Science.gov

Sample records for adult family homes

  1. A Comparison of Activity Levels among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Family Homes and Out-of-Family Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felce, David; Perry, Jonathan; Kerr, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background: The quality of life of adults with intellectual disabilities living in the family home is an under-researched area. The current study compared indicators of household and community activity between adults living in family homes and those in out-of-family placements. Methods: Four datasets were merged to produce information on the…

  2. Mixed Methods Research of Adult Family Care Home Residents and Informal Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanty, Guy C.; Hibel, James

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a mixed methods approach used to explore the experiences of adult family care home (AFCH) residents and informal caregivers (IC). A rationale is presented for using a mixed methods approach employing the sequential exploratory design with this poorly researched population. The unique challenges attendant to the sampling…

  3. Food and Nutrition Practices and Education Needs in Florida's Adult Family Care Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Wendy J.; Ford, Amanda L.; Gal, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    A statewide survey was carried out to determine food and nutrition practices and education needs of Florida's adult family care homes (AFCHs). The 30-item survey included questions on food and nutrition education, supplement use, and menu planning. Infrequent use of menus and nutrition supplements was reported. A strong need was indicated for…

  4. Living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home.

    PubMed

    Fex, Angelika; Flensner, Gullvi; Ek, Anna-Christina; Söderhamn, Olle

    2011-12-01

    Living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home An increased number of chronically ill adults perform self-care while using different sorts of advanced medical technology at home. This hermeneutical study aimed to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning of living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home. Eleven next of kin to adults performing self-care at home, either using long-term oxygen from a cylinder or ventilator, or performing peritoneal or haemodialysis, were interviewed. The qualitative interviews were analysed using a Gadamerian methodology. The main interpretation explained the meaning as rhythmical patterns of connectedness versus separation, and of sorrow versus reconciliation. Dependence on others was shown in the need for support from healthcare professionals and significant others. In conclusion, next of kin took considerable responsibility for dependent-care. All next of kin were positive to the idea of bringing the technology home, even though their own needs receded into the background, while focusing on the best for the patient. The results were discussed in relation to dependent-care and transition, which may have an influence on the self-care of next of kin and patients. The study revealed a need for further nursing attention to next of kin in this context.

  5. Physical abuse of older adults in nursing homes: a random sample survey of adults with an elderly family member in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Schiamberg, Lawrence B; Oehmke, James; Zhang, Zhenmei; Barboza, Gia E; Griffore, Robert J; Von Heydrich, Levente; Post, Lori A; Weatherill, Robin P; Mastin, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Few empirical studies have focused on elder abuse in nursing home settings. The present study investigated the prevalence and risk factors of staff physical abuse among elderly individuals receiving nursing home care in Michigan. A random sample of 452 adults with elderly relatives, older than 65 years, and in nursing home care completed a telephone survey regarding elder abuse and neglect experienced by this elder family member in the care setting. Some 24.3% of respondents reported at least one incident of physical abuse by nursing home staff. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the importance of various risk factors in nursing home abuse. Limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs), older adult behavioral difficulties, and previous victimization by nonstaff perpetrators were associated with a greater likelihood of physical abuse. Interventions that address these risk factors may be effective in reducing older adult physical abuse in nursing homes. Attention to the contextual or ecological character of nursing home abuse is essential, particularly in light of the findings of this study.

  6. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  7. Policy Changes in Medicare Home Health Care: Challenges to Providing Family-Centered, Community-Based Care for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2009-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) established new reimbursement systems in the Medicare home health fee-for-service benefit. Reimbursements were reduced to 1993 levels and per-beneficiary capitated limits were introduced for the first time. This article analyzes the impact of these changes on chronically ill older adults and their families.…

  8. Adult Roles & Responsibilities. Home Economics Family Life Course. Grades 11-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for developing a home economics family life course to assist students in improving the quality of individual and family life. The course contains 12 units that cover the following topics: self-awareness, wheel of life, dating, mate selection, engagement, marriage, money management, parenting, crisis…

  9. Health Profile of Aging Family Caregivers Supporting Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaki, Kiyoshi; Hsieh, Kelly; Heller, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    The health status of 206 female caregivers supporting adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities at home was investigated using objective (i.e., presence of chronic health conditions and activity limitations) and subjective (i.e., self-perceived health status) health measures compared with those of women in the general population in 2…

  10. Marriage and Family Life. Vocational Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Donna

    These course materials, designed to be used with students in the 11th and 12th grades and for adult students, are intended to provide basic knowledge of family life and adult living. The one-semester home economics course focuses on basic marriage and family skills, life choices, parenthood, and family changes. The guide contains 4 sections and 10…

  11. Adults with Autism Living at Home or in Non-Family Settings: Positive and Negative Aspects of Residential Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, M. W.; Seltzer, M. M.; Jacobson, H. T.

    2005-01-01

    Very little is known about the context of caregiving by parents of adults with autism or about the perceived impacts of continued patterns of co-residence vs. out-of-family living. In the present study, maternal assessments of residential status, involvement with adult children living in a non-family setting, and the impacts on mothers of their…

  12. Inspiration from Home: Understanding Family as Key to Adult Women's Self-Investment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccaro, Annemarie; Lovell, Cheryl D.

    2010-01-01

    As the number of nontraditional-age students grows on college campuses, it is essential for higher education practitioners to understand if and how older students, especially women, become and remain engaged in their education. A review of the educational engagement literature reveals images of disengaged adult learners whose work and family…

  13. Strong Families, Tidy Houses, and Children's Values in Adult Life: Are "Chaotic", "Crowded" and "Unstable" Homes Really so Bad?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flouri, Eirini

    2009-01-01

    Chaotic home systems have been linked with children's adverse psychological and academic outcomes. But, as they represent a departure from the suburban ideal of space, order, and family cohesiveness and stability, they should also be linked with low support for survival values. Using longitudinal data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70)…

  14. Family Child Care Home Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska State Dept. of Health and Human Services, Lincoln.

    This guide enumerates regulations for anyone caring for four or more children at any one time in their home, from families other than their own, in the state of Nebraska. The purpose of the regulations is to protect and promote the health and safety of children in home based child care. The first section of the guide lists specific regulations for…

  15. Family identification: a beneficial process for young adults who grow up in homes affected by parental intimate partner violence

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Catherine M.; Muldoon, Orla T.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to parental intimate partner violence (parental IPV) is a complex trauma. Research within social psychology establishes that identification with social groups impacts positively on how we appraise, respond to and recover from traumatic events. IPV is also a highly stigmatized social phenomenon and social isolation is a major factor for families affected by IPV, yet strong identification with the family group may act as a beneficial psychological resource to young people who grew up in homes affected by IPV. The current study, an online survey of 355 students (Mage = 20, 70% female), investigated if a psychosocial process, specifically identification with the family, may influence the relationship between the predictor, exposure to parental IPV, and outcomes, global self-esteem and state anxiety. Mediation analysis suggests that identification with the family has a positive influence on the relationship between exposure to parental IPV and psychological outcomes; exposure to parental IPV results in reduced family identification, but when family identification is strong it results in both reduced anxiety and increased self-esteem for young people. The findings highlight the importance of having a strong sense of belonging to the extended family for young people who were exposed to parental IPV, thus has implications for prevention, intervention, and social policy. PMID:26379582

  16. Kindergarten: Home and Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegany County Board of Education, Cumberland, MD.

    The curriculum guide presents a working draft of the kindergarten component of a K-6 social studies program developed by the Allegany County Board of Education in Maryland. Goals and activities relating to ethnic heritage studies; family life; and career, consumer, citizenship, and environmental education are included in each of the seven guides.…

  17. Rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections among adults in relation to the home environment in multi-family buildings in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Engvall, Karin; Smedje, Greta; Norbäck, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections in the home environment were studied by a questionnaire survey. Totally 5775 occupants (≥ 18 years old) from a stratified random sample of multi-family buildings in Sweden participated (46%). 51.0% had rhinitis in the last 3 months (current rhinitis); 11.5% doctor diagnosed asthma; 46.4% respiratory infections in the last 3 months and 11.9% antibiotic medication for respiratory infections in the last 12 months. Associations between home environment and health were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, controlling for gender, age and smoking and mutual adjustment. Buildings constructed during 1960-1975 were risk factors for day time breathlessness (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.03-2.29). And those constructed during 1976-1985 had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.43, 95%CI 1.12-1.84) and respiratory infections (OR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.21-1.78). Cities with higher population density had more current rhinitis (p = 0.008) and respiratory infections (p<0.001). Rented apartments had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.23, 95%CI 1.07-1.40), wheeze (OR = 1.20, 95%CI 1.02-1.41), day time breathlessness (OR = 1.31, 95%CI 1.04-1.66) and respiratory infections (OR = 1.13, 95%CI 1.01-1.26). Living in colder parts of the country was a risk factor for wheeze (p = 0.03) and night time breathlessness (p = 0.002). Building dampness was a risk factor for wheeze (OR = 1.42, 95%CI 1.08-1.86) and day time breathlessness (OR = 1.57, 95%CI 1.09-2.27). Building dampness was a risk factor for health among those below 66 years old. Odor at home was a risk factor for doctor diagnosed asthma (OR = 1.49, 95%CI 1.08-2.06) and current asthma (OR = 1.52, 95%CI 1.03-2.24). Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) was a risk factor for current asthma (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.09-2.16). Window panel condensation was a risk factor for antibiotic medication for respiratory infections (OR = 1.41, 95%CI 1.10-1.82). In conclusion, rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections

  18. Rhinitis, Asthma and Respiratory Infections among Adults in Relation to the Home Environment in Multi-Family Buildings in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Engvall, Karin; Smedje, Greta; Norbäck, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections in the home environment were studied by a questionnaire survey. Totally 5775 occupants (≥18 years old) from a stratified random sample of multi-family buildings in Sweden participated (46%). 51.0% had rhinitis in the last 3 months (current rhinitis); 11.5% doctor diagnosed asthma; 46.4% respiratory infections in the last 3 months and 11.9% antibiotic medication for respiratory infections in the last 12 months. Associations between home environment and health were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, controlling for gender, age and smoking and mutual adjustment. Buildings constructed during 1960–1975 were risk factors for day time breathlessness (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.03–2.29). And those constructed during 1976–1985 had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.43, 95%CI 1.12–1.84) and respiratory infections (OR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.21–1.78). Cities with higher population density had more current rhinitis (p = 0.008) and respiratory infections (p<0.001). Rented apartments had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.23, 95%CI 1.07–1.40), wheeze (OR = 1.20, 95%CI 1.02–1.41), day time breathlessness (OR = 1.31, 95%CI 1.04–1.66) and respiratory infections (OR = 1.13, 95%CI 1.01–1.26). Living in colder parts of the country was a risk factor for wheeze (p = 0.03) and night time breathlessness (p = 0.002). Building dampness was a risk factor for wheeze (OR = 1.42, 95%CI 1.08–1.86) and day time breathlessness (OR = 1.57, 95%CI 1.09–2.27). Building dampness was a risk factor for health among those below 66 years old. Odor at home was a risk factor for doctor diagnosed asthma (OR = 1.49, 95%CI 1.08–2.06) and current asthma (OR = 1.52, 95%CI 1.03–2.24). Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) was a risk factor for current asthma (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.09–2.16). Window pane condensation was a risk factor for antibiotic medication for respiratory infections (OR

  19. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial restrictive cardiomyopathy familial restrictive cardiomyopathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. For ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: familial hemiplegic migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial hemiplegic migraine familial hemiplegic migraine Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial hemiplegic migraine is a form of migraine headache that runs ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: familial atrial fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial atrial fibrillation familial atrial fibrillation Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial atrial fibrillation is an inherited condition that disrupts the heart's ...

  2. Adult and Family Living. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide for teachers is designed for use with 11th- and 12th-grade students who have had no more than 1 year of vocational home economics. It focuses on providing young adults with the knowledge and skills they need for healthy and positive adult and family lives. It includes 27 units in 8 sections as follows: (1) personal…

  3. Engaging Families in In-Home Family Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ronald W.; Koley, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Boys Town has created a program called In-Home Family Services to deliver help to families in stress. In-home family intervention programs have become widely used to help more families who are at risk and experiencing difficulties with a wide range of problems including domestic violence, child behavior problems, parent-child and family…

  4. Home Economists: A Force for Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kinsey B.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the mission of home economics as enabling families to function on their own strength. Considers alternatives for the provision of basic survival needs for all: governments, corporate sector, institutions, charitable organizations, families, and individuals. (SK)

  5. Family and home characteristics correlate with mold in homes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously, we demonstrated that infants exposed to higher Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value homes were more likely to develop asthma by age seven. The purpose of this analysis was to determine what family and home characteristics were associated with higher ER...

  6. Family Perceptions of Geriatric Foster Family and Nursing Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Rose, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Relatives (N=62) of matched pairs of patients in geriatric foster homes and nursing homes rated care provided to their relatives. Significantly more foster family patients had positive pre-placement attitudes than did nursing home patients. Upon follow-up, relatives of foster patients reported seeing more patient improvement, satisfaction,…

  7. Independent Living: A Study of Rehabilitation of Physically Handicapped Adults Living in Foster Homes; Social Work Intervention in the Adaptation to Family Environment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Howard D.

    As an alternative to unnecessary inpatient care of adults with orthopedic disabilities, the Independent Living Project (ILP) placed persons who were institutionalized without need and persons who were living in the community under unsatisfactory circumstances in foster homes. Information is presented on the intake procedures, homefinding…

  8. Parent, Home, and Family Life Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syracuse Univ., NY. ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult Education.

    This 149 item bibliography on parent, home, and family life education begins with descriptions of a number of periodicals and bibliographies, and several studies of trends in home economics education. These are followed by 27 surveys of role perception, needs, interests, and participation; 25 studies on the training of professionals and…

  9. Dying at Home: Can Families Cope?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hine, Virginia H.

    1979-01-01

    Examines five considerations involved in decision for home death: (1) sources of moral support necessary for family; (2) kinds of professional aid available; (3) special equipment necessary; (4) necessary nursing skills; and (5) basic information about death. (Author)

  10. Genetics Home Reference: familial paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (1 link) Health Topic: Movement Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ... links) Disease InfoSearch: Paroxysmal choreoathetosis Kennedy Krieger Institute: Movement ... familial paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia Merck Manual Home ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: familial cylindromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with the skin (skin appendages), such as hair follicles and sweat glands . People with familial cylindromatosis typically ... cylindromas are now generally believed to begin in hair follicles. Individuals with familial cylindromatosis occasionally develop other types ...

  12. At-home oral care for adults with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Minihan, Paula M.; Morgan, John P.; Park, Angel; Yantsides, Konstantina E.; Nobles, Carrie J.; Finkelman, Matthew D.; Stark, Paul C.; Must, Aviva

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about effective at-home oral care methods for people with developmental disabilities (DDs) who are unable to perform personal preventive practices themselves and rely on caregivers for assistance. Methods A convenience sample of 808 caregivers (84.5 percent paid, 15.5 percent family members) who accompanied adults with DDs (20 years or older) to appointments at a specialized statewide dental care system completed computer-assisted personal interview surveys. The authors used these data to investigate caregivers’ at-home oral care experiences and to explore differences between caregivers who were paid and those who were family members. Results Caregivers reported that a high proportion (85 percent) of dentate adults with DDs received assistance with tooth cleaning. They also reported a high prevalence of dental problems, and low adherence to brushing (79 percent) and flossing (22 percent) recommendations. More caregivers reported that they felt confident assisting with brushing than with flossing (85 percent versus 54 percent). Family members and paid caregivers differed with respect to confidence and training. Conclusions At-home oral care, particularly flossing, presents substantial challenges for adults with DDs. Solutions must be tailored to address the different experiences and distinct needs of the family members and paid caregivers who assist these adults. Practical Implications Caregivers play an important role in providing at-home oral care, and they must be included in efforts to improve oral health outcomes for people with DDs. PMID:25270700

  13. The Resource Home: A Service to Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, C. Derek; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Available from: Canadian Association for the Mentally Retarded, Kinsmen National Institute on Mental Retardation Building, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Downsview, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada. A resource home in Saskatoon, Canada, for families of mentally handicapped children provides planned holiday relief for natural and foster families,…

  14. Resolution on Creating Family-Style Children's Homes, August 1988.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    This Resolution approves a proposal of the V.I. Lenin Soviet Children's Fund for setting up "family-style" children's homes in the Soviet Union. Children's homes are to consist of a) children's towns--single-family, multiroom homes occupied by families raising at least ten orphaned children and children left without parental care; and b) premises of individual families raising at least five such children while occupying separate multiroom units in regular apartment buildings, specialized buildings, or groups of buildings. In addition to residential buildings, children's towns are to contain a secondary school, a sports and fitness center, preschool facilities, housekeeping and preventative health care buildings, auxiliary farming plots, and other land where children and adults can work together. Thirty homes are to be built in the period 1988-1991. The Resolution also approves proposals establishing an All-Union Wardship Council; charging public health officials with providing permanent, qualified health care, consultation, mental health care, and diagnostics to every family assuming the responsibility of raising children; setting the task of organizing expanded research on children's health and treatment; recommending that enterprises, organizations, and institutions provide transportation service to family-style children's homes and families of employees raising these children and give them passes to sanatoriums, preventoriums, recreation centers and vacation complexes; and pledging the Council of Ministers' participation in the financing, construction, outfitting, and equipping of these homes and in providing material assistance to families raising orphaned children and children left without parental care. The Council of Ministers also decided that the time foster parents spend in raising five or more such children will be added to their overall continuous work record for the purposes of pensions and benefits and to their length of service in their specialty.

  15. Transition from home care to nursing home: unmet needs in a home- and community-based program for older adults.

    PubMed

    Robison, Julie; Shugrue, Noreen; Porter, Martha; Fortinsky, Richard H; Curry, Leslie A

    2012-01-01

    A major effort is under way nationally to shift long-term care services from institutional to home- and community-based settings. This article employs quantitative and qualitative methods to identify unmet needs of consumers who transition from a statewide home- and community-based service program for older adults to long-term nursing home residence. Administrative data, care manager notes, and focus group discussions identified program service gaps that inadequately accommodated acute health problems, mental health issues, and stressed family caregivers; additional unmet needs highlighted an inadequate workforce, transportation barriers, and limited supportive housing options. National and state-level policy implications are considered.

  16. Hospital Experiences of Older People with Intellectual Disability: Responses of Group Home Staff and Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Ruth; Bowers, Barbara; Bigby, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study reports on the hospitalisation experiences of older adults with intellectual disability living in group homes. Methods: Grounded dimensional analysis was used to guide data collection and analysis. Group home residents were tracked prospectively over a 3-year period. Interviews were conducted with family, group home, and…

  17. Genetics Home Reference: familial dysautonomia

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the senses, such as taste and the perception of pain, heat, and cold. Familial dysautonomia is ... age 6. Developmental milestones, such as walking and speech, are usually delayed, although some affected individuals show ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: familial candidiasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or in the vagina. These episodes, commonly called yeast infections, usually last only a short time before ... people with familial candidiasis have chronic or recurrent yeast infections that begin in early childhood. Skin infections ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: familial adenomatous polyposis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Järvinen HJ, Peltomäki P. The complex genotype-phenotype relationship in familial adenomatous polyposis. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  20. Science Learning at Home: Involving Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Elizabeth Outlaw; Heaton, Emily T.; Heslop, Karen; Kixmiller, Kassandra

    2009-01-01

    Families' involvement in their children's science learning at home has numerous benefits, especially when they support children's self-initiated investigations. In a position statement on parental involvement in science education, the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA 2009) stresses the role of parents in the daily reinforcement of…

  1. Low Energy Technology. A Unit of Instruction in Housing and Home Environment. Single Family Homes--Multi-Family Homes--Mobile Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulieu, Barbara; And Others

    This unit of instruction on selection and living styles for energy conservation in single-family and multi-family housing and mobile homes was designed for use by home economics teachers in Florida high schools and by home economics extension agents as they work with their clientele. It is one of a series of 11 instructional units (see note)…

  2. Building Leadership Capacity of Family Home Childcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Jane; Peterson, Karen; Jewett, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Family home childcare providers play an important role in the delivery of essential childcare and in early learning. According to the 1999 U.S. Census, 30.7% of children under 5 years of age in non-parental care attend organized family home care (Child Care Bureau, 2001). In Washington State, 27% of children attend regulated family home childcare…

  3. Home Schooling in Alabama: Perspectives of Public School Superintendents and Home Schooling Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozlowski, Anna T.

    This paper describes home schooling in Alabama from the perspectives of public-school superintendents and home-schooling families. It is based on a study that investigated the extent, causes, and experiences of home schooling; concerns about the practice of home schooling; and the relationship between home schoolers and public-school systems. Home…

  4. Making the Transition from Traditional to Home Schooling: Home School Family Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Kenneth Vance; Burroughs, Susie

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the motivations of families that operate home schools. Four intact, religiously conservative families were interviewed and observed over one year. Findings showed that families were motivated by multiple factors to leave traditional schooling and begin home schooling. Additionally, the motivations to home school influenced the…

  5. Older adults' perceptions of home telehealth services.

    PubMed

    Cimperman, Miha; Brenčič, Maja Makovec; Trkman, Peter; Stanonik, Mateja de Leonni

    2013-10-01

    The success of home telemedicine depends on end-user adoption, which has been slow despite rapid advances in technological development. This study focuses on an examination of significant factors that may predict the successful adoption of home telemedicine services (HTS) among older adults. Based on previous studies in the fields of remote patient monitoring, assisted living technologies, and consumer health information technology acceptance, eight factors were identified as a framework for qualitative testing. Twelve focus groups were conducted with an older population living in both urban and rural environments. The results reveal seven predictors that play an important role in perceptions of HTS: perceived usefulness, effort expectancy, social influence, perceived security, computer anxiety, facilitating conditions, and physicians' opinion. The results provide important insights in the field of older adults' acceptance of HTS, with guidelines for the strategic planning, developing, and marketing of HTS for the graying market.

  6. Older Adults' Perceptions of Home Telehealth Services

    PubMed Central

    Brenčič, Maja Makovec; Trkman, Peter; de Leonni Stanonik, Mateja

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The success of home telemedicine depends on end-user adoption, which has been slow despite rapid advances in technological development. This study focuses on an examination of significant factors that may predict the successful adoption of home telemedicine services (HTS) among older adults. Based on previous studies in the fields of remote patient monitoring, assisted living technologies, and consumer health information technology acceptance, eight factors were identified as a framework for qualitative testing. Twelve focus groups were conducted with an older population living in both urban and rural environments. The results reveal seven predictors that play an important role in perceptions of HTS: perceived usefulness, effort expectancy, social influence, perceived security, computer anxiety, facilitating conditions, and physicians' opinion. The results provide important insights in the field of older adults' acceptance of HTS, with guidelines for the strategic planning, developing, and marketing of HTS for the graying market. PMID:23931702

  7. Former WWII Fighter Pilot Finds New Home Near Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Senior Living Former WWII Fighter Pilot Finds New Home Near Family Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... on. Bill Mufich, with daughter Molly, at his new home. Photo courtesy of Kathleen Cravedi Personal Transitions ...

  8. The Home Visit as a Teaching Event: Lessons from Eight Even Start Family Literacy Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Jeffrey

    Family literacy programs have arisen in an attempt to break the cycle of intergenerational poverty and illiteracy. Numerous federally-supported family literacy programs have recognized the importance of instructing parents and children in a home setting. The legislation of Even Start seeks to integrate parenting education, adult basic education,…

  9. Smoke-free home and vehicle rules by tobacco use status among US adults

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Judy; Jama, Amal; Homa, David M.; Babb, Stephen D.; King, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence and characteristics of smoke-free home and vehicle rules by tobacco use. Methods Data came from the 2012–2013 National Adult Tobacco Survey, a telephone survey of adults aged ≥18. Respondents who reported smoking is ‘never allowed’ inside their home or any family vehicle were considered to have smoke-free home and vehicle rules, respectively. Prevalence and characteristics of smoke-free rules were assessed overall and by current tobacco use (combustible only, noncombustible only, combustible and noncombustible, no current tobacco use). Assessed characteristics included: sex, age, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, income, region, and sexual orientation. Results Nationally, 83.7% of adults (n = 48,871) had smoke-free home rules and 78.1% (n = 46,183) had smoke-free vehicle rules. By tobacco use, prevalence was highest among nonusers of tobacco (homes: 90.8%; vehicles: 88.9%) and lowest among combustible-only users (homes: 53.7%; vehicles: 34.2%). Prevalence of smoke-free home and vehicle rules was higher among males, adults with a graduate degree, and adults living in the West. Conclusions Most adults have smoke-free home and vehicle rules, but differences exist by tobacco use. Opportunities exist to educate adults about the dangers of secondhand smoke and the benefits of smoke-free environments, particularly among combustible tobacco users. PMID:26092055

  10. Take-home video for adult literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yule, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    In the past, it has not been possible to "teach oneself to read" at home, because learners could not read the books to teach them. Videos and interactive compact discs have changed that situation and challenge current assumptions of the pedagogy of literacy. This article describes an experimental adult literacy project using video technology. The language used is English, but the basic concepts apply to any alphabetic or syllabic writing system. A half-hour cartoon video can help adults and adolescents with learning difficulties. Computer-animated cartoon graphics are attractive to look at, and simplify complex material in a clear, lively way. This video technique is also proving useful for distance learners, children, and learners of English as a second language. Methods and principles are to be extended using interactive compact discs.

  11. Smoking and Secondhand Smoke Exposure at Home Were Associated with Poor Perceived Family Well-Being: Findings of FAMILY Project

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Man Ping; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Wan, Alice; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To investigate the associations of cigarette smoking and secondhand (SHS) exposure at home with family well-being among Chinese adults in Hong Kong. Methods Telephone surveys were conducted among 3043 randomly selected adults (response rate 70%) in 2010 and 2012 to monitor family health information and tobacco use in Hong Kong. Family well-being was measured using three questions of perceived family harmony, happiness and health (3Hs) with responses ranging from 0–10 and a higher score indicating better family well-being. Smoking status, nicotine dependence, quitting behaviours and SHS exposure at home were recorded. Multiple linear regressions were used to calculate β-coefficients for individual family 3Hs component and an overall composite score representing family well-being. Results Compared with never smokers, current smokers reported lower levels of family harmony (adjusted β = -0.15, 95% CI: -0.35 to -0.10), happiness (adjusted β = -0.12, 95% CI: -0.28 to -0.02), health (adjusted β = -0.15, 95% CI: -0.30 to -0.03) and overall family well-being (adjusted β = -0.17, 95% CI: -0.32 to -0.06). Quit attempt and intention to quit were not associated with family well-being. SHS exposure at home was associated with lower levels of family harmony (adjusted β = -0.17, 95% CI: -0.30 to -0.07), happiness (adjusted β = -0.19, 95% CI: -0.32 to -0.08), health (adjusted β = -0.13, 95% CI: -0.26 to -0.03) and family well-being (adjusted β = -0.19, 95% CI: -0.32 to -0.09). Conclusions Smoking and SHS exposure at home were associated with the lower levels of perceived family well-being. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the results. PMID:27560663

  12. Investigating Home Primes and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Marlena; Schiffman, Jay

    2014-01-01

    The process of prime factor splicing to generate home primes raises opportunity for conjecture and exploration. The notion of "home primes" is relatively new in the chronicle of mathematics. Heleen (1996-97) first described a procedure called "prime factor splicing" (PFS). The exploration of home primes is interesting and…

  13. Observational Learning among Older Adults Living in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Colleen D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate learning by older adults living in nursing homes through observational learning based on Bandura's (1977) social learning theory. This quantitative study investigated if older adults could learn through observation. The nursing homes in the study were located in the midwestern United States. The…

  14. Family and Consumer Science (Home Economics) Education References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholl, Jan

    This document lists a total of 141 family and consumer science (home economics) references that were gleaned from popular press periodicals dating from December 1, 1994, to December 15, 1995. The references are organized by the following categories: child development, consumerism, grooming and clothing care, home environment, personal…

  15. Impact of HIPPY on Home Learning Environments of Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nievar, M. Angela; Jacobson, Arminta; Chen, Qi; Johnson, Ursula; Dier, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated effects of Home Instruction of Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY), a paraprofessional home visiting program, on parents and children. The program site served low-income, Spanish-speaking families. On average, mothers were 31 years old (SD = 4.78) and children were 3 or 4 years old (M = 3.92, SD = 0.92). Participants (n…

  16. LOW INCOME FAMILY, TRAINING NEEDS OF HOME DEMONSTRATION EXTENSION AGENTS, HOME ECONOMICS CURRICULUM CONSTRUCTION, EDUCATION 685.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MANN, OPAL H.

    A STUDY WAS MADE OF THE NEED FOR EXTENSION WORK WITH LOW INCOME FAMILIES IN EASTERN KENTUCKY (APPALACHIA) AND OF THE PROBLEMS AND TRAINING NEEDS OF HOME DEMONSTRATION EXTENSION AGENTS WHO WORK WITH THESE FAMILIES. THE AGENTS FELT THEY HAD A RESPONSIBILITY TO HELP LOW INCOME FAMILIES IN BUDGETING TIME, EFFORT, AND RESOURCES TO MEET MINIMUM…

  17. Genetics Home Reference: familial paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (1 link) Health Topic: Movement Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ... paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia Merck Manual Home Health Handbook: Movement ... Infantile convulsions and choreoathetosis Orphanet: Paroxysmal kinesigenic ...

  18. Home Away from Home: A Toolkit for Planning Home Visiting Partnerships with Family, Friend, and Neighbor Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Staub, Christine; Schmit, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Home visiting is one tool used to prevent child abuse and improve child well-being by providing education and services in families' homes through parent education and connection to community resources. This toolkit provides state policymakers and advocates with strategies for extending and expanding access to state- or federally-funded home…

  19. [Terminal patient home care: the family caregivers perspective].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Stefanie Griebeler; Quintana, Alberto Manuel; Denardin-Budó, Maria de Lourdes; de Moraes, Natália de Andrade; Lüdtke, Manoela Fonseca; Cassel, Paula Argemi

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at getting to know the relationships built among patients, family caregivers and the health care team, during home care,from the perspective of the family caregiver It is a qualitative study with 11 family caregivers of terminal patients, registered on a home care service of a university hospital in the South of Brazil. Data collection was carried out through narrative interviews that were recorded transcribed and analyzed through content analysis. Three categories were built from data analysis: relationships among the family caregiver, the patient and the health care team; awareness of the patient's terminal condition. the caregiver's perspective; and situation in which patients are unaware of their terminal condition. They approach how the home care relationships are established among the caregivers, such as health care professionals and family caregivers, and the people who are taken care of such as the patients, highlighting the importance of communication in such care related context.

  20. Family Members' Experience With Hospice in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Gage, L Ashley; Washington, Karla; Oliver, Debra Parker; Kruse, Robin; Lewis, Alexandra; Demiris, George

    2016-05-01

    Research has documented numerous benefits and challenges associated with receipt of hospice care in nursing homes; however, study of this partnership from the perspective of residents' family members has been limited. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to explore family members' experience with hospice services received in the nursing home setting. Researchers conducted a secondary data analysis of 175 family member interviews using a thematic analytic approach. Findings highlighted the critical role of communication in supporting residents and their family members. Care coordination, support and oversight, and role confusion also impacted family members' experience of hospice care in the nursing home. Efforts directed at enhancing communication and more clearly articulating the roles of members of the health care team are indicated.

  1. Adolescent Family Context and Adult Identity Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Janel E.; Johnson, Monica Kirkpatrick

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the links between adolescent family context and coming to see oneself as an adult. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the authors investigate how adolescent family structure, resources, and processes together influence adult identity and whether they do so similarly for men and women. The…

  2. Local Medicaid Home- and Community-Based Services Spending and Nursing Home Admissions of Younger Adults

    PubMed Central

    Keohane, Laura; Mor, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    We used fixed-effect models to examine the relationship between local spending on home- and community-based services (HCBSs) for cash-assisted Medicaid-only disabled (CAMOD) adults and younger adult admissions to nursing homes in the United States during 2001 through 2008, with control for facility and market characteristics and secular trends. We found that increased CAMOD Medicaid HCBS spending at the local level is associated with decreased admissions of younger adults to nursing homes. Our findings suggest that states’ efforts to expand HCBS for this population should continue. PMID:25211711

  3. Local Medicaid home- and community-based services spending and nursing home admissions of younger adults.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kali S; Keohane, Laura; Mor, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    We used fixed-effect models to examine the relationship between local spending on home- and community-based services (HCBSs) for cash-assisted Medicaid-only disabled (CAMOD) adults and younger adult admissions to nursing homes in the United States during 2001 through 2008, with control for facility and market characteristics and secular trends. We found that increased CAMOD Medicaid HCBS spending at the local level is associated with decreased admissions of younger adults to nursing homes. Our findings suggest that states' efforts to expand HCBS for this population should continue.

  4. Family Smoking, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke at Home and Family Unhappiness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Jiu; Ho, Sai Yin; Au, Wing Man; Wang, Man Ping; Lam, Tai Hing

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco use adversely affects many aspects of well-being and is disliked by non-smokers. However, its association with family happiness is unknown. We investigated the associations of family unhappiness with smoking in family members and secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure at home in Hong Kong children. In a school-based survey in 2012–2013, 1238 primary school students (mean age 8.5 years, standard deviation 0.9; 42.6% boys) reported family smoking, SHS exposure at home and whether their families had any unpleasant experience caused by smoking or SHS in the past 30 days (tobacco-related unpleasant experience), and rated the overall level of happiness in their families (family unhappiness). Multivariable logistic regression was used to study the associations of tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness with family smoking and SHS exposure at home. Tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness were reported by 27.5% and 16.5% of students. Unpleasant experience was more strongly associated with family smoking than SHS exposure at home. Family unhappiness was associated with both family smoking (odds ratio 2.37; 95% confidence interval 1.51–3.71) and SHS exposure at home (1.82; 1.39–2.40). These results suggest a previously neglected possible impact of tobacco use on family happiness. PMID:26580642

  5. Family Smoking, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke at Home and Family Unhappiness in Children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Jiu; Ho, Sai Yin; Au, Wing Man; Wang, Man Ping; Lam, Tai Hing

    2015-11-13

    Tobacco use adversely affects many aspects of well-being and is disliked by non-smokers. However, its association with family happiness is unknown. We investigated the associations of family unhappiness with smoking in family members and secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure at home in Hong Kong children. In a school-based survey in 2012-2013, 1238 primary school students (mean age 8.5 years, standard deviation 0.9; 42.6% boys) reported family smoking, SHS exposure at home and whether their families had any unpleasant experience caused by smoking or SHS in the past 30 days (tobacco-related unpleasant experience), and rated the overall level of happiness in their families (family unhappiness). Multivariable logistic regression was used to study the associations of tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness with family smoking and SHS exposure at home. Tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness were reported by 27.5% and 16.5% of students. Unpleasant experience was more strongly associated with family smoking than SHS exposure at home. Family unhappiness was associated with both family smoking (odds ratio 2.37; 95% confidence interval 1.51-3.71) and SHS exposure at home (1.82; 1.39-2.40). These results suggest a previously neglected possible impact of tobacco use on family happiness.

  6. Examining Claims of Family Process Differences Ensuing from the Choice to Home-School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Mark H.; Harper, James M.; Call, Matthew L.; Bird, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Advocates of home-schooling claim a variety of positive educational and familial outcomes. Research is needed to examine possible effects of home-schooling on family relationships. We investigated family environment differences between home-schooling and public-schooling families matched in terms of family-centric orientation. Family cohesion was…

  7. Home Food Preservation among Families with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenz, Lorraine J.; Sawicki, Marjorie A.; Elliott, Michael; White, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine preservation practices, perceived barriers, and likelihood of parents with young children to home preserve food in the future. Implications of this research relate to family and consumer sciences professionals who endeavor to improve fruit and vegetable intake and provide resources to families and…

  8. Everyday Life in Distance Education: One Family's Home Schooling Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Nicole C.

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a narrative portrait of one family enrolled in a school of distance education in Queensland, Australia. Most of the families own or manage sheep and/or beef grazing properties, and their children receive their education by correspondence papers and daily UHF radio lessons. The students complete their school work at home with a…

  9. Children's Use of Retreats in Family Child Care Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, Nanci

    2006-01-01

    The use of retreat spaces by 65 children in 9 family child care homes was assessed in this study. Family child care providers used daily diaries to collect information about children's retreat frequency and associated behavior. The findings revealed that nearly half of the children used informal, readily available retreats during the research…

  10. A Strong Start for Families: Voluntary Home Visiting in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Now, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Home visiting programs are voluntary, family-centered programs that match new and expectant parents with trained professionals who provide ongoing, individualized support during critical points throughout pregnancy and a child's first year(s) of life. By reaching families early in their transition into parenthood, and linking them with needed…

  11. Home Visiting Family Support Programs: Benefits of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Home Visiting Campaign, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The federally funded, locally administered Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program sponsors family support programs that are often called "home visiting" because they take place in the homes of at-risk families. These families often lack support, experience, and knowledge of basic parenting skills. Because children…

  12. Supporting Family Engagement in Home Visiting with the Family Map Inventories.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, Angela; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; McKelvey, Lorraine; Swindle, Taren

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and usefulness of a universal screening tool, the Family Map Inventory (F MI), to assess family strengths and needs in a home visiting program. The FMI has been used successfully by center-based early childcare programs to tailor services to family need and build on existing strengths. Home visiting coordinators (N = 39) indicated the FMI would provide useful information, and they had the capacity to implement. In total, 70 families who enrolled in a Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) program were screened by the coordinator. The results of the FMI provided meaningful information about the home and parenting environment. Overall, most caregivers provided high levels of school readiness and parental warmth and low levels of family conflict and parenting stress. On the other hand, many families did not provide adequate food quality, exhibited chaotic home environments, and practiced negative discipline. This study demonstrated that the FMI is a feasible and useful option to assess comprehensive family needs in home visiting programs. It also demonstrated that the FMI provided home visiting coordinators a system to measure family strengths and needs. This could provide an assessment of program effectiveness and changes in the family's environment.

  13. Vocational Home Economics Education: Family Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawatzky, Joyce

    Intended for use by vocational home economics teachers in grades 11 and 12, this curriculum guide provides preparation for students to assume the roles of homemakers and wage earners. The seven sections included are subdivided into two or more units and consist of the following topics: (1) career planning, which also encompasses job search methods…

  14. Protect Your Home and Family from Radon

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Jan. 11, 2016) Radon-the silent killer-is responsible for about 21,000 lung cancer deaths every year. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency encourages Americans around the country to test their homes for this naturally occurring radioac

  15. Family and neighborhood disadvantage, home environment, and children's school readiness.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Lieny; Buettner, Cynthia K; Hur, Eunhye

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations between family socioeconomic risk, neighborhood disadvantage, and children's school readiness. A sample of 420 children from 48 early childcare programs yielded multi-informant data. The average age was 55.3 months (SD = 6.4), with 38% of children being Black, non-Hispanic, Hispanic, or other minority race (American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander). One third (32.4%) of the parents had annual incomes less than $30,000. We used multilevel structural equation modeling to test direct and indirect associations among family socioeconomic risk and neighborhood disadvantage and children's cognitive and social-emotional development through home learning environment and parental depression. Children with a greater number of family socioeconomic risks and a higher level of neighborhood disadvantage demonstrated lower scores on cognitive skills. The degree of family socioeconomic risk was indirectly associated with children's cognitive ability through parents' cognitive stimulation at home. Parents who had more family socioeconomic risks and neighborhood disadvantage reported more depressive symptoms, which, in turn, suggested children's greater probability of having social-emotional problems. In other words, home learning environments explained associations between family socioeconomic disadvantage and children's cognitive skills, while parental depression explained associations between family/neighborhood disadvantages and children's social-emotional problems. Results suggest the importance of intervention or prevention strategies for parents to improve cognitive stimulation at home and to reduce depressive symptoms.

  16. Supporting Family Engagement in Home Visiting with the Family Map Inventories

    PubMed Central

    Kyzer, Angela; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; McKelvey, Lorraine; Swindle, Taren

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and usefulness of a universal screening tool, the Family Map Inventory (F MI), to assess family strengths and needs in a home visiting program. The FMI has been used successfully by center-based early childcare programs to tailor services to family need and build on existing strengths. Home visiting coordinators (N = 39) indicated the FMI would provide useful information, and they had the capacity to implement. In total, 70 families who enrolled in a Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) program were screened by the coordinator. The results of the FMI provided meaningful information about the home and parenting environment. Overall, most caregivers provided high levels of school readiness and parental warmth and low levels of family conflict and parenting stress. On the other hand, many families did not provide adequate food quality, exhibited chaotic home environments, and practiced negative discipline. This study demonstrated that the FMI is a feasible and useful option to assess comprehensive family needs in home visiting programs. It also demonstrated that the FMI provided home visiting coordinators a system to measure family strengths and needs. This could provide an assessment of program effectiveness and changes in the family’s environment. PMID:26681837

  17. Bringing Instructional Strategies Home: Reaching Families Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtiss, Sarah L.; Pearson, Jamie N.; Akamoglu, Yusuf; Fisher, Kim W.; Snodgrass, Melinda R.; Meyer, Lori E.; Meadan, Hedda; Halle, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Online family education can be challenging but rewarding for both families and practitioners. Parents of children with disabilities are integral in fostering children's early development and in promoting independence across the life span. Practitioners and parents working collaboratively can enhance this development. Collaboration between parents…

  18. Effects of Green House nursing homes on residents' families.

    PubMed

    Lum, Terry Y; Kane, Rosalie A; Cutler, Lois J; Yu, Tzy-Chyi

    2008-01-01

    A longitudinal quasi-experimental study with two comparison groups was conducted to test the effects of a Green House (GH) nursing home program on residents' family members. The GHs are individual residences, each serving 10 elders, where certified nursing assistant (CNA)-level resident assistants form primary relationships with residents and family, family is encouraged to visits, and professionals adapted their roles to support the model. GH family were somewhat less involved in providing assistance to their residents although family contact did not differ among the settings at any time period. GH family were more satisfied with their resident's care and with their own experience as family members, and had no greater family burden. Issues in studying family outcomes are discussed as well as implications for roles of various personnel, including social service and activities staff in a GH model.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: familial glucocorticoid deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... familial glucocorticoid deficiency type 1 lead to defective trafficking of the receptor to the cell surface. J ... short stature, and natural killer cell deficiency in humans. J Clin Invest. 2012 Mar;122(3):814- ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: multiple familial trichoepithelioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with the skin (skin appendages), such as hair follicles and sweat glands. People with multiple familial trichoepithelioma ... smooth, round tumors called trichoepitheliomas, which arise from hair follicles. Trichoepitheliomas are generally noncancerous (benign) but occasionally develop ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: familial isolated hyperparathyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... growth and division. The resulting increase in cell proliferation leads to the formation of an adenoma involving ... of other genes (gene transcription) and in cell proliferation. CDC73 gene mutations that cause familial isolated hyperparathyroidism ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: familial isolated pituitary adenoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... adenoma predisposition due to mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene. Endocr Rev. 2013 ... AB, Korbonits M. The role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein gene in familial and sporadic ...

