Science.gov

Sample records for adult general intensive

  1. General Information about Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  2. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. General Information about Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  5. General Information about Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. Case mix, outcome and length of stay for admissions to adult, general critical care units in England, Wales and Northern Ireland: the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre Case Mix Programme Database

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David A; Brady, Anthony R; Rowan, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Introduction The present paper describes the methods of data collection and validation employed in the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre Case Mix Programme (CMP), a national comparative audit of outcome for adult, critical care admissions. The paper also describes the case mix, outcome and activity of the admissions in the Case Mix Programme Database (CMPD). Methods The CMP collects data on consecutive admissions to adult, general critical care units in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Explicit steps are taken to ensure the accuracy of the data, including use of a dataset specification, of initial and refresher training courses, and of local and central validation of submitted data for incomplete, illogical and inconsistent values. Criteria for evaluating clinical databases developed by the Directory of Clinical Databases were applied to the CMPD. The case mix, outcome and activity for all admissions were briefly summarised. Results The mean quality level achieved by the CMPD for the 10 Directory of Clinical Databases criteria was 3.4 (on a scale of 1 = worst to 4 = best). The CMPD contained validated data on 129,647 admissions to 128 units. The median age was 63 years, and 59% were male. The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 16.5. Mortality was 20.3% in the CMP unit and was 30.8% at ultimate discharge from hospital. Nonsurvivors stayed longer in intensive care than did survivors (median 2.0 days versus 1.7 days in the CMP unit) but had a shorter total hospital length of stay (9 days versus 16 days). Results for the CMPD were comparable with results from other published reports of UK critical care admissions. Conclusions The CMP uses rigorous methods to ensure data are complete, valid and reliable. The CMP scores well against published criteria for high-quality clinical databases. PMID:15025784

  7. Case mix, outcome and length of stay for admissions to adult, general critical care units in England, Wales and Northern Ireland: the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre Case Mix Programme Database

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The present paper describes the methods of data collection and validation employed in the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre Case Mix Programme (CMP), a national comparative audit of outcome for adult, critical care admissions. The paper also describes the case mix, outcome and activity of the admissions in the Case Mix Programme Database (CMPD). Methods The CMP collects data on consecutive admissions to adult, general critical care units in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Explicit steps are taken to ensure the accuracy of the data, including use of a dataset specification, of initial and refresher training courses, and of local and central validation of submitted data for incomplete, illogical and inconsistent values. Criteria for evaluating clinical databases developed by the Directory of Clinical Databases were applied to the CMPD. The case mix, outcome and activity for all admissions were briefly summarised. Results The mean quality level achieved by the CMPD for the 10 Directory of Clinical Databases criteria was 3.4 (on a scale of 1 = worst to 4 = best). The CMPD contained validated data on 129,647 admissions to 128 units. The median age was 63 years, and 59% were male. The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 16.5. Mortality was 20.3% in the CMP unit and was 30.8% at ultimate discharge from hospital. Nonsurvivors stayed longer in intensive care than did survivors (median 2.0 days versus 1.7 days in the CMP unit) but had a shorter total hospital length of stay (9 days versus 16 days). Results for the CMPD were comparable with results from other published reports of UK critical care admissions. Conclusions The CMP uses rigorous methods to ensure data are complete, valid and reliable. The CMP scores well against published criteria for high-quality clinical databases.

  8. Nursing activity in general intensive care.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lynne; Nixon, Gillian

    2002-03-01

    1. In this cost-conscious climate there is a need to make explicit and justify the rationale to support direct patient contact by Registered Nurses. The current shortage of qualified nursing staff means that it is essential that experience and expertise be utilized to the benefit of patients and the service as a whole. 2. This study used a descriptive approach to describe, categorize and quantify the activities of nurses working in a six-bed general intensive care unit. 3. Data were collected using a self-reporting diary log sheet that identified the focus of an individual's activity at 5-minute intervals. All Registered Nurses, on all shifts over a 7-day period, completed log sheets. 4. The results demonstrate that nurses working in this general intensive care unit spent 85% of their time in activities associated with providing direct patient care. However, up to 6% of time was spent undertaking non-nursing duties, and analysis of unit activity provided data to support an increase in the establishment and review of the shift patterns of health care assistants. 5. The findings of the study indicate that nurses in charge of shifts spend 24.1% of their time in managerial and administrative activity; this reduces the amount of time spent in direct patient contact. PMID:11903715

  9. Healthcare intensity at initiation of chronic dialysis among older adults.

    PubMed

    Wong, Susan P Y; Kreuter, William; O'Hare, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the circumstances under which older adults initiate chronic dialysis and subsequent outcomes. Using national registry data, we conducted a retrospective analysis of 416,657 Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥67 years who initiated chronic dialysis between January 1995 and December 2008. Our goal was to define the relationship between health care intensity around the time of dialysis initiation and subsequent survival and patterns of hospitalization, use of intensive procedures (mechanical ventilation, feeding tube placement, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation), and discontinuation of dialysis before death. We found that most patients (64.5%) initiated dialysis in the hospital, including 36.6% who were hospitalized for ≥2 weeks and 7.4% who underwent one or more intensive procedures. Compared with patients who initiated dialysis in the outpatient setting, those who received the highest intensity of care at dialysis initiation (those hospitalized ≥2 weeks and receiving at least one intensive procedure) had a shorter median survival (0.7 versus 2.1 years; P<0.001), spent a greater percentage of remaining follow-up time in the hospital (median, 22.9% versus 3.1%; P<0.001), were more likely to undergo subsequent intensive procedures (44.9% versus 26.0%; adjusted hazard ratio, 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.27 to 2.39), and were less likely to have discontinued dialysis before death (19.1% versus 26.2%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.72). In conclusion, most older adults initiate chronic dialysis in the hospital. Those who have a prolonged hospital stay and receive other forms of life support around the time of dialysis initiation have limited survival and more intensive patterns of subsequent healthcare utilization. PMID:24262795

  10. Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Fear Generalization, and Stress.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Antoine; Sahay, Amar

    2016-01-01

    The generalization of fear is an adaptive, behavioral, and physiological response to the likelihood of threat in the environment. In contrast, the overgeneralization of fear, a cardinal feature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), manifests as inappropriate, uncontrollable expression of fear in neutral and safe environments. Overgeneralization of fear stems from impaired discrimination of safe from aversive environments or discernment of unlikely threats from those that are highly probable. In addition, the time-dependent erosion of episodic details of traumatic memories might contribute to their generalization. Understanding the neural mechanisms underlying the overgeneralization of fear will guide development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat PTSD. Here, we conceptualize generalization of fear in terms of resolution of interference between similar memories. We propose a role for a fundamental encoding mechanism, pattern separation, in the dentate gyrus (DG)-CA3 circuit in resolving interference between ambiguous or uncertain threats and in preserving episodic content of remote aversive memories in hippocampal-cortical networks. We invoke cellular-, circuit-, and systems-based mechanisms by which adult-born dentate granule cells (DGCs) modulate pattern separation to influence resolution of interference and maintain precision of remote aversive memories. We discuss evidence for how these mechanisms are affected by stress, a risk factor for PTSD, to increase memory interference and decrease precision. Using this scaffold we ideate strategies to curb overgeneralization of fear in PTSD. PMID:26068726

  11. General Information about Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers? (a)...

  13. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?...

  14. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?...

  15. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?...

  16. Chronic Disease in a General Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Kathleen N.; Kamberg, Caren J.; Goldberg, George A.; Brook, Robert H.; Keeler, Emmett B.; Calabro, Thomas A.

    1986-01-01

    Using questionnaire and physical screening examination data for a general population of 4,962 adults aged 18 to 61 years enrolled in the Rand Health Insurance Experiment, we calculated the prevalence of 13 chronic illnesses and assessed disease impact. Low-income men had a significantly higher prevalence of anemia, chronic airway disease and hearing impairment than their high-income counterparts, low-income women a higher prevalence of congestive heart failure, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hearing impairment and vision impairment. Of our sample, 30% had one chronic condition and 16% had two or more. Several significant pairs or “clusters” of chronic illnesses were found. With few exceptions (diabetes, hypertension), the use of physician care in the previous year for a specific condition tended to be low. Disease impact (worry, activity restriction) was widespread but mild. Persons with angina, congestive heart failure, mild chronic joint disorders and peptic ulcer disease reported a greater impact than persons with other illnesses. PMID:3788141

  17. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlström, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisén, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  18. Adults with childhood-onset chronic conditions admitted to U.S. pediatric and adult intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jeffrey D; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Yoo, Erika J; Houtrow, Amy J; Boscardin, W John; Dudley, R Adams; Okumura, Megumi J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare demographics, intensive care units (ICU) admission characteristics, and ICU outcomes among adults with childhood-onset chronic conditions (COCC) admitted to U.S. pediatric and adult ICUs. Materials and Methods Retrospective cross-sectional analyses of 6,088 adults aged 19–40 years admitted in 2008 to 70 pediatric ICUs that participated in the Virtual Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Performance Systems and 50 adult ICUs that participated in Project IMPACT. Results COCC were present in 53% of young adults admitted to pediatric units, compared to 9% of those in adult units. The most common COCC in both groups were congenital cardiac abnormalities, cerebral palsy, and chromosomal abnormalities. Adults with COCC admitted to pediatric units were significantly more likely to be younger, have lower functional status, and be non-trauma patients than those in adult units. The median ICU length-of-stay was 2 days and the intensive care unit mortality rate was 5% for all COCC patients with no statistical difference between pediatric or adult units. Conclusions There are marked differences in characteristics between young adults with COCC admitted to PICUs and adult ICUs. Barriers to accommodating these young adults may be reasons why many such adults have not transitioned from pediatric to adult critical care. PMID:25466316

  19. IFLA General Conference, 1984. Section on Adult Education. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Four papers on the role of libraries in adult education were presented at the 1984 IFLA general conference meeting of the Section on Adult Education. They include: (1) "The Library of the Pompeia Leisure Centre, Sao Paulo, Brazil," in which Apaty Peroni of Brazil provides background on the community, location, collection, personnel, operation, and…

  20. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers? 663.200 Section 663.200 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What...

  1. Intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Heller, Axel R

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish oils have shown efficacy in the treatment of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases due to their pleiotropic effects on inflammatory cell signalling pathways. In a variety of experimental and clinical studies, omega-3 fatty acids attenuated hyperinflammatory conditions and induced faster recovery. This chapter will shed light on the effects of intravenous fish oil in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients and will discuss clinical data and recent meta-analyses on the topic. While significant beneficial effects on infection rates and the lengths of ICU and hospital stays have concordantly been identified in three recent meta-analyses on non-ICU surgical patients, the level of evidence is not so clear for critically ill patients. Three meta-analyses published in 2012 or 2013 explored data on the ICU population. Although the present data suggest the consideration of enteral nutrition enriched with fish oil, borage oil and antioxidants in mild to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, only one of the three meta-analyses found a trend (p = 0.08) of lower mortality in ICU patients receiving intravenous omega-3 fatty acids. Two of the meta-analyses indicated a significantly shorter hospital stay (5.17-9.49 days), and one meta-analysis found a significant reduction in ICU days (1.92). As a result of these effects, cost savings were postulated. Unlike in surgical patients, the effects of fish oil on infection rates were not found to be statistically significant in ICU patients, and dose-effect relationships were not established for any cohort. Thus, obvious positive secondary outcome effects with intravenous fish oil have not yet been shown to transfer to lower mortality in critically ill patients. There is a need for adequately powered, well-planned and well-conducted randomized trials to give clear recommendations on the individual utility and dosage of intravenous omega-3 fatty acids in critical illness. PMID:25471809

  2. The negative event scale: measuring frequency and intensity of adult hassles.

    PubMed

    Maybery, D J; Neale, Jason; Arentz, Alex; Jones-Ellis, Jenny

    2007-06-01

    This study examined the structure, concurrent validity, and reliability of a hassle measure for middle-aged adults in both event frequency and intensity recordings. The measure included a range of interpersonal day-to-day events and re-examined aspects of the primary appraisal confounding debate between Lazarus and colleagues (Lazarus, Delongis, Folkman, & Gruen, 1985) and Dohrenwend and Shrout (1985). Of the 373 participants, 73% were female, 72% were in paid work, 69% were in permanent relationships and 62% had children. Principal component analyses of separate hassle frequency and intensity scores highlighted components consistent with previous research. There were seven interpersonal and four non-interpersonal subscales associated with negative events with family and friends, work, health, money, and household. The subscales had very good reliability and concurrent validity and there were generally strong correlations (i.e. up .84) between frequency and intensity scores for each subscale. Given some important sampling limitations (e.g. female overrepresentation) the findings show a psychometrically sound hassle scale for adults. PMID:17999222

  3. MRI correlates of general intelligence in neurotypical adults.

    PubMed

    Malpas, Charles B; Genc, Sila; Saling, Michael M; Velakoulis, Dennis; Desmond, Patricia M; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-02-01

    There is growing interest in the neurobiological substrate of general intelligence. Psychometric estimates of general intelligence are reduced in a range of neurological disorders, leading to practical application as sensitive, but non-specific, markers of cerebral disorder. This study examined estimates of general intelligence in neurotypical adults using diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional connectivity analysis. General intelligence was related to white matter organisation across multiple brain regions, confirming previous work in older healthy adults. We also found that variation in general intelligence was related to a large functional sub-network involving all cortical lobes of the brain. These findings confirm that individual variance in general intelligence is related to diffusely represented brain networks. PMID:26455546

  4. Usefulness of a Perceived Exertion Scale for Monitoring Exercise Intensity in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanish, Heidi I.; Aucoin, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain physical fitness and health, exercise must be performed at a sufficient level of intensity. Exercise intensity can be monitored with rated perceived exertion (RPE) scales to promote safe and effective programming. The usefulness of the Children's OMNI Scale as a subjective measure of intensity for adults with intellectual…

  5. General Case Simulation Instruction of Generalized Housekeeping Skills in Blind, Multihandicapped Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lengyel, L. M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study with three blind and mentally retarded adults with additional disabilities found that general case simulation instruction in housekeeping skills led to generalization to untrained settings. Degree of generalization was inversely related to the severity and complexity of participant disability. (Author/DB)

  6. Long-term survival following intensive care: subgroup analysis and comparison with the general population.

    PubMed

    Wright, J C; Plenderleith, L; Ridley, S A

    2003-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the very long-term survival of critically ill patients with that of the general population, and examine the association among age, sex, admission diagnosis, APACHE II score and mortality. In a retrospective observational cohort study of prospectively gathered data, 2104 adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a teaching hospital in Glasgow from 1985 to 1992, were followed until 1997. Vital status at five years was compared with that of an age- and sex-matched Scottish population. Five-year mortality for the ICU patients was 47.1%, 3.4 times higher than that of the general population. For those surviving intensive care the five-year mortality was 33.4%. Mortality was greater than that of the general population for four years following intensive care unit admission (95% confidence interval included 1.0 at four years). Multivariate analysis showed that risk factors for mortality in those admitted to ICU were age, APACHE II score on admission and diagnostic category. Mortality was higher for those admitted with haematological (87.5%) and neurological diseases (61.7%) and septic shock (62.9%). A risk score was produced: Risk Score = 10 (age hazard ratio + APACHE II hazard ratio + diagnosis hazard ratio). None of the patients with a risk score > 100 survived more than five years and for those who survived to five years the mean risk score was 57. Long-term survival following intensive care is not only related to age and severity of illness but also diagnostic category. The risk of mortality in survivors of critical illness matches that of the normal population after four years. Age, severity of illness and diagnosis can be combined to provide an estimate of five-year survival. PMID:12790812

  7. Suggesting a General ESP Model for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Jumaily, Samir

    2011-01-01

    The study suggests a general model that could guarantee the cooperation between teachers and their students to overcome the difficulties encountered in ESP learning. It tries to join together different perspectives in the research of adult education, specifically in the teaching of English for Specific Purposes. It also provides some sort of trust…

  8. Intensive care outcomes in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas D; Nates, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    Although outcomes of intensive care for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have improved in the last two decades, the short-term mortality still remains above 50% among allogeneic HSCT patients. Better selection of HSCT patients for intensive care, and consequently reduction of non-beneficial care, may reduce financial costs and alleviate patient suffering. We reviewed the studies on intensive care outcomes of patients undergoing HSCT published since 2000. The risk factors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission identified in this report were primarily patient and transplant related: HSCT type (autologous vs allogeneic), conditioning intensity, HLA mismatch, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At the same time, most of the factors associated with ICU outcomes reported were related to the patients’ functional status upon development of critical illness and interventions in ICU. Among the many possible interventions, the initiation of mechanical ventilation was the most consistently reported factor affecting ICU survival. As a consequence, our current ability to assess the benefit or futility of intensive care is limited. Until better ICU or hospital mortality prediction models are available, based on the available evidence, we recommend practitioners to base their ICU admission decisions on: Patient pre-transplant comorbidities, underlying disease status, GVHD diagnosis/grade, and patients’ functional status at the time of critical illness. PMID:26862493

  9. Defining and Treating Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Ineligible for Intensive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Kristen; Odenike, Olatoyosi

    2015-01-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of older adults (age ≥60 years), the optimal treatment for older adults remains largely undefined. Intensive chemotherapy is rarely beneficial for frail older adults or those with poor-risk disease, but criteria that define fitness and/or appropriateness for intensive chemotherapy remain to be standardized. Evaluation of disease-related and patient-specific factors in the context of clinical decision making has therefore been largely subjective. A uniform approach to identify those patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapies is needed. Here, we review currently available objective measures to define older adults with AML who are ineligible for intensive chemotherapy, and discuss promising investigational approaches. PMID:26697412

  10. APACHE II scoring system on a general intensive care unit: audit of daily APACHE II scores and 6-month survival of 691 patients admitted to a general intensive care unit between May 1990 and December 1991.

    PubMed

    Campbell, N N; Tooley, M A; Willatts, S M

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the use of the APACHE II (acute physiological and chronic health evaluation) scoring system on all of the patients admitted to the general intensive care unit at the Bristol Royal Infirmary over a 20-month period. The 6-month survival of 691 adult medical and surgical patients following intensive care was recorded and this data was analysed with admission and daily APACHE II scores using a relational database. Our data confirms the relationship between admission APACHE II scores and outcome, with mean scores decreasing as duration of survival increases. We also demonstrate that the best day one scores are approximately 50% less than the admission score, irrespective of outcome, indicating the benefit of intensive care. By contrast, however, the scores on day one have either not improved or have worsened since admission, reflecting the importance of the pre-morbid health status of the patient in determining outcome from intensive care. PMID:8196033

  11. APACHE II scoring system on a general intensive care unit: audit of daily APACHE II scores and 6-month survival of 691 patients admitted to a general intensive care unit between May 1990 and December 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N N; Tooley, M A; Willatts, S M

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the use of the APACHE II (acute physiological and chronic health evaluation) scoring system on all of the patients admitted to the general intensive care unit at the Bristol Royal Infirmary over a 20-month period. The 6-month survival of 691 adult medical and surgical patients following intensive care was recorded and this data was analysed with admission and daily APACHE II scores using a relational database. Our data confirms the relationship between admission APACHE II scores and outcome, with mean scores decreasing as duration of survival increases. We also demonstrate that the best day one scores are approximately 50% less than the admission score, irrespective of outcome, indicating the benefit of intensive care. By contrast, however, the scores on day one have either not improved or have worsened since admission, reflecting the importance of the pre-morbid health status of the patient in determining outcome from intensive care. PMID:8196033

  12. Viral Respiratory Infections of Adults in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Christopher; Kaku, Shawn; Tutera, Dominic; Kuschner, Ware G; Barr, Juliana

    2016-08-01

    Viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are an underappreciated cause of critical illness in adults. Recent advances in viral detection techniques over the past decade have demonstrated viral LRTIs are associated with rates of morbidity, mortality, and health care utilization comparable to those of seen with bacterial community acquired and nosocomial pneumonias. In this review, we describe the relationship between viral LRTIs and critical illness, as well as discuss relevant clinical features and management strategies for the more prevalent respiratory viral pathogens. PMID:25990273

  13. Reduced-intensity conditioned allogeneic SCT in adults with AML.

    PubMed

    Reshef, R; Porter, D L

    2015-06-01

    AML is currently the most common indication for reduced-intensity conditioned (RIC) allo-SCT. Reduced-intensity regimens allow a potent GVL response to occur with minimized treatment-related toxicity in patients of older age or with comorbidities that preclude the use of myeloablative conditioning. Whether RIC SCT is appropriate for younger and more standard risk patients is not well defined and the field is changing rapidly; a prospective randomized trial of myeloablative vs RIC (BMT-CTN 0901) was recently closed when early results indicated better outcomes for myeloablative regimens. However, detailed results are not available, and all patients in that study were eligible for myeloablative conditioning. RIC transplants will likely remain the standard of care as many patients with AML are not eligible for myeloablative conditioning. Recent publication of mature results from retrospective and prospective cohorts provide contemporary efficacy and toxicity data for these attenuated regimens. In addition, recent studies explore the use of alternative donors, introduce regimens that attempt to reduce toxicity without reducing intensity, and identify predictive factors that pave the way to personalized approaches. These studies paint a picture of the future of RIC transplants. Here we review the current status of RIC allogeneic SCT in AML. PMID:25730186

  14. Fatigue in Family Caregivers of Adult Intensive Care Unit Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiYeon; Tate, Judith A.; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara A.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Context Family caregivers are a vital resource in the recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Of concern, the stress associated with this role can negatively affect caregiver health. Fatigue, an important health indicator, has been identified as a predictor of various illnesses, greater use of health services, and early mortality. Examining the impact of fatigue on caregivers’ physical health can assist in identifying critical time points and potential targets for intervention. Objectives To describe self-reported fatigue in caregivers of ICU survivors from patients’ ICU admission to ≤ two weeks, two- and four-months post-ICU discharge. Methods Patient-caregiver pairs were enrolled from a medical ICU. Caregiver fatigue was measured using the Short-Form-36 Health Survey Vitality subscale (SF-36 Vitality). Caregiver psychobehavioral stress responses included depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors, and sleep quality. Patient data included self-reported physical symptoms and disposition (home vs. institution). Results Forty seven patient-caregiver pairs were initially enrolled. Clinically significant fatigue (SF-36 Vitality ≤ 45) was reported by 43% to 53% of caregivers across the time points and these caregivers reported worse scores in measures of depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors and sleep quality, and patients’ symptom burden. In 26 caregivers with data for all time points (55% of the total sample), SF-36 Vitality scores showed trends of improvement when the patient returned home and greater impairment when institutionalization continued. Conclusion In caregivers of ICU survivors, fatigue is common and potentially linked with poor psychobehavioral responses. Worsening fatigue was associated with greater symptom distress and long-term patient institutionalization. PMID:24439845

  15. Generalized Hypertrichosis Induced by Topical Minoxidil in an Adult Woman.

    PubMed

    Chellini, Patrícia Rocha; Pirmez, Rodrigo; Raso, Paula; Sodré, Celso T

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is a common side effect of topical minoxidil and has been reported to occur mainly close to the areas of application. In this paper, we present a case of a 26-year-old woman who developed generalized hypertrichosis 8 weeks after treatment with 5% topical minoxidil solution for alopecia areata. Generalized hypertrichosis is a rare side effect and has been described mainly in children and adolescents. Even though minoxidil is commonly prescribed for alopecia areata, there is insufficient evidence to support its systematic use and the occurrence of adverse effects should prompt drug interruption. Nonetheless, topical minoxidil has been shown to be a safe medication for adult patients, and we believe that the present case was an isolated one, possibly resulting from the misuse of the drug. PMID:26903750

  16. Generalized Hypertrichosis Induced by Topical Minoxidil in an Adult Woman

    PubMed Central

    Chellini, Patrícia Rocha; Pirmez, Rodrigo; Raso, Paula; Sodré, Celso T

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is a common side effect of topical minoxidil and has been reported to occur mainly close to the areas of application. In this paper, we present a case of a 26-year-old woman who developed generalized hypertrichosis 8 weeks after treatment with 5% topical minoxidil solution for alopecia areata. Generalized hypertrichosis is a rare side effect and has been described mainly in children and adolescents. Even though minoxidil is commonly prescribed for alopecia areata, there is insufficient evidence to support its systematic use and the occurrence of adverse effects should prompt drug interruption. Nonetheless, topical minoxidil has been shown to be a safe medication for adult patients, and we believe that the present case was an isolated one, possibly resulting from the misuse of the drug. PMID:26903750

  17. Recognition of Facial Expressions and Prosodic Cues with Graded Emotional Intensities in Adults with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doi, Hirokazu; Fujisawa, Takashi X.; Kanai, Chieko; Ohta, Haruhisa; Yokoi, Hideki; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa; Shinohara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of adults with Asperger syndrome to recognize emotional categories of facial expressions and emotional prosodies with graded emotional intensities. The individuals with Asperger syndrome showed poorer recognition performance for angry and sad expressions from both facial and vocal information. The group…

  18. Patient stress in intensive care: comparison between a coronary care unit and a general postoperative unit

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Douglas de Sá; Resende, Mariane Vanessa; Diniz, Gisele do Carmo Leite Machado

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare stressors identified by patients of a coronary intensive care unit with those perceived by patients of a general postoperative intensive care unit. Methods This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units of a private hospital. In total, 60 patients participated in the study, 30 in each intensive care unit. The stressor scale was used in the intensive care units to identify the stressors. The mean score of each item of the scale was calculated followed by the total stress score. The differences between groups were considered significant when p < 0.05. Results The mean ages of patients were 55.63 ± 13.58 years in the coronary intensive care unit and 53.60 ± 17.47 years in the general postoperative intensive care unit. For patients in the coronary intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “being bored”. For patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “not being able to communicate”. The mean total stress scores were 104.20 ± 30.95 in the coronary intensive care unit and 116.66 ± 23.72 (p = 0.085) in the general postoperative intensive care unit. When each stressor was compared separately, significant differences were noted only between three items. “Having nurses constantly doing things around your bed” was more stressful to the patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit than to those in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.013). Conversely, “hearing unfamiliar sounds and noises” and “hearing people talk about you” were the most stressful items for the patients in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.046 and 0.005, respectively). Conclusion The perception of major stressors and the total stress score were similar between patients

  19. Intensive video gaming improves encoding speed to visual short-term memory in young male adults.

    PubMed

    Wilms, Inge L; Petersen, Anders; Vangkilde, Signe

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of action video gaming on central elements of visual attention using Bundesen's (1990) Theory of Visual Attention. To examine the cognitive impact of action video gaming, we tested basic functions of visual attention in 42 young male adults. Participants were divided into three groups depending on the amount of time spent playing action video games: non-players (<2h/month, N=12), casual players (4-8h/month, N=10), and experienced players (>15h/month, N=20). All participants were tested in three tasks which tap central functions of visual attention and short-term memory: a test based on the Theory of Visual Attention (TVA), an enumeration test and finally the Attentional Network Test (ANT). The results show that action video gaming does not seem to impact the capacity of visual short-term memory. However, playing action video games does seem to improve the encoding speed of visual information into visual short-term memory and the improvement does seem to depend on the time devoted to gaming. This suggests that intense action video gaming improves basic attentional functioning and that this improvement generalizes into other activities. The implications of these findings for cognitive rehabilitation training are discussed. PMID:23261420

  20. Nightmares: Risk Factors Among the Finnish General Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Sandman, Nils; Valli, Katja; Kronholm, Erkki; Revonsuo, Antti; Laatikainen, Tiina; Paunio, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify risk factors for experiencing nightmares among the Finnish general adult population. The study aimed to both test whether previously reported correlates of frequent nightmares could be reproduced in a large population sample and to explore previously unreported associations. Design: Two independent cross-sectional population surveys of the National FINRISK Study. Setting: Age- and sex-stratified random samples of the Finnish population in 2007 and 2012. Participants: A total of 13,922 participants (6,515 men and 7,407 women) aged 25–74 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and results: Nightmare frequency as well as several items related to socioeconomic status, sleep, mental well-being, life satisfaction, alcohol use, medication, and physical well-being were recorded with a questionnaire. In multinomial logistic regression analysis, a depression-related negative attitude toward the self (odds ratio [OR] 1.32 per 1-point increase), insomnia (OR 6.90), and exhaustion and fatigue (OR 6.86) were the strongest risk factors for experiencing frequent nightmares (P < 0.001 for all). Sex, age, a self-reported impaired ability to work, low life satisfaction, the use of antidepressants or hypnotics, and frequent heavy use of alcohol were also strongly associated with frequent nightmares (P < 0.001 for all). Conclusions: Symptoms of depression and insomnia were the strongest predictors of frequent nightmares in this dataset. Additionally, a wide variety of factors related to psychological and physical well-being were associated with nightmare frequency with modest effect sizes. Hence, nightmare frequency appears to have a strong connection with sleep and mood problems, but is also associated with a variety of measures of psychological and physical well-being. Citation: Sandman N, Valli K, Kronholm E, Revonsuo A, Laatikainen T, Paunio T. Nightmares: risk factors among the finnish general adult population. SLEEP 2015;38(4):507–514. PMID:25325474

  1. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  2. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  3. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  4. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult day health care program. Adult day health care must be...

  5. 38 CFR 52.61 - General requirements for adult day health care program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for adult day health care program. 52.61 Section 52.61 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.61 General requirements for adult...

  6. Type and Intensity of Negative Life Events Are Associated With Depression in Adults With Intellectual Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Hove, Oddbjørn; Assmus, Jörg; Havik, Odd E

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the associations between types and intensity of life events and symptoms of depression among adults with intellectual disabilities. A community sample (N = 593) was screened for current depression and exposure to life events (i.e., loss, illness, change, and bullying) during the previous 12 months. Symptoms of depression were measured using the Psychopathology Checklists for Adults With Intellectual Disabilities. Exposure to three of the four types of life events studied (loss, illness, and bullying) and the intensity of the events were associated with depression, particularly in the cases of loss of relatives and bullying. Quality of care moderated the association between bullying and depression and may buffer the adverse consequences of bullying. PMID:27611352

  7. Low-intensity daily walking activity is associated with hippocampal volume in older adults.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vijay R; Chuang, Yi-Fang; Harris, Gregory C; Tan, Erwin J; Carlson, Michelle C

    2015-05-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is associated with memory impairment and dementia and serves as a key biomarker in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity, one of the most promising behavioral interventions to prevent or delay cognitive decline, has been shown to be associated with hippocampal volume; specifically increased aerobic activity and fitness may have a positive effect on the size of the hippocampus. The majority of older adults, however, are sedentary and have difficulty initiating and maintaining exercise programs. A modestly more active lifestyle may nonetheless be beneficial. This study explored whether greater objectively measured daily walking activity was associated with larger hippocampal volume. We additionally explored whether greater low-intensity walking activity, which may be related to leisure-time physical, functional, and social activities, was associated with larger hippocampal volume independent of exercise and higher-intensity walking activity. Segmentation of hippocampal volumes was performed using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain's Software Library (FSL), and daily walking activity was assessed using a step activity monitor on 92, nondemented, older adult participants. After controlling for age, education, body mass index, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the Mini Mental State Exam, we found that a greater amount, duration, and frequency of total daily walking activity were each associated with larger hippocampal volume among older women, but not among men. These relationships were specific to hippocampal volume, compared with the thalamus, used as a control brain region, and remained significant for low-intensity walking activity, independent of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity and self-reported exercise. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to explore the relationship between objectively measured daily walking activity and hippocampal volume in an older adult population. Findings

  8. A computer model of the artificially ventilated human respiratory system in adult intensive care.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A J; Murphy, C M; Brook, B S; Breen, D; Miles, A W; Tilley, D G

    2009-11-01

    A multi-technique approach to modelling artificially ventilated patients on the adult general intensive care unit (ICU) is proposed. Compartmental modelling techniques were used to describe the mechanical ventilator and the flexible hoses that connect it to the patient. 3D CFD techniques were used to model flow in the major airways and a Windkessel style balloon model was used to model the mechanical properties of the lungs. A multi-compartment model of the lung based on bifurcating tree structures representing the conducting airways and pulmonary circulation allowed lung disease to be modelled in terms of altered V/Q ratios within a lognormal distribution of values and it is from these that gas exchange was determined. A compartmental modelling tool, Bathfp, was used to integrate the different modelling techniques into a single model. The values of key parameters in the model could be obtained from measurements on patients in an ICU whilst a sensitivity analysis showed that the model was insensitive to the value of other parameters within it. Measured and modelled values for arterial blood gases and airflow parameters are compared for 46 ventilator settings obtained from 6 ventilator dependent patients. The results show correlation coefficients of 0.88 and 0.85 for the arterial partial pressures of the O(2) and CO(2), respectively (p<0.01) and of 0.99 and 0.96 for upper airway pressure and tidal volume, respectively (p<0.01). The difference between measured and modelled values was large in physiological terms, suggesting that some optimisation of the model is required. PMID:19699134

  9. GENERAL STRAIN THEORY, PERSISTENCE, AND DESISTANCE AMONG YOUNG ADULT MALES

    PubMed Central

    Eitle, David

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Despite the surge in scholarly activity investigating the criminal career, relatively less attention has been devoted to the issue of criminal desistance versus persistence (until recently). The present study contributed to our understanding of this process by exploring the suitability of General Strain Theory (GST) for predicting changes in criminal activity across time. Methods Data from a longitudinal study of males in South Florida are examined using robust regression analyses. Results The core GST relationship, that changes in strain should predict changes in criminal activity, was supported, even after controlling for important adult social roles such as marriage, labor force participation, and education. While no support for the proposition that changes in self-esteem and social support moderate the strain-criminal desistance association was evinced, evidence was found that angry disposition, a measure of negative emotionality, moderated the association between change in chronic stressors and change in criminal activity. Conclusions While exploratory in nature, these findings demonstrate the utility of employing GST principles in studies of criminal desistance. PMID:21499526

  10. Operator Priming and Generalization of Practice in Adults' Simple Arithmetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yalin; Campbell, Jamie I. D.

    2016-01-01

    There is a renewed debate about whether educated adults solve simple addition problems (e.g., 2 + 3) by direct fact retrieval or by fast, automatic counting-based procedures. Recent research testing adults' simple addition and multiplication showed that a 150-ms preview of the operator (+ or ×) facilitated addition, but not multiplication,…

  11. Recognition of facial expressions and prosodic cues with graded emotional intensities in adults with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hirokazu; Fujisawa, Takashi X; Kanai, Chieko; Ohta, Haruhisa; Yokoi, Hideki; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa; Shinohara, Kazuyuki

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the ability of adults with Asperger syndrome to recognize emotional categories of facial expressions and emotional prosodies with graded emotional intensities. The individuals with Asperger syndrome showed poorer recognition performance for angry and sad expressions from both facial and vocal information. The group difference in facial expression recognition was prominent for stimuli with low or intermediate emotional intensities. In contrast to this, the individuals with Asperger syndrome exhibited lower recognition accuracy than typically-developed controls mainly for emotional prosody with high emotional intensity. In facial expression recognition, Asperger and control groups showed an inversion effect for all categories. The magnitude of this effect was less in the Asperger group for angry and sad expressions, presumably attributable to reduced recruitment of the configural mode of face processing. The individuals with Asperger syndrome outperformed the control participants in recognizing inverted sad expressions, indicating enhanced processing of local facial information representing sad emotion. These results suggest that the adults with Asperger syndrome rely on modality-specific strategies in emotion recognition from facial expression and prosodic information. PMID:23371506

  12. 20 CFR 416.920 - Evaluation of disability of adults, in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evaluation of disability of adults, in general. 416.920 Section 416.920 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY... § 416.920 Evaluation of disability of adults, in general. (a) General—(1) Purpose of this section....

  13. 20 CFR 416.920 - Evaluation of disability of adults, in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Evaluation of disability of adults, in general. 416.920 Section 416.920 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY... § 416.920 Evaluation of disability of adults, in general. (a) General—(1) Purpose of this section....

  14. 20 CFR 416.920 - Evaluation of disability of adults, in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evaluation of disability of adults, in general. 416.920 Section 416.920 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY... § 416.920 Evaluation of disability of adults, in general. (a) General—(1) Purpose of this section....

  15. 20 CFR 416.920 - Evaluation of disability of adults, in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evaluation of disability of adults, in general. 416.920 Section 416.920 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY... § 416.920 Evaluation of disability of adults, in general. (a) General—(1) Purpose of this section....

  16. Cord Blood Transplantation Following Reduced-intensity Conditioning for Adult-onset Inherited Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Takuro; Kato, Koji; Sakamoto, Keiji; Hayashi, Masayasu; Takashima, Shuichiro; Mori, Yasuo; Takenaka, Katsuto; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Teshima, Takanori; Harada, Naoki; Nagafuji, Koji; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Akashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Inherited hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a genetic anomaly disorder in which abnormally activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes cannot induce the apoptosis of target cells and antigen-presenting cells, leading to hemophagocytosis, pancytopenia, and a variety of symptoms such as a high fever. The present patient with adult-onset HLH developed refractory disease despite receiving immunosuppressive treatments. He underwent a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen that comprised antithymocyte globulin (ATG) followed by cord blood transplantation (RIC-CBT). He achieved and maintained a complete donor type. The incorporation of ATG into RIC-CBT may prevent graft failure and control hemophagocytosis, however, further efforts are necessary to reduce infectious complications. PMID:26984088

  17. Generalization of Conditioned Fear along a Dimension of Increasing Fear Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; Mitroff, Stephen R.; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the extent to which fear generalization in humans is determined by the amount of fear intensity in nonconditioned stimuli relative to a perceptually similar conditioned stimulus. Stimuli consisted of graded emotionally expressive faces of the same identity morphed between neutral and fearful endpoints. Two…

  18. Beyond pleasure and pain: Facial expression ambiguity in adults and children during intense situations.

    PubMed

    Wenzler, Sofia; Levine, Sarah; van Dick, Rolf; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Aviezer, Hillel

    2016-09-01

    According to psychological models as well as common intuition, intense positive and negative situations evoke highly distinct emotional expressions. Nevertheless, recent work has shown that when judging isolated faces, the affective valence of winning and losing professional tennis players is hard to differentiate. However, expressions produced by professional athletes during publicly broadcasted sports events may be strategically controlled. To shed light on this matter we examined if ordinary people's spontaneous facial expressions evoked during highly intense situations are diagnostic for the situational valence. In Experiment 1 we compared reactions with highly intense positive situations (surprise soldier reunions) versus highly intense negative situations (terror attacks). In Experiment 2, we turned to children and compared facial reactions with highly positive situations (e.g., a child receiving a surprise trip to Disneyland) versus highly negative situations (e.g., a child discovering her parents ate up all her Halloween candy). The results demonstrate that facial expressions of both adults and children are often not diagnostic for the valence of the situation. These findings demonstrate the ambiguity of extreme facial expressions and highlight the importance of context in everyday emotion perception. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27337681

  19. Intensity of physical activity in the energy expenditure of older adults.

    PubMed

    Colbert, Lisa H; Matthews, Charles E; Schoeller, Dale A; Havighurst, Thomas C; Kim, KyungMann

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the intensity of activity contributing to physical activity energy expenditure in older adults. In 57 men and women aged ≥ 65, total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water and resting metabolic rate was measured using indirect calorimetry to calculate a physical activity index (PAI). Sedentary time and physical activity of light and moderate to vigorous (mod/vig) intensity was measured using an accelerometer. The subjects were 75 ± 7 yrs (mean ± SD) of age and 79% female. Subjects spent 66 ± 8, 25 ± 5, and 9 ± 4% of monitor wear time in sedentary, light, and mod/vig activity per day, respectively. In a mixture regression model, both light (β = 29.6 [15.6-43.6, 95% CI]), p < .001) and mod/vig intensity activity (β = 28.7 [7.4-50.0, 95% CI]), p = .01) were strongly associated with PAI, suggesting that both light and mod/vig intensity activities are major determinants of their physical activity energy expenditure. PMID:24306390

  20. Intensity of Physical Activity in the Energy Expenditure of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Colbert, Lisa H.; Matthews, Charles E.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Havighurst, Thomas C.; Kim, KyungMann

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the intensity of activity contributing to physical activity energy expenditure in older adults. In 57 men and women aged ≥65, total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured using doubly labeled water, and resting metabolic rate was measured using indirect calorimetry to calculate a physical activity index (PAI). Sedentary time, and physical activity of light and moderate/vigorous (mod/vig) intensity was measured using an accelerometer. The subjects were 75 ± 7 yrs (mean ± SD) of age and 79% female. Subjects spent 66 ± 8, 25 ± 5, and 9 ± 4% of monitor wear time in sedentary, light, and mod/vig activity per day, respectively. In a mixture regression model, both light (β=29.6 (15.6 – 43.6, 95%CI)), p<0.001) and mod/vig intensity activity (β=28.7 (7.4 – 50.0, 95%CI)), p=0.01) were strongly associated with PAI, suggesting that both light and mod/vig intensity activities are major determinants of their physical activity energy expenditure. PMID:24306390

  1. Experimental hypervigilance changes the intensity/unpleasantness ratio of pressure sensations: evidence for the generalized hypervigilance hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hollins, Mark; Walters, Sloan

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic pain conditions such as fibromyalgia often demonstrate hypervigilance-undue alertness for unpleasant or threatening bodily sensations-as well as enhancement of these sensations. The generalized hypervigilance hypothesis (GHH) of Rollman and colleagues asserts that hypervigilance leads to this perceptual amplification. However, cause-and-effect relationships are difficult to establish in studies using a quasi-experimental design. In the present study, we sought to address this issue by attempting to induce hypervigilance experimentally, in one of two groups to which young, healthy adults had been randomly assigned. Those in the experimental group wrote about the flu and practiced counting their own blinks, breaths, and heartbeats; those in the control group wrote about a neutral topic and counted innocuous lights and sounds. Next, both groups rated the intensity and unpleasantness of pressure sensations (ranging from mild to painful) caused by a series of applications of a weighted rod to the forearm. The intensity/unpleasantness ratio of these ratings was significantly greater in the experimental group, suggesting that induced hypervigilance had caused perceptual amplification that generalized to pressure sensations, which had not been part of the experimental manipulation. Psychometric measures of anxiety and catastrophizing were equivalent in the two groups, indicating that the experimental manipulation operated via attentional rather than emotional changes. The results support the GHH. PMID:26724932

  2. The M-Integral for Computing Stress Intensity Factors in Generally Anisotropic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warzynek, P. A.; Carter, B. J.; Banks-Sills, L.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a capability for computing stress intensity factors in generally anisotropic materials. These objectives have been met. The primary deliverable of this project is this report and the information it contains. In addition, we have delivered the source code for a subroutine that will compute stress intensity factors for anisotropic materials encoded in both the C and Python programming languages and made available a version of the FRANC3D program that incorporates this subroutine. Single crystal super alloys are commonly used for components in the hot sections of contemporary jet and rocket engines. Because these components have a uniform atomic lattice orientation throughout, they exhibit anisotropic material behavior. This means that stress intensity solutions developed for isotropic materials are not appropriate for the analysis of crack growth in these materials. Until now, a general numerical technique did not exist for computing stress intensity factors of cracks in anisotropic materials and cubic materials in particular. Such a capability was developed during the project and is described and demonstrated herein.

  3. Sex difference in substrate oxidation during low-intensity isometric exercise in young adults.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Delphine; Schutz, Yves; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Dulloo, Abdul G; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    Low-intensity physical activity is increasingly promoted as an alternative to sedentary behavior. However, much research to date has focused on moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, and in particular dynamic work, with the effect of low-intensity isometric exercise (<4 METs) on substrate utilization yet to be explored. Here we investigate the effects of such exercise on respiratory quotient (RQ) and determine the extent of intra- and inter-individual variability in response. Energy expenditure, RQ, and substrate oxidation were measured by ventilated-hood indirect calorimetry at rest and in response to standardized, intermittent, low-level isometric leg-press exercises at 5 loads (+5, +10, +15, +20, +25 kg) in 26 healthy, young adults. Nine participants repeated the experiment on 3 separate days to assess within-subject, between-day variability. There was no significant difference in energy cost and heart rate responses to low-intensity isometric exercise (<2 METs) between men and women. However, a sex difference was apparent in terms of substrate oxidation - with men increasing both fat and carbohydrate oxidation, and women only increasing fat oxidation while maintaining carbohydrate oxidation at baseline, resting levels. This sex difference was repeatable and persisted when substrate oxidation was adjusted for differences in body weight or body composition. Individual variability in RQ was relatively low, with both intra- and inter-individual coefficients of variation in the range of 3%-6% in both sexes. These results suggest that women preferentially increase fat oxidation during low-level isometric exercise. Whether such physical activity could be incorporated into treatment/prevention strategies aimed at optimizing fat oxidation in women warrants further investigation. PMID:27540628

  4. Body Pain Intensity and Interference in Adults (45-53 Years Old): A Cross-Sectional Survey in Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianglong; Li, Bing; Liu, Lingli; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Culture and national care models matter both in reporting and treatment of pain status. However, most findings on body pain intensity and interference in adults are from Western studies, with little reliable evidence from China. This study aimed to assess body pain intensity and interference and its associations with demographic, socioeconomic characteristics, and health behaviors in adults. A cross-sectional survey was performed to collect data from 1224 adults, who were recruited via multistage stratified random sampling. The SF-36 quality-of-life instrument was used to investigate body pain intensity and interference. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was used in this study. Our results showed that 64.1% of the participants (males: 687; females: 537) reported body pain, and 45.7% of the participants reported body pain interference. Middle-aged respondents who were female, were unmarried/divorced or separated/widowed, had a negative relationship with their family, had poor sleep quality, and were not satisfied with their current living conditions had a higher body pain intensity rating (ordered logistic regression/six-level pain intensity criterion; odds ratios, p < 0.05). Respondents who were unmarried/divorced or separated/widowed, with a low education level, were unemployed, had lower incomes, had a negative relationship with their family, and were not satisfied with their current living conditions had a higher body pain interference rating (ordered logistic regression/five-level pain interference criterion; odds ratios, p < 0.05). In conclusion, an estimated 64.1% of middle-aged adults reported body pain, and 45.7% of middle-aged adults reported body pain interference. These results provide a clue for possible interventions for improving body pain intensity and interference in adults, especially among middle-aged people. These factors should be taken into consideration in the prevention of pain, pain management and treatment planning in order to help

  5. General Education Development (GED®) Credential Attainment, Externalizing Disorders, and Substance Use Disorders in Disconnected Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Andrea; Kong, Grace; Pope, Alice

    2014-01-01

    There are many benefits for emerging adults, both financial and personal, in obtaining a General Education Development (GED®) credential (Ou, 2008). However, little is known about the correlates of GED® credential attainment in "disconnected" emerging adults attending GED® programs. Our goal was to examine whether externalizing…

  6. Prevalence of Chronic Medical Conditions in Adults with Mental Retardation: Comparison with the General Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapell, Deborah; Nightingale, Beryle; Rodriguez, Ana; Lee, Joseph H.; Zigman, Warren B.; Schupf, Nicole

    1998-01-01

    A study interviewed caregivers and reviewed medical records of 278 adults with mental retardation with and without Down syndrome. The adults with mental retardation had age-related disorders comparable to those in the general population, but there was an increased frequency of thyroid disorders, nonischemic heart disorders, and sensory impairment.…

  7. Alpha-2 agonists for sedation of mechanically ventilated adults in intensive care units: a systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank, Moira; Henderson, Lorna; MacLennan, Graeme; Fraser, Cynthia; Campbell, Marion; Blackwood, Bronagh; Gordon, Anthony; Brazzelli, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Care of critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs) often requires potentially invasive or uncomfortable procedures, such as mechanical ventilation (MV). Sedation can alleviate pain and discomfort, provide protection from stressful or harmful events, prevent anxiety and promote sleep. Various sedative agents are available for use in ICUs. In the UK, the most commonly used sedatives are propofol (Diprivan(®), AstraZeneca), benzodiazepines [e.g. midazolam (Hypnovel(®), Roche) and lorazepam (Ativan(®), Pfizer)] and alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonists [e.g. dexmedetomidine (Dexdor(®), Orion Corporation) and clonidine (Catapres(®), Boehringer Ingelheim)]. Sedative agents vary in onset/duration of effects and in their side effects. The pattern of sedation of alpha-2 agonists is quite different from that of other sedatives in that patients can be aroused readily and their cognitive performance on psychometric tests is usually preserved. Moreover, respiratory depression is less frequent after alpha-2 agonists than after other sedative agents. OBJECTIVES To conduct a systematic review to evaluate the comparative effects of alpha-2 agonists (dexmedetomidine and clonidine) and propofol or benzodiazepines (midazolam and lorazepam) in mechanically ventilated adults admitted to ICUs. DATA SOURCES We searched major electronic databases (e.g. MEDLINE without revisions, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) from 1999 to 2014. METHODS Evidence was considered from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing dexmedetomidine with clonidine or dexmedetomidine or clonidine with propofol or benzodiazepines such as midazolam, lorazepam and diazepam (Diazemuls(®), Actavis UK Limited). Primary outcomes included mortality, duration of MV, length of ICU stay and adverse events. One reviewer extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included trials. A second reviewer cross-checked all the

  8. A Survey of Rounding Practices in Canadian Adult Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Holodinsky, Jessalyn K.; Hebert, Marilynne A.; Zygun, David A.; Rigal, Romain; Berthelot, Simon; Cook, Deborah J.; Stelfox, Henry T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe rounding practices in Canadian adult Intensive Care Units (ICU) and identify opportunities for improvement. Design Mixed methods design. Cross sectional survey of Canadian Adult ICUs (n = 180) with purposefully sampled follow-up interviews (n = 7). Measurements and Main Results Medical directors representing 111 ICUs (62%) participated in the survey. Rounding practices varied across ICUs with the majority reporting the use of interprofessional rounds (81%) that employed an open (94%) and collaborative (86%) approach, occurred at the patient’s bedside (82%), and started at a standard time (79%) and standard location (56%). Most participants reported that patients (83%) and family members (67%) were welcome to attend rounds. Approximately half of ICUs (48%) used tools to facilitate rounds. Interruptions during rounds were reported to be common (i.e., ≥1 interruption for ≥50% of patients) in 46% of ICUs. Four themes were identified from qualitative analysis of participant responses to open-ended survey questions and interviews: multidisciplinarity, patient and family involvement, factors influencing productivity, and teaching and learning. Conclusions There is considerable variation in current rounding practices in Canadian medical/surgical ICUs. Opportunities exist to improve ICU rounds including ensuring the engagement of essential participants, clearly defining participant roles, establishing a standardized approach to the rounding process, minimizing interruptions, modifying the role of teaching, utilizing a structured rounding tool, and developing a metric for measuring rounding quality. PMID:26700860

  9. Continuous Exercise but Not High Intensity Interval Training Improves Fat Distribution in Overweight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Shelley E.; Machan, Elizabeth A.; O'Connor, Helen T.; Gerofi, James A.; Sainsbury, Amanda; Caterson, Ian D.; Johnson, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of high intensity interval training (HIIT) versus continuous aerobic exercise training (CONT) or placebo (PLA) on body composition by randomized controlled design. Methods. Work capacity and body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) were measured before and after 12 weeks of intervention in 38 previously inactive overweight adults. Results. There was a significant group × time interaction for change in work capacity (P < 0.001), which increased significantly in CONT (23.8 ± 3.0%) and HIIT (22.3 ± 3.5%) but not PLA (3.1 ± 5.0%). There was a near-significant main effect for percentage trunk fat, with trunk fat reducing in CONT by 3.1 ± 1.6% and in PLA by 1.1 ± 0.4%, but not in HIIT (increase of 0.7 ± 1.0%) (P = 0.07). There was a significant reduction in android fat percentage in CONT (2.7 ± 1.3%) and PLA (1.4 ± 0.8%) but not HIIT (increase of 0.8 ± 0.7%) (P = 0.04). Conclusion. These data suggest that HIIT may be advocated as a time-efficient strategy for eliciting comparable fitness benefits to traditional continuous exercise in inactive, overweight adults. However, in this population HIIT does not confer the same benefit to body fat levels as continuous exercise training. PMID:24669314

  10. Low intensity, long term exposure to tobacco smoke inhibits hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Csabai, Dávid; Csekő, Kata; Szaiff, Lilla; Varga, Zsófia; Miseta, Attila; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Czéh, Boldizsár

    2016-04-01

    Previous data have shown that high dose of nicotine administration or tobacco smoke exposure can reduce cell formation and the survival rate of adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus. Here, we subjected adult mice to low intensity cigarette smoke exposure over long time periods. We did a 2×30min/day smoke exposure with two cigarettes per occasion over 1- or 2-months. Subsequently, we carried out a systematic quantitative histopathological analysis to assess the number of newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus. To investigate cell proliferation, the exogenous marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered on the last experimental day and animals were sacrificed 2h later. To investigate the effect of tobacco smoke on the population of immature neurons, we quantified the number of doublecortin-positive (DCX+) neurons in the same animals. We found that exposing animals to cigarette smoke for 1- or 2-months had no influence on cell proliferation rate, but significantly reduced the number of DCX-positive immature neurons. Our tobacco smoke exposure regimen caused no substantial changes in respiratory functions, but histopathological analysis of the pulmonary tissue revealed a marked perivascular/peribronchial edema formation after 1-month and signs of chronic pulmonary inflammation after 2-months of cigarette smoke exposure. These data demonstrate that even mild exposure to cigarette smoke, without significantly affecting respiratory functions, can have a negative effect on adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus, when applied over longer time periods. Our data indicate that besides nicotine other factors, such as inflammatory mediators, may also contribute to this effect. PMID:26792108

  11. Outcomes of Older Adults With Sepsis at Admission to an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Theresa; Araujo, Katy L. B.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Pisani, Margaret A.; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among older adults. The main goals of this study were to assess the association of sepsis at intensive care unit (ICU) admission with mortality and to identify predictors associated with increased mortality in older adults. Methods. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 309 participants ≥60 years admitted to an ICU. Sepsis was defined as 2 of 4 systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria plus a documented infection within 2 calendar days before or after admission. The main outcome measure was time to death within 1 year of ICU admission. Sepsis was evaluated as a predictor for mortality in a Cox proportional hazards model. Results. Of 309 participants, 196 (63%) met the definition of sepsis. Among those admitted with and without sepsis, 75 (38%) vs 20 (18%) died within 1 month of ICU admission (P < .001) and 117 (60%) vs 48 (42%) died within 1 year (P < .001). When adjusting for baseline characteristics, sepsis had a significant impact on mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28–2.52; P < .001); however, after adjusting for baseline characteristics and process covariates (antimicrobials and vasopressor use within 48 hours of admission), the impact of sepsis on mortality became nonsignificant (HR = 1.26; 95% CI, .87–1.84; P = .22). Conclusions. The diagnosis of sepsis in older adults upon ICU admission was associated with an increase in mortality compared with those admitted without sepsis. After controlling for early use of antimicrobials and vasopressors for treatment, the association of sepsis with mortality was reduced. PMID:26925430

  12. Drug incompatibilities in the adult intensive care unit of a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marsilio, Naiane Roveda; da Silva, Daiandy; Bueno, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to identify the physical and chemical incompatibilities among the drugs administered intravenously to patients admitted to an adult intensive care unit. We also aimed to establish pharmaceutical guidelines for administering incompatible drugs. Methods This cross-sectional, prospective, and quantitative study was conducted from July to September 2015. Drug incompatibilities were identified based on an analysis of the patient prescriptions available in the hospital online management system. A pharmaceutical intervention was performed using the guidelines on the preparation and administration of incompatible drugs. Adherence to those guidelines was subsequently assessed among the nursing staff. Results A total of 100 prescriptions were analyzed; 68 were incompatible with the intravenous drugs prescribed. A total of 271 drug incompatibilities were found, averaging 4.0 ± 3.3 incompatibilities per prescription. The most commonly found drug incompatibilities were between midazolam and hydrocortisone (8.9%), between cefepime and midazolam (5.2%), and between hydrocortisone and vancomycin (5.2%). The drugs most commonly involved in incompatibilities were midazolam, hydrocortisone, and vancomycin. The most common incompatibilities occurred when a drug was administered via continuous infusion and another was administered intermittently (50%). Of the 68 prescriptions that led to pharmaceutical guidelines, 45 (66.2%) were fully adhered to by the nursing staff. Conclusion Patients under intensive care were subjected to a high rate of incompatibilities. Drug incompatibilities can be identified and eliminated by the pharmacist on the multidisciplinary team, thereby reducing undesirable effects among patients. PMID:27410410

  13. UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF GENERALIZED MACULAR AMYLOIDOSIS IN A YOUNG ADULT

    PubMed Central

    Kudur, Mohan H; B, Sathish Pai; H, Sripathi; Prabhu, Smitha

    2008-01-01

    Macular amyloidosis is a common problem seen dermatology out-patient department. Generalized macular amyloidosis presenting with a poikilodermatous appearance is rare. In our case, an 18-year-old male presented with generalized hypopigmented macules with a poikilodermatous appearance of 10-year duration. His developmental milestones were normal with negative family history of similar complaints. Histopathology of hyperpigmented lesions revealed hyperkeratosis and acanthosis of epidermis and hypopigmented lesion showing only hyperkeratosis. Both lesions were showing the deposition of amorphous, hazy material in the tips of papillary dermis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrate. Congo red staining of the amorphous material was positive for amyloid. PMID:19882037

  14. High-intensity physical training in adults with asthma. A 10-week rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Emtner, M; Herala, M; Stålenheim, G

    1996-02-01

    Twenty-six adults (23 to 58 years) with mild to moderate asthma underwent a 10-week supervised rehabilitation program, with emphasis on physical training. In the first 2 weeks, they exercised daily in an indoor swimming pool (33 degrees C) and received education about asthma, medication, and principles of physical training. In the following 8 weeks, they exercised in the pool twice a week. Every training session lasted 45 min. The training sessions were made as suitable as possible for the individual subjects, in order to minimize "drop outs" from the program. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of the rehabilitation program and to determine if inactive asthmatic adults can exercise at high intensity. The rehabilitation program was preceded by a 6-min submaximal cycle ergometry test, a 12-min walking test, spirometry, and a methacholine provocation test. The subjects also responded to a five-item questionnaire related to anxiety about exercise, breathlessness, and asthma symptoms using a visual analogue scale. All subjects were able to perform physical training at a very high intensity, to 80 to 90% of their predicted maximal heart rate. No asthmatic attacks occurred in connection with the training sessions. Twenty-two of the 26 subjects completed the rehabilitation program, felt confident with physical training, and planned to continue regular physical training after the 10-week program. Improvements in cardiovascular conditioning, measured as a decreased heart rate at the same load on the cycle ergometer (average of 12 beats/min), and as a longer distance at the 12-min walking test (average of 111 m), were observed during the program. FEV1 increased significantly from 2.2 to 2.5 L. Forced expiratory flow at 25% of vital capacity also increased slightly but significantly. Methacholine provocation dose causing a fall in FEV1 by 20% was unchanged. Seventeen subjects had a peak expiratory flow reduction of more than 15% after the preprogram ergometry

  15. General Welfare Assistance: Barriers to Mentally Disabled Homeless Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Marjorie J.

    The present study describes specific conditions which are thought to interfere with application for general welfare assistance by homeless persons with mental disabilities. This report summarizes the observations and recommendations of direct-service providers who serve the target population in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. In-depth structured…

  16. A reliability generalization meta-analysis of self-report measures of adult attachment.

    PubMed

    Graham, James M; Unterschute, Marta S

    2015-01-01

    This study is a reliability generalization meta-analysis that reviews 5 of the most frequently used continuous measures of adult attachment security: the Adult Attachment Scale, Revised Adult Attachment Scale, Adult Attachment Questionnaire, Experiences in Close Relationships, and Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised. A total of 313,462 individuals from 564 studies provided 1,629 internal consistency reliability estimates for this meta-analysis. We present the average internal consistency reliability of scores for each measure and test the consistency of score reliabilities across a wide variety of sample characteristics. In light of this, we highlight several issues in the measurement of adult attachment security and make concrete recommendations for researchers seeking to measure adult attachment. PMID:24963994

  17. Application of Jean Piaget's theory of human development for nursing children in an adult intensive therapy unit.

    PubMed

    Green, A

    1991-12-01

    Piaget (1964) believed that interaction with the environment has a large part to play in human development. Matthew (1986) states that in an ideal world critically ill children should be cared for by staff trained in paediatrics, within designated paediatric intensive therapy units. Unfortunately, there are only 28 paediatric intensive therapy units in Great Britain (CMA Medical Data, 1987), consequently each year a third of children requiring intensive care are admitted to adult intensive therapy units (ITU). A knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology can therefore be beneficial to nurses in assessing which stage of development a child has reached, in order to plan the correct level of stimulation, and hence facilitate progress rather than regression in the accomplishment of developmental tasks. The psychological and social processes involved in Jean Piaget's (1896-1980) theory of human development are discussed with regard to nursing children requiring intubation and ventilation in an adult ITU. PMID:1765639

  18. Comparison of absolute intensity between EAS with gamma-families and general EAS at Mount Norikura

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatsuka, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Saito, T.; Sakata, M.; Dake, S.; Kawamoto, M.; Mitsumune, T.; Shima, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Kusumose, M.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma-families with total energy greater than 10 TeV, found in the EX chamber which was cooperated with the EAS array were combined with EAS triggered by big bursts. The absolute intensity of the size spectrum of these combined EAS was compared with that of general EAS obtained by AS trigger. The EAS with sizes greater than 2x1 million were always accompanied by gamma-families with sigma E sub gamma H 10 TeV, n sub gamma, H 2 and Emin=3 TeV, although the rate of EAS accompaning such gamma-families decreases rapidly as their sizes decrease.

  19. Complications and benefits of intrahospital transport of adult Intensive Care Unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Harish, M. M.; Janarthanan, S.; Siddiqui, Suhail Sarwar; Chaudhary, Harish K.; Prabu, Natesh R.; Divatia, Jigeeshu V.; Kulkarni, Atul Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The transport of critically ill patients for procedures or tests outside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is potentially hazardous; hence, the transport process must be organized and efficient. Plenty of data is available on pre- and inter-hospital transport of patients; the data on intrahospital transport of patients are limited. We audited the complications and benefits of intrahospital transport of critically ill patients in our tertiary care center over 6 months. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty adult critically ill cancer patients transported from the ICU for either diagnostic or therapeutic procedure over 6 months were included. The data collected include the destination, the accompanying person, total time spent outside the ICU, and any adverse events and adverse change in vitals. Results: Among the 120 adult patients, 5 (4.1%) required endotracheal intubation, 5 (4.1%) required intercostal drain placement, and 20 (16.7%) required cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Dislodgement of central venous catheter occurred in 2 (1.6%) patients, drain came out in 3 (2.5%) patients, orogastric tube came out in 1 (0.8%) patient, 2 (1.6%) patients self-extubated, and in one patient, tracheostomy tube was dislodged. The adverse events were more in patients who spent more than 60 min outside the ICU, particularly requirement of CPR (18 [25%] vs. 2 [4.2%], ≤60 min vs. >60 min, respectively) with P < 0.05. Transport led to change in therapy in 32 (26.7%) patients. Conclusion: Transport in critically ill cancer patients is more hazardous and needs adequate pretransport preparations. Transport in spite being hazardous may lead to a beneficial change in therapy in a significant number of patients.

  20. Mortality Among Adults With Intellectual Disability in England: Comparisons With the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Hosking, Fay J.; Shah, Sunil M.; Harris, Tess; DeWilde, Stephen; Beighton, Carole; Cook, Derek G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To describe mortality among adults with intellectual disability in England in comparison with the general population. Methods. We conducted a cohort study from 2009 to 2013 using data from 343 general practices. Adults with intellectual disability (n = 16 666; 656 deaths) were compared with age-, gender-, and practice-matched controls (n = 113 562; 1358 deaths). Results. Adults with intellectual disability had higher mortality rates than controls (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.3, 3.9). This risk remained high after adjustment for comorbidity, smoking, and deprivation (HR = 3.1; 95% CI = 2.7, 3.4); it was even higher among adults with intellectual disability and Down syndrome or epilepsy. A total of 37.0% of all deaths among adults with intellectual disability were classified as being amenable to health care intervention, compared with 22.5% in the general population (HR = 5.9; 95% CI = 5.1, 6.8). Conclusions. Mortality among adults with intellectual disability is markedly elevated in comparison with the general population, with more than a third of deaths potentially amenable to health care interventions. This mortality disparity suggests the need to improve access to, and quality of, health care among people with intellectual disability. PMID:27310347

  1. General and Religious Coping Predict Drinking Outcomes for Alcohol Dependent Adults in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rosemarie A.; Ellingsen, Victor J.; Tzilos, Golfo K.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Religiosity is associated with improved treatment outcomes among adults with alcohol dependence; however, it is unknown whether religious coping predicts drinking outcomes above and beyond the effects of coping in general, and whether gender differences exist. Methods We assessed 116 alcohol-dependent adults (53% women; mean age = 37, SD = 8.6) for use of religious coping, general coping and alcohol use within two weeks of entering outpatient treatment, and again 6 months after treatment. Results Religious coping at 6 months predicted fewer heavy alcohol use days and fewer drinks per day. This relationship was no longer significant after controlling for general coping at 6 months. Conclusion The relationship between the use of religious coping strategies and drinking outcomes is not independent of general coping. Coping skills training that includes religious coping skills, as one of several coping methods, may be useful for a subset of adults early in recovery. PMID:25662479

  2. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Mattias; Nadjm, Behzad; Dinh, Quynh-Dao; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Rydell, Ulf; Le, Tuyet Thi Diem; Trinh, Son Hong; Pham, Hung Minh; Tran, Cang Thanh; Doan, Hanh Thi Hong; Tran, Nguyen Thua; Le, Nhan Duc; Huynh, Nhuan Van; Tran, Thao Phuong; Tran, Bao Duc; Nguyen, Son Truong; Pham, Thao Thi Ngoc; Dang, Tam Quang; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Lam, Yen Minh; Thwaites, Guy; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Hanberger, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs) across Vietnam. Methods Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included. Results Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing). Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012) of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012]) were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855) acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855) developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76), urinary catheter (OR 2.12), no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94), and surgery after admission (OR 1.66). 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%]), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%]), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%]), with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287) patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively). Conclusion A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts. PMID:26824228

  3. Sex differences in the intensity and qualitative dimensions of exertional dyspnea in physically active young adults.

    PubMed

    Cory, Julia M; Schaeffer, Michele R; Wilkie, Sabrina S; Ramsook, Andrew H; Puyat, Joseph H; Arbour, Brandon; Basran, Robbi; Lam, Michael; Les, Christian; MacDonald, Benjamin; Jensen, Dennis; Guenette, Jordan A

    2015-11-01

    Understanding sex differences in the qualitative dimensions of exertional dyspnea may provide insight into why women are more affected by this symptom than men. This study explored the evolution of the qualitative dimensions of dyspnea in 70 healthy, young, physically active adults (35 M and 35 F). Participants rated the intensity of their breathing discomfort (Borg 0-10 scale) and selected phrases that best described their breathing from a standardized list (work/effort, unsatisfied inspiration, and unsatisfied expiration) throughout each stage of a symptom-limited incremental-cycle exercise test. Following exercise, participants selected phrases that described their breathing at maximal exercise from a list of 15 standardized phrases. Intensity of breathing discomfort was significantly higher in women for a given ventilation, but differences disappeared when ventilation was expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary ventilation. The dominant qualitative descriptor in both sexes throughout exercise was increased work/effort of breathing. At peak exercise, women were significantly more likely to select the following phrases: "my breathing feels shallow," "I cannot get enough air in," "I cannot take a deep breath in," and "my breath does not go in all the way." Women adopted a more rapid and shallow breathing pattern and had significantly higher end-inspiratory lung volumes relative to total lung capacity throughout exercise relative to men. These findings suggest that men and women do not differ in their perceived quality of dyspnea during submaximal exercise, but subjective differences appear at maximal exercise and may be related, at least in part, to underlying sex differences in breathing patterns and operating lung volumes during exercise. PMID:26338458

  4. Impact of the Protection and Advocacy Subscale on the Factorial Validity of the Supports Intensity Scale-Adult Version.

    PubMed

    Shogren, Karrie A; Seo, Hyojeong; Wehmeyer, Michael L; Thompson, James R; Little, Todd D

    2016-01-01

    The Supports Intensity Scale-Adult Version is a standardized assessment of support needs. This study examined the factorial validity of the standardized portion of the scale, finding that the six-factor model (Home Living, Community Living, Lifelong Learning, Employment, Health and Safety, Social Activities) demonstrated good fit, and that the inclusion of the Protection and Advocacy Scale did not affect fit and contributed unique information. Age and gender impacted intensity of support needs, with those of transition age and in late adulthood having the highest intensities. Gender also impacted support needs, but in fewer instances. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:26701074

  5. How to Study the Influence of Intensity of Treatment on Generalized Skill and Knowledge Acquisition in Students with Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Paul J.; Woynaroski, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    Seven empirical studies from this special issue and an overview chapter are reviewed to illustrate several points about studying the possible effects of treatment intensity manipulations on generalized skill or knowledge acquisition in students with disabilities. First, we make a case in favor of studying intensity as separate from complexity and expense of treatment. Second, we encourage researchers to define dependent variables in a way that allows us to determine whether treatment intensity effects on child skills and knowledge are highly generalized versus potentially context bound. Third, we acknowledge that effects of treatment intensity on generalized knowledge and skills likely vary according to student characteristics. Finally, we discuss important research design and measurement issues that are relevant to isolating the likely conditional effects of treatment intensity on generalized outcomes. PMID:25914513

  6. Low Intensive Lifestyle Modification in Young Adults With Metabolic Syndrome A Community-Based Interventional Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Lien; Lu, Chia-Wen; Shi, Leiyu; Liou, Yiing-Mei; Lee, Long-Teng; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The study aims to find whether a low intensity lifestyle modification (LILM) program was effective to achieve weight reduction and improves metabolic syndrome in young adults. Our study prospectively enrolled young adults aged 30 to 45 years with metabolic syndrome in northeastern Taiwan from June 1, 2008 to December 31, 2009. The participants in the intervention group attended a LILM program for 6 months, which included 4 interactive group discussion sessions and weekly phone contact with volunteer counselors. Participants in the comparison group, however, attended only 1 noninteractive session on diet and physical activity. The main outcomes measured the weight reduction and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in intervention and comparison groups. Generalized estimating equation modeling was used to analyze the effects at baseline, during the study, and postcompletion of the program. Compared with comparison group, the intervention group showed significantly greater reductions in body weight (−2.95 ± 3.52 vs −0.76 ± 2.76 kg, P < 0.0001) and body mass index (−1.03 ± 1.25 vs −0.30 ± 1.16 kg/m2, P < 0.0001). After adjustment for potential confounders, a modest decrease in body weight resulted in a statistically significant 43.32% resolution in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the intervention group compared with 33.64% in the comparison group (P < 0.01). The 6-month LILM program is not only effective in weight reduction but also an efficient intervention tool of metabolic syndrome in a community setting. The program with restricted manpower and limited medical resources can be practically transferred into primary care in rural area. PMID:26039125

  7. Urinary tract infections in adult general practice patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Kochen, Michael M

    2002-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are symptomatic infections of the urinary tract, mainly caused by the bacterium Escherichia coli. One in two women suffers from a UTI at least once in her life. The young and sexually active are particulaly affected, but it is also seen in elderly, postmenopausal women. The likelihood of recurrence is high. Diagnosis is made with regard to typical complaints and the presence of leucocytes and nitrites in the urine. A culture is unnecessary in most cases. Uncomplicated UTI should be distinguished from complicated UTI, which has a risk of severe illness. The treatment of choice--short-term therapy with trimethoprim or nitrofurantoin--is successful in over 80% of the cases. Co-trimoxazol fluoroquinolones or cephalsporins are not considered first-choice drugs. There are indications that general practitioners' (GPs') management of UTI is not always optimal, specifically concerning diagnostic tests, the application of second-choice antibiotics, and the length of prescribed treatment courses. Many points relevant to GPs requirefurther research, such as epidemiology and resistance of urinary pathogens in the community and natural history of UTI, as well as optimal management in elderly or complicated patients and men. PMID:12236281

  8. Effects of cannabinoids (marijuana) on taste intensity and hedonic ratings and salivary flow of adults.

    PubMed

    Mattes, R D; Shaw, L M; Engelman, K

    1994-04-01

    Cannabinoids purportedly improve taste responsiveness and enhance the sensory appeal of foods. These properties and a commonly cited oral drying effect were evaluated in a series of studies with 'light' marijuana users. The first was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, acute oral dosing trial, involving an age and gender stratified sample of 57 adults. An influence of route of drug delivery was explored in another 11 individuals who were administered a single dose orally, sublingually and via cigarette. To explore effects following chronic administration, six additional individuals were dosed twice per day for 3 days orally and by rectal suppository. Taste intensity and hedonic responses for sweet, sour, salty and bitter food stimuli were monitored at baseline, 2, 4 and 6 hours post-dosing in the acute studies, and daily in the chronic study. Stimulated saliva samples were collected at these same times. Salivary flow rate was significantly negatively correlated with plasma drug levels, and reported 'high' 2 and 4 h post-dosing. No effects of the drug were observed on taste responses. Self-reported shifts in taste responsiveness and hedonics may be related to alterations of memory and cognition, rather than gustatory function. PMID:8055263

  9. Epidemiological features of influenza in Canadian adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G; Abdesselam, K; Pelude, L; Fernandes, R; Mitchell, R; McGeer, A; Frenette, C; Suh, K N; Wong, A; Katz, K; Wilkinson, K; Mersereau, T; Gravel, D

    2016-03-01

    To identify predictive factors and mortality of patients with influenza admitted to intensive care units (ICU) we carried out a prospective cohort study of patients hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza in adult ICUs in a network of Canadian hospitals between 2006 and 2012. There were 626 influenza-positive patients admitted to ICUs over the six influenza seasons, representing 17·9% of hospitalized influenza patients, 3·1/10,000 hospital admissions. Variability occurred in admission rate and proportion of hospital influenza patients who were admitted to ICUs (proportion range by year: 11·7-29·4%; 21·3% in the 2009-2010 pandemic). In logistic regression models ICU patients were younger during the pandemic and post-pandemic period, and more likely to be obese than hospital non-ICU patients. Influenza B accounted for 14·2% of all ICU cases and had a similar ICU admission rate as influenza A. Influenza-related mortality was 17·8% in ICU patients compared to 2·0% in non-ICU patients. PMID:26384310

  10. Gram-Negative Infections in Adult Intensive Care Units of Latin America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Carlos M.; Rodriguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Bavestrello, Luis; Guzmán-Blanco, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes recent epidemiology of Gram-negative infections in selected countries from Latin American and Caribbean adult intensive care units (ICUs). A systematic search of the biomedical literature (PubMed) was performed to identify articles published over the last decade. Where appropriate, data also were collected from the reference list of published articles, health departments of specific countries, and registries. Independent cohort data from all countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela) signified a high rate of ICU infections (prevalence: Argentina, 24%; Brazil, 57%). Gram-negative pathogens, predominantly Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli, accounted for >50% of ICU infections, which were often complicated by the presence of multidrug-resistant strains and clonal outbreaks. Empirical use of antimicrobial agents was identified as a strong risk factor for resistance development and excessive mortality. Infection control strategies utilizing hygiene measures and antimicrobial stewardship programs reduced the rate of device-associated infections. To mitigate the poor health outcomes associated with infections by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, urgent focus must be placed on infection control strategies and local surveillance programs. PMID:25525515

  11. Sedation for critically ill or injured adults in the intensive care unit: a shifting paradigm.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Derek J; Haroon, Babar; Hall, Richard I

    2012-10-01

    As most critically ill or injured patients will require some degree of sedation, the goal of this paper was to comprehensively review the literature associated with use of sedative agents in the intensive care unit (ICU). The first and selected latter portions of this article present a narrative overview of the shifting paradigm in ICU sedation practices, indications for uninterrupted or prolonged ICU sedation, and the pharmacology of sedative agents. In the second portion, we conducted a structured, although not entirely systematic, review of the available evidence associated with use of alternative sedative agents in critically ill or injured adults. Data sources for this review were derived by searching OVID MEDLINE and PubMed from their first available date until May 2012 for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses and economic evaluations. Advances in the technology of mechanical ventilation have permitted clinicians to limit the use of sedation among the critically ill through daily sedative interruptions or other means. These practices have been reported to result in improved mortality, a decreased length of ICU and hospital stay and a lower risk of drug-associated delirium. However, in some cases, prolonged or uninterrupted sedation may still be indicated, such as when patients develop intracranial hypertension following traumatic brain injury. The pharmacokinetics of sedative agents have clinical importance and may be altered by critical illness or injury, co-morbid conditions and/or drug-drug interactions. Although use of validated sedation scales to monitor depth of sedation is likely to reduce adverse events, they have no utility for patients receiving neuromuscular receptor blocking agents. Depth of sedation monitoring devices such as the Bispectral Index (BIS©) also have limitations. Among existing RCTs, no sedative agent has been reported to improve the risk of mortality among the critically ill or

  12. High-Intensity Interval Training as an Efficacious Alternative to Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training for Adults with Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mary E.; Bourne, Jessica E.; Beauchamp, Mark R.; Robinson, Emily; Little, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) leads to improvements in various markers of cardiometabolic health but adherence to HIIT following a supervised laboratory intervention has yet to be tested. We compared self-report and objective measures of physical activity after one month of independent exercise in individuals with prediabetes who were randomized to HIIT (n = 15) or traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT, n = 17). Method. After completing 10 sessions of supervised training participants were asked to perform HIIT or MICT three times per week for four weeks. Results. Individuals in HIIT (89 ± 11%) adhered to their prescribed protocol to a greater extent than individuals in MICT (71 ± 31%) as determined by training logs completed over one-month follow-up (P = 0.05, Cohen's d = 0.75). Minutes spent in vigorous physical activity per week measured by accelerometer were higher in HIIT (24 ± 18) as compared to MICT (11 ± 10) at one-month follow-up (P = 0.049, Cohen's d = 0.92). Cardiorespiratory fitness and systolic blood pressure assessed at one-month follow-up were equally improved (P's < 0.05). Conclusions. This study provides preliminary evidence that individuals with prediabetes can adhere to HIIT over the short-term and do so at a level that is greater than MICT. PMID:25918728

  13. How to Study the Influence of Intensity of Treatment on Generalized Skill and Knowledge Acquisition in Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Paul J.; Woynaroski, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Seven empirical studies from this special issue and an overview chapter are reviewed to illustrate several points about studying the possible effects of treatment intensity manipulations on generalized skill or knowledge acquisition in students with disabilities. First, we make a case in favor of studying intensity as separate from complexity and…

  14. Lower survival probabilities for adult Florida manatees in years with intense coastal storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langtimm, C.A.; Beck, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    The endangered Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) inhabits the subtropical waters of the southeastern United States, where hurricanes are a regular occurrence. Using mark-resighting statistical models, we analyzed 19 years of photo-identification data and detected significant annual variation in adult survival for a subpopulation in northwest Florida where human impact is low. That variation coincided with years when intense hurricanes (Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale) and a major winter storm occurred in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Mean survival probability during years with no or low intensity storms was 0.972 (approximate 95% confidence interval = 0.961-0.980) but dropped to 0.936 (0.864-0.971) in 1985 with Hurricanes Elena, Kate, and Juan; to 0.909 (0.837-0.951) in 1993 with the March "Storm of the Century"; and to 0.817 (0.735-0.878) in 1995 with Hurricanes Opal, Erin, and Allison. These drops in survival probability were not catastrophic in magnitude and were detected because of the use of state-of-the-art statistical techniques and the quality of the data. Because individuals of this small population range extensively along the north Gulf coast of Florida, it was possible to resolve storm effects on a regional scale rather than the site-specific local scale common to studies of more sedentary species. This is the first empirical evidence in support of storm effects on manatee survival and suggests a cause-effect relationship. The decreases in survival could be due to direct mortality, indirect mortality, and/or emigration from the region as a consequence of storms. Future impacts to the population by a single catastrophic hurricane, or series of smaller hurricanes, could increase the probability of extinction. With the advent in 1995 of a new 25- to 50-yr cycle of greater hurricane activity, and longer term change possible with global climate change, it becomes all the more important to reduce mortality and injury

  15. Developmental aspects of fear: Comparing the acquisition and generalization of conditioned fear in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Miriam A; Reinhard, Julia; Reif, Andreas; Domschke, Katharina; Romanos, Marcel; Deckert, Jürgen; Pauli, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Most research on human fear conditioning and its generalization has focused on adults whereas only little is known about these processes in children. Direct comparisons between child and adult populations are needed to determine developmental risk markers of fear and anxiety. We compared 267 children and 285 adults in a differential fear conditioning paradigm and generalization test. Skin conductance responses (SCR) and ratings of valence and arousal were obtained to indicate fear learning. Both groups displayed robust and similar differential conditioning on subjective and physiological levels. However, children showed heightened fear generalization compared to adults as indexed by higher arousal ratings and SCR to the generalization stimuli. Results indicate overgeneralization of conditioned fear as a developmental correlate of fear learning. The developmental change from a shallow to a steeper generalization gradient is likely related to the maturation of brain structures that modulate efficient discrimination between danger and (ambiguous) safety cues. © 2016 The Authors. Developmental Psychobiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 58: 471-481, 2016. PMID:26798984

  16. Prospective independent validation of APACHE III models in an Australian tertiary adult intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Cook, D A; Joyce, C J; Barnett, R J; Birgan, S P; Playford, H; Cockings, J G L; Hurford, R W

    2002-06-01

    Evaluation of the performance of the APACHE III (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) ICU (intensive care unit) and hospital mortality models at the Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane is reported. Prospective collection of demographic, diagnostic, physiological, laboratory, admission and discharge data of 5681 consecutive eligible admissions (1 January 1995 to 1 January 2000) was conducted at the Princess Alexandra Hospital, a metropolitan Australian tertiary referral medical/surgical adult ICU ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve areas for the APACHE III ICU mortality and hospital mortality models demonstrated excellent discrimination. Observed ICU mortality (9.1%) was significantly overestimated by the APACHE III model adjusted for hospital characteristics (10.1%), but did not significantly differ from the prediction of the generic APACHE III model (8.6%). In contrast, observed hospital mortality (14.8%) agreed well with the prediction of the APACHE III model adjusted for hospital characteristics (14.6%), but was significantly underestimated by the unadjusted APACHE III model (13.2%). Calibration curves and goodness-of-fit analysis using Hosmer-Lemeshow statistics, demonstrated that calibration was good with the unadjusted APACHE III ICU mortality model, and the APACHE III hospital mortality model adjusted for hospital characteristics. Post hoc analysis revealed a declining annual SMR (standardized mortality rate) during the study period. This trend was present in each of the non-surgical, emergency and elective surgical diagnostic groups, and the change was temporally related to increased specialist staffing levels. This study demonstrates that the APACHE III model performs well on independent assessment in an Australian hospital. Changes observed in annual SMR using such a validated model support an hypothesis of improved survival outcomes 1995-1999. PMID:12075637

  17. Self-Reported Pain Intensity with the Numeric Reporting Scale in Adult Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joshua G. X.; Gan, Victor C.; Ng, Ee-Ling; Leo, Yee-Sin; Chan, Siew-Pang; Choo, Robin; Lye, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is a prominent feature of acute dengue as well as a clinical criterion in World Health Organization guidelines in diagnosing dengue. We conducted a prospective cohort study to compare levels of pain during acute dengue between different ethnicities and dengue severity. Methods Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. Data on self-reported pain was collected using the 11-point Numerical Rating Scale. Generalized structural equation models were built to predict progression to severe disease. Results A total of 499 laboratory confirmed dengue patients were recruited in the Prospective Adult Dengue Study at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore. We found no statistically significant differences between pain score with age, gender, ethnicity or the presence of co-morbidity. Pain score was not predictive of dengue severity but highly correlated to patients’ day of illness. Prevalence of abdominal pain in our cohort was 19%. There was no difference in abdominal pain score between grades of dengue severity. Conclusion Dengue is a painful disease. Patients suffer more pain at the earlier phase of illness. However, pain score cannot be used to predict a patient’s progression to severe disease. PMID:24788828

  18. Psychosocial Experiences and Adjustment among Adult Swedes with Superior General Mental Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalnacke, Jannica; Smedler, Ann-Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    In Sweden, special needs of high-ability individuals have received little attention. For this purpose, adult Swedes with superior general mental ability (GMA; N = 302), defined by an IQ score greater than 130 on tests of abstract reasoning, answered a questionnaire regarding their views of themselves and their giftedness. The participants also…

  19. [Use of local infiltration for tonsillectomy in adults under general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Revilla Borjas, C; Stuyt, M T

    1990-01-01

    The paper deals with 60 adults (aged between 13-30) tonsillectomies done under general anesthesia. The collective was alternatively divided in 2 groups, only one of them receiving local infiltration. In the infiltrated group the tonsil dissection was easier, the bleeding sparse and the follow-up less unpleasant. PMID:2221308

  20. 20 CFR 416.920 - Evaluation of disability of adults, in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evaluation of disability of adults, in general. 416.920 Section 416.920 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Evaluation of Disability § 416.920 Evaluation of disability of...

  1. New Research into General Psychiatric Services for Adults with Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: There are a variety of models for the mental health care of adults with comorbid intellectual disability (ID) and mental illness. There has been a long-running debate as to whether this should be provided by general psychiatric or specialised ID services. A previous review concluded that there was no clear evidence to support either…

  2. Generalization of Social Skills through Self-Monitoring by Adults with Mild Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misra, Anjali

    1992-01-01

    Three adult subjects with mild mental retardation were trained in individualized social skills and then taught to self-monitor their behavior, initially using a self-monitoring device. Self-monitoring assisted in generalization of trained social skills across settings and people; however, maintenance results were variable. (Author/DB)

  3. Checklists for General Practitioner Diagnosis of Depression in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torr, J.; Iacono, T.; Graham, M. J.; Galea, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In Australia, diagnosis and management of depression in adults with intellectual disability (ID) often occurs within the primary care setting. Few tools are available to assist general practitioners (GPs) in the diagnostic process. The study aim was to assess properties of carer and GP checklists developed to address this problem.…

  4. Why Some Adults with Intellectual Disability Consult Their General Practitioner More Than Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, V.; Kerry, S.; Corney, R.; Rowlands, G.; Khattran, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This research identifies factors affecting why some adults with intellectual disability (AWIDs) consult their general practitioner (GP) more than others. Little is known about these factors, despite AWIDs having higher health needs and reduced longevity. Current barriers to accessing health care need to be understood and overcome to…

  5. Light-Intensity Physical Activities and Mortality in the United States General Population and CKD Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo; Marcus, Robin L.; Chonchol, Michel; Greene, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Sedentary behavior is associated with increased mortality in the general population. Whether replacing sedentary behavior with low- or light-intensity activities confers a survival benefit in the general or CKD populations is unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This observational analysis of the 2003–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey examined the associations of low- and light-intensity activities with mortality. On the basis of the number of counts/min recorded by an accelerometer, durations of sedentary (<100/min), low (100–499/min), light (500–2019/min), and moderate/vigorous (≥2020/min) activity were defined and normalized to 60 minutes. The mortality associations of 2 min/hr less sedentary duration in conjunction with 2 min/hr more (tradeoff) spent in one of the low, light, or moderate/vigorous activity durations while controlling for the other two activity durations were examined in multivariable Cox regression models in the entire cohort and in the CKD subgroup. Results Of the 3626 participants included, 383 had CKD. The mean sedentary duration was 34.4±7.9 min/hr in the entire cohort and 40.8±6.8 in the CKD subgroup. Tradeoff of sedentary duration with low activity duration was not associated with mortality in the entire cohort or the CKD subgroup. Tradeoff of sedentary duration with light activity duration was associated with a lower hazard of death in the entire cohort (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.48 to 0.93) and CKD subgroup (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.35 to 0.98). Tradeoff of sedentary duration with moderate/vigorous activity duration had a nonsignificant lower hazard in the entire cohort and CKD subgroup. Conclusions Patients with CKD are sedentary nearly two thirds of the time. Interventions that replace sedentary duration with an increase in light activity duration might confer a survival benefit. PMID:25931456

  6. Recognising falls risk in older adult mental health patients and acknowledging the difference from the general older adult population.

    PubMed

    Wynaden, Dianne; Tohotoa, Jenny; Heslop, Karen; Al Omari, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Older adults admitted to inpatient mental health units present with complex mental health care needs which are often compounded by the challenges of living with physical co-morbidities. They are a mobile population and a high risk group for falling during hospitalisation. To address quality and safety concerns around the increased risk for falls, a qualitative research study was completed to obtain an improved understanding of the factors that increase the risk of falling in this patient cohort. Focus groups were conducted with mental health professionals working across older adult mental health services in metropolitan Western Australia. Data were analysed using content analysis and three themes emerged that were significant concepts relevant to falls risk in this patient group. These themes were (1) limitations of using generic falls risk assessment and management tools, (2) assessment of falls risk not currently captured on standardised tools, and (3) population specific causes of falls. The findings demonstrate that older adult mental health patients are a highly mobile group that experience frequent changes in cognition, behaviour and mental state. The mix of patients with organic or functional psychiatric disorders within the same environment also presents complex and unique care challenges and multi-disciplinary collaboration is central to reduce the risk of falls. As this group of patients are also frequently admitted to both general inpatient and aged care settings, the findings are relevant to the assessment and management of falls risk across all health care settings. PMID:27188045

  7. Evaluation of a Peer-Led, Low-Intensity Physical Activity Program for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Danilea; Teufel, James; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity is a primary contributor to decreasing functional physical fitness and increasing chronic disease in older adults. Purpose: This study assessed the health-related benefits of ExerStart for Lay Leaders, a 20-week, community based, peer-led, low-impact exercise program for older adults. ExerStart focuses on aerobic…

  8. Generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Distribution and Envelope Equation for High-intensity Beams in a Coupled Transverse Focusing Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin, Moses Chung, and Ronald C. Davidson

    2009-11-20

    In an uncoupled lattice, the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution function first analyzed in 1959 is the only known exact solution of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for high- intensity beams including self-fields in a self-consistent manner. The KV solution is generalized here to high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice using the recently developed generalized Courant-Snyder invariant for coupled transverse dynamics. This solution projects to a rotating, pulsating elliptical beam in transverse configuration space, determined by the generalized matrix envelope equation.

  9. Professionalisation in General Adult Education in Germany--An Attempt to Cut a Path through a Jungle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dausien, Bettina; Schwendowius, Dorothee

    2009-01-01

    The article summarizes the findings of a study on adult learning professions in Europe (ALPINE) commissioned by DG Education and Culture. It explores the current professional and social situation of staff in non-vocational adult education in Germany. It describes the structures and organisations of general adult education in Germany and…

  10. Reaction of cells to local, regional, and general low-intensive laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibekov, Iskander M.; Kasymov, A. S.; Musaev, Erkin S.; Vorojeikin, V. M.; Artikov, S. N.

    1993-07-01

    Local influence of low intensive laser irradiation (LILI) of Helium-Neon (HNL), Copper vapor (CVL), Nitrogen (UVL) and Arsenic Gallium (AGL) lasers cause stimulation of processes of physiological and reparative regeneration in intact skin, and mucous membrane of stomach and duodenum, dermatome wounds and gastroduodenal ulcers. Structural bases of these effects are the acceleration of cell proliferation and differentiation and also the activation of intracellular structures and intensification of cell secretion. Regional influence of the pointed types of LILI on hepar in cirrhosis and hepatitis causes decreasing of the inflammatory and cirrhotic changes. After endo- and exo-vascular laser irradiations of blood the decreasing of the number of pathological forms of erythrocytes and the increasing of their catalase activity, are indicated. General (total) laser irradiation of the organism--laser shower, increases the bone marrow cells proliferation, especially myeloid series. It is accompanied with acceleration of their differentiation and migration in circulation. It was revealed, that HNL to a considerable extent influences the epithelial cells and CVL the connective tissue cells. UVL increases the amount of microorganisms on cell surfaces (membrane bound microorganisms). Regional irradiation of the LILI causes both direct and indirect influence of cells. Structural changes of bone marrow cells and gut mucous membrane cells indicate intersystemic interaction.

  11. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in General Intensive Care Unit Survivors: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Gifford, Jeneen M.; Desai, Sanjay V.; Needham, Dale M.; Bienvenu, O. Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to summarize and critically review data on the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in general intensive care unit (ICU) survivors, risk factors for post-ICU PTSD, and the impact of post-ICU PTSD on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods We conducted a systematic literature review using Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and a hand-search of thirteen journals. Results Fifteen studies were eligible. The median point prevalence of questionnaire-ascertained “clinically significant” PTSD symptoms was 22% (n = 1,104), and the median point prevalence of clinician-diagnosed PTSD was 19% (n = 93). Consistent predictors of post-ICU PTSD included prior psychopathology, greater ICU benzodiazepine administration, and post-ICU memories of in-ICU frightening and/or psychotic experiences. Female sex and younger age were less consistent predictors, and severity of critical illness was consistently not a predictor. Post-ICU PTSD was associated with substantially lower HRQOL. Conclusions The prevalence of PTSD in ICU survivors is high and negatively impacts survivors’ HRQOL. Future studies should comprehensively address how patient-specific factors (e.g., pre-ICU psychopathology), ICU management factors (e.g., administration of sedatives), and ICU clinical factors (e.g., in-ICU delirium) relate to one another and to post-ICU PTSD. Clinicians caring for the growing population of ICU survivors should be aware of PTSD risk factors and monitor patients’ needs for early intervention. PMID:18774425

  12. Relationship between the intensity of physical activity and depressive symptoms among Korean adults: analysis of Korea Health Panel data

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jin-Won; Lee, Sang Ah; Choi, Hyo Jin; Hong, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Min Hee; Kwon, Young Dae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the intensity of physical activity and symptoms of depression. [Subjects and Methods] We analyzed the influence of different intensities of physical activity on depressive symptoms using the data of 12,350 adults over the age of 20 years who had completed the 2011 Korea Health Panel. After controlling for confounding variables, a multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify the association between the intensity of physical activity and depressive symptoms. [Results] The results showed that vigorous physical activity had a significant effect on depressive symptoms. The incidence of depressive symptoms was 1.487 (95% CI 1.137, 1.943) OR higher among people who did not participate in regular activity than it was among those who took part in regular intense physical activity. [Conclusion] It appears that physical activity affects depressive symptoms, a result which is in agreement with previous studies. However, we also showed a difference in influence according to activity intensity. Thus, the intensity of physical activity should be considered when developing physical activity programs for improving depressive symptoms. PMID:25995596

  13. Analysis of large new South African dataset using two host-specificity indices shows generalism in both adult and larval ticks of mammals.

    PubMed

    Espinaze, Marcela P A; Hellard, Eléonore; Horak, Ivan G; Cumming, Graeme S

    2016-03-01

    Ticks and tick-borne pathogens can have considerable impacts on the health of livestock, wildlife and people. Knowledge of tick-host preferences is necessary for both tick and pathogen control. Ticks were historically considered as specialist parasites, but the range of sampled host species has been limited, infestation intensity has not been included in prior analyses, and phylogenetic distances between hosts have not been previously considered. We used a large dataset of 35 604 individual collections and two host-specificity indices to assess the specificity of 61 South African tick species, as well as distinctions between adult and juvenile ticks, for 95 mammalian hosts. When accounting for host phylogeny, most adult and juvenile ticks behaved as generalists, with juveniles being significantly more generalist than adults. When we included the intensity of tick infestation, ticks exhibited a wider diversity of specificity in all life stages. Our results show that ticks of mammals in South Africa tend to behave largely as generalists and that adult ticks are more host-specific. More generally, our analysis shows that the incorporation of life-stage differences, infestation intensity and phylogenetic distances between hosts, as well as the use of more than one specificity index, can all contribute to a deeper understanding of host-parasite interactions. PMID:26690251

  14. On-Farm Welfare Assessment Protocol for Adult Dairy Goats in Intensive Production Systems

    PubMed Central

    Battini, Monica; Stilwell, George; Vieira, Ana; Barbieri, Sara; Canali, Elisabetta; Mattiello, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary The Animal Welfare Indicators (AWIN) project developed a practical welfare assessment protocol for lactating dairy goats in intensive husbandry systems, using animal-based indicators that cover the whole multidimensional concept of animal welfare. The strict collaboration between scientists and stakeholders resulted in an easy-to-use protocol that provides farmers or veterinarians with comprehensive but clear feedback on the welfare status of the herd in less than three hours. The protocol, which highlights key points and motivates farmers to achieve improvements, has received much attention from interested parties. Abstract Within the European AWIN project, a protocol for assessing dairy goats’ welfare on the farm was developed. Starting from a literature review, a prototype including animal-based indicators covering four welfare principles and 12 welfare criteria was set up. The prototype was tested in 60 farms for validity, reliability, and feasibility. After testing the prototype, a two-level assessment protocol was proposed in order to increase acceptability among stakeholders. The first level offers a more general overview of the welfare status, based on group assessment of a few indicators (e.g., hair coat condition, latency to the first contact test, severe lameness, Qualitative Behavior Assessment), with no or minimal handling of goats and short assessment time required. The second level starts if welfare problems are encountered in the first level and adds a comprehensive and detailed individual evaluation (e.g., Body Condition Score, udder asymmetry, overgrown claws), supported by an effective sampling strategy. The assessment can be carried out using the AWIN Goat app. The app results in a clear visual output, which provides positive feedback on welfare conditions in comparison with a benchmark of a reference population. The protocol may be a valuable tool for both veterinarians and technicians and a self-assessment instrument for

  15. Barium versus Nonbarium Stimuli: Differences in Taste Intensity, Chemesthesis, and Swallowing Behavior in Healthy Adult Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Ahmed; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors examined the impact of barium on the perceived taste intensity of 7 different liquid tastant stimuli and the modulatory effect that these differences in perceived taste intensity have on swallowing behaviors. Method: Participants were 80 healthy women, stratified by age group (<40; >60) and genetic taste status…

  16. A Class Of Generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Solutions And Associated Envelope Equations For High-intensity Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin and Ronald C. Davidson

    2012-04-25

    A class of generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij solutions of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations and the associated envelope equations for high-intensity beams in a periodic lattice is derived. It includes the classical Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij solution as a special case. For a given lattice, the distribution functions and the envelope equations are specified by eight free parameters. The class of solutions derived captures a wider range of dynamical envelope behavior for high-intensity beams, and thus provides a new theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of high-intensity beams.

  17. Alcohol screening for older adults in an acute general hospital: FAST v. MAST-G assessments.

    PubMed

    Knightly, Rachel; Tadros, George; Sharma, Juhi; Duffield, Peter; Carnall, Emma; Fisher, Jacqui; Salman, Shaza

    2016-04-01

    Aims and method Documented prevalence of alcohol misuse among older adult patients at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital is significantly lower than the national prevalence. We aimed to evaluate our alcohol misuse screening protocol for older adults to identify possible shortcomings. Hospital protocol is to screen all adults for alcohol misuse in the accident and emergency (A&E) department using the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST). One hundred consecutive consenting in-patients aged 65-94 admitted via A&E subsequently undertook an additional alcohol screening test (Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test-Geriatric version; MAST-G). Results of the two tests were compared. Results FAST screening was completed for 71 patients and none were FAST-positive for alcohol misuse, yet using MAST-G, 18 patients scored positively for alcohol misuse. FAST screening failed to identify 8 patients with a documented history of alcohol misuse. Clinical implications Older adult alcohol misuse prevalence is significantly underreported using FAST. Screening older adults for alcohol problems requires a different approach to screening the general population. PMID:27087989

  18. Alcohol screening for older adults in an acute general hospital: FAST v. MAST-G assessments

    PubMed Central

    Knightly, Rachel; Tadros, George; Sharma, Juhi; Duffield, Peter; Carnall, Emma; Fisher, Jacqui; Salman, Shaza

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method Documented prevalence of alcohol misuse among older adult patients at Birmingham Heartlands Hospital is significantly lower than the national prevalence. We aimed to evaluate our alcohol misuse screening protocol for older adults to identify possible shortcomings. Hospital protocol is to screen all adults for alcohol misuse in the accident and emergency (A&E) department using the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST). One hundred consecutive consenting in-patients aged 65-94 admitted via A&E subsequently undertook an additional alcohol screening test (Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test-Geriatric version; MAST-G). Results of the two tests were compared. Results FAST screening was completed for 71 patients and none were FAST-positive for alcohol misuse, yet using MAST-G, 18 patients scored positively for alcohol misuse. FAST screening failed to identify 8 patients with a documented history of alcohol misuse. Clinical implications Older adult alcohol misuse prevalence is significantly underreported using FAST. Screening older adults for alcohol problems requires a different approach to screening the general population. PMID:27087989

  19. Improving the documentation of the daily review of patients in general intensive care.

    PubMed

    Zucco, Liana; Webb, Carly

    2014-01-01

    Following the daily review of patients on the general intensive care unit (GICU), ongoing issues are addressed and a management plan formulated. Within our unit, the documentation of this daily review is freehand and should include all items covered within the local GICU daily review checklist. However, an initial audit of the daily review demonstrated an average completion rate of only 57%, with several aspects of care consistently missed, most notably: eye and mouth care in ventilated patients (44% and 40%, respectively), glucose control (33%), stress ulcer prophylaxis (54%), and inspection and need for peripheral and central lines (24%). The current system relied on doctors learning the requirements for the clerking and remembering to document them all. It is known that there is a low level of reliability in successfully applying proven medical evidence; this is partly explained by dependence on vigilance and hard work by the clinician, and absence of checklists and protocols to reduce the impact of human factors on results. The majority of doctors on the unit believe they consistently record all items of this checklist, highlighting the gap between the ideal that clinicians strive towards and the outcome. An abbreviated daily review checklist was therefore implemented in the form of a laminated bookmark into the medical notes, to act as a reminder of the items that should be considered in the daily review and prompt subsequent documentation. Bookmarks were implemented over two PDSA cycles and medical notes re-audited. Post-intervention, the documentation of the daily review improved to an overall completion rate of >77%, with notable improvements in eye and mouth care in ventilated patients (89%, 95% respectively), glucose control (67%), stress ulcer prophylaxis (100%), and inspection and need for peripheral and central lines (43%). The daily review checklist concisely summarised onto bookmarks were cheap and simple to create, durable and easy to use, and

  20. Improving the documentation of the daily review of patients in general intensive care

    PubMed Central

    Zucco, Liana; Webb, Carly

    2014-01-01

    Following the daily review of patients on the general intensive care unit (GICU), ongoing issues are addressed and a management plan formulated. Within our unit, the documentation of this daily review is freehand and should include all items covered within the local GICU daily review checklist. However, an initial audit of the daily review demonstrated an average completion rate of only 57%, with several aspects of care consistently missed, most notably: eye and mouth care in ventilated patients (44% and 40%, respectively), glucose control (33%), stress ulcer prophylaxis (54%), and inspection and need for peripheral and central lines (24%). The current system relied on doctors learning the requirements for the clerking and remembering to document them all. It is known that there is a low level of reliability in successfully applying proven medical evidence; this is partly explained by dependence on vigilance and hard work by the clinician, and absence of checklists and protocols to reduce the impact of human factors on results. The majority of doctors on the unit believe they consistently record all items of this checklist, highlighting the gap between the ideal that clinicians strive towards and the outcome. An abbreviated daily review checklist was therefore implemented in the form of a laminated bookmark into the medical notes, to act as a reminder of the items that should be considered in the daily review and prompt subsequent documentation. Bookmarks were implemented over two PDSA cycles and medical notes re-audited. Post-intervention, the documentation of the daily review improved to an overall completion rate of >77%, with notable improvements in eye and mouth care in ventilated patients (89%, 95% respectively), glucose control (67%), stress ulcer prophylaxis (100%), and inspection and need for peripheral and central lines (43%). The daily review checklist concisely summarised onto bookmarks were cheap and simple to create, durable and easy to use, and

  1. Prevalence of Advance Directives Among Older Adults Admitted to Intensive Care Units and Requiring Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Gamertsfelder, Elise M; Seaman, Jennifer Burgher; Tate, Judith; Buddadhumaruk, Praewpannarai; Happ, Mary Beth

    2016-04-01

    Because older adults are at high risk for hospitalization and potential decisional incapacity, advance directives are important components of pre-hospital advanced care planning, as they document individual preferences for future medical care. The prevalence of pre-hospital advance directive completion in 450 critically ill older adults requiring mechanical ventilation from two Mid-Atlantic hospitals is described, and demographic and clinical predictors of pre-hospital advance directive completion are explored. The overall advance directive completion rate was 42.4%, with those in older age groups (75 to 84 years and 85 and older) having approximately two times the odds of completion. No significant differences in the likelihood of advance directive completion were noted by sex, race, or admitting diagnosis. The relatively low prevalence of advance directive completion among older adults with critical illness and high mortality rate (24%) suggest a need for greater awareness and education. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(4), 34-41.]. PMID:26651862

  2. The 12-Item General Health Questionnaire as an Effective Mental Health Screening Tool for General Korean Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ju; Cho, Maeng Je; Park, Subin; Hong, Jin Pyo; Sohn, Jee Hoon; Bae, Jae Nam; Jeon, Hong Jin; Chang, Sung Man; Lee, Hae Woo

    2013-01-01

    Objective The 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) has been used extensively in various settings across different cultures. This study was conducted to determine the thresholds associated with optimum sensitivity and specificity for the GHQ-12 in Korean adults. Methods Data was acquired from a sample of 6,510 Korean adults, ages 18 to 64 years old, who were selected from the 2005 Census (2,581 men and 3,929 women). Participants completed the GHQ-12 and the Korean Composite International Diagnostic Interview (K-CIDI). Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was conducted. Results The mean GHQ-12 score for the total sample was 1.63 (SD 1.98). The internal consistency of the GHQ-12 was good (Cronbach's α=0.72). Results from the ROC curve indicated that the GHQ-12 yielded greater accuracy when identifying mood and anxiety disorders than when identifying all mental disorders as a whole. The optimal threshold of the GHQ-12 was either 1/2 or 2/3 point depending on the disorder, but was mainly 2/3. Conclusion The Korean version of the GHQ-12 could be used to screen for individuals at high risk of mental disorders, namely mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:24474983

  3. Short-term high-intensity interval and moderate-intensity continuous training reduce leukocyte TLR4 in inactive adults at elevated risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Emily; Durrer, Cody; Simtchouk, Svetlana; Jung, Mary E; Bourne, Jessica E; Voth, Elizabeth; Little, Jonathan P

    2015-09-01

    Exercise can have anti-inflammatory effects in obesity, but the optimal type and intensity of exercise are not clear. This study compared short-term high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in terms of improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness, markers of inflammation, and glucose control in previously inactive adults at elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Thirty-nine inactive, overweight/obese adults (32 women) were randomly assigned to 10 sessions over 2 wk of progressive HIIT (n = 20, four to ten 1-min sessions at ∼90% peak heart rate, 1-min rest periods) or MICT (n = 19, 20-50 min at ∼65% peak heart rate). Before and 3 days after training, participants performed a peak O2 uptake test, and fasting blood samples were obtained. Both HIIT (1.8 ± 0.4 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4 l/min, pre vs. post) and MICT (1.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.9 ± 0.5 l/min, pre vs. post) improved peak O2 uptake (P < 0.001) and lowered plasma fructosamine (P < 0.05). Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 (TLR4) expression was reduced on lymphocytes and monocytes after both HIIT and MICT (P < 0.05) and on neutrophils after MICT (P < 0.01). TLR2 on lymphocytes was reduced after HIIT and MICT (P < 0.05). Plasma inflammatory cytokines were unchanged after training in both groups, but MICT led to a reduction in fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.05, 5.9 ± 1.0 vs. 5.6 ± 1.0 mmol/l, pre vs. post). Ten days of either HIIT or MICT can improve cardiorespiratory fitness and glucose control and lead to reductions in TLR2 and TLR4 expression. MICT, which involved a longer duration of exercise, may be superior for reducing fasting glucose. PMID:26139217

  4. Short-term high-intensity interval and moderate-intensity continuous training reduce leukocyte TLR4 in inactive adults at elevated risk of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Emily; Durrer, Cody; Simtchouk, Svetlana; Jung, Mary E.; Bourne, Jessica E.; Voth, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Exercise can have anti-inflammatory effects in obesity, but the optimal type and intensity of exercise are not clear. This study compared short-term high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in terms of improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness, markers of inflammation, and glucose control in previously inactive adults at elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Thirty-nine inactive, overweight/obese adults (32 women) were randomly assigned to 10 sessions over 2 wk of progressive HIIT (n = 20, four to ten 1-min sessions at ∼90% peak heart rate, 1-min rest periods) or MICT (n = 19, 20-50 min at ∼65% peak heart rate). Before and 3 days after training, participants performed a peak O2 uptake test, and fasting blood samples were obtained. Both HIIT (1.8 ± 0.4 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4 l/min, pre vs. post) and MICT (1.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.9 ± 0.5 l/min, pre vs. post) improved peak O2 uptake (P < 0.001) and lowered plasma fructosamine (P < 0.05). Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 (TLR4) expression was reduced on lymphocytes and monocytes after both HIIT and MICT (P < 0.05) and on neutrophils after MICT (P < 0.01). TLR2 on lymphocytes was reduced after HIIT and MICT (P < 0.05). Plasma inflammatory cytokines were unchanged after training in both groups, but MICT led to a reduction in fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.05, 5.9 ± 1.0 vs. 5.6 ± 1.0 mmol/l, pre vs. post). Ten days of either HIIT or MICT can improve cardiorespiratory fitness and glucose control and lead to reductions in TLR2 and TLR4 expression. MICT, which involved a longer duration of exercise, may be superior for reducing fasting glucose. PMID:26139217

  5. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeffi, Michael; Johnson, Kyle; Paciullo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review. PMID:25849690

  6. Effect of Temperature Regime on Diapause Intensity in an Adult-Wintering Hymenopteran with Obligate Diapause

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osmia lignaria is a solitary bee that overwinters as a fully-eclosed, cocooned, unfed adult. Our objective is to understand the effect of wintering temperature on diapause maintenance and termination in this species. We measured respiration rates and weight loss in individuals exposed to various win...

  7. Long-Term Outcome After Static Intensity-Modulated Total Body Radiotherapy Using Compensators Stratified by Pediatric and Adult Cohorts

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Ralf A. Schultze, Juergen; Jensen, J. Martin; Hebbinghaus, Dieter; Galalae, Razvan M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcome after total body irradiation with intensity-modulating compensators and allogeneic/autologous transplantation, especially in terms of therapy-related toxicity in pediatric and adult cohorts. Methods and Materials: A total of 257 consecutive patients (40 children and 217 adults) have been treated since 1983 with TBI using static intensity-modulated radiotherapy for hematologic malignancies. The total dose of 12 Gy was applied in six fractions within 3 days before allogeneic (n = 174) or autologous (n = 83) transplantation. The median follow-up was 9.2 years. Results: The 5-year overall survival rate was 47.9% (49.8% for the adults and 37.5% for the children, p = 0.171). The 5-year tumor-related mortality rate was 23%, and the 5-year treatment-related mortality rate 29.2% (29.5% in the adults and 27.5% in the pediatric patients). Interstitial pneumonitis developed in 28 (10.9%) of 257 patients and in 12.5% of the pediatric cohort. The interstitial pneumonitis rate was 25% in pediatric patients treated with a 12-Gy lung dose compared with 4.2% for those treated to an 11-Gy lung dose. The overall survival rate stratified by lung dose was 26.7% for 12 Gy and 52.4% for 11 Gy (p = 0.001). The incidence of veno-occlusive disease and cataract was 5.8% and 6.6% in all patients and 12.5% and 15% in the pediatric patients, respectively (p < 0.05). Secondary malignancies were found in 4.3% of all patients, all in the adult cohort at transplantation. Conclusion: Static intensity-modulated total body irradiation with a total dose of 12 Gy before allogeneic/autologous transplantation is a successful treatment with good long-term outcome and acceptable therapy-related toxicities. Constraining the lung dose to 11 Gy substantially lowered the actuarial treatment-related mortality. This effect was especially striking in the pediatric patients.

  8. Self-reported mood, general health, wellbeing and employment status in adults with suspected DCD.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Amanda; Williams, Natalie; Thomas, Marie; Hill, Elisabeth L

    2013-04-01

    Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) affects around 2-6% of the population and is diagnosed on the basis of poor motor coordination in the absence of other neurological disorders. Its psychosocial impact has been delineated in childhood but until recently there has been little understanding of the implications of the disorder beyond this. This study aims to focus on the longer term impact of having DCD in adulthood and, in particular, considers the effect of employment on this group in relation to psychosocial health and wellbeing. Self-reported levels of life satisfaction, general health and symptoms of anxiety and depression were investigated in a group of adults with a diagnosis of DCD and those with suspected DCD using a number of published self-report questionnaire measures. A comparison between those in and out of employment was undertaken. As a group, the unemployed adults with DCD reported significantly lower levels of life satisfaction. Whilst there was no significant difference between those who were employed and unemployed on General Health Questionnaire scores; both groups reported numbers of health related issues reflective of general health problems in DCD irrespective of employment status. While both groups reported high levels of depressive symptoms and rated their satisfaction with life quite poorly, the unemployed group reported significantly more depressive symptoms and less satisfaction. Additionally, the results identified high levels of self-reported anxiety in both groups, with the majority sitting outside of the normal range using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. These findings add to the small but increasing body of literature on physical and mental health and wellbeing in adults with DCD. Furthermore, they are the first to provide insight into the possible mediating effects of employment status in adults with DCD. PMID:23417140

  9. Effect of moderate-intensity exercise training on the cognitive function of young adults with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Pastula, Robert M; Stopka, Christine B; Delisle, Anthony T; Hass, Chris J

    2012-12-01

    In addition to cognitive impairment, young adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) are also more likely to be in poor health. Exercise may help ameliorate both of these deficits. While the health benefits of exercise are well documented and understood, the cognitive benefits of exercise are emerging. Exercise has been shown to improve the cognitive function of young, old, and diseased populations but few studies have evaluated the effect of exercise training on the cognitive functioning of individuals with IDs. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of moderate-intensity exercise training on the cognitive function of young adults with IDs. Fourteen students (age, 19.4 ± 1.3 years) with mild to moderate IDs participated in an 8-week comprehensive exercise intervention program based on circuit training, aerobic dancing, and adapted sport activities. Sessions lasted 45 minutes, and intensity was maintained at 60-70% of maximum heart rate (HR(max)). Aerobic fitness was assessed via the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) step test, and intellectual functioning was assessed via 3 subtests from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities once before and after the intervention. Performance was significantly improved on all 3 cognitive tests (all, p < 0.002). Aerobic fitness also significantly improved (p < 0.002). The mean percent increase in processing speed, a measure taking into account each individual's performance on the 3 subtests, was 103%. The mean individual improvement in aerobic fitness was 17.5%. Moderate-intensity exercise training can yield robust improvements in the cognitive functioning and aerobic fitness of young adults with IDs. These effects support the inclusion of exercise into the lives of young adults with ID to promote their physical and cognitive health. Fourteen students (age, 19.4 ± 1.3 years) with mild to moderate IDs participated in an 8-week comprehensive exercise intervention program based on circuit

  10. Enhanced intensity discrimination in the intact ear of adults with unilateral deafness.

    PubMed

    Maslin, Michael R D; Taylor, Melissa; Plack, Christopher J; Munro, Kevin J

    2015-06-01

    Physiological measures of neural activity in the auditory cortex have revealed plasticity following unilateral deafness. Central projections from the remaining ear reorganize to produce a stronger cortical response than normal. However, little is known about the perceptual consequences of this increase. One possibility is improved sound intensity discrimination. Intensity difference limens were measured in 11 individuals with unilateral deafness that were previously shown to exhibit increased cortical activity to sounds heard by the intact ear. Significantly smaller mean difference limens were observed compared with controls. These results provide evidence of the perceptual consequences of plasticity in humans following unilateral deafness. PMID:26093448

  11. Adult age differences in learning and generalization of feedback-based associations.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jessica R; Gluck, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    Feedback-based associative learning (e.g., acquiring new associations from positive or negative outcomes) and generalization (e.g., applying past learning to new settings) are important cognitive skills that enable people to make economic decisions or social judgments. This ability to acquire new skills based on feedback and transfer those experiences to predict positive outcomes in novel situations is essential at all ages, but especially among older adults who must continually adapt to new people, environments, and technologies. Ample evidence from animal work, clinical research, and computational modeling has demonstrated that feedback-based associative learning is sensitive to basal ganglia dysfunction and generalization to medial temporal lobe dysfunction. This dissociation is relevant because of recent evidence that has suggested healthy aging compromises the basal ganglia system earlier than the medial temporal lobes. However, few studies have investigated how healthy aging influences these cognitive processes. Here, we examined both feedback-based associative learning and generalization in younger, middle-aged, and older adults using a computerized acquired equivalence task. Results revealed a significant effect of age group on feedback-based associative learning, consistent with evidence of persistent age-related declines in the basal ganglia. In contrast, generalization was spared in all but the oldest adult group, likely reflecting preserved medial temporal lobe function until advanced old age. Our findings add behavioral evidence to the emerging view that healthy aging affects the striatal system before the medial temporal lobes. Although further evidence is needed, this finding may shed light on the possible time course of neural system dysfunction in healthy aging. PMID:24364400

  12. Stressors, social support, religious practice, and general well-being among Korean adult immigrants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Hag; Woo, Hyeyoung

    2013-10-01

    Through this cross-sectional study the authors explore how stressors, social support, and religious practice are associated with the general well-being of 147 Korean adult immigrants through interviews. Hierarchical regression analysis reveals that low English proficiency and financial hardship are significantly related to low general well-being. However, high social support and religious practice are significantly associated with high general well-being. Social service and health care providers need to carefully assess stressors, social support systems, and spiritual issues for providing appropriate services/programs for English, culture, or social activities as well as spiritual intervention to maximize the strengths of Korean immigrants coping with health issues. PMID:24066632

  13. Effects of high-intensity interval training and moderate-intensity continuous training on endothelial function and cardiometabolic risk markers in obese adults.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Brandon J; Tucker, Wesley J; Bhammar, Dharini M; Ryder, Justin R; Sweazea, Karen L; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2016-07-01

    We hypothesized that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would be more effective than moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) at improving endothelial function and maximum oxygen uptake (V̇o2 max) in obese adults. Eighteen participants [35.1 ± 8.1 (SD) yr; body mass index = 36.0 ± 5.0 kg/m(2)] were randomized to 8 wk (3 sessions/wk) of either HIIT [10 × 1 min, 90-95% maximum heart rate (HRmax), 1-min active recovery] or MICT (30 min, 70-75% HRmax). Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) increased after HIIT (5.13 ± 2.80% vs. 8.98 ± 2.86%, P = 0.02) but not after MICT (5.23 ± 2.82% vs. 3.05 ± 2.76%, P = 0.16). Resting artery diameter increased after MICT (3.68 ± 0.58 mm vs. 3.86 ± 0.58 mm, P = 0.02) but not after HIIT (4.04 ± 0.70 mm vs. 4.09 ± 0.70 mm; P = 0.63). There was a significant (P = 0.02) group × time interaction in low flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC) between MICT (0.63 ± 2.00% vs. -2.79 ± 3.20%; P = 0.03) and HIIT (-1.04 ± 4.09% vs. 1.74 ± 3.46%; P = 0.29). V̇o2 max increased (P < 0.01) similarly after HIIT (2.19 ± 0.65 l/min vs. 2.64 ± 0.88 l/min) and MICT (2.24 ± 0.48 l/min vs. 2.55 ± 0.61 l/min). Biomarkers of cardiovascular risk and endothelial function were unchanged. HIIT and MICT produced different vascular adaptations in obese adults, with HIIT improving FMD and MICT increasing resting artery diameter and enhancing L-FMC. HIIT required 27.5% less total exercise time and ∼25% less energy expenditure than MICT. PMID:27255523

  14. Managing Transition with Support: Experiences of Transition from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry to General Adult Psychiatry Narrated by Young Adults and Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Young adults with mental illness who need continuing care when they turn 18 are referred from child and adolescent psychiatry to general adult psychiatry. During this process, young adults are undergoing multiple transitions as they come of age while they transfer to another unit in healthcare. The aim of this study was to explore expectations and experiences of transition from child and adolescent psychiatry to general adult psychiatry as narrated by young adults and relatives. Individual interviews were conducted with three young adults and six relatives and analysed according to grounded theory. The analysis resulted in a core category: managing transition with support, and three categories: being of age but not mature, walking out of security and into uncertainty, and feeling omitted and handling concerns. The young adults' and relatives' main concerns were that they might be left out and feel uncertainty about the new situation during the transition process. To facilitate the transition process, individual care planning is needed. It is essential that young adults and relatives are participating in the process to be prepared for the changes and achieve a successful transition. Knowledge about the simultaneous processes seems to be an important issue for facilitating transition. PMID:24829900

  15. Randomized study of reduced-intensity chemotherapy combined with imatinib in adults with Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chalandon, Yves; Thomas, Xavier; Hayette, Sandrine; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Abbal, Claire; Huguet, Françoise; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Leguay, Thibaut; Rousselot, Philippe; Lepretre, Stéphane; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Maury, Sébastien; Berthon, Céline; Tavernier, Emmanuelle; Lambert, Jean-François; Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Lhéritier, Véronique; Chevret, Sylvie; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2015-06-11

    In this study, we randomly compared high doses of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib combined with reduced-intensity chemotherapy (arm A) to standard imatinib/hyperCVAD (cyclophosphamide/vincristine/doxorubicin/dexamethasone) therapy (arm B) in 268 adults (median age, 47 years) with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The primary objective was the major molecular response (MMolR) rate after cycle 2, patients being then eligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) if they had a donor, or autologous SCT if in MMolR and no donor. With fewer induction deaths, the complete remission (CR) rate was higher in arm A than in arm B (98% vs 91%; P = .006), whereas the MMolR rate was similar in both arms (66% vs 64%). With a median follow-up of 4.8 years, 5-year event-free survival and overall survival (OS) rates were estimated at 37.1% and 45.6%, respectively, without difference between the arms. Allogeneic transplantation was associated with a significant benefit in relapse-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; P = .036) and OS (HR, 0.64; P = .02), with initial white blood cell count being the only factor significantly interacting with this SCT effect. In patients achieving MMolR, outcome was similar after autologous and allogeneic transplantation. This study validates an induction regimen combining reduced-intensity chemotherapy and imatinib in Ph+ ALL adult patients and suggests that SCT in first CR is still a good option for Ph+ ALL adult patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00327678. PMID:25878120

  16. End-of-Life Care Intensity among Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Patients in Kaiser Permanente Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Jennifer W.; Chen, Lie H.; Cannavale, Kimberley; Sattayapiwat, Olivia; Cooper, Robert M.; Chao, Chun R.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Cancer is the leading disease-related cause of death among adolescents and young adults (AYAs), but little is known about the care that AYA patients with cancer receive at the end of life (EOL). Objective To evaluate the intensity of EOL care among AYA cancer patients. Design Cross-sectional study using cancer registry and electronic health record data. Setting Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KSPC), an integrated health care delivery system. Participants 663 AYA patients with either (1) stage I-III cancer and evidence of cancer recurrence or (2) stage IV cancer at diagnosis who received care in KPSC and died in the years 2001–2010. Patients were eligible if they were aged 15–39 at death. Main Outcome Measures Chemotherapy use in the last 14 days of life, intensive care unit (ICU) care in the last 30 days of life, more than one emergency room (ER) visit in the last 30 days of life, hospitalization in the last 30 days of life, and a composite measure of medically intensive EOL care comprising any of the aforementioned measures. Results 11% of patients (72/663) received chemotherapy within 14 days of death. In the last 30 days of life, 22% of patients (144/663) were admitted to the ICU; 22% (147/663) had >1 ER visit; and 62% (413/663) were hospitalized. Overall, 68% (449/663) of subjects received at least one medically intensive EOL care measure. Conclusions and Relevance Most AYA patients receive at least one form of medically intensive EOL care. These findings suggest the need to better understand EOL care preferences and decision-making in this young population. PMID:26181778

  17. Epstein–Barr virus dynamics in asymptomatic immunocompetent adults: an intensive 6-month study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kristin H; Webb, Chiu-Ho; Schmeling, David O; Brundage, Richard C; Balfour, Henry H

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) dynamics in asymptomatic immunocompetent persons provides a baseline for defining quantitative thresholds associated with EBV disease. Studying latent membrane protein (LMP)-1 sequence variation over time could establish the rates of reactivation and superinfection, and also trace transmission. Twelve asymptomatic adult subjects were evaluated prospectively nine times over 6 months. EBV serum antibodies were measured by enzyme immunoassay. EBV DNA in oral and whole-blood samples was quantitated by real-time (TaqMan) PCR and analyzed for LMP-1 sequence variability. All 11 antibody positive subjects had EBV DNA detected in their oral compartment at least once during the 6-month study. The quantities ranged from 1.70 to 4.91 log10 copies EBV per ml of oral cell pellet. One subject was continuously viremic for 79 days. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 63 (24%) of 260 samples from 11 antibody-positive subjects and in 0/27 samples from an antibody-negative subject. The quantities in positive samples ranged from 1.7 to 4.9 log10 copies EBV per ml. EBV LMP-1 gene sequence variations in subjects were constant over time regardless of the compartment sampled. Subjects 18–30 years old had EBV DNA detected more frequently than subjects >30 years old (38/108 positive samples versus 25/152; P<0.001). In conclusion, EBV DNA shedding is common in asymptomatic adults. The younger adults shed more frequently, which may reflect a shorter time from their primary EBV infection to sampling. The LMP-1 sequence analysis method employed here could be used to trace person-to-person transmission because patterns remained almost identical over time. PMID:27350880

  18. A prospective study of the modified Atkins diet for adults with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kverneland, Magnhild; Selmer, Kaja K; Nakken, Karl O; Iversen, Per O; Taubøll, Erik

    2015-12-01

    For children with pharmacoresistant epilepsy, the ketogenic diet is an established treatment option worldwide. However, for adults, this treatment is less frequently offered, and its efficacy less well-documented. The aim of this study was to examine efficacy and tolerability of such a diet as an adjuvant therapy to antiepileptic drugs for adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. Thirteen patients (12 women) aged 16-57 years were included prospectively. They were treated with a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks. Nine of the 13 participants had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), two had childhood absence epilepsy, one had Jeavons syndrome, and one had generalized epilepsy of unknown type. Six participants, all with JME, completed the 12-week study period. Among these six, four had >50% seizure reduction. Their seizure severity, using the revised Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale, was reduced by 1, 5, 57.5, and 70 points, respectively (scale: 1-100 points). In three of these four responders, quality of life, assessed by QOLIE-89, increased more than 20 points (scale: 0-100 points). Mean reduction of body weight after 12 weeks on diet was 6.5 (range: 4.3-8.1) kg. Lack of motivation, poor compliance, and seizure aggravation were the main reasons for premature termination of the diet. Apart from one patient who developed gallstones when ending the treatment after 10 months, no adverse effects were noted. In conclusion, using a modified Atkins diet for 12 weeks led to a clinically relevant reduction of seizure frequency in four of thirteen adult patients with pharmacoresistant generalized epilepsy. All responders were diagnosed with JME. In three of the four, the benefits of diet were so considerable that they chose to continue the treatment. PMID:26588588

  19. Exploring the Options. Curriculum Documents and Support Materials for the General Curriculum Options Stream of the Certificates of General Education for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marlene, Ed.; Brearley, Laura, Ed.

    This document contains detailed curriculum outlines and teacher support materials for the General Curriculum Options (GCO) stream of the Certificates of General Education (CGE) for Adults in Victoria, Australia. The following topics are discussed in the introduction: purpose of the guide, details of GCO subject areas, accreditation framework and…

  20. General and Domain-Specific Self-Concepts of Adults with Learning Disabilities: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jason M.

    2012-01-01

    The empirical literature investigating general and domain-specific self-concepts of adults with learning disabilities was examined using meta-analytic techniques. Eight inclusion criteria were developed to evaluate this literature and led to the inclusion of 22 studies. Results indicated that adults with learning disabilities reported lower…

  1. A visit to the intensive cares unit: a family-centered culture change to facilitate pediatric visitation in an adult intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Julie Boyer; Piazza, Julie

    2012-01-01

    To guide family adjustment, an effort was made to facilitate pediatric visitation in an adult intensive care unit (ICU). Goals were to improve customer satisfaction and to raise staff comfort level with child visitation. After implementing an open visitation policy, concerns around pediatric visitation in the ICU remained. Fears centered on risks to both patient and child. Literature was reviewed before a book was written entitled A Visit to the ICU. It contained information about what a child visiting the ICU would see, hear, and feel when visiting a loved one. The book provided reassurance for caregivers and children, informing them about what to expect when visiting. The goal of the book was to provide caregivers with a framework for age-appropriate education. Staff education was provided on developmental stages, including a child's understandings of illness and death. Nursing interventions were reviewed and resources provided. A survey demonstrated that the book increased staff comfort level with children visiting the unit, was a positive tool for patients and families, and eased fears among children while helping to facilitate coping mechanisms. The article will describe the practice change of pediatric visitation in an ICU and how it could be applied to other critical care settings. PMID:22157497

  2. Training for generalization in Theory of Mind: a study with older adults.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Elena; Bianco, Federica; Bottiroli, Sara; Rosi, Alessia; Vecchi, Tomaso; Lecce, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) refers to the ability to attribute independent mental states to self and others in order to explain and predict social behavior. Recent research in this area has shown a decline in ToM abilities associated with normal aging that is of a moderate magnitude or greater. Very few studies have investigated whether it is possible to improve older adults' ToM abilities. The present study was designed to address this gap in the literature by evaluating the impact of a ToM training on practiced and transfer tasks. We provided older adults with a variety of activities designed to facilitate the generalization of benefits to other ToM-demanding tasks. Participants were 63 healthy older adults, native Italian speakers (M age = 71.44, SD = 5.24, age range: 63-81 years). Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the ToM training (age range: 63-81 years) and the physical-conversation training (age range: 64-81 years). Training effects were measured using the strange stories (practiced task) and the animation task (transfer task). Results revealed the efficacy of the training in producing improvements on practiced but also on transfer tasks. PMID:26300818

  3. Generalized in-line digital holographic technique based on intensity measurements at two different planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Situ, Guohai; Ryle, James P.; Gopinathan, Unnikrishnan; Sheridan, John T.

    2008-02-01

    In-line digital holography based on two-intensity measurements [Zhang et al. Opt. Lett. 29, 1787 (2004)], is modified by introducing a π shifting in the reference phase. Such an improvement avoids the assumption that the object beam must be much weaker than the reference beam in strength and results in a simplified experimental implementation. Computer simulations and optical experiments are carried out to validate the method, which we refer to as position-phase-shifting digital holography.

  4. Assessment of intensity effort of middle-aged adults practicing regular walking

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Anderson A.; Lima, Daniela A.; Vieira, Gabriella F.; Fernandes, Aline A.; Pereira, Danielle A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Walking is one of the most commonly recommended activities for sedentary individuals. When performed at the correct intensity, it can provide cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic, and other benefits by providing a training effect in addition to reducing the risk of death from cardiovascular diseases and other chronic health conditions. Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to assess whether individuals who practiced regular unsupervised walking carry out the activity safely and with sufficient effort intensity parameters to have a positive physiological (training) effect. The secondary objective was to compare the training heart rate (HR) and the stability of the HR within the ideal range of training between the sexes. Method: Individuals were selected from walking tracks within the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The study included subjects from 40 to 60 years of age who had practiced walking for at least two months prior to the study, walking at least three times a week. Individuals who agreed to participate in the survey were asked to walk 15 minutes at their usual pace with their HR measured every 5 minutes using a heart rate monitor. Their average walking HR was compared to the average training HR based on the formula: (220 - age) × 70 to 80% that would result in a positive physiological training effect. Results: Of the 142 individuals evaluated, 25.4% achieved the average training HR. This result was significantly lower than those who did not achieve the average training HR while walking (p=0.002). There were significant differences between men and women who had reached the training HR (p=0.0001). Conclusion: The authors found that individuals who walk regularly performed outside the range of the ideal HR intensity that would cause a positive physiological effect and therefore would probably not achieve a beneficial training effect while walking. PMID:26647751

  5. Personalised Prescription of Scalable High Intensity Interval Training to Inactive Female Adults of Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Jacqueline L.

    2016-01-01

    Stepping is a convenient form of scalable high-intensity interval training (HIIT) that may lead to health benefits. However, the accurate personalised prescription of stepping is hampered by a lack of evidence on optimal stepping cadences and step heights for various populations. This study examined the acute physiological responses to stepping exercise at various heights and cadences in young (n = 14) and middle-aged (n = 14) females in order to develop an equation that facilitates prescription of stepping at targeted intensities. Participants completed a step test protocol consisting of randomised three-minute bouts at different step cadences (80, 90, 100, 110 steps·min-1) and step heights (17, 25, 30, 34 cm). Aerobic demand and heart rate values were measured throughout. Resting metabolic rate was measured in order to develop female specific metabolic equivalents (METs) for stepping. Results revealed significant differences between age groups for METs and heart rate reserve, and within-group differences for METs, heart rate, and metabolic cost, at different step heights and cadences. At a given step height and cadence, middle-aged females were required to work at an intensity on average 1.9 ± 0.26 METs greater than the younger females. A prescriptive equation was developed to assess energy cost in METs using multilevel regression analysis with factors of step height, step cadence and age. Considering recent evidence supporting accumulated bouts of HIIT exercise for health benefits, this equation, which allows HIIT to be personally prescribed to inactive and sedentary women, has potential impact as a public health exercise prescription tool. PMID:26848956

  6. Personalised Prescription of Scalable High Intensity Interval Training to Inactive Female Adults of Different Ages.

    PubMed

    Mair, Jacqueline L; Nevill, Alan M; De Vito, Giuseppe; Boreham, Colin A

    2016-01-01

    Stepping is a convenient form of scalable high-intensity interval training (HIIT) that may lead to health benefits. However, the accurate personalised prescription of stepping is hampered by a lack of evidence on optimal stepping cadences and step heights for various populations. This study examined the acute physiological responses to stepping exercise at various heights and cadences in young (n = 14) and middle-aged (n = 14) females in order to develop an equation that facilitates prescription of stepping at targeted intensities. Participants completed a step test protocol consisting of randomised three-minute bouts at different step cadences (80, 90, 100, 110 steps·min-1) and step heights (17, 25, 30, 34 cm). Aerobic demand and heart rate values were measured throughout. Resting metabolic rate was measured in order to develop female specific metabolic equivalents (METs) for stepping. Results revealed significant differences between age groups for METs and heart rate reserve, and within-group differences for METs, heart rate, and metabolic cost, at different step heights and cadences. At a given step height and cadence, middle-aged females were required to work at an intensity on average 1.9 ± 0.26 METs greater than the younger females. A prescriptive equation was developed to assess energy cost in METs using multilevel regression analysis with factors of step height, step cadence and age. Considering recent evidence supporting accumulated bouts of HIIT exercise for health benefits, this equation, which allows HIIT to be personally prescribed to inactive and sedentary women, has potential impact as a public health exercise prescription tool. PMID:26848956

  7. Intimate partner victimization among adults aged 60 and older: an analysis of the 1999 and 2004 General Social Survey.

    PubMed

    Poole, Christopher; Rietschlin, John

    2012-04-01

    Accounts in both the scientific literature and popular media have brought about increased recognition of the reality of elder abuse. However, relatively little work has examined intimate partner victimization with respect to older adults. In this study, weighted data from cycles 13 (1999) and 18 (2004) of the General Social Survey are pooled to examine how factors uniquely influence the prevalence and risk of emotional, financial, and physical abuse among adults aged 60 and over. Considerations regarding elder abuse committed by spouses, versus abuse of older adults more broadly (by their children and other adults), are also discussed. PMID:22471512

  8. Evaluation of Dose-Intense Ifosfamide, with and Without Edatrexate, in Adults with Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Gary M.; Leung, Denis; Sugarman, Alison; Bertino, Joseph R.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. To define the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of ifosfamide when given with G-CSF on an every other week schedule, and to define the MTD of edatrexate that can be given every two weeks with an intense schedule of ifosfamide. Patients and Methods. Forty-one patients with metastatic or unresectable, locally advanced sarcoma participated in this 2-step phase I trial.The starting dose of ifosfamide was 10 gm/m2 given by continuous intravenous infusion over 4 days every 2 weeks.When the MTD was defined, edatrexate, beginning at a dose of 40 mg/m2 intravenously every 2 weeks was added in subsequent cohorts of patients. Results. Myelosuppression was the most prominent toxicity. Fatigue, nausea, and vomiting were observed in the majority of patients. Ifosfamide 12 gm/m2 given every 2 weeks approached or exceeded the MTD. Edatrexate 100 mg/m2 could be given safety as an intravenous bolus with ifosfamide 10 gm/m2 every 2 weeks. Therapeutic responses were observed in patients with measurable disease. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of administering a dose-intense schedule of ifosfamide alone or ifosfamide with edatrexate that might be applied in the adjuvant or neo-adjuvant setting. PMID:18521274

  9. Adult attachment, emotion dysregulation, and symptoms of depression and generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Marganska, Anna; Gallagher, Michelle; Miranda, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Differences in attachment style have been linked to both emotion regulation and psychological functioning, but the emotion regulatory mechanism through which attachment style might impact symptoms of depression and anxiety is unclear. The present study examined the explanatory role of emotion dysregulation in the relation between adult attachment style and symptoms of depression and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a sample of 284 adults. Secure attachment was associated with lower depression and GAD symptoms and lower emotion dysregulation, whereas insecure attachment styles were generally associated with higher depression and GAD scores and higher emotion dysregulation. Perceived inability to generate effective emotion regulation strategies mediated the relation between insecure attachment and both depression and GAD symptoms. Nonacceptance of negative emotions and inability to control impulsive behaviors emerged as additional mediators of the relation between insecure attachment styles and GAD symptoms. The differential contribution of attachment style and emotion regulation to the prediction of depression and GAD symptoms may reflect differences in vulnerability to depression and GAD. PMID:23330631

  10. General anesthesia for the provision of dental treatment to adults with developmental disability.

    PubMed Central

    Ananthanarayan, C.; Sigal, M.; Godlewski, W.

    1998-01-01

    The management of the behavior of mentally challenged adults when providing required dental care is often a problem, whether in the dental office or in a hospital setting. Our institution has a designated program to provide required dental care to this group of patients. Because of the high incidence of poor cooperation, which may include aggressive antagonistic behavior, many of these patients are scheduled for dental care under general anesthesia with an incomplete preoperative medical assessment. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact and limitations that an incomplete medical assessment may present in the delivery of dental care under general anesthesia to these adults with developmental disability. After approval from the institutional review board, the medical records of 139 patients treated in this program between 1992 and 1994 were reviewed to determine the patient profiles, anesthesia management, and complications. The charts of these patients, who underwent dental and radiographic examination, scaling and prophylaxis, and restoration and extraction of teeth under general anesthesia, were reviewed. There were 149 procedures performed on these patients, some more than once. The mean age was 29.5 yr. Males predominated females by a ratio of 2:1. All had multiple diagnoses, medical problems, and medications. Twenty-three patients had Down's Syndrome, four had schizophrenia disorders, 42 had seizure disorders, 11 had hypothyroidism, seven had heart disease, and 14 had central nervous system and neuromuscular disorders. The remainder had a variety of diagnoses, including rare syndromes. One hundred had intravenous (i.v.), 25 had mask inhalation, and 24 had intramuscular ketamine (Ketalar) induction. Nasotracheal intubation was uneventful in 139 patients, five had difficult visualization of the larynx and intubation. Ten patients experienced intraoperative complications, including nonfatal ventricular arrhythmia, slight fall in blood pressure and

  11. Recognition of Intensive Valence and Arousal Affective States via Facial Electromyographic Activity in Young and Senior Adults

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hang; Walter, Steffen; Hrabal, David; Rukavina, Stefanie; Limbrecht-Ecklundt, Kerstin; Hoffman, Holger; Traue, Harald C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Research suggests that interaction between humans and digital environments characterizes a form of companionship in addition to technical convenience. To this effect, humans have attempted to design computer systems able to demonstrably empathize with the human affective experience. Facial electromyography (EMG) is one such technique enabling machines to access to human affective states. Numerous studies have investigated the effects of valence emotions on facial EMG activity captured over the corrugator supercilii (frowning muscle) and zygomaticus major (smiling muscle). The arousal emotion, specifically, has not received much research attention, however. In the present study, we sought to identify intensive valence and arousal affective states via facial EMG activity. Methods Ten blocks of affective pictures were separated into five categories: neutral valence/low arousal (0VLA), positive valence/high arousal (PVHA), negative valence/high arousal (NVHA), positive valence/low arousal (PVLA), and negative valence/low arousal (NVLA), and the ability of each to elicit corresponding valence and arousal affective states was investigated at length. One hundred and thirteen participants were subjected to these stimuli and provided facial EMG. A set of 16 features based on the amplitude, frequency, predictability, and variability of signals was defined and classified using a support vector machine (SVM). Results We observed highly accurate classification rates based on the combined corrugator and zygomaticus EMG, ranging from 75.69% to 100.00% for the baseline and five affective states (0VLA, PVHA, PVLA, NVHA, and NVLA) in all individuals. There were significant differences in classification rate accuracy between senior and young adults, but there was no significant difference between female and male participants. Conclusion Our research provides robust evidences for recognition of intensive valence and arousal affective states in young and senior adults. These

  12. Effects of a low-volume, vigorous intensity step exercise program on functional mobility in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Doheny, Emer P; McGrath, Denise; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Mair, Jacqueline L; Greene, Barry R; Caulfield, Brian; De Vito, Giuseppe; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2013-08-01

    Aging-related decline in functional mobility is associated with loss of independence. This decline may be mitigated through programs of physical activity. Despite reports of aging-related mobility impairment in middle-aged adults, this age group has been largely overlooked in terms of exercise programs that target functional mobility and the preservation of independence in older age. A method to quantitatively assess changes in functional mobility could direct rehabilitation in a proactive rather than reactive manner. Thirty-three healthy but sedentary middle-aged adults participated in a four week low-volume, vigorous intensity stepping exercise program. Two baseline testing sessions and one post-training testing session were conducted. Functional mobility was assessed using the timed up and go (TUG) test, with its constituent sit-to-walk and walk-to-sit phases examined using a novel inertial sensor-based method. Additionally, semi-tandem balance and knee extensor muscle isometric torque were assessed. Trunk acceleration during walk-to-sit reduced significantly post-training, suggesting altered movement control due to the exercise program. No significant training-induced changes in sit-to-walk acceleration, TUG time, balance or torque were observed. The novel method of functional mobility assessment presented provides a reliable means to quantify subtle changes in mobility during postural transitions. Over time, this exercise program may improve functional mobility. PMID:23568151

  13. Muscle size and arterial stiffness after blood flow-restricted low-intensity resistance training in older adults.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Fukumura, K; Fukuda, T; Uchida, Y; Iida, H; Meguro, M; Sato, Y; Yamasoba, T; Nakajima, T

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that blood flow-restricted low-intensity resistance training (BFR-RT) causes muscle hypertrophy while maintaining arterial function in young adults. We examined the effects of BFR-RT on muscle size and arterial stiffness in older adults. Healthy subjects (ages 61-84 years) were divided into BFR-RT (n = 9) or non-training control (CON; n = 10) groups. The BFR-RT group performed 20% and 30%, respectively, of one-repetition maximal (1-RM) knee extension and leg press exercises, 2 days/wk for 12 weeks. The BFR-RT group wore elastic cuffs (120-270 mmHg) on both legs during training. Magnetic resonance imaging-measured muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), 1-RM strength, chair stand (CS) test, and cardio-ankle vascular index testing (CAVI), an index of arterial stiffness, were measured before and 3-5 days after the final training session. Muscle CSA of the quadriceps (8.0%), adductors (6.5%), and gluteus maximus (4.4%), leg extension and leg press 1-RM strength (26.1% and 33.4%), and CS performance (18.3%) improved (P < 0.05) in the BFR-RT group, but not in the CON group. In CAVI testing, there were no changes in both two groups. In conclusion, BFR-RT improves muscle CSA as well as maximal muscle strength, but does not negatively affect arterial stiffness or humeral coagulation factors in older adults. PMID:23730848

  14. Strategies to reduce curative antibiotic therapy in intensive care units (adult and paediatric).

    PubMed

    Bretonnière, Cédric; Leone, Marc; Milési, Christophe; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Armand-Lefevre, Laurence; Baldesi, Olivier; Bouadma, Lila; Decré, Dominique; Figueiredo, Samy; Gauzit, Rémy; Guery, Benoît; Joram, Nicolas; Jung, Boris; Lasocki, Sigismond; Lepape, Alain; Lesage, Fabrice; Pajot, Olivier; Philippart, François; Souweine, Bertrand; Tattevin, Pierre; Timsit, Jean-François; Vialet, Renaud; Zahar, Jean Ralph; Misset, Benoît; Bedos, Jean-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Emerging resistance to antibiotics shows no signs of decline. At the same time, few new antibacterials are being discovered. There is a worldwide recognition regarding the danger of this situation. The urgency of the situation and the conviction that practices should change led the Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF) and the Société Française d'Anesthésie et de Réanimation (SFAR) to set up a panel of experts from various disciplines. These experts met for the first time at the end of 2012 and have since met regularly to issue the following 67 recommendations, according to the rigorous GRADE methodology. Five fields were explored: i) the link between the resistance of bacteria and the use of antibiotics in intensive care; ii) which microbiological data and how to use them to reduce antibiotic consumption; iii) how should antibiotic therapy be chosen to limit consumption of antibiotics; iv) how can antibiotic administration be optimized; v) review and duration of antibiotic treatments. In each institution, the appropriation of these recommendations should arouse multidisciplinary discussions resulting in better knowledge of local epidemiology, rate of antibiotic use, and finally protocols for improving the stewardship of antibiotics. These efforts should contribute to limit the emergence of resistant bacteria. PMID:26077053

  15. Acute high-intensity exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in young, healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jungyun; Brothers, R Matthew; Castelli, Darla M; Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Chen, Yen T; Salinas, Mandy M; Kim, Jihoon; Jung, Yeonhak; Calvert, Hannah G

    2016-09-01

    Acute exercise can positively impact cognition. The present study examined the effect of acute high-intensity aerobic exercise on prefrontal-dependent cognitive performance and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Fifty-eight young adults were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (a) an acute bout of high-intensity exercise (n=29) or (b) a non-exercise control (n=29). Participants in the exercise group improved performance on inhibitory control in Stroop interference and on cognitive flexibility in Trail Making Test (TMT) Part-B compared with participants in the control group and increased BDNF immediately after exercise. There was a significant relationship between BDNF and TMT Part-B on the pre-post change following exercise. These findings provide support for the association between improved prefrontal-dependent cognitive performance and increased BDNF in response to acute exercise. We conclude that the changes in BDNF concentration may be partially responsible for prefrontal-dependent cognitive functioning following an acute bout of exercise. PMID:27450438

  16. Changes in the Bispectral Index in Response to Experimental Noxious Stimuli in Adults under General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Robin Marie; Gélinas, Céline; Choinière, Manon; Parenteau-Goudreault, Elizabeth; Bourgault, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Pain assessment is a major challenge in nonverbal patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Recent studies suggest a relationship between the Bispectral Index (BIS) and nociceptive stimuli. This study was designed to examine changes in BIS in response to experimental noxious stimuli. Methods. Thirty participants under general anesthesia were in this quasiexperimental, within subject, pre- and poststudy. In the operating room (OR), BIS was monitored during moderate and severe noxious stimuli, induced by a thermal probe on the participants' forearm, after induction of general anesthesia, prior to surgery. Results. Significant increases in BIS occurred during moderate (increase from 35.00 to 40.00, P = 0.003) and severe noxious stimuli (increase from 37.67 to 40.00, P = 0.007). ROC showed a sensitivity (Se) of 40.0% and a specificity (Sp) of 73.3% at a BIS value > 45, in distinguishing a moderate from a severe noxious stimuli. Conclusion. BIS increased in response to moderate and severe noxious stimuli. The Se and Sp of the BIS did not support the use of the BIS for distinction of different pain intensities in the context of deep sedation in the OR. However, the results justify further studies in more lightly sedated patients such as those in the ICU. PMID:27335878

  17. [Forced opioid detoxification under general anesthesia--a new challenge for anesthetists and intensive care physicians].

    PubMed

    Hensel, M; Volk, T; Kox, W J

    1999-05-01

    Treatment of opioid addicts by means of competitive opioid receptor antagonists was developed at the University of Vienna in 1987 by Loimer and co-workers. They compared two withdrawal regimens: The short Opiate withdrawal using a staggered naloxone regimen and the rapid opiate detoxification during general anesthesia by means of high doses of naloxone. Based on the latter concept, various modifications have been developed world-wide using either naloxone or as an alternative, naltrexone, an antagonist available for oral administration only. However, there are considerable objections to opioid detoxification during general anasthesia. The main criticism is based an the supposedly unacceptable high risk:benefit-ratio, the higher costs, the lack of psycho-social support, and the lack of prospective studies. However, first results suggest that rapid detoxification procedures are more successful in decreasing relapse than methods which are based on psychiatric treatment alone. As sympathetic hyperfunction is common in rapid detoxification procedures using high doses of opioid receptor antagonists, it is essential to avoid severe autonomic imbalance with possible subsequent impairment of organ functions. To prevent those disturbances, general anesthesia plays an important role. So far, there is almost no information about such methods in the anesthesiological literature. In this article the clinical relevance of such methods is discussed summarizing both the available literature and our own experience and we conclude that rapid opioid detoxification under general anesthesia is a safe and efficient method to suppress withdrawal symptoms. This treatment may be of benefit in patients who particularly suffer from severe withdrawal symptoms and who have failed repeatedly to complete conventional withdrawal. PMID:10372215

  18. Post Hoc Analyses of Anxiety Measures in Adult Patients With Generalized Anxiety Disorder Treated With Vilazodone

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif; Durgam, Suresh; Tang, Xiongwen; Ruth, Adam; Mathews, Maju; Gommoll, Carl P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate vilazodone, currently approved for major depressive disorder in adults, for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Method Three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies showing positive results for vilazodone (2,040 mg/d) in adult patients with GAD (DSM-IV-TR) were pooled for analyses; data were collected from June 2012 to March 2014. Post hoc outcomes in the pooled intent-to-treat population (n = 1,462) included mean change from baseline to week 8 in Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) total score, psychic and somatic anxiety subscale scores, and individual item scores; HARS response (≥ 50% total score improvement) and remission (total score ≤ 7) at week 8; and category shifts, defined as HARS item score ≥ 2 at baseline (moderate to very severe symptoms) and score of 0 at week 8 (no symptoms). Results The least squares mean difference was statistically significant for vilazodone versus placebo in change from baseline to week 8 in HARS total score (−1.83, P < .0001) and in psychic anxiety (−1.21, P < .0001) and somatic anxiety (−0.63, P < .01) subscale scores; differences from placebo were significant on 11 of 14 HARS items (P < .05). Response rates were higher with vilazodone than placebo (48% vs 39%, P < .001), as were remission rates (27% vs 21%, P < .01). The percentage of patients who shifted to no symptoms was significant for vilazodone on several items: anxious mood, tension, intellectual, depressed mood, somatic-muscular, somatic-sensory, cardiovascular, respiratory, and autonomic symptoms (P < .05). Conclusions Treatment with vilazodone versus placebo was effective in adult GAD patients, with significant differences between treatment groups found on both psychic and somatic HARS items. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT01629966, NCT01766401, NCT01844115. PMID:27486544

  19. Short, Subjective Measures of Numeracy and General Health Literacy in an Adult Emergency Department Setting

    PubMed Central

    Wallston, Kenneth A.; Rothman, Russell L.; Marcovitz, David E.; Storrow, Alan B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the reliability and validity of brief subjective measures of numeracy and general health literacy in the adult emergency department setting. Methods A convenience sample of adult emergency department patients completed subjective measures of general health literacy (Short Literacy Screening questions, SLS) and numeracy (Subjective Numeracy Scale, SNS). These patients also completed two objective tests of literacy (the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults, S-TOFHLA; and the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine, REALM) and an objective test of numeracy (WRAT4). Internal reliability of the subjective measures was assessed using Cronbach’s alpha. Construct validity of the subjective measures was assessed by correlating them against the S-TOFHLA, REALM, and WRAT4, using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients, receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves, and hierarchical, multiple linear regression with adjustment for patient age, gender, race, and education. Results The median age of the 207 patients surveyed was 46 (interquartile range 32, 59); twenty-seven percent were African American. Sixty-one percent of patients reported their highest level of education was high school or below. As measured by the S-TOFHLA and REALM, most patients had adequate literacy levels (89% and 80%, respectively), while 44% of patients had below average numeracy skills on the WRAT4. Median SLS was 14 (IQR 12, 15) on a scale of 3 to 15; median SNS was 36 (IQR 30, 42) on a scale of 6 to 48. The SLS and SNS had good internal reliability, with Cronbach’s alphas of 0.74 and 0.82, respectively. The SLS Spearman’s rank order correlation coefficient was 0.33 (95% confidence interval 0.20, 0.45) for the S-TOFHLA, with a standardized beta coefficient of 0.36 (p<0.05) after adjustment for patient demographics. The SLS correlation coefficient was 0.26 (95% CI 0.13, 0.38) for the REALM, with a standardized beta coefficient of 0.38 (p<0.05) after

  20. Increasing intensity of therapies assigned at diagnosis does not improve survival of adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Krug, U; Berdel, W E; Gale, R P; Haferlach, C; Schnittger, S; Müller-Tidow, C; Braess, J; Spiekermann, K; Staib, P; Beelen, D; Serve, H; Schliemann, C; Stelljes, M; Balleisen, L; Maschmeyer, G; Grüneisen, A; Eimermacher, H; Giagounidis, A; Rasche, H; Hehlmann, R; Lengfelder, E; Thiel, E; Reichle, A; Aul, C; Ludwig, W-D; Kern, W; Haferlach, T; Köpcke, W; Görlich, D; Sauerland, M C; Heinecke, A; Wörmann, B J; Hiddemann, W; Büchner, T

    2016-06-01

    We randomized 3375 adults with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome to test whether increasingly intensive chemotherapies assigned at study-entry and analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis improved outcomes. In total, 1529 subjects <60 years were randomized to receive: (1) a first course of induction therapy with high-dose cytarabine and mitoxantrone (HAM) or with standard-dose cytarabine, daunorubicin and 6-thioguanine (TAD) followed by a second course of HAM; (2) granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) or no G-CSF before induction and consolidation courses; and (3) high-dose therapy and an autotransplant or maintenance chemotherapy. In total, 1846 subjects ⩾60 years were randomized to receive: (1) a first induction course of HAM or TAD and second induction course of HAM (if they had bone marrow blasts ⩾5% after the first course); and (2) G-CSF or no G-CSF as above. Median follow-up was 7.4 years (range, 1 day to 14.7 years). Five-year event-free survivals (EFSs) for subjects receiving a first induction course of HAM vs TAD were 17% (95% confidence interval, 15, 18%) vs 16% (95% confidence interval 14, 18%; P=0.719). Five-year EFSs for subjects randomized to receive or not receive G-CSF were 19% (95% confidence interval 16, 21%) vs 16% (95% confidence interval 14, 19%; P=0.266). Five-year relapse-free survivals (RFSs) for subjects <60 years receiving an autotransplant vs maintenance therapy were 43% (95% confidence interval 40, 47%) vs 40 (95% confidence interval 35, 44%; P=0.535). Many subjects never achieved pre-specified landmarks and consequently did not receive their assigned therapies. These data indicate the limited impact of more intensive therapies on outcomes of adults with AML. Moreover, none of the more intensive therapies we tested improved 5-year EFS, RFS or any other outcomes. PMID:26859081

  1. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Older Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Therapist Manual for Primary Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Melinda A.; Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Hopko, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    At least four academic clinical trials have demonstrated the utility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). These data may not generalize, however, to more heterogeneous and functionally impaired patients and the medical settings in which they typically receive care. A recent pilot project…

  2. Clustering of health behaviours in adult survivors of childhood cancer and the general population

    PubMed Central

    Rebholz, C E; Rueegg, C S; Michel, G; Ammann, R A; von der Weid, N X; Kuehni, C E; Spycher, B D

    2012-01-01

    Background: Little is known about engagement in multiple health behaviours in childhood cancer survivors. Methods: Using latent class analysis, we identified health behaviour patterns in 835 adult survivors of childhood cancer (age 20–35 years) and 1670 age- and sex-matched controls from the general population. Behaviour groups were determined from replies to questions on smoking, drinking, cannabis use, sporting activities, diet, sun protection and skin examination. Results: The model identified four health behaviour patterns: ‘risk-avoidance', with a generally healthy behaviour; ‘moderate drinking', with higher levels of sporting activities, but moderate alcohol-consumption; ‘risk-taking', engaging in several risk behaviours; and ‘smoking', smoking but not drinking. Similar proportions of survivors and controls fell into the ‘risk-avoiding' (42% vs 44%) and the ‘risk-taking' cluster (14% vs 12%), but more survivors were in the ‘moderate drinking' (39% vs 28%) and fewer in the ‘smoking' cluster (5% vs 16%). Determinants of health behaviour clusters were gender, migration background, income and therapy. Conclusion: A comparable proportion of childhood cancer survivors as in the general population engage in multiple health-compromising behaviours. Because of increased vulnerability of survivors, multiple risk behaviours should be addressed in targeted health interventions. PMID:22722311

  3. The Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Short Version in a general population sample of emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Colins, Olivier F; Andershed, Henrik

    2016-05-01

    Prior studies with children and adolescents have shown that Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Short Version (YPI-S) scores are internally consistent and manifest expected relations with external variables of interest. In the present study, the factor structure and the internal consistency of YPI-S scores, and the convergent validity of the interpretation of YPI-S scores were tested in a sample of 2,500 emerging adults from the general population in Sweden (aged 20-24 years; 52.6% women). Results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses support a 3-factor structure among both men and women that is similar to prior YPI-S studies conducted with children and adolescents. The YPI-S total score and the 3 factor scores were internally consistent. Correlations with external variables, including aggression and delinquency, support the convergent validity of the interpretation of YPI-S scores. Finally, the strength of these zero-order and partial correlations, overall, was not significantly different across gender. In conclusion, this study provides initial evidence that the YPI-S may hold promise as a brief and time-effective self-report tool for assessing psychopathic traits in emerging adults. The present findings also suggest that the YPI-S performs in a consistent manner across gender. Recommendations for future research with the YPI-S are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26302107

  4. Major Dietary Patterns in Relation to General and Central Obesity among Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Canqing; Shi, Zumin; Lv, Jun; Du, Huaidong; Qi, Lu; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Chang, Liang; Tang, Xuefeng; Jiang, Qilian; Mu, Huaiyi; Pan, Dongxia; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Li, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Limited evidence exists for the association between diet pattern and obesity phenotypes among Chinese adults. In the present study, we analyzed the cross-sectional data from 474,192 adults aged 30–79 years from the China Kadoorie Biobank baseline survey. Food consumption was collected by an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Three dietary patterns were extracted by factor analysis combined with cluster analysis. After being adjusted for potential confounders, individuals following a traditional southern dietary pattern had the lowest body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC); the Western/new affluence dietary pattern had the highest BMI; and the traditional northern dietary pattern had the highest WC. Compared to the traditional southern dietary pattern in multivariable adjusted logistic models, individuals following a Western/new affluence dietary pattern had a significantly increased risk of general obesity (prevalence ratio (PR): 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03–1.08) and central obesity (PR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.06–1.08). The corresponding risks for the traditional northern dietary pattern were 1.05 (1.02–1.09) and 1.17 (1.25–1.18), respectively. In addition, the associations were modified by lifestyle behaviors, and the combined effects with alcohol drinking, tobacco smoking, and physical activity were analyzed. Further prospective studies are needed to elucidate the diet-obesity relationships. PMID:26184308

  5. Season of birth and population schizotypy: Results from a large sample of the adult general population.

    PubMed

    Konrath, Lisa; Beckius, Danièle; Tran, Ulrich S

    2016-08-30

    Although the last years have seen an increasing interest in schizotypy and its pathogenesis, there exist only a handful of studies examining the possible interaction between season of birth (SOB) and schizotypic personality structure. Available research used differing screening instruments, rendering comparisons between studies difficult, and sample sizes in adult populations may have been too small to detect a mild effect. The current study examined the association between SOB and psychometric schizotypy in the so far single-largest sample from the adult general population (N=8114), balanced for men and women, and utilizing a valid and reliable instrument for the assessment of schizotypy. Using the 12 most informative items of the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire Brief, we obtained evidence of a small, but significant, effect of late winter and early spring births (February/March) on psychometric schizotypy. The effect was not constrained to women, but affected men and women alike. The observed association between SOB and schizotypy appears compatible with seasonal variations of temperature and influenza prevalence, and with recent evidence on seasonal variability in the activity of the human immune system. Our findings lend support to the continuum hypothesis of schizotypy and schizophrenia, for which SOB effects have been previously established. PMID:27310922

  6. Major Dietary Patterns in Relation to General and Central Obesity among Chinese Adults.

    PubMed

    Yu, Canqing; Shi, Zumin; Lv, Jun; Du, Huaidong; Qi, Lu; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Chang, Liang; Tang, Xuefeng; Jiang, Qilian; Mu, Huaiyi; Pan, Dongxia; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Li, Liming

    2015-07-01

    Limited evidence exists for the association between diet pattern and obesity phenotypes among Chinese adults. In the present study, we analyzed the cross-sectional data from 474,192 adults aged 30-79 years from the China Kadoorie Biobank baseline survey. Food consumption was collected by an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Three dietary patterns were extracted by factor analysis combined with cluster analysis. After being adjusted for potential confounders, individuals following a traditional southern dietary pattern had the lowest body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC); the Western/new affluence dietary pattern had the highest BMI; and the traditional northern dietary pattern had the highest WC. Compared to the traditional southern dietary pattern in multivariable adjusted logistic models, individuals following a Western/new affluence dietary pattern had a significantly increased risk of general obesity (prevalence ratio (PR): 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.08) and central obesity (PR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.06-1.08). The corresponding risks for the traditional northern dietary pattern were 1.05 (1.02-1.09) and 1.17 (1.25-1.18), respectively. In addition, the associations were modified by lifestyle behaviors, and the combined effects with alcohol drinking, tobacco smoking, and physical activity were analyzed. Further prospective studies are needed to elucidate the diet-obesity relationships. PMID:26184308

  7. Use of generalized population ratios to obtain Fe XV line intensities and linewidths at high electron densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    A generalized method for obtaining individual level population ratios is used to obtain relative intensities of extreme ultraviolet Fe XV emission lines in the range 284-500 A, which are density dependent for electron densities in the tokamak regime or higher. Four lines in particular are found to attain quite high intensities in the high-density limit. The same calculation provides inelastic contributions to linewidths. The method connects level populations and level widths through total probabilities t(ij), related to 'taboo' probabilities of Markov chain theory. The t(ij) are here evaluated for a real atomic system, being therefore of potential interest to random-walk theorists who have been limited to idealized systems characterized by simplified transition schemes.

  8. Electrophysiological evidence for a general auditory prediction deficit in adults who stutter.

    PubMed

    Daliri, Ayoub; Max, Ludo

    2015-11-01

    We previously found that stuttering individuals do not show the typical auditory modulation observed during speech planning in nonstuttering individuals. In this follow-up study, we further elucidate this difference by investigating whether stuttering speakers' atypical auditory modulation is observed only when sensory predictions are based on movement planning or also when predictable auditory input is not a consequence of one's own actions. We recorded 10 stuttering and 10 nonstuttering adults' auditory evoked potentials in response to random probe tones delivered while anticipating either speaking aloud or hearing one's own speech played back and in a control condition without auditory input (besides probe tones). N1 amplitude of nonstuttering speakers was reduced prior to both speaking and hearing versus the control condition. Stuttering speakers, however, showed no N1 amplitude reduction in either the speaking or hearing condition as compared with control. Thus, findings suggest that stuttering speakers have general auditory prediction difficulties. PMID:26335995

  9. Penetration of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Into General Aviation Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Birtcher, Craig R.; Georgakopoulos, Stavros V.; Panaretos, Anastasios H.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to design and achieve electromagnetic compatibility is becoming more challenging with the rapid development of new electronic products and technologies. The importance of electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) issues stems from the fact that the ambient electromagnetic environment has become very hostile; that is, it increases both in density and intensity, while the current trend in technology suggests the number of electronic devices increases in homes, businesses, factories, and transportation vehicles. Furthermore, the operating frequency of products coming into the market continuously increases. While cell phone technology has exceeded 1 GHz and Bluetooth operates at 2.4 GHz, products involving satellite communications operate near 10 GHz and automobile radar systems involve frequencies above 40 GHz. The concern about higher frequencies is that they correspond to smaller wavelengths, therefore electromagnetic waves are able to penetrate equipment enclosure through apertures or even small cracks more easily. In addition, electronic circuits have become small in size, and they are usually placed on motherboards or housed in boxes in very close proximity. Cosite interference and coupling in all electrical and electronic circuit assemblies are two essential issues that have to be examined in every design.

  10. Intestinal helminth infections amongst HIV-infected adults in Mthatha General Hospital, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Wright, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Background In South Africa, studies on the prevalence of intestinal helminth co-infection amongst HIV-infected patients as well as possible interactions between these two infections are limited. Aim To investigate the prevalence of intestinal helminth infestation amongst adults living with HIV or AIDS at Mthatha General Hospital. Setting Study participants were recruited at the outpatient department of Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between October and December 2013 amongst consecutive consenting HIV-positive adult patients. Socio-demographic and clinical information were obtained using data collection forms and structured interviews. Stool samples were collected to investigate the presence of helminths whilst blood samples were obtained for the measurement of CD4+ T-cell count and viral load. Results Data were obtained on 231 participants, with a mean age of 34.9 years, a mean CD4 count of 348 cells/µL and a mean viral load of 4.8 log10 copies/mL. Intestinal helminth prevalence was 24.7%, with Ascaris Lumbricoides (42.1%) the most prevalent identified species. Statistically significant association was found between CD4 count of less than 200 cells/µL and helminth infection (p = 0.05). No statistically significant association was found between intestinal helminth infection and the mean CD4 count (p = 0.79) or the mean viral load (p = 0.98). Conclusion A high prevalence of intestinal helminth infections was observed amongst the study population. Therefore, screening and treatment of helminths should be considered as part of the management of HIV and AIDS in primary health care. PMID:26842519

  11. Retinal Microvasculature Is Associated With Long-Term Survival in the General Adult Dutch Population.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Unal; Ikram, M Kamran; Wolters, Frank J; Hofman, Albert; Klaver, Caroline C W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-02-01

    Retinal vascular diameters are associated with (sub)clinical cardiovascular disease and short-term cardiovascular mortality, but their association with long-term mortality is uncertain. We studied the association of retinal vascular diameters with cause-specific mortality in the general adult Dutch population during 25 years of follow-up. From 1990 to 1993, arteriolar and venular diameters were measured semiautomatically on digitized images in 5674 persons (mean age 68.0 years, 59% women) from the population-based Rotterdam study. Follow-up for mortality was complete till March 2015. Associations between vascular diameters and mortality were examined using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and the fellow vessel diameter. During 85 770 person-years (mean±SD: 15.1±6.67), 3794 (66.8%) persons died, of whom 1034 due to cardiovascular causes. We found that narrower arterioles and wider venules were associated with higher risk of mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] per SD decrease 1.04 [1.00-1.08] and increase 1.07 [1.03-1.12], respectively). For arterioles, these associations were strongest for cardiovascular mortality, whereas venules showed consistent associations for cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality. Importantly, these associations remained unchanged after excluding the first 10 years of follow-up as immortal person-time. We found evidence for effect modification with stronger associations in persons <70 years (venules only) and smokers (P value for interaction<0.01). We replicated our findings in another independent cohort from the Rotterdam Study of 3106 persons with 19 880 person-years of follow-up and 144 deaths (hazard ratio for venules 1.22 [1.00-1.49]). Markers of retinal microvasculature are associated with long-term mortality in the general adult Dutch population. PMID:26628677

  12. Nightmares: Prevalence among the Finnish General Adult Population and War Veterans during 1972-2007

    PubMed Central

    Sandman, Nils; Valli, Katja; Kronholm, Erkki; Ollila, Hanna M.; Revonsuo, Antti; Laatikainen, Tiina; Paunio, Tiina

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of nightmares among the Finnish general adult population during 1972-2007 and the association between nightmare prevalence and symptoms of insomnia, depression, and anxiety in World War II veterans. Design: Eight independent cross-sectional population surveys of the National FINRISK Study conducted in Finland in 1972, 1977, 1982, 1987, 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007. Setting: Epidemiologic. Participants: A total of 69,813 people (33,811 men and 36,002 women) age 25-74 years. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The investigation of nightmare prevalence and insomnia, depression, and anxiety symptoms was based on questionnaires completed by the participants. Among the whole sample, 3.5% of the men and 4.8% of the women reported frequent nightmares (P < 0.0001 for sex difference), but the prevalence was affected by the age of participants and the year of the survey. Nightmare prevalence increased with age, particularly among the men. The number of people reporting occasional nightmares increased roughly by 20% for both sexes from 1972 to 2007 (P < 0.0001). Participants with war experiences reported more frequent nightmares and symptoms of insomnia, depression, and anxiety than participants without such experiences (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Prevalence of nightmares was affected by the sex and age of the participants, and occasional nightmares have become more common in Finland. Exposure to war elevates nightmare prevalence as well as insomnia, depression, and anxiety symptoms even decades after the war; large numbers of war veterans can affect nightmare prevalence on population level. Citation: Sandman N; Valli K; Kronholm E; Ollila HM; Revonsuo A; Laatikainen T; Paunio T. Nightmares: prevalence among the Finnish general adult population and war veterans during 1972-2007. SLEEP 2013;36(7):1041-1050. PMID:23814341

  13. On-FarmWelfare Assessment Protocol for Adult Dairy Goats in Intensive Production Systems.

    PubMed

    Battini, Monica; Stilwell, George; Vieira, Ana; Barbieri, Sara; Canali, Elisabetta; Mattiello, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Within the European AWIN project, a protocol for assessing dairy goats' welfareon the farm was developed. Starting from a literature review, a prototype includinganimal-based indicators covering four welfare principles and 12 welfare criteria was set up.The prototype was tested in 60 farms for validity, reliability, and feasibility. After testing theprototype, a two-level assessment protocol was proposed in order to increase acceptabilityamong stakeholders. The first level offers a more general overview of the welfare status,based on group assessment of a few indicators (e.g., hair coat condition, latency to thefirst contact test, severe lameness, Qualitative Behavior Assessment), with no or minimalhandling of goats and short assessment time required. The second level starts if welfareAnimals 2015, 5 935problems are encountered in the first level and adds a comprehensive and detailed individualevaluation (e.g., Body Condition Score, udder asymmetry, overgrown claws), supported byan effective sampling strategy. The assessment can be carried out using the AWIN Goatapp. The app results in a clear visual output, which provides positive feedback on welfareconditions in comparison with a benchmark of a reference population. The protocol maybe a valuable tool for both veterinarians and technicians and a self-assessment instrumentfor farmers. PMID:26479477

  14. A comparison of the spatial dependence of body mass index among adults and children in a Swiss general population

    PubMed Central

    Guessous, I; Joost, S; Jeannot, E; Theler, J-M; Mahler, P; Gaspoz, J-M; Cantoreggi, Nicola; Chételat, Joël; Simos, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Background: Body mass index (BMI) may cluster in space among adults and be spatially dependent. Whether BMI clusters among children and how age-specific BMI clusters are related remains unknown. We aimed to identify and compare the spatial dependence of BMI in adults and children in a Swiss general population, taking into account the area's income level. Methods: Geo-referenced data from the Bus Santé study (adults, n=6663) and Geneva School Health Service (children, n=3601) were used. We implemented global (Moran's I) and local (local indicators of spatial association (LISA)) indices of spatial autocorrelation to investigate the spatial dependence of BMI in adults (35–74 years) and children (6–7 years). Weight and height were measured using standardized procedures. Five spatial autocorrelation classes (LISA clusters) were defined including the high–high BMI class (high BMI participant's BMI value correlated with high BMI-neighbors' mean BMI values). The spatial distributions of clusters were compared between adults and children with and without adjustment for area's income level. Results: In both adults and children, BMI was clearly not distributed at random across the State of Geneva. Both adults' and children's BMIs were associated with the mean BMI of their neighborhood. We found that the clusters of higher BMI in adults and children are located in close, yet different, areas of the state. Significant clusters of high versus low BMIs were clearly identified in both adults and children. Area's income level was associated with children's BMI clusters. Conclusions: BMI clusters show a specific spatial dependence in adults and children from the general population. Using a fine-scale spatial analytic approach, we identified life course-specific clusters that could guide tailored interventions. PMID:24614662

  15. The activity intensities reached when playing active tennis gaming relative to sedentary gaming, tennis game-play, and current activity recommendations in young adults.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, Aaron T; Arkinstall, Hayley; Dalbo, Vincent J; Humphries, Brendan J; Jennings, Cameron T; Kingsley, Michael I C

    2013-09-01

    Although active gaming is popular and can increase energy expenditure in young adults, its efficacy as a prescriptive exercise tool is not well understood. This study aimed to: (a) compare the activity intensities experienced by young adults while playing active tennis gaming with conventional sedentary gaming, tennis game-play, and current activity recommendations for health; and (b) identify changes in activity intensities across playing time. After habitualization, 10 active young adults (age: 20.2 ± 0.4 years; stature: 1.74 ± 0.03 m; body mass: 67.7 ± 3.3 kg) completed 3 experimental trials (sedentary gaming, active tennis gaming, and tennis game-play) on separate days in a randomized order. Heart rate (HR) and metabolic equivalents (METs) were averaged across 5 minutes and 10 minutes intervals, and the entire 20 minutes bout within each condition. Active gaming produced greater intensities across 5-10, 10-15, and 15-20 minutes time intervals compared with sedentary gaming (p < 0.01). Tennis game-play elicited greater HR (67 ± 5% HR(max)) and METs (5.0 ± 0.2) responses than both sedentary (40 ± 2% HR(max), 1.1 ± 0.1 METs) and active gaming (45 ± 2% HR(max), 1.4 ± 0.1 METs) (p < 0.001). Only tennis game-play produced activity intensities meeting current recommendations for health benefit. Lower HR intensities were reached across 0-5 minutes than during later time intervals during active gaming (6%) and tennis game-play (9%) (p < 0.01). Activity intensities elicited by active gaming were greater than sedentary gaming but less than tennis game-play and insufficient to contribute toward promoting and maintaining good health in young adults. These data suggest that active tennis gaming should not be recommended by exercise professionals as a substitute for actual sports participation in young adults. PMID:23238089

  16. Intensive care adult patients with severe respiratory failure caused by Influenza A (H1N1)v in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Patients with influenza A (H1N1)v infection have developed rapidly progressive lower respiratory tract disease resulting in respiratory failure. We describe the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of the first 32 persons reported to be admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to influenza A (H1N1)v infection in Spain. Methods We used medical chart reviews to collect data on ICU adult patients reported in a standardized form. Influenza A (H1N1)v infection was confirmed in specimens using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction (RT PCR) assay. Results Illness onset of the 32 patients occurred between 23 June and 31 July, 2009. The median age was 36 years (IQR = 31 - 52). Ten (31.2%) were obese, 2 (6.3%) pregnant and 16 (50%) had pre-existing medical complications. Twenty-nine (90.6%) had primary viral pneumonitis, 2 (6.3%) exacerbation of structural respiratory disease and 1 (3.1%) secondary bacterial pneumonia. Twenty-four patients (75.0%) developed multiorgan dysfunction, 7 (21.9%) received renal replacement techniques and 24 (75.0%) required mechanical ventilation. Six patients died within 28 days, with two additional late deaths. Oseltamivir administration delay ranged from 2 to 8 days after illness onset, 31.2% received high-dose (300 mg/day), and treatment duration ranged from 5 to 10 days (mean 8.0 ± 3.3). Conclusions Over a 5-week period, influenza A (H1N1)v infection led to ICU admission in 32 adult patients, with frequently observed severe hypoxemia and a relatively high case-fatality rate. Clinicians should be aware of pulmonary complications of influenza A (H1N1)v infection, particularly in pregnant and young obese but previously healthy persons. PMID:19747383

  17. A Clinical Decision Rule to Predict Adult Patients with Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage Who Do Not Require Intensive Care Unit Admission

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Daniel K.; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Echeverri, Angela; Holmes, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To derive a clinical decision rule to identify adult emergency department (ED) patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (tICH) who are at low risk for requiring critical care resources during hospitalization. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of patients (≥18 years) with tICH presenting to the ED. The need for intensive care unit (ICU) admission was defined as the presence of a critical care intervention including: intubation, neurosurgical intervention, blood product transfusion, vasopressor or inotrope administration, invasive monitoring for hemodynamic instability, emergent treatment for arrhythmia, therapeutic angiography, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The decision rule was derived using binary recursive partitioning. Results A total of 432 patients were identified (median age 48 years) of which 174 patients (40%) had a critical care intervention. We performed binary recursive partitioning with Classification and Regression Trees (CART) software to develop the clinical decision rule. Patients with a normal mental status (Glasgow Coma Score=15), isolated head injury, and age < 65 were considered low risk for a critical care intervention. The derived rule had a sensitivity of 98% (95% confidence interval [CI] 94–99), a specificity of 50% (95% CI 44–56), a positive predictive value of 57% (95% CI 51–62), and a negative predictive value of 97% (95% CI 93–99). The area under the curve for the decision rule was 0.74 (95% CI 0.70–0.77). Conclusions This clinical decision rule identifies low risk adult ED patients with tICH who do not need ICU admission. Further validation and refinement of these findings would allow for more appropriate ICU resource utilization. PMID:21839444

  18. Machiavellianism and Adult Attachment in General Interpersonal Relationships and Close Relationships.

    PubMed

    Ináncsi, Tamás; Láng, András; Bereczkei, Tamás

    2015-02-01

    Up to the present, the relationship between Machiavellianism and adult attachment has remained a question to be answered in the psychological literature. That is why this study focused on the relationship between Machiavellianism and attachment towards significant others in general interpersonal relationships and in intimate-close relationships. Two attachment tests (Relationship Questionnaire and long-form of Experiences in Close Relationship) and the Mach-IV test were conducted on a sample consisting of 185 subjects. Results have revealed that Machiavellian subjects show a dismissing-avoidant attachment style in their general interpersonal relationships, while avoidance is further accompanied by some characteristics of attachment anxiety in their intimate-close relationships. Our findings further refine the relationship between Machiavellianism and dismissing-avoidant attachment. Machiavellian individuals not only have a negative representation of significant others, but they also tend to seek symbiotic closeness in order to exploit their partners. This ambitendency in distance regulation might be particularly important in understanding the vulnerability of Machiavellian individuals. PMID:27247647

  19. Machiavellianism and Adult Attachment in General Interpersonal Relationships and Close Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Ináncsi, Tamás; Láng, András; Bereczkei, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Up to the present, the relationship between Machiavellianism and adult attachment has remained a question to be answered in the psychological literature. That is why this study focused on the relationship between Machiavellianism and attachment towards significant others in general interpersonal relationships and in intimate-close relationships. Two attachment tests (Relationship Questionnaire and long-form of Experiences in Close Relationship) and the Mach-IV test were conducted on a sample consisting of 185 subjects. Results have revealed that Machiavellian subjects show a dismissing-avoidant attachment style in their general interpersonal relationships, while avoidance is further accompanied by some characteristics of attachment anxiety in their intimate-close relationships. Our findings further refine the relationship between Machiavellianism and dismissing-avoidant attachment. Machiavellian individuals not only have a negative representation of significant others, but they also tend to seek symbiotic closeness in order to exploit their partners. This ambitendency in distance regulation might be particularly important in understanding the vulnerability of Machiavellian individuals. PMID:27247647

  20. Stacking sequence determines Raman intensities of observed interlayer shear modes in 2D layered materials - A general bond polarizability model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Cong, Chunxiao; Yu, Ting; Xiong, Qihua; Ying Quek, Su

    2015-10-01

    2D layered materials have recently attracted tremendous interest due to their fascinating properties and potential applications. The interlayer interactions are much weaker than the intralayer bonds, allowing the as-synthesized materials to exhibit different stacking sequences, leading to different physical properties. Here, we show that regardless of the space group of the 2D materials, the Raman frequencies of the interlayer shear modes observed under the typical configuration blue shift for AB stacked materials, and red shift for ABC stacked materials, as the number of layers increases. Our predictions are made using an intuitive bond polarizability model which shows that stacking sequence plays a key role in determining which interlayer shear modes lead to the largest change in polarizability (Raman intensity); the modes with the largest Raman intensity determining the frequency trends. We present direct evidence for these conclusions by studying the Raman modes in few layer graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and Bi2Se3, using both first principles calculations and Raman spectroscopy. This study sheds light on the influence of stacking sequence on the Raman intensities of intrinsic interlayer modes in 2D layered materials in general, and leads to a practical way of identifying the stacking sequence in these materials.

  1. A facile and general route to synthesize silica-coated SERS tags with the enhanced signal intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youlin; Li, Xiaokun; Xue, Bin; Kong, Xianggui; Liu, Xiaomin; Tu, Langping; Chang, Yulei

    2015-10-01

    Silica-coated SERS tags have been attracting greater attention in recent years. However, the reported methods to synthesize these tags are tedious, and often subjected to the limited signal intensity. Here, we report a facile and general method to prepare the silica-coated Ag SERS tags with the enhanced signal intensity by no introducing the primers. This approach mainly depends on the colloidal stability of the Ag NPs in alcohol solution. By decreasing the concentration of salt in Ag NP solution, the citrate-stabilized Ag NPs can be well dispersed in alcohol solution. Based on this, the Ag SERS tags can be directly coated with thickness-controlled and homogeneous silica shells. This approach is highly reproducible for silica shell growth and signal intensity, not depending on the properties of Raman molecules, proved by 7 kinds of the Raman molecules. Moreover, this kind of SERS tags coated with silica hold the stronger SERS signals than the traditional method due to no interference from the priming molecules.

  2. A facile and general route to synthesize silica-coated SERS tags with the enhanced signal intensity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youlin; Li, Xiaokun; Xue, Bin; Kong, Xianggui; Liu, Xiaomin; Tu, Langping; Chang, Yulei

    2015-01-01

    Silica-coated SERS tags have been attracting greater attention in recent years. However, the reported methods to synthesize these tags are tedious, and often subjected to the limited signal intensity. Here, we report a facile and general method to prepare the silica-coated Ag SERS tags with the enhanced signal intensity by no introducing the primers. This approach mainly depends on the colloidal stability of the Ag NPs in alcohol solution. By decreasing the concentration of salt in Ag NP solution, the citrate-stabilized Ag NPs can be well dispersed in alcohol solution. Based on this, the Ag SERS tags can be directly coated with thickness-controlled and homogeneous silica shells. This approach is highly reproducible for silica shell growth and signal intensity, not depending on the properties of Raman molecules, proved by 7 kinds of the Raman molecules. Moreover, this kind of SERS tags coated with silica hold the stronger SERS signals than the traditional method due to no interference from the priming molecules. PMID:26450559

  3. Effectiveness of Guided and Unguided Low-Intensity Internet Interventions for Adult Alcohol Misuse: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riper, Heleen; Blankers, Matthijs; Hadiwijaya, Hana; Cunningham, John; Clarke, Stella; Wiers, Reinout; Ebert, David; Cuijpers, Pim

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol misuse ranks within the top ten health conditions with the highest global burden of disease. Low-intensity, Internet interventions for curbing adult alcohol misuse have been shown effective. Few meta-analyses have been carried out, however, and they have involved small numbers of studies, lacked indicators of drinking within low risk guidelines, and examined the effectiveness of unguided self-help only. We therefore conducted a more thorough meta-analysis that included both guided and unguided interventions. Methods Systematic literature searches were performed up to September 2013. Primary outcome was the mean level of alcohol consumption and drinking within low risk guidelines for alcohol consumption at post-treatment. Findings We selected 16 randomised controlled trials (with 23 comparisons and 5,612 participants) for inclusion. Results, showed a small but significant overall effect size in favour of Internet interventions (g = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.13–0.27, p<.001). Participants in Internet interventions drunk on average 22 grams of ethanol less than controls and were significantly more likely to be adhering to low-risk drinking guidelines at post-treatment (RD 0.13, 95% CI: 0.09–0.17, p<.001). Subgroup analyses revealed no significant differences in potential moderators for the outcome of alcohol consumption, although there was a near-significant difference between comparisons with waitlist control and those with assessment-only or alcohol information control conditions (p = .056). Conclusions Internet interventions are effective in reducing adult alcohol consumption and inducing alcohol users to adhere to guidelines for low-risk drinking. This effect is small but from a public health point of view this may warrant large scale implementation at low cost of Internet interventions for adult alcohol misuse. Moderator analyses with sufficient power are, however, needed in order to assess the robustness of these overall results and to

  4. Brain Responses before and after Intensive Second Language Learning: Proficiency Based Changes and First Language Background Effects in Adult Learners

    PubMed Central

    White, Erin Jacquelyn; Genesee, Fred; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study tracked the neuro-cognitive changes associated with second language (L2) grammar learning in adults in order to investigate how L2 processing is shaped by a learner’s first language (L1) background and L2 proficiency. Previous studies using event-related potentials (ERPs) have argued that late L2 learners cannot elicit a P600 in response to L2 grammatical structures that do not exist in the L1 or that are different in the L1 and L2. We tested whether the neuro-cognitive processes underlying this component become available after intensive L2 instruction. Korean- and Chinese late-L2-learners of English were tested at the beginning and end of a 9-week intensive English-L2 course. ERPs were recorded while participants read English sentences containing violations of regular past tense (a grammatical structure that operates differently in Korean and does not exist in Chinese). Whereas no P600 effects were present at the start of instruction, by the end of instruction, significant P600s were observed for both L1 groups. Latency differences in the P600 exhibited by Chinese and Korean speakers may be attributed to differences in L1–L2 reading strategies. Across all participants, larger P600 effects at session 2 were associated with: 1) higher levels of behavioural performance on an online grammaticality judgment task; and 2) with correct, rather than incorrect, behavioural responses. These findings suggest that the neuro-cognitive processes underlying the P600 (e.g., “grammaticalization”) are modulated by individual levels of L2 behavioural performance and learning. PMID:23300641

  5. Brain responses before and after intensive second language learning: proficiency based changes and first language background effects in adult learners.

    PubMed

    White, Erin Jacquelyn; Genesee, Fred; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study tracked the neuro-cognitive changes associated with second language (L2) grammar learning in adults in order to investigate how L2 processing is shaped by a learner's first language (L1) background and L2 proficiency. Previous studies using event-related potentials (ERPs) have argued that late L2 learners cannot elicit a P600 in response to L2 grammatical structures that do not exist in the L1 or that are different in the L1 and L2. We tested whether the neuro-cognitive processes underlying this component become available after intensive L2 instruction. Korean- and Chinese late-L2-learners of English were tested at the beginning and end of a 9-week intensive English-L2 course. ERPs were recorded while participants read English sentences containing violations of regular past tense (a grammatical structure that operates differently in Korean and does not exist in Chinese). Whereas no P600 effects were present at the start of instruction, by the end of instruction, significant P600s were observed for both L1 groups. Latency differences in the P600 exhibited by Chinese and Korean speakers may be attributed to differences in L1-L2 reading strategies. Across all participants, larger P600 effects at session 2 were associated with: 1) higher levels of behavioural performance on an online grammaticality judgment task; and 2) with correct, rather than incorrect, behavioural responses. These findings suggest that the neuro-cognitive processes underlying the P600 (e.g., "grammaticalization") are modulated by individual levels of L2 behavioural performance and learning. PMID:23300641

  6. Effect of Exercise Intensity on Percent Body Fat Determined by Leg-to-Leg and Segmental Bioelectrical Impedance Analyses in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreacci, Joseph L.; Nagle, Trisha; Fitzgerald, Elise; Rawson, Eric S.; Dixon, Curt B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the impact that cycle ergometry exercise had on percent body fat (%BF) estimates when assessed using either leg-to-leg or segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis (LBIA; SBIA) and whether the intensity of the exercise bout impacts the %BF magnitude of change. Method: Seventy-four college-aged adults participated in this…

  7. Pregabalin: a review of its use in adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2014-09-01

    Pregabalin (Lyrica(®)), a well established anxiolytic agent, has been approved in the EU for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in adults. It has a distinct mechanism of action relative to other anti-anxiety agents (α2δ binding at presynaptic voltage dependent calcium channels leading to inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission), a rapid onset of effect (typically ≤1 week) and broad spectrum activity against both the psychic and somatic symptoms of GAD. In long-term studies, pregabalin maintained improvements in anxiety symptoms that occurred in response to short-term treatment and delayed the time to relapse of GAD compared with placebo. Common comorbidities of GAD, such as insomnia, gastrointestinal symptoms and subsyndromal depression, have no effect on the anxiolytic efficacy of, and moreover are specifically improved by, pregabalin. Treatment with pregabalin is generally well tolerated; the drug has an adverse event profile that includes dizziness, somnolence and weight gain. The potential for abuse of pregabalin is low; the risk of withdrawal symptoms is generally low when the drug is discontinued gradually (over 1 week). Alongside selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), pregabalin is considered a first-line agent for the long-term treatment of GAD by the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry. It should be stressed, however, that definitive head-to-head studies comparing pregabalin with SSRI/SNRIs, including in patients with GAD and co-morbid major depressive disorder, are currently lacking. Recently, a study of SSRI/SNRI augmentation with pregabalin yielded positive results, while another study of switching from long-term benzodiazepine therapy to pregabalin was inconclusive; further investigations on these topics are warranted. PMID:25149863

  8. Hippocampal structure, metabolism, and inflammatory response after a 6-week intense aerobic exercise in healthy young adults: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd; Herbsleb, Marco; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Schumann, Andy; Brünner, Franziska; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Gussew, Alexander; Puta, Christian; Smesny, Stefan; Gabriel, Holger W; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Interventional studies suggest that changes in physical fitness affect brain function and structure. We studied the influence of high intensity physical exercise on hippocampal volume and metabolism in 17 young healthy male adults during a 6-week exercise program compared with matched controls. We further aimed to relate these changes to hypothesized changes in exercised-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We show profound improvement of physical fitness in most subjects and a positive correlation between the degree of fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels. We unexpectedly observed an average volume decrease of about 2%, which was restricted to right hippocampal subfields CA2/3, subiculum, and dentate gyrus and which correlated with fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels negatively. This result indicates that mainly those subjects who did not benefit from the exercise program show decreased hippocampal volume, reduced BDNF levels, and increased TNF-α concentrations. While spectroscopy results do not indicate any neuronal loss (unchanged N-acetylaspartate levels) decreased glutamate-glutamine levels were observed in the right anterior hippocampus in the exercise group only. Responder characteristics need to be studied in more detail. Our results point to an important role of the inflammatory response after exercise on changes in hippocampal structure. PMID:26082010

  9. Sex differences in the effects of mental work and moderate-intensity physical activity on energy intake in young adults.

    PubMed

    Pérusse-Lachance, Emilie; Brassard, Patrice; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Drapeau, Vicky; Teasdale, Normand; Sénécal, Caroline; Tremblay, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of mental work and moderate-intensity physical activity on various components of energy balance in young and healthy adults. With the use of a randomized crossover design, 35 participants aged 24 ± 3 years completed three 45-min conditions, namely, (i) resting in a sitting position (control), (ii) reading and writing (mental work (MW)), and (iii) exercising on a treadmill at 40% of peak oxygen uptake (exercise), followed by an ad libitum lunch. The endpoints were spontaneous energy intake (EI), energy expenditure (EE), appetite sensations, and EI for the remainder of the day. We observed that the energy cost of the control and MW conditions was about the same whereas the exercise condition increased EE to a greater extent in men than women. Exercise induced a decrease in EI relative to EE compared to the control condition that was more pronounced in men than women. However, women tended to increase their energy intake after the MW condition compared to the control one whereas an opposite trend was observed in men. None of the appetite sensation markers differed significantly between both sexes. In conclusion, men and women have specific food intake patterns when submitted to cognitive and physical stimuli. PMID:24967260

  10. Sex Differences in the Effects of Mental Work and Moderate-Intensity Physical Activity on Energy Intake in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Drapeau, Vicky; Sénécal, Caroline; Tremblay, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of mental work and moderate-intensity physical activity on various components of energy balance in young and healthy adults. With the use of a randomized crossover design, 35 participants aged 24 ± 3 years completed three 45-min conditions, namely, (i) resting in a sitting position (control), (ii) reading and writing (mental work (MW)), and (iii) exercising on a treadmill at 40% of peak oxygen uptake (exercise), followed by an ad libitum lunch. The endpoints were spontaneous energy intake (EI), energy expenditure (EE), appetite sensations, and EI for the remainder of the day. We observed that the energy cost of the control and MW conditions was about the same whereas the exercise condition increased EE to a greater extent in men than women. Exercise induced a decrease in EI relative to EE compared to the control condition that was more pronounced in men than women. However, women tended to increase their energy intake after the MW condition compared to the control one whereas an opposite trend was observed in men. None of the appetite sensation markers differed significantly between both sexes. In conclusion, men and women have specific food intake patterns when submitted to cognitive and physical stimuli. PMID:24967260

  11. Treatment of ununited femoral neck fractures in young adults using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound: Report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Delayed union and non-union of displaced femoral neck fractures remains a difficult clinical problem for orthopaedic surgeons. In the physiologically young patient, every effort should be made to preserve the native hip joint. We present two cases of ununited femoral neck fractures in young adults who were successfully treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and showed satisfactory results. Presentation of case 1 A 41-year-old woman was involved in a motor vehicle crash and was diagnosed with displaced femoral neck fracture. Eleven months after internal fixation, a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed the presence of non-union of the femoral neck. LIPUS treatment was therefore initiated. After eight months, the fracture was completely consolidated. Presentation of case 2 A 39-year-old man was involved in a cycling accident and was diagnosed with displaced femoral neck fracture. Thirteen weeks after internal fixation, a CT scan revealed delayed union of the femoral neck. LIPUS treatment was therefore initiated. After six months, the fracture was completely consolidated. Conclusion We suggest use of LIPUS as a possible treatment approach for delayed union and non-union of displaced femoral neck fractures in young patients before considering further surgical intervention. PMID:26942332

  12. Use of novel psychoactive substances by inpatients on general adult psychiatric wards

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jack L; Mogford, Daniel V; Lawrence, Rebecca J; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Non-illicit alternatives to controlled drugs, known as novel psychoactive substances (NPS), have recently risen to prominence. They are readily available, with uncertain pharmacology and no widely available assay. Given that psychiatric patients are at risk of comorbid substance abuse, we hypothesised that NPS use would be present in the psychiatric population, and sought to determine its prevalence and investigate the characteristics of those who use these drugs with a retrospective review of discharge letters. Setting General adult inpatient wards of a psychiatric hospital in a Scottish city. Participants All adult inpatients (18–65) discharged from general psychiatric wards between 1 July 2014 and 31 December 2014. Of the 483 admissions identified, 46 were admissions for maintenance electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and were excluded. Of the remaining 437 admissions, 49 discharge letters were unobtainable, leaving 388 admissions to analyse. Primary outcome measure The mention, or lack thereof, of NPS use in discharge letters was our planned primary outcome measure and was also the primary outcome measure we used in our analysis. Results NPS use was identified in 22.2% of admissions, contributing to psychiatric symptoms in 59.3%. In comparison to non-users, NPS users were younger (p<0.01), male and more likely to have a forensic history ((p<0.001) for both). The diagnosis of drug-induced psychosis was significantly more likely in NPS users (p<0.001, OR 18.7, 95% CI 8.1 to 43.0) and the diagnosis of depression was significantly less likely (p<0.005, OR 0.133, CI 0.031 to 0.558). Use of cannabis was significantly more likely in NPS users (p<0.001, OR 4.2, CI 2.5 to 7.1), as was substitute opiate prescribing (p<0.001, OR 3.7, CI 1.8 to 7.4). Conclusions NPS use was prevalent among young, male psychiatric inpatients, in particular those with drug-induced psychosis and often occurred alongside illicit drug use. PMID:27165643

  13. Mouthwash Use in General Population: Results from Adult Dental Health Survey in Grampian, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Kawecki, Michal M.; Cunningham, Claudia; Bovaird, Iain; Morgan, Rochelle; Rhodes, Kirstin; Watkins, Ray

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the pattern of mouthwash use and to investigate the associated factors in general population. Material and Methods An Adult Dental Health Survey was conducted on 3,022 residents of Grampian region of Scotland (adjusted participation rate 58.2%). Participants received a questionnaire consisting of questions on oral health and behavioural factors. Results The majority of participants (38.1%) have never used mouthwash, 17.5% used mouthwash less than once a month, 19.4% used mouthwash once every few days and 25.1% used mouthwash daily. Prevalence of use decreased with age (P < 0.001). Woman were more likely to use mouthwash than men (P = 0.004). Mouthwash use decreased with decrease in the level of deprivation (P < 0.001). Never-smokers were less likely to use mouthwash (40.3%) compared to smokers (53.1%) or those who stopped smoking (46.5%) (P < 0.001). Mouthwash was used by smaller proportion of people drinking alcohol on daily basis (36.6%), than by abstainers (42.2%) (P = 0.012). There was a positive relationship between flossing or brushing pattern and mouthwash use (P < 0.001). There was statistically significant relationship between mouthwash use and reasons for the last dental visit (P = 0.009). When compared to healthy individuals, mouthwash was used by higher proportion of people reporting that they had gum disease (P = 0.001), ulcers (P = 0.001), oral infections or swelling (P = 0.002) or other problems (P = 0.025). Conclusions Mouthwash use in general population is associated with socio-demographic, health and behavioural factors. PMID:24421979

  14. Axis II disorders and cigarette smoking among adults from the general population.

    PubMed

    Becoña, Elisardo; Fernández del Río, Elena; López-Durán, Ana; Piñeiro, Bárbara; Martínez, Úrsula

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined whether personality disorders (PDs) are associated with cigarette smoking, and the possible influence of nicotine dependence, sociodemographic variables, and the presence of any lifetime Axis I mental disorder in these relationships. The sample was made up of 1,081 adult participants from the Spanish general population and was stratified by smoking status (519 smokers and 562 nonsmokers). PDs were assessed by means of the International Personality Disorder Examination Questionnaire, Module DSM-IV. Results indicated that participants with a paranoid, a narcissistic, a borderline, an antisocial, or an obsessive-compulsive PD had a higher probability for being smokers and for being nicotine-dependent. The only exception was the schizoid PD, because participants with this Axis II disorder had a lower probability for being nicotine-dependent smokers. The association between PDs and smoking was maintained even after adjusting for all covariates. Findings are discussed in relation to the influence of Axis II disorders on smoking cessation interventions. PMID:22928853

  15. Effects of Social Reinforcement Contingent on Conventional or Unconventional Responses on Generalized Creativity by Older Adults in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polenick, Courtney Allyn; Flora, Stephen Ray

    2012-01-01

    The effects of social praise contingent on either usual (conventional) or unusual (unconventional) responses during an object uses task were assessed on measures of generalized creativity in two novel, unrelated tasks. Participants were 20 older adults, ages 63 to 89 years (M = 80.90), who were recruited from a joint skilled nursing and assisted…

  16. CIRCULAR INTENSITY DIFFERENTIAL SCATTERING OF LIGHT BY HELICAL STRUCTURES. III. A GENERAL POLARIZABILITY TENSOR AND ANOMALOUS SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Bustamante, Carlos; Maestre, Marcos F.; Tinoco, Jr., Ignacio

    1980-11-01

    Numerical calculations of the circular intensity differential scattering of light by oriented helical structures made of units with general polarizability tensors are presented. The effects on the scattering patterns of both absorptive and dispersive properties of the units are illustrated. The differential scattering and the total scattering both show anomalous scattering phenomena; the differential scattering pattern is asymmetric when the wavelength of incident light is within an absorption band. Equations for bi-axial polarizabilities are used to derive the symmetry properties of the differential scattering pattern and to show how this symmetry can be used to determine the right- or left-handed sense of the helical structure. The wavelength dependence of the scattering pattern is obtained for a Lorentzian polarizability.

  17. Intensive Lifestyle Intervention Improves Physical Function Among Obese Adults With Knee Pain: Findings From the Look AHEAD Trial

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Capri G.; Lewis, Cora E.; Hairston, Kristen G.; Miller, Gary D.; Lang, Wei; Jakicic, John M.; Rejeski, W. Jack; Ribisl, Paul M.; Walkup, Michael P.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.

    2011-01-01

    Lifestyle interventions have resulted in weight loss or improved physical fitness among individuals with obesity, which may lead to improved physical function. This prospective investigation involved participants in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial who reported knee pain at baseline (n = 2,203). The purposes of this investigation were to determine whether an Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI) condition resulted in improvement in self-reported physical function from baseline to 12 months vs. a Diabetes Support and Education (DSE) condition, and whether changes in weight or fitness mediated the effect of the ILI. Outcome measures included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, stiffness, and physical function subscales, and WOMAC summary score. ILI participants exhibited greater adjusted mean weight loss (s.e.) vs. DSE participants (−9.02 kg (0.48) vs. −0.78 kg (0.49); P < 0.001)). ILI participants also demonstrated more favorable change in WOMAC summary scores vs. DSE participants (β (s.e.) = −1.81 (0.63); P = 0.004). Multiple regression mediation analyses revealed that weight loss was a mediator of the effect of the ILI intervention on change in WOMAC pain, function, and summary scores (P < 0.001). In separate analyses, increased fitness also mediated the effect of the ILI intervention upon WOMAC summary score (P < 0.001). The ILI condition resulted in significant improvement in physical function among overweight and obese adults with diabetes and knee pain. The ILI condition also resulted in significant weight loss and improved fitness, which are possible mechanisms through which the ILI condition improved physical function. PMID:20559303

  18. Frequency of Intensive Care Unit admission after elective interventional neuroradiological procedures under general anesthesia in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Faisal; Asghar, Ali; Karam, Karima

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) after elective interventional neuroradiology (INR) procedures under general anesthesia. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 121 patients underwent INR procedures performed with general anesthesia within a 5-year period. Information including demographics, aneurysm/arteriovenous malformations pathology (ruptured or un-ruptured), preoperative neurological status, co-morbidities, complications during procedure and postoperative admission in ICU were recorded on a predesigned form. Results: Elective INR procedure for both ruptured (n = 29, 24%) and un-ruptured (n = 85, 70.25%) aneurysms was performed. Rate of postoperative admission in ICU was significantly high in patients with preoperative ruptured aneurysm (P < 0.01). High rate of neurological deficit, sub-arachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and hypertension in patients were significant factors of postoperative admission in ICU (P < 0.05). Out of 24 patients, 12 were admitted to ICU postoperatively because of procedure-related complications and 11 were sent due to preexisting significant co-morbidities with added complication of SAH. Conclusion: The authors conclude that patients without major co-morbidities, intraoperative complications, or complex aneurysm morphology can be safely observed in a regular ward rather than being admitted to the ICU. PMID:25558194

  19. Comparative Cost-Effectiveness of Conservative or Intensive Blood Pressure Treatment Guidelines in Adults Aged 35-74 Years: The Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model.

    PubMed

    Moise, Nathalie; Huang, Chen; Rodgers, Anthony; Kohli-Lynch, Ciaran N; Tzong, Keane Y; Coxson, Pamela G; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Goldman, Lee; Moran, Andrew E

    2016-07-01

    The population health effect and cost-effectiveness of implementing intensive blood pressure goals in high-cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk adults have not been described. Using the CVD Policy Model, CVD events, treatment costs, quality-adjusted life years, and drug and monitoring costs were simulated over 2016 to 2026 for hypertensive patients aged 35 to 74 years. We projected the effectiveness and costs of hypertension treatment according to the 2003 Joint National Committee (JNC)-7 or 2014 JNC8 guidelines, and then for adults aged ≥50 years, we assessed the cost-effectiveness of adding an intensive goal of systolic blood pressure <120 mm Hg for patients with CVD, chronic kidney disease, or 10-year CVD risk ≥15%. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios <$50 000 per quality-adjusted life years gained were considered cost-effective. JNC7 strategies treat more patients and are more costly to implement compared with JNC8 strategies. Adding intensive systolic blood pressure goals for high-risk patients prevents an estimated 43 000 and 35 000 annual CVD events incremental to JNC8 and JNC7, respectively. Intensive strategies save costs in men and are cost-effective in women compared with JNC8 alone. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50 000 per quality-adjusted life years gained, JNC8+intensive had the highest probability of cost-effectiveness in women (82%) and JNC7+intensive the highest probability of cost-effectiveness in men (100%). Assuming higher drug and monitoring costs, adding intensive goals for high-risk patients remained consistently cost-effective in men, but not always in women. Among patients aged 35 to 74 years, adding intensive blood pressure goals for high-risk groups to current national hypertension treatment guidelines prevents additional CVD deaths while saving costs provided that medication costs are controlled. PMID:27181996

  20. [Japanese adults' general beliefs about changes in the ability to remember from childhood to old age as measured by the General Beliefs about Memory Instrument (GBMI)].

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Hikari; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    This study examined and compared beliefs about the ability to remember of three groups of adults: 99 young, 97 middle-aged, and 104 older adults. The beliefs were assessed by asking participants to indicate the expected trajectory over the lifespan on a graphic rating scale, the General Beliefs about Memory Instrument (GBMI) (Lineweaver & Hertzog, 1998). The results showed the following. Although all age groups expect a decline in the ability to remember with age with the peak around 20-30 years old, older adults perceive an age-related sharp decline later in life than the other age groups do. All age groups perceive that remembering names is more affected by age than any other memory abilities. The trajectory of age decline in remembering in general coincides with that in remembering trivia. All age groups believe that the ability to remember at the age of 10 is as good as at the age of 40. All age groups responded to the scales based mainly on the abilities based on their experiences. PMID:23379080

  1. Acute rhinosinusitis (ARS). Diagnosis and treatment of adults in general practice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jens Georg

    2014-02-01

    The idea behind this thesis is to present how ARS and especially acute maxillary sinusitis in adults is diagnosed and treated in general practice. The study extends over many years, beginning with the first survey in 1991. Based on doctors' answers, we then investigated the diagnostic values ​​of the symptoms, signs and examinations which the doctors reported using. All patients over 18 years suspected of acute maxillary sinusitis were included consecutively and only once and, after a clinical examination with the GP, they were offered the opportunity to enter into the prospective study referred to acute CT scan and by changes in the CT, immediately referred to sinus puncture. Both examinations were conducted at Aalborg Hospital. The disease was found most frequently in younger and 2/3 were women. The reason for this gender difference is unknown. We have assessed the diagnostic values of the symptoms, objective findings and investigations ​​using 3 different reference standards: sinus puncture, microbiological diagnosis and CT scan described in three articles. In all examinations, it appeared that the usual signs and symptoms of acute maxillary sinusitis occur almost equally often and with a few exceptions in patients, with and without pus in the sinus cavities. Pain in the sinus cavities occurring in 95% of patients, and only elevated levels of CRP and ESR are significantly and independently associated with pus in the sinus cavities. This finding is surprising, because they are two nonspecific markers. CRP tested by near-patient testing has, within the investigations period, been introduced in general practice, and from 1999 the doctors also get reimbursed for performing the test. We have on this background originally defined a clinical criterion with pain over the sinuses accompanied by elevated values ​​of CRP and/or ESR giving a sensitivity of 0.82, specificity 0.57, ppv 0.68 and npv 0.74. But looking at the ROC curve we suggest that a more clinical

  2. Physical, lifestyle, psychological, and social determinants of pain intensity, pain disability, and the number of pain locations in depressed older adults.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, Denise J C; Naarding, Paul; Collard, Rose M; Comijs, Hannie C; Oude Voshaar, Richard C

    2014-10-01

    Late-life depression and pain more often co-occur than can be explained by chance. Determinants of pain in late-life depression are unknown, even though knowledge on possible determinants of pain in depression is important for clinical practice. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were 1) to describe pain characteristics of depressed older adults and a nondepressed comparison group, and 2) to explore physical, lifestyle, psychological, and social determinants of acute and chronic pain intensity, disability, and multisite pain in depressed older adults. Data from the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons cohort, consisting of 378 depressed persons, diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition criteria, and 132 nondepressed persons aged 60 years and older, were used in a cross-sectional design. Pain characteristics were measured by the Chronic Graded Pain Scale. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to explore the contribution of physical, lifestyle, psychological, and social determinants to outcomes pain intensity, disability, and the number of pain locations. Depressed older adults more often reported chronic pain and experienced their pain as more intense and disabling compared to nondepressed older adults. Adjusted for demographic, physical, and lifestyle characteristics, multinomial logistic regression analyses showed increased odds ratios (OR) for depression in acute pain (OR 3.010; P=0.005) and chronic pain (OR 4.544, P<0.001). In addition, linear regression analyses showed that acute and chronic pain intensity, disability, and multisite pain were associated with several biopsychosocial determinants, of which anxiety was most pronounced. Further research could focus on the temporal relationship between anxiety, late-life depression, and pain. PMID:25072890

  3. The outcome of full-intensity and reduced-intensity conditioning matched sibling or unrelated donor transplantation in adults with Philadelphia chromosome–negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first and second complete remission

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David I.; Wang, Tao; Pérez, Waleska S.; Antin, Joseph H.; Copelan, Edward; Gale, Robert Peter; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Halter, Joerg; Khoury, H. Jean; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Lewis, Victor A.; McCarthy, Philip; Rizzieri, David A.; Sabloff, Mitchell; Szer, Jeff; Tallman, Martin S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and compared outcomes of 93 patients older than 16 years after RIC with 1428 patients receiving full-intensity conditioning for allografts using sibling and unrelated donors for Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in first or second complete remission. RIC conditioning included busulfan 9 mg/kg or less (27), melphalan 150 mg/m2 or less (23), low-dose total body irradiation (TBI; 36), and others (7). The RIC group was older (median 45 vs 28 years, P < .001) and more received peripheral blood grafts (73% vs 43%, P < .001) but had similar other prognostic factors. The RIC versus full-intensity conditioning groups had slightly, but not significantly, less acute grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease (39% vs 46%) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (34% vs 42%), yet similar transplantation-related mortality. RIC led to slightly more relapse (35% vs 26%, P = .08) yet similar age-adjusted survival (38% vs 43%, P = .39). Multivariate analysis showed that conditioning intensity did not affect transplantation-related mortality (P = .92) or relapse risk (P = .14). Multivariate analysis demonstrated significantly improved overall survival with: Karnofsky performance status more than 80, first complete remission, lower white blood count, well-matched unrelated or sibling donors, transplantation since 2001, age younger than 30 years, and conditioning with TBI, but no independent impact of conditioning intensity. RIC merits further investigation in prospective trials of adult ALL. PMID:20404137

  4. Streaming Physiological Data: General Public Perceptions of Secondary Use and Application to Research in Neonatal Intensive Care.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Carolyn; Heath, Jennifer; Choi, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    High speed physiological data represents one of the most untapped resources in healthcare today and is a form of Big Data. Physiological data is captured and displayed on a wide range of devices in healthcare environments. Frequently this data is transitory and lost once initially displayed. Researchers wish to store and analyze these datasets, however, there is little evidence of any engagement with citizens regarding their perceptions of physiological data capture for secondary use. This paper presents the findings of a self-administered household survey (n=165, response rate = 34%) that investigated Australian and Canadian citizens' perceptions of such physiological data capture and re-use. Results indicate general public support for the secondary use of physiological streaming data. Discussion considers the potential application of such data in neonatal intensive care contexts in relation to our Artemis research. Consideration of the perceptions of secondary use of the streaming data as early as possible will assist in building appropriate use models, with a focus on parents in the neonatal context. PMID:26262091

  5. The Effect of Training Intensity on VO2max in Young Healthy Adults: A Meta-Regression and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    SCRIBBANS, TRISHA D.; VECSEY, STEPHAN; HANKINSON, PAUL B.; FOSTER, WILLIAM S.; GURD, BRENDON J.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training at a variety of intensities increases maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), the strongest predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review, meta-regression and meta-analysis of available literature to determine if a dose-response relationship exists between exercise intensity and training-induced increases in VO2max in young healthy adults. Twenty-eight studies involving human participants (Mean age: 23±1 yr; Mean VO2max: 3.4±0.8 l·min−1) were included in the meta-regression with exercise training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max, and total training volume used as covariates. These studies were also divided into 3 tertiles based on intensity (tertile 1: ~60–70%; 2: ~80–92.5%; 3: ~100–250%VO2max), for comparison using separate meta-analyses. The fixed and random effects meta-regression models examining training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max and total training volume was non-significant (Q4=1.36; p=0.85; R2=0.05). There was no significant difference between tertiles in mean change in VO2max (tertile 1:+0.29±0.15 l/min, ES (effect size) =0.77; 2:+0.26±0.10 l/min, ES=0.68; 3:+0.35±0.17 l/min, ES=0.80), despite significant (p<0.05) reductions in session dose and total training volume as training intensity increased. These data suggest that exercise training intensity has no effect on the magnitude of training-induced increases in maximal oxygen uptake in young healthy human participants, but similar adaptations can be achieved in low training doses at higher exercise intensities than higher training doses of lower intensity (endurance training). PMID:27182424

  6. Renal replacement therapy in adult and pediatric intensive care : Recommendations by an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Society of Anesthesia Intensive Care (SFAR) French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP) the French Dialysis Society (SFD).

    PubMed

    Vinsonneau, Christophe; Allain-Launay, Emma; Blayau, Clarisse; Darmon, Michael; Ducheyron, Damien; Gaillot, Theophile; Honore, Patrick M; Javouhey, Etienne; Krummel, Thierry; Lahoche, Annie; Letacon, Serge; Legrand, Matthieu; Monchi, Mehran; Ridel, Christophe; Robert, René; Schortgen, Frederique; Souweine, Bertrand; Vaillant, Patrick; Velly, Lionel; Osman, David; Van Vong, Ly

    2015-12-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in critically ill patients is currently very frequent and requires renal replacement therapy (RRT) in many patients. During the last 15 years, several studies have considered important issues regarding the use of RRT in ARF, like the time to initiate the therapy, the dialysis dose, the types of catheter, the choice of technique, and anticoagulation. However, despite an abundant literature, conflicting results do not provide evidence on RRT implementation. We present herein recommendations for the use of RRT in adult and pediatric intensive care developed with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system by an expert group of French Intensive Care Society (SRLF), with the participation of the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies (GFRUP), and the French Dialysis Society (SFD). The recommendations cover 4 fields: criteria for RRT initiation, technical aspects (access routes, membranes, anticoagulation, reverse osmosis water), practical aspects (choice of the method, peritoneal dialysis, dialysis dose, adjustments), and safety (procedures and training, dialysis catheter management, extracorporeal circuit set-up). These recommendations have been designed on a practical point of view to provide guidance for intensivists in their daily practice. PMID:26714808

  7. Contextual Constraint Treatment for coarse coding deficit in adults with right hemisphere brain damage: Generalization to narrative discourse comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Margaret Lehman; Tompkins, Connie A.; Scharp, Victoria L.; Meigh, Kimberly M.; Wambaugh, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Coarse coding is the activation of broad semantic fields that can include multiple word meanings and a variety of features, including those peripheral to a word’s core meaning. It is a partially domain-general process related to general discourse comprehension and contributes to both literal and non-literal language processing. Adults with damage to the right cerebral hemisphere (RHD) and a coarse coding deficit are particularly slow to activate features of words that are relatively distant or peripheral. This manuscript reports a pre-efficacy study of Contextual Constraint Treatment (CCT), a novel, implicit treatment designed to increase the efficiency of coarse coding with the goal of improving narrative comprehension and other language performance that relies on coarse coding. Participants were four adults with RHD. The study used a single-subject controlled experimental design across subjects and behaviors. The treatment involves pre-stimulation, using a hierarchy of strong- and moderately-biased contexts, to prime the intended distantly-related features of critical stimulus words. Three of the four participants exhibited gains in auditory narrative discourse comprehension, the primary outcome measure. All participants exhibited generalization to untreated items. No strong generalization to processing nonliteral language was evident. The results indicate that CCT yields both improved efficiency of the coarse coding process and generalization to narrative comprehension. PMID:24983133

  8. Novel all-extremity high-intensity interval training improves aerobic fitness, cardiac function and insulin resistance in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chueh-Lung; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Kim, Han-Kyul; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Handberg, Eileen M; Petersen, John W; Christou, Demetra D

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with decreased aerobic fitness and cardiac remodeling leading to increased risk for cardiovascular disease. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) on the treadmill has been reported to be more effective in ameliorating these risk factors compared with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in patients with cardiometabolic disease. In older adults, however, weight-bearing activities are frequently limited due to musculoskeletal and balance problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and safety of non-weight-bearing all-extremity HIIT in older adults. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that all-extremity HIIT will be more effective in improving aerobic fitness, cardiac function, and metabolic risk factors compared with all-extremity MICT. Fifty-one healthy sedentary older adults (age: 65±1years) were randomized to HIIT (n=17), MICT (n=18) or non-exercise control (CONT; n=16). HIIT (4×4min 90% of peak heart rate; HRpeak) and isocaloric MICT (70% of HRpeak) were performed on a non-weight-bearing all-extremity ergometer, 4×/week for 8weeks under supervision. All-extremity HIIT was feasible in older adults and resulted in no adverse events. Aerobic fitness (peak oxygen consumption; VO2peak) and ejection fraction (echocardiography) improved by 11% (P<0.0001) and 4% (P=0.001), respectively in HIIT, while no changes were observed in MICT and CONT (P≥0.1). Greater improvements in ejection fraction were associated with greater improvements in VO2peak (r=0.57; P<0.0001). Insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment) decreased only in HIIT by 26% (P=0.016). Diastolic function, body composition, glucose and lipids were unaffected (P≥0.1). In conclusion, all-extremity HIIT is feasible and safe in older adults. HIIT, but not MICT, improved aerobic fitness, ejection fraction, and insulin resistance. PMID:27346646

  9. Are Irish adult general practice consultation rates as low as official records suggest? A cross sectional study at six general practices.

    PubMed

    Behan, W; Molony, D; Beamer, C; Cullen, W

    2013-01-01

    Accurate data on primary care activity is key to health services planning and reconfiguration. Official data estimate general practice adult consultation rates to be 3.2 visits annually, based on patient self reports. We aim to estimate the consultation rate using practice based data and compare this to official estimates. We interrogated six general practices' information systems and estimated consultation rates based on practice, telephone, domiciliary and out of hours consultations by patients aged 18 years or older. The study population (20,706 patients) was representative of the national population in terms of age and GMS status. The mean consultation rate was 5.17, though this was higher among GMS-eligible patients and among older age groups. Estimates of consultation rates derived from practice based data are likely to be higher than that derived from other approaches. Using multiple sources of data will enhance accuracy of workload estimates and this will benefit service planning. PMID:24579407

  10. The influence of childhood abuse, adult life events, and affective temperaments on the well-being of the general, nonclinical adult population

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Yoshiaki; Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Nakai, Yukiei; Ichiki, Masahiko; Sato, Mitsuhiko; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Ishikawa, Jun; Ono, Yasuyuki; Murakoshi, Akiko; Tanabe, Hajime; Kusumi, Ichiro; Inoue, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown the effects of childhood abuse, life events, and temperaments on well-being (positive affect) and ill-being (negative affect). We hypothesized that childhood abuse, affective temperaments, and adult life events interact with one another and influence positive and negative affects in the general adult population and tested this hypothesis using structural equation modeling. Methods A total of 415 participants from the general, nonclinical adult population were studied using the following self-administered questionnaires: the Subjective Well-Being Inventory (SUBI); Life Experiences Survey (LES); Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire (TEMPS-A); and the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS). The data were analyzed with single and multiple regression analyses and structural equation modeling (Mplus). Results Childhood abuse indirectly predicted the worsening of positive and negative affects through cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments as measured by the TEMPS-A in the structural equation model. The cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable temperaments directly worsened the positive and negative affects and the negative appraisal of life events that occurred during the past year, while the hyperthymic temperament had the opposite effects. Limitations The subjects of this study were nonclinical volunteers. The findings might not be generalizable to psychiatric patients. Conclusion This study demonstrated that childhood abuse, particularly neglect, indirectly worsened the well-being of individuals through cyclothymic, anxious, and irritable affective temperaments. An important “mediator” role of affective temperaments in the effect of childhood abuse on well-being was suggested. PMID:27110116

  11. Learned Attention in Adult Language Acquisition: A Replication and Generalization Study and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Nick C.; Sagarra, Nuria

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates associative learning explanations of the limited attainment of adult compared to child language acquisition in terms of learned attention to cues. It replicates and extends Ellis and Sagarra (2010) in demonstrating short- and long-term learned attention in the acquisition of temporal reference in Latin. In Experiment 1,…

  12. Participation in the 2005 General Election by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, H.; Redley, M.; Holland, A. J.; Clare, I. C. H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: International and UK legislation confirms and supports the right of adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) to vote. It is widely accepted, although not previously empirically confirmed, that citizens with ID are under-represented at the polls. Method: To document the extent of their under-representation at the polls, the names and…

  13. "Subtypes" in the Presentation of Autistic Traits in the General Adult Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Colin J.; Paton, Bryan; Enticott, Peter G.; Hohwy, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the presentation of autistic traits in a large adult population sample (n = 2,343). Cluster analysis indicated two subgroups with clearly distinguishable trait profiles. One group (n = 1,059) reported greater social difficulties and lower detail orientation, while the second group (n = 1,284) reported lesser social…

  14. Higher Perceived Stress Scale scores are associated with higher pain intensity and pain interference levels in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    White, Robert S.; Jiang, Julie; Hall, Charles B.; Katz, Mindy J.; Zimmerman, Molly E.; Sliwinski, Martin; Lipton, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of bodily pain measures (pain intensity and pain interference) in elderly people and their relationship with perceived stress scale (PSS) scores. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Community. Participants A representative community sample of 578 subjects aged 70 and older. Measurements The prevalence of pain intensity and pain interference and their relationship with perceived stress scale scores, demographic factors, past medical history, and neuropsychological testing scores were examined. Pain intensity and pain interference were measured by the SF-36 bodily pain questions. Results The study sample of 578 participants has a mean age of 78.8 years and is 63% female. Bivariate analysis for pain measures showed that higher scores on the perceived stress scale, lower neuropsychological test scores, and medical histories were associated with both pain intensity and interference. Logistic regression showed that higher scores on the perceived stress scale were significantly associated with increased odds of having moderate/severe pain intensity and moderate/severe pain interference (with and without the inclusion of for pain intensity in the models). Conclusion Higher PSS scores are associated with higher levels of pain intensity and pain interference. In this cross-sectional analysis, directionality cannot be determined. As both perceived stress and pain are potentially modifiable risk factors for cognitive decline and other poor health outcomes, future research should address temporality and the benefits of treatment. PMID:25516031

  15. Prevalence of tension-type headache in adult general population: the PACE study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, T; Manzoni, G C; Russo, M; Camarda, C; Taga, A; Veronesi, L; Pasquarella, C; Sansebastiano, G; Torelli, P

    2013-05-01

    The mean global prevalence of tension-type headache (TTH) in adult is 42 %. To date, there have been no Italian studies on TTH prevalence in the adult general population. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional study, called PACE (PArma CEfalea, or "Headache in Parma"), aimed at detecting the prevalence and clinical features of primary headaches in the city of Parma's adult general population. Crude past-year prevalence for definite TTH was 19.4 % (95 % CI 16.8-21.9), namely 9.0 % (95 % CI 7.1-10.8) for infrequent TTH, 9.8 % (95 % CI 7.9-11.8) for frequent TTH, and 0.6 % (95 % CI 0.1-1) for chronic TTH. Crude prevalence for probable TTH was 2.3 % (95 % CI 1.3-3.3). Our study results indicate a TTH prevalence rate (19.4 %) at the lower limit of data ranges currently available for Western countries, and prevalence rates for infrequent forms (9 %) do not appear much different from those of frequent forms (9.8 %). PMID:23695063

  16. Evaluation and use of pet foods: general considerations in using pet foods for adult maintenance.

    PubMed

    Kallfelz, F A

    1989-05-01

    Questions regarding pet animal nutrition are probably among the most frequent queries encountered by companion animal veterinarians. Given the plethora of pet food products available and the amount of advertising used to promote them, it is not surprising that pet owners have concerns as to what they should feed their pets. This "practical" review of pet foods and feeding is designed to assist veterinarians in making nutritional recommendations to their clients, with respect to feeding normal adult pets at maintenance. PMID:2658281

  17. Influence of the Perceived Taste Intensity of Chemesthetic Stimuli on Swallowing Parameters Given Age and Genetic Taste Differences in Healthy Adult Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelletier, Cathy A.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether the perceived taste intensity of liquids with chemesthetic properties influenced lingua-palatal pressures and submental surface electromyography (sEMG) in swallowing, compared with water. Method: Swallowing was studied in 80 healthy women, stratified by age group and genetic taste status. General Labeled…

  18. Mechanical ventilation in patients in the intensive care unit of a general university hospital in southern Brazil: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Farenzena, Maurício; Wawrzeniak, Iuri Christmann; Brauner, Janete Salles; Vieira, Sílvia Regina Rios; Vigo, Alvaro; Bozzetti, Mary Clarisse

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the characteristics, the frequency and the mortality rates of patients needing mechanical ventilation and to identify the risk factors associated with mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a general university hospital in southern Brazil. METHOD: Prospective cohort study in patients admitted to the ICU who needed mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours between March 2004 and April 2007. RESULTS: A total of 1,115 patients admitted to the ICU needed mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 51%. The mean age (± standard deviation) was 57±18 years, and the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score was 22.6±8.3. The variables independently associated with mortality were (i) conditions present at the beginning of mechanical ventilation, age (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.001); the APACHE II score (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.005); acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.38; p=0.009), sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.33; p=0.003), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (hazard ratio: 0.58; p=0.042), and pneumonia (hazard ratio: 0.78; p=0.013) as causes of mechanical ventilation; and renal (hazard ratio: 1.29; p=0.011) and neurological (hazard ratio: 1.25; p=0.024) failure, and (ii) conditions occurring during the course of mechanical ventilation, acute lung injuri/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.31; p<0.010); sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.53; p<0.001); and renal (hazard ratio: 1.75; p<0.001), cardiovascular (hazard ratio: 1.32; p≤0.009), and hepatic (hazard ratio: 1.67; p≤0.001) failure. CONCLUSIONS: This large cohort study provides a comprehensive profile of mechanical ventilation patients in South America. The mortality rate of patients who required mechanical ventilation was higher, which may have been related to the severity of illness of the patients admitted to our ICU. Risk factors for hospital mortality included conditions present at the start of mechanical

  19. Model VESL Program Guide, Office Information Systems, International: One Semester Intensive Training Certificate of Achievement Programs in General, Medical, and Legal Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Irma J.

    The Office Information Systems-International Program at Southwestern College, in California, was designed to provide Hispanic students with training for entry-level office employment. This model program guide stems from a project to improve curricula and delivery and focuses on changes in three intensive bilingual programs in general, medical, and…

  20. Generalized Courant-Snyder theory and Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij distribution for high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse focusing lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-05-15

    The Courant-Snyder (CS) theory and the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution for high-intensity beams in an uncoupled focusing lattice are generalized to the case of coupled transverse dynamics. The envelope function is generalized to an envelope matrix, and the envelope equation becomes a matrix envelope equation with matrix operations that are noncommutative. In an uncoupled lattice, the KV distribution function, first analyzed in 1959, is the only known exact solution of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for high-intensity beams including self-fields in a self-consistent manner. The KV solution is generalized to high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice using the generalized CS invariant. This solution projects to a rotating, pulsating elliptical beam in transverse configuration space. The fully self-consistent solution reduces the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations to a nonlinear matrix ordinary differential equation for the envelope matrix, which determines the geometry of the pulsating and rotating beam ellipse. These results provide us with a new theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice. A strongly coupled lattice, a so-called N-rolling lattice, is studied as an example. It is found that strong coupling does not deteriorate the beam quality. Instead, the coupling induces beam rotation and reduces beam pulsation.

  1. Generalized Courant-Snyder Theory and Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Distribution For High-intensity Beams In A Coupled Transverse Focusing Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Hong QIn, Ronald Davidson

    2011-07-18

    The Courant-Snyder (CS) theory and the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution for high-intensity beams in a uncoupled focusing lattice are generalized to the case of coupled transverse dynamics. The envelope function is generalized to an envelope matrix, and the envelope equation becomes a matrix envelope equation with matrix operations that are non-commutative. In an uncoupled lattice, the KV distribution function, first analyzed in 1959, is the only known exact solution of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for high-intensity beams including self-fields in a self-consistent manner. The KV solution is generalized to high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice using the generalized CS invariant. This solution projects to a rotating, pulsating elliptical beam in transverse configuration space. The fully self-consistent solution reduces the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations to a nonlinear matrix ordinary differential equation for the envelope matrix, which determines the geometry of the pulsating and rotating beam ellipse. These results provide us with a new theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice. A strongly coupled lattice, a so-called N-rolling lattice, is studied as an example. It is found that strong coupling does not deteriorate the beam quality. Instead, the coupling induces beam rotation, and reduces beam pulsation.

  2. "Aging males" symptoms and general health of adult males: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Yuen, John W; Ng, Chi-Fai; Chiu, Peter Ka Fung; Teoh, Jeremy Yuen Chun; Yee, C H

    2016-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to explore the prevalence and severity of health-related complaints perceived by adult males of Hong Kong by using the Hong Kong Traditional Chinese versions of the Aging males' symptoms (AMS) scale and the 5-dimensional and 3-level European Quality of life (EQ-5D-3L) questionnaire. A total of 825 adult males aged 40 years or above were surveyed, and observed that 80% of the population was living with little-to-mild levels of aging symptoms with mean total scores ranged between 26.02 ± 7.91 and 32.99 ± 7.91 in different age groups. Such symptoms were correlated with age, especially for the somato-vegetative and sexual symptoms. The most severe AMS symptoms were observed in the oldest age group at 70 years or above, with 76%, 34% and 70% living with moderate-to-severe levels of somato-vegetative, psychological and sexual symptoms, respectively. The result was highly correlated with the EQ-5D-3L questionnaire. Secondly, the Hong Kong Aging males' symptoms (AMS) scale was shown to have good reliability with test-retest coefficient at 0.79 (ranged 0.66-0.87) and Cronbach's alpha coefficient at 0.88 (ranged 0.70-0.84). In summary, the population of Hong Kong male adults was commonly living with little-to-mild levels of aging symptoms, whereas their severity was correlated with age. PMID:27068128

  3. Comparison of Younger and Older Adults' Acceptability of Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder Co-Occurring with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Ament, Patrick A.; Holt, Peter S.; Hunt, Lauren S.

    2013-01-01

    Acceptability ratings of medication or Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT), for general anxiety disorder (GAD) co-occurring with Parkinson's Disease (PD) were obtained from younger ("n" = 79) and older ("n" = 54) adults. Participants read a case description of an older adult with PD and comorbid GAD followed by a…

  4. The Over-Scheduling Hypothesis Revisited: Intensity of Organized Activity Participation During Adolescence and Young Adult Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Joseph L; Vest, Andrea E

    2012-09-01

    Concern exists that youth who spend a lot of time participating in organized out-of-school activities (e.g., sports) are at-risk for poor developmental outcomes. This concern - called the over-scheduling hypothesis - has primarily been assessed in terms of adolescent adjustment. This longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of 1,115 youth (ages 12-18) assessed long-term relations between intensity of participation during adolescence and adjustment at young adulthood (ages 18-24). Time diaries measured intensity as hours per week of participation. Results showed that, controlling for demographic factors and baseline adjustment, intensity was a significant predictor of positive outcomes (e.g., psychological flourishing, civic engagement, educational attainment) and unrelated to indicators of problematic adjustment (e.g., psychological distress, substance use, antisocial behavior) at young adulthood. PMID:23066336

  5. Evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult brood parasitic bird, and generalized defences in its host.

    PubMed

    Feeney, W E; Troscianko, J; Langmore, N E; Spottiswoode, C N

    2015-07-01

    Mimicry of a harmless model (aggressive mimicry) is used by egg, chick and fledgling brood parasites that resemble the host's own eggs, chicks and fledglings. However, aggressive mimicry may also evolve in adult brood parasites, to avoid attack from hosts and/or manipulate their perception of parasitism risk. We tested the hypothesis that female cuckoo finches (Anomalospiza imberbis) are aggressive mimics of female Euplectes weavers, such as the harmless, abundant and sympatric southern red bishop (Euplectes orix). We show that female cuckoo finch plumage colour and pattern more closely resembled those of Euplectes weavers (putative models) than Vidua finches (closest relatives); that their tawny-flanked prinia (Prinia subflava) hosts were equally aggressive towards female cuckoo finches and southern red bishops, and more aggressive to both than to their male counterparts; and that prinias were equally likely to reject an egg after seeing a female cuckoo finch or bishop, and more likely to do so than after seeing a male bishop near their nest. This is, to our knowledge, the first quantitative evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult bird, and suggests that host-parasite coevolution can select for aggressive mimicry by avian brood parasites, and counter-defences by hosts, at all stages of the reproductive cycle. PMID:26063850

  6. Evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult brood parasitic bird, and generalized defences in its host

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, W. E.; Troscianko, J.; Langmore, N. E.; Spottiswoode, C. N.

    2015-01-01

    Mimicry of a harmless model (aggressive mimicry) is used by egg, chick and fledgling brood parasites that resemble the host's own eggs, chicks and fledglings. However, aggressive mimicry may also evolve in adult brood parasites, to avoid attack from hosts and/or manipulate their perception of parasitism risk. We tested the hypothesis that female cuckoo finches (Anomalospiza imberbis) are aggressive mimics of female Euplectes weavers, such as the harmless, abundant and sympatric southern red bishop (Euplectes orix). We show that female cuckoo finch plumage colour and pattern more closely resembled those of Euplectes weavers (putative models) than Vidua finches (closest relatives); that their tawny-flanked prinia (Prinia subflava) hosts were equally aggressive towards female cuckoo finches and southern red bishops, and more aggressive to both than to their male counterparts; and that prinias were equally likely to reject an egg after seeing a female cuckoo finch or bishop, and more likely to do so than after seeing a male bishop near their nest. This is, to our knowledge, the first quantitative evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult bird, and suggests that host–parasite coevolution can select for aggressive mimicry by avian brood parasites, and counter-defences by hosts, at all stages of the reproductive cycle. PMID:26063850

  7. Error-related brain activity in youth and young adults before and after treatment for generalized or social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Autumn; Weinberg, Anna; Bunford, Nora; Fitzgerald, Kate D; Hanna, Gregory L; Monk, Christopher S; Kennedy, Amy E; Klumpp, Heide; Hajcak, Greg; Phan, K Luan

    2016-11-01

    Increased error monitoring, as measured by the error-related negativity (ERN), has been shown to persist after treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder in youth and adults; however, no previous studies have examined the ERN following treatment for related anxiety disorders. We used a flanker task to elicit the ERN in 28 youth and young adults (8-26years old) with primary diagnoses of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) or social anxiety disorder (SAD) and 35 healthy controls. Patients were assessed before and after treatment with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), and healthy controls were assessed at a comparable interval. The ERN increased across assessments in the combined sample. Patients with SAD exhibited an enhanced ERN relative to healthy controls prior to and following treatment, even when analyses were limited to SAD patients who responded to treatment. Patients with GAD did not significantly differ from healthy controls at either assessment. Results provide preliminary evidence that enhanced error monitoring persists following treatment for SAD in youth and young adults, and support conceptualizations of increased error monitoring as a trait-like vulnerability that may contribute to risk for recurrence and impaired functioning later in life. Future work is needed to further evaluate the ERN in GAD across development, including whether an enhanced ERN develops in adulthood or is most apparent when worries focus on internal sources of threat. PMID:27495356

  8. Generalized probabilistic seimsic hazard estimates in terms of macroseismic intensity as a tool for risk assessment in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarello, Dario; D'Amico, Vera; Rotondi, Renata; Varini, Elsa; Zonno, Gaetano

    2013-04-01

    The use of macroseismic intensity to parameterize earthquakes effects allows a direct link of hazard assessment with risk estimates in urban areas. This is particularly true in most of European countries where long lasting documentary history is available about the effects of past earthquakes. This is why the use of the computational code SASHA (Site Approach to Seismic Hazard Assessment), on purpose developed for a coherent probabilistic analysis of intensity data locally available (site seismic histories) to provided hazard estimates in terms of intensity by taking into account the specific nature of intensity (ordinal, discrete, finite in range, site-dependent) and relevant uncertainty (completeness, ill-definition of the oldest earthquakes, etc.), resulted of specific interest in the frame of the EU research project UPStratMAFA "Urban Disaster Prevention Strategies Using MAcroseismic Fields and FAult Sources" (Grant Agreement n. 230301/2011/613486/SUB/A5). In order to extend the application of this approach to sites and countries where local seismic histories are relatively poor, a new implementation of the code was provided, allowing to include in the hazard assessment information coming from different branches (historical studies, seismological instrumental information and numerical simulations). In particular, macroseismic information related to the seismic history locally documented, that represents the bulk of the considered information, can be integrated with "virtual" intensities deduced from epicentral data (via earthquake-specific probabilistic attenuation relationships) and "simulated" intensities deduced via physical/stochastic simulations from data concerning seismogenic faults activated during past earthquakes. This allows a more complete reconstruction of local seismic history and also reducing uncertainty affecting macroseismic data relative to older earthquakes. Results of some applications of the new release of the SASHA code will be described.

  9. Cognitive behavioral treatment for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder. A therapist manual for primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Melinda A; Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Hopko, Derek R

    2004-01-01

    At least four academic clinical trials have demonstrated the utility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). These data may not generalize, however, to more heterogeneous and functionally impaired patients and the medical settings in which they typically receive care. A recent pilot project suggested the potential benefits of a new version of CBT for GAD among older patients in primary care. The manual developed and tested in this pilot project is presented here. Treatment components include motivation and education, relaxation skills, cognitive therapy, problem-solving-skills training, exposure exercises, and sleep-management-skills training. Procedures are designed to be administered flexibly to maximize attention to individual patient needs. Examples of session summaries, patient handouts, and homework forms are provided. PMID:14710708

  10. General Anxiety Disorder Symptoms, Tension Reduction, and Marijuana Use Among Young Adult Females

    PubMed Central

    Hagerty, Claire E.; Herman, Debra S.; Hayaki, Jumi; Anderson, Bradley J.; Budney, Alan J.; Stein, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The current study tested the hypothesis that tension reduction expectancies mediate the relationship between anxiety symptoms and marijuana use. Methods Interview data for 332 young adult females from Southern New England were collected from 2004 to 2009. Results In structural equation modeling, anxiety symptoms had a significant direct effect (byx = 0.227, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.086-0.369, p < 0.05) on tension reduction expectancies and a significant indirect effect (byx = 0.026, 95% CI 0.010-0.046, p < 0.05) on marijuana use. Conclusions The effect of anxiety symptoms on marijuana use was fully mediated by tension reduction expectancies. Implications for tension reduction as a possible component of treatment interventions are discussed. PMID:20718677

  11. Evaluation of skin temperature over carotid artery for temperature monitoring in comparison to nasopharyngeal temperature in adults under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Venkatesh; Gnanaprakasam, Pughal Vendan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thermoregulation is markedly affected in patients undergoing surgical procedures under anesthesia. Monitoring of temperature is very important during such conditions. Skin temperature is one of the easy and noninvasive ways of temperature monitoring. Common skin temperature monitoring sites are unreliable and did not correlate to the core temperature measurement. Aim: To compare and study the correlation of skin temperature over carotid artery in the neck to that of simultaneously measured nasopharyngeal temperature in adult patients undergoing surgical procedures under general anesthesia. Settings and Design: Prospective double-blinded study in a Tertiary Care Center. Materials and Methods: Ninety-seven consecutive American Society of Anesthesiologists I–II patients of age 18–40 years posted for elective surgical procedures under general anesthesia were included. Two temperature sites are monitored: The skin temperature over the carotid artery in the neck with a skin temperature probe T (skin-carotid) and the nasopharyngeal temperature T (naso) with another nasopharyngeal probe. The temperature readings are taken at 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after induction of general anesthesia. Statistical Analysis: Paired t-test, Pearson correlation and Bland–Altman analysis for the rate of agreement. Results: The skin over the carotid artery in the neck showed statistically significant lower values than simultaneously measured nasopharyngeal temperature. This comparison is done with paired t-test at P< 0.05 significance. Bland–Altman plots showed good agreement between the two sites of temperature measurement. Conclusion: This study has shown that the skin temperature over the carotid artery in the neck was strongly correlated to the nasopharyngeal temperature in adult patients undergoing surgical procedures under general anesthesia. PMID:27212763

  12. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Risk of General and Abdominal Obesity in Iranian Adults: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    PubMed Central

    MIRMIRAN, Parvin; EJTAHED, Hanieh-Sadat; BAHADORAN, Zahra; BASTAN, Sara; AZIZI, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: General and abdominal obesity are major global health problems. This cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the association between consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and body mass index and waist circumference status in 5852 Iranian adults within the framework of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS). Methods: Intakes of SSBs including carbonated drinks and synthetic fruit juices were measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. The association between body mass index, waist circumference and body adiposity index in each quartile category of SSB consumption were determined using the multivariable linear regression models. The odds ratio (OR) of general and abdominal obesity in each quartile of SSB consumption was also determined using the multivariable logistic regression models. Results: Mean dietary intake of SSBs was 48.9 g/d or 0.25 servings/d. After adjustment for all potential confounding variables, significant associations were observed between SSB consumption and BMI (β: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.13–0.86), and waist circumference (β: 1.28, 95% CI: 0.40–2.16) in the fourth quartile. There was no significant association between SSB consumption and body adiposity index. Participants who consumed > 57.1 g/d of SSBs had 22% higher risk of general obesity (OR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.00–1.48) and 35% higher risk of abdominal obesity (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.12–1.61), compared with those in the lowest quartile of SSB consumption. Conclusion: Higher intakes of SSBs were associated with the higher risk of general and abdominal obesity in adults suggesting that limiting the consumption of SSBs may be a practical approach to prevent and manage obesity. PMID:26744712

  13. Pilot study comparing multi-family therapy to single family therapy for adults with anorexia nervosa in an intensive eating disorder program.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulos, Gina; Farquhar, Jamie C; Freeman, Victoria Emily; Colton, Patricia Anne; Olmsted, Marion Patricia

    2015-07-01

    Multi-family therapy (MFT) has yet to be evaluated in families of adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). The study aims were: (i) assess the feasibility of MFT for AN; and, (ii) assess whether MFT is associated with improved outcomes for families compared with single-family therapy (SFT). Adult patients with AN consecutively referred to an eating disorder treatment program were assigned (non-randomly) to receive eight sessions of SFT or MFT. Assessment occurred pre-therapy, immediately post-therapy, and at 3-month follow-up. A total of 37 female patients (13 SFT, 24 MFT) and 45 family members (16 SFT, 29 MFT) completed treatment. There were significant time effects for patients' BMI, eating disorder-related psychopathology and multiple family outcome measures. There were no differences between MFT and SFT on family outcome measures at end of treatment and 3 months post treatment. MFT is a feasible intervention that can be used in adult intensive treatment for those with AN. PMID:25823423

  14. [Video games: are the motivations and intensity of use changing with age? Comparison between a population of adolescent and adult gamers].

    PubMed

    Caillon, J; Bouju, G; Grall-Bronnec, M

    2014-03-01

    Despite the popularity of video games, few studies have been conducted in France on their use. The objective of this study was to gather data from a sample of French video game players to learn more about this population. This approach also aimed to examine whether differences exist between adolescent and adult gamers in terms of their motivations to play and whether this practice met the criteria for problem video game playing. A questionnaire collecting sociodemographic data and assessing the problems associated with the use of video games, as well as motivations to play, was distributed during a video game festival and on the Internet. A total of 778 people responded to the questionnaire. The results showed that there were few differences between adolescent and adult gamers. Both groups had an intense video game habit. The majority of them sometimes had the feeling of losing control of their use and sacrificed other activities to play video games. This last dimension was most frequently cited by adults. The feeling of spending more time playing was most frequently cited by adolescents. Concerning motivations to play, the two groups differed only on the score of the "social" dimension, significantly higher among adolescents. PMID:24457109

  15. Polypharmacy in older adults with human immunodeficiency virus infection compared with the general population

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno-Gracia, Mercedes; Crusells-Canales, María José; Armesto-Gómez, Francisco Javier; Compaired-Turlán, Vicente; Rabanaque-Hernández, María José

    2016-01-01

    Background The percentage of older HIV-positive patients is growing, with an increase in age-related comorbidities and concomitant medication. Objectives To quantify polypharmacy and profile types of non-antiretroviral drugs collected at community pharmacies in 2014 by HIV-positive individuals on antiretroviral therapy and to compare these findings with those of the general population. Methods HIV-positive patients (n=199) were compared with a group of patients from the general population (n=8,172), aged between 50 and 64 years. The factors compared were prevalence of polypharmacy (≥5 comedications with cumulative defined daily dose [DDD] per drug over 180), percentage of patients who collected each therapeutic class of drug, and median duration for each drug class (based on DDD). Results were stratified by sex. Results Polypharmacy was more common in HIV-positive males than in the male general population (8.9% vs 4.4%, P=0.010). Polypharmacy was also higher in HIV-positive females than in the female general population (11.3% vs 3.4%, P=0.002). Percentage of HIV-positive patients receiving analgesics, anti-infectives, gastrointestinal drugs, central nervous system (CNS) agents, and respiratory drugs was higher than in the general population, with significant differences between male populations. No differences were observed in proportion of patients receiving cardiovascular drugs. The estimated number of treatment days (median DDDs) were higher in HIV-positive males than in males from the general population for anti-infectives (32.2 vs 20.0, P<0.001) and CNS agents (238.7 vs 120.0, P=0.002). A higher percentage of HIV-positive males than males from the general population received sulfonamides (17.1% vs 1.5%, P<0.001), macrolides (37.1% vs 24.9%, P=0.020), and quinolones (34.3% vs 21.2%, P=0.009). Conclusion Polypharmacy is more common in HIV-positive older males and females than in similarly aged members of the general population. HIV-positive patients received

  16. Use of caries preventive agents on adult patients compared to pediatric patients by general practitioners: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Williams, O. Dale; Ritchie, Lloyd K.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that caries prevention reduces caries in adults. This study tested the frequency of recommended caries prevention agents for children compared to adult patients. Methods This study surveyed 467 Dental Practice-Based Research Network general dentists who practice within the United States and treat both pediatric and adult patients. Dentists were asked the percentage of their patients who are administered or recommended dental sealants, in-office and at-home fluoride, chlorhexidine rinse, and xylitol gum. Results Adults were less likely to receive in-office caries preventive agents compared to pediatric patients. However, the rate of recommendation for at-home preventive regimens was very similar. Dentists with a conservative approach to caries treatment were the most likely to use caries prevention at similar rates in adults as in children. In addition, practices with a greater number of patients with dental insurance were significantly less likely to provide in-office fluoride or sealants to adult patients than to their pediatric patients. Conclusion In-office caries prevention agents are more commonly used by general dentists for their pediatric patients compared to their adult patients. Practice Implications Some general dentists should consider providing additional in-office prevention agents for their adult patients who are at increased risk for dental caries. PMID:20516100

  17. Integrated IMR for Psychiatric and General Medical Illness for Adults Aged 50 or Older With Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Pratt, Sarah I.; Mueser, Kim T.; Naslund, John A.; Wolfe, Rosemarie S.; Santos, Meghan; Xie, Haiyi; Riera, Erik G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Self-management is promoted as a strategy for improving outcomes for serious mental illness as well as for chronic general medical conditions. This study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of an eight-month program combining training in self-management for both psychiatric and general medical illness, including embedded nurse care management. Methods Participants were 71 middle-aged and older adults (mean age=60.3±6.5) with serious mental illness and chronic general medical conditions who were randomly assigned to receive integrated Illness Management and Recovery (I-IMR) (N=36) or usual care (N=35). Feasibility was determined by attendance at I-IMR and nurse sessions. Effectiveness outcomes were measured two and six months after the intervention (ten- and 14-month follow-ups) and included self-management of psychiatric and general medical illness, participation in psychiatric and general medical encounters, and self-reported acute health care utilization. Results I-IMR participants attended 15.8±9.5 I-IMR and 8.2±5.9 nurse sessions, with 75% attending at least ten I-IMR and five nurse sessions. Compared with usual care, I-IMR was associated with greater improvements in participant and clinician ratings for psychiatric illness self-management, greater diabetes self-management, and an increased preference for detailed diagnosis and treatment information during primary care encounters. The proportion of I-IMR participants with at least one psychiatric or general medical hospitalization decreased significantly between baseline and ten- and 14-month follow-ups. Conclusions I-IMR is a feasible intervention for this at-risk group and demonstrated potential effectiveness by improving self-management of psychiatric illness and diabetes and by reducing the proportion of participants requiring psychi atric or general medical hospitalizations. PMID:24292559

  18. Long-Term Mild, rather than Intense, Exercise Enhances Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Greatly Changes the Transcriptomic Profile of the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Koshiro; Okamoto, Masahiro; Shibato, Junko; Lee, Min Chul; Matsui, Takashi; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Our six-week treadmill running training (forced exercise) model has revealed that mild exercise (ME) with an intensity below the lactate threshold (LT) is sufficient to enhance spatial memory, while intense exercise (IE) above the LT negates such benefits. To help understand the unrevealed neuronal and signaling/molecular mechanisms of the intensity-dependent cognitive change, in this rat model, we here investigated plasma corticosterone concentration as a marker of stress, adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) as a potential contributor to this ME-induced spatial memory, and comprehensively delineated the hippocampal transcriptomic profile using a whole-genome DNA microarray analysis approach through comparison with IE. Results showed that only IE had the higher corticosterone concentration than control, and that the less intense exercise (ME) is better suited to improve AHN, especially in regards to the survival and maturation of newborn neurons. DNA microarray analysis using a 4 × 44 K Agilent chip revealed that ME regulated more genes than did IE (ME: 604 genes, IE: 415 genes), and only 41 genes were modified with both exercise intensities. The identified molecular components did not comprise well-known factors related to exercise-induced AHN, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Rather, network analysis of the data using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis algorithms revealed that the ME-influenced genes were principally related to lipid metabolism, protein synthesis and inflammatory response, which are recognized as associated with AHN. In contrast, IE-influenced genes linked to excessive inflammatory immune response, which is a negative regulator of hippocampal neuroadaptation, were identified. Collectively, these results in a treadmill running model demonstrate that long-term ME, but not of IE, with minimizing running stress, has beneficial effects on increasing AHN, and provides an ME-specific gene inventory containing some potential regulators of this

  19. Risk It: A Youth Curriculum Resource for the Certificates in General Education for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document is a youth curriculum resource designed to accommodate learners in Australia's Certificates in General Education (CGEA) program. The document begins by discussing the following topics: the curriculum framework; the curriculum's content and its relationship to the CGEA program's numeracy learning outcomes and criteria; successful…

  20. Caution: Alcohol Advertising and the Surgeon General's Alcohol Warnings May Have Adverse Effects on Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, Deborah J.; Snyder, Leslie B.

    A study investigated the effects of the newly introduced Surgeon General's alcohol warnings and advertisements on college students. One hundred fifty-nine undergraduates in communication sciences at the University of Connecticut viewed slides of alcohol products, with or without advertisements and warnings. Following the viewings, subjects filled…

  1. Effects of priming exercise on the speed of adjustment of muscle oxidative metabolism at the onset of moderate-intensity step transitions in older adults.

    PubMed

    De Roia, Gabriela; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Adami, Alessandra; Papadopoulou, Christina; Capelli, Carlo

    2012-05-15

    Aging is associated with a functional decline of the oxidative metabolism due to progressive limitations of both O(2) delivery and utilization. Priming exercise (PE) increases the speed of adjustment of oxidative metabolism during successive moderate-intensity transitions. We tested the hypothesis that such improvement is due to a better matching of O(2) delivery to utilization within the working muscles. In 21 healthy older adults (65.7 ± 5 yr), we measured contemporaneously noninvasive indexes of the overall speed of adjustment of the oxidative metabolism (i.e., pulmonary Vo(2) kinetics), of the bulk O(2) delivery (i.e., cardiac output), and of the rate of muscle deoxygenation (i.e., deoxygenated hemoglobin, HHb) during moderate-intensity step transitions, either with (ModB) or without (ModA) prior PE. The local matching of O(2) delivery to utilization was evaluated by the ΔHHb/ΔVo(2) ratio index. The overall speed of adjustment of the Vo(2) kinetics was significantly increased in ModB compared with ModA (P < 0.05). On the contrary, the kinetics of cardiac output was unaffected by PE. At the muscle level, ModB was associated with a significant reduction of the "overshoot" in the ΔHHb/ΔVo(2) ratio compared with ModA (P < 0.05), suggesting an improved O(2) delivery. Our data are compatible with the hypothesis that, in older adults, PE, prior to moderate-intensity exercise, beneficially affects the speed of adjustment of oxidative metabolism due to an acute improvement of the local matching of O(2) delivery to utilization. PMID:22422668

  2. The grieving adult and the general practitioner: a literature review in two parts (Part 2).

    PubMed

    Woof, W R; Carter, Y H

    1997-08-01

    In part 1 of this review, published last month, literature exploring the psychological bereavement theories and the health consequences of bereavement are summarized. The second part builds on this to outline the debate surrounding the characteristics of abnormal bereavement, while also focusing on risk factors for this morbidity. This leads on to a summary of the literature on bereavement care, particularly from a general practice point of view. Finally, areas for further research are highlighted. PMID:9302794

  3. Cardiometabolic Risk Indicators That Distinguish Adults with Psychosis from the General Population, by Age and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Debra L.; Mackinnon, Andrew; Watts, Gerald F.; Shaw, Jonathan E.; Magliano, Dianna J.; Castle, David J.; McGrath, John J.; Waterreus, Anna; Morgan, Vera A.; Galletly, Cherrie A.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with psychosis are more likely than the general community to develop obesity and to die prematurely from heart disease. Interventions to improve cardiovascular outcomes are best targeted at the earliest indicators of risk, at the age they first emerge. We investigated which cardiometabolic risk indicators distinguished those with psychosis from the general population, by age by gender, and whether obesity explained the pattern of observed differences. Data was analyzed from an epidemiologically representative sample of 1,642 Australians with psychosis aged 18–64 years and a national comparator sample of 8,866 controls aged 25–64 years from the general population. Cubic b-splines were used to compare cross sectional age trends by gender for mean waist circumference, body mass index [BMI], blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, LDL, HDL, and total cholesterol in our psychosis and control samples. At age 25 individuals with psychosis had a significantly higher mean BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides, glucose [women only], and diastolic blood pressure and significantly lower HDL-cholesterol than controls. With the exception of triglycerides at age 60+ in men, and glucose in women at various ages, these differences were present at every age. Differences in BMI and waist circumference between samples, although dramatic, could not explain all differences in diastolic blood pressure, HDL-cholesterol or triglycerides but did explain differences in glucose. Psychosis has the hallmarks of insulin resistance by at least age 25. The entire syndrome, not just weight, should be a focus of intervention to reduce mortality from cardiovascular disease. PMID:24367528

  4. Associations between cortical thickness and general intelligence in children, adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Menary, Kyle; Collins, Paul F.; Porter, James N.; Muetzel, Ryan; Olson, Elizabeth A.; Kumar, Vipin; Steinbach, Michael; Lim, Kelvin O.; Luciana, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging research indicates that human intellectual ability is related to brain structure including the thickness of the cerebral cortex. Most studies indicate that general intelligence is positively associated with cortical thickness in areas of association cortex distributed throughout both brain hemispheres. In this study, we performed a cortical thickness mapping analysis on data from 182 healthy typically developing males and females ages 9 to 24 years to identify correlates of general intelligence (g) scores. To determine if these correlates also mediate associations of specific cognitive abilities with cortical thickness, we regressed specific cognitive test scores on g scores and analyzed the residuals with respect to cortical thickness. The effect of age on the association between cortical thickness and intelligence was examined. We found a widely distributed pattern of positive associations between cortical thickness and g scores, as derived from the first unrotated principal factor of a factor analysis of Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) subtest scores. After WASI specific cognitive subtest scores were regressed on g factor scores, the residual score variances did not correlate significantly with cortical thickness in the full sample with age covaried. When participants were grouped at the age median, significant positive associations of cortical thickness were obtained in the older group for g-residualized scores on Block Design (a measure of visual-motor integrative processing) while significant negative associations of cortical thickness were observed in the younger group for g-residualized Vocabulary scores. These results regarding correlates of general intelligence are concordant with the existing literature, while the findings from younger versus older subgroups have implications for future research on brain structural correlates of specific cognitive abilities, as well as the cognitive domain specificity of behavioral

  5. The efficacy of vigorous-intensity exercise as an aid to smoking cessation in adults with elevated anxiety sensitivity: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although cigarette smoking is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States (US), over 40 million adults in the US currently smoke. Quitting smoking is particularly difficult for smokers with certain types of psychological vulnerability. Researchers have frequently called attention to the relation between smoking and anxiety-related states and disorders, and evidence suggests that panic and related anxiety vulnerability factors, specifically anxiety sensitivity (AS or fear of somatic arousal), negatively impact cessation. Accordingly, there is merit to targeting AS among smokers to improve cessation outcome. Aerobic exercise has emerged as a promising aid for smoking cessation for this high-risk (for relapse) group because exercise can effectively reduce AS and other factors predicting smoking relapse (for example, withdrawal, depressed mood, anxiety), and it has shown initial efficacy for smoking cessation. The current manuscript presents the rationale, study design and procedures, and design considerations of the Smoking Termination Enhancement Project (STEP). Methods STEP is a randomized clinical trial that compares a vigorous-intensity exercise intervention to a health and wellness education intervention as an aid for smoking cessation in adults with elevated AS. One hundred and fifty eligible participants will receive standard treatment (ST) for smoking cessation that includes cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). In addition, participants will be randomly assigned to either an exercise intervention (ST+EX) or a health and wellness education intervention (ST+CTRL). Participants in both arms will meet 3 times a week for 15 weeks, receiving CBT once a week for the first 7 weeks, and 3 supervised exercise or health and wellness education sessions (depending on randomization) per week for the full 15-week intervention. Participants will be asked to set a quit date for 6 weeks after the baseline visit

  6. A Cross-Sectional Survey of Childhood Trauma and Compliance With General Health Care Among Adult Primary Care Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Jordan Bohinc, R.; Wiederman, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Beyond the examination of medication compliance among individuals with substance abuse or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), few studies have examined relationships between childhood trauma and health care compliance in adulthood—the focus of the present study. Method: Using a cross-sectional approach and a self-report survey methodology, we examined 5 types of childhood trauma (ie, witnessing violence, physical neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse) in relationship to 4 measures of general health care compliance (ie, self-rated general conscientiousness with medical treatment; 5 items pertaining to general health care compliance such as scheduling regular dental checkups, timely arrival for doctor’s appointments, and timely completion of laboratory work; 2 medication compliance items; and the Medical Outcomes Study general adherence score) among a sample of adult primary care outpatients (N = 272). Data were collected in March 2014. Results: According to findings, some health care adherence variables demonstrated relationships with the summed childhood trauma score, whereas others did not. It could be interpreted that the more subjective health care compliance variables (eg, self-rated conscientiousness with regard to medical treatment) demonstrated no relationship with a summed childhood trauma score, whereas the more objective health care compliance variables (eg, frequency of regular dental checkups, ability to remember to take all medications, Medical Outcomes Study general adherence score) did demonstrate statistically significant relationships with a summed childhood trauma score (most at P < .01). Conclusions: Patients with histories of childhood trauma demonstrate some deficits with health care compliance in comparison to those without childhood trauma. One interpretation is that the mistreated appear to believe that they are fairly compliant with health care treatment, but

  7. The Relation between Early Maladaptive Schemas, Depression, and Generalized Anxiety among Adults Seeking Residential Treatment for Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Elmquist, Joanna; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous research has shown that early maladaptive schemas (EMS) play an important role in substance use, depression, and anxiety. However, little work has examined the role of EMS within the context of all three concurrently. The goal of this study was to determine the role of EMS in predicting symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) among adults in residential treatment for substance dependence. Method We used pre-existing patient records of adults diagnosed with a substance use disorder from a residential substance use treatment facility (N = 122). Results The EMS domains of disconnection and rejection and impaired limits were associated with symptoms of MDD and the domain of impaired autonomy and performance was associated with symptoms of GAD even after controlling for age, gender, years of education, alcohol use, drug use, and symptoms of MDD (when predicting GAD) and GAD (when predicting MDD). Conclusions Findings suggest that EMS may play an important role in comorbid mental health problems among men and women in residential substance use treatment. Continued treatment outcome research is needed to examine whether modification of EMS results in improved mental health and substance use outcomes. PMID:26099037

  8. Overweight and General and Abdominal Obesity in a Representative Sample of Spanish Adults: Findings from the ANIBES Study.

    PubMed

    López-Sobaler, Ana M; Aparicio, Aránzazu; Aranceta-Bartrina, Javier; Gil, Ángel; González-Gross, Marcela; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Ortega, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the anthropometric parameters from a representative sample of Spanish adults participating in ANIBES study and the prevalence of general and abdominal obesity. Methods. This cross-sectional study focused on 1655 adults aged 18-64 years. Weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were evaluated, and body mass index (BMI) and waist to height ratio (WHtR) were calculated. A composite index combining BMI and WHtR was designed to establish five groups with different anthropometric status. Results. The prevalence of overweight (OW) was 35.8% and that of obesity was 19.9%. Obesity (OB) was higher among men (OR 1.725, 1.415-2.104; p = 0.000) and each year of age increased the risk of obesity (OR 1.054, 1.045-1.064; p = 0.000). The prevalence of abdominal obesity (WHtR ≥ 0.5) was 58.4%. Only 36.1% of the population had an optimal anthropometric situation (BMI < 25 kg/m(2), WHtR < 0.5), whereas 50.1% had weight excess and high WHtR (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2), WHtR ≥ 0.5). Conclusions. More than half of Spanish population has weight excess and cardiometabolic risk. The results of this study provide an understanding of the current anthropometric situation in the Spanish population, as a first step toward planning interventions and assessing their effectiveness in the future. PMID:27382572

  9. Reduction of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Rates in Patients in the Adult Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Mary C; Macy, Deborah L

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) prolong hospital stays and increase cost, morbidity, and mortality. An intensive care unit (ICU) in a suburban Baltimore hospital reduced CLABSI rates to zero in 2012, by revising central venous access device policies and initiatives, which included a bloodstream infection alert system, bundle compliance monitoring and routine evaluation, and use of positive displacement needleless connectors. The hospital's ICU infection rate decreased from 2.9/1000 central-line days in 2010 to 0.8 by 2011, 0 by 2012, and 0.91 in 2013. The utilization ratio was 0.64 in 2011, 0.60 in 2012, and 0.58 in 2013. CLABSI prevention involves all disciplines and requires staff accountability for patient safety. PMID:26714119

  10. Bad Dream Frequency in Older Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Prevalence, Correlates, and Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Nadorff, Michael R.; Porter, Ben; Rhoades, Howard M.; Greisinger, Anthony J.; Kunik, Mark E.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and frequency of bad dreams in older adults. A secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety (CBT) to enhanced usual care (EUC), it assessed bad dream frequency at baseline, post-treatment (3 months), and 6, 9, 12 and 15 months. Of 227 participants (mean age = 67.4), 134 met GAD diagnostic criteria (CBT = 70, EUC = 64), with the remaining 93 serving as a comparison group. Patients with GAD had significantly more bad dreams than those without, and bad dream frequency was significantly associated with depression, anxiety, worry, and poor quality of life. CBT for anxiety significantly reduced bad dream frequency at post-treatment and throughout follow-up compared to EUC. PMID:23470116

  11. Bad dream frequency in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder: prevalence, correlates, and effect of cognitive behavioral treatment for anxiety.

    PubMed

    Nadorff, Michael R; Porter, Ben; Rhoades, Howard M; Greisinger, Anthony J; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relation between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and frequency of bad dreams in older adults. A secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety to enhanced usual care (EUC) assessed bad dream frequency at baseline, post treatment (3 months), and at 6, 9, 12, and 15 months. Of 227 participants (mean age = 67.4), 134 met GAD diagnostic criteria (CBT = 70, EUC = 64), with the remaining 93 serving as a comparison group. Patients with GAD had significantly more bad dreams than those without, and bad dream frequency was significantly associated with depression, anxiety, worry, and poor quality of life. CBT for anxiety significantly reduced bad dream frequency at post treatment and throughout follow up compared to EUC. PMID:23470116

  12. Prevalence and comorbidity of nocturnal wandering in the US adult general population

    PubMed Central

    Mahowald, M.W.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Krystal, A.D.; Léger, D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence and comorbid conditions of nocturnal wandering with abnormal state of consciousness (NW) in the American general population. Methods: Cross-sectional study conducted with a representative sample of 19,136 noninstitutionalized individuals of the US general population ≥18 years old. The Sleep-EVAL expert system administered questions on life and sleeping habits; health; and sleep, mental, and organic disorders (DSM-IV-TR; International Classification of Sleep Disorders, version 2; International Classification of Diseases–10). Results: Lifetime prevalence of NW was 29.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 28.5%–29.9%). In the previous year, NW was reported by 3.6% (3.3%–3.9%) of the sample: 1% had 2 or more episodes per month and 2.6% had between 1 and 12 episodes in the previous year. Family history of NW was reported by 30.5% of NW participants. Individuals with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (odds ratio [OR] 3.9), circadian rhythm sleep disorder (OR 3.4), insomnia disorder (OR 2.1), alcohol abuse/dependence (OR 3.5), major depressive disorder (MDD) (OR 3.5), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (OR 3.9), or using over-the-counter sleeping pills (OR 2.5) or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants (OR 3.0) were at higher risk of frequent NW episodes (≥2 times/month). Conclusions: With a rate of 29.2%, lifetime prevalence of NW is high. SSRIs were associated with an increased risk of NW. However, these medications appear to precipitate events in individuals with a prior history of NW. Furthermore, MDD and OCD were associated with significantly greater risk of NW, and this was not due to the use of psychotropic medication. These psychiatric associations imply an increased risk due to sleep disturbance. PMID:22585435

  13. High-intensity interval training on an aquatic treadmill in adults with osteoarthritis: effect on pain, balance, function, and mobility.

    PubMed

    Bressel, Eadric; Wing, Jessica E; Miller, Andrew I; Dolny, Dennis G

    2014-08-01

    Although aquatic exercise is considered a potentially effective treatment intervention for people with osteoarthritis (OA), previous research has focused primarily on calisthenics in a shallow pool with the inherent limitations on regulating exercise intensity. The purpose of this study was to quantify the efficacy of a 6-week aquatic treadmill exercise program on measures of pain, balance, function, and mobility. Eighteen participants (age = 64.5 ± 10.2 years) with knee OA completed a non-exercise control period followed by a 6-week exercise period. Outcome measures included visual analog scales for pain, posturography for balance, sit-to-stand test for function, and a 10-m walk test for mobility. The exercise protocol included balance training and high-intensity interval training (HIT) in an aquatic treadmill using water jets to destabilize while standing and achieve high ratings of perceived exertion (14-19) while walking. In comparison with pretests, participants displayed reduced joint pain (pre = 50.3 ± 24.8 mm vs. post = 15.8 ± 10.6 mm), improved balance (equilibrium pre = 66.6 ± 11.0 vs. post = 73.5 ± 7.1), function (rising index pre = 0.49 ± 0.19% vs. post = 0.33 ± 0.11%), and mobility (walk pre = 8.6 ± 1.4 s vs. post = 7.8 ± 1.1 s) after participating in the exercise protocol (p = 0.03-0.001). The same benefits were not observed after the non-exercise control period. Adherence to the exercise protocol was exceptional and no participants reported adverse effects, suggesting that aquatic treadmill exercise that incorporates balance and HIT training was well tolerated by patients with OA and may be effective at managing symptoms of OA. PMID:25057845

  14. The influence of moderate-intensity physical effort on peripheral blood in adults with Down syndrome - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aleksander-Szymanowicz, P; Marchewka, A; Dabrowski, Z; Teleglow, A; Bac, A; Glodzik, J

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a six-week aerobic training on peripheral blood in adults with Down syndrome. Fifteen men with Down syndrome (average age 22.4 years ± 0.91) with moderate or severe intellectual disability took part in the study. Patients underwent a training program three times a week for six weeks. Venous blood samples of 10 ml were collected from every examined patient, 24 hours before and after the exercise. The blood samples were submitted to hematological examination (hematocrit, fibrinogen, plasma viscosity, red blood cell (RBC) number, RBC indicators: mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH)), reduced glutathione (GSH) level and number of macrocytes, polikilocytrometric examination of RBC and rheological blood examination (elongation index (EI), aggregation index (AI), syllectogram amplitude (AMP), aggregation half time (t1/2)) was made by LORCA. Amoderate six-week physical training performed on a cycloergometer resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the MCV value, hematocrit and plasma viscosity. The six-week cycloergometer training caused a statistically significant increase in the GSH level and erythrocyte pliability at a shear stress of 0.58 Pa. PMID:25371533

  15. Assessing the impact of the duration and intensity of inhalation exposure on the magnitude of the variability of internal dose metrics in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Valcke, Mathieu; Krishnan, Kannan

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the exposure duration and intensity on the human kinetic adjustment factor (HKAF). A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was used to compute target dose metrics (i.e. maximum blood concentration (C(max)) and amount metabolized/L liver/24  h (Amet)) in adults, neonates (0-30 days), toddlers (1-3 years), and pregnant women following inhalation exposure to benzene, styrene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and 1,4-dioxane. Exposure scenarios simulated involved various concentrations based on the chemical's reference concentration (low) and six of U.S. EPA's Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) (high), for durations of 10  min, 60  min, 8  h, and 24  h, as well as at steady-state. Distributions for body weight (BW), height (H), and hepatic CYP2E1 content were obtained from the literature or from P3M software, whereas blood flows and tissue volumes were calculated from BW and H. The HKAF was computed based on distributions of dose metrics obtained by Monte Carlo simulations [95th percentile in each subpopulation/median in adults]. At low levels of exposure, ranges of C(max)-based HKAF were 1-6.8 depending on the chemical, with 1,4-dioxane exhibiting the greatest values. At high levels of exposure, this range was 1.1-5.2, with styrene exhibiting the greatest value. Neonates were always the most sensitive subpopulation based on C(max), and pregnant women were most sensitive based on Amet in the majority of the cases (1.3-2.1). These results have shown that the chemical-specific HKAF varies as a function of exposure duration and intensity of inhalation exposures, and sometimes exceeds the default value used in risk assessments. PMID:22084919

  16. Effects of low-impact, moderate-intensity exercise training with and without wrist weights on functional capacities and mood states in older adults.

    PubMed

    Engels, H J; Drouin, J; Zhu, W; Kazmierski, J F

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effects of low-impact, moderate-intensity exercise training with and without wrist weights (0.68 kg.wrist-1) on functional capacities and mood states in older adults (age 68.6 +/- 5.6, mean +/- SD). Twenty-three senior citizens residing in the community were randomly assigned to wrist weight (WW; n = 12) and no-wrist weight (NW; n = 11) exercise groups while 11 matched subjects served as non-exercise controls (NE). Exercise training was performed for 10 weeks, 3 days/week, for 60 min/session and consisted of low-impact aerobic dance (50-70% of maximal heart rate) combined with exercises to promote muscular fitness, flexibility, and balance. Before and after the intervention, each participant's aerobic fitness, muscular strength, flexibility, static and dynamic balance, skinfold thickness, and psychological mood states were assessed under standardized testing conditions. Exercise training resulted in significant improvements in peak oxygen uptake, lower extremity muscle strength, and psychological vigor (p < 0.05) but did not affect other fitness components (p > 0.05). There were no differences between the WW and NW exercise groups for any of the same variables studied (p > 0.05). No significant pre- to post-test changes were found for the NE control group (p > 0.05). It is concluded that 10 weeks of low-impact, moderate-intensity exercise training of the type that can be considered well-rounded in nature provides a sufficient stimulus to augment aerobic fitness, beneficially affects leg strength, and increases feelings of vigor in older adults. The present observations indicate that the use of light wrist weights has no beneficial or adverse effects on the measured training outcomes. PMID:9657086

  17. Structural invariance of General Behavior Inventory (GBI) scores in Black and White young adults.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, Laura L; Youngstrom, Eric A; Brown, Christopher; Jensen, Dane; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2015-03-01

    In the United States, Black and White individuals show discrepant rates of diagnosis of bipolar disorder versus schizophrenia and antisocial personality disorder, as well as disparate access to and utilization of treatment for these disorders (e.g., Alegria, Chatterji, et al., 2008; Chrishon, Anderson, Arora, & Bailey, 2012). Such diagnostic discrepancies might stem from racially related cognitive biases in clinical judgment or from racial biases in measurements of bipolar disorder. The General Behavior Inventory (GBI) is among the most well-validated and widely used measures of bipolar mood symptoms, but the psychometric properties of the GBI have been examined primarily in predominantly White samples. In this study, we used multigroup confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) to examine the invariance of GBI scores across racial groups with a nonclinical sample. Fit was acceptable for tests of configural invariance, equal factor loadings, and equal intercepts, but not invariance of residuals. Findings indicate that GBI scores provide functionally invariant measurement of mood symptoms in both Black and White samples. The use of GBI scores may contribute consistent information to clinical assessments and could potentially reduce diagnostic discrepancies and associated differences in access to and utilization of mental health services. PMID:25222430

  18. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy for adult craniospinal irradiation—A comparison with traditional techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Shen, Xinglei; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Ying; Shi, Wenyin; Biswas, Tithi; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Harrison, Amy S.

    2013-04-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) poses a challenging planning process because of the complex target volume. Traditional 3D conformal CSI does not spare any critical organs, resulting in toxicity in patients. Here the dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are compared with classic conformal planning in adults for both cranial and spine fields to develop a clinically feasible technique that is both effective and efficient. Ten adult patients treated with CSI were retrospectively identified. For the cranial fields, 5-field IMRT and dual 356° VMAT arcs were compared with opposed lateral 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) fields. For the spine fields, traditional posterior-anterior (PA) PA fields were compared with isocentric 5-field IMRT plans and single 200° VMAT arcs. Two adult patients have been treated using this IMRT technique to date and extensive quality assurance, especially for the junction regions, was performed. For the cranial fields, the IMRT technique had the highest planned target volume (PTV) maximum and was the least efficient, whereas the VMAT technique provided the greatest parotid sparing with better efficiency. 3D-CRT provided the most efficient delivery but with the highest parotid dose. For the spine fields, VMAT provided the best PTV coverage but had the highest mean dose to all organs at risk (OAR). 3D-CRT had the highest PTV and OAR maximum doses but was the most efficient. IMRT provides the greatest OAR sparing but the longest delivery time. For those patients with unresectable disease that can benefit from a higher, definitive dose, 3D-CRT–opposed laterals are the most clinically feasible technique for cranial fields and for spine fields. Although inefficient, the IMRT technique is the most clinically feasible because of the increased mean OAR dose with the VMAT technique. Quality assurance of the beams, especially the junction regions, is essential.

  19. Hormonal, metabolic, and cardiorespiratory responses of young and adult athletes to a single session of high-intensity cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Engel, Florian; Härtel, Sascha; Wagner, Matthias Oliver; Strahler, Jana; Bös, Klaus; Sperlich, Billy

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of a single high-intensity interval training (HIIT) session on salivary cortisol (SC) levels, physiological responses, and performance in trained boys and men. Twenty-three boys (11.5 ± 0.8 years) and 25 men (29.7 ± 4.6 years) performed HIIT (4 consecutive Wingate Anaerobic Tests). SC in boys and men increased after HIIT from 5.55 ± 3.3 nmol/l to 15.13 ± 9.7 nmol/l (+173%) and from 7.07 ± 4.7 nmol/l to 19.19 ± 12.7 nmol/l (+171%), respectively (p < .01). Pretest SC as well as posttest changes were comparable in both groups (both p < .01). Peak blood lactate concentration was significantly lower in boys (12.6 ± 3.5 mmol/l) than in men (16.3 ± 3.1 mmol/l; p < .01). Throughout the HIIT, mean heart rates in boys were higher (p < .001) but relative peak oxygen uptake (ml·min-1·kg-1; p < .05) and performance were lower (p < .001) in boys than in men. HIIT in young athletes is associated with a higher activation of the hormonal stress axis than other types of exercise regimes as described in the literature. This study is the first to show a pronounced SC increase to HIIT in trained boys accompanied by elevated levels of blood lactate concentrations and heart rate suggesting a high cardio-respiratory, metabolic, and hormonal response to HIIT in 11-year-old boys. PMID:25050695

  20. General and abdominal adiposity in a representative sample of Portuguese adults: dependency of measures and socio-demographic factors' influence.

    PubMed

    Kowalkowska, Joanna; Poínhos, Rui; Franchini, Bela; Afonso, Cláudia; Correia, Flora; Pinhão, Sílvia; Vaz de Almeida, Maria Daniel; Rodrigues, Sara

    2016-01-14

    The aims of this study were: (i) to estimate the dependency between BMI and waist:height ratio (WHtR) as measures of general and abdominal adiposity, and (ii) to evaluate the influence of socio-demographic factors on both measures and on their dependency in risk classification. Data from a cross-sectional study conducted in 2009 among a representative sample of 3529 Portuguese adults were used. Height, weight and waist were measured and socio-demographic data (sex, age, education level, occupational status, marital status, region of residence) were obtained. Using logistic regression, crude and adjusted OR for high general (BMI≥25·0 kg/m²) and abdominal (WHtR≥0·5) adiposity, and for incompatible classification between them, were calculated. Above half (50·8%) of the respondents had high BMI and 42·1% had high WHtR, and the rates were higher in men than in women. There was an inverse association between education level and both adiposity measures. The lowest prevalence of high general and abdominal adiposity was observed in students and singles, whereas the highest was found in retired, widowed and respondents from Azores, Madeira and Alentejo. Nearly a quarter of respondents (24·0%) were incompatibly classified by BMI and WHtR, with higher prevalence in men than in women and in low- than in high-educated people. Future surveys should focus on developing at least sex-specific cut-offs for both measures. Implementation of effective strategies for preventing and reducing high adiposity levels in Portugal should be directed primarily to men, older, low-educated individuals, as well as those living in the islands and poor regions of the country. PMID:26489926

  1. Overweight and General and Abdominal Obesity in a Representative Sample of Spanish Adults: Findings from the ANIBES Study

    PubMed Central

    López-Sobaler, Ana M.; Aparicio, Aránzazu; Aranceta-Bartrina, Javier; Gil, Ángel; González-Gross, Marcela; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Ortega, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the anthropometric parameters from a representative sample of Spanish adults participating in ANIBES study and the prevalence of general and abdominal obesity. Methods. This cross-sectional study focused on 1655 adults aged 18–64 years. Weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were evaluated, and body mass index (BMI) and waist to height ratio (WHtR) were calculated. A composite index combining BMI and WHtR was designed to establish five groups with different anthropometric status. Results. The prevalence of overweight (OW) was 35.8% and that of obesity was 19.9%. Obesity (OB) was higher among men (OR 1.725, 1.415–2.104; p = 0.000) and each year of age increased the risk of obesity (OR 1.054, 1.045–1.064; p = 0.000). The prevalence of abdominal obesity (WHtR ≥ 0.5) was 58.4%. Only 36.1% of the population had an optimal anthropometric situation (BMI < 25 kg/m2, WHtR < 0.5), whereas 50.1% had weight excess and high WHtR (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, WHtR ≥ 0.5). Conclusions. More than half of Spanish population has weight excess and cardiometabolic risk. The results of this study provide an understanding of the current anthropometric situation in the Spanish population, as a first step toward planning interventions and assessing their effectiveness in the future. PMID:27382572

  2. Less indoor cleaning is associated with poor health and unhappiness in adults: Japanese General Social Survey, 2010.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-12-01

    Indoor environment is important to human health and well-being. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships among indoor cleaning, rubbish disposal and human health and well-being in a national and population-based setting. Data was retrieved from the Japanese General Social Survey, 2010. Information on demographics, lifestyle factors, frequency of indoor cleaning and rubbish disposal and self-reported health and well-being in Japanese adults was obtained by household interview. Analysis included chi-square test, logistic and multi-nominal regression modelling. Of 5003 Japanese adults (aged 20-89) included in the study cohort, 11.4 % (n = 566) never cleaned their living place, 39.1 % had occasional cleaning and 49.6 % had frequent cleaning. Moreover, 17.5 % (n = 869) never disposed rubbish, 24.9 % had occasional rubbish disposal and 57.6 % had frequent rubbish disposal. 15.0 % of Japanese adults claimed poor self-rated health, and 5.9 % reported unhappiness. Compared to people who frequently cleaned the living place, others tended to report poor self-rated health condition (relative risk ratios (RRR) 1.52, 95 % confidence intervals (CI) 1.24-1.85, P < 0.001) and unhappiness (RRR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.10-1.95, P < 0.001). The combined effects of never cleaning and never rubbish disposal significantly impacted on poor self-rated health (RRR 2.61, 95 % CI 1.40-4.88, P = 0.003) and unhappiness (RRR 2.72, 95 % CI 1.72-4.30, P < 0.001). Only half of the Japanese population frequently cleaned their living place and disposed rubbish. Less or never cleaning and rubbish disposal were associated with poor self-rated health, subjective happiness and potentially other health conditions. Public education on maintaining clean indoor environments to optimise psychological well-being in addition to the known physical health would be suggested. PMID:26503003

  3. Rapidly controlled outbreak of Serratia marcescens infection/colonisations in a neonatal intensive care unit, Pescara General Hospital, Pescara, Italy, April 2011.

    PubMed

    Polilli, E; Parruti, G; Fazii, P; D'Antonio, D; Palmieri, D; D'Incecco, C; Mangifesta, A; Garofalo, G; Del Duca, L; D'Amario, C; Scimia, M; Cortesi, V; Fortunato, V

    2011-01-01

    In April 2011, an outbreak of Serratia marcescens infection/ colonisations occurred in the neonatal intensive care unit of Pescara General Hospital. Rapid microbiological investigations lead to identification of five cases of likely cross-transmission from a neonate hospitalised for S. marcescens sepsis: four infections and one neonate colonised post-mortem. Two low birth weight neonates died. The environmental investigation detected S. marcescens from two soap dispensers. Strict hygiene measures lead to early interruption of the outbreak, without recurrences to date. PMID:21699768

  4. Secondary stroke in patients with polytrauma and traumatic brain injury treated in an Intensive Care Unit, Karlovac General Hospital, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Belavić, M; Jančić, E; Mišković, P; Brozović-Krijan, A; Bakota, B; Žunić, J

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is divided into primary and secondary brain injury. Primary brain injury occurs at the time of injury and is the direct consequence of kinetic energy acting on the brain tissue. Secondary brain injury occurs several hours or days after primary brain injury and is the result of factors including shock, systemic hypotension, hypoxia, hypothermia or hyperthermia, intracranial hypertension, cerebral oedema, intracranial bleeding or inflammation. The aim of this retrospective analysis of a prospective database was to determine the prevalence of secondary stroke and stroke-related mortality, causes of secondary stroke, treatment and length of stay in the ICU and hospital. This study included patients with TBI with or without other injuries who were hospitalised in a general ICU over a five-year period. The following parameters were assessed: demographics (age, sex), scores (Glasgow Coma Score, APACHE II, SOFA), secondary stroke (prevalence, time of occurrence after primary brain injury, causes of stroke and associated mortality), length of stay in the ICU and hospital, vital parameters (state of consciousness, cardiac function, respiration, circulation, thermoregulation, diuresis) and laboratory values (leukocytes, C-reactive protein [CRP], blood glucose, blood gas analysis, urea, creatinine). Medical data were analysed for 306 patients with TBI (median age 56 years, range 18-93 years) who were treated in the general ICU. Secondary stroke occurred in 23 patients (7.5%), 10 of whom died, which gives a mortality rate of 43.4%. Three patients were excluded as the cause of the injury was missile trauma. The study data indicate that inflammation is the most important cause of secondary insults. Levels of CRP were elevated in 65% of patients with secondary brain injury; leukocytosis was present in 87% of these patients, and blood glucose was elevated in 73%. The lungs and urinary tract were the most common sites of infection. In conclusion

  5. Cost utility analysis of reduced intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adolescence and young adult with severe thalassemia compared to hypertransfusion and iron chelation program

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hematopoieticic stem cell transplantation is the only therapeutic option that can cure thalassemia disease. Reduced intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (RI-HSCT) has demonstrated a high cure rate with minimal complications compared to other options. Because RI-HSCT is very costly, economic justification for its value is needed. This study aimed to estimate the cost-utility of RI-HSCT compared with blood transfusions combined with iron chelating therapy (BT-ICT) for adolescent and young adult with severe thalassemia in Thailand. Methods A Markov model was used to estimate the relevant costs and health outcomes over the patients’ lifetimes using a societal perspective. All future costs and outcomes were discounted at a rate of 3% per annum. The efficacy of RI-HSCT was based a clinical trial including a total of 18 thalassemia patients. Utility values were derived directly from all patients using EQ-5D and SF-6D. Primary outcomes of interest were lifetime costs, quality adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) in US ($) per QALY gained. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA) were conducted to investigate the effect of parameter uncertainty. Results In base case analysis, the RI-HSCT group had a better clinical outcomes and higher lifetime costs. The incremental cost per QALY gained was US $ 3,236 per QALY. The acceptability curve showed that the probability of RI-HSCT being cost-effective was 71% at the willingness to pay of 1 time of Thai Gross domestic product per capita (GDP per capita), approximately US $ 4,210 per QALY gained. The most sensitive parameter was utility of severe thalassemia patients without cardiac complication patients. Conclusion At a societal willingness to pay of 1 GDP per capita, RI-HSCT was a cost-effective treatment for adolescent and young adult with severe thalassemia in Thailand compared to BT-ICT. PMID:23379888

  6. Effects of an intensive behavioral weight loss intervention consisting of caloric restriction with or without physical activity on common carotid artery remodeling in severely obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jennifer N.; Columbus, Mindy L.; Shields, Kelly J.; Asubonteng, Julius; Meyer, Michelle L.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Goodpaster, Bret H.; DeLany, James P.; Jakicic, John M.; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Objective Obesity increases cardiovascular disease risk and adversely affects vascular structure and function. Few studies have evaluated the vascular effects of non-surgical weight reduction in the severely obese. We hypothesized that weight loss and improvements in cardiometabolic factors would reduce common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) and inter-adventitial diameter (AD) in severely obese adults. Methods We performed carotid ultrasound and measured cardiometabolic factors in 90 severely obese participants (body mass index (BMI)≥35 kg/m2, age 30–55) at baseline and 6 months in a randomized clinical trial of dietary intervention with (n=45) or without (n=45) physical activity. Results The achieved weight loss (mean=8%) did not differ significantly by intervention group (P=0.10) and resulted in a 0.07 mm mean decrease in AD (P=0.001). AD change was positively correlated with changes in BMI, waist circumference, abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat, and body fat mass, and AD decreased more in men (P<0.05 for all). After multivariable adjustment, changes in BMI (P=0.03) and abdominal subcutaneous fat (P=0.04) were significant determinants of AD change. Although CIMT did not decrease significantly overall (−0.008 mm, P=0.16), individuals who lost at least 5% of their body weight experienced a significant mean reduction in CIMT of 0.02 mm (P=0.002). CIMT change was positively correlated with changes in BMI, waist circumference, fat-free mass, leptin, and insulin (P<0.05 for all). After multivariable adjustment, insulin reduction remained a significant determinant of CIMT decrease (P=0.03). Conclusion A6 month intensive behavioral intervention can significantly reverse metabolic and vascular abnormalities in severely obese adults. PMID:22579053

  7. Poor growth, thyroid dysfunction and vitamin D deficiency remain prevalent despite reduced intensity chemotherapy for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Myers, K C; Howell, J C; Wallace, G; Dandoy, C; El-Bietar, J; Lane, A; Davies, S M; Jodele, S; Rose, S R

    2016-07-01

    Myeloablative conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) are known to affect endocrine function, but little is known regarding reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens. We retrospectively reviewed 114 children and young adults after single RIC HSCT. The analysis was grouped by age (<2 and ⩾2 years) and diagnosis (hemophagocytic lymphohistiocystosis/X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (HLH/XLP), other immune disorders, metabolic/genetic disorders). All groups displayed short stature by mean height-adjusted Z-score (HAZ) before (-1.29) and after HSCT (HAZ -1.38, P=0.47). After HSCT, younger children with HLH/XLP grew better (HAZ -3.41 vs -1.65, P=0.006), whereas older subjects had decline in growth (HAZ -0.8 vs -1.01, P=0.06). Those with steroid therapy beyond standard GVHD prophylaxis were shorter than those without (P 0.04). After HSCT, older subjects with HLH/XLP became thinner with a mean body mass index (BMI) Z-score of 1.20 vs 0.64, P=0.02, and similar to metabolic/genetic disorders (BMI-Z= 0.59 vs -0.99, P<0.001). BMI increased among younger children in these same groups. Thyroid function was abnormal in 24% (18/76). 25-OH vitamin D levels were insufficient in 73% (49/65), with low bone mineral density in 8 of 19 evaluable subjects. Despite RIC, children and young adults still have significant late endocrine effects. Further research is required to compare post-transplant endocrine effects after RIC to those after standard chemotherapy protocols. PMID:26974276

  8. A decade of adult intensive care unit design: a study of the physical design features of the best-practice examples.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2006-01-01

    This article reports a study of the physical design characteristics of a set of adult intensive care units (ICUs), built between 1993 and 2003. These ICUs were recognized as the best-practice examples by the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, and the American Institute of Architects. This study is based on a systematic analysis of the materials found on these ICUs in the booklet and videos jointly published by the above organizations in 2005. The study finds that most of these examples of best-practice adult ICUs have the following negative characteristics: (1) they are built as renovation projects with more health and safety hazards during construction; (2) most of them are mixed-service units with more safety and staffing problems; (3) the overall layout and the layout of staff work areas in these ICUs do not have any common design solutions for improved patient and staff outcomes; and (4) in these ICUs, family space is often located outside the unit, and family access to the patient room is restricted, even though family presence at the bedside may be important for improved patient outcomes. Some of these negative characteristics are offset by the following positive characteristics in most ICUs: (1) they have only private patient rooms for improved patient care, safety, privacy, and comfort; (2) most patient beds are freestanding for easy access to patients from all sides; (3) they have handwashing sinks and waste disposal facilities in the patient room for improved safety; and (4) most patient rooms have natural light to help patients with circadian rhythms. The article discusses, in detail, the implications of its findings, and the role of the ICU design community in a very complicated design context. PMID:17063097

  9. Stacking sequence determines Raman intensities of observed interlayer shear modes in 2D layered materials – A general bond polarizability model

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Cong, Chunxiao; Yu, Ting; Xiong, Qihua; Ying Quek, Su

    2015-01-01

    2D layered materials have recently attracted tremendous interest due to their fascinating properties and potential applications. The interlayer interactions are much weaker than the intralayer bonds, allowing the as-synthesized materials to exhibit different stacking sequences, leading to different physical properties. Here, we show that regardless of the space group of the 2D materials, the Raman frequencies of the interlayer shear modes observed under the typical configuration blue shift for AB stacked materials, and red shift for ABC stacked materials, as the number of layers increases. Our predictions are made using an intuitive bond polarizability model which shows that stacking sequence plays a key role in determining which interlayer shear modes lead to the largest change in polarizability (Raman intensity); the modes with the largest Raman intensity determining the frequency trends. We present direct evidence for these conclusions by studying the Raman modes in few layer graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and Bi2Se3, using both first principles calculations and Raman spectroscopy. This study sheds light on the influence of stacking sequence on the Raman intensities of intrinsic interlayer modes in 2D layered materials in general, and leads to a practical way of identifying the stacking sequence in these materials. PMID:26469313

  10. Stacking sequence determines Raman intensities of observed interlayer shear modes in 2D layered materials--A general bond polarizability model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Cong, Chunxiao; Yu, Ting; Xiong, Qihua; Quek, Su Ying

    2015-01-01

    2D layered materials have recently attracted tremendous interest due to their fascinating properties and potential applications. The interlayer interactions are much weaker than the intralayer bonds, allowing the as-synthesized materials to exhibit different stacking sequences, leading to different physical properties. Here, we show that regardless of the space group of the 2D materials, the Raman frequencies of the interlayer shear modes observed under the typical z(xx)z configuration blue shift for AB stacked materials, and red shift for ABC stacked materials, as the number of layers increases. Our predictions are made using an intuitive bond polarizability model which shows that stacking sequence plays a key role in determining which interlayer shear modes lead to the largest change in polarizability (Raman intensity); the modes with the largest Raman intensity determining the frequency trends. We present direct evidence for these conclusions by studying the Raman modes in few layer graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and Bi2Se3, using both first principles calculations and Raman spectroscopy. This study sheds light on the influence of stacking sequence on the Raman intensities of intrinsic interlayer modes in 2D layered materials in general, and leads to a practical way of identifying the stacking sequence in these materials. PMID:26469313

  11. Accuracy and Acceptability of Oral Fluid HIV Self-Testing in a General Adult Population in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Ann E; Cleland, Charles M; Chhun, Nok; Sidle, John E; Were, Edwin; Naanyu, Violet; Emonyi, Wilfred; Macharia, Stephen M; Sang, Edwin; Siika, Abraham M

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated performance, accuracy, and acceptability parameters of unsupervised oral fluid (OF) HIV self-testing (HIVST) in a general population in western Kenya. In a prospective validation design, we enrolled 240 adults to perform rapid OF HIVST and compared results to staff administered OF and rapid fingerstick tests. All reactive, discrepant, and a proportion of negative results were confirmed with lab ELISA. Twenty participants were video-recorded conducting self-testing. All participants completed a staff administered survey before and after HIVST to assess attitudes towards OF HIVST acceptability. HIV prevalence was 14.6 %. Thirty-six of the 239 HIVSTs were invalid (15.1 %; 95 % CI 11.1-20.1 %), with males twice as likely to have invalid results as females. HIVST sensitivity was 89.7 % (95 % CI 73-98 %) and specificity was 98 % (95 % CI 89-99 %). Although sensitivity was somewhat lower than expected, there is clear interest in, and high acceptability (94 %) of OF HIV self-testing. PMID:26438487

  12. Effectiveness of Housing First with Intensive Case Management in an Ethnically Diverse Sample of Homeless Adults with Mental Illness: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Gozdzik, Agnes; Misir, Vachan; Skosireva, Anna; Connelly, Jo; Sarang, Aseefa; Whisler, Adam; Hwang, Stephen W.; O’Campo, Patricia; McKenzie, Kwame

    2015-01-01

    Housing First (HF) is being widely disseminated in efforts to end homelessness among homeless adults with psychiatric disabilities. This study evaluates the effectiveness of HF with Intensive Case Management (ICM) among ethnically diverse homeless adults in an urban setting. 378 participants were randomized to HF with ICM or treatment-as-usual (TAU) in Toronto (Canada), and followed for 24 months. Measures of effectiveness included housing stability, physical (EQ5D-VAS) and mental (CSI, GAIN-SS) health, social functioning (MCAS), quality of life (QoLI20), and health service use. Two-thirds of the sample (63%) was from racialized groups and half (50%) were born outside Canada. Over the 24 months of follow-up, HF participants spent a significantly greater percentage of time in stable residences compared to TAU participants (75.1% 95% CI 70.5 to 79.7 vs. 39.3% 95% CI 34.3 to 44.2, respectively). Similarly, community functioning (MCAS) improved significantly from baseline in HF compared to TAU participants (change in mean difference = +1.67 95% CI 0.04 to 3.30). There was a significant reduction in the number of days spent experiencing alcohol problems among the HF compared to TAU participants at 24 months (ratio of rate ratios = 0.47 95% CI 0.22 to 0.99) relative to baseline, a reduction of 53%. Although the number of emergency department visits and days in hospital over 24 months did not differ significantly between HF and TAU participants, fewer HF participants compared to TAU participants had 1 or more hospitalizations during this period (70.4% vs. 81.1%, respectively; P=0.044). Compared to non-racialized HF participants, racialized HF participants saw an increase in the amount of money spent on alcohol (change in mean difference = $112.90 95% CI 5.84 to 219.96) and a reduction in physical community integration (ratio of rate ratios = 0.67 95% CI 0.47 to 0.96) from baseline to 24 months. Secondary analyses found a significant reduction in the number of days

  13. Assessment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder Diagnostic Criteria in the National Comorbidity Survey and Virginia Adult Twin Study of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubarych, Thomas S.; Aggen, Steven H.; Hettema, John M.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Neale, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated measurement properties of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition," generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) criteria in the National Comorbidity Survey and the Virginia Adult Twin Study of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders (VATSPSUD). The two studies used different widely used…

  14. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disabilities to Perform Multiple Step, Job Tasks in a Generalized Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ortega-Hurndon, Fanny

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach three young adults with moderate intellectual disabilities to perform complex, multiple step, job tasks in a generalized setting. A multiple probe design across three job tasks and replicated across three students was used to evaluate the effectiveness of…

  15. A Study of the Achievement Level Criteria for Nonveteran Adult Students' Eligibility for Taking the Test of General Educational Development in Louisiana. Bulletin No. 1267.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dauzat, Sam V.; And Others

    The investigation tested the mean overall grade level placement of senior students in Louisiana secondary schools for the 1973-74 school session to see if they could meet the same standard that was used for adult students as the prerequisite for General Educational Development (GED) testing for the high school equivalency diploma (that is a…

  16. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation with reduced conditioning intensity as a novel immunotherapy and antiviral therapy for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Jun; Utsunomiya, Atae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Uike, Naokuni; Sonoda, Shunro; Kannagi, Mari; Tomonaga, Masao; Harada, Mine; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Masuda, Masato; Kawano, Fumio; Yufu, Yuji; Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Saburi, Yoshio

    2005-05-15

    Sixteen patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) who were all over 50 years of age underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation with reduced-conditioning intensity (RIST) from HLA-matched sibling donors after a conditioning regimen consisting of fludarabine (180 mg/m2), busulfan (8 mg/kg), and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (5 mg/kg). The observed regimen-related toxicities and nonhematologic toxicities were all found to be acceptable. Disease relapse was the main cause of treatment failure. Three patients who had a relapse subsequently responded to a rapid discontinuation of the immunosuppressive agent and thereafter achieved another remission. After RIST, the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load became undetectable in 8 patients. RIST is thus considered to be a feasible treatment for ATL. Our data also suggest the presence of a possible graft-versus-ATL effect; an anti-HTLV-1 activity was also found to be associated with this procedure. PMID:15665110

  17. Increased objectively assessed vigorous-intensity exercise is associated with reduced stress, increased mental health and good objective and subjective sