014-09-01

    While most older adults have thought about their future care needs, few have discussed their preferences with family members. We interviewed older persons (24), adult children (24), health professionals (23), and representatives of stakeholder associations (3) to understand their views and experiences on later life care (LLC) planning conversations, in terms of (a) their respective roles, and (b) barriers and facilitators that should be taken into account when having these conversations. Roles described included that of information user (older persons), information seeker (family members), and information provider (health care providers). The study identified practical and emotional considerations relevant to LLC planning conversations. This study found strong support for planning for LLC before the need arises, as well as important potential benefits for older adults, family members, and health professionals. There is interest in, and need for, resources to guide families in LLC planning. PMID:24652903

  14. Educational Counter Culture: Motivations, Instructional Approaches, Curriculum Choices, and Challenges of Home School Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Kenneth Vance

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an in depth knowledge of the day to day activities of home school families in order to better understand the instructional approaches, curriculum decisions, and challenges. Four themes were addressed: motivations, operations, resources, and challenges. Findings about motivations to home school included: (a)…

  15. An Evaluation of Health and Safety Hazards in Family Based Day Care Homes in Philadelphia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Hernando; Haynes, Sonia; Michael, Karen; Burstyn, Igor; Jandhyala, Malica; Palermo, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In Pennsylvania, Family Day Care Homes (FDCH) are private residences used to care for up to six children in a 24 h period. These homes are often times the most affordable alternative to day care centers parents have in low-income communities. The aims of this study were to evaluate FDCH providers' knowledge of hazards and their understanding of…

  16. Marital Satisfaction, Family Emotional Expressiveness, Home Learning Environments, and Children's Emergent Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froyen, Laura C.; Skibbe, Lori E.; Bowles, Ryan P.; Blow, Adrian J.; Gerde, Hope K.

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigates associations among marital satisfaction, family emotional expressiveness, the home learning environment, and preschool-aged children's emergent literacy skills among 385 Midwestern mothers and their children. Path analyses examined how marital satisfaction related to emotional expressiveness in the home and whether…

  17. Family Home Visiting Outcomes for Mothers with and without Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsen, K.; Sanders, A.; Yu, F.; Radosevich, D.; Geppert, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes of public health nurse home visiting for mothers with intellectual disabilities (ID) and a comparison group. Methods: The study was a secondary analysis of existing de-identified family home visiting data. It used a two-group comparative, 1:3 match design. Sixty-eight clients were in…

  18. Preventing crises in palliative care in the home. Role of family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, G.; Willison, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    With the current shift to community care, the need for palliative care in the home involving the family physician has increased. Potential causes of crises in the home care of the dying are identified. Strategies to prevent crises are suggested that rely on a team's providing comprehensive and anticipatory care. PMID:7539653

  19. Determinants of Educational Performance in India: Role of Home and Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Uday

    1991-01-01

    Examines effects of family and pupil characteristics on Indian primary school children's academic learning, studying students who dropped out before completing primary schooling. Finds educational supplies, home sanitary facilities, home locale, distance to drinking water source, father's work and literacy status, and schooling completed related…

  20. Income Tax Deductions for Family Day Care Homes. Southeastern Day Care Bulletin No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Eva C.

    Women who provide day care in their own homes augment their modest earnings in some cases if they take afvantage of deductions permitted under the Internal Revenue regulations concerning use of private homes for business purposes. Where combined family income is at a level where income tax is payable, it may be profitable to calculate all…

  1. Musical Home Environment, Family Background, and Parenting Style on Success in School Music and in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdzinski, Stephen; Dell, Charlene; Gumm, Alan; Rinnert, Nathan; Orzolek, Douglas; Yap, Ching Ching; Cooper, Shelly; Keith, Timothy; Russell, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine influences of parental involvement-home music environment, family background, and parenting style factors on success in school music and in school. Participants (N = 1114) were music students in grades 4-12 from six regions of the United States. Data were gathered about parental involvement-home environment…

  2. Pilot Evaluation of a Home Visit Parent Training Program in Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study reported the pilot evaluation of the Healthy Start Home Visit Program for disadvantaged Chinese parents with preschool children, delivered by trained parent assistants. Home visiting was used to make services more accessible to disadvantaged families. Method: The participants included 21 parent-child dyads. Outcome measures…

  3. Home Health Care With Telemonitoring Improves Health Status for Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Elizabeth; Schmotzer, Brian J.; Struk, Cynthia J.; DiCarlo, Christina M.; Kikano, George; Piña, Ileana L.; Boxer, Rebecca S.

    2014-01-01

    Home telemonitoring can augment home health care services during a patient's transition from hospital to home. Home health care agencies commonly use telemonitors for patients with heart failure although studies have shown mixed results in the use of telemonitors to reduce rehospitalizations. This randomized trial investigated if older patients with heart failure admitted to home health care following a hospitalization would have a reduction in rehospitalizations and improved health status if they received telemonitoring. Patients were followed up to 180 days post-discharge from home health care services. Results showed no difference in the time to rehospitalizations or emergency visits between those who received a telemonitoring vs. usual care. Older heart failure patients who received telemonitoring had better health status by home health care discharge than those who received usual care. Therefore for older adults with heart failure telemonitoring may be important adjunct to home health care services to improve health status. PMID:23438509

  4. Racial and ethnic differences in leaving and returning to the parental home: The role of life course transitions, socioeconomic resources, and family connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; South, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although Black and Hispanic young adults in the U.S. are less likely than Whites to move out of the parental home and more likely than Whites to return, reasons for these differences have not been clearly identified. OBJECTIVE This study examines the ability of racial/ethnic disparities in life course transitions, socioeconomic resources, and family connectivity to account for racial/ethnic differences in leaving and returning home. METHODS Using data from the 2005–2011 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics’ Transition into Adulthood study (N=1,491, age 18 to 26), we estimated discrete-time event history models predicting the timing of moving out of and back into the parental home. RESULTS Although no single factor completely explained racial-ethnic differences in the timing of leaving and returning to the parental home, the bulk of the Black-White differences in both home-leaving and home-returning was explained by group differences in transitions into adult roles, the ability to afford independent living, and connections to the origin family. These factors also explained most of the Mexican-White difference in home-leaving. However, only a small portion of the Hispanic-White difference in returning home was attributable to the proposed explanatory variables. CONCLUSION Explanations for racial and ethnic differences in the timing of leaving and returning to the parental home need to consider a broad array of life course characteristics in which Black, Hispanic, and White youth differ. The factors that explain Black-White differences in home-leaving and home-returning may differ from those that explain Hispanic-White differences in these behaviors. PMID:27110219

  5. Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Learn how to protect children from lead poisoning and get other information about lead hazards on ... 6 years old are most at risk for lead poisoning in your home. • Lead exposure can harm young ...

  6. Can family caregiving substitute for nursing home care?

    PubMed

    Charles, Kerwin Kofi; Sevak, Purvi

    2005-11-01

    Informal care should be a substitute for nursing homes but empirical evidence often suggests the opposite. This may be because informal care receipt is positively correlated with unobserved negative health characteristics. We exploit variation in children's characteristics as instruments for informal care to provide Two-Stage Least Squares (TSLS) estimates of nursing home use among a sample of 6855 individuals from the 1993-2000 waves of the AHEAD survey. While OLS results suggest informal care is associated with greater future nursing home risk, TSLS estimates show that receipt of informal care statistically and substantially reduces the risk of nursing home entry. This finding has implications for Medicaid and private long-term care insurance markets.

  7. Transitioning Newborns from NICU to Home: Family Information Packet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Organization (PSO) Program Quality Measure Tools & Resources Tools & Resources Value Surveys on Patient Safety Culture Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture Nursing Home Survey ...

  8. House Calls: The Impact of Home-Based Care for Older Adults With Alzheimer's and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kasey; Bachman, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Older adults with Alzheimer's/dementia have high health care costs; they may benefit from home-based care, but few have home visits. This article describes a home-based care program for frail elders, including those with Alzheimer's/dementia. Descriptive statistics are provided for Medicare-enrolled program participants and matched controls with Alzheimer's/dementia on expenditures along six services: skilled nursing facility, inpatient acute, physician, home health, hospice, and social services. Cases with dementia were significantly more likely to have home health and hospice expenditures than controls, suggesting potential for the program to improve end-of-life care. Very few cases or controls had any social service expenditures. Social workers should advocate for the expanded role of home-based care for older adults with dementia and for increased Medicare reimbursement of social work services. PMID:26186425

  9. House Calls: The Impact of Home-Based Care for Older Adults With Alzheimer's and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kasey; Bachman, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Older adults with Alzheimer's/dementia have high health care costs; they may benefit from home-based care, but few have home visits. This article describes a home-based care program for frail elders, including those with Alzheimer's/dementia. Descriptive statistics are provided for Medicare-enrolled program participants and matched controls with Alzheimer's/dementia on expenditures along six services: skilled nursing facility, inpatient acute, physician, home health, hospice, and social services. Cases with dementia were significantly more likely to have home health and hospice expenditures than controls, suggesting potential for the program to improve end-of-life care. Very few cases or controls had any social service expenditures. Social workers should advocate for the expanded role of home-based care for older adults with dementia and for increased Medicare reimbursement of social work services.

  10. Adult Day Care--Extended Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bert Kruger

    This pamphlet describes a multi-purpose day-care center for the elderly in Abilene, Texas which is intended to fill the "extended family" role of offering companionship, medical attention, and other aspects of concern to older persons in the community. The goals of the program are as follows: (1) to keep individuals out of institutions as long as…

  11. At Home with the Johars: Another Look at Family Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mui, Selina; Anderson, Jim

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we document the literacy practices of Genna Johar and her extended family. Genna, a grade 1 student, is a member of a Indo-Canadian joint family in which her parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins, share a household. Family members including siblings and cousins play important roles in supporting Genna's literacy…

  12. Home-School Relationships: A Qualitative Study with Diverse Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardona, Betty; Jain, Sachin; Canfield-Davis, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored how families from diverse cultural backgrounds understood family involvement in the context of early childhood care and educational settings. Participants in the study included nine members from six families who had children enrolled in three early childhood care and education programs. The primary method of…

  13. Alternative families in recovery: fictive kin relationships among residents of sober living homes.

    PubMed

    Heslin, Kevin C; Hamilton, Alison B; Singzon, Trudy K; Smith, James L; Anderson, Nancy Lois Ruth

    2011-04-01

    Sober living homes are group residences for people attempting to maintain abstinence from alcohol and drugs in a mutually supportive setting. Residents typically develop strong psychological and economic ties and have been referred to as "alternative families," thus evoking the anthropological concept of fictive kinship. We analyzed data from seven focus groups with sober living home residents to assess the prevalence and functions of fictive kinship in these settings. Results suggest that residents created kinship by exchanging various types of support, and by incorporating other residents into existing family relationships, particularly in homes where there were children. Residents perceived fictive kin as more supportive than actual kin, encouraging them toward greater individuation, in contrast with family backgrounds that were sometimes described as stifling. These accounts of the therapeutic qualities of fictive kin in sober living homes could inform the work of fair housing advocates and other community stakeholders.

  14. Using the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey to Examine the Prevalence and Characteristics of Families Who Home Educate in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emma; Nelson, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    This paper has two aims, first to examine the feasibility of using an omnibus survey to estimate the prevalence and characteristics of families who home educate and secondly to provide an empirical contribution to recent research on home education in the UK. Because there is no statutory requirement for families who home educate to register with…

  15. Balancing Work and Family: How Female Superintendents Succeed at Work and Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesniewicz, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Women leaders in education struggle to balance work and family life. Historically, this struggle has stemmed from attempts to manage societal expectations of balancing work and family. In managing these expectations, women leaders face many challenges, which have made it difficult to maintain home responsibilities and deal with increasing demands…

  16. Understanding Children's Sedentary Behaviour: A Qualitative Study of the Family Home Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granich, Joanna; Rosenberg, Michael; Knuiman, Matthew; Timperio, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Electronic media (EM) (television, electronic games and computer) use has been associated with overweight and obesity among children. Little is known about the time spent in sedentary behaviour (SB) among children within the family context. The aim of this study was to explore how the family home environment may influence children's…

  17. Young Children Engaging with Technologies at Home: The Influence of Family Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephen, Christine; Stevenson, Olivia; Adey, Claire

    2013-01-01

    This article is about the ways in which young children engage with technological toys and resources at home and, in particular, the ways in which the family context makes a difference to young children’s engagement with these technologies. The data reviewed come from family interviews and parent-recorded video of four case study children as they…

  18. Practice Related Home-Based Family Centered Services Course for Master of Social Work Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond. Region III Child Welfare Training Center.

    This course outline provides a framework for incorporating material about home-based family centered services (HBFCS) in existing masters-level family/child welfare curricula. The placement of the course in the curriculum is discussed, with suggestions for appropriate background knowledge/course work. Seven major topics are outlined: (1)…

  19. Family Day Care as Observed in Licensed Homes in Montgomery County, Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rebecca Blundell

    A questionnaire was administered to 19 licensed day-care mothers in Montgomery County, Maryland. This report presents what was found in observations of the family day care homes, and points out the relative merits and disadvantages of family day care and group day care. The sections of the report are: I. Introduction; II. The Needs of Children;…

  20. School and Home Connections and Children's Kindergarten Achievement Gains: The Mediating Role of Family Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galindo, Claudia; Sheldon, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Children's home and school are the most influential contexts in which learning and development occur, especially during early childhood. This paper builds on Bronfenbrenner's ecological theory and Epstein's theory of overlapping spheres of influence to examine school and family connections and their relationships to family involvement and…

  1. Adults returning to school: the impact on family and work.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Peter G; Biever, Joan L; Martinez, Isaac G; Gómez, John P

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the impact of attending a Weekend College (WEC) program on adult students' family, work, and social life. Student participants responded to a 26-item questionnaire and three open-ended questions. Regression analyses of the 566 completed surveys revealed that satisfaction with school and support from family and the work place were predictive of lower levels of stress. Content analyses of responses to open-ended questions showed that expected stress was the result of time constraints but also highlighted the positive aspects of continuing one's education. The study includes suggestions for designing programs to meet the needs of adult students.

  2. Pneumonia care and the nursing home: a qualitative descriptive study of resident and family member perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chan Carusone, Soo; Loeb, Mark; Lohfeld, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    Background Nursing home residents are frequently sent to hospital for diagnostic tests or to receive acute health care services. These transfers are both costly and for some, associated with increased risks. Although improved technology allows long-term care facilities to deliver more complex health care on site, if this is to become a trend then residents and family members must see the value of such care. This qualitative study examined resident and family member perspectives on in situ care for pneumonia. Methods A qualitative descriptive study design was used. Participants were residents and family members of residents treated for pneumonia drawn from a larger randomized controlled trial of a clinical pathway to manage nursing home-acquired pneumonia on-site. A total of 14 in-depth interviews were conducted. Interview data were analyzed using the editing style, described by Miller and Crabtree, to identify key themes. Results Both residents and family members preferred that pneumonia be treated in the nursing home, where possible. They both felt that caring and attention are key aspects of care which are more easily accessible in the nursing home setting. However, residents felt that staff or doctors should make the decision whether to hospitalize them, whereas family members wanted to be consulted or involved in the decision-making process. Conclusion These findings suggest that interventions to reduce hospitalization of nursing home residents with pneumonia are consistent with resident and family member preferences. PMID:16430782

  3. The Impact of Long-Term Home Parenteral Nutrition on the Patient and the Family: Achieving Normalcy in Life.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Marion F; Smith, Carol E

    2015-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is a technologically complex, life-sustaining therapy for individuals who have intestinal failure. Accepting an invasive lifelong therapy like HPN is challenging for patients and their family caregivers. There is a desire to maintain a sense of normalcy in life and to carry on as usual. Using qualitative methodology, the authors explored and described the lived experience of HPN-dependent adults and identified normalization as a repeating and strong theme. Understanding how individuals adapt, cope, or experience this complex therapy provides insight into how they manage their lives in as normal a way as possible. By understanding the perspective of normalization, home infusion nurses and nutrition support clinicians can embrace caregiving strategies and tools consistent with the changing social environment in which the HPN experience is lived. PMID:26126145

  4. Home-based viewing (el velorio) after death: a cost-effective alternative for some families.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Faustino; Hereira, Mildreys

    2008-01-01

    After the death of a loved one, giving an opportunity to view the body helps bring families and friends together to celebrate the life and mourn the passing of a person. This gathering, known as a Wake or a Viewing, precedes the burial and usually lasts from 1 to several days. In the United States, the viewing now takes place in funeral parlors, away from the decedent's home. However, there are still several countries and people who keep the body at home where the family and friends are invited to say their goodbyes. We present here 2 cases for which our Hospice assisted the families with a home viewing. These were indigent people who could not afford embalming or the additional cost of a viewing in a parlor and who, without this opportunity, would have not had time to get together and mourn and celebrate life as friends, family, and community.

  5. Career Development: The Family--Home--Community Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Environmental Sciences Foundation, Inc., Minneapolis.

    The second of a three-part series developed to show how the junior high school curriculum can be enhanced by adding real-life career oriented processes, the document provides further career exploration experiences for the eighth grade student. Building on the home model utilized in the seventh grade element of the series, the booklet treats the…

  6. A Family Affair: When School Troubles Come Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley-Marling, Curt

    Little is known about the effects of schooling on parents, especially on those with children who struggle in school. Drawing on a series of interviews with parents, this book provides an insider's view of what happens at home when school goes wrong. The stories in this book reveal that school troubles threaten the happiness and self-esteem of…

  7. Vulnerability within families headed by teen and young adult mothers investigated by child welfare services in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Hovdestad, W.; Shields, M.; Williams, G.; Tonmyr, L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Young mothers’ families are at increased risk of child maltreatment and other poor health and social outcomes. Methods: Chi-square analyses of pooled child welfare services data from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS–2003; CIS–2008) were used to compare 284 teen mothers (18 years or younger) and 800 young mothers (19–21 years) and their families with 5752 families where the mother was 22 years or older. Results: Twenty-six percent of young mothers were 18 years or younger. Most (68% of teen-mother families and 57% of families with a young adult mother) received social assistance as their main source of income compared with 36% of families with a mother aged 22 years or older. Teen and young adult mothers were more likely than those aged 22 or older to have childhood histories of out-of-home care (31% and 23% vs. 10%) and were more likely to have risk factors such as alcohol abuse (25% and 23% vs. 18%) and few social supports (46% and 41% vs. 37%). Secondary caregivers in families with young mothers also had more risk factors. Teen and young adult mother families were more likely to have their child placed out-of-home during the investigation (29% and 27% vs. 17%). All were equally likely to be victims of domestic violence and to have mental health issues. Conclusion: Within this sample of high-risk families, young mothers’ families were more at risk than comparison families. Mothers’ youth may be a useful criterion to identify families for targeted interventions. PMID:26605563

  8. Conversations about End of Life: Perspectives of Nursing Home Residents, Family, and Staff

    PubMed Central

    Hirschman, Karen B.; Madden, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Care in nursing homes (NHs) often overlooks individual values and preferences. Residents' voices are critical to discussions about preferences, yet there remains limited research on conversations about the end of life (EOL) from the perspective of older adults who reside in NHs. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the communication, content and process, related to EOL conversations among residents, family, and staff. Methods: We used semistructured interviews in this qualitative, descriptive study to describe conversations about EOL preferences. We examined participants' conversation, when it occurred, and what was discussed. We queried about barriers to and facilitators in discussing EOL care in the NH setting. We interviewed residents (n=16), family (n=12), and interdisciplinary staff (n=10) from four NHs. Results: The overarching theme—missed conversations—describes EOL-related communication. Residents, families, and staff rarely talked about EOL care preferences, nor did they pass along information about preferences or initiate conversations about EOL care with each other. Three categories explained missed conversations: inquiry (“No one asked”); assumptions (presence of an advance directive [AD], “They know me”); and conveying (lack of conveying information or wishes). Existing barriers and lacking facilitators resulted in missed opportunities to hold conversations about EOL preferences. Conclusions: Not all residents wanted to have conversations, but many wanted to be asked about their preferences. Missed conversations may adversely affect the quality of EOL care. Conversations with residents can be initiated by asking residents who they would like involved in the conversation and drawing upon the experience of others. PMID:25658608

  9. Caring from Home: Addressing Barriers to Family Child Care Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, NY.

    This study involved focus groups with New York City family day care providers to determine difficulties they experienced in three areas: economic barriers, payment and regulatory barriers, and barriers to workforce development. Overall, providers had difficulty making wages that allowed them to provide for themselves and their families. They…

  10. Using Home Learning Tool Kits to Facilitate Family Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Loury Ollison; Vernon-Dotson, Lisa Jo

    2009-01-01

    It is a widely held belief that increased family involvement enhances student academic achievement. When considering children with special needs, involvement is not only beneficial; it is often an essential ingredient in a child's success. Families of children with special needs are often limited by time constraints that inhibit school…

  11. Family Involvement Following Institutionalization: Modeling Nursing Home Visits over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaugler, Joseph E.; Zarit, Steven H.; Pearlin, Leonard I.

    2003-01-01

    Gerontological research has emphasized family members' continued involvement in the lives of loved ones following institutionalization. However, many of these studies are cross-sectional in design and do not ascertain how family members' visits change over time. The present study utilized a growth curve analysis to examine preplacement and…

  12. Project Booktalk: Library Outreach to Family Day-Care Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamme, Linda Leonard; Russo, Roseanne

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the need for public libraries to broaden their services to preschool children in family daycare settings and describes Project Booktalk, developed by the University of Florida to provide students with opportunities to become involved in early language and literacy development practices by reading to children in family daycare settings.…

  13. Home apnea monitoring and disruptions in family life: a multidimensional controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmann, E; Wulff, L; Meny, R G

    1992-01-01

    We used data from telephone interviews and mailed questionnaires to examine 12 aspects of family life among 93 families with infants considered at high risk for sudden infant death syndrome and on home apnea monitors and a matched comparison group with infants not requiring monitoring. Using logistic regression to control confounding variables, we found that case mothers were at an increased risk of poor health, but we found no other significant differences in family life between the two groups. PMID:1566950

  14. When children cannot remain home: foster family care and kinship care.

    PubMed

    Berrick, J D

    1998-01-01

    Despite the best efforts of child welfare agencies, community agencies, and individuals, some children are not safe in their homes and must be placed in substitute care settings by child welfare authorities. Increasingly, as this article points out, child welfare agencies are placing children in the homes of their relatives rather than in traditional foster family homes (31% of all children in out-of-home care in the early 1990s were living with kin). This article discusses how such factors as the availability of foster homes, the demand for foster care, attitudes toward the extended families of troubled parents, and policies regarding payment for the costs of care have contributed to the rapid growth in kinship foster care. It discusses differences in the personal characteristics of kin and traditional foster parents and in the supports provided to the caregivers by child welfare agencies. Research findings suggest that kinship homes can promote the child welfare goals of protecting children and supporting families, but they are less likely to facilitate the prompt achievement of legal permanence for children. To forge a coherent policy toward kinship caregivers, officials must balance the natural strengths of informal, private exchanges among family members with the power of government agencies to provide both resources and oversight.

  15. Pharmaceutical opioids in the home and youth: implications for adult medical practice

    PubMed Central

    Binswanger, Ingrid A.; Glanz, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical opioid prescribing, opioid use disorders, and related poisonings have increased substantially in the last decade. In particular, pharmaceutical opioid deaths among youth have markedly increased. One area that has received relatively little attention is the role of home safety, given that parents are an important source of opioids for youth. Parents may intentionally share opioids with youth, due to low perceived risks or limited knowledge, and youth may divert opioids from parents’ medicine cabinets. Safe medication storage has long been mandated by treatment programs that provide pharmacologically supported treatment of opioid use disorders, but it is not generally encouraged or required for pharmaceutical opioids prescribed for pain. Greater attention is needed on the development, evaluation and implementation of three preventive strategies. These three strategies can be delivered in or supported by adult medical practices: 1) fully informing adults prescribed opioids about the risks of opioids to family members and others; 2) providing locked medication safe storage devices; and 3) educating parents on safe disposal options. However, a critical evidence base is still lacking for these opioid safety interventions. PMID:25671706

  16. Learning to Live in a Multi-Cultural Society: Home-School Liaison and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saad, Haroon

    1995-01-01

    A holistic, community-based multiagency approach is needed to foster effective home-school liaison with ethnic minority parents. Adult educators should take a community development approach that identifies parenting needs and recognizes the implications of underachievement among young ethnic minority adults. (SK)

  17. Violent Crime Victimization Increases the Risk of Nursing Home Placement in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachs, Mark; Bachman, Ronet; Williams, Christianna S.; Kossack, Alice; Bove, Carolyn; O'Leary, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We estimate the independent contribution of crime victimization to nursing home placement in a cohort of older adults who were community dwelling at baseline. Design and Methods: The data come from an observational cohort study of 2,321 community-residing older adults who were members of the New Haven Established Populations for…

  18. Becoming an Adult. Home and Family Education: 6763.05.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikens, Grace; And Others

    This course enables teenagers to examine their present level of achievement of the developmental goals involved in the process of maturing toward adulthood. The factors involved in achieving sexual identity, emotional independence, effective social relationships, a positive self-concept and a personal value system are assessed. The course is not…

  19. Becoming an Adult: Leaving Home, Relationships and Home Ownership among Australian Youth. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Kylie J.; Marks, Gary N.

    Four Australian cohorts (born in 1961, 1965, 1970 and 1975) were studied between 1980-2000. The life transitions study focused on these three traditional markers of adulthood: (1) moving out of the parental home; (2) establishing an intimate relationship; and (3) buying a home. Incidence of these transitions was analyzed in terms of their…

  20. Family Home Childcare Providers: A Comparison of Subsidized and Non-Subsidized Working Environments and Employee Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriner, Michael; Schlee, Bethanne M.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Cornille, Thomas A.; Mullis, Ann K.

    2008-01-01

    Federal and State Governments provide childcare subsidies for low-income working families. This study compares the encountered issues and working environments of family home providers of subsidized and non-subsidized childcare. Questionnaires were distributed throughout a southeastern state in the United States to 548 family home childcare…

  1. Child Injury Prevention in the Home: A National Survey of Safety Practices and Use of Safety Equipment in Deprived Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, C. A.; Watson, M. C.; Smith, S.; Coupland, C.; Kendrick, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of home safety practices and use of safety equipment by disadvantaged families participating in a national home safety equipment scheme in England. Design: Cross-sectional postal survey sent to a random sample of 1,000 families. Setting: England, United Kingdom. Results: Half the families (51%) returned a…

  2. SKI-HI Home Intervention for Families with Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Barbara; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The SKI-HI program, which provides home-based family support services for infants, toddlers, and preschool children who are deaf or hard of hearing, has been implemented by approximately 250 agencies and annually serves about 4,000 families. Information is provided on the program's rationale, development, family-centered home-based services,…

  3. Parental Perceptions of Family Centered Care in Medical Homes of Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Zajicek-Farber, Michaela L; Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R; Long, Toby M; Farber, Jon Matthew

    2015-08-01

    Life course theory sets the framework for strong inclusion of family centered care (FCC) in quality medical homes of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities (CNDD). The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of families with their experiences of FCC in medical homes for CNDD. Using a structured questionnaire, the Family-Centered Care Self-Assessment Tool developed by Family Voices, this study surveyed 122 parents of CNDD in a large urban area during 2010-2012. Data collected information on FCC in the provision of primary health care services for CNDD and focused on family-provider partnerships, care setting practices and policies, and community services. Frequency analysis classified participants' responses as strengths in the "most of the time" range, and weaknesses in the "never" range. Only 31 % of parents were satisfied with the primary health care their CNDD received. Based on an accepted definition of medical home services, 16 % of parents reported their CNDD had most aspects of a medical home, 64 % had some, and 20 % had none. Strengths in FCC were primarily evident in the family-provider partnership and care settings when focused on meeting the medical care needs of the child. Weaknesses in FCC were noted in meeting the needs of families, coordination, follow-up, and support with community resources. Improvements in key pediatric health care strategies for CNDD are recommended. CNDD and their families have multifaceted needs that require strong partnerships among parents, providers, and communities. Quality medical homes must include FCC and valued partnerships with diverse families and community-based providers.

  4. Aspirations of Adult Learners in Aboriginal Family Service Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jason; Fraehlich, Cheryl; Debassige, Brent

    2012-01-01

    There is a gap in the literature on the experiences of Aboriginal adults who have made the transition into education and employment after moving to an urban community. Staff of three Aboriginal inner-city family services agencies participated in an interview that included the question: What changes do you see in your employment and education?…

  5. Cognitive Developmental Therapy: Aiding Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towers, David A.

    The works of Kegan and Guidano have presented cognition and emotion as complementary modes of knowing that develop together. Cognition is conceived of as being concerned with the knowledge of reality, and emotions are conceptualized as people's system for knowing of their relationship to that reality. Adult children of dysfunctional families are a…

  6. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    MedlinePlus

    ... in regulating phosphate levels within the body (phosphate homeostasis) by transporting phosphate across cell membranes. The SLC20A2 ... link familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification with phosphate homeostasis. Nat Genet. 2012 Feb 12;44(3):254- ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... N. A family harboring a germ-line N-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation and development of acute myeloid leukemia with an additional somatic C-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar; ...

  9. Home care for ventilator-assisted children: implications for the children, their families, and health policy.

    PubMed

    Aday, L A; Wegener, D H

    1988-01-01

    This article presents findings from a national study of home care programs for ventilator-assisted children conducted between 1984 and 1987 by the Center for Health Administration Studies at The University of Chicago. These findings point to the issues that need to be addressed in the development of policies surrounding both the delivery and the financing of services for these children and their families: (a) ventilator-assisted children are a widely varying group with diverse needs; (b) most families report that though they are glad to bring their child home, many difficult adjustments are required to do so; (c) full-time nursing care offers support to families but also intrudes on their privacy; (d) both families and children need social and psychological support once the child is home; (e) the needs of the child and the family may change over time; and (f) the financial burden of having a child on a ventilator at home can be a big stress on the family.

  10. British Thoracic Society guidelines for home oxygen use in adults.

    PubMed

    Hardinge, Maxine; Annandale, Joe; Bourne, Simon; Cooper, Brendan; Evans, Angela; Freeman, Daryl; Green, Angela; Hippolyte, Sabrine; Knowles, Vikki; MacNee, William; McDonnell, Lynn; Pye, Kathy; Suntharalingam, Jay; Vora, Vandana; Wilkinson, Tom

    2015-06-01

    The British Thoracic Society (BTS) Home Oxygen Guideline provides detailed evidence-based guidance for the use of home oxygen for patients out of hospital. Although the majority of evidence comes from the use of oxygen in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the scope of the guidance includes patients with a variety of long-term respiratory illnesses and other groups in whom oxygen is currently ordered, such as those with cardiac failure, cancer and end-stage cardiorespiratory disease, terminal illness or cluster headache. It explores the evidence base for the use of different modalities of oxygen therapy and patient-related outcomes such as mortality, symptoms and quality of life. The guideline also makes recommendations for assessment and follow-up protocols, and risk assessments, particularly in the clinically challenging area of home oxygen users who smoke. The guideline development group is aware of the potential for confusion sometimes caused by the current nomenclature for different types of home oxygen, and rather than renaming them, has adopted the approach of clarifying those definitions, and in particular emphasising what is meant by long-term oxygen therapy and palliative oxygen therapy. The home oxygen guideline provides expert consensus opinion in areas where clinical evidence is lacking, and seeks to deliver improved prescribing practice, leading to improved compliance and improved patient outcomes, with consequent increased value to the health service.

  11. Exploration of Home Economics Occupations; Home and Family Education: 6775.01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Pauline; Estrada, Rosa J.

    The course, for use at the junior high school level, explores employment possibilities in home economics and related areas. Lists of resource materials, a pretest and posttest, and an extensive, 70-page curriculum guide are appended. The guide explores eight block areas: (1) introduction; (2) homemaking; (3) personal development for careers; (4)…

  12. Storage of Poisonous Substances and Firearms in Homes with Young Children Visitors and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Runyan, Carol W.; Baccaglini, Lorena; Perkis, David; Johnson, Renee M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Most unintentional childhood poisonings and firearm injuries occur in residential environments. Therefore, a preventive strategy includes limiting children’s access to poisons and firearms through safe storage. This study examines storage of poisons and firearms among households with older adults, and households where young children reside compared to those where they visit only. Methods Sample is from a 2002 national random-digit-dial survey of 1003 households. Analyses were weighted to reflect the national population. Results There were 637 households with children residents or visitors aged <6 years. Seventy-five percent of the households (n =480) had children aged <6 as visitors only, and 15% had older adult residents (aged ≥70 years). Poisons and firearms were stored less securely in homes with young children as visitors as compared to those homes with resident young children. In 55% of homes where young children lived, and 74% of homes where young children were only visitors, household chemicals were reportedly stored unlocked. Although firearm ownership was comparable between the two categories of households (33% vs 34%), homes in which children were only visitors were more likely to store firearms unlocked (56%), than homes in which children resided (33%). Homes with older adult residents had more firearms present. Conclusions Children are at risk from improperly stored poisonous substances and firearms in their own homes and homes they visit. Strategies are needed to improve the storage practices of both poisons and firearms to minimize in-home hazards to young children, particularly raising awareness of these hazards to young visitors. PMID:15626565

  13. Perceived Neighborhood and Home Environmental Factors Associated with Television Viewing among Taiwanese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Ming-Chun; Liao, Yung; Chang, Shao-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the associations between perceived neighborhood and home environmental factors and excessive television (TV) viewing time among Taiwanese older adults. The sample data was collected by administering computer-assisted telephone interviewers to 980 Taiwanese older adults (aged ≥ 65 years) living in two regions. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to examine the associations between self-reported perceived neighborhood and home environmental attributions and TV viewing time by using logistic regression analyses. The results showed that perceived neighborhood and home environmental factors were associated with excessive TV viewing time (≥2 h/day) after adjusting for potential confounders. Compared with a reference group, older adults who perceived their neighborhoods to have unsafe traffic were more likely to report excessive TV viewing time (OR = 1.36, 95%CI = 1.02–1.82). Older adults who reported having two or more TV sets in the home (OR = 1.77, CI = 1.28–2.44) and having a TV in the bedroom (OR = 1.55, CI = 1.18–2.03) were also more likely to report excessive TV viewing time. Further longitudinal research can confirm these findings, and tailored interventions focusing on the perceptions of neighborhood traffic safety and TV access at home for older adults might be effective means of preventing excessive TV viewing time. PMID:27420086

  14. Perceived Neighborhood and Home Environmental Factors Associated with Television Viewing among Taiwanese Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Ming-Chun; Liao, Yung; Chang, Shao-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the associations between perceived neighborhood and home environmental factors and excessive television (TV) viewing time among Taiwanese older adults. The sample data was collected by administering computer-assisted telephone interviewers to 980 Taiwanese older adults (aged ≥ 65 years) living in two regions. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to examine the associations between self-reported perceived neighborhood and home environmental attributions and TV viewing time by using logistic regression analyses. The results showed that perceived neighborhood and home environmental factors were associated with excessive TV viewing time (≥2 h/day) after adjusting for potential confounders. Compared with a reference group, older adults who perceived their neighborhoods to have unsafe traffic were more likely to report excessive TV viewing time (OR = 1.36, 95%CI = 1.02-1.82). Older adults who reported having two or more TV sets in the home (OR = 1.77, CI = 1.28-2.44) and having a TV in the bedroom (OR = 1.55, CI = 1.18-2.03) were also more likely to report excessive TV viewing time. Further longitudinal research can confirm these findings, and tailored interventions focusing on the perceptions of neighborhood traffic safety and TV access at home for older adults might be effective means of preventing excessive TV viewing time.

  15. Practising family medicine for adults with intellectual disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Baumbusch, Jennifer; Phinney, Alison; Baumbusch, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the perspectives of adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) on helpful interactions with their family physicians. Design Exploratory, qualitative study. Setting Vancouver, BC. Participants Purposive sample of 11 community-dwelling adults with IDs. Methods In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted face to face with participants. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Research team members read the transcripts, which were then coded into categories and subcategories and discussed at collective analysis meetings. The main study themes were generated through this iterative, collective process. Main findings Two themes about helpful interactions were identified: helping patients understand and helping patients navigate the health care system. The first theme reflected helpful ways of communicating with patients with IDs. These approaches focused on plain-language communication and other strategies developed jointly by the patients and their physicians. The second theme reflected ways in which the family physicians helped adults with IDs manage their health needs despite the complex constraints of their socioeconomic situations. Conclusion Adults with IDs want to play an active role in managing their health as they age, and helpful interactions with family physicians make this possible. PMID:25022654

  16. Elderly adult survivors of family violence. Implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Anetzberger, G J

    1997-10-01

    This article on elderly adult survivors of domestic violence (usually women) reviews the literature that examines the impact on later life of domestic violence experienced earlier in life and that examines the effects of elder abuse perpetrated by adult family members. The discussion is illustrated with case studies and figures that list the physical, psychological, behavioral, and social effects of each type of violence as well as intervening variables. Next, the paper reviews the influence of culture and ethnicity on the meaning attached to elder abuse and on help-seeking or accepting behavior. The article then proposes a conceptual framework that uses contributing factors (cultural background, individual influences, and cohort influences), modifying factors (the nature of violence, personal circumstances, and relationship with perpetrator), the meaning of violence, and the effects on the survivor to explain the effects of early or late family violence on elderly adult survivors. The discussion notes that the framework focuses on negative effects but that survivors of domestic violence can experience positive effects, such as the development of personal coping skills. The article ends by noting that this proposed framework has clinical implications because it recognizes that the effects of domestic violence on elderly adults may be complicated, it helps practitioners link symptoms to domestic violence, it helps practitioners realize that the meaning of domestic violence may vary among elderly victims, and it shows that family violence occurs in a social context.

  17. Adult Literacy and Parenting Outcomes of a Rural, Home-Based Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Walsh, Sandra; Spring, Janet; Swisher, Angie; Lewis, Harry

    The Even Start Family Literacy Program is a national program designed to break the cycle of poverty and illiteracy by working with low-income families to improve adult literacy, parenting skills, and developmental and preschool readiness of young children in the family. The Monongalia County (West Virginia) Even Start Program is unusual in that…

  18. Emerging adults' lived experience of formative family stress: the family's lasting influence.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Carmen R; Chavez, Tom; Woulfe, Julie

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we use a phenomenology framework to explore emerging adults' formative experiences of family stress. Fourteen college students participated in a qualitative interview about their experience of family stress. We analyzed the interviews using the empirical phenomenological psychology method. Participants described a variety of family stressors, including parental conflict and divorce, physical or mental illness, and emotional or sexual abuse by a family member. Two general types of parallel processes were essential to the experience of family stress for participants. First, the family stressor was experienced in shifts and progressions reflecting the young person's attempts to manage the stressor, and second, these shifts and progressions were interdependent with deeply personal psychological meanings of self, sociality, physical and emotional expression, agency, place, space, project, and discourse. We describe each of these parallel processes and their subprocesses, and conclude with implications for mental health practice and research.

  19. Moses and Superman Come Home: Counseling Adoptees and Adoptive Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiz, Stephen G.

    This paper looks at three parties impacted by adoption: the adoptive parents, the adopted child, and the adoptive family. When working with adoptive parents, counselors should respect the strength of the couple, their commitment to parenthood, and the closeness that may develop from weathering the issue of childlessness. Adoptive parents are…

  20. Taxonomy of Family Life Styles: I. Homes with TMR Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mink, Iris Tan; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cluster analysis of social environment variables for 115 families with children (average age 12 years) in trainable mentally retarded classes revealed five distinctive patterns: cohesive; harmonious; control oriented, somewhat unharmonious; low disclosure, unharmonious; child oriented, expressive; and disadvantaged, low morale. Comparisons and…

  1. Diluting the Cesspool: Families, Home Improvement, and Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the process of social change through improvement of residences in decaying neighborhoods--gentrification--has itself changed. Traditional families (married with children) and a broader spectrum of the social class spectrum are more likely to be involved. The present research takes an ethnographic perspective and considers the…

  2. Food Buying Guide for Family Day Care Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Chicago, IL. Midwest Regional Office.

    Offered in this guide are facts enabling family day care providers in Michigan to serve meals meeting meal pattern requirements of the state's Child Care Food Program. Adapted from the "Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs," contents are based on the latest Federal regulations and meal pattern requirements, current food production and…

  3. Family Living. Performance Objectives. Criterion Measures. Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duval County School Board, Jacksonville, FL.

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a family living course for 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students. The materials were developed for a semester or 1-year course designed to prepare students (1) to exhibit knowledge of the past, present, and future…

  4. Family-based, in-home services for the severely emotionally disturbed child.

    PubMed

    Heying, K R

    1985-01-01

    FBS was not conceived as a substitute for a residential treatment program. It was instead established to provide a greater array of services in the center's continuum of care and another treatment alternative. Although children were accepted into the FBS program when residential treatment was indicated, it was not because the program was considered an equal to residential treatment. Rather, we felt the child and family could receive greater benefits from an in-home approach [Willner et al. 1972]. The results of intensive family-based services speak for themselves in terms of cost-effectiveness, placement prevention, and family reunification [Bryce and Lloyd 1980a]. It has been the center's experience that the most vulnerable children are those who have been removed for extended periods of time to an institutional setting. Results of table 1 indicate that 68% of the children receiving FBS aftercare remained in their homes, while children who were served before any placement remained in their homes 97% of the time. In spite of major behavioral changes experienced by the child and family during the residential course of treatment, the staff reports the following obstacles to successful reunification: Child "identified" as the problem is often expected to return home as a different human being without needs or problems. Temporary expulsion of the identified child often immediately relieves family stress, yet begins a process of homeostatic adjustment whereby the system closes, excluding the child.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Skin tears: care and management of the older adult at home.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Regina F; Davidson, Martha W; Thompson, Bonnie J; Kelechi, Teresa J

    2013-02-01

    Skin tears experienced by older adults require special skills to promote healing. Home healthcare providers are in key positions to manage skin tears and prevent further skin trauma. Several guidelines, risk assessments, classifications, and products exist to manage high-risk patients. Frequent evaluation of the effectiveness of the treatment and prevention strategies in an overall skin care protocol for home care patients is critical to reduce skin tear incidence and promote prompt healing when skin tears are present.

  6. Consumption and expenditure on food prepared away from home among Mexican adults in 2006

    PubMed Central

    Langellier, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to describe food expenditure and consumption of foods prepared away from home among Mexican adults. Methods Data were from 45,241 adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006, a nationally-representative, cross-sectional survey of Mexican households. Descriptive statistics and multivariable linear and logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between location of residence, educational attainment, socioeconomic status and the following: 1) expenditure on all food and at restaurants, and 2) frequency of consumption of comida corrida/restaurant food and street food. Results Food expenditure and consumption of food prepared away from home were positively associated with socioeconomic status, educational attainment, and urban vs. rural residence (p<0.001 for all relationships in bivariate analyses). Conclusions Consumption of food prepared outside of the home may be an important part of the diet among urban Mexican adults and those with high socioeconomic status and educational attainment. PMID:25629274

  7. Assessing the home fire safety of urban older adults: a case study.

    PubMed

    Twyman, Stephanie; Fahey, Erin; Lehna, Carlee

    2014-01-01

    Older adults are at a higher risk for fatal house fire injury due to decreased mobility, chronic illness, and lack of smoke alarms. The purpose of this illustrative case study is to describe the home fire safety (HFS) status of an urban older adult who participated in a large study funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). During a home visit with the participant, HFS data were collected from documents, observation, physical artifacts, reflective logs, and interviews. Numerous HFS hazards were identified including non-working smoke alarms, inadequate number and inappropriate placement of smoke alarms, lack of carbon monoxide (CO) alarms, inability to identify a home fire escape plan, hot water heater temperature set too high, and cooking hazards. Identification of HFS risk factors will assist in the development of educational materials that can be tailored to the older adult population to decrease their risk of fire-related injuries and death. PMID:25362758

  8. Interior design preferences of residents, families, and staff in two nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Miller, D B; Goldman, L E; Woodman, S A

    1985-01-01

    The small number of respondents and the absence of specific demographic data concerning the three categories of respondents represented definite limitations. Further investigation in other long-term care facilities clearly is indicated. However, as a preliminary survey of preferences in nursing home interior design, several interesting findings have emerged: Patients, staff and families all emphasized patient safety and function over aesthetics. Yet, more residents than staff and families were concerned with appearance. Although experts advocate creating a home-like atmosphere in the nursing home, 50% or more of each group applied different criteria for specific design elements for private homes and for long-term care institutions. Design preferences for the three groups were similar, with an emphasis on modern furniture, painted walls, resilient tile rather than carpet, blinds, pastel and warm colors, and the use of paintings as accessories. Contrary to study assumptions, design features that promote patient individuality (e.g., patient artwork) received much greater emphasis from staff than from patients and families. Environmental change was considered an important aspect of interior design. Of the three constituencies, staff was most aware of periodic changes in decor and considered change as "very important" more often than did families or patients. As the nature of the nursing home patient population has changed--with residents presenting more disability and less rehabilitation potential and less likelihood of returning home--the ambiance of facilities has assumed even more importance. Clearly, the design preferences of residents who live in the facility are of paramount importance. However, it is also helpful to have an environment that is pleasing to family members who often experience difficulty in ongoing visitations, particularly to intellectually impaired relatives. Maintaining staff morale at a high level is a constant challenge in a long-term care

  9. Managing Home and Work Responsibilities. Secondary Learning Guide 9. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This competency-based secondary learning guide on managing home and work responsibilities is part of a series that are adaptations of guides developed for adult consumer and homemaking education programs. The guides provide students with experiences that help them learn to do the following: make decisions; use creative approaches to solve…

  10. Non-therapist identification of falling hazards in older adult homes using digital photography

    PubMed Central

    Ritchey, Katherine C.; Meyer, Deborah; Ice, Gillian H.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation and removal of home hazards is an invaluable method for preventing in-home falls and preserving independent living. Current processes for conducting home hazard assessments are impractical from a whole population standpoint given the substantial resources required for implementation. Digital photography offers an opportunity to remotely evaluate an environment for falling hazards. However, reliability of this method has only been tested under the direction of skilled therapists. Ten community dwelling adults over the age of 65 were recruited from local primary care practices between July, 2009 and February, 2010. In-home (IH) assessments were completed immediately after a photographer, blinded to the assessment form, took digital photographs (DP) of the participant home. A different non-therapist assessor then reviewed the photographs and completed a second assessment of the home. Kappa statistic was used to analyze the reliability between the two independent assessments. Home assessments completed by a non-therapist using digital photographs had a substantial agreement (Kappa = 0.61, p < 0.001) with in-home assessments completed by another non-therapist. Additionally, the DP assessments agreed with the IH assessments on the presence or absence of items 96.8% of the time. This study showed that non-therapists can reliably conduct home hazard evaluations using digital photographs. PMID:26844151

  11. Non-therapist identification of falling hazards in older adult homes using digital photography.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, Katherine C; Meyer, Deborah; Ice, Gillian H

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation and removal of home hazards is an invaluable method for preventing in-home falls and preserving independent living. Current processes for conducting home hazard assessments are impractical from a whole population standpoint given the substantial resources required for implementation. Digital photography offers an opportunity to remotely evaluate an environment for falling hazards. However, reliability of this method has only been tested under the direction of skilled therapists. Ten community dwelling adults over the age of 65 were recruited from local primary care practices between July, 2009 and February, 2010. In-home (IH) assessments were completed immediately after a photographer, blinded to the assessment form, took digital photographs (DP) of the participant home. A different non-therapist assessor then reviewed the photographs and completed a second assessment of the home. Kappa statistic was used to analyze the reliability between the two independent assessments. Home assessments completed by a non-therapist using digital photographs had a substantial agreement (Kappa = 0.61, p < 0.001) with in-home assessments completed by another non-therapist. Additionally, the DP assessments agreed with the IH assessments on the presence or absence of items 96.8% of the time. This study showed that non-therapists can reliably conduct home hazard evaluations using digital photographs. PMID:26844151

  12. Non-therapist identification of falling hazards in older adult homes using digital photography.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, Katherine C; Meyer, Deborah; Ice, Gillian H

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation and removal of home hazards is an invaluable method for preventing in-home falls and preserving independent living. Current processes for conducting home hazard assessments are impractical from a whole population standpoint given the substantial resources required for implementation. Digital photography offers an opportunity to remotely evaluate an environment for falling hazards. However, reliability of this method has only been tested under the direction of skilled therapists. Ten community dwelling adults over the age of 65 were recruited from local primary care practices between July, 2009 and February, 2010. In-home (IH) assessments were completed immediately after a photographer, blinded to the assessment form, took digital photographs (DP) of the participant home. A different non-therapist assessor then reviewed the photographs and completed a second assessment of the home. Kappa statistic was used to analyze the reliability between the two independent assessments. Home assessments completed by a non-therapist using digital photographs had a substantial agreement (Kappa = 0.61, p < 0.001) with in-home assessments completed by another non-therapist. Additionally, the DP assessments agreed with the IH assessments on the presence or absence of items 96.8% of the time. This study showed that non-therapists can reliably conduct home hazard evaluations using digital photographs.

  13. Female children with incarcerated adult family members at risk for lifelong neurological decline.

    PubMed

    Brewer-Smyth, Kathleen; Pohlig, Ryan T; Bucurescu, Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    A secondary analysis of data from adult female prison inmates in the mid-Atlantic United States defined relationships between having incarcerated adult family members during childhood and neurological outcomes. Of 135 inmates, 99 (60%) had one or more incarcerated adult family members during childhood. Regression analyses revealed that having incarcerated adult family members was related to greater frequency and severity of childhood abuse and higher incidence of neurological deficits in adulthood, especially related to traumatic brain injuries, compared to those without incarcerated adult family members. Along with being role models, adult family members impact the neurological health of children throughout their life-span. PMID:26788781

  14. Home management of the adult patient with leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, J E; Held, D M

    1982-12-01

    The many changes that have occurred within the medical profession and among the public are taking long-term care out of the hospital and placing it back into the home. Attitudes toward cancer have altered, as seen by the rapid growth of the oncology specialty as well as the willingness of the community to allow those with cancer to return to a viable status. Even the individual who must face end-stage disease can now rest comfortably in the privacy of his or her own home, surrounded by loved ones. Improved nutritional efforts during periods of active therapy are reducing the side effects and improving the tolerance of highly cytotoxic drugs. Thus, acute episodes of treatment are shortened, allowing for earlier discharge. Individuals are demanding accurate information regarding their disease and its treatment. Patients are catalysts for their own recovery as they become more active participants in their care. Some are even choosing not to undergo suggested therapies and are returning home to put their lives in order and let disease processes take their natural course, even until death. As for leukemia, more supportive measures such as blood component therapy and evaluative work-ups are being offered on an outpatient basis. Patients are learning self-care measures to counteract or minimize side effects to chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Thus, overwhelming infection is of less risk and hospitalization is shortened. Infection, especially from Staphylococcus aureus, still remains a major cause of death of patients with leukemia. However, one must consider how prevalent this organism is in the hospital environment. Home care management is improving; care can be as comprehensive as one might need or receive in the hospital setting. PMID:6924785

  15. 77 FR 19008 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy Upgrades AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S.... Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) requests comments on......

  16. 77 FR 23238 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy Upgrades AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S..., Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program, Mailstop EE-2K, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable......

  17. Nutrition and Physical Activity Practices in Childcare Centers versus Family Childcare Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Ruby; Page, Monica; Sanders, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Obesity rates among preschool-aged children have doubled in the past 10 years, and 60% of these children spend the majority of their day in childcare facilities. Few studies have examined the quality of nutrition and physical activity practices in childcare centers as compared to family childcare homes. The purpose of this study is to determine if…

  18. Family Living, Personal Culture, Child Development, [and] Careers in Home Economics. Career Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Gloria E.; And Others

    The four instructional units or mini-courses in the area of home economics are designed for the seventh through ninth grade levels. In the first two units (parts A and B), both six-week courses, provide seven learning activities in family living and 10 activities in personal culture focusing on: self and personality development, goals and values,…

  19. Book Reading Mediation, SES, Home Literacy Environment, and Children's Literacy: Evidence from Arabic-Speaking Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korat, Ofra; Arafat, Safieh H.; Aram, Dorit; Klein, Pnina

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the contribution of maternal mediation in storybook reading, socioeconomic status (SES), and home literacy environment (HLE) to children's literacy level in kindergarten and first grade in Israeli Arabic-speaking families. A total of 109 kindergarten children and their mothers participated. Children's literacy level was…

  20. Take-Home Art Appreciation Kits for Kindergartners and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahey, Christine

    2002-01-01

    Describes collaborative project between an art specialist and kindergarten teacher to develop take-home art appreciation kits for kindergartners. Discusses benefits of the collaboration for teachers, children, and families. Focuses on aesthetic inquiry approach to the art kits to develop inquiry and critical thinking skills. Describes the kits'…

  1. School Readiness of Children from Immigrant Families: Contributions of Region of Origin, Home, and Childcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Amanda S.; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Children from immigrant families make up a growing proportion of young children in the United States. This study highlights the heterogeneity in early academic skills related to parental region of origin. It also considers the contributions of early home and nonparental care settings to the diversity in early academic performance. Using nationally…

  2. Social Work Home Visits to Children and Families in the UK: A Foucauldian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Karen; Cree, Viviene E.

    2016-01-01

    The home visit is at the heart of social work practice with children and families; it is what children and families' social workers do more than any other single activity (except for recording), and it is through the home visit that assessments are made on a daily basis about risk, protection and welfare of children. And yet it is, more than any other activity, an example of what Pithouse has called an ‘invisible trade’: it happens behind closed doors, in the most secret and intimate spaces of family life. Drawing on conceptual tools associated with the work of Foucault, this article sets out to provide a critical, chronological review of research, policy and practice on home visiting. We aim to explain how and in what ways changing discourses have shaped the emergence, legitimacy, research and practice of the social work home visit to children and families at significant time periods and in a UK context. We end by highlighting the importance for the social work profession of engagement and critical reflection on the identified themes as part of their daily practice. PMID:27559221

  3. Heritage Language Acquisition and Maintenance: Home Literacy Practices of Japanese-Speaking Families in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomura, Takako; Caidi, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we examine the case of Japanese-speaking families in Canada and their experiences with teaching a heritage language at home, along with the uses and perceived usefulness of public library resources, collections, and services in the process. Methods: We interviewed fourteen mothers who speak Japanese to their children.…

  4. Views from the Home Front: The Experience of Children from Military Families. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Research has begun to document the challenges faced by members of the U.S. military in deploying for war and reintegrating into life at home. But little is known about how wartime experience and parental deployments have affected the children from military families. This fact sheet summarizes a study that explored how these children fared…

  5. Family and Home Literacy Practices: Mediating Factors for Preliterate English Learners at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denney, Maria K.; English, Judith P.; Gerber, Michael M.; Leafstedt, Jill; Ruz, Monica L.

    This paper reports the initial findings of a survey of family and home literacy factors that may influence the development of phonological awareness skills for preliterate English learners during the acquisition phase of reading development in a second language (L2). Preliminary findings are from the first year of a 3-year longitudinal study of…

  6. The Nontoxic Home. Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Everyday Toxics and Health Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadd, Debra Lynn

    The document maintains that the world is filled with health hazards and the best a person can do is to assess the danger of individual products, learn the risks, weigh the risks against the benefits, and decide whether or not to personally take these risks or to subject family members to them. This perspective begins in the home. This book…

  7. Family Perspectives on End-of-Life Care Experiences in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetle, Terrie; Shield, Renee; Teno, Joan; Miller, Susan C.; Welch, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to expand knowledge regarding end-of-life care received in nursing homes through the use of narrative interviews with family members close to the decedents. Design and Methods: We conducted follow-up qualitative interviews with 54 respondents who had participated in an earlier national survey of 1,578…

  8. Family Life Program for the Women's Home Leagues of the Salvation Army. Leader's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvation Army. New York, NY.

    This guide, one of a series of Education for Parenthood manuals developed for use in Salvation Army demonstration programs, offers a course to be used by the Army's Women's Home Leagues, other women's groups, or young married couples. Subject matter focuses on changing patterns of family life, parent-child relationships, and ways to strengthen the…

  9. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home palliative care services for adults with advanced illness and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Barbara; Calanzani, Natalia; Curiale, Vito; McCrone, Paul; Higginson, Irene J

    2013-01-01

    Background Extensive evidence shows that well over 50% of people prefer to be cared for and to die at home provided circumstances allow choice. Despite best efforts and policies, one-third or less of all deaths take place at home in many countries of the world. Objectives 1. To quantify the effect of home palliative care services for adult patients with advanced illness and their family caregivers on patients' odds of dying at home; 2. to examine the clinical effectiveness of home palliative care services on other outcomes for patients and their caregivers such as symptom control, quality of life, caregiver distress and satisfaction with care; 3. to compare the resource use and costs associated with these services; 4. to critically appraise and summarise the current evidence on cost-effectiveness. Search methods We searched 12 electronic databases up to November 2012. We checked the reference lists of all included studies, 49 relevant systematic reviews, four key textbooks and recent conference abstracts. We contacted 17 experts and researchers for unpublished data. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series (ITSs) evaluating the impact of home palliative care services on outcomes for adults with advanced illness or their family caregivers, or both. Data collection and analysis One review author assessed the identified titles and abstracts. Two independent reviewers performed assessment of all potentially relevant studies, data extraction and assessment of methodological quality. We carried out meta-analysis where appropriate and calculated numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNTBs) for the primary outcome (death at home). Main results We identified 23 studies (16 RCTs, 6 of high quality), including 37,561 participants and 4042 family caregivers, largely with advanced cancer but also congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive

  10. [Variability of home dietary habits of families living in Bamako (Mali) according to their socioeconomic status].

    PubMed

    Ag Bendech, M; Chauliac, M; Malvy, D

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the influence of standard of living on the dietary and eating habits of families in Bamako (Mali). Family meals eaten at home at any time of day were studied. Families were selected for the study according to two criteria: the place of residence and the domestic commodities and urban investments. Thus, 24 families were included from affluent and 24 from moderately affluent neighborhoods, and 26 families from poor neighborhoods. All families ate three meals a day, each including staples and sauce. However, the dishes selected for the different meals and their ingredients varied considerably with the family's status. Cereals were the main component of breakfast, but the type varied from one category of family to another. All poor families and 79% of the intermediate group and only 54% of the affluent group ate millet/sorghum. Seventy-five % of the affluent, 13% of the intermediate and none of the poor families drank coffee at breakfast. Fifty % of the affluent, 29% of the intermediate and 19% of the poor families ate rice with nadji sauce at lunch. The quality of the nadji sauce varied with economic status. Tigadeguena sauce was eaten with rice in 17% of the affluent families, 50% of the intermediate group and 12% of the poor families. Very little millet/sorghum was eaten by the affluent at lunch, whereas it was included in lunch by over half the poor and one fifth of the intermediate families. The diversity of dishes was larger at supper, but only in the affluent families which had 2 to 4 different dishes or produce. They included garden vegetable salads and stews, with or without bread. Dinner for the intermediate and poor families was similar to lunch, that is a cereal base and a sauce. Home eating habits also differed according to status. In the affluent families breakfast was eaten alone, whereas in the poor families it was a communal meal. The intermediate group displayed both patterns. Affluent families tried to alternate and diversify their

  11. Differences in understanding and subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation between user families and rehabilitation providers

    PubMed Central

    Ohura, Tomoko; Tsuyama, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify differences in understanding and subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation between user families and rehabilitation providers. [Subjects] The subjects were home-visit rehabilitation providers and user families. [Methods] Home-visit rehabilitation providers and user families completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding the content and subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation. For statistical analysis, the McNemar’s test was used. [Results] Fifty pairs of responses met the inclusion criteria. The mean age of user families was 65.0 ± 11.2 years, and 58.0% (29/50) were spouses of users (user mean age, 77.7 ± 10.2 years; 48.0% (24/50) female). With regard to home-visit rehabilitation content, user families thought that paralysis improvement exercise, massage, and self-care activities were implemented to a greater degree than did rehabilitation providers. With regard to the subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation, a higher proportion of user families noticed “maintenance/improvement” effects on symptoms and sequelae, as well as pain and suffering, compared with providers. [Conclusion] User families believed that rehabilitation would also improve users’ symptoms and pain. Care providers should explain the aims of home-visit rehabilitation to users and their families, both of which require a strong understanding of home-visit rehabilitation in order to achieve rehabilitation goals. PMID:26834364

  12. Breadwinner and caregiver: a cross-sectional analysis of children's and emerging adults' visions of their future family roles.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Megan; Coyle, Emily F

    2011-06-01

    Participants were 150 school-age boys and girls, 58 high school students, and 145 university students drawn from communities in the Southeastern United States. In this cross-sectional study, family role attitudes and expectations were examined across development. Parental work traditionality (occupational prestige and traditionality, and employed hours) predicted daughters' social role attitudes and plans for future family roles, such that daughters' envisioned families resembled that of their parents. Sons' and daughters' own attitudes about adult family roles predicted their plans to work or stay home with their future children; however, mothers' work traditionality predicted daughters' future plans over and above daughters' own attitudes. The only exception to this was in the case of university daughters, where university women's attitudes about social roles fully mediated this relationship. It may be that, as young women approach adulthood and the formation of families, they adjust their vision of their future self to match more closely their own attitudes about the caregiving role.

  13. Home Sweet Home? Families' Experiences with Aggression in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgetts, Sandra; Nicholas, David; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie

    2013-01-01

    Although not inherent to the diagnosis, many individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) display aggressive behavior. This study examined the experiences of families living with individuals with ASD who also demonstrate aggressive behaviors. Using a qualitative approach, semistructured interviews were conducted with parents of nine males with…

  14. Building bridges between families and nursing home staff: the Partners in Caregiving Program.

    PubMed

    Pillemer, K; Hegeman, C R; Albright, B; Henderson, C

    1998-08-01

    Compelling evidence exists that conflict and communication problems occur between nursing home staff and family members of residents. However, few interventions have been documented that simultaneously address the needs of both groups. The Partners in Caregiving program was created to train staff and family members in communication techniques and conflict resolution skills. Through a joint meeting with facility administrators, both groups also have the opportunity to influence facility practices. Evaluation data indicated that satisfaction with the program was extremely high, and that positive changes in staff-family interactions occurred. PMID:9726137

  15. Living above the shop: home, business, and family in the English "Industrial Revolution".

    PubMed

    Barker, Hannah; Hamlett, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the living arrangements and familial relations of small business households in northwest English towns between 1760 and 1820. Focusing on evidence from inventories and personal writing, it examines the homes that such households lived and worked in and the ways in which space was ordered and used: indicating that access to particular spaces was determined by status. This study suggests both the continuance of the "household family" into the nineteenth century (rather than its more modern, "nuclear" variant) and the existence of keenly felt gradations of status within households making it likely that the constitution of "the family" differed according to one's place in the domestic hierarchy.

  16. Information needs and sources of family caregivers of home elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Enoki, Hiromi; Uemura, Kazumasa

    2011-01-01

    Meeting the information needs of family caregivers in a timely and appropriate way is a key concern of home care. The present study aimed to explore the following two areas: (a) the priority information needs and sources of family caregivers of home elderly patients and (b) the differences in information needs according to severity of dementia. The subjects were 475 family caregivers of home elderly patients residing in Nagoya city. Data was collected through questionnaires. Severity of dementia was evaluated according to the criteria of the public long-term care insurance policy (levels 0-5). The top 3 items they perceived as of most concern were dementia, first aid, and available public long-term care insurance services. A few respondents felt the need for information on public long-term care insurance services. Nearly half of the caregivers were interested in food and nutrition. The respondents were more likely to receive information from their care managers or physicians than any other source. Caregivers of elderly dependents with severe dementia reported a greater need for information on the spread of dementia, dementia-specific care, or the negative effects of dementia on family and neighborhood. Our results provide useful information on how family caregivers should be educated.

  17. Transition From Hospital to Home in Preterm Infants and Their Families.

    PubMed

    Boykova, Marina

    2016-01-01

    When the day of discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) comes for the parents of newborn infants, they are filled with long-awaited joy and happiness. They go home feeling as parents, away from scheduled routines of the hospital, monitor alarms, clinical rounds, numerous tests, and so on. What do we know about what happens after these little patients and their families leave the NICU? What happens from the point of leaving the hospital until when things get settled and life becomes perceived as normal? This article presents a short summary of research conducted with the vulnerable population of high-risk and preterm infants and their families postdischarge. Available evidence suggests that transition to home after hospital discharge, a phenomenon that many families experience, is challenging and requires attention from clinicians and researchers if we are to provide effective, efficient, and high-quality care. PMID:27465464

  18. Does empowering resident families or nursing home employees in decision making improve service quality?

    PubMed

    Hamann, Darla J

    2014-08-01

    This research examines how the empowerment of residents' family members and nursing home employees in managerial decision making is related to service quality. The study was conducted using data from 33 nursing homes in the United States. Surveys were administered to more than 1,000 employees on-site and mailed to the primary-contact family member of each resident. The resulting multilevel data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. The empowerment of families in decision making was positively associated with their perceptions of service quality. The empowerment of nursing staff in decision making was more strongly related to service quality than the empowerment of nonnursing staff. Among nursing staff, the empowerment of nursing assistants improved service quality more than the empowerment of nurses. PMID:24652909

  19. Does empowering resident families or nursing home employees in decision making improve service quality?

    PubMed

    Hamann, Darla J

    2014-08-01

    This research examines how the empowerment of residents' family members and nursing home employees in managerial decision making is related to service quality. The study was conducted using data from 33 nursing homes in the United States. Surveys were administered to more than 1,000 employees on-site and mailed to the primary-contact family member of each resident. The resulting multilevel data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. The empowerment of families in decision making was positively associated with their perceptions of service quality. The empowerment of nursing staff in decision making was more strongly related to service quality than the empowerment of nonnursing staff. Among nursing staff, the empowerment of nursing assistants improved service quality more than the empowerment of nurses.

  20. Robotics to Enable Older Adults to Remain Living at Home

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Alan J.; Adair, Brooke; Ozanne, Elizabeth; Said, Catherine; Santamaria, Nick; Morris, Meg E.

    2012-01-01

    Given the rapidly ageing population, interest is growing in robots to enable older people to remain living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of the scientific literature, from 1990 to the present, on the use of robots in aged care. The key research questions were as follows: (1) what is the range of robotic devices available to enable older people to remain mobile, independent, and safe? and, (2) what is the evidence demonstrating that robotic devices are effective in enabling independent living in community dwelling older people? Following database searches for relevant literature an initial yield of 161 articles was obtained. Titles and abstracts of articles were then reviewed by 2 independent people to determine suitability for inclusion. Forty-two articles met the criteria for question 1. Of these, 4 articles met the criteria for question 2. Results showed that robotics is currently available to assist older healthy people and people with disabilities to remain independent and to monitor their safety and social connectedness. Most studies were conducted in laboratories and hospital clinics. Currently limited evidence demonstrates that robots can be used to enable people to remain living at home, although this is an emerging smart technology that is rapidly evolving. PMID:23304507

  1. Theory of Mind Among Young Adult Children From Alcoholic Families

    PubMed Central

    Kopera, Maciej; Glass, Jennifer M; Heitzeg, Mary M; Wojnar, Marcin; Puttler, Leon I; Zucker, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Given the evidence that several cognitive and emotional functions are impaired in adult alcohol-dependent patients and the possibility that some of these deficits are transmitted to their children, the objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the perception of complex mental states would be reduced in young adults from families with a positive family history of alcohol dependence. It was also anticipated that social-perceptual deficits would confer unique predictive ability beyond that shared with other cognitive risk factors for alcohol dependence and/or substance use risk. Method: Data from 301 youth ages 18–21 years, recruited from an ongoing community longitudinal study of alcoholic and matched control families, were analyzed. Family history of alcohol dependence as well as alcohol-dependence diagnosis in the youth was based on diagnostic criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. A substance use risk factor measured early problem alcohol/other drug use. The perception of mental states was measured with the computerized version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). Results: Children of alcohol-dependent parents did not show impairment in the mental states perception task, nor did social perception skills predict alcohol dependence in the youth. Correlational analysis performed between RMET and the substance use risk factor showed no significant association between the variables. Conclusions: The study results do not confirm the hypothesis that behaviorally measured social perception impairment is more prevalent in the children of alcohol-dependent parents. In addition, social-perceptual deficits were not a unique marker of either alcohol dependence or high risk for alcohol dependence in this young adult sample. PMID:25208207

  2. Evaluating the Impact of the Life of a Caregiver Simulation on Student Attitudes, Understanding, and Knowledge of Frail Older Adults and Their Family Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Sawin, Erika Metzler; Mast, Merle E; Sessoms, John C; Fulcher, Keston H

    2016-01-01

    Many older adults age at home, cared for by family caregivers. Nurse educators need effective educational strategies to teach students family caregiving issues. This article examines how the Life of a Caregiver (LOC) simulation influences students' understanding and knowledge of aging, family caregiving issues, and related community services. A descriptive mixed-methods study was used with a student sample (n = 46). Participants reported significantly higher knowledge of caregiving terminology and significantly greater understanding of caregiving challenges and community services. The LOC simulation was found to be an effective strategy to teach students to care for older adults and their caregivers. PMID:27164776

  3. Mental and behavioral health conditions among older adults: implications for the home care workforce

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Hayley P.; Coyle, Caitlin E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The shift towards home and community-based care, coupled with the growing prevalence of mental and behavioral health conditions, increases the demand for skilled home care workers. However, little is known about the experiences of home care aides who provide care to clients with mental and behavioral health diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to identify challenges aides face in providing care to this particular group of clients, as well as the strategies and support they utilize to complete their job responsibilities. Methods Data from five focus groups with home care workers (N = 49) throughout Massachusetts were used to examine the experiences of home care workers providing services to adults with mental or behavioral health needs. A constant comparative method was used during analysis of the focus group transcripts. Results Aides described a lack of prior-knowledge of challenging client behaviors, leaving them unprepared to deal with disruptions to care delivery. Aides feel unsafe or unsure providing care to someone with complex needs, made worse by a perceived lack of training and support from the broader care team. Aides develop unique strategies for accomplishing their work. Conclusion This analysis of the aide’s perspective contributes valuable, and often unheard, insight to inform what we know about providing reliable, quality and safe home care to this growing group of vulnerable adults. Implications of this convergence are discussed relative to aides. PMID:25965114

  4. A profile of middle-aged and older adults admitted to nursing homes: 2000-2008.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nancy A; Pinet-Peralta, Luis M; Elder, Keith T

    2012-01-01

    Middle-aged adults are becoming an increasing share of the nursing home population. Minimum Data Set assessment data for 2000 and 2008 are used to explore similarities and differences in sociodemographic, residential, medical, and psychiatric characteristics of newly admitted middle-aged adults (31-64) compared to their older counterparts (65+). Relative to their share of the state population, Black middle-aged adults are overrepresented in nursing homes across 45 states and the District of Columbia. Chronic conditions, including diabetes, renal failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and circulatory/heart disorders, appeared to contribute to the increasing presence of middle-aged adults. There were substantial increases in diagnoses of psychiatric disorders at admission; psychiatric diagnoses were significantly higher among middle-aged adults. Middle-aged adults were also more likely to have residential histories of prior stays in psychiatric facilities relative to older adults. States' rebalancing efforts need to attend to the increasing presence of disability associated with chronic medical and psychiatric conditions among middle-aged adults. PMID:22720887

  5. Home Educated and Now Adults: Their Community and Civic Involvement, Views about Homeschooling, and Other Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    For nearly 20 years, critics and the curious have been asking about the homeschooled: But how will they do in the "real world" of adulthood? As a corollary, they have also asked: What about socialization? This unique study takes a look at the lives of over 7,000 adults from across the United States who were home educated during their elementary…

  6. "There's No Place like Home": An Analysis of Young Adults' Mature Coresidency in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Barbara A.; Gee, Ellen M.; Wister, Andrew V.

    2002-01-01

    This article investigates the propensity for young adults to live in the parental home between the ages of 25 to 34--termed "mature coresidency." Drawing upon a synthesis of life course theory and the concept of social capital, a rationale is developed for examination of emotional closeness to parents during childhood and a number of…

  7. Residential Characteristics, Social Factors, and Mortality among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Transitions out of Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Kelly; Heller, Tamar; Freels, Sally

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the degree to which residential characteristics and social factors are associated with mortality, after controlling for personal characteristics, among adults with intellectual disabilities who have resided in nursing homes (facilities providing skilled care and related services) at baseline in the Chicago area. Initial…

  8. Age Effects in a Study Abroad Context: Children and Adults Studying Abroad and at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llanes, Angels; Munoz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effects of learning context and age on second language development by comparing the language gains, measured in terms of oral and written fluency, lexical and syntactic complexity, and accuracy, experienced by four groups of learners of English: children in a study abroad setting, children in their at-home school, adults in…

  9. Hazards of Immobility: Bedsores. Adult Residential Care Home, Lesson Plan No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Kathleen

    Developed as part of a 104-hour course on adult residential care homes (ARCHs), this 50-minute lesson is designed to enable a student to: (1) define a bedsore; (2) list and describe three major causes of bedsores; (3) identify potential bedsore sites in the back-lying, side-lying, and sitting positions; and (4) calculate the risk for developing…

  10. Running Away from Home: A Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Risk Factors and Young Adult Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Joan S.; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Ellickson, Phyllis L.; Klein, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the adolescent risk factors and young adult health-related outcomes associated with running away from home. We examined these correlates of running away using longitudinal data from 4,329 youth (48% female, 85% white) who were followed from Grade 9 to age 21. Nearly 14% of the sample reported running away in the past year at…

  11. Selected Resources on Adult Children Living at Home: An Annotated Bibliography for Researchers, Educators, and Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.; Hayes, Kathleen C.

    The resources in this annotated bibliography were selected to help readers better understand what is known about adult children living at home. Data on this subject are scarce. The bibliography is a literature review--a State-of-the-Art report--which is applicable to many professionals and students in the social sciences. It was developed by…

  12. Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities in Adult Homes: Monitoring Changes over Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmerman, A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Residents (n=617) with psychiatric disabilities, living in 3 adult homes, were studied over 24 months to determine changes that occurred in population served, modes of intervention, and outcome measures. Residents showed stability in their rehospitalization rate, symptomatology, and social integration. A token economy reduced symptomatology and…

  13. Medication regimens of frail older adults after discharge from home healthcare.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Rachelle; Marek, Karen Dorman; Bub, Linda Denison; Stetzer, Frank

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the number and types of discrepancy errors present after discharge from home healthcare in older adults at risk for medication management problems following an episode of home healthcare. More than half of the 414 participants had at least one medication discrepancy error (53.2%, n = 219) with the participant's omission of a prescribed medication (n = 118, 30.17%) occurring most frequently. The results of this study support the need for home healthcare clinicians to perform frequent assessments of medication regimens to ensure that the older adults are aware of the regimen they are prescribed, and have systems in place to support them in managing their medications.

  14. "Is there a gun in the home?" Assessing the risks of gun ownership in older adults.

    PubMed

    Pinholt, Ellen M; Mitchell, Joshua D; Butler, Jane H; Kumar, Harjinder

    2014-06-01

    An important ethical and safety concern that geriatricians, primary care providers, and home health professionals need to address is gun ownership by elderly adults. Those aged 65 and older now have the highest rate of gun ownership in America, and they also have a high prevalence of depression and suicide. Dementia can add additional layers of risk. Even older gun owners who are otherwise intellectually intact may benefit from information about gun safety with the increasing numbers of children being cared for by grandparents. Health professionals should ask patients, "Is there a gun in the home?" in the clinic and during home visits. Healthcare professionals must have knowledge and skills to address safe gun ownership in elderly adults. The 5 L's (Locked, Loaded, Little children, feeling Low, Learned owner) will assist professionals in addressing all aspects of safe ownership.

  15. Longitudinal prevalence and correlates of elder mistreatment among older adults receiving home visiting nursing.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce; Santos, Elizabeth J; Liebel, Dianne V; Russ, Ann J; Conwell, Yeates

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify elder mistreatment (EM) prevalence among a cohort of older adults receiving visiting nurse care in their homes, determine EM subtypes, and identify factors associated with EM. EM data were collected by nurses during monthly home visits for up to 24 months. It took the nurses a mean of 10.5 visits to discern EM. Fifty-four (7.4%) of 724 patients were identified as mistreated, of which 33 had enough information to subtype the EM. Of these 33, 27 were victims of neglect, 16 of psychological abuse, and 10 of financial exploitation, and 17 suffered more than one type. Among the entire sample, 11 variables were positively correlated with EM presence. Nurses visiting older adults in their homes should be aware that their patients are, as a group, vulnerable to EM, and that the factors identified here may be specific markers of greater risk.

  16. Preliminary Data from the Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) Program: A Care Coordination Program for Home-Based Dementia Care and Caregiver Support in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Maria F; Davagnino, Judith; Hastings, S Nicole; Sloane, Richard; Kamholz, Barbara; Twersky, Jack

    2015-06-01

    Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) is an innovative care coordination program of the Durham Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, that provides home-based dementia care and caregiver support for individuals with dementia and their family caregivers, including attention to behavioral symptoms, functional impairment, and home safety, on a consultation basis. The objectives of this study were to describe the COACH program in its first 2 years of operation, assess alignment of program components with quality measures, report characteristics of program participants, and compare rates of placement outside the home with those of a nontreatment comparison group using a retrospective cohort design. Participants were community-dwelling individuals with dementia aged 65 and older who received primary care in the medical center's outpatient clinics and their family caregivers, who were enrolled as dyads (n = 133), and a control group of dyads who were referred to the program and met clinical eligibility criteria but did not enroll (n = 29). Measures included alignment with Dementia Management Quality Measures and time to placement outside the home during 12 months of follow-up after referral to COACH. Results of the evaluation demonstrated that COACH aligns with nine of 10 clinical process measures identified using quality measures and that COACH delivers several other valuable services to enhance care. Mean time to placement outside the home was 29.6 ± 14.3 weeks for both groups (P = .99). The present study demonstrates the successful implementation of a home-based care coordination intervention for persons with dementia and their family caregivers that is strongly aligned with quality measures. PMID:26032224

  17. Preliminary Data from the Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) Program: A Care Coordination Program for Home-Based Dementia Care and Caregiver Support in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Maria F; Davagnino, Judith; Hastings, S Nicole; Sloane, Richard; Kamholz, Barbara; Twersky, Jack

    2015-06-01

    Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) is an innovative care coordination program of the Durham Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, that provides home-based dementia care and caregiver support for individuals with dementia and their family caregivers, including attention to behavioral symptoms, functional impairment, and home safety, on a consultation basis. The objectives of this study were to describe the COACH program in its first 2 years of operation, assess alignment of program components with quality measures, report characteristics of program participants, and compare rates of placement outside the home with those of a nontreatment comparison group using a retrospective cohort design. Participants were community-dwelling individuals with dementia aged 65 and older who received primary care in the medical center's outpatient clinics and their family caregivers, who were enrolled as dyads (n = 133), and a control group of dyads who were referred to the program and met clinical eligibility criteria but did not enroll (n = 29). Measures included alignment with Dementia Management Quality Measures and time to placement outside the home during 12 months of follow-up after referral to COACH. Results of the evaluation demonstrated that COACH aligns with nine of 10 clinical process measures identified using quality measures and that COACH delivers several other valuable services to enhance care. Mean time to placement outside the home was 29.6 ± 14.3 weeks for both groups (P = .99). The present study demonstrates the successful implementation of a home-based care coordination intervention for persons with dementia and their family caregivers that is strongly aligned with quality measures.

  18. Quality Outcomes in Group Home Dementia Care for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janicki, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dementia, as a public health challenge, is a phenomenon vexing many care organisations providing specialised residential and family supports for older adults with intellectual disabilities. With increasing survivorship to ages when risk is greatest, expectations are that many more adults in service will present with cognitive decline…

  19. What is Family-Centered Care for Nursing Home Residents With Advanced Dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ruth Palan; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Givens, Jane L.

    2014-01-01

    To understand family members’ perspectives on person- and family-centered end-of-life care provided to nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia, we conducted a qualitative follow-up interview with 16 respondents who had participated in an earlier prospective study, Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advance Dementia at End of Life (CASCADE). Family members of NH residents (N = 16) with advanced dementia participated in semistructured qualitative interviews that inquired about overall NH experience, communication, surrogate decision making, emotional reaction, and recommendations for improvement. Analysis identified 5 areas considered important by family members: (1) providing basic care; (2) ensuring safety and security; (3) creating a sense of belonging and attachment; (4) fostering self-esteem and self-efficacy; and (5) coming to terms with the experience. These themes can provide a framework for creating and testing strategies to meet the goal of person- and family-centered care. PMID:24085250

  20. Primary Health Care: Potential Home for Family-Focused Preventive Interventions.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Laurel K; Mehus, Christopher J; Hawkins, J David; Boat, Thomas; McCabe, Mary Ann; Barkin, Shari; Perrin, Ellen C; Metzler, Carol W; Prado, Guillermo; Tait, V Fan; Brown, Randall; Beardslee, William

    2016-10-01

    Family-focused prevention programs have been shown to effectively reduce a range of negative behavioral health outcomes but have had limited reach. Three key barriers must be overcome to expand the reach of family-focused prevention programs and thereby achieve a significant public health impact. These barriers are (1) current social norms and perceptions of parenting programs; (2) concerns about the expertise and legitimacy of sponsoring organizations to offer parenting advice; and (3) a paucity of stable, sustainable funding mechanisms. Primary healthcare settings are well positioned to overcome these barriers. Recent changes within health care make primary care settings an increasingly favorable home for family-focused prevention and suggest possibilities for sustainable funding of family-focused prevention programs. This paper discusses the existing advantages of primary care settings and lays out a plan to move toward realizing the potential public health impact of family-focused prevention through widespread implementation in primary healthcare settings.

  1. Primary Health Care: Potential Home for Family-Focused Preventive Interventions.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Laurel K; Mehus, Christopher J; Hawkins, J David; Boat, Thomas; McCabe, Mary Ann; Barkin, Shari; Perrin, Ellen C; Metzler, Carol W; Prado, Guillermo; Tait, V Fan; Brown, Randall; Beardslee, William

    2016-10-01

    Family-focused prevention programs have been shown to effectively reduce a range of negative behavioral health outcomes but have had limited reach. Three key barriers must be overcome to expand the reach of family-focused prevention programs and thereby achieve a significant public health impact. These barriers are (1) current social norms and perceptions of parenting programs; (2) concerns about the expertise and legitimacy of sponsoring organizations to offer parenting advice; and (3) a paucity of stable, sustainable funding mechanisms. Primary healthcare settings are well positioned to overcome these barriers. Recent changes within health care make primary care settings an increasingly favorable home for family-focused prevention and suggest possibilities for sustainable funding of family-focused prevention programs. This paper discusses the existing advantages of primary care settings and lays out a plan to move toward realizing the potential public health impact of family-focused prevention through widespread implementation in primary healthcare settings. PMID:27498167

  2. Aggressive behavior directed at nursing home personnel by residents' family members.

    PubMed

    Vinton, L; Mazza, N

    1994-08-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests there is a significant amount of aggressive behavior directed at nursing home personnel by residents' family members. This exploratory study describes a random sample survey of 70 Florida nursing homes. Administrators reported 1,193 acts of verbal aggression and 13 acts of physical aggression for a 6-month period. Dissatisfaction over how the specific and overall care needs of residents were being met was most frequently cited as the contributing factor. Social work staff and directors of nursing were most often called on to resolve these conflicts. The authors conclude with recommendations for research and conflict resolution. PMID:7959112

  3. The significance of losing things for nursing home residents with dementia and their families.

    PubMed

    Powers, Bethel Ann

    2003-11-01

    This article examines the significance of losing things as part of an individual's whole experience with the material aspects of life. The data on which this report is based were drawn from a broader ethnographic study of everyday ethics affecting nursing home residents with dementia. Combined anthropological methods of participant observation and in-depth interviewing were used to gather information about ordinary daily issues for residents, family members, and nursing home staff. Findings are described as themes related to personal possessions and concerns surrounding them. Discussion comprises an interpretive analysis of meanings drawn from the research and represented as ethical considerations and practice implications--general principles and strategies. PMID:14619317

  4. Forecasting prices of single family homes using GIS-defined neighborhoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaboudan, Mak; Sarkar, Avijit

    2008-03-01

    We estimate spatiotemporal models of average neighborhood single family home prices to use in predicting individual property prices. Average home-price variations are explained in terms of changes in average neighborhood house attributes, spatial attributes, and temporal economic variables. Models adopting three different definitions of neighborhoods are estimated with quarterly cross-sectional data over the period 2000 2004 from four cities in Southern California. Heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation problems are detected and adjusted for via a sequential routine. Results of these models suggest that forecasts obtained using city neighborhood average price equations may have advantage over forecasts obtained using city aggregated price equations.

  5. Predictors and processes associated with home-based family therapists' professional quality of life.

    PubMed

    Macchi, C R; Johnson, Matthew D; Durtschi, Jared A

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether home-based family therapists' (HBFT) workload and clinical experience were associated with therapists' professional quality of life directly and indirectly through self-care activities and frequency of clinical supervision. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling with a sample of 225 home-based therapists. Results suggested that therapists' workload and HBFT experience significantly predicted therapists' professional quality of life. These associations between therapists' workload and HBFT experience were partially mediated through participation in self-care and frequency of clinical supervision. Implications for improving therapists' quality of life are discussed as a function of therapists' workload, clinical experience, self-care, and supervision.

  6. The significance of losing things for nursing home residents with dementia and their families.

    PubMed

    Powers, Bethel Ann

    2003-11-01

    This article examines the significance of losing things as part of an individual's whole experience with the material aspects of life. The data on which this report is based were drawn from a broader ethnographic study of everyday ethics affecting nursing home residents with dementia. Combined anthropological methods of participant observation and in-depth interviewing were used to gather information about ordinary daily issues for residents, family members, and nursing home staff. Findings are described as themes related to personal possessions and concerns surrounding them. Discussion comprises an interpretive analysis of meanings drawn from the research and represented as ethical considerations and practice implications--general principles and strategies.

  7. Home Exercise Programs for Adults With Neurological Injuries: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to describe current occupational therapy practices in the usage and prescription of and clinical reasoning process supporting home exercise programs (HEPs) for clients with neurological injuries (CWNIs). METHOD. A survey was distributed via mail to 2,000 members of the American Occupational Therapy Association. The survey questions concerned basic demographics, current HEP practices, and attitudes toward using HEPs with CWNIs. RESULTS. In the 360 returned surveys, occupational therapists reported numerous benefits of using HEPs and were able to clearly articulate their clinical reasoning. Commonly reported HEP activities were preparatory in nature, and the most frequently prescribed dosage was 16–30 min daily. Most therapists relied on the same clinical reasoning process but varied in implementation methods. CONCLUSION. This study’s results highlight the gaps between evidence and practice. The active ingredients in HEPs for CWNIs need to be more clearly defined and described. PMID:27089296

  8. The roles of familial alcoholism and adolescent family harmony in young adults' substance dependence disorders: mediated and moderated relations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; King, Kevin M; Chassin, Laurie

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the prospective relations among family history density of alcoholism (FHD), adolescent family harmony, and young adults' alcohol and drug dependence. Family harmony was rated by mothers and fathers in adolescence, and young adults' substance dependence diagnoses were obtained through structured interviews. Higher FHD predicted lower adolescent family harmony, which in turn increased young adults' odds of being diagnosed with drug dependence (with and without alcohol dependence) compared to no diagnoses or to alcohol dependence only. Family harmony also interacted with FHD such that the protective effect of family harmony on young adults' drug dependence with or without alcohol dependence decreased as FHD rose, and was nonsignificant at high levels of FHD. The findings suggest the importance of distinguishing among alcohol and drug dependence disorders and examining their differential etiological pathways, and also suggest that the protective effects of harmonious family environments on substance dependence may be limited at high levels of FHD.

  9. Home for the Helidays: A Guide for Student Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACoA). Making a Difference Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    For many students with addicted family members, the holiday season acts more like a time machine, instantly transporting them back to a time when addicted behavior makes it seem like they have gone, "home for the helidays" rather than home to celebrate caring and sharing with members of the family. Often, students who return to an addicted family…

  10. Outcome evaluation of Family Eats: An eight-session web-based program promoting healthy home food environments and dietary behaviors for African American families

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article presents the results of a randomized clinical trial evaluating the eight-session Family Eats web-based intervention promoting healthy home food environments for African American families. African American families (n=126) with 8- to 12-year-old children completed online baseline questio...

  11. Dual-Career Families: The Interfaces of Work, Family and the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jump, Teresa Layne

    This extensive discussion provides an examination of issues concerning dual-career families in the United States. Section I explores changes in the paid labor force and factors contributing to such changes. Section II discusses sex stratification in the family and briefly points out changes needed to strengthen the interface between work and…

  12. Bringing Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Home: Catheter Maintenance Practices and Beliefs of Pediatric Oncology Patients and Families

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, Michael L.; Chen, Allen R.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Hebert, Lindsay C.; Bundy, David G.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Fratino, Lisa; Herpst, Cynthia; Kokoszka, Michelle; Miller, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to investigate (1) the extent to which best-practice central line maintenance practices were employed in the homes of pediatric oncology patients and by whom, (2) caregiver beliefs about central line care and central line–associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) risk, (3) barriers to optimal central line care by families, and (4) educational experiences and preferences regarding central line care. Methods Researchers administered a survey to patients and families in a tertiary care pediatric oncology clinic that engaged in rigorous ambulatory and inpatient CLABSI prevention efforts. Results Of 110 invited patients and caregivers, 105 participated (95% response rate) in the survey (March–May 2012). Of the 50 respondents reporting that they or another caregiver change central line dressings, 48% changed a dressing whenever it was soiled as per protocol (many who did not change dressings per protocol also never personally changed dressings); 67% reported the oncology clinic primarily cares for their child’s central line, while 29% reported that an adult caregiver or the patient primarily cares for the central line. Eight patients performed their own line care “always” or “most of the time.” Some 13% of respondents believed that it was “slightly likely” or “not at all likely” that their child will get an infection if caregivers do not perform line care practices perfectly every time. Dressing change practices were the most difficult to comply with at home. Some 18% of respondents wished they learned more about line care, and 12% received contradictory training. Respondents cited a variety of preferences regarding line care teaching, although the majority looked to clinic nurses for modeling line care. Conclusions Interventions aimed at reducing ambulatory CLABSIs should target appropriate educational experiences for adult caregivers and patients and identify ways to improve compliance with best-practice care

  13. Creating Patient and Family Education Websites: Design and Content of the Home Parenteral Nutrition Family Caregivers Website

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Sharon; Yadrich, Donna Macan; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Smith, Carol

    2011-01-01

    When managing chronic illnesses, caregivers repeatedly seek online information about providing complex, long-term care but often neglect to find information about how to care for themselves. Poor health among caregivers is not only detrimental to their own well-being but may also result in harm to those for whom they care. For this reason, caregivers need access to information and activities about caring for themselves in addition to the information about managing home care they were already likely to seek. The HPN Family Caregivers Website was developed to guide caregivers through the process of caring for themselves by establishing a caregiving routine, self-monitoring their mental and physical health, practicing good sleep hygiene, etc., while also managing the complexities of home care. While website information, activities and algorithms for managing chronic illnesses need to be specific to each population, the content guiding caregivers to care for their own health is universal. PMID:21825970

  14. Gendered Processes in Hospice Palliative Home Care for Seniors With Cancer and Their Family Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Nisha; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; McWilliam, Carol; Stajduhar, Kelli

    2016-06-01

    There has been limited investigation into the processes that shape gender (in)equities in hospice palliative home care. As part of a larger critical ethnographic study, we examined how and why gender relations occur in this context. Using a critical feminist lens, we conducted in-depth interviews with clients living with terminal cancer, their family caregivers and primary nurses; observations of agency home visits; and review of institutional documents. A gender-based analysis revealed that gender enactments of Regulating Gender Relations were legitimized through ideological processes of Normalizing Gender Relations and Equalizing Gender Relations (Re)produced through institutional discourses of individualism and egalitarianism, these gendered processes both advantaged and disadvantaged men and women in hospice palliative home care. Findings suggest that to promote equity, health care providers and policy makers must attend to gender as a prevalent social determinant of health and health care. Implications for policy, practice, education, and research are discussed. PMID:26489710

  15. A Family-Based Diabetes Intervention for Hispanic Adults and Their Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Debra; McCoy, Thomas; Amirehsani, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this quasi-experimental one group longitudinal study is to examine the effects of a family-based intervention program on diabetes self-management behaviors, HbA1c, other biomarkers, psychosocial factors and health-related quality of life in Hispanics with diabetes. Methods Adult patients with diabetes (n = 36) and family members (n = 37) were recruited from a community clinic in rural central North Carolina. Patients and family members attended an 8-week culturally tailored diabetes educational program taught in Spanish. Data was collected pre and post intervention for both patients and family members, with an additional data collection for patients 1 month post intervention. Results Most patients and family members were female and almost all were immigrants. HbA1c dropped by 0.41% on average among patients from pre-intervention to 1 month post intervention. Patients showed significant improvements in systolic blood pressure, diabetes self-efficacy diabetes knowledge, and physical and mental components of health-related quality of life. Higher levels of intake of healthy foods and performance of blood sugar tests and foot inspections were reported. Family members significantly lowered BMI and improved diabetes knowledge from pre- to immediate post-intervention. No significant changes in levels of physical activity were found among patients with diabetes or family members. Conclusions Findings suggest that including family members in educational interventions may provide emotional and psychological support to patients with diabetes, help to develop healthy family behaviors, and promote diabetes self-management. PMID:24248832

  16. Day to Day Operations of Home School Families: Selecting from a Menu of Educational Choices to Meet Students' Individual Instructional Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Kenneth V.; Burroughs, Susie

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the day to day operations of home schools. The case study method was used with four families from a larger pool of families that held membership in a home school organization. Data was gathered using interviews, observations, and artifacts. Findings suggest that these families operated their home schools using traditional…

  17. Factoid forensics: have "more than 40" Australian families abandoned their homes because of wind farm noise?

    PubMed

    Chapman, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Anti-wind farm activists repeatedly claim that families said to be adversely affected by noise from wind turbines "abandon" their homes. In Australia, a claim of "more than 40 families" has been made by a prominent anti-wind farm activist. Six sources (parliamentary submissions, media reports, an anti-wind farm website, wind industry sources, correspondence with known anti-wind farm activists and with three politicians opposed to wind farms) were used to find evidence of home "abandonments." Claims about 12 Australian households permanently (n = 10) or periodically (n = 2) leaving their homes were found. However, no house appears to have been permanently "abandoned" without sale, as the expression implies. These 12 cases need contextualizing against considerations that several of those involved were either dedicated activists against wind farms from times sometimes pre-dating their construction, were engaged in protracted negotiations for home purchase with wind companies, had pre-existing health problems, grievances with the wind company over employment or had left the area for unrelated reasons of employment elsewhere. The statement that "more than 40" houses have been "abandoned" because of wind turbines in Australia is a factoid promoted by wind farm opponents for dramatic, rhetorical impact. Other considerations are often involved in abandonment unrelated to the claims made about wind farm noise.

  18. Factoid forensics: have "more than 40" Australian families abandoned their homes because of wind farm noise?

    PubMed

    Chapman, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Anti-wind farm activists repeatedly claim that families said to be adversely affected by noise from wind turbines "abandon" their homes. In Australia, a claim of "more than 40 families" has been made by a prominent anti-wind farm activist. Six sources (parliamentary submissions, media reports, an anti-wind farm website, wind industry sources, correspondence with known anti-wind farm activists and with three politicians opposed to wind farms) were used to find evidence of home "abandonments." Claims about 12 Australian households permanently (n = 10) or periodically (n = 2) leaving their homes were found. However, no house appears to have been permanently "abandoned" without sale, as the expression implies. These 12 cases need contextualizing against considerations that several of those involved were either dedicated activists against wind farms from times sometimes pre-dating their construction, were engaged in protracted negotiations for home purchase with wind companies, had pre-existing health problems, grievances with the wind company over employment or had left the area for unrelated reasons of employment elsewhere. The statement that "more than 40" houses have been "abandoned" because of wind turbines in Australia is a factoid promoted by wind farm opponents for dramatic, rhetorical impact. Other considerations are often involved in abandonment unrelated to the claims made about wind farm noise. PMID:25033786

  19. Family Involvement in School-Based Health Promotion: Bringing Nutrition Information Home

    PubMed Central

    Blom-Hoffman, Jessica; Wilcox, Kaila R.; Dunn, Liam; Leff, Stephen S.; Power, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Family-school collaboration related to children’s physical development has become increasingly important as childhood obesity rates continue to rise. The present study described the development and implementation of a literacy-based, family component of a school-based health education program and investigated its viability, acceptability, and effectiveness. Interactive children’s books were the mechanism by which students, parents, and teachers received consistent messages at home and school regarding nutrition information. The home-school intervention served to bridge home and school cultures in an urban population. Preliminary process evaluation results indicated that the interactive children’s books were feasible to implement in the school context. Parents, children, and teachers had positive perceptions of the books. Parents who received the books demonstrated increased knowledge of 5 a Day, the primary nutrition message communicated in the program. Although not statistically significant, after the first and second years of intervention, parents in the experimental group reported that their children were eating 0.54 and 0.36 additional servings of fruit and vegetables per day compared with children in the control group. The program did not seem to impact the availability and accessibility of fruits and vegetables at home. PMID:19633724

  20. Maternal Differential Treatment in Later Life Families and Within-Family Variations in Adult Sibling Closeness

    PubMed Central

    Suitor, J. Jill; Nam, Sangbo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In this article, we explore within-family differences in the closeness of sibling ties in adulthood. Specifically, we consider the sibship as a network and investigate the ways in which perceptions of mothers’ differential treatment play a role in within-family variations in sibling closeness in midlife. Method. Data were analyzed from 2,067 adult sibling dyads nested within 216 later life families, collected as part of the Within-Family Differences Study-II. Results. Respondents reported the greatest closeness to siblings whom they perceived as favored by their mothers when they were not favored themselves, whereas respondents were less likely to choose siblings whom they perceived as disfavored by their mothers when they did not perceive themselves as disfavored. Discussion. Variability in the strength of sibling ties within families suggests that some individuals receive greater benefits from this relationship than do their brothers and sisters. These findings shed new light on such within-family variations in sibling closeness by identifying how specific patterns of maternal differential treatment draw offspring toward some siblings and away from others. PMID:25324293

  1. A comparative study of resident, family, and administrator expectations for service quality in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Duffy, J A; Duffy, M; Kilbourne, W E

    2001-01-01

    This article compares the service quality expectations of residents, family, and administrators within a long-term-care context. Expectations for service quality are measured using the SERVQUAL scale. The results support the reliability of the SERVQUAL instrument for nursing home residents. Resident expectations were significantly different from administrators' expectations on all dimensions of quality. The findings are interpreted in terms of expectation formation and the nature of service encounters.

  2. A comparative study of resident, family, and administrator expectations for service quality in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Duffy, J A; Duffy, M; Kilbourne, W E

    2001-01-01

    This article compares the service quality expectations of residents, family, and administrators within a long-term-care context. Expectations for service quality are measured using the SERVQUAL scale. The results support the reliability of the SERVQUAL instrument for nursing home residents. Resident expectations were significantly different from administrators' expectations on all dimensions of quality. The findings are interpreted in terms of expectation formation and the nature of service encounters. PMID:11482179

  3. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Martin, Eric; Moyer, Neil

    2012-10-01

    This report is a revision of an earlier report titled: Measure Guideline: Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. Revisions include: Information in the text box on page 1 was revised to reflect the most accurate information regarding classifications as referenced in the 2012 International Residential Code. “Measure Guideline” was dropped from the title of the report. An addition was made to the reference list.

  4. Transforming Teacher-Family Relationships: Shifting Roles and Perceptions of Home Visits through the Funds of Knowledge Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Kristin Lyn; Karabon, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Education has embraced the idea of an "asset approach" to working with families and children, creating a focus on developing collaborative relationships with families by building on what they bring to the table. In this paper we explore what happened when early childhood teachers entered homes to learn from families and identify their…

  5. Up the Down Staircase: A Look at Family Homelessness in New Jersey. A Report of Homes for the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Children and Poverty, New York, NY.

    In response to the increasing numbers of homeless families, Homes for the Homeless surveyed families in emergency shelters in Newark (New Jersey) to gain some insights into the characteristics and circumstances of urban homeless families. Newark was chosen because it is a large urban center with a high concentration of welfare recipients that is…

  6. "In This Country Education Happen at the Home": Two Families in Search of the "Instruments of Appropriation" for School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markose, Susan; Symes, Colin; Hellsten, Meeri

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses ethnographic data from the study of the home literacy practices of two immigrant families, a Lebanese-Muslim and a Chinese family. It explores the experiences of the immigrant families as they blend the pedagogical practices and behaviours of their own cultures with those of the mainstream culture to ensure academic success in…

  7. Volunteered, negotiated, enforced: family politics and the regulation of home smoking.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jude; Ritchie, Deborah; Amos, Amanda; Greaves, Lorraine; Cunningham-Burley, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The protection of children from secondhand smoke in their homes remains a key objective for health agencies worldwide. While research has explored how parents can influence the introduction of home smoking restrictions, less attention has been paid to the role of wider familial and social networks as conduits for positive behaviour changes. In this article we explore how people living in Scotland have introduced various home smoking restrictions to reduce or eliminate children's exposure to tobacco smoke, and how some have gone on to influence people in their wider familial and social networks. The results suggest that many parents are willing to act on messages on the need to protect children from smoke, leading to the creation of patterns of smoking behaviour that are passed on to their parents and siblings and, more widely, to friends and visitors. However, while some parents and grandparents apparently voluntarily changed their smoking behaviour, other parents found that they had to make direct requests to family members and some needed to negotiate more forcefully to protect children, albeit often with positive results. PMID:21039621

  8. The Marital and Family Functioning of Adults with ADHD and Their Spouses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eakin, L.; Minde, K.; Hechtman, L.; Ochs, E.; Krane, E.; Bouffard, R.; Greenfield, B.; Looper, K.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the family relationships of adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Thus, the marital adjustment and family functioning of 33 married adults with ADHD and their spouses was compared to 26 non-ADHD control participants and their spouses. Results revealed that married adults with ADHD reported poorer…

  9. Adults' Perceptions of Children's Science Abilities and Interest after Participating in a Family Science Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanowitz, Karen L.; Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie L.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research was to examine adults' and children's perceptions of participating in a family science night event, especially in the context of parental belief about children's science abilities. Family science nights are becoming increasingly popular and are used in a wide range of settings. During family science nights, adults and…

  10. Work-Family Spillover and Daily Reports of Work and Family Stress in the Adult Labor Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Almeida, David M.; McDonald, Daniel A.

    2002-01-01

    Data from two affiliated national surveys were used to examine distribution of work-family spillover among working adults. Analyses testing family life course hypotheses indicated self-reported negative and positive spillover between work and family were not randomly distributed within the labor force. Age was found to have a persistent…

  11. Dietary quality differs by consumption of meals prepared at home vs. outside in Korean adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Won; Song, Won O.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Eating out has been reported to have negative effects on nutritional status. However, eating out can include meals prepared at home and eaten outside. Conversely, meals eaten at home can be brought from outside, as take-out and home deliveries have become common in Korea. Thus, we tested whether or not meal preparation location influences daily diet quality. SUBJECTS/METHODS From the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2007-2009, 4,915 Korean adults (20-64 years) were classified into two groups: home-made meal group (HMG), who ate ≥ 2 meals per day prepared at home (n = 4,146), and non-home-made meal group (NHMG), who ate ≥ 2 meals per day prepared outside home (n = 769). Daily diet quality was determined by energy intake, nutrient intake, Dietary Variety Score (DVS), and Diet Diversity Score (DDS). RESULTS Compared to the HMG, the NHMG was more likely to consist of men, single, employed, educated and of a higher economic status (all, P < 0.01). The NHMG showed higher energy intakes (1,776 vs. 2,116 kcal/day) with higher percentages of energy from protein (15 vs. 23%) and fat (14 vs. 16%) and lower intakes of dietary fiber, phosphorus, potassium, niacin, and vitamin C (all, P < 0.01) than the HMG, with some variations among age groups. The NHMG tended to consume foods prepared by frying and grilling and had more one-dish meals such as bibimbap, noodles, and dumplings but also showed higher dietary diversity. CONCLUSIONS It should be noted that home-made meals do not necessarily guarantee a healthy diet, and the effects of meal preparation location on nutritional status might vary depending on socio-demographic characteristics. PMID:27247726

  12. Managing Home and Work Responsibilities. Learning Guide 9. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This learning guide is designed to connect personal, family, and job responsibilities for adults and out-of-school youth in economically depressed areas of the state (including transitional ex-offenders and corrections populations) so that these individuals learn to manage and balance these aspects of their lives in order to prepare for or…

  13. “This Case Is Closed”: Family Caregivers and the Termination of Home Health Care Services for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Carol; Albert, Steven M; Hokenstad, Alene; Halper, Deborah E; Hart, Andrea Y; Gould, David A

    2006-01-01

    Policies promoting home- and community-based services and disease management models implicitly rely on family care, still the bedrock of long-term and chronic care in the United States. The United Hospital Fund studied family caregivers of stroke and brain injury patients when home care cases were opened and closed and found that even with short-term formal services, family caregivers provided three-quarters of the care. Patients' mobility impairments and Medicaid eligibility were the main factors in determining the amount and duration of formal services. Between one-third and one-half of family caregivers reported being inadequately prepared for the case closing. At all stages, family caregivers expressed significant isolation, anxiety, and depression. Therefore, home care agency practice and public policies should provide better education, support, and services for family caregivers. PMID:16771820

  14. Development of a wheelchair skills home program for older adults using a participatory action design approach.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Edward M; Miller, William C; Mitchell, Ian M; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2014-01-01

    Restricted mobility is the most common impairment among older adults and a manual wheelchair is often prescribed to address these limitations. However, limited access to rehabilitation services results in older adults typically receiving little or no mobility training when they receive a wheelchair. As an alternative and novel approach, we developed a therapist-monitored wheelchair skills home training program delivered via a computer tablet. To optimize efficacy and adherence, principles of self-efficacy and adult learning theory were foundational in the program design. A participatory action design approach was used to engage older adult wheelchair users, care providers, and prescribing clinicians in an iterative design and development process. A series of prototypes were fabricated and revised, based on feedback from eight stakeholder focus groups, until a final version was ready for evaluation in a clinical trial. Stakeholder contributions affirmed and enhanced the foundational theoretical principles and provided validation of the final product for the target population. PMID:25276768

  15. Prevalence of pressure ulcers by race and ethnicity for older adults admitted to nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Harms, Susan; Bliss, Donna Z; Garrard, Judith; Cunanan, Kristen; Savik, Kay; Gurvich, Olga; Mueller, Christine; Wyman, Jean F; Eberly, Lynn; Virnig, Beth

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of pressure ulcers (PUs) among racial and ethnic groups of older individuals admitted to nursing homes (NHs). NHs admitting higher percentages of minority individuals may face resource challenges for groups with more PUs or ones of greater severity. This study examined the prevalence of PUs (Stages 2 to 4) among older adults admitted to NHs by race and ethnicity at the individual, NH, and regional levels. Results show that the prevalence of PUs in Black older adults admitted to NHs was greater than that in Hispanic older adults, which were both greater than in White older adults. The PU rate among admissions of Black individuals was 1.7 times higher than White individuals. A higher prevalence of PUs was observed among NHs with a lower percentage of admissions of White individuals. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 40(3), 20-26.]. PMID:24219072

  16. Development of a Wheelchair Skills Home Program for Older Adults Using a Participatory Action Design Approach

    PubMed Central

    Giesbrecht, Edward M.; Miller, William C.; Mitchell, Ian M.; Woodgate, Roberta L.

    2014-01-01

    Restricted mobility is the most common impairment among older adults and a manual wheelchair is often prescribed to address these limitations. However, limited access to rehabilitation services results in older adults typically receiving little or no mobility training when they receive a wheelchair. As an alternative and novel approach, we developed a therapist-monitored wheelchair skills home training program delivered via a computer tablet. To optimize efficacy and adherence, principles of self-efficacy and adult learning theory were foundational in the program design. A participatory action design approach was used to engage older adult wheelchair users, care providers, and prescribing clinicians in an iterative design and development process. A series of prototypes were fabricated and revised, based on feedback from eight stakeholder focus groups, until a final version was ready for evaluation in a clinical trial. Stakeholder contributions affirmed and enhanced the foundational theoretical principles and provided validation of the final product for the target population. PMID:25276768

  17. Generalized Linear Models of home activity for automatic detection of mild cognitive impairment in older adults.

    PubMed

    Akl, Ahmad; Snoek, Jasper; Mihailidis, Alex

    2014-01-01

    With a globally aging population, the burden of care of cognitively impaired older adults is becoming increasingly concerning. Instances of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia are becoming ever more frequent. Earlier detection of cognitive impairment offers significant benefits, but remains difficult to do in practice. In this paper, we develop statistical models of the behavior of older adults within their homes using sensor data in order to detect the early onset of cognitive decline. Specifically, we use inhomogenous Poisson processes to model the presence of subjects within different rooms throughout the day in the home using unobtrusive sensing technologies. We compare the distributions learned from cognitively intact and impaired subjects using information theoretic tools and observe statistical differences between the two populations which we believe can be used to help detect the onset of cognitive decline.

  18. Generalized Linear Models of home activity for automatic detection of mild cognitive impairment in older adults.

    PubMed

    Akl, Ahmad; Snoek, Jasper; Mihailidis, Alex

    2014-01-01

    With a globally aging population, the burden of care of cognitively impaired older adults is becoming increasingly concerning. Instances of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia are becoming ever more frequent. Earlier detection of cognitive impairment offers significant benefits, but remains difficult to do in practice. In this paper, we develop statistical models of the behavior of older adults within their homes using sensor data in order to detect the early onset of cognitive decline. Specifically, we use inhomogenous Poisson processes to model the presence of subjects within different rooms throughout the day in the home using unobtrusive sensing technologies. We compare the distributions learned from cognitively intact and impaired subjects using information theoretic tools and observe statistical differences between the two populations which we believe can be used to help detect the onset of cognitive decline. PMID:25570050

  19. Your Home Furnishings Dollar. Money Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Nancy H., Ed.; Tarrant, Sharon M., Ed.

    This booklet on home furnishings, 1 in a series of 12, covers all the basic aspects of personal- and family-money management. Suitable for use by high school and college students as well as adults, this handbook offers guidelines for purchasing home furnishings and decorating materials. Section 1 discusses planning for home furnishings based on…

  20. In-Service Education for Case Workers in Home Management Improvement for Welfare Recipient Families in Ten Eastern Kentucky Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morehead State Univ., KY. School of Applied Sciences and Technology.

    Morehead State University conducted inservice workshops in home management for 42 social caseworkers in eastern Kentucky. The subjects covered were community resources; family planning; clothing, gardening, and nutrition; and environmental sanitation and home nursing. Teaching methods included lectures, field trips, buzz sessions, questions and…

  1. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... Often, home health care nurses will come to your home to give you the medicine. Sometimes, a family member, a friend, or ...

  2. Personal and Family Survival. Civil Defense Adult Education Course Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    A manual providing general orientation on the subject of United States civil defense is presented. It can serve as a home reference and as a tool for an adult education class. The nine chapters are: U.S. Civil Defense, Modern Weapons and Radioactive Fallout, Public Fallout Shelters, Fallout Shelter Occupancy, Fallout Protection at Home, Community…

  3. Effect of a Home Telecare Program on Oral Health among Adults with Tetraplegia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Study design one group pre- and post-test design Objective The primary aim was to examine both the short- and long-term effects of an oral home telecare program on improving gingival health among adults with tetraplegia. Methods Eight adults with tetraplegia participated. The oral home telecare program consisted of individualized oral hygiene training in the use of assistive devices (powered toothbrush and adapted flosser and/or oral irrigator) using PC-based videoconferencing between each participant and an occupational therapist. Training was conducted on an average of five 15 to 30 min sessions across three months. During these training sessions, supervised practice of oral hygiene, and provision of immediate corrective feedback and positive reinforcement in the use of adaptive oral hygiene devices was emphasized. Gingival health assessment using the Löe-Silness gingival index (LSGI) was conducted at baseline, six months and 12 months. Results From baseline to six months, participants showed statistically significant differences (i.e., improvement with less gingival inflammation) in their LSGI scores (z=2.18, P=.03). From baseline to 12 months, participants also showed a statistically significant difference (i.e., improvement, z=2.03; P=.04) in their LSGI scores. Conclusion This study indicates that preventive oral home telecare with repeated oral hygiene training in the use of adaptive devices improved gingival health at six and 12 months among adults with tetraplegia. PMID:23318557

  4. The feasibility of a telephone coaching program on heart failure home management for family caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Smith, Carol E.; Russell, Christy; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Elyachar, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To test the feasibility of delivery and evaluate the helpfulness of a coaching heart failure (HF) home management program for family caregivers. Background The few available studies on providing instruction for family caregivers are limited in content for managing HF home care and guidance for program implementation. Method This pilot study employed a mixed methods design. The measures of caregiver burden, confidence, and preparedness were compared at baseline and 3 months post-intervention. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize program costs and demographic data. Content analysis research methods were used to evaluate program feasibility and helpfulness. Results Caregiver (n=10) burden scores were significantly reduced and raw scores of confidence and preparedness for HF home management improved 3 months after the intervention. Content analyses of nurse and caregiver post-intervention data found caregivers rated the program as helpful and described how they initiated HF management skills based on the program. Conclusion The program was feasible to implement. These results suggest the coaching program should be further tested with a larger sample size to evaluate its efficacy. PMID:23116654

  5. The Keys to Healthy Family Child Care Homes intervention: Study design and rationale

    PubMed Central

    Østbye, Truls; Mann, Courtney M.; Vaughn, Amber E.; Namenek Brouwer, Rebecca J.; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E.; Hales, Derek; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I.; Ward, Dianne S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a major public health problem for which early preventive interventions are needed. Large numbers of young children are enrolled in some form of child care program, making these facilities influential environments in children’s development. Family child care homes (FCCH) are a specific type of child care in which children are cared for within the provider’s own residence. FCCHs serve approximately 1.5 million children in the U.S.; however, research to date has overlooked FCCH providers and their potential to positively influence children’s health-related behaviors. Methods Keys to Healthy Family Child Care Homes (Keys) is a cluster-randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of an intervention designed to help providers become healthy role models, provide quality food- and physical activity-supportive FCCH environments, and implement effective business practices. The intervention is delivered through workshops, home visits, tailored coaching calls, and educational toolkits. Primary outcomes are child physical activity measured via accelerometry data and dietary intake data collected using direct observation at the FCCH. Secondary outcomes include child body mass index, provider weight-related behaviors, and observed obesogenic environmental characteristics. Conclusion Keys is an innovative approach to promoting healthy eating and physical activity in young children. The intervention operates in a novel setting, targets children during a key developmental period, and addresses both provider and child behaviors to synergistically promote health. PMID:25460337

  6. The effectiveness of mitigation for reducing radon risk in single-family Minnesota homes.

    PubMed

    Steck, Daniel J

    2012-09-01

    Increased lung cancer incidence has been linked with long-term exposure to elevated residential radon. Experimental studies have shown that soil ventilation can be effective in reducing radon concentrations in single-family homes. Most radon mitigation systems in the U.S. are installed by private contractors. The long-term effectiveness of these systems is not well known, since few state radon programs regulate or independently confirm post-mitigation radon concentrations. The effectiveness of soil ventilation systems in Minnesota was measured for 140 randomly selected clients of six professional mitigators. Homeowners reported pre-mitigation radon screening concentrations that averaged 380 Bq m (10.3 pCi L). Long term post-mitigation radon measurements on the two lowest floors show that, even years after mitigation, 97% of these homes have concentrations below the 150 Bq m U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action level. The average post-mitigation radon in the houses was 30 Bq m, an average observed reduction of >90%. If that reduction was maintained over the lifetime of the 1.2 million Minnesotans who currently reside in single-family homes with living space radon above the EPA action level, approximately 50,000 lives could be extended for nearly two decades by preventing radon-related lung cancers.

  7. Home dampness, current allergic diseases, and respiratory infections among young adults

    PubMed Central

    Kilpelainen, M; Terho, E; Helenius, H; Koskenvuo, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The relation between home dampness and respiratory symptoms among adults is well confirmed, but data on specific allergic diseases and respiratory infections is more limited. Individual factors that may enhance susceptibility to the effects of home dampness are mainly unknown.
METHODS—The association between home dampness and current physician diagnosed asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis, common colds, and bacterial respiratory infections was studied in a questionnaire survey of 10 667 Finnish first year university students aged 18-25 years. The dampness categories analysed were visible mould and visible mould or damp stains or water damage during the last year. In multivariate analyses adjustment was made for parental education, active and passive smoking, type and place of residence, pets, and wall to wall carpets. The interaction effect of atopic heredity and dampness was investigated.
RESULTS—Visible mould or damp stains or water damage was reported by 15.0% of the respondents. In multivariate models there was a positive association between home dampness and current asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis, as well as common colds ⩾4 times per year and other respiratory infections, but not between home dampness and allergic conjunctivitis. The strongest association was found between exposure to visible mould and asthma (OR 2.21,95% CI 1.48 to 3.28) and common colds (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.87). The risk of current asthma in damp homes was highest among subjects with atopic heredity.
CONCLUSIONS—The risk of current asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis was higher in damp homes. Of the respiratory infections, the risk of common colds was most clearly increased.

 PMID:11359962

  8. Family Planning Services for Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Minkowski, William L.; Weiss, Robert C.; Lowther, Laura; Shonick, Helen; Heidbreder, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    If we are to influence the numerical trends of venereal disease and of unwanted pregnancies in the young, family planning services should be made easily available to them. To encourage the widest possible and most effective use of such services requires that health professionals openly endorse their ready availability. They must foster non-judgmental attitudes, however unorthodox patient life styles may be, and provide the young with opportunities to explore their own sexual behavior. The Youth Clinics of the Department of Community Health Services in Los Angeles are designed to meet both the immediate therapeutic and preventive health needs of our patients. Contraceptive services, abortion counseling and referrals as well as individual, group and community education are the primary pillars of our program. There is an enormous task for all of us who are concerned with adolescents to press for sex education programs, in or out of the school system, that will include adults as well as our children. PMID:4813794

  9. A Smart-Home System to Unobtrusively and Continuously Assess Loneliness in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Austin, Johanna; Dodge, Hiroko H; Riley, Thomas; Jacobs, Peter G; Thielke, Stephen; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Loneliness is a common condition in older adults and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, decreased sleep quality, and increased risk of cognitive decline. Assessing loneliness in older adults is challenging due to the negative desirability biases associated with being lonely. Thus, it is necessary to develop more objective techniques to assess loneliness in older adults. In this paper, we describe a system to measure loneliness by assessing in-home behavior using wireless motion and contact sensors, phone monitors, and computer software as well as algorithms developed to assess key behaviors of interest. We then present results showing the accuracy of the system in detecting loneliness in a longitudinal study of 16 older adults who agreed to have the sensor platform installed in their own homes for up to 8 months. We show that loneliness is significantly associated with both time out-of-home ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) and number of computer sessions ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). [Formula: see text] for the model was 0.35. We also show the model's ability to predict out-of-sample loneliness, demonstrating that the correlation between true loneliness and predicted out-of-sample loneliness is 0.48. When compared with the University of California at Los Angeles loneliness score, the normalized mean absolute error of the predicted loneliness scores was 0.81 and the normalized root mean squared error was 0.91. These results represent first steps toward an unobtrusive, objective method for the prediction of loneliness among older adults, and mark the first time multiple objective behavioral measures that have been related to this key health outcome.

  10. Psychometric properties of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure in home-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Tuntland, Hanne; Aaslund, Mona Kristin; Langeland, Eva; Espehaug, Birgitte; Kjeken, Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    Background The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) is an occupational therapy instrument designed to help participants identify, prioritize, and evaluate performance of important occupations. Objective To investigate the validity, responsiveness, interpretability, and feasibility of the COPM when used by various health professions in home-dwelling older adults receiving reablement. Reablement is a new form of multidisciplinary home-based rehabilitation for older adults experiencing functional decline. Participants and methods The sample of 225 participants, mean age 80.8 years, who were in need of rehabilitation for various health conditions were included in the study. Data collection was conducted at baseline and at 10 weeks follow-up. The COSMIN guidelines and recommendations for evaluating methodological quality were followed. Results Content validity, construct validity, and feasibility were found to be adequate. Responsiveness, however, was moderate. Functional mobility was the most frequently prioritized occupational category of all. Regarding interpretability, the minimal important change was 3.0 points and 3.2 points for performance and satisfaction, respectively. The older adults reported that COPM was a useful and manageable instrument. The majority of the occupational therapists, physiotherapists, and nurses reported that they had the required expertise to conduct the COPM assessments. Conclusion The results support the multidisciplinary use of the COPM in clinical practice and research in a home-dwelling, heterogeneous population of older adults. Based on the findings, 3 points are recommended as a cutoff point to distinguish between older adults who have a minimal important change in COPM performance and COPM satisfaction and those who have not.

  11. A Smart-Home System to Unobtrusively and Continuously Assess Loneliness in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Austin, Johanna; Dodge, Hiroko H; Riley, Thomas; Jacobs, Peter G; Thielke, Stephen; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Loneliness is a common condition in older adults and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, decreased sleep quality, and increased risk of cognitive decline. Assessing loneliness in older adults is challenging due to the negative desirability biases associated with being lonely. Thus, it is necessary to develop more objective techniques to assess loneliness in older adults. In this paper, we describe a system to measure loneliness by assessing in-home behavior using wireless motion and contact sensors, phone monitors, and computer software as well as algorithms developed to assess key behaviors of interest. We then present results showing the accuracy of the system in detecting loneliness in a longitudinal study of 16 older adults who agreed to have the sensor platform installed in their own homes for up to 8 months. We show that loneliness is significantly associated with both time out-of-home ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) and number of computer sessions ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). [Formula: see text] for the model was 0.35. We also show the model's ability to predict out-of-sample loneliness, demonstrating that the correlation between true loneliness and predicted out-of-sample loneliness is 0.48. When compared with the University of California at Los Angeles loneliness score, the normalized mean absolute error of the predicted loneliness scores was 0.81 and the normalized root mean squared error was 0.91. These results represent first steps toward an unobtrusive, objective method for the prediction of loneliness among older adults, and mark the first time multiple objective behavioral measures that have been related to this key health outcome. PMID:27574577

  12. Psychometric properties of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure in home-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Tuntland, Hanne; Aaslund, Mona Kristin; Langeland, Eva; Espehaug, Birgitte; Kjeken, Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    Background The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) is an occupational therapy instrument designed to help participants identify, prioritize, and evaluate performance of important occupations. Objective To investigate the validity, responsiveness, interpretability, and feasibility of the COPM when used by various health professions in home-dwelling older adults receiving reablement. Reablement is a new form of multidisciplinary home-based rehabilitation for older adults experiencing functional decline. Participants and methods The sample of 225 participants, mean age 80.8 years, who were in need of rehabilitation for various health conditions were included in the study. Data collection was conducted at baseline and at 10 weeks follow-up. The COSMIN guidelines and recommendations for evaluating methodological quality were followed. Results Content validity, construct validity, and feasibility were found to be adequate. Responsiveness, however, was moderate. Functional mobility was the most frequently prioritized occupational category of all. Regarding interpretability, the minimal important change was 3.0 points and 3.2 points for performance and satisfaction, respectively. The older adults reported that COPM was a useful and manageable instrument. The majority of the occupational therapists, physiotherapists, and nurses reported that they had the required expertise to conduct the COPM assessments. Conclusion The results support the multidisciplinary use of the COPM in clinical practice and research in a home-dwelling, heterogeneous population of older adults. Based on the findings, 3 points are recommended as a cutoff point to distinguish between older adults who have a minimal important change in COPM performance and COPM satisfaction and those who have not. PMID:27621647

  13. [A Study on problems associated with a patient's death during home care, based on the duration of home care and patient's age-why terminal home care is difficult for a patient's family].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Hiroo; Okabe, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Kumiko; Kikuchi, Kana

    2012-12-01

    When a patient receives home care, an important factor is how the family accepts the patient's death. In this study, we observed that the number of long-term in-home terminal care cases increased, as well as the number of short-term in-home care cases. Moreover, the number of cancer cases among the young population is also increasing. Consequently, how to acceptance of a patient's death varies among their family. When tending to patients, suitable support from the medical staff is required. Additionally, various options need to be provided for terminal care. PMID:23268913

  14. Providing More Home-Delivered Meals Is One Way To Keep Older Adults With Low Care Needs Out Of Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Kali S.; Mor, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Programs that help older adults live independently in the community can also deliver net savings to states on the costs of long-term supports and services. We estimate that if all states had increased by 1 percent the number of adults age sixty-five or older who received home-delivered meals in 2009 under Title III of the Older Americans Act, total annual savings to states’ Medicaid programs could have exceeded $109 million. The projected savings primarily reflect decreased Medicaid spending for an estimated 1,722 older adults with low-care needs who would no longer require nursing home care— instead, they could remain at home, sustained by home-delivered meals. Twenty-six states could have realized net savings in 2009 from the expansion of their home-delivered meals programs, while twenty-two states would have incurred net costs. Programs such as home-delivered meals have the potential to provide substantial savings to some states’ Medicaid programs. PMID:24101071

  15. Higher environmental relative moldiness index values measured in homes of adults with asthma, rhinitis, or both conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Higher values of the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI), a DNA-based method for quantifying indoor molds, have been associated with asthma in children. In this study, settled dust samples were collected from the homes of adults with asthma and rhinitis (n=202 homes) i...

  16. Older Adults' Perspectives on Home Exercise after Falls Rehabilitation: Understanding the Importance of Promoting Healthy, Active Ageing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore what might encourage older people to exercise at home after falls rehabilitation. Design: Qualitative research methods were used based on a grounded theory approach, to provide insights into older adults' experiences following a fall, of both rehabilitation and home exercise. Setting: Community dwellings. Method: Nine…

  17. A Case of Palytoxin Poisoning in a Home Aquarium Enthusiast and His Family.

    PubMed

    Hall, Christine; Levy, David; Sattler, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational exposure to palytoxin is an extremely rare cause of respiratory distress. This little-known marine toxin has the potential to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Toxicity has been best documented in cases of ingestion but has also been seen in cases of dermal exposure and inhalation of vapors. Palytoxin has been found in several coral species, some of which are favored by home aquarium enthusiasts and are commercially available. We report a case of a family who were exposed to the aerosolized toxin following the cleaning of a coral in their home aquarium. It is important that clinicians be aware of this source of toxic exposure to provide necessary care to these patients.

  18. A Case of Palytoxin Poisoning in a Home Aquarium Enthusiast and His Family

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Christine; Levy, David; Sattler, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational exposure to palytoxin is an extremely rare cause of respiratory distress. This little-known marine toxin has the potential to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Toxicity has been best documented in cases of ingestion but has also been seen in cases of dermal exposure and inhalation of vapors. Palytoxin has been found in several coral species, some of which are favored by home aquarium enthusiasts and are commercially available. We report a case of a family who were exposed to the aerosolized toxin following the cleaning of a coral in their home aquarium. It is important that clinicians be aware of this source of toxic exposure to provide necessary care to these patients. PMID:26587298

  19. The interplay of institution and family caregiving: relations between patient hassles, nursing home hassles and caregivers' burnout.

    PubMed

    Almberg, B; Grafström, M; Krichbaum, K; Winblad, B

    2000-10-01

    This population-based study investigated the relationship between stresses (hassles) and burnout for 30 family caregivers and their institutionalized demented elderly. The Burnout Measure, the Patient Hassles Scales and the Nursing Home Hassles Scale were used. Hassles included: patient hassles (cognitive, behavior, basic ADL) and nursing home hassles (caregiver - staff, patient - staff, practical/logistical). The caregiver's characteristics are described in relation to burnout and the caregiver's most frequent hassles are discussed. All subscales except basic ADL were correlated to burnout. However, regression analysis showed the nursing home hassles to be the most important stresses explaining variance in burnout among family caregivers.

  20. Working it out together: family caregivers' perceptions of relationship-building with in-home service providers.

    PubMed

    Gantert, Thomas W; McWilliam, Carol L; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Allen, Natalie

    2009-09-01

    Provision of in-home services to seniors involves the contributions of numerous professional and paraprofessional health-care providers but is largely dependent upon the involvement of caregiver networks consisting of friends and family members. Therefore, in-home provider/family caregiver relationships have become an essential component of care provision. However, evidence suggests that provider/family caregiver interactions often are lacking or are ambiguous and characterized by tension and power struggles.The purpose of this study was to explore family caregivers' perceptions of their relationships with in-home care providers. Applying interpretive phenomenology, the authors conducted in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of family caregivers and used an immersion/crystallization analysis strategy to elicit the findings. The findings reveal that family caregivers perceive their relationship-building with in-home providers as a dynamic process with facilitators and barriers encountered at both individual and system levels.The interpretive findings afford several insights into building provider/family caregiver relationships within the in-home context.

  1. A desire to be seen: family caregivers' experiences of their caring role in palliative home care.

    PubMed

    Linderholm, Märit; Friedrichsen, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Primary health care is the base of Swedish healthcare, and many terminally ill patients are cared for at home. A dying relative has a profound impact on his/her family members' situation, including negative effects on roles, well-being, and health. The aim of this study was to explore how the informal carers of a dying relative in palliative home care experienced their caring role and support during the patient's final illness and after death. Fourteen family members were selected in 4 primary health care areas in Sweden. Data were collected using open, tape-recorded interviews. A hermeneutic approach was used to analyze the data. The findings revealed that being an informal carer was natural when a relative became seriously ill. More or less voluntarily, the family member took on a caring role of control and responsibility. The informal carers felt left out and had feelings of powerlessness when they did not manage to establish a relationship with the healthcare professionals. For the informal carers to feel seen, it was necessary for them to narrate about their own supporting role.

  2. Exergames for unsupervised balance training at home: A pilot study in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    van Diest, M; Stegenga, J; Wörtche, H J; Verkerke, G J; Postema, K; Lamoth, C J C

    2016-02-01

    Exercise videogames (exergames) are gaining popularity as tools for improving balance ability in older adults, yet few exergames are suitable for home-based use. The purpose of the current pilot study was to examine the effects of a 6-week unsupervised home-based exergaming training program on balance performance. Ten community dwelling healthy older adults (age: 75.9 ± 7.2 years) played a newly developed ice skating exergame for six weeks at home. In the game, the speed and direction of a virtual ice skater on a frozen canal were controlled using lateral weight shifts, which were captured using Kinect. Sway characteristics during quiet standing in eyes open (EO), eyes closed (EC) and dual task (DT) conditions were assessed in time and frequency domain before, and after two, four and six weeks of training. Balance was also evaluated using the narrow ridge balance test (NRBT). Multilevel modeling was applied to examine changes in balance ability. Participants played 631 (± 124)min over the intervention period and no subjects dropped out. Balance in terms of sway characteristics improved on average by 17.4% (EO) and 23.3% (EC) after six weeks of training (p<0.05). Differences in rate of improvement (p<0.05) were observed between participants. No intervention effects were found for quiet standing in DT conditions and on the NRBT. In conclusion, the pilot study showed that unsupervised home-based exergaming is feasible in community dwelling older adults, but also that participants do not benefit equally from the program, thereby emphasizing the need for more personalized exergame training programs. PMID:27004651

  3. Pyrethroids in house dust from the homes of farm worker families in the MICASA study.

    PubMed

    Trunnelle, Kelly J; Bennett, Deborah H; Tancredi, Daniel J; Gee, Shirley J; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T; Hennessy-Burt, Tamara E; Hammock, Bruce D; Schenker, Marc B

    2013-11-01

    Indoor pesticide exposure is a growing concern, particularly for pyrethroids, a commonly used class of pesticides. Pyrethroid concentrations may be especially high in homes of immigrant farm worker families, who often live in close proximity to agricultural fields and are faced with poor housing conditions, potentially causing high pest infestation and pesticide use. We investigate levels of pyrethroids in the house dust of farm worker family homes in a study of mothers and children living in Mendota, CA, within the population-based Mexican Immigration to California: Agricultural Safety and Acculturation (MICASA) Study. We present pesticide use data and levels of pyrethroid pesticides in indoor dust collected in 2009 as measured by questionnaires and a GC/MS analysis of the pyrethroids cis- and trans-permethrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate and resmethrin in single dust samples collected from 55 households. Cis- and trans-permethrin had the highest detection frequencies at 67%, with median concentrations of 244 and 172ng/g dust, respectively. Cypermethrin was detected in 52% of the homes and had a median concentration of 186ng/g dust. Esfenvalerate, resmethrin and deltamethrin were detected in less than half the samples. We compared the pyrethroid concentrations found in our study to other studies looking at both rural and urban homes and daycares. Lower detection frequencies and/or lower median concentrations of cis- and trans-permethrin and cypermethrin were observed in our study as compared to those studies. However, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate and resmethrin were detected more frequently in the house dust from our study than in the other studies. Because households whose children had higher urinary pyrethroid metabolite levels were more likely to be analyzed in this study, a positive bias in our estimates of household pyrethroid levels may be expected. A positive association was observed with reported outdoor pesticide use and cypermethrin levels

  4. Effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) added to Home Mechanical Ventilation (HMV) in Adult Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sayeed, Nadia; Sharma, Pooja; Abdelhalim, Manahil; Mukherjee, Rahul

    2015-12-01

    Adult Pompe disease/acid maltase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in accumulation of glycogen in skeletal muscles, leading to myopathy frequently involving respiratory muscles. This involvement can cause respiratory insufficiency that may present as acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with alpha - glucosidase alfa, the only disease-specific treatment, has been available as treatment option since 2006. ERT has shown efficacy concerning muscle strength and pulmonary function in adult patients as well as positive association with survival. We present two cases where addition of ERT to Home Mechanical Ventilation (HMV) showed improvements in lung function and gas exchange that may not be entirely attributable to nocturnal HMV and therefore may further indicate the beneficial role of ERT in conjunction with HMV in Adult Pompe disease. PMID:26740886

  5. Feasibility of integrating the "Healthy moves for aging well" program into home care aide services for frail older adults.

    PubMed

    Park, Chae-Hee; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the feasibility of implementing simple, safe, non-equipment evidence-based movements (Healthy Moves for Aging Well program) using an affordable and sustainable homecare-aide based delivery model that reaches the maximum possible number of frail older adults living at home in Illinois. Two local agencies were asked to identify two experienced home care aides and two inexperienced home care aides (n= 8). Each home care aides delivered the Healthy Moves to four clients (n= 16). Eight home care aides visited the client in the home and were asked to deliver the Healthy Moves program on a regular basis for a four-month time period. Outcome measures included a pre-and post- survey, a functional fitness test (older adults), and interviews. Evaluation procedures focused on older adult participants, homecare aids, and sites. The results showed that both interview and survey data revealed that most participants including older adults, home care aides, and site directors had a positive perception and high satisfaction with the program. Specially, 100% of older adult participants reported that they would recommend the program to others. Additionally, seniors and home care aides reported that they enjoyed working with each other on the program and both site directors reported that dissemination of the program in the State of Illinois employing home care aides was feasible and acceptable. Our study results indicate that Healthy Moves for Aging Well could be safely and successfully be disseminated to frail older adults in the State of Illinois.

  6. Feasibility of integrating the "Healthy moves for aging well" program into home care aide services for frail older adults.

    PubMed

    Park, Chae-Hee; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the feasibility of implementing simple, safe, non-equipment evidence-based movements (Healthy Moves for Aging Well program) using an affordable and sustainable homecare-aide based delivery model that reaches the maximum possible number of frail older adults living at home in Illinois. Two local agencies were asked to identify two experienced home care aides and two inexperienced home care aides (n= 8). Each home care aides delivered the Healthy Moves to four clients (n= 16). Eight home care aides visited the client in the home and were asked to deliver the Healthy Moves program on a regular basis for a four-month time period. Outcome measures included a pre-and post- survey, a functional fitness test (older adults), and interviews. Evaluation procedures focused on older adult participants, homecare aids, and sites. The results showed that both interview and survey data revealed that most participants including older adults, home care aides, and site directors had a positive perception and high satisfaction with the program. Specially, 100% of older adult participants reported that they would recommend the program to others. Additionally, seniors and home care aides reported that they enjoyed working with each other on the program and both site directors reported that dissemination of the program in the State of Illinois employing home care aides was feasible and acceptable. Our study results indicate that Healthy Moves for Aging Well could be safely and successfully be disseminated to frail older adults in the State of Illinois. PMID:25061600

  7. Randomized controlled trial of a comprehensive home environment-focused weight loss program for adults

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Amy A.; Raynor, Hollie A.; Fava, Joseph; Maguire, Kimberly; Robichaud, Erica; Trautvetter, Jennifer; Crane, Melissa; Wing, Rena R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Behavioral weight loss programs (BWL) provide limited instruction on how to change the environmental context of weight-regulating behaviors, perhaps contributing to regain. Drawing on social ecological models, this trial evaluated a comprehensive weight loss program that targeted both an individual’s behavior and their physical and social home environment. Methods Overweight and obese adults (N=201; 48.9±10.5 years; 78.1% women) were randomized to BWL or to BWL plus home environment changes (BWL+H). Groups met weekly for 6 months and bi-monthly for 12 months. BWL+H participants were given items to facilitate healthy choices in their homes (e.g., exercise equipment, portion plates) and attended treatment with a household partner. Weight loss at 6 and 18 months was the primary outcome. Results BWL+H changed many aspects of the home environment and produced better 6 month weight losses than BWL (p=.017). At 18 months, no weight loss differences were observed (p=.19) and rates of regain were equivalent (p=.30). Treatment response was moderated by gender (6 month p=.01; 18 month p=.006). Women lost more weight in BWL+H than BWL at 6 and 18 months, whereas men in BWL lost more weight than those in BWL+H at 18 months. Partners, regardless of gender, lost more weight in BWL+H than BWL at both time points (ps<.0001). Conclusion The home food and exercise environment is malleable and targeting this microenvironment appears to improve initial weight loss, and in women, 18-month outcomes. Research is needed to understand this gender difference and to develop home-focused strategies with more powerful and sustained weight loss effects. PMID:22309885

  8. Transition from pediatric to adult care in sickle cell disease: perspectives on the family role.

    PubMed

    Porter, Jerlym S; Graff, J Carolyn; Lopez, Alana D; Hankins, Jane S

    2014-01-01

    Transition from pediatric to adult care poses challenges for adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). This study explored the transition perspectives of adolescents with SCD, their siblings, and caregivers. Focus groups were conducted with 12 African American families. Adolescents, siblings, and caregivers demonstrated awareness of transition and need for disease management responsibility. Siblings' and caregivers' concerns included adolescent medication adherence. Family concerns included leaving the pediatric environment and adult providers' lack of knowledge. Families recommended more transition preparation opportunities. Family members' perspectives are valuable in informing transition planning. Family-focused interventions designed to prepare and support families during transition are necessary.

  9. Home-to-School Connections Guide: Tips, Tech Tools, and Strategies for Improving Family-to-School Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Lucas Educational Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Communication between home and school is good for kids. Keeping families up-to-date about upcoming events is important, but it's not enough to fully engage parents as partners. When schools and families really work together, that sets the stage for all kinds of benefits. The National Coalition for Parent Involvement in Education reports that…

  10. Concordance of Family and Staff Member Reports about End of Life in Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Shayna E.; Williams, Christianna S.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in perspectives that may complicate the process of joint decision making at the end of life, this study determined the agreement of family and staff perspectives about end-of-life experiences in nursing homes and residential care/assisted living communities and whether family and staff roles, involvement in care,…

  11. Race, Class, and Schooling: Multicultural Families Doing the Hard Work of Home Literacy in America's Inner City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Guofang

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on a larger ethnographic study, this article documents (a) how and for what purposes literacy is used in 3 culturally diverse families of low socioeconomic status and (b) what various cultural, socioeconomic, and environmental factors shape the families' literacy practices in their home milieus in an urban context. Data analysis revealed…

  12. Impact of a Consumer-Directed Family Support Program on Reduced Out-of-Home Institutional Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Tamar; Caldwell, Joe

    2005-01-01

    The impact of a consumer-directed family support program on actual out-of-home placement in one American state was evaluated over an 8-year period. Under this program, individuals with intellectual disabilities and their families control their own resources and design and direct supports through the use of cash allowances or individualized…

  13. Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Family Child Care Homes in Oregon: Baseline Findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Katherine B.; Rice, Kelly R.; Trost, Stewart G.

    2012-01-01

    Baseline findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project include data from Family Child Care Providers (FCCPs) in Oregon (n=53) who completed assessments of nutrition and physical activity policies and practices and BMI data for children in the care of FCCPs (n=205). Results show that a significant percentage of FCCPs failed to meet child care…

  14. The everlasting trial of strength and patience': transitions in home care nursing as narrated by patients and family members.

    PubMed

    Efraimsson, E; Höglund, I; Sandman, P

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and interpret patients' and their family members' lived experiences of caring at home. Twelve tape-recorded narratives, with seven patients and five family members, were interpreted in accordance with a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by Ricoeur. The findings revealed life situations where natural caring was changed into patient-care-giver relations and the home became a public room. The patients had to deal with decreased abilities and the family members with adjusting to caring needs. The changes in the life situations were interpreted as long lasting and trying transitions. Implications for nursing and further research are proposed. PMID:11822854

  15. Future Planning Resource Guide for Families and Adults with Developmental Disabilities in Illinois. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Joe; Lopez, Erick; DeBrine, Elizabeth; Factor, Alan; Heller, Tamar; Ennis, Donna

    2006-01-01

    This updated guide helps families navigate the maze of adult services and supports for individuals with developmental disabilities. It responds to families' need for a centralized source of information that describes adult services and how to access them. Content includes an overview of the service system and information on legal and financial…

  16. The Family of Origin Parachute Model: Landing Safely in Adult Romantic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Dean M.; Gardner, Brandt C.; Taniguchi, Narumi

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the utility of the family of origin parachute model in predicting longitudinal outcomes for couples in romantic relationships. This conceptual model contains common family variables that are theoretically and empirically related to later adult functioning and are believed to influence attitudes that adult children develop…

  17. Parental Divorce and Family Functioning: Effects on Differentiation Levels of Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Patrick; Throngren, Jill M.; Smith, Adina J.

    2001-01-01

    Study examines the effect of parental divorce and various dimensions of functioning in the family of origin on young adult development. Results indicate that parental divorce and family functioning significantly affect differentiation levels of young adults. Implications of the results for counselors and future researchers are provided. (Contains…

  18. Consequences of Family Literacy for Adults and Children: Some Preliminary Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philliber, William W.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents data from a family literacy program, called the Toyota Families for Learning Program, and compares it to data from programs that focus primarily on adults or on children, but not both. Discusses outcomes for adults, and outcomes for children, and finds results to be promising but not definitive. (SR)

  19. Family beyond Parents? An Exploration of Family Configurations and Psychological Adjustment in Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmer, Eric D.; Kempf, Nadine; Sapin, Marlene; Galli-Carminati, Giuliana

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the family configurations of young adults with intellectual disability. Based on a sample of 40 individuals interviewed two times in a year, we found as many as four types of family configurations, with distinct compositions, and different types of social capital. This diversity is not without consequences for individual…

  20. Home care as a family matter? Discursive positioning, storylines and decision-making in assessment talk.

    PubMed

    Olaison, Anna; Cedersund, Elisabet

    2008-01-01

    Home care arrangements for older people are coordinated via a client-centred assessment process. This article describes how storylines and discursive positioning are used among older people and their relatives when divergent opinions of care needs are expressed. Eleven assessment interviews were studied using discourse analysis. The results show that relatives and older people advanced three major storylines, and positioned themselves within them with respect to the need for help. These storylines were based on whether the persons viewed home care as an intrusion into daily routines and relationships, or as a complement and support in everyday life, or as a right. The content of the storylines and the ways in which positions were shaped within them illustrate how positioning is incorporated as part of the ongoing reflexive process in interaction in which participants form an image of the older person's needs. Assessments clarify the views of the participants on home care, but they also reflect the discourses that are prevalent in the aged care community and in society in general. The article raises questions about strengthening older people's participation in the decision making process and also whether a new communicative practice is needed for assessments, i.e., one that proceeds on the basis of a broader family perspective. PMID:19736653

  1. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, Marta; Bianchi, Lucia; Lucano, Melissa; Bertù, Lorenza; Vender, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Summary The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders. PMID:27358221

  2. Medicare and Medicaid Home Health and Medicaid Waiver Services for Dually Eligible Older Adults: Risk Factors for Use and Correlates of Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Fenster, Juliane R.; Judge, James O.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to, among frail dually eligible older adults, determine risk factors for the likelihood of using Medicare home health and Medicaid home health services and to, among service users, determine correlates of Medicare home health, Medicaid home health, and Medicaid waiver service expenditures. Design and Methods:…

  3. 75 FR 41793 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2010 Through June 30, 2011 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  4. Home Economics Semester Modules: Adult Living, Bachelor Survival, Foods and You, Home Decor, Personal Finance, Teen Clothing, Young Child. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehighton Area School District, PA.

    This curriculum guide consists of course modules for instruction at the secondary level. Each module contains a concept title, major generalization, behavioral objective, subgeneralizations, list of learning experiences, and resources. The courses are entitled: Adult Living, Bachelor Survival, Foods and You, Home Decor, Personal Finance, Teen…

  5. Stakeholder Perspectives on Policies to Support Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Michelle; Pickard, Joseph G.; Rodriguez, Carroll; Shear, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Persons with dementia are often excluded from consumer-directed home- and community-based service programs because they cannot direct their own care. Surrogates are permitted in some states, thereby allowing program participation. This study explored family caregiver perspectives on policies that support family needs related to providing care to…

  6. Effects of Home Visitation on Maternal Competencies, Family Environment, and Child Development: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sierau, Susan; Dähne, Verena; Brand, Tilman; Kurtz, Vivien; von Klitzing, Kai; Jungmann, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Based on the US Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) program, the German home visiting program "Pro Kind" offered support for socially and financially disadvantaged first-time mothers from pregnancy until the children's second birthday. A multi-centered, longitudinal randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to assess its effectiveness on mothers and children. A total of 755 women with multiple risk factors were recruited, 394 received regular home visits (treatment group), while 361 only had access to standard community services (control group). Program influences on family environment (e.g., quality of home, social support), maternal competencies (e.g., maternal self-efficacy, empathy, parenting style), and child development (e.g., cognitive and motor development) were assessed from mothers' program intake in pregnancy to children's second birthday based on self-reports in regular interviews and developmental tests. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models showed small, but significant positive treatment effects on parental self-efficacy, and marginally significant effects on social support, and knowledge on child rearing. Maternal stress, self-efficacy, and feelings of attachment in the TG tend to show a more positive development over time. Subgroup effects were found for high-risk mothers in the TG, who reported more social support over time and, generally, had children with higher developmental scores compared to their CG counterparts. Post hoc analyses of implementation variables revealed the quality of the helping relationship as a significant indicator of treatment effects. Results are discussed in terms of implementation and public policy differences between NFP and Pro Kind. PMID:26103919

  7. Adult Play-Learning: Observing Informal Family Education at a Science Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanhadilok, Peeranut; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the issues surrounding the nature of adult play. More specifically, we explore "family play-learning", where play activities result in forms of added knowledge or insight for the adults involved. Adult play itself is an under-researched area, and play-learning even more so. We discuss related research and, in…

  8. Adult Children of Alcoholics and Their Family Roles: A Comparison of Incarcerated and Non-Incarcerated Adult Children of Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jennifer Fay; And Others

    This study was conducted to empirically investigate the specific suggestion that, without help, children who play the scapegoat role in the alcoholic family may later end up in prison. Family roles assumed by incarcerated and non-incarcerated male and female Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACOAs) were compared. The incarcerated subjects were drawn…

  9. Contemporary perioperative management of adult familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome).

    PubMed

    Milne, Andrew; Mon, Wint Yu; Down, James; Obichere, Austin; Ackland, Gareth L

    2015-05-01

    Familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome) is a rare multisystem disorder associated with an excess risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Because life expectancy is limited, few reports consider the perioperative management of familial dysautonomia in adults with advanced disease and end-organ dysfunction. Here, we report on the management of an adult patient with familial dysautonomia, highlighting recent developments in perioperative technology and pharmacology of special relevance to this challenging population.

  10. Adolescent Family Factors Promoting Healthy Adult Functioning: A Longitudinal Community Study

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Angela D.; Giaconia, Rose M.; Reinherz, Helen Z.; Beardslee, William R.; Ward, Kirsten E.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although long-held wisdom and current research suggests that accepting and supportive family relationships may positively influence adult psychosocial functioning, few studies have prospectively investigated these associations. This study examined whether positive family factors during adolescence are associated with healthy adult functioning. Method The 353 participants were part of a single-age cohort whose psychosocial development has been prospectively traced. Two aspects of family functioning - feeling highly valued as a family member and having a family confidant - were measured at age 15. Developmentally-relevant areas of functioning were assessed at age 30. Results Both positive family factors were predictive of adaptive adult functioning across several domains, including mental health and social/interpersonal functioning. Conclusions Findings provide evidence about the salient relationships between positive family relationships and later healthy functioning. PMID:21532965

  11. Family Cultural Socialization Practices and Ethnic Identity in College-Going Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juang, Linda; Syed, Moin

    2010-01-01

    We examined how family cultural socialization related to the ethnic identity of Asian American, Latino, White, and Mixed-Ethnic emerging adults (N = 225). Greater family cultural socialization was related to greater ethnic identity exploration and commitment. Ethnic minority students reported higher levels of family cultural socialization and…

  12. Family Health History Communication Networks of Older Adults: Importance of Social Relationships and Disease Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashida, Sato; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Goodman, Melody; Schafer, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Older individuals play a critical role in disseminating family health history (FHH) information that can facilitate disease prevention among younger family members. This study evaluated the characteristics of older adults and their familial networks associated with two types of communication ("have shared" and "intend to share…

  13. The Influence of Family Factors on the Executive Functioning of Adult Children of Alcoholics in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Valarie M.; Kelley, Michelle L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined executive functioning in college aged adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs; n = 84) and non-ACOAs (188). We examined whether characteristics of the family environment and family responsibility in one's family of origin were associated with executive functioning above the contribution of ACOA status. ACOAs reported more…

  14. Adult Outcome of Children Reared for Long-Term Periods in Foster Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumaret, Annick-Camille; Coppel-Batsch, Marthe; Couraud, Simone

    1997-01-01

    Assessment of adult outcomes of 59 children from severely psychosocially dysfunctional families, who were placed in foster families for at least five years, found most had overcome their childhood adversities with 56% well-integrated socially and only 10% in situations of failure. Difficulties were linked to multiple family disturbances, traumatic…

  15. Does Participation in Home-delivered Meals Programs Improve Outcomes for Older Adults?: Results of a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Anthony D.; Godfryd, Alice; Buys, David R.; Locher, Julie L.

    2015-01-01

    Participation in home-delivered meals programs may contribute to the health and independence of older adults living in the community, especially those who are food insecure or those who are making transitions from acute, subacute, and chronic care settings to the home. The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive and systematic review of ALL studies related to home-delivered meals in order to shed light on the state of the science. A complete review of articles appearing in PubMed using the Keyword “Meal” was conducted; and titles, abstracts, and full-texts were screened for relevance. Included in this review are 80 articles. Most studies are descriptive and do not report on outcomes. Frequently reported outcomes included nutritional status based upon self-reported dietary intake. Additionally, most studies included in this review are cross-sectional, have a small sample size, and/or are limited to a particular setting or participant population. More rigorous research is needed to: 1) gain insight into why so few eligible older adults access home-delivered meals programs, 2) support expansion of home-delivered meals to all eligible older adults, 3) better identify what home-delivered meals models alone and in combination with other services works best and for whom, and 4) better target home-delivered meals programs where and when resources are scarce. PMID:26106985

  16. Clustering Home Activity Distributions for Automatic Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults1

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Ahmad; Chikhaoui, Belkacem; Mattek, Nora; Kaye, Jeffrey; Austin, Daniel; Mihailidis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The public health implications of growing numbers of older adults at risk for dementia places pressure on identifying dementia at its earliest stages so as to develop proactive management plans. The prodromal dementia phase commonly identified as mild cognitive impairment is an important target for this early detection of impending dementia amenable to treatment. In this paper, we propose a method for home-based automatic detection of mild cognitive impairment in older adults through continuous monitoring via unobtrusive sensing technologies. Our method is composed of two main stages: a training stage and a test stage. For training, room activity distributions are estimated for each subject using a time frame of ω weeks, and then affinity propagation is employed to cluster the activity distributions and to extract exemplars to represent the different emerging clusters. For testing, room activity distributions belonging to a test subject with unknown cognitive status are compared to the extracted exemplars and get assigned the labels of the exemplars that result in the smallest normalized Kullbak–Leibler divergence. The labels of the activity distributions are then used to determine the cognitive status of the test subject. Using the sensor and clinical data pertaining to 85 homes with single occupants, we were able to automatically detect mild cognitive impairment in older adults with an F0.5 score of 0.856. Also, we were able to detect the non-amnestic sub-type of mild cognitive impairment in older adults with an F0.5 score of 0.958. PMID:27617044

  17. Clustering Home Activity Distributions for Automatic Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults1

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Ahmad; Chikhaoui, Belkacem; Mattek, Nora; Kaye, Jeffrey; Austin, Daniel; Mihailidis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The public health implications of growing numbers of older adults at risk for dementia places pressure on identifying dementia at its earliest stages so as to develop proactive management plans. The prodromal dementia phase commonly identified as mild cognitive impairment is an important target for this early detection of impending dementia amenable to treatment. In this paper, we propose a method for home-based automatic detection of mild cognitive impairment in older adults through continuous monitoring via unobtrusive sensing technologies. Our method is composed of two main stages: a training stage and a test stage. For training, room activity distributions are estimated for each subject using a time frame of ω weeks, and then affinity propagation is employed to cluster the activity distributions and to extract exemplars to represent the different emerging clusters. For testing, room activity distributions belonging to a test subject with unknown cognitive status are compared to the extracted exemplars and get assigned the labels of the exemplars that result in the smallest normalized Kullbak–Leibler divergence. The labels of the activity distributions are then used to determine the cognitive status of the test subject. Using the sensor and clinical data pertaining to 85 homes with single occupants, we were able to automatically detect mild cognitive impairment in older adults with an F0.5 score of 0.856. Also, we were able to detect the non-amnestic sub-type of mild cognitive impairment in older adults with an F0.5 score of 0.958.

  18. Food preparation supplies predict children's family meal and home-prepared dinner consumption in low-income households.

    PubMed

    Appelhans, Bradley M; Waring, Molly E; Schneider, Kristin L; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2014-05-01

    Frequent family meals and home food preparation are considered important for children's nutritional health and weight maintenance. This cross-sectional study tested whether these parent-driven behaviors are related to the availability of food preparation supplies in low-income urban households. Caregivers of children ages 6-13 provided information on family meal frequency, child consumption of home-prepared dinners, household food insecurity, and attitudes towards cooking. Researchers used a newly developed Food Preparation Checklist (FPC) to assess the availability of 41 food preparation supplies during a physical audit of the home environment. Caregivers and children provided anthropometric measurements and jointly reported on child dietary intake. In ordinal logistic regression models, greater home availability of food preparation supplies was associated with more frequent family meals and child consumption of home-prepared dinners. Associations were independent of household financial strain, food insecurity, caregiver attitudes toward cooking, and sociodemographic characteristics. Fewer food preparation supplies were available in households characterized by greater food insecurity, lower income, and negative caregiver attitudes towards cooking, but did not differ by child or caregiver weight status. As in prior studies, more frequent family meals and consumption of home-prepared dinners were associated with healthier child dietary intake in several areas. We conclude that food preparation supplies are often limited in the most socioeconomically disadvantaged households, and their availability is related to the frequency with which children consume family meals and home-prepared dinners. The potential role of food preparation supplies as contributors to socioeconomic disparities in child nutritional health and obesity deserves further study. PMID:24462491

  19. Home food and activity assessment: Development and validation of an instrument for diverse families of young children

    PubMed Central

    Boles, Richard E.; Burdell, Alexandra; Johnson, Susan L.; Gavin, William J.; Davies, Patricia L.; Bellows, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to refine and psychometrically test an instrument measuring the home food and activity environment of geographically and economically diverse families of preschool aged children. Caregivers of preschool aged children (n = 83) completed a modified self-report questionnaire. Reliably trained researchers conducted independent observations on 25 randomly selected homes. Agreement statistics were conducted at the item level (159 total items) to determine reliability. Frequency counts were calculated to identify item availability. Results showed Kappa statistics were high (0.67–1.00) between independent researchers but varied between researchers and parents resulting in 85 items achieving criterion validity (Kappa >0.60). Analyses of reliable items revealed the presence in the home of a high frequency of unhealthy snack foods, high fat milk and low frequency of availability of fruits/vegetables and low fat milk. Fifty-two percent of the homes were arranged with a television in the preschool child’s bedroom. Physical Activity devices also were found to have high frequency availability. Families reporting lower education reported higher levels of sugar sweetened beverages and less low-fat dairy (p<0.05) compared to higher education families. Low-income families (<$27K/year) reported significantly fewer Physical Activity devices (p<0.001) compared to higher income families. Hispanic families reported significantly higher numbers of Sedentary Devices (p<0.05) compared to non-Hispanic families. There were no significant differences between demographic comparisons on available fruits/vegetables, meats, whole grains, and regular fat dairy. A modified home food and activity instrument was found to reliably identify foods and activity devices with geographically and economically diverse families. PMID:24798760

  20. "Grandma, You Should Do It--It's Cool" Older Adults and the Role of Family Members in Their Acceptance of Technology.

    PubMed

    Luijkx, Katrien; Peek, Sebastiaan; Wouters, Eveline

    2015-12-01

    Despite its potential, the acceptance of technology to support the ability to live independently in one's own home, also called aging in place, is not optimal. Family members may play a key role in technology acceptance by older adults; however, it is not well understood why and how they exert influence. Based on open interviews with 53 community-dwelling older adults, this paper describes the influence of family members, including spouses, on the use of various types of consumer electronics by older adults as was reported by themselves. Such a broad focus enables understanding the use of technology as was reported by older adults, instead of its intended use. Our study reveals that the influence of each family member has its own characteristics. The influence of technology acceptance is a natural and coincidental part of the interaction with spouses and grandchildren in which entertainment and pleasure are prominent. This is also partly true for the influence of children, but their influence also is intentional and driven by concerns. Our study indicates the importance of including all family members when implementing technology in the lives of older adults. Besides information for children about the use(fullness) of devices, it is worthwhile to give grandchildren an important role, because older adults easily adopt their enthusiasm and it might eventually lighten the burden on children. PMID:26690188

  1. “Grandma, You Should Do It—It’s Cool” Older Adults and the Role of Family Members in Their Acceptance of Technology

    PubMed Central

    Luijkx, Katrien; Peek, Sebastiaan; Wouters, Eveline

    2015-01-01

    Despite its potential, the acceptance of technology to support the ability to live independently in one’s own home, also called aging in place, is not optimal. Family members may play a key role in technology acceptance by older adults; however, it is not well understood why and how they exert influence. Based on open interviews with 53 community-dwelling older adults, this paper describes the influence of family members, including spouses, on the use of various types of consumer electronics by older adults as was reported by themselves. Such a broad focus enables understanding the use of technology as was reported by older adults, instead of its intended use. Our study reveals that the influence of each family member has its own characteristics. The influence of technology acceptance is a natural and coincidental part of the interaction with spouses and grandchildren in which entertainment and pleasure are prominent. This is also partly true for the influence of children, but their influence also is intentional and driven by concerns. Our study indicates the importance of including all family members when implementing technology in the lives of older adults. Besides information for children about the use(fullness) of devices, it is worthwhile to give grandchildren an important role, because older adults easily adopt their enthusiasm and it might eventually lighten the burden on children. PMID:26690188

  2. "Grandma, You Should Do It--It's Cool" Older Adults and the Role of Family Members in Their Acceptance of Technology.

    PubMed

    Luijkx, Katrien; Peek, Sebastiaan; Wouters, Eveline

    2015-12-05

    Despite its potential, the acceptance of technology to support the ability to live independently in one's own home, also called aging in place, is not optimal. Family members may play a key role in technology acceptance by older adults; however, it is not well understood why and how they exert influence. Based on open interviews with 53 community-dwelling older adults, this paper describes the influence of family members, including spouses, on the use of various types of consumer electronics by older adults as was reported by themselves. Such a broad focus enables understanding the use of technology as was reported by older adults, instead of its intended use. Our study reveals that the influence of each family member has its own characteristics. The influence of technology acceptance is a natural and coincidental part of the interaction with spouses and grandchildren in which entertainment and pleasure are prominent. This is also partly true for the influence of children, but their influence also is intentional and driven by concerns. Our study indicates the importance of including all family members when implementing technology in the lives of older adults. Besides information for children about the use(fullness) of devices, it is worthwhile to give grandchildren an important role, because older adults easily adopt their enthusiasm and it might eventually lighten the burden on children.

  3. Migration, home range, and important use areas of Florida sub-adult bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mojica, E.K.

    2006-01-01

    Long distance movements of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) have prevented a thorough documentation of their migration when monitored with traditional methods of banding and radio telemetry. I used satellite telemetry to determine diurnal and nocturnal important use areas (IUAs), migration routes, stopover sites, and home ranges of 69 migratory and non-migratory Florida sub-adult Bald Eagles. I located 151 daytime IUAs in 20 states and provinces, and 50 nocturnal roosts in 8 states and provinces. There was no difference in coarse home range size of migratory eagles between sexes in winter or summer (2-way ANOVA sex x season). Coarse home ranges were larger in winter ( x = 25,218 km2, 95% CI: 13,015 ? 37,421) than summer ( x = 6,166 km2, 95% CI: 2,696 ? 9,637; F1,64 = 4.03, P = 0.01). Eagles made equal use of Coastal Plain (n = 24) and Appalachian Mountain (n = 26) migratory routes during the first migration north. I recommend conserving nocturnal roosts and undeveloped shoreline forest within IUAs for sustained recruitment of Florida Bald Eagles.

  4. The impact of informal caregivers on depressive symptoms among older adults receiving formal home health care.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunhee; Lee, Nam-Ju; Kim, Eun-Young; Strumpf, Neville E

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the association between presence and types of informal caregivers and the presence of depressive symptoms among older adults receiving formal home health care (HHC). A secondary analysis of data was conducted using a computerized patient care database, the Outcome and Assessment Information Set. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the data of 8448 patients aged 65 years or older who had been admitted to an HHC agency from acute care hospitals between January 1, 2002 and June 30, 2002. The outcome variable was the presence of depressive symptoms. The primary predictor variable was the presence and types of informal caregivers. Covariates included demographic variables, health status, length of time enrolled in formal HHC, patient living arrangements, and the frequency and types of care received from informal caregivers. A lower percentage of older adults receiving care from both informal caregivers and a formal HHC agency (13.3%) had depressive symptoms than older adults receiving only formal HHC (14.9%) at the end of a 60-day episode in formal HHC. Older adults without an informal caregiver were more likely to experience depressive symptoms than those with an informal caregiver after a 60-day episode in HHC (odds ratio = 1.229, 95% confidence interval = 1.027-1.471). There was no significant association between the types of informal caregivers and the presence of depressive symptoms.

  5. Befriending breastfeeding: a home-based antenatal pilot for south Asian families.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Naomi

    2012-06-01

    In the last decade recognition of the impact of social inequalities on health has resulted in a refocus of the public health agenda, with health visitors having a pivotal role. While this involvement is in the form of family-centred public health, it is also intended to involve work with the wider community and primarily focuses on beginning to address the injustice of inequality before a child is born, acknowledging that early intervention is key to breaking the cycle of deprivation. Such inequalities disproportionately affect those from black and minority ethnic (BME) groups who are more likely to report long-term ill health than their white counterparts. Access to healthcare services is restricted not only by family choices but also by difficulties of location and language. Numerous initiatives to address these issues have been implemented in the last 10 years, from Sure Start centres to maternity service reform, but the level of engagement from women from BME groups is not equal to their counterparts. In one locality in Oxford there is a high concentration of families from Pakistan and Bangladesh who, despite concerted efforts, have remained hard to reach. This project attempted to redesign the current antenatal breastfeeding information service, and aimed to produce evidence to guide practice to better connect with this group. The review considers evidence provided by the literature base and uses a home visiting approach to investigate the topic. Results are correlated and compared, and recommendations for the future are presented.

  6. Befriending breastfeeding: a home-based antenatal pilot for south Asian families.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Naomi

    2012-06-01

    In the last decade recognition of the impact of social inequalities on health has resulted in a refocus of the public health agenda, with health visitors having a pivotal role. While this involvement is in the form of family-centred public health, it is also intended to involve work with the wider community and primarily focuses on beginning to address the injustice of inequality before a child is born, acknowledging that early intervention is key to breaking the cycle of deprivation. Such inequalities disproportionately affect those from black and minority ethnic (BME) groups who are more likely to report long-term ill health than their white counterparts. Access to healthcare services is restricted not only by family choices but also by difficulties of location and language. Numerous initiatives to address these issues have been implemented in the last 10 years, from Sure Start centres to maternity service reform, but the level of engagement from women from BME groups is not equal to their counterparts. In one locality in Oxford there is a high concentration of families from Pakistan and Bangladesh who, despite concerted efforts, have remained hard to reach. This project attempted to redesign the current antenatal breastfeeding information service, and aimed to produce evidence to guide practice to better connect with this group. The review considers evidence provided by the literature base and uses a home visiting approach to investigate the topic. Results are correlated and compared, and recommendations for the future are presented. PMID:22779392

  7. Family-centered maternity care for deaf refugees: the patient-centered medical home in action.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Shirish K; Carroll, Jennifer K; Fogarty, Colleen T; Finigan, Elizabeth G

    2009-12-01

    The intersection of 2 underserved populations-refugees and deaf individuals-presents novel challenges to health care systems and has not been described previously. A patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is uniquely equipped to provide outstanding primary care to disadvantaged groups. As an illustrative case study, we present our experience applying principles of the PCMH to address an extremely challenging clinical situation: providing high-quality maternity care to a recently immigrated Vietnamese refugee couple lacking formal language skills. We describe how enhanced access, continuity, coordination, and cultural appropriateness can facilitate favorable outcomes in even daunting circumstances. By collaborating with multiple interpreters, the health center staff, and the extended family, we effectively mobilized an expanded system of care to ensure informed consent and shared decision making, ultimately culminating in a successful labor and vaginal delivery. Through organizational and individual commitment to the tenets of the PCMH, we demonstrate the particular strengths of family medicine training sites in caring for similar patients and families with complex cultural and linguistic barriers to care.

  8. Toward a passive low-cost in-home gait assessment system for older adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Stone, Erik; Skubic, Marjorie; Keller, James M; Abbott, Carmen; Rantz, Marilyn

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a webcam-based system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed, step time, and step length from a 3-D voxel reconstruction, which is built from two calibrated webcam views. The gait parameters are validated with a GAITRite mat and a Vicon motion capture system in the laboratory with 13 participants and 44 tests, and again with GAITRite for 8 older adults in senior housing. Excellent agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.99 and repeatability coefficients between 0.7% and 6.6% was found for walking speed, step time, and step length given the limitation of frame rate and voxel resolution. The system was further tested with ten seniors in a scripted scenario representing everyday activities in an unstructured environment. The system results demonstrate the capability of being used as a daily gait assessment tool for fall risk assessment and other medical applications. Furthermore, we found that residents displayed different gait patterns during their clinical GAITRite tests compared to the realistic scenario, namely a mean increase of 21% in walking speed, a mean decrease of 12% in step time, and a mean increase of 6% in step length. These findings provide support for continuous gait assessment in the home for capturing habitual gait. PMID:24235111

  9. Fall detection in homes of older adults using the Microsoft Kinect.

    PubMed

    Stone, Erik E; Skubic, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    A method for detecting falls in the homes of older adults using the Microsoft Kinect and a two-stage fall detection system is presented. The first stage of the detection system characterizes a person's vertical state in individual depth image frames, and then segments on ground events from the vertical state time series obtained by tracking the person over time. The second stage uses an ensemble of decision trees to compute a confidence that a fall preceded on a ground event. Evaluation was conducted in the actual homes of older adults, using a combined nine years of continuous data collected in 13 apartments. The dataset includes 454 falls, 445 falls performed by trained stunt actors and nine naturally occurring resident falls. The extensive data collection allows for characterization of system performance under real-world conditions to a degree that has not been shown in other studies. Cross validation results are included for standing, sitting, and lying down positions, near (within 4 m) versus far fall locations, and occluded versus not occluded fallers. The method is compared against five state-of-the-art fall detection algorithms and significantly better results are achieved. PMID:24733032

  10. Predictors of externalizing behavior problems in early elementary-aged children: the role of family and home environments.

    PubMed

    Price, Joseph M; Chiapa, Amanda; Walsh, Natalia Escobar

    2013-01-01

    As children enter elementary school they display behavioral orientations that reveal potential developmental trajectories. Developmental transitions offer unique opportunities for examining developmental pathways and the factors that influence emerging pathways. The primary goal of this investigation was to examine characteristics of family and home contexts in predicting externalizing behavior problems among children transitioning into elementary school. Dimensions of the family and home environments of maltreated and nonmaltreated children (N = 177) were examined and used to predict externalizing behavior problems. Maltreatment was assessed using case file information, characteristics of the family and home environment were rated by interviewers, and externalizing behavior was assessed by mother's ratings on the Child Behavior Checklist. Relative to nonmaltreated children, the family environments of physically abused children were characterized by higher levels of negative social interactions. Also, in comparison to nonmaltreated children, the home environments of children who experienced neglect were characterized as less organized and clean. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that physical abuse was the strongest predictor of externalizing behavior. After controlling for the contribution of physical abuse, mother's negative behavior toward the focal child, aggression between siblings, and the lack of an organized and clean home were each predictive of externalizing behavior. PMID:23991617

  11. What can local authorities do to improve the social care-related quality of life of older adults living at home? Evidence from the Adult Social Care Survey.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, K M; Malley, J; Bosmans, J E; Jansen, A P D; Ostelo, R W; van der Horst, H E; Netten, A

    2014-09-01

    Local authorities spend considerable resources on social care at home for older adults. Given the expected growth in the population of older adults and budget cuts on local government, it is important to find efficient ways of maintaining and improving the quality of life of older adults. The ageing in place literature suggests that policies in other functions of local authorities may have a significant role to play. This study aims to examine the associations between social care-related quality of life (SCRQoL) in older adults and three potential policy targets for local authorities: (i) accessibility of information and advice, (ii) design of the home and (iii) accessibility of the local area. We used cross-sectional data from the English national Adult Social Care Survey (ASCS) 2010/2011 on service users aged 65 years and older and living at home (N=29,935). To examine the association between SCRQoL, as measured by the ASCOT, and three single-item questions about accessibility of information, design of the home and accessibility of the local area, we estimate linear and quantile regression models. After adjusting for physical and mental health factors and other confounders our findings indicate that SCRQoL is significantly lower for older adults who find it more difficult to find information and advice, for those who report that their home design is inappropriate for their needs and for those who find it more difficult to get around their local area. In addition, these three variables are as strongly associated with SCRQoL as physical and mental health factors. We conclude that in seeking to find ways to maintain and improve the quality of life of social care users living at home, local authorities could look more broadly across their responsibilities. Further research is required to explore the cost-effectiveness of these options compared to standard social care services.

  12. "That was grown folks' business": narrative reflection and response in older adults' family health history communication.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Jill; Hovick, Shelly R

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of family health history and the pivotal role of older adults in communicating it, this study examines how African American older adults (a) characterize their understandings of health-related conditions in their family histories and (b) rationalize their motivations and constraints for sharing this information with current family members. Using narrative theory as a framework, we illustrate how the participants reflect on prior health-related experiences within the family to respond to moral and practical calls for communicating family health information to current relatives. Specifically, our analysis highlights how storied family secrets--as constructed by 28 participants in group and individual interviews--reveal and inform shifting cultural and generational practices that shape the lived health behaviors and communication of older adults at greater risk for health disparities.

  13. Early home-based intervention in the Netherlands for children at familial risk of dyslexia.

    PubMed

    van Otterloo, Sandra G; van der Leij, Aryan; Henrichs, Lotte F

    2009-08-01

    Dutch children at higher familial risk of reading disability received a home-based intervention programme before formal reading instruction started to investigate whether this would reduce the risk of dyslexia. The experimental group (n=23) received a specific training in phoneme awareness and letter knowledge. A control group (n=25) received a non-specific training in morphology, syntax, and vocabulary. Both interventions were designed to take 10 min a day, 5 days a week for 10 weeks. Most parents were sufficiently able to work with the programme properly. At post-test the experimental group had gained more on phoneme awareness than the control group. The control group gained more on one of the morphology measures. On average, these specific training results did not lead to significant group differences in first-grade reading and spelling measures. However, fewer experimental children scored below 10th percentile on word recognition. PMID:18819166

  14. Determinants of educational performance in India: Role of home and family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Uday

    1991-06-01

    This paper addresses the impacts of family and pupil characteristics on children's academic learning in primary schools in India. The present study focuses on the children who have dropped out before completing primary schooling. The study is based on a random sample of two hundred children from twenty villages in two districts in the state of Andhra Pradesh in south India. A special test was developed and administered to measure the academic achievement of the children. Our study found that education supplies and the sanitary facilities at home have a remarkable relationship with the academic performance of children. In addition, the locale of a child's home, its distance from the source of drinking water, the child's father's work status and literacy and the level (grade) of schooling that the child has completed before dropping out, also have significant influence on child's performance. Our study also found that the child's gender, age at enrollment, reason for dropping out, and parents' income, literacy and caste do not have significant influence on performance. These findings have important public policy implications for the provision of basic sanitary facilities to all households, subsidized educational supplies, free uniforms, text-books, and mid-day meals.

  15. PRP8 intein in Ajellomycetaceae family pathogens: sequence analysis, splicing evaluation and homing endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Volkmann, Gerrit; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2011-02-01

    Inteins are intervening sequences that are transcribed and translated with flanking host protein sequences and then self-excised by protein splicing. Bi-functional inteins also contain a homing endonuclease responsible for their genetic mobility. The PRP8 intein, the most widespread among fungi, occurs in important pathogens such as Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, from the Ajellomycetaceae family. Herein, we describe the bi-functional PRP8 intein in two other Ajellomycetacean pathogens, Blastomyces dermatitidis and Emmonsia parva. Sequence analysis and experimental evidence suggest that the homing endonuclease from PbrPRP8 is inactive. The splicing activity of the PRP8 intein from the B. dermatitidis, E. parva and P. brasiliensis species complex was demonstrated in a non-native protein context in Escherichia coli. Since the PRP8 intein is located in a functionally essential nuclear protein, it can be considered a promising therapeutic target for anti-fungal drugs, because inhibition of intein splicing should inhibit proliferation of intein-containing pathogens. PMID:20682355

  16. Providing Support to Families with Specific Regard to the Removal of Barriers that Exist for Families Trying to Provide Academic Support at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide resources for families such that they would be well equipped to provide academic support at home; hence examining the impact of providing said resources and the subsequent impact on a first grade child's reading development. In this study, the researcher took a group of twenty students and divided them into…

  17. Do indoor environments influence asthma and asthma-related symptoms among adults in homes?: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jie, Yu; Ismail, Noor Hassim; Jie, Xu; Isa, Zaleha Md

    2011-09-01

    This review summarizes the results of epidemiological studies focusing on the detrimental effects of home environmental factors on asthma morbidity in adults. We reviewed the literature on indoor air quality (IAQ), physical and sociodemographic factors, and asthma morbidity in homes, and identified commonly reported asthma, allergic, and respiratory symptoms involving the home environment. Reported IAQ and asthma morbidity data strongly indicated positive associations between indoor air pollution and adverse health effects in most studies. Indoor factors most consistently associated with asthma and asthma-related symptoms in adults included fuel combustion, mold growth, and environmental tobacco smoke. Environmental exposure may increase an adult's risk of developing asthma and also may increase the risk of asthma exacerbations. Evaluation of present IAQ levels, exposure characteristics, and the role of exposure to these factors in relation to asthma morbidity is important for improving our understanding, identifying the burden, and for developing and implementing interventions aimed at reducing asthma morbidity.

  18. "Willing but unwilling": attitudinal barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology among older adults.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Willis, Erin; Cameron, Glen; Geana, Mugur

    2014-06-01

    While much research focuses on adoption of electronic health-care records and other information technology among health-care providers, less research explores patient attitudes. This qualitative study examines barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology, particularly personal electronic health records, among older adults. We conducted in-depth interviews (30-90 min duration) with 35 American adults, aged 46-72 years, to determine their perceptions of and attitudes toward home-based health information technology. Analysis of interview data revealed that most barriers to adoption fell under four themes: technological discomfort, privacy or security concerns, lack of relative advantage, and perceived distance from the user representation. Based on our findings, systems to promote home-based health information technology should incorporate familiar computer applications, alleviate privacy and security concerns, and align with older adults' active and engaged self-image.

  19. How family carers engage with technical health procedures in the home: a grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Janet; McKinlay, Eileen; Keeling, Sally; Levack, William

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences of family carers who manage technical health procedures at home and describe their learning process. Design A qualitative study using grounded theory. Participants New Zealand family carers (21 women, 5 men) who managed technical health procedures such as enteral feeding, peritoneal dialysis, tracheostomy care, a central venous line or urinary catheter. In addition, 15 health professionals involved in teaching carers were interviewed. Methods Semistructured interviews were coded soon after completion and preliminary analysis influenced subsequent interviews. Additional data were compared with existing material and as analysis proceeded, initial codes were grouped into higher order concepts until a core concept was described. Interviewing continued until no new ideas emerged and concepts were well defined. Results The response of carers to the role of managing technical health procedures in the home is presented in terms of five dispositions: (1) Embracing care, (2) Resisting, (3) Reluctant acceptance, (4) Relinquishing and (5) Being overwhelmed. These dispositions were not static and carers commonly changed between them. Embracing care included cognitive understanding of the purpose and benefits of a procedure; accepting a ‘technical’ solution; practical management; and an emotional response. Accepting embrace is primarily motivated by perceived benefits for the recipient. It may also be driven by a lack of alternatives. Resisting or reluctant acceptance results from a lack of understanding about the procedure or willingness to manage it. Carers need adequate support to avoid becoming overwhelmed, and there are times when it is appropriate to encourage them to relinquish care for the sake of their own needs. Conclusions The concept of embracing care encourages health professionals to extend their attention beyond simply the practical aspects of technical procedures to assessing and addressing carers’ emotional and

  20. Home-based rehabilitation interventions for adults living with HIV: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Cobbing, Saul; Hanass-Hancock, Jill; Myezwa, Hellen

    2016-01-01

    Home-based rehabilitation (HBR) has been shown to improve the lives of people living with a wide range of chronic diseases in resource-rich settings. This may also be a particularly effective strategy in resource-poor settings, where access to institution-based rehabilitation is limited. This review aimed to summarise and discuss the evidence related to the effectiveness of home-based rehabilitation (HBR) interventions designed specifically for adults living with HIV. A scoping review methodology was employed, involving systematic search techniques and appraisal of appropriate evidence. English-language journal articles that assessed the quality of life or functional ability outcomes of HBR interventions for adults living with HIV were considered for this review. Out of an initial 1 135 publications retrieved from the search of databases, six articles met this review's inclusion criteria. While this review highlights the scarcity of empirical evidence related to HBR interventions for adults living with HIV, the findings of these six articles are that HBR is a safe management option that may confer a number of physical and psychological benefits for this population. Future research on HBR interventions should include a wider range of assessment measures, including cost-benefit analyses and specific tools designed to assess the functional ability and participation in activities of daily living of participants involved in these programmes. In particular, more research on HBR is required in resource-poor environments, such as sub-Saharan Africa where HIV is endemic, to assess whether this is a feasible strategy that is both effective and practical in the areas that may need it most. PMID:27002360

  1. Everyday (in)equality at home: complex constructions of gender in South African families

    PubMed Central

    Helman, Rebecca; Ratele, Kopano

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of violence and HIV have been documented within the South African context. Constructions of masculinity and femininity that position men as dominant and highly sexually active and women as subordinate and acquiescent have been found to contribute towards gender inequality. This inequality is in turn related to negative health consequences, specifically violence against women, children, and other men, as well as sexual risk. Within this context it becomes important to explore how problematic constructions of gender are being (re)produced and how these constructions are being challenged. Families have been identified as key sites in which gender is both constructed and enacted on a daily basis and it is within this space that children are first exposed to notions of gender. Objective This article draws from a study that was intended to expand on the limited understandings of the ways in which gender (in)equality is constructed and conveyed within the context of South African families on an everyday basis. Design Children and parents in 18 families from a range of different material and cultural backgrounds were interviewed about the meanings and practices of gender within their homes. Data were analysed using a Foucauldian discourse analysis. Results The data reveal how problematic constructions of masculinity and femininity are (re)produced but also challenged within a range of different families. Gender and gender (in)equality are therefore routinely accomplished in complex ways. Conclusions These findings have important implications for promoting gender equality and therefore for disrupting violence and sexual risk as gendered health issues. PMID:27293123

  2. Family eating out-of-home: a review of nutrition and health policies.

    PubMed

    McGuffin, L E; Wallace, J M W; McCrorie, T A; Price, R K; Pourshahidi, L K; Livingstone, M B E

    2013-02-01

    Childhood obesity is a growing problem worldwide. In recent years, out-of-home (OH) eating has been highlighted as one of the many factors contributing to the obesogenic environment. This review seeks to identify a range of existing guidelines for the provision of healthy food options for families who eat OH frequently. Nationally available nutrition policies were identified using targeted and untargeted searches of the internet to identify established strategies for providing food for children in the family eating out sector in America (US), Australia, Canada and the WHO's European Region (EUR). These were categorised on the basis of eleven pre-defined criteria including: family eating out sector included as stakeholder; inclusion of children's food OH; cost strategies for healthier food choices; provision of nutrition information for customers; nutrition training of catering staff; and monitoring and evaluation structures. Fifty-five policies were reviewed, of which 71% addressed children's food served OH, but principally only for food available in schools. Two voluntary programmes, from Colorado and Slovenia, were identified as possible best practice models as they met a majority of the evaluation criteria. The most frequently used strategy by policies to promote healthier eating OH was the provision of nutrition information on menus, while monitoring and evaluation plans were poorly incorporated into any OH strategies, thus raising issues about their effectiveness. This review has identified a range of initiatives that could be employed to make healthier eating OH more accessible for families. However, to establish best practice guidelines for healthier OH food choices further investigations are required. PMID:23182109

  3. Home for now: A mixed-methods evaluation of a short-term housing support program for homeless families.

    PubMed

    Meschede, Tatjana; Chaganti, Sara

    2015-10-01

    The use of short-term rental subsidy vouchers offers a new approach to addressing the housing needs of families facing homelessness. In Massachusetts, the Family Home pilot program placed homeless families in housing instead of shelter, providing two years of rental subsidy plus support services with the goal of enabling families to maintain market rate housing. This mixed-method case study complements staff and participant interview data with participant survey and administrative data to evaluate the implementation and short-term outcomes of Family Home in one region. Data point to improved family well-being in housing but also persistent barriers to achieving longer-term housing and economic stability. Of the families who had exited the program at the end of the study, one quarter were able to retain their housing at market rate, only 9% returned to shelter, and one in five moved in with families/friends. Lack of affordable housing in a high rental cost region and jobs that pay living wages were among the major reasons that families struggled to maintain housing. This research points to the need for integrating supportive services from the program's start, including targeted workforce development, to plan for the end of the short-term rental subsidy. PMID:25989204

  4. Home for now: A mixed-methods evaluation of a short-term housing support program for homeless families.

    PubMed

    Meschede, Tatjana; Chaganti, Sara

    2015-10-01

    The use of short-term rental subsidy vouchers offers a new approach to addressing the housing needs of families facing homelessness. In Massachusetts, the Family Home pilot program placed homeless families in housing instead of shelter, providing two years of rental subsidy plus support services with the goal of enabling families to maintain market rate housing. This mixed-method case study complements staff and participant interview data with participant survey and administrative data to evaluate the implementation and short-term outcomes of Family Home in one region. Data point to improved family well-being in housing but also persistent barriers to achieving longer-term housing and economic stability. Of the families who had exited the program at the end of the study, one quarter were able to retain their housing at market rate, only 9% returned to shelter, and one in five moved in with families/friends. Lack of affordable housing in a high rental cost region and jobs that pay living wages were among the major reasons that families struggled to maintain housing. This research points to the need for integrating supportive services from the program's start, including targeted workforce development, to plan for the end of the short-term rental subsidy.

  5. Should Parents Allow Their Adolescent Children to Drink at Home? Family Factors as Predictors of Alcohol Involvement Trajectories Over 15 Years

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Ash; Cooper, M. Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study examined familial risk and protective factors as moderators of parents allowing their adolescent children to drink at home on longitudinal alcohol involvement trajectories. Method: A total of 772 community adolescents and their parents provided data beginning in 1989 and at four subsequent time points over 15 years; Black adolescents were intentionally oversampled (50% at baseline). Results: Outcomes related to allowing adolescents to drink at home depended on family structure: Adolescents from intact families who were allowed to drink at home showed the lowest levels of alcohol use and problems over time, whereas those from nonintact families who were allowed to drink at home showed the highest levels of involvement. These results controlled for family history of alcohol problems, consistent parenting styles, and demographic characteristics. Conclusions: Results suggest that allowing adolescents to drink at home is neither inherently protective nor risky but depends on the family context. Implications for the development of adolescent alcohol involvement are discussed. PMID:26402346

  6. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    Building homes that are zero energy-ready is a goal of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America program and one embodied in Building America’s premier home certification program, the Challenge Home program. This case study describes several examples of successful zero energy-ready home projects completed by Building America teams and partner builders.

  7. Formative Research on Creating Smoke-free Homes in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle Crozier; Butler, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The home is a significant place for exposure to secondhand smoke for children and non-smoking adults. This study explored factors that would convince families to adopt household smoking bans and actions to create and maintain smoke-free homes. Interviews were conducted with adults in 102 households in rural Georgia. Participating families had a…

  8. Pain Medication Management Processes Used by Oncology Outpatients and Family Caregivers Part II: Home and Lifestyle Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Karen L.; Plano Clark, Vicki L.; West, Claudia M.; Dodd, Marylin J.; Rabow, Michael W.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Context Despite the increasing complexity of medication regimens for persistent cancer pain, little is known about how oncology outpatients and their family caregivers manage pain medications at home. Objectives To describe the day-to-day management of pain medications from the perspectives of oncology outpatients and their family caregivers who participated in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a psycho-educational intervention called the Pro-Self © Plus Pain Control Program. In this article, we focus on pain medication management in the context of highly individualized home environments and lifestyles. Methods This qualitative study was conducted as part of a RCT in which an embedded mixed methods research design was used. Audio-recorded dialogue among patients, family caregivers, and intervention nurses was analyzed using qualitative research methods. Results Home and lifestyle contexts for managing pain medications included highly individualized home environments, work and recreational activities, personal routines, and family characteristics. Pain medication management processes particularly relevant in these contexts included understanding, organizing, storing, scheduling, remembering, and taking the medications. With the exception of their interactions with the intervention nurses, most study participants had little involvement with clinicians as they worked through these processes. Conclusion Pain medication management is an ongoing multidimensional process, each step of which has to be mastered by patients and family caregivers when cancer treatment and supportive care is provided on an outpatient basis. Realistic patient- and family-centered skill-building interventions are needed to achieve effective and safe pain medication management in the contexts of individual home environments and lifestyles. PMID:24709364

  9. Differences in vision between clinic and home and the effect of lighting in older adults with and without glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhorade, Anjali M.; Perlmutter, Monica S.; Wilson, Brad; Kambarian, Jamie; Chang, Sidney; Pekmezci, Melike; Gordon, Mae

    2015-01-01

    vision measured at home, with differences mainly due to poor home lighting. Knowledge that vision discrepancies between patient report and clinical testing may be due to home lighting may initiate clinician-patient discussions to increase home lighting and improve vision of older adults in their homes. PMID:24263699

  10. Old Wives, the Same Man, and a Baby: Location and Family as the Foundation of Home in "Tales of Burning Love" and "Bingo Palace"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses two books ("Tales of Burning Love" and "Bingo Palace" by Louise Erdrich) that highlight location and family as the foundation of home. The two novels suggest that "home" must be revised to include, negotiate, and, at times, embrace tenets of Western ideology in order to find or secure one's home. While various…

  11. Links between Home and School among Low-Income Mexican-American and European-American Families. Educational Practice Report: 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azmitia, Margarita; And Others

    This report shows that, in low-income Mexican-American and European-American families, children's everyday learning activities at home and aspirations of parents for their children's future are key elements in home-school linkages. Two models of home-school linkages are reviewed: the cultural match/mismatch model and the two-way partnership…

  12. Family conflict and lower morning cortisol in adolescents and adults: modulation of puberty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jihui; Lam, Siu-Ping; Kong, Alice PS; Ma, Ronald CW; Li, Shirley Xin; Chan, Joey WY; Yu, Mandy WM; Zhou, Junying; Chan, Michael HM; Ho, Chung-Shun; Li, Albert M; Tang, Xiangdong; Wing, Yun-Kwok

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to explore the association between family conflict and HPA axis activity, especially with respect to the potential modulating effect of puberty. A total of 205 adolescents and 244 adult parents were recruited. Family conflict was assessed by the family conflict subscale of the Family Environmental Scale and serial salivary cortisol was measured in all participants. A marginally lower AUCg at 30 minutes after wake up in the morning and a significant lower AUCg at 60 minutes and 90 minutes in adult parents with high family conflict was found when compared to those with low family conflict. In adolescents, there were significant interaction effects between pubertal status and family conflict on AUCg (interaction p values <0.05). Among the adolescents with low family conflict, those at late/post pubertal status had higher AUCg than their pre/early pubertal counterparts but this difference was not observed in the adolescents with high family conflict. Adverse family environment is associated with HPA axis dysfunction in adults and late/post pubertal adolescents and pubertal maturation plays a critical role in modulating the association between family environment and HPA axis function. PMID:26928887

  13. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve

    2010-05-14

    Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certification. Consumers, installers, and builders who make decisions about installing space and water heating equipment generally do not perform an analysis to assess the economic impacts of different combinations and efficiencies of space and water heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential life-cycle economic and energy savings of installing space and water heating equipment combinations. Drawing on previous and current analysis conducted for the United States Department of Energy rulemaking on amended standards for furnaces and water heaters, this paper evaluates the extent to which condensing equipment can provide life-cycle cost-effectiveness in a representative sample of single family American homes. The economic analyses indicate that significant energy savings and consumer benefits may result from large-scale introduction of condensing water heaters combined with condensing furnaces in U.S. residential single-family housing, particularly in the Northern region. The analyses also shows that important benefits may be overlooked when policy analysts evaluate the impact of space and water heating equipment separately.

  14. Ontario pharmacists practicing in family health teams and the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Dolovich, Lisa

    2012-04-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) approach continues to gather momentum in the United States and Canada as a broad approach to reform the delivery of the complete primary care system. The family health team (FHT) model implemented in Ontario, Canada, best mirrors the PCMH approach of the United States. The integration of pharmacists as key members of the health care team providing on-site, in-office coordinated care to FHT patients was included from the start of planning the FHT model and represents a substantial opportunity for pharmacists to realize their professional vision. Several research projects in Canada and elsewhere have contributed to providing evidence to support the integration of pharmacists into primary care practice sites. Two major research programs, the Seniors Medication Assessment Research Trial (SMART) cluster randomized controlled trial and the Integrating Family Medicine and Pharmacy to Advance Primary Care Therapeutics (IMPACT) multipronged demonstration project made substantial contributions to evidence-informed policy decisions supporting the integration of pharmacists into FHTs. These projects can provide useful information to support the integration of pharmacists into the PCMH and to encourage further research to better measure the effect of the pharmacist from the holistic patient-centered perspective.

  15. [Volunteers as family supporters in the home care setting: profile and motives].

    PubMed

    Fringer, André; Mayer, Herbert; Schnepp, Wilfried

    2010-06-01

    Family caregivers are increasingly receiving support in home care at low threshold from so called "social support services", since they are often overburdened with caring. Over the necessity for voluntary workers in and beyond this area, literature identifies different aspects that describe the profile of voluntary workers. The central idea of a "new culture of aid" manifests itself in various pilot projects. Such a project was implemented in North Rhine-Westfalia, Germany, during the years 2005 to 2008. It offered social support services to family caregivers and was scientifically assessed by means of case study research. The aim of this study was to depict the profile of voluntary workers, to understand their motives, and to identify their reasons for leaving the project. A total of 52 voluntary workers were surveyed by means of a standardised questionnaire, before and six months after their enrollment in the study. The motives for their commitment to participate in the study differed significantly from the first to the second interview, particularly with regard to participation allowance and the need to strengthen their sense of self-worth. The participation allowance in itself played no primary role in the motivation to become a voluntary worker, it is, however, a not to be underestimated aspect of acknowledgement for provided help. PMID:20509113

  16. Forging the Family of Humankind through International Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how she developed an interest in and originally became involved with international adult education. The author first became aware of the international aspects and activities of adult education while matriculating for her master's degree with Malcolm Knowles at Boston University. As early as 1983, the author…

  17. Home Environments of Infants From Immigrant Families in the United States: Findings From the New Immigrant Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert H.; Pennar, Amy; Glick, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Data from the New Immigrant Survey were used to describe the home environments of 638 children ages birth to 3 years whose parents legally immigrated to the United States. Thirty-two indicators of home conditions were clustered into four domains: discipline and socioemotional in support, learning materials, enriching experiences, and family activities. Results revealed variation in how frequently infants from every country (Mexico, El Salvador, India, Philippines) and region (East Asia, Europe, Caribbean, Africa) studied experienced each home environmental condition. There were differences between countries and regions on many indicators as well as differences based on parents' level of education. The experiences documented for children of recent legal immigrants were similar to those documented for children of native-born families in other studies. PMID:25798506

  18. The Home Literacy Environment as a Predictor of the Early Literacy Development of Children at Family-Risk of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Lorna G.; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Hulme, Charles; Snowling, Margaret J.

    2016-01-01

    The home literacy environment (HLE) predicts language and reading development in typically developing children; relatively little is known about its association with literacy development in children at family-risk of dyslexia. We assessed the HLE at age 4 years, precursor literacy skills at age 5, and literacy outcomes at age 6, in a sample of…

  19. Interact. A Plan for Participation in Home & Family Life Programs. Revised. H.E. Bulletin No. 44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    This guide is intended to assist teachers and vocational administrators in getting parents, students, and members of the community at large to participate in the process of planning and developing a high-quality home and family life education program. The first section discusses the importance of teamwork among parents, students, school, and…

  20. Home-Based Child Development Interventions for Preschool Children from Socially Disadvantaged Families. Campbell Systematic Reviews. 2012:1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Sarah; Maguire, Lisa K.; Macdonald, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the effects of home-based programmes aimed specifically at improving developmental outcomes for preschool children from socially disadvantaged families. The authors searched the following databases between 7 October and 12 October 2010: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2010,…

  1. Mental Health Problems in Norwegian School Children Placed Out-of-Home: The Importance of Family Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havnen, Karen Skaale; Jakobsen, Reidar; Stormark, Kjell Morten

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to explore the association between mental health problems in children placed out-of-home and family risk factors reported as reasons for placement. The sample consisted of 109 Norwegian children aged 6-12 years. Mental health problems were assessed by the Revised Rutter scales reported by the parents and the…

  2. Caregiver Attitudes toward Disabled Elderly Family Members and Institutional Placement in a Home-Based Behavioral Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankin, Eric; And Others

    Although the effectiveness of home-based, behaviorally-oriented treatment programs with the elderly and their families has been well documented, assessment of caregivers' attitudes toward those programs remains rare. To assess the relationship between outcome measures and client and principal caregiver characteristics, 21 client-caregiver dyads,…

  3. From Reminiscing to Reading: Home Contributions to Children's Developing Language and Literacy in Low-Income Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Alison; Reese, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the relations among a range of literacy-related home practices and children's acquisition of language and literacy at the outset of preschool are examined in a sample of linguistically diverse children from low-income families in the United States. Specifically, the study focuses on sources of variation found in mother-child…

  4. Profession differences in family focused practice in the adult mental health system.

    PubMed

    Maybery, Darryl; Goodyear, Melinda; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Cuff, Rose; Reupert, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    There is a large gulf between what psychiatric services should (or could) provide and what they do in practice. This article sought to determine practice differences between the differing professions working in adult mental health services in terms of their family focused work. Three hundred and seven adult mental health professionals completed a cross-sectional survey of family focused practices in adult mental health services. Findings highlight that social workers engaged in more family focused practice compared to psychiatric nurses, who performed consistently the lowest on direct family care, compared to both social workers and psychologists. Clear skill, knowledge, and confidence differences are indicated between the professions. The article concludes by offering direction for future profession education and training in family focused practices.

  5. Mediators of Well-Being in Ageing Family Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnes, Patricia; Woodford, Lynn; Passey, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Background: Increasing numbers of adults with an intellectual disability are being cared for at home by ageing parents. The purpose of this study was to determine whether carer resources (i.e. social support and formal service use) and carer appraisals of ageing and stress/burden mediate the relationships between (1) maladaptive behaviour and…

  6. "Yo Te Estoy Ayudando; Estoy Aprendiendo También/I Am Helping You; I Am Learning Too:" A Bilingual Family's Community of Practice during Home Literacy Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Ashley Simpson; Kibler, Amanda; Palacios, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    This case study examines one Honduran immigrant family's community of practice during home literacy events. Data include field notes and audio and video recordings from six weeks of in-home observations. Coding and discourse analysis are used to analyse talk-in-interaction in order to understand how the family engages in literacy events. Family…

  7. 5 CFR 792.230 - May an agency use appropriated funds to improve the physical space of the family child care homes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... improve the physical space of the family child care homes or child care centers? 792.230 Section 792.230... EMPLOYEES' HEALTH AND COUNSELING PROGRAMS Agency Use of Appropriated Funds for Child Care Costs for Lower... May an agency use appropriated funds to improve the physical space of the family child care homes...

  8. Home Economics/Family Studies Curricula in Canada: Current Status and Challenges = Programmes d'etudes en economie familiale et sciences familiale au Canada: Situation actuelle et enjeux.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterat, Linda; Khamasi, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    Replicating a 1984 study, a survey of home economics/family studies coordinators in the 10 Canadian provinces found the following: home economics has expanded into grades lower than 8; required courses have increased; core curriculum has not changed radically; there is increased focus on family well-being; and there is a need to address curriculum…

  9. Ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental food practices among families of low income Hispanic and African-American preschoolers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family and home environment are important in shaping the dietary patterns of children, yet research among low-income, minority groups is limited. We examined ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental practices among 706 low-income African-American and Hispanic families of pre...

  10. Home visiting programs for HIV-affected families: a comparison of service quality between volunteer-driven and paraprofessional models

    PubMed Central

    Kidman, Rachel; Nice, Johanna; Taylor, Tory; Thurman, Tonya R.

    2014-01-01

    Home visiting is a popular component of programs for HIV-affected children in sub-Saharan Africa, but its implementation varies widely. While some home visitors are lay volunteers, other programs invest in more highly trained paraprofessional staff. This paper describes a study investigating whether additional investment in paraprofessional staffing translated into higher quality service delivery in one program context. Beneficiary children and caregivers at sites in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa were interviewed after 2 years of program enrollment and asked to report about their experiences with home visiting. Analysis focused on intervention exposure, including visit intensity, duration and the kinds of emotional, informational and tangible support provided. Few beneficiaries reported receiving home visits in program models primarily driven by lay volunteers; when visits did occur, they were shorter and more infrequent. Paraprofessional-driven programs not only provided significantly more home visits, but also provided greater interaction with the child, communication on a larger variety of topics, and more tangible support to caregivers. These results suggest that programs that invest in compensation and extensive training for home visitors are better able to serve and retain beneficiaries, and they support a move toward establishing a professional workforce of home visitors to support vulnerable children and families in South Africa. PMID:25379052

  11. Trajectories, Long-Term Outcomes and Family Experiences of 76 Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamak, Brigitte; Bonniau, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to retrace the trajectories and long-term outcomes of individuals with autism in France, and to explore the family experiences. Data obtained from parents enables us to follow the trajectories of 76 adults. Two-thirds of adults with severe autism had a very poor outcome. Those with moderate autism had a…

  12. Moving towards Participatory Adult Education: Involving Family Literacy Students in Meaningful Leadership Experiences. Research Brief #4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toso, Blaire Willson; Prins, Esther; Drayton, Brendaly; Gungor, Ramazan; Gnanadass, Edith

    2008-01-01

    Although adult educators espouse values such as inclusion and ownership, adult learners seldom play a substantive role in programmatic decision making. This collaborative research project explored family literacy participants' experiences in their program's parent advisory council (PAC). The study shows that involvement in the PAC enhanced program…

  13. Family Environment and Behavior Problems in Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jan S.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Baker, Jason K.; Smith, Leann E.; Warren, Steven F.; Brady, Nancy; Hong, Jinkuk

    2012-01-01

    We examine how the family environment is associated with aspects of the Fragile X syndrome phenotype during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Mothers of children (n = 48), adolescents (n = 85), and adults (n = 34) with Fragile X syndrome participated in a multisite study. For children and adults with Fragile X syndrome, the presence of warmth…

  14. Older and Younger Family Caregivers of Adults with Intellectual Disability: Factors Associated with Future Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Lee, Yue-Chune; Lin, Li-Chan; Kroger, Teppo; Chang, Ai-Ning

    2009-01-01

    A structured interview survey was conducted in a major city in Taiwan to explore and compare older and younger family primary caregivers' well being and their future caregiving plans for these adults with intellectual disability. The sample size was 315 caregivers who were 55 years or older and who cared for adults with intellectual disability and…

  15. Tracking an Elusive Population: Family Carers of Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Romandy (Switzerland)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jecker-Parvex, Maurice; Breitenbach, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Despite a long-standing tradition of institutional placement in Switzerland, many older adults with intellectual disabilities continue to be supported by aging parents and siblings. For various reasons, these carers and the adults concerned have been overlooked up to now. To find out how many such families are providing housing and care of this…

  16. Systemic Family Therapy Using the Reflecting Team: The Experiences of Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anslow, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to illuminate the experiences of adults with learning disabilities of the reflecting team, in the context of their systemic family therapy. Five adults with learning disabilities were recruited from one community learning disability team. A qualitative design using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was appropriate…

  17. Family Literacy in Adult Education: The Federal and State Support Role. A Special Perspectives Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyton, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Family literacy programs are a unique component of the adult education system. They work by bringing parents with low literacy skills together with their children to learn and receive instruction, reaching a cohort of people who might not be served by other adult education programs. As parents see their children's learning increase, they are…

  18. When Military Parents Come Home: Building "Strong Families Strong Forces," a Home-Based Intervention for Military Families with Very Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, Ruth; Acker, Michelle L.; Ross, Abigail M.; DeVoe, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01

    The long wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have presented unique challenges to military-connected families with very young children, yet few evidence-based services are available to support these families through deployment and reintegration. Although many military families have shown remarkable resilience throughout the intense demands of the wars,…

  19. Why Do Families Relinquish Care? An Investigation of the Factors that Lead to Relinquishment into Out-of-Home Respite Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nankervis, K.; Rosewarne, A.; Vassos, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Families/carers relinquishing the care of family members with a disability into the care of out-of-home respite facilities is an under-researched area in the disability field. With this in mind, the aim of this study was to explore the factors that lead to families relinquishing care, the potential early indicators that families are…

  20. Evaluating clinical supervision in community homes and teams serving adults with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Malin, N A

    2000-03-01

    Evaluating clinical supervision in community homes and teams serving adults with learning disabilities This paper provides a discussion of some of the professional and policy outcomes associated with implementing clinical supervision within a community service for adults with learning disabilities. It is based upon a small qualitative study whose aim was to examine how clinical supervision was operating, its strengths, its weaknesses and where improvements might be made. The study followed the introduction of clinical supervision 9 months earlier for nurses and carers employed in three community homes and one community multiprofessional team. The method consisted of direct observation of individual and group supervision and staff completing critical incident questionnaires, followed by semi-structured, audio-taped interviews with seven registered nurses and four community team members, including a social worker, psychologist and physiotherapist. Outcomes were expressed in two ways: in terms of the benefits of clinical supervision or of its ambivalence. The range of matters brought for discussion, or resolution, in supervision reflected some of the difficulties or dilemmas staff faced working in this area, for example promoting empowerment and assisting clients to make choices, and dealing with clients' challenging and inappropriate behaviours. As for the role of supervisor there was some evidence of nurses expressing apprehension or unpreparedness, also a perceived general concern over the relatively low status of clinical supervision, thought to be due to absence of visible management approval or failure to articulate properly the objective of supervision. A limitation of the study was its small subject sample although considerable data were gathered in each of the units through relatively long-term contact.

  1. The Family's Influence on Adolescent and Young Adult Career Development: Theory, Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Cathy; Thomas, Trang

    2003-01-01

    A research review identified a range of family process variables associated with enhanced career development for adolescents and young adults. Findings were consistent with the theories of Roe (personality development and career choice) and Super (life-span, life-space) regarding the influence of family processes on career development. (Contains…

  2. Invisible Contributions in Families with Children and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    For many years there has been an underlying pathology within the literature about families with children and adults with intellectual disabilities (Helff & Glidden, 1998). This literature has emphasized stress and burden, incapacity and dependency, leading to negative stereotyping of families in this context. Over the last 2 decades research has…

  3. Caring for Adults with Intellectual Disability: The Perspectives of Family Carers in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Judith; McConkey, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Internationally adults with intellectual disability are largely cared for by their families, especially in low- to middle-income countries (LAMIC). Compared to high-income countries, little is known about their experiences in LAMIC such as South Africa. Methods: Focus group discussions were carried out with 37 family caregivers (FCGs)…

  4. Gender Differences in Adult Sibling Relations in Two-Child Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitze, Glenna; Trent, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    We examine affective closeness, contact, and helping among adult siblings using data for over 1,500 respondents in 2-child families from the National Survey of Families and Households. Using this subsample allows us to investigate differences by gender of respondent and of individual siblings using a nationally representative sample. We find that…

  5. Buffering Effects of a Family-Based Intervention for African American Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Gene H.; Chen, Yi-fu; Kogan, Steven M.; Smith, Karen; Brown, Anita C.

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on the buffering effects of Adults in the Making (AIM), a family-centered preventive intervention, on the link between life stress and increases in risk behaviors among 347 rural, southern African Americans as they left high school. Of the families, 174 were assigned to the prevention condition and 173 to a control condition.…

  6. Family Quality of Life: Adult School Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svraka, E.; Loga, S.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This study endeavours to provide initial data on quality of life for families with adult children who have intellectual disabilities (ID) in the Canton of Sarajevo. Methods: The principal measure used was the "Family Quality of life Survey 2006-main caregivers of people with intellectual or developmental disabilities." The sample consisted…

  7. A Smart-Home System to Unobtrusively and Continuously Assess Loneliness in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, Hiroko H.; Riley, Thomas; Jacobs, Peter G.; Thielke, Stephen; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Loneliness is a common condition in older adults and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, decreased sleep quality, and increased risk of cognitive decline. Assessing loneliness in older adults is challenging due to the negative desirability biases associated with being lonely. Thus, it is necessary to develop more objective techniques to assess loneliness in older adults. In this paper, we describe a system to measure loneliness by assessing in-home behavior using wireless motion and contact sensors, phone monitors, and computer software as well as algorithms developed to assess key behaviors of interest. We then present results showing the accuracy of the system in detecting loneliness in a longitudinal study of 16 older adults who agreed to have the sensor platform installed in their own homes for up to 8 months. We show that loneliness is significantly associated with both time out-of-home (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$ {\\beta } = -0.88$ \\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$p<0.01$ \\end{document}) and number of computer sessions (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$ {\\beta } = 0.78$ \\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength

  8. Factors Predicting Mortality in Midlife Adults with and without Down Syndrome Living with Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, A. J.; Seltzer, M. M.; Greenberg, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the mortality of individuals with Down syndrome who have lived at home with their families throughout their lives. The current study evaluates the predictors, causes and patterns of mortality among co-residing individuals in midlife with Down syndrome as compared with co-residing individuals with ID owing to other…

  9. Family caregiving for adults with schizophrenia and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    El-Mallakh, Peggy; Yates, Brittany Evans; Adkins, Sarah

    2013-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is common among those with schizophrenia, but little is known about family members' roles in the care of relatives who have both schizophrenia and DM. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine DM knowledge and caregiver burden among 27 family caregivers of people with schizophrenia and DM. Findings indicate that DM knowledge was low. Objective caregiver burden was highest for providing assistance with daily living activities. Subjective burden was highest for preventing the care recipient from keeping people awake at night and dealing with the care recipient's non-adherence to DM care. Family caregivers are in need of education and support in the caregiving role.

  10. The Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community: Factor Validity and Effect of Subject Variables for Adults in Group Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Michael G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The factor validity of the new Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community (ABC-C) was determined with 1,040 adults, ages 18-89, who were mentally retarded and living in group homes. The original ABC factor structure appeared valid for scoring the ABC-C with this population. Variables studied included age, gender, level of mental retardation,…

  11. 76 FR 44573 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 Correction In notice document 2011... page 43255, the table labeled ``Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of...

  12. The Impact of Perceived Stress, Social Support, and Home-Based Physical Activity on Mental Health among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Martin, Peter; Russell, Daniel; Franke, Warren; Kohut, Marian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity affected older adults' fatigue, loneliness, and depression. We also explored whether social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health problems. The data of 163 older participants were analyzed in this…

  13. Nutrition Risk in Home-Bound Older Adults: Using Dietician-Trained and Supervised Nutrition Volunteers for Screening and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laforest, Sophie; Goldin, Benita; Nour, Kareen; Roy, Marie-Andree; Payette, Helene

    2007-01-01

    Nutrition screening and early intervention in home-bound older adults are key to preventing unfavourable health outcomes and functional decline. This pilot study's objectives were (a) to test the reliability of the Elderly Nutrition Screening Tool (ENS [C]) when administered by dietician-trained and supervised nutrition volunteers, and (b) to…

  14. Expressive Communication Strengths of Adults with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities as Reported by Group Home Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cascella, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    This study documents the communication strengths of 14 adults who resided in community group-home settings through the use of staff informant reports. These participants had as many as 12 different communication forms (e.g., reaching gestures, body orientation, facial expression, leading gestures, eye gaze, vocalizations) and 11 different…

  15. Understanding the use of a community-based drive-home service after alcohol consumption among young adults.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, M; Godin, G; Valois, P

    1999-06-01

    To know and understand the intention of young adults to use, during the Christmas and New Year's period, the community drive-home service after drinking alcohol, that is, to phone for oneself when they are the driver or when they are the passenger to suggest to a friend who is the driver to phone for the service. This study was conducted in the Province of Quebec, Canada, among a representative sample of 544 young adults aged 18 to 24 years. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by mail. Young adults showed a very good knowledge of the drive home service and had a very positive attitude toward its use. Among those who reported having experienced drinking too much alcohol during the Christmas and New Year's period, 17 percent had phoned when they were the driver and 36 percent had, when they were a passenger, suggested to a friend who was the driver to phone the community drive-home service. Nonetheless, more than half of them intended to use or to recommend its use to a friend in the future. Several factors identified in this study might be useful for increasing this drive-home service and therefore, contribute to lowering the risk of injury related to alcohol-impaired driving among young adults.

  16. Time Out-of-Home and Cognitive, Physical, and Emotional Wellbeing of Older Adults: A Longitudinal Mixed Effects Model

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Time out-of-home has been linked with numerous health outcomes, including cognitive decline, poor physical ability and low emotional state. Comprehensive characterization of this important health metric would potentially enable objective monitoring of key health outcomes. The objective of this study is to determine the relationship between time out-of-home and cognitive status, physical ability and emotional state. Methods and Findings Participants included 85 independent older adults, age 65–96 years (M = 86.36; SD = 6.79) who lived alone, from the Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Changes (ISAAC) and the ORCATECH Life Laboratory cohorts. Factors hypothesized to affect time out-of-home were assessed on three different temporal levels: yearly (cognitive status, loneliness, clinical walking speed), weekly (pain and mood) or daily (time out-of-home, in-home walking speed, weather, and season). Subject characteristics including age, race, and gender were assessed at baseline. Total daily time out-of-home in hours was assessed objectively and unobtrusively for up to one year using an in-home activity sensor platform. A longitudinal tobit mixed effects regression model was used to relate daily time out-of-home to cognitive status, physical ability and emotional state. More hours spend outside the home was associated with better cognitive function as assessed using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale, where higher scores indicate lower cognitive function (βCDR = -1.69, p<0.001). More hours outside the home was also associated with superior physical ability (βPain = -0.123, p<0.001) and improved emotional state (βLonely = -0.046, p<0.001; βLow mood = -0.520, p<0.001). Weather, season, and weekday also affected the daily time out-of-home. Conclusions These results suggest that objective longitudinal monitoring of time out-of-home may enable unobtrusive assessment of cognitive, physical and emotional state. In addition, these results indicate

  17. Correlates of availability and accessibility of fruits and vegetables in homes of low-income Hispanic families.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jayna M; Evans, Alexandra E; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Watkins, Ken W; Saunders, Ruth P

    2010-02-01

    Availability and accessibility (AA) has been consistently shown across studies as the most important correlate of fruits and vegetables (FV) intake. However, there is little data on factors that influence AA of FV, especially in Hispanic families. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between parental factors, child's preferences for FV and AA of FV in homes of low-income Hispanic families with children 5-12 years old. A convenience sample of 184 parents of low socioeconomic status recruited through public elementary schools completed a self-administered questionnaire about demographics, language spoken at home and food insecurity (FI). Parental factors and child's preferences were measured using a 16-item questionnaire, which was developed specifically for the study. AA of FV was measured using a validated nine-item index. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that language spoken at home, parental practices that promote consumption of FV, parental role modeling and perceived benefits of fast food had significant and independent associations with AA of FV at home. Intervention programs should take into consideration the language spoken at home and target at improving parental factors in order to improve AA of FV.

  18. Correlates of availability and accessibility of fruits and vegetables in homes of low-income Hispanic families.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jayna M; Evans, Alexandra E; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Watkins, Ken W; Saunders, Ruth P

    2010-02-01

    Availability and accessibility (AA) has been consistently shown across studies as the most important correlate of fruits and vegetables (FV) intake. However, there is little data on factors that influence AA of FV, especially in Hispanic families. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between parental factors, child's preferences for FV and AA of FV in homes of low-income Hispanic families with children 5-12 years old. A convenience sample of 184 parents of low socioeconomic status recruited through public elementary schools completed a self-administered questionnaire about demographics, language spoken at home and food insecurity (FI). Parental factors and child's preferences were measured using a 16-item questionnaire, which was developed specifically for the study. AA of FV was measured using a validated nine-item index. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that language spoken at home, parental practices that promote consumption of FV, parental role modeling and perceived benefits of fast food had significant and independent associations with AA of FV at home. Intervention programs should take into consideration the language spoken at home and target at improving parental factors in order to improve AA of FV. PMID:19654221

  19. Families of the lesbian baby boom: children's contact with grandparents and other adults.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C J; Hurt, S; Mason, C D

    1998-07-01

    In an exploratory study of 37 lesbian-mother families, the frequency of children's contact with adults in their extended family and friendship networks was found to counter stereotypes of such children as isolated from parents' families of origin. Children were more likely to have regular contact with relatives of the biological than nonbiological mother. Mothers rated those in regular contact with grandparents as having fewer behavior problems, and those in more regular contact with unrelated adults rated themselves more positively on general well-being.

  20. Hepatitis A outbreak among adults with developmental disabilities in group homes--Michigan, 2013.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Susan R; Berger, Keira Wickliffe; Hackert, Pamela B; Renas, Richard; Brunette, Suzanne; Parker, Nicole; Padro, Carolyn; Hocking, Anne; Hedemark, Mary; Edwards, Renai; Bush, Russell L; Khudyakov, Yury; Nelson, Noele P; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2015-02-20

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections among persons with developmental disabilities living in institutions were common in the past, but with improvements in care and fewer persons institutionalized, the number of HAV infections has declined in these institutions. However, residents in institutions are still vulnerable if they have not been vaccinated. On April 24, 2013, a resident of a group home (GH) for adults with disabilities in southeast Michigan (GH-A) was diagnosed with hepatitis A and died 2 days later of fulminant liver failure. Four weeks later, a second GH-A resident was diagnosed with hepatitis A. None of the GH-A residents or staff had been vaccinated against hepatitis A. Over the next 3 months, six more cases of hepatitis A were diagnosed in residents in four other Michigan GHs. Three local health departments were involved in case investigation and management, including administration of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). Serum specimens from seven cases were found to have an identical strain of HAV genotype 1A. This report describes the outbreak investigation, the challenges of timely delivery of PEP for hepatitis A, and the need for preexposure vaccination against hepatitis A for adults living or working in GHs for the disabled.

  1. An Arts Intervention for Older Adults Living in Subsidized Retirement Homes

    PubMed Central

    Noice, Helga; Noice, Tony

    2009-01-01

    A theatrically-based intervention was given to 122 older adults who took acting lessons twice a week for 4 weeks. The training consisted of multi-modal activities (cognitive-affective-physiological) typically employed in college acting classes. Comparison groups consisted of no-treatment controls and participants instructed in a different performing art, singing. Assessment of effectiveness was performed using a battery of 11 cognitive/affective test measures that included word recall, prose comprehension/recall, word generation, digit-span ability, and problem-solving. It was found that the acting group improved significantly from pretest to posttest over both other groups. Digit-span was the only measure that failed to improve. No aspects of the intervention supplied specific training or practice on the test measures. Previous versions of the intervention with community-dwelling adults had produced similar findings but the current participants were older, less well-educated, and lived in subsidized, primarily low-income, retirement homes. PMID:18686051

  2. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  3. Dissemination of educational classes for families of adults with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Amenson, C S; Liberman, R P

    2001-05-01

    Despite the well-documented efficacy of psychoeducational and behavioral approaches in family interventions for persons with serious mental illness (1), clinicians have rarely included these methods in their professional repertoires (2). Journal publications, books, continuing education courses, and advocacy by the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill and its local affiliates have induced few professionals to provide family psychoeducation. Mental health professionals adopt new services primarily for the same reason that employees of any firm change their work practices-namely, because the authority structure and contingencies of reinforcement that impinge on their daily activities are altered in a direction favoring change. Therefore, administrative clout must be brought to bear to mandate the inclusion of family psychoeducation in the spectrum of services provided by a clinic, mental health center, community support program, hospital, or independent provider (3). In addition, the consequences of clinicians' services must differentially reward the use of these methods of involving families in services for the seriously mentally ill (4). Differential rewards could come from performance standards and evaluations, performance-based pay, third-party payments, positive feedback from clients and families, public recognition, and increased self-efficacy. Use of in-service training or workshops to persuade clinicians to adopt innovations such as family psychoeducation and family management techniques has a checkered and unremarkable track record. For example, brief training has failed completely in efforts to bring about adoption of family interventions. On the other hand, more extended efforts to train staff, including organizational consultation, have been more successful (5). In one study, two days of staff training produced no change, whereas intensive training over several months resulted in the implementation of new family programs at the majority of study sites

  4. Formal home-care utilisation by older adults in Ireland: evidence from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA).

    PubMed

    Murphy, Catriona M; Whelan, Brendan J; Normand, Charles

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a population-based estimate of the utilisation of publicly financed formal home care by older adults in Ireland and to identify the principal characteristics of those utilising formal home care. Data were collected through computer-aided personal interviews from a representative sample of community living older adults in Ireland. The interviews were conducted between 2009 and 2011 as part of the first wave of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). The study is cross-sectional in design and limited to participants aged 65 years and older (n = 3507). Results reveal that 8.2% (95% CI 7.1%-9.3%) of participants utilised publicly financed formal home care in the form of home help and/or personal care. Key determinants of formal home-care utilisation were Instrumental Activity of Daily Living (IADL) difficulty (Adj OR 3.8, 95% CI 2.7-5.3), older age (Adj OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.4-4.8) and living alone (Adj OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.9-3.8). Almost half of those utilising formal care did not self-report an Activity of Daily Living (ADL) difficulty or an IADL difficulty. Government policy aims to reduce the need for long-term residential care by providing formal home care for older adults with low to moderate levels of dependency. This requires an increasing emphasis on personal care provision in the home. No evidence was found in this study to suggest that a shift in emphasis from formal domestic to personal care is taking place in Ireland. The absence of standardised assessment and eligibility criteria are deemed to be barriers to reorientation of the system. From a health services perspective, the current situation is not sustainable into the future and requires a focused policy response.

  5. Formal home-care utilisation by older adults in Ireland: evidence from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA).

    PubMed

    Murphy, Catriona M; Whelan, Brendan J; Normand, Charles

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a population-based estimate of the utilisation of publicly financed formal home care by older adults in Ireland and to identify the principal characteristics of those utilising formal home care. Data were collected through computer-aided personal interviews from a representative sample of community living older adults in Ireland. The interviews were conducted between 2009 and 2011 as part of the first wave of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). The study is cross-sectional in design and limited to participants aged 65 years and older (n = 3507). Results reveal that 8.2% (95% CI 7.1%-9.3%) of participants utilised publicly financed formal home care in the form of home help and/or personal care. Key determinants of formal home-care utilisation were Instrumental Activity of Daily Living (IADL) difficulty (Adj OR 3.8, 95% CI 2.7-5.3), older age (Adj OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.4-4.8) and living alone (Adj OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.9-3.8). Almost half of those utilising formal care did not self-report an Activity of Daily Living (ADL) difficulty or an IADL difficulty. Government policy aims to reduce the need for long-term residential care by providing formal home care for older adults with low to moderate levels of dependency. This requires an increasing emphasis on personal care provision in the home. No evidence was found in this study to suggest that a shift in emphasis from formal domestic to personal care is taking place in Ireland. The absence of standardised assessment and eligibility criteria are deemed to be barriers to reorientation of the system. From a health services perspective, the current situation is not sustainable into the future and requires a focused policy response. PMID:25442330

  6. Everyday Living with Diabetes Described by Family Members of Adult People with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Paavilainen, Eija; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore family members' experiences of everyday life in families with adult people living with type 1 diabetes. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data from the interviews of nineteen family members. Six concepts describing the family members' views on everyday living with diabetes were generated on the basis of the data. Everyday life with diabetes is described as being intertwined with hypoglycemia. Becoming acquainted with diabetes takes place little by little. Being involved in the management and watching self-management from the sidelines are concepts describing family members' participation in the daily management of diabetes. The family members are also integrating diabetes into everyday life. Living on an emotional roller-coaster tells about the thoughts and feelings that family members experience. Family members of adult people with diabetes are involved in the management of the diabetes in many ways and experience many concerns. The family members' point of view is important to take into consideration when developing education for adults with diabetes. PMID:24455251

  7. Everyday living with diabetes described by family members of adult people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rintala, Tuula-Maria; Paavilainen, Eija; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore family members' experiences of everyday life in families with adult people living with type 1 diabetes. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data from the interviews of nineteen family members. Six concepts describing the family members' views on everyday living with diabetes were generated on the basis of the data. Everyday life with diabetes is described as being intertwined with hypoglycemia. Becoming acquainted with diabetes takes place little by little. Being involved in the management and watching self-management from the sidelines are concepts describing family members' participation in the daily management of diabetes. The family members are also integrating diabetes into everyday life. Living on an emotional roller-coaster tells about the thoughts and feelings that family members experience. Family members of adult people with diabetes are involved in the management of the diabetes in many ways and experience many concerns. The family members' point of view is important to take into consideration when developing education for adults with diabetes. PMID:24455251

  8. Home-Based Preventive Parenting Intervention for at-Risk Infants and Their Families: An Open Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bagner, Daniel M.; Rodríguez, Gabriela M.; Blake, Clair A.; Rosa-Olivares, Jose

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and initial outcome of a home-based adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for at-risk infants with externalizing behavior problems. Seven 12- to 15-month-old infants and their families were recruited at a large pediatric primary care clinic to participate in a home-based parenting intervention to prevent subsequent externalizing behavior problems. Home-based assessments were conducted at baseline, postintervention, and a 4- to 6-month follow-up. Six of the 7 (86%) families completed the intervention, and all completers reported high satisfaction with the intervention. All of the mothers demonstrated significant improvements and statistically reliable changes in their interactions with their infant, and most reported clinically significant and statistically reliable changes in infant behavior problems. The current study provides preliminary support for the use of this brief, home-based parenting intervention in addressing behavior problems as early as possible to improve access to an intervention for at-risk infants and their families. Successes and challenges with the development and implementation of this intervention are discussed along with directions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:25414568

  9. Caregiving families within the long-term services and support system for older adults.

    PubMed

    Qualls, Sara Honn

    2016-01-01

    Long-term care services and supports are primarily a family industry that warrants psychologists' involvement through practice, research, and policy advocacy. Families are poorly integrated into service systems despite the dominance of family caregiving work within health care and long-term care. This article positions family caregiving work within the context of family life across the life span, noting overlaps and distinctions between normal family life and caregiving work for older adults whose physical or cognitive challenges require assistance. The prevalence, work, and consequences of family caregiving for older adults are described. Families are identified as key partners in long-term care, despite substantial policy and practice barriers to integrating them into care structures and systems. Policy options for reducing or eliminating barriers are suggested, as are professional practice opportunities for psychologists to support caregiving families. Approaches to assessment and interventions for caregivers across a variety of settings are described. Gaps in research are highlighted, with a focus on how to understand caregiving as embedded within context of family, long-term care services and supports, and health care. Caregiving work presents an imperative for expanding psychologists' engagement in integrating and supporting the families whose caregiving is so critical to a rapidly aging society. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27159435

  10. The Impact of a Family Home-Learning Program on Levels of Parental/Caregiver Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Tomasine A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to determine if participation in a home education learning program would impact the perceived levels of parental self-efficacy of parents/caregivers who participate in the completion of home-learning assignments and increase their levels of home-learning involvement practices. Also, the study examined the relationship between the…

  11. Talking (or Not) about Family Health History in Families of Latino Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corona, Rosalie; Rodríguez, Vivian; Quillin, John; Gyure, Maria; Bodurtha, Joann

    2013-01-01

    Although individuals recognize the importance of knowing their family's health history for their own health, relatively few people (e.g., less than a third in one national survey) collect this type of information. This study examines the rates of family communication about family health history of cancer, and predictors of communication in a…

  12. Projected Outcomes of Nurse-Family Partnership Home Visitation During 1996-2013, United States

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ted R.

    2015-01-01

    Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) targets intensive prenatal and postnatal home visitation by registered nurses to low-income first-time mothers. Through 2013, 177,517 pregnant women enrolled in NFP programs. This article projects how NFP will affect their lives and the lives of their babies. NFP has been evaluated in six randomized trials and several more limited analyses of operational programs. We systematically reviewed evaluation findings on 21 outcomes and calculated effects on 3 more. We added outcome data from the NFP national data system and personal communications that filled outcome data gaps on some trials. We assumed effectiveness in replication declined by 21.8%, proportionally with the decline in mean visits per family from trials to operational programs. By 2031, NFP program enrollments in 1996-2013 will prevent an estimated 500 infant deaths, 10,000 preterm births, 13,000 dangerous closely spaced second births, 4,700 abortions, 42,000 child maltreatment incidents, 36,000 intimate partner violence incidents, 90,000 violent crimes by youth, 594,000 property and public order crimes (e.g., vandalism, loitering) by youth, 36,000 youth arrests, and 41,000 person-years of youth substance abuse. They will reduce smoking during pregnancy, pregnancy complications, childhood injuries, and use of subsidized child care; improve language development, increase breast-feeding, and raise compliance with immunization schedules. They will eliminate the need for 4.8 million person-months of child Medicaid spending and reduce estimated spending on Medicaid, TANF, and food stamps by $3.0 billion (present values in 2010 dollars). By comparison, NFP cost roughly $1.6 billion. Thus, NFP appears to be a sound investment. It saves money while enriching the lives of participating low-income mothers and their offspring and benefiting society more broadly by reducing crime and safety net demand. PMID:26076883

  13. Projected Outcomes of Nurse-Family Partnership Home Visitation During 1996-2013, USA.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ted R

    2015-08-01

    Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) targets intensive prenatal and postnatal home visitation by registered nurses to low-income first-time mothers. Through 2013, 177,517 pregnant women enrolled in NFP programs. This article projects how NFP will affect their lives and the lives of their babies. NFP has been evaluated in six randomized trials and several more limited analyses of operational programs. We systematically reviewed evaluation findings on 21 outcomes and calculated effects on three more. We added outcome data from the NFP national data system and personal communications that filled outcome data gaps on some trials. We assumed effectiveness in replication declined by 21.8 %, proportionally with the decline in mean visits per family from trials to operational programs. By 2031, NFP program enrollments in 1996-2013 will prevent an estimated 500 infant deaths, 10,000 preterm births, 13,000 dangerous closely spaced second births, 4700 abortions, 42,000 child maltreatment incidents, 36,000 intimate partner violence incidents, 90,000 violent crimes by youth, 594,000 property and public order crimes (e.g., vandalism, loitering) by youth, 36,000 youth arrests, and 41,000 person-years of youth substance abuse. They will reduce smoking during pregnancy, pregnancy complications, childhood injuries, and use of subsidized child care; improve language development; increase breast-feeding; and raise compliance with immunization schedules. They will eliminate the need for 4.8 million person-months of child Medicaid spending and reduce estimated spending on Medicaid, TANF, and food stamps by $3.0 billion (present values in 2010 dollars). By comparison, NFP cost roughly $1.6 billion. Thus, NFP appears to be a sound investment. It saves money while enriching the lives of participating low-income mothers and their offspring and benefiting society more broadly by reducing crime and safety net demand.

  14. Bringing Person- and Family-Centred Care Alive in Home, Community and Long-Term Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Bender, Danielle; Holyoke, Paul

    2016-01-01

    It is now more important than ever for person- and family-centred care (PFCC) to be at the forefront of program and service design and delivery; yet, to date, very little guidance is available to assist home, community and long-term care (LTC) organizations to operationalize this concept and overcome inherent challenges. This article provides a list of practical strategies for healthcare leaders to promote and support a culture shift towards PFCC in their organizations and identifies and addresses five common concerns. The unique opportunities and challenges for practicing PFCC in home, community and LTC settings are also discussed.

  15. Bringing Person- and Family-Centred Care Alive in Home, Community and Long-Term Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Bender, Danielle; Holyoke, Paul

    2016-01-01

    It is now more important than ever for person- and family-centred care (PFCC) to be at the forefront of program and service design and delivery; yet, to date, very little guidance is available to assist home, community and long-term care (LTC) organizations to operationalize this concept and overcome inherent challenges. This article provides a list of practical strategies for healthcare leaders to promote and support a culture shift towards PFCC in their organizations and identifies and addresses five common concerns. The unique opportunities and challenges for practicing PFCC in home, community and LTC settings are also discussed. PMID:27133612

  16. [Quality of care among older adults with diabetes mellitus: comparison between community-dwelling adults attended to by home care services and nursing home residents in Dresden].

    PubMed

    Coll-Planas, Laura; Bergmann, Antje; Schwarz, Peter; Guillén-Grima, Francisco; Schulze, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Due to changes in the age structure of the population the number of frail elderly diabetics is rising. This change is accompanied by an increase in nursing care efforts and requirements in both home care services and nursing homes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of care in the home care and nursing home setting concerning the structure, the process and the outcome quality at the institutional and patient level. This is an observational transversal study. At the institutional level a standardised questionnaire of the German Diabetes Research Institute was sent to all nursing homes (37) and home care services (88) in Dresden. At the patient level 37 homebound patients and 46 residents were recruited. A Geriatric assessment and a clinical examination were performed and a blood sample was analysed. Patients with moderate or severe cognitive impairment were excluded. The prevalence of diabetes in home care services was 27.2% and in nursing homes 36.1%. The participation rate among the institutions was 21.6% (n = 27). In 14% (n = 12) of the diabetic patients the HbA1c was above 8% (poor metabolic control) and in 24% (20) it was between 7% and 8% (regular metabolic control). 56.6% (n = 21) of the homebound elderly diabetics and 46.7% (n = 21) of the nursing home residents with diabetes were hospitalized at least once during the last 12 months. Our study showed a high prevalence of diabetes in both types of institutions in Dresden and a high hospitalisation rate of the elderly diabetics, although 62% of the patients had an optimum metabolic control. These facts indicate that the quality of care of frail elderly diabetics concerning the multimorbidity might be further improved. PMID:18269054

  17. Assessment of Marital and Family Expectations of a Group of Urban Single Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Henry, J. A.; Parthasarathy, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The lack of baseline understanding of what young adults’ needs and expectations are from marital and family life is the context in which this study has evolved. The author believes that the findings from this study could fee into the contents of a more relevant and useful Family Life Education program for young adults in urban India. Aims: To explore and analyze the needs and expectations of single young adults with respect to marital and family life. Materials and Methods: A college in Bangalore with students from graduate and post-graduate courses in the age group of 18 to 25 years. A semi-structure interview schedule prepared by the author was administered on 100 students. Qualitative and Quantitative. Results and Conclusion: The results showed that a large number of the participants had very specific emotional, cognitive and physiological expectations from marital and family life. They also expressed an active need for education on mate selection, sexuality, parenting, interpersonal relationships, intimacy, conflict resolution, among other areas of need. The findings from this study would find great relevance in the preparation of a relevant and practical Family Life Education program for single young adults which in turn would be useful in colleges, workplaces, family counseling centers or any platform where single young adults wish to access such family base services. PMID:21799559

  18. Using Information and Communication Technology in Home Care for Communication between Patients, Family Members, and Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Birgitta; Nilsson, Carina; Zotterman, Daniel; Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Information and communication technology (ICT) are becoming a natural part in healthcare both for delivering and giving accessibility to healthcare for people with chronic illness living at home. Aim. The aim was to review existing studies describing the use of ICT in home care for communication between patients, family members, and healthcare professionals. Methods. A review of studies was conducted that identified 1,276 studies. A selection process and quality appraisal were conducted, which finally resulted in 107 studies. Results. The general results offer an overview of characteristics of studies describing the use of ICT applications in home care and are summarized in areas including study approach, quality appraisal, publications data, terminology used for defining the technology, and disease diagnosis. The specific results describe how communication with ICT was performed in home care and the benefits and drawbacks with the use of ICT. Results were predominated by positive responses in the use of ICT. Conclusion. The use of ICT applications in home care is an expanding research area, with a variety of ICT tools used that could increase accessibility to home care. Using ICT can lead to people living with chronic illnesses gaining control of their illness that promotes self-care. PMID:23690763

  19. Parental divorce during early adolescence in Caucasian families: the role of family process variables in predicting the long-term consequences for early adult psychosocial adjustment.

    PubMed

    Summers, P; Forehand, R; Armistead, L; Tannenbaum, L

    1998-04-01

    The relationship between parental divorce occurring during adolescence and young adult psychosocial adjustment was examined, as was the role of family process variables in clarifying this relationship. Participants were young Caucasian adults from divorced (n = 119) and married (n = 123) families. Assessments were conducted during adolescence and 6 years later during early adulthood. Young adults from married families reported more secure romantic attachments than those from divorced families; however, differences were not evident in other domains of psychosocial adjustment after demographic variables were controlled. Three family process variables (parent-adolescent relationship, interparental conflict, and maternal depressive symptoms) were examined as potential mediators and moderators of the association between parental divorce and young adult adjustment. No evidence supporting mediation or moderation was found; however, the parent-adolescent and parent-young adult relationships, particularly when the identified parent was the father, emerged as significant predictors of young adult psychosocial adjustment. PMID:9583336

  20. Engineering domain fusion chimeras from I-OnuI family LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Abigail R.; Kuhar, Ryan; Jarjour, Jordan; Kulshina, Nadia; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Danaher, Patrick; Gano, Jacob; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Although engineered LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (LHEs) are finding increasing applications in biotechnology, their generation remains a challenging, industrial-scale process. As new single-chain LAGLIDADG nuclease scaffolds are identified, however, an alternative paradigm is emerging: identification of an LHE scaffold whose native cleavage site is a close match to a desired target sequence, followed by small-scale engineering to modestly refine recognition specificity. The application of this paradigm could be accelerated if methods were available for fusing N- and C-terminal domains from newly identified LHEs into chimeric enzymes with hybrid cleavage sites. Here we have analyzed the structural requirements for fusion of domains extracted from six single-chain I-OnuI family LHEs, spanning 40–70% amino acid identity. Our analyses demonstrate that both the LAGLIDADG helical interface residues and the linker peptide composition have important effects on the stability and activity of chimeric enzymes. Using a simple domain fusion method in which linker peptide residues predicted to contact their respective domains are retained, and in which limited variation is introduced into the LAGLIDADG helix and nearby interface residues, catalytically active enzymes were recoverable for ∼70% of domain chimeras. This method will be useful for creating large numbers of chimeric LHEs for genome engineering applications. PMID:22684507