  3. Vocational Home and Family Life Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nancy L.

    1978-01-01

    Parents and prospective parents need to learn more about child growth and development and the family's role in furthering that development; experience-based child development programs are helping to do this for many young people today. (MM)

  4. Genetics Home Reference: familial Mediterranean fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... health and development? More about Mutations and Health Inheritance Pattern Familial Mediterranean fever is almost always inherited in ... in an autosomal dominant pattern . An autosomal dominant inheritance pattern describes cases in which one copy of the ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: progressive familial heart block

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Lev syndrome Lev's disease PCCD progressive cardiac conduction defect Related Information How are genetic conditions and ... Diseases Information Center (1 link) Familial progressive cardiac conduction defect Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Heart, ...

  6. 77 FR 19008 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy Upgrades... Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy Upgrades. This document is a set of work specifications applicable to energy efficiency retrofits of single family homes....

  7. A Home for the Whole Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Laurie and Jeff Schutz can't imagine how they ever survived. It was not that long ago that the Schutz family of five was living in an 1,100 square foot, two bedroom house. Under normal circumstances, this would have been cramped for any family. The Schutzes, however, have a son with cerebral palsy. Laurie Schutz had about as normal a first-time…

  8. STEM learning activity among home-educating families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning was studied among families in a group of home-educators in the Pacific Northwest. Ethnographic methods recorded learning activity (video, audio, fieldnotes, and artifacts) which was analyzed using a unique combination of Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) and Mediated Action (MA), enabling analysis of activity at multiple levels. Findings indicate that STEM learning activity is family-led, guided by parents' values and goals for learning, and negotiated with children to account for learner interests and differences, and available resources. Families' STEM education practice is dynamic, evolves, and influenced by larger societal STEM learning activity. Parents actively seek support and resources for STEM learning within their home-school community, working individually and collectively to share their funds of knowledge. Home-schoolers also access a wide variety of free-choice learning resources: web-based materials, museums, libraries, and community education opportunities (e.g. afterschool, weekend and summer programs, science clubs and classes, etc.). A lesson-heuristic, grounded in Mediated Action, represents and analyzes home STEM learning activity in terms of tensions between parental goals, roles, and lesson structure. One tension observed was between 'academic' goals or school-like activity and 'lifelong' goals or everyday learning activity. Theoretical and experiential learning was found in both activity, though parents with academic goals tended to focus more on theoretical learning and those with lifelong learning goals tended to be more experiential. Examples of the National Research Council's science learning strands (NRC, 2009) were observed in the STEM practices of all these families. Findings contribute to the small but growing body of empirical CHAT research in science education, specifically to the empirical base of family STEM learning practices at home. It also fills a

  9. Supporting Family Engagement in Home Visiting with the Family Map Inventories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyzer, Angela; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; McKelvey, Lorraine; Swindle, Taren

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and usefulness of a universal screening tool, the Family Map Inventory (FMI), to assess family strengths and needs in a home visiting program. The FMI has been used successfully by center-based early childcare programs to tailor services to family needs and build on existing strengths. Home…

  10. Called home: The creation of family life.

    PubMed

    Hutch, R A

    1992-09-01

    Engendering family life is a spiritual process (theosis) based on human ethological constants of gender difference and generational turnover. Recent studies on ethnicity suggest that such a process retrieves a primordial sense of the human species as a whole, "humankind." Families, especially in this broad sense, link together the living and the dead and, at their best, morally empower individuals who link their destinies to such a vision of creation and human health. Reference is made to work on human strengths and speciation by Erik Erikson and to that on maternal thinking by Sara Ruddick. A political program by which an ideology of "familism" can be made is offered.

  11. Gender, home and family in cultural capital theory.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elizabeth B

    2005-03-01

    The paper argues that Bourdieu's stress on early familiarization for the highest value of cultural capital is closely linked to his idea, strongly emphasized in Distinction, about the role of family and domestic life for individual development and social positions. The role of women, as mothers and homemakers, is crucial in this process. Yet, Bourdieu defines social origin as deriving from the father. The centrality to Bourdieu's thinking of a resilient traditional pattern of masculine domination and feminine submission constitutive of the Western gender habitus explains both his stress on 'normalcy' for the production of legitimate dispositions, and his resistance to incorporating into his thinking the implications of recent transformations in home family living, which have destabilized the gender order. It is thus important to consider contemporary feminist analyses of the family and home life and their significance for a renewed theory of cultural capital. The paper considers two sets of literature. Firstly, it addresses the manners in which home and family are conceptualized in Bourdieu's key texts where these issues were prominent in the development of his thinking on cultural capital. The second set of literature includes texts by feminist academics in the fields of family, gender and the body, which analyse the destabilizing of the gender order and everyday family living in contemporary society. Two questions are addressed on the basis of these reflections: (1) Is cultural capital an individual or a household resource? (2) How does cultural capital relate to personal interdependencies at the level of family and households?

  12. Genetics Home Reference: familial osteochondritis dissecans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Familial osteochondritis dissecans Seattle Children's TeensHealth from Nemours: Knee Injuries University of Connecticut Health Center Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (1 link) American College of Rheumatology: Osteoarthritis ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles ...

  13. Home English Literacy for Parents: An ESL Family Literacy Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terdy, Dennis; Bercovitz, Laura

    The Home English Literacy for Parents (H.E.L.P.) Project and curriculum were developed and implemented in a variety of school programs in the northwest suburban Chicago area. Project services were offered to parents for 5 hours a week at 7 school sites. The curriculum was intended for implementation in a typical adult English-as-a-Second-Language…

  14. Adults raised as children in lesbian families.

    PubMed

    Tasker, F; Golombok, S

    1995-04-01

    A longitudinal study of 25 young adults from lesbian families and 21 raised by heterosexual single mothers revealed that those raised by lesbian mothers functioned well in adulthood in terms of psychological well-being and of family identity and relationships. The commonly held assumption that lesbian mothers will have lesbian daughters and gay sons was not supported by the findings.

  15. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    PubMed

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... 44(1):25-32. Review. Citation on PubMed Martín-Campos JM, Julve J, Roig R, Martínez S, Errico TL, Martínez-Couselo S, Escolà-Gil JC, Méndez-González J, Blanco-Vaca F. Molecular analysis of chylomicronemia in a clinical ... Krishnan AS, George TT. Familial chylomicronemia syndrome. Indian J Pediatr. 2005 ...

  17. Learning at Home: Families' Educational Media Use in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rideout, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The Joan Ganz Cooney Center has conducted a national survey of more than 1500 parents of children ages 2-10 to find out how much of children's media time is devoted to educational content, platform by platform, age by age. "Learning at Home: Families' Educational Media Use in America" is the first comprehensive analysis of parents'…

  18. Housing & Home Furnishings Curriculum Guide. Energy and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Jane S.; Morris, Carol

    This curriculum guide on housing and home furnishings, covering one of the five content areas of the Energy and the Family Curriculum Guide, has been designed to provide learning experiences and identify resources that can be used to develop units of study related to energy usage and conservation. The guide is intended for use in comprehensive…

  19. No Home, No Family: Homeless Children in Rural Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ronald K.; Johnson, Alice K.; Bremseth, Michael D.; Tracy, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Statewide study of 455 Ohio children who received family preservation or reunification services found that the homeless child was more likely to be a child of color, to be younger, to have problems maintaining a bond with parents, and to be in a relative's home, and less likely to have behavior problems or successful service outcomes. Contains 22…

  20. Home and Family. Social Studies Guide, Unit I, Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota State Dept. of Public Instruction, Pierre.

    GRADES OR AGES: Kindergarten. SUBJECT MATTER: Social studies: home and family. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The introductory material includes an overview of the unit, suggestions for incorporating it in the K-12 social studies program, performance criteria, and suggested ways to initiate the unit. The main text is presented in four…

  1. Family Values, the Curriculum of the Home, and Educational Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redding, Sam

    1992-01-01

    The "curriculum of the home" consists of patterns of habit formation and attitude development that prepare children for academic learning and sustain them through the schooling years. Building on Herbert Walberg's educational productivity findings, this article isolates family values (high regard for personal development, communication,…

  2. Children's Home Environments: Understanding the Role of Family Structure Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowaleski-Jones, Lori; Dunifon, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the 1996 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) merged mother-child sample, we investigate the impact of two family events, parental divorce and the birth of a sibling, on the cognitive stimulation and emotional support provided to children in the home. We use fixed-effect regression techniques to control for unmeasured…

  3. Detecting delirium in older adults living at home.

    PubMed

    Malenfant, Priscilla; Voyer, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether in-home care nurses had the necessary knowledge to detect delirium in older adults. To this end, 87 home care nurses from 2 sites in the greater Quebec City region in Canada answered a questionnaire. The results showed nurses had limited level of knowledge about the diagnostic criteria for delirium, the main signs and symptoms of delirium, and the tools for its detection. Moreover, 54.4% of the in-home care nurses were able to recognize delirium, from structured clinical vignettes.

  4. Enhancing Quality of Life of Families Who Use Adult Day Services: Short- and Long-Term Effects of the Adult Day Services Plus Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitlin, Laura N.; Reever, Karen; Dennis, Marie P.; Mathieu, Esther; Hauck, Walter W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the short- and long-term effects of Adult Day Services Plus (ADS Plus), a low-cost care management intervention designed to enhance family caregiver well-being, increase service utilization, and decrease nursing home placement of impaired older adults enrolled in adult day care. Design and Methods: We used a…

  5. Analysis of the Lifecycle Impacts and Potential for Avoided Impacts Associated with Single Family Homes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn how recovering construction and demolition materials from single-family homes and reusing them in building and road construction and other applications helps offset the environmental impacts associated with single-family homes.

  6. Declarations of Independence: Home School Families' Perspectives on Education, the Common Good, and Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Kenneth V.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the perspectives of home school families regarding the rights, interests, and responsibilities of family and state over education. These families viewed the common good differently than critics of home schooling. They believed the diversity of curriculum and worldview in their home schools positively impacts the common good by…

  7. Home Remedy Use Among African American and White Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Sandberg, Joanne C.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Altizer, Kathryn P.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Home remedy use is an often overlooked component of health self-management, with a rich tradition, particularly among African Americans and others who have experienced limited access to medical care or discrimination by the health care system. Home remedies can potentially interfere with biomedical treatments. This study documented the use of home remedies among older rural adults, and compared use by ethnicity (African American and white) and gender. A purposeful sample of 62 community-dwelling adults ages 65+ from rural North Carolina was selected. Each completed an in-depth interview, which probed current use of home remedies, including food and non-food remedies, and the symptoms or conditions for use. Systematic, computer-assisted analysis was used to identify usage patterns. Five food and five non-food remedies were used by a large proportion of older adults. African American elders reported greater use than white elders; women reported more use for a greater number of symptoms than men. Non-food remedies included long-available, over-the-counter remedies (e.g., Epsom salts) for which “off-label” uses were reported. Use focused on alleviating common digestive, respiratory, skin, and musculoskeletal symptoms. Some were used for chronic conditions in lieu of prescription medications. Home remedy use continues to be a common feature of the health self-management of older adults, particularly among African Americans, though at lower levels than previously reported. While some use is likely helpful or benign, other use has the potential to interfere with medical management of disease. Health care providers should be aware of the use of remedies by their patients. PMID:26543255

  8. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Home Environment and Home Social Behavior Data from the Elementary School Success Profile for Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegmann, Kate M.; Thompson, Aaron M.; Bowen, Natasha K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to test the factor structure and scale quality of data provided by caregivers about the home environment and child behavior at home using the Elementary School Success Profile (ESSP) for Families. The ESSP for Families is one component of the ESSP, an online social-environmental assessment that also collects…

  9. The Service System's Hidden Places: Adult Homes and Room and Board Homes Housing People with Developmental Disability and Psychiatric Labels in Onondaga County. Final Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racino, Julie Ann; And Others

    The paper describes adult homes and room and board homes serving persons with disabilities in Onondaga County, New York. Visits were made to eight adult homes and five room and board homes. Briefly considered are ownership and licensing regulations, referrals, and admission criteria. Observations at the homes are offered. Concerns are raised about…

  10. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    PubMed Central

    Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Conclusion Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients. PMID:24648834

  11. Virtual Visits in Home Health Care for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Husebø, Anne Marie Lunde

    2014-01-01

    Background. This review identifies the content of virtual visits in community nursing services to older adults and explores the manner in which service users and the nurses use virtual visits. Design. An integrative literature review. Method. Data collection comprised a literature search in three databases: Cinahl, Medline, and PubMed. In addition, a manual search of reference lists and expert consultation were performed. A total of 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. The articles were reviewed in terms of study characteristics, service content and utilization, and patient and health care provider experience. Results. Our review shows that in most studies the service is delivered on a daily basis and in combination with in-person visits. The findings suggest that older home-dwelling patients can benefit from virtual visits in terms of enhanced social inclusion and medication compliance. Service users and their nurses found virtual visits satisfactory and suitable for care delivery in home care to the elderly. Evidence for cost-saving benefits of virtual visits was not found. Conclusions. The findings can inform the planning of virtual visits in home health care as a complementary service to in-person visits, in order to meet the increasingly complex needs of older adults living at home. PMID:25506616

  12. Carer Reports of Health Status among Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities in Taiwan Living at Home and in Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, K.-Y.; Hsieh, K.; Heller, T.; Davidson, P. W.; Janicki, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to assess the health status of a cohort of adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) residing in family homes or institutions in Taiwan and to examine whether morbidity varied with age, sex, existing diagnosis [Down syndrome (DS), seizures, cerebral palsy (CP), intellectual disability…

  13. Oral home telecare for adults with tetraplegia: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Hon K; Pope, Charlene

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the feasibility of delivering an individualized program of oral home telecare training using PC-based, real-time interactive videoconferencing via the Internet to meet the unique challenges of dental care for people with tetraplegia. A home-based videoconferencing method was tested with two adults with tetraplegia and an occupational therapist (rehabilitation specialist). As part of the proposed rehabilitation training to improve independence in performing oral hygiene, adaptive devices (a rechargeable oscillating-rotating power toothbrush and a cordless oral irrigator) were introduced to facilitate oral care performance with interactive, Web-based instruction. Training was conducted once a week for 4 weeks. The oral home telecare experience was evaluated using a questionnaire and in-depth interviews after the training. Both subjects were satisfied with the oral home telecare services and were enthusiastic about using the services without major difficulty after having previously experienced barriers to dental care. In addition to their positive perceptions about videoconferencing, the subjects suggested adaptations and identified unexpected potential uses for interactive videoconferencing. The use of interactive videoconferencing as a mode of oral hygiene training may lead to a change in oral hygiene service delivery methods, improving accessibility to geographically dispersed populations with tetraplegia. Oral home telecare offers strategies to decrease physical barriers and communication difficulties that correspond to recommendations to improve the quality of dental health services for people with tetraplegia.

  14. Differences in Home Food and Activity Environments between Obese and Healthy Weight Families of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Richard E.; Scharf, Cynthia; Filigno, Stephanie S.; Saelens, Brian E.; Stark, Lori J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop and test a home food and activity instrument to discriminate between the home environments of obese and healthy weight preschool children. Design: A modified questionnaire about home environments was tested as an observation tool. Setting: Family homes. Participants: A total of 35 obese children with at least 1 obese…

  15. What Is the Role of Home Economics in Teaching Family Housing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Eloise

    1979-01-01

    States that the traditional skills courses are only marginally representative of the broad meaning of home economics, such as individual and family improvement. Discusses housing from a home economics perspective, emphasizing concern with home and family life, social perspective, and housing as a dimension of life style. (MF)

  16. Effects of Family-Oriented Intervention on Home Environment Variables with Young Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Tess; And Others

    Effects of family-oriented early intervention on the home environment were explored in a 6-month study of 23 handicapped children (ages birth to 5) and their families, who participated as members of an experimental or control group. The Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) Inventory was administered to evaluate differences in…

  17. From Public Policy to Family Practices: Researching the Everyday Realities of Families' Technology Use at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, O.

    2011-01-01

    Informed by "critical" approaches to "educational technology", this paper aims to move away from presenting a "could" and "should" explanation of children learning with technology to a more nuanced, context-rich analyses of how information and communication technologies (ICTs) are being used by technologically privileged families at home. Here, a…

  18. Family Relationships from Adolescence to Early Adulthood: Changes in the Family System following Firstborns' Leaving Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2011-01-01

    This study charted the course of parent-child and sibling relationships from early adolescence to early adulthood and examined how these relationships changed following firstborns' departure from their parents' home for the first time. Data were drawn from a 10-year longitudinal study of family relationships. Participants included mothers,…

  19. Korean Families in America: Their Family Language Policies and Home-Language Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyun-Sook

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the family language policies (FLP) of Korean American parents and how the language practice, management, and ideology components of their FLP and demographic variables predict maintenance of the home language. Results of a large-scale (N = 480) survey show that different sets of FLP and demographic variables contributed to a…

  20. Home visiting for intervention delivery to improve rural family asthma management.

    PubMed

    Horner, Sharon D

    2006-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the use of home visits in an asthma self-management intervention study with rural families who have a school-aged child with asthma. The study design involved randomization of the sample by elementary schools, then baseline (pretest) and postintervention data collection.(1) The purpose of this article is to describe challenges with, and pose solutions for, implementing home visits for asthma self-management in rural areas. Home visiting is a strategy for program delivery that takes advantage of the home context for tailoring services to address the family's individual needs. The advantages of intervening in the home include being able to (a) use actual home conditions for individualizing the asthma education to meet families' needs; (b) match home visitors with family in terms of ethnicity and language; (c) retain a high percentage of families over the year-long duration of the study; and (d) not add to family burden of managing asthma.

  1. Development and Examination of a Family Triadic Measure to Examine Quality of Life Family Congruence in Nursing Home Residents and Two Family Members.

    PubMed

    Aalgaard Kelly, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The overall purpose of this study was to propose and test a conceptual model and apply family analyses methods to understand quality of life family congruence in the nursing home setting. Method: Secondary data for this study were from a larger study, titled Measurement, Indicators and Improvement of the Quality of Life (QOL) in Nursing Homes. Research literature, family systems theory and human ecological assumptions, fostered the conceptual model empirically testing quality of life family congruence. Results: The study results supported a model examining nursing home residents and two family members on quality of life family congruence. Specifically, family intergenerational dynamic factors, resident personal and social-psychological factors, and nursing home family input factors were examined to identify differences in quality of life family congruence among triad families. Discussion: Formal family involvement and resident cognitive functioning were found as the two most influential factors to quality of life family congruence (QOLFC).

  2. Development and Examination of a Family Triadic Measure to Examine Quality of Life Family Congruence in Nursing Home Residents and Two Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Aalgaard Kelly, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The overall purpose of this study was to propose and test a conceptual model and apply family analyses methods to understand quality of life family congruence in the nursing home setting. Method: Secondary data for this study were from a larger study, titled Measurement, Indicators and Improvement of the Quality of Life (QOL) in Nursing Homes. Research literature, family systems theory and human ecological assumptions, fostered the conceptual model empirically testing quality of life family congruence. Results: The study results supported a model examining nursing home residents and two family members on quality of life family congruence. Specifically, family intergenerational dynamic factors, resident personal and social-psychological factors, and nursing home family input factors were examined to identify differences in quality of life family congruence among triad families. Discussion: Formal family involvement and resident cognitive functioning were found as the two most influential factors to quality of life family congruence (QOLFC). PMID:28138474

  3. Action-oriented evaluation of an in-home family therapy program for families at risk for foster care placement.

    PubMed

    McWey, Lenore M; Humphreys, Julie; Pazdera, Andrea L

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an action-oriented evaluation of an in-home family therapy program serving families deemed at risk for the placement of children in foster care. In this study, feedback was solicited from both clients and therapists. Results indicate "duality" associated with several aspects of in-home family therapy, including the opportunity to observe families in their own homes versus the vulnerability some families feel when therapy is conducted in-home; therapists suggesting that sufficient training is required for in-home family therapy to be effective versus clients' opinions that therapists' lived experiences are more relevant; and the importance of the therapeutic alliance versus feelings of abandonment upon termination. Implications for researchers and practitioners are discussed.

  4. Family exemplars during implementation of a home pain management intervention.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Shirley A

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative pain and symptom management at home following pediatric tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T & A) is challenging. There are few randomized clinical trials that have established postoperative care interventions that are specific and effective during home recovery. The purpose of this pilot feasibility study was to describe how children and their families implemented a randomly assigned alarm intervention designed to promote postoperative around-the-clock administration of analgesics. Thirteen children from 12 through 18 years of age were randomly assigned to either the around-the-clock (RTC) intervention group (n = 7) or the usual care group (UCG) of controls (n = 6). The RTC intervention group was requested to use an alarm as a reminder to awaken and administer analgesia during the nighttime hours of sleep. Children randomly assigned to the UCG of controls were given the same discharge education as the RTC intervention group that emphasized around-the-clock administration of analgesia. The UCG of controls were not requested to use the alarm intervention. Both groups documented pain intensity and other symptoms daily for 3 days in a diary. All children wore an actigraphy-score wrist monitor to assess sleep during the same 3 days. Telephone interviews were conducted with the children and mothers at 24 hours and 10 to 14 days after surgery. Nonparametric statistics were used to compare differences between the two groups. Children in the RTC intervention group administered significantly (p = .014) more analgesics by the second postoperative day than the UCG of controls. Pain intensity was moderate to severe for both groups. The mean hours of nighttime sleep for the two groups did not differ. Themes that emerged from the qualitative analysis of the interviews included painful challenges; struggling with decisions; making things work; a lengthy recovery; and family support. Results supported the need for research to establish evidenced-based home care

  5. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  6. Home healthcare and family responsibility: a critical discourse analysis of talk and text.

    PubMed

    Funk, Laura M

    2013-10-01

    This paper addresses how families' roles and responsibility for care are constructed within home health (in contrast to the responsibility of home health). A discourse analysis informed by a critical theoretical approach was used to analyze qualitative interviews with 13 home health managers and clinical leaders in British Columbia, alongside home care documents. When referring to family involvement, there was an emphasis on the importance of supporting a client's choice to stay at home. Government and agency documents describe family members as primary providers, with home health having a supplementary role. Agencies seek to avoid "substituting" for family care. Family responsibility is characterized as having both moral and structural value. Nonetheless, some participants advocated flexibility and recognized potential caregiving challenges. Data provide examples of how agency expectations are communicated to clients and families and become embedded within practice and policy. Findings are viewed within the broader organizational context as representing the "responsibilization" of support.

  7. Cigarette Smoking among African American Youth from Single Mother Homes: Examining the Roles of Maternal Smoking and Positive Parenting within an Extended Family Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Sarah E.; Zalot, Alecia A.; Jones, Deborah J.

    2007-01-01

    The current study examined the main and interactive effects of three family context variables, maternal smoking, positive parenting behavior, and the quality of the mother's relationship with another adult or family member who assists with parenting (i.e., coparent), and adolescent smoking among African American youth from single mother homes. The…

  8. Family Dynamics of the Stay-at-Home Father and Working Mother Relationship.

    PubMed

    Rushing, Cassie; Powell, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    A phenomenological qualitative study was utilized to explore family dynamics in stay-at-home father and working mother households. A total of 20 working mothers were asked to describe family interactions and daily routines with regard to their stay-at-home father and working mother dynamic. All participants were married, heterosexual women with biological children ages 1 to 4 and who worked outside the home and the father stayed home as primary caretaker and did not contribute financially. The study indicated that the family dynamic of a working mother and stay-at-home father provided a positive parent-child relationship, enhanced parenting cohesion, and enhanced quality time.

  9. Meeting the Needs of Older Adult Refugee Populations With Home Health Services.

    PubMed

    Miner, Sarah M; Liebel, Dianne; Wilde, Mary H; Carroll, Jennifer K; Zicari, Elizabeth; Chalupa, Stephanie

    2015-12-27

    The United States resettles close to 70,000 refugees each year more than any other country in the world. Adult refugees are at risk for negative health outcomes and inefficient health resource use, and meeting the multiple health needs of this vulnerable population is a challenge. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a home health care (HHC) pilot project on meeting the needs of older adult refugee patients. A retrospective chart review of 40 refugee adult patients who participated in an HHC pilot was done to analyze their health outcomes using OASIS-C data. Participants' pain level, anxiety level, medication management, and activities of daily living management all significantly improved over the course of their HHC episode. Results of this study indicate that HHC has great potential to improve the health of vulnerable refugee populations and assist the families involved in their care.

  10. Home-Delivered Meals and Nutrition Status Among Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Sahyoun, Nadine R; Vaudin, Anna

    2014-08-01

    The trend among older adults in the United States is to "age in place" instead of opting for institutionalization. To maintain older adults with chronic conditions in their homes and to improve health after hospitalization, comprehensive social, health, and nutrition services are essential. Quality of dietary intake is crucial and yet often underestimated. Calorie needs decrease with age while nutrient needs remain the same, even increasing for some nutrients. This poses difficulties for individuals with functional disabilities who are unable to shop and cook due to physical or mental limitations or on a limited budget. The Older American Act home-delivered meal (HDM) program offers at least 1 healthy meal per day, 5 or more days per week, and targets individuals homebound due to illness, disability, or social isolation and those with greatest economic or social need. This review summarizes the available literature on the relationship between HDM and health outcomes. The HDM program is difficult to evaluate because of the multifactorial effect on health status. However, national surveys and smaller studies show that it is well targeted, efficient, and well liked; provides quality food to needy individuals; and helps individuals remain living independently. Studies show that HDMs improve dietary intake, with greater health benefits when more meals reach the neediest individuals. HDMs also decrease institutionalization of older adults and resulting healthcare expenditures. However, funding has not kept up with increased demand for this program. More studies with improved designs may provide more information supporting the program's impact on nutrition status and decreased health expenditures.

  11. Families, resources, and adult health: where do sexual minorities fit?

    PubMed

    Denney, Justin T; Gorman, Bridget K; Barrera, Cristina B

    2013-03-01

    Extensive research documents the relevance of families and socioeconomic resources to health. This article extends that research to sexual minorities, using 12 years of the National Health Interview Survey (N = 460,459) to examine self-evaluations of health among male and female adults living in same-sex and different-sex relationships. Adjusting for socioeconomic status eliminates differences between same- and different-sex cohabitors so that they have similarly higher odds of poor health relative to married persons. Results by gender reveal that the cohabitation disadvantage for health is more pronounced for different-sex cohabiting women than for men, but little difference exists between same-sex cohabiting men and women. Finally, the presence of children in the home is more protective for women's than men's health, but those protections are specific to married women. In all, the results elucidate the importance of relationship type, gender, and the presence of children when evaluating health.

  12. Adult Triploids in a Rainbow Trout Family

    PubMed Central

    Thorgaard, Gary H.; Gall, Graham A. E.

    1979-01-01

    Six triploid individuals were found in a full-sib family of 11 adult rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) from a domesticated hatchery stock. The triploid individuals were normal in size and external appearance, had underdeveloped gonads, and showed no evidence of 3n/2n chimerism or mosaicism. XXY triploids were males, suggesting that the Y chromosome is male determining in trout. Because they may avoid production losses associated with sexual maturation in normal fish, triploid trout and salmon could potentially be useful in fish culture. PMID:546676

  13. An Intergenerational Approach to Literacy: Effects on the Literacy Learning of Adults and on the Practice of Family Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paratore, Jeanne R.

    A study examined the influence of an intergenerational approach on the literacy development of parents and on the practice of family literacy at home. During a 3-year period, 367 families enrolled in multilingual, multiability literacy classes for at least one instructional cycle. The adult basic education classes were held in a community center…

  14. Impact of a Home Leisure Educational Program for Older Adults Who Have Had a Stroke (Home Leisure Educational Program).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nour, Kareen; Desrosiers, Johanne; Gauthier, Pierre; Carbonneau, Helene

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of leisure education for older adults having difficulty adjusting psychologically after a stroke. Participants received either an experimental home leisure education program (intervention group) or a friendly home visit (control group) after discharge from rehabilitation. The intervention group performed significantly…

  15. Genetic Influence on Adults' Ratings of Their Current Family Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied genetic and environmental origins of individual differences in adults' (N=386) ratings of their current family environment using Moos Family Environment Scales (FES). Found 25 percent of adults' FES scores due to genetic differences. Found environment in which they were reared had little effect on adults' ratings of their family…

  16. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pigg, Scott; Cautley, Dan; Francisco, Paul; Hawkins, Beth A; Brennan, Terry M

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  17. Family Histories and Multiple Transitions Among Homeless Young Adults: Pathways to Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Schmitz, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the early family histories of homeless young adults, the types and number of transitions they experienced, and their pathways to the street. Intensive qualitative interviews were audio taped and transcribed with 40 homeless young adults 19 to 21 years of age in the Midwest. Findings show that family backgrounds were generally characterized by substance use, child maltreatment, and witnessing violence, all of which provide social context for understanding why so many of these young people opted to leave home in search of an alternative living situation. The current findings also reveal that while some young adults ran away from home as adolescents, others were “pushed out” (i.e., told to leave), or removed by state agencies. Current study findings illustrate that young adults’ trajectories are marked by multiple living arrangements such as home, foster care, detention facility, and drug rehabilitation. Overall, study results show that young adults’ family histories place them on trajectories for early independence marked by multiple transitions and numerous living situations, culminating in a lack of a permanent residence to call home. PMID:24151346

  18. Seasonal variation and homes: understanding the social experiences of older adults.

    PubMed

    Perry, Tam E

    2014-01-01

    There has been limited research on the importance of seasons in the lives of older adults. Previous research has highlighted seasonal fluctuations in physical functioning--including limb strength, range of motion, and cardiac death--the spread of influenza in seasonal migration patterns. In addition, older adults experience isolation for various reasons, such as decline of physical and cognitive ability, lack of transportation, and lack of opportunities for social interaction. There has been much attention paid to the social isolation of older adults, yet little analysis about how the isolation changes throughout the year. Based on findings from an ethnographic study of older adults (n = 81), their family members (n = 49), and supportive professionals (n = 46) as they embark on relocation from their homes, this study analyzes the processes of moving for older adults. It examines the seasonal fluctuations of social isolation because of the effect of the environment on the social experiences of older adults. Isolation occurs because of the difficulty inclement weather causes on social interactions and mobility. The article concludes with discussion of the ways that research and practice can be designed and implemented to account for seasonal variation.

  19. Seasonal Variation and Homes: Understanding the Social Experiences of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Tam E.

    2014-01-01

    There has been limited research on the importance of seasons in the lives of older adults. Previous research has highlighted seasonal fluctuations in physical functioning—including limb strength, range of motion, and cardiac death—the spread of influenza in seasonal migration patterns. In addition, older adults experience isolation for various reasons, such as decline of physical and cognitive ability, lack of transportation, and lack of opportunities for social interaction. There has been much attention paid to the social isolation of older adults, yet little analysis about how the isolation changes throughout the year. Based on findings from an ethnographic study of older adults (n = 81), their family members (n = 49), and supportive professionals (n = 46) as they embark on relocation from their homes, this study analyzes the processes of moving for older adults. It examines the seasonal fluctuations of social isolation because of the effect of the environment on the social experiences of older adults. Isolation occurs because of the difficulty inclement weather causes on social interactions and mobility. The article concludes with discussion of the ways that research and practice can be designed and implemented to account for seasonal variation. PMID:24761536

  20. Hospice family members’ perceptions and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L.; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the fact that more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had two research questions; 1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared to family members of community dwelling hospice patients? 2) What are family members’ perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? Methods This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family member of hospice patients residing in the community. Results Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n=176) with family members of community dwelling hospice patients (n=267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. Conclusion These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for

  1. A Research Review: The Importance of Families and the Home Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Parents are a child's first educator. A child's family and home environment has a strong impact on his/her language and literacy development and educational achievement. This impact is stronger during the child's early years but continues throughout their school years. Many background variables affect the impact of the family and home environment…

  2. In-Home Generalization of Social Interactions in Families of Adolescents with Behavior Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Loretta A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A communication program was implemented with the families of three adolescents with behavior problems. Skill teaching resulted in parent-adolescent dyads learning to use the skills in the teaching setting, but competent use of the skills in the home was not observed until an in-home family conference phase was implemented. (Author/JDD)

  3. Those Who Care: A Report on Approved Family Day Home Providers in Alberta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Malcolm; LaGrange, Annette

    This study examines the characteristics and work environments of approved family day home providers in Alberta. Family day home agency coordinators from across Alberta completed questionnaires, as did approved providers who contracted with 12 agencies in central Alberta. Typical providers were married, had children, and had lived in their present…

  4. Design for the Evaluation of the San Francisco Home Health Services. Emergency Family Care Services Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remy, Linda L.

    This is a design for the evaluation of emergency family care programs of the San Francisco, California Home Health Services administration. The design objectives are qiven as the promotion of the health and welfare of the family unit and the reduction of the number of out-of-home placements of children and subsequent crises. The objectives of the…

  5. More than Memories: Studying Home Movies and the Families Who Made Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhrich, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Unfairly viewed as poorly made and unwatchable, home movies actually constitute a wide variety of events and images that make them an invaluable and largely unexplored resource for scholars and researchers. The images captured in home movies--first birthdays, parades, vacations, family gatherings, etc.--were originally made by family members to…

  6. Home Visiting for At-Risk Preschoolers: A Successful Model for Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nievar, M. Angela; Jacobson, A.; Dier, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) program promotes school readiness by providing services directly to parents through home visitation. This study describes the outcomes of the HIPPY program for Latino immigrant families in a large Southwestern city. A quasi-experimental design compared 48 families on the program…

  7. Older adult perceptions of smart home technologies: implications for research, policy & market innovations in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, J; D'Ambrosio, L A; Reimer, B; Pratt, M R

    2007-01-01

    Advances in information communications technology and related computational power are providing a wide array of systems and related services that form the basis of smart home technologies to support the health, safety and independence of older adults. While these technologies offer significant benefits to older people and their families, they are also transforming older adults into lead adopters of a new 24/7 lifestyle of being monitored, managed, and, at times, motivated, to maintain their health and wellness. To better understand older adult perceptions of smart home technologies and to inform future research a workshop and focus group was conducted with 30 leaders in aging advocacy and aging services from 10 northeastern states. Participants expressed support of technological advance along with a variety of concerns that included usability, reliability, trust, privacy, stigma, accessibility and affordability. Participants also observed that there is a virtual absence of a comprehensive market and policy environment to support either the consumer or the diffusion of these technologies. Implications for research, policy and market innovation are discussed.

  8. Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... is to create strong, sustainable, inclusive communities and quality affordable homes for all. Contact HUD’s Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control for further information regarding the Lead Safe Housing ...

  9. The home environment and family asthma management among ethnically diverse urban youth with asthma.

    PubMed

    Sato, Amy F; Kopel, Sheryl J; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Seifer, Ronald; Esteban, Cynthia; Coutinho, Maria Teresa; Klein, Robert; Fritz, Gregory K; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne

    2013-06-01

    Although the pediatric psychology literature underscores the importance of illness-related aspects of the home environment for optimal family asthma management, little is known about the contribution of more global aspects of the home environment (e.g., family routines/schedule, quality of stimulation provided to child) to asthma management in ethnic minority and urban families. The goals of this study were to (a) explore ethnic/racial group differences in global and specific dimensions of home environment quality among Latino, non-Latino White (NLW), and African American urban children with asthma; and (b) examine associations between the quality and quantity of support and stimulation within the home environment, as measured by the HOME Inventory, and family asthma management. Urban, low-income children (N = 131) between the ages of 6 and 13 with asthma and a primary caregiver participated in a multimodal assessment, including an in-home observation and semistructured interviews to assess aspects of home environment quality and family asthma management practices. While controlling for poverty, no ethnic group differences were found in the global home environment; however, there were significant differences in specific dimensions (e.g., Family Participation in Developmentally Stimulating Experiences, and Aspects of the Physical Environment) of home environment quality. Across the whole sample, home environment quality predicted family asthma management. When examining this association for specific ethnic groups, this finding did not hold for the Latino subsample. The results highlight the need to consider ethnic group differences in non-illness-specific aspects of the home environment when addressing families' asthma management strategies.

  10. Teaching Family Communication Concepts through Family Stories: An Analysis of Stories and Rituals in David Bradley's "Harvest Home"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixson, Marcia D.

    2006-01-01

    In this activity, students will be able to apply the concepts of stories and rituals to an analysis of the ritual in the short story "Harvest Home" by David Bradley, gaining understanding of how stories and rituals affect and reflect family values, power structures and identities. "Harvest Home" talks about the rituals involved in a…

  11. Evaluating Fidelity in Home-Visiting Programs a Qualitative Analysis of 1058 Home Visit Case Notes from 105 Families

    PubMed Central

    Saïas, Thomas; Lerner, Emilie; Greacen, Tim; Simon-Vernier, Elodie; Emer, Alessandra; Pintaux, Eléonore; Guédeney, Antoine; Dugravier, Romain; Tereno, Susana; Falissard, Bruno; Tubach, Florence; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Objective Implementation fidelity is a key issue in home-visiting programs as it determines a program’s effectiveness in accomplishing its original goals. This paper seeks to evaluate fidelity in a 27-month program addressing maternal and child health which took place in France between 2006 and 2011. Method To evaluate implementation fidelity, home visit case notes were analyzed using thematic qualitative and computer-assisted linguistic analyses. Results During the prenatal period, home visitors focused on the social components of the program. Visitors discussed the physical changes in pregnancy, and psychological and social environment issues. Discussing immigration, unstable employment and financial related issues, family relationships and dynamics and maternity services, while not expected, were found in case notes. Conversely, health during pregnancy, early child development and postpartum mood changes were not identified as topics within the prenatal case notes. During the postnatal period, most components of the intervention were addressed: home visitors observed the mother’s adaptation to the baby; routine themes such as psychological needs and medical-social networks were evaluated; information on the importance of social support and on adapting the home environment was given; home visitors counseled on parental authority, and addressed mothers’ self-esteem issues; finally, they helped to find child care, when necessary. Some themes were not addressed or partially addressed: health education, child development, home environment, mother’s education plans and personal routine, partner support and play with the child. Other themes were not expected, but found in the case notes: social issues, mother-family relationship, relation with services, couple issues, quality of maternal behavior and child’s language development. Conclusions In this program, home visitors experienced difficulties addressing some of the objectives because they gave precedence

  12. Independence and shared decision making: the role of smart home technology in empowering older adults.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to explore the concepts of independence and shared decision making in the context of smart home technologies for older adults. We conducted a Delphi study with three rounds involving smart home designers, and researchers as well as community dwelling older adults. While there were differences in the way different stakeholders define these concepts, the study findings provide clear implications for the design, implementation and evaluation of smart home applications.

  13. The Shift in Existential Life Situations of Adult Children to Parents with Dementia Relocated to Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Høgsnes, Linda; Norbergh, Karl-Gustaf; Danielson, Ella; Melin-Johansson, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous research describes spouses and adult children of people with dementia as a homogeneous group using one term: family caregivers. Recent research shows that the needs and experiences of spouses and adult children differ, therefore they cannot be studied as a homogeneous group. Aims: The aim of the study was to describe the shift in existential life situations of adult children of a parent with dementia relocated to nursing homes. Design: This is a qualitative study with an interpretive approach. Methods: Face-to-face interviews were held with 11 adult children aged 48-65 years. The interviews lasted 30–60 minutes and data were analysed using interpretive content analysis. Findings: The adult children described how they experienced their life situation before and after their parents’ relocation. Before relocation they described feelings of powerlessness, loneliness in their responsibilities, loss and guilt. After relocation they had feelings of freedom, ongoing responsibility, living with loss and having a new relationship with death. Conclusion: The most important finding in our study was that adult children developed a different relationship with death than before the parent became affected by dementia. It is essential that healthcare staff understand and address the adult children’s existential life situations and the suffering they are experiencing. Healthcare staff need to be conscious about adult children’s needs for support to address their existential life situations before and after their parents relocate to nursing homes. PMID:27651850

  14. Homes of low-income minority families with asthmatic children have increased condition issues

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Christina E.; Nazir, Niaman; Daley, Christine M.; DiDonna, Anita; Choi, Won S.; Barnes, Charles S.; Rosenwasser, Lanny J.

    2014-01-01

    The home is increasingly associated with asthma. It acts both as a reservoir of asthma triggers and as a refuge from seasonal outdoor allergen exposure. Racial/ethnic minority families with low incomes tend to reside in neighborhoods with low housing quality. These families also have higher rates of asthma. This study explores the hypothesis that black and Latino urban households with asthmatic children experienced more home mechanical, structural condition–related areas of concern than white households with asthmatic children. Participant families (n = 140) took part in the Kansas City Safe and Healthy Homes Program, had at least one asthmatic child, and met income qualifications of no more than 80% of local median income; many were below 50%. Families self-identified their race. Homes were assessed by environmental health professionals using a standard set of criteria and a specific set of on-site and laboratory sampling and analyses. Homes were given a score for areas of concern between 0 (best) and 53 (worst). The study population self-identified as black (46%), non-Latino white (26%), Latino (14.3%), and other (12.9%). Mean number of areas of concern were 18.7 in Latino homes, 17.8 in black homes, 13.3 in other homes, and 13.2 in white homes. Latino and black homes had significantly more areas of concern. White families were also more likely to be in the upper portion of the income. In this set of 140 low-income homes with an asthmatic child, households of minority individuals had more areas of condition concerns and generally lower income than other families. PMID:25584914

  15. Homes of low-income minority families with asthmatic children have increased condition issues.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Christina M; Ciaccio, Christina E; Nazir, Niaman; Daley, Christine M; DiDonna, Anita; Choi, Won S; Barnes, Charles S; Rosenwasser, Lanny J

    2014-01-01

    The home is increasingly associated with asthma. It acts both as a reservoir of asthma triggers and as a refuge from seasonal outdoor allergen exposure. Racial/ethnic minority families with low incomes tend to reside in neighborhoods with low housing quality. These families also have higher rates of asthma. This study explores the hypothesis that black and Latino urban households with asthmatic children experienced more home mechanical, structural condition-related areas of concern than white households with asthmatic children. Participant families (n = 140) took part in the Kansas City Safe and Healthy Homes Program, had at least one asthmatic child, and met income qualifications of no more than 80% of local median income; many were below 50%. Families self-identified their race. Homes were assessed by environmental health professionals using a standard set of criteria and a specific set of on-site and laboratory sampling and analyses. Homes were given a score for areas of concern between 0 (best) and 53 (worst). The study population self-identified as black (46%), non-Latino white (26%), Latino (14.3%), and other (12.9%). Mean number of areas of concern were 18.7 in Latino homes, 17.8 in black homes, 13.3 in other homes, and 13.2 in white homes. Latino and black homes had significantly more areas of concern. White families were also more likely to be in the upper portion of the income. In this set of 140 low-income homes with an asthmatic child, households of minority individuals had more areas of condition concerns and generally lower income than other families.

  16. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home palliative care services for adults with advanced illness and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Barbara; Calanzani, Natalia; Curiale, Vito; McCrone, Paul; Higginson, Irene J

    2013-01-01

    Background Extensive evidence shows that well over 50% of people prefer to be cared for and to die at home provided circumstances allow choice. Despite best efforts and policies, one-third or less of all deaths take place at home in many countries of the world. Objectives 1. To quantify the effect of home palliative care services for adult patients with advanced illness and their family caregivers on patients' odds of dying at home; 2. to examine the clinical effectiveness of home palliative care services on other outcomes for patients and their caregivers such as symptom control, quality of life, caregiver distress and satisfaction with care; 3. to compare the resource use and costs associated with these services; 4. to critically appraise and summarise the current evidence on cost-effectiveness. Search methods We searched 12 electronic databases up to November 2012. We checked the reference lists of all included studies, 49 relevant systematic reviews, four key textbooks and recent conference abstracts. We contacted 17 experts and researchers for unpublished data. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series (ITSs) evaluating the impact of home palliative care services on outcomes for adults with advanced illness or their family caregivers, or both. Data collection and analysis One review author assessed the identified titles and abstracts. Two independent reviewers performed assessment of all potentially relevant studies, data extraction and assessment of methodological quality. We carried out meta-analysis where appropriate and calculated numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNTBs) for the primary outcome (death at home). Main results We identified 23 studies (16 RCTs, 6 of high quality), including 37,561 participants and 4042 family caregivers, largely with advanced cancer but also congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive

  17. Protecting Young Children: Identifying Family Substance Use and Risks in the Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conners-Burrow, Nicola A.; Johnson, Danya; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; McKelvey, Lorraine; Bokony, Patti A.; Bradley, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the usefulness of a screening process implemented in the context of a Head Start home visit and compares families who screened positive for substance abuse with those who did not on an array of child and family indicators important for healthy child development. The sample included 1,105 low-income families with preschool-age…

  18. Creating Taxonomies to Improve School-Home Connections with Families of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linse, Caroline Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Families of culturally and linguistically diverse pupils often do not participate fully in their children's school-based education. The purpose of this article is to introduce taxonomies as a means to examine and improve school practices and levels of responsiveness to families whose home language is not English, so that families feel more…

  19. Impact of Home-Based Family Therapy on Maternal and Child Outcomes in Disadvantaged Adolescent Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherniss, Cary; Herzog, Elaine

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates the effects of home-based family therapy on 116 high- risk teenage mothers and their children. Subjects received case management, supportive counseling and some received family therapy. Twelve-month follow-up indicated family therapy subjects improved parenting and became less welfare dependent. No significant difference was found at 24…

  20. Altering the Succession of Illiteracy in Families: A Tutoring/Home Intervention Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Ruth

    1995-01-01

    Presents a case study of the effectiveness of a combination of a family literacy home intervention program with one-on-one intense tutoring for nonreading families. Notes that the family began to make positive changes in their reading environment, attitudes, and interactions which had a positive effect on their child's reading progress at school.…

  1. Home Literacy Beliefs and Practices among Low-Income Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Heather S.; Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Pollard-Durodola, Sharolyn; Saenz, Laura M.; Soares, Denise A.; Resendez, Nora; Zhu, Leina; Hagan-Burke, Shanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore within-group patterns of variability in the home literacy environments (HLEs) of low-income Latino families using latent profile analysis. Participants were (N = 193) families of Latino preschoolers enrolled in a larger study. In the fall of 2012, mothers filled out a family literacy practices inventory, a…

  2. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multi-Family Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore multiple family members’ perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home. Design Ten multi-family focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting Community setting. Participants Primarily Black and White families. Family members (n = 103) were between the ages of 8–61 years. Analysis A grounded hermeneutic approach. Phenomenon of Interest Risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home environment. Results Ten major themes were identified by family members related to health behaviors in the home environment, including: (a) accessibility to healthy foods and activity, (b) time constraints, (c) stage of youth development, (d) individual investment in health behaviors, (e) family investment in health behaviors, (f) family meals and shared activities, (g) parent modeling, (h) making health behaviors fun, (i) making health behaviors part of the family lifestyle, and (j) community investment in family health behaviors. Conclusions and Implications This study identified the importance of the family system and the reciprocal influences within the home environment on health behaviors. In addition, individual and community-level suggestions were identified. Insights from the families provide leads for future research and ideas for the prevention of youth obesity. PMID:22192951

  3. Stability of Measures of the Home Environment for Families of Children with Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousey, Ann Maria; Wild, Margaret; Blacher, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of the home environments of 64 families of children with severe disabilities 7 and 9 years after the initial assessment found a high degree of stability, especially on the Family Environment Scale (FES). However, internal consistency reliability of the FES was lower for these families than in the standardization samples. (Contains…

  4. Family Influences on the Career Development of Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splete, Howard; Freeman-George, Ann

    1985-01-01

    This article (1) reviews family influences on career development (geographic location, genetic inheritance, family background, socioeconomic status, family composition, parenting style, parental work-related attitudes) and (2) suggests counselor interventions to aid young adults in becoming autonomous in their career development (e.g., review…

  5. Home: The place the older adult can not imagine living without

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rapidly aging populations with an increased desire to remain at home and changes in health policy that promote the transfer of health care from formal places, as hospitals and institutions, to the more informal setting of one's home support the need for further research that is designed specifically to understand the experience of home among older adults. Yet, little is known among health care providers about the older adult's experience of home. The aim of this study was to understand the experience of home as experienced by older adults living in a rural community in Sweden. Methods Hermeneutical interpretation, as developed by von Post and Eriksson and based on Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics, was used to interpret interviews with six older adults. The interpretation included a self examination of the researcher's experiences and prejudices and proceeded through several readings which integrated the text with the reader, allowed new questions to emerge, fused the horizons, summarized main and sub-themes and allowed a new understanding to emerge. Results Two main and six sub-themes emerged. Home was experienced as the place the older adult could not imagine living without but also as the place one might be forced to leave. The older adult's thoughts vacillated between the well known present and all its comforts and the unknown future with all its questions and fears, including the underlying threat of loosing one's home. Conclusions Home has become so integral to life itself and such an intimate part of the older adult's being that when older adults lose their home, they also loose the place closest to their heart, the place where they are at home and can maintain their identity, integrity and way of living. Additional effort needs to be made to understand the older adult's experience of home within home health care in order to minimize intrusion and maximize care. There is a need to more fully explore the older adult's experience with health care

  6. A qualitative examination of home and neighborhood environments for obesity prevention in rural adults

    PubMed Central

    Kegler, Michelle C; Escoffery, Cam; Alcantara, Iris; Ballard, Denise; Glanz, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Background The home and neighborhood environments may be important in obesity prevention by virtue of food availability, food preparation, cues and opportunities for physical activity, and family support. To date, little research has examined how home and neighborhood environments in rural communities may support or hinder healthy eating and physical activity. This paper reports characteristics of rural homes and neighborhoods related to physical activity environments, availability of healthy foods, and family support for physical activity and maintaining an ideal body weight. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 60 African American and White adults over 50 years of age in two rural counties in Southwest Georgia. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two members of the research team using standard methods of qualitative analysis. Themes were then identified and data matrices were used to identify patterns by gender or race. Results Neighborhood features that supported physical activity were plenty of land, minimal traffic and living in a safe and friendly neighborhood. The major barrier was lack of recreational facilities. The majority of participants were not physically active with their family members due to schedule conflicts and lack of time. Family member-initiated efforts to encourage physical activity met with mixed results, with refusals, procrastination, and increased activity all reported. Participants generally reported it was easy to get healthy foods, although cost barriers and the need to drive to a larger town for a supermarket with good variety were noted as obstacles. Family conversations about weight had occurred for about half of the participants, with reactions ranging from agreement about the need to lose weight to frustration. Conclusion This study suggests that successful environmental change strategies to promote physical activity and healthy eating in rural neighborhoods may differ from those used in

  7. Identifying Inefficient Single-Family Homes With Utility Bill Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, S.; Krarti, M.; Bianchi, M.; Roberts, D.

    2010-08-01

    Differentiating between energy-efficient and inefficient single-family homes on a community scale helps identify and prioritize candidates for energy-efficiency upgrades. Prescreening diagnostic procedures can further retrofit efforts by providing efficiency information before a site-visit is conducted. We applied the prescreening diagnostic to a simulated community of homes in Boulder, Colorado and analyzed energy consumption data to identify energy-inefficient homes.

  8. Preventing crises in palliative care in the home. Role of family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, G.; Willison, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    With the current shift to community care, the need for palliative care in the home involving the family physician has increased. Potential causes of crises in the home care of the dying are identified. Strategies to prevent crises are suggested that rely on a team's providing comprehensive and anticipatory care. PMID:7539653

  9. An Evaluation of Health and Safety Hazards in Family Based Day Care Homes in Philadelphia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Hernando; Haynes, Sonia; Michael, Karen; Burstyn, Igor; Jandhyala, Malica; Palermo, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In Pennsylvania, Family Day Care Homes (FDCH) are private residences used to care for up to six children in a 24 h period. These homes are often times the most affordable alternative to day care centers parents have in low-income communities. The aims of this study were to evaluate FDCH providers' knowledge of hazards and their understanding of…

  10. Musical Home Environment, Family Background, and Parenting Style on Success in School Music and in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdzinski, Stephen; Dell, Charlene; Gumm, Alan; Rinnert, Nathan; Orzolek, Douglas; Yap, Ching Ching; Cooper, Shelly; Keith, Timothy; Russell, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine influences of parental involvement-home music environment, family background, and parenting style factors on success in school music and in school. Participants (N = 1114) were music students in grades 4-12 from six regions of the United States. Data were gathered about parental involvement-home environment…

  11. Team Up at Home. Team Nutrition Activity Booklet. Fun Nutrition Activities for the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Consumer Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This guide booklet helps parents teach their children about healthy nutrition at home. It is part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Team Nutrition, which is designed to improve the health and education of children and which actively involves children and their families in nutrition education activities in the school, community, and home. The…

  12. Educational Counter Culture: Motivations, Instructional Approaches, Curriculum Choices, and Challenges of Home School Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Kenneth Vance

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an in depth knowledge of the day to day activities of home school families in order to better understand the instructional approaches, curriculum decisions, and challenges. Four themes were addressed: motivations, operations, resources, and challenges. Findings about motivations to home school included: (a)…

  13. Determinants of Educational Performance in India: Role of Home and Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Uday

    1991-01-01

    Examines effects of family and pupil characteristics on Indian primary school children's academic learning, studying students who dropped out before completing primary schooling. Finds educational supplies, home sanitary facilities, home locale, distance to drinking water source, father's work and literacy status, and schooling completed related…

  14. Pilot Evaluation of a Home Visit Parent Training Program in Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study reported the pilot evaluation of the Healthy Start Home Visit Program for disadvantaged Chinese parents with preschool children, delivered by trained parent assistants. Home visiting was used to make services more accessible to disadvantaged families. Method: The participants included 21 parent-child dyads. Outcome measures…

  15. Optimizing undergraduate nursing education: demystifying care of older adults in the home setting.

    PubMed

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie

    2006-01-01

    It is a challenge to provide experiences for nursing students that allow them to experience a professional relationship with older adults in the home setting. Home health agencies are under pressure related to productivity demands and may not provide preceptored experiences for students. Nursing students may not know any older adults outside of the institutional setting and consequently may have many misconceptions about what is and is not normal aging. This article describes an undergraduate nursing class and the out-of-classroom assignments that increased student understanding of nursing practice in the home, the effects of the home environment on the care of older adults, and the experiences of older adults living in the community. This article has relevance to nurses because it is important that we participate in creative methods of teaching students to value older adults and how to care for them in the community.

  16. Rehospitalization of Older Adults Discharged to Home Hospice Care

    PubMed Central

    Goldenheim, Anna; Oates, Daniel; Parker, Victoria; Russell, Matthew; Winter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acute hospital readmission of older adults receiving hospice care is not aligned with hospice goals. Objective: To identify factors associated with 30-day readmission among older adults newly discharged to hospice. Design/Subjects: Medical record review of 59 patients, 19 readmitted within 30 days and 40 randomly selected controls not readmitted, from 206 patients newly discharged to home hospice care between February 1, 2005 and January 31, 2010. Measures/Analysis: Information was collected about hospital course, end-of-life planning, and posthospitalization follow-up. We calculated bivariate associations and developed a Cox Proportional Hazards model examining the relation between index admission characteristics and readmission. Results: Patients' mean age was 79.7±8.4; 74.6% were female; 52.5% were black. Among those readmitted, 25% had received a palliative care consultation, compared to 47.1% of those not readmitted (p=0.06). Patients without a participating decision-maker involved in their hospice decision had 3.5 times the risk of readmission within 30 days, compared to those with (hazard ratio [HR] 3.53, confidence interval [CI] 0.97, 12.82). Patients who had one or more telephone contacts with their primary care physician (PCP) during week 1 after discharge had 2.4 times the readmission risk within 30 days, compared to patients with no such contacts during this period (HR 2.35, CI 0.9, 6.1). Conclusions: Readmission within 30 days of initial discharge to hospice is associated with several measures of care and care planning. Further study of these measures may identify opportunities for interventions to improve the hospital-to-hospice transition and to decrease hospital readmissions. PMID:24708490

  17. Racial and ethnic differences in leaving and returning to the parental home: The role of life course transitions, socioeconomic resources, and family connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; South, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although Black and Hispanic young adults in the U.S. are less likely than Whites to move out of the parental home and more likely than Whites to return, reasons for these differences have not been clearly identified. OBJECTIVE This study examines the ability of racial/ethnic disparities in life course transitions, socioeconomic resources, and family connectivity to account for racial/ethnic differences in leaving and returning home. METHODS Using data from the 2005–2011 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics’ Transition into Adulthood study (N=1,491, age 18 to 26), we estimated discrete-time event history models predicting the timing of moving out of and back into the parental home. RESULTS Although no single factor completely explained racial-ethnic differences in the timing of leaving and returning to the parental home, the bulk of the Black-White differences in both home-leaving and home-returning was explained by group differences in transitions into adult roles, the ability to afford independent living, and connections to the origin family. These factors also explained most of the Mexican-White difference in home-leaving. However, only a small portion of the Hispanic-White difference in returning home was attributable to the proposed explanatory variables. CONCLUSION Explanations for racial and ethnic differences in the timing of leaving and returning to the parental home need to consider a broad array of life course characteristics in which Black, Hispanic, and White youth differ. The factors that explain Black-White differences in home-leaving and home-returning may differ from those that explain Hispanic-White differences in these behaviors. PMID:27110219

  18. Loneliness and nursing home admission among rural older adults.

    PubMed

    Russell, D W; Cutrona, C E; de la Mora, A; Wallace, R B

    1997-12-01

    In this study, the authors tested the relation between loneliness and subsequent admission to a nursing home over a 4-year time period in a sample of approximately 3,000 rural older Iowans. Higher levels of loneliness were found to increase the likelihood of nursing home admission and to decrease the time until nursing home admission. The influence of extremely high loneliness on nursing home admission remained statistically significant after controlling for other variables, such as age, education, income, mental status, physical health, morale, and social contact, that were also predictive of nursing home admission. Several mechanisms are proposed to explain the link between extreme loneliness and nursing home admission. These include loneliness as a precipitant of declines in mental and physical health and nursing home placement as a strategy to gain social contact with others. Implications for preventative interventions are discussed.

  19. Perceived Need for Home- and Community-Based Services: Experiences of Urban Chinese Older Adults With Functional Impairments.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Xu, Ling; Chi, Iris

    2017-01-01

    Guided by Cantor's social care model, this study identified individual, family, and social support factors that influence urban older adults' need for home- and community-based services, including medical and rehabilitation, instrumental care and support, and psychosocial services. The data were extracted from the Sample Survey on Aged Population in Urban/Rural China conducted by the China Research Center on Aging in 2006. Results from multiple logistic regression show that older adults' need for medical and rehabilitation services is significantly related to instrumental activities of daily living, depression, not having filial children, friend support networks, and having a confidant. Older adults' need for instrumental care and support is related to their educational attainment, financial strain, instrumental activities of daily living, not living with children, and friend support networks. Finally, older adults' need for psychosocial services is significantly related to educational attainment, depression, not being married, friend support networks, and having a confidant. Implications for social service development are discussed.

  20. Is the medical home for adult patients with sickle cell disease a reality or an illusion?

    PubMed

    Ballas, Samir K; Vichinsky, Elliott P

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) emerged as a viable method to improve delivery of medical care. Due to all the promotion about the effectiveness of the PCMH, patients with sickle cell disease, their families and the community hoped that this could be a possible solution to the problems that arise in the treatment of adult patients with sickle cell disease. Review of the literature and review of the criteria for the establishment of a PCMH show that the PCMH is not an ideal model for patients with sickle cell disease because finding a personal physician, which is the first criteria of a functional PCMH, is a major problem in the process of transitioning the care of patients with sickle cell disease from pediatrics to adult care. Moreover, garnering hospital support to defray the initial costs to establish a PCMH for adults with sickle cell disease is unlikely given the already high costs of care for patients with sickle cell disease. Moreover, recent studies have shown insufficient evidence to determine the presumed beneficial effects of the PCMH, especially in patients with chronic disease.

  1. Families' engagement with young children's science and technology learning at home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robin L.; Schaverien, Lynette

    2001-07-01

    There is accumulating evidence of the worth of involving families in young children's learning in informal contexts. By exploring families' engagement with their children's science and technology learning at home over a 6-month period, the present investigation sought to illuminate both the nature and the educational significance of what families do. Initially, in order to seed scientific and technological inquiry in homes, kindergarten and year-one children investigated flashlights with family members at school. Each day, equipment was available to take home. Using established anthropological methods, one of the researchers investigated children's further inquiries beyond the classroom in diverse ways; for example, by visiting homes and conversing via telephone and facsimile. The findings showed that families engaged with children's inquiries at home in many ways - by providing resources, conversing, and investigating collaboratively with children. Moreover, when families pursued inquiries together and when children conducted their own sustained intellectual searches, children's ideas deepened. Such evidence of the educational significance of what families do suggests that early science and technology education might be made more effective if it were aligned with the ways people learn together outside formal institutions.

  2. Using the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey to Examine the Prevalence and Characteristics of Families Who Home Educate in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emma; Nelson, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    This paper has two aims, first to examine the feasibility of using an omnibus survey to estimate the prevalence and characteristics of families who home educate and secondly to provide an empirical contribution to recent research on home education in the UK. Because there is no statutory requirement for families who home educate to register with…

  3. Constructing and Adapting Causal and Formative Measures of Family Settings: The HOME Inventory as Illustration

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Measures of the home environment are frequently used in studies of children’s development. This review provides information on indices composed of causal and formative indicators (the kind of indicators often used to capture salient aspects of family environments) and to suggest approaches that may be useful in constructing such measures for diverse populations. The HOME Inventory is used to illustrate challenges scholars face in determining what to include in useful measures of family settings. To that end, a cross-cultural review of research on relations among HOME, family context, and child outcomes is presented. The end of the review offers a plan for how best to further research on relations between the home environment and child development for diverse populations. PMID:26997978

  4. Constructing and Adapting Causal and Formative Measures of Family Settings: The HOME Inventory as Illustration.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Measures of the home environment are frequently used in studies of children's development. This review provides information on indices composed of causal and formative indicators (the kind of indicators often used to capture salient aspects of family environments) and to suggest approaches that may be useful in constructing such measures for diverse populations. The HOME Inventory is used to illustrate challenges scholars face in determining what to include in useful measures of family settings. To that end, a cross-cultural review of research on relations among HOME, family context, and child outcomes is presented. The end of the review offers a plan for how best to further research on relations between the home environment and child development for diverse populations.

  5. Does school health and home economics education influence adults' food knowledge?

    PubMed

    Worsley, A; Wang, W C; Yeatman, H; Byrne, S; Wijayaratne, P

    2016-12-01

    Home economics and health teachers are to be found in many parts of the world. They teach students about food in relation to its nutritional, safety and environmental properties. The effects of such teaching might be expected to be reflected in the food knowledge of adults who have undertaken school education in these areas. This study examined the food knowledge associations of school home economics and health education among Australian adults. Two separate online surveys were conducted nationwide among 2022 (November 2011) and 2146 Australian adults (November-December 2012). True/false and multiple choice questions in both surveys were used to assess nutrition, food safety and environmental knowledge. Knowledge scores were constructed and compared against respondents' experience of school health or home economics education via multiple regression analyses. The results from both studies showed that home economics (and similar) education was associated with higher levels of food knowledge among several age groups. The associations of home economics education with food knowledge differed across several Australian states and recall of home economics themes differed across the age groups. These findings suggest that home economics education may bring about long-lasting learning of food knowledge. Further research is required, however, to confirm the findings and to test the causal influence of home economics education on adults' food knowledge.

  6. Out-of-Home Treatment and Family Bonds: Parent Perspectives & Practice Standards. Data Trends #127

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. The article summarized in this "Data Trends" addresses the experiences of families across the United States with regard to parent-child contact when the children are placed out of their home for the…

  7. NIH's "Family Inn" Lets Out-of-Town Youngsters Stay "Home."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Sylvia

    1993-01-01

    The Children's Inn, on the grounds of the National Institutes for Health (NIH) near Washington, DC, serves as a national model of the value of family-centered homes for pediatric patients and their families. When parents bring their child to NIH from a distant place, they can stay in the inn with their child while the child is receiving treatment.…

  8. Balancing Work and Family: How Female Superintendents Succeed at Work and Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesniewicz, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Women leaders in education struggle to balance work and family life. Historically, this struggle has stemmed from attempts to manage societal expectations of balancing work and family. In managing these expectations, women leaders face many challenges, which have made it difficult to maintain home responsibilities and deal with increasing demands…

  9. Family Day Care as Observed in Licensed Homes in Montgomery County, Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rebecca Blundell

    A questionnaire was administered to 19 licensed day-care mothers in Montgomery County, Maryland. This report presents what was found in observations of the family day care homes, and points out the relative merits and disadvantages of family day care and group day care. The sections of the report are: I. Introduction; II. The Needs of Children;…

  10. Young Children Engaging with Technologies at Home: The Influence of Family Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephen, Christine; Stevenson, Olivia; Adey, Claire

    2013-01-01

    This article is about the ways in which young children engage with technological toys and resources at home and, in particular, the ways in which the family context makes a difference to young children’s engagement with these technologies. The data reviewed come from family interviews and parent-recorded video of four case study children as they…

  11. Home-School Partnerships: A Case Study of Teachers and African American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagwell, Cynthia S.

    2011-01-01

    This study utilized a mixed methods design to analyze the ways in which teachers and African American families establish home-school partnerships, and to identify the beliefs, practices, and traditions of teachers and African American families that underlie such partnerships, the factors that motivate their development, and the ways these vary by…

  12. Identifying Changeable Barriers to Family Involvement in the Nursing Home for Cognitively Impaired Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Port, Cynthia Lindman

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Barriers to family involvement in the nursing home with the potential for change through intervention are examined, including transportation, caregiver health, relationships with staff, and resident characteristics. Design and Methods: Data were collected for 93 family caregiver-resident pairs by means of telephone interviews and chart…

  13. Understanding Children's Sedentary Behaviour: A Qualitative Study of the Family Home Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granich, Joanna; Rosenberg, Michael; Knuiman, Matthew; Timperio, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Electronic media (EM) (television, electronic games and computer) use has been associated with overweight and obesity among children. Little is known about the time spent in sedentary behaviour (SB) among children within the family context. The aim of this study was to explore how the family home environment may influence children's…

  14. Pneumonia care and the nursing home: a qualitative descriptive study of resident and family member perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chan Carusone, Soo; Loeb, Mark; Lohfeld, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    Background Nursing home residents are frequently sent to hospital for diagnostic tests or to receive acute health care services. These transfers are both costly and for some, associated with increased risks. Although improved technology allows long-term care facilities to deliver more complex health care on site, if this is to become a trend then residents and family members must see the value of such care. This qualitative study examined resident and family member perspectives on in situ care for pneumonia. Methods A qualitative descriptive study design was used. Participants were residents and family members of residents treated for pneumonia drawn from a larger randomized controlled trial of a clinical pathway to manage nursing home-acquired pneumonia on-site. A total of 14 in-depth interviews were conducted. Interview data were analyzed using the editing style, described by Miller and Crabtree, to identify key themes. Results Both residents and family members preferred that pneumonia be treated in the nursing home, where possible. They both felt that caring and attention are key aspects of care which are more easily accessible in the nursing home setting. However, residents felt that staff or doctors should make the decision whether to hospitalize them, whereas family members wanted to be consulted or involved in the decision-making process. Conclusion These findings suggest that interventions to reduce hospitalization of nursing home residents with pneumonia are consistent with resident and family member preferences. PMID:16430782

  15. Family Science Activities for Adult Basic and Literacy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Action Southwest, Waynesburg, PA.

    A staff development project created a series of family science activities to be used in adult basic and literacy education (ABLE) and family literacy programs and a training guide for staff and volunteers. The training guide provides background principles and concepts for science activities. The activities identify materials and indicate ways the…

  16. Home-based viewing (el velorio) after death: a cost-effective alternative for some families.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Faustino; Hereira, Mildreys

    2008-01-01

    After the death of a loved one, giving an opportunity to view the body helps bring families and friends together to celebrate the life and mourn the passing of a person. This gathering, known as a Wake or a Viewing, precedes the burial and usually lasts from 1 to several days. In the United States, the viewing now takes place in funeral parlors, away from the decedent's home. However, there are still several countries and people who keep the body at home where the family and friends are invited to say their goodbyes. We present here 2 cases for which our Hospice assisted the families with a home viewing. These were indigent people who could not afford embalming or the additional cost of a viewing in a parlor and who, without this opportunity, would have not had time to get together and mourn and celebrate life as friends, family, and community.

  17. Transitioning Newborns from NICU to Home: Family Information Packet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for emergencies. Return to Appendix Contents Tips About Health Insurance Your baby will need to visit the doctor ... newborn to your insurance plan. Call your current insurance company as soon as ... Home, and other low-cost health care benefits if you do not qualify for ...

  18. The Disproportionate Impact Of Dementia On Family And Unpaid Caregiving To Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Judith D; Freedman, Vicki A; Spillman, Brenda C; Wolff, Jennifer L

    2015-10-01

    The number of US adults ages sixty-five and older who are living with dementia is substantial and expected to grow, raising concerns about the demands that will be placed on family members and other unpaid caregivers. We used data from the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study and its companion study, the National Study of Caregiving, to investigate the role of dementia in caregiving. We found that among family and unpaid caregivers to older noninstitutionalized adults, one-third of caregivers, and 41 percent of the hours of help they provide, help people with dementia, who account for about 10 percent of older noninstitutionalized adults. Among older adults who receive help, the vast majority in both community and residential care settings other than nursing homes rely on family or unpaid caregivers (more than 90 percent and more than 80 percent, respectively), regardless of their dementia status. Caregiving is most intense, however, to older adults with dementia in community settings and from caregivers who are spouses or daughters or who live with the care recipient.

  19. Integrating mental health parity for homebound older adults under the medicare home health care benefit.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Joan K; Gellis, Zvi D

    2011-04-01

    Despite high rates of mental illness, very few homebound older adults receive treatment. Comorbid mental illness exacerbates physical health conditions, reduces treatment adherence, and increases dependency and medical costs. Although effective treatments exist, many home health agencies lack capacity to effectively detect and treat mental illness. This article critically analyzes barriers within the Medicare home health benefit that impede access to mental health treatment. Policy, practice, and research recommendations are made to integrate mental health parity in home health care. In particular, creative use of medical social work can improve detection and treatment of mental illness for homebound older adults.

  20. Distress among young adults from divorced families.

    PubMed

    Laumann-Billings, L; Emery, R E

    2000-12-01

    Researchers find that most children from divorced families function normally, but some clinicians assert that young people are disturbed even many years after a divorce. These accounts may be less discrepant than they appear, because research typically focuses on notably problematic behavior (disorder), whereas case studies emphasize more subtle inner turmoil (distress). In Study 1 college students reported painful feelings, beliefs, and memories about their parents divorce on a reliable new measure, but they also reported accepting the divorce and having few psychological symptoms. Distress about family life was greater among students from divorced than from married families. Study 2 replicated these findings in a community sample of young people from low-income divorced families. In both studies, greater distress was associated with children's residence, frequency of contact with fathers, interparental conflict, and psychological symptoms.

  1. Structural impact on gendered expectations and exemptions for family caregivers in hospice palliative home care.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Nisha; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; McWilliam, Carol; Stajduhar, Kelli

    2017-01-01

    Evidence of gender differences in the amount and type of care provided by family caregivers in hospice palliative home care suggests potential inequities in health and health care experiences. As part of a larger critical ethnographic study examining gender relations among clients with cancer, their family caregivers and primary nurses, this article describes gendered expectations and exemptions for family caregivers within the sociopolitical context of end-of-life at home. Data were collected from in-depth interviews (n = 25), observations of agency home care visits (n = 9) and analyses of policy and home care agency documents (n = 12). Employing a critical feminist lens, a gender-based analysis revealed that structural discourses emphasizing an artificial divide between public and private spheres constructed end-of-life at home as private and apolitical. Associated with care of home and family, women were most impacted by these public/private discourses underpinning neoliberal values of cost-efficiency. Findings suggest that a critical perspective is needed to assist policy makers and healthcare providers to view how caregiver experiences are shaped by structures that control the availability of resources. Thus, instead of focusing on caregivers' deficits, interventions should be directed at the social, political and economic conditions that shape gendered experiences.

  2. Conversations about End of Life: Perspectives of Nursing Home Residents, Family, and Staff

    PubMed Central

    Hirschman, Karen B.; Madden, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Care in nursing homes (NHs) often overlooks individual values and preferences. Residents' voices are critical to discussions about preferences, yet there remains limited research on conversations about the end of life (EOL) from the perspective of older adults who reside in NHs. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the communication, content and process, related to EOL conversations among residents, family, and staff. Methods: We used semistructured interviews in this qualitative, descriptive study to describe conversations about EOL preferences. We examined participants' conversation, when it occurred, and what was discussed. We queried about barriers to and facilitators in discussing EOL care in the NH setting. We interviewed residents (n=16), family (n=12), and interdisciplinary staff (n=10) from four NHs. Results: The overarching theme—missed conversations—describes EOL-related communication. Residents, families, and staff rarely talked about EOL care preferences, nor did they pass along information about preferences or initiate conversations about EOL care with each other. Three categories explained missed conversations: inquiry (“No one asked”); assumptions (presence of an advance directive [AD], “They know me”); and conveying (lack of conveying information or wishes). Existing barriers and lacking facilitators resulted in missed opportunities to hold conversations about EOL preferences. Conclusions: Not all residents wanted to have conversations, but many wanted to be asked about their preferences. Missed conversations may adversely affect the quality of EOL care. Conversations with residents can be initiated by asking residents who they would like involved in the conversation and drawing upon the experience of others. PMID:25658608

  3. SKI-HI Home Intervention for Families with Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Barbara; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The SKI-HI program, which provides home-based family support services for infants, toddlers, and preschool children who are deaf or hard of hearing, has been implemented by approximately 250 agencies and annually serves about 4,000 families. Information is provided on the program's rationale, development, family-centered home-based services,…

  4. Child Injury Prevention in the Home: A National Survey of Safety Practices and Use of Safety Equipment in Deprived Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, C. A.; Watson, M. C.; Smith, S.; Coupland, C.; Kendrick, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of home safety practices and use of safety equipment by disadvantaged families participating in a national home safety equipment scheme in England. Design: Cross-sectional postal survey sent to a random sample of 1,000 families. Setting: England, United Kingdom. Results: Half the families (51%) returned a…

  5. Abusive Drinking in Young Adults: Personality Type and Family Role as Moderators of Family-of-Origin Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Judith L.; Wampler, Richard S.

    1994-01-01

    Examined relationship between roles in the family and individual personality types and abusive drinking among young adults (n=674). Family roles and personality type were found to moderate effects of family-of-origin variables on abusive drinking: family role of hero acted as buffer between family of origin and young adult's drinking behaviors;…

  6. Variation in Older Adult Characteristics by Residence Type and Use of Home- and Community-Based Services.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Heidi H; Washington, Tiffany R; Emerson, Kerstin G; Carswell, Andrew T; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2017-03-22

    Background: The majority of older adults prefer to remain in their homes, or to "age-in-place." To accomplish this goal, many older adults will rely upon home- and community-based services (HCBS) for support. However, the availability and accessibility of HCBS may differ based on whether the older adult lives in the community or in a senior housing apartment facility. Methods: This paper reports findings from the Pathways to Life Quality study of residential change and stability among seniors in upstate New York. Data were analyzed from 663 older adults living in one of three housing types: service-rich facilities, service-poor facilities, and community-dwelling in single-family homes. A multinomial logistic regression model was used to examine factors associated with residence type. A linear regression model was fitted to examine factors associated with HCBS utilization. Results: When compared to community-dwelling older adults, those residing in service-rich and service-poor facilities were more likely to be older, report more activity limitations, and provide less instrumental assistance to others. Those in service-poor facilities were more likely to have poorer mental health and lower perceived purpose in life. The three leading HCBS utilized were senior centers (20%), homemaker services (19%), and transportation services (18%). More HCBS utilization was associated with participants who resided in service-poor housing, were older, were female, and had more activity limitations. More HCBS utilization was also associated with those who received instrumental support, had higher perceived purpose in life, and poorer mental health. Conclusions: Findings suggest that older adults' residential environment is associated with their health status and HCBS utilization. Building upon the Person-Environment Fit theories, dedicated efforts are needed to introduce and expand upon existing HCBS available to facility residents to address physical and mental health needs as well

  7. Caring from Home: Addressing Barriers to Family Child Care Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, NY.

    This study involved focus groups with New York City family day care providers to determine difficulties they experienced in three areas: economic barriers, payment and regulatory barriers, and barriers to workforce development. Overall, providers had difficulty making wages that allowed them to provide for themselves and their families. They…

  8. Adult smoking in the home environment and children's IQ.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D L; Swank, P R; Baldwin, C D; McCormick, D

    1999-02-01

    In a sample of 3- and 5-yr.-old children, smoking in the home was found to be significantly and inversely related to IQ. Children of normal birth weight and without neurological impairment had been enrolled in a longitudinal study of child development. Analyses were conducted with sex, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, educational stimulation in the home, day care, and mother's intelligence controlled. Significant results were obtained for scores on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised at age three years and on the major Stanford-Binet Fourth Edition scales at ages three and five years. All effects were for the mother, not the father, smoking in the home.

  9. Parental Perceptions of Family Centered Care in Medical Homes of Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Zajicek-Farber, Michaela L; Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R; Long, Toby M; Farber, Jon Matthew

    2015-08-01

    Life course theory sets the framework for strong inclusion of family centered care (FCC) in quality medical homes of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities (CNDD). The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of families with their experiences of FCC in medical homes for CNDD. Using a structured questionnaire, the Family-Centered Care Self-Assessment Tool developed by Family Voices, this study surveyed 122 parents of CNDD in a large urban area during 2010-2012. Data collected information on FCC in the provision of primary health care services for CNDD and focused on family-provider partnerships, care setting practices and policies, and community services. Frequency analysis classified participants' responses as strengths in the "most of the time" range, and weaknesses in the "never" range. Only 31 % of parents were satisfied with the primary health care their CNDD received. Based on an accepted definition of medical home services, 16 % of parents reported their CNDD had most aspects of a medical home, 64 % had some, and 20 % had none. Strengths in FCC were primarily evident in the family-provider partnership and care settings when focused on meeting the medical care needs of the child. Weaknesses in FCC were noted in meeting the needs of families, coordination, follow-up, and support with community resources. Improvements in key pediatric health care strategies for CNDD are recommended. CNDD and their families have multifaceted needs that require strong partnerships among parents, providers, and communities. Quality medical homes must include FCC and valued partnerships with diverse families and community-based providers.

  10. Violent Crime Victimization Increases the Risk of Nursing Home Placement in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachs, Mark; Bachman, Ronet; Williams, Christianna S.; Kossack, Alice; Bove, Carolyn; O'Leary, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We estimate the independent contribution of crime victimization to nursing home placement in a cohort of older adults who were community dwelling at baseline. Design and Methods: The data come from an observational cohort study of 2,321 community-residing older adults who were members of the New Haven Established Populations for…

  11. Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numerous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high-quality residential energy upgrades. Today, the Standard Work Specifications provide a unique source for defining high-quality home energy upgrades, establishing clear expectations for homeowners, contractors, trainers, workers, program administrators, and organizations that provide financing for energy upgrades.

  12. Exploration of Home Economics Occupations; Home and Family Education: 6775.01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Pauline; Estrada, Rosa J.

    The course, for use at the junior high school level, explores employment possibilities in home economics and related areas. Lists of resource materials, a pretest and posttest, and an extensive, 70-page curriculum guide are appended. The guide explores eight block areas: (1) introduction; (2) homemaking; (3) personal development for careers; (4)…

  13. Adult Day Care--Extended Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bert Kruger

    This pamphlet describes a multi-purpose day-care center for the elderly in Abilene, Texas which is intended to fill the "extended family" role of offering companionship, medical attention, and other aspects of concern to older persons in the community. The goals of the program are as follows: (1) to keep individuals out of institutions…

  14. Genetics Home Reference: familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    MedlinePlus

    ... in regulating phosphate levels within the body (phosphate homeostasis) by transporting phosphate across cell membranes. The SLC20A2 ... link familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification with phosphate homeostasis. Nat Genet. 2012 Feb 12;44(3):254- ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: familial male-limited precocious puberty

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gonadotropin-independent familial sexual precocity Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) Boston Children's Hospital: Precocious Puberty General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy ...

  16. Allocation of Rehabilitation Services for Older Adults in the Ontario Home Care System

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Joshua J.; Sims-Gould, Joanie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physiotherapy and occupational therapy services can play a critical role in maintaining or improving the physical functioning, quality of life, and overall independence of older home care clients. Despite their importance, however, there is limited understanding of the factors that influence how rehabilitation services are allocated to older home care clients. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a preliminary understanding of the factors that influence decisions to allocate rehabilitation therapy services to older clients in the Ontario home care system, as perceived by three stakeholder groups. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 key informants from three stakeholder groups: case managers, service providers, and health system policymakers. Results: Drivers of the allocation of occupational therapy and physiotherapy for older adults included functional needs and postoperative care. Participants identified challenges in providing home care rehabilitation to older adults, including impaired cognition and limited capacity in the home care system. Conclusions: Considering the changing demands for home care services, knowledge of current practices across the home care system can inform efforts to optimize rehabilitation services for the growing number of older adults. Further research is needed to advance the understanding of, and optimize rehabilitation service allocation to, older frail clients with multiple morbidities. Developing novel decision-support mechanisms and standardized clinical care pathways for older client populations may be beneficial. PMID:27904234

  17. Allocation of Rehabilitation Services for Older Adults in the Ontario Home Care System.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Joshua J; Sims-Gould, Joanie; Stolee, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physiotherapy and occupational therapy services can play a critical role in maintaining or improving the physical functioning, quality of life, and overall independence of older home care clients. Despite their importance, however, there is limited understanding of the factors that influence how rehabilitation services are allocated to older home care clients. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a preliminary understanding of the factors that influence decisions to allocate rehabilitation therapy services to older clients in the Ontario home care system, as perceived by three stakeholder groups. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 key informants from three stakeholder groups: case managers, service providers, and health system policymakers. Results: Drivers of the allocation of occupational therapy and physiotherapy for older adults included functional needs and postoperative care. Participants identified challenges in providing home care rehabilitation to older adults, including impaired cognition and limited capacity in the home care system. Conclusions: Considering the changing demands for home care services, knowledge of current practices across the home care system can inform efforts to optimize rehabilitation services for the growing number of older adults. Further research is needed to advance the understanding of, and optimize rehabilitation service allocation to, older frail clients with multiple morbidities. Developing novel decision-support mechanisms and standardized clinical care pathways for older client populations may be beneficial.

  18. Resident and family member perceptions of cultural diversity in aged care homes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Willis, Eileen; Harrington, Ann; Gillham, David; De Bellis, Anita; Morey, Wendy; Jeffers, Lesley

    2017-03-01

    Similar to many developed nations, older people living in residential aged care homes in Australia and the staff who care for them have become increasingly multicultural. This cultural diversity adds challenges for residents in adapting to the care home. This study explores: (i) residents' and family members' perceptions about staff and cultural diversity, and (ii) culturally and linguistically diverse residents' and family members' experiences. An interpretive study design employing a thematic analysis was applied. Twenty-three residents and seven family members participated in interviews. Four themes were identified from interpreting residents and family members' perceptions of the impact of cultural diversity on their adaptation to aged care homes: (i) perceiving diversity as an attraction; (ii) adapting to cross-cultural communication; (iii) adjusting to diet in the residential care home; and (iv) anticipating individualized psychosocial interactions. The findings have implications for identifying strategies to support staff from all cultural backgrounds in order to create a caring environment that facilitates positive relationships with residents and supports residents to adjust to the care home.

  19. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  20. Variation in Older Adult Characteristics by Residence Type and Use of Home- and Community-Based Services

    PubMed Central

    Ewen, Heidi H.; Washington, Tiffany R.; Emerson, Kerstin G.; Carswell, Andrew T.; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2017-01-01

    Background: The majority of older adults prefer to remain in their homes, or to “age-in-place.” To accomplish this goal, many older adults will rely upon home- and community-based services (HCBS) for support. However, the availability and accessibility of HCBS may differ based on whether the older adult lives in the community or in a senior housing apartment facility. Methods: This paper reports findings from the Pathways to Life Quality study of residential change and stability among seniors in upstate New York. Data were analyzed from 663 older adults living in one of three housing types: service-rich facilities, service-poor facilities, and community-dwelling in single-family homes. A multinomial logistic regression model was used to examine factors associated with residence type. A linear regression model was fitted to examine factors associated with HCBS utilization. Results: When compared to community-dwelling older adults, those residing in service-rich and service-poor facilities were more likely to be older, report more activity limitations, and provide less instrumental assistance to others. Those in service-poor facilities were more likely to have poorer mental health and lower perceived purpose in life. The three leading HCBS utilized were senior centers (20%), homemaker services (19%), and transportation services (18%). More HCBS utilization was associated with participants who resided in service-poor housing, were older, were female, and had more activity limitations. More HCBS utilization was also associated with those who received instrumental support, had higher perceived purpose in life, and poorer mental health. Conclusions: Findings suggest that older adults’ residential environment is associated with their health status and HCBS utilization. Building upon the Person–Environment Fit theories, dedicated efforts are needed to introduce and expand upon existing HCBS available to facility residents to address physical and mental health needs

  1. Home nursing and home help for dementia patients: Predictors for utilization and expected quality from a family caregiver's point of view.

    PubMed

    Graessel, Elmar; Luttenberger, Katharina; Bleich, Stefan; Adabbo, Raffaela; Donath, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the factors that influence utilization of home nursing and home help or about quality expectations of family caregivers of a dementia patient. These questions are addressed in the following paper. The cross-sectional study was carried out as an anonymous written survey of family caregivers of dementia patients in four regions of Germany. Quantitative and qualitative data from 404 family caregivers were analyzed using binary logistic regression analysis and content analysis. We found that subjective need of home nursing respectively of home help and the age of the dementia patient are significant predictors for utilization. Utilization of home nursing is also predicted by the age of the family caregiver. Punctuality of the staff is the dominant quality criterion. Hence, in order to reduce the number of those Alzheimer's disease (AD) caregivers who think they don't need home nursing or home help compared with the number who really don't need it, caregivers should be transparently informed of the relevant advantages and quality principles of using home nursing respectively home help.

  2. Perceived Neighborhood and Home Environmental Factors Associated with Television Viewing among Taiwanese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Ming-Chun; Liao, Yung; Chang, Shao-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the associations between perceived neighborhood and home environmental factors and excessive television (TV) viewing time among Taiwanese older adults. The sample data was collected by administering computer-assisted telephone interviewers to 980 Taiwanese older adults (aged ≥ 65 years) living in two regions. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to examine the associations between self-reported perceived neighborhood and home environmental attributions and TV viewing time by using logistic regression analyses. The results showed that perceived neighborhood and home environmental factors were associated with excessive TV viewing time (≥2 h/day) after adjusting for potential confounders. Compared with a reference group, older adults who perceived their neighborhoods to have unsafe traffic were more likely to report excessive TV viewing time (OR = 1.36, 95%CI = 1.02–1.82). Older adults who reported having two or more TV sets in the home (OR = 1.77, CI = 1.28–2.44) and having a TV in the bedroom (OR = 1.55, CI = 1.18–2.03) were also more likely to report excessive TV viewing time. Further longitudinal research can confirm these findings, and tailored interventions focusing on the perceptions of neighborhood traffic safety and TV access at home for older adults might be effective means of preventing excessive TV viewing time. PMID:27420086

  3. Family things: Attending the household disbandment of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Ekerdt, David J.; Sergeant, Julie F.

    2006-01-01

    When adults move to smaller quarters in later life, family members become involved in the management and disposal of possessions—some cherished, some mundane. Interviews were conducted with 14 family members who had participated in a household disbandment by elders. This qualitative analysis describes the various tasks that were undertaken by family members; how family members asserted themselves in the process; how they were an outlet for possessions; the way that some possessions are shared; and implications for family’s story about itself. Household disbandment is a field for all sorts of family practices that can be summarized along three continua that characterize (1) the receiving of goods, (2) the location of agency between elder and family members, and (3) family’s self-understanding. PMID:17047729

  4. Moses and Superman Come Home: Counseling Adoptees and Adoptive Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiz, Stephen G.

    This paper looks at three parties impacted by adoption: the adoptive parents, the adopted child, and the adoptive family. When working with adoptive parents, counselors should respect the strength of the couple, their commitment to parenthood, and the closeness that may develop from weathering the issue of childlessness. Adoptive parents are…

  5. Home Is Where the Family Is: Moving House with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linke, Pam

    2000-01-01

    This publication is intended to help parents address their children's needs and emotions when the family is moving from one place to another. Detailed information and tips are provided on several moving-related issues, including: (1) how children respond to change; (2) how parents respond to change; (3) preparing children for the move; (4) the…

  6. Food Buying Guide for Family Day Care Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Chicago, IL. Midwest Regional Office.

    Offered in this guide are facts enabling family day care providers in Michigan to serve meals meeting meal pattern requirements of the state's Child Care Food Program. Adapted from the "Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs," contents are based on the latest Federal regulations and meal pattern requirements, current food…

  7. Diluting the Cesspool: Families, Home Improvement, and Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the process of social change through improvement of residences in decaying neighborhoods--gentrification--has itself changed. Traditional families (married with children) and a broader spectrum of the social class spectrum are more likely to be involved. The present research takes an ethnographic perspective and considers the…

  8. Multiple Family Groups for Adult Cancer Survivors and Their Families: A 1-Day Workshop Model

    PubMed Central

    STEINGLASS, PETER; OSTROFF, JAMIE S.; STEINGLASS, ABBE STAHL

    2015-01-01

    With marked advances in early detection and aggressive multimodality treatment, many adult cancers are now associated with good prognoses for disease-free survival. A burgeoning literature examining posttreatment quality-of-life issues has highlighted the numerous challenges experienced by patients and families in the aftermath of cancer treatment, further underscoring a need for new family-based psychosocial support interventions for cancer survivors and their families. This paper describes the clinical protocol for one such intervention, a 1-day “workshop” version of a multiple family group (MFG) for head and neck cancer survivors and their families. Data are reported from our experiences in running five 1-day workshops. Families uniformly reported that they were highly satisfied with their MFG participation, leading us to conclude that the abbreviated 1-day MFG model we are advocating is a promising family-focused support intervention for cancer survivors and their families. PMID:21884077

  9. Family Resource Allocation after Firstborns Leave Home: Implications for Secondborns' Academic Functioning.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Alexander C; Whiteman, Shawn D; Bernard, Julia M; McHale, Susan M

    2015-12-29

    This study assessed secondborn adolescents' perceptions of changes in the allocation of family resources following their firstborn siblings' departure from home after high school, and whether perceived changes were related to changes over 1 year in secondborns' academic functioning. Participants were secondborn siblings (mean age = 16.58, SD = 0.91) from 115 families in which the older sibling had left the family home in the previous year. Allocation of resources was measured via coded qualitative interviews. Most (77%) secondborns reported increases in at least one type of family resource (i.e., parental companionship, attention, material goods), and many reported an increase in multiple types of resources in the year following their older sibling's departure. Consistent with resource dilution theory, perceptions of increases in fathers' companionship, fathers' attention, and mothers' companionship were related to improvements over time in secondborns' academic functioning.

  10. The home as a workplace: work-family interaction and psychological well-being in telework.

    PubMed

    Standen, P; Daniels, K; Lamond, D

    1999-10-01

    Home-based telework is a growing phenomenon with great potential to affect employees' psychological well-being. Although prior studies show both positive and negative effects on work-family interaction, conclusions are limited by the way telework, well-being, and work-family interaction have been modeled. The authors present a conceptual framework that describes telework as a multidimensional phenomenon and separates the effects of the home environment from those of distance from the organization. Propositions concerning work-family interaction are developed from P. Warr's (1987) model of the environmental antecedents of well-being, prior telework studies, and the work-family literature. Spillover between work and nonwork domains of well-being is discussed, and suggestions for future research on this complex issue are presented.

  11. Non-therapist identification of falling hazards in older adult homes using digital photography.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, Katherine C; Meyer, Deborah; Ice, Gillian H

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation and removal of home hazards is an invaluable method for preventing in-home falls and preserving independent living. Current processes for conducting home hazard assessments are impractical from a whole population standpoint given the substantial resources required for implementation. Digital photography offers an opportunity to remotely evaluate an environment for falling hazards. However, reliability of this method has only been tested under the direction of skilled therapists. Ten community dwelling adults over the age of 65 were recruited from local primary care practices between July, 2009 and February, 2010. In-home (IH) assessments were completed immediately after a photographer, blinded to the assessment form, took digital photographs (DP) of the participant home. A different non-therapist assessor then reviewed the photographs and completed a second assessment of the home. Kappa statistic was used to analyze the reliability between the two independent assessments. Home assessments completed by a non-therapist using digital photographs had a substantial agreement (Kappa = 0.61, p < 0.001) with in-home assessments completed by another non-therapist. Additionally, the DP assessments agreed with the IH assessments on the presence or absence of items 96.8% of the time. This study showed that non-therapists can reliably conduct home hazard evaluations using digital photographs.

  12. Home Renovation, Family History of Atopy, and Respiratory Symptoms and Asthma Among Children Living in China

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guang-Hui; Wang, Jing; Trevathan, Edwin; Liu, Miao-Miao; Wang, Da; Ren, Wan-Hui; Chen, Weiqing; Simckes, Maayan; Zelicoff, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the association of indoor air pollution with the respiratory health of children, we evaluated the associations of children’s respiratory symptoms with asthma and recent home renovation. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a school recruitment sample of 31 049 children aged 2 to 14 years in 25 districts of 7 cities of northeast China in 2008–2009. The children’s parents completed standardized questionnaires characterizing the children’s histories of respiratory symptoms and illness, recent home renovation information, and other associated risk factors. Results. The effects of home renovation in the past 2 years were significantly associated with cough, phlegm, current wheeze, doctor-diagnosed asthma, and current asthma. The associations we computed when combining the status of home renovation and family history of atopy were higher than were those predicted from the combination of the separate effects. However, the interactions between home renovation and family history of atopy on a multiplicative scale were not statistically significant (P > .05). Conclusions. Home renovation is associated with increases in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma in children. The effects of different renovation materials on child respiratory health should be studied further. PMID:24228648

  13. An interprofessional approach to shared decision making: an exploratory case study with family caregivers of one IP home care team

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the context of an exploratory case study, the authors assessed the perceptions of family caregivers about the decision-making process regarding relocating their relative and about the applicability of an interprofessional approach to shared decision making (IP-SDM). They also assessed perceptions of health professionals and health managers about IP-SDM. Methods From November 2010 to October 2011, we worked with one IP home care team dedicated to older adults (the case) from a large primary health care organization in Quebec City, Canada. We identified six of their clients who had faced a decision about whether to stay at home or move to a long-term care facility in the past year and interviewed their family caregivers. We explored the decision-making process they had experienced regarding relocating their relative and their perceptions about the applicability of IP-SDM in this context. Attitudes towards IP-SDM and potential barriers to this approach were explored using a focus group with the participating IP home care team, individual interviews with 8 managers and a survey of 272 health professionals from the primary care organization. A hybrid process of inductive and deductive thematic analysis was used and data were triangulated across all sources. Results Family caregivers reported lack of agreement on the nature of the decision to be made, a disconnection between home care services and relatives’ needs, and high cost of long-term care alternatives. Factors influencing their decision included their ability to provide care for their relative. While they felt somewhat supported by the IP home care team, they also felt pressured in the decision. Overall, they did not perceive they had been exposed to IP-SDM but agreed that it was applicable in this context. Results from the survey, focus group and interviews with health professionals and managers indicated they all had a favourable attitude towards IP-SDM but many barriers hampered its

  14. Systematic review of family and home-based interventions targeting paediatric overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, A P; Sharma, M

    2012-06-01

    The family and home environment is a highly influential psychosocial antecedent of paediatric obesity. The purpose of this investigation was to systematically analyze family and home-based randomized control trials aimed at treating overweight and obesity in children ages 2-7 years. In gathering materials for this review, a search of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, MEDLINE, Education Resources Information Center, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection and CENTRAL databases was conducted for the time frame of January 2001 to August 2011. The data extraction spanned three phases resulting in a total of nine interventions that met the specified inclusion criteria. Among the identified studies, eight produced significant outcomes. The majority of the programmes incorporated educational sessions targeting parents as the primary modality for intervention delivery. Less than one-quarter of the interventions included home visitations; however, all of the interventions included home-based activities to reinforce behaviour modification. Only three of the interventions applied social and behavioural theory, and only two interventions employed process evaluation. Additional research is needed to gauge the efficacy of the home and family milieu for treating paediatric obesity.

  15. "Why Should I Leave?" Belgian Emerging Adults' Departure from Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kins, Evie; De Mol, Jan; Beyers, Wim

    2014-01-01

    In today's Western societies, the transition to adulthood is prolonged, creating a separate developmental phase between adolescence and adulthood referred to as "emerging adulthood". Following from this general delay in adult commitment-making, a considerable number of emerging adults continues to live in the parental household. The…

  16. A family nursing educational intervention supports nurses and families in an adult intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Eggenberger, Sandra K; Sanders, Marita

    2016-11-01

    The family experience of critical illness is filled with distress that may have a lasting impact on family coping and family health. A nurse can become a source of comfort that helps the family endure. Yet, nurses often report a lack of confidence in communicating with families and families report troubling relationships with nurses. In spite of strong evidence supporting nursing practice focused on the family, family nursing interventions often not implemented in the critical care setting. This pilot study examined the influence of an educational intervention on nurses' attitudes towards and confidence in providing family care, as well as families' perceptions of support from nurses in an adult critical care setting. An academic-clinical practice partnership used digital storytelling as an educational strategy. A Knowledge to Action Process Framework guided this study. Results of pre-intervention data collection from families and nurses were used to inform the educational intervention. A convenience sample of family members completed the Iceland Family Perceived Support Questionnaire (ICE-FPSQ) to measure perception of support provided by nurses. Video, voice, and narrative stories of nurses describing their experiences caring for family members during a critical illness and family members' experiences with a critically ill family member also guided education plans. When comparing the pre and post results of the Family Nurse Practice Scale (FNPS), nurses reported increased confidence, knowledge, and skill following the educational intervention. Qualitative data from nurses reported satisfaction with the educational intervention. Findings suggest that engaging nurses in educational opportunities focused on families while using storytelling methods encourages empathic understandings. Academic-clinician teams that drive directions show promise in supporting families and nurses in critical care settings. Plans are moving forward to use this study design and methods in

  17. Privacy and social implications of distinct sensing approaches to implementing smart homes for older adults.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George

    2009-01-01

    Two distinct approaches to smart home design, namely Distributed Direct Sensing (DDS) and Infrastructure Mediated Sensing (IMS), have distinguishing features and implications resulting from their implementation. These two distinct smart home approaches have not been directly compared pertaining to their technical performance or their acceptance by the end users. It is also unclear what the perceived privacy and obtrusiveness concerns are when it comes to the implementation of these two different approaches in homes. The study presented here aimed to evaluate acceptance of these two sensing approaches by older adults and assess the perceived privacy and obtrusiveness concerns and ultimately define their social implications.

  18. Family relationships of adults with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Allen, D M; Farmer, R G

    1996-01-01

    Current, ongoing interactions between adults exhibiting borderline personality disorder (BPD) traits and their families of origin may influence and maintain self-destructive behavior. Family interactions in such patients are often characterized by coexisting extremes of overinvolvement and underinvolvement by parental figures. Such parental behavior may trigger preexisting role relationship schemata in vulnerable individuals. Negative family reactions to new behavior patterns may make change difficult. A model for how present-day interpersonal patterns lead to self-destructive behavior, based on clinical observations, is proposed and case examples are presented.

  19. Incorporating home demands into models of job strain: Findings from the Work, Family & Health Network

    PubMed Central

    Koenen, KC; Berkman, LF

    2009-01-01

    Objective To integrate home demands with the Demand-Control-Support model to test if home demands interact with job strain to increase depressive symptoms. Methods Data were from 431 employees in four extended care facilities. Presence of a child under age 18 in the household signified home demands. The outcome was depressive symptoms based on a shortened version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Results The association between job strain and depressive symptoms was moderated by social support (SS) and presence of a child in the household (child). There was no association among participants with high SS and no child, but a positive one among participants with low SS and a child. Conclusions Job strain may be a particularly important determinant of depressive symptoms among employees with family demands. Models of job strain should expand to incorporate family demands. PMID:19001950

  20. Home modification and prevention of frailty progression in older adults: a Japanese prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Mitoku, Kazuko; Shimanouchi, Setsu

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether home modification was associated with subsequent progression of frailty and mortality in older adults. We conducted a prospective cohort study in 574 adults 65 and older who required a low or moderate level of care. Of these, 34% modified their homes-most frequently a corridor-and the most common type of modification was the installation of handrails. The mortality was significantly lower among older adults with home modifications than in those without home modifications at 2 years (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.32, 0.87]), 3 years (HR = 0.57, 95% CI [0.54, 0.81]), and 4.7 years (HR = 0.65, 95% CI [0.65, 0.91]). These findings suggest that home modification may prevent the progression of frailty (i.e., need for low/moderate level of care increasing to the need for high level of care) in older adults.

  1. Reaching families at their homes for an intervention to reduce tobacco smoke exposure among infants.

    PubMed

    Kastirke, Nadin; John, Ulrich; Goeze, Christian; Sannemann, Janine; Ulbricht, Sabina

    2013-04-01

    The methods of reaching families for a home intervention trial (HIT) were analyzed in this study. The study aimed to reduce environmental tobacco smoke exposure among infants in one region of Germany. The systematic screening data of smoking among families in their homes were compared with reference data of a representative household sample of the state in which the study was conducted. The characteristics of participating and non-participating families were analyzed. All households (N = 3,570) containing at least one infant age 3 years or younger were selected using the residents` registration files and invited to participate in a screening assessment. Among these families, 3,293 (92.2 %) were contacted and from that group, 2,641 families participated in the screening. Compared with the reference sample, the screened sample included a higher proportion of families with employment and with more than 10 years of education. Participation in the HIT was recommended if at least one parent reported smoking one or more cigarettes per day during the previous 4 weeks. Among the 1,282 families that met the inclusion criteria, 71.5 % took part in the screening. Participating families, compared with non-participating families, were older, included more families with two parents living in the household, and had higher rates of employment. The effect size of the final regression model was small (Cohen's f (2) = 0.01). In conclusion, proactive approaches that are delivered at home may yield a high reach of the target population and particularly of socioeconomically disadvantaged populations.

  2. Adult Literacy and Parenting Outcomes of a Rural, Home-Based Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Walsh, Sandra; Spring, Janet; Swisher, Angie; Lewis, Harry

    The Even Start Family Literacy Program is a national program designed to break the cycle of poverty and illiteracy by working with low-income families to improve adult literacy, parenting skills, and developmental and preschool readiness of young children in the family. The Monongalia County (West Virginia) Even Start Program is unusual in that…

  3. Personalized technology to support older adults with and without cognitive impairment living at home.

    PubMed

    Kerssens, Chantal; Kumar, Renu; Adams, Anne E; Knott, Camilla C; Matalenas, Laura; Sanford, Jon A; Rogers, Wendy A

    2015-02-01

    Although persons with dementia (PWD) and their family caregivers need in-home support for common neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), few if any assistive technologies are available to help manage NPS. This implementation study tested the feasibility and adoption of a touch screen technology, the Companion, which delivers psychosocial, nondrug interventions to PWD in their home to address individual NPS and needs. Interventions were personalized and delivered in home for a minimum of 3 weeks. Postintervention measures indicated the technology was easy to use, significantly facilitated meaningful and positive engagement, and simplified caregivers' daily lives. Although intervention goals were met, caregivers had high expectations of their loved one's ability to regain independence. Care recipients used the system independently but were limited by cognitive and physical impairments. We conclude the Companion can help manage NPS and offer caregiver respite at home. These data provide important guidance for design and deployment of care technology for the home.

  4. Personalized Technology to Support Older Adults With and Without Cognitive Impairment Living at Home

    PubMed Central

    Kerssens, Chantal; Kumar, Renu; Adams, Anne E.; Knott, Camilla C.; Matalenas, Laura; Sanford, Jon A.; Rogers, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Although persons with dementia (PWD) and their family caregivers need in-home support for common neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), few if any assistive technologies are available to help manage NPS. This implementation study tested the feasibility and adoption of a touch screen technology, the Companion, that delivers psychosocial, nondrug interventions to PWD in their home to address individual NPS and needs. Interventions were personalized and delivered in-home for a minimum of 3 weeks. Post-intervention measures indicated the technology was easy to use, significantly facilitated meaningful and positive engagement, and simplified caregivers’ daily lives. Although intervention goals were met, caregivers had high expectations of their loved-one’s ability to regain independence. Care recipients used the system independently, but were limited by cognitive and physical impairments. We conclude the Companion can help manage NPS and offer caregiver respite at home. These data provide important guidance for design and deployment of care technology for the home. PMID:25614507

  5. Understanding children's sedentary behaviour: a qualitative study of the family home environment.

    PubMed

    Granich, Joanna; Rosenberg, Michael; Knuiman, Matthew; Timperio, Anna

    2010-04-01

    Electronic media (EM) (television, electronic games and computer) use has been associated with overweight and obesity among children. Little is known about the time spent in sedentary behaviour (SB) among children within the family context. The aim of this study was to explore how the family home environment may influence children's electronic-based SB. Focus groups and family interviews were conducted with 11- to 12-year old children (n = 54) and their parents (n = 38) using a semi-structured discussion guide. Transcripts were analysed using a thematic content approach. A brief self-completed questionnaire was also used to measure leisure behaviour and electronic devices at home. Children incorporated both sedentary and physical activities into their weekly routine. Factors influencing children's EM use included parent and sibling modelling and reinforcement, personal cognitions, the physical home environment and household EM use rules and restrictions. Participants were not concerned about the excessive time children spent with EM. This under-recognition emerged as a personal influencing factor and was viewed as a major barrier to modifying children's electronic-based SB. Efforts to reduce SB in children should focus on the influencing factors that reciprocally interact within the family home. An emphasis on increasing awareness about the risks associated with spending excessive time in screen-based activities should be a priority when developing intervention strategies aimed at modifying the time children spend in SB.

  6. A Case Study of Childhood Disintegrative Disorder Using Systematic Analysis of Family Home Movies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palomo, Ruben; Thompson, Meagan; Colombi, Costanza; Cook, Ian; Goldring, Stacy; Young, Gregory S.; Ozonoff, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD) is a rare pervasive developmental disorder that involves regression after a period of at least 2 years of typical development. This case study presents data from family home movies, coded by reliable raters using an objective coding system, to examine the trajectory of development in one child with a…

  7. Dutch Home-Based Pre-Reading Intervention with Children at Familial Risk of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Otterloo, Sandra G.; van der Leij, Aryan

    2009-01-01

    Children (5 and 6 years old, n = 30) at familial risk of dyslexia received a home-based intervention that focused on phoneme awareness and letter knowledge in the year prior to formal reading instruction. The children were compared to a no-training at-risk control group (n = 27), which was selected a year earlier. After training, we found a small…

  8. Social Work Home Visits to Children and Families in the UK: A Foucauldian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Winter, Karen; Cree, Viviene E

    2016-07-01

    The home visit is at the heart of social work practice with children and families; it is what children and families' social workers do more than any other single activity (except for recording), and it is through the home visit that assessments are made on a daily basis about risk, protection and welfare of children. And yet it is, more than any other activity, an example of what Pithouse has called an 'invisible trade': it happens behind closed doors, in the most secret and intimate spaces of family life. Drawing on conceptual tools associated with the work of Foucault, this article sets out to provide a critical, chronological review of research, policy and practice on home visiting. We aim to explain how and in what ways changing discourses have shaped the emergence, legitimacy, research and practice of the social work home visit to children and families at significant time periods and in a UK context. We end by highlighting the importance for the social work profession of engagement and critical reflection on the identified themes as part of their daily practice.

  9. Building Brains, Forging Futures: A Call to Action for the Family-Centered Medical Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    The family-centered medical home describes an approach to providing comprehensive primary care. Research advances in developmental neuroscience, genetics, and epigenetics offer a framework for understanding the dynamic process of brain development. It is this process that sets the life-course trajectory for an individual; in turn, a child's…

  10. The Nontoxic Home. Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Everyday Toxics and Health Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadd, Debra Lynn

    The document maintains that the world is filled with health hazards and the best a person can do is to assess the danger of individual products, learn the risks, weigh the risks against the benefits, and decide whether or not to personally take these risks or to subject family members to them. This perspective begins in the home. This book…

  11. Nutrition and Physical Activity Practices in Childcare Centers versus Family Childcare Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Ruby; Page, Monica; Sanders, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Obesity rates among preschool-aged children have doubled in the past 10 years, and 60% of these children spend the majority of their day in childcare facilities. Few studies have examined the quality of nutrition and physical activity practices in childcare centers as compared to family childcare homes. The purpose of this study is to determine if…

  12. Connecting Schools and Families: Understanding the Influence of Home Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Daphney L.; Reeves, Emily; Mcintyre, Christina J.

    2016-01-01

    Home literacy practices are extremely important in developing early language and literacy skills. Children from lower socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds may be at risk, not because their family literacy practices are inferior, but because their culturally defined literacy practices may not be consistent with school literacy expectations. To…

  13. Family Perspectives on End-of-Life Care Experiences in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetle, Terrie; Shield, Renee; Teno, Joan; Miller, Susan C.; Welch, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to expand knowledge regarding end-of-life care received in nursing homes through the use of narrative interviews with family members close to the decedents. Design and Methods: We conducted follow-up qualitative interviews with 54 respondents who had participated in an earlier national survey of 1,578…

  14. Heritage Language Acquisition and Maintenance: Home Literacy Practices of Japanese-Speaking Families in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomura, Takako; Caidi, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we examine the case of Japanese-speaking families in Canada and their experiences with teaching a heritage language at home, along with the uses and perceived usefulness of public library resources, collections, and services in the process. Methods: We interviewed fourteen mothers who speak Japanese to their children.…

  15. What Studies of Family Home Movies Can Teach Us about Autistic Infants: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Georges, Catherine; Cassel, Raquel S.; Cohen, David; Chetouani, Mohamed; Laznik, Marie-Christine; Maestro, Sandra; Muratori, Filippo

    2010-01-01

    The current study reviewed all prior studies conducted on family home movies of infants who would be later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Out of 41 original reports found since 1975, we retained 18 studies (317 films, maximum), sorted according to their methodological design using a quality grid. In the first 2 years of life, signs…

  16. School Readiness of Children from Immigrant Families: Contributions of Region of Origin, Home, and Childcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Amanda S.; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Children from immigrant families make up a growing proportion of young children in the United States. This study highlights the heterogeneity in early academic skills related to parental region of origin. It also considers the contributions of early home and nonparental care settings to the diversity in early academic performance. Using nationally…

  17. The Experiences of Sleep Disruption in Families of Technology-Dependent Children Living at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Janet; Noyes, Jane; Sloper, Patricia; Shah, Robina

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the sleep disruption experienced by 36 families of technology-dependent children living at home in the United Kingdom. The paper begins with an overview of the qualitative study in which parents' experiences of sleep disruption emerged as a major theme. We then describe the nature of and reasons for the sleep disruption, the…

  18. Views from the Home Front: The Experience of Children from Military Families. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Research has begun to document the challenges faced by members of the U.S. military in deploying for war and reintegrating into life at home. But little is known about how wartime experience and parental deployments have affected the children from military families. This fact sheet summarizes a study that explored how these children fared…

  19. Home Environments and Perceived Needs of Anglo and Latino Families of Young Children with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dote-Kwan, Jamie; Chen, Deborah; Hughes, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the influence of home environment, socioeconomic status, and visual functioning on mothers' perceptions of the family needs and development of 19 toddlers with visual impairments from Latino and Anglo backgrounds. Differences were found between the mothers' perceived needs based on ethnicity and their children's degree of…

  20. Home/School Support for Families and Children with Traumatic Brain Injury. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glang, Ann; And Others

    This final report describes the Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Home/School Support project, an Oregon project which attempted to decrease stress in parents caring for school-aged children with TBI and to provide support to schools serving students with TBI. During its 3 years of development, the project involved over 50 families of children, ages…

  1. Accidental Injuries among Children in Day Care Centers and Family Day Care Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Charles W.; And Others

    For this study, information was obtained about accidential injuries among children in day care centers (DCC) and family day care homes (DCH) in North Carolina. An Accident Survey Questionnaire was used to report injuries that required treatment by a staff member, doctor, or nurse. Results of data analyses showed that: (1) falls were the leading…

  2. Book Reading Mediation, SES, Home Literacy Environment, and Children's Literacy: Evidence from Arabic-Speaking Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korat, Ofra; Arafat, Safieh H.; Aram, Dorit; Klein, Pnina

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the contribution of maternal mediation in storybook reading, socioeconomic status (SES), and home literacy environment (HLE) to children's literacy level in kindergarten and first grade in Israeli Arabic-speaking families. A total of 109 kindergarten children and their mothers participated. Children's literacy level was…

  3. 78 FR 18576 - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single Family Energy Upgrades AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is making final content available for the Guidelines...

  4. Social Work Home Visits to Children and Families in the UK: A Foucauldian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Karen; Cree, Viviene E.

    2016-01-01

    The home visit is at the heart of social work practice with children and families; it is what children and families' social workers do more than any other single activity (except for recording), and it is through the home visit that assessments are made on a daily basis about risk, protection and welfare of children. And yet it is, more than any other activity, an example of what Pithouse has called an ‘invisible trade’: it happens behind closed doors, in the most secret and intimate spaces of family life. Drawing on conceptual tools associated with the work of Foucault, this article sets out to provide a critical, chronological review of research, policy and practice on home visiting. We aim to explain how and in what ways changing discourses have shaped the emergence, legitimacy, research and practice of the social work home visit to children and families at significant time periods and in a UK context. We end by highlighting the importance for the social work profession of engagement and critical reflection on the identified themes as part of their daily practice. PMID:27559221

  5. Early educational intervention, early cumulative risk, and the early home environment as predictors of young adult outcomes within a high-risk sample.

    PubMed

    Pungello, Elizabeth P; Kainz, Kirsten; Burchinal, Margaret; Wasik, Barbara H; Sparling, Joseph J; Ramey, Craig T; Campbell, Frances A

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which early educational intervention, early cumulative risk, and the early home environment were associated with young adult outcomes was investigated in a sample of 139 young adults (age 21) from high-risk families enrolled in randomized trials of early intervention. Positive effects of treatment were found for education attainment, attending college, and skilled employment; negative effects of risk were found for education attainment, graduating high school, being employed, and avoiding teen parenthood. The home mediated the effects of risk for graduating high school, but not being employed for teen parenthood. Evidence for moderated mediation was found for educational attainment; the home mediated the association between risk and educational attainment for the control group, but not the treated group.

  6. En el seno del hogar. Experiencias familiares para desarrollar el alfabetismo (Right at Home. Family Experiences for Building Literacy).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Merrily P.; Armstrong, Gloria

    This publication, a Spanish translation of "Right at Home," is a family involvement program in the form of easy-to-read cartoon-style letters to be used at home by parents or other family members with their preschool or kindergarten-age children. The book is designed to be used independently by parents, or to be reproduced and distributed to…

  7. The National Conference on the Registration of Family Day Homes (San Antonio, Texas, October 20-November 1, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, David J., Comp.; And Others

    Concerns regarding the regulation of family day home care led to a National Conference on Family Day Homes, the proceedings of which appear in this document. Co-sponsored by Texas and the Association for Regulatory Administration, the conference was intended to enable the exchange of ideas and information, identify research issues, and develop…

  8. Aspirations of Adult Learners in Aboriginal Family Service Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jason; Fraehlich, Cheryl; Debassige, Brent

    2012-01-01

    There is a gap in the literature on the experiences of Aboriginal adults who have made the transition into education and employment after moving to an urban community. Staff of three Aboriginal inner-city family services agencies participated in an interview that included the question: What changes do you see in your employment and education?…

  9. Adult Day Care for Alzheimer's Patients and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Dan; Suzuki, Thelma

    1983-01-01

    Harbor Area Adult Day Care Center has operated for two years with a primary purpose of providing respite care to families caring for a relative with Alzheimer's disease or related disorders. The rationale, history, program, staffing, funding, and experience for the first two years of the project are provided. (Author/RC)

  10. Home Sweet Home? Families' Experiences with Aggression in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgetts, Sandra; Nicholas, David; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie

    2013-01-01

    Although not inherent to the diagnosis, many individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) display aggressive behavior. This study examined the experiences of families living with individuals with ASD who also demonstrate aggressive behaviors. Using a qualitative approach, semistructured interviews were conducted with parents of nine males with…

  11. The Home Observation Assessment Method (HOAM): Real-Time Naturalistic Observation of Families in Their Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinglass, Peter

    The vast bulk of psychosocial research data about the family are derived from two basic sources: self-report, retrospective data obtained by questionnaires or interviews; and direct observations of behavior occurring in a laboratory or treatment setting. Despite an emerging enthusiasm for the notion of studying behavior in its natural environment…

  12. Work-Family Conflict, Sleep, and Mental Health of Nursing Assistants Working in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Nannini, Angela

    2016-10-28

    Work-family conflict is challenging for workers and may lead to depression, anxiety, and overall poor health. Sleep plays an important role in the maintenance of mental health; however, the role of sleep in the association between work-family conflict and mental health is not well-studied. Questionnaires were collected from 650 nursing assistants in 15 nursing homes. Multivariate linear regression modeling demonstrated that increased work-family conflict was associated with lower mental health scores (β = -2.56, p < .01). More work-family conflict was correlated with more job demands, less job control, less social support, and longer work hours. Poor sleep quality, but not short sleep duration, mediated the association between work-family conflict and mental health. Workplace interventions to improve nursing assistants' mental health should increase their control over work schedules and responsibilities, provide support to meet their work and family needs, and address healthy sleep practices.

  13. Associations Between Family Ratings on Experience With Care and Clinical Quality-of-Care Measures for Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Li, Qinghua; Tang, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Several states are currently collecting and publicly reporting nursing home resident and/or family member ratings of experience with care in an attempt to improve person-centered care in nursing homes. Using the 2008 Maryland nursing home family survey reports and other data, this study performed both facility- and resident-level analyses, and estimated the relationships between family ratings of care and several long-term care quality measures (pressure ulcers, overall and potentially avoidable hospitalizations, and mortality) after adjustment for resident characteristics. We found that better family evaluations of overall and specific aspects of care may be associated with reduced rates of risk-adjusted measures at the facility level (range of correlation coefficients: -.01 to -.31). Associations of overall experience ratings tended to persist after further adjustment for common nursing home characteristics such as nurse staffing levels. We conclude that family ratings of nursing home care complement other types of performance measures such as risk-adjusted outcomes.

  14. Adult passive smoking in the home environment: a risk factor for chronic airflow limitation.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, F; Tessier, J F; Oriol, P

    1983-03-01

    Using the data of the French Cooperative Study PAARC (Pollution Atmosphérique et Affections Respiratoires Chroniques), which in 1975 surveyed more than 7800 adult residents of seven cities throughout France, the authors compared the spirometric measurements of two groups of nonsmokers: those with and without exposure to passive smoking in the home. They restricted the analysis to subjects aged 40 years of more (i.e., those presumably exposed for 15 years or more to smoking by their spouses) and who were living in households without other persons aged 18 years or older (to avoid potential misclassification as true nonsmokers of persons living with non-interviewed individuals). The authors found that nonsmoking subjects of either sex whose spouses were current smokers of at least 10 g of tobacco a day had significantly lower forced mid-expiratory flow rate (FEF25-75) than those married to nonsmokers. This difference was not explained by social class, educational level, air pollution, or family size. Women, among whom passive smoking is much more prevalent than it is among men, also showed a significant difference in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and a clear dose-effect relationship to amount of smoking by their husbands was found in the large subgroup of women without paid work (i.e., those not exposed to workplace smoking).

  15. Living above the shop: home, business, and family in the English "Industrial Revolution".

    PubMed

    Barker, Hannah; Hamlett, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the living arrangements and familial relations of small business households in northwest English towns between 1760 and 1820. Focusing on evidence from inventories and personal writing, it examines the homes that such households lived and worked in and the ways in which space was ordered and used: indicating that access to particular spaces was determined by status. This study suggests both the continuance of the "household family" into the nineteenth century (rather than its more modern, "nuclear" variant) and the existence of keenly felt gradations of status within households making it likely that the constitution of "the family" differed according to one's place in the domestic hierarchy.

  16. [Home care for terminal cancer patients from the family and caregiver perspective].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Mitsuko; Ogiwara, Miyoko; Yamaoka, Keita; Matsumoto, Ayumi; Fujimaki, Yoko; Watanabe, Mutsuko; Kushida, Kazuki

    2014-12-01

    The progression of home care provision is associated with an increased burden on the family, as patients tend to progressively become more dependent on medicine. In the present case, a family supported a patient by performing medical activities such as taking blood sugar measurements, administering insulin injections, exchanging fluids, managing each tube, handling medical devices, conducting status observations, and attending to emergency calls. Thus, the family caregiver undertakes duties that were previously performed by a nurse and interacts with the various professionals who visit the patient's home daily. Therefore, the caregiver undergoes a considerable amount of stress. Family caregivers with no medical knowledge or nursing experience require plenty of support, in order to fulfill a patient's requirements. The first step is the establishment of trust between the medical professionals and the caregiver. In the present case, because the trust had been established, interprofessional collaboration ensured that the patient received support until the end. Thus, we reported on the perspectives of the family and caregiver on home care for terminal cancer patients.

  17. Progress of Ontario's Family Health Team model: a patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Walter W; Colwill, Jack M; Kasperski, Jan; Wilson, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Ontario's Family Health Team (FHT) model, implemented in 2005, may be North America's largest example of a patient-centered medical home. The model, based on multidisciplinary teams and an innovative incentive-based funding system, has been developed primarily from fee-for-service primary care practices. Nearly 2 million Ontarians are served by 170 FHTs. Preliminary observations suggest high satisfaction among patients, higher income and more gratification for family physicians, and trends for more medical students to select careers in family medicine. Popular demand is resulting in expansion to 200 FHTs. We describe the development, implementation, reimbursement plan, and current status of this multidisciplinary model, relating it to the principles of the patient-centered medical home. We also identify its potential to provide an understanding of many aspects of primary care.

  18. Transition From Hospital to Home in Preterm Infants and Their Families.

    PubMed

    Boykova, Marina

    2016-01-01

    When the day of discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) comes for the parents of newborn infants, they are filled with long-awaited joy and happiness. They go home feeling as parents, away from scheduled routines of the hospital, monitor alarms, clinical rounds, numerous tests, and so on. What do we know about what happens after these little patients and their families leave the NICU? What happens from the point of leaving the hospital until when things get settled and life becomes perceived as normal? This article presents a short summary of research conducted with the vulnerable population of high-risk and preterm infants and their families postdischarge. Available evidence suggests that transition to home after hospital discharge, a phenomenon that many families experience, is challenging and requires attention from clinicians and researchers if we are to provide effective, efficient, and high-quality care.

  19. Does empowering resident families or nursing home employees in decision making improve service quality?

    PubMed

    Hamann, Darla J

    2014-08-01

    This research examines how the empowerment of residents' family members and nursing home employees in managerial decision making is related to service quality. The study was conducted using data from 33 nursing homes in the United States. Surveys were administered to more than 1,000 employees on-site and mailed to the primary-contact family member of each resident. The resulting multilevel data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. The empowerment of families in decision making was positively associated with their perceptions of service quality. The empowerment of nursing staff in decision making was more strongly related to service quality than the empowerment of nonnursing staff. Among nursing staff, the empowerment of nursing assistants improved service quality more than the empowerment of nurses.

  20. Selection Bias in Family Reports on End of Life with Dementia in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Deliens, Luc; Ribbe, Miel W.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background : Selective participation in retrospective studies of families recruited after the patient's death may threaten generalizability of reports on end-of-life experiences. Objectives To assess possible selection bias in retrospective study of dementia at the end of life using family reports. Methods Two physician teams covering six nursing home facilities in the Netherlands reported on 117 of 119 consecutive decedents within two weeks after death unaware of after-death family participation in the study. They reported on characteristics; treatment and care; overall patient outcomes such as comfort, nursing care, and outcomes; and their own perspectives on the experience. We compared results between decedents with and without family participation. Results The family response rate was 55%. There were no significant differences based on participation versus nonparticipation in demographics and other nursing home resident characteristics, treatment and care, or overall resident outcome. However, among participating families, physicians perceived higher-quality aspects of nursing care and outcome, better consensus between staff and family on treatment, and a more peaceful death. Participation was less likely with involvement of a new family member in the last month. Conclusions Families may be more likely to participate in research with more harmonious teamwork in end-of-life caregiving. Where family participation is an enrollment criterion, comparing demographics alone may not capture possible selection bias, especially in more subjective measures. Selection bias toward more positive experiences, which may include the physician's and probably also the family's experiences, should be considered if representativeness is aimed for. Future work should address selection bias in other palliative settings and countries, and with prospective recruitment. PMID:23153076

  1. Emerging adults' lived experience of formative family stress: the family's lasting influence.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Carmen R; Chavez, Tom; Woulfe, Julie

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we use a phenomenology framework to explore emerging adults' formative experiences of family stress. Fourteen college students participated in a qualitative interview about their experience of family stress. We analyzed the interviews using the empirical phenomenological psychology method. Participants described a variety of family stressors, including parental conflict and divorce, physical or mental illness, and emotional or sexual abuse by a family member. Two general types of parallel processes were essential to the experience of family stress for participants. First, the family stressor was experienced in shifts and progressions reflecting the young person's attempts to manage the stressor, and second, these shifts and progressions were interdependent with deeply personal psychological meanings of self, sociality, physical and emotional expression, agency, place, space, project, and discourse. We describe each of these parallel processes and their subprocesses, and conclude with implications for mental health practice and research.

  2. Parentification and family responsibility in the family of origin of adult children of alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Michelle L; French, Alexis; Bountress, Kaitlin; Keefe, Heather A; Schroeder, Valarie; Steer, Kate; Fals-Stewart, William; Gumienny, Leslie

    2007-04-01

    The present study examined parentification and family responsibility in the families of origin of 103 female college students who met criteria for being Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACOAs) as compared to 233 women who did not. The gender of the parent with an alcohol problem (mother only, father only, both parents, neither) was also examined in relation to family roles. Participants completed the Parentification Questionnaire-Adult (PQ-A; Sessions, M. W., and Jurkovic, G. J. (1986). Parentification Questionnaire-Adult (PQ-A). Unpublished document. Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA), the Filial Responsibility Scale-Adult (FRS-A; Jurkovic, G. J., and Thirkield, A. (1999). Filial Responsibility Scale-Adult (FRS-A). Unpublished document. Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA), the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST; Jones, J. W. (1983). The Children of Alcoholics Screening Test: Test manual. Chicago: Camelot), and indicated whether they suspected their mother/father of a drinking problem. ACOAs reported more parentification, instrumental caregiving, emotional caregiving, and past unfairness in their families of origin as compared to non-ACOAs. However, as compared to ACOAs who indicated that their father was the alcohol-abusing parent or non-ACOAs, respondents who thought their mothers had an alcohol problem reported greater past unfairness. In addition, ACOAs who thought their mothers had a problem with alcohol abuse reported more parentification and emotional caretaking than did non-ACOAs.

  3. Young adults with spina bifida transitioned to a medical home: a survey of medical care in Jacksonville, Florida.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Antonio M; Wood, David L; Keeley, Cortney; James, Hector E; Aldana, Philipp R

    2015-10-23

    OBJECT The transition of the young adult with spina bifida (YASB) from pediatric to adult health care is considered a priority by organized pediatrics. There is a paucity of transition programs and related studies. Jacksonville Health and Transition Services (JaxHATS) is one such transition program in Jacksonville, Florida. This study's purpose was to evaluate the health care access, utilization, and quality of life (QOL) of a group of YASBs who have transitioned from pediatric care. METHODS A survey tool addressing access to health care and quality of health and life was developed based on an established survey. Records of the Spinal Defects Clinic held at Wolfson Children's Hospital and JaxHATS Clinic were reviewed and YASBs (> 18 and < 30 years old) were identified. RESULTS Ten of the 12 invited YASBs in the Jacksonville area completed the surveys. The mean age of respondents was 25.1 years. All reported regular medical home visits, 8 with JaxHATS and 2 with other family care groups. All reported easy access to medical care and routine visits to spina bifida (SB) specialists; none reported difficulty or delays in obtaining health care. Only 2 patients required emergent care in the last year for an SB-related medical problem. Seven respondents reported very good to excellent QOL. Family, lifestyle, and environmental factors were also examined. CONCLUSIONS In this small group of YASBs with a medical home, easy access to care for medical conditions was the norm, with few individuals having recent emergency visits and almost all reporting at least a good overall QOL. Larger studies of YASBs are needed to evaluate the positive effects of medical homes on health and QOL in this population.

  4. Forecasting prices of single family homes using GIS-defined neighborhoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaboudan, Mak; Sarkar, Avijit

    2008-03-01

    We estimate spatiotemporal models of average neighborhood single family home prices to use in predicting individual property prices. Average home-price variations are explained in terms of changes in average neighborhood house attributes, spatial attributes, and temporal economic variables. Models adopting three different definitions of neighborhoods are estimated with quarterly cross-sectional data over the period 2000 2004 from four cities in Southern California. Heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation problems are detected and adjusted for via a sequential routine. Results of these models suggest that forecasts obtained using city neighborhood average price equations may have advantage over forecasts obtained using city aggregated price equations.

  5. Robotics to Enable Older Adults to Remain Living at Home

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Alan J.; Adair, Brooke; Ozanne, Elizabeth; Said, Catherine; Santamaria, Nick; Morris, Meg E.

    2012-01-01

    Given the rapidly ageing population, interest is growing in robots to enable older people to remain living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of the scientific literature, from 1990 to the present, on the use of robots in aged care. The key research questions were as follows: (1) what is the range of robotic devices available to enable older people to remain mobile, independent, and safe? and, (2) what is the evidence demonstrating that robotic devices are effective in enabling independent living in community dwelling older people? Following database searches for relevant literature an initial yield of 161 articles was obtained. Titles and abstracts of articles were then reviewed by 2 independent people to determine suitability for inclusion. Forty-two articles met the criteria for question 1. Of these, 4 articles met the criteria for question 2. Results showed that robotics is currently available to assist older healthy people and people with disabilities to remain independent and to monitor their safety and social connectedness. Most studies were conducted in laboratories and hospital clinics. Currently limited evidence demonstrates that robots can be used to enable people to remain living at home, although this is an emerging smart technology that is rapidly evolving. PMID:23304507

  6. "Is there a gun in the home?" Assessing the risks of gun ownership in older adults.

    PubMed

    Pinholt, Ellen M; Mitchell, Joshua D; Butler, Jane H; Kumar, Harjinder

    2014-06-01

    An important ethical and safety concern that geriatricians, primary care providers, and home health professionals need to address is gun ownership by elderly adults. Those aged 65 and older now have the highest rate of gun ownership in America, and they also have a high prevalence of depression and suicide. Dementia can add additional layers of risk. Even older gun owners who are otherwise intellectually intact may benefit from information about gun safety with the increasing numbers of children being cared for by grandparents. Health professionals should ask patients, "Is there a gun in the home?" in the clinic and during home visits. Healthcare professionals must have knowledge and skills to address safe gun ownership in elderly adults. The 5 L's (Locked, Loaded, Little children, feeling Low, Learned owner) will assist professionals in addressing all aspects of safe ownership.

  7. Leaving Home: An Examination of Late-Life Relocation among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungers, Christin M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes older adults' experiences of a late-life residential relocation from a home to a long-term health care setting. Findings from 14 participants who engaged in a focus group and/or an individual interview supported 8 major themes. Thematic experiences were related to precipitating factors prior to the move, risks and protective…

  8. Running Away from Home: A Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Risk Factors and Young Adult Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Joan S.; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Ellickson, Phyllis L.; Klein, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the adolescent risk factors and young adult health-related outcomes associated with running away from home. We examined these correlates of running away using longitudinal data from 4,329 youth (48% female, 85% white) who were followed from Grade 9 to age 21. Nearly 14% of the sample reported running away in the past year at…

  9. Residential Characteristics, Social Factors, and Mortality among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Transitions out of Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Kelly; Heller, Tamar; Freels, Sally

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the degree to which residential characteristics and social factors are associated with mortality, after controlling for personal characteristics, among adults with intellectual disabilities who have resided in nursing homes (facilities providing skilled care and related services) at baseline in the Chicago area. Initial…

  10. Hazards of Immobility: Bedsores. Adult Residential Care Home, Lesson Plan No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Kathleen

    Developed as part of a 104-hour course on adult residential care homes (ARCHs), this 50-minute lesson is designed to enable a student to: (1) define a bedsore; (2) list and describe three major causes of bedsores; (3) identify potential bedsore sites in the back-lying, side-lying, and sitting positions; and (4) calculate the risk for developing…

  11. Home Beautification. An Instructional Unit for Teachers of Adult Vocational Education in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Shirley R.; Iverson, Maynard J.

    Ten lesson plans in the basic area of home beautification are included in the guide for use by teachers in planning and conducting youth or adult farmer classes. The major emphasis of this unit is on landscaping. The development of a landscape plan, plant identification and selection, landscape construction and maintenance, and flower specialty…

  12. Rural Older Adults' Access Barriers to In-Home and Community-Based Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong

    2006-01-01

    This study identified specific access barriers to seven commonly used in-home and community-based services (CBS) and examined factors that were related to barriers to these services. The data used in this study were extracted from the 1999 National Long Term Care Survey and included 283 dyads of rural older adults and their caregivers. The CBS to…

  13. Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities in Adult Homes: Monitoring Changes over Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmerman, A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Residents (n=617) with psychiatric disabilities, living in 3 adult homes, were studied over 24 months to determine changes that occurred in population served, modes of intervention, and outcome measures. Residents showed stability in their rehospitalization rate, symptomatology, and social integration. A token economy reduced symptomatology and…

  14. Primary Health Care: Potential Home for Family-Focused Preventive Interventions.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Laurel K; Mehus, Christopher J; Hawkins, J David; Boat, Thomas; McCabe, Mary Ann; Barkin, Shari; Perrin, Ellen C; Metzler, Carol W; Prado, Guillermo; Tait, V Fan; Brown, Randall; Beardslee, William

    2016-10-01

    Family-focused prevention programs have been shown to effectively reduce a range of negative behavioral health outcomes but have had limited reach. Three key barriers must be overcome to expand the reach of family-focused prevention programs and thereby achieve a significant public health impact. These barriers are (1) current social norms and perceptions of parenting programs; (2) concerns about the expertise and legitimacy of sponsoring organizations to offer parenting advice; and (3) a paucity of stable, sustainable funding mechanisms. Primary healthcare settings are well positioned to overcome these barriers. Recent changes within health care make primary care settings an increasingly favorable home for family-focused prevention and suggest possibilities for sustainable funding of family-focused prevention programs. This paper discusses the existing advantages of primary care settings and lays out a plan to move toward realizing the potential public health impact of family-focused prevention through widespread implementation in primary healthcare settings.

  15. Treatment Engagement: Building Therapeutic Alliance in Home-Based Treatment with Adolescents and their Families

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sanna J.; Bender, Kimberly; Lantry, Janet; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Client engagement is an essential yet challenging ingredient in effective therapy. Engaged clients are more likely to bond with therapists and counselors, endorse treatment goals, participate to a greater degree, remain in treatment longer, and report higher levels of satisfaction. This study explored the process of engaging high-risk youth and their parents in a unique home-based family therapy intervention. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 families who completed family therapy sessions that included a core component aimed at increasing treatment engagement. Parents’ and youths’ perceptions of engagement suggest the importance of developing therapeutic alliance with therapists, who facilitated building a shared alliance among family members. Implications for improving client engagement are discussed within the context of alliance building with the therapist and among family members. PMID:20556209

  16. Home for the Helidays: A Guide for Student Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACoA). Making a Difference Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    For many students with addicted family members, the holiday season acts more like a time machine, instantly transporting them back to a time when addicted behavior makes it seem like they have gone, "home for the helidays" rather than home to celebrate caring and sharing with members of the family. Often, students who return to an addicted family…

  17. Outcome Evaluation of "Family Eats": An Eight-Session Web-Based Program Promoting Healthy Home Food Environments and Dietary Behaviors for African American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Thompson, Debbe; Chen, Tzu-An

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a randomized clinical trial evaluating the eight-session "Family Eats" web-based intervention promoting healthy home food environments for African American families. African American families (n = 126) with 8- to 12-year-old children completed online baseline questionnaires and were randomized into…

  18. Outcome evaluation of Family Eats: An eight-session web-based program promoting healthy home food environments and dietary behaviors for African American families

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article presents the results of a randomized clinical trial evaluating the eight-session Family Eats web-based intervention promoting healthy home food environments for African American families. African American families (n=126) with 8- to 12-year-old children completed online baseline questio...

  19. Bringing Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Home: Catheter Maintenance Practices and Beliefs of Pediatric Oncology Patients and Families

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, Michael L.; Chen, Allen R.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Hebert, Lindsay C.; Bundy, David G.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Fratino, Lisa; Herpst, Cynthia; Kokoszka, Michelle; Miller, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to investigate (1) the extent to which best-practice central line maintenance practices were employed in the homes of pediatric oncology patients and by whom, (2) caregiver beliefs about central line care and central line–associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) risk, (3) barriers to optimal central line care by families, and (4) educational experiences and preferences regarding central line care. Methods Researchers administered a survey to patients and families in a tertiary care pediatric oncology clinic that engaged in rigorous ambulatory and inpatient CLABSI prevention efforts. Results Of 110 invited patients and caregivers, 105 participated (95% response rate) in the survey (March–May 2012). Of the 50 respondents reporting that they or another caregiver change central line dressings, 48% changed a dressing whenever it was soiled as per protocol (many who did not change dressings per protocol also never personally changed dressings); 67% reported the oncology clinic primarily cares for their child’s central line, while 29% reported that an adult caregiver or the patient primarily cares for the central line. Eight patients performed their own line care “always” or “most of the time.” Some 13% of respondents believed that it was “slightly likely” or “not at all likely” that their child will get an infection if caregivers do not perform line care practices perfectly every time. Dressing change practices were the most difficult to comply with at home. Some 18% of respondents wished they learned more about line care, and 12% received contradictory training. Respondents cited a variety of preferences regarding line care teaching, although the majority looked to clinic nurses for modeling line care. Conclusions Interventions aimed at reducing ambulatory CLABSIs should target appropriate educational experiences for adult caregivers and patients and identify ways to improve compliance with best-practice care

  20. Doctor-patient communication without family is most frequently practiced in patients with malignant tumors in home medical care settings.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takuma; Imanaga, Teruhiko; Matsuzaki, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Promotion of home medical care is absolutely necessary in Japan where is a rapidly aging society. In home medical care settings, triadic communications among the doctor, patient and the family are common. And "communications just between the doctor and the patient without the family" (doctor-patient communication without family, "DPC without family") is considered important for the patient to frankly communicate with the doctor without consideration for the family. However, the circumstances associated with DPC without family are unclear. Therefore, to identify the factors of the occurrence of DPC without family, we conducted a cross-sectional mail-in survey targeting 271 families of Japanese patients who had previously received home medical care. Among 227 respondents (83.8%), we eventually analyzed data from 143, excluding families of patients with severe hearing or cognitive impairment and severe verbal communication dysfunction. DPC without family occurred in 26.6% (n = 38) of the families analyzed. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed using a model including Primary disease, Daily activity, Duration of home medical care, Interval between doctor visits, Duration of doctor's stay, Existence of another room, and Spouse as primary caregiver. As a result, DPC without family was significantly associated with malignant tumor as primary disease (OR, 3.165; 95% CI, 1.180-8.486; P = 0.022). In conclusion, the visiting doctors should bear in mind that the background factor of the occurrence of DPC without family is patient's malignant tumors.

  1. Managing Medications During Home Hospice Cancer Care: The Needs of Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Tjia, Jennifer; Ellington, Lee; Clayton, Margaret F.; Lemay, Celeste; Reblin, Maija

    2015-01-01

    Context Family caregivers (FCGs) are often at the frontline of symptom management for patients with advanced illness in home hospice. FCGs’ cognitive, social and technical skills in complex medication management have been well studied in the literature; however, few studies have tested existing frameworks in clinical cases in home hospice. Objectives This study sought to assess the applicability of Lau et al.’s caregiver medication management skills framework in the context of family caregiving in home hospice in order to further the understanding of FCGs’ essential medication management skills. Methods This was a secondary data analysis of 18 audio recorded home hospice visits transcribed verbatim; deductive content analysis of caregiver-nurse interactions was conducted. The target sample included FCGs of hospice patients who had cancer diagnoses in hospices located in the greater urban area of the Rocky Mountain West. Caregiver medication management skills were identified and categorized into the five domains of caregiver expertise. Exemplars of each domain were identified. Results An average of four medications (SD 3.5) was discussed at each home hospice visit. Medication knowledge skills were observed in the majority of home hospice visits (15 of 18). Teamwork skills were observed in 11 of 18 cases, followed by organizational and personhood skills (10 of 18). Symptom management skills occurred in 12 of 18 cases. An additional two subconstructs of the Personhood domain –1) advocacy for the caregiver and 2) skills in discontinuing medications – were proposed. Conclusion These findings support Lau et al.’s framework for caregiver medication management skills and expands upon the existing domains proposed. Future interventions to assess FCGs’ skills are recommended. PMID:26159294

  2. Creating patient and family education web sites: design and content of the home parenteral nutrition family caregivers web site.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Sharon A; Macan Yadrich, Donna; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Smith, Carol E

    2011-11-01

    When managing chronic illnesses, caregivers repeatedly seek online information about providing complex, long-term care but often neglect to find information about how to care for themselves. Poor health among caregivers is not only detrimental to their own well-being but may also result in harm to those for whom they care. For this reason, caregivers need access to information and activities about caring for themselves in addition to the information about managing home care they are already likely to seek. The HPN Family Caregivers Web site was developed to guide caregivers through the process of caring for themselves by establishing a caregiving routine, self-monitoring their mental and physical health, and practicing good sleep hygiene, while also managing the complexities of home care. While Web site information, activities, and algorithms for managing chronic illnesses need to be specific to each population, the content guiding caregivers to care for their own health is universal.

  3. Day to Day Operations of Home School Families: Selecting from a Menu of Educational Choices to Meet Students' Individual Instructional Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Kenneth V.; Burroughs, Susie

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the day to day operations of home schools. The case study method was used with four families from a larger pool of families that held membership in a home school organization. Data was gathered using interviews, observations, and artifacts. Findings suggest that these families operated their home schools using traditional…

  4. Mealtime family interactions in home environments of children with loss of control eating.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Julia; Hartmann, Andrea Sabrina; Rief, Winfried; Hilbert, Anja

    2011-06-01

    Experimental and self-report studies have shown that parents have a strong influence on their normal or overweight children's eating behavior, i.e. through parental feeding behavior or communication. Studies in children with loss of control (LOC) eating that have investigated this relationship are scarce, and ecologically valid observational studies are missing. This study examined family functioning at mealtimes in home environments in 43 families of a child with LOC eating and 31 families of a child without LOC eating; the children were 8-13 years old. Familial interactions, child eating behavior, and parental mealtime behavior were assessed using the Mealtime Family Interaction Coding System, observation of bite speed of the child, and self-report questionnaires. Less healthy patterns of communication (U=201.53, p<.01) and interpersonal involvement (U=207.54, p<.01) and more maladaptive overall family functioning (U=233.52, p<.05) were observed but not self-reported in families of a child with LOC eating compared to those without LOC eating. Children with LOC eating (M=4.73, SD=1.88) ate faster than controls (M=3.71, SD=1.19; p<.05), with highest bite speed in a group with high recurrent LOC eating (p<.01). The results indicate that maladaptive patterns of family functioning during family mealtimes are present in LOC eating in children and are associated with the child's eating behavior. Parent-child communication training should be tested as an intervention for children with LOC episodes.

  5. Telecommuting's differential impact on work-family conflict: is there no place like home?

    PubMed

    Golden, Timothy D; Veiga, John F; Simsek, Zeki

    2006-11-01

    The literature on the impact of telecommuting on work-family conflict has been equivocal, asserting that telecommuting enhances work-life balance and reduces conflict, or countering that it increases conflict as more time and emotional energy are allocated to family. Surveying 454 professional-level employees who split their work time between an office and home, the authors examined how extensively working in this mode impacts work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict, as well as the contextual impact of job autonomy, scheduling flexibility, and household size. As hypothesized, the findings suggest that telecommuting has a differential impact on work-family conflict, such that the more extensively individuals work in this mode, the lower their work-to-family conflict, but the higher their family-to-work conflict. Additionally, job autonomy and scheduling flexibility were found to positively moderate telecommuting's impact on work-to-family conflict, but household size was found to negatively moderate telecommuting's impact on family-to-work conflict, suggesting that contextual factors may be domain specific.

  6. Relations Among Home- and Community-Based Services Investment and Nursing Home Rates of Use for Working-Age and Older Adults: A State-Level Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. I examined state-level rates of nursing home use for the period from 2000 to 2007. Methods. I used multivariate fixed-effects models to examine associations between state sociodemographic, economic, supply, and programmatic characteristics and rates of use. Results. Nursing home use declined among older adults (aged ≥65 years) in more than two thirds of states and the District of Columbia but increased among older working-age adults (aged 31–64 years) in all but 2 states. State characteristics associated with these trends differed by age group. Although relatively greater state investment in Medicaid home- and community-based services coupled with reduced nursing home capacity was associated with reduced rates of nursing home care for adults aged 65 years and older, neither characteristic was associated with use among older working-age adults. Their use was associated with state sociodemographic characteristics, as well as chronic disease prevalence. Conclusions. Policy efforts to expand home- and community-based services and to reduce nursing facility capacity appear warranted. To more fully extend the Supreme Court's Olmstead decision's promise to older working-age adults, additional efforts to understand factors driving their increasing use are required. PMID:21778497

  7. Quality Outcomes in Group Home Dementia Care for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janicki, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dementia, as a public health challenge, is a phenomenon vexing many care organisations providing specialised residential and family supports for older adults with intellectual disabilities. With increasing survivorship to ages when risk is greatest, expectations are that many more adults in service will present with cognitive decline…

  8. Factoid forensics: have "more than 40" Australian families abandoned their homes because of wind farm noise?

    PubMed

    Chapman, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Anti-wind farm activists repeatedly claim that families said to be adversely affected by noise from wind turbines "abandon" their homes. In Australia, a claim of "more than 40 families" has been made by a prominent anti-wind farm activist. Six sources (parliamentary submissions, media reports, an anti-wind farm website, wind industry sources, correspondence with known anti-wind farm activists and with three politicians opposed to wind farms) were used to find evidence of home "abandonments." Claims about 12 Australian households permanently (n = 10) or periodically (n = 2) leaving their homes were found. However, no house appears to have been permanently "abandoned" without sale, as the expression implies. These 12 cases need contextualizing against considerations that several of those involved were either dedicated activists against wind farms from times sometimes pre-dating their construction, were engaged in protracted negotiations for home purchase with wind companies, had pre-existing health problems, grievances with the wind company over employment or had left the area for unrelated reasons of employment elsewhere. The statement that "more than 40" houses have been "abandoned" because of wind turbines in Australia is a factoid promoted by wind farm opponents for dramatic, rhetorical impact. Other considerations are often involved in abandonment unrelated to the claims made about wind farm noise.

  9. Family Involvement in School-Based Health Promotion: Bringing Nutrition Information Home.

    PubMed

    Blom-Hoffman, Jessica; Wilcox, Kaila R; Dunn, Liam; Leff, Stephen S; Power, Thomas J

    2008-12-01

    Family-school collaboration related to children's physical development has become increasingly important as childhood obesity rates continue to rise. The present study described the development and implementation of a literacy-based, family component of a school-based health education program and investigated its viability, acceptability, and effectiveness. Interactive children's books were the mechanism by which students, parents, and teachers received consistent messages at home and school regarding nutrition information. The home-school intervention served to bridge home and school cultures in an urban population. Preliminary process evaluation results indicated that the interactive children's books were feasible to implement in the school context. Parents, children, and teachers had positive perceptions of the books. Parents who received the books demonstrated increased knowledge of 5 a Day, the primary nutrition message communicated in the program. Although not statistically significant, after the first and second years of intervention, parents in the experimental group reported that their children were eating 0.54 and 0.36 additional servings of fruit and vegetables per day compared with children in the control group. The program did not seem to impact the availability and accessibility of fruits and vegetables at home.

  10. In Home Family Supports: What Families of Youngsters with Traumatic Brain Injury Really Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Betty

    This guide, based on a qualitative research study which identified primary stressors in families of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI), presents: (1) a summary of the needs of families affected by TBI; and (2) a proposed theoretical intervention model to meet those needs. The first section attempts to describe the present system of…

  11. Parental psychopathology and reports of the childhood home environment in adults with early-onset dysthymic disorder.

    PubMed

    Lizardi, H; Klein, D N

    2000-02-01

    In previous studies, patients with dysthymic disorder (DD) have reported significantly more adverse early home environments than patients with episodic major depressive disorder (MDD) and normal controls. However, DD is also associated with increased rates of mood and personality disorders in first-degree relatives, raising the possibility that the DD-early adversity relationship may be due to the confounding effects of parental psychopathology. The present study addressed this issue using a sample of 97 adult outpatients with early-onset DD, 45 adult outpatients with episodic MDD, and 45 normal controls, and their first-degree relatives. The early home environment was assessed with semi-structured interviews and self-report inventories. Parental psychopathology was assessed using semi-structured direct and family history interviews, and diagnoses were assigned using the best-estimate procedure. Results indicated that parental mood and personality disorders were strongly associated with probands' reports of early adversity. However, patients with DD continued to differ significantly from patients with episodic MDD and normal controls after controlling for parental psychopathology.

  12. Nurse-family conflict beyond the walls of Iranian homes who have the mechanical ventilation dependent patient: a qualitative research

    PubMed Central

    Moradian, ST; Nourozi, K; Ebbadi, A; Khankeh, HR

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. Home health care (HHC) has been developed more than any other industry in the past decade. Conflict between nurse and family can diminish the aid produced to the home care patients. Objective. This research was guidance to explore the nature of conflicts between the patient’s families and nurses in homes of dangerous care patients, in an Iranian context. Methods and results. Using the qualitative comfortable study system and the purposive sampling, 15 participants including 7 nurses (4 males and 3 females) operating in houses and 8 members of family who had a care receiving mechanical ventilation at house, were interviewed during 2013 and 2014. The main sources of conflict were due to nurse expectations, family belief, and personal qualities of nurses. The team guider tried to prevent the conflict by different measures, but in some samples, the conflict arose. Both members of family and nurses accepted the team leader as the judge. At first, he tried to keep the situation stable and gave some notification to the nurse and some descriptions to the members of family. In some samples, that the family could not adapt to the position and efforts to solve the conflict were unsuccessful, the team relation with the family being cut. Conclusion. Home care situation is prone to conflict due to various factors. The mentioned sources of conflict in home trial were changed from the ones of the hospital. Based on these results appropriate interventions suitable for home conditions should be implemented. PMID:28316661

  13. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Martin, Eric; Moyer, Neil

    2012-10-01

    This report is a revision of an earlier report titled: Measure Guideline: Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. Revisions include: Information in the text box on page 1 was revised to reflect the most accurate information regarding classifications as referenced in the 2012 International Residential Code. “Measure Guideline” was dropped from the title of the report. An addition was made to the reference list.

  14. Family-focused children's end of life care in hospital and at home.

    PubMed

    Parker, Helen; Farrell, Mairead; Ryder, Allison; Fernley, Karen; Cox, Chantel; Farasat, Helen; Hewitt-Taylor, Jaqui

    2014-07-01

    An increasing number of children and young people require end of life care, and providing them and their families with optimum support at this time is crucial. This article describes how nurses working with children and families in home, hospital and community settings used the principles of practice development methodology to develop end of life care provision and follow-up bereavement support. It outlines the 'ways of knowing' that informed developments and how parents' priorities were kept central to the process. Finally, it discusses how the approach taken to practice development reflected the value of compassion in nursing practice.

  15. Transforming Teacher-Family Relationships: Shifting Roles and Perceptions of Home Visits through the Funds of Knowledge Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Kristin Lyn; Karabon, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Education has embraced the idea of an "asset approach" to working with families and children, creating a focus on developing collaborative relationships with families by building on what they bring to the table. In this paper we explore what happened when early childhood teachers entered homes to learn from families and identify their…

  16. Prevalence of urinary incontinence among community-dwelling adults receiving home care.

    PubMed

    Du Moulin, M F M T; Hamers, J P H; Ambergen, A W; Janssen, M A P; Halfens, R J G

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2005 to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with urinary incontinence (UI) in adults receiving home care. Of the 2,866 patients surveyed, 46% suffered from UI; 6.5% had stress, 16.6% had urge, 9% had mixed, and 17.6% had functional incontinence. No diagnosis regarding type of UI had been established in 50.2%. Factors associated with UI were advanced age, higher body mass index, and impaired mobility. UI is prevalent in older persons receiving home care, but the lack of diagnosis of type of UI in half of the participants surveyed impedes management of UI.

  17. Delivering home-based case management to families with children with mental retardation and developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ardito, M; Botuck, S; Freeman, S E; Levy, J M

    1997-01-01

    To meet the needs of individuals with mental retardation and developmental disabilities (MR/DD) and their families living in urban setting, a noncenter-based model of case management was implemented. In contrast to traditional case management in which families and consumers come to the case manager and most service coordination is done by telephone or in meetings at the case manager/social worker's worksite, the case manager in a noncenter-based model is mobile and able to meet the consumer and family in their domains. In this model, case management is provided in conjunction with in-home residential habilitation and funded by Medicaid under the Home and Community Based Services Waiver. This funding stream provides monies for nontraditional services delivered in noncertified settings. Case managers used the Family Resource Scale to get an immediate indication of the resources and needs of each family. The scale highlights the adequacy of a person's basic and caregiving resources, as well as financial needs. The findings from this study suggest that an understanding of both disability and entitlements is essential for case managers who may have to help advocate for consumers around services and benefits. Moreover, to build and maintain an egalitarian and supportive relationship with families, the importance of caregiver-specified resources and needs must be recognized by case managers. Access to resource information and the ability to engage the family in problem-solving depends on a well-trained staff with the ability to respond to individuals with different needs and from a variety of circumstances. These essential skills prepare a case manager to assist families with their immediate requirements as well as to mobilize them to plan for future needs.

  18. “Missing Pieces” – Functional, Social, and Environmental Barriers to Recovery for Vulnerable Older Adults Transitioning From Hospital to Home

    PubMed Central

    Greysen, S. Ryan; Hoi-Cheung, Doug; Garcia, Veronica; Kessell, Eric; Sarkar, Urmimala; Goldman, Lauren; Schneidermann, Michelle; Critchfield, Jeffrey; Pierluissi, Edgar; Kushel, Margot

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent interventions to improve transitions in care for older adults focus on hospital discharge processes. Limited data exists on patient concerns for care at home after discharge, particularly for vulnerable older adults. Design We used in-depth, in-person interviews to describe barriers to recovery at home after leaving the hospital for vulnerable, older adults. We purposefully sampled by age, gender, race, and English proficiency to ensure a wide breadth of experiences. Interviews were independently coded by two investigators using the constant comparative method. Thematic analysis was performed by the entire research team with diverse backgrounds in primary care, hospital medicine, geriatrics, and nursing. Setting and Participants We interviewed vulnerable older adults (low income/health literacy, and/or Limited English Proficiency) who were enrolled in a larger discharge interventional study within 30 days of discharge from an urban public hospital. All participants were interviewed in their native language (English, Spanish, or Chinese). Results We interviewed 24 patients: mean age 63 (55–84), 66% male, 67% Non-white, 16% Spanish-speaking, 16% Chinese-speaking. We identified an overarching theme of “missing pieces” in the plan for post-discharge recovery at home from which three specific sub-themes emerged: (1) functional limitations and difficulty with mobility and self-care tasks; (2) social isolation and lack of support from family and friends; (3) challenges from poverty and the built environment at home. In contrast, patients described mostly supportive experiences with traditional focuses of transition care such as following prescribed medication and diet regimens. Conclusion Hospital-based discharge interventions that focus on traditional aspects of care may overlook social and functional gaps in post-discharge care at home for vulnerable older adults. Post-discharge interventions that address these challenges may be necessary to

  19. Effectiveness of a balance training home exercise programme for adults with haemophilia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hill, K; Fearn, M; Williams, S; Mudge, L; Walsh, C; McCarthy, P; Walsh, M; Street, A

    2010-01-01

    Adults with haemophilia and other bleeding disorders often develop lower limb musculoskeletal problems associated with bleeds into joints and muscles, which may affect balance performance and increase likelihood of falling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an individualized balance and strength home exercise programme on improving balance and related outcomes for adults with haemophilia and other bleeding disorders. Twenty male adults with haemophilia and other bleeding disorders (mean age 39.4 years, 95% CI = 33.7-45.1) were recruited to participate. They underwent a comprehensive clinical and force platform assessment of balance and related measures. Based on assessment findings, the assessing physiotherapist provided an individualized home exercise programme of balance, strengthening and walking exercises. Re-assessment occurred after the 4-month exercise programme. Twelve participants (60%) completed the programme and were re-assessed. There were no safety problems or dropouts associated with the exercise programme aggravating joint status. Although there were no statistically significant changes in any of the measures (adjusted for multiple comparisons), there were improvements of between 5% and 22% on 10 of the 16 measures, with the Neurocom modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance (P = 0.036) and Timed Sit to Stand (P = 0.064) approaching significance. A tailored home exercise programme targeting balance, strengthening and walking is feasible for adults with haemophilia and other bleeding disorders. These results suggest that positive physical outcomes including improved balance and mobility may be achieved with this type of programme.

  20. Career Education: Learning with a Purpose. Secondary Guide-Vol. 4. Home Economics, Family/Community Relations, Home Management, Foods and Nutrition, Clothing and Textiles, Field Trip Sites and Guest Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Marilyn; And Others

    The guide offers a compilation of teacher-developed career education materials which may be integrated with secondary level curriculum in home economics. Suggested activities and ideas are presented as unit plans in the following areas of home economics: family relations/family living, home management, child development, foods and nutrition,…

  1. [Coordination to assist with hospital-to-home discharge after cerebral hemorrhage--perspectives of a patient's family and nurse].

    PubMed

    Waguchi, Hideko; Hidaka, Kumi; Shinoki, Keiji; Matsuoka, Mio; Mito, Saori; Doi, Seiko; Hata, Akiko; Ibata, Takeshi; Komuro, Ryutaro; Iijima, Shohei

    2013-12-01

    Discharge support, although provided for a limited time, is of vital importance in the acute phase care period. Such support is necessary to ensure continuity of care and treatment even after being discharged from the hospital. I acquired both the viewpoints of the family and the nurse of a patient who was about to be discharged from the hospital after cerebral hemorrhage. However, the patient's family and I were not able to decide on a home care plan or hospital-to-home transfer ahead of time because of the unstable condition of the patient, limited care power of the family, and varying discharge plans among the family members. I intended to help in the decision-making process, taking into consideration the patient's best interest. I evaluated the viewpoint of the family and was able to understand situations in which a family member, who assumes the role of a primary care giver, would need guidance in providing home care to the patient.

  2. In-Service Education for Case Workers in Home Management Improvement for Welfare Recipient Families in Ten Eastern Kentucky Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morehead State Univ., KY. School of Applied Sciences and Technology.

    Morehead State University conducted inservice workshops in home management for 42 social caseworkers in eastern Kentucky. The subjects covered were community resources; family planning; clothing, gardening, and nutrition; and environmental sanitation and home nursing. Teaching methods included lectures, field trips, buzz sessions, questions and…

  3. Daily Spillover From Family to Work: A Test of the Work-Home Resources Model.

    PubMed

    Du, Danyang; Derks, Daantje; Bakker, Arnold B

    2017-02-02

    The present study examines a mediated moderation model of the day-level effects of family hassles and family-work spillover (affect and cognition) on the relationship between job resources and employees' flourishing at work. Based on the work-home resources model, the authors hypothesized that demands from one domain (family) induce repetitive thoughts or negative feelings about those problems, so that individuals are not able to function optimally and to make full use of contextual resources in the other domain (work). Multilevel analyses of 108 Chinese working parents' 366 daily surveys revealed that the relationship between morning job resources and afternoon flourishing was significantly positive when previous day family hassles were low; the relationship became nonsignificant when previous day family hassles were high. In addition, as predicted, daily rumination also attenuated the relationship between morning job resources and afternoon flourishing, whereas daily affect did not. Finally, the moderating effect of previous day family hassles was mediated by daily rumination. The findings contribute to spillover theories by revealing the roles of affective and cognitive spillover from family to work. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. The roles of familial alcoholism and adolescent family harmony in young adults' substance dependence disorders: mediated and moderated relations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; King, Kevin M; Chassin, Laurie

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the prospective relations among family history density of alcoholism (FHD), adolescent family harmony, and young adults' alcohol and drug dependence. Family harmony was rated by mothers and fathers in adolescence, and young adults' substance dependence diagnoses were obtained through structured interviews. Higher FHD predicted lower adolescent family harmony, which in turn increased young adults' odds of being diagnosed with drug dependence (with and without alcohol dependence) compared to no diagnoses or to alcohol dependence only. Family harmony also interacted with FHD such that the protective effect of family harmony on young adults' drug dependence with or without alcohol dependence decreased as FHD rose, and was nonsignificant at high levels of FHD. The findings suggest the importance of distinguishing among alcohol and drug dependence disorders and examining their differential etiological pathways, and also suggest that the protective effects of harmonious family environments on substance dependence may be limited at high levels of FHD.

  5. [A Study on problems associated with a patient's death during home care, based on the duration of home care and patient's age-why terminal home care is difficult for a patient's family].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Hiroo; Okabe, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Kumiko; Kikuchi, Kana

    2012-12-01

    When a patient receives home care, an important factor is how the family accepts the patient's death. In this study, we observed that the number of long-term in-home terminal care cases increased, as well as the number of short-term in-home care cases. Moreover, the number of cancer cases among the young population is also increasing. Consequently, how to acceptance of a patient's death varies among their family. When tending to patients, suitable support from the medical staff is required. Additionally, various options need to be provided for terminal care.

  6. Development of a Wheelchair Skills Home Program for Older Adults Using a Participatory Action Design Approach

    PubMed Central

    Giesbrecht, Edward M.; Miller, William C.; Mitchell, Ian M.; Woodgate, Roberta L.

    2014-01-01

    Restricted mobility is the most common impairment among older adults and a manual wheelchair is often prescribed to address these limitations. However, limited access to rehabilitation services results in older adults typically receiving little or no mobility training when they receive a wheelchair. As an alternative and novel approach, we developed a therapist-monitored wheelchair skills home training program delivered via a computer tablet. To optimize efficacy and adherence, principles of self-efficacy and adult learning theory were foundational in the program design. A participatory action design approach was used to engage older adult wheelchair users, care providers, and prescribing clinicians in an iterative design and development process. A series of prototypes were fabricated and revised, based on feedback from eight stakeholder focus groups, until a final version was ready for evaluation in a clinical trial. Stakeholder contributions affirmed and enhanced the foundational theoretical principles and provided validation of the final product for the target population. PMID:25276768

  7. Development of a wheelchair skills home program for older adults using a participatory action design approach.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Edward M; Miller, William C; Mitchell, Ian M; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2014-01-01

    Restricted mobility is the most common impairment among older adults and a manual wheelchair is often prescribed to address these limitations. However, limited access to rehabilitation services results in older adults typically receiving little or no mobility training when they receive a wheelchair. As an alternative and novel approach, we developed a therapist-monitored wheelchair skills home training program delivered via a computer tablet. To optimize efficacy and adherence, principles of self-efficacy and adult learning theory were foundational in the program design. A participatory action design approach was used to engage older adult wheelchair users, care providers, and prescribing clinicians in an iterative design and development process. A series of prototypes were fabricated and revised, based on feedback from eight stakeholder focus groups, until a final version was ready for evaluation in a clinical trial. Stakeholder contributions affirmed and enhanced the foundational theoretical principles and provided validation of the final product for the target population.

  8. The effectiveness of mitigation for reducing radon risk in single-family Minnesota homes.

    PubMed

    Steck, Daniel J

    2012-09-01

    Increased lung cancer incidence has been linked with long-term exposure to elevated residential radon. Experimental studies have shown that soil ventilation can be effective in reducing radon concentrations in single-family homes. Most radon mitigation systems in the U.S. are installed by private contractors. The long-term effectiveness of these systems is not well known, since few state radon programs regulate or independently confirm post-mitigation radon concentrations. The effectiveness of soil ventilation systems in Minnesota was measured for 140 randomly selected clients of six professional mitigators. Homeowners reported pre-mitigation radon screening concentrations that averaged 380 Bq m (10.3 pCi L). Long term post-mitigation radon measurements on the two lowest floors show that, even years after mitigation, 97% of these homes have concentrations below the 150 Bq m U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action level. The average post-mitigation radon in the houses was 30 Bq m, an average observed reduction of >90%. If that reduction was maintained over the lifetime of the 1.2 million Minnesotans who currently reside in single-family homes with living space radon above the EPA action level, approximately 50,000 lives could be extended for nearly two decades by preventing radon-related lung cancers.

  9. Families and Futures. A Resource for Developing Home and Family Life Education Programs. Revised Working Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    This curriculum guide was designed to help teachers in strengthening the ability of students from middle school through grade 12 to recognize complex problems, examine competing points of view, and engage in dialogue leading to practical solutions for issues that affect individuals and families and ultimately the world. The course integrates the…

  10. Effect of a Home Telecare Program on Oral Health among Adults with Tetraplegia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Study design one group pre- and post-test design Objective The primary aim was to examine both the short- and long-term effects of an oral home telecare program on improving gingival health among adults with tetraplegia. Methods Eight adults with tetraplegia participated. The oral home telecare program consisted of individualized oral hygiene training in the use of assistive devices (powered toothbrush and adapted flosser and/or oral irrigator) using PC-based videoconferencing between each participant and an occupational therapist. Training was conducted on an average of five 15 to 30 min sessions across three months. During these training sessions, supervised practice of oral hygiene, and provision of immediate corrective feedback and positive reinforcement in the use of adaptive oral hygiene devices was emphasized. Gingival health assessment using the Löe-Silness gingival index (LSGI) was conducted at baseline, six months and 12 months. Results From baseline to six months, participants showed statistically significant differences (i.e., improvement with less gingival inflammation) in their LSGI scores (z=2.18, P=.03). From baseline to 12 months, participants also showed a statistically significant difference (i.e., improvement, z=2.03; P=.04) in their LSGI scores. Conclusion This study indicates that preventive oral home telecare with repeated oral hygiene training in the use of adaptive devices improved gingival health at six and 12 months among adults with tetraplegia. PMID:23318557

  11. Family health information sharing among older adults: reaching more family members.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Sato; Schafer, Ellen J

    2015-01-01

    Although family health history (FHH) information has tremendous potential in the prevention of common complex diseases such as heart disease and cancer, lack of knowledge about one's own FHH among the public hinders its utility. Older individuals often desire to contribute to the well-being of younger generations and also play critical roles in disseminating this information. This study evaluated psychosocial factors associated with the extent of FHH communication within families. Older adults (N = 110) were interviewed at three senior centers in an urban community. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis showed that respondents who received FHH from a parent reported 41 % more family members with whom they shared FHH (b = 0.34, p < 0.001) controlling for the family network size. Furthermore, one unit increase in the number of family members with whom respondents exchange reciprocal emotional support (b = 0.04, p < 0.01), perceived familiarity with own FHH (b = 0.14, p = 0.01), and self-efficacy to share FHH (b = 0.18, p = 0.02) were associated with 4, 15, and 20 % increases in the number of family members with whom respondents shared FHH, respectively. Future efforts may inform older adults about their important role in modeling FHH communication behavior to encourage information sharing in future generations while providing information about how to collect and disseminate FHH to increase their familiarity and ability to share FHH within the family.

  12. Perceptions of Family Alcohol Use in a Young Adult Sample

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Kelly A.; Stewart, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Perceptions of family alcohol use have been linked to adolescent alcohol use behaviors, yet there have been no studies that have assessed this relationship in young adults. This study examined perceptions of family alcohol use and their association with participants’ self-reported alcohol use. Participants included 171 undergraduate students (mean age = 21.67, 71.9 percent female, 75.4 percent Caucasian). Participants completed measures assessing quantity and frequency of alcohol use, negative consequences of use, and sibling relationship quality. They also reported their perceptions of alcohol use for siblings and parents during a typical week. Perceptions of siblings’ quantity of weekly alcohol use were significantly associated with participants’ quantity of alcohol use (r = .21, p = .006) and frequency of alcohol use (r = .23, p = .002). Perceptions of parental alcohol use were not related to the participants’ alcohol use patterns. PMID:26339202

  13. Providing More Home-Delivered Meals Is One Way To Keep Older Adults With Low Care Needs Out Of Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Kali S.; Mor, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Programs that help older adults live independently in the community can also deliver net savings to states on the costs of long-term supports and services. We estimate that if all states had increased by 1 percent the number of adults age sixty-five or older who received home-delivered meals in 2009 under Title III of the Older Americans Act, total annual savings to states’ Medicaid programs could have exceeded $109 million. The projected savings primarily reflect decreased Medicaid spending for an estimated 1,722 older adults with low-care needs who would no longer require nursing home care— instead, they could remain at home, sustained by home-delivered meals. Twenty-six states could have realized net savings in 2009 from the expansion of their home-delivered meals programs, while twenty-two states would have incurred net costs. Programs such as home-delivered meals have the potential to provide substantial savings to some states’ Medicaid programs. PMID:24101071

  14. Lizards cooperatively tunnel to construct a long-term home for family members.

    PubMed

    McAlpin, Steve; Duckett, Paul; Stow, Adam

    2011-05-11

    Constructing a home to protect offspring while they mature is common in many vertebrate groups, but has not previously been reported in lizards. Here we provide the first example of a lizard that constructs a long-term home for family members, and a rare case of lizards behaving cooperatively. The great desert skink, Liopholis kintorei from Central Australia, constructs an elaborate multi-tunnelled burrow that can be continuously occupied for up to 7 years. Multiple generations participate in construction and maintenance of burrows. Parental assignments based on DNA analysis show that immature individuals within the same burrow were mostly full siblings, even when several age cohorts were present. Parents were always captured at burrows containing their offspring, and females were only detected breeding with the same male both within- and across seasons. Consequently, the individual investments made to construct or maintain a burrow system benefit their own offspring, or siblings, over several breeding seasons.

  15. Higher environmental relative moldiness index values measured in homes of adults with asthma, rhinitis, or both conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Higher values of the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI), a DNA-based method for quantifying indoor molds, have been associated with asthma in children. In this study, settled dust samples were collected from the homes of adults with asthma and rhinitis (n=202 homes) i...

  16. Older Adults' Perspectives on Home Exercise after Falls Rehabilitation: Understanding the Importance of Promoting Healthy, Active Ageing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore what might encourage older people to exercise at home after falls rehabilitation. Design: Qualitative research methods were used based on a grounded theory approach, to provide insights into older adults' experiences following a fall, of both rehabilitation and home exercise. Setting: Community dwellings. Method: Nine…

  17. A Smart-Home System to Unobtrusively and Continuously Assess Loneliness in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Austin, Johanna; Dodge, Hiroko H; Riley, Thomas; Jacobs, Peter G; Thielke, Stephen; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Loneliness is a common condition in older adults and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, decreased sleep quality, and increased risk of cognitive decline. Assessing loneliness in older adults is challenging due to the negative desirability biases associated with being lonely. Thus, it is necessary to develop more objective techniques to assess loneliness in older adults. In this paper, we describe a system to measure loneliness by assessing in-home behavior using wireless motion and contact sensors, phone monitors, and computer software as well as algorithms developed to assess key behaviors of interest. We then present results showing the accuracy of the system in detecting loneliness in a longitudinal study of 16 older adults who agreed to have the sensor platform installed in their own homes for up to 8 months. We show that loneliness is significantly associated with both time out-of-home ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) and number of computer sessions ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). [Formula: see text] for the model was 0.35. We also show the model's ability to predict out-of-sample loneliness, demonstrating that the correlation between true loneliness and predicted out-of-sample loneliness is 0.48. When compared with the University of California at Los Angeles loneliness score, the normalized mean absolute error of the predicted loneliness scores was 0.81 and the normalized root mean squared error was 0.91. These results represent first steps toward an unobtrusive, objective method for the prediction of loneliness among older adults, and mark the first time multiple objective behavioral measures that have been related to this key health outcome.

  18. Pyrethroids in house dust from the homes of farm worker families in the MICASA study.

    PubMed

    Trunnelle, Kelly J; Bennett, Deborah H; Tancredi, Daniel J; Gee, Shirley J; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T; Hennessy-Burt, Tamara E; Hammock, Bruce D; Schenker, Marc B

    2013-11-01

    Indoor pesticide exposure is a growing concern, particularly for pyrethroids, a commonly used class of pesticides. Pyrethroid concentrations may be especially high in homes of immigrant farm worker families, who often live in close proximity to agricultural fields and are faced with poor housing conditions, potentially causing high pest infestation and pesticide use. We investigate levels of pyrethroids in the house dust of farm worker family homes in a study of mothers and children living in Mendota, CA, within the population-based Mexican Immigration to California: Agricultural Safety and Acculturation (MICASA) Study. We present pesticide use data and levels of pyrethroid pesticides in indoor dust collected in 2009 as measured by questionnaires and a GC/MS analysis of the pyrethroids cis- and trans-permethrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate and resmethrin in single dust samples collected from 55 households. Cis- and trans-permethrin had the highest detection frequencies at 67%, with median concentrations of 244 and 172ng/g dust, respectively. Cypermethrin was detected in 52% of the homes and had a median concentration of 186ng/g dust. Esfenvalerate, resmethrin and deltamethrin were detected in less than half the samples. We compared the pyrethroid concentrations found in our study to other studies looking at both rural and urban homes and daycares. Lower detection frequencies and/or lower median concentrations of cis- and trans-permethrin and cypermethrin were observed in our study as compared to those studies. However, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate and resmethrin were detected more frequently in the house dust from our study than in the other studies. Because households whose children had higher urinary pyrethroid metabolite levels were more likely to be analyzed in this study, a positive bias in our estimates of household pyrethroid levels may be expected. A positive association was observed with reported outdoor pesticide use and cypermethrin levels

  19. Role of domiciliary and family carers in individualised nutrition support for older adults living in the community.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Skye; Agarwal, Ekta; Young, Adrienne; Isenring, Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is common amongst people aged 65 years and older, has a multifactorial aetiology, and numerous negative outcomes. Domiciliary carers (non-clinical paid carers) and family carers (including family, friends and neighbours) are required to support the increasing demand for in-home assistance with activities of daily living due to the ageing population. This review provides insight into the role of both domiciliary and family carers in providing individualised nutrition support for older, community-dwelling adults with malnutrition. Four electronic databases were searched for intervention studies from database inception to December 2016. Both domiciliary and family carers are well placed to monitor the dietary intake and nutritional status of older adults; to assist with many food-related tasks such as the sourcing and preparation of meals, and assisting with feeding when necessary; and to act as a conduit between the care recipient and formal nutrition professionals such as dietitians. There is moderate evidence to support the role of domiciliary carers in implementing nutrition screening and referral pathways, and emerging evidence suggests they may have a role in malnutrition interventions when supported by health professionals. Moderate evidence also supports the engagement of family carers as part of the nutrition care team for older adults with malnutrition. Interventions such as group education, skill-development workshops and telehealth demonstrate promise and have significantly improved outcomes in older adults with dementia. Further interventional and translational research is required to demonstrate the efficacy of engaging with domiciliary and family carers of older adults in the general community.

  20. Personal and Family Survival. Civil Defense Adult Education Course Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    A manual providing general orientation on the subject of United States civil defense is presented. It can serve as a home reference and as a tool for an adult education class. The nine chapters are: U.S. Civil Defense, Modern Weapons and Radioactive Fallout, Public Fallout Shelters, Fallout Shelter Occupancy, Fallout Protection at Home, Community…

  1. The Marital and Family Functioning of Adults with ADHD and Their Spouses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eakin, L.; Minde, K.; Hechtman, L.; Ochs, E.; Krane, E.; Bouffard, R.; Greenfield, B.; Looper, K.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the family relationships of adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Thus, the marital adjustment and family functioning of 33 married adults with ADHD and their spouses was compared to 26 non-ADHD control participants and their spouses. Results revealed that married adults with ADHD reported poorer…

  2. Cost-effectiveness evaluation of a home visiting triage program for family planning in Turkey.

    PubMed Central

    Bertera, R L; Green, L W

    1979-01-01

    Graduate Turkish midwives were trained in triage rules for determining family planning home visit frequency based on risk of couples. In a sample of 542 couples followed for six months, modern contraceptive use increased 22 per cent among high-risk and about 15 per cent among moderate- and low-risk couples. After making assumptions about the fecundity, contraceptive success, and pregnancy complications, the estimated average cost per complication averted was $61 for high-risk, $177 for moderate-risk and $526 for low-risk couples. PMID:112875

  3. Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Family Child Care Homes in Oregon: Baseline Findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Katherine B.; Rice, Kelly R.; Trost, Stewart G.

    2012-01-01

    Baseline findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project include data from Family Child Care Providers (FCCPs) in Oregon (n=53) who completed assessments of nutrition and physical activity policies and practices and BMI data for children in the care of FCCPs (n=205). Results show that a significant percentage of FCCPs failed to meet child care…

  4. Adults' Perceptions of Children's Science Abilities and Interest after Participating in a Family Science Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanowitz, Karen L.; Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie L.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research was to examine adults' and children's perceptions of participating in a family science night event, especially in the context of parental belief about children's science abilities. Family science nights are becoming increasingly popular and are used in a wide range of settings. During family science nights, adults and…

  5. Feasibility of integrating the "Healthy moves for aging well" program into home care aide services for frail older adults.

    PubMed

    Park, Chae-Hee; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the feasibility of implementing simple, safe, non-equipment evidence-based movements (Healthy Moves for Aging Well program) using an affordable and sustainable homecare-aide based delivery model that reaches the maximum possible number of frail older adults living at home in Illinois. Two local agencies were asked to identify two experienced home care aides and two inexperienced home care aides (n= 8). Each home care aides delivered the Healthy Moves to four clients (n= 16). Eight home care aides visited the client in the home and were asked to deliver the Healthy Moves program on a regular basis for a four-month time period. Outcome measures included a pre-and post- survey, a functional fitness test (older adults), and interviews. Evaluation procedures focused on older adult participants, homecare aids, and sites. The results showed that both interview and survey data revealed that most participants including older adults, home care aides, and site directors had a positive perception and high satisfaction with the program. Specially, 100% of older adult participants reported that they would recommend the program to others. Additionally, seniors and home care aides reported that they enjoyed working with each other on the program and both site directors reported that dissemination of the program in the State of Illinois employing home care aides was feasible and acceptable. Our study results indicate that Healthy Moves for Aging Well could be safely and successfully be disseminated to frail older adults in the State of Illinois.

  6. The Effect of Alaska's Home Visitation Program for High-Risk Families on Trends in Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: At 6 sites serving 21 communities, Alaska implemented Healthy Families Alaska, a home visitation program using paraprofessionals designed to decrease child abuse and neglect. The primary study objective was to compare changes over time in Child Protective Services outcomes by Healthy Families Alaska enrollment status. Methods:…

  7. Home-to-School Connections Guide: Tips, Tech Tools, and Strategies for Improving Family-to-School Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Lucas Educational Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Communication between home and school is good for kids. Keeping families up-to-date about upcoming events is important, but it's not enough to fully engage parents as partners. When schools and families really work together, that sets the stage for all kinds of benefits. The National Coalition for Parent Involvement in Education reports that…

  8. Impact of a Consumer-Directed Family Support Program on Reduced Out-of-Home Institutional Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Tamar; Caldwell, Joe

    2005-01-01

    The impact of a consumer-directed family support program on actual out-of-home placement in one American state was evaluated over an 8-year period. Under this program, individuals with intellectual disabilities and their families control their own resources and design and direct supports through the use of cash allowances or individualized…

  9. Concordance of Family and Staff Member Reports about End of Life in Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Shayna E.; Williams, Christianna S.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in perspectives that may complicate the process of joint decision making at the end of life, this study determined the agreement of family and staff perspectives about end-of-life experiences in nursing homes and residential care/assisted living communities and whether family and staff roles, involvement in care,…

  10. Health of Elderly Mexican American Adults and Family Caregiver Distress

    PubMed Central

    Rote, Sunshine; Angel, Jacqueline L.; Markides, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Using newly available data on family caregivers from a large epidemiological study of elderly Mexican-origin adults (Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly [HEPESE], 2010/2011), we identify which types of impairment (functional, psychological, and cognitive) in the elderly individual are associated with family caregiver depressive symptoms. Results from ordinary least squares regressions using 626 caregiver–care recipient dyads demonstrate that more severe mobility limitations (Performance-Oriented Mobility Assessment), social disability (instrumental activities of daily living), neuropsychiatric disturbances related to cognitive decline (Neuropsychiatric Inventory), and depressive symptoms in the elderly subject are positively associated with caregiver psychological distress. Perceived social stress partially accounts for these associations. We also identify certain segments of this caregiver population that are especially vulnerable to burden when caring for a family member with high levels of impairment, namely female and low-income caregivers. These vulnerabilities should be the focus of intervention efforts to reduce stress and improve the emotional and psychological well-being of Mexican-origin caregivers. PMID:25651573

  11. Communication Processes that Mediate Family Communication Patterns and Mental Well-Being: A Mean and Covariance Structures Analysis of Young Adults from Divorced and Nondivorced Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrodt, Paul; Ledbetter, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, demand/withdraw patterns and feeling caught were tested as mediators of family communication patterns and young adults' mental well-being. Participants included 567 young adults from divorced and nondivorced families. For young adults in nondivorced families, family conversation orientations had both a positive, direct effect on…

  12. Older Adult Perceptions of Participation in Group- and Home-Based Falls Prevention Exercise.

    PubMed

    Robins, Lauren M; Hill, K D; Day, Lesley; Clemson, Lindy; Finch, Caroline; Haines, Terry

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes why older adults begin, continue, and discontinue group- and home-based falls prevention exercise and benefits and barriers to participation. Telephone surveys were used to collect data for 394 respondents. Most respondents reported not participating in group- (66%) or home-based (78%) falls prevention exercise recently. Reasons for starting group-based falls prevention exercise include health benefits (23-39%), health professional recommendation (13-19%), and social interaction (4-16%). They discontinued because the program finished (44%) or due to poor health (20%). Commonly reported benefits were social interaction (41-67%) and health (15-31%). Disliking groups was the main barrier (2-14%). Home-based falls prevention exercise was started for rehabilitation (46-63%) or upon health professional recommendation (22-48%) and stopped due to recovery (30%). Improvement in health (18-46%) was the main benefit. These findings could assist health professionals in prescribing group-based falls prevention exercise by considering characteristics of older adults who perceive social interaction to be beneficial.

  13. Daily mood and out-of-home mobility in older adults: does cognitive impairment matter?

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Roman; Oswald, Frank; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Voss, Elke; Wettstein, Markus

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the relationship between out-of-home behavior and daily mood of community-dwelling older adults with different levels of cognitive impairment across four consecutive weeks. The sample included 16 persons with early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD), 30 persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 95 cognitively healthy persons (CH). Using a multi-method approach, GPS tracking and daily-diary data were combined on a day-to-day basis. AD and MCI adults showed lower mood than the CH group. Whereas stronger positive links between mood and out-of-home behavior were found for AD compared to the total sample on an aggregate level, predicting daily mood by person (i.e., cognition) and occasion-specific characteristics (i.e., mobility and weekday), using multilevel regression analysis revealed no corresponding effect. In conclusion, cognitive status in old age appears to impact on mobility and mood as such, rather than on the mood and out-of-home behavior connection.

  14. Technology Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Indirect Solar Water Heating Systems in Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    2016-04-01

    In 2011, Rural Development, Inc. (RDI) completed the construction of Wisdom Way Solar Village (WWSV), which is a development of 20 very efficient homes in Greenfield, Massachusetts. The homes feature R-40 walls, triple-pane windows, R-50 attic insulation, and airtight construction. All homes also have photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems. Auxiliary water heating is provided by tankless gas water heaters. With the SDHW systems, RDI hoped to eliminate most of the need for gas for water heating and get the homes closer to zero energy.

  15. Building America Case Study: Indirect Solar Water Heating Systems in Single-Family Homes, Greenfield, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2016-04-01

    Solar water heating systems are not new, but they have not become prevalent in most of the U.S. Most of the country is cold enough that indirect solar thermal systems are required for freeze protection, and average installed cost of these systems is $9,000 to $10,000 for typical systems on single-family homes. These costs can vary significantly in different markets and with different contractors, and federal and regional incentives can reduce these up-front costs by 50% or more. In western Massachusetts, an affordable housing developer built a community of 20 homes with a goal of approaching zero net energy consumption. In addition to excellent thermal envelopes and PV systems, the developer installed a solar domestic water heating system (SDHW) on each home. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a research consortium funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program, commissioned some of the systems, and CARB was able to monitor detailed performance of one system for 28 months.

  16. Indirect Solar Water Heating in Single-Family, Zero Energy Ready Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, Robb

    2016-02-17

    Solar water heating systems are not new, but they have not become prevalent in most of the U.S. Most of the country is cold enough that indirect solar thermal systems are required for freeze protection, and average installed cost of these systems is $9,000 to $10,000 for typical systems on single-family homes. These costs can vary significantly in different markets and with different contractors, and federal and regional incentives can reduce these up-front costs by 50% or more. In western Massachusetts, an affordable housing developer built a community of 20 homes with a goal of approaching zero net energy consumption. In addition to excellent thermal envelopes and PV systems, the developer installed a solar domestic water heating system (SDHW) on each home. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a research consortium funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program, commissioned some of the systems, and CARB was able to monitor detailed performance of one system for 28 months.

  17. Which Components of Medical Homes Reduce the Time Burden on Families of Children with Special Health Care Needs?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jane E; Nugent, Colleen N; Russell, Louise B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine which components of medical homes affect time families spend arranging/coordinating health care for their children with special health care needs (CSHCNs) and providing health care at home. Data Sources 2009–2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN), a population-based survey of 40,242 CSHCNs. Study Design NS-CSHCN is a cross-sectional, observational study. We used generalized ordered logistic regression, testing for nonproportional odds in the associations between each of five medical home components and time burden, controlling for insurance, child health, and sociodemographics. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Medical home components were collected using Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative definitions. Principal Findings Family-centered care, care coordination, and obtaining needed referrals were associated with 15–32 percent lower odds of time burdens arranging/coordinating and 16–19 percent lower odds providing health care. All five components together were associated with lower odds of time burdens, with greater reductions for higher burdens providing care. Conclusions Three of the five medical home components were associated with lower family time burdens arranging/coordinating and providing health care for children with chronic conditions. If the 55 percent of CSHCNs lacking medical homes had one, the share of families with time burdens arranging care could be reduced by 13 percent. PMID:25100200

  18. Stressors and Well-Being among Caregivers to Older Adults with Dementia: The In-Home versus Nursing Home Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined differences in stressors and well-being for caregivers who care for relative with dementia at home and those with relative in nursing home (n=120). Found no differences in depression or somatic complaints, but nursing home caregivers reported fewer social disruptions and more stressors resulting from activities of daily living assistance,…

  19. Depressive symptoms in young adults: the influences of the early home environment and early educational child care.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Andrea E; Campbell, Frances A; Pungello, Elizabeth P; Skinner, Martie

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between depressive symptoms in young adults, the quality of the early home environment, and early educational child care was investigated in young adults randomly assigned to receive early childhood intervention in the Abecedarian study. Of the original 111 infants enrolled (98% African American), 104 participated in an age-21 follow-up. Those who had early treatment reported fewer depressive symptoms. The protective effects of the early childhood program were further supported by a significant home environment by treatment interaction. Negative effects of lower quality home environments on young adult depressive symptoms were almost entirely offset by preschool treatment, whereas depressive symptoms increased as the quality of the early home environment decreased for those in the control group.

  20. Self-administered written prompts to teach home accident prevention skills to adults with brain injuries.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, M F; Green, G; Braunling-McMorrow, D

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of written checklists and task analyses as self-administered prompts to teach home accident prevention skills to 4 adults with brain injuries. Subsequent to baseline, participants used written checklists that identified potential in-home hazards but did not prompt behaviors necessary for hazard remediation. Written individualized task analyses, incorporating specific behavioral steps for correcting hazards that participants had failed to remediate during the checklist phase, were used to prompt appropriate responding when necessary. These were subsequently faded to transfer stimulus control to the natural conditions. A multiple probe technique across participants and settings was used. Results indicated that the checklist alone was sufficient to increase appropriate responses to many of the potential hazards. Individualized task analyses, when needed, resulted in appropriate remediation of all potential hazards. Generalization to untrained potential hazards occurred to some degree for all participants. Follow-up results showed that most skills trained were maintained over a 1-month period. PMID:2074235

  1. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, M; Bianchi, L; Lucano, M; Bertù, Lorenza; Vender, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders.

  2. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, M; Bianchi, L; Lucano, M; Bertù, L; Vender, Simone

    2016-05-13

    The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders.

  3. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, Marta; Bianchi, Lucia; Lucano, Melissa; Bertù, Lorenza; Vender, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Summary The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders. PMID:27358221

  4. Effects of Home Visitation on Maternal Competencies, Family Environment, and Child Development: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sierau, Susan; Dähne, Verena; Brand, Tilman; Kurtz, Vivien; von Klitzing, Kai; Jungmann, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Based on the US Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) program, the German home visiting program "Pro Kind" offered support for socially and financially disadvantaged first-time mothers from pregnancy until the children's second birthday. A multi-centered, longitudinal randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to assess its effectiveness on mothers and children. A total of 755 women with multiple risk factors were recruited, 394 received regular home visits (treatment group), while 361 only had access to standard community services (control group). Program influences on family environment (e.g., quality of home, social support), maternal competencies (e.g., maternal self-efficacy, empathy, parenting style), and child development (e.g., cognitive and motor development) were assessed from mothers' program intake in pregnancy to children's second birthday based on self-reports in regular interviews and developmental tests. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models showed small, but significant positive treatment effects on parental self-efficacy, and marginally significant effects on social support, and knowledge on child rearing. Maternal stress, self-efficacy, and feelings of attachment in the TG tend to show a more positive development over time. Subgroup effects were found for high-risk mothers in the TG, who reported more social support over time and, generally, had children with higher developmental scores compared to their CG counterparts. Post hoc analyses of implementation variables revealed the quality of the helping relationship as a significant indicator of treatment effects. Results are discussed in terms of implementation and public policy differences between NFP and Pro Kind.

  5. Associations between family ratings on experience with care and clinical quality-of-care measures for nursing home residents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinghua; Tang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Several states are currently collecting and publicly reporting nursing home resident and/or family member ratings of experience with care in an attempt to improve person-centered care in nursing homes. Using the 2008 Maryland nursing home family survey reports and other data, this study performed both facility- and resident-level analyses, and estimated the relationships between family ratings of care and several long-term care quality measures (pressure ulcers, overall and potentially-avoidable hospitalizations, and mortality) after adjustment for resident characteristics. We found that better family evaluations of overall and specific aspects of care may be associated with reduced rates of risk-adjusted measures at the facility level (range of correlation coefficients: −0.01 to −0.31). Associations of overall experience ratings tended to persist after further adjustment for common nursing home characteristics such as nurse staffing levels. We conclude that family ratings of nursing home care complement other types of performance measures such as risk-adjusted outcomes. PMID:26199288

  6. 76 FR 43254 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  7. 78 FR 45176 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2013 Through June 30, 2014 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  8. 75 FR 41793 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2010 Through June 30, 2011 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  9. Changes in gene expression for GH/PRL/SL family hormones in the pituitaries of homing chum salmon during ocean migration through upstream migration.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Takeshi A; Ban, Masatoshi; Makino, Keita; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Hu, WeiWei; Ando, Hironori; Fukuwaka, Masa-aki; Azumaya, Tomonori; Urano, Akihisa

    2010-05-01

    Gene expression for growth hormone (GH)/prolactin (PRL)/somatolactin (SL) family hormones in the pituitaries of homing chum salmon were examined, because gene expression for these hormones during ocean-migrating phases remains unclear. Fish were collected in the winter Gulf of Alaska, the summer Bering Sea and along homing pathway in the Ishikari River-Ishikari Bay water system in Hokkaido, Japan in autumn. The oceanic fish included maturing adults, which had developing gonads and left the Bering Sea for the natal river by the end of summer. The absolute amounts of GH, PRL and SL mRNAs in the pituitaries of the maturing adults in the summer Bering Sea were 5- to 20-fold those in the winter Gulf of Alaska. The amount of GH mRNA in the homing adults at the coastal seawater (SW) areas was smaller than that in the Bering fish, while the amount of PRL mRNA remained at the higher level until fish arrived at the Ishikari River. The gill Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in the coastal SW fish and the plasma Na(+) levels in the brackish water fish at the estuary were lowered to the levels that were comparable to those in the fresh water (FW) fish. In conclusion, gene expression for GH, PRL and SL was elevated in the pituitaries of chum salmon before initiation of homing behavior from the summer Bering Sea. Gene expression for GH is thereafter lowered coincidently with malfunction of SW adaptability in the breeding season, while gene expression for PRL is maintained high until forthcoming FW adaptation.

  10. Recurrent group A streptococcal vulvovaginitis in adult women: family epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Jack D; Funaro, Deana; Kaplan, Edward L

    2007-03-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) vulvovaginitis has been reported in prepubertal girls. In adult women, a vaginal carrier state has been described, but vulvovaginitis is rarely reported. We describe 2 cases of recurrent GAS vulvovaginitis in women whose husbands were gastrointestinal carriers of GAS. Characterization of the isolated strains demonstrated that identical emm types of GAS were shared by partners. Treatment of both partners resulted in resolution of vaginitis. On the basis of negative vaginal culture results obtained after treatment of each individual episode of vaginitis, we believe that the female patients were reinfected as a result of exposure to their husbands, with shedding likely to have occurred in bed. These cases reiterate the necessity for adequate screening of the patient's family and contacts in cases of recurrent GAS infection by culturing all potential areas of GAS carriage.

  11. Sociodemographic Differences Among U.S. Children and Adults Exposed to Secondhand Smoke at Home: National Health Interview Surveys 2000 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hai-Yen; Wang, Yingning; Lightwood, James; Max, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined the levels and change in prevalence of self-reported secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure at home, and analyzed sociodemographic differences in exposure among children (aged 0–17 years) and nonsmoking adults (aged ≥18 years) in the United States in 2000 and 2010. Methods We included 18,731 children and 44,049 adults from the 2000 and 2010 National Health Interview Survey Cancer Control Supplements. We used multivariate logistic regression to determine the factors associated with exposure. Results The prevalence of self-reported SHS exposure declined from 2,627 of 10,636 (24.7%) to 663 of 8,095 (8.2%) for children and from 2,863 of 23,665 (12.1%) to 897 of 20,384 (4.4%) for adults from 2000 to 2010. SHS exposure declined for all population subgroups between the two years, but differences were found. Compared with 2000, children aged 12–17 years in 2010 were no longer more likely than children aged 0–5 years to be exposed to SHS. Non-Hispanic black children and adults were more likely than non-Hispanic white children and adults to be exposed to SHS in 2010. In 2010, no differences were found for children whose parents had a higher level of education, and no differences were observed for children or adults with high family income vs. other levels of family income. Children living in the Midwest and South had higher levels of SHS exposure than children in other regions in 2010. Conclusions Self-reported SHS exposure at home declined for all population subgroups from 2000 to 2010, but socioeconomic differences existed for some subgroups in both years. Current tobacco control policies need to be improved to reach all population subgroups so that SHS exposure can be further reduced, especially among vulnerable populations. PMID:26957671

  12. The behavioural homing response of adult chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta to amino-acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Chen, E Y; Leonard, J B K; Ueda, H

    2016-11-21

    Adult chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta homing behaviour in a two-choice test tank (Y-maze) was monitored using a passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tag system in response to river-specific dissolved free amino-acid (DFAA) profiles and revealed that the majority of O. keta showed a preference for artificial natal-stream water and tended to stay in this maze arm for a longer period; natal-stream water was chosen over a nearby tributary's water, but not when the O. keta were presented with a non-tributary water. The results demonstrate the ability of O. keta to discriminate artificial stream waters containing natural levels of DFAA.

  13. Food preparation supplies predict children's family meal and home-prepared dinner consumption in low-income households.

    PubMed

    Appelhans, Bradley M; Waring, Molly E; Schneider, Kristin L; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2014-05-01

    Frequent family meals and home food preparation are considered important for children's nutritional health and weight maintenance. This cross-sectional study tested whether these parent-driven behaviors are related to the availability of food preparation supplies in low-income urban households. Caregivers of children ages 6-13 provided information on family meal frequency, child consumption of home-prepared dinners, household food insecurity, and attitudes towards cooking. Researchers used a newly developed Food Preparation Checklist (FPC) to assess the availability of 41 food preparation supplies during a physical audit of the home environment. Caregivers and children provided anthropometric measurements and jointly reported on child dietary intake. In ordinal logistic regression models, greater home availability of food preparation supplies was associated with more frequent family meals and child consumption of home-prepared dinners. Associations were independent of household financial strain, food insecurity, caregiver attitudes toward cooking, and sociodemographic characteristics. Fewer food preparation supplies were available in households characterized by greater food insecurity, lower income, and negative caregiver attitudes towards cooking, but did not differ by child or caregiver weight status. As in prior studies, more frequent family meals and consumption of home-prepared dinners were associated with healthier child dietary intake in several areas. We conclude that food preparation supplies are often limited in the most socioeconomically disadvantaged households, and their availability is related to the frequency with which children consume family meals and home-prepared dinners. The potential role of food preparation supplies as contributors to socioeconomic disparities in child nutritional health and obesity deserves further study.

  14. Does Participation in Home-Delivered Meals Programs Improve Outcomes for Older Adults? Results of a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony D; Godfryd, Alice; Buys, David R; Locher, Julie L

    2015-01-01

    Participation in home-delivered meals programs may contribute to the health and independence of older adults living in the community, especially those who are food insecure or those who are making transitions from acute, subacute, and chronic care settings to the home. The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive and systematic review of all studies related to home-delivered meals in order to shed light on the state of the science. A complete review of articles appearing in PubMed using the keyword "Meal" was conducted; and titles, abstracts, and full-texts were screened for relevance. Included in this review are 80 articles. Most studies are descriptive and do not report on outcomes. Frequently reported outcomes included nutritional status based on self-reported dietary intake. Additionally, most studies included in this review are cross-sectional, have a small sample size, and/or are limited to a particular setting or participant population. More rigorous research is needed to (1) gain insight into why so few eligible older adults access home-delivered meals programs, (2) support expansion of home-delivered meals to all eligible older adults, (3) better identify what home-delivered meals models alone and in combination with other services works best and for whom, and (4) better target home-delivered meals programs where and when resources are scarce.

  15. Does Participation in Home-delivered Meals Programs Improve Outcomes for Older Adults?: Results of a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Anthony D.; Godfryd, Alice; Buys, David R.; Locher, Julie L.

    2015-01-01

    Participation in home-delivered meals programs may contribute to the health and independence of older adults living in the community, especially those who are food insecure or those who are making transitions from acute, subacute, and chronic care settings to the home. The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive and systematic review of ALL studies related to home-delivered meals in order to shed light on the state of the science. A complete review of articles appearing in PubMed using the Keyword “Meal” was conducted; and titles, abstracts, and full-texts were screened for relevance. Included in this review are 80 articles. Most studies are descriptive and do not report on outcomes. Frequently reported outcomes included nutritional status based upon self-reported dietary intake. Additionally, most studies included in this review are cross-sectional, have a small sample size, and/or are limited to a particular setting or participant population. More rigorous research is needed to: 1) gain insight into why so few eligible older adults access home-delivered meals programs, 2) support expansion of home-delivered meals to all eligible older adults, 3) better identify what home-delivered meals models alone and in combination with other services works best and for whom, and 4) better target home-delivered meals programs where and when resources are scarce. PMID:26106985

  16. Willingness of families caring for victims of dementia to pay for nursing home care: results of a pilot study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, L; Tang, K Y; Liu, Y H; Shyu, W C; Chang, T P

    1998-01-01

    In order to examine the value family caregivers attach to the benefits associated with nursing home services, this contingent survey was designed to investigate the willingness of family caregivers of dementia victims to pay for nursing home care. A total of 136 members of families of dementia patients from the department of neurology and psychiatry of four medical centers in Taiwan were interviewed by phone. These family members provided in-home care for dementia victims and had expressed the need for nursing home placement. These family caregivers were asked to explicitly state the maximum amount of family income per month they are able to give up to receive nursing home services. The willingness to pay (WTP) for nursing home care ranged from US$185 to $2,407 per month, and 37.5 percent of the family caregivers interviewed indicated a willingness to pay at least 50 percent of the monthly family income for nursing home placement. The amount of monthly family income was strongly associated with the WTP for nursing home care in dollars. Age and education of the caregiver, and accessibility of nursing home care were significantly associated with WTP in both cost range and percentage of monthly family income. Interviewees who were older than 65 years (odds ratio is 3.52), and educated equal to or above senior high school (odds ratio is 5.57) were inclined to pay at least 50 percent of monthly family income for nursing home placement. As other variables were adjusted, respondents older than 65 years were willing to pay US$208.4 per month more than those younger than 65 years for nursing home placement; and the educated equal to or above senior high school were inclined to pay US$171.9 per month more than those with less than a senior high school education. The easier it was to find nursing home agencies near the residence, the more willing the family was to pay at least 50 percent of their monthly family income for nursing home services; with an odds ratio of 16

  17. Predictors of externalizing behavior problems in early elementary-aged children: the role of family and home environments.

    PubMed

    Price, Joseph M; Chiapa, Amanda; Walsh, Natalia Escobar

    2013-01-01

    As children enter elementary school they display behavioral orientations that reveal potential developmental trajectories. Developmental transitions offer unique opportunities for examining developmental pathways and the factors that influence emerging pathways. The primary goal of this investigation was to examine characteristics of family and home contexts in predicting externalizing behavior problems among children transitioning into elementary school. Dimensions of the family and home environments of maltreated and nonmaltreated children (N = 177) were examined and used to predict externalizing behavior problems. Maltreatment was assessed using case file information, characteristics of the family and home environment were rated by interviewers, and externalizing behavior was assessed by mother's ratings on the Child Behavior Checklist. Relative to nonmaltreated children, the family environments of physically abused children were characterized by higher levels of negative social interactions. Also, in comparison to nonmaltreated children, the home environments of children who experienced neglect were characterized as less organized and clean. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that physical abuse was the strongest predictor of externalizing behavior. After controlling for the contribution of physical abuse, mother's negative behavior toward the focal child, aggression between siblings, and the lack of an organized and clean home were each predictive of externalizing behavior.

  18. EPA Urges Home Radon Testing/Protect Your Family from Lung Cancer Caused by Exposure to Radon in Your Home

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - In recognizing January as National Radon Action Month, EPA encourages Americans around the country to test their homes for this naturally occurring radioactive gas and make 2015 a healthier, safer new year.

  19. Extended Family Support Networks of Caribbean Black Adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert Joseph; Forysthe-Brown, Ivy; Lincoln, Karen D; Chatters, Linda M

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the extended family social support networks of Caribbean Black adults (Afro Caribbeans). Although there are several ethnographic accounts of familial ties and support exchanges among Black Caribbean immigrants, only a handful of studies utilize quantitative data. This paper utilizes data from the National Survey of American Life, which contains the first national probability sample of Caribbean Blacks in the United States. Age, gender, income, material hardship and immigration status were all associated with at least one of the four indicators of family support networks. Subjective family closeness and frequency of family contact were significantly associated with both giving and receiving informal support. A significant age and parental status interaction for receiving support indicated that older adults without children received assistance from their extended families less frequently than older adults with children. Overall, study findings affirm the importance of extended family networks for Caribbean Black adults.

  20. Befriending breastfeeding: a home-based antenatal pilot for south Asian families.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Naomi

    2012-06-01

    In the last decade recognition of the impact of social inequalities on health has resulted in a refocus of the public health agenda, with health visitors having a pivotal role. While this involvement is in the form of family-centred public health, it is also intended to involve work with the wider community and primarily focuses on beginning to address the injustice of inequality before a child is born, acknowledging that early intervention is key to breaking the cycle of deprivation. Such inequalities disproportionately affect those from black and minority ethnic (BME) groups who are more likely to report long-term ill health than their white counterparts. Access to healthcare services is restricted not only by family choices but also by difficulties of location and language. Numerous initiatives to address these issues have been implemented in the last 10 years, from Sure Start centres to maternity service reform, but the level of engagement from women from BME groups is not equal to their counterparts. In one locality in Oxford there is a high concentration of families from Pakistan and Bangladesh who, despite concerted efforts, have remained hard to reach. This project attempted to redesign the current antenatal breastfeeding information service, and aimed to produce evidence to guide practice to better connect with this group. The review considers evidence provided by the literature base and uses a home visiting approach to investigate the topic. Results are correlated and compared, and recommendations for the future are presented.

  1. Family-centered maternity care for deaf refugees: the patient-centered medical home in action.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Shirish K; Carroll, Jennifer K; Fogarty, Colleen T; Finigan, Elizabeth G

    2009-12-01

    The intersection of 2 underserved populations-refugees and deaf individuals-presents novel challenges to health care systems and has not been described previously. A patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is uniquely equipped to provide outstanding primary care to disadvantaged groups. As an illustrative case study, we present our experience applying principles of the PCMH to address an extremely challenging clinical situation: providing high-quality maternity care to a recently immigrated Vietnamese refugee couple lacking formal language skills. We describe how enhanced access, continuity, coordination, and cultural appropriateness can facilitate favorable outcomes in even daunting circumstances. By collaborating with multiple interpreters, the health center staff, and the extended family, we effectively mobilized an expanded system of care to ensure informed consent and shared decision making, ultimately culminating in a successful labor and vaginal delivery. Through organizational and individual commitment to the tenets of the PCMH, we demonstrate the particular strengths of family medicine training sites in caring for similar patients and families with complex cultural and linguistic barriers to care.

  2. Migration, home range, and important use areas of Florida sub-adult bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mojica, E.K.

    2006-01-01

    Long distance movements of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) have prevented a thorough documentation of their migration when monitored with traditional methods of banding and radio telemetry. I used satellite telemetry to determine diurnal and nocturnal important use areas (IUAs), migration routes, stopover sites, and home ranges of 69 migratory and non-migratory Florida sub-adult Bald Eagles. I located 151 daytime IUAs in 20 states and provinces, and 50 nocturnal roosts in 8 states and provinces. There was no difference in coarse home range size of migratory eagles between sexes in winter or summer (2-way ANOVA sex x season). Coarse home ranges were larger in winter ( x = 25,218 km2, 95% CI: 13,015 ? 37,421) than summer ( x = 6,166 km2, 95% CI: 2,696 ? 9,637; F1,64 = 4.03, P = 0.01). Eagles made equal use of Coastal Plain (n = 24) and Appalachian Mountain (n = 26) migratory routes during the first migration north. I recommend conserving nocturnal roosts and undeveloped shoreline forest within IUAs for sustained recruitment of Florida Bald Eagles.

  3. Stenotrophomonas, Mycobacterium, and Streptomyces in home dust and air: Associations with moldiness and other home/family characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kettleson, Eric; Kumar, Sudhir; Reponen, Tiina; Vesper, Stephen; Méheust, Delphine; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Adhikari, Atin

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory illnesses have been linked to children’s exposures to water-damaged homes. Therefore, understanding the microbiome in water-damaged homes is critical to preventing these illnesses. Few studies have quantified bacterial contamination, especially specific species, in water-damaged homes. We collected air and dust samples in twenty-one low-mold homes and twenty-one high-mold homes. The concentrations of three bacteria/genera, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Streptomyces sp. and Mycobacterium sp., were measured in air and dust samples using quantitative PCR (QPCR). The concentrations of the bacteria measured in the air samples were not associated with any specific home characteristic based on multiple regression models. However, higher concentrations of S. maltophilia in the dust samples were associated with water damage, i.e. with higher floor surface moisture and higher concentrations of moisture-related mold species. The concentrations of Streptomyces and Mycobacterium sp. had similar patterns and may be partially determined by human and animal occupants and outdoor sources of these bacteria. PMID:23397905

  4. Stakeholder Perspectives on Policies to Support Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Michelle; Pickard, Joseph G.; Rodriguez, Carroll; Shear, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Persons with dementia are often excluded from consumer-directed home- and community-based service programs because they cannot direct their own care. Surrogates are permitted in some states, thereby allowing program participation. This study explored family caregiver perspectives on policies that support family needs related to providing care to…

  5. Fall detection in homes of older adults using the Microsoft Kinect.

    PubMed

    Stone, Erik E; Skubic, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    A method for detecting falls in the homes of older adults using the Microsoft Kinect and a two-stage fall detection system is presented. The first stage of the detection system characterizes a person's vertical state in individual depth image frames, and then segments on ground events from the vertical state time series obtained by tracking the person over time. The second stage uses an ensemble of decision trees to compute a confidence that a fall preceded on a ground event. Evaluation was conducted in the actual homes of older adults, using a combined nine years of continuous data collected in 13 apartments. The dataset includes 454 falls, 445 falls performed by trained stunt actors and nine naturally occurring resident falls. The extensive data collection allows for characterization of system performance under real-world conditions to a degree that has not been shown in other studies. Cross validation results are included for standing, sitting, and lying down positions, near (within 4 m) versus far fall locations, and occluded versus not occluded fallers. The method is compared against five state-of-the-art fall detection algorithms and significantly better results are achieved.

  6. Towards a Passive Low-Cost In-Home Gait Assessment System for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Stone, Erik; Skubic, Marjorie; Keller, James M.; Abbott, Carmen; Rantz, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a webcam-based system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed, step time and step length from a three-dimensional voxel reconstruction, which is built from two calibrated webcam views. The gait parameters are validated with a GAITRite mat and a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 44 tests, and again with GAITRite for 8 older adults in senior housing. An excellent agreement with intra-class correlation coefficients of 0.99 and repeatability coefficients between 0.7% and 6.6% was found for walking speed, step time and step length given the limitation of frame rate and voxel resolution. The system was further tested with 10 seniors in a scripted scenario representing everyday activities in an unstructured environment. The system results demonstrate the capability of being used as a daily gait assessment tool for fall risk assessment and other medical applications. Furthermore, we found that residents displayed different gait patterns during their clinical GAITRite tests compared to the realistic scenario, namely a mean increase of 21% in walking speed, a mean decrease of 12% in step time, and a mean increase of 6% in step length. These findings provide support for continuous gait assessment in the home for capturing habitual gait. PMID:24235111

  7. Fractured genes: a novel genomic arrangement involving new split inteins and a new homing endonuclease family.

    PubMed

    Dassa, Bareket; London, Nir; Stoddard, Barry L; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Pietrokovski, Shmuel

    2009-05-01

    Inteins are genetic elements, inserted in-frame into protein-coding genes, whose products catalyze their removal from the protein precursor via a protein-splicing reaction. Intein domains can be split into two fragments and still ligate their flanks by a trans-protein-splicing reaction. A bioinformatic analysis of environmental metagenomic data revealed 26 different loci with a novel genomic arrangement. In each locus, a conserved enzyme coding region is broken in two by a split intein, with a free-standing endonuclease gene inserted in between. Eight types of DNA synthesis and repair enzymes have this 'fractured' organization. The new types of naturally split-inteins were analyzed in comparison to known split-inteins. Some loci include apparent gene control elements brought in with the endonuclease gene. A newly predicted homing endonuclease family, related to very-short patch repair (Vsr) endonucleases, was found in half of the loci. These putative homing endonucleases also appear in group-I introns, and as stand-alone inserts in the absence of surrounding intervening sequences. The new fractured genes organization appears to be present mainly in phage, shows how endonucleases can integrate into inteins, and may represent a missing link in the evolution of gene breaking in general, and in the creation of split-inteins in particular.

  8. Determinants of educational performance in India: Role of home and family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Uday

    1991-06-01

    This paper addresses the impacts of family and pupil characteristics on children's academic learning in primary schools in India. The present study focuses on the children who have dropped out before completing primary schooling. The study is based on a random sample of two hundred children from twenty villages in two districts in the state of Andhra Pradesh in south India. A special test was developed and administered to measure the academic achievement of the children. Our study found that education supplies and the sanitary facilities at home have a remarkable relationship with the academic performance of children. In addition, the locale of a child's home, its distance from the source of drinking water, the child's father's work status and literacy and the level (grade) of schooling that the child has completed before dropping out, also have significant influence on child's performance. Our study also found that the child's gender, age at enrollment, reason for dropping out, and parents' income, literacy and caste do not have significant influence on performance. These findings have important public policy implications for the provision of basic sanitary facilities to all households, subsidized educational supplies, free uniforms, text-books, and mid-day meals.

  9. Fractured genes: a novel genomic arrangement involving new split inteins and a new homing endonuclease family

    PubMed Central

    Dassa, Bareket; London, Nir; Stoddard, Barry L.; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Pietrokovski, Shmuel

    2009-01-01

    Inteins are genetic elements, inserted in-frame into protein-coding genes, whose products catalyze their removal from the protein precursor via a protein-splicing reaction. Intein domains can be split into two fragments and still ligate their flanks by a trans-protein-splicing reaction. A bioinformatic analysis of environmental metagenomic data revealed 26 different loci with a novel genomic arrangement. In each locus, a conserved enzyme coding region is broken in two by a split intein, with a free-standing endonuclease gene inserted in between. Eight types of DNA synthesis and repair enzymes have this ‘fractured’ organization. The new types of naturally split-inteins were analyzed in comparison to known split-inteins. Some loci include apparent gene control elements brought in with the endonuclease gene. A newly predicted homing endonuclease family, related to very-short patch repair (Vsr) endonucleases, was found in half of the loci. These putative homing endonucleases also appear in group-I introns, and as stand-alone inserts in the absence of surrounding intervening sequences. The new fractured genes organization appears to be present mainly in phage, shows how endonucleases can integrate into inteins, and may represent a missing link in the evolution of gene breaking in general, and in the creation of split-inteins in particular. PMID:19264795

  10. Behaviour Problems, Maternal Internalising Symptoms and Family Relations in Families of Adolescents and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, J. K.; Seltzer, M. M.; Greenberg, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Studies have linked the behaviour problems of children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) to maternal well-being, but less is known about how behaviour problems relate to important family factors such as marital satisfaction and family cohesion. Methods: Married mothers of 115 adolescents and adults with FXS completed questionnaires and…

  11. Family beyond Parents? An Exploration of Family Configurations and Psychological Adjustment in Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmer, Eric D.; Kempf, Nadine; Sapin, Marlene; Galli-Carminati, Giuliana

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the family configurations of young adults with intellectual disability. Based on a sample of 40 individuals interviewed two times in a year, we found as many as four types of family configurations, with distinct compositions, and different types of social capital. This diversity is not without consequences for individual…

  12. Assessing Family-of-Origin Functioning in Mexican American Adults: Retrospective Application of the Family Environment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negy, Charles; Snyder, Douglas K.

    2006-01-01

    Although both theoretical and empirical literature suggests that individuals' family-of-origin experiences affect subsequent relationship functioning as adults, few studies have examined the appropriateness of family assessment techniques when applied retrospectively for use in either theory development or clinical applications. This study…

  13. Childhood family disruptions and adult well-being: the differential effects of divorce and parental death.

    PubMed

    Mack, K Y

    2001-01-01

    This study draws on attachment theory and social learning theory and uses data from the National Survey of Families and Households to examine the differential effects of childhood family disruptions on adult well-being. Comparisons are made between adults who experienced parental divorce, adults who experienced parental death, and adults who were raised in intact families (N = 4,341). The present study differs from previous research by making direct comparisons between different family disruption groups, assessing the effects of family disruptions that occur before age 19, and including multiple measures of adult well-being as dependent variables. Consistent with hypotheses and inferences made from comparisons with adults from intact families, adults who experienced parental divorce report lower levels of parent-child relationship quality, higher levels of self-confidence, and lower levels of depression than adults who experienced parental death during childhood. Therefore, studies that fail to take type of childhood family disruption into account will lead to inaccurate and misleading conclusions about the effects of these experiences on adult outcomes.

  14. Future Planning Resource Guide for Families and Adults with Developmental Disabilities in Illinois. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Joe; Lopez, Erick; DeBrine, Elizabeth; Factor, Alan; Heller, Tamar; Ennis, Donna

    2006-01-01

    This updated guide helps families navigate the maze of adult services and supports for individuals with developmental disabilities. It responds to families' need for a centralized source of information that describes adult services and how to access them. Content includes an overview of the service system and information on legal and financial…

  15. Consequences of Family Literacy for Adults and Children: Some Preliminary Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philliber, William W.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents data from a family literacy program, called the Toyota Families for Learning Program, and compares it to data from programs that focus primarily on adults or on children, but not both. Discusses outcomes for adults, and outcomes for children, and finds results to be promising but not definitive. (SR)

  16. How family carers engage with technical health procedures in the home: a grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Janet; McKinlay, Eileen; Keeling, Sally; Levack, William

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences of family carers who manage technical health procedures at home and describe their learning process. Design A qualitative study using grounded theory. Participants New Zealand family carers (21 women, 5 men) who managed technical health procedures such as enteral feeding, peritoneal dialysis, tracheostomy care, a central venous line or urinary catheter. In addition, 15 health professionals involved in teaching carers were interviewed. Methods Semistructured interviews were coded soon after completion and preliminary analysis influenced subsequent interviews. Additional data were compared with existing material and as analysis proceeded, initial codes were grouped into higher order concepts until a core concept was described. Interviewing continued until no new ideas emerged and concepts were well defined. Results The response of carers to the role of managing technical health procedures in the home is presented in terms of five dispositions: (1) Embracing care, (2) Resisting, (3) Reluctant acceptance, (4) Relinquishing and (5) Being overwhelmed. These dispositions were not static and carers commonly changed between them. Embracing care included cognitive understanding of the purpose and benefits of a procedure; accepting a ‘technical’ solution; practical management; and an emotional response. Accepting embrace is primarily motivated by perceived benefits for the recipient. It may also be driven by a lack of alternatives. Resisting or reluctant acceptance results from a lack of understanding about the procedure or willingness to manage it. Carers need adequate support to avoid becoming overwhelmed, and there are times when it is appropriate to encourage them to relinquish care for the sake of their own needs. Conclusions The concept of embracing care encourages health professionals to extend their attention beyond simply the practical aspects of technical procedures to assessing and addressing carers’ emotional and

  17. Family Day Care in the United States: Family Day Care Systems. Final Report of the National Day Care Home Study. Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grasso, Janet; Fosburg, Steven

    Fifth in a series of seven volumes reporting the design, methodology, and findings of the 4-year National Day Care Home Study (NDCHS), this volume presents a descriptive and statistical analysis of the day care institutions that administer day care systems. These systems, such as Learning Unlimited in Los Angeles and the family day care program of…

  18. What can local authorities do to improve the social care-related quality of life of older adults living at home? Evidence from the Adult Social Care Survey.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, K M; Malley, J; Bosmans, J E; Jansen, A P D; Ostelo, R W; van der Horst, H E; Netten, A

    2014-09-01

    Local authorities spend considerable resources on social care at home for older adults. Given the expected growth in the population of older adults and budget cuts on local government, it is important to find efficient ways of maintaining and improving the quality of life of older adults. The ageing in place literature suggests that policies in other functions of local authorities may have a significant role to play. This study aims to examine the associations between social care-related quality of life (SCRQoL) in older adults and three potential policy targets for local authorities: (i) accessibility of information and advice, (ii) design of the home and (iii) accessibility of the local area. We used cross-sectional data from the English national Adult Social Care Survey (ASCS) 2010/2011 on service users aged 65 years and older and living at home (N=29,935). To examine the association between SCRQoL, as measured by the ASCOT, and three single-item questions about accessibility of information, design of the home and accessibility of the local area, we estimate linear and quantile regression models. After adjusting for physical and mental health factors and other confounders our findings indicate that SCRQoL is significantly lower for older adults who find it more difficult to find information and advice, for those who report that their home design is inappropriate for their needs and for those who find it more difficult to get around their local area. In addition, these three variables are as strongly associated with SCRQoL as physical and mental health factors. We conclude that in seeking to find ways to maintain and improve the quality of life of social care users living at home, local authorities could look more broadly across their responsibilities. Further research is required to explore the cost-effectiveness of these options compared to standard social care services.

  19. Everyday (in)equality at home: complex constructions of gender in South African families.

    PubMed

    Helman, Rebecca; Ratele, Kopano

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of violence and HIV have been documented within the South African context. Constructions of masculinity and femininity that position men as dominant and highly sexually active and women as subordinate and acquiescent have been found to contribute towards gender inequality. This inequality is in turn related to negative health consequences, specifically violence against women, children, and other men, as well as sexual risk. Within this context it becomes important to explore how problematic constructions of gender are being (re)produced and how these constructions are being challenged. Families have been identified as key sites in which gender is both constructed and enacted on a daily basis and it is within this space that children are first exposed to notions of gender. Objective This article draws from a study that was intended to expand on the limited understandings of the ways in which gender (in)equality is constructed and conveyed within the context of South African families on an everyday basis. Design Children and parents in 18 families from a range of different material and cultural backgrounds were interviewed about the meanings and practices of gender within their homes. Data were analysed using a Foucauldian discourse analysis. Results The data reveal how problematic constructions of masculinity and femininity are (re)produced but also challenged within a range of different families. Gender and gender (in)equality are therefore routinely accomplished in complex ways. Conclusions These findings have important implications for promoting gender equality and therefore for disrupting violence and sexual risk as gendered health issues.

  20. Supporting activity engagement by family carers at home: maintenance of agency and personhood in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Pat Yin Fan; Ellis-Hill, Caroline; Coleman, Peter

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT An explorative paper to describe how family carers, through the caregiving journey, reaffirm and promote the agency of people with dementia. Agency is an important concept in dementia care and is crucial to the promotion of wellbeing and the delivery of person-centred care. This article is based on one of the key findings of a study that explored family carers’ experiences of engaging their relatives in daily activities in domestic settings. Following research governance and ethical approval, 30 in-depth interviews (initial and follow-up) were carried out with 15 resident-carers of people with dementia who were recruited via local community mental health teams. Then five focus groups were conducted with 21 participants accessed through carers support groups. Interviews and focus groups were transcribed, coded and analysed using a grounded theory method. Findings showed the process in which family carers encouraged and sustained a sense of autonomy and control (agency) in their relative’s daily activities. Key strategies used by carers included: being non-judgemental; facilitating a sense of worth; taking calculated risks; maintaining the continuity of their relative’s identity; enhancing a sense of connection with their relative’s role and identity using enjoyable activities; preventing inactivity and attending to the bodily source of the agency. Lack of support for carers could ultimately pose a risk to the maintenance of the agency of people with dementia. This study provides a deeper insight into the process used by home carers to support the agency of people with dementia. This is essential if practitioners are to identify and develop more realistic intervention strategies and to work in effective partnership with family carers. The implications for the creation of dementia-friendly communities are discussed.

  1. Everyday (in)equality at home: complex constructions of gender in South African families

    PubMed Central

    Helman, Rebecca; Ratele, Kopano

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of violence and HIV have been documented within the South African context. Constructions of masculinity and femininity that position men as dominant and highly sexually active and women as subordinate and acquiescent have been found to contribute towards gender inequality. This inequality is in turn related to negative health consequences, specifically violence against women, children, and other men, as well as sexual risk. Within this context it becomes important to explore how problematic constructions of gender are being (re)produced and how these constructions are being challenged. Families have been identified as key sites in which gender is both constructed and enacted on a daily basis and it is within this space that children are first exposed to notions of gender. Objective This article draws from a study that was intended to expand on the limited understandings of the ways in which gender (in)equality is constructed and conveyed within the context of South African families on an everyday basis. Design Children and parents in 18 families from a range of different material and cultural backgrounds were interviewed about the meanings and practices of gender within their homes. Data were analysed using a Foucauldian discourse analysis. Results The data reveal how problematic constructions of masculinity and femininity are (re)produced but also challenged within a range of different families. Gender and gender (in)equality are therefore routinely accomplished in complex ways. Conclusions These findings have important implications for promoting gender equality and therefore for disrupting violence and sexual risk as gendered health issues. PMID:27293123

  2. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    Building homes that are zero energy-ready is a goal of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America program and one embodied in Building America’s premier home certification program, the Challenge Home program. This case study describes several examples of successful zero energy-ready home projects completed by Building America teams and partner builders.

  3. "Willing but unwilling": attitudinal barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology among older adults.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Willis, Erin; Cameron, Glen; Geana, Mugur

    2014-06-01

    While much research focuses on adoption of electronic health-care records and other information technology among health-care providers, less research explores patient attitudes. This qualitative study examines barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology, particularly personal electronic health records, among older adults. We conducted in-depth interviews (30-90 min duration) with 35 American adults, aged 46-72 years, to determine their perceptions of and attitudes toward home-based health information technology. Analysis of interview data revealed that most barriers to adoption fell under four themes: technological discomfort, privacy or security concerns, lack of relative advantage, and perceived distance from the user representation. Based on our findings, systems to promote home-based health information technology should incorporate familiar computer applications, alleviate privacy and security concerns, and align with older adults' active and engaged self-image.

  4. Cognitive flexibility as a mediator of family communication environments and young adults' well-being.

    PubMed

    Koesten, Joy; Schrodt, Paul; Ford, Debra J

    2009-01-01

    In this study, cognitive flexibility was tested as a mediator of family communication environments (i.e., family expressiveness, structural traditionalism, and avoidance of conflict) and young adults' well-being (i.e., self-esteem, mental health, and physical health). Participants included 395 young adults from first-marriage and postdivorce families. Using structural equation modeling, the results revealed that family expressiveness positively predicted young adults' cognitive flexibility, whereas avoidance of conflict emerged as a negative predictor. Cognitive flexibility, in turn, fully mediated the influence of both expressiveness and avoidance of conflict on well-being. Although structural traditionalism did not predict cognitive flexibility, it did have a direct, inverse effect on young adults' well-being. Among the more important implications of this study is the finding that structural traditionalism and avoidance of conflict, 2 aspects of a conformity orientation in families, generate different effects (i.e., direct vs. indirect) on young adult's well-being.

  5. Old Wives, the Same Man, and a Baby: Location and Family as the Foundation of Home in "Tales of Burning Love" and "Bingo Palace"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses two books ("Tales of Burning Love" and "Bingo Palace" by Louise Erdrich) that highlight location and family as the foundation of home. The two novels suggest that "home" must be revised to include, negotiate, and, at times, embrace tenets of Western ideology in order to find or secure one's home. While various…

  6. Home-based rehabilitation interventions for adults living with HIV: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Cobbing, Saul; Hanass-Hancock, Jill; Myezwa, Hellen

    2016-01-01

    Home-based rehabilitation (HBR) has been shown to improve the lives of people living with a wide range of chronic diseases in resource-rich settings. This may also be a particularly effective strategy in resource-poor settings, where access to institution-based rehabilitation is limited. This review aimed to summarise and discuss the evidence related to the effectiveness of home-based rehabilitation (HBR) interventions designed specifically for adults living with HIV. A scoping review methodology was employed, involving systematic search techniques and appraisal of appropriate evidence. English-language journal articles that assessed the quality of life or functional ability outcomes of HBR interventions for adults living with HIV were considered for this review. Out of an initial 1 135 publications retrieved from the search of databases, six articles met this review's inclusion criteria. While this review highlights the scarcity of empirical evidence related to HBR interventions for adults living with HIV, the findings of these six articles are that HBR is a safe management option that may confer a number of physical and psychological benefits for this population. Future research on HBR interventions should include a wider range of assessment measures, including cost-benefit analyses and specific tools designed to assess the functional ability and participation in activities of daily living of participants involved in these programmes. In particular, more research on HBR is required in resource-poor environments, such as sub-Saharan Africa where HIV is endemic, to assess whether this is a feasible strategy that is both effective and practical in the areas that may need it most.

  7. Home for now: A mixed-methods evaluation of a short-term housing support program for homeless families.

    PubMed

    Meschede, Tatjana; Chaganti, Sara

    2015-10-01

    The use of short-term rental subsidy vouchers offers a new approach to addressing the housing needs of families facing homelessness. In Massachusetts, the Family Home pilot program placed homeless families in housing instead of shelter, providing two years of rental subsidy plus support services with the goal of enabling families to maintain market rate housing. This mixed-method case study complements staff and participant interview data with participant survey and administrative data to evaluate the implementation and short-term outcomes of Family Home in one region. Data point to improved family well-being in housing but also persistent barriers to achieving longer-term housing and economic stability. Of the families who had exited the program at the end of the study, one quarter were able to retain their housing at market rate, only 9% returned to shelter, and one in five moved in with families/friends. Lack of affordable housing in a high rental cost region and jobs that pay living wages were among the major reasons that families struggled to maintain housing. This research points to the need for integrating supportive services from the program's start, including targeted workforce development, to plan for the end of the short-term rental subsidy.

  8. Office versus Home-Based Family Therapy for Runaway, Alcohol Abusing Adolescents: Examination of Factors Associated with Treatment Attendance

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Prestopnik, Jillian L.

    2008-01-01

    There is a dearth of research examining treatment engagement and attendance among runaway youth and their families. Such research is needed in order to inform treatment providers on factors associated with engagement and maintenance of these difficult to engage families into counseling. This study examined differential treatment attendance for alcohol abusing runaway youth residing at a local shelter. A traditional office-based family systems approach, Functional Family Therapy (FFT), was compared to a non-traditional, home-based, multi-systemic family therapy approach, Ecologically Based Family Therapy (EBFT). As expected, treatment engagement and attendance was significantly higher for those assigned to EBFT (N = 37) compared to FFT (N = 40). Predictors of treatment attendance (income, family chaos, externalization problems and level of youth substance use) were examined within each treatment modality. Findings suggest that home-based (compared to office-based) treatment modalities may significantly increase treatment attendance and engagement of runaway youth and their families. Non-traditional forms of treatment may need to be considered in order to best meet the needs of highly chaotic and disorganized family systems. PMID:18607515

  9. Differences Between Parents of Young Versus Adult Children Seeking to Participate in Family-to-Family Psychoeducation

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Jason; Kline, Emily; Reeves, Gloria; Jones, Amanda; Medoff, Deborah; Lucksted, Alicia; Fang, Li Juan; Dixon, Lisa B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Parents of individuals with mental illness often play a central role in initiating and supporting their children’s treatment. This study compared psychological symptoms and experiences of parents of younger versus older consumers. Parents were seeking to participate in a family education program for relatives of individuals with mental illness. Methods Domains of caregiving and distress were assessed among parents of youths (N=56), of young adults (N=137), and of adults ≥30 (N=72) who were seeking to participate in the National Alliance on Mental Illness Family-to-Family program. Results Parents of youths endorsed greater burden, difficulties, and emotional distress than parents of young adults, who in turn endorsed greater burden, difficulties, and emotional distress than parents of older adults. Conclusions Findings suggest that burden, difficulties, and emotional distress among parents seeking participation in this program may be highest when children with mental health concerns are younger and that the burdens recede as children age. PMID:24492901

  10. Formative Research on Creating Smoke-free Homes in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle Crozier; Butler, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The home is a significant place for exposure to secondhand smoke for children and non-smoking adults. This study explored factors that would convince families to adopt household smoking bans and actions to create and maintain smoke-free homes. Interviews were conducted with adults in 102 households in rural Georgia. Participating families had a…

  11. Dying at home: a qualitative study of family carers’ views of support provided by GPs community staff

    PubMed Central

    Seamark, David; Blake, Susan; Brearley, Sarah G; Milligan, Christine; Thomas, Carol; Turner, Mary; Wang, Xu; Payne, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Background Dying at home is the preference of many patients with life-limiting illness. This is often not achieved and a key factor is the availability of willing and able family carers. Aim To elicit family carers’ views about the community support that made death at home possible. Design and setting Qualitative study in East Devon, North Lancashire, and Cumbria. Method Participants were bereaved family carers who had provided care at the end of life for patients dying at home. Semi-structured interviews were conducted 6–24 months after the death. Results Fifty-nine bereaved family carers were interviewed (54% response rate; 69% female). Two-thirds of the patients died from cancer with median time of home care being 5 months and for non-cancer patients the median time for home care was 30 months. An overarching theme was of continuity of care that divided into personal, organisational, and informational continuity. Large numbers and changes in care staff diluted personal continuity and failure of the GPs to visit was viewed negatively. Family carers had low expectations of informational continuity, finding information often did not transfer between secondary and primary care and other care agencies. Organisational continuity when present provided comfort and reassurance, and a sense of control. Conclusion The requirement for continuity in delivering complex end-of-life care has long been acknowledged. Family carers in this study suggested that minimising the number of carers involved in care, increasing or ensuring personal continuity, and maximising the informational and organisational aspects of care could lead to a more positive experience. PMID:25452545

  12. Adult Play-Learning: Observing Informal Family Education at a Science Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanhadilok, Peeranut; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the issues surrounding the nature of adult play. More specifically, we explore "family play-learning", where play activities result in forms of added knowledge or insight for the adults involved. Adult play itself is an under-researched area, and play-learning even more so. We discuss related research and, in…

  13. Family of origin environment and adolescent bullying predict young adult loneliness.

    PubMed

    Segrin, Chris; Nevarez, Natalie; Arroyo, Analisa; Harwood, Jake

    2012-01-01

    This study tested parental loneliness, family of origin environment, and a history of being bullied as predictors of loneliness in young adults. The role of social skills in young adults' loneliness was also examined. Participants were 111 young-adult-parent dyads who completed measures of loneliness and the family communication environment. In addition, young adults completed measures of social skills and history of being bullied. Predictions were tested with structural equation modeling, path analysis, and multiple regression analysis. Results showed that parental loneliness and a history of being bullied were each significant predictors of young adult loneliness. A family environment that supported open communication was negatively associated with young adults' loneliness. Parental loneliness and a history of being bullied each had direct effects on young adults' loneliness as well as indirect effects through reduced social skills.

  14. Home Environments of Infants From Immigrant Families in the United States: Findings From the New Immigrant Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert H.; Pennar, Amy; Glick, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Data from the New Immigrant Survey were used to describe the home environments of 638 children ages birth to 3 years whose parents legally immigrated to the United States. Thirty-two indicators of home conditions were clustered into four domains: discipline and socioemotional in support, learning materials, enriching experiences, and family activities. Results revealed variation in how frequently infants from every country (Mexico, El Salvador, India, Philippines) and region (East Asia, Europe, Caribbean, Africa) studied experienced each home environmental condition. There were differences between countries and regions on many indicators as well as differences based on parents' level of education. The experiences documented for children of recent legal immigrants were similar to those documented for children of native-born families in other studies. PMID:25798506

  15. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve

    2010-05-14

    Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certification. Consumers, installers, and builders who make decisions about installing space and water heating equipment generally do not perform an analysis to assess the economic impacts of different combinations and efficiencies of space and water heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential life-cycle economic and energy savings of installing space and water heating equipment combinations. Drawing on previous and current analysis conducted for the United States Department of Energy rulemaking on amended standards for furnaces and water heaters, this paper evaluates the extent to which condensing equipment can provide life-cycle cost-effectiveness in a representative sample of single family American homes. The economic analyses indicate that significant energy savings and consumer benefits may result from large-scale introduction of condensing water heaters combined with condensing furnaces in U.S. residential single-family housing, particularly in the Northern region. The analyses also shows that important benefits may be overlooked when policy analysts evaluate the impact of space and water heating equipment separately.

  16. Ontario pharmacists practicing in family health teams and the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Dolovich, Lisa

    2012-04-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) approach continues to gather momentum in the United States and Canada as a broad approach to reform the delivery of the complete primary care system. The family health team (FHT) model implemented in Ontario, Canada, best mirrors the PCMH approach of the United States. The integration of pharmacists as key members of the health care team providing on-site, in-office coordinated care to FHT patients was included from the start of planning the FHT model and represents a substantial opportunity for pharmacists to realize their professional vision. Several research projects in Canada and elsewhere have contributed to providing evidence to support the integration of pharmacists into primary care practice sites. Two major research programs, the Seniors Medication Assessment Research Trial (SMART) cluster randomized controlled trial and the Integrating Family Medicine and Pharmacy to Advance Primary Care Therapeutics (IMPACT) multipronged demonstration project made substantial contributions to evidence-informed policy decisions supporting the integration of pharmacists into FHTs. These projects can provide useful information to support the integration of pharmacists into the PCMH and to encourage further research to better measure the effect of the pharmacist from the holistic patient-centered perspective.

  17. Effectiveness of a stress management program for family caregivers of the elderly at home.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, E; Hosak, T; Ogihara, R; Higano, H; Mano, Y

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of a structured intervention program in emotional and physical states of family caregivers for elderly. This program is a series of five weekly 90-minute sessions including psycho-education, problem-solving techniques, and relaxation training. Subjects were 56 primary caregivers looking after relatives with dementia or disability at home. Psychological inventories, i.e., Profile of Mood States (POMS) and General Health Questionnaire30 (GHQ-30) were administered at the period of 4 weeks before, pre-, post-intervention, and 2 months after intervention. They were taken a blood sample to measure natural killer (NK) cell activity at the 4 weeks before, pre-, and post-intervention. In the waiting list control group, there was no change in the POMS, the GHQ-30 and NK cell activity. The scores for depression, anger-hostility, tension-anxiety, confusion (POMS), and general illness, social dysfunction, anxiety and dysphoria, suicidal depression (GHQ-30) at the post-intervention decreased significantly when compared with pre-intervention scores. Moreover, there was persistence of the improvement during two months after intervention. Post-intervention NK cell activity was significantly higher than the pre-intervention. These results indicated that our program was effective in managing the stress of family caregivers.

  18. Home visiting programs for HIV-affected families: a comparison of service quality between volunteer-driven and paraprofessional models

    PubMed Central

    Kidman, Rachel; Nice, Johanna; Taylor, Tory; Thurman, Tonya R.

    2014-01-01

    Home visiting is a popular component of programs for HIV-affected children in sub-Saharan Africa, but its implementation varies widely. While some home visitors are lay volunteers, other programs invest in more highly trained paraprofessional staff. This paper describes a study investigating whether additional investment in paraprofessional staffing translated into higher quality service delivery in one program context. Beneficiary children and caregivers at sites in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa were interviewed after 2 years of program enrollment and asked to report about their experiences with home visiting. Analysis focused on intervention exposure, including visit intensity, duration and the kinds of emotional, informational and tangible support provided. Few beneficiaries reported receiving home visits in program models primarily driven by lay volunteers; when visits did occur, they were shorter and more infrequent. Paraprofessional-driven programs not only provided significantly more home visits, but also provided greater interaction with the child, communication on a larger variety of topics, and more tangible support to caregivers. These results suggest that programs that invest in compensation and extensive training for home visitors are better able to serve and retain beneficiaries, and they support a move toward establishing a professional workforce of home visitors to support vulnerable children and families in South Africa. PMID:25379052

  19. Young Girls' Arithmetic and Spatial Skills: The Distal and Proximal Roles of Family Socioeconomics and Home Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearing, Eric; Casey, Beth M.; Ganley, Colleen M.; Tillinger, Miriam; Laski, Elida; Montecillo, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The present study addressed girls' (N=127) early numerical and spatial reasoning skills, within the context of a critical environment in which these cognitive skills develop, namely their homes. Specifically, proximal links between distal family socioeconomic conditions and first-grade girls' arithmetic and spatial skills were examined (mean…

  20. Spiritual Content of Yoruba Concept of Sexuality and Sustenance of Family Values through Eko-Ile (Home Training)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olaniyan, Gabriel O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examined the spiritual content of the Yoruba concept of sexuality and the implications it has for the sustenance of family values by use of "eko ile" (home training) which parents are expected to provide for their children as they prepare them for good citizenship. It is observed that most complaints about bad behaviours of…

  1. The Home Literacy Environment as a Predictor of the Early Literacy Development of Children at Family-Risk of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Lorna G.; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Hulme, Charles; Snowling, Margaret J.

    2016-01-01

    The home literacy environment (HLE) predicts language and reading development in typically developing children; relatively little is known about its association with literacy development in children at family-risk of dyslexia. We assessed the HLE at age 4 years, precursor literacy skills at age 5, and literacy outcomes at age 6, in a sample of…

  2. Home-Based Child Development Interventions for Preschool Children from Socially Disadvantaged Families. Campbell Systematic Reviews. 2012:1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Sarah; Maguire, Lisa K.; Macdonald, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the effects of home-based programmes aimed specifically at improving developmental outcomes for preschool children from socially disadvantaged families. The authors searched the following databases between 7 October and 12 October 2010: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2010,…

  3. From Reminiscing to Reading: Home Contributions to Children's Developing Language and Literacy in Low-Income Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Alison; Reese, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the relations among a range of literacy-related home practices and children's acquisition of language and literacy at the outset of preschool are examined in a sample of linguistically diverse children from low-income families in the United States. Specifically, the study focuses on sources of variation found in mother-child…

  4. The Social Prerequisites of Literacy Development: Home and School Experiences of Preschool-Aged Children from Low-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Catherine E.; And Others

    This document is a report of a symposium whose participants are involved with the Home-School Study of Language and Literacy Development, a project engaged in a longitudinal study of 80 low-income families with preschool-aged children in Boston (Massachusetts). The project was designed to identify possible success factors for children from…

  5. Mental Health Problems in Norwegian School Children Placed Out-of-Home: The Importance of Family Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havnen, Karen Skaale; Jakobsen, Reidar; Stormark, Kjell Morten

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to explore the association between mental health problems in children placed out-of-home and family risk factors reported as reasons for placement. The sample consisted of 109 Norwegian children aged 6-12 years. Mental health problems were assessed by the Revised Rutter scales reported by the parents and the…

  6. The Parent Tutorial Curriculum: A Home Instruction Program of Family Life Education for Clients of a Child Welfare Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Douglas B.; Dowling, William D.

    A tutorial program of family life education has been developed for use in the homes of parents who are clients of Franklin County Children Services (FCCS) in Columbus, Ohio. The subject matter of the Parent Tutorial Curriculum (PTC) is divided into five content areas: self esteem (2 modules), communications (9), child rearing (4), homemaking (9),…

  7. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  8. "Grandma, You Should Do It--It's Cool" Older Adults and the Role of Family Members in Their Acceptance of Technology.

    PubMed

    Luijkx, Katrien; Peek, Sebastiaan; Wouters, Eveline

    2015-12-05

    Despite its potential, the acceptance of technology to support the ability to live independently in one's own home, also called aging in place, is not optimal. Family members may play a key role in technology acceptance by older adults; however, it is not well understood why and how they exert influence. Based on open interviews with 53 community-dwelling older adults, this paper describes the influence of family members, including spouses, on the use of various types of consumer electronics by older adults as was reported by themselves. Such a broad focus enables understanding the use of technology as was reported by older adults, instead of its intended use. Our study reveals that the influence of each family member has its own characteristics. The influence of technology acceptance is a natural and coincidental part of the interaction with spouses and grandchildren in which entertainment and pleasure are prominent. This is also partly true for the influence of children, but their influence also is intentional and driven by concerns. Our study indicates the importance of including all family members when implementing technology in the lives of older adults. Besides information for children about the use(fullness) of devices, it is worthwhile to give grandchildren an important role, because older adults easily adopt their enthusiasm and it might eventually lighten the burden on children.

  9. “Grandma, You Should Do It—It’s Cool” Older Adults and the Role of Family Members in Their Acceptance of Technology

    PubMed Central

    Luijkx, Katrien; Peek, Sebastiaan; Wouters, Eveline

    2015-01-01

    Despite its potential, the acceptance of technology to support the ability to live independently in one’s own home, also called aging in place, is not optimal. Family members may play a key role in technology acceptance by older adults; however, it is not well understood why and how they exert influence. Based on open interviews with 53 community-dwelling older adults, this paper describes the influence of family members, including spouses, on the use of various types of consumer electronics by older adults as was reported by themselves. Such a broad focus enables understanding the use of technology as was reported by older adults, instead of its intended use. Our study reveals that the influence of each family member has its own characteristics. The influence of technology acceptance is a natural and coincidental part of the interaction with spouses and grandchildren in which entertainment and pleasure are prominent. This is also partly true for the influence of children, but their influence also is intentional and driven by concerns. Our study indicates the importance of including all family members when implementing technology in the lives of older adults. Besides information for children about the use(fullness) of devices, it is worthwhile to give grandchildren an important role, because older adults easily adopt their enthusiasm and it might eventually lighten the burden on children. PMID:26690188

  10. Adolescent Family Factors Promoting Healthy Adult Functioning: A Longitudinal Community Study

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Angela D.; Giaconia, Rose M.; Reinherz, Helen Z.; Beardslee, William R.; Ward, Kirsten E.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although long-held wisdom and current research suggests that accepting and supportive family relationships may positively influence adult psychosocial functioning, few studies have prospectively investigated these associations. This study examined whether positive family factors during adolescence are associated with healthy adult functioning. Method The 353 participants were part of a single-age cohort whose psychosocial development has been prospectively traced. Two aspects of family functioning - feeling highly valued as a family member and having a family confidant - were measured at age 15. Developmentally-relevant areas of functioning were assessed at age 30. Results Both positive family factors were predictive of adaptive adult functioning across several domains, including mental health and social/interpersonal functioning. Conclusions Findings provide evidence about the salient relationships between positive family relationships and later healthy functioning. PMID:21532965

  11. Home Economics/Family Studies Curricula in Canada: Current Status and Challenges = Programmes d'etudes en economie familiale et sciences familiale au Canada: Situation actuelle et enjeux.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterat, Linda; Khamasi, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    Replicating a 1984 study, a survey of home economics/family studies coordinators in the 10 Canadian provinces found the following: home economics has expanded into grades lower than 8; required courses have increased; core curriculum has not changed radically; there is increased focus on family well-being; and there is a need to address curriculum…

  12. "Yo Te Estoy Ayudando; Estoy Aprendiendo También/I Am Helping You; I Am Learning Too:" A Bilingual Family's Community of Practice during Home Literacy Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Ashley Simpson; Kibler, Amanda; Palacios, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    This case study examines one Honduran immigrant family's community of practice during home literacy events. Data include field notes and audio and video recordings from six weeks of in-home observations. Coding and discourse analysis are used to analyse talk-in-interaction in order to understand how the family engages in literacy events. Family…

  13. Ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental food practices among families of low-income Hispanic and African-American preschoolers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family and home environment are important in shaping the dietary patterns of children, yet research among low-income, minority groups is limited. We examined ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental practices among 706 low-income, African-American and Hispanic families of pre...

  14. Ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental food practices among families of low income Hispanic and African-American preschoolers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family and home environment are important in shaping the dietary patterns of children, yet research among low-income, minority groups is limited. We examined ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental practices among 706 low-income African-American and Hispanic families of pre...

  15. The hidden harm of home-based care: pulmonary tuberculosis symptoms among children providing home medical care to HIV/AIDS-affected adults in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Cluver, Lucie; Orkin, Mark; Moshabela, Mosa; Kuo, Caroline; Boyes, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Millions of children in sub-Saharan Africa undertake personal and medical care for family members who are unwell with AIDS. To date, no research has investigated whether such care provision places children at heightened risk for pulmonary tuberculosis. This study aimed to address this gap by identifying risk factors for paediatric pulmonary tuberculosis symptomatology. In 2009-2011, 6002 children aged 10-17 years were surveyed using door-to-door household sampling of census enumeration areas. These were randomly sampled from six urban and rural sites with over 30% HIV prevalence, within South Africa's three highest tuberculosis-burden provinces. Validated scales and clinical tuberculosis symptom checklists were modelled in multivariate logistic regressions, controlling for socio-demographic co-factors. Findings showed that, among children, severe pulmonary tuberculosis symptomatology was predicted by primary caregiver HIV/AIDS-illness [odds ratio (OR): 1.63, confidence interval (CI): 1.23-2.15, p<0.001], and AIDS-orphanhood (OR: 1.44, CI: 1.04-2.00, p<0.029). Three-fold increases in severe tuberculosis symptoms were predicted by the child's exposure to body fluids through providing personal or medical care to an ill adult (OR: 3.12, CI: 1.96-4.95, p<0.001). Symptoms were also predicted by socio-economic factors of food insecurity (OR: 1.52, CI: 1.15-2.02, p<0.003) and household overcrowding (OR: 1.35, CI: 1.06-1.72, p<0.017). Percentage probability of severe tuberculosis symptoms rose from 1.4% amongst least-exposed children, to 18.1% amongst those exposed to all above-stated risk factors, independent of biological relationship of primary caregiver-child and other socio-demographics. Amongst symptomatic children, 75% had never been tested for tuberculosis. These findings identify the risk of tuberculosis among children providing home medical care to their unwell caregivers, and suggest that there are gaps in the health system to screen and detect these cases of

  16. The Influence of Family Factors on the Executive Functioning of Adult Children of Alcoholics in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Valarie M.; Kelley, Michelle L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined executive functioning in college aged adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs; n = 84) and non-ACOAs (188). We examined whether characteristics of the family environment and family responsibility in one's family of origin were associated with executive functioning above the contribution of ACOA status. ACOAs reported more…

  17. Family Health History Communication Networks of Older Adults: Importance of Social Relationships and Disease Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashida, Sato; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Goodman, Melody; Schafer, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Older individuals play a critical role in disseminating family health history (FHH) information that can facilitate disease prevention among younger family members. This study evaluated the characteristics of older adults and their familial networks associated with two types of communication ("have shared" and "intend to share…

  18. Home-based family intervention for low-income children with asthma: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Celano, Marianne P; Holsey, Chanda Nicole; Kobrynski, Lisa J

    2012-04-01

    Low-income African American children have disproportionately higher asthma morbidity and mortality. Education alone may not address barriers to asthma management due to psychosocial stress. This study evaluated the efficacy of a home-based family intervention integrating asthma education and strategies to address stress using a community-based participatory research model. Children age 8 to 13 with poorly controlled asthma and their caregivers were recruited from an urban hospital and an asthma camp. Caregivers with elevated scores on a stress measure were enrolled. Forty-three families were randomized to the 4- to 6-session Home Based Family Intervention (HBFI) or the single session of Enhanced Treatment as Usual (ETAU). All families received an asthma action plan and dust mite covers; children performed spirometry and demonstrated MDI/spacer technique at each home visit. The HBFI addressed family-selected goals targeting asthma management and stressors. Asthma management, morbidity, family functioning, and caregiver stress were assessed at baseline, postintervention, and 6 months after the intervention. ED visits and hospitalizations were ascertained by medical record review for a year after intervention completion. Only one child (5%) in HBFI had an asthma-related hospitalization compared to 7 patients (35%) in ETAU in the year following intervention. Participants in both groups demonstrated improved asthma management and family functioning, and reduced ED visits, symptom days, missed school days, and caregiver stress, but there were no differential treatment effects. The results suggest that a home-based intervention addressing medical and psychosocial needs may prevent hospitalizations for children with poorly controlled asthma and caregivers under stress.

  19. Bringing baby home together: examining the impact of a couple-focused intervention on the dynamics within family play.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Alyson F; Nahm, Eun Young; Gottman, John M; Content, Kristi

    2011-07-01

    The transition to parenthood brings with it challenges to a couple's relationship, which in turn are likely to negatively impact coparenting and overall family process. The focus of the current study was to examine the effects of the Bringing Baby Home psycho-educational intervention at the first postintervention follow-up for promoting positive coparenting and family process within the mother-father-baby family system. Expectant parents (N = 181) were recruited from the greater Seattle area to participate in a longitudinal random clinical trials study. Families were randomly assigned to a control, workshop, or workshop plus support group. Observational coding indexed both parent and baby contribution to family interaction during the Lausanne Triadic Play procedure. Principal components analysis was used to create summary factors describing the family play. Results of intent-to-treat analyses indicated that the Bringing Baby Home program was successful in promoting less competition during family play. There also was an effect of workshop timing, suggesting that fathers who took the workshop prebirth were less likely to exhibit intrusiveness during mother-baby focused play than those who received it postbirth. Implications for promoting the formation of positive family-level relations are discussed.

  20. Why Do Families Relinquish Care? An Investigation of the Factors that Lead to Relinquishment into Out-of-Home Respite Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nankervis, K.; Rosewarne, A.; Vassos, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Families/carers relinquishing the care of family members with a disability into the care of out-of-home respite facilities is an under-researched area in the disability field. With this in mind, the aim of this study was to explore the factors that lead to families relinquishing care, the potential early indicators that families are…

  1. Family caregivers' perspectives on dementia-related dressing difficulties at home: The preservation of self model.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Diane F; LaRose, Sharon; Mahoney, Edward L

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's caregiving literature acknowledges dressing as a major daily stressor but research on this topic is negligible. A qualitative grounded theory approach was used to explore Alzheimer's family caregivers' perspectives about issues that arise when their family members lose the ability to dress independently. Three focus groups and seven individual interviews were conducted and audio recorded with 25 information rich caregivers. Constant comparative analyses and coding of the transcripts identified six major themes leading to a 'Preservation of Self Model: Care Recipient to Care Giver' that portrays the caregiving trajectory. Initially, caregivers tried to protect the self dignity of the family member by maintaining usual routines and absorbing blame for difficulties. Dressing 'battles' occurred and caregivers learned management through trial and error. Crossing adult-child-gender role boundaries escalated discomfort. When facing unrelenting demands, concern shifted to preservation of the caregivers' health and self. Results suggest that caregivers would benefit from more pro-active dressing counseling to shorten the trial and error periods, dressing aids more relevant to dementia and more knowledgeable helpers. The preservation model can facilitate understanding of the caregiving trajectory and guide intervention support.

  2. Dealing with chemotherapy-related symptoms at home: a qualitative study in adult patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Coolbrandt, A; Dierckx de Casterlé, B; Wildiers, H; Aertgeerts, B; Van der Elst, E; van Achterberg, T; Milisen, K

    2016-01-01

    Given that chemotherapy treatments are done mostly in an outpatient setting, patients with cancer must deal with treatment-related symptoms mainly at home. Evidence suggests that they often feel left alone or unprepared to do so. This qualitative study explores how patients deal with chemotherapy-related symptoms in their home, which factors and ideas influence their self-management and what role professional caregivers play. One-off, semi-structured interviews were held with 28 adult patients with cancer being treated with chemotherapy. Using a Grounded Theory approach, we cyclically collected and analysed data to come to a thorough understanding of the major conceptual themes and their interconnections. Dealing with chemotherapy-related symptoms involves a process of experiencing and learning how side effects unfold over time and how to deal with them. Patients express very personal symptom experiences and symptom-management styles, which are shaped by personal factors (e.g. coping with cancer and cancer treatment, perceived level of control) and environmental factors (e.g. professionals' attitude, information resources). Improving symptom self-management support requires active exploration of the personal symptom experience and symptom-management style. Professional care should be tailored to the patient's perspective and should address personal and environmental determinants of their behaviour.

  3. Impact of cooking and home food preparation interventions among adults: outcomes and implications for future programs

    PubMed Central

    Reicks, Marla; Trofholz, Amanda C.; Stang, Jamie S; Laska, Melissa N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cooking programs are growing in popularity; however an extensive review has not examined overall impact. Therefore, this study reviewed previous research on cooking/home food preparation interventions and diet and health-related outcomes among adults and identified implications for practice and research. Design Literature review and descriptive summative method. Main outcome measures Dietary intake, knowledge/skills, cooking attitudes and self-efficacy/confidence, health outcomes. Analysis Articles evaluating effectiveness of interventions that included cooking/home food preparation as the primary aim (January 1980 through December 2011) were identified via OVID MEDLINE, Agricola and Web of Science databases. Studies grouped according to design and outcomes were reviewed for validity using an established coding system. Results were summarized for several outcome categories. Results Of 28 studies identified, 12 included a control group with six as non-randomized and six as randomized controlled trials. Evaluation was done post-intervention for five studies, pre- and post-intervention for 23 and beyond post-intervention for 15. Qualitative and quantitative measures suggested a positive influence on main outcomes. However, non-rigorous study designs, varying study populations, and use of non-validated assessment tools limited stronger conclusions. Conclusions and Implications Well-designed studies are needed that rigorously evaluate long-term impact on cooking behavior, dietary intake, obesity and other health outcomes. PMID:24703245

  4. When Military Parents Come Home: Building "Strong Families Strong Forces," a Home-Based Intervention for Military Families with Very Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, Ruth; Acker, Michelle L.; Ross, Abigail M.; DeVoe, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01

    The long wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have presented unique challenges to military-connected families with very young children, yet few evidence-based services are available to support these families through deployment and reintegration. Although many military families have shown remarkable resilience throughout the intense demands of the wars,…

  5. Processes of user participation among formal and family caregivers in home-based care for persons with dementia.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Lill Sverresdatter; Normann, Hans Ketil; Hamran, Torunn

    2017-02-01

    Scandinavian health policy supports prolonged home-based care for people with dementia. User participation is expected to reduce family burden. The aim of this study was to explore how formal and family caregivers experience collaboration while providing home-based dementia care, with a focus on user participation. Seventeen qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted among formal and family caregivers in rural municipalities. The theme identified during this process was 'negotiating participation in decisions'. This theme was analysed using positioning theory. Concepts such as user participation are ambiguous, and caregivers negotiate positions during decision-making processes. Such negotiations are caused by the problematic relationships among patients' legal consent, undefined spokespersons and pragmatic care practices. These constant negotiations enable or obstruct collaboration in several situations. User participation as a concept might contribute to conflicts during collaborations. Dialogues about user participation that focus on consent and spokespersons could reduce the burden created by negotiations in practice.

  6. Characterization of Post-Hospital Infections in Adults Requiring Home Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Vivian M.; Griffith, Daniel P.; Blumberg, Henry M.; Dave, Nisha J.; Battey, Cynthia H.; McNally, Therese A.; Easley, Kirk A.; Galloway, John R.; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Limited data are available on the incidence and risk factors for infection among patients requiring home parenteral nutrition (HPN). Methods Retrospective study of 101 consecutive adults (63 female, 38 male) discharged on HPN from Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, GA. New bloodstream infections (BSI) requiring re-hospitalization and other infections were evaluated. Results Most infections (75%) developed during the initial 6 months after hospital discharge; rates of BSI were particularly high during the first four months. A total of 56 patients (55.4%) developed a total of 102 BSIs (11.5 BSI/1000 catheter-days). Most BSIs were attributed to Gram positive organisms (46%) including coagulase-negative staphylococcus, staphylococcus aureus, enterococcus species, and others, followed by Candida species (20%) and Gram negative organisms (13%). Twenty-one percent of BSIs were polymicrobial. The BSI incidence rate ratio (IRR) was significantly increased for patients with mean pre-hospital discharge blood glucose (BG) concentrations in the highest quartile versus the lowest quartile; IRR 2.4; P = 0.017). Patients with a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) versus non-PICC central venous catheters had significantly higher rates of BSI (p = 0.018). Thirty-nine (38.6%) patients developed 81 non-BSI infections, including pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and surgical site infections. Post-discharge PN dextrose, lipid, and total calorie doses were unrelated to BSI but variably related to the rate of non-BSI. Conclusions Adult HPN patients exhibit a very high incidence of post-hospital infections. Higher mean BG levels during pre-discharge hospitalization and use of PICCs at discharge are associated with an increased risk of BSI in the post-discharge home setting. PMID:22858199

  7. Time Out-of-Home and Cognitive, Physical, and Emotional Wellbeing of Older Adults: A Longitudinal Mixed Effects Model

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Time out-of-home has been linked with numerous health outcomes, including cognitive decline, poor physical ability and low emotional state. Comprehensive characterization of this important health metric would potentially enable objective monitoring of key health outcomes. The objective of this study is to determine the relationship between time out-of-home and cognitive status, physical ability and emotional state. Methods and Findings Participants included 85 independent older adults, age 65–96 years (M = 86.36; SD = 6.79) who lived alone, from the Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Changes (ISAAC) and the ORCATECH Life Laboratory cohorts. Factors hypothesized to affect time out-of-home were assessed on three different temporal levels: yearly (cognitive status, loneliness, clinical walking speed), weekly (pain and mood) or daily (time out-of-home, in-home walking speed, weather, and season). Subject characteristics including age, race, and gender were assessed at baseline. Total daily time out-of-home in hours was assessed objectively and unobtrusively for up to one year using an in-home activity sensor platform. A longitudinal tobit mixed effects regression model was used to relate daily time out-of-home to cognitive status, physical ability and emotional state. More hours spend outside the home was associated with better cognitive function as assessed using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale, where higher scores indicate lower cognitive function (βCDR = -1.69, p<0.001). More hours outside the home was also associated with superior physical ability (βPain = -0.123, p<0.001) and improved emotional state (βLonely = -0.046, p<0.001; βLow mood = -0.520, p<0.001). Weather, season, and weekday also affected the daily time out-of-home. Conclusions These results suggest that objective longitudinal monitoring of time out-of-home may enable unobtrusive assessment of cognitive, physical and emotional state. In addition, these results indicate

  8. Home-Based Preventive Parenting Intervention for at-Risk Infants and Their Families: An Open Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bagner, Daniel M.; Rodríguez, Gabriela M.; Blake, Clair A.; Rosa-Olivares, Jose

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and initial outcome of a home-based adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for at-risk infants with externalizing behavior problems. Seven 12- to 15-month-old infants and their families were recruited at a large pediatric primary care clinic to participate in a home-based parenting intervention to prevent subsequent externalizing behavior problems. Home-based assessments were conducted at baseline, postintervention, and a 4- to 6-month follow-up. Six of the 7 (86%) families completed the intervention, and all completers reported high satisfaction with the intervention. All of the mothers demonstrated significant improvements and statistically reliable changes in their interactions with their infant, and most reported clinically significant and statistically reliable changes in infant behavior problems. The current study provides preliminary support for the use of this brief, home-based parenting intervention in addressing behavior problems as early as possible to improve access to an intervention for at-risk infants and their families. Successes and challenges with the development and implementation of this intervention are discussed along with directions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:25414568

  9. A Smart-Home System to Unobtrusively and Continuously Assess Loneliness in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, Hiroko H.; Riley, Thomas; Jacobs, Peter G.; Thielke, Stephen; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Loneliness is a common condition in older adults and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, decreased sleep quality, and increased risk of cognitive decline. Assessing loneliness in older adults is challenging due to the negative desirability biases associated with being lonely. Thus, it is necessary to develop more objective techniques to assess loneliness in older adults. In this paper, we describe a system to measure loneliness by assessing in-home behavior using wireless motion and contact sensors, phone monitors, and computer software as well as algorithms developed to assess key behaviors of interest. We then present results showing the accuracy of the system in detecting loneliness in a longitudinal study of 16 older adults who agreed to have the sensor platform installed in their own homes for up to 8 months. We show that loneliness is significantly associated with both time out-of-home (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$ {\\beta } = -0.88$ \\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$p<0.01$ \\end{document}) and number of computer sessions (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$ {\\beta } = 0.78$ \\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength

  10. "That was grown folks' business": narrative reflection and response in older adults' family health history communication.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Jill; Hovick, Shelly R

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of family health history and the pivotal role of older adults in communicating it, this study examines how African American older adults (a) characterize their understandings of health-related conditions in their family histories and (b) rationalize their motivations and constraints for sharing this information with current family members. Using narrative theory as a framework, we illustrate how the participants reflect on prior health-related experiences within the family to respond to moral and practical calls for communicating family health information to current relatives. Specifically, our analysis highlights how storied family secrets--as constructed by 28 participants in group and individual interviews--reveal and inform shifting cultural and generational practices that shape the lived health behaviors and communication of older adults at greater risk for health disparities.

  11. 76 FR 44573 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 Correction In notice document 2011... page 43255, the table labeled ``Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of...

  12. Visually Impaired Older Adults and Home-Based Leisure Activities: The Effects of Person-Environment Congruence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens-Ratchford, Regina; Krause, Airi

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the effect of person-environment congruence on participation in homebased leisure activities by two legally blind older adults who lived independently in the community. The results indicated that visual impairment increased the time spent in home-based leisure activities and that the participants used various…

  13. The Impact of Perceived Stress, Social Support, and Home-Based Physical Activity on Mental Health among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Martin, Peter; Russell, Daniel; Franke, Warren; Kohut, Marian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity affected older adults' fatigue, loneliness, and depression. We also explored whether social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health problems. The data of 163 older participants were analyzed in this…

  14. Nutrition Risk in Home-Bound Older Adults: Using Dietician-Trained and Supervised Nutrition Volunteers for Screening and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laforest, Sophie; Goldin, Benita; Nour, Kareen; Roy, Marie-Andree; Payette, Helene

    2007-01-01

    Nutrition screening and early intervention in home-bound older adults are key to preventing unfavourable health outcomes and functional decline. This pilot study's objectives were (a) to test the reliability of the Elderly Nutrition Screening Tool (ENS [C]) when administered by dietician-trained and supervised nutrition volunteers, and (b) to…

  15. "It's the Way They Do It": Expressions of Agency in Child-Adult Relations at Home and School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerke, Havard

    2011-01-01

    This article examines children's (8-9 years) and young people's (14-15 years) views about their own participation in decision-making processes with adults, within the context of home and school in Norway. A difference-centred theoretical perspective is used to identify children's participation as expressions of agency embedded in intricate…

  16. Using Information and Communication Technology in Home Care for Communication between Patients, Family Members, and Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Birgitta; Nilsson, Carina; Zotterman, Daniel; Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Information and communication technology (ICT) are becoming a natural part in healthcare both for delivering and giving accessibility to healthcare for people with chronic illness living at home. Aim. The aim was to review existing studies describing the use of ICT in home care for communication between patients, family members, and healthcare professionals. Methods. A review of studies was conducted that identified 1,276 studies. A selection process and quality appraisal were conducted, which finally resulted in 107 studies. Results. The general results offer an overview of characteristics of studies describing the use of ICT applications in home care and are summarized in areas including study approach, quality appraisal, publications data, terminology used for defining the technology, and disease diagnosis. The specific results describe how communication with ICT was performed in home care and the benefits and drawbacks with the use of ICT. Results were predominated by positive responses in the use of ICT. Conclusion. The use of ICT applications in home care is an expanding research area, with a variety of ICT tools used that could increase accessibility to home care. Using ICT can lead to people living with chronic illnesses gaining control of their illness that promotes self-care. PMID:23690763

  17. Using Information and Communication Technology in Home Care for Communication between Patients, Family Members, and Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Birgitta; Nilsson, Carina; Zotterman, Daniel; Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Information and communication technology (ICT) are becoming a natural part in healthcare both for delivering and giving accessibility to healthcare for people with chronic illness living at home. Aim. The aim was to review existing studies describing the use of ICT in home care for communication between patients, family members, and healthcare professionals. Methods. A review of studies was conducted that identified 1,276 studies. A selection process and quality appraisal were conducted, which finally resulted in 107 studies. Results. The general results offer an overview of characteristics of studies describing the use of ICT applications in home care and are summarized in areas including study approach, quality appraisal, publications data, terminology used for defining the technology, and disease diagnosis. The specific results describe how communication with ICT was performed in home care and the benefits and drawbacks with the use of ICT. Results were predominated by positive responses in the use of ICT. Conclusion. The use of ICT applications in home care is an expanding research area, with a variety of ICT tools used that could increase accessibility to home care. Using ICT can lead to people living with chronic illnesses gaining control of their illness that promotes self-care.

  18. Formal home-care utilisation by older adults in Ireland: evidence from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA).

    PubMed

    Murphy, Catriona M; Whelan, Brendan J; Normand, Charles

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a population-based estimate of the utilisation of publicly financed formal home care by older adults in Ireland and to identify the principal characteristics of those utilising formal home care. Data were collected through computer-aided personal interviews from a representative sample of community living older adults in Ireland. The interviews were conducted between 2009 and 2011 as part of the first wave of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). The study is cross-sectional in design and limited to participants aged 65 years and older (n = 3507). Results reveal that 8.2% (95% CI 7.1%-9.3%) of participants utilised publicly financed formal home care in the form of home help and/or personal care. Key determinants of formal home-care utilisation were Instrumental Activity of Daily Living (IADL) difficulty (Adj OR 3.8, 95% CI 2.7-5.3), older age (Adj OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.4-4.8) and living alone (Adj OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.9-3.8). Almost half of those utilising formal care did not self-report an Activity of Daily Living (ADL) difficulty or an IADL difficulty. Government policy aims to reduce the need for long-term residential care by providing formal home care for older adults with low to moderate levels of dependency. This requires an increasing emphasis on personal care provision in the home. No evidence was found in this study to suggest that a shift in emphasis from formal domestic to personal care is taking place in Ireland. The absence of standardised assessment and eligibility criteria are deemed to be barriers to reorientation of the system. From a health services perspective, the current situation is not sustainable into the future and requires a focused policy response.

  19. Projected Outcomes of Nurse-Family Partnership Home Visitation During 1996-2013, USA.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ted R

    2015-08-01

    Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) targets intensive prenatal and postnatal home visitation by registered nurses to low-income first-time mothers. Through 2013, 177,517 pregnant women enrolled in NFP programs. This article projects how NFP will affect their lives and the lives of their babies. NFP has been evaluated in six randomized trials and several more limited analyses of operational programs. We systematically reviewed evaluation findings on 21 outcomes and calculated effects on three more. We added outcome data from the NFP national data system and personal communications that filled outcome data gaps on some trials. We assumed effectiveness in replication declined by 21.8 %, proportionally with the decline in mean visits per family from trials to operational programs. By 2031, NFP program enrollments in 1996-2013 will prevent an estimated 500 infant deaths, 10,000 preterm births, 13,000 dangerous closely spaced second births, 4700 abortions, 42,000 child maltreatment incidents, 36,000 intimate partner violence incidents, 90,000 violent crimes by youth, 594,000 property and public order crimes (e.g., vandalism, loitering) by youth, 36,000 youth arrests, and 41,000 person-years of youth substance abuse. They will reduce smoking during pregnancy, pregnancy complications, childhood injuries, and use of subsidized child care; improve language development; increase breast-feeding; and raise compliance with immunization schedules. They will eliminate the need for 4.8 million person-months of child Medicaid spending and reduce estimated spending on Medicaid, TANF, and food stamps by $3.0 billion (present values in 2010 dollars). By comparison, NFP cost roughly $1.6 billion. Thus, NFP appears to be a sound investment. It saves money while enriching the lives of participating low-income mothers and their offspring and benefiting society more broadly by reducing crime and safety net demand.

  20. Hepatitis A outbreak among adults with developmental disabilities in group homes--Michigan, 2013.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Susan R; Berger, Keira Wickliffe; Hackert, Pamela B; Renas, Richard; Brunette, Suzanne; Parker, Nicole; Padro, Carolyn; Hocking, Anne; Hedemark, Mary; Edwards, Renai; Bush, Russell L; Khudyakov, Yury; Nelson, Noele P; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2015-02-20

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections among persons with developmental disabilities living in institutions were common in the past, but with improvements in care and fewer persons institutionalized, the number of HAV infections has declined in these institutions. However, residents in institutions are still vulnerable if they have not been vaccinated. On April 24, 2013, a resident of a group home (GH) for adults with disabilities in southeast Michigan (GH-A) was diagnosed with hepatitis A and died 2 days later of fulminant liver failure. Four weeks later, a second GH-A resident was diagnosed with hepatitis A. None of the GH-A residents or staff had been vaccinated against hepatitis A. Over the next 3 months, six more cases of hepatitis A were diagnosed in residents in four other Michigan GHs. Three local health departments were involved in case investigation and management, including administration of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). Serum specimens from seven cases were found to have an identical strain of HAV genotype 1A. This report describes the outbreak investigation, the challenges of timely delivery of PEP for hepatitis A, and the need for preexposure vaccination against hepatitis A for adults living or working in GHs for the disabled.

  1. Mediators of Well-Being in Ageing Family Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnes, Patricia; Woodford, Lynn; Passey, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Background: Increasing numbers of adults with an intellectual disability are being cared for at home by ageing parents. The purpose of this study was to determine whether carer resources (i.e. social support and formal service use) and carer appraisals of ageing and stress/burden mediate the relationships between (1) maladaptive behaviour and…

  2. Engineering domain fusion chimeras from I-OnuI family LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Abigail R.; Kuhar, Ryan; Jarjour, Jordan; Kulshina, Nadia; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Danaher, Patrick; Gano, Jacob; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Although engineered LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases (LHEs) are finding increasing applications in biotechnology, their generation remains a challenging, industrial-scale process. As new single-chain LAGLIDADG nuclease scaffolds are identified, however, an alternative paradigm is emerging: identification of an LHE scaffold whose native cleavage site is a close match to a desired target sequence, followed by small-scale engineering to modestly refine recognition specificity. The application of this paradigm could be accelerated if methods were available for fusing N- and C-terminal domains from newly identified LHEs into chimeric enzymes with hybrid cleavage sites. Here we have analyzed the structural requirements for fusion of domains extracted from six single-chain I-OnuI family LHEs, spanning 40–70% amino acid identity. Our analyses demonstrate that both the LAGLIDADG helical interface residues and the linker peptide composition have important effects on the stability and activity of chimeric enzymes. Using a simple domain fusion method in which linker peptide residues predicted to contact their respective domains are retained, and in which limited variation is introduced into the LAGLIDADG helix and nearby interface residues, catalytically active enzymes were recoverable for ∼70% of domain chimeras. This method will be useful for creating large numbers of chimeric LHEs for genome engineering applications. PMID:22684507

  3. Loneliness and coping among tertiary-level adult cancer patients in the home.

    PubMed

    Perry, G R

    1990-10-01

    This exploratory study measured the degree of loneliness experienced by adult cancer patients. All were in the initial phases of the illness, that is, currently receiving treatment consisting of either chemotherapy or radiation therapy on an outpatient basis and/or recuperating from surgery in the home setting. All were within 100 days of initial diagnosis of cancer. The UCLA Loneliness Scale by Peplau was used in measuring loneliness. In addition, the coping methods of this same group of patients were examined using the Jalowiec Coping Scale to determine predominant methods of coping with the situational crisis imposed by cancer diagnosis and treatment. The instruments were administered in the home or in an outpatient setting and patients were accessed through cancer treatment centers and from oncologists in the southern Illinois area. The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of loneliness, to identify predominant coping methods, and to discern the relationship, if any, between coping methods employed and the degree of loneliness reported by the adult cancer patients. The conceptual framework chosen for the study was taken from the work of Lazarus and Jalowiec with regard to coping; the work of Peplau, Russell, and Cutrone on loneliness formed the conceptual basis for the portion of the study regarding that dimension. A total of 41 cancer patients were surveyed--21 were male and 20 were female. The median age was 60 years, and the mean educational level was 10.5 years. There were significant differences found between loneliness scores by age categories and by marital status, as well as a relationship between membership in organizations and loneliness scores. There were significant relationships found between coping methods (confrontive, emotive, palliative) employed and the degree of loneliness experienced by these cancer patients. Coping methods were also ranked by frequency of use, and interesting patterns emerged--especially noteworthy were group

  4. Youth dietary intake and weight status: healthful neighborhood food environments enhance the protective role of supportive family home environments.

    PubMed

    Berge, Jerica M; Wall, Melanie; Larson, Nicole; Forsyth, Ann; Bauer, Katherine W; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate individual and joint associations of the home environment and the neighborhood built environment with adolescent dietary patterns and body mass index (BMI) z-score. Racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse adolescents (n=2682; 53.2% girls; mean age14.4 years) participating in the EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens) study completed height and weight measurements and surveys in Minnesota middle and high schools. Neighborhood variables were measured using Geographic Information Systems data. Multiple regressions of BMI z-score, fruit and vegetable intake, and fast food consumption were fit including home and neighborhood environmental variables as predictors and also including their interactions to test for effect modification. Supportive family environments (i.e., higher family functioning, frequent family meals, and parent modeling of healthful eating) were associated with higher adolescent fruit and vegetable intake, lower fast food consumption, and lower BMI z-score. Associations between the built environment and adolescent outcomes were fewer. Interaction results, although not all consistent, indicated that the relationship between a supportive family environment and adolescent fruit and vegetable intake and BMI was enhanced when the neighborhood was supportive of healthful behavior. Public health interventions that simultaneously improve both the home environment and the neighborhood environment of adolescents may have a greater impact on adolescent obesity prevention than interventions that address one of these environments alone.

  5. Examining therapist comfort in delivering family therapy in home and community settings: development and evaluation of the Therapist Comfort Scale.

    PubMed

    Glebova, Tatiana; Foster, Sharon L; Cunningham, Phillippe B; Brennan, Patricia A; Whitmore, Elizabeth

    2012-03-01

    This study reports on the development and psychometric properties of a new measure assessing therapist comfort in the home treatment context and the relationship between therapist comfort, related process variables, and therapist characteristics. Data were drawn from a longitudinal evaluation of 185 families treated by 51 therapists using Multisystemic Therapy (MST). Therapist comfort was measured at four time points. Psychometric evaluation indicated that the measure was internally and temporally consistent. Examination of the measure's validity indicated that therapists' feelings of safety and comfort during the provision of home-based treatment were associated with family neighborhood characteristics and family socioeconomic factors. Furthermore, the therapist's reported level of alliance (as measured by the Emotional Bonding subscale of the Working Alliance Inventory) was related to her/his feeling of comfort. Analyses also indicated that therapists with greater belief in the clinical utility of the MST model felt more comfortable when delivering MST. Together the results suggest that economically disadvantaged families treated in home and community settings may be most at risk for erosions in the therapeutic relationship over time as a function of lower therapist comfort. Because therapist comfort was associated with therapeutic alliance-a factor found to be associated with clinical outcomes across studies and treatment models-findings imply that psychotherapists should regularly examine their own level of comfort, especially when providing services in nontraditional settings, and that therapist comfort should be routinely assessed as part of clinical supervision and training.

  6. Recruitment and Reasons for Non-Participation in a Family-Coping-Orientated Palliative Home Care Trial (FamCope).

    PubMed

    Ammari, Anne Birgitte Hjuler; Hendriksen, Carsten; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients and their family caregivers need support to cope with physical, psychosocial, and existential problems early in the palliative care trajectory. Many interventions target patient symptomatology, with health care professionals acting as problem-solvers. Family coping, however, is a new research area within palliative care. The FamCope intervention was developed to test if a nurse-led family-coping-orientated palliative home care intervention would help families cope with physical and psychosocial problems at home--together as a family and in interaction with health care professionals. However, an unexpectedly high number of families declined participation in the trial. We describe and discuss the recruitment strategy and patient reported reasons for non-participation to add to the knowledge about what impedes recruitment and to identify the factors that influence willingness to participate in research aimed at family coping early in the palliative care trajectory. Patients with advanced cancer and their closest relative were recruited from medical, surgical, and oncological departments. Reasons for non-participation were registered and characteristics of participants and non-participants were compared to evaluate differences between subgroups of non-participants based on reasons not to participate and reasons to participate in the trial. A total of 65.9% of the families declined participation. Two main categories for declining participation emerged: first, that the "burden of illness is too great" and, second, that it was "too soon" to receive this kind of support. Men were more likely to participate than women. Patients in the "too soon" group had similar characteristics to participants in the trial. Timing of interventions and readiness of patients and their relatives seems to affect willingness to receive a family-coping-orientated care approach and impeded recruitment to this trial. Our findings can be used in further research and in clinical

  7. [Family dynamics in the caring context of adults on the fourth age].

    PubMed

    Polaro, Sandra Helena Isse; Gonçalves, Lucia Hisako Takase; Nassar, Silvia Modesto; Lopes, Márcia Maria Bragança; Ferreira, Viviane Ferraz; Monteiro, Hellen Karinna

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the pattern of family functioning on everyday care relationships of adults in the fourth age. This is a study of diagnostic-evaluative nature of adults with 80 or more years old who depend on care, and of their relatives as caregivers. The participants were selected among the registered patients of a Family Health Unit in a district in the suburbs of Belém-PA, Brazil. They were evaluated according to the dynamics of their family, and quality of life related health lifestyle. Most of the elderly rated their families with good functionality. However, data on the elderly and caregivers' quality of life and caregivers' life style only reached the median level, showing some difficulty in the family functioning system. It was concluded that the multiple results obtained through the assessments indicate some practical implications of care to the family unity and confirm the need for multidimensional assessment about the family intervention.

  8. Family conflict and lower morning cortisol in adolescents and adults: modulation of puberty

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jihui; Lam, Siu-Ping; Kong, Alice PS; Ma, Ronald CW; Li, Shirley Xin; Chan, Joey WY; Yu, Mandy WM; Zhou, Junying; Chan, Michael HM; Ho, Chung-Shun; Li, Albert M; Tang, Xiangdong; Wing, Yun-Kwok

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to explore the association between family conflict and HPA axis activity, especially with respect to the potential modulating effect of puberty. A total of 205 adolescents and 244 adult parents were recruited. Family conflict was assessed by the family conflict subscale of the Family Environmental Scale and serial salivary cortisol was measured in all participants. A marginally lower AUCg at 30 minutes after wake up in the morning and a significant lower AUCg at 60 minutes and 90 minutes in adult parents with high family conflict was found when compared to those with low family conflict. In adolescents, there were significant interaction effects between pubertal status and family conflict on AUCg (interaction p values <0.05). Among the adolescents with low family conflict, those at late/post pubertal status had higher AUCg than their pre/early pubertal counterparts but this difference was not observed in the adolescents with high family conflict. Adverse family environment is associated with HPA axis dysfunction in adults and late/post pubertal adolescents and pubertal maturation plays a critical role in modulating the association between family environment and HPA axis function. PMID:26928887

  9. Roles within the Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  10. Improving Family Communications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  11. Factors Predicting Mortality in Midlife Adults with and without Down Syndrome Living with Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, A. J.; Seltzer, M. M.; Greenberg, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the mortality of individuals with Down syndrome who have lived at home with their families throughout their lives. The current study evaluates the predictors, causes and patterns of mortality among co-residing individuals in midlife with Down syndrome as compared with co-residing individuals with ID owing to other…

  12. Church-Based ESL Adult Programs: Social Mediators for Empowering "Family Literacy Ecology of Communities"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Xia; Mantero, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    This multi-sited ethnographic study examines the ways in which Latino and Asian immigrant parents' English learning through two church-based ESL programs in a Southeastern U.S. city affects their family literacy and home language practices. It demonstrates that the parents' participation in the programs is an empowering experience promoting ESL…

  13. Profession differences in family focused practice in the adult mental health system.

    PubMed

    Maybery, Darryl; Goodyear, Melinda; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Cuff, Rose; Reupert, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    There is a large gulf between what psychiatric services should (or could) provide and what they do in practice. This article sought to determine practice differences between the differing professions working in adult mental health services in terms of their family focused work. Three hundred and seven adult mental health professionals completed a cross-sectional survey of family focused practices in adult mental health services. Findings highlight that social workers engaged in more family focused practice compared to psychiatric nurses, who performed consistently the lowest on direct family care, compared to both social workers and psychologists. Clear skill, knowledge, and confidence differences are indicated between the professions. The article concludes by offering direction for future profession education and training in family focused practices.

  14. Nursing home staffing and training recommendations for promoting older adults' quality of care and life: Part 1. Deficits in the quality of care due to understaffing and undertraining.

    PubMed

    Maas, Meridean L; Specht, Janet P; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Gittler, Josephine; Bechen, Kate

    2008-04-01

    Caught between the inability or unwillingness of nursing home corporations and owners to redistribute revenue and the reluctance of federal and state agencies to increase payments to nursing homes, the nation's most vulnerable older adults are not receiving the care they deserve. Widespread recognition of substandard care and quality of life of older adults in nursing homes has existed for decades. In addition, there is substantial evidence that poor quality of care is related to inadequate numbers and training of nursing staff. Still, policy makers and nursing home owners have failed to take needed action. In the first article of this two-part series, major deficits in the care of older adult nursing home residents are reviewed, and research documenting the relationship between nursing home staffing and the quality of care and life of residents is summarized.

  15. Familial support as perceived by adult victims of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Stroud, D D

    1999-04-01

    With the increasing popularity of family therapies in cases of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), many studies have discussed the importance of familial support in the successful recovery of victims. Therefore, a systematic study exploring family support of victims was undertaken to shed light on the level of family support perceived by adult victims of CSA. It was anticipated that victims of intrafamilial CSA would report more family dissatisfaction and perceive less family support than extrafamilial victims. As hypothesized, intrafamilial victims reported significantly more general family dissatisfaction and specifically, perceived significantly less father, parent, and brother support. Additionally, the gender of the victim played a significant role: Male victims reported less father, parent and sister support and less family protectiveness after disclosure when compared to female victims. Based on the results, clinicians should be aware that issues of gender and relatedness may play a significant part in the effectiveness of their CSA clients' family support systems.

  16. Activity, specificity and structure of I-Bth0305I: a representative of a new homing endonuclease family

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gregory K.; Heiter, Daniel F.; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2011-01-01

    Novel family of putative homing endonuclease genes was recently discovered during analyses of metagenomic and genomic sequence data. One such protein is encoded within a group I intron that resides in the recA gene of the Bacillus thuringiensis 0305ϕ8–36 bacteriophage. Named I-Bth0305I, the endonuclease cleaves a DNA target in the uninterrupted recA gene at a position immediately adjacent to the intron insertion site. The enzyme displays a multidomain, homodimeric architecture and footprints a DNA region of ∼60 bp. Its highest specificity corresponds to a 14-bp pseudopalindromic sequence that is directly centered across the DNA cleavage site. Unlike many homing endonucleases, the specificity profile of the enzyme is evenly distributed across much of its target site, such that few single base pair substitutions cause a significant decrease in cleavage activity. A crystal structure of its C-terminal domain confirms a nuclease fold that is homologous to very short patch repair (Vsr) endonucleases. The domain architecture and DNA recognition profile displayed by I-Bth0305I, which is the prototype of a homing lineage that we term the ‘EDxHD’ family, are distinct from previously characterized homing endonucleases. PMID:21890897

  17. Creating Grander Families: Older Adults Adopting Younger Kin and Nonkin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinterlong, James; Ryan, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: There is a dearth of research on older adoptive parents caring for minor children, despite a growing number of such adoptions finalized each year. This study offers a large-scale investigation of adoptive families headed by older parents. We describe these families and explore how preadoptive kinship between the adoptive parent and the…

  18. Decision-making processes shaping the home food environments of young adult women with and without children.

    PubMed

    Raskind, Ilana G; Woodruff, Rebecca C; Ballard, Denise; Cherry, Sabrina T; Daniel, Sandra; Haardörfer, Regine; Kegler, Michelle C

    2017-02-21

    Although young adult women consume the majority of their total daily energy intake from home food sources, the decision-making processes that shape their home food environments have received limited attention. Further, how decision-making may be affected by the transformative experience of motherhood is unknown. In this study, we explore the factors that influence two key decision-making processes-food choices while grocery shopping and the use of non-home food sources-and whether there are differences by motherhood status. In-depth interviews were conducted with 40 women, aged 20-29, living in southwest Georgia. Thematic analysis was used to analyze qualitative data stratified by whether or not children were present in the home. Decision-making was affected by numerous factors, which differed across groups. In regard to grocery shopping, women with children more frequently discussed the influence of nutrition and the preferences of children, while women without children more frequently discussed the influence of taste and the preferences of other household members. Cost, convenience, weight control, and pre-planning meals emerged as salient in both groups. In regard to the use of non-home food sources, convenience and taste were discussed by both groups, while social factors were only discussed by women without children. The cost of eating out was the only reason cited for eating inside the home, and this factor only emerged among women with children. Motherhood may be an important contributor to the decision-making processes that shape young adult women's home food environments. Interventions may find success in framing messaging to emphasize factors identified as motivating healthy decisions, such as protecting the health of children, and practical strategies may be adapted from those already in use, such as pre-planning and budgeting for healthy meals.

  19. Assessing family-of-origin functioning in Mexican American adults: retrospective application of the family environment scale.

    PubMed

    Negy, Charles; Snyder, Douglas K

    2006-12-01

    Although both theoretical and empirical literature suggests that individuals' family-of-origin experiences affect subsequent relationship functioning as adults, few studies have examined the appropriateness of family assessment techniques when applied retrospectively for use in either theory development or clinical applications. This study examined psycho-metric characteristics of the Family Environment Scale (FES) when used retrospectively with Mexican Americans to assess their families-of-origin. Findings provided qualified support for the internal consistency of the FES and showed significant mean profile differences for this population across gender and when compared to the normative sample for this measure. Retrospective reports on the FES related to independent measures of family history of distress and, to a lesser extent, with current relationship functioning, providing preliminary support for the criterion-related validity of the FES when adapted for retrospective assessment. Limitations and implications of findings for further research are discussed.

  20. Moving towards Participatory Adult Education: Involving Family Literacy Students in Meaningful Leadership Experiences. Research Brief #4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toso, Blaire Willson; Prins, Esther; Drayton, Brendaly; Gungor, Ramazan; Gnanadass, Edith

    2008-01-01

    Although adult educators espouse values such as inclusion and ownership, adult learners seldom play a substantive role in programmatic decision making. This collaborative research project explored family literacy participants' experiences in their program's parent advisory council (PAC). The study shows that involvement in the PAC enhanced program…

  1. Family Environment and Behavior Problems in Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jan S.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Baker, Jason K.; Smith, Leann E.; Warren, Steven F.; Brady, Nancy; Hong, Jinkuk

    2012-01-01

    We examine how the family environment is associated with aspects of the Fragile X syndrome phenotype during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Mothers of children (n = 48), adolescents (n = 85), and adults (n = 34) with Fragile X syndrome participated in a multisite study. For children and adults with Fragile X syndrome, the presence of warmth…

  2. Syndrome Specificity and Behavioural Disorders in Young Adults with Intellectual Disability: Cultural Differences in Family Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blacher, J.; McIntyre, L. L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study examined whether behaviour problems and adaptive behaviour of low functioning young adults, and well-being of their families, varied by diagnostic syndrome intellectual disability (ID) only, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, autism, as well as by cultural group. Methods: Behaviour disorders in young adults with moderate to…

  3. Tracking an Elusive Population: Family Carers of Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Romandy (Switzerland)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jecker-Parvex, Maurice; Breitenbach, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Despite a long-standing tradition of institutional placement in Switzerland, many older adults with intellectual disabilities continue to be supported by aging parents and siblings. For various reasons, these carers and the adults concerned have been overlooked up to now. To find out how many such families are providing housing and care of this…

  4. Family and Friend Relationships among Older and Younger Adults: Interaction Motivation, Mood, and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Brian P.

    1995-01-01

    In a study of relationships and life satisfaction, 82 independently-living older adults and 91 younger adults completed measures of their relationships with family and friends. For elderly people, the quality of relationships with their friends was more important than the quality of relationships with their children. The discussion focuses on how…

  5. Systemic Family Therapy Using the Reflecting Team: The Experiences of Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anslow, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to illuminate the experiences of adults with learning disabilities of the reflecting team, in the context of their systemic family therapy. Five adults with learning disabilities were recruited from one community learning disability team. A qualitative design using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was appropriate…

  6. Trajectories, Long-Term Outcomes and Family Experiences of 76 Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamak, Brigitte; Bonniau, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to retrace the trajectories and long-term outcomes of individuals with autism in France, and to explore the family experiences. Data obtained from parents enables us to follow the trajectories of 76 adults. Two-thirds of adults with severe autism had a very poor outcome. Those with moderate autism had a…

  7. Illinois State Plan: Adult Education and Family Literacy. Under Title II of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, Adult Education and Family Literacy Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community College Board, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document contains Illinois' State Plan for Adult Education and Family Literacy under Title II of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 for July 1, 1999, through June 30, 2015. The plan is comprised of the following sections: (1) Eligible agency certifications and assurances; (2) Description of the steps to ensure direct and equitable access;…

  8. Family Quality of Life: Adult School Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svraka, E.; Loga, S.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This study endeavours to provide initial data on quality of life for families with adult children who have intellectual disabilities (ID) in the Canton of Sarajevo. Methods: The principal measure used was the "Family Quality of life Survey 2006-main caregivers of people with intellectual or developmental disabilities." The sample…

  9. Family, Child, and Teacher Perceptions of African American Adult Assistance to Young Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Msengi, Shadrack Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of African American adult family members, their children, and teachers regarding how family members viewed their roles in assisting their elementary-aged children to become better readers. The study compared each of the subgroups' perceptions respectively regarding: (a) the child's reading level; (b) family…

  10. Family Caregiver Uplift and Burden: Associations with Aggressive Behavior in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, Gemma; Deb, Shoumitro

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the experience of family caregivers caring for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display aggressive behavior in terms of associations with caregiver burden and uplift. The family caregivers of 44 people with ID and aggressive behavior were interviewed using a suite of questionnaires and…

  11. Caring for Adults with Intellectual Disability: The Perspectives of Family Carers in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Judith; McConkey, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Internationally adults with intellectual disability are largely cared for by their families, especially in low- to middle-income countries (LAMIC). Compared to high-income countries, little is known about their experiences in LAMIC such as South Africa. Methods: Focus group discussions were carried out with 37 family caregivers (FCGs)…

  12. Buffering Effects of a Family-Based Intervention for African American Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Gene H.; Chen, Yi-fu; Kogan, Steven M.; Smith, Karen; Brown, Anita C.

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on the buffering effects of Adults in the Making (AIM), a family-centered preventive intervention, on the link between life stress and increases in risk behaviors among 347 rural, southern African Americans as they left high school. Of the families, 174 were assigned to the prevention condition and 173 to a control condition.…

  13. The Family's Influence on Adolescent and Young Adult Career Development: Theory, Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Cathy; Thomas, Trang

    2003-01-01

    A research review identified a range of family process variables associated with enhanced career development for adolescents and young adults. Findings were consistent with the theories of Roe (personality development and career choice) and Super (life-span, life-space) regarding the influence of family processes on career development. (Contains…

  14. Invisible Contributions in Families with Children and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    For many years there has been an underlying pathology within the literature about families with children and adults with intellectual disabilities (Helff & Glidden, 1998). This literature has emphasized stress and burden, incapacity and dependency, leading to negative stereotyping of families in this context. Over the last 2 decades research has…

  15. Family cultural socialization practices and ethnic identity in college-going emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Juang, Linda; Syed, Moin

    2010-06-01

    We examined how family cultural socialization related to the ethnic identity of Asian American, Latino, White, and Mixed-Ethnic emerging adults (N=225). Greater family cultural socialization was related to greater ethnic identity exploration and commitment. Ethnic minority students reported higher levels of family cultural socialization and ethnic identity compared to White students. The family cultural socialization-ethnic identity link was more pronounced for females compared to males, and for White compared to ethnic minority students. The findings highlight the importance of the family for identity development beyond adolescence.

  16. Validity and reliability of the Family Empowerment Scale for caregivers of adults with mental health issues.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, M; Nakamura, Y; Kobayashi, S; Yokoyama, K

    2016-10-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Empowerment of family caregivers of adults with mental health issues has received increasing attention among mental health nurses in Japan and has been recognized as a new goal of family interventions. The Family Empowerment Scale (FES) was originally developed to measure the empowerment status of parents of children with emotional disorders. However, it was later applied to broader health issues. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: We developed a Japanese version of the FES for family caregivers of adults with mental health issues (FES-AMJ) and examined the validity and reliability among parents. Results showed that the FES-AMJ had acceptable concurrent validity and reliability; however, insufficient construct validity was found, especially for the subscale regarding the service system. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Further studies need to modify the scale. Clarification of ideal family empowerment status in the service system through discussion with mental health nurses and family caregivers may be important.

  17. Medicines in My Home: Information for Adults on Using Over-the-Counter Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus

    Medicines In My Home More about using medicines safely Medicines in My Home: www.fda.gov/medsinmyhome FDA Consumer Medicine Education: www.fda.gov/usemedicinesafely National Council on Patient Information and ...

  18. Factors associated with the 6-minute walk test in nursing home residents and community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Caballer, Vicent-Benavent; Lisón, Juan Francisco; Rosado-Calatayud, Pedro; Amer-Cuenca, Juan José; Segura-Orti, Eva

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The main objective of this study was to determine the contributions and extent to which certain physical measurements explain performance in the 6-minute walk test in healthy older adults living in a geriatric nursing home and for older adults dwelling in the community. [Subjects] The subjects were 122 adults aged 65 and older with no cognitive impairment who were independent in their daily activities. [Methods] The 6-minute walk test, age, body mass index, walking speed, chair stand test, Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up-and-Go test, rectus femoris cross-sectional area, Short Physical Performance Battery, and hand-grip strength were examined. [Results] Strong significant associations were found between mobility, lower-limb function, balance, and the 6-minute walk test. A stepwise multiple regression on the entire sample showed that lower-limb function was a significant and independent predictor for the 6-minute walk test. Additionally, lower-limb function was a strong predictor for the 6-minute walk test in our nursing home group, whereas mobility was found to be the best predictor in our community-dwelling group. [Conclusion] Better lower-limb function, balance, and mobility result in a higher distance covered by healthy older adults. Lower-limb function and mobility appeared to best determine walking performance in the nursing home and community-dwelling groups, respectively. PMID:26696740

  19. Characterising food environment exposure at home, at work, and along commuting journeys using data on adults in the UK

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Socio-ecological models of behaviour suggest that dietary behaviours are potentially shaped by exposure to the food environment (‘foodscape’). Research on associations between the foodscape and diet and health has largely focussed on foodscapes around the home, despite recognition that non-home environments are likely to be important in a more complete assessment of foodscape exposure. This paper characterises and describes foodscape exposure of different types, at home, at work, and along commuting routes for a sample of working adults in Cambridgeshire, UK. Methods Home and work locations, and transport habits for 2,696 adults aged 29–60 were drawn from the Fenland Study, UK. Food outlet locations were obtained from local councils and classified by type - we focus on convenience stores, restaurants, supermarkets and takeaway food outlets. Density of and proximity to food outlets was characterised at home and work. Commuting routes were modelled based on the shortest street network distance between home and work, with exposure (counts of food outlets) that accounted for travel mode and frequency. We describe these three domains of food environment exposure using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results For all types of food outlet, we found very different foodscapes around homes and workplaces (with overall outlet exposure at work 125% higher), as well as a potentially substantial exposure contribution from commuting routes. On average, work and commuting environments each contributed to foodscape exposure at least equally to residential neighbourhoods, which only accounted for roughly 30% of total exposure. Furthermore, for participants with highest overall exposure to takeaway food outlets, workplaces accounted for most of the exposure. Levels of relative exposure between home, work and commuting environments were poorly correlated. Conclusions Relying solely on residential neighbourhood characterisation greatly underestimated total

  20. Veteran family reintegration, primary care needs, and the benefit of the patient-centered medical home model.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa, Ramon; Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna; Nelson, Karen; Nelson, David

    2010-01-01

    Men and women returning from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq face a multitude of difficulties while integrating back into civilian life, but the importance of their veteran status is often overlooked in primary care settings. Family physicians have the potential to be the first line of defense to ensure the well-being of veterans and their families because many will turn to nonmilitary and non-Veterans Affairs providers for health care needs. An awareness of the unique challenges faced by this population is critical to providing care. A patient-centered medical home orientation can help the family physician provide veterans and their families the care they need. Specific recommendations for family physicians include screening their patient population; providing timely care; treating the whole family; and integrating care from multiple disciplines and specialties, providing veterans and families with "one-stop shopping" care. An awareness of the unique challenges faced by veterans and their families translates into better overall outcomes for this population.