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Sample records for adult fathead minnows

  1. Kin recognition and cannibalistic behaviours by adult male fathead minnows ( Pimephales promelas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Warren W.; Mirza, Reehan S.; Pyle, Greg G.

    2008-03-01

    Parental care is an energetically demanding activity that ensures genes are efficiently passed from one generation to the next. According to evolutionary theory, the greatest energetic investment should be directed towards offspring that are most closely related to the parent. Male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, provide this parental investment to developing embryos but not newly hatched larvae. Therefore, selection should favour recognition of embryonic kin to ensure energetic expenditure is optimally invested. In this study, adult male fathead minnows were tested using behavioural assays, with egg cannibalism as an endpoint, to determine whether adult males could discriminate between related and unrelated embryos. Egg cannibalism was highest when adult male fathead minnows were presented with unrelated eggs and lowest when presented with eggs fertilized by the test subject (related eggs). The degree of cannibalism was also a function of breeding status. Unrelated males in breeding condition showed an intermediate response between the low cannibalism demonstrated by related males and the high cannibalism demonstrated by unrelated males in a nonbreeding condition. These results suggest that although male fathead minnows can discriminate between unrelated and related embryos, at least some component of parental investment is a simple function of breeding status.

  2. TOXAPHENE: CHRONIC TOXICITY TO FATHEAD MINNOWS AND CHANNEL CATFISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were continuously exposed to several toxaphene concentrations (13-630 ng) in flow-through diluter systems for 8 to 10 months. Growth and backbone quality of adult fathead minnows were decreased at 97 ...

  3. 17-A ETHYNYLESTRADIOL-INDUCED VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION QUANTIFIED IN LIVERS OF ADULT MALES, LARVAE, AND GILLS OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have applied a method for quantifying relative levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription to assess chemically-induced gene expression in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Synthetic oligonucleotides designed for the fathead minnow vitellogenin gene transcription (Vg) p...

  4. 17A-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL-INDUCED VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION QUANTIFIED IN LIVERS OF ADULT MALES, LARVAE, AND GILLS OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have applied a method for quantifying relative levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription to assess chemically-induced gene expression in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Synthetic oligonucleotides designed for the fathead minnow vitellogenin gene transcription (Vg) p...

  5. Induction of vitellogenin gene expression in adult male fathead minnows for select EDCs in 48-hour exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals have been shown to be present in surface waters, sediments and sludge, and are known to induce vitellogenin gene liver transcripts in male fathead minnows. The purpose of our study was to establish the lowest concentrations of estrogenic chemicals ...

  6. ACUTE TOXICITY OF AMMONIA TO FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute toxicity of ammonia to fathead minnows Pimephales promelas was measured in 35, 96-hour, flow-through tests. The fish were from both wild and hatchery-reared stocks, and ranged in size from 0.1 to 2.3 g. The 96-hour median lethal concentrations (LC50) ranged from 0.75 to...

  7. Bold, Sedentary Fathead Minnows Have More Parasites.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tiffany; Gladen, Kelsey; Duncan, Elizabeth C; Cotner, Sehoya; Cotner, James B; McEwen, Daniel C; Wisenden, Brian D

    2016-08-01

    Parasites that rely on trophic transmission can manipulate the behavior of an intermediate host to compromise the host's antipredator competence and increase the probability of reaching the next host. Selection for parasite manipulation is diminished when there is significant risk of host death to causes other than consumption by a suitable definitive host for the parasite. Consequently, behavioral manipulation by parasites can be expected to be subtle. Ornithodiplostomum ptychocheilus (Op) is a trematode parasite that has a bird-snail-fish host life cycle. Fathead minnows are a common intermediate host of Op, where metacercariae encyst in the minnow brain. In this study, we report a link between metacercarial intensity and behavior in fathead minnows. In the field, we found that roaming distance by free-living minnows over 24 h was negatively correlated with parasite intensity. In the laboratory, we found that boldness in an open field test was positively correlated with parasite intensity. These parasite-induced behavioral changes may render infected minnows more susceptible to predators, which would serve to facilitate trophic transmission of parasites to the bird host. PMID:27093037

  8. ASSESSMENT OF A FATHEAD MINNOW REPRODUCTION ASSAY FOR IDENTIFYING ENDOCRINE-DISRUPTING CHEMICALS WITH DIVERSE MODES OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA has developed a short-term reproduction test with the fathead minnow to identify potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The assay is initiated by collecting baseline spawning data from reproductively-active adult fathead minnows for 21 d, followed by a 21 d e...

  9. TOXICITY OF DIAZINON TO BROOK TROUT AND FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows exposed to diazinon from 5 days through 24 weeks post hatch developed severe scoliosis. The incidence and degree of spinal deformity correlated to exposure level. Fish in 3.2 micrograms/l was 30% lower than the controls. Hatch of eggs from fathead minnows exposed ...

  10. Gene prediction in the fathead minnow [Pimephales promelas] genome

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow is a well-established model organism which has been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over half century. While much information has been gathered on the organism over the years, the fathead minnow genome, a critical source of infor...

  11. Bringing the fathead minnow into the genomic era

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow is a well-established ecotoxicological model organism that has been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over a half century. While a large amount of molecular information has been gathered on the fathead minnow over the years, the la...

  12. EXPOSURE METHOD CONSIDERATIONS FOR MEASURING VITELLOGENIN EXPRESSION IN LARVAL AND MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our laboratory has developed methods for measuring the expression of the vitellogenin (Vg) gene in larval and adult male fathead minnows. During this development we found several conditions that affect background Vg levels and we observed preconditions for the expression of this...

  13. EFFECTS OF AROCLOR (TRADE NAME) 1248 AND 1260 ON THE FATHEAD MINNOW ('PIMEPHALES PROMELAS')

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows were exposed to Aroclor(Trademark) 1248 and 1260 in flow-through bioassays to determine the acute (30-d) and chronic (240-d life cycle) effects on the larvae and adults, as well as the bioconcentration of the mixtures of PCBs in the fish. Newly hatched larvae (<8 ...

  14. Effects of dietary methylmercury on reproduction of fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammerschmidt, C.R.; Sandheinrich, M.B.; Wiener, J.G.; Rada, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    We examined effects of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) on reproduction of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Juvenile fish were fed one of four diets until sexual maturity (phase 1): a control diet (0.06 μg Hg g-1 dry weight) and three diets contaminated with MeHg at 0.88 (low), 4.11 (medium), and 8.46 μg Hg g-1 dry weight (high). At sexual maturity, male and female fish were paired, again fed one of the four diets, and allowed to reproduce (phase 2). To assess effects of MeHg during gametogenesis, some fish were fed diets during phase 2 that differed from those during phase 1. Spawning success of pairs fed the same diet during phases 1 and 2 was 75% for controls and 46%, 50%, and 36% for the low-, medium-, and high-MeHg treatments, respectively. Spawning success of pairs fed a contaminated diet during phase 1 and a control diet during phase 2 was 63%, 40%, and 14% for the low-, medium-, and high-MeHg treatments, respectively, whereas exposure to dietary MeHg only during phase 2 did not reduce spawning success. Dietary MeHg delayed spawning, and days to spawning was positively correlated with concentration of total mercury in the carcasses of test fish. MeHg reduced the instantaneous rate of reproduction of fish fed the same diets during phases 1 and 2. Both the gonadosomatic index and reproductive effort of female fish were inversely correlated with mercury in carcasses, whereas developmental and hatching success of embryos, 7-d survival, and 7-d growth of larvae were unrelated to mercury concentrations in parental fish or their diets. MeHg decreased reproduction of adult fathead minnows at dietary concentrations encountered by predatory fishes in aquatic systems with MeHg-contaminated food webs, implying that exposed fish populations could be adversely affected by this widespread contaminant.

  15. Chronic toxicity of ammonia to fathead minnows

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, R.V.; Russo, R.C.; Meyn, E.L.; Zajdel, R.K.; Smith, C.E.

    1986-03-01

    Chronic effects of ammonia on the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas were studied in the laboratory in two flow-through tests, each test lasting approximately 1 year. Fish were exposed to five test concentrations over the range 0.07-0.96 mg/L un-ionized ammonia (NH/sub 3/); the mean pH of the test water was 8.0, and the mean temperature was 24.2/sup 0/C. The tests started with 3- to 5-d-old larvae that were reared to sexual maturity; progeny of these fish (F/sub 1/) were reared until they were 60 d old. The 5% probability level was chosen to indicate significance. No effects were observed on growth or survival of parental fish at 0.44 mg/L NH/sub 3/, or on egg production or viability at 0.37 mg/L, but effects on all of these were observed at 0.91 mg/L. Growth and survival of F/sub 1/ larvae were not affected at 0.36 mg/L NH/sub 3/, which was the highest concentration at which these were tested. Egg hatching success was not affected at 0.19 mg/L NH/sub 3/, but was at 0.37 mg/L. Brain lesions were common in parental fish at all stages of development at exposure concentrations of 0.21 mg/L NH/sub 3/ and higher, but not at 0.11 mg/L; no other histopathologic effects were observed at any of the test concentrations. The chronic-effects threshold concentration, based on survival, growth, and reproductive success, is estimated to be 0.27 mg/L NH/sub 3/ for the conditions of these tests. Based on histological damage, however, this concentration is estimated to be 0.15 mg/L NH/sub 3/.

  16. REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY OF ANDROGENIC GROWTH PROMOTORS IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reproductive Toxicity of Androgenic Growth Promoters in the Fathead Minnow. Jensen, KM*, Kahl, MD, Makynen, EA, Hornung, MW, Ankley, GT. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN. Trenbolone acetate is a synthetic steroid which is extensively used in the US as a growth pro...

  17. TOXICITY OF DDT FOOD AND WATER EXPOSURE TO FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed during a partial chronic toxicity test to two DDT concentrations in the water, one in the diet, and combinations of water and diet for 266 days through a reproductive period of their life cycle. Tissue-residue analyses were perfo...

  18. A METABOLOMIC APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION IN FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although widely used in the study of rodent toxicity responses to assess human risk, metabolomics is now finding utility in toxicity assessments in a wide variety of other organisms including environmentally relevant small fish species such as fathead minnow (FHM) and medaka. To...

  19. SPAWNING SUCCESS OF FATHEAD MINNOWS ON SELECTED ARTIFICIAL SUBSTRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spawning success of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) on six different substrates was tested and evaluated. Egg adhesiveness was equally good on cement-asbestos tile and sand-coated stainless steel substrates, but was poor on unaltered stainless steel, shot-peened stainless s...

  20. MICROSATELLITE DNA VARIATION IN TWO FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) STOCKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse effects on more than 2000 species of fish in the U.S. and Canada are estimated by sensitvity results of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) acute toxicity tests. Whether survival and susceptibility to toxicants are influenced by genetic variation is still under question...

  1. Embryotoxicity of maternally transferred methylmercury to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Bridges, Kristin N; Soulen, Brianne K; Overturf, Carmen L; Drevnick, Paul E; Roberts, Aaron P

    2016-06-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and potent neurotoxin. In aquatic environments, Hg can be transformed into methylmercury (MeHg), which bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs, including fish. Methylmercury has been shown to transfer from female fish to developing eggs; however, relatively little is known regarding the effects of maternally transferred MeHg on fish embryos. The present study evaluated the effects of maternally transferred MeHg on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) embryos. Embryos were collected from adult fatheads exposed for 30 d to 1 of 3 diets spiked with MeHg: a control diet (0.02 ppm Hg dry wt), a low diet (0.87 ppm Hg dry wt), or a high diet (5.5 ppm Hg dry wt). No effects on spawning frequency, clutch size, or total egg output were observed. In embryos, Hg concentration was a function of female diet and the duration (number of days) of female exposure. Compared with controls, embryos from the low-diet treatment displayed altered embryonic movement patterns (hyperactivity) and decreased time to hatch. Embryos from the high-diet treatment had delayed hatching and increased mortality compared with the other treatments. Collectively, these results suggest that maternally transferred Hg may impact survival, behavior, and developmental milestones of the embryo-larval stages of fish. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1436-1441. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26471903

  2. An inexpensive fathead minnow egg incubation and toxicant exposure system

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.A.; Oris, J.T.; Guttman, S.I.

    1995-08-01

    Several methods have been developed for bulk hatching of fathead minnow eggs for laboratory and commercial culture. These methods generally involve placing whole, egg-laden breeding substrates in an aeration or water-flow device, or manually removing eggs from breeding substrates. Eggs removed from substrates are then hatched in Downing or McDonald jar hatching devices or are agitated in cylindrical vessels from which larvae are manually removed. These methods are difficult to incorporate into toxicity tests involving determination of hatching success in replicate systems. Both require either continuous water flow to individual hatching chambers or frequent static renewal, which adds to the labor of separating larvae from unhatched eggs. The authors report on an inexpensive, easily constructed system for hatching fathead minnow eggs and maintaining hatched larvae for growth and survivorship studies. Data are presented to illustrate the use of the system for toxicant exposures. This system has applications for both field and laboratory studies.

  3. Comparison of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Patterns in Fathead Minnows Exposed to Trenbolone and Flutamide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen signaling in the liver of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) was examined both at the transcriptome level and the proteome level. We exposed female fathead minnows for 48 hr to a prototypical androgen (17b-trenbolone, 5 ug/L), to an antiandrogen (flutamide, 50...

  4. Proteomic Expression Patterns in Fathead Minnows Exposed to Trenbolone and Flutamide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Insights into androgen signaling in the liver of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) was obtained using non-gel based proteomics analysis. We exposed female fathead minnows for 48 hr through the water to a prototypical androgen (17b-trenbolone, 5 ?g/L), a prototypical anti-andr...

  5. I. Effects of a Dopamine Receptor Antagonist on Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas ,Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used a 21 d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction assay to test the hypothesis that exposure to the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, haloperidol, would impair fish reproduction. Additionally, a 96 h experiment with fathead minnows and zebrafish (Danio ...

  6. Atrazine reduces reproduction in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, D.E.; Papoulias, D.M.; Whyte, J.J.; Richter, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Atrazine, the widely used herbicide, has shown to affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis in certain vertebrate species, but few studies have examined reproductive effects of this chemical on fish. Our study was designed to evaluate a population endpoint (egg production) in conjunction with histological (e.g., gonad development) and biochemical (e.g., hormone production) phenotypes associated with atrazine exposure in fathead minnows. Adult virgin breeding groups of 1 male and 2 females were exposed to nominal concentrations of 0, 0.5, 5.0, and 50 ??g/L of atrazine in a flow-through diluter for 14 or 30 days. Total egg production was lower (19-39%) in all atrazine-exposed groups as compared to the controls. The decreases in cumulative egg production of atrazine treated fish were significant by 17-20 days of exposure. Reductions in egg production in atrazine treatment groups were most attributable to reduced numbers of spawning events with increased atrazine exposure concentrations. Gonad abnormalities were observed in both male and female fish of atrazine-exposed fish. Our results also indicate that atrazine reduces egg production through alteration of final maturation of oocytes. The reproductive effects observed in this study warrant further investigation and evaluation of the potential risks posed by atrazine, particularly feral populations of fish from streams in agricultural areas with high use of this herbicide. ?? 2010.

  7. THE EFFECTS OF METHOXYCHLOR AND METHYLTESTOSTERONE ON REPRODUCTION IN A SHORT-TERM ASSAY USING THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of chemicals on reproduction of fishes is an area of great uncertainty. Because full life cycle testing of fish is cost prohibitive, we have developed a short-term assay to assess the effects of chemicals on reproduction of adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). ...

  8. INTRODUCTION OF THE VITELLOGENIN GENE IN EARLY LIFE STAGE FATHEAD MINNOWS AS AN EFFECTIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR FOR ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vitellogenin (Vg) gene expression in adult male fathead minnows (FHM) has previously been used successfully to detect exposures to estrogenic compounds in aquatic systems; however, sample volume(s)required for >24h exposure durations and the logistics of sampling pose some limita...

  9. Development and validation of a 2,000-gene microarray for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, Patrick; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Knoebl, Iris; Miracle, Ann L.; Carter, Barbara J.; Liu, Li; Denslow, Nancy D.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-07-01

    Gene microarrays provide the field of ecotoxicology new tools to identify mechanisms of action of chemicals and chemical mixtures. Herein we describe the development and application of a 2,000-gene oligonucleotide microarray for the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, a species commonly used in ecological risk assessments in North America. The microarrays were developed from various cDNA and subtraction libraries that we constructed. Consistency and reproducibility of the microarrays were documented by examining multiple technical replicates. To test application of the fathead minnow microarrays, gene expression profiles of fish exposed to 17-estradiol, a well-characterized estrogen receptor (ER) agonist, were examined. For these experiments, adult male fathead minnows were exposed for 24 h to waterborne 17-estradiol (40 or 100 ng/L) in a flow-through system, and gene expression in liver samples was characterized. Seventy-one genes were identified as differentially regulated by estradiol exposure. Examination of the gene ontology designations of these genes revealed patterns consistent with estradiol’s expected mechanisms of action and also provided novel insights as to molecular effects of the estrogen. Our studies indicate the feasibility and utility of microarrays as a basis for understanding biological responses to chemical exposure in a model ecotoxicology test species.

  10. Ammonia causes decreased brain monoamines in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ronan, P.J.; Gaikowski, M.P.; Hamilton, S.J.; Buhl, K.J.; Summers, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    Hyperammonemia, arising from variety of disorders, leads to severe neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms of ammonia toxicity in brain are not completely understood. This study investigated the effects of ammonia on monoaminergic systems in brains of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish serve as a good model system to investigate hyperammonemic effects on brain function since no liver manipulations are necessary to increase endogenous ammonia concentrations. Using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, monoamines and some associated metabolites were measured from whole brain homogenate. Adult males were exposed for 48??h to six different concentrations of ammonia (0.01-2.36??mg/l unionized) which bracketed the 96-h LC50 for this species. Ammonia concentration-dependent decreases were found for the catecholamines (norepinephrine and dopamine) and the indoleamine serotonin (5-HT). After an initial increase in the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan it too decreased with increasing ammonia concentrations. There were also significant increases in the 5-HIAA/5-HT and DOPAC/DA ratios, often used as measures of turnover. There were no changes in epinephrine (Epi) or monoamine catabolites (DOPAC, 5-HIAA) at any ammonia concentrations tested. Results suggest that ammonia causes decreased synthesis while also causing increased release and degradation. Increased release may underlie behavioral reactions to ammonia exposure in fish. This study adds weight to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that ammonia leads to dysfunctional monoaminergic systems in brain which may underlie neurological symptoms associated with human disorders such as hepatic encephalopathy. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic analysis of a novel nidovirus from fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, William N.; Goodwin, Andrew E.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A bacilliform virus was isolated from diseased fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Analysis of the complete genome coding for the polyprotein (pp1ab), spike (S), membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins revealed that the virus was most like white bream virus (WBV), another bacilliform virus isolated from white bream (Blicca bjoerkna L.) and the type species of the genus Bafinivirus within the order Nidovirales. In addition to similar gene order and size, alignment of deduced amino acid sequences of the pp1ab, M, N and S proteins of the fathead minnow nidovirus (FHMNV) with those of WBV showed 46, 44, 39 and 15 % identities, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using the conserved helicase domain of the replicase showed FHMNV was distinct from WBV, yet the closest relative identified to date. Thus, FHMNV appears to represent a second species in the genus Bafinivirus. A PCR assay was developed for the identification of future FHMNV-like isolates.

  12. Influence of Ovarian Stage on Transcript Profiles in Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) Ovary Tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small fish species with an asynchronous pattern of gonad development and reproduction are commonly used test organisms in aquatic ecotoxicology and more recently in ecotoxicogenomics. This study applies coordinated histological examination and fathead minnow oligonucleotide micr...

  13. Propiconazole inhibits steroidogenesis and reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study assessed effects of the conazole-fungicide propiconazole on endocrine function and reproductive success of the fathead minnow, using an experimental approach based on previously defined adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that inhibit steroidogenesis in fish...

  14. A Quantative Adverse Outcome Pathway Linking Aromatase Inhibition in Fathead Minnows with Population Dynamics

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Quantitative Adverse Outcome Pathway Linking Aromatase Inhibition in Fathead Minnows with Population DynamicsAn adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a qualitative description linking a molecular initiating event (MIE) with measureable key events leading to an adverse outcome (AO). ...

  15. OOCYTE ATRESIA AND REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS IN FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) EXPOSED TO ACIDIFIED HARDWATER ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ovarian histology of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) chronically exposed to three levels of environmental pH was examined for evidence of reproductive impairment. Exposures occurred in three experimental water channels receiving Mississippi River water. One of these cha...

  16. Effects of antiandrogen flutamide on steroidogenesis and gene expression in female fathead minnow ovary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanisms underlying reproductive impacts of antiandrogens in fish are not well-characterized and effective biomarkers of antiandrogen exposure are lacking. This work sought to identify genes and pathways affected by antiandrogen exposure in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promel...

  17. GUIDELINES FOR THE CULTURE OF FATHEAD MINNOWS 'PIMEPHALES PROMELAS' FOR USE IN TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the mechanical apparatus and biological techniques now in use to culture fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) at the US Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Research Laboratory in Duluth, Minnesota. Physical system information includes water supply...

  18. Inference of a Transcriptional Network Involved in Chemical Inhibition of Estrogen Synthesis in Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using transcriptional network inferen...

  19. HERITABLE REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS OF BENZO[A]PYRENE ON THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental toxicologists rarely investigate multigeneration effects of aquatic contaminants. In this study we investigated the survivorship of fathead minnow larvae two generations removed from an exposure to the potent mutagen benzo [a] pyrene. The F2 broods with grandparenta...

  20. FATHEAD MINNOW VITELLOGENIN: CDNA SEQUENCE AND MRNA AND PROTEIN EXPRESSION AFTER 17 BETA-ESTRADIOL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the present study, a sensitive ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) for VTG mRNA was developed for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), a species proposed for routine endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) screening.

  1. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS SUBSP. ISRAELENSIS AND FATHEAD MINNOWS, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS RAFINESQUE, UNDER LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, were studied in laboratory exposures to two commercial formulations, Vectobac-G and Mosquito Attack. ortality among fatheads exposed to 2.0 x 10 6 to 6.5 x 10 6 CFU/ml with bo...

  2. EFFECTS OF EUTROPHICATION ON VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) EXPOSED TO 17A-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL IN FIELD MESOCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the effect of aquatic secondary nutrient supply levels (nitrogen and phosphorus) on the subcellular response of adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to a single nominal concentration of 17a-ethynylestradiol (EE2), a potent synthetic estrog...

  3. Effects of a Short-term Exposure to the Fungicide Prochloraz on Endocrine Function and Gene Expression in Female Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz is a fungicide known to cause endocrine disruption through effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. To determine the short-term impacts of prochloraz on gene expression and steroid production, adult female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exp...

  4. Male Fathead Minnow Urine-Based Metabolomics for Assessing Impacts of Chemical Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed the potential for profiling metabolites in urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to assess chemical exposures, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy was us...

  5. INFLUENCE OF DIET AND STARVATION ON TOXICITY OF ENDRIN TO FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endrin toxicity to fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, was determined in flow-through toxicity tests at 25 C for periods of up to 30 days. Three months prior to endrin exposure six groups of fish were fed artificial diets containing an increasing percentage of fat, and two grou...

  6. ACUTE TOXICITY OF SELECTED SUBSTITUTED PHENOLS, BENZENES AND BENZOIC ACID ESTERS TO FATHEAD MINNOWS 'PIMEPHALES PROMELAS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow-through acute toxicity tests were conducted with 24 organic compounds using fathead minnows Pimephales promelas as test organisms. The tested toxicants consisted of 11 substituted phenols, four substituted benzenes and nine esters. The 96-h LC50 values determined for these c...

  7. ASSESSING THE USE OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAYS FOR FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) TO EXAMINE EXPOSURE VALUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    New microarray technologies to determine gene expression in animals exposed to chemical stressors promise to revolutionize the science of toxicology. The work described in this abstract concerns development and validation of a gene microarray for the fathead minnow designed to ai...

  8. TOXIC EFFECTS OF ZINC ON FATHEAD MINNOWS 'PIMEPHALES PROMELAS' IN SOFT WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fathead minnow life-cycle exposure to various zinc concentrations demonstrated that the most sensitive indicators of zinc toxicity were egg adhesiveness and fragility, which were significantly affected at 145 micrograms Zn per liter and above, but were not affected at 78 microg...

  9. Acute aquatic toxicity of nine alcohol ethoxylate surfactants to fathead minnow and Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.C.L.; Dorn, P.B.; Chai, E.Y.

    1995-12-31

    The aquatic toxicity of nine commercial-grade alcohol ethoxylate surfactants was studied in acute exposures to fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Daphnia magna. All studies were conducted in accordance with USEPA TSCA Good Laboratory Practice Standards. Mean measured surfactant concentrations in exposure solutions showed good agreement with nominal concentrations for both fathead minnow and daphnid tests. Surfactant recoveries ranged from 59 to 97% and 67 to 106% in the fathead minnow and daphnid solutions, respectively. The response of both species to the surfactants was generally similar with the daphnids being slightly more sensitive to a few surfactants. Surfactant toxicity tended to increase with increasing alkyl chain lengths. The effect of low average EO groups on increased surfactant toxicity was more evident in the daphnid exposures. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed form the data which relates surfactant structure to toxicity. The models predict increasing toxicity with decreasing EO number and increasing alkyl chain length. The models also indicate that alkyl chain length has a greater effect on toxicity than EO groups. Further, the models indicate that both species did not differ markedly in their sensitivity to alkyl chain length effects, while the number of EO groups had a stronger effect on daphnids than fathead minnow. Good agreement was found between QSAR model-predicted toxicity and reported toxicity values from the literature for several surfactants previously studied.

  10. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure in the Hypothalamic-Pituitary Gonadal Axis of Fathead Minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We are developing a mechanistic mathematical model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict doseresponse and time-course ...

  11. ASPECTS OF BASIC REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY AND ENDOCRINOLOGY IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow has been proposed as a model species for assessing the adverse effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on reproduction and development. The purpose of these studies was to develop baseline reproductive biology and endocrinology data for this species to...

  12. COMPARISON OF QPCR METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF VITELLOGENIN EXPRESSION IN FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male fathead minnows (FHM) normally express little if any of the egg yolk precursor protein vitellogenin (Vg). However, when exposed to estrogenic compounds such as 17a-ethynylestradiol (EE2), transcriptional levels of Vg rise dramatically and result in decreased fecundity and i...

  13. ACUTE TOXICITY AND BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF ACRYLATES AND METHACRYLATES TO JUVENILE FATHEAD MINNOWS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrylate and methacrylate esters are reactive monomers that are used primarily in the synthesis of acrylic plastics and polymers. Ninety-six hour flow-through acute toxicity tests were conducted with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) using 6 acrylates and 6 methacrylates. Nin...

  14. Direct Effects, Compensation, and Recovery in Female Fathead Minnows Exposed to the Aromatase Inhibitor Fadrozole

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals present in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. The objective of this study was to provide a detailed characterization of the molecular and biochemical responses of female fathead minnows to a m...

  15. A New Approach for the Laboratory Culture of the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas) are routinely cultured for use in aquatic toxicology studies. Most culture systems consist of a series of 4 to 30 individual tanks with a varied number of breeding pairs in each tank. A new mass culture system described here consists of six ...

  16. Environmental hormones and their impacts on sex differentiation in fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Runoff from lands fertilized with animal manure from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) is a source of hormones to surface water. To test the hypothesis that juvenile fathead minnows exposed to sex steroids singly and in a “typical” CAFO mixture while undergoing sex...

  17. Sex-specific gonadal and gene expression changes throughout development in fathead minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are commonly used as a model fish in endocrine disruption studies, none have characterized sex-specific baseline expression of genes involved in sex differentiation during development in this species. Using a sex-linked DNA marker t...

  18. IN VIVO CONFIRMATION OF THE ANTI-ANDROGENIC NATURE OF FLUTAMIDE IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term reproduction assay with the fathead minnow has been developed to detect chemicals with the potential to disrupt reproductive endocrine function controlled by estrogen- and androgen-mediated pathways. As part of characterizing the assay, tests have been conducted wit...

  19. Effects of 2,3,7,8-TCDD on the larvae of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Olivieri, C.E.; Cooper, K.R.

    1994-12-31

    This study evaluated the sensitivity of the fathead minnow larvae to 2,3,7,8-TCDD. There are no reported studies that have examined 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic effects on fathead minnow larvae (0.0017--0.0094 g). One month old fathead minnow larvae were exposed to varying concentrations of [H{sup 3}]2,3,7,8-TCDD for 24h, and then were transferred into clean water. The no-treatment, acetone-control and 2,3,7,8-TCDD exposed larvae were observed for at least 32 days after exposure. Mortality, growth and appearance of a wasting-type syndrome were noted. The tissue dose were based on larvae wet weight. One hundred percent mortality was observed at a tissue dose of 163 ng/g at 32 days. The wasting-type syndrome appeared at day 7 after the 2,3,7,8-TCDD exposure. Statistically significant differences in growth (total length and weight) were observed at tissue doses as low as 20 ng/g. The wasting-type syndrome was observed in all fish by day 20. The 2,3,7,8-TCDD tissue level showing this effect was 44 ng/g. These results suggested that the fathead minnow larvae are more sensitive than the Japanese medaka larvae, and not as sensitive as the lake trout.

  20. Direct Effects, Compensation, and Recovery in Female Fathead Minnows Exposed to a Model Aromatase Inhibitor

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports on the effects of a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, on molecular and biochemical endpoints within the fathead minnow reproductive axis. Unlike previous studies, this work incorporated extensive time-course characterization over the course of an 8 d exposu...

  1. Social Status Modulates Gene Expression and Metabolite Profiles in the Fathead Minnow Males

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow (FHM) is a valuable small fish model for genomic research in ecotoxicology. Our recent studies have successfully used genomic and metabolomic analyses to evaluate responses to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in urine of the FHM, but these results indicate...

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A 2,000 GENE MICROARRAY FOR THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of the gene microarray has provided the field of ecotoxicology a new tool to identify modes of action (MOA) of chemicals and chemical mixtures. Herein we describe the development and application of a 2,000 gene oligonucleotide microarray for the fathead minnow (P...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A FATHEAD MINNOW MODEL FOR EVALUATING EXPOSURE OF FISH TO GENOTOXIC SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow (FHM) is widely used as a standard test species for acute and chronic toxicity testing of contaminants, effluents, and receiving waters. Because of its widespread distribution throughout North America, this species also has application in monitoring studies and...

  4. Sequencing and De novo Draft Assemblies of the Fathead Minnow (Pimphales promelas)Reference Genome

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken to develop genome-scale resources for the fathead minnow (Pimphales promelas) an important model organism widely used in both aquatic ecotoxicology research and in regulatory toxicity testing. We report on the first sequencing and two draft assemblies fo...

  5. Gene prediction in the fathead minnow [Pimephales promelas] genome-presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow is a well-established ecotoxicological model organism, having been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over a half century. While a large amount of molecular information has been gathered on the organism over the years, to date, the ...

  6. A NEW APPROACH FOR THE CULTURE OF FATHEAD MINNOWS, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas) are routinely cultured for use in aquatic toxicology studies. Most culture systems consist of a series of 4 to 30 individual tanks with 16 - 18 fish (2 males and 14-16 females) in each tank. The new mass culture system consists of six 50 gal...

  7. VITELLOGENIN ELISA FOR FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) USING A COMPLETELY HOMOLOGOUS ASSAY SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The indication of vitellogenin in fish has been used as a biomarker for estrogen-receptor mediated gene induction pathways resulting from exposure to environmental estrogens. Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) have been selected as one of the test models to investigate reprodu...

  8. Characterization of Ontogenetic Changes in Gene Expression in the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow Pimephales promelas is often used for ecotoxicological studies in the US and elsewhere. Recently, researchers have begun looking at changes in gene expression in this species after contaminant exposure, mostly as a way to unravel novel mechanisms of act...

  9. TOXICITY OF ACETYLENIC ALCOHOLS TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS: NARCOSIS AND PROELECTROPHILE ACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 96-h LC50 values for 16 acetylenic alcohols in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were determined using continuous-flow diluters. The measured LC50 values for seven tertiary propargylic alcohols agreed closely with the QSAR predictions based upon data for other organic ...

  10. BEHAVIORAL TOXICITY SYNDROMES: A PROMISING TOOL FOR ASSESSING TOXICITY MECHANISMS IN JUVENILE FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to acutely toxic concentrations of organic chemicals under flow-through conditions at 25oC for 96 h. hanges in behavior and morphology were systematically recorded to develop a plan for classifying these chemicals. n this basis, ...

  11. Lead effects on the predictability of reproductive behavior in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas): A mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Alados, C.L.; Weber, D.N.

    1999-10-01

    Lead (Pb) has been shown to affect the behavior of a wide variety of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, and mammals. This article re-examines previous data on the effect of short-term, sublethal levels of waterborne Pb on the reproductive behavior of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Previous research has found that Pb decreased the time spent in displaying specific reproductive behaviors in male minnows. Because each activity performed within a sequence depends upon previous parts of the sequence, the reproductive behavior of fish is not randomly distributed but is presented as a long-range self-similar correlation. By treating these data as a fractal dimension, it is now possible to determine changes in the long-term correlation of different behavioral sequences involved in nest maintenance owing to Pb exposure, both before and after adult males attain reproductive maturity. The authors hypothesized that the scaling exponent of this fluctuation varies in relation with environmental contaminants. Known Pb-induced changes in hormonal activity may account for changes in observed reproductive and nest maintenance behaviors. Pb-exposed fish exhibited higher levels of predictability in their behavioral sequences, i.e., they demonstrated an increase in the scaling parameter of the fluctuation {alpha}. However, if Pb was introduced after sexual maturity was observed, there was no significant difference in the scaling component {alpha}. Thus, the use of fractal dimension may provide a useful tool to analyze the effects of environmental contaminants and other stresses.

  12. What is Normal? A Characterization of the Values and Variabilty in Reproductive Endpoints of the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Jensen et al. investigated aspects of the normal reproductive biology of the fathead minnow (FHM, P. promelas), and subsequent studies have generated a large amount of additional reproductive data for endpoints such as plasma steroid hormone and vitellogenin concentrations, spa...

  13. Transcription of Key Genes Regulating Gonadal Steroidogenesis in Control and Ketoconazole- or Vinclozolin-exposed Fathead Minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides the first report on the effects of two endocrine-active fungicides, ketoconazole and vinclozolin, on the expression of steroidogenesis-related genes in the testis of male fathead minnows.

  14. Computational Modeling to Evaluate Alternative Hypotheses for the Linkage of Aromatase Inhibition to Vitellogenin Levels in Fathead Minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aromatase converts testosterone to estradiol (E2). In fish, E2 concentrations control hepatic synthesis of the glycolipoprotein vitellogenin (VTG), an egg yolk precursor protein essential to oocyte development and larval survival. Fathead minnows were exposed to the aromatase in...

  15. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING PROVIDES A SENSITIVE MEASURE OF EXPOSURE TO 17-A ETHINYLESTRADIOL IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The freshwater fish, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) represents an outstanding biological indicator response model organism based on its ubiquitous North American distribution and extensive use in acute and chronic testing of contaminants, effluents and receiving waters....

  16. Altered Gene Expression in the Brain and Liver of Female Fathead Minnows Pimephales promelas Rafinesque Exposed to Fadrozole

    EPA Science Inventory

    Overall, results of this study demonstrate the utility of high density oligonucleotide microarrays for unsupervised, discovery-driven, ecotoxicogenomics research with the fathead minnow and helped inform the subsequent development of a 22,000 gene microarray for the species.

  17. EVALUATION OF A WASTEWATER DISCHARGE USING VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION AND PLASMA PROTEIN LEVELS IN MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liver vitellogenin gene expression and plasma vitellogenin protein presence, indicators of exposure of fish to estrogens, were measured in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) caged at two locations in a constructed wetland below a sewage treatment plant effluent outfall in...

  18. Fathead Minnow Steroidogenesis: In Silico Analyses Reveals Tradeoffs Between Nominal Target Efficacy and Robustness to Cross-talk

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the formulation and evaluation of a mechanistic mathematical model of fathead minnow ovarian steroidogenesis. The model presented in the present study was adpated from other models developed as part of an integrated, multi-disciplinary computational toxicolog...

  19. Occurrence of Glugea pimephales in planktonic larvae of fathead minnow in Algonquin Park, Ontario.

    PubMed

    Forest, Jonathon J H; King, Stanley D; Cone, David K

    2009-09-01

    The microsporidian Glugea pimephales was found parasitizing larval fathead minnow Pimephales promelas in Scott Lake, Algonquin Park, Ontario. These fish were estimated to be 2-3 weeks posthatch and, given the development time of the parasite, must have acquired infection soon after commencement of exogenous feeding. Histological sections revealed that the parasite typically developed in loose connective tissue between the peritoneum and the dermis of the abdominal cavity, with protruding xenomas of up to 2.6 mm in diameter forming near the vent. Prevalence was estimated at 1% by divers performing snorkel surveys along the lake shoreline. Divers following schools of fathead minnow consistently reported that larvae with the obvious cysts wobbled during swimming and that infected fish were typically located at the back of the dispersing school. This case history joins a growing list of studies suggesting that fish can become infected with parasites soon after hatch, the potential importance of which has not been critically studied. PMID:20043401

  20. Metal effects on fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) under field and laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Charles; Couture, Patrice; Pyle, Greg G

    2006-03-01

    The consequences of low-level metal exposure to early life stages of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were investigated along a contamination gradient near Sudbury, Canada. Field exposures resulted in elevated hatching time and increased mortality in metal-contaminated lakes, in contrast to laboratory exposures where no effects were observed. Dissolved and ionic Cd and Ni were associated with changes in hatching time and larval mortality under field conditions, though other potential contaminants were not examined and may also have had an influence. The increased biological response of field-exposed fish, relative to fish exposed to the same water in laboratory conditions, may be the result of higher stress in natural environments, which could sensitize fish to contaminants. Analysis also indicated that, as contamination increases, the discrepancies between laboratory and field estimates of effect also increase. A temperature versus hatching time relationship was also quantified for fathead minnows. PMID:16507372

  1. Early life stage (ELS) toxicity of sucralose to fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, K I; Huggett, D B

    2014-10-01

    Sucralose, an intense artificial sweetener, has been detected in wastewater and surface waters at concentrations ranging from ng/L to low µg/L. Although over a hundred studies have been conducted to evaluate the safety of sucralose for human consumption, few studies have focused on the chronic ecotoxicological effects of this compound in fish. As a remedy to this data gap, an early-life stage toxicity test was conducted to assess the effects of sucralose on hatching, survival, and growth of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Hatching, survival, and growth were unaffected by 98 mg/L of sucralose. The Lowest-Observed-Effect Concentration (LOEC) and the No-Observed-Effect Concentration (NOEC) for fathead minnows determined by this study are >98 and 98 mg/L, respectively. The results from this study suggest that the concentrations of sucralose detected in the environment are well below those required to cause adverse effects to developing aquatic organisms. PMID:25120258

  2. Reproductive effects in fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas) following a 21 d exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Brandon M; Lazorchak, James M; Jensen, Kathleen M; Haring, Herman J; Smith, Mark E; Flick, Robert W; Bencic, David C; Biales, Adam D

    2016-02-01

    17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic estrogen that is an active ingredient in oral contraception and hormone replacement therapy. Surveys of wastewater treatment plant effluents and surface waters throughout the world have reported EE2 concentrations in the ng/L range, and these low levels can cause significant reproductive effects in fish. This study tested the effects of three environmentally relevant EE2 concentrations: 0.47, 1.54 and 3.92 ng/L using a 21 d short-term reproductive assay to investigate the effects of EE2 on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction. The two highest EE2 concentrations tested in this study caused significant liver gene expression and induction of vitellogenin plasma protein in male fathead minnows. Exposure to 3.92 ng EE2/L increased the production of plasma vitellogenin in the females. Plasma estradiol concentrations were significantly reduced in females exposed to 1.54 and 3.92 ng EE2/L. All three tested concentrations significantly reduced fathead minnow egg production after a 21 d exposure to EE2. The results of this study indicate that the previously reported no observed adverse effect concentration (NOAEC) for EE2 on fathead minnow egg production (1.0 ng/L) may be too high. Because all three treatments resulted in significantly reduced egg production, the lowest observed adverse effect concentration (LOAEC) for EE2 on fathead minnow egg production is 0.47 ng EE2/L. This research estimates a NOAEC for fathead minnow reproduction at 0.24 ng EE2/L following a 21 d exposure. Additionally, induction of vitellogenin is a sensitive indicator of estrogen exposure but does not appear to be predictive of fathead minnow egg production. PMID:26383263

  3. Antidepressants at environmentally relevant concentrations affect predator avoidance behavior of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Painter, M.M.; Buerkley, M.A.; Julius, M.L.; Vajda, A.M.; Norris, D.O.; Barber, L.B.; Furlong, E.T.; Schultz, M.M.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of embryonic and larval exposure to environmentally relevant (ng/L) concentrations of common antidepressants, fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, and bupropion (singularly and in mixture) on C-start escape behavior were evaluated in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Embryos (postfertilization until hatching) were exposed for 5 d and, after hatching, were allowed to grow in control well water until 12 d old. Similarly, posthatch fathead minnows were exposed for 12 d to these compounds. High-speed (1,000 frames/s) video recordings of escape behavior were collected and transferred to National Institutes of Health Image for frame-by-frame analysis of latency periods, escape velocities, and total escape response (combination of latency period and escape velocity). When tested 12 d posthatch, fluoxetine and venlafaxine adversely affected C-start performance of larvae exposed as embryos. Conversely, larvae exposed for 12 d posthatch did not exhibit altered escape responses when exposed to fluoxetine but were affected by venlafaxine and bupropion exposure. Mixtures of these four antidepressant pharmaceuticals slowed predator avoidance behaviors in larval fathead minnows regardless of the exposure window. The direct impact of reduced C-start performance on survival and, ultimately, reproductive fitness provides an avenue to assess the ecological relevance of exposure in an assay of relatively short duration. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  4. Antidepressants at environmentally relevant concentrations affect predator avoidance behavior of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furlong, Edward T.; Barber, Larry B.; Meghan R. McGee; Megan A. Buerkley; Matthew L. Julius; Vajda, Alan M.; Heiko L. Schoenfuss; Schultz, Melissa M.; Norris, David O.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of embryonic and larval exposure to environmentally relevant (ng/L) concentrations of common antidepressants, fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, and bupropion (singularly and in mixture) on C-start escape behavior were evaluated in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Embryos (postfertilization until hatching) were exposed for 5 d and, after hatching, were allowed to grow in control well water until 12 d old. Similarly, posthatch fathead minnows were exposed for 12 d to these compounds. High-speed (1,000 frames/s) video recordings of escape behavior were collected and transferred to National Institutes of Health Image for frame-by- frame analysis of latency periods, escape velocities, and total escape response (combination of latency period and escape velocity). When tested 12 d posthatch, fluoxetine and venlafaxine adversely affected C-start performance of larvae exposed as embryos. Conversely, larvae exposed for 12 d posthatch did not exhibit altered escape responses when exposed to fluoxetine but were affected by venlafaxine and bupropion exposure. Mixtures of these four antidepressant pharmaceuticals slowed predator avoidance behaviors in larval fathead minnows regardless of the exposure window. The direct impact of reduced C-start performance on survival and, ultimately, reproductive fitness provides an avenue to assess the ecological relevance of exposure in an assay of relatively short duration.

  5. Swimming performance and energy homeostasis in juvenile laboratory raised fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) exposed to uranium mill effluent.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, Meghan M; Driessnack, Melissa K; Janz, David M; Weber, Lynn P

    2011-11-01

    Research at the Key Lake uranium mill (Saskatchewan, Canada) suggests effluent discharged from the mill affects energy stores of resident fish, but the mechanisms by which energy homeostasis is affected and the subsequent effects on swimming performance are unknown. In the present study larvae were collected from laboratory raised adult fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) exposed to 5% diluted uranium mill effluent or control (dechlorinated municipal) water, and reared in the same treatments to 60 days post hatch (dph). Critical swimming speed (U(crit)) was significantly lower in effluent exposed 60 dph fish compared to control fish. Fish used in tests were considered fatigued and compared to fish without swim testing (non-fatigued). There were no differences in whole body glycogen or triglyceride concentrations between effluent exposed versus control fish. However, fatigued fish from both treatments had significantly lower triglycerides, but not glycogen, compared to non-fatigued fish from the same treatment. Whole body β-hydroxyacyl coenzymeA dehydrogenase activity was similar in fish from both treatments, but citrate synthase activity was significantly lower in effluent exposed fish. Our results suggest uranium mill effluent exposure in the laboratory affects aerobic energy metabolism and swimming performance in juvenile fathead minnow, which could affect wild fish survivability. PMID:21839854

  6. Channel catfish polyculture with fathead minnows or threadfin shad effects on pond plankton communities and catfish fillet flavor, color, and fatty acid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Threadfin shad, Dorosoma petenense, or fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, were co-cultured with channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, in earthen ponds to determine the effects of planktivory on plankton community dynamics and catfish fillet quality. Fathead minnows had no effect on the plankton c...

  7. Fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish life-stage responses to 17β-estradiol exposure in outdoor mesocosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Sarah M.; Kiesling, Richard L.; Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Rearick, Daniel C.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Fredricks, Kim T.; Gaikowski, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental and reproductive effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) exposure on two generations of fathead minnows and one generation of bluegill sunfish were assessed. Fish were exposed to E2 for six continuous weeks in outdoor mesocosms simulating natural lake environments. First generation fish were exposed while sexually mature. Second generation fathead minnows were exposed either during early development, sexual maturity, or both stages. Multiple endpoints were measured to assess effects of E2 exposure on fecundity and fish health and development. Plasma vitellogenin concentrations were highly variable in all fish. Differences in egg production timing for both species indicate differences in fecundity between females exposed to E2 and controls. First generation fathead minnows exposed to E2 had lower body condition factors and reduced secondary sexual characteristic expression by males. Only a difference in relative liver weight was observed in second generation fathead minnows. First generation bluegill males exposed to E2 had significantly smaller testes compared to controls. Although fish response was highly variable, results indicate that exposure to E2 at environmentally relevant concentrations affect fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish health and development, which may have implications for the health and sustainability of fish populations. Furthermore, exposure timing and environmental factors affect fish response to E2 exposure.

  8. Effects of progesterone and norethindrone on female fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lene H; Hala, David; Carty, Dennis; Cantu, Mark; Martinović, Dalma; Huggett, Duane B

    2015-02-01

    As knowledge of contaminants capable of adversely modulating endocrine functions increases, attention is focused on the effects of synthetic progestins as environmental endocrine disrupters. In the present study, effects of exposure to a synthetic progestin (norethindrone, 168 ± 7.5 ng/L) and endogenous progestogen (progesterone, 34 ± 4.1 ng/L) on steroidogenesis in adult female fathead minnows were examined. In vivo exposure to either compound lowered expression (nonsignificant) of luteinizing hormone (LHβ) levels in the brain along with significantly down-regulating the beta isoform of membrane progesterone receptor (mPRβ) in ovary tissue. The correspondence between lowered LHβ levels in the brain and mPRβ in the ovary is suggestive of a possible functional association as positive correlations between LHβ and mPR levels have been demonstrated in other fish species. In vitro exposure of ovary tissue to progesterone resulted in significantly elevated progestogen (pregnenolone, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, and 17α,20β-dihydroxypregnenone) and androgen (testosterone) production. Whereas in vitro exposure to norethindrone did not significantly impact steroid hormone production but showed decreased testosterone production relative to solvent control (however this was not significant). Overall, this study showed that exposure to a natural progestogen (progesterone) and synthetic progestin (norethindrone), was capable of modulating LHβ (in brain) and mPRβ expression (in ovary). PMID:25470578

  9. Consumption estimates of walleye stocked as fry to suppress fathead minnow populations in west-central Minnesota wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, M.C.; Willis, D.W.; Herwig, B.R.; Chipps, S.R.; Parsons, B.G.; Reed, J.R.; Hanson, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Fisheries managers throughout the Prairie Pothole Region of Minnesota often use semi-permanent and permanent wetland basins to extensively culture walleye Sander vitreus fry. Waterfowl managers have expressed concern over this practice because of the potential influence that fish have on food resources used by waterfowl during development and migration. It is well known that native fathead minnows Pimephales promelas can have detrimental effects on macroinvertebrates, zooplankton, water clarity, epiphyton, and macrophytes in wetlands. Because walleye commonly become piscivorous as soon as mouth gape allows, walleye fry may suppress fathead minnow populations and improve wetland conditions for waterfowl. In this study, we quantify consumption estimates, specifically predation on fathead minnows, by age-0 and age-1 walleye reared in natural wetland basins. Six wetlands were stocked in mid-May 2001 and 2002 at a rate of 12,000 walleye fry ha-1. Age-0 walleye were sampled bi-weekly from mid-June through mid-September 2001. Age-0 and age-1 walleye were sampled monthly from mid-May through mid-September 2002. A generalised diet shift from zooplankton to fish to macroinvertebrates was observed in 2001, whereas diets of juvenile walleye contained primarily macroinvertebrates in 2002. Stocked walleye quickly reduced fathead minnow populations in 2001 and suppression was maintained throughout 2002. Although walleye consumed primarily macroinvertebrates once prey fish populations became suppressed, consumption estimates of invertebrates by walleye were substantially less than those documented for fathead minnow populations. Thus, stocking age-0 walleye was an effective biomanipulation tool that substantially reduced fathead minnow densities and influenced lower trophic levels in these aquatic communities. ?? 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  10. Sensitivity of early life stages of white sturgeon, rainbow trout, and fathead minnow to copper.

    PubMed

    Vardy, David W; Oellers, Johanna; Doering, Jon A; Hollert, Henner; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Populations of white sturgeon (WS; Acipenser transmontanus) are in decline in several parts of the United States and Canada, attributed primarily to poor recruitment caused by degradation of habitats, including pollution with contaminants such as metals. Little is known about sensitivity of WS to contaminants or metals such as copper (Cu). Here, acute (96 h) mortalities of WS early life stages due to exposure to Cu under laboratory conditions are reported. Two standard test species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), were exposed in parallel to determine relative sensitivity among species. Swim-up larvae [15 days post-hatch (dph)] and early juveniles (40-45 dph) of WS were more sensitive to Cu (LC(50) = 10 and 9-17 μg/L, respectively) than were yolksac larvae (8 dph; LC(50) = 22 μg/L) and the later juvenile life stage (100 dph; LC(50) = 54 μg/L). WS were more sensitive to Cu than rainbow trout and fathead minnow at all comparable life stages tested. Yolksac larvae of rainbow trout and fathead minnow were 1.8 and 4.6 times, respectively, more tolerant than WS, while swim-up and juvenile life stages of rainbow trout were between 1.4- and 2.4-times more tolerant than WS. When plotted in a species sensitivity distribution with other fishes, the mean acute toxicity value for early life stage WS was ranked between the 1st and 2nd centile. The WS life stage of greatest Cu sensitivity coincides with the beginning of active feeding and close association with sediment, possibly increasing risk. WS early life stages are sensitive to aqueous copper exposure and site-specific water quality guidelines and criteria should be evaluated closely to ensure adequate protection. PMID:23124699

  11. Effects of environmental exposure to diazepam on the reproductive behavior of fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Varenka; Choe, Ree; Schlenk, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Pharmaceutical drugs are continuously discharged into the aquatic environment primarily through wastewater discharge; therefore, their possible effects on wildlife is a reason of concern. Diazepam is a widely prescribed benzodiazepine drug used to treat insomnia and anxiety disorders, and it has been found in wastewater effluents worldwide. The present study tested the effects of diazepam on fecundity and the reproductive behavior of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, a fish that exhibits male parental care. Sexually mature fathead minnows were housed at a ratio of one male and two females per tank and exposed to nominal (measured) concentrations of 0, 0.1 (0.14 ± 0.06), 1.0 (1.04 ± 0.15), 10 (13.4 ± 1.5) µg L(-1) for 21 days. Fish receiving the low diazepam treatment had significantly larger clutches than fish receiving the highest concentration but neither were different from controls. Diazepam exposure was not associated with a significant change in fertilization rate, hatchability or time to hatch, but a trend toward a higher number of eggs/day was observed in fish exposed to the low diazepam concentration relative to those exposed to the medium concentration. There were no significant differences in any of the behaviors analyzed when responses were averaged over time. The results showed that exposure to diazepam at concentrations as high as 13 µg L(-1) did not significantly impact the reproductive behavior of fathead minnow. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 561-568, 2016. PMID:25410424

  12. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, M.M.; Painter, M.M.; Bartell, S.E.; Logue, A.; Furlong, E.T.; Werner, S.L.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305. ng/L and 1104. ng/L) and SER (5.2. ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28. ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish-a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, Melissa M.; Painter, Meghan M.; Bartell, Stephen E.; Logue, Amanda; Furlong, Edward T.; Werner, Stephen L.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimeplwles promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305 ng/L and 1104 ng/L) and SER (5.2 ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28 ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish—a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies.

  14. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Melissa M; Painter, Meghan M; Bartell, Stephen E; Logue, Amanda; Furlong, Edward T; Werner, Stephen L; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2011-07-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305 ng/L and 1104 ng/L) and SER (5.2 ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28 ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish--a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies. PMID:21536011

  15. INFLUENCE OF DIET AND BODY LIPIDS ON THE BIOCONCENTRATION OF ENDRIN FROM WATER IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW ('PIMEPHALES PROMELAS')

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the importance of the fathead minnow's (Pimephales promelas) body lipid content and its composition in the bioconcentration of a lipophilic chemical (endrin) from water. For three months prior to exposure, six groups of fish were fed refe...

  16. NMR ANALYSIS OF MALE FATHEAD MINNOW URINARY METABOLITES: A POTENTIAL APPROACH FOR STUDYING IMPACTS OF CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for profiling endogenous metabolites in urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to assess chemical exposures was explored using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy w...

  17. Investigating Compensation and Recovery of Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) Exposed to 17α-Ethynylestradiol with Metabolite Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    1H-NMR spectroscopy was used to profile metabolite changes in the livers of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to the synthetic estrogen 17α ethynylestradiol (EE2) via a continuous flow water exposure. Fish were exposed to either 10 or 100 ng EE2/L for 8 days, followed...

  18. A computational model linking oocyte growth and spawning to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reproduction is vital to the survival of all living organisms, and reproductive toxicity is an important outcome in determining the ecological risks of chemicals in the environment. To evaluate reproductive toxicity, fathead minnow fecundity, as measured by the average number of...

  19. BEHAVIORAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN FATHEAD MINNOW ('PIMEPHALES PROMELAS') AS DIAGNOSTIC ENDPOINTS FOR SCREENING CHEMICALS ACCORDING TO MODE OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute (96-h) toxicity tests were conducted using 30-day old fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). A total of 139 chemicals were tested under flow-through conditions at a temperature of 25 plus or minus 1.0 degs C using Lake Superior water. A checklist was developed for systemati...

  20. BEHAVIORAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES, IN FATHEAD MINNOW 'PIMEPHALES PROMELAS' AS DIAGNOSTIC ENDPOINTS FOR SCREENING CHEMICALS ACCORDING TO MODE OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute (96 hr) bioassays were conducted using 30-day old fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). A total of 139 tests were performed under flow-through conditions at a temperature of 25 + or - 1.0 C using Lake Superior water. A checklist was developed for systematically recording v...

  1. Adaptive Response in Female Fathead Minnows Exposed to an Aromatase Inhibitor: Computational Modeling of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We are developing a mechanistic computational model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict dose-response and time-course ...

  2. Human low density lipoprotein as a substrate for in vitro steroidogenesis assays with fathead minnow ovary explants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gonad explant in vitro steroidogenesis assays are used as part of a multifaceted strategy to detect endocrine active chemicals capable of altering steroid hormone synthesis. An in vitro steroidogenesis assay used in our laboratory involves exposing fathead minnow (FHM) gonad exp...

  3. Modulation of estrogenic exposure effects via alterations in salinity and dissolved oxygen in male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory exposure data indicate that estrogens and estrogen mimics can cause endocrine disruption in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). In the wild, conditions are not static as is often the case in the laboratory. Changes in water quality parameters, such as salinity influx due to road s...

  4. Observed and modeled effects of pH on bioconcentration of diphenhydramine, a weakly basic pharmaceutical, by fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the influence of pH on uptake and accumulation of ionizable pharmaceuticals by fish was recently identified as a major research need. In the present study, fathead minnows were exposed to diphenhydramine (DPH), a weakly basic pharmaceutical (pKa = 9.1). Fish were ...

  5. SUBCHRONIC SENSITIVITY OF ONE-, FOUR-, AND SEVEN-DAY-OLD FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) LARVAE TO FIVE TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow (pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test was used to evaluate the relative sensitivity of 1-,4-, and 7-d-old larvae to five contaminants, KC1, NaC1, 1-octanol, carbaryl, and benzaldehyde. The no observable effect concentration (NOEC) for survival o...

  6. PREDICTION OF THE ACUTE TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMALAS) USING A GROUP CONTRIBUTION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A group contribution method has been developed to correlate the acute toxicity (96 h LC50) to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) for 379 organic chemicals. Multilinear regression and computational neural networks (CNNs) were used for model building. The multilinear linear m...

  7. Development of a Computational Model for Female Fathead Minnows Exposed to 17a-ethynylestradiol and 17B-trenbolone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow (FHM) is a valuable small fish model for genomic research in ecotoxicology. Our recent studies have successfully used genomic and metabolomic analyses to evaluate responses to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in urine of the FHM, but these results indicate...

  8. Predicting Adaptive Response to Fadrozole Exposure: Computational Model of the Fathead Minnow Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We are developing a mechanistic mathematical model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict dose-response and time-course (...

  9. Predicting Adaptive Response to Fadrozole Exposure:Computational Model of the Fathead MinnowsHypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We are developing a mechanistic mathematical model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict doseresponse and time-course (...

  10. A COMPARISON OF THE LETHAL AND SUBLETHAL TOXICITY OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL MIXTURES TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The joint toxic effects of known binary and multiple organic chemical mixtures to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were defined at both the 96-h 50% lethal effect concentration (LC50) and sublethal (32-d growth) response levels for toxicants with a narcosis I, narcosis II...

  11. Effects-based Monitoring with Caged Fathead Minnows: An Exposure Gradient Case Study in the Duluth-Superior Harbor, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the Great Lakes there is an increased focus on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and consideration of potential effects of chemical mixtures. To further characterize the utility of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for effects-based monitoring of CECs, we c...

  12. Fishy aroma of social status: Urinary chemo-signaling of territoriality in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exhibit life history traits which may be conducive to evolution of systems that use chemical communication to confer information about an individual’s social status. Reproduction in males of this species is dependent upon their ability ...

  13. Acute toxicity of firefighting chemical formulations to four life stages of fathead minnow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, Mark P.; Hamilton, Steve J.; Buhl, Kevin J.; McDonald, Susan F.; Summers, Cliff H.

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted with four early life stages of fathead minnow,Pimephales promelas,to determine the acute toxicity of five firefighting chemical formulations in standardized soft and hard water. Egg, fry, 30-day posthatch, and 60-day posthatch life stages were tested with three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R, Fire-Trol LCG-R, and Phos-Chek D75-F) and two fire-suppressant foams (Phos-Chek WD-881 and Ansul Silv-Ex). Fry were generally the most sensitive life stage tested, whereas the eggs were the least sensitive life stage. Formulation toxicity was greater in hard water than in soft water for all life stages tested. Fire-suppressant foams were more toxic than the fire retardants. The 96-hr LC50s derived for fathead minnows were rank ordered from the most toxic to the least toxic formulation as follows: Phos-Chek WD-881 (13a??32 mg/liter) > Silv-Ex (19a??32 mg/liter) > Fire-Trol GTS-R (135a??787 mg/liter) > Phos-Chek D75-F (168a??2250 mg/liter) > Fire-Trol LCG-R (519a??6705 mg/liter) (ranges are the lowest and highest 96-hr LC50for each formulation). (C) 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  14. Lethal body concentrations of four non-polar narcotic chemicals in larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Groetsch, K.; Oris, J.T.; Versteeg, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the lethal body concentrations of tetra chloroethane, dichlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene, and hexachlorobenzene in the larval fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). The authors exposed similar populations of larval fathead minnows to a range of concentrations of one of four non-polar, narcotic chemicals. Morbid larvae were collected and the time of collection and internal body concentration were recorded. Example results for pentachlorobenzene show that the concentration of chemical in larvae that die in short time intervals were significantly lower than the concentration of chemical in larvae that died later in the test (ANOVA F-Value = 139, P-Value <.0001). Morbidity occurred between 16 and 210 hours of exposure. After 210 hours, exposed individuals had similar rates of morbidity compared to controls. This study corroborates other research that suggests the existence of a threshold body concentration that causes lethality for non-polar narcotic chemicals. However, individual based tolerance appears to contribute significantly to variability in lethal body concentrations.

  15. Enantioselective toxicity and bioaccumulation of fipronil in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) following water and sediment exposures.

    PubMed

    Baird, Suzanne; Garrison, Arthur; Jones, Jack; Avants, Jimmy; Bringolf, Robert; Black, Marsha

    2013-01-01

    Fipronil is a widely used, broad-spectrum pesticide that is applied as an equal mixture of two enantiomers. As regulations on older pesticides become more stringent, production and application of fipronil is expected to grow, leading to increased inputs into aquatic environments and complex exposures to biota. To better understand the potential exposures introduced by fipronil contamination, we conducted subchronic toxicity tests with larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and waterborne fipronil and its enantiomers and exposed juvenile fathead minnows to fipronil-spiked sediment. Enantioselective toxicity was observed in fish after the 7-d subchronic exposure, with increased toxicity of the racemate and (+) enantiomer observed compared with the (-) enantiomer. Curiously, toxicities of the racemate and (+) enantiomer were not significantly different, even though the racemate contains 50% of the (+) enantiomer and 50% of the less toxic (-) enantiomer. During the sediment exposure, racemic fipronil in sediment was transformed primarily to fipronil sulfide, while exposed fish rapidly accumulated fipronil and/or fipronil sulfide and transformed the majority to fipronil sulfone. Using the results of the sediment-exposure experiment, the authors explored a mechanism that may contribute to the interesting trends in enantioselective toxicity observed during the waterborne exposures. In tandem, the aquatic toxicity experiment and the spiked sediment exposure demonstrate the potentially complex behavior of fipronil in sediment and fish. PMID:23109279

  16. Fathead minnow FHM cells for use in in vitro cytotoxicity assays of aquatic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, H.; Borenfreund, E.

    1987-08-01

    The suitability of the fathead minnow (FHM) epithelial cell line for use as the target (indicator) system in in vitro cytotoxicity assays was evaluated using several endpoints. The organometal diethyltin dichloride served as the representative test agent. The concentration of diethyltin dichloride which resulted in a midpoint toxicity was 3.5 microM in a 3-day cell growth assay, 3.8 microM in the 24-hr neutral red assay, and 16.5 microM in a 4-hr cell detachment assay. The neutral red assay was used to compare the relative sensitivities of the FHM cells (exposed at 34/sup 0/C) with those of bluegill sunfish (BF-2) cells, a fibroblastic cell culture (exposed at 26 degrees C), in the presence of different classes of test agents frequently occurring as aquatic pollutants. For both fish species the sequence of potencies of the test agents was in the order of organometals greater than pesticides approximately equal to polychlorinated biphenyls greater than polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons greater than phenolics. Overall, the FHM cells were more sensitive than were the BF-2 cells. However, there was a better correlation between the in vitro cytotoxicity data for the BF-2 cell culture and LC50 data for bluegill sunfish than between similar data for the FHM cell line and fathead minnows.

  17. Investigations of transcript expression in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) brain tissue reveal toxicological impacts of RDX exposure.

    PubMed

    Gust, Kurt A; Wilbanks, Mitchell S; Guan, Xin; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Habib, Tanwir; Yoo, Leslie; Wintz, Henri; Vulpe, Chris D; Perkins, Edward J

    2011-01-17

    Production, usage and disposal of the munitions constituent (MC) cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) has led to environmental releases on military facilities. The chemical attributes of RDX are conducive for leaching to surface water which may put aquatic organisms at risk of exposure. Because RDX has been observed to cause aberrant neuromuscular effects across a wide range of animal phyla, we assessed the effects of RDX on central nervous system (CNS) functions in the representative aquatic ecotoxicological model species, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). We developed a fathead minnow brain-tissue cDNA library enriched for transcripts differentially expressed in response to RDX and trinitrotoluene (TNT) exposure. All 4,128 cDNAs were sequenced, quality filtered and assembled yielding 2230 unique sequences and 945 significant blastx matches (E ≤10(-5)). The cDNA library was leveraged to create custom-spotted microarrays for use in transcript expression assays. The impact of RDX on transcript expression in brain tissue was examined in fathead minnows exposed to RDX at 0.625, 2.5, 5, 10mg/L or an acetone-spike control for 10 days. Overt toxicity of RDX in fathead minnow occurred only at the highest exposure concentration resulting in 50% mortality and weight loss. Conversely, Bayesian analysis of microarray data indicated significant changes in transcript expression at concentrations as low as 0.625 mg/L. In total, 154 cDNAs representing 44 unique transcripts were differentially expressed in RDX exposures, the majority of which were validated by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Investigation of molecular pathways, gene ontology (GO) and individual gene functions affected by RDX exposures indicated changes in metabolic processes involved in: oxygen transport, neurological function, calcium binding/signaling, energy metabolism, cell growth/division, oxidative stress and ubiquitination. In total, our study indicated that RDX exposure affected

  18. A time-course analysis of effects of the steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole on components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of fathead minnows (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate temporal effects of the model steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole (KTC) on aspects of reproductive endocrine function controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Ketoconazo...

  19. Sex-specific gene expression in early life stage fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) throughout development and after exposure to synthetic hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is evidence that exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) during early life stages can alter sex differentiation in fishes. Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are commonly used as a model fish species in endocrine disruption studies. However, limited knowledge...

  20. A Time-course Analysis of Effects of the Steroidogenesis Inhibitor Ketoconazole on Components of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal Axis of Fathead Minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate temporal effects of the model steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole (KTC) on aspects of reproductive endocrine function controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Ketoconaz...

  1. A Time-course Analysis of Effects of the Steroidogenesis Inhibitor Ketoconazole on Components of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal Axis of Fathead Minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate temporal effects of the model steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole (KTC) on aspects of reproductive endocrine function controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Ketoconazo...

  2. Reciprocal influences of temperature and copper on survival of fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, V.L.; Beitinger, T.L.

    1995-08-01

    Contemporary ecological concerns of accelerated global warming, increase in toxic chemicals and loss of biodiversity make relevant studies of tolerance of various organisms to abiotic variables. In this study, the reciprocal effects of temperature and copper on survival of fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, were determined. Temperature tolerance of fishes is limited by a cornucopia of biotic and abiotic factors, including various toxicants. Not only do chemicals affect temperature tolerance of fishes, temperature influences the sensitivity of fish to toxic chemicals; however, the relationship between temperature and lethality is complex, difficult to predict, and has not been the focus of many studies. Copper, a necessary trace element in animal metabolism and ubiquitous in aquatic environments, was selected as our test toxicant. Hodson et al. (1979) reported copper concentrations of one to 29 {mu}g/L in unpolluted surface waters in the United States. Copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}), is an algicide, bactericide and herbicide for ponds, lakes and fish hatcheries. Also, copper is recommended as a fungicide for a variety of ornamental plants and crops, and in various chemical forms enters the environment through mining, smelting, and refining activities. Copper is toxic in parts per billion concentrations ({mu}g/L) and is an EPA priority pollutant. In this research two null hypotheses were tested: (1) temperature has no effect on the lethality of copper sulfate, and (2) sublethal concentrations of copper do not affect the upper temperature tolerance of fathead minnows. It was found that acclimation temperature significantly affects the 96-hr median lethal concentration. Exposure to copper adversely affects the ability of minnows to withstand high temperatures. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Influence of dissolved organic matter on acute toxicity of zinc to larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Bringolf, Robert B; Morris, Brady A; Boese, Connie J; Santore, Robert C; Allen, Herbert E; Meyer, Joseph S

    2006-10-01

    We conducted laboratory toxicity tests in support of the development of a biotic ligand model (BLM) to predict acute toxicity of zinc (Zn) to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). To test the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on Zn toxicity, we exposed larval fathead minnows to Zn in water containing elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in 96-h static-renewal toxicity tests. We tested DOM isolated from four surface waters: Cypress Swamp, Delaware; Edisto River, South Carolina; Suwannee River, Georgia; and Wilmington, Delaware, wastewater treatment effluent. The DOM isolates from the Edisto River and Wilmington wastewater treatment effluent contained elevated concentrations of NaCl (20-110x control NaCl) due to the use of a Na+-exchange resin to remove Ca2+ and Mg2+ during the DOM isolation process. Therefore, we also performed Zn toxicity tests in which we added up to 20 mM NaCl to exposure solutions containing Cypress Swamp and Suwannee River DOM. A threshold concentration of 11 mg DOC/L was needed to decrease Zn toxicity, after which the 96 h Zn LC50 was positively correlated with DOC concentration. Elevated NaCl concentrations did not alter Zn toxicity in the presence of DOM. In conjunction with data from other studies with fish and invertebrates, results of this study were used to calibrate Version 2.1.1 of the Zn BLM. BLM-predicted LC50s for our exposure waters containing elevated DOM concentrations were within the range of acceptable deviation relative to the observed LC50s (i.e., 0.5-2x observed LC50s); however, BLM-predicted LC50s for our exposure waters containing < 1 mg DOC/L were 2-3x lower than the observed LC50s (i.e., the BLM over-predicted the toxicity). Therefore, the current composite-species BLM for Zn could be improved for fathead minnows if that species were modeled separately from the other species used to calibrate Version 2.1.1. PMID:16788742

  4. Assessing acute toxicities of pre- and post-treatment industrial wastewaters with Hydra attenuata: A comparative study of acute toxicity with the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, L.J.; Staples, R.E.; Stahl, R.G. Jr. . Haskell Lab. for Toxicology and Industrial Medicine)

    1994-04-01

    This study was undertaken to (a) determine wastewater treatment effectiveness using two freshwater organisms, (b) compare acute toxicity results from the two species exposed to the wastewaters, and (c) link acute and potential developmental toxicity of wastewaters in one organism. The acute toxicities of several pretreatment and post-treatment industrial waste-water samples wee evaluated with adult Hydra attenuata and fathead minnows. The acute LC50s agreed closely when results in Hydra attenuata were compared with those from fathead minnow tests. Acute LC50s ranged from 3 to >100% of samples with hydra, and from 1.0 to >100% of sample with fathead minnows. The results provided strong evidence of treatment effectiveness because toxicity decreased with progressive stages of treatment. Previously the Hydra Developmental Toxicity Assay was used as a prescreen mainly for in vitro assessment of developmental toxicity with pure compounds and to prioritized toxicants according to selective toxicity to the developing embryo. Recently the authors modified the assay for testing natural waters and wastewaters; hence, some of the wastewater samples also were tested for their developmental toxicity. In this case, the relative selective toxicity of these wastewater samples ranged from 0.7 to 2.1, indicating that no sample was uniquely toxic to the developing embryo, although acute toxicity was manifested. Overall, their results indicate the Hydra Assay functions appropriately in assessments of acute and developmental toxicity of industrial wastewaters and may be a simple and useful tool in a battery of tests for broader scale detection of environmental hazards.

  5. Comparing biological effects and potencies of estrone and 17β-estradiol in mature fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Dammann, A A; Shappell, N W; Bartell, S E; Schoenfuss, H L

    2011-10-01

    The presence of endocrine active compounds such as estrogens in treated wastewater effluent and their effects on aquatic life are causing concern among aquatic resource managers. In contrast to 17β-estradiol (E2), the steroid hormone produced by all vertebrates, the biological effects of estrone (E1), one of its breakdown products are less understood, even though the aquatic concentrations of E1 are often higher than those of E2. The central hypothesis of this study was that at environmental concentrations, E1 has estrogenic effects in fish, with increased vitellogenin concentrations and decreased reproductive success in both male and female fathead minnows, as found with E2. In two replicate experiments, we exposed mature fathead minnows to three concentrations of each estrogen for 21 days in a flow-through exposure system and measured a broad suite of anatomical (body indices, histopathology), physiological (plasma vitellogenin), behavioral (nest defense), and reproductive (fecundity, fertility, hatching) endpoints. These endpoints have previously been associated with adverse effects of estrogenic exposures. While body length and weight parameters were unaltered by exposure, secondary sex characteristics exhibited an exposure concentrated-related decline in male fathead minnows. Interestingly, low concentrations of estrone (≈ 15 ng/L) enhanced the aggressiveness of male fathead minnows in a behavioral assay. Vitellogenin concentrations in male fish increased with higher concentrations of both estrogens, but remained unchanged in all female treatments. A decrease in fecundity was observed at high concentrations of E2 as compared with control minnows. These results suggest that E1, at concentrations previously found in waters receiving wastewater effluent, can have reproductive effects on fish. PMID:21939616

  6. Atrazine reduces reproduction in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas): raw data report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, Donald E.; Papoulias, Diana M.; Whyte, Jeffrey J.; Richter, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    The herbicide, atrazine, routinely is observed in surface and groundwaters, particularly in the “corn belt” region, a high-use area of the United States. Atrazine has demonstrated effects on reproduction in mammals and amphibians, but the characterization of endocrine-related effects in fish has received only limited attention. Peak concentrations of atrazine in surface water of streams from these agricultural areas coincide with annual spawning events of native fishes. Consequently, there was an unacceptable level of uncertainty in our understanding of the risks associated with the periods of greatest atrazine exposure and greatest vulnerability of certain species of fishes. For this reason, a study of the effects of atrazine on fathead minnow reproduction was undertaken (Tillitt and others, 2010). This report provides the raw data from that study.

  7. Hexachlorobenzene uptake by fathead minnows and macroinvertebrates in recirculating sediment/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuytema, G.S.; Krawczyk, D.F.; Griffis, W.L.; Nebeker, A.V.; Robideaux, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), the worm, Lumbriculus variegatus, and the amphipods Hyalella azteca and Gammarus lacustris were exposed to hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in water with and without a bed of HCB-spiked sediment. Water HCB concentrations were maintained by recirculation through HCB-packed columns. Recirculating HCB-bound particulates and possibly eroded HCB particulates were an added source of HCB in addition to the sediment bed. Significant bioaccumulation of HCB in animal tissues was observed in water-only and water-sediment exposures. The presence of the HCB-spiked sediment did not result in a significant increase in the uptake of HCB by the organisms, but there was a substantial increase in sediment HCB levels over time. Higher tissue HCB levels in aquaria without sediment suggest that the sediment was a more efficient sink for HCB than the organisms.

  8. Transfer of toxic concentrations of selenium from parent to progeny in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.; Hermanutz, R.

    1990-01-01

    Selenium, an essential trace element, may become concentrated in aquatic ecosystems to levels that are toxic to fish. Finley (1985) and Gillespie and Baumann (1986) have shown that selenium in overflow water from coal burning power plant settling basins contributed to a decline in fish populations. The leaching of selenium from the soil into water systems used for irrigation in highly seleniferous areas of the country poses another serious problem. Studies demonstrated that female bluegill sunfish transfer selenium to their progeny. The objective of the study was to determine whether the selenium levels within fathead minnow embryos in a semi-natural ecosystem resulted from direct uptake by the embryos following spawning, from female-to-progeny transferral, or from some combination of these two occurrences.

  9. Determining the effects of ammonia on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Brandon M; Lazorchak, James M; Murphy, Cheryl A; Haring, Herman J; Jensen, Kathleen M; Smith, Mark E

    2012-03-15

    Ammonia can cause adverse reproductive and mortality effects in individual fish by interacting with the central nervous system. The last published study that assessed the effects of ammonia on fathead minnow reproduction was a lifecycle study conducted in 1986. Our study's main goal was to re-evaluate ammonia toxicity on fathead minnow Pimephales promelas reproduction using a 20-day fecundity flow-through diluter method. Flow-through diluter systems have been used by regulatory agencies, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in the past as an effective way to estimate acceptable levels of contaminants. There was a significant difference in cumulative egg production among treatments (ANOVA; F=10.167, p≤0.01, df=3). All three concentrations of ammonia tested in this study significantly reduced fecundity after 20days of exposure (Dunnett's, p≤0.05 for each treatment). The lowest un-ionized ammonia concentration (0.06mg/L at a pH of 7.3 and temperature of 25.1°C) tested during this study resulted in a 29% decrease in cumulative fecundity. Because all tested ammonia concentrations caused an effect on P. promelas reproduction, the no effect concentration was estimated to be 0.025mg/L un-ionized ammonia (2.19mg/L total ammonia-nitrogen). This estimate was determined using the U.S. EPA Toxicity Relationship Analysis Program to calculate the 10% effect concentration of ammonia on P. promelas reproduction. This value is much lower than the previous reported no effect concentration on P. promelas reproduction (0.37mg/L un-ionized ammonia or 6.43mg/L total ammonia-nitrogen) as determined from the 1986 study, which was used to determine the ammonia water quality criteria by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Our results should be considered in the next revision of water quality criteria. PMID:22330422

  10. Effects of a fire-retardant chemical to fathead minnows in experimental streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, R.D.; Little, E.E.

    2003-01-01

    Background. Each year millions of liters of fire-retardant chemicals are applied to wildfires across the nation. Recent laboratory studies with long-term fire-retardant chemicals indicate a significant photoenhanced toxicity of products containing sodium ferrocyanide corrosion inhibitors. Our objective of this study was to determine the toxicity of fire-retardant chemicals to fathead minnows during exposure in experimental outdoor streams. Methods. Stream tests were conducted to determine the potential toxicity of a pulse of exposure as might occur when fire retardant chemical is rinsed from the watershed by rainfall. Two artificial 55-meter experimental streams were dosed with different concentrations of Fire-Trol?? GTS-R, or uncontaminated for a control. Replicate groups of fathead minnows were added to screened containers (10 fish per container) and exposed to retardant chemicals in the recirculating flow of the stream for up to 6 hours. Results and Discussion. Under field conditions toxicity of GTS-R only occurred in the presence of sunlight. When GTS-R was tested on sunny days, 100% mortality occurred. However, when tested during heavily overcast conditions, no mortality occurred. Conclusions. Lethal concentrations of cyanide were measured when GTS-R with YPS exposures were conducted under sunny conditions, but not under cloudy conditions, indicating that a minimum UV level is necessary to induce toxicity as well as the release of cyanide from YPS. The toxicity observed with GTS-R was likely associated with lethal concentrations of cyanide. Rainwater runoff following applications of this fire-retardant at the recommended rate could result in lethal concentrations in small ponds and streams receiving limited water flow under sunny conditions. Recommendations and Outlook. In addition to avoiding application to aquatic habitats, it is important to consider characteristics of the treated site including soil binding affinity and erosive properties.

  11. Environmental hormones and their impacts on sex differentiation in fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Leet, Jessica K; Sassman, Stephen; Amberg, Jon J; Olmstead, Allen W; Lee, Linda S; Ankley, Gerald T; Sepúlveda, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    Runoff from lands fertilized with animal manure from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) is a source of hormones to surface water. In this study we tested the hypothesis that larval fathead minnows exposed to sex steroids singly or in a "typical" CAFO mixture during sex differentiation would respond with changes in the expression of a set of target genes, leading to gonadal abnormalities later in life. In the first experiment, a static daily-renewal system was used to expose larvae during the period of 10-20 days post-hatch (dph) to either 5 ng/L 17β-trenbolone (17β-TRB) or 5 ng/L 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2). In a second experiment, fish were exposed from 0 to 45 dph in a flow-through system to a CAFO mixture composed of steroids and degradates (2-16 ng/L), atrazine and degradates (15-250 ng/L), and nitrate (3-11 mg/L). In the single hormone experiment, expression of genes involved in steroidogenesis (cyp19a, cyp17, and star) was decreased in females. In contrast, no differences in gene expression were observed in fish exposed to the CAFO mixture. However, the majority (84%) of treated males had testes containing an ovarian cavity, indicative of feminization, compared to 0% in the control males. Overall, our results show that: (1) changes in gene expression after single hormone exposures are sex-specific, with females more responsive than males; and (2) phenotypic alterations in testicular development can be elicited by a simulated "CAFO" mixture when fathead minnows are exposed during the first 45 days of development. More research is needed to further discern the complex response of fish to steroid mixtures, especially those associated with runoff from land-applied CAFO waste. PMID:25671225

  12. Isolation of the Fathead Minnow Nidovirus from Muskellunge Experiencing Lingering Mortality.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohamed; Baird, Ashley; Winters, Andrew D; Millard, Elena V; Marcquenski, Sue; Hsu, Hui-Min; Hennings, Ann; Bochsler, Phil; Standish, Isaac; Loch, Thomas P; Gunn, Michelle R; Warg, Janet

    2016-06-01

    In 2011, the Fathead Minnow nidovirus (FHMNV; Genus Bafinivirus, Family Coronaviridae, Order Nidovirales) was isolated from pond-raised juvenile Muskellunge Esox masquinongy suffering from lingering mortality at the Wild Rose Hatchery in Wild Rose, Wisconsin. Moribund Muskellunge exhibited tubular necrosis in the kidneys as well as multifocal coalescing necrotizing hepatitis. The FHMNV was also isolated from apparently healthy juvenile Muskellunge at the Wolf Lake State Fish Hatchery in Mattawan, Michigan. The identity of the two syncytia-forming viruses (designated MUS-WR and MUS-WL from Wild Rose Hatchery and Wolf Lake State Fish Hatchery, respectively) as strains of FHMNV was determined based on multiple-gene sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. The pathogenicity of the MUS-WL FHMNV strain was determined by experimentally infecting naive juvenile Muskellunge through intraperitoneal injection with two viral concentrations (63 and 6.3 × 10(3) TCID50/fish). Both doses resulted in 100% mortality in experimentally infected fish, which exhibited severely pale gills and petechial hemorrhaging in eyes, fins, and skin. Histopathological alterations in experimentally infected fish were observed mainly in the hematopoietic tissues in the form of focal areas of necrosis. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated partial spike glycoprotein and helicase gene sequences revealed differences between the MUS-WL FHMNV, MUS-WR FHMNV, and two other FHMNV originally isolated from moribund Fathead Minnows Pimephales promelas including the index FHMNV strain (GU002364). Based on a partial helicase gene sequence, a reverse transcriptase PCR assay was developed that is specific to FHMNV. These results give evidence that the risks posed to Muskellunge by FHMNV should be taken seriously. Received May 1, 2015; accepted February 8, 2016. PMID:27230033

  13. Gene expression responses in male fathead minnows exposed to binary mixtures of an estrogen and antiestrogen

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Kroll, Kevin J; Liu, Li; Orlando, Edward F; Watanabe, Karen H; Sepúlveda, María S; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Perkins, Edward J; Ankley, Gerald T; Denslow, Nancy D

    2009-01-01

    Background Aquatic organisms are continuously exposed to complex mixtures of chemicals, many of which can interfere with their endocrine system, resulting in impaired reproduction, development or survival, among others. In order to analyze the effects and mechanisms of action of estrogen/anti-estrogen mixtures, we exposed male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for 48 hours via the water to 2, 5, 10, and 50 ng 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2)/L, 100 ng ZM 189,154/L (a potent antiestrogen known to block activity of estrogen receptors) or mixtures of 5 or 50 ng EE2/L with 100 ng ZM 189,154/L. We analyzed gene expression changes in the gonad, as well as hormone and vitellogenin plasma levels. Results Steroidogenesis was down-regulated by EE2 as reflected by the reduced plasma levels of testosterone in the exposed fish and down-regulation of genes in the steroidogenic pathway. Microarray analysis of testis of fathead minnows treated with 5 ng EE2/L or with the mixture of 5 ng EE2/L and 100 ng ZM 189,154/L indicated that some of the genes whose expression was changed by EE2 were blocked by ZM 189,154, while others were either not blocked or enhanced by the mixture, generating two distinct expression patterns. Gene ontology and pathway analysis programs were used to determine categories of genes for each expression pattern. Conclusion Our results suggest that response to estrogens occurs via multiple mechanisms, including canonical binding to soluble estrogen receptors, membrane estrogen receptors, and other mechanisms that are not blocked by pure antiestrogens. PMID:19594897

  14. Observed and modeled effects of pH on bioconcentration of diphenhydramine, a weakly basic pharmaceutical, in fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows were exposed to diphenhydramine (DPH), a weakly basic pharmaceutical (pKa = 9.1), to examine pH effects on uptake and accumulation. Fish were exposed to 10 ìg/L DPH in water for up to 96 h at three nominal pH levels: 6.7, 7.7, and 8.7. In each case, an appa...

  15. MULTIPLE EFFECTS OF ACID AND ALUMINUM ON BROOD STOCK AND OF FATHEAD MINNOWS, WITH EMPHASIS ON HISTOPATHOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirty-day-old fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, were reared at different pH values in softened Lake Superior water enriched with aluminum: H 7.5 - 35 ug Al/L, pH 5.5 - 30 ug Al/L, pH 5.2 - 35 and 60 ug Al/L, including a background level of 15 ug Al/L, and at pH 7.5, 6.0, 5.5...

  16. Induction and subcellular localization of two major stress proteins in response to copper in the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Sanders, B M; Nguyen, J; Martin, L S; Howe, S R; Coventry, S

    1995-11-01

    In the present study we characterize the stress response induced by copper in the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas. The fathead minnow epithelial cell line ATCC CCL 42 was used to examine the induced synthesis and subcellular localization of the two major stress proteins, stress 70 and cpn60. Western blot analysis demonstrated increased stress70 in cells exposed to 400 and 500 microM Cu. Two-dimensional analysis revealed three isoforms of stress70, one of 70 kDa and two of 72 kDa, at the highest Cu concentration. Chaperonin60 abundance did not change over the same range of Cu concentrations. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that stress70 localized in the cytoplasm, particularly in the paranuclear region. Chaperonin60 was localized in mitochondria. Further, when we examined the stress response elicited by Cu in fathead minnow larvae in vivo, we found that Cu induced the stress response at nominal Cu concentrations that were more than an order of magnitude lower that in the cell culture. This disparity between the concentration of Cu, which induced the stress response in cells in culture and in vivo, may be the result of differences in Cu complexation that alter its availability, uptake and toxicity. PMID:8838687

  17. Chronic toxicity of di-n-butyl and di-n-octyl phthalate to Daphnia magna and the fathead minnow

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.; Whitmore, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    The toxicities of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and di-n-octyl phthalate (DOP) were assessed by measuring the effect of exposure to these compounds on the fecundity of Daphnia magna and on the hatching and survival of the early life stages of the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas. For D. magna, exposure to 1.8 mg/L DBP or 1.0 mg/L DOP caused a significant reduction in reproduction. Doses of 0.56 mg/L DBP or 0.32 mg/L DOP had no significant effect in decreasing reproduction. Survival of fathead minnow embryos was decreased by exposure to 1.8 mg/L DBP; none of the embryos exposed to this dose hatched successfully. Hatching and larval survival were affected by exposure to 1.0 mg/L DBP, but not to 0.56 mg/L. Exposure to DOP did not affect survival of either early embryos or larvae of the fathead minnow at doses up to 10 mg/L (the highest dose tested). Hatching of the embryos was significantly decreased at 10 mg/L, but not at 3.2 mg/L DOP. 26 references, 4 figures, 11 tables.

  18. Comparison of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) as test species in the Fish Sexual Development Test (FSDT).

    PubMed

    Holbech, Henrik; Kinnberg, Karin L; Brande-Lavridsen, Nanna; Bjerregaard, Poul; Petersen, Gitte I; Norrgren, Leif; Orn, Stefan; Braunbeck, Thomas; Baumann, Lisa; Bomke, Christiane; Dorgerloh, Michael; Bruns, Eric; Ruehl-Fehlert, Christine; Green, John W; Springer, Timothy A; Gourmelon, Anne

    2012-03-01

    Results are presented from a validation (with 5 laboratories) of the Fish Sexual Development Test (FSDT) developed to detect endocrine disrupters (EDs) and included in the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) working program. The aromatase-inhibiting fungicide prochloraz was tested in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). The fish were exposed during sexual differentiation and development from 0 to 60 days post hatch (dph). After exposure, the vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations were quantified in head/tail homogenate and the sex ratio was determined (defined as female, male, intersex or undifferentiated). NOEC/LOEC and EC(x) designs were compared to optimize the test approach. Results show that both species are highly sensitive to prochloraz during sexual development. They respond by skewing of the sex ratio towards male phenotype and by a VTG decline in females. The NOEC/LOEC approach is preferred because sex ratio is difficult to analyze with a regression model. The mean NOEC/LOEC for prochloraz on the sex ratio was 43.3/134 μg/L and 101/293 μg/L for zebrafish and fathead minnow, respectively. The mean NOEC/LOEC on the decline in female VTG concentration was 65/110 μg/L and ~30/68 μg/L respectively. In conclusion, zebrafish and fathead minnow are suitable species in the FSDT and their sexual differentiation is equally labile to EDs. PMID:22115822

  19. Population dynamics, production, and prey consumption of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in prairie wetlands: A bioenergetics approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffy, W.G.

    1998-01-01

    I assessed the population dynamics of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in prairie wetlands and developed a bioenergetics model to estimate their production and prey consumption. I sampled populations in four wetlands weekly from late May through June and biweekly during July and August using a Kushlan 1-m2 throw trap. I imposed commercial harvest on two populations; the other two populations served as controls. Weekly population density estimates ranged from 52 000 to 356 000??ha-1 during early June and from 5400 to 19 700??ha-1 in late August. Simulated commercial harvest did not influence population density, mortality rates, or size of fathead minnows. Standing stock biomass differed among wetlands sampled, ranging from 144 to 482 kg??ha-1 in early June and from 1 to 33 kg??ha-1 during late August. However, differences were attributed to differential predation pressure rather than harvest pressure. Net production during the period ranged from 71.5 to 202.7 kg??ha-1. Daily net production was greatest in early June (2.6-13.5 kg??ha-1??day-1) and then declined during July and August (0.1-1.2 kg??ha-1??day-1). Total mass of prey consumed by fathead minnows ranged from 332.7-1104.8 kg??ha-1 among wetlands.

  20. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  1. Low level exposure to the flame retardant BDE-209 reduces thyroid hormone levels and disrupts thyroid signaling in fathead minnows

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Pamela D.; Lema, Sean C.; Macaulay, Laura J.; Douglas, Nora K.; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2013-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormone regulation, neurodevelopment, and reproduction in some animals. However, effects of the most heavily used PBDE, decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), on thyroid functioning remain unclear. This study examined low-dose effects of BDE-209 on thyroid hormone levels and signaling in fathead minnows. Adult males received dietary exposures of BDE-209 at a low dose (~3 ng/g bw-day) and high dose (~300 ng/g bw-day) for 28 days followed by a 14-day depuration to evaluate recovery. Compared to controls, fish exposed to the low dose for 28 days experienced a 53% and 46% decline in circulating total thyroxine (TT4) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (TT3), respectively, while TT4 and TT3 deficits at the high dose were 59% and 62%. Brain deiodinase activity (T4-ORD) was reduced by ~65% at both doses. BDE-209 elevated the relative mRNA expression of genes encoding deiodinases, nuclear thyroid receptors, and membrane transporters in the brain and liver in patterns that varied with time and dose, likely in compensation to hypothyroidism. Declines in the gonadal-somatic index (GSI) and increased mortality were also measured. Effects at the low dose were consistent with the high dose, suggesting non-linear relationships between BDE-209 exposures and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:23899252

  2. Short-term study investigating the estrogenic potency of diethylstilbesterol in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Adedeji, Olufemi B; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Kahl, Michael D; Jensen, Kathleen M; Lalone, Carlie A; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Perkins, Edward J; Thomas, Linnea; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T

    2012-07-17

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen that has been banned for use in humans, but still is employed in livestock and aquaculture operations in some parts of the world. Detectable concentrations of DES in effluent and surface waters have been reported to range from slightly below 1 to greater than 10 ng/L. Little is known, however, concerning the toxicological potency of DES in fish. In this study, sexually mature fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) of both sexes were exposed to 1, 10, or 100 ng of DES/L of water in a flow-through system. Tissue concentrations of DES and changes in a number of estrogen-responsive end points were measured in the fish at the end of a 4 d exposure and after a 4 d depuration/recovery period in clean water. Accumulation of DES was sex-dependent, with females exhibiting higher tissue residues than males after the 4 d exposure. The observed bioconcentration of DES in the fish was about 1 order of magnitude lower than that predicted on the basis of the octanol-water partition coefficient of the chemical, suggesting relatively efficient metabolic clearance by the fish. Exposure to 1, 10, or 100 ng of DES/L caused decreased testis weight and morphological demasculinization of males (regression of dorsal nuptial tubercles). Diethylstilbesterol induced plasma vitellogenin (VTG) in both sexes at water concentrations ≥10 ng/L; this response (especially in males) persisted through the end of the 4 d recovery period. Hepatic transcripts of VTG and estrogen receptor-α also were affected at DES concentrations ≥10 ng/L. Evaluation of transcript profiles in the liver of females using a 15K-gene fathead minnow microarray revealed a concentration-dependent change in gene expression, with mostly up-regulated transcripts after the exposure and substantial numbers of down-regulated gene products after depuration. Genes previously identified as vitellogenesis-related and regulated by 17β-estradiol were significantly enriched among those

  3. Development and validation of a direct homologous quantitative sandwich ELISA for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) vitellogenin.

    PubMed

    Eidem, Janne K; Kleivdal, Hans; Kroll, Kevin; Denslow, Nancy; van Aerle, Ronny; Tyler, Charles; Panter, Grace; Hutchinson, Tom; Goksøyr, Anders

    2006-06-15

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) is an established and sensitive endpoint for analysis of exposure to (anti-)oestrogens and their mimics in fish [Sumpter, J.P., 1995. Feminized responses in fish to environmental estrogens. Toxicol. Lett. 82, 737-742; Arukwe, A., Goksøyr, A., 2003. Eggshell and egg yolk proteins in fish: hepatic proteins for the next generation: oogenetic, population, and evolutionary implications of endocrine disruption. Comp. Hepatol. 2, 4. ]. In some instances, links have been drawn between high level induction of Vtg and adverse health effects in fish [Herman, R.L., Kincaide, H.L., 1988. Pathological effects of orally administered estradiol to rainbow trout. Aquaculture 72, 165-172; Schwaiger, J., Spieser, O.H., Bauer, C., Ferling, H., Mallow, U., Kalbfus, W., Negele, R.D., 2000. Chronic toxicity of nonylphenol and ethinyloestraiol: haematological and histopathological effects in juvenile common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Aquat. Toxicol. 51, 69-78]. The widespread use of Vtg as a biomarker has led to the development of a variety of assays to quantitatively measure Vtg concentrations in tissue samples from fish, and hence a need for a standardization of the performance criteria and validation of such assays [Goksøyr, A., Eidem, J.K., Kristiansen, S.I., Nilsen, B.M., 2003. On the need for a standardized set-up for validation studies of fish vitellogenin assays as an endpoint in endocrine disruptor testing and screening-a proposal. ]. One of the most popular test fish species for assessing chemical effects is the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), which is now used widely for studies into endocrine disruption [Panter, G.H., Hutchinson, T.H., Lange, R., Lye, C.M., Sumpter, J.P., Zerulla, M., Tyler, C.R., 2002. Utility of a juvenile fathead minnow screening assay for detecting (anti)estrogenic substances. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 21, 319-326; Hutchinson, T.H., Yokota, H., Hagino, S., Ozato, K., 2003. Development of fish tests for endocrine disruptors. Pure Appl

  4. Effects of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) density on the survival and growth of juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas): Implications for North American river fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, Cecil A.

    1996-01-01

    I used replicated 37.8 1 aquaria in a factorial design (four densities of zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha; two hydrologic regimes) to determine if the survival or growth of juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) was affected by the density of zebra mussel or by the retention time of the test system. None of the fathead minnows died during the 30-d experiment. However, growth of fathead minnows was lower (P0.05). These laboratory results suggest that juvenile fish survival will not be affected by low to moderate densities of mussels (0-3000 m super(-2)) but fish growth might be adversely affected at moderate densities of mussels (e.g., 3000 m super(-2)).

  5. Gene expression of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to two types of treated municipal wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dorsch, Doris E; Colli-Dula, R Cristina; Bay, Steven M; Greenstein, Darrin J; Wiborg, Lan; Petschauer, Dawn; Denslow, Nancy D

    2013-10-01

    Contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in treated municipal effluents have the potential to adversely impact exposed organisms prompting elevated public concern. Using transcriptomic tools, we investigated changes in gene expression and cellular pathways in the liver of male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to 5% concentrations of full secondary-treated (HTP) or advanced primary-treated (PL) municipal wastewater effluents containing CECs. Gene expression changes were associated with apical end points (plasma vitellogenin and changes in secondary sexual characteristics). Of 32 effluent CECs analyzed, 28 were detected including pharmaceuticals, personal care products, hormones, and industrial compounds. Exposure to both effluents produced significantly higher levels of plasma VTG and changes in secondary sexual characteristics (e.g., ovipositor development). Transcript patterns differed between effluents, with <10% agreement in the detected response (e.g., altered production of transcripts involved in xenobiotic detoxification, oxidative stress, and apoptosis were observed following exposure to both effluents). Exposure to PL effluent caused changes in transcription of genes involved in metabolic pathways (e.g., lipid transport and steroid metabolism). Exposure to HTP effluent affected transcripts involved in signaling pathways (e.g., focal adhesion assembly and extracellular matrix). The results suggest a potential association between some transcriptomic changes and physiological responses following effluent exposure. This study identified responses in pathways not previously implicated in exposure to complex chemical mixtures containing CECs, which are consistent with effluent exposure (e.g., oxidative stress) in addition to other pathway responses specific to the effluent type. PMID:23919544

  6. Fishy Aroma of Social Status: Urinary Chemo-Signalling of Territoriality in Male Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    PubMed Central

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Ekman, Drew R.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; James, Channing M.; Teng, Quincy; Collette, Timothy W.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical structures of several urinary reproductive pheromones in fish have been identified, and their role in the chemical communication of reproductive condition is well characterized. On the contrary, the role of chemical communication in signalling of social/territorial status in fish is poorly understood. Fathead minnows are an example of a fish species whose life history traits appear conducive to evolution of chemical communication systems that confer information about social/territorial status. Male reproduction in this species is dependent upon their ability to acquire and defend a high quality nesting territory, and to attract a female to the nest. We hypothesized that fathead minnow males use visual and urine-derived chemical cues to signal territorial status. To test this hypothesis, effects of territorial acquisition on male-specific secondary sex characteristics (SSCs) and urine volumes were first assessed. Second, frequencies of male urination in varying social contexts were examined. Finally, nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics was used to identify urinary metabolites that were differentially excreted in the urine of territorial versus non-territorial males. The expression of SSCs, sperm, and urine volumes increased with territory acquisition, and either remained unchanged or decreased in non-territorial males. Frequency of male urination increased significantly in the presence of females (but not males), suggesting that females are the main target of the urinary signals. Territorial and non-territorial males had distinct urinary metabolomic profiles. An unforeseen finding was that one could discern future territorial status of males, based on their initial metabolomic profiles. Bile acids and volatile amines were identified as potential chemical signals of social status in the fathead minnow. The finding that trimethylamine (a fishy smelling volatile amine) may be a social cue is particularly interesting, because it is known to bind trace

  7. Transcription of key genes regulating gonadal steroidogenesis in control and ketoconazole- or vinclozolin-exposed fathead minnows

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Blake, Lindsey S.; Brodin, Jeffrey; Greene, Katie J.; Knoebl, Iris; Miracle, Ann L.; Martinovic, Dalma; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-08-01

    This study evaluated changes in the expression of steroidogenesis-related genes in male fathead minnows exposed to ketoconazole (KTC) or vinclozolin (VZ) for 21 days. The aim was to evaluate links between molecular changes and higher level outcomes after exposure to endocrine-active chemicals (EACs) with different modes of action. To aid our analysis and interpretation of EAC-related effects, we first examined variation in the relative abundance of steroidogenesis-related gene transcripts in the gonads of male and female fathead minnows as a function of age, gonad development, and spawning status, independent of EAC exposure. Gonadal expression of several genes varied with age and/or gonadal somatic index in either males or females. However, with the exception of aromatase, steroidogenesis-related gene expression did not vary with spawning status. Following the baseline experiments, expression of the selected genes in male fathead minnows exposed to KTC or VZ was evaluated in the context of effects observed at higher levels of organization. Exposure to KTC elicited changes in gene transcription that were consistent with an apparent compensatory response to the chemical's anticipated direct inhibition of steroidogenic enzyme activity. Exposure to VZ, an antiandrogen expected to indirectly impact steroidogenesis, increased pituitary expression of follicle-stimulating hormone beta-subunit as well as testis expression of 20beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and luteinizing hormone receptor transcripts. Results of this study contribute to ongoing research aimed at understanding responses of the teleost hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis to different types of EACs and how changes in molecular endpoints translate into apical outcomes reflective of either adverse effect or compensation.

  8. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for disposition of 2,3,7,8-TCDD in fathead minnow and medaka.

    PubMed

    Parhizgari, Zahra; Li, James

    2014-05-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model was developed for the disposition of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) in 2 fish species--fathead minnow and medaka. The model was developed based on the empirical data on disposition of dioxins in fish tissues, as well as existing knowledge on the mechanisms of uptake, distribution, storage, and elimination of dioxins in various species (other than fish). The present study examined the applicability of mechanisms known to occur in other species for fish and concluded that the same mechanisms defined for disposition of 2,3,7,8-TCDD in (mostly) rodents can be applicable for the 2 fish species examined as well. Parameter values for the model were selected and/or calibrated using available databases. Model compartments included the gill, kidney, liver, and other richly-perfused tissues, as well as fat and other slowly-perfused tissues. The model was calibrated using 2 independent datasets for exposure of fathead minnow and medaka to 2,3,7,8-TCDD in water. The initial values of the model parameters were selected from several sources, and calibrated to represent the 2 exposure datasets. With very few exceptions, the estimated parameter values for the 2 species were comparable, and the final predictions were in strong agreement with the observations. The model developed in the present study can therefore be used in the prediction of the body burden of 2,3,7,8-TCDD in fathead minnow and medaka. Uncertainty in the model prediction as a result of variability in input parameters is discussed for the parameters with the highest impacts on the model outcome. PMID:24375498

  9. Fishy aroma of social status: urinary chemo-signalling of territoriality in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Ekman, Drew R; Villeneuve, Daniel L; James, Channing M; Teng, Quincy; Collette, Timothy W; Ankley, Gerald T

    2012-01-01

    Chemical structures of several urinary reproductive pheromones in fish have been identified, and their role in the chemical communication of reproductive condition is well characterized. On the contrary, the role of chemical communication in signalling of social/territorial status in fish is poorly understood. Fathead minnows are an example of a fish species whose life history traits appear conducive to evolution of chemical communication systems that confer information about social/territorial status. Male reproduction in this species is dependent upon their ability to acquire and defend a high quality nesting territory, and to attract a female to the nest. We hypothesized that fathead minnow males use visual and urine-derived chemical cues to signal territorial status. To test this hypothesis, effects of territorial acquisition on male-specific secondary sex characteristics (SSCs) and urine volumes were first assessed. Second, frequencies of male urination in varying social contexts were examined. Finally, nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics was used to identify urinary metabolites that were differentially excreted in the urine of territorial versus non-territorial males. The expression of SSCs, sperm, and urine volumes increased with territory acquisition, and either remained unchanged or decreased in non-territorial males. Frequency of male urination increased significantly in the presence of females (but not males), suggesting that females are the main target of the urinary signals. Territorial and non-territorial males had distinct urinary metabolomic profiles. An unforeseen finding was that one could discern future territorial status of males, based on their initial metabolomic profiles. Bile acids and volatile amines were identified as potential chemical signals of social status in the fathead minnow. The finding that trimethylamine (a fishy smelling volatile amine) may be a social cue is particularly interesting, because it is known to bind trace

  10. Natural Variation in Fish Transcriptomes: Comparative Analysis of the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong-Lin; Bencic, David C.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Perkins, Edward J.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Ankley, Gerald T.; Biales, Adam D.

    2014-01-01

    Fathead minnow and zebrafish are among the most intensively studied fish species in environmental toxicogenomics. To aid the assessment and interpretation of subtle transcriptomic effects from treatment conditions of interest, better characterization and understanding are needed for natural variation in gene expression among fish individuals from lab cultures. Leveraging the transcriptomics data from a number of our toxicogenomics studies conducted over the years, we conducted a meta-analysis of nearly 600 microarrays generated from the ovary tissue of untreated, reproductively mature fathead minnow and zebrafish samples. As expected, there was considerable batch-to-batch transcriptomic variation; this “batch-effect” appeared to differentially impact subsets of fish transcriptomes in a nonsystematic way. Temporally more closely spaced batches tended to share a greater transcriptomic similarity among one another. The overall level of within-batch variation was quite low in fish ovary tissue, making it a suitable system for studying chemical stressors with subtle biological effects. The observed differences in the within-batch variability of gene expression, at the levels of both individual genes and pathways, were probably both technical and biological. This suggests that biological interpretation and prioritization of genes and pathways targeted by experimental conditions should take into account both their intrinsic variability and the size of induced transcriptional changes. There was significant conservation of both the genomes and transcriptomes between fathead minnow and zebrafish. The high degree of conservation offers promising opportunities in not only studying fish molecular responses to environmental stressors by a comparative biology approach, but also effective sharing of a large amount of existing public transcriptomics data for developing toxicogenomics applications. PMID:25493933

  11. High diet overlap between native small-bodied fishes and nonnative fathead minnow in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seegert, Sarah E. Zahn; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.; Baxter, Colden V.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Hall, Robert O., Jr.; Cross, Wyatt F.

    2014-01-01

    River regulation may mediate the interactions among native and nonnative species, potentially favoring nonnative species and contributing to the decline of native populations. We examined food resource use and diet overlap among small-bodied fishes in the Grand Canyon section of the Colorado River as a first step in evaluating potential resource competition. We compared the diets of the predominant small-bodied fishes (native Speckled Dace Rhinichthys osculus, juvenile Flannelmouth Sucker Catostomus latipinnis, and juvenile Bluehead Sucker C. discobolus, and nonnative Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas) across seasons at four sites downstream of Glen Canyon Dam using nonmetric multidimensional scaling and Schoener's similarity index. The diets of these fishes included diatoms, amorphous detritus, aquatic invertebrates (especially simuliid and chironomid larvae), terrestrial invertebrates, and terrestrial vegetation. Diets varied with season and were affected by high turbidity. Fish consumed more amorphous detritus and terrestrial vegetation during the summer monsoon season (July–September), when turbidity was higher. The diets of all species overlapped, but there was large variation in the degree of overlap. The diets of juvenile suckers and Fathead Minnows were most similar, while Speckled Dace had relatively distinct diets. The differences took the form of higher proportions of diatoms and amorphous detritus in the diets of Bluehead Suckers and Fathead Minnows and higher proportions of simuliids and chironomids in those of Speckled Dace. If food resources are or become limiting, diet overlap suggests that competition may occur among native and nonnative species, which could have implications for the population dynamics of these fishes and for the management of the Colorado River ecosystem in Grand Canyon.

  12. Effects of acid and aluminum on swim bladder development and yolk absorption in the fathead minnow, pimephales promelas, (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Leino, R.L.; McCormick, J.H.; Jensen, K.M.

    1988-05-01

    Thirty-day old fathead minnows were raised to maturity and spawning in a laboratory flow-through system using softened water at various pH and Al levels. Successful spawnings were reduced by more than 85% at pH 6.0, 5.5-25 microg/L Al+3, and 5.5, and absent in all pH 5.2 treatments. Hatching success, larval survival, swim bladder development and yolk absorption were reduced or abnormal when spawning did occur at lower pHs.

  13. Larval exposure to environmentally relevant mixtures of alkylphenolethoxylates reduces reproductive competence in male fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bistodeau, T.J.; Barber, L.B.; Bartell, S.E.; Cediel, R.A.; Grove, K.J.; Klaustermeier, J.; Woodard, J.C.; Lee, K.E.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2006-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of nonylphenolethoxylate/octylphenolethoxylate (NPE/OPE) compounds in aquatic environments adjacent to wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) warrants an assessment of the endocrine disrupting potential of these complex mixtures on aquatic vertebrates. In this study, fathead minnow larvae were exposed for 64 days to a mixture of NPE/OPE, which closely models the NPE/OPE composition of a major metropolitan WWTP effluent. Target exposure concentrations included a total NPE/OPE mixture load of 200% of the WWTP effluent concentration (148 ??g/L), 100% of the WWTP effluent concentration (74 ??g/L) and 50% of the WWTP effluent concentration (38 ??g/L). The NPE/OPE mixture contained 0.2% 4-t-octylphenol, 2.8% 4-nonylphenol, 5.1% 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate, 9.3% 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate, 0.9% 4-t-octylphenolmonoethoxylate, 3.1% 4-t-octylphenoldiethoxylate, 33.8% 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxycarboxylate, and 44.8% 4-nonylphenoldiethoxycarboxylate. An additional exposure of 5 ??g/L 4-nonylphenol (nominal) was conducted. The exposure utilized a flow-through system supplied by ground water and designed to deliver consistent concentrations of applied chemicals. Following exposure, larvae were raised to maturity. Upon sexual maturation, exposed male fish were allowed to compete with control males in a competitive spawning assay. Nest holding ability of control and exposed fish was carefully monitored for 7 days. All male fish were then sacrificed and analyzed for plasma vitellogenin, developmental changes in gonadal tissues, alterations in the development of secondary sexual characters, morphometric changes, and changes to reproductive behavior. When exposed to the 200% NPE/OPE treatment most larvae died within the first 4 weeks of exposure. Both the 100% and 50% NPE/OPE exposures caused a significant decrease in reproductive behavior, as indicated by an inability of many of the previously exposed males to acquire and hold a nest site required for reproduction

  14. Early life-stage toxicity of eight pharmaceuticals to the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Overturf, M D; Overturf, C L; Baxter, D; Hala, D N; Constantine, L; Venables, B; Huggett, D B

    2012-04-01

    Human pharmaceuticals are routinely being detected in the environment, and there is growing concern about whether these drugs could elicit effects on aquatic organisms. Regulatory paradigms have shifted accordingly, with a greater emphasis on chronic toxicity data compared with acute data. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 210 Early Life Stage Test has been proposed as a good measure of the potential for pharmaceuticals to elicit chronic toxicity. To begin building a data set regarding the early life-stage toxicity of pharmaceuticals to fish, fathead minnows (FHM) were exposed to amiodarone, carbamazepine, clozapine, dexamethasone, fenofibrate, ibuprofen, norethindrone, or verapamil. Survival and growth were used to assess chronic toxicity in FHM at 28 days posthatch. Exposure of FHM to carbamazepine, fenofibrate, and ibuprofen resulted in no significant adverse effects at the concentrations tested. FHM survival was not impacted by verapamil exposure; however, growth was significantly decreased at 600 μg/L. Dexamethasone-exposed FHM showed a significant decrease in survival at a concentration of 577 μg/L; however, growth was not impacted at the concentration tested. Norethindrone exposure resulted in a significant decrease in survival and dry weight at 14.8 and 0.74 μg/L, respectively. Exposure to amiodarone and clozapine resulted in a significant decrease in survival and a significant increase in growth at concentrations of 1020 and 30.8 μg/L, respectively. Although the effect levels derived in this study are greater then concentrations observed in the environment, these data suggest that synthetic progestins may require additional research. PMID:22048524

  15. Effects of Ammonium Perchlorate on Thyroid Function in Developing Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Helen M.; Pickford, Daniel B.; Hutchinson, Thomas H.; Brown, J. Anne

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate is a known environmental contaminant, largely due to widespread military use as a propellant. Perchlorate acts pharmacologically as a competitive inhibitor of thyroidal iodide uptake in mammals, but the impacts of perchlorate contamination in aquatic ecosystems and, in particular, the effects on fish are unclear. Our studies aimed to investigate the effects of concentrations of ammonium perchlorate that can occur in the environment (1, 10, and 100 mg/L) on the development of fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas. For these studies, exposures started with embryos of < 24-hr postfertilization and were terminated after 28 days. Serial sectioning of thyroid follicles showed thyroid hyperplasia with increased follicular epithelial cell height and reduced colloid in all groups of fish that had been exposed to perchlorate for 28 days, compared with control fish. Whole-body thyroxine (T4) content (a measure of total circulating T4) in fish exposed to 100 mg/L perchlorate was elevated compared with the T4 content of control fish, but 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) content was not significantly affected in any exposure group. Despite the apparent regulation of T3, after 28 days of exposure to ammonium perchlorate, fish exposed to the two higher levels (10 and 100 mg/L) were developmentally retarded, with a lack of scales and poor pigmentation, and significantly lower wet weight and standard length than were control fish. Our study indicates that environmental levels of ammonium perchlorate affect thyroid function in fish and that in the early life stages these effects may be associated with developmental retardation. PMID:15811828

  16. Linking biomarkers to reproductive success of caged fathead minnows in streams with increasing urbanization.

    PubMed

    Crago, Jordan; Corsi, Steven R; Weber, Daniel; Bannerman, Roger; Klaper, Rebecca

    2011-03-01

    Reproductive and oxidative stress biomarkers have been recommended as tools to assess the health of aquatic organisms. Though validated in the laboratory, there are few studies that tie a change in gene expression to adverse reproductive or population outcomes in the field. This paper looked at 17 streams with varying degrees of urbanization to assess the use of biomarkers associated with reproduction or stress in predicting reproductive success of fathead minnows. In addition, the relationship between biomarkers and water quality measures in streams with varying degrees of urbanization was examined. Liver vitellogenin mRNA was correlated with reproduction within a period of 11d prior to sampling irrespective of habitat, but its correlation with egg output declined at 12d and beyond indicating its usefulness as a short-term biomarker but its limits as a biomarker of total reproductive output. Stress biomarkers such as glutathione S-transferase may be better correlated with factors affecting reproduction over a longer term. There was a significant correlation between GST mRNA and a variety of anthropogenic pollutants. There was also an inverse correlation between glutathione S-transferase and the amount of the watershed designated as wetland. Egg production over the 21-d was negatively correlated with the amount of urbanization and positively correlated to wetland habitats. This study supports the development of multiple biomarkers linking oxidative stress and other non-reproductive endpoints to changes in aquatic habitats will be useful for predicting the health of fish populations and identifying the environmental factors that may need mitigation for sustainable population management. PMID:21147497

  17. Direct Effects, Compensation, and Recovery in Female Fathead Minnows Exposed to a Model Aromatase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Mueller, Nathaniel D.; Martinović, Dalma; Makynen, Elizabeth A.; Kahl, Michael D.; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Durhan, Elizabeth J.; Cavallin, Jenna E.; Bencic, David; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Several chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. Objectives The objective of this study was to provide a detailed characterization of molecular and biochemical responses of female fathead minnows to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole (FAD). Methods Fish were exposed via water to 0, 3, or 30 μg FAD/L for 8 days and then held in clean water for 8 days, with samples collected at four time points during each 8-day period. We quantified ex vivo steroid production, plasma steroids, and plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) concentrations and analyzed relative transcript abundance of 10 key regulatory genes in ovaries and 3 in pituitary tissue by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Ex vivo 17β-estradiol (E2) production and plasma E2 and Vtg concentrations were significantly reduced after a single day of exposure to 3 μg or 30 μg FAD/L. However, plasma E2 concentrations recovered by the eighth day of exposure in the 3-μg/L group and within 1 day of cessation of exposure in the 30-μg/L group, indicating concentration- and time-dependent physiologic compensation and recovery. Concentration-dependent increases in transcripts coding for aromatase (A isoform), cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and follicle-stimulating hormone receptor all coincided with increased E2 production and recovery of plasma E2 concentrations. Conclusions Results of this research highlight the need to consider compensation/adaptation and recovery when developing and interpreting short-term bioassays or biomarkers or when trying to predict the effects of chemical exposures based on mode of action. PMID:19440503

  18. Linking biomarkers to reproductive success of caged fathead minnows in streams with increasing urbanization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crago, J.; Corsi, S.R.; Weber, D.; Bannerman, R.; Klaper, R.

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive and oxidative stress biomarkers have been recommended as tools to assess the health of aquatic organisms. Though validated in the laboratory, there are few studies that tie a change in gene expression to adverse reproductive or population outcomes in the field. This paper looked at 17 streams with varying degrees of urbanization to assess the use of biomarkers associated with reproduction or stress in predicting reproductive success of fathead minnows. In addition, the relationship between biomarkers and water quality measures in streams with varying degrees of urbanization was examined. Liver vitellogenin mRNA was correlated with reproduction within a period of 11. d prior to sampling irrespective of habitat, but its correlation with egg output declined at 12. d and beyond indicating its usefulness as a short-term biomarker but its limits as a biomarker of total reproductive output. Stress biomarkers such as glutathione S-transferase may be better correlated with factors affecting reproduction over a longer term. There was a significant correlation between GST mRNA and a variety of anthropogenic pollutants. There was also an inverse correlation between glutathione S-transferase and the amount of the watershed designated as wetland. Egg production over the 21-d was negatively correlated with the amount of urbanization and positively correlated to wetland habitats. This study supports the development of multiple biomarkers linking oxidative stress and other non-reproductive endpoints to changes in aquatic habitats will be useful for predicting the health of fish populations and identifying the environmental factors that may need mitigation for sustainable population management. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Propiconazole inhibits steroidogenesis and reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Skolness, Sarah Y; Blanksma, Chad A; Cavallin, Jenna E; Churchill, Jessica J; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Jensen, Kathleen M; Johnson, Rodney D; Kahl, Michael D; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T

    2013-04-01

    Conazoles are designed to inhibit cytochrome P450 (CYP) 14α-demethylase, an enzyme key to fungal cell wall formation. In vertebrates, conazoles may inhibit other CYPs, potentially disrupting processes like sex steroid synthesis. Propiconazole is a current-use pesticide that is among the first chemicals being tested in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency endocrine disruptor screening program. Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to 0, 5, 50, 500, or 1000 µg propiconazole/l in a 21-day study that evaluated apical reproductive endpoints (fecundity, fertility, hatch); measures of endocrine function and steroid synthesis, such as cholesterol, vitellogenin (VTG), and sex steroid (testosterone [T], 17β-estradiol [E2]) concentrations in the plasma; and changes in gonadal expression of steroidogenic genes. Plasma E2 and VTG concentrations in females were reduced by exposure to propiconazole, and egg production was decreased in the 500 and 1000 µg/l treatment groups. These in vivo effects coincided with inhibition of E2 synthesis by ovary explants exposed to propiconazole in vitro. We also observed a compensatory response in females exposed to propiconazole, manifested as increased gonad weight and upregulation of genes coding for key steriodogenic proteins, including CYP19 (aromatase), CYP17 (hydroxylase/lyase), CYP11A (cholesterol side-chain-cleavage), and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. Other than an increase in relative testis weight, effects on endocrine function in males were less pronounced than in females. This study provides important data relative to the potential endocrine activity of propiconazole in fish and, more generally, to the further delineation of pathways for the reproductive effects of steroid synthesis inhibitors in fish. PMID:23339182

  20. Transcriptional networks associated with 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) ovary.

    PubMed

    Ornostay, Anna; Marr, Joshua; Loughery, Jennifer R; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Androgens play a significant role in regulating oogenesis in teleost fishes. The androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is a potent non-aromatizable androgen involved in sexual differentiation in mammals; however, its actions are not well understood in teleost fish. To better characterize the physiological role of DHT in the fathead minnow (FHM) ovary on a temporal scale, in vitro assays for 17β-estradiol (E2) production were conducted in parallel with microarray analysis. Ovarian explants were incubated at different concentrations of DHT (10(-6), 10(-7), and 10(-8)M DHT) in three separate experiments conducted at 6, 9, and 12h. DHT treatment resulted in a rapid and consistent increase in E2 production from the ovary at all three time points. Therefore, DHT may act to shift the balance of metabolites in the steroidogenic pathway within the ovary. Major biological themes affected by DHT in the ovary in one or more of the time points included those related to blood (e.g. vasodilation, blood vessel contraction, clotting), lipids (e.g. lipid storage, cholesterol metabolism, lipid degradation) and reproduction (e.g. hormone and steroid metabolism). Gene networks related to immune responses and calcium signaling were also affected by DHT, suggesting that this androgen may play a role in regulating these processes in the ovary. This study detected no change in mRNA levels of steroidogenic enzymes (cyp19a1, star, 11βhsd, 17βhsd, srd5a isoforms), suggesting that the observed increase in E2 production is likely more dependent on the pre-existing gene or protein complement in the ovary rather than the de novo expression of transcripts. This study increases knowledge regarding the roles of DHT and androgens in general in the teleost ovary and identifies molecular signaling pathways that may be associated with increased E2 production. PMID:26344943

  1. Fathead minnow nidovirus infects spotfin shiner Cyprinella spiloptera and golden shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas.

    PubMed

    Baird, Ashley; Faisal, Mohamed

    2016-04-12

    Since the initial isolation of the fathead minnow nidovirus (FHMNV), concerns have been raised regarding the risks it may pose to other fish species. In this study, 7 fish species resident to the Laurentian Great Lakes were challenged intraperitoneally with 2 doses of FHMNV: 102.8 and 104.8 median tissue culture infective dose (TCID(50)) ml(-1). Infected spotfin shiner Cyprinella spiloptera and golden shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas suffered morbidity and mortality during the 40 d observation period, while other species, including creek chub Semotilus atromaculatus, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and walleye Sander vitreus, showed no clinical signs or mortality. FHMNV was re-isolated on the epithelioma papulosum cyprini cell line from the tissues of infected spotfin shiner and golden shiner, which harbored high numbers of viral RNA copies as measured by quantitative loop-mediated isothermal amplification. Infected spotfin shiner and golden shiner exhibited external petechiae, exophthalmia, oedematous kidneys, and liver pallor. Histopathological analysis revealed multifocal areas of necrosis in the kidney, spleen and liver of infected fish. Spotfin shiner and golden shiner were then infected with 2 doses of FHMNV (10(3.5) and 10(3.9) TCID(50) ml(-1)) by immersion to mimic more natural modes of infection. Spotfin shiner experienced 60% mortality at both doses, while golden shiner did not experience mortality nor develop any clinical signs following a 40 d observation period. Overall, piscivorous fish tested in this study do not seem to be at risk for infection, while cyprinids appear to vary in their susceptibility to the strain of FHMNV used in this study. PMID:27068501

  2. CHANGES IN GILL HISTOLOGY OF FATHEAD MINNOWS AND YELLOW PERCH TRANSFERRED TO SOFT WATER OR ACIDIFIED SOFT WATER WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO CHLORIDE CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and yellow perch, Perca flavescens, were transferred from moderately soft Lake Superior water (hardness similar to 45 mg/l as CaCO3) to very soft diluted Lake Superior water (hardness similar to 4.5 mg/l). Sulfuric acid was added in some trea...

  3. Effects of short time-course exposure to antiandrogen flutamide on steroidogenesis and gene expression in ovary of female fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the mechanisms through which antiandrogens disrupt reproduction in fish are not well-characterized, this work sought to identify genes and pathways affected by antiandrogen exposure, and to compare differentially expressed genes in the fathead minnow to those previously r...

  4. Sensitivity of walleye (Sander vitreus) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) early-life stages to naphthenic acid fraction components extracted from fresh oil sands process-affected waters.

    PubMed

    Marentette, Julie R; Frank, Richard A; Hewitt, L Mark; Gillis, Patricia L; Bartlett, Adrienne J; Brunswick, Pamela; Shang, Dayue; Parrott, Joanne L

    2015-12-01

    Unconventional oil production in Alberta's oil sands generates oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), which contains toxic constituents such as naphthenic acid fraction components (NAFCs). There have been few studies examining effects of NAFC exposure over long periods of early-life stage development in fish. Here we examined the effects of NAFCs extracted from OSPW to embryo-larval fathead minnow, exposed for 21 days. We compared the sensitivity of fathead minnow to walleye reared to 7 days post-hatch (18-20 days total). EC50s for hatch success, including deformities, and total survival were lower for walleye (10-11 mg/L) than fathead minnow (22-25 mg/L), with little post-hatch mortality observed in either species. NAFC exposure affected larval growth at concentrations below the EC50 in fathead minnow (total mass IC10 14-17 mg/L). These data contribute to an understanding of the developmental stages targeted by oil sands NAFCs, as well as their toxicity in a greater range of relevant taxa. PMID:26342575

  5. PREDICTION OF THE ACUTE TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMALAS) USING A GROUP CONTRIBUTION METHOD: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-CIN-1379 Martin**, T.M., and Young*, D.M. Prediction of the Acute Toxicity of Organic Compounds to the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promalas) using a Group Contribution Method. Chemical Research in Toxicology (Marnett, L.J. (Ed.), Washington, DC: American Chemical Society) 1...

  6. Pathogenesis of spring viremia of carp virus in emerald shiner Notropis atherinoides Rafinesque, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas Rafinesque and white sucker Catostomus commersonii (Lacepede).

    PubMed

    Misk, E; Garver, K; Nagy, E; Isaac, S; Tubbs, L; Huber, P; Al-Hussinee, L; Lumsden, J S

    2016-06-01

    Spring viremia of carp (SVC) is a reportable disease to the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE) as it is known to cause significant international economic impact. In Canada, the first and only isolation of SVC virus (SVCV) was in 2006, from common carp Cyprinus carpio L., at Hamilton Harbour, Lake Ontario. The susceptibility of fathead minnow Pimephales promelas Rafinesque, emerald shiner Notropis atherinoides Rafinesque and white sucker Catostomus commersonii (Lacepede) to intraperitoneal injection of the Canadian isolate (HHOcarp06) was evaluated using experimental infection, virus isolation, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Emerald shiner and fathead minnow were most susceptible with 43 and 53% cumulative mortality, respectively, compared with koi at 33%. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that koi had high viral loads throughout the experiment. At 34 days post-infection, SVCV was detected from sampled emerald shiner and white sucker in very low titre and was not detected from fathead minnow. Koi, fathead minnow and emerald shiner had gross lesions typical of SVC disease. The histopathological picture was mostly dominated by necrotic changes in kidney, spleen, liver, pancreas and intestine. IHC further confirmed SVCV infection, and staining was largely correlated with histological lesions. PMID:26411333

  7. A Method for the Determination of Genetic Sex in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas, to Support Testing of Endocrine-active Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows are used as a model fish species for the characterization of the endocrine-disrupting potential of environmental contaminants. This research describes the development of a PCR method that can determine the genetic sex in this species. This method, when incorpora...

  8. Field-Based Approach for Assessing the Impact of Treated Pulp and Paper Mill Effluent on Endogenous Metabolites of Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field-based metabolomic study was conducted during a shutdown of a pulp and paper mill (PPM) to assess the impacts of treated PPM effluent on endogenous polar metabolites in fathead minnow (FHM; Pimephales promelas) livers. Caged male and female FHMs were deployed at a Great La...

  9. Profiling Lipid Metabolites Yields Unique Information on Sex- and Time-dependent Responses of Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) Exposed to 17α-Ethynylestradiol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alterations in hepatic lipid profiles of fathead minnows (FHM) exposed to the synthetic estrogen 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) were determined using 1H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolite profiling. The exposures were conducted using either 10 ng/l or 100 ng/l EE2 via a continuous flo...

  10. CDNA CLONING OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN RECEPTORS FOR USE IN STEROID RECEPTOR EXTRAPOLATION STUDIES FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    cDNA Cloning of Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Estrogen and Androgen Receptors for Use in Steroid Receptor Extrapolation Studies for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.

    Wilson, V.S.1,, Korte, J.2, Hartig P. 1, Ankley, G.T.2, Gray, L.E., Jr 1, , and Welch, J.E.1. 1U.S...

  11. EFFECTS OF PHENOL, 2,4-DIMETHYLPHENOL, 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOL, AND PENTACHLOROPHENOL ON EMBRYO, LARVAL, AND EARLY-JUVENILE FATHEAD MINNOWS ('PIMEPHALES PROMELAS')

    EPA Science Inventory

    Embryos of fathead minnows were more resistant to phenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol (2,4-DMP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) than were larval or juvenile life stages. Growth of 28-day-old fish was the most sensitive indicator of stress during exposures to phe...

  12. EVALUATION OF THE MODEL ANTI-ANDROGEN FLUTAMIDE FOR ASSESSING THE MECHANISTIC BASIS OF RESPONSES TO AN ANDROGEN IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (JOURNAL ARTICLE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we characterized the effects of flutamide, a model mammalian androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, on endocrine function in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), a small fish species which is widely used for testing endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Binding a...

  13. Impacts of an Anti-Androgen and an Adrogen/Anti-Androgen Mixture on the Metabolite Profile of Male Fathead Minnow Urine

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male and female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas, FHM) were exposed via water to 20 or 200 μg/L of cyproterone acetate (CA), a model androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. FHM were also exposed to 500 ng/L of 17β-trenbolone (TB), a model AR agonist, and to mixtures of TB with bot...

  14. Computational Modeling of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis to Predict Adaptive Responses in Female Fathead Minnows Exposed to an Aromatase Inhibitor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We are developing a mechanistic computational model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict dose response and time-course...

  15. The effectiveness of flow-through and/or static copper sulfate treatments on the survival of Golden Shiners and Fathead Minnows infected with Flavobacterium columare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four studies were done comparing various treatments of copper sulfate (CuSO4) on the survival of golden shiner and fathead minnow (both economically important baitfish) that had columnaris disease. The treatments were observed for their ability to reduce mortality in well water. In experiment 1 an...

  16. Inference of chemicals that cause biological effects in treated pulp and paper mill effluent using gene expression in caged fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical chemistry techniques can identify chemicals present in the waters of the Great Lakes areas of concern, however it remains a challenge to identify those chemicals or classes of chemicals that actually cause adverse effects. Use of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales prome...

  17. CHRONIC EFFECTS OF LOW PH AND ELEVATED ALUMINUM ON SURVIVAL, MATURATION, SPAWNING AND EMBRYO-LARVAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW IN SOFT WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to a range of pH and A1 concentrations in soft water (8 mg Ca L-1) to determine effect levels at various life stages. The tested pH levels ranged from 8.0 through 5.2 and inorganic monomeric A1 from 15 through 60 ug L-1. Reproduc...

  18. Effects-based monitoring in the lower Green Bay/Fox River and Milwaukee Estuary Areas of Concern using caged Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the Great Lakes there is an increased focus on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and their potential effects on aquatic organisms, including adverse reproductive effects. To further characterize the utility of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for effects-b...

  19. Impacts of an Anti-androgen and an Androgen/anti-androgen Mixture on the Metabolite Profile of Male Fathead Minnow Urine

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male and female fathead minnows (FHM) were exposed via the water to cyproterone acetate (CA), a model androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. FHM were also exposed to 517b-trenbolone (TB), a model AR agonist, and to mixtures of TB with CA. The urine metabolite profile of male FHM ex...

  20. MODELLING IMPACTS ON POPULATIONS: FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) EXPOSURE TO THE ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR 17-B-TRENBOLONE AS A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of population-level impacts is critical to credible ecological risk assessments. In this study, a predictive model was developed to translate changes in fecundity of the fathead minnow in a short term laboratory toxicity test to alterations in population growth rate. T...

  1. Comparison of Chemical Binding to Recombinant Fathead minnow and Human Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) in Whole Cell and Cell-Free Assay Systems.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objectives were to assess whether binding of chemicals differs significantly between recombinant estrogen receptors from fathead minnow (fhERα) and human (hERα) and to evaluate the performance of these receptors using two different in vitro assay systems: a COS whole cell bin...

  2. The effectiveness of flow-through and/or static copper sulfate treatments on the survival of Golden Shiners and Fathead Minnows infected with Flavobacterium columare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four studies were done comparing various treatments of copper sulfate (CuSO4) on the survival of golden shiner and fathead minnow (both economically important baitfish) that had columnaris disease. The treatments were observed for their ability to reduce mortality in well water. In experiment 1 and ...

  3. Effects-based Monitoring with Caged Fathead Minnows: An Exposure Gradient Case Study in the Duluth-Superior Harbor, USA (SETAC meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the Great Lakes there is an increased focus on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and consideration of potential effects of chemical mixtures. To further characterize the utility of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for effects-based monitoring of CECs, we c...

  4. EVALUATION OF THE MODEL ANTI-ANDROGEN FLUTAMIDE FOR ASSESSING THE MECHANISTIC BASIS OF RESPONSES TO AN ANDROGEN IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we characterized the effects of flutamide, a model mammalian androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, on endocrine function in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), a small fish species which is widely used for testing endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Binding as...

  5. Progress Towards the Development of a Fathead Minnow Embryo Test and Comparison to the Zebrafish Embryo Test for Assessing Acute Fish Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Zebrafish Embryo Test (ZFET) for acute fish toxicity is a well developed method nearing adoption as an OECD Test Guideline. Early drafts of the test guideline (TG) envisioned a suite of potential test species to be covered including zebrafish, fathead minnow, Japanese Medaka...

  6. Early Life Stage Exposure to BDE-47 Causes Adverse Effects on Reproductive Success and Sexual Differentiation in Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Thornton, Leah M; Path, Elise M; Nystrom, Gunnar S; Venables, Barney J; Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K

    2016-07-19

    2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), a compound manufactured for use as a flame retardant, is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and suspected endocrine disruptor. Though several studies have explored the reproductive effects of BDE-47 in adult fish, there is a paucity of data regarding the reproductive effects of early life stage exposure. The goal of this study was to assess the reproductive effects of early life stage BDE-47 exposure in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). To achieve this, minnows were exposed to either a low (57.68 μg BDE-47/g Artemia) or high (392.59 μg BDE-47/g Artemia) dose of BDE-47 from fertilization to 34 days postfertilization (dpf) via a combination of maternal transfer and dietary exposure. Larvae were then raised on a clean diet until sexual maturity (∼184 dpf) when reproductive function was evaluated using a 21 day breeding study. Fish exposed to BDE-47 had significantly reduced clutch size and fecundity relative to controls. BDE-47 exposed groups also had female-biased sex ratios and exposed males had fewer tubercles. Overall, this study demonstrates that exposure to BDE-47 during early life stages can alter both sexual differentiation and reproductive function. PMID:27326452

  7. Levonorgestrel exposure to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) alters survival, growth, steroidogenic gene expression and hormone production.

    PubMed

    Overturf, Matthew D; Overturf, Carmen L; Carty, Dennis R; Hala, David; Huggett, Duane B

    2014-03-01

    Human pharmaceuticals are commonly detected in the environment. Concern over these compounds in the environment center around the potential for pharmaceuticals to interfere with the endocrine system of aquatic organisms. The main focus of endocrine disruption research has centered on how estrogenic and androgenic compounds interact with the endocrine system to elicit reproductive effects. Other classes of compounds, such as progestins, have been overlooked. Recently, studies have investigated the potential for synthetic progestins to impair reproduction and growth in aquatic organisms. The present study utilizes the OECD 210 Early-life Stage (ELS) study to investigate the impacts levonorgestrel (LNG), a synthetic progestin, on fathead minnow (FHM) survival and growth. After 28 days post-hatch, survival of larval FHM was impacted at 462 ng/L, while growth was significantly reduced at 86.9 ng/L. Further analysis was conducted by measuring specific endocrine related mRNA transcript profiles in FHM larvae following the 28 day ELS exposure to LNG. Transcripts of 3β-HSD, 20β-HSD, CYP17, AR, ERα, and FSH were significantly down-regulated following 28d exposure to 16.3 ng/L LNG, while exposure to 86.9 ng/L significantly down-regulated 3β-HSD, 20β-HSD, CYP19A, and FSH. At 2,392 ng/L of LNG, a significant down-regulation occurred with CYP19A and ERβ transcripts, while mPRα and mPRβ profiles were significantly induced. No significant changes occurred in 11β-HSD, CYP11A, StAR, LHβ, and VTG mRNA expression following LNG exposure. An ex vivo steroidogenesis assay was conducted with sexually mature female FHM following a 7 day exposure 100 ng/L LNG with significant reductions observed in pregnenolone, 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20-DHP), testosterone, and 11-ketotestosterone. Together these data suggest LNG can negatively impact FHM larval survival and growth, with significant alterations in endocrine related responses. PMID:24503577

  8. Oral Exposure of PBDE-47 in Fish: Toxicokinetics and Reproductive Effects in Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes) and Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, Elisabeth K.; Skillman, Ann D.; Hook, Sharon E.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2006-01-15

    The toxicokinetics of 2,2,4,4-tetrabromodipohenyl ether (PBDE-47) was studied in the Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes) after a single oral exposure followed by termination at specific time points. The effects of repeated oral exposure to PBDE-47 on reproductive performance was assessed using a pair breeding experimental design with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) given daily PBDE-47 exposures for 25 days, during which fecundity was measured as an indicator of reproductive performance. Medaka and fathead minnows were orally exposed to PBDE-47 by bioencapsulation in brine shrimp, Artemia sp. In the medaka studies, measurable levels of PBDE-47 were detected in the carcass within 0.25 hr with peak levels occurring at 8 hrs. The body levels of PBDE-47 slowly declined and were still 25% of peak levels at 624 hrs after dosing. Assimilation of the bioencapsulated dose was at least 80% and may well approach 100 %. The PBDE-47 concentration-time profile was fitted to a one-compartment clearance-volume toxicokinetic model and the model-predicted values for elimination half-life was determined to be 281 hrs and the first order absorption rate constant was (Ka) = 0.26 hr 1. In the fathead minnow study, egg laying in the PBDE-treated breeding pairs stopped after 10 days. The condition factor of PBDE-treated males was significantly reduced (P < 0.011) compared with control males, whereas no significant difference was observed in females. Histological examination revealed a greater than 50% reduction in mature sperm in PBDE-47 exposed minnows compared to controls. Collectively, these results suggest PBDE-47 is selectively toxic to sexually mature male fathead minnows.

  9. Gene expression profiles of Fathead minnows exposed to surface waters above and below a sewage treatment plant in Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Adelman, Ira; Liu, Li; Denslow, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Water treatment plants are often not effective in removing pharmaceuticals, personal care products or natural hormones from their effluents. To test the effects of these effluents on fish, we exposed male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for 48 hours to effluents at two sites, one up-stream and the other down-stream from a water treatment plant. Gene expression profiling showed that significant changes occurred in the gonad of fish exposed below, compared to above the treatment plant and to laboratory control fish. Among the biological processes affected were the innate immune response, response to stress, control of homeostasis, control of transcription, metabolism, and cell communication. This work suggests that fish are impacted by exposures to the sewage treatment effluents and effects can be detected rapidly by gene expression profiling. PMID:18417205

  10. Altered gene expression in the brain and liver of female fathead minnows Pimephales promelas Rafinesque exposed to fadrozole

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Knoebl, Iris; Larkin, Patrick; Miracle, Ann L.; Carter, Barbara J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2008-06-01

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a small fish species widely used for ecotoxicology research and regulatory testing in North America. This study used a novel 2000 gene oligonucleotide microarray to evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, on gene expression in the liver and brain tissue of exposed females. Exposure to 60 μg 1-1 fadrozole/L for 7 d, resulted in the significant (p<0.05; high-moderate agreement among multiple probes spotted on the array) up-regulation of approximately 47 genes in brain and 188 in liver, and the significant down-regulation of 61 genes in brain and 162 in liver. In particular, fadrozole exposure elicited significant up-regulation of five genes in brain involved in the cholesterol synthesis pathway and altered the expression of over a dozen cytoskeleton-related genes. In the liver, there was notable down-regulation of genes coding for vitellogenin precursors, vigillin, and fibroin-like ovulatory proteins which were consistent with an expected reduction in plasma estradiol concentrations as a result of fadrozole exposure and an associated reduction in measured plasma vitellogenin concentrations. These changes coincided with a general down-regulation of genes coding for non-mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and proteins that play a role in translation. With the exception of the fibroin-like ovulatory proteins, real-time PCR results largely corroborated the microarray responses. Overall, results of this study demonstrate the utility of high density oligonucleotide microarrays for unsupervised, discovery-driven, ecotoxicogenomics research with the fathead minnow and helped inform the subsequent development of a 22,000 gene microarray for the species.

  11. Statistical models to predict the toxicity of major ions to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows)

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, D.R.; Gulley, D.D.; Hockett, J.R.; Garrison, T.D.; Evans, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    Toxicity of fresh waters with high total dissolved solids has been shown to be dependent on the specific ionic composition of the water. To provide a predictive tool to assess toxicity attributable to major ions, the authors tested the toxicity of over 2,900 ion solutions using the daphnids, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna, and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Multiple logistic regression was used to relate ion composition to survival for each of the three test species. In general, relative ion toxicity was K{sup +} > HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} {approx} Mg{sup 2+} > Cl{sup {minus}} > SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}; Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} were not significant variables in the regressions, suggesting that the toxicity of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} salts was primarily attributable to the corresponding anion. For C. dubia and D. magna, toxicity of Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and K{sup +} was reduced in solutions enriched with more than one cation. Final regression models showed a good quality of fit to the data (R{sup 2} = 0.767--0.861). Preliminary applications of these models to field-collected samples indicated a high degree of accuracy for the C. dubia model, while the D. magna and fathead minnow models tended to overpredict ion toxicity. Studies of oil and gas produced waters, irrigation drain waters, shale oil leachates, sediment pore waters, and industrial process waters have shown toxicity caused by elevated concentrations of common ions.

  12. Genomic investigation of year-long and multigenerational exposures of fathead minnow to the munitions compound RDX.

    PubMed

    Gust, Kurt A; Brasfield, Sandra M; Stanley, Jacob K; Wilbanks, Mitchell S; Chappell, Pornsawan; Perkins, Edward J; Lotufo, Guilherme R; Lance, Richard F

    2011-08-01

    We assessed the impacts of exposure to an environmentally representative concentration (0.83 mg/L) of the explosive cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) on fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in one-year and multigenerational bioassays. In the one-year bioassay, impacts were assessed by statistical comparisons of females from breeding groups reared in control or RDX-exposure conditions. The RDX had no significant effect on gonadosomatic index or condition factor assayed at 1 d and at one, three, six, nine, and 12 months. The liver-somatic index was significantly increased versus controls only at the 12-month timepoint. RDX had no significant effect on live-prey capture rates, egg production, or fertilization. RDX caused minimal differential-transcript expression with no consistent discernable effect on gene-functional categories for either brain or liver tissues in the one-year exposure. In the multigenerational assay, the effects of acute (96 h) exposure to RDX were compared in fish reared to the F(2) generation in either control or RDX-exposure conditions. Enrichment of gene functions including neuroexcitatory glutamate metabolism, sensory signaling, and neurological development were observed comparing control-reared and RDX-reared fish. Our results indicated that exposure to RDX at a concentration representing the highest levels observed in the environment (0.83 mg/L) had limited impacts on genomic, individual, and population-level endpoints in fathead minnows in a one-year exposure. However, multigenerational exposures altered transcript expression related to neural development and function. Environ. PMID:21538488

  13. Accumulation and Debromination of Decabromodiphenyl Ether (BDE-209) in Juvenile Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) Induces Thyroid Disruption and Liver Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Pamela D.; Hinton, David E.; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2011-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants are known to affect thyroid hormone (TH) regulation. The TH-regulating deiodinases have been implicated in these impacts; however, PBDE effects on the fish thyroid system are largely unknown. Moreover, the liver as a potential target of PBDE toxicity has not been explored in young fish. This study measured decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) effects on TH regulation by measuring deiodinase activity in juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Dietary accumulations and debromination of BDE-209 were also measured, and the morphology of thyroid and liver tissues was examined. Juvenile fathead minnows (28 days old) received a 28-day dietary treatment of BDE-209 at 9.8 ± 0.16 μg/g of food at 5% of their body weight per day followed by a 14-day depuration period in which they were fed clean food. Chemical analysis revealed that BDE-209 accumulated in tissues and was metabolized to reductive products ranging from penta- to octaBDEs with 2,2′,4,4′,5,6′-hexabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-154) being the most accumulative metabolite. By day 28 of the exposure, rates of outer and inner ring deiodination (ORD and IRD, respectively) of thyroxine (T4) were each reduced by ∼74% among treatments. Effects on T4-ORD and T4-IRD remained significant even after the 14-day depuration period. Histological examination of treated fish showed significantly increased thyroid follicular epithelial cell heights and vacuolated hepatocyte nuclei. Enlarged biliary passageways may be the cause of the distinctive liver phenotype observed, although further testing is needed. Altogether, these results suggest that juvenile fish may be uniquely susceptible to thyroid disruptors like PBDEs. PMID:21546348

  14. In Silico analysis of perturbed steroidogenesis and gonad growth in fathead minnows (P. promelas) exposed to 17α-ethynylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Hala, David; Petersen, Lene H; Martinović, Dalma; Huggett, Duane B

    2015-06-01

    The multi-factorial nature of adverse reproductive effects mediated by endocrine disrupting compounds (or EDCs) makes understanding the mechanistic basis of reproductive dysfunction a highly pertinent area of research. As a consequence, a main motivator for continued research is to integrate 'multi-leveled' complexity (i.e., from genes to phenotype) using mathematical methods capable of encapsulating properties of physiological relevance. In this study, an in silico stoichiometric model of piscine steroidogenesis was augmented with a 'biomass' reaction associating the underlying stoichiometry of steroidogenesis with a reaction representative of gonad growth. The ability of the in silico model to predict perturbed steroidogenesis and subsequent effects on gonad growth was tested by exposing reproductively active male and female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to 88 ng/L of the synthetic estrogen, 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2). The in silico model was parameterized (or constrained) with experimentally quantified concentrations of selected steroid hormones (using mass spectrometry) and fold changes in gene expression (using RT-qPCR) for selected steroidogenic enzyme genes, in gonads of male and female fish. Once constrained, the optimization framework of flux balance analysis (FBA) was used to calculate an optimal flux through the biomass reaction (analogous to gonad growth) and associated steroidogenic flux distributions required to generate biomass. FBA successfully predicted effects of EE2 exposure on fathead minnow gonad growth (%gonadosomatic index or %GSI) and perturbed production of steroid hormones. Specifically, FBA accurately predicted no effects of exposure on male %GSI and a significant reduction for female %GSI. Furthermore, in silico simulations accurately identified disrupted reaction fluxes catalyzing productions of androgens (in male fish) and progestogens (in female fish), an observation which agreed with in vivo experimentation. The analyses

  15. Impacts of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid aquatic herbicide formulations on reproduction and development of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    DeQuattro, Zachary A; Karasov, William H

    2016-06-01

    The authors studied the effects of 2 formulations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, dimethylamine salt (2,4-D) herbicide on fathead minnow reproduction, embryonic development, and larval survival. Groups of reproductively mature fathead minnows were exposed for 28 d to 0.00 ppm, 0.05 ppm, 0.50 ppm, and 2.00 ppm 2,4-D (target) in a flow-through system. Weedestroy® AM40 significantly (p ≤ 0.05) depressed male tubercle presence and significantly increased female gonadosomatic index, and there were statistical trends (0.05 ≤ p ≤ 0.10) for effects on fecundity and hepatic vitellogenin mRNA expression in females and males. The herbicide DMA® 4 IVM also significantly depressed male tubercle presence. Gonads of females exposed to DMA 4 IVM exhibited significantly depressed stage of oocyte maturation, significantly increased severity of oocyte atresia, and a significant presence of an unidentified tissue type. Also, DMA 4 IVM significantly decreased larval survival. It had no impact on hepatic vitellogenin mRNA expression or gonadosomatic index. No significant effects on fertilization, hatchability, or embryonic development were observed in either trial. The formulations tested exhibited different toxicological profiles from pure 2,4-D. These data suggest that the formulations have the potential for endocrine disruption and can exert some degree of chronic toxicity. The present use of 2,4-D formulations in lake management practices and their permitting based on the toxicological profile of 2,4-D pure compound should be reconsidered. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1478-1488. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26510165

  16. Examining waterborne and dietborne routes of exposure and their contribution to biological response patterns in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Rozon-Ramilo, Lisa D; Dubé, Monique G; Squires, Allison J; Niyogi, Som

    2011-10-01

    The objectives of the current study were: (i) to gain a better understanding of the relative importance of water and diet as routes of exposure causing toxicity in fathead minnow (FHM) exposed to metal mining effluents (MME) using a full factorial water/food experimental design (Experiment 1), and (ii) to assess differences in the effects of food quality on toxicity by comparing FHM fed both a live and frozen diet of Chironomus dilutus (Experiment 2). The results showed significant increases in general water quality parameters (e.g., hardness, conductivity) and various metals in the effluent treatment waters compared to control waters, with maximum increase seen in the multi-trophic streams. Metals accumulation (Rb, Al, Se, Sr, Tl, Ce, Co, Cu, Pb) effects of both waterborne and multi-trophic exposures were significant in one or more fathead minnow tissue type (muscle, gonads, liver, larvae) relative to those in the control systems. Condition factor and liver somatic index (LSI) of FHM were also significantly affected in both exposures by one or both routes of exposure (water and/or diet). In addition, cumulative total egg production and cumulative spawning events were significantly affected by both waterborne and dietborne exposures, with maximum effect found in the multi-trophic streams. These results suggest that under environmentally relevant exposure conditions, trophic transfer of metals may lead to greater reproductive effects and increased metal toxicity in fish. It also indicates that metals are assimilated in tissues differently depending on the quality of the food (live vs. frozen). Overall, it appears that the multi-trophic bioassay provides an important link between the laboratory and field, which may allow for a more realistic assessment of the true impact of MME's in the environment. PMID:21888872

  17. Fathead minnow response to broad-range exposure of β-sitosterol concentrations during life-cycle testing.

    PubMed

    Flinders, Camille A; Streblow, William R; Philbeck, Raymond E; Cook, Diana L; Campbell, David E; Brown-Peterson, Nancy J; Gross, Timothy S

    2014-02-01

    The β-sitosterol concentration in pulp and paper mill effluents is typically greater than that of other phytosterols and has been shown to cause a variety of effects in fish. The authors exposed fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to low (22 ± 0.93 µg/L), medium-low (70 ± 2.1 µg/L), medium-high (237 ± 5.5 µg/L), and high (745 ± 16.2 µg/L) concentrations of β-sitosterol as well as negative (water), positive (ethynyl estradiol, 16 ± 0.58 ng/L), and carrier (0.6 mL/L acetone) controls. Fish were monitored over a full life cycle for population-level endpoints including growth and survival, reproductive endpoints (e.g. fecundity, sex steroids and vitellogenin, gonado-/hepatosomatic indices, and gonad histology). No significant differences were seen in fish growth, mortality, or reproduction with β-sitosterol exposure, although a trend for lower egg production in β-sitosterol exposures relative to the water control may be related to the acetone carrier. All ethynyl estradiol-exposed fish were smaller, showed female characteristics, and did not spawn. Sex steroid and vitellogenin were highly variable with no detectable treatment-related differences. Gonadal tissue showed no β-sitosterol-related differences in reproductive development and spawning capability, although most ethynyl estradiol-exposed males had ovarian tissue and were not spawning-capable. The results indicate that β-sitosterol exposure had little apparent impact on fathead minnow survival, growth, and reproduction even at concentrations >10 times that of typical effluents, although small sample size and variability precluded fully evaluating treatment responses on sex steroids and vitellogenin. PMID:24173772

  18. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of October 21--28, 1993. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Due to serious reproduction/embryo abortion problems with the TVA daphnid cultures, TVA conducted tests during this study period using only fathead minnows. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Poplar Creek Mile 2.9, Mile 4.3, and Mile 5.1 on October 20, 22, and 25. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) in testing conducted by TVA. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; and Reference toxicant test information.

  19. Reproductive responses of male fathead minnows exposed to wastewater treatment plant effluent, effluent treated with XAD8 resin, and an environmentally relevant mixture of alkylphenol compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.; Lee, K.E.; Swackhamer, D.L.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2007-01-01

    On-site, continuous-flow experiments were conducted during August and October 2002 at a major metropolitan wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) to determine if effluent exposure induced endocrine disruption as manifested in the reproductive competence of sexually mature male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). The fathead minnows were exposed in parallel experiments to WWTP effluent and WWTP effluent treated with XAD8 macroreticular resin to remove the hydrophobic-neutral fraction which contained steroidal hormones, alkylphenolethoxylates (APEs), and other potential endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). The effluent composition varied on a temporal scale and the continuous-flow experiments captured the range of chemical variability that occurred during normal WWTP operations. Exposure to WWTP effluent resulted in vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows, with greater response in October than in August. Concentrations of ammonia, APEs, 17??-estradiol, and other EDCs also were greater in October than in August, reflecting a change in effluent composition. In the October experiment, XAD8 treatment significantly reduced vitellogenin induction in the male fathead minnows relative to the untreated effluent, whereas in August, XAD8 treatment had little effect. During both experiments, XAD8 treatment removed greater than 90% of the APEs. Exposure of fish to a mixture of APEs similar in composition and concentration to the WWTP effluent, but prepared in groundwater and conducted at a separate facility, elicited vitellogenin induction during both experiments. There was a positive relation between vitellogenin induction and hepatosomatic index (HSI), but not gonadosomatic index (GSI), secondary sexual characteristics index (SSCI), or reproductive competency. In contrast to expectations, the GSI and SSCI increased in males exposed to WWTP effluent compared to groundwater controls. The GSI, SSCI, and reproductive competency were positively affected by XAD8 treatment of

  20. Reproductive responses of male fathead minnows exposed to wastewater treatment plant effluent, effluent treated with XAD8 resin, and an environmentally relevant mixture of alkylphenol compounds.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larry B; Lee, Kathy E; Swackhamer, Deborah L; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2007-04-20

    On-site, continuous-flow experiments were conducted during August and October 2002 at a major metropolitan wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) to determine if effluent exposure induced endocrine disruption as manifested in the reproductive competence of sexually mature male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). The fathead minnows were exposed in parallel experiments to WWTP effluent and WWTP effluent treated with XAD8 macroreticular resin to remove the hydrophobic-neutral fraction which contained steroidal hormones, alkylphenolethoxylates (APEs), and other potential endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). The effluent composition varied on a temporal scale and the continuous-flow experiments captured the range of chemical variability that occurred during normal WWTP operations. Exposure to WWTP effluent resulted in vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows, with greater response in October than in August. Concentrations of ammonia, APEs, 17beta-estradiol, and other EDCs also were greater in October than in August, reflecting a change in effluent composition. In the October experiment, XAD8 treatment significantly reduced vitellogenin induction in the male fathead minnows relative to the untreated effluent, whereas in August, XAD8 treatment had little effect. During both experiments, XAD8 treatment removed greater than 90% of the APEs. Exposure of fish to a mixture of APEs similar in composition and concentration to the WWTP effluent, but prepared in groundwater and conducted at a separate facility, elicited vitellogenin induction during both experiments. There was a positive relation between vitellogenin induction and hepatosomatic index (HSI), but not gonadosomatic index (GSI), secondary sexual characteristics index (SSCI), or reproductive competency. In contrast to expectations, the GSI and SSCI increased in males exposed to WWTP effluent compared to groundwater controls. The GSI, SSCI, and reproductive competency were positively affected by XAD8 treatment of

  1. Development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) gonadotropin ß subunit mRNAs to support endocrine disruptor research.

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Degitz, Sigmund J.; Kahl, Michael D.; Korte, Joseph J.; Greene, Katie J.; Blake, Lindsey S.; Linnum, Ann; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-03-01

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are one of the most widely-used small fish models for regulatory ecotoxicology testing and research related to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In this study, we isolated and sequenced cDNAs for fathead minnow follicle-stimulating hormone-like and luteinizing hormone-like β (FSHβ and LHβ) and glycoprotein α (GPα) subunits. Quantitative real-time PCR assays for measuring gonadotropin (GtH) β subunit transcripts were developed and used to examine “baseline” transcript levels over a range of age classes and reproductive states encompassed in EDC testing. In females, FSHβ and LHβ transcripts were greater in 4-5 month old than in younger fish and were significantly correlated with one another across all age classes examined. In males, FSHβ transcripts were greatest in 2-3 month old fish and were inversely correlated with various measures of testis development including, gonadal-somatic index (GSI), and histological stage. Overall, the pattern of GtHβ expression over age classes associated with gonad development was similar to that reported for other asynchronous-spawning fish. Despite significant changes in female GSI, gonad stage, and plasma vitellogenin within 24 h of spawning, GtHβ transcript levels in fish that had spawned within the preceding 24 h were not significantly different from those in fish that were 2-3 days post-spawn and expected to spawn within the next 24 h based on spawning history. Results of this study provide insights related to the role of GtHs in fathead minnow reproductive development and function. Additionally they provide useful “baseline” data needed to design and interpret effective experiments for studying direct and indirect effects of EDCs on GtH subunit mRNA expression, which will facilitate a greater understanding of integrated system-wide responses of the fathead minnow brain-pituitary-gonadal axis to stressors including EDCs.

  2. Estimating the effects of 17α-ethinylestradiol on stochastic population growth rate of fathead minnows: a population synthesis of empirically derived vital rates.

    PubMed

    Schwindt, Adam R; Winkelman, Dana L

    2016-09-01

    Urban freshwater streams in arid climates are wastewater effluent dominated ecosystems particularly impacted by bioactive chemicals including steroid estrogens that disrupt vertebrate reproduction. However, more understanding of the population and ecological consequences of exposure to wastewater effluent is needed. We used empirically derived vital rate estimates from a mesocosm study to develop a stochastic stage-structured population model and evaluated the effect of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the estrogen in human contraceptive pills, on fathead minnow Pimephales promelas stochastic population growth rate. Tested EE2 concentrations ranged from 3.2 to 10.9 ng L(-1) and produced stochastic population growth rates (λ S ) below 1 at the lowest concentration, indicating potential for population decline. Declines in λ S compared to controls were evident in treatments that were lethal to adult males despite statistically insignificant effects on egg production and juvenile recruitment. In fact, results indicated that λ S was most sensitive to the survival of juveniles and female egg production. More broadly, our results document that population model results may differ even when empirically derived estimates of vital rates are similar among experimental treatments, and demonstrate how population models integrate and project the effects of stressors throughout the life cycle. Thus, stochastic population models can more effectively evaluate the ecological consequences of experimentally derived vital rates. PMID:27372448

  3. Predator avoidance performance of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) following short-term exposure to estrogen mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, M.R.; Julius, M.L.; Vajda, A.M.; Norris, D.O.; Barber, L.B.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2009-01-01

    Aquatic organisms exposed to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) at early life-stages may have reduced reproductive fitness via disruption of reproductive and non-reproductive behavioral and physiological pathways. Survival to reproductive age relies upon optimal non-reproductive trait expression, such as adequate predator avoidance responses, which may be impacted through EDC exposure. During a predator–prey confrontation, larval fish use an innate C-start escape behavior to rapidly move away from an approaching threat. We tested the hypotheses that (1) larval fathead minnows exposed to estrogens, a primary class of EDCs, singularly or in mixture, suffer a reduced ability to perform an innate C-start behavior when faced with a threat stimulus; (2) additive effects will cause greater reductions in C-start behavior; and (3) effects will differ among developmental stages. In this study, embryos (post-fertilization until hatching) were exposed for 5 days to environmentally relevant concentrations of estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) singularly and in mixture. Exposed embryos were allowed to hatch and grow in control well water until 12 days old. Similarly, post-hatch fathead minnows were exposed for 12 days to these compounds. High-speed (1000 frames/s) video recordings of escape behavior were collected and transferred to National Institutes of Health Image for frame-by-frame analysis of latency period, escape velocity, and total escape response (combination of latency period and escape velocity). When tested 12 days post-hatch, only E1 adversely affected C-start performance of larvae exposed as embryos. Conversely, larvae exposed for 12 days post-hatch did not exhibit altered escape responses when exposed to E1, while adverse responses were seen in E2 and the estrogen mixture. Ethinylestradiol exposure did not elicit changes in escape behaviors at either developmental stage. The direct impact of reduced C-start performance on

  4. Impaired anterior swim bladder inflation following exposure to the thyroid peroxidase inhibitor 2-mercaptobenzothiazole part I: Fathead minnow.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Krysta R; Schroeder, Anthony L; Ankley, Gerald T; Blackwell, Brett R; Blanksma, Chad; Degitz, Sigmund J; Flynn, Kevin M; Jensen, Kathleen M; Johnson, Rodney D; Kahl, Michael D; Knapen, Dries; Kosian, Patricia A; Milsk, Rebecca Y; Randolph, Eric C; Saari, Travis; Stinckens, Evelyn; Vergauwen, Lucia; Villeneuve, Daniel L

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, a hypothesized adverse outcome pathway linking inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity to impaired swim bladder inflation was investigated in two experiments in which fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT). Continuous exposure to 1mg MBT/L for up to 22 days had no effect on inflation of the posterior chamber of the swim bladder, which typically inflates around 6 days post fertilization (dpf), a period during which maternally-derived thyroid hormone is presumed to be present. In contrast, inflation of the anterior swim bladder, which occurs around 14dpf, was impacted. Specifically, at 14dpf, approximately 50% of fish exposed to 1mg MBT/L did not have an inflated anterior swim bladder. In fish exposed to MBT through 21 or 22dpf, the anterior swim bladder was able to inflate, but the ratio of the anterior/posterior chamber length was significantly reduced compared to controls. Both abundance of thyroid peroxidase mRNA and thyroid follicle histology suggest that fathead minnows mounted a compensatory response to the presumed inhibition of TPO activity by MBT. Time-course characterization showed that fish exposed to MBT for at least 4 days prior to normal anterior swim bladder inflation had significant reductions in anterior swim bladder size, relative to the posterior chamber, compared to controls. These results, along with similar results observed in zebrafish (see part II, this issue) are consistent with the hypothesis that thyroid hormone signaling plays a significant role in mediating anterior swim bladder inflation and development in cyprinids, and that role can be disrupted by exposure to thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitors. Nonetheless, possible thyroid-independent actions of MBT on anterior swim bladder inflation cannot be ruled out based on the present results. Overall, although anterior swim bladder inflation has not been directly linked to survival as posterior swim bladder inflation

  5. EFFECTS OF HANDLING ON ENDOCRINOLOGY AND REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term (21-d) reproductive toxicity test with the fatheadt minnow (Pimephales promelas) has been proposed as a standard method for identifying certain classes of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). A potentially useful route of chemical exposure for the test is intraperi...

  6. Influence of prey type on nickel and thallium assimilation, subcellular distribution and effects in juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Dominique; Gentès, Sophie; Ponton, Dominic E; Hare, Landis; Couture, Patrice

    2009-11-15

    Because fish take up metals from prey, it is important to measure factors controlling metal transfer between these trophic levels so as to explain metal bioaccumulation and effects in fish. To achieve this, we exposed two types of invertebrates, an oligochaete (Tubifex tubifex) and a crustacean (Daphnia magna), to environmentally relevant concentrations of two important contaminants, nickel (Ni) and thallium (Tl), and fed these prey to juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). We then measured the assimilation efficiency (AE), subcellular distribution and effects of these metals in fish. Fish assimilated dietary Tl more efficiently from D. magna than from T. tubifex, and more efficiently than Ni, regardless of prey type. However, the proportion of metal bound to prey subcellular fractions that are likely to be trophically available (TAM) had no significant influence on the efficiency with which fish assimilated Ni or Tl. In fish, the majority of their Ni and Tl was bound to subcellular fractions that are purportedly detoxified, and prey type had a significant influence on the proportion of detoxified Ni and Tl in fish. We measured higher activities of cytochrome C oxidase and glutathione S-transferase in fish fed D. magna compared to fish fed T. tubifex, regardless of the presence or absence of Ni or Tl in prey. However, we measured decreased activities of glutathione S-transferase and nucleoside diphosphate kinase in fish fed Tl-contaminated D. magna compared to fish from the three other treatment levels. PMID:20028068

  7. Evaluation of potential mechanisms of atrazine-induced reproductive impairment in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Cathy; Papoulias, Diana M.; Whyte, Jeffrey J.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Atrazine has been implicated in reproductive dysfunction of exposed organisms, and previous studies documented decreased egg production in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) during 30-d to 38-d exposures to 0.5 µg/L, 5 µg/L, and 50 µg/L atrazine. The authors evaluated possible mechanisms underlying the reduction in egg production. Gene expression in steroidogenesis pathways and the hypothalamus–pituitary–gonad axis of male and female fish was measured. Atrazine did not significantly induce gonad aromatase (cyp19a1a) expression. An atrazine-induced shift in the number of females in an active reproductive state was observed. Expression of the egg maturation genes vitellogenin 1 (vtg1) and zona pellucida glycoprotein 3.1 (zp3.1) in medaka females was correlated and had a bimodal distribution. In both species, females with low vtg1 or zp3.1 expression also had low expression of steroidogenesis genes in the gonad, estrogen receptor in the liver, and gonadotropins in the brain. In the medaka, the number of females per tank that had high expression of zp3.1 was significantly correlated with egg production per tank. The number of medaka females with low expression of zp3.1 increased significantly with atrazine exposure. Thus, the decline in egg production observed in response to atrazine exposure may be the result of a coordinated downregulation of genes required for reproduction in a subset of females.

  8. Dactylogyrus olfactorius n. sp. (Monogenea, Dactylogyridae) from the olfactory chamber of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas Rafinesque (Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Lari, Ebrahim; Adams, Rachael V; Cone, David K; Goater, Cameron P; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-07-01

    Dactylogyrus olfactorius n. sp. (Monogenea) is described from the olfactory chamber of the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas Rafinesque in Alberta, Canada. The new species resembles Dactylogyrus bychowskyi Mizelle, 1937, D. bifurcatus Mizelle, 1937 and D. simplexus Mizelle, 1937, all parasites of Pimephales spp. in North America, in overall size and shape of the anchors and hooks, and in having a male copulatory complex with a tapered tubular penis and bifurcate accessory piece. Diagnostically, D. olfactorius n. sp. has relatively small anchors, hooks of anchor length, and a thin, long dorsal bar and no apparent ventral bar nor 4A hooks. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the body tegument of D. olfactorius n. sp. to be microvillous and in shallow annular folds, while that of D. bifurcatus, occurring on host gills of the same fish, was avillous and in gill-like folds dorsally and ventrally. Partial 28S rDNA sequences revealed significant differences between the two species, supporting establishment of D. olfactorius n. sp. and dispelling the possibility of ecophenotypic effects of site of attachment on morphology. PMID:27307170

  9. QSTR studies regarding the ECOSAR toxicity of benzene-carboxylic acid' esters to fathead minnow fish (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Tarko, Laszlo; Putz, Mihai V; Ionascu, Cosmin; Putz, Ana-Maria

    2014-01-01

    The present work employs 152 benzene-carboxylic acid' esters having computed the toxicity within the range [2.251, 10.222] for fathead minnow fish (Pimephales promelas). Calibration set includes many pairs having very similar chemical structure, size, shape and hydrophilicity, but very different value of ECOSAR toxicity or vice versa. The QSTR study, which uses all esters as calibration set, emphasized a large percent (16.2%) of outliers. In this QSTR study most of the estimated values of toxicity for outliers are much lower than ECOSAR toxicity. The LogP and some aromaticity descriptors are predictors. The best QSTR for esters having low value (< 5.5) of ECOSAR toxicity and the best QSTR for esters having high value (> 5.5) of ECOSAR toxicity are obtained when the number of outliers is very small. These QSTRs are different enough and highlight opposite influences of certain descriptors on toxicity. The results emphasize two possibilities: (a) the esters having low value of ECOSAR toxicity and the esters having high value of ECOSAR toxicity are included in two different classes from the point of view of structure-toxicity relationship and/or (b) many high values of ECOSAR toxicity are wrong. By comparison, a QSTR using experimental values of toxicity against rats for 37 benzene-carboxylic esters included in the same database gives good correlation experimental/computed values of toxicity, the number of outliers is null and the result of validation test is good. PMID:24724900

  10. Triclosan impairs swimming behavior and alters expression of excitation contraction coupling proteins in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Erika B.; Connon, Richard E.; Werner, Inge; Davies, Rebecca; Beggel, Sebastian; Feng, Wei; Pessah, Isaac N.

    2013-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS), a high volume chemical widely used in consumer products, is a known aquatic contaminant found in fish inhabiting polluted watersheds. Mammalian studies have recently demonstrated that TCS disrupts signaling between the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), two proteins essential for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in striated muscle. We investigated the swimming behavior and expression of EC coupling proteins in larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to TCS for up to 7 days (d). Concentrations as low as 75μg L−1 significantly altered fish swimming activity after 1d; which was consistent after 7d of exposure. The mRNA transcription and protein levels of RyR and DHPR (subunit CaV1.1) isoforms changed in a dose and time dependent manner. Crude muscle homogenates from exposed larvae did not display any apparent changes in receptor affinity toward known radioligands. In non-exposed crude muscle homogenates, TCS decreased the binding of [3H]PN200-110 to the DHPR and decreased the binding of [3H]-ryanodine to the RyR, demonstrating a direct impact at the receptor level. These results support TCS’s impact on muscle function in vertebrates further exemplifying the need to re-evaluate the risks this pollutant poses to aquatic environments. PMID:23305567

  11. Predicting Fecundity of Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) Exposed to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals Using a MATLAB®-Based Model of Oocyte Growth Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Karen H.; Mayo, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fish spawning is often used as an integrated measure of reproductive toxicity, and an indicator of aquatic ecosystem health in the context of forecasting potential population-level effects considered important for ecological risk assessment. Consequently, there is a need for flexible, widely-applicable, biologically-based models that can predict changes in fecundity in response to chemical exposures, based on readily measured biochemical endpoints, such as plasma vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations, as input parameters. Herein we describe a MATLAB® version of an oocyte growth dynamics model for fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) with a graphical user interface based upon a previously published model developed with MCSim software and evaluated with data from fathead minnows exposed to an androgenic chemical, 17β-trenbolone. We extended the evaluation of our new model to include six chemicals that inhibit enzymes involved in steroid biosynthesis: fadrozole, ketoconazole, propiconazole, prochloraz, fenarimol, and trilostane. In addition, for unexposed fathead minnows from group spawning design studies, and those exposed to the six chemicals, we evaluated whether the model is capable of predicting the average number of eggs per spawn and the average number of spawns per female, which was not evaluated previously. The new model is significantly improved in terms of ease of use, platform independence, and utility for providing output in a format that can be used as input into a population dynamics model. Model-predicted minimum and maximum cumulative fecundity over time encompassed the observed data for fadrozole and most propiconazole, prochloraz, fenarimol and trilostane treatments, but did not consistently replicate results from ketoconazole treatments. For average fecundity (eggs•female-1•day-1), eggs per spawn, and the number of spawns per female, the range of model-predicted values generally encompassed the experimentally observed values. Overall, we found

  12. Androgenic and estrogenic effects of the synthetic androgen 17alpha-methyltestosterone on sexual development and reproductive performance in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) determined using the gonadal recrudescence assay.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, S; Sauer, A; Shears, J A; Tyler, C R; Braunbeck, T

    2004-06-24

    The effects of the androgen, 17alpha-methyltestosterone were assessed on sexual development and reproductive performance in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) using a gonadal recrudescence assay. In this assay, mature male and female fathead minnow, previously kept under simulated winter conditions (15 degrees C; 8:16 h light:dark regime) were transferred to simulated summer conditions (25 degrees C water temperature; 16:8 h light:dark regime) to induce gonadal recrudescence. To assess sexual development fish were exposed to nominal concentrations of 0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 50 microg/L 17alpha-methyltestosterone. After 3 weeks of chemical exposure, effects on condition (condition factor, CF), plasma vitellogenin (VTG), secondary sex characteristics, gonad growth (gonadosomatic index; GSI) and gonad histology were investigated. Reproductive performance, including reproductive output (egg production), spawning behaviour, and fertilisation rate were measured over a subsequent 3-week-period in breeding adults maintained in clean water. 17alpha-Methyltestosterone had no effects on the condition of fish at any of the doses tested. 17alpha-Methyltestosterone induced both androgenic and estrogenic effects with females generally more affected by 17alpha-methyltestosterone than males: atretic follicles and male-specific sex characteristics (androgenic effect) were induced in females at > or = 0.1 and > or = 1 microg/L 17alpha-methyltestosterone, respectively. An inhibitory effect on ovary growth occurred at an exposure concentration of 50 microg/L 17alpha-methyltestosterone. In males 1 microg/L 17alpha-methyltestosterone induced a concentration-response induction of plasma vitellogenin (estrogenic effect) likely due to its conversion into 17alpha-methylestradiol, rather to the competition with endogenous steroids and their cross reactivity with the estrogen receptor. In the fish breeding studies, concentration-dependent reductions in egg number, fertilisation rate and

  13. Effects of triclocarban, N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide, and a mixture of pharmaceuticals and personal care products on fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Zenobio, Jenny E; Sanchez, Brian C; Archuleta, Laura C; Sepulveda, Maria S

    2014-04-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) have been detected widely in aquatic ecosystems, but little is known about their mechanisms of toxicity. We exposed adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for 48 h to triclocarban (1.4 µg/L), N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET; 0.6 µg/L), or a mixture of PPCPs consisting of atenolol (1.5 µg/L), caffeine (0.25 µg/L), diphenhydramine (0.1 µg/L), gemfibrozil (1.5 µg/L), ibuprofen (0.4 µg/L), naproxen (1.6 µg/L), triclosan (2.3 µg/L), progesterone (0.2 µg/L), triclocarban (1.4 µg/L), and DEET (0.6 µg/L). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed an upregulation in vitellogenin (vtg) in livers of females and males exposed to triclocarban. Also, an upregulation of hepatic lipoprotein lipase (lpl) and a downregulation of androgen receptor (ar) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (star) were observed in testes. The group treated with DEET only showed a significant decrease in ar in females. In contrast, the PPCP mixture downregulated vtg in females and males and expression of estrogen receptor alpha (erα), star, and thyroid hormone receptor alpha 1 (thra1) in testes. The authors' results show that the molecular estrogenic effects of triclocarban are eliminated (males) or reversed (females) when dosed in conjunction with several other PPCP, once again demonstrating that results from single exposures could be vastly different from those observed with mixtures. Environ Toxicol Chem 2014;33:910-919. © 2013 SETAC. PMID:24375658

  14. Detecting population-level genotoxic effects of benzo(a)pyrene on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.A.; Rasmussen, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    Investigations of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) toxicity have been primarily concerned with effects mediated by somatic cell DNA damage, particularly those linked to carcinogenesis. However, somatic cell effects may be of little ecological consequence, particularly when resulting pathologies become clinically visible long after sexual maturity. Germ cell effects may be more consequential, with alterations of the germ cell mutation rate effecting the dynamics of entire populations. The goal was to demonstrate that a potent DNA damaging agent can induce detectable population level effects. To accomplish this task the authors investigated changes in the survivorship of fathead minnow larvae two generations removed from in vitro BaP exposure. The experiment was initiated by exposing laboratory-raised individuals to 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 ppb BaP or a solvent blank for a period of 3 months. Exposed pairs were isolated and mated as soon as secondary sexual characteristics became visible. Progeny of exposed, mated pairs were subsequently isolated in order to provide families with a known exposure history. Siblings from isolated families were then mated to examine the effect of BaP exposure on the survival of larvae two generations removed from the exposure. As expected, inbreeding depression decreased hatching success and larval survival in both control and experimental broods. However, while larval survival from control broods was usually greater than 50%, two-thirds of the 1 ppb BaP broods showed no survival at all. Overall, the results revealed a significant effect of BaP treatment on both hatching success and larval survival. The results also revealed evidence of a concentration-response relationship.

  15. Dietary Exposure of Fathead Minnows to the Explosives TNT and RDX and to the Pesticide DDT using Contaminated Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Jerre G.; Lotufo, Guilherme R.

    2005-01-01

    Explosive compounds have been released into the environment during manufacturing, handling, and usage procedures. These compounds have been found to persist in the environment and potentially promote detrimental biological effects. The lack of research on bioaccumulation and bioconcentration and especially dietary transfer on aquatic life has resulted in challenges in assessing ecological risks. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential trophic transfer of the explosive compounds 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) using a realistic freshwater prey/predator model and using dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), a highly bioaccumulative compound, to establish relative dietary uptake potential. The oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus was exposed to 14C-labeled TNT, RDX or DDT for 5 hours in water, frozen in meal-size packages and subsequently fed to individual juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish were sampled for body residue determination on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 following an 8-hour gut purging period. Extensive metabolism of the parent compound in worms occurred for TNT but not for RDX and DDT. Fish body residue remained relatively unchanged over time for TNT and RDX, but did not approach steady-state concentration for DDT during the exposure period. The bioaccumulation factor (concentration in fish relative to concentration in worms) was 0.018, 0.010, and 0.422 g/g for TNT, RDX and DDT, respectively, confirming the expected relatively low bioaccumulative potential for TNT and RDX through the dietary route. The experimental design was deemed successful in determining the potential for trophic transfer of organic contaminants via a realistic predator/prey exposure scenario. PMID:16705829

  16. Dietary exposure of fathead minnows to the explosives TNT and RDX and to the pesticide DDT using contaminated invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Houston, Jerre G; Lotufo, Guilherme R

    2005-08-01

    Explosive compounds have been released into the environment during manufacturing, handling, and usage procedures. These compounds have been found to persist in the environment and potentially promote detrimental biological effects. The lack of research on bioaccumulation and bioconcentration and especially dietary transfer on aquatic life has resulted in challenges in assessing ecological risks. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential trophic transfer of the explosive compounds 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) using a realistic freshwater prey/predator model and using dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), a highly bioaccumulative compound, to establish relative dietary uptake potential. The oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus was exposed to 14C-labeled TNT, RDX or DDT for 5 hours in water, frozen in meal-size packages and subsequently fed to individual juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish were sampled for body residue determination on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 following an 8-hour gut purging period. Extensive metabolism of the parent compound in worms occurred for TNT but not for RDX and DDT. Fish body residue remained relatively unchanged over time for TNT and RDX, but did not approach steady-state concentration for DDT during the exposure period. The bioaccumulation factor (concentration in fish relative to concentration in worms) was 0.018, 0.010, and 0.422 g/g for TNT, RDX and DDT, respectively, confirming the expected relatively low bioaccumulative potential for TNT and RDX through the dietary route. The experimental design was deemed successful in determining the potential for trophic transfer of organic contaminants via a realistic predator/prey exposure scenario. PMID:16705829

  17. Comparative acute toxicity of a synthetic mine effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia, larval fathead minnow and the freshwater mussel Anodonta imbecilis

    SciTech Connect

    Masnado, R.G.; Geis, S.W.; Sonzogni, W.C.

    1995-11-01

    To determine if water quality-based effluent limitations recommended for a proposed discharger would provide adequate protection of aquatic life, site-specific acute toxicity tests were performed. The proposed discharger studied was a mine to be located in northern Wisconsin. The mine`s discharge would flow into the Flambeau River, a relatively pristine river that harbors endangered freshwater mussels. The toxicity effects of synthetic effluents, representing a mixture of five different metals under contrasting conditions of hardness, were tested on several different organisms. Results indicated that Ceriodaphnia dubia exhibited a much greater sensitivity to various mixtures of cadmium, hexavalent chromium, copper, nickel, and zinc than did either larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) or the freshwater mussel Anodonta imbecilis. Mixture o metals at the permitted discharge levels of individual metals were also found to be consistently toxic to C. dubia. Because C. dubia was found to be much more sensitive than A. imbecilis, an effluent safe for C. dubia should also be safe for A. imbecilis and the physiologically similar endangered mussels found in the river. Based on such testing, aquatic life toxicity-testing conditions and criteria suggested for the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit should be protective of C. dubia and, hence, other aquatic life such as endangered mussels. Overall, effluent limitations for proposed dischargers need to be based on the combined effect of complex effluents. Aquatic toxicity testing using synthetic effluents that approximate the expected discharge characteristics provides a viable approach to determining the limits for proposed dischargers of multiple pollutants.

  18. Expression profiling and gene ontology analysis in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) liver following exposure to pulp and paper mill effluents.

    PubMed

    Costigan, Shannon L; Werner, Julieta; Ouellet, Jacob D; Hill, Lauren G; Law, R David

    2012-10-15

    Many studies link pulp and paper mill effluent (PPME) exposure to adverse effects in fish populations present in the mill receiving environments. These impacts are often characteristic of endocrine disruption and may include impaired reproduction, development and survival. While these physiological endpoints are well-characterized, the molecular mechanisms causing them are not yet understood. To investigate changes in gene transcription induced by exposure to a PPME at several stages of treatment, male and female fathead minnows (FHMs) were exposed for 6 days to 25% (v/v) secondary (biologically) treated kraft effluent (TK) or 100% (v/v) combined mill outfall (CMO) from a mill producing both kraft pulp and newsprint. The gene expression changes in the livers of these fish were analyzed using a 22K oligonucleotide microarray. Exposure to TK or CMO resulted in significant changes in the expression levels of 105 and 238 targets in male FHMs and 296 and 133 targets in females, respectively. Targets were then functionally analyzed using gene ontology tools to identify the biological processes in fish hepatocytes that were affected by exposure to PPME after its secondary treatment. Proteolysis was affected in female FHMs exposed to both TK and CMO. In male FHMs, no processes were affected by TK exposure, while sterol, isoprenoid, steroid and cholesterol biosynthesis and electron transport were up-regulated by CMO exposure. The results presented in this study indicate that short-term exposure to PPMEs affects the expression of reproduction-related genes in the livers of both male and female FHMs, and that secondary treatment of PPMEs may not neutralize all of their metabolic effects in fish. Gene ontology analysis of microarray data may enable identification of biological processes altered by toxicant exposure and thus provide an additional tool for monitoring the impact of PPMEs on fish populations. PMID:22728206

  19. Evaluation of potential mechanisms of atrazine-induced reproductive impairment in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Richter, Catherine A; Papoulias, Diana M; Whyte, Jeffrey J; Tillitt, Donald E

    2016-09-01

    Atrazine has been implicated in reproductive dysfunction of exposed organisms, and previous studies documented decreased egg production in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) during 30-d to 38-d exposures to 0.5 µg/L, 5 µg/L, and 50 µg/L atrazine. The authors evaluated possible mechanisms underlying the reduction in egg production. Gene expression in steroidogenesis pathways and the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis of male and female fish was measured. Atrazine did not significantly induce gonad aromatase (cyp19a1a) expression. An atrazine-induced shift in the number of females in an active reproductive state was observed. Expression of the egg maturation genes vitellogenin 1 (vtg1) and zona pellucida glycoprotein 3.1 (zp3.1) in medaka females was correlated and had a bimodal distribution. In both species, females with low vtg1 or zp3.1 expression also had low expression of steroidogenesis genes in the gonad, estrogen receptor in the liver, and gonadotropins in the brain. In the medaka, the number of females per tank that had high expression of zp3.1 was significantly correlated with egg production per tank. The number of medaka females with low expression of zp3.1 increased significantly with atrazine exposure. Thus, the decline in egg production observed in response to atrazine exposure may be the result of a coordinated downregulation of genes required for reproduction in a subset of females. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2230-2238. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. PMID:26792394

  20. Expression of two vitellogenin genes (vg1 and vg3) in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) liver in response to exposure to steroidal estrogens and androgens.

    SciTech Connect

    Miracle, Ann L.; Ankley, Gerald; Lattier, David

    2006-03-01

    In this study, we describe the sequence for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) vitellogenin 3 gene (vg3), and compare the response of vg1 and vg3 following exposure to steroidal estrogens and androgens. The fathead minnow vg3 sequence is only the second nucleotide sequence described in teleosts, following the original description of this isoform in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Following a brief exposure (24 hours) to 2, 5, and 10 ng/L 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), both vg1and vg3 are upregulated in male liver. However, levels of vg3 induction are 4 orders of magnitude lower than induction of vg1. Suppression of vg in female liver following androgenic exposure with 50 or 500 ng/L 17 beta-trenbolone occurs at similar significance levels for both vg1 and vg3 isoforms. The results of this study confirm the use of vg1 as an indicator of estrogenic exposure in male fish, and present the potential for vg1 and /or vg3 for use as indicators of androgenic exposure.

  1. Pathway-based approaches for assessment of real-time exposure to an estrogenic wastewater treatment plant effluent on fathead minnow reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cavallin, Jenna E.; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Kahl, Michael D.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Lee, Kathy E.; Schroeder, Anthony L.; Mayasich, Joe; Eid, Evan P.; Nelson, Krysta R.; Milsk, Rebecca Y.; Blackwell, Brett R.; Berninger, Jason P.; LaLone, Carlie A.; Blanskma, Chad; Jicha, Terri M.; Elonen, Colleen M.; Johnson, Rodney C.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are known contributors of chemical mixtures into the environment. Of particular concern are endocrine-disrupting compounds, such as estrogens, which can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function in exposed organisms. The present study examined reproductive effects in fathead minnows exposed for 21 d to a historically estrogenic WWTP effluent. Fathead minnow breeding pairs were held in control water or 1 of 3 effluent concentrations (5%, 20%, and 100%) in a novel onsite, flow-through system providing real-time exposure. The authors examined molecular and biochemical endpoints representing key events along adverse outcome pathways linking estrogen receptor activation and other molecular initiating events to reproductive impairment. In addition, the authors used chemical analysis of the effluent to construct a chemical-gene interaction network to aid in targeted gene expression analyses and identifying potentially impacted biological pathways. Cumulative fecundity was significantly reduced in fish exposed to 100% effluent but increased in those exposed to 20% effluent, the approximate dilution factor in the receiving waters. Plasma vitellogenin concentrations in males increased in a dose-dependent manner with effluent concentration; however, male fertility was not impacted. Although in vitro analyses, analytical chemistry, and biomarker responses confirmed the effluent was estrogenic, estrogen receptor agonists were unlikely the primary driver of impaired reproduction. The results provide insights into the significance of pathway-based effects with regard to predicting adverse reproductive outcomes.

  2. Effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on early life stage development of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Winden, P.J.J. de; Donselaar, E.G. van; Herwig, H.J.

    1994-12-31

    Eggs of fathead minnow were exposed to graded concentrations (0.1--100 ppt) of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) at 24 C for 5 days. Exposure started about one hour after fertilization. The medium was refreshed daily. At day 6 (one day posthatching), body lengths were measured. A dose-dependent retardation of growth (from 1 to 30%) was observed in the range from 0.1 to 20 ppt TCDD. At higher concentrations, growth reduction remained the same but mortality still increased. Microscopic observations of the TCDD-exposed embryos revealed a number of deviations from the normal early development. Initial changes consisted of congestion of the blood flow in the caudal tail area and in the yolk sac vascular complex, followed by hemorrhages. At a later stage, pericardial edema and generalized edema were observed. In addition the embryos revealed, anaemia, decreased amounts of dermal and retinal melanin, shortened mandibles, degeneration of heart tissue, absence of swim bladder, decreased utilization of yolk sac material and a curved chords. The results indicate that embryonic development of the fathead minnow is very sensitive to TCDD. It might prove a useful model for further embryotoxic studies.

  3. Computational model of the fathead minnow hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis: Incorporating protein synthesis in improving predictability of responses to endocrine active chemicals.

    PubMed

    Breen, Miyuki; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T; Bencic, David; Breen, Michael S; Watanabe, Karen H; Lloyd, Alun L; Conolly, Rory B

    2016-01-01

    There is international concern about chemicals that alter endocrine system function in humans and/or wildlife and subsequently cause adverse effects. We previously developed a mechanistic computational model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows exposed to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole (FAD), to predict dose-response and time-course behaviors for apical reproductive endpoints. Initial efforts to develop a computational model describing adaptive responses to endocrine stress providing good fits to empirical plasma 17β-estradiol (E2) data in exposed fish were only partially successful, which suggests that additional regulatory biology processes need to be considered. In this study, we addressed short-comings of the previous model by incorporating additional details concerning CYP19A (aromatase) protein synthesis. Predictions based on the revised model were evaluated using plasma E2 concentrations and ovarian cytochrome P450 (CYP) 19A aromatase mRNA data from two fathead minnow time-course experiments with FAD, as well as from a third 4-day study. The extended model provides better fits to measured E2 time-course concentrations, and the model accurately predicts CYP19A mRNA fold changes and plasma E2 dose-response from the 4-d concentration-response study. This study suggests that aromatase protein synthesis is an important process in the biological system to model the effects of FAD exposure. PMID:26875912

  4. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (daphnids). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25--February 1, 1994. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Meter calibrations; and Reference toxicant test information.

  5. Method for Detection and Quantitation of Fathead Minnow Vitellogenin (Vtg) by Liquid Chromatography and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Schultz, Irv R.; Skillman, Ann D.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2005-03-11

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) is a well recognized biomarker of estrogen exposure in many species, particularly fish. This large protein shares a high degree of sequence homology across a large number of species. Quantitative measurement is currently done using antibody-based assays. These assays frequently require purification of Vtg and antibody production from each species because there is poor cross reactivity between antibodies for different fish. Therefore, complementary methods of measuring Vtg are desirable. Mass spectrometric (MS) analysis coupled to database searching offers the promise of a general method for protein identification. In this study we used the well characterized Vtg from rainbow trout (O. mykiss) to evaluate the analytical parameters for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) analysis of the intact and tryptic digested protein. An analytical scale HPLC separation combined with MALDI-MS was used to measure and confirm the identity of Vtg from the plasma of an important species for regulatory agencies, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). The small volume requirement of this method (< 10 uL) was found to be compatible with the plasma volume obtained from a few minnows. A semi quantitative measurement of Vtg from minnows exposed to estradiol was achieved, which was similar to previously obtained ELISA data.

  6. Fathead minnow steroidogenesis: in silico analyses reveals tradeoffs between nominal target efficacy and robustness to cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Interpreting proteomic and genomic data is a major challenge in predictive ecotoxicology that can be addressed by a systems biology approach. Mathematical modeling provides an organizational platform to consolidate protein dynamics with possible genomic regulation. Here, a model of ovarian steroidogenesis in the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, (FHM) is developed to evaluate possible transcriptional regulation of steroid production observed in microarray studies. Results The model was developed from literature sources, integrating key signaling components (G-protein and PKA activation) with their ensuing effect on steroid production. The model properly predicted trajectory behavior of estradiol and testosterone when fish were exposed to fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, but failed to predict the steroid hormone behavior occurring one week post-exposure as well as the increase in steroid levels when the stressor was removed. In vivo microarray data implicated three modes of regulation which may account for over-production of steroids during a depuration phase (when the stressor is removed): P450 enzyme up-regulation, inhibin down-regulation, and luteinizing hormone receptor up-regulation. Simulation studies and sensitivity analysis were used to evaluate each case as possible source of compensation to endocrine stress. Conclusions Simulation studies of the testosterone and estradiol response to regulation observed in microarray data supported the hypothesis that the FHM steroidogenesis network compensated for endocrine stress by modulating the sensitivity of the ovarian network to global cues coming from the hypothalamus and pituitary. Model predictions of luteinizing hormone receptor regulation were consistent with depuration and in vitro data. These results challenge the traditional approach to network elucidation in systems biology. Generally, the most sensitive interactions in a network are targeted for further elucidation but microarray

  7. Effects of exposure to the β-blocker propranolol on the reproductive behavior and gene expression of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Varenka; Mehinto, Alvina C; Denslow, Nancy D; Schlenk, Daniel

    2012-07-15

    Human pharmaceutical drugs have been found in surface waters worldwide, and represent an increasing concern since little is known about their possible effects on wildlife. Propranolol is a common beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist (β-blocker) typically prescribed to people suffering from heart disease and hypertension. Propranolol has been detected in United States wastewater effluents at concentrations ranging from 0.026 to 1.90 μg/l. In mammals, there is evidence that β-blockers can cause sexual dysfunction, and alter serotonergic pathways which may impact reproductive behavior but little is known about the effects on fish behavior. The present study tested the effects of propranolol on fecundity, on brain gene expression and on reproductive behavior of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, a fish that exhibits male parental care. Sexually mature fathead minnows were housed at a ratio of one male and two females per tank and exposed to nominal concentrations of 0, 0.1, 1, 10 μg/l for 21 days. Measured concentrations (±SD) of propranolol were 0.003±0.004, 0.05±0.02, 0.88±0.34 and 4.11±1.19 μg/l. There were no statistically significant differences in fecundity, fertilization rate, hatchability and time to hatch. Propranolol exposure was not associated with a change in nest rubbing behavior, time spent in the nest or approaching the females. There was a significant difference in the number of visits to the nest with males receiving low and medium propranolol treatments. The microarray analysis showed that there were 335 genes up-regulated and 400 genes down-regulated in the brain after exposure to the highest dose of propranolol. Among those genes, myoglobin and calsequestrin transcripts (fold change=10.84 and 5.49, respectively) were highly up-regulated. Ontological analyses indicated changes in genes involved in calcium ion transport, transcription, proteolysis and apoptosis/anti-apoptosis. Pathway analysis indicated that the reduced expression of

  8. The influence of food quantity on metal bioaccumulation and reproduction in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) during chronic exposures to a metal mine effluent.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Jacob D; Dubé, Monique G; Niyogi, Som

    2013-05-01

    Metal mine effluents can impact fish in the receiving environment via both direct effects from exposure as well as indirect effects via food web. The main objective of the present study was to assess whether an indirect effect such as reduced food (prey) availability could influence metal accumulation and reproductive capacity in fish during chronic exposure to a metal mine effluent. Breeding pairs of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to either reference water (RW) or an environmentally relevant metal mine effluent [45 percent process water effluent (PWE)] for 21 days and fed either low food quantities [LF (a daily ration of 6-10 percent body weight)] or normal food quantities [NF (a daily ration of 20-30 percent body weight)] in artificial stream systems. Fish in RW treatments were fed Chironomus dilutus larvae cultured in RW (Treatments: RW-NF or RW-LF), while fish in PWE treatments were fed C. dilutus larvae cultured in PWE (Treatments: PWE-NF or PWE-LF). Tissue-specific (gill, liver, gonad and carcass) metal accumulation, egg production, and morphometric parameters in fish were analyzed. Fathead minnows that were exposed to LF rations had significantly smaller body, gonad and liver sizes, and were in a relatively poor condition compared to fathead minnows exposed to NF rations, regardless of the treatment water type (RW or PWE) (two-way ANOVA; p<0.05). Although elevated concentrations of copper, nickel, rubidium, selenium, and thallium were recorded in C. dilutus cultured in PWE, only the concentrations of rubidium, selenium and thallium increased in tissues of fish in PWE treatments. Interestingly though, despite the greater abundance of metal-contaminated food in the PWE-NF treatment, tissue metal accumulation pattern were almost similar between the PWE-NF and PWE-LF treatments, except for higher liver barium, cobalt and manganese concentrations in the latter treatment. This indicated that a higher food ration could help reduce the tissue

  9. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (daphnids). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of July 22--29, 1993. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 19.0 and Mile 22.0 on July 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; and Reference toxicant test information.

  10. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (daphnids). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) pilot study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a pilot study during the week of April 22--29, 1993, prior to initiation of CR-ERP Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis activities. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0 and Poplar Creek Kilometer 1.6 on April 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Reference toxicant test information; and Personnel training documentation.

  11. Effects of Sediment Containing Coal Ash from the Kingston Ash Release on Embryo-Larval Development in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820)

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty; Sherrard, Rick

    2014-01-01

    The largest environmental release of coal ash in U.S. history occurred in December 2008 with the failure of a retention structure at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee. A byproduct of coal-burning power plants, coal ash is enriched in metals and metalloids such as selenium and arsenic with known toxicity to fish including embryonic and larval stages. The effects of contact exposure to sediments containing up to 78 % coal ash from the Kingston spill on the early development of fish embryos and larvae were examined in 7-day laboratory tests with the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). No significant effects were observed on hatching success, incidences of gross developmental abnormalities, or embryo-larval survival. Results suggest that direct exposures to sediment containing residual coal ash from the Kingston ash release may not present significant risks to fish eggs and larvae in waterways affected by the spill.

  12. Comparative QSTR Study Using Semi-Empirical and First Principle Methods Based Descriptors for Acute Toxicity of Diverse Organic Compounds to the Fathead Minnow

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Erol; Palaz, Selami; Oltulu, Oral; Turkmen, Hasan; Ozaydın, Cihat

    2007-01-01

    Several quantum-mechanics-based descriptors were derived for a diverse set of 48 organic compounds using AM1, PM3, HF/6-31+G, and DFT-B3LYP/6-31+G (d) level of the theory. LC50 values of acute toxicity of the compounds were correlated to the fathead minnow and predicted using calculated descriptors by employing Comprehensive Descriptors for Structural and Statistical Analysis (CODESSA) program. The heuristic method, implemented in the CODESSA program for selecting the ‘best’ regression model, was applied to a pre-selection of the most-representative descriptors by sequentially eliminating descriptors that did not satisfy a certain level of statistical criterion. First model, statistically, the most significant one has been drawn up with the help of DFT calculations in which the squared correlation coefficient R2 is 0.85, and the squared cross-validation correlation coefficient RCV2 is 0.79. Second model, which has been drawn up with the help of HF calculations, has its statistical quality very close to the DFT-based one and in this model value of R2 is 0.84 and that of RCV2 is 0.78. Third and fourth models have been drawn up with the help of AM1 and PM3 calculations, respectively. The values of R2 and RCV2 in the third case are correspondingly 0.79 and 0.66, whereas in the fourth case they are 0.78 and 0.65 respectively. Results of this study clearly demonstrate that for the calculations of descriptors in modeling of acute toxicity of organic compounds to the fathead minnow, first principal methods are much more useful than semi-empirical methods.

  13. Pathway-based approaches for assessment of real-time exposure to an estrogenic wastewater treatment plant effluent on fathead minnow reproduction.

    PubMed

    Cavallin, Jenna E; Jensen, Kathleen M; Kahl, Michael D; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Lee, Kathy E; Schroeder, Anthony L; Mayasich, Joe; Eid, Evan P; Nelson, Krysta R; Milsk, Rebecca Y; Blackwell, Brett R; Berninger, Jason P; LaLone, Carlie A; Blanksma, Chad; Jicha, Terri; Elonen, Colleen; Johnson, Rodney; Ankley, Gerald T

    2016-03-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are known contributors of chemical mixtures into the environment. Of particular concern are endocrine-disrupting compounds, such as estrogens, which can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function in exposed organisms. The present study examined reproductive effects in fathead minnows exposed for 21 d to a historically estrogenic WWTP effluent. Fathead minnow breeding pairs were held in control water or 1 of 3 effluent concentrations (5%, 20%, and 100%) in a novel onsite, flow-through system providing real-time exposure. The authors examined molecular and biochemical endpoints representing key events along adverse outcome pathways linking estrogen receptor activation and other molecular initiating events to reproductive impairment. In addition, the authors used chemical analysis of the effluent to construct a chemical-gene interaction network to aid in targeted gene expression analyses and identifying potentially impacted biological pathways. Cumulative fecundity was significantly reduced in fish exposed to 100% effluent but increased in those exposed to 20% effluent, the approximate dilution factor in the receiving waters. Plasma vitellogenin concentrations in males increased in a dose-dependent manner with effluent concentration; however, male fertility was not impacted. Although in vitro analyses, analytical chemistry, and biomarker responses confirmed the effluent was estrogenic, estrogen receptor agonists were unlikely the primary driver of impaired reproduction. The results provide insights into the significance of pathway-based effects with regard to predicting adverse reproductive outcomes. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:702-716. Published 2015 by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work, and as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. PMID:26332155

  14. Site-specific impacts on gene expression and behavior in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed in situ to streams adjacent to sewage treatment plants

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Environmental monitoring for pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors in the aquatic environment traditionally employs a variety of methods including analytical chemistry, as well as a variety of histological and biochemical endpoints that correlate with the fish fitness. It is now clear that analytical chemistry alone is insufficient to identify aquatic environments that are compromised because these measurements do not identify the biologically available dose. The biological endpoints that are measured are important because they relate to known impairments; however, they are not specific to the contaminants and often focus on only a few known endpoints. These studies can be enhanced by looking more broadly at changes in gene expression, especially if the analysis focuses on biochemical pathways. The present study was designed to obtain additional information for well-characterized sites adjacent to sewage treatment plants in MN that are thought to be impacted by endocrine disruptors. Results Here we examine five sites that have been previously characterized and examine changes in gene expression in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) that have been caged for 48 h in each of the aquatic environments. We find that the gene expression changes are characteristic and unique at each of the five sites. Also, fish exposed to two of the sites, 7 and 12, present a more aggressive behavior compared to control fish. Conclusion Our results show that a short-term exposure to sewage treatment plant effluents was able to induce a site-specific gene expression pattern in the fathead minnow gonad and liver. The short-term exposure was also enough to affect fish sexual behavior. Our results also show that microarray analysis can be very useful at determining potential exposure to chemicals, and could be used routinely as a tool for environmental monitoring. PMID:19811676

  15. The fish embryo toxicity test as a replacement for the larval growth and survival test: A comparison of test sensitivity and identification of alternative endpoints in zebrafish and fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Marlo K Sellin; Stultz, Amy E; Smith, Austin W; Stephens, Dane A; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Oris, James T

    2015-06-01

    The fish embryo toxicity (FET) test has been proposed as an alternative to the larval growth and survival (LGS) test. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the sensitivity of the FET and LGS tests in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) and to determine if the inclusion of sublethal metrics as test endpoints could enhance test utility. In both species, LGS and FET tests were conducted using 2 simulated effluents. A comparison of median lethal concentrations determined via each test revealed significant differences between test types; however, it could not be determined which test was the least and/or most sensitive. At the conclusion of each test, developmental abnormalities and the expression of genes related to growth and toxicity were evaluated. Fathead minnows and zebrafish exposed to mock municipal wastewater-treatment plant effluent in a FET test experienced an increased incidence of pericardial edema and significant alterations in the expression of genes including insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2, heat shock protein 70, and cytochrome P4501A, suggesting that the inclusion of these endpoints could enhance test utility. The results not only show the utility of the fathead minnow FET test as a replacement for the LGS test but also provide evidence that inclusion of additional endpoints could improve the predictive power of the FET test. PMID:25929752

  16. Application of endocrine disruptor screening program fish short-term reproduction assay: Reproduction and endocrine function in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) exposed to Bermuda pond sediment.

    PubMed

    Fort, Douglas J; Mathis, Michael; Fort, Chelsea E; Fort, Hayley M; Bacon, Jamie P

    2015-06-01

    A modified tier 1 Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) 21-d fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) was used to evaluate the effects of sediment exposure from freshwater and brackish ponds in Bermuda on reproductive fecundity and endocrine function in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Reproductively active male and female fish were exposed to control sediment and sediment from 2 freshwater ponds (fathead minnow) and 2 marine ponds (killifish) contaminated with polyaromatic hydrocarbons and metals via flow-through exposure for 21 d. Reproductive fecundity was monitored daily. At termination, the status of the reproductive endocrine system was assessed by the gonadosomatic index, gonadal histology, plasma steroids (estrogen [E2], testosterone [T], and 11-ketotestosterone [11-KT]), steroidogenic enzymes (aromatase and combined 3β/17β -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [3β/17β-HSD]), and plasma vitellogenin (VTG). Decreased reproductive fecundity, lower male body weight, and altered endocrinological measures of reproductive status were observed in both species. Higher plasma T levels in female minnows and 11-KT levels in both male and female minnows and female killifish exposed to freshwater and brackish sediments, respectively. Decreased female E2 and VTG levels and gonadal cytochrome P19 (aromatase) activity were also found in sediment exposed females from both species. No effect on female 3β/17β-HSD activity was found in either species. The FSTRA provided a robust model capable of modification to evaluate reproductive effects of sediment exposure in fish. PMID:25565366

  17. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BRAIN AND OVARY AROMATASE ACTIVITY AND ISOFORM-SPECIFIC AROMATASE MRNA EXPRESSION IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing evidence that some chemicals present in the environment have the capacity to inhibit, or potentially induce, aromatase activity. This study compared aromatase activities and isoform-specific mRNA expression in brain and ovary tissue from non-exposed fathead min...

  18. Toxicity of untreated and ozone-treated oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) to early life stages of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    He, Yuhe; Patterson, Sarah; Wang, Nan; Hecker, Markus; Martin, Jonathan W; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve B

    2012-12-01

    Due to a policy of no release, oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), produced by the surface-mining oil sands industry in North Eastern Alberta, Canada, is stored on-site in tailings ponds. Currently, ozonation is considered one possible method for remediation of OSPW by reducing the concentrations of dissolved organic compounds, including naphthenic acids (NAs), which are considered the primary toxic constituents. However, further work was needed to evaluate the effectiveness of ozonation in reducing the toxicity of OSPW and to ensure that ozonation does not increase the toxicity of OSPW. This study examined effects of untreated, ozone-treated, and activated charcoal-treated OSPW (OSPW, O3-OSPW, and AC-OSPW) on the early life stage (ELS) of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Success of hatching of eggs, spontaneous movement, and incidences of hemorrhage, pericardial edema, and malformation of the spine of embryos were examined. To elucidate the mechanism of toxicity, concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured, and the abundances of transcripts of genes involved in biotransformation of xenobiotics, response to oxidative stress, and apoptosis were quantified by real-time PCR. Compared to the control group, which had an embryo survival rate of 97.9 ± 2.08%, survival was significantly less when exposed to OSPW (43.8 ± 7.12%). Eggs exposed to untreated OSPW exhibited a significantly greater rate of premature hatching, and embryos exhibited greater spontaneous movement. Incidences of hemorrhage (50.0 ± 3.40%), pericardial edema (56.3 ± 7.12%), and malformation of the spine (37.5 ± 5.38%) were significantly greater in embryos exposed to OSPW compared to controls. These effects are typical of exposure to dioxin-like compounds, however, abundance of transcripts of cyp1a was not significantly greater in embryos exposed to OSPW. Significantly greater concentrations of ROS, and greater abundances of transcripts cyp3a, gst, sod, casp9, and apopen

  19. Examining the effects of metal mining mixtures on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) using field-based multi-trophic artificial streams.

    PubMed

    Rozon-Ramilo, Lisa D; Dubé, Monique G; Rickwood, Carrie J; Niyogi, Som

    2011-09-01

    This study illustrates the use of a mesocosm approach for assessing the independent effects of three treated metal mine effluents (MME) discharging into a common receiving environment and regulated under the same regulation. A field-based, multi-trophic artificial stream study was conducted in August 2008 to assess the effects of three metal mining effluents on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) in a 21-day reproduction bioassay. The nature of the approach allowed for assessment of both dietary and waterborne exposure pathways. Elements (e.g. Se, Co, Cl, Cu, Fe) were analyzed in several media (water, sediments) and tissues (biofilm, Chironomus dilutus, female fathead minnow (FHM) body, ovary, liver, gills). Significant increases in metal and micronutrient concentrations were observed in the water and biofilm tissues in all MME treatments [20% surface water effluent (SWE), 30% mine water effluent (MWE), and 45% process water effluent (PWE)], compared to reference. However, copper was the only element to significantly increase in the sediments when exposed to PWE. Co and Ni increased significantly in C. dilutus tissues in SWE (1.4- and 1.5-fold, respectively), Cu and Se also increased in chironomid tissues in PWE (5.2- and 3.3-fold, respectively); however, no significant increases in metals or micronutrients occurred in chironomid tissues when exposed to MWE compared to reference. There were no significant increases in metal concentrations in female FHM tissues (body, liver, gonads, gills) in any of the treatments suggesting that metals were either not bioavailable, lost from the females via the eggs, or naturally regulated through homeostatic mechanisms. Cumulative number of eggs per female per day increased significantly (∼127%) after exposure to SWE and decreased significantly (∼33%) after exposure to PWE when compared to reference. Mean total number of days to hatch was reduced in PWE compared to reference. This study shows the importance of isolating

  20. Influence of the route of exposure on the accumulation and subcellular distribution of nickel and thallium in juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Dominique; Couture, Patrice

    2009-10-01

    In this study, we examine the relative contribution of water and live prey (Tubifex tubifex) as sources of nickel (Ni) and thallium (Tl) in juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Overall, both water and prey were important sources of metals for our fish, although only approximately 35% of the metal estimated available for trophic transfer in the prey was assimilated. We also investigated the influence of exposure route on the subcellular distribution of these two metals. Once assimilated, most of the Ni was found in the granules, debris, and heat-stable protein (HSP), regardless of the route of exposure. Thallium was also mostly located in granules, debris, and HSP, and fish exposed from both water and prey had a higher proportion of Tl bound to the HSP compartment compared to control fish. Our results, obtained using environmentally relevant concentrations, suggest the presence of regulation mechanisms for both metals. Nevertheless, we measured increased metal concentrations in potentially metal-sensitive subcellular fractions when fish were exposed from water and diet simultaneously compared to a single route of exposure, suggesting that exposure to Ni and Tl from both routes could represent a risk of toxicity. PMID:19253010

  1. Comparison of chemical binding to recombinant fathead minnow and human estrogen receptors alpha in whole cell and cell-free binding assays.

    PubMed

    Rider, Cynthia V; Hartig, Phillip C; Cardon, Mary C; Wilson, Vickie S

    2009-10-01

    Mammalian receptors and assay systems are generally used for in vitro screening of endocrine-disrupting chemicals with the assumption that minor differences in amino acid sequences among species do not translate into significant differences in receptor function. Objectives of the present study were to evaluate the performance of two different in vitro assay systems (a whole cell and a cell-free competitive binding assay) in assessing whether binding of chemicals differs significantly between full-length recombinant estrogen receptors from fathead minnows (fhERalpha) and those from humans (hERalpha). It was confirmed that 17beta-estradiol displays a reduction in binding to fhERalpha at an elevated temperature (37 degrees C), as has been reported with other piscine estrogen receptors. Several of the chemicals (17beta-estradiol, ethinylestradiol, alpha-zearalanol, fulvestrant, dibutyl phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate, and cadmium chloride) displayed higher affinity for fhERalpha than for hERalpha in the whole cell assay, while only dibutyl phthalate had a higher affinity for fhERalpha than for hERalpha in the cell-free assay. Both assays were effective in identifying strong binders, weak binders, and nonbinders to the two receptors. However, the cell-free assay provided a less complicated and more efficient binding platform and is, therefore, recommended over the whole cell binding assay. In conclusion, no strong evidence showed species-specific binding among the chemicals tested. PMID:19453209

  2. Exposure to the Contraceptive Progestin, Gestodene, Alters Reproductive Behavior, Arrests Egg Deposition, and Masculinizes Development in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Frankel, Tyler E; Meyer, Michael T; Kolpin, Dana W; Gillis, Amanda B; Alvarez, David A; Orlando, Edward F

    2016-06-01

    Endogenous progestogens and pharmaceutical progestins enter the environment through wastewater treatment plant effluent and agricultural field runoff. Lab studies demonstrate strong, negative exposure effects of these chemicals on aquatic vertebrate reproduction. Behavior can be a sensitive, early indicator of exposure to environmental contaminants associated with altered reproduction yet is rarely examined in ecotoxicology studies. Gestodene is a human contraceptive progestin and a potent activator of fish androgen receptors. Our objective was to test the effects of gestodene on reproductive behavior and associated egg deposition in the fathead minnow. After only 1 day, males exposed to ng/L of gestodene were more aggressive and less interested in courtship and mating, and exposed females displayed less female courtship behavior. Interestingly, 25% of the gestodene tanks contained a female that drove the male out of the breeding tile and displayed male-typical courtship behaviors toward the other female. Gestodene decreased or arrested egg deposition with no observed gonadal histopathology. Together, these results suggest that effects on egg deposition are primarily due to altered reproductive behavior. The mechanisms by which gestodene disrupts behavior are unknown. Nonetheless, the rapid and profound alterations of the reproductive biology of gestodene-exposed fish suggest that wild populations could be similarly affected. PMID:27129041

  3. Impacts of the phenylpyrazole insecticide fipronil on larval fish: time-series gene transcription responses in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) following short-term exposure.

    PubMed

    Beggel, Sebastian; Werner, Inge; Connon, Richard E; Geist, Juergen P

    2012-06-01

    The utilization of molecular endpoints in ecotoxicology can provide rapid and valuable information on immediate organismal responses to chemical stressors and is increasingly used for mechanistic interpretation of effects at higher levels of biological organization. This study contributes knowledge on the sublethal effects of a commonly used insecticide, the phenylpyrazole fipronil, on larval fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), utilizing a quantitative transcriptomic approach. Immediately after 24h of exposure to fipronil concentrations of ≥31 μg.L(-1), highly significant changes in gene transcription were observed for aspartoacylase, metallothionein, glucocorticoid receptor, cytochrome P450 3A126 and vitellogenin. Different mechanisms of toxicity were apparent over the course of the experiment, with short-term responses indicating neurotoxic effects. After 6 days of recovery, endocrine effects were observed with vitellogenin being up-regulated 90-fold at 61 μg.L(-1) fipronil. Principal component analysis demonstrated a significant increase in gene transcription changes over time and during the recovery period. In conclusion, multiple mechanisms of action were observed in response to fipronil exposure, and unknown delayed effects would have been missed if transcriptomic responses had only been measured at a single time-point. These challenges can be overcome by the inclusion of multiple endpoints and delayed effects in experimental designs. PMID:22542256

  4. Field-based approach for assessing the impact of treated pulp and paper mill effluent on endogenous metabolites of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Collette, T W; Villeneuve, D L; Cavallin, J E; Teng, Q; Jensen, K M; Kahl, M D; Mayasich, J M; Ankley, G T; Ekman, D R

    2013-09-17

    A field-based metabolomic study was conducted during a shutdown of a pulp and paper mill (PPM) to assess the impacts of treated PPM effluent on endogenous polar metabolites in fathead minnow (FHM; Pimephales promelas) livers. Caged male and female FHMs were deployed at a Great Lakes area of concern during multiple periods (pre-, during, and post-shutdown) near the outflow for a wastewater treatment plant. Influent to this plant is typically 40% PPM effluent by volume. Additional FHMs were exposed to reference lake water under laboratory conditions. A bioassay using T47D-KBluc cells showed that estrogenic activity of receiving water near the outflow declined by 46% during the shutdown. We then used (1)H NMR spectroscopy and principal component analysis to profile abundances of hepatic endogenous metabolites for FHMs. Profiles for males deployed pre-shutdown in receiving water were significantly different from those for laboratory-control males. Profiles were not significantly different for males deployed during the shutdown, but they were significant again for those deployed post-shutdown. Impacts of treated effluent from this PPM were sex-specific, as differences among profiles of females were largely nonsignificant. Thus, we demonstrate the potential utility of field-based metabolomics for performing biologically based exposure monitoring and evaluating remediation efforts occurring throughout the Great Lakes and other ecosystems. PMID:23919260

  5. Effect of Lipid Partitioning on Predictions of Acute Toxicity of Oil Sands Process Affected Water to Embryos of Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Morandi, Garrett D; Zhang, Kun; Wiseman, Steve B; Pereira, Alberto Dos Santos; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P

    2016-08-16

    Dissolved organic compounds in oil sands process affected water (OSPW) are known to be responsible for most of its toxicity to aquatic organisms, but the complexity of this mixture prevents use of traditional bottom-up approaches for predicting toxicities of mixtures. Therefore, a top-down approach to predict toxicity of the dissolved organic fraction of OSPW was developed and tested. Accurate masses (i.e., m/z) determined by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry in negative and positive ionization modes were used to assign empirical chemical formulas to each chemical species in the mixture. For each chemical species, a predictive measure of lipid accumulation was estimated by stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) to poly(dimethyl)siloxane, or by partitioning to solid-supported lipid membranes (SSLM). A narcosis mode of action was assumed and the target-lipid model was used to estimate potencies of mixtures by assuming strict additivity. A model developed using a combination of the SBSE and SSLM lipid partitioning estimates, whereby the accumulation of chemicals to neutral and polar lipids was explicitly considered, was best for predicting empirical values of LC50 in 96-h acute toxicity tests with embryos of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Model predictions were within 4-fold of observed toxicity for 75% of OSPW samples, and within 8.5-fold for all samples tested, which is comparable to the range of interlaboratory variability for in vivo toxicity testing. PMID:27420640

  6. Chronic toxicity of un-ionized ammonia to early life-stages of endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) compared to the surrogate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Allert, A.L.; Sappington, L.C.; Waddell, B.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-contaminated groundwater enters the Upper Colorado River from beneath the abandoned Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Pile near Moab, Utah. This reach of the Upper Colorado River was designated as critical habitat for four endangered fish species because it is one of the few existing areas with known spawning and rearing habitats. Un-ionized ammonia (NH3) concentrations frequently exceed 1.00 mg/L in backwaters adjacent to the tailings pile, which exceeds the Utah 30-d average chronic water quality criterion for un-ionized ammonia (0.07 mg/L NH3; temperature 20??C; pH 8.2) by a factor of more than 10. However, there is little published information regarding the sensitivity of endangered fishes to ammonia. We conducted 28-d static renewal studies with post-swim-up larvae to determine the relative sensitivity of Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius), razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus), and the standard surrogate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to NH3. Chronic values (ChVs) for mortality and growth were determined as the geometric mean of the no observed effect concentration and the lowest observed effect concentration based on analysis of variance. The ChVs for growth of fathead minnow, Colorado pikeminnow, and razorback sucker were 0.43, 0.40, and 0.67 mg/L NH3, respectively. The ChVs for mortality of fathead minnow, Colorado pikeminnow, and razorback sucker were 0.43, 0.70, and 0.67 mg/L NH3, respectively. Therefore, the ChVs for mortality and growth were similar for fathead minnow and razorback sucker; however, the ChV for growth was lower than the ChV for mortality for Colorado pikeminnow. Maximum likelihood regression was used to calculate 28-d lethal concentrations (LCx) for each species. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for fathead minnow were 0.69, 0.42, and 0.13 mg/L NH3, respectively. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for Colorado pikeminnow were 0.76, 0.61, and 0.38 mg/L NH3, respectively. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for razorback

  7. Chronic toxicity of un-ionized ammonia to early life-stages of endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) compared to the surrogate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Fairchild, J F; Allert, A L; Sappington, L C; Waddell, B

    2005-10-01

    Ammonia-contaminated groundwater enters the Upper Colorado River from beneath the abandoned Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Pile near Moab, Utah. This reach of the Upper Colorado River was designated as critical habitat for four endangered fish species because it is one of the few existing areas with known spawning and rearing habitats. Un-ionized ammonia (NH3) concentrations frequently exceed 1.00 mg/L in backwaters adjacent to the tailings pile, which exceeds the Utah 30-d average chronic water quality criterion for un-ionized ammonia (0.07 mg/L NH3; temperature 20 degrees C; pH 8.2) by a factor of more than 10. However, there is little published information regarding the sensitivity of endangered fishes to ammonia. We conducted 28-d static renewal studies with post-swim-up larvae to determine the relative sensitivity of Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius), razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus), and the standard surrogate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to NH3. Chronic values (ChVs) for mortality and growth were determined as the geometric mean of the no observed effect concentration and the lowest observed effect concentration based on analysis of variance. The ChVs for growth of fathead minnow, Colorado pikeminnow, and razorback sucker were 0.43, 0.40, and 0.67 mg/L NH3, respectively. The ChVs for mortality of fathead minnow, Colorado pikeminnow, and razorback sucker were 0.43, 0.70, and 0.67 mg/L NH3, respectively. Therefore, the ChVs for mortality and growth were similar for fathead minnow and razorback sucker; however, the ChV for growth was lower than the ChV for mortality for Colorado pikeminnow. Maximum likelihood regression was used to calculate 28-d lethal concentrations (LCx) for each species. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for fathead minnow were 0.69, 0.42, and 0.13 mg/L NH3, respectively. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for Colorado pikeminnow were 0.76, 0.61, and 0.38 mg/L NH3, respectively. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for

  8. Metabolite profiles of repeatedly sampled urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) contain unique lipid signatures following exposure to anti-androgens.

    PubMed

    Collette, Timothy W; Skelton, David M; Davis, John M; Cavallin, Jenna E; Jensen, Kathleen M; Kahl, Michael D; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T; Martinović-Weigelt, Dalma; Ekman, Drew R

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, we sought to identify candidate markers of exposure to anti-androgens by analyzing endogenous metabolite profiles in the urine of male fathead minnows (mFHM, Pimephales promelas). Based on earlier work, we hypothesized that unidentified lipids in the urine of mFHM were selectively responsive to exposure to androgen receptor antagonists, which is otherwise difficult to confirm using established fish toxicity assays. A second goal was to evaluate the feasibility of non-lethally and repeatedly sampling urine from individual mFHMs over the time course of response to a chemical exposure. Accordingly, we exposed mFHM to the model anti-androgens vinclozolin or flutamide. Urine was collected from each fish at 48hour intervals over the course of a 14day exposure. Parallel experiments were conducted with mFHM exposed to bisphenol A or control water. The frequent handling/sampling regime did not cause apparent adverse effects on the fish. Endogenous metabolite profiling was conducted with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), which exhibited lower variation for the urinary metabolome than was found in earlier work with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Specifically, for inter- and intra-individual variations, the median spectrum-wide relative standard deviation (RSD) was 32.6% and 33.3%, respectively, for GC-MS analysis of urine from unexposed mFHM. These results compared favorably with similar measurements of urine from other model species, including the Sprague Dawley rat. In addition, GC-MS allowed us to identify several lipids (e.g., certain saturated fatty acids) in mFHM urine as candidate markers of exposure to androgen receptor antagonists. PMID:26810197

  9. Accumulation and DNA damage in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to 2 brominated flame-retardant mixtures, Firemaster 550 and Firemaster BZ-54.

    PubMed

    Bearr, Jonathan S; Stapleton, Heather M; Mitchelmore, Carys L

    2010-03-01

    Firemaster 550 and Firemaster BZ-54 are two brominated formulations that are in use as replacements for polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants. Two major components of these mixtures are 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-ethylhexylbenzoate (TBB) and 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (TBPH). Both have been measured in environmental matrices; however, scant toxicological information exists. The present study aimed to determine if these brominated flame-retardant formulations are bioavailable and adversely affect DNA integrity in fish. Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were orally exposed to either FM 550, FM BZ54, or the nonbrominated form of TBPH, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) for 56 d and depurated (e.g., fed clean food) for 22 d. At several time points, liver and blood cells were collected and assessed for DNA damage. Homogenized fish tissues were extracted and analyzed on day 0 and day 56 to determine the residue of TBB and TBPH and the appearance of any metabolites using gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ion mass spectrometry (GC/ECNI-MS). Significant increases (p < 0.05) in DNA strand breaks from liver cells (but not blood cells) were observed during the exposure period compared with controls, although during depuration these levels returned to control. Both parent compounds, TBB and TBPH, were detected in tissues at approximately 1% of daily dosage along with brominated metabolites. The present study provides evidence for accumulation, metabolism, and genotoxicity of these new formulation flame retardants in fish and highlights the potential adverse effects of TBB- and TBPH-formulated fire retardants to aquatic species. PMID:20821500

  10. The endocrine effects of dietary brominated diphenyl ether-47 exposure, measured across multiple levels of biological organization, in breeding fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Leah M; Path, Elise M; Venables, Barney J; Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K

    2016-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the reproductive function of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to brominated diphenyl ether-47 (BDE-47) at doses lower than those used in previous studies. This was accomplished by evaluating the impacts of BDE-47 exposures across multiple levels of biological organization. Breeding pairs were exposed to BDE-47 via diet for 21 d, during which reproductive success was monitored. At the conclusion of the exposure, fish were euthanized to assess the effects of BDE-47 on sex steroid-related and thyroid-related transcripts, plasma androgen levels, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and secondary sexual characteristics. Several alterations in gene expression were noted including a >2.1-fold decrease in hepatic estrogen receptor α (erα) and a 2.9-fold decrease in ovarian aromatase (arom). In addition, BDE-47-exposed males experienced increases in deiodinase 2 (dio2) expression in brain tissue (∼1.5-fold) and decreases in hepatic transthyretin (ttr) expression (∼1.4-fold). Together, these gene expression alterations suggest the potential for BDE-47 to disrupt endocrine signaling. There were no significant differences in plasma hormone levels, GSI, secondary sexual characteristics, or reproductive success. Overall, the present study demonstrates that exposure to BDE-47 is capable of altering both sex steroid-related and thyroid-related transcripts but that these observed alterations do not necessarily manifest themselves at higher levels of biological organization for the endpoints selected. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2048-2057. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26749031

  11. The genomic transcriptional response of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to an acute exposure to the androgen, 17β-trenbolone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorts, Jennifer; Richter, Catherine A.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Carter, Barbara J.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the genomic transcriptional response of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to an acute (4 days) exposure to 0.1 or 1.0 ??g/L of 17??-trenbolone (TB), the active metabolite of an anabolic androgenic steroid used as a growth promoter in cattle and a contaminant of concern in aquatic systems. Our objectives were to investigate the gene expression profile induced by TB, define biomarkers of exposure to TB, and increase our understanding of the mechanisms of adverse effects of TB on fish reproduction. In female gonad tissue, microarray analysis using a 22 K oligonucleotide microarray (EcoArray Inc., Gainesville, FL) showed 99 significantly upregulated genes and 741 significantly downregulated genes in response to 1 ??g TB/L. In particular, hydroxysteroid (17??) dehydrogenase 12a (hsd17b12a), zona pellucida glycoprotein 2.2 (zp2.2), and protein inhibitor of activated STAT, 2 (pias2) were all downregulated in gonad. Q-PCR measurements in a larger sample set were consistent with the microarray results in the direction and magnitude of these changes in gene expression. However, several novel potential biomarkers were verified by Q-PCR in the same samples, but could not be validated in independent samples. In liver, Q-PCR measurements showed a significant decrease in vitellogenin 1 (vtg1) mRNA expression. In brain, cytochrome P450, family 19, subfamily A, polypeptide 1b (cyp19a1b, previously known as aromatase B) transcript levels were significantly reduced following TB exposure. Our study provides a candidate gene involved in mediating the action of TB, hsd17b12a, and two potential biomarkers sensitive to acute TB exposure, hepatic vtg1 and brain cyp19a1b.

  12. Mixture toxicity of imidacloprid and cyfluthrin to two non-target species, the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas and the amphipod Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Lanteigne, Michelle; Whiting, Sara A; Lydy, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Two species, the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas and the amphipod Hyalella azteca, were tested to examine acute toxicity to two insecticides, cyfluthrin and imidacloprid individually and as a mixture. Cyfluthrin was acutely toxic to P. promelas and H. azteca with EC50 values and 95 % confidence intervals of 0.31 µg L(-1) (0.26-0.35 µg L(-1)) and 0.0015 µg L(-1) (0.0011-0.0018 µg L(-1)), respectively. Imidacloprid was not acutely toxic to P. promelas at water concentrations ranging from 1 to 5000 µg L(-1), whereas it was toxic to H. azteca with a EC50 value of 33.5 µg L(-1) (23.3-47.4 µg L(-1)). For the P. promelas mixture test, imidacloprid was added at a single concentration to a geometric series of cyfluthrin concentrations bracketing the EC50 value. A synergistic ratio (SR) of 1.9 was found for P. promelas, which was calculated using the cyfluthrin-only exposure and mixture-exposure data. Because cyfluthrin and imidacloprid were toxic to H. azteca, the mixture test was designed based on an equipotent toxic unit method. Results from the mixture test indicated a model deviation ratio (MDR) of 1.7 or 2.7 depending on the model. Mixture test results from the simultaneous exposure to cyfluthrin and imidacloprid with both species indicated a greater than expected toxic response because the SR or MDR values were >1. Because these two insecticides are commonly used together in the same product formulations, nontarget species could be more affected due to their greater-than-additive toxicity observed in the current study. PMID:25298152

  13. KEPONE (TRADEMARK): CHRONIC EFFECTS ON EMBRYO, FRY, JUVENILE, AND ADULT SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS ('CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS')

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the toxicity of Kepone to, and uptake by embryo, fry, juvenile, and adult sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) using intermittent-flow toxicity tests. Concentrations of Kepone and percentage of adult fish surviving in a 28-day exposure were--Control, 95...

  14. Environmental concentrations of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine impact specific behaviors involved in reproduction, feeding and predator avoidance in the fish Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow)

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Joel; Klaper, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP) have been found in surface waters worldwide, but little is understood of their effects on the wildlife that inhabit these waters. Fluoxetine (Prozac; Eli Lilly), a highly prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is a commonly found PPCP in surface water. The purpose of this project was to determine if environmentally relevant concentrations of fluoxetine impact behavior that is important for population survival in native fish species, including reproduction, feeding and predator avoidance. Chronic 4-week exposures were conducted with doses ranging from 100 ng/L to 100 μg/L to cover a range of environmentally relevant concentrations up to higher concentrations comparable to other published studies with the same drug that have documented various physiological impacts. Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), a species native to North America, was used as it conducts a range of specific mating behaviors and therefore serves as an excellent model of specific impacts on brain function. Fluoxetine concentrations as low as 1 μg/L, a concentration that has been found in many freshwater environments, were found to significantly impact mating behavior, specifically nest building and defending in male fish. Males were also found to display aggression, isolation, and repetitive behaviors at higher concentrations. Female mating behavior was largely unaffected. In addition, predator avoidance behaviors in males and females were also impacted at 1 μg/L. Feeding was impacted at 10 μg/L and in the highest exposure (100 μg/L), egg production was limited by deaths of females due to significant male aggressive behaviors in first two weeks of exposure. Specific behavioral changes occurred at each concentration (most noticeably 1 μg/L and 100 μg/L) indicating a dose dependent effect that triggered different responses at lower exposures versus higher exposures or differential impacts of dose depending on brain region

  15. A mixture of an environmentally realistic concentration of a phthalate and herbicide reduces testosterone in male fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) through a novel mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Crago, Jordan; Klaper, Rebecca

    2012-04-01

    Several chemicals that are used by humans, such as pesticides and plastics, are released into the aquatic environment through wastewater and runoff and have been shown to be potent disruptors of androgen synthesis at high concentrations. Although many of these chemicals have been studied in isolation, a large amount of uncertainty remains over how fish respond to low concentrations of anti-androgenic mixtures, which more accurately reflects how such chemicals are present in the aquatic environment. In this study male fathead minnows (FHM) (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of two anti-androgens, the herbicide linuron, and the plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) individually and as part of a mixture of the two for a 28-day period. At the end of this period there was a reduction in plasma testosterone (T) concentrations in male FHM exposed to the mixture, but not in FHM exposed individually to linuron or DEHP or the control FHM. There was also a significant reduction in 17β-estradiol (E2) in the DEHP-only and mixture exposed groups as compared to the control. Contrary to what has been previously published for these two chemicals in mammals, the lower plasma T concentrations in male FHM exposed to the mixture was not a result of the inhibition of genes involved in steroidogenesis; nor due to an increase in the expression of genes associated with peroxisome proliferation. Rather, an increase in relative transcript abundance for CYP3A4 in the liver and androgen- and estrogen-specific SULT2A1 and SULT1st2 in the testes provides evidence that the decrease in plasma T and E2 may be linked to increased steroid catabolism. Feedback from the pituitary is not repressed as the relative expression of follicle stimulating hormone β-subunit mRNA transcript levels in the brain was significantly higher in both DEHP and mixture exposed FHM. In addition, luteinizing hormone β-subunit mRNA transcript levels increased but were not

  16. γ-Amino-butyric acid (GABA) receptor subunit and transporter expression in the gonad and liver of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Biggs, Katie; Seidel, Jason S; Wilson, Alex; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-09-01

    γ-Amino-butyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system. GABA receptors and synthesizing enzymes have also been localized to peripheral tissues including the liver, oviduct, uterus and ovary of mammals but the distribution and role of GABA in peripheral tissues of fish has not been fully investigated. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine if mRNA encoding GABA synthesizing enzymes (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67; gad65 and gad67), GABA transporters, and GABAA receptor subunits are localized to liver and gonad of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) (FHM) (2) investigate the effects of GABA on ovarian 17β-estradiol (E2) production, and (3) measure transcript responses in the ovary after in vitro incubation to GABA. Real-time PCR assays were developed for gad65, gad67, vesicular GABA transporter (vgat) and GABA transporter 1 (gat1), and select GABAA receptor subunits (gabra1, gabra5, gabrb1, gabrb2, gabrg1, gabrg2). All transcripts were localized to the brain as expected; however transcripts were also detected in the liver, ovary, and testis of FHMs. In the female liver, gad65 mRNA was significantly higher in expression compared to the male liver. Transcripts for gad67 were the highest in the brain>gonad>liver and in the gonads, gad67 was significantly higher in expression than gad65 mRNA. In the liver and gonad, the relative abundance of the subunits followed a general trend of gabrb1>gabrb2=gabrg1=gabrg2>gabra1=gabra5. To explore the effects of GABA in the ovary, tissue explants from reproductive female FHMs were treated with GABA (10(-10), 10(-8) and 10(-6)M) for 12h. GABA had no significant effect on 17β-estradiol production or on mRNA abundance for genes involved in ovarian steroidogenesis (e.g., 11βhsd, cyp17, cyp19a). There was a significant decrease in estrogen receptor 2a (esr2a) mRNA with 10(-10)M GABA. This study begins to investigate the GABA system in non-neural tissues of

  17. Influence of elevated alkalinity and natural organic matter (NOM) on tissue-specific metal accumulation and reproductive performance in fathead minnows during chronic, multi-trophic exposures to a metal mine effluent.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Jacob D; Dubé, Monique G; Niyogi, Som

    2013-09-01

    Metal bioavailability in aquatic organisms is known to be influenced by various water chemistry parameters. The present study examined the influence of alkalinity and natural organic matter (NOM) on tissue-specific metal accumulation and reproductive performance of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) during environmentally relevant chronic exposures to a metal mine effluent (MME). Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) or NOM (as commercial humic acid) were added to a Canadian MME [45 percent process water effluent (PWE)] in order to evaluate whether increases in alkalinity (3-4 fold) or NOM (~1.5-3mg/L dissolved organic carbon) would reduce metal accumulation and mitigate reproductive toxicity in fathead minnows during a 21-day multi-trophic exposure. Eleven metals (barium, boron, cobalt, copper, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, rubidium, selenium, and strontium) were elevated in the 45 percent PWE relative to the reference water. Exposure to the unmodified 45 percent PWE resulted in a decrease of fathead minnow egg production (~300 fewer eggs/pair) relative to the unmodified reference water, over the 21-day exposure period. Water chemistry modifications produced a modest decrease in free ion activity of some metals (as shown by MINTEQ, Version 3) in the 45 percent PWE exposure water, but did not alter the metal burden in the treatment-matched larval Chironomus dilutus (the food source of fish during exposure). The tissue-specific metal accumulation increased in fish exposed to the 45 percent PWE relative to the reference water, irrespective of water chemistry modifications, and the tissue metal concentrations were found to be similar between fish in the unmodified and modified 45 percent PWE (higher alkalinity or NOM) treatments. Interestingly however, increased alkalinity and NOM markedly improved fish egg production both in the reference water (~500 and ~590 additional eggs/pair, respectively) and 45 percent PWE treatments (~570 and ~260 additional eggs

  18. Sensitivity of the vitellogenin assay: ability to discriminate among exposure concentrations in adult fathead minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vitellogenin is often used to infer exposure of an organism to estrogenic substances. Vitellogenin gene induction and protein levels increase, up to a point, with concentration of estrogen and duration of exposure. A biomarker such as vitellogenin should exhibit sufficient sens...

  19. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BRAIN AND OVARY AROMATASE ACTIVITY AND ISOFORM-SPECIFIC AROMATASE MRNA EXPRESSION IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) - JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing evidence that some chemicals present in the environment have the capacity to inhibit, or potentially induce, aromatase activity. This study compared aromatase activities and isoform-specific mRNA expression in brain and ovary tissue from non-exposed fathead minn...

  20. Fathead fecundity study

    SciTech Connect

    Barman, M.A.E.; Geis, S.; Repavich, W.; Schappe, K.

    1995-12-31

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are cultured in controlled laboratory settings for use in aquatic toxicity testing. Culturing is done to maintain a continuous supply of organisms of all ages; breeders, juveniles and larvae. This study is designed to determine the age at which peak egg production occurs. Fish are paired, one male to one female, at three to four months of age. Daily egg production is recorded and graphed. The graph of egg production vs. fish age will determine the age at which peak egg production occurs. The results of this study will provide information for more efficient use of lab space and staff, while maximizing egg production.

  1. Studies of the environmental fate and effect of aircraft deicing fluids: detection of 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Cancilla, Devon A; Baird, J Christopher; Geis, Steven W; Corsi, Steven R

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a number of field and laboratory studies to evaluate the environmental impact of aircraft deicing and anti-icing fluids (ADAFs) on aquatic systems. Both 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (5-MeBt) and 4-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (4-MeBt), known additives to ADAFs, were found in whole-tissue extracts from minnows placed downstream of an effluent outfall that receives ADAF contaminated runoff from General Mitchell International Airport (Milwaukee, WI, USA). Neither of these compounds was detected in tissues from minnows placed upstream from the airport. A toxicity assessment of water collected during the minnow exposure studies utilizing Hyalella azteca, Pimephales promelas, and Ceriodaphnia dubia showed greater toxicity in a secondary airport outfall containing ADAFs when compared to upstream non-ADAF-contaminated samples. In two 28-d static renewal tests using 5-MeBt laboratory-fortified waters, 5-MeBt was detected in whole-tissue extracts of minnows at all concentrations tested. In studies using laboratory water fortified with 5-MeBt, the median lethal concentration (LC50) of 5-MeBt for P. promelas was found to be 22.0 mg/L. The LC50 for C. dubia to 5-MeBt laboratory-fortified water was found to be 81.3 mg/L. The 25% inhibition concentration (IC25) of 5-MeBt for the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum was 23.2 mg/L, and the average median effective concentration (EC50) for Microtox was 4.25 mg/L. The results of these field and lab studies indicate that additives, other than glycols, used in aircraft deicing fluids can be found in aquatic systems and may be of greater risk than previously believed. PMID:12503756

  2. Studies of the environmental fate and effect of aircraft deicing fluids: Detection of 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cancilla, Devon A.; Baird, J.C.; Geis, S.W.; Corsi, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a number of field and laboratory studies to evaluate the environmental impact of aircraft deicing and anti-icing fluids (ADAFs) on aquatic systems. Both 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (5-MeBt) and 4-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (4-MeBt), known additives to ADAFs, were found in whole-tissue extracts from minnows placed downstream of an effluent outfall that receives ADAF contaminated runoff from General Mitchell International Airport (Milwaukee, WI, USA). Neither of these compounds was detected in tissues from minnows placed upstream from the airport. A toxicity assessment of water collected during the minnow exposure studies utilizing Hyalella azteca, Pimephales promelas, and Ceriodaphnia dubia showed greater toxicity in a secondary airport outfall containing ADAFs when compared to upstream non-ADAF-contaminated samples. In two 28-d static renewal tests using 5-MeBt laboratory-fortified waters, 5-MeBt was detected in whole-tissue extracts of minnows at all concentrations tested. In studies using laboratory water fortified with 5-MeBt, the median lethal concentration (LC50) of 5-MeBt for P. promelas was found to be 22.0 mg/L. The LC50 for C. dubia to 5-MeBt laboratory-fortified water was found to be 81.3 mg/L. The 25% inhibition concentration (IC25) of 5-MeBt for the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum was 23.2 mg/L, and the average median effective concentration (EC50) for Microtox?? was 4.25 mg/L. The results of these field and lab studies indicate that additives, other than glycols, used in aircraft deicing fluids can be found in aquatic systems and may be of greater risk than previously believed.

  3. Minnows get columnaris too; copper sulfate works!

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to compare the therapeutic effects of copper sulfate (CuSO4), when delivered in either a flow-through or static system, on the survival of golden shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas; Fig. 1A) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas; Fig. 1B) infected with Flavobacterium columnare (...

  4. CHRONIC EFFECTS OF THE HERBICIDE DIURON ON FRESHWATER CLADOCERANS,AMPHIPODS,MIDGES,MINNOWS,WORMS, AND SNAILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chronic effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and reproduction of Daphnia pulex, and survival and growth of the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midge Chironomus tentans, juvenile and embro/larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, annelid worms, Lumbriculus variegatus,...

  5. Effects of the UV-filter 2-ethyl-hexyl-4-trimethoxycinnamate (EHMC) on expression of genes involved in hormonal pathways in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and link to vitellogenin induction and histology.

    PubMed

    Christen, Verena; Zucchi, Sara; Fent, Karl

    2011-04-01

    UV-filters are increasingly used in cosmetics and in the protection of materials against UV-irradiation, and ultimately they reach aquatic systems. The lipophilic UV-filter 2-ethyl-hexyl-4-trimethoxycinnamate (EHMC) belongs to one of the most frequently used UV-filters and accumulates in aquatic animals. Despite its ubiquitous presence in water and biota, very little is known about its potential hormonal effects on aquatic organisms. In our study, we evaluated the effects of measured water concentration of 5.4, 37.5, 244.5 and 394 μg/L EHMC on the expression of genes involved in hormonal pathways in the liver, testis and brain of male and female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). We compare the transcription profile with the plasma vitellogenin (VTG) content, secondary sex characteristics, and gonad histology. Transcripts of the androgen receptor (ar) were significantly down-regulated in the liver of females at 37.5, 244.5 μg/L and 394 μg/L EHMC. Additionally, the 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) transcript was significantly decreased in the liver of males at 37.5, 244.5 and 394 μg/L EHMC, and at 244.5 and 394 μg/L EHMC in females. The expressional changes were tissue-specific in most cases, being most significant in the liver. Vitellogenin plasma concentration was significantly increased at 244.5 μg/L EHMC in males. EHMC induced significant histological changes in testes and ovaries at 394 μg/L. Testes displayed a decrease in spermatocytes, and ovaries a decrease in previtellogenic oocytes. The induction of VTG plasma concentration and the histological changes in gonads suggest an estrogenic and/or antiandrogenic activity of EHMC. On the other hand, the gene expression profile shows an antiestrogenic (e.g.: down-regulation of esr1) activity of EHMC. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that EHMC displays low but multiple hormonal activities in fish. PMID:21356179

  6. Evaluation of whole mount in situ hybridization as a tool for pathway-based toxicological research in early-life stage fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Early-life stage fish can be more sensitive to chemical exposure than mature, adult fish. Therefore, defining adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) relevant to early-life stages is critical for linking perturbations of key events during fish development to potential adverse outcomes of...

  7. Evaluation of whole mount in situ hybridization as a tool for pathway-based toxicological research in early-life stage fathead minnows (poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Early-life stage fish can be more sensitive to chemical exposure than mature, adult fish. Therefore, defining adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) relevant to early-life stages is critical for linking perturbations of key events during fish development to potential adverse outcomes of...

  8. Evaluation of whole-mount in situ hybridization as a tool for pathway-based toxicological research with early-life stage fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Early-life stage fish can be more sensitive to chemical exposure than adult fish. Therefore, determining possible adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for early-life stages is crucial. To determine chemical effects and/or mechanisms of action in exposed fish embryos and larvae, whole-...

  9. Histological alternation and vitellogenin induction in adult rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) after exposure to ethynylestradiol and nonylphenol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zha, J.; Wang, Z.; Wang, N.; Ingersoll, C.

    2007-01-01

    Adult rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) were exposed to 0, 1, 5, and 25 ng/l (nominal concentrations) of 17??-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 3, 10, and 30 ??g/l (nominal concentrations) of 4-nonylphenol (NP) under flow-through conditions for a period of 28 d. Low mortality was observed at 5 and 25 ng/l EE2 and the growth of fish reduced significantly at 25 ng/l EE2 compared to controls. However, the gonadosomatic indices (GSI) of male fish were significantly higher in 1 ng/l EE2 treatments and in 10 and 30 ??g/l NP treatments (p < 0.05). Renal somatic indices (RSI) of male fish in EE2 treatments were significantly higher than those in controls (p < 0.05). In contrast, significantly decreased GSI and RSI of female fish could only be observed in 5 and 25 ng/l EE2 treatments (p < 0.05). Hepatosomatic indices (HSI) of male fish were significantly higher in 25 ng/l EE2 treatments. However, significantly increased of HSI of female fish could only be observed in 1 ng/l EE2 treatments. Plasma vitellogenin (VTG) induction could be observed in males after exposed to different concentrations of EE2 and NP, and plasma VTG concentrations in females exposed to 5 and 25 ng/l EE2 were also significantly higher than in controls (p < 0.05). At level higher than 5 ng/l EE2 or 30 ??g/l NP, hepatic tissue and renal tissue impairment of males could be observed. The pathological male liver was associated with a hypertrophy of hepatocytes and damages to cellar structure and accumulated eosinophilic material. Renal tissue showed different pathological effects which was reflected by accumulated eosinophilic material, hemorrhages within the kidney tubules and hypertrophy of the tubular epithelia. Also at these levels of exposure, feminization of male fish could be noticed and parts of males manifested the testis-ova phenomenon. Ovaries of female rare minnow in 25 ng/l EE2 treatment group were degenerated. Therefore when exposed to EE2 and NP even at environmental observed concentrations, adverse

  10. Behind the scene with the fathead team: Part III. Molecular, biochemical, and in vitro analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a research team focused on aquatic toxicity testing using fathead minnows as a model species, this presentation is the third in the three-part series, giving an overview of the types of field and laboratory studies as well as sample processing our team conducts at the ...

  11. Modulation of estrogenic exposure effects mediated through temperature and dietary regimens in male fat head minnows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A plethora of studies has examined the biological effects of environmental estrogens on fathead minnows. However, in many cases results from environmental studies do not match the expectations from prior laboratory exposures, which usually are designed to minimize confounding factors such as temper...

  12. Enhanced GSH synthesis by Bisphenol A exposure promoted DNA methylation process in the testes of adult rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cong; Zhang, Yingying; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Zaizhao

    2016-09-01

    DNA methylation is a commonly studied epigenetic modification. The mechanism of BPA on DNA methylation is poorly understood. The present study aims to explore whether GSH synthesis affects DNA methylation in the testes of adult male rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus in response to Bisphenol A (BPA). Male G. rarus was exposed to 1, 15 and 225μgL(-1) BPA for 7 days. The levels of global DNA methylation, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and glutathione (GSH) in the testes were analyzed. Meanwhile, the levels of enzymes involved in DNA methylation and de novo GSH synthesis, and the substrate contents for GSH production were measured. Furthermore, gene expression profiles of the corresponding genes of all studied enzymes were analyzed. Results indicated that BPA at 15 and 225μgL(-1) caused hypermethylation of global DNA in the testes. The 15μgL(-1) BPA resulted in significant decrease of ten-eleven translocation proteins (TETs) while 225μgL(-1) BPA caused significant increase of DNA methyltransferase proteins (DNMTs). Moreover, 225μgL(-1) BPA caused significant increase of H2O2 and GSH levels, and the de novo GSH synthesis was enhanced. These results indicated that the significant decrease of the level of TETs may be sufficient to cause the DNA hypermethylation by 15μgL(-1) BPA. However, the significantly increased of DNMTs contributed to the significant increase of DNA methylation levels by 225μgL(-1) BPA. Moreover, the elevated de novo GSH synthesis may promote the DNA methylation process. PMID:27474941

  13. EFFECTS OF TRENBOLONE ON EXPRESSION OF ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE PLASMA PROTEINS IN ADULT SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW, (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protein profiling can be used for detection of biomarkers that can be applied diagnostically to screen chemicals for endocrine modifying activity. In previous studies using sheepshead minnows (SHM), mass spectral analysis detected four peptides (2950.5, 2972.5, 3003.4, 3025.5 m/z...

  14. Behind the scene with the fathead team: Part I. Caged fish for assessment of chemicals in the environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a research team focused on aquatic toxicity testing using fathead minnows as a model species, this presentation is the first of a three-part series, giving an overview of the types of field and laboratory studies as well as sample processing our team conducts at the U....

  15. Field verification of predator attraction to minnow alarm substance.

    PubMed

    Wisenden, Brian D; Thiel, Travis A

    2002-02-01

    Fishes such as minnows in the superorder Ostariophysi possess specialized alarm substance cells (ASC) that contain an alarm cue. Alarm substance can only be released by damage to the epidermis; thus, the release of alarm substance is a reliable indicator of predation risk. When nearby minnows detect the cue, they adopt a range of antipredator behaviors that reduce their probability of predation. Predator-predator interactions afford prey an opportunity to escape and, thus, a fitness benefit that maintains alarm substance calls over evolutionary time. Here, we present data from a simple field experiment verifying that nearby predators are attracted to minnow alarm substance because it signals an opportunity to pirate a meal. Fishing lures were baited with sponge blocks scented with either (1) water (control for sponge odor and appearance), (2) skin extract from non-ostariophysan convict cichlids (superorder Acanthopterygii, Archocentrus "Cichlasoma" nigrofasciatus) to control for general injury-released cues from fish, or (3) skin extract from fathead minnows (superorder Ostariophysi, Pimephales promelas). Predator strike frequency on each sponge type was 1, 1, and 7 for water, cichlid, and minnow cues, respectively. These data provide the first field test using fish predators of the predator-attraction hypothesis for the evolution of Ostariophysan alarm substance cells. PMID:11925077

  16. A Computational Model for Oocyte Growth Dynamics in Fathead Minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular biomarkers have been used in ecotoxicological studies to evaluate the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals in fish. Changes in these molecular biomarkers must then be linked to the effects upon reproduction in individuals, and subsequently populations. To meet th...

  17. EE2 Changes Gene Expression in Fathead Minnow Testis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens have been implicated in altering reproductive health of aquatic animals. Early studies of sewage treatment effluents attributed the feminization of male fish to exposure to mixtures of natural and synthetic estrogens. One of the most potent estrogens kno...

  18. GENETIC VARIATION FOR COPPER RESISTANCE IN FATHEAD MINNOW TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unexplained variation in the results of aquatic organism toxicity tests is a consistently observed and troubling phenomenon. Possible sources of variation include differences in condition or nutritional status of the population prior to the test, as well as age, density and hand...

  19. Behind the scene with the fathead team: Part II. In-lab flow through exposures and “omics” to complement effects based monitoring in the Duluth-Superior Harbor.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a research team focused on aquatic toxicity testing using fathead minnows as a model species, this presentation is the second of a three-part series, giving an overview of the types of field and laboratory studies as well as sample processing our team conducts at the U...

  20. Metformin exposure at environmentally relevant concentrations causes potential endocrine disruption in adult male fish.

    PubMed

    Niemuth, Nicholas J; Jordan, Renee; Crago, Jordan; Blanksma, Chad; Johnson, Rodney; Klaper, Rebecca D

    2015-02-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are emerging contaminants that have been found ubiquitously in wastewater and surface waters around the world. A major source of these compounds is incomplete metabolism in humans and subsequent excretion in human waste, resulting in discharge into surface waters by wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. One pharmaceutical found in particularly high abundance in recent WWTP effluent and surface water studies is metformin, one of the world's most widely prescribed antidiabetic drugs. Interactions between insulin signaling and steroidogenesis suggest potential endocrine-disrupting effects of metformin found in the aquatic environment. Adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were chronically exposed to metformin for 4 wk, at 40 µg/L, a level similar to the average found in WWTP effluent in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. Genetic endpoints related to metabolism and endocrine function as well as reproduction-related endpoints were examined. Metformin treatment induced significant up-regulation of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) encoding the egg-protein vitellogenin in male fish, an indication of endocrine disruption. The present study, the first to study the effects of environmentally relevant metformin exposure in fathead minnows, demonstrates the need for further study of the endocrine-disrupting effects of metformin in aquatic organisms. PMID:25358780

  1. Metformin Exposure at Environmentally Relevant Concentrations Causes Potential Endocrine Disruption in Adult Male Fish

    PubMed Central

    Niemuth, Nicholas J; Jordan, Renee; Crago, Jordan; Blanksma, Chad; Johnson, Rodney; Klaper, Rebecca D

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are emerging contaminants that have been found ubiquitously in wastewater and surface waters around the world. A major source of these compounds is incomplete metabolism in humans and subsequent excretion in human waste, resulting in discharge into surface waters by wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. One pharmaceutical found in particularly high abundance in recent WWTP effluent and surface water studies is metformin, one of the world's most widely prescribed antidiabetic drugs. Interactions between insulin signaling and steroidogenesis suggest potential endocrine-disrupting effects of metformin found in the aquatic environment. Adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were chronically exposed to metformin for 4 wk, at 40 µg/L, a level similar to the average found in WWTP effluent in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. Genetic endpoints related to metabolism and endocrine function as well as reproduction-related endpoints were examined. Metformin treatment induced significant up-regulation of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) encoding the egg-protein vitellogenin in male fish, an indication of endocrine disruption. The present study, the first to study the effects of environmentally relevant metformin exposure in fathead minnows, demonstrates the need for further study of the endocrine-disrupting effects of metformin in aquatic organisms. Environ Toxicol Chem 2014;9999:1–6. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:25358780

  2. Targeting neurotrophic factors and their receptors, but not cholinesterase or neurotransmitter, in the neurotoxicity of TDCPP in Chinese rare minnow adults (Gobiocypris rarus).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lilai; Li, Jiasu; Zha, Jinmiao; Wang, Zijian

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been detected at high concentrations in various environmental and biotic samples, but little is known about their toxicity. In this study, the potential neurotoxicity of three OPFRs (TCEP, TDCPP, and TPP) and Chlorpyrifos (CPF, an organophosphate pesticide) were compared in Chinese rare minnow using an acute toxicity test and a 21-day fish assay. The acute test demonstrated significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) by CPF. Although significant AChE inhibition at high concentration of TPP was also observed, none of the OPFRs had effects similar to CPF on these enzymes, indicating that their acute toxicities to Chinese rare minnow may be unrelated to cholinesterase inhibition. In addition, the 21-day fish assay with TDCPP demonstrated no significant effects on cholinesterase activities or neurotransmitter levels. Nonetheless, this OPFR exhibited widespread effects on the neurotrophic factors and their receptors (e.g., ntf3, ntrk1, ntrk2, ngfr, and fgf2, fgf11, fgf22, fgfr4), indicating that TDCPP or other OPFRs may elicit neurological effects by targeting neurotrophic factors and their receptors in Chinese rare minnow. PMID:26552522

  3. CHRONIC TOXICITY OF METHOXYCHLOR, MALATHION, AND CARBOFURAN TO SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) were exposed to each of three pesticides--methoxychlor, malathion, and carbofuran--in flowing seawater to determine the acute and chronic (partial life-cycle) effects. Mortality of adult fish exposed to concentrations of methoxychlor > o...

  4. EVALUATION OF METHOXYCHLOR AS AN ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR IN FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent concerns over the possible effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on humans and wildlife has resulted in considerable interest in environmental contaminants that adversely affect aspects of sexual reproduction and early development. The U.S. Environmental Protect...

  5. Differential Toxicity and Accumulation of Fipronil Enantiomers in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a chiral insecticide applied as a racemate of two enantiomers. Because of its high log Koc, fipronil will be found primarily in sediments of aquatic environments. Although a number of studies have examined toxicity in aquatic invertebrates, data on enantioselective t...

  6. Meeting in China: Differential Toxicity and Accumulation of Fipronil Enantiomers in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a chiral insecticide applied as a racemate with two enantiomers. Because of its high log KOC, fipronil will be found primarily in sediments of aquatic environments. Although a number of studies have examined toxicity in aquatic invertebrates, data on enantioselective...

  7. Enantioselective Toxicity and Biotransformation of Fipronil in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a relatively new chiral phenylpyrazole insecticide used to control both agricultural and household invertebrate pests. Fipronil is applied as a racemate, or equal mixture, of its two enantiomers. As regulations on older pesticides increase, production and applicatio...

  8. Effects of Diethylstilbestrol in Fathead Minnows: Part 1. Effects on Reproductive Endocrine Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen, was once widely prescribed to prevent miscarriages, and was used as a growth promoter in feed for beef and poultry production. After it was determined that DES caused significant adverse effects in the offspring of mo...

  9. Testing quantitative adverse outcome pathway predictions using aromatase inhibitors in female fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    To become more efficient and cost effective regulatory toxicology is increasingly averting from whole animal testing toward collecting data at lower levels of biological organization, through such means as in vitro high throughput screening (HTS) assays. When anchored to relevant...

  10. METABOLISM OF PBDES IN FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) AND EFFECTS ON THYROID REGULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBDE effects on fish and other wildlife continue to be poorly understood, and this research will contribute to filling this data gap. It will increase our understanding of PBDE metabolic pathways and mechanisms of thyroid dysfunction in fish exposed to this important class of ...

  11. Effects of the azole fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) steroidogenesis pathway

    EPA Science Inventory

    Azole fungicides, used for both agriculture and human therapeutic applications may disrupt endocrine function of aquatic life. Azole fungicides are designed to inhibit the fungal enzyme lanosterol 14 á-demethylase (cytochrome P450 [CYP] 51). However, they can also interact...

  12. DIFFERENTIAL DISPLAY OF TRENBOLONE AND DEHP INDUCED GENE TRANSCRIPT PATTERNS IN FATHEAD MINNOW LIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The endocrine disruptor risk assessment process is being delayed without more robust data on the estrogenic and androgenic activity of chemicals found in the environment such as trenbolone and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Trenbolone is an androgenic compound known to reduc...

  13. ASSESSING THE USE OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAYS FOR FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) TO EXAMINE EXPOSURE VARIABLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology has proven to be a useful tool for analyzing the transcriptome of various organisms representing conditions such as disease states, developmental stages, and responses to chemical exposure. Although most commercially available arrays are limited to organism...

  14. Hormone Binding to Recombinant Estrogen Receptors from Human, Alligator, Quail, Salamander, and Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work, a 96-well plate estrogen receptor binding assay was developed to facilitate the direct comparison of chemical binding to full-length recombinant estrogen receptors across vertebrate classes. Receptors were generated in a baculovirus expression system. This approach ...

  15. COMPARISON OF FATHEAD MINNOW AND HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR BINDING TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental estrogens have the potential to disrupt endocrine function in a myriad of species. However, in vitro assays designed to detect and characterize endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) typically utilize mammalian estrogen receptors. Our overall objective is to charac...

  16. Comparative Biological Effects and Potency of 17a- and 17ß-Estradiol In Fathead Minnows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    17ß-estradiol is the most potent natural estrogen commonly found in anthropogenically altered environments and has been the focus of many toxicological laboratory studies. However, fewer aquatic toxicological data on the effects of 17a-estradiol, a diastereoisomer of 17ß-estradiol, exists in the li...

  17. Effects of the insecticide fipronil on reproductive endocrinology in the fathead minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA receptors play an important role in neuroendocrine regulation in fish. Disruption of the GABAergic system by environmental contaminants could interfere with normal regulation of the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis, leading to imp...

  18. Sensitivity of the vitellogenin assay to diagnose exposure of fathead minnows to 17α-ethynylestradiol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vitellogenin is frequently used as a biomarker of exposure to environmental estrogens. When designing an experiment using vitellogenin, investigators must decide whether to deploy fish in the field or expose fish in the lab, how many fish to expose, and how long to expose the fi...

  19. Effects of Diethylstilbestrol in Fathead Minnows: Part 2. Concentrations in Water and Tissues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen, was once widely prescribed to prevent miscarriages, and was used as a growth promoter in feed for beef and poultry production. After it was determined that DES caused significant adverse effects in the offspring of mot...

  20. Cloning and initial characterization of nuclear and membrane progesterone receptors in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both native progestagens and synthetic progestins have important effects on reproduction that are mediated through progesterone receptors (PRs). They regulate gamete maturation and can serve as precursors for other steroid hormones in vertebrates and act as reproductive pheromone...

  1. Effects of a Glucocorticoid Receptor Agonist, Dexamethasone, on Fathead Minnow Reproduction and Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few studies have examined the effects of synthetic glucocorticoids on the reproductive axis of fish, despite the fact that these chemicals are therapeutically prescribed anti-inflammatory agents that are abundantly produced and consumed. To generate data to assess potential risk ...

  2. Effects of a Glucocorticoid Receptor Agonist, Dexamethasone, on Fathead Minnow Reproduction, Growth, and Development.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few studies have examined the effects of synthetic glucocorticoids on the reproductive axis of fish, despite the fact that these chemicals are therapeutically prescribed anti-inflammatory agents that are abundantly produced and consumed. To generate data to assess potential risk ...

  3. A SHORT-TERM REPRODUCTION TEST WITH THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS): L METHODS DESCRIPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the time and expense associated with full life-cycle testing, most current toxicity tests with fish do not explicity consider reproductive output as an endpoint but, rather, focus on early life-stage survival and development. However, there are classes of chemicals that co...

  4. A Computational Model for Oocyte Growth Dynamics in Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular biomarkers have been used in ecotoxicological studies to evaluate the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals in fish. Ideally, changes in these molecular biomarkers should be linked to the effects upon reproduction in individuals, and subsequently populations. To m...

  5. Dynamic Nature of Alterations in the Endocrine System of Fathead Minnows Exposed to Prochloraz

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is controlled through various feedback mechanisms, ideally maintaining dynamic homeostasis in the face of changing environmental conditions, including exposure to chemical stressors. These studies assessed the effects of t...

  6. Investigation of adaptive responses in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to the model aromatase inhibitor fadrozole

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is a highly dynamic system, which, through various feedback mechanisms, strives to maintain physiological conditions conducive to reproduction even in potentially stressful situations. The development of useful predictive m...

  7. FATHEAD MINNOW AND PEARL DACE PILOT AT CANADIAN EXPERIMENTAL LAKES AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing concern about the potential impact of EDCs on aquatic organisms. Among the EDCs found in aquatic habitats are synthetic estrogens, which are used in contraceptives and other pharmaceuticals. These chemicals enter waterways through sewage treatment plants and s...

  8. VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION IN FATHEAD MINNOWS EXPOSED TO EE2 IN A WHOLE LAKE DOSING EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A whole-lake endocrine disruption experiment was conducted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), northwestern Ontario in 2001 and 2002. This experiment examined population, organism, biochemical and cellular-level effects in lake trout, white sucke...

  9. Non-gel Based Proteomics to Study Steroid Receptor Agonists in the Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicoproteomics is an emerging field that is greatly enabled by non-gel based methods using LC MS/MS for biomarker discovery and characterization for endocrine disrupting chemicals. Using iTRAQ (isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation), we quantified a diverse r...

  10. Hypothesis testing with computational modeling: linking aromatase inhibition with plasma vitellogenin dynamics in fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fadrozole inhibits aromatase (CYP19A), a key enzyme that converts testosterone to estradiol (E2). In fish, E2 concentrations control hepatic synthesis ofthe glycolipoprotein vitellogenin (VTG), an egg yolk precursor protein essential to oocyte development and larval survival. Whe...

  11. Effects of Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Bisphenol A on the Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a wide-spread environmental contaminant of concern due, in part, to possible effects on the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, including activation of the estrogen receptor (ER). There is a reasonable amount of toxicological information fo...

  12. Effects of Xenoestrogen and Androgen Mixtures on Ovarian Transcriptome of the Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), such as the estrogens ethinylestradiol (EE2) and bisphenol A (BPA), and androgens like 17â-trenbolone (TRB) can occur as mixtures in aquatic environments. To date, however, most studies with EDCs in fish have focused on their effects as indi...

  13. A Compendium of Transcriptomic Effects of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals on the Fathead Minnow Ovary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding potential hazards of chemicals released into the environment is challenging not only due to the large and growing number of chemicals and materials that need to be screened, but also to the bioavailability, exposure conditions, and species differences among others. ...

  14. VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS EXPOSED TO DI(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PHTHALATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer used extensively in the plastics industry. DEHP has been shown to be ubiquitous in the environment and has been detected in ground and surface waters, sediment sludge and at several Superfund sites. Previous studies using rats ...

  15. The Effects of Endocrine Disruptors on Steroidogenesis Gene Expression Dynamics in Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid hormones play key roles in regulating reproduction and development and fish and other vertebrates. This presentation reports results from two in vitro experiments aimed characterizing the dynamics of transcriptional and metabolomic responses to endocrine disrupting chemi...

  16. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Reproduction in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fib...

  17. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Reproduction in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fibrate th...

  18. Effects of gemfibrozil on lipid metabolism, steroidogenesis and reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fi...

  19. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism and Steroidogenesis in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fib...

  20. Perturbation of Gene Expression and Steroidogenesis with In vitro Exposure of Fathead Minnow Ovaries to Ketoconazole

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various chemicals in the environment can disrupt normal endocrine function, including steroid hormone synthesis, causing deleterious effects. Because these compounds can act at different levels of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, their effects can lead to a mixture...

  1. Method optimization for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) liver S9 isolation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols have been proposed to assess metabolic stability in rainbow trout liver S9 fractions. Using in vitro substrate depletion assays, in vitro intrinsic clearance rates can be calculated for a variety of study compounds. Existing protocols suggest potential adaptati...

  2. Development and Validation of a 2,000 Gene Microarray in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of the gene microarray has given the field of ecotoxicology a new tool to understand the mechanisms of action (MOA) of various anthropogenic compounds. . .Overall, data from this analysis suggest that the microarrays can be broadly useful in ecotoxicology studies ...

  3. Developmental Effects Of A Municipal Wastewater Effluent On Two Generations Of The Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Municipal wastewater effluents have been shown to contain a variety of anthropogenic compounds, many of which are know to display estrogenic properties. While multiple laboratory studies have shown the effects of such compounds on an individual basis at elevated concentrations, ...

  4. Effects of a 3β-hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Inhibitor, Trilostane, on the Fathead Minnow Reproductive Axis

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of environmental contaminants and plant flavonoid compounds have been shown to inhibit the activity of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5-Δ4 isomerase (3β-HSD). Because 3β-HSD plays a critical role in steroid hormone synthesis, inhibition of 3β-HSD represents a potentia...

  5. Development of a Computational Model for Female Fathead Minnows exposed to Two Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (e.g., estrogens and androgens) are known to affect reproductive functions in fish. A synthetic estrogen used in birth control pills, 17á-ethynylestradiol (EE2), is discharged from wastewater treatment plants into water bodies throughout the United ...

  6. Expression Signatures for a Model Androgen and Antiandrogen in the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas Ovary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trenbolone and flutamide are prototypical model compounds for respectively androgen and antiandrogen modes of action. Trenbolone is an anabolic steroid used in cattle industry to increase weight gain and feed efficiency, and flutamide is a pharmaceutical used to treat prostate c...

  7. SHORT TERM FATHEAD MINNOW REPRODUCTION ASSAY GENERATES RESPONSE PROFILES BROADLY CONSISTENT WITH MECHANISMS OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small fish tests have been a recommended component of regulatory programs proposed for EDCs ... the EPA plans to use this assay to help fulfill screening and testing requirements associated with the current EDC regulatory program.

  8. Effects of the Antipsychotic Drug, Haloperidol, on Reproduction in the Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Haloperidol is a butyrophenone antipsychotic drug used for the treatment of human hyperactive and manic disorders, agitation, and schizophrenia. The drug is thought to act through antagonism of dopaminergic receptors. We have studied a variety of endocrine-disrupting chemicals wi...

  9. Genotyping Sex in Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas, for Use in Endocrine Disruption Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting compounds have been shown to completely sex reverse both male and female individuals in amphibian, avian, fish, invertebrate, and reptile species. In many cases these sex-reversed individuals are morphologically indistinguishable from normal individuals. De...

  10. Genotyping Sex in Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas, for Use in Endocrine Disruption Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting compounds have been shown to completely sex reverse both male and female individuals in amphibian, avian, fish, invertebrate, and reptile species. In many cases these sex-reversed individuals are morphologically indistinguishable from normal individuals. Dete...

  11. Ketoconazole in the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas: Reproductive Toxicity and Biological Compensation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ketoconazole (KTC) is a model pharmaceutical representing inidazole and triazole pesticides which inhibit fungal growth through blocking a cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated step in ergosterol biosynthesis. Overall, our data indicate that, while KTC adversely affects steroidogenesis ...

  12. VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION AS AN INDICATOR OF EXPOSURE TO 17-ALPHA-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL IN FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmentally persistent chemicals that functionally mimic estrogen are ubiquitous in surface waters and have been shown to effect reproductive health of species living in these habitats. Toxicant induced transcription of specific genes is a sensitive indicator of exposure and ...

  13. EFFECTS OF THE MAMMALIAN ANTIANDROGEN VINCLOZOLIN ON DEVELOPMENT AND REPRODUCTION OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work with the chlorinated fungicide vinclozolin and its metabolites, 2-{[(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-carbamoyl]oxy}-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (M1) and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2), indicated antiandrogenic properties expressed in vivo as abnormalities in...

  14. EFFECTS OF THE MAMMALIAN ANTIANDROGEN VINCLOZOLIN ON DEVELOPMENT AND REPRODUCTION OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work with the chlorinated fungicide vinclozolin and its metabolites, 2-{[(3,5-dichloropheny1]-carbamoyl]oxy}-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (M1) and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2), indicated antiandrogenic properties expressed in vivo as abnormalities in...

  15. Environmental gestagens activate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) nuclear progesterone and androgen receptors in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gestagen is a collective term for endogenous and synthetic progesterone receptor (PR) ligands. In teleost fishes, 17á,20â-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP) and17á,20â,21- trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (20â-S) are the predominant progestogens, whereas in other vertebrates the major pro...

  16. THE INSTABILITY OF ESTROGENIC CHEMICALS DURING LABORATORY STATIC EXPOSURE CONDITIONS WITH MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as Para-nonylphenol (NP), estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), estriol (E3) and ethynylestradiol (EE2) are shown to be ubiquitous in surface waters, sediments and sludge. These EDCs are known to induce vitellogenin gene (Vg) expression in male...

  17. Determining the effects of ammonia on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic organisms are exposed to a multitude of contaminants and to fully understand the impact of multiple stressors on fish populations, we should first understand the mechanism of action for each toxicant and how the combined effects manifest at the level of the individual. Am...

  18. METALLOTHIONEIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION AS AN INDICATOR OF METAL EXPOSURE IN FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metallothionein is a cysteine rich, low molecular weight, metal binding protein. Basal levels of endogenous metallothioneins (MT) have been reported in all eucaryotes. MT has been shown to play an essential role in regulating physiological requirements of essential metals such a...

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Profiles of Androgen Receptor Signaling in the Liver of Fathead Minnows Pimephalus promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgenic chemicals are present in the environment at concentrations that impair reproductive processes in fish. The objective of this experiment was to identify proteins altered by an androgen receptor agonist (17â-trenbolone) and antagonist (flutamide) in the liver. Female fa...

  20. TRANSFER TO TOXIC CONCENTRATIONS OF SELENIUM FROM PARENT TO PROGENY IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selenium, an essential trace clement, may become concentrated in aquatic ecosystems to levels that are toxic to fish. inley (1985) and Gillespie and Baumarn (1986) have shown that selenium in overflow water from coal burning power plant settling basins contributed to a decline in...

  1. Enantioselective toxicity and bioaccumulation of fipronil in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) following water and sediment exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a widely used, broad-spectrum pesticide that is applied as an equal mixture of two enantiomers. As regulations on older pesticides become more stringent, production and application of fipronil is expected to grow, leading to increased inputs into aquatic environments ...

  2. Integrated approach to explore the mechanisms of aromatase inhibition and recovery in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aromatase, a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, is a key enzyme in estradiol synthesis that catalyzes the aromatization of androgens into estrogens in ovaries. Here, we used an integrated approach to assess the mechanistic basis of the direct effects of aromatase inhibiti...

  3. Gene Expression Responses in Male Fathead Minnows Exposed to Binary Mixtures of an Estrogen and Antiestrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic organisms are continuously exposed to complex mixtures of chemicals, many of which can interfere with their endocrine system, resulting in impaired reproduction, development or survival, among others. In order to analyze the effects and mechanisms of action of estrogen...

  4. Evaluation of arsenic speciation in rainbow trout and fathead minnows from dietary exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of total arsenic and various arsenic species were measured in food and fish tissue samples from two dietary arsenic exposures to juvenile fish. For arsenic speciation, samples were extracted with 10% MeOH and analyzed by HPLC/ICPMS. Total arsenic concentration...

  5. Minnows can acclimate to total residual chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Lotts, J.W. Jr.; Stewart, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    Observations in a chlorine-contaminated stream in eastern Tennessee revealed several species of fish in areas where total residual chlorine (TRC) concentrations were often great enough to be lethal, based on the results of other studies. The authors used in situ and laboratory experiments to test the hypothesis that minnows could acclimate to TRC. Acclimation was assessed by time-to-death for fish exposed to a single lethal regime of TRC. In in situ experiments, striped shiner and central stoneroller minnows collected from East Fork Poplar Creek at a TRC-contaminated site and a site farther downstream, where TRC was below detection, were caged at sites in the stream where TRC concentrations were either nil or great enough to be lethal. At the cage with high TRC, minnows collected from the ``TRC-free`` site survived two to four times longer (15.8 h vs. 6.1 h) than the same species from the ``TRC-free`` site. In laboratory experiments, golden shiner minnows were exposed to TRC in a stepwise increasing concentration regime (0.04 mg/L during week 1, 0.08 mg/L during week 2, and 0.12 mg/L during week 3) before being challenged-tested with a lethal concentration of TRC. Minnows that had been previously exposed to TRC survived longer than controls in each test, and the magnitude of the mean time to death increased as the TRC concentration and duration of exposure increased (1.2-, 2.5-, and 3.9-fold increases for weeks 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Another experiment with golden shiner minnows showed that a 21-d exposure to TRC at a low concentration (0.04 mg/L) only slightly increased their tolerance to TRC. Thus, several minnow species apparently can acclimate, fairly rapidly, to TRC. This study may help explain why fish kills are less common than expected in TRC-contaminated streams.

  6. PLASMA CLEARANCE OF VITELLOGENIN IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS AFTER CESSATION OF EXPOSURE TO 17BETA-ESTRADIOL AND PARA-NONYLPHENOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two experiments were performed to determine the rate of vitellogenin plasma accumulation and clearance in male sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) during and after exposure to either 17b-estradiol (E2) or para-nonylphenol (p-NP). Adult fish were continuously exposed to aqu...

  7. TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL VARIABILITY IN THE ESTROGENICITY OF A MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenicity of a municipal wastewater effluent was monitored using the vitellogenin biomarker in adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Variability in expression of the vitellogenin biomarker was evident among monitoring periods. Significant increases in plasma vit...

  8. Cloning and initial characterization of nuclear and four membrane progesterone receptors in the fathead minnow(Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both native progestagens and synthetic progestins have important effects on reproduction that are mediated through progesterone receptors (PRs). Progestagens regulate gamete maturation in vertebrates, are critical regulators of placental mammal pregnancy, and act as reproductive ...

  9. Comparing biological effects and potencies of estrone and 17 B-estradiol in mature fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of endocrine active compounds such as estrogens in treated wastewater effluent and their effects on aquatic life are causing concern among aquatic resource managers. In contrast to 17B-estradiol (E2), the steroid hormone produced by all vertebrates, the biological effects of estrone (E1...

  10. TOXICITY OF SELECTED CONTROLLED RELEASE AND CORRESPONDING UNFORMULATED TECHNICAL GRADE PESTICIDES TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW 'PIMEPHALES PROMELAS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controlled release pesticides (CRP), also called encapsulated pesticides, are a relatively recent development, although controlled release technology has been in use by the drug industry for many years. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of selected CRP's o...

  11. Integrated ecological hazard assessment of waste site soil extracts using FETAX and short-term fathead minnow teratogenesis assay

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, D.J.; Stover, E.L.; Bantle, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX) is a 96-h whole embryo-larval assay designed to detect environmental developmental toxicants for use in ecological hazard assessment. FETAX offers several advantages in integrated biological hazard assessment including, time- and cost-effectiveness, technical ease, and versatility. FETAX has undergone extensive intra- and more recently interlaboratory validation with known mammalian teratogens and non-teratogens. Ecological hazard evaluations of contaminated sediments, waste site soils, and complex surface and groundwaters have also been performed. An integrated hazard assessment study using FETAX, the conventional, Pimephales promelas 7-d teratogenecity test, and an abbreviated P. promelas teratogenecity test utilizing the general FETAX protocol was conducted with specific reference toxicants and aqueous extracts of contaminated hazardous waste site soils. Results from the studies indicated that FETAX can be used as a component of a battery of bioassays designed to assess potential ecological hazard. Furthermore, the generalized FETAX protocol may be useful with other species in evaluating developmental toxicity hazard.

  12. Current lineages of the epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cell line are contaminated with fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, cells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.; Batts, W.; deKinkelin, P.; LeBerre, M.; Bremont, M.; Fijan, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initially established from proliferative skin lesions of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio L., the epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cell line (Fijan, Sulimanovic, Bearzotti, Muzinic, Zwillenberg, Chilmonczyk, Vautherot & de Kinkelin 1983) has become one of the most widely used tools for research on fish viruses and the diagnosis of fish viral diseases.

  13. Sex Differentiation as a Target of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Early Life Stage Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in concentrated animal feed operation (CAFO) waste, and the potential effects of these chemicals on aquatic ecosystems have been of recent concern. There is evidence that exposure to EDCs during enhanced windows of sensitiv...

  14. Effects of the anti-microbial, triclocarban, on the reproductive function and ovarian transcriptome of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclocarban (TCC) is a widely used antimicrobial agent that is routinely detected in surface waters. The present study was designed to examine TCC’s efficacy and mode of action as a reproductive toxicant in fish. Reproductively mature Pimephales promelas were continuously ...

  15. Linkage of Biochemical Responses to Population-level Effects: A Case Study with Vitellogenin in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a novel approach to quantifying estuarine habitat use by fish using stable isotopes. In brief, we further developed and evaluated an existing stable isotope turnover model to estimate the time American shad, an anadromous clupeid, spend in various river habitats durin...

  16. Dynamic Nature of Alterations in the Endocrine System of Fathead Minnows Exposed to the Fungicide Prochloraz, Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is controlled through various feedback mechanisms that ideally serve to maintain a dynamic homeostasis of the system in the face of changing environmental conditions, including exposure to chemical stressors. In these stud...

  17. Effects of Cholesterol-altering Pharmaceuticals on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Gene Expression in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmaceuticals that target cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake are among the most widely prescribed drugs and have been detected in the aquatic environment. Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome pr...

  18. Effects of a real-time exposure to an estrogenic effluent on reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are a well-established point of convergence through which anthropogenic chemicals enter surface waters. Whole effluent testing guidelines were developed to screen these complex mixtures for acute toxicity. However, effects-based approac...

  19. Impaired anterior swim bladder inflation following exposure to the thyroid peroxidase inhibitor 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole Part I: Fathead minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of adverse outcome pathways linking specific chemical-induced pathway perturbations to adverse outcomes relevant to regulatory decision-making has potential to support the development of alternatives to traditional whole organism toxicity tests, such as the fish early...

  20. MOLECULAR, PROTEIN AND HISTOLOGICAL INDICATORS IN FATHEAD MINNOWS EXPOSEDF TO EE2 IN A WHOLE-LAKE DOSING EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A whole-lake endocrine disruption experiment was conducted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), northwestern Ontario from 2001 to 2003. This experiment examined population, organism, biochemical and cellular-level effects in lake trout, white suck...

  1. Effects of Fadrozole, Ketoconazole, and 17β-trenbolone on Ex Vivo Steroidogenesis in the Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of endocrine-disrupting chemicals have the ability to disrupt steroidogenesis through interaction with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. We examined the effects of the competitive aromatase inhibitor fadrozole (0, 3, and 30 g/L), the cytochrome P450 enzyme...

  2. A short-term study investigating the estrogenic potency of diethylstilbesterol in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen that has been banned for use in humans, but still is employed in livestock and aquaculture operations in some parts of the world. Detectable concentrations of DES in effluent and surface waters have been reported to range from slig...

  3. Short-term effects of propiconazole on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in the fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is an ergosterol inhibitor commonly used in agriculture and has been detected in aquatic environments. Ergosterol inhibitors decrease fungal growth through effects on 14á-demethylase, a cytochrome P450 (CYP), isoform important for ergosterol biosynthesis. In higher ...

  4. CLONING, EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists, including those recommended for use in the EPA's Tier 1 screening battery, typically use mammalian estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) such as rat or human. Although we know that the amino acid s...

  5. Impacts of WWTP Effluents on the Hepatic Metabolome of Male and Female Fathead Minnows in the South Platte River, Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics is rapidly becoming established as an eefective tool for studying the responses of organisms, such as fish, to various environmentally relevant stressors. While the majority of the work has been laboratory-based, successful application of the technique in recent year...

  6. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Triclocarban in a Short-term Reproduction Assay with the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclocarban, commercially known as TCC, is a trichlorinated pesticide used extensively as an antimicrobial additive in personal care products. TCC is characterized as a high production volume chemical and recent monitoring programs have shown it is prevalent in aquatic environme...

  7. Evidence for Compensatory Responses at the Molecular, Biochemical, and Tissue Level in Fathead Minnows Exposed to Steroidogenesis Inhibitors

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to survive, organisms require a capacity to adapt to a wide variety of biotic and abiotic stressors, including chemicals of both natural and synthetic origin. Recent studies in our laboratory have provided evidence of compensatory responses to endocrine active chemicals...

  8. Comparing biological effects of estrone (E1) and 17ß-estradiol (E2) in mature fathead minnows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of endocrine active compounds such as estrogens in treated wastewater effluent and their effects on aquatic life are causing concern among aquatic resource managers. Among the natural estrogens are 17ß-estradiol, 17a-estradiol, and estrone. Although 17ß-estradiol has received significa...

  9. Use of Microarray to Analyze Gene Expression Profiles of Acute Effects of Prochloraz on Fathead Minnows Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology is a powerful tool to investigate the gene expression profiles for thousands of genes simultaneously. In recent years, microarrays have been used to characterize environmental pollutants and identify molecular mode(s) of action of chemicals including endocri...

  10. Identification of Androgen Receptor Antagonists in Fish Using a Simple Bioassay with the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas .

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considerable effort has been expended on the development of bioassays to detect chemicals that affect endocrine function controlled by the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis via different mechanisms/modes of action (MOA). Antagonism of the androgen receptor (AR)...

  11. Crafting a gene expression timeline for the thyroid in the early-life stages of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis plays a number of critical roles in chordate physiology including regulation of metabolism, growth, and development. While the role of the HPT axis and thyroid hormone signaling in mammalian and amphibian development is well establis...

  12. Competitive binding comparison of endocrine-disrupting compounds to recombinant androgen receptor from fathead minnow, rainbow trout, and human

    EPA Science Inventory

    Typically, in vitro hazard assessments for the identification of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), including those outlined in the Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Advisory Committee (EDSTAC) Tier 1 Screening protocols, utilize mammalian receptors. Evidence, however...

  13. EFFECTS OF THE ANDROGENIC GROWTH PROMOTER 17-β TRENBOLONE ON FECUNDITY AND REPRODUCTIVE ENDROCRINOLOGY OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trenbolone acetate is a synthetic steroid which is extensively used in the U.S. as a growth promoter in beef cattle. The acetate is administered to livestock via slow release implants; some is converted by the animal to 17-β trenbolone, a relatively potent androgen receptor ...

  14. Pathway level impacts of in situ exposure of fathead minnow to effluent mixtures in the Duluth harbor

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a major effort to characterize the potential adverse effects of effluents released from sewage treatment plants in North America. At many locations pharmaceuticals, endocrine disruptors, and other chemicals of emerging concerns are present in the environment at concentra...

  15. Temporal Evaluation of Effects of a Model 3B-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Inhibitor on Endocrine Function in the Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhibition of enzymes involved in the synthesis of sex steroids can substantially impact developmental and reproductive processes controlled by the hypothalmic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. A key steroidogenic enzyme that has received little attention from a toxicological perspe...

  16. Modeling a molecular initiating event to population effects: A case study of aromatase inhibition in fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) conceptually links a molecular initiating event with measureable key events at higher levels of biological organization that ultimately result in an adverse outcome. Development of an AOP requires experimental data and scientific expertise to ide...

  17. Effects of a model 3B-hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenas Inhibitor, Trilostane, on Reproductive Endocrine Function in the Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhibition of enzymes involved in the synthesis of sex steroids can substantially impact developmental and reproductive processes controlled by the hypothalmic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. A key steroidogenic enzyme that has received little attention from a toxicological perspec...

  18. Unsupervised Analysis of the Effects of a Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent on the Fathead Minnow Ovarian Transcriptome

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents contain complex mixtures of chemicals, potentially including endocrine active chemicals (EACs), pharmaceuticals, and other contaminants of emerging concern (CECs). Due to the complex and variable nature of effluents, biological monitori...

  19. Testicular transcript responses in rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus following different concentrations bisphenol A exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Yuan, Cong; Gao, Jiancao; Liu, Yan; Wang, Zaizhao

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely spread in the environment. It can cause various reproductive disrupting effects on different organisms, including fish. To investigate the effect of BPA at different concentrations comprehensively, RNA-seq was performed on the testicular mRNA libraries of adult male rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus that exposed to 0, 1, 15 and 225 μg/L BPA for 7 days. Meanwhile, biological indicators and sex steroid hormone levels were investigated. Result showed that (1) BPA at all three concentrations affected the expression of genes related to testicular steroid hormone biosynthesis, blood-testis barrier, proteolysis, and lipid transport and metabolism. (2) BPA at 1 μg/L induced gene expression in renin-angiotensin system pathway and possibly initiate membrane form of estrogen receptor (mER); 1 and 15 μg/L BPA inhibited tRNA processing-related genes expression; 15 and 225 μg/L BPA decreased hemostasis and blood coagulation-related gene expression. The present study indicated that BPA did influence rare minnow testicular gene expressing, and the effect BPA effects varied with concentration. PMID:27183338

  20. VITELLOGENIN EXPRESSION IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS FROM THE PENSACOLA BAY SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hemmer, M.J., B.L. Hemmer, S.D. Friedman and P.S. Harris. In press. Vitellogenin Expression in Populations of Sheepshead Minnows from the Pensacola Bay System (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB R1015). <...

  1. Transcriptome profiling analysis of rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) gills after waterborne cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Jin, Li; Pu, De-Yong; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-09-01

    Rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) is a widely used experimental fish in risk assessments of aquatic pollutants in China. Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic heavy metals in the world; however, few studies have used fish gills, a multi-functional organ. In this study, we characterized the differential expression of adult female rare minnow gills after sub-chronic waterborne Cd (75μg/L CdCl2) exposure for 35d. A total of 452 genes (209 up-regulated and 243 down-regulated) were identified by gene expression profiling using RNA-Seq before and after treatment. Of these differentially expressed genes, 75, 21, and 54 differentially expressed genes are related to ion transport, oxidation-reduction processes, and the immune response, respectively. The results of GO and KEGG enrichment analyses, together with the altered transcript levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules and the significant increases in the levels of serum tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL1β) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), indicated a disruption of the immune system, particularly the induction of inflammation and autoimmunity. The significant down-regulation of coagulation factor XIII A1 polypeptide (F13A1), tripartite motif-containing protein 21 (TRIM21), and Golgi-associated plant pathogenesis-related protein (GAPr) during both acute (≤96h) and sub-chronic (35d) waterborne Cd exposure, as well as their dosage dependence, suggested that these three genes could be used as sensitive biomarkers for aquatic Cd risk assessment. PMID:27292131

  2. An intergeneric hybrid of a native minnow, the golden shiner, and an exotic minnow, the rudd

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhead, N.M.; Williams, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    The hybrid golden shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas × rudd Scardinius erythrophthalmus is the first known nonsalmonid, intergeneric hybrid of an exotic species and a North American native species. The cross is also the first valid record of a viable hybrid involving the native golden shiner. Meristic and mensural characters of 30 artificially produced hybrids of male golden shiners and female rudds were analyzed. Forty-seven percent of the meristic traits exhibited character states intermediate between those of parents. Twenty-seven percent of the meristic characters were supernumerary, suggesting developmental instability of the hybrid genome. Mensural hybrid characters were significantly skewed to the golden shiner phenotype. The skewed mensural inheritance and other skewed patterns of morphological inheritance also suggest problems in canalization of the hybrid phenome or atypical patterns of dominance. All hybrids were identifiable by intermediate squamation of the cultrate abdomen: the keel was mostly scaled but exhibited a small fleshy ridge posteriorly. This minnow hybrid allows general inferences to be made about the phylogenetic affinity of the golden shiner to other cultrate cyprinids of Eurasia. The hybrid cross has important management and conservation implications for fishes in North America. The hybrid is an example of how an exotic species may negatively affect a native species.

  3. Predicting the toxicity of major ions in seawater to mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia), sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus), and inland silverside minnow (Menidia beryllina)

    SciTech Connect

    Pillard, D.A.; DuFresne, D.L.; Caudle, D.D.; Tietge, J.E.; Evans, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Although marine organisms are naturally adapted to salinities well above those of freshwater, elevated concentrations of specific ions have been shown to cause adverse effects on some saltwater species. Because some ions are also physiologically essential, a deficiency of these ions can also cause significant effects. To provide a predictive tool to assess toxicity associated with major ions, mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia), sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus), and inland silverside minnows (Menidia beryllina) were exposed to saline solutions containing calcium, magnesium, potassium, strontium, bicarbonate, borate, bromide, and sulfate at concentrations above and below what would be found in seawater. Solution salinity was maintained at approximately 31% by increasing or decreasing sodium and chloride concentrations. Logistic regression models were developed with both the ion molar concentrations and ion activity. Toxicity to all three species was observed when either a deficiency or an excess of potassium and calcium occurred. Significant mortality occurred in all species when exposed to excess concentrations of magnesium, bicarbonate, and borate. The response to the remaining ions varied with species. Sheepshead minnows were the most tolerant of both deficient and elevated levels of the different ions. Mysid shrimp and inland silverside minnows demonstrated similar sensitivities to several ions, but silverside minnow response was more variable. As a result, the logistic models that predict inland silverside minnow survival generally were less robust than for the other two species.

  4. Comparison of Cultured and Wild Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) Health Condition Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four standard health condition metrics (hepatosomatic index, HSI; gonadosomatic index, GSI; fecundity, condition factor) were compared between cultured and wild caught sheepshead minnow (Cyrprinodon variegatus) to determine if laboratory cultured were representative of wild popul...

  5. OOCYTE ENVELOPE PROTEINS AND VITELLOGENIN IN MALE SHEEPHEAD MINNOW EXPOSED TO ESTRADIOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oocyte Envelope Proteins and Vitellogenin Expression in Male Sheepshead Minnows Exposed to Estradiol (Abstract). To be presented at the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry: Changing Environmental Awareness: Societal Concerns and Scientifi...

  6. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN GENETIC DIVERSITY AND ANTHROPOGENIC DISTURBANCE IN MIDWESTERN STREAM-DWELLING MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic disturbances may leave imprints on patterns of intraspecific genetic diversity through their effects on population size, adaptation, migration, and mutation. We examined patterns of genetic diversity for a stream-dwelling minnow (the central stoneroller, Campostoma...

  7. CHRONIC TOXICITY OF CHLORDANE, TRIFLURALIN, AND PENTACHLOROPHENOL TO SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) were exposed to three chemicals--chlordane, trifluralin, or pentachlorophenol--in flowing, natural seawater to determine acute and chronic (full life-cycle effects). Mortality of parental fish exposed to mean measured chlordane concentra...

  8. EFFECTS OF HEPTACHLOR AND TOXAPHENE ON LABORATORY-REARED EMBRYOS AND FRY OF THE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow-through seawater bioassays of 28-days duration were conducted with the organochlorine pesticides heptachlor and toxaphene to determine their toxicity to and bioconcentration by embryos and fry of the sheepshead minnow (Cyprindon variegatus). At technical heptachlor measured ...

  9. A Computational Model of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal Axis in Male Fathead Minnows Exposed to 17 | *alpha* | -ethinylestradiol and 17 | *beta* | -estradiol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic chemicals in the aquatic environment have been shown to cause a variety of reproductive anomalies in fish including full sex reversal, intersex, and altered population sex ratios. Two estrogens found in the aquatic environment, 17-ethinylestradiol and 17â-estradiol, h...

  10. Mixtures of 17â-trenbolone with Ethinylestradiol or Bisphenol A Altered Tubercle Formation and Steroid Production in the Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    The xenoestrogens, ethinylestradiol (EE2) and bisphenol A (BPA), and the androgen 17â-trenbolone (TRB) are examples of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) commonly detected in the environment. All have been shown to affect fish reproductive endocrinology individually, but littl...

  11. Evaluation of Sex-specific Responses to Trenbolone Acetate Metabolites in Early Life-stage Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) Using Molecular Tools

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in concentrated animal feed operation (CAFO) waste, and the potential effects of these chemicals on aquatic ecosystems have been of recent concern, especially in large agricultural regions. Currently, little is known concer...

  12. A field-based approach for assessing the impact of paper pulp mill effluent on the metbolite profile of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although evidence indicates that exposure to effluent from paper pulp mills (PME) can alter the body condition, secondary sexual characteristics, and reproductive success of aquatic organisms, there is currently little understanding of the biochemical mechanisms for these effects...

  13. Influence of water quality on silver toxicity to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), and water fleas (Daphnia magna)

    SciTech Connect

    Karen, D.J.; Ownby, D.R.; Forsythe, B.L.; Bills, T.P.; La Point, T.W.; Cobb, G.B.; Klaine, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Toxicity bioassays were conducted to quantify water quality conditions under which silver, as silver nitrate, is toxic to Oncorhynchus mykiss. Pimephales promelas, and Daphnia magna. Bioassays for P. promelas and D. magna were conducted as static replacement tests, whereas a flow-through bioassay system was modified and used for O. mykiss. Results from 96-h toxicity bioassays for O. mykiss indicated that chloride, hardness, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) protected against silver toxicosis, with DOC affording the highest protective effects. For P. promelas and D. magna, little protection was provided by increased CaCo+O{sub 3} alone, whereas DOC had a major ameliorating influence on measured silver toxicity. Lower concentrations of chloride had little effect on reducing silver nitrate toxicity. Dissolved organic carbon was more important than hardness for predicting the toxicity of ionic silver in natural waters to O. mykiss, P. promelas, and D. magna. Similarly, DOC significantly reduced silver nitrate toxicity to trout, whereas Cl{sup {minus}} and hardness had only a minor protective effect. However, Cl{sup {minus}}/DOC mixtures showed a greater-than-additive protective effect. Thus, the authors suggest that incorporating an organic carbon coefficient into the silver criterion equation will enhance the criterion values for site specificity.

  14. Use of NMR-based Metabolite Profiling to Study Responses of Fathead Minnows Exposed to the Potent Androgen 17β-trenbolone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of organisms in aquatic ecosystems to chemicals which possess endocrine disrupting properties can produce numerous detrimental effects. Furthermore, due to the potency of these chemicals, even relatively low level exposures can reduce fitness. As a result, classical expo...

  15. THE PATH FROM MOLECULAR INDICATORS OF EXPOSURE TO DESCRIBING DYNAMIC BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS IN AN AQUATIC ORGANISM: MICROARRAYS AND THE FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent to which humans and wildlife are exposed to toxicants is an important focus of environmental research. This work has been directed toward the development of molecular indicators diagnostic for exposure to various stressors in freshwater fish. Research includes the di...

  16. EVALUATION OF PILOT TREATMENT EFFLUENTS FROM SUMMITVILLE MINE, CO, USING CERIODAPHNIA DUBIA, FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS), AND RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS) TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated a remediation technology at the Summitville Mine Superfund site in southern Colorado. The technology evaluated was a successive alkalinity producing system ...

  17. A Computational Model of the Hypothalamic Pituitary Gonadal Axis in Female Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to 17á-ethynylestradiol and 17â-trenbolone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (e.g., estrogens, androgens and their mimics) are known to affect reproduction in fish. 17a-ethynylestradiol is a synthetic estrogen used in birth control pills. 17a-trenbolone is a relatively stable metabolite of trenbolone acetate, a synthetic and...

  18. RECOMBINANT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR (AR) BINDING ACROSS VERTEBRATE SPECIES: COMPARISON OF BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL COMPOUNDS TO HUMAN, RAINBOW TROUT AND FATHEAD MINNOW AR.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify androgen mimics or antagonists typically use mammalian (rat, human) androgen receptors (AR). Although the amino acid sequences of receptors from nonmammalian vertebrates are not identical to the mammalian receptors, it is uncertain ...

  19. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL OF THE BPG AXIS IN FATHEAD MINNOWS: PREDICTING EFFECTS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICAL EXPOSURE ON REPRODUCTIVE ENDPOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes development and application of a physiologically-based computational model that simulates the brain-pituitary-gonadal (BPG) axis and other endpoints important in reproduction such as concentrations of sex steroid hormones, 17-estradiol, testosterone, a...

  20. VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION IN FATHEAD MINNOWS AND PEARL DACE FROM CONTROL (NON-DOSED) AND LAKES DOSED WITH EE2 IN THE CANADIAN EXPERIMENTAL LAKES AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A whole-lake endocrine disruption experiment was conducted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in northwestern Ontario for three years beginning in 2001. This experiment examined population, organismal, biochemical and cellular-level effects in la...

  1. Predicting fecundity of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed toeEndocrine-disrupting chemicals using a MATLAB®-based model of oocyte growth dynamics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish spawning is often used as an integrated measure of reproductive toxicity, and an indicator of aquatic ecosystem health in the context of forecasting potential population-level effects considered important for ecological risk assessment. Consequently, there is a need for fle...

  2. Pathway-based approaches for assessment of real-time exposure to an estrogenic wastewater treatment plant effluent on fathead minnow reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are known contributors of chemical mixtures into the environment. Of particular concern are endocrine-disrupting compounds, such as estrogens, that can affect hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function in exposed organisms. The presen...

  3. Effects of a short-term exposure to the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole on steroid production and gene expression in the ovary of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytochrome P450 aromatase is a steriodogenic enzyme that converts C19 androgens to C18 estrogens and is critical for normal reproduction in females. Fadrozole is a well-studied aromatase inhibitor that has been shown to suppress estrogen production in the ovaries of fish. Howev...

  4. CLONING AND IN VITRO EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR α FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists typically use mammalian (rat, human) estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR). Although we know that the amino acid sequences of steroid receptors in nonmammalian vertebrates are not identical to the ma...

  5. Determining the effects of a mixture of an endocrine disrupting compound, 17a-ethinylestradiol, and ammonia on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic organisms are exposed to a multitude of contaminants and to fully understand the impact of multiple stressors on fish populations, we must first understand the mechanism of action for each toxicant and how the combined effects manifest at the level of the individual. 17α-...

  6. QUANTIFICATION AND ASSOCIATED VARIABILITY OF INDUCED VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTS IN FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) BY QUANTITATIVE REAL-TIME POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological risk assessors have a growing need for sensitive and rapid indicators of environmental exposure in aquatic ecosystems resulting from natural and synthetic estrogen-like compounds. Investigators developing subcellular exposure markers in traditional sentinel organisms m...

  7. An Individual-based Model for Extrapolating Standard Toxicity Test Data into Population-level Adverse Outcomes in the Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    While environmental toxicity testing typically focuses on organism-level endpoints such as mortality, growth, and reproduction, risk assessment guidelines specify protection goals at the level of the population and above. One method of linking these different levels of biological...

  8. EFFECTS OF AMMONIUM SULFATE ON GROWTH OF LARVAL NORTHWESTERN SALAMANDERS, RED-LEGGED AND PACIFIC TREEFROG TADPOLES, AND JUVENILE FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonium-nitrogen fertilizers are used in large quantities in agricultural areas of the United States, including the grass-seed fields of the Willamette Valley of western Oregon, and are a potential threat to larval amphibians living in the treat areas (Edwards and Daniel 1994, M...

  9. DIFFERENCES IN THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF FATHEAD MINNOW AND HUMAN ERA: IMPLICATIONS FOR IN VITRO TESTING OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammalian receptors and assay systems are generally used for in vitro analysis of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) with the assumption that minor differences in amino acid sequences among species do not translate into significant differences in receptor function. We have fou...

  10. AROMATASE-B (CYP 19B) EXPRESSION IN FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) EXPOSED TO PERFLUOROOCTANE (PFOS) AND THE AROMATASE INHIBITOR FADROZOLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a fluorinated organic contaminant that is globally distributed in both humans and wildlife. PFOS belongs to a family of perfluorinated sulfonates that are highly persistent in the environment and have been commercially produced for over 40 year...

  11. Toxicogenomic applications of Chinese rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) in aquatic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xuefang; Zha, Jinmiao

    2016-09-01

    Rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus), a Chinese native species, are an excellent emerging model organism for aquatic toxicity testing and chemical safety assessment. "Big data" omics approaches (i.e., genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) to inform mechanistic toxicology are now applied to studies in rare minnows to better understand toxicity and molecular pathways perturbed by chemicals. This review highlights recent applications of toxicogenomics to study changes in the gene and protein expression profiles in rare minnows in response to chemicals. Here we briefly describe studies that utilized cDNA microarrays in characterization of the cellular effects of rare minnows in single and mixed chemical exposures. Then we compare gel-based proteomics studies in liver of rare minnows following treatment with endocrine disrupting chemicals including 17β-estradiol, 17α-methyltestosterone, pentachlorophenol, and perfluorooctanoic acid. A total of 90 proteins identified in these studies were functionally annotated and categorized. These responsive proteins have roles in biological processes that include metabolism (37.8%), response to oxidation/chemicals (16.7%), signal transduction (11.1%), transport (10%), cytoskeleton (6.7%) and others (17.8%). In addition, recent investigations of endocrine disrupting effects and neurotoxicity of benzotriazole, an emerging contaminant, are summarized. The objective is to continue to enrich genome and protein databases for this species and to integrate molecular datasets to consider temporal effects and complex regulation at the level of the genome and proteome. PMID:27373348

  12. Survey of receiving-water environmental impacts associated with discharges from pulp mills; 1: Mill characteristics, receiving-water chemical profiles and lab toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.D. . Dept. of Environmental Biology); Carey, J.H. . Rivers Research Branch); Solomon, K.R. ); Smith, I.R. . Water Resources Branch); Servos, M.R.; Munkittrick, K.R. . Great Lakes Lab. for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences)

    1994-07-01

    This survey examined the relationship between environmental responses at pulp mill sites and the pulping process, effluent treatment, and bleaching technology used by pulp mills. This manuscript is the first in a series of four; it reviews the location and operating characteristics of mills included in the survey and provides background information on water chemistry that is relevant to the other components of the survey. In addition, lab 7-d toxicity tests of receiving water were conducted using fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia with water samples collected upstream and downstream of effluent discharges at 11 Canadian pulp and paper mills; these samples were collected at the same time as fish surveys were conducted. Survival of fathead minnow larvae was significantly reduced at four of the 11 downstream sites. Ceriodaphnia reproduction was significantly higher at six of the 11 downstream sites and significantly lower at two downstream sites. There were no significant effects on fathead minnow larva growth or adult Ceriodaphnia survival at any of the examined downstream sites. Negative effects in the toxicity tests were generally associated with the low dilution discharge of primary treated effluent with a previous history of acute toxicity. Fathead minnow and Ceriodaphnia tests were generally correlated with historical data on benthic macroinvertebrate community responses. Neither toxicity test predicted the physiological changes in wild fish that are presented in accompanying papers.

  13. Effects of temperature and feeding frequency on ingestion and growth for rare minnow.

    PubMed

    Wu, Benli; Luo, Si; Wang, Jianwei

    2015-03-01

    Water temperature and feeding frequency are two important components in feeding strategy that directly affect the growth and physiology of fishes. The rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) has been cultured for decades in the laboratory as an experimental fish and is widely used in environmental science research. An 8-week factorial feeding experiment was conducted on juvenile rare minnows to investigate the interaction between water temperature (ambient, 20, 24, 28°C) and feeding frequency (one, two, three meals per day) on growth performance, feed utilization, gut evacuation and adaptability to variable environmental conditions. Groups fed three times a day at 28°C attained the maximum final body weight, followed by those fed two times a day at 24°C. There was an obvious curvilinear relationship between specific growth rate and temperature. Increased temperature significantly promoted food consumption and growth rate, but there were no benefits on growth by feeding multiple times at temperatures of 18°C or lower. Temperature and feeding frequency also affected gut evacuation rates: high temperature and frequency lead to fast evacuation. These results show that the optimal temperature and feeding frequency for rare minnow is 24°C and two meals a day for maximal growth, feeding efficiency, and daily management. The findings also suggest that the rare minnow has the ability to rapidly adapt to changing culture conditions by adjusting physiological activities in the short term. PMID:25542891

  14. SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF A SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW LARVAE AND JUVENILES ON A DIET OF 'ARTEMIA' NAUPLII

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two geographic strains of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) nauplii were evaluated for nutritional quality as a food source for young sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus). Although there was no mortality of fish fed either strain, fish reared on brine shrimp nauplii from S...

  15. SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW LARVAE AND JUVENILES ON A DIET OF 'ARTEMIA' NAUPLII

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two geographic strains of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) nauplii were evaluated for nutritional quality as a food source for young sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus). Although there was no mortality of fish fed either strain, fish reared on brine shrimp nauplii from S...

  16. TEMPORAL GENE INDUCTION PATTERNS IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS EXPOSED TO 17-ESTRADIOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene arrays provide a powerful method to examine changes in gene expression in fish due to chemical exposures in the environment. In this study, we expanded an existing gene array for sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) (SHM) and used it to examine temporal changes in gene...

  17. EXPRESSION PROFILING OF ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS USING A SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW CDNA MACROARRAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Larkin, Patrick, Leroy C. Folmar, Michael J. Hemmer, Arianna J. Poston and Nancy D. Denslow. 2003. Expression Profiling of Estrogenic Compounds Using a Sheepshead Minnow cDNA Macroarray. Environ. Health Perspect. 111(6):839-846. (ERL,GB 1171).

    A variety of anthropogenic c...

  18. Sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) as a surrogate species in assessing contaminant risk to two endangered cyprinodontids

    SciTech Connect

    Brecken-Folse, J.; Albrecht, B.; Mayer, F.; Ellersieck, M.; Sappington, L.

    1995-12-31

    Sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) were tested as a surrogate species to assess contaminant risk for the endangered Leon Springs pupfish (C. bovinus) and desert pupfish (C. macularius). Acute toxicity tests were conducted with carbaryl, copper sulfate, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, and permethrin in accordance with ASTM guidelines. Sheepshead minnows were always more sensitive than pupfish, but the differences were small. 96-h LC50s for sheepshead minnows and Leon Springs pupfish were, respectively: carbaryl (4.2 and 4.6 mg/L), copper sulfate (2.5 and 4.6 mg/L), 4-nonylphenol (0.46 and 0.48 mg/L), pentachlorophenol (0.05 and 0.08 mg/L), permethrin (1 7 and 21 ug/L). Only one test could be conducted with desert pupfish and carbaryl, with the sheepshead minnow being more sensitive (7.3 vs 4.2 mg/L). These data, along with other data from the US NBS, Columbia, MO (two surrogate and six endangered freshwater fishes), indicate that toxicity test data for surrogate fishes can be used reliably to predict chemical toxicity to endangered fishes by interspecies correlations. However, the correlations were generally best within a family, particularly with the Cyprinodontids.

  19. INFLUENCE OF SPAWNING GROUP SIZE AND SPACE ON REPRODUCTION BY SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS, CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cripe, G.M., R.L. Hemmer and L.R. Goodman. In press. Influence of Spawning Group Size and Space on Reproduction Variability of Sheepshead Minnows, Cyprinodon variegatus (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB...

  20. MAXIMIZING GROWTH AND SEXUAL MATURATION OF SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS IN SUPPORT OF MULTI-GENERATION TEST DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hemmer, R.L., G.M. Cripe and L.R. Goodman. In press. Maximizing Growth and Sexual Maturation of Sheepshead Minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) in Support of Multi-Generation Test Development (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland...

  1. 75 FR 7625 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Rio Grande Silvery Minnow (Hybognathus amarus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... Rio Grande silvery minnow was listed as federally endangered in 1994 (July 20, 1994; 59 FR 36988) and critical habitat was designated in 2003 (February 19, 2003; 68 FR 8087). The species was extirpated from... (mi)) reach of the Rio Grande River in New Mexico, downstream of Cochiti Dam to the headwaters...

  2. FIELD VALIDATION OF A SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE CDNA MACROARRAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hemmer, Michael J., Iris Knoebl, Becky L. Hemmer, Patrick Larkin, Peggy S. Harris and Nancy D. Denslow. In press. Field Validation of a Sheepshead Minnow Estrogen-Responsive cDNA Macroarray (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portl...

  3. Comparative acute toxicity to aquatic organisms of components of coal-derived synthetic fuels. [Selenastrum capricornutum; Nitzchia palea; Physa gyrina, Daphnia magna; Chironomus tentans; Gammarus minus; Pimephales promelas; Salmo gairdneri; Micropterus salmoides

    SciTech Connect

    Millemann, R.E.; Birge, W.J.; Black, J.A.; Cushman, R.M.; Daniels, K.L.; Franco, P.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Stewart, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    In acute toxicity tests, green algae Selenaastrum capricornutum, diatoms Nitzschia palea, adult snails Physa gyrina, juvenile cladocerans Daphnia magna, larval midges Chironomus tentans, adult amphipods Gammarus minus, juvenile fathead minnows Pimephales promelas, and embryo-larva stages of rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri and largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides were exposed for 4 hours (algae), 48 hours (arthropods and snails), 96 hours (fathead minnows), 7 days (large-mouth bass), and 27 days (rainbow trout) to two phenols (phenol and ..beta..-naphthol), two azaarenes (quinoline and acridine), and two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene and phenanthrene) present in coal-derived oils. Median lethal or median effective concentrations (LC50s or EC50s) ranged from 0.03 mg/liter for phenanthrene and rainbow trout to 286.54 mg/liter for phenol and the green alga. The rainbow trout embryo-larva assay was the most sensitive of the test systems to all the chemicals except quinoline. For this last compound, systems with juvenile fathead minnows and largemouth bass embryos were the most sensitive. As test systems, fish embryos and larvae were the most sensitive, juvenile fathead minnows and arthropods had intermediate sensitivity, and algae and snails were the most resistant to the test compounds under the test conditions. Within each chemical class (phenols, azaarenes, and polycylcic aromatic hydrocarbons), toxicity increased with increased ring number except for the reversed relationship with the azaarenes and fathead minnows. Thus, ..beta..-naphthol (two rings) was 2 to 45 times more toxic than phenol (one ring); acridine (three rings) was 7 to 27 times more toxic than quinoline (two rings); and phenanthrene (three rings) was 3 to 9 times more toxic than naphthalene (two rings). 50 references.

  4. An evaluation of the efficiency of minnow traps for estimating the abundance of minnows in desert spring systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, James T.; Scheerer, Paul D.; Clements, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    Desert springs are sensitive aquatic ecosystems that pose unique challenges to natural resource managers and researchers. Among the most important of these is the need to accurately quantify population parameters for resident fish, particularly when the species are of special conservation concern. We evaluated the efficiency of baited minnow traps for estimating the abundance of two at-risk species, Foskett Speckled Dace Rhinichthys osculus ssp. and Borax Lake Chub Gila boraxobius, in desert spring systems in southeastern Oregon. We evaluated alternative sample designs using simulation and found that capture–recapture designs with four capture occasions would maximize the accuracy of estimates and minimize fish handling. We implemented the design and estimated capture and recapture probabilities using the Huggins closed-capture estimator. Trap capture probabilities averaged 23% and 26% for Foskett Speckled Dace and Borax Lake Chub, respectively, but differed substantially among sample locations, through time, and nonlinearly with fish body size. Recapture probabilities for Foskett Speckled Dace were, on average, 1.6 times greater than (first) capture probabilities, suggesting “trap-happy” behavior. Comparison of population estimates from the Huggins model with the commonly used Lincoln–Petersen estimator indicated that the latter underestimated Foskett Speckled Dace and Borax Lake Chub population size by 48% and by 20%, respectively. These biases were due to variability in capture and recapture probabilities. Simulation of fish monitoring that included the range of capture and recapture probabilities observed indicated that variability in capture and recapture probabilities in time negatively affected the ability to detect annual decreases by up to 20% in fish population size. Failure to account for variability in capture and recapture probabilities can lead to poor quality data and study inferences. Therefore, we recommend that fishery researchers and

  5. Hepatic expression patterns of aryl hydrocarbon receptor, pregnane X receptor, two cytochrome P450s and five phase II metabolism genes responsive to 17alpha-methyltestosterone in rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiancao; Liu, Shaozhen; Zhang, Yingying; Yuan, Cong; Yang, Yanping; Wang, Zaizhao

    2014-05-01

    17Alpha-methyltestosterone (MT), a synthetic androgen, is widely used in aquaculture. Aquatic organisms can receive continuous exposure to residual MT throughout their lives. Aiming to evaluate the effects of MT on genes involved in biotransformation pathway, meanwhile attempting to unravel the MT metabolic pathway at the transcriptional level in fish, here we isolated the cDNAs of previously unreported AHR2, Sult1 st1, Ugt2a1 and Ugt2b6 in rare minnow, and predominantly investigated the hepatic transcriptional patterns of AHR2, PXR and five biotransformation genes after MT exposure in both genders adult rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus. The present findings suggest that AHR2 and PXR should play important roles in regulating biotransformation enzymes related to MT catabolism, moreover, CYP1A, CYP3A, SULT1 ST4, SULT1 ST6 and UGT2A1 may play certain roles in catabolism of MT in adult G. rarus. Additionally, UGT2A1 may make greater contribution than SULT1 ST4 and SULT1 ST6 in MT catabolism in males. PMID:24814259

  6. Large differences in catch per unit of effort between two minnow trap models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about variation in catch per unit of effort (CPUE) in stickleback fisheries, or the factors explaining this variation. We investigated how nine-spined stickleback (Pungitius pungitius) CPUE was influenced by trap model by comparing the CPUEs of two very similar minnow trap models fished side-by-side in a paired experimental design. Results The galvanized trap type (mean CPUE = 1.31 fish h–1) out-fished the black trap type (mean CPUE = 0.20 fish h–1) consistently, and yielded on average 81% more fish. Conclusions The results demonstrate that small differences in trap appearance can have large impacts on CPUE. This has implications for studies designed to investigate abundance and occurrence of fish using minnow traps. PMID:23590839

  7. Assessment of 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol effects and underlying mechanisms in a continuous, multigeneration exposure of the Chinese rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus)

    SciTech Connect

    Zha Jinmiao; Sun Liwei; Zhou Yiqi; Spear, Philip A.; Ma, Mei; Wang Zijian

    2008-02-01

    17{alpha}-Ethinylestradiol (EE{sub 2}) is a synthetic estrogen used primarily in birth control pills and in hormone replacement therapy. Owing to its occurrence in surface waters at concentrations frequently greater than 1 ng/l and its projected future use, EE{sub 2} is expected to pose a significant risk to aquatic organisms. This study was conducted to obtain long-term exposure data necessary for the establishment of water quality criteria and to investigate mechanisms associated with toxic effects. In a multigeneration experiment, Chinese rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus) were constantly exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of the synthetic estrogen EE{sub 2}. Mortality, deformities, reproductive parameters, plasma vitellogenin and histopathology were assessed. The results showed that, in the F{sub 0} generation, all endpoints were significantly affected at concentrations higher than 0.2 ng/l EE{sub 2}. No F{sub 1} phenotypic males developed to maturity at 0.2 ng/l and, when adult females of this exposure group were crossed with unexposed males, no F{sub 2} fertile eggs were produced. Kidney histopathology and ultrastructure suggest anomalies possibly associated with increased vitellogenin accumulation. We concluded that the reproduction of the F{sub 1} minnows was completely inhibited at the lowest concentration tested, 0.2 ng/l EE{sub 2}, a concentration frequently detected in surface waters. Growth effects may be related to increased energy requirements including the energy used in VTG synthesis. Reproductive effects are presumably associated with male feminization and the occurrence of testis-ova in males; however, ovarian degeneration observed in females may also have contributed to reproductive failure.

  8. In vivo and in vitro effects of benzothiazole on sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus).

    PubMed

    Evans, J J; Shoemaker, C A; Klesius, P H

    2000-01-01

    Benzothiazole, a common chemical associated with tire manufacturing and industrial wastewater, is a principal component of both fresh water and estuarine tire leachate, a neurotoxicant to larval sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) in in vivo estuarine studies. The neurotoxic potential of benzothiazole was investigated following in vivo and in vitro exposure of sheepshead minnows to 3.75, 7.5, 15, 30 and 60 mg/l benzothiazole. Following benzothiazole exposure, fish were evaluated for survival, growth and histological alterations. Fish mortality occurred after 5 days of exposure to 60 mg/l (LC50 = 41.9). Significant decreases in larval growth were noted at all concentrations. Histologically, gills had cellular alterations but the central nervous system lacked the severe cellular damage seen in previous tire leachate exposure studies. Benzothiazole cytotoxicity to primary cultures of brain cells from sheepshead minnow and tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and two epithelial cell lines was evaluated using a tetrazolium salt assay (MTT) at 1 and 4 days. In vitro results indicate primary cultures of brain cells are less sensitive to benzothiazole than epithelial cell lines. Significant cytotoxicity to the epithelial cell lines was noted at 30 and 60 mg/l concentrations. Histologically and cytotoxicologically, the present study indicates that benzothiazole is a gill toxicant and not a neurotoxicant. PMID:11460700

  9. Biogeography and divergent patterns of body size disparification in North American minnows.

    PubMed

    Martin, Samuel D; Bonett, Ronald M

    2015-12-01

    Body size is one of the most important traits influencing an organism's ecology and a major axis of evolutionary change. We examined body size disparification in the highly speciose North American minnows (Cyprinidae), which exhibit diverse body sizes and ecologies, including the giant piscivorous pikeminnows. We estimated a novel phylogeny for 285 species based on a supermatrix alignment of seven mitochondrial and ten nuclear genes, and used this to reconstruct ancestral body sizes (log-total length) and ancestral area. Additionally, given that fishes inhabiting Pacific drainages have historically been subjected to frequent local extinctions due to periodic flooding, droughts, and low drainage connectivity, we also compared body size disparification between the highly speciose Atlantic drainages and comparatively depauperate Pacific drainages. We found that dispersal between Atlantic and Pacific drainages has been infrequent and generally occurred in minnows with southerly distributions, where drainage systems are younger and less stable. The long isolation between Atlantic and Pacific drainages has allowed for divergent patterns of morphological disparification; we found higher rates of body size disparification in minnows from the environmentally harsher Pacific drainages. We propose several possible explanations for the observed patterns of size disparification in the context of habitat stability, niche space, and species diversification. PMID:26210938

  10. SURROGATE SPECIES IN ASSESSING CONTAMINANT RISK FOR ENDANGERED FISHES, INCLUDING INTERSPECIES TOXICITY CORRELATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout, fathead minnows, and sheepshead minnows were tested as surrogate species to assess contaminant risk for 17 endangered fishes and one toad species. Acute toxicity tests were conducted with carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, and permethrin in accorda...

  11. SURROGATE SPECIES IN ASSESSING CONTAMINANT RISK FOR ENDANGERED FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout, fathead minnows, and sheepshead minnows were tested as surrogate species to assess contaminant risk for 17 endangered fishes and one toad species. Acute toxicity tests were conducted with carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol, and permethrin in accord...

  12. Quantitative PCR Assays for Detecting Loach Minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and Spikedace (Meda fulgida) in the Southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Dysthe, Joseph C; Carim, Kellie J; Paroz, Yvette M; McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Schwartz, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Loach minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) and spikedace (Meda fulgida) are legally protected with the status of Endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and are endemic to the Gila River basin of Arizona and New Mexico. Efficient and sensitive methods for monitoring these species' distributions are critical for prioritizing conservation efforts. We developed quantitative PCR assays for detecting loach minnow and spikedace DNA in environmental samples. Each assay reliably detected low concentrations of target DNA without detection of non-target species, including other cyprinid fishes with which they co-occur. PMID:27583576

  13. Toxicogenomic analysis of the hepatic effects of perfluorooctanoic acid on rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus)

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Yanhong; Liu Yang; Wang Jianshe; Tao Yi; Dai Jiayin

    2008-02-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that has been detected in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. To assess the effects of PFOA in fish and predict its potential mode of action, a toxicogenomic approach was applied to hepatic gene expression profile analysis in male and female rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus) using a custom cDNA microarray containing 1773 unique genes. Rare minnows were treated with continuous flow-through exposure to PFOA at concentrations of 3, 10, and 30 mg/L for 28 days. Based on the observed histopathological changes, the livers from fish exposed to 10 mg/L PFOA were selected for further hepatic gene expression analysis. While 124 and 171 genes were significantly altered by PFOA in males and females, respectively, of which 43 genes were commonly regulated in both sexes. The affected genes are involved in multiple biological processes, including lipid metabolism and transport, hormone action, immune responses, and mitochondrial functions. PFOA exposure significantly suppressed genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and transport but induced genes associated with intracellular trafficking of cholesterol. Alterations in expression of genes associated with mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation were only observed in female rare minnows. In addition, PFOA inhibited genes responsible for thyroid hormone biosynthesis and significantly induced estrogen-responsive genes. These findings implicate PFOA in endocrine disruption. This work contributes not only to the elucidation of the potential mode of toxicity of PFOA to aquatic organisms but also to the use of toxicogenomic approaches to address issues in environmental toxicology.

  14. Dietary lipid and gross energy affect protein utilization in the rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Benli; Xiong, Xiaoqin; Xie, Shouqi; Wang, Jianwei

    2016-07-01

    An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to detect the optimal dietary protein and energy, as well as the effects of protein to energy ratio on growth, for the rare minnow ( Gobiocypris rarus), which are critical to nutrition standardization for model fish. Twenty-four diets were formulated to contain three gross energy (10, 12.5, 15 kJ/g), four protein (20%, 25%, 30%, 35%), and two lipid levels (3%, 6%). The results showed that optimal dietary E/P was 41.7-50 kJ/g for maximum growth in juvenile rare minnows at 6% dietary crude lipid. At 3% dietary lipid, specific growth rate (SGR) increased markedly when E/P decreased from 62.5 kJ/g to 35.7 kJ/g and gross energy was 12.5 kJ/g, and from 75 kJ/g to 42.9 kJ/g when gross energy was 15.0 kJ/g. The optimal gross energy was estimated at 12.5 kJ/g and excess energy decreased food intake and growth. Dietary lipid exhibited an apparent protein-sparing effect. Optimal protein decreased from 35% to 25%-30% with an increase in dietary lipid from 3% to 6% without adversely effecting growth. Dietary lipid level affects the optimal dietary E/P ratio. In conclusion, recommended dietary protein and energy for rare minnow are 20%-35% and 10-12.5 kJ/g, respectively.

  15. Dietary lipid and gross energy affect protein utilization in the rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Benli; Xiong, Xiaoqin; Xie, Shouqi; Wang, Jianwei

    2015-10-01

    An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to detect the optimal dietary protein and energy, as well as the effects of protein to energy ratio on growth, for the rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus), which are critical to nutrition standardization for model fish. Twenty-four diets were formulated to contain three gross energy (10, 12.5, 15 kJ/g), four protein (20%, 25%, 30%, 35%), and two lipid levels (3%, 6%). The results showed that optimal dietary E/P was 41.7-50 kJ/g for maximum growth in juvenile rare minnows at 6% dietary crude lipid. At 3% dietary lipid, specific growth rate (SGR) increased markedly when E/P decreased from 62.5 kJ/g to 35.7 kJ/g and gross energy was 12.5 kJ/g, and from 75 kJ/g to 42.9 kJ/g when gross energy was 15.0 kJ/g. The optimal gross energy was estimated at 12.5 kJ/g and excess energy decreased food intake and growth. Dietary lipid exhibited an apparent protein-sparing effect. Optimal protein decreased from 35% to 25%-30% with an increase in dietary lipid from 3% to 6% without adversely effecting growth. Dietary lipid level affects the optimal dietary E/P ratio. In conclusion, recommended dietary protein and energy for rare minnow are 20%-35% and 10-12.5 kJ/g, respectively.

  16. The thyroid gland and thyroid hormones in sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) during early development and metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Joseph G; Klaren, Peter H M; Mariavelle, Emeline; Das, Krishna

    2016-04-01

    The sheepshead minnow is widely used in ecotoxicological studies that only recently have begun to focus on disruption of the thyroid axis by xenobiotics and endocrine disrupting compounds. However, reference levels of the thyroid prohormone thyroxine (T4) and biologically active hormone 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) and their developmental patterns are unknown. This study set out to describe the ontogeny and morphology of the thyroid gland in sheepshead minnow, and to correlate these with whole-body concentrations of thyroid hormones during early development and metamorphosis. Eggs were collected by natural spawning in our laboratory. T4 and T3 were extracted from embryos, larvae and juveniles and an enzyme-linked immunoassay was used to measure whole-body hormone levels. Length and body mass, hatching success, gross morphology, thyroid hormone levels and histology were measured. The onset of metamorphosis at 12-day post-hatching coincided with surges in whole-body T4 and T3 concentrations. Thyroid follicles were first observed in pre-metamorphic larvae at hatching and were detected exclusively in the subpharyngeal region, surrounding the ventral aorta. Follicle size and thyrocyte epithelial cell heights varied during development, indicating fluctuations in thyroid hormone synthesis activity. The increase in the whole-body T3/T4 ratio was indicative of an increase in outer ring deiodination activity. This study establishes a baseline for thyroid hormones in sheepshead minnows, which will be useful for the understanding of thyroid hormone functions and in future studies of thyroid toxicants in this species. PMID:26573854

  17. INDUCTION OF ZONA RADIATA PROTEINS AND VITELLOGENINS IN ESTRADIOL AND NONYLPHENOL EXPOSED MALE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knoebl, Iris, Michael J. Hemmer and Nancy D. Denslow. 2004. Induction of Zona Radiata Proteins and Vitellogenins in Estradiol and Nonylphenol Exposed Male Sheepshead Minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus). Mar. Environ. Res. 58(2-5):547-551. (ERL,GB X1059).

    Several genes normall...

  18. CYPRINID DISTRIBUTIONS IN NORTHEAST U.S.A. LAKES: EVIDENCE OF REGIONAL-SCALE MINNOW BIODIVERSITY LOSSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish assemblages were sampled in 195 randomly selected lakes in the northeastern United States during the summers of 1991-1994. Most lakes in northern Maine had three to seven minnow species, constituting 40-80% of species in each lake. Lakes in New Jersey, southern New York, and...

  19. Determining the Effects of Oiled Sediment on Fish Life Cycle Endpoints using the Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of long-term effects of exposure to crude oil is critical for ascertaining population-level risk following spill events. A 19-week life-cycle experiment was conducted with the estuarine sheepshead minnow exposed to natural sediment spiked with weathered Louisiana S...

  20. N-NITROSODIETHYLAMINE-INDUCED HEPATOCARCINOGENESIS IN ESTUARINE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW ('CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS'): NEOPLASMS AND RELATED LESIONS COMPARED WITH MAMMALIAN LESIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groups of estuarine sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) were exposed to 50-60 mg/l N-nitrosodiethylamine (DENA) for five to six weeks. Exposure was stopped and the fish were then transferred to clean, flowing seawater. Induced liver lesions were studied in periodic samples...

  1. Comparison of catch per unit effort among four minnow trap models in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) fishery

    PubMed Central

    Budria, Alexandre; DeFaveri, Jacquelin; Merilä, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Minnow traps are commonly used in the stickleback (Gasterostidae) fishery, but the potential differences in catch per unit effort (CPUE) among different minnow trap models are little studied. We compared the CPUE of four different minnow trap models in field experiments conducted with three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Marked (up to 26 fold) differences in median CPUE among different trap models were observed. Metallic uncoated traps yielded the largest CPUE (2.8 fish/h), followed by metallic black nylon-coated traps (1.3 fish/h). Collapsible canvas traps yielded substantially lower CPUEs (black: 0.7 fish/h; red: 0.1 fish/h) than the metallic traps. Laboratory trials further revealed significant differences in escape probabilities among the different trap models. While the differences in escape probability can explain at least part of the differences in CPUE among the trap models (e.g. high escape rate and low CPUE in red canvas traps), discrepancies between model-specific CPUEs and escape rates suggests that variation in entrance rate also contributes to the differences in CPUE. In general, and in accordance with earlier data on nine-spined stickleback (Pungitius pungitius) trapping, the results suggest that uncoated metallic (Gee-type) traps are superior to the other commonly used minnow trap models in stickleback fisheries. PMID:26685761

  2. Effects of the herbivorous minnow, southern redbelly dace (Phoxinus erythrogaster), on stream productivity and ecosystem structure.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Katie N; Gido, Keith B

    2007-02-01

    We used field and mesocosm experiments to measure effects of southern redbelly dace (Phoxinus erythrogaster), a grazing minnow, on stream ecosystem structure and function. Ecosystem structure was quantified as algal filament length, algal biomass, size distribution of particulate organic matter (POM), algal assemblage structure, and invertebrate assemblage structure, whereas ecosystem function was based on gross and net primary productivity. Our experiments showed that moderate densities of Phoxinus temporarily reduced mean algal filament length and mean size of POM relative to fishless controls. However, there was no detectable effect on algal biomass or ecosystem primary productivity. Several factors could explain the lack of effect of Phoxinus on primary productivity including increased algal production efficiency in grazed treatments or increased grazing by other organisms in fishless treatments. The inability of Phoxinus to reduce algal biomass and system productivity contrasts with experimental results based on other grazing minnows, such as the central stoneroller (Campostoma anomalum), and questions the generality of grazer effects in stream ecosystems. However, environmental venue and the spatial and temporal scale of ecosystem measurements can greatly influence the outcome of these experiments. PMID:17031700

  3. Sequencing and analysis of the complete mitochondrial genome of Amur minnow from China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuai; Han, Xiaomin; Xu, Chunzhu

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitogenome sequence of Amur minnow (Rhynchocypris lagowskii) was determined using long PCR. The genome was 16,594 bp in length and contained 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and one control region. The overall base composition of the heavy strand is A (28.60%), C (26.32%), T (27.40%), and G (17.68%). The control region was 927 bp in length and the A + T content of the region was 63.32%. The extended termination-associated sequence domain, the central conserved domain, and the conserved sequence block domain are defined in the mitochondrial genome control region of Amur minnow. Mitochondrial genomes analyses based on maximum parsimony (MP), neighbor-joining (NJ), and Bayesian analyses yielded identical phylogenetic trees, indicating a close phylogenetic affinity of the 15 Cyprinidae species. It appeared that no less than two major phyletic lineages were present in Leuciscinae. The main clades within the Leuciscinae supported are: A clade is the Tribolodon. A clade (Rhynchocypris) with the Oreoleuciscus as the sister taxon to Tribolodon was supported by bootstrap values of 49%. The five different geographical populations of the R. lagowskii formed a paraphyletic group with the high bootstrap value (45%) in all examinations. PMID:26029880

  4. Social learning strategies and predation risk: minnows copy only when using private information would be costly

    PubMed Central

    Webster, M.M; Laland, K.N

    2008-01-01

    Animals can acquire information from the environment privately, by sampling it directly, or socially, through learning from others. Generally, private information is more accurate, but expensive to acquire, while social information is cheaper but less reliable. Accordingly, the ‘costly information hypothesis’ predicts that individuals will use private information when the costs associated with doing so are low, but that they should increasingly use social information as the costs of using private information rise. While consistent with considerable data, this theory has yet to be directly tested in a satisfactory manner. We tested this hypothesis by giving minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus) a choice between socially demonstrated and non-demonstrated prey patches under conditions of low, indirect and high simulated predation risk. Subjects had no experience (experiment 1) or prior private information that conflicted with the social information provided by the demonstrators (experiment 2). In both experiments, subjects spent more time in the demonstrated patch than in the non-demonstrated patch, and in experiment 1 made fewer switches between patches, when risk was high compared with when it was low. These findings are consistent with the predictions of the costly information hypothesis, and imply that minnows adopt a ‘copy-when-asocial-learning-is-costly’ learning strategy. PMID:18755676

  5. Vitellogenin mRNA regulation and plasma clearance in male sheepshead minnows, (Cyprinodon variegatus) after cessation of exposure to 17 beta-estradiol and p-nonylphenol.

    PubMed

    Hemmer, Michael J; Bowman, Christopher J; Hemmer, Becky L; Friedman, Stephanie D; Marcovich, Dragoslav; Kroll, Kevin J; Denslow, Nancy D

    2002-07-01

    Research was conducted to determine the kinetics of hepatic vitellogenin (VTG) mRNA regulation and plasma VTG accumulation and clearance in male sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) during and after cessation of exposure to either 17 beta-estradiol (E2) or para-nonylphenol (NP). Adult fish were continuously exposed to aqueous measured concentrations of 0.089 and 0.71 microg E2 per l, and 5.6 and 59.6 microg NP per l for 16 days using an intermittent flow-through dosing apparatus. Fish were sampled on days 8 and 16 of exposure followed by sampling at discrete intervals for up to 96 days post-exposure. At each interval five fish were randomly sampled from each concentration and hepatic VTG mRNA and serum VTG levels for individual fish determined by slot blot and direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Exposure to E2 and NP resulted in a dose dependent increase in hepatic VTG mRNA and plasma VTG over the course of the 16-day exposure period. Mean plasma VTG levels at day 16 were >100 mg/ml for both high doses of E2 and NP, and >20 mg/ml for the low exposure treatments. Within 8 days post-exposure, hepatic VTG mRNA levels returned to baseline in both high and low E2 treatments but remained elevated 2-4 fold in the NP treatments. Due to a shortened sampling period, a clearance rate for plasma VTG in the 5.6 microg NP per l treatment could not determined. In the 0.089, 0.71 microg E2 per l, and 59.6 microg NP per l treatments, VTG levels began decreasing within 4 days after exposure cessation and exhibited an exponential rate of elimination from plasma. Clearance rates for 0.71 microg E2 per l and 59.6 microg NP per l were not significantly different (P=0.47), however, both demonstrated significantly higher rates of clearance (P<0.02) than observed in the 0.089 microg E2 per l treatment. Our results indicate that hepatic VTG mRNA rapidly diminishes after cessation of estrogenic exposure in sheepshead minnows, but plasma VTG clearance is

  6. Simultaneous exposure to chronic hypoxia and dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons results in reduced egg production and larval survival in the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus).

    PubMed

    Hedgpeth, Bryan M; Griffitt, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Estuarine fish in the northern Gulf of Mexico are exposed annually to hypoxic conditions. In addition to hypoxia, fish located throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico were potentially exposed to oil released during the Deepwater Horizon incident. Therefore, the interaction between oil exposure and hypoxia is worth investigating. To examine this interaction, the authors exposed adult and larval sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) to crude or dispersed oil under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The authors examined total egg production, egg hatching success, and larval survival post hatch. The authors' results indicate that co-exposure to crude or dispersed oil and hypoxia resulted in a significant decrease in egg production, as well as a significant decrease in both egg hatch success and larval survival post hatch. The significant impact on reproductive success following crude or dispersed oil and hypoxia exposure indicates the importance of including environmental parameters such as hypoxia when evaluating the impact of an oil spill. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:645-651. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26274940

  7. TRAINING AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER OF ORD-DEVELOPED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY-BASED TOOLS: 1. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICAL FATHEAD MINNOW BIOASSAY; 2. MICROBIAL SOURCE TRACKING METHODS; 3. FIELD IDENTIFICATION OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROP PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Region 9 RSL and ORD/NERL scientists developed a course for the RSC (Regional Science Council)-sponsored training class on Molecular Biology Concepts. The training will take place as part of the technology transfer of a fish EDC (endocrine disrupting chemical) bioassay to the Reg...

  8. Short term chronic and acute toxicity screening of water and sediment using fathead minnows, daphnids, rotifers (Rotox[reg sign]) and light emitting bacteria (Microtox[reg sign]), Ambient Stream Monitoring, summers of 1990 and 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, J.; Wade, D.C.

    1992-07-01

    Toxicological evaluation of water column and sediment samples from six locations in the Ambient Stream Monitoring fixed station network was initiated in 1986 using short-term chronic bioassay methods. Toxicological evaluation of six additional stations was initiated in 1990. Chronic studies were conducted at one of these new stations and acute screening methods were used at all twelve locations now included in the activity. This report provides results from studies conducted during the summers of 1990 and 1991. The 1990--91 studies evaluated toxicity of stream water and porewater extracted from sediments as test media, whereas previous studies evaluated water and sediment elutriate samples.

  9. Different on the inside: extreme swimbladder sexual dimorphism in the South Asian torrent minnows

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Kevin W.; Britz, Ralf; Siegel, Dustin S.

    2014-01-01

    The swimbladder plays an important role in buoyancy regulation but is typically reduced or even absent in benthic freshwater fishes that inhabit fast flowing water. Here, we document, for the first time, a remarkable example of swimbladder sexual dimorphism in the highly rheophilic South Asian torrent minnows (Psilorhynchus). The male swimbladder is not only much larger than that of the female (up to five times the diameter and up to 98 times the volume in some cases), but is also structurally more complex, with multiple internal septa dividing it into smaller chambers. Males also exhibit a strange organ of unknown function or homology in association with the swimbladder that is absent in females. Extreme sexual dimorphism of non-gonadal internal organs is rare among vertebrates and the swimbladder sexual dimorphisms that we describe for Psilorhynchus are unique among fishes. PMID:25009242

  10. Establishment of a cell line derived from top-minnow (Gambusia patruelis).

    PubMed

    Wang, S Y; Chen, S N; Kou, G H

    1987-07-01

    A cell line, derived from top-minnow (Gambusia patruelis), has been transferred for 114 times in Leibovitz L-15 medium plus 10% FCS (GM-L-15) at a temperature of 31 degrees C and designated as TM. The results of a chromosome analysis of 100 cells at the metaphase stage, show a bimodal distribution of the chromosome number ranged from 21 to 68 with a modal number of 38. At a low seeding density, the plating efficiency of TM cells was 11-12.4%. TM cells are susceptible to EVE, EVA, EVEX, IPNV and LV-1 at 18 degrees C. The result of a sterility test showed that the TM cell line was free of bacterial, fungal and mycoplasmic contamination. The presence of numerous microvilli on the surface of TM cells in the micrographs of normal TM cell. The microvilli are replaced by blebs at the late stage of cytokinesis of the cells. PMID:3122238

  11. Gonadal development and transcript profiling of steroidogenic enzymes in response to 17α-methyltestosterone in the rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaozhen; Wang, Lihong; Qin, Fang; Zheng, Yao; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yingying; Yuan, Cong; Wang, Zaizhao

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that natural and anthropogenic chemicals interfere with the hormonal system of vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. How these chemicals regulate gonadal steroidogenesis remains to be determined. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), a synthetic model androgen, on gene expression profiles of six key steroidogenic genes in adult rare minnow. The full-length cDNA encoding 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 (11β-HSD2) was firstly isolated and characterized by RT-PCR and RACE methods. The gonadal transcript changes of StAR, cyp11a1, 3β-HSD, cyp17a1, 11β-HSD2 and cyp19a1a in 6-month adult Gobiocypris rarus exposed to MT and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) for 7, 14 and 21 days were detected by qRT-PCR. To make an effort to connect the transcriptional changes of steroidogenic enzymes with effects on higher levels of biological organization and on VTG, one remarkable sensitive target of steroids, body and gonad weights, histology of gonads, and hepatic vtg mRNA level were measured. MT caused varying degree of abnormalities in ovaries and testes. The hepatic vtg mRNA level was highly inhibited in females and slightly altered in males by MT. Transcripts of several steroidogenic genes including StAR, cyp17a1, and cyp11a1 showed high responsiveness to MT exposure in G. rarus. The gene expression profiles of these steroidogenic genes in MT-treated groups were much distinct with the EE2-treated group. PMID:24681399

  12. Alternative Responses to Predation in Two Headwater Stream Minnows Is Reflected in Their Contrasting Diel Activity Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kadye, Wilbert T.; Booth, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Animals exhibit diel periodicity in their activity in part to meet energy requirements whilst evading predation. A competing hypothesis suggests that partitioning of diel activities is less important because animals capitalise on opportunity. To test these hypotheses we examined the diel activity patterns for two cyprinid minnows, chubbyhead barb Barbus anoplus and the Eastern Cape redfin minnow Pseudobarbus afer that both occur within headwater streams in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Chubbyhead barbs exhibited consistent nocturnal activity based on both field and laboratory observations. Due to the absence of fish predators within its habitat, its nocturnal behaviour suggests a response to the cost associated with diurnal activity, such as predation risk by diving and wading birds. In contrast, redfin minnows showed high diurnal activity and a shoaling behaviour in the wild, whereas, in the laboratory, they showed high refuge use during the diel cycle. Despite their preference for refuge in the laboratory, they were diurnally active, a behaviour that was consistent with observations in the wild. The diurnal activity of this species suggests a response to the cost associated with nocturnal activity. Such a cost could be inferred from the presence of the longfin eel, a native predator that was active at night, whereas the daytime shoaling behaviour suggests an anti-predator mechanism to diurnal visual predators. The implications of these findings relate to the impacts associated with the potential invasions by non-native piscivores that occur in the mainstem sections. Diurnal activity patterns for redfin minnows, that are IUCN-listed as endangered, may, in part, explain their susceptibility to high predation by visual non-native piscivores, such as bass and trout. In contrast, the nocturnal habits of chubbyhead barbs suggest a probable pre-adaptation to visual predation. The likelihood of invasion by nocturnally-active sharptooth catfish Clarias gariepinus

  13. Combining molecular evolution and environmental genomics to unravel adaptive processes of MHC class IIB diversity in European minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus)

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Helene; Burri, Reto; Comtesse, Fabien; Fumagalli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Host–pathogen interactions are a major evolutionary force promoting local adaptation. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) represent unique candidates to investigate evolutionary processes driving local adaptation to parasite communities. The present study aimed at identifying the relative roles of neutral and adaptive processes driving the evolution of MHC class IIB (MHCIIB) genes in natural populations of European minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus). To this end, we isolated and genotyped exon 2 of two MHCIIB gene duplicates (DAB1 and DAB3) and 1′665 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers in nine populations, and characterized local bacterial communities by 16S rDNA barcoding using 454 amplicon sequencing. Both MHCIIB loci exhibited signs of historical balancing selection. Whereas genetic differentiation exceeded that of neutral markers at both loci, the populations' genetic diversities were positively correlated with local pathogen diversities only at DAB3. Overall, our results suggest pathogen-mediated local adaptation in European minnows at both MHCIIB loci. While at DAB1 selection appears to favor different alleles among populations, this is only partially the case in DAB3, which appears to be locally adapted to pathogen communities in terms of genetic diversity. These results provide new insights into the importance of host–pathogen interactions in driving local adaptation in the European minnow, and highlight that the importance of adaptive processes driving MHCIIB gene evolution may differ among duplicates within species, presumably as a consequence of alternative selective regimes or different genomic context. Using next-generation sequencing, the present manuscript identifies the relative roles of neutral and adaptive processes driving the evolution of MHC class IIB (MHCIIB) genes in natural populations of a cyprinid fish: the European minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus). We highlight that the relative importance of neutral

  14. [PARASITE FAUNA AND STRUCTURE OF PARASITE COMPONENT COMMUNITIES IN THE MINNOW PHOXNUS PHOXINUS (LINNAEUS, 1758) IN AN OIL POLLUTED WATERSTREAM].

    PubMed

    Dorovskikh, G N; Stepanov, V G

    2015-01-01

    In June 1992 and July 1996, 238 minnow specimens of the 2+--3+ age were collected from 5 parts of the Kolva River and studied using the standard technique of the general parasitological dissection. Comparative analysis of parasite fauna and the structure of component parasite communities in the minnow from ecologically safe and variably polluted parts of the river was performed. The analysis had demonstrated that the increase in the water pollution by domestic wastewater, washings of fertilizers from agricultural fields and private country houses, cattle farm drains (Dorovskikh et al., 2005, 2008), and oil results in the change of dominant parasite species of the minnow, alteration of the sum of errors in the regression equation characterizing the spread of biomass values of the species forming the parasite community, changes in the "graphic" structure of the community, and alteration of the index D(E)'. It is proved, that the high concentration of nutrients has a destructive effect on natural systems, and, at the same time, causes the process of self-organizing, leading to the alteration of the community structure. As soon as even a small part of nutrients is stopped to come into the reservoir, and the quality of environment is restored, the community restores its structure. PMID:27055328

  15. Acute toxicity of 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, terbufos and trichlorfon to grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp. ) and sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) as affected by salinity and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Brecken-Folse, J.A. . Environmental Protection Agency) Mayer, F.L. . Environmental Protection Agency); Pedigo, L.E. ); Marking, L.L. . National Fisheries Research Center)

    1994-01-01

    The toxicities of two industrial chemicals (4-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol) and two organophosphate insecticides (terbufos and trichlorfon) to juvenile grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp.) and sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) were determined by static, 96-h toxicity tests in a factorial design with 12 combinations of salinity and temperature (15, 20, 25, 30 ppt [times] 17, 22, 27 C). Concentrations of the toxicants, including bioconcentration, were determined as appropriate by gas or liquid chromatography and the use of [sup 14]C-labeled compounds. The 96-h LC50s for 4-nitrophenol ranged from 12 to 31 mg/L and for 2,4-dinitrophenol from 13 to 50 mg/L. Toxicity decreased as salinity increased for 4-nitrophenol and both test organisms. Toxicity decreased as salinity increased for 2,4-dinitrophenol and sheepshead minnows, but toxicity to grass shrimp increased as salinity increased. Toxicity decreased with increased temperature for grass shrimp exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol and sheepshead minnows exposed to 4-nitrophenol, increased with temperature for sheepshead minnows exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol, and no change was observed for grass shrimp exposed to 4-nitrophenol. Bioconcentration of phenols in both test organisms increased as concentration increased. The 96-h LC50s for terbufos ranged from 3.4 to 6.6 [mu]g/L and for trichlorfon from 6.3 to 19,300 [mu]g/L. Terbufos and trichlorfon toxicity to grass shrimp and sheepshead minnows increased with increased temperature. BCFs for terbufos were greater in sheepshead minnows than grass shrimp, but were reversed for trichlorfon.

  16. Acute toxicity of 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, terbufos and trichlorfon to grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp.) and sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) as affected by salinity and temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brecken-Folse, J. A.; Mayer, F.L.; Pedigo, L.E.; Marking, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    The toxicities of two industrial chemicals (4-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol) and two organophosphate insecticides (terbufos and trichlorfon) to juvenile grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp.) and sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon vanegatus) were determined by static, 96-h toxicity tests in a factorial design with 12 combinations of salinity and temperature (15, 20, 25, 30ppt x 17, 22, 27°C). Concentrations of the toxicants, including bioconcentradon, were determined as appropriate by gas or liquid chromatography and the use of 14C-labeled compounds. The 96-h LC50s for 4-nitrophenol ranged from 12 to 31 mg/L and for 2,4-dinitrophenol from 13 to 50 mg/L. Toxicity decreased as salinity increased for 4-nitrophenol and both test organisms. Toxicity decreased as salinity increased for 2,4-dinitrophenol and sheepshead minnows, but toxicity to grass shrimp increased as salinity increased. Toxicity decreased with increased temperature for grass shrimp exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol and sheepshead minnows exposed to 4-nitrophenol, increased with temperature for sheepshead minnows exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol, and no change was observed for grass shrimp exposed to 4-nitrophenol. Bioconcentration of phenols in both test organisms increased as concentration increased. The 96-h LC50s for terbufos ranged from 3.4 to 6.6 μg/L and for trichlorfon from 6.3 to 19,300 μg/L. Terbufos and trichlorfon toxicity to grass shrimp and sheepshead minnows increased with increased temperature. BCFs for terbufos were greater in sheepshead minnows than grass shrimp, but were reversed for trichlorfon.

  17. Temperature affects Hg-induced antioxidant responses in Chinese rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus larvae in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Li, Ping; Chen, Lu

    2014-12-01

    The effect of temperature on HgCl2 (Hg(2+))-induced oxidative stress to Chinese rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) was evaluated in vitro. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were determined in whole body homogenates incubated with 0.1 mg/L Hg(2+) at 15, 25 and 35°C for 60 min. The result showed that oxidative stress was at a normal level in the Hg(2+) + NT (0.1 mg/L Hg(2+) and normal temperature, 25°C) and Hg(2+) + LT (0.1 mg/L Hg(2+) and low temperature, 15°C) groups, but a significant induction in oxidative stress occurred in the Hg(2+) + HT (35°C) group. This was reflected by an increased level of MDA and decreased activities of the antioxidant enzymes. The results suggest that higher temperature enhances heavy metal toxicity in aquatic systems, which should be given more attention in the future. PMID:25323039

  18. Whole-body and body-part-specific bioconcentration of explosive compounds in sheepshead minnows.

    PubMed

    Lotufo, Guilherme R

    2011-03-01

    Sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) were exposed to radiolabeled isotopes of the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), exahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (commonly known as RDX), and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (commonly known as HMX), yielding the bioconcentration factors (BCF) of 3.3, 0.7, and 0.1 L kg(-1), respectively. For TNT, the body residue of transformation product exceeded that of the parent compound by factors of 1, 8, and 16 for total aminonitrotoluenes, total extractable compounds, and total transformation products, respectively, with substantial bioaccumulation of both non-identified extractable and unextractable (i.e., tissue-bound), compounds. In comparison, the sum body residues of RDX and HMX transformation products were <4 times higher than for parent compounds. The concentrations of RDX and HMX and their transformation products were similar among liver, viscera (excluding liver), gills, and body remains (integument and muscles), while 46% of the TNT transformation products resided in the liver, and 64% of the parent compound was in the viscera. PMID:21255837

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of the sheepshead minnow Cyprinodon variegatus (Cyprinodontiformes: Cyprinodontidae).

    PubMed

    Barcelon, Brinda R; Lema, Sean C

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) with the length of 16,498 bp was determined using long PCR and Sanger sequencing. The mitogenome contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and a D-loop region of 831 bp in length. All protein-coding genes except NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (nd6) are encoded on the heavy strand (H-strand). ATG acts as the start codon for all protein-coding genes except cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (coI), which has GTG as a start codon. Fourteen tRNA genes and both rRNA genes are also encoded on the H-strand, as observed in other Actinopterygiian fishes. This complete mitogenome sequence will facilitate studies on adaptation of C. variegates to local variation in temperature, salinity and chemical pollution conditions, as well as inform studies of genetic introgression by C. variegatus into other Cyprinodon species that have imperiled protection status. PMID:26024144

  20. Short-term toxicity of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate to early life stages of the rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus).

    PubMed

    Luo, Si; Wu, Benli; Xiong, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jianwei

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogenous pollutants including ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate are a widespread concern in natural waters and aquaculture. In the present study, the toxicity of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate to rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) in the early life stage were evaluated by 2 short-term toxicity tests. In the short-term toxicity test, conducted on embryo and sac-fry stages, 30 fertilized eggs with 3 replicates were randomly exposed to varying levels of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate until 3 d posthatch (dph). In the 7-d larval subchronic toxicity test, 30 newly hatched larvae with 3 replicates were randomly exposed to varying levels of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate until 7 dph. The results showed that the 7-d larval subchronic toxicity test was more sensitive than the short-term toxicity test on embryo and sac-fry stages. Both toxicity tests revealed that ammonia was most toxic to rare minnows, followed by nitrite and nitrate. High levels of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate decreased growth, retarded development, and increased mortality. The no-observed-effect concentrations of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate for larval growth were 2.49 mg L(-1) , 13.33 mg L(-1) , and 19.95 mg L(-1) nitrogen, respectively. The present study's results demonstrate that nitrogenous pollutants pose a threat to wild populations of rare minnows and provide useful information for establishing water quality criteria for this laboratory fish. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1422-1427. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26472009

  1. Tributyltin affects shoaling and anxiety behavior in female rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiliang; Zhang, Chunnuan; Sun, Ping; Shao, Xian

    2016-09-01

    Effects of tributyltin (TBT) on reproduction are well established in many fish species. However, few studies report the effects of TBT on non-reproductive behaviors, which is a novel aspect of endocrine disruption in fish. Thus, the present study used rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) to investigate the effects of TBT, at environmental concentrations of 1, 10 and 100ng/L, on shoaling and anxiety behaviors. The results showed that fish exposed to TBT had less group cohesion during the course of the 10-min observation period as compared with the control fish. Further, TBT altered the shoaling in the Novel tank test, where shoaling is determined as the tendency to leave a shoal of littermates trapped behind a Plexiglas barrier at one end of the test tank. Fish exposed to TBT had shorter latency before leaving shoal mates and spent more time away from shoal than control fish. In addition, we also used Novel tanks to study the anxiety behavior as the tendency to stay at the bottom when introduced into an unfamiliar environment. The fish exposed to TBT showed increased anxiety, manifested as increased latency to enter the upper half and decreased time in upper half when compared with the control fish. TBT exposure increased the levels of dopamine and its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and decreased the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine and its metabolite 5-hydroxy indole acetic acid in the brain. Thus, the hypofunction of the dopaminergic system or of the serotoninergic system or the combination of the two may underlie the observed behavioral change, which might affect the fitness of fish in their natural environment. PMID:27472783

  2. Multigenerational Exposure of the Estuarine Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) to 17β-estradiol. I. Organism-Level Effects Over Three GenerationsLife Cycles

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) on reproductive processes through two complete generations of the sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, and determined the need for multiple generation exposure testing for assessing the risks of endocrine disrupting chemic...

  3. Exposure of Three Generations of the Estuarine Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) to the Androgen 17β-trenbolone: Effects on Survival, Development, and Reproduction.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating long-term effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on a species is important to assessing the overall risk to the populations. This study reports the results of a 42-week exposure of estuarine sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) to the androgen, 17B-tre...

  4. VITELLOGENIN MRNA REGULATION AND PLASMA CLEARANCE IN MALE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS, CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS AFTER CESSATION OF EXPOSURE TO 17B-ESTRADIOL AND P-NONYLPHENOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to determine the kinetics of hepatic vitellogenin (VTG) mRNA regulation and plasma VTG accumulation and clearance in male sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) during and after cessation of exposure to either 17b-estradiol (E2) or para-nonylphenol (NP)...

  5. EFFECT OF THE OIL DISPERSANT OMNI-CLEAN(R) ON THE TOXICITY OF FUEL OIL NO. 2 IN TWO BIOASSAYS WITH THE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioassays (7-day early life stage and 96h acute bioassays) were conducted with the sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, to determine the toxicity of the dispersant Omni-Clean< by itself and in combination with fuel oil no. 2. Performance characteristics of both bioassay type...

  6. Genetic monitoring and complex population dynamics: insights from a 12-year study of the Rio Grande silvery minnow.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Megan J; Carson, Evan W; Turner, Thomas F

    2012-09-01

    The endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow persists as a remnant population in a highly fragmented and regulated arid-land river system. The species is subject to dramatic annual fluctuations in density. Since 2003, the wild population has been supplemented by hatchery-reared fish. We report on a 12-year (1999-2010) monitoring study of genetic diversity and effective population size (N(e)) of wild and hatchery stocks. Our goals were to evaluate how genetic metrics responded to changes in wild fish density and whether they corresponded to the number and levels of diversity of hatchery-reared repatriates. Genetic diversity and all measures of N(e) in the wild population did not correlate with wild fish density until hatchery supplementation began in earnest. Estimates of variance and inbreeding effective size were not correlated. Our results suggest source-sink dynamics where captive stocks form a genetically diverse source and the wild population behaves as a sink. Nevertheless, overall genetic diversity of silvery minnow has been maintained over the last decade, and we attribute this to a well-designed and executed propagation management plan. When multiple factors like environmental fluctuation and hatchery supplementation act simultaneously on a population, interpretation of genetic monitoring data may be equally complex and require considerable ecological data. PMID:23028397

  7. The impact of long term exposure to phthalic acid esters on reproduction in Chinese rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongyong; Yang, Yuanjin; Gao, Yong; Wang, Xianfeng; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2015-08-01

    The environmental risk of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) is of great concern. We investigated the reproductive impairment of di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) on Chinese rare minnow, an endemic fish inhabiting the upper streams of the Yangtze River. Chinese rare minnow larvae were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of DEHP (0, 4.2, 13.3, and 40.8 μg/L) for 6 months. Plasma testosterone and 17β-estradiol levels decreased in females, accompanied by downregulation of cyp19a and cyp17 gene transcription in ovary. Increases in plasma testosterone concentration were observed in males, accompanied by downregulation of cyp19a gene transcription in testes. Hepatic VTG gene transcription was upregulated in males and females. Exposure to DEHP reduced egg production and inhibited oocyte maturation in females and retarded spermiation in males. Decreased egg protein content was measured in F1 embryos. These results indicate that long-term exposure to low concentrations of DEHP (13.3 μg/L) causes endocrine disruption and impairs fish reproduction. PMID:25880617

  8. Genetic monitoring and complex population dynamics: insights from a 12-year study of the Rio Grande silvery minnow

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Megan J; Carson, Evan W; Turner, Thomas F

    2012-01-01

    The endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow persists as a remnant population in a highly fragmented and regulated arid-land river system. The species is subject to dramatic annual fluctuations in density. Since 2003, the wild population has been supplemented by hatchery-reared fish. We report on a 12-year (1999–2010) monitoring study of genetic diversity and effective population size (Ne) of wild and hatchery stocks. Our goals were to evaluate how genetic metrics responded to changes in wild fish density and whether they corresponded to the number and levels of diversity of hatchery-reared repatriates. Genetic diversity and all measures of Ne in the wild population did not correlate with wild fish density until hatchery supplementation began in earnest. Estimates of variance and inbreeding effective size were not correlated. Our results suggest source–sink dynamics where captive stocks form a genetically diverse source and the wild population behaves as a sink. Nevertheless, overall genetic diversity of silvery minnow has been maintained over the last decade, and we attribute this to a well-designed and executed propagation management plan. When multiple factors like environmental fluctuation and hatchery supplementation act simultaneously on a population, interpretation of genetic monitoring data may be equally complex and require considerable ecological data. PMID:23028397

  9. The influence of density on adults and juveniles of the estuarine fish, the sheepshead minnow (cyprinodon variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between population density and demographic rates (e.g. survival, reproduction, growth) is critical to understand population dynamics and has been widely studied in fishes. Estuarine species are regularly exposed to dramatic changes in density with daily, monthly,...

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Kinmen's population of endangered minnow Metzia mesembrinum (Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae) from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Jang-Liaw, Nian-Hong; Wen, Zong-Han; Chen, I-Shiung

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of endangered minnow, Metzia mesembrinum, which collected from Kimnen island, Fujian Province of Taiwan. The circular mitogenome (16,603 bp) consists of 13 protein coding, 22 tRNA, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region. It has the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement. The overall base composition in descending order is A (32.0%), T (27.1%), C (25.2%), G (15.7%) with rather higher AT content as 59.1%. Yuan et al. reported the complete mitogenome (KF997093) of M. mesembrimum from southern China that may belong to other congeneric species, but not exactly M. mesembrinum collected from either southern Fujian or Taiwan. The well-identified species sequence data of Metzia mesembrinum would be rather beneficial for further phlyogenetic approach for congeneric species in East and Southeast Asia. PMID:24749977

  11. MEETING IN PORTUGAL: LINKAGE OF EXPOSURE AND EFFECTS USING GENOMICS, PROTEOMICS AND METABOLOMICS IN SMALL FISH MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    With an interdisciplinary team of scientists from U.S. Government Agencies and Universities, we are utilizing zebrafish and fathead minnow to develop techniques for extrapolation of chemical stressor impacts across species, chemicals and endpoints. The linkage of responses acros...

  12. ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY OF CHLORDANE TO FISH AND INVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute and chronic toxicity of technical chlordane to bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), Daphnia magna, Hyallela azteca, and Chironomus No. 51 were determined with flow-through conditions. The purpose was ...

  13. ASSESSING CONTAMINANT SENSITIVITY OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES: EFFLUENT TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity tests using standard effluent test procedures were conducted (EPA 1994) with Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnows and four endangered fish species: bonytail chub (Gila elegans), Colorado squawfish (Ptychocheilus lucias ), razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) and Gila t...

  14. Transcriptional pathway and de novo network-based approaches to effects-based monitoring in the Great Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transcriptomics provides unique solutions for understanding the impact of complex mixtures and their components on aquatic systems. Here we describe the application of transcriptomics analysis of in situ fathead minnow exposures for assessing biological impacts of wastewater trea...

  15. Adaptation, Compensation, and Recovery: Unraveling the Mechanisms through Genomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using transcriptional network inferen...

  16. Developing Predictive Approaches to Characterize Adaptive Responses of the Reproductive Endocrine Axis to Aromatase Inhibition II: Computational Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We developed a mechanistic mathematical model of the hypothalamic­ pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predic...

  17. STRUCTURE TOXICITY IN RELATIONSHIPS FOR A,B-UNSATURATED ALCOHOLS IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous toxicity testing with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) indicated that some unsaturated acetylenic and allylic alcohols can be metabolically activated, via alcohol dehydrogenase, to highly toxic a,B-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones or allene derivatives. lthough sev...

  18. EFFECTS OF SYNTHETIC POLYELECTROLYTES ON SELECTED AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute toxicity of several polyelectrolytes to daphnids (Daphnia magna), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), gammarids (Gammarus pseudolimnaeus) and midges (Paratanytarsus parthenogeneticus) was tested. Most nonionic and anionic polyelectrolytes were not toxic at 100 mg/l w...

  19. SIMULTANEOUS MULTIPLE SPECIES TESTING: ACUTE TOXICITY OF 13 CHEMICALS TO 12 DIVERSE FRESHWATER AMPHIBIAN, FISH, AND INVERTEBRATE FAMILIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The test series developed methods for testing a compliment of aquatic organisms in a single test that satisfies the freshwater acute toxicity requirements for setting water quality criteria. Species tested included fathead minnows Pimephales promelas, rainbow trout Salmo gairdner...

  20. ECOTOXICOGENOMICS: EXPOSURE INDICATORS USING ESTS AND SUBTRACTIVE LIBRARIES FOR MULTI-LIFE STAGES OF PIMEPHALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecotoxicogenomics is research that identifies patterns of gene expression in wildlife and predicts effects of environmental stressors. We are developing a multiple stressor, multiple life stage exposure model using the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), initially studying fou...

  1. SEARCH FOR THE PERFECT BIOMARKER: ROLE OF TOXICOGENOMICS IN ERAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will provide a case study, focused on reproduction in the fathead minnow, in which a novel biochemical indicator of chemical effects on reproductive endocrine function is linked to population-level impacts.

  2. TOXICITY AND METABOLISM STUDIES WITH EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) PRIORITY POLLUTANTS AND RELATED CHEMICALS IN FRESHWATER ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twenty-two chemicals from the EPA priority pollutant list were studied for their acute and/or chronic toxicity to selected freshwater organisms. Freshwater species tested included the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis...

  3. Predation on larval suckers in the Williamson River Delta revealed by molecular genetic assays—A pilot study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hereford, Danielle M.; Ostberg, Carl O.; Burdick, Summer M.

    2016-01-01

    Predation of endangered Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) during larval egress to Upper Klamath Lake from the Williamson River is poorly understood but may be an important factor limiting recruitment into adult spawning populations. Native and non-native piscivores are abundant in nursery wetland habitat, but larval predation has not been directly studied for all species. Larvae lack hard body structures and digest rapidly in predator digestive systems. Therefore, traditional visual methods for diet analysis may fail to identify the extent of predation on larvae. The goals of this study were to (1) use quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays developed for Lost River and shortnose suckers to assay predator stomach contents for sucker DNA, and (2) to assess our ability to use this technique to study predation. Predators were captured opportunistically during larval sucker egress. Concurrent feeding trials indicate that most predators—yellow perch (Perca flaverscens), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), blue chub (Gila coerulea), Klamath tui chub (Siphatales bicolor bicolor), Klamath Lake sculpin (Cottus princeps), slender sculpin (Cottus tenuis)—preyed on sucker larvae in the laboratory. However, sucker DNA was not detected in fathead minnow stomachs. Of the stomachs screened from fish captured in the Williamson River Delta, 15.6 percent of yellow perch contained sucker DNA. This study has demonstrated that the application of qPCR and SNP assays is effective for studying predation on larval suckers. We suggest that techniques associated with dissection or detection of sucker DNA from fathead minnow stomachs need improvement.

  4. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas... concentration below 20 µg/l. (ii) Dissolved oxygen concentration. (A) During static tests with rainbow trout the... minnow and 12 °C for rainbow trout. Excursions from the test temperature shall be no greater than ±2...

  5. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas... concentration below 20 µg/l. (ii) Dissolved oxygen concentration. (A) During static tests with rainbow trout the... minnow and 12 °C for rainbow trout. Excursions from the test temperature shall be no greater than ±2...

  6. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas... concentration below 20 µg/l. (ii) Dissolved oxygen concentration. (A) During static tests with rainbow trout the... minnow and 12 °C for rainbow trout. Excursions from the test temperature shall be no greater than ±2...

  7. The Pleistocene history of the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus): Non-equilibrium evolutionary dynamics within a diversifying species complex.

    PubMed

    Haney, Robert A; Silliman, Brian R; Fry, Adam J; Layman, Craig A; Rand, David M

    2007-06-01

    The sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, is a widespread fish species that typically inhabits coastal tidal marsh and mangrove swamp environments, ranging from Cape Cod, Massaschusetts to northern Mexico and into the Caribbean. This wide range crosses several biogeographic boundaries which are coincident with genetic structuring within numerous species originating in the Pleistocene. In addition, the more northerly reaches of this species range have been further subject to the evolutionary consequences of Pleistocene glaciation due to local extinction and recolonization of formerly glaciated sites. C. variegatus thus provides an excellent vertebrate model system within which to test the extent of genetic differentiation among populations in a dominant coastal ecosystem and examine patterns of historical demography in populations distributed along a latitudinal gradient. Using mitochondrial control region and ND2 sequence data, we discovered monophyletic clades within C. variegatus with divergence times within the Pleistocene, and very low gene flow between most sites. Intraspecific genetic breaks appear to correspond broadly to biogeographic or oceanic boundaries. Pleistocene climate change appears to have had dramatic impacts on the size and distribution of populations within and near the glacial margins, but has also affected populations far from formerly glaciated regions. PMID:17081774

  8. The sheepshead minnow as an in vivo model for endocrine disruption in marine teleosts: a partial life-cycle test with 17alpha-ethynylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Zillioux, E J; Johnson, I C; Kiparissis, Y; Metcalfe, C D; Wheat, J V; Ward, S G; Liu, H

    2001-09-01

    The sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus Lacépède), an estuarine fish species, was exposed to 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2) at nominal test concentrations of 0.2, 2, 20, 200, 400, 800, 1,600, and 3,200 ng/L. Fish were exposed for up to 59 d, from subadult stages to sexual maturity, under flow-through conditions. The exposure period was followed by an evaluation of reproductive success and survival of progeny. The reproductive success of exposed sheepshead minnows, as determined from data on egg production from two subsequent spawning trials, was reduced in fish exposed to 200 ng/L EE2 and, in one spawning trial, in the 20-ng/L treatment. Hatching success was reduced in the progeny of fish exposed to 200 ng/L EE2, but survival was good among fry that successfully hatched. Histological examination indicated generalized edema, damage to gill epithelia, hepatic toxicity, fibrosis of the testis, and evidence of sex reversal, including testes-ova and spermatagonia-like cells in ovaries. The maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) for gonadal development in males was within the normal range of EE2 concentrations in sewage treatment plant effluents. The exposure regimen and choice of test organism, combined with histological examination, allowed independent evaluation of ecologically significant acute, reproductive and estrogenic endpoints. Estrogen receptor-mediated effects occurred at concentrations where reproductive effects were measurable under standard reproduction assays. The sheepshead minnow appears to be a sensitive in vivo model for partial life-cycle testing of compounds that have the potential to disrupt the endocrine system as well as reproduction in estuarine and coastal marine fish species. PMID:11521823

  9. Downstairs gene flow: the effects of a linear sequence of waterfalls on the only population of the endangered minnow Astyanax xavante.

    PubMed

    Reis, K V; Venere, P C; Sampaio, I; Rêgo, P S; Vallinoto, M; Souza, I L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic diversity and structure of the only known population of minnow Astyanax xavante, which inhabits a stretch of river including several waterfalls. The FST values among the samples were not significant, except between two populations separated by a 30 m waterfall. Nevertheless, haplotype and nucleotide diversity increased in the downstream direction, indicating that gene flow is unidirectional, which indicates this genetic pattern as downstairs gene flow, as it has the effect of increasing genetic diversity in the downstream direction. PMID:26212357

  10. Effects of suspended sediment on the reproductive success of the tricolor shiner, a crevice-spawning minnow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhead, N.M.; Jelks, H.L.

    2001-01-01

    Excessive sedimentation of rivers and creeks has been linked to increasing levels of imperilment in the diverse fish fauna of the southeastern United States. In particular, benthic-spawning fishes have decreased in both numbers and range. The tricolor shiner Cyprinella trichroistia is a crevice-spawning minnow that is widespread in the eastern Mobile River drainage above the Fall Line. While they are less sensitive to perturbation than the federally threatened blue shiner C. caerulea, tricolor shiners have decreased in numbers and range during the past few decades. This experiment examined the effects of 0 (control), 100, 300, and 600 mg/L initial concentrations of suspended sediment on the reproductive success of the tricolor shiner. Increasing levels of suspended sediment caused decreasing levels of reproductive success (fewer spawns and fewer eggs laid when spawning occurred). Increasing levels of suspended sediment also delayed the onset of spawning, resulting in distinct frequency distributions of clear eggs, eyed eggs, and larvae across treatments. Mortality of eggs and larvae was not a factor in the experiment. We examined daily sediment concentration data recorded at three sites in the upper Coosa River over the April-August spawning season of 1963. By weighting our experimental results by the number of days above each sediment concentration, we estimated that 20% fewer eggs were laid than would have been laid if conditions had been like those of the controls. Albeit our model is simplistic, it provides insight into how excessive sedimentation contributes to population extirpation. Mitigation of suspended sediments is an important management action for the conservation of southern Appalachian fishes that spawn in benthic habitats.

  11. Refuge habitats for fishes during seasonal drying in an intermittent stream: Movement, survival and abundance of three minnow species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, S.W.; Magoulick, D.D.

    2011-01-01

    Drought and summer drying can be important disturbance events in many small streams leading to intermittent or isolated habitats. We examined what habitats act as refuges for fishes during summer drying, hypothesizing that pools would act as refuge habitats. We predicted that during drying fish would show directional movement into pools from riffle habitats, survival rates would be greater in pools than in riffles, and fish abundance would increase in pool habitats. We examined movement, survival and abundance of three minnow species, bigeye shiner (Notropis boops), highland stoneroller (Campostoma spadiceum) and creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus), during seasonal stream drying in an Ozark stream using a closed robust multi-strata mark-recapture sampling. Population parameters were estimated using plausible models within program MARK, where a priori models are ranked using Akaike's Information Criterion. Creek chub showed directional movement into pools and increased survival and abundance in pools during drying. Highland stonerollers showed strong directional movement into pools and abundance increased in pools during drying, but survival rates were not significantly greater in pools than riffles. Bigeye shiners showed high movement rates during drying, but the movement was non-directional, and survival rates were greater in riffles than pools. Therefore, creek chub supported our hypothesis and pools appear to act as refuge habitats for this species, whereas highland stonerollers partly supported the hypothesis and bigeye shiners did not support the pool refuge hypothesis. Refuge habitats during drying are species dependent. An urgent need exists to further understand refuge habitats in streams given projected changes in climate and continued alteration of hydrological regimes. ?? 2011 Springer Basel AG (outside the USA).

  12. Refuge habitats for fishes during seasonal drying in an intermittent stream: movement, survival and abundance of three minnow species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, S.W.; Magoulick, Daniel D.

    2011-01-01

    Drought and summer drying can be important disturbance events in many small streams leading to intermittent or isolated habitats. We examined what habitats act as refuges for fishes during summer drying, hypothesizing that pools would act as refuge habitats. We predicted that during drying fish would show directional movement into pools from riffle habitats, survival rates would be greater in pools than in riffles, and fish abundance would increase in pool habitats. We examined movement, survival and abundance of three minnow species, bigeye shiner (Notropis boops), highland stoneroller (Campostoma spadiceum) and creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus), during seasonal stream drying in an Ozark stream using a closed robust multi-strata mark-recapture sampling. Population parameters were estimated using plausible models within program MARK, where a priori models are ranked using Akaike's Information Criterion. Creek chub showed directional movement into pools and increased survival and abundance in pools during drying. Highland stonerollers showed strong directional movement into pools and abundance increased in pools during drying, but survival rates were not significantly greater in pools than riffles. Bigeye shiners showed high movement rates during drying, but the movement was non-directional, and survival rates were greater in riffles than pools. Therefore, creek chub supported our hypothesis and pools appear to act as refuge habitats for this species, whereas highland stonerollers partly supported the hypothesis and bigeye shiners did not support the pool refuge hypothesis. Refuge habitats during drying are species dependent. An urgent need exists to further understand refuge habitats in streams given projected changes in climate and continued alteration of hydrological regimes.

  13. Evolution of herbivory in a carnivorous clade of minnows (teleostei: cyprinidae): effects on gut size and digestive physiology.

    PubMed

    German, Donovan P; Nagle, Brett C; Villeda, Jennette M; Ruiz, Ana M; Thomson, Alfred W; Contreras Balderas, Salvador; Evans, David H

    2010-01-01

    We constructed a phylogeny for 10 minnow species (family Cyprinidae) previously revealed to be members of sister genera with different dietary affinities and used the phylogeny to examine whether the evolution of digestive tract size and physiology is correlated with the evolution of diet in these fishes. We studied a total of 11 taxa: four herbivorous species in the genus Campostoma and six largely carnivorous species in the genus Nocomis, including two populations of Nocomis leptocephalus, the carnivorous Chattahoochee River drainage population and the herbivorous Altamaha River drainage population. Thus, we were able to compare digestive tract size and physiology among sister genera (Campostoma and Nocomis) and among sister taxa (N. leptocephalus Chattahoochee and N. leptocephalus Altamaha) in dietary and phylogenetic contexts. The herbivorous taxa had longer digestive tracts and higher activity of the carbohydrases amylase and laminarinase in their guts, whereas the carnivorous species had higher chitinase activity. Phylogenetic independent-contrast analysis suggested that the evolution of amylase and chitinase activities was correlated with the evolution of diet in these species, whereas trypsin and lipase activities showed no pattern associated with diet or phylogenetic history. Concentrations of short-chain fatty acids were low in all taxa, indicating that these fishes rely largely on endogenous digestive mechanisms to subsist on their respective diets. Subtle differences in tooth shape were observed between species in the two genera. Overall, our results suggest that dietary specialization can be observed on the level of anatomy and physiology of the digestive tracts of fishes but that such differences are most appropriately viewed in comparisons of closely related species with different diets. PMID:19929637

  14. INDUCTION OF GENE EXPRESSION IN SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS) TREATED WITH 17B-ESTRADIOL, DIETHYLSTILBESTROL, OR ETHINYLESTRADIOL: THE USE OF MRNA FINGERPRINTS AS AN INDICATOR OF GENE REGULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent interest in hormonally active environmental contaminants has sparked a drive to find sensitive methods to measure their effects on wildlife. A molecular-based assay has been developed to measure the induction of gene expression in sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variega...

  15. Do highly ornamented and less parasitized males have high quality sperm? – an experimental test for parasite-induced reproductive trade-offs in European minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus)

    PubMed Central

    Kekäläinen, Jukka; Pirhonen, Juhani; Taskinen, Jouni

    2014-01-01

    Parasites take their resources from hosts and thus directly reduce available resources for hosts’ own body functions, such as growth and reproduction. Furthermore, parasite infections cause significant indirect costs to their hosts in terms of increased investments on immune defense. In this study, we investigated the impact of parasite infection on the sperm quality and expression of secondary sexual ornamentation (saturation of the red abdominal colouration and number of breeding tubercles) in the Eurasian minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus). We exposed minnows to a high and low dose of common nonspecific fish ectoparasite, the glochidia larvae of duck mussel (Anodonta anatina) and tested whether parasite infection leads to trade-off in sperm quality and/or ornamental expression. We found that glochidia infection reduces the curvature of the sperm swimming trajectory, number of breeding tubercles, and possibly male competitive ability, but does not affect expression of male color ornamentation. Furthermore, glochidia infection was found to reduce sperm motility, but only when all the noninfected individuals were excluded from the model. Supporting one of the predictions by phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis both in high-infection and low-infection group male breeding colouration was positively associated with sperm quality. Our results suggest that although glochidia infection may have negative impact on male reproductive success, parasite-induced costs may not create strong trade-off between breeding colouration and sperm quality or that such trade-off become detectable only in resource-limited conditions. PMID:25540686

  16. Do highly ornamented and less parasitized males have high quality sperm? - an experimental test for parasite-induced reproductive trade-offs in European minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus).

    PubMed

    Kekäläinen, Jukka; Pirhonen, Juhani; Taskinen, Jouni

    2014-11-01

    Parasites take their resources from hosts and thus directly reduce available resources for hosts' own body functions, such as growth and reproduction. Furthermore, parasite infections cause significant indirect costs to their hosts in terms of increased investments on immune defense. In this study, we investigated the impact of parasite infection on the sperm quality and expression of secondary sexual ornamentation (saturation of the red abdominal colouration and number of breeding tubercles) in the Eurasian minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus). We exposed minnows to a high and low dose of common nonspecific fish ectoparasite, the glochidia larvae of duck mussel (Anodonta anatina) and tested whether parasite infection leads to trade-off in sperm quality and/or ornamental expression. We found that glochidia infection reduces the curvature of the sperm swimming trajectory, number of breeding tubercles, and possibly male competitive ability, but does not affect expression of male color ornamentation. Furthermore, glochidia infection was found to reduce sperm motility, but only when all the noninfected individuals were excluded from the model. Supporting one of the predictions by phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis both in high-infection and low-infection group male breeding colouration was positively associated with sperm quality. Our results suggest that although glochidia infection may have negative impact on male reproductive success, parasite-induced costs may not create strong trade-off between breeding colouration and sperm quality or that such trade-off become detectable only in resource-limited conditions. PMID:25540686

  17. Assessing contaminant sensitivity of endangered and threatened aquatic species: Part III. Effluent toxicity tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dwyer, F.J.; Hardesty, D.K.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Whites, D.W.; Augspurger, T.; Canfield, T.J.; Mount, D.R.; Mayer, F.L.

    2005-01-01

    Toxicity tests using standard effluent test procedures described by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were conducted with Ceriodaphnia dubia, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), and seven threatened and endangered (listed) fish species from four families: (1) Acipenseridae: shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum); (2) Catostomidae; razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus); (3) Cyprinidae: bonytail chub (Gila elegans), Cape Fear shiner (Notropis mekistocholas) Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius), and spotfin chub (Cyprinella monacha); and (4) Poecillidae: Gila topminnow (Poeciliopsis occidentalis). We conducted 7-day survival and growth studies with embryo-larval fathead minnows and analogous exposures using the listed species. Survival and reproduction were also determined with C. dubia. Tests were conducted with carbaryl, ammonia-or a simulated effluent complex mixture of carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol and permethrin at equitoxic proportions. In addition, Cape Fear shiners and spotfin chub were tested using diazinon, copper, and chlorine. Toxicity tests were also conducted with field-collected effluents from domestic or industrial facilities. Bonytail chub and razorback suckers were tested with effluents collected in Arizona whereas effluent samples collected from North Carolina were tested with Cape Fear shiner, spotfin chub, and shortnose sturgeon. The fathead minnow 7-day effluent test was often a reliable estimator of toxic effects to the listed fishes. However, in 21 % of the tests, a listed species was more sensitive than fathead minnows. More sensitive species results varied by test so that usually no species was always more or less sensitive than fathead minnows. Only the Gila topminnow was consistently less sensitive than the fathead minnow. Listed fish species were protected 96% of the time when results for both fathead minnows and C. dubia were considered, thus reinforcing the value of standard whole

  18. Long-term reproductive and behavioral toxicity of anthracene to fish in the presence of solar ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, A.T.; Oris, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    The long-term, low-level effects of anthracene in the presence of solar ultraviolet radiation (SUVR) were examined in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Adult fish exposed to anthracene exhibited reduced egg laying capacity, with altered oocyte maturation as a potential mechanism of action. Eggs and larvae maternally exposed to anthracene exhibited reduced hatching success and severe developmental abnormalities when incubated under SUVR. The combination of reduced egg output and developmental effects resulted in an inhibition in reproductive capacity in the range of 70--100%. Maternal transfer of anthracene to eggs was efficient; the BCF was 717 for maternally exposed eggs. However, anthracene deputation from eggs after oviposition with only maternal PAH exposure was rapid; anthracene half-life from eggs equaled 1.3 days. Exposure to anthracene under SUVR altered locomotor activity patterns in fathead minnows by inducing hyperactivity or hypoactivity during the light or dark phases of the photoperiod, respectively. Altered activity patterns indicated potential effects of anthracene on the nervous system and/or pineal gland. These alterations disrupted normal activity patterns and reproductive behaviors, and thus have major implications on a fish`s ability to survive and reproduce. Anthracene, a model phototoxic PAH, has many potential sites of toxic action, and any organism exposed to such contaminants will be an considerable SUVR-enhanced risk in the environment.

  19. Effluent monitoring at a bleached kraft mill: directions for best management practices for eliminating effects on fish reproduction.

    PubMed

    Martel, Pierre H; Kovacs, Tibor G; O'connor, Brian I; Semeniuk, Sharon; Hewitt, L Mark; Maclatchy, Deborah L; McMaster, Mark E; Parrott, Joanne L; van den Heuvel, Michael R; Van Der Kraak, Glen J

    2011-01-01

    A long-term monitoring study was conducted on effluents from a bleached kraft pulp and paper mill located in Eastern Canada. The study was designed to gain insights into temporal effluent variability with respect to fish reproduction as it related to production upsets, mill restarts and conditions affecting biological treatment performance. Final effluent quality was monitored between February 2007 and May 2009 using biochemical and chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids, resin and fatty acids, a gas chromatographic profiling index, and the presence of methyl substituted 2-cyclopentenones. Selected effluent samples were evaluated for effects on fish reproduction (egg production) using a shortened version of the adult fathead minnow reproductive test. The events relating to negative effects on fish reproduction were upsets of the pulping liquor recovery system resulting in black liquor losses, operational upsets of the hardwood line resulting in the loss of oxygen delignification filtrates, and conditions that reduced the performance of biological treatment (e.g., mill shutdown and low ambient temperatures). The reductions in egg production observed in fathead minnow were associated with biochemical oxygen demand values > 20 mg/L, GC profiling indices > 1.2 and the presence of methyl-substituted 2-cyclopentenones at concentrations > 100 μg/L. This study demonstrated the importance of both in-plant measures for controlling the loss of organics as well as the optimum operation of biological effluent treatment for eliminating effluent-related effects on fish reproduction (egg production) in the laboratory. PMID:21644165

  20. Adult Compacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin focuses on adult compacts, three-way agreements among employers, potential employees, and trainers to provide the right kind of quality training to meet the employers' requirements. Part 1 is an executive summary of a report of the Adult Compacts Project, which studied three adult compacts in Birmingham and Loughborough, England, and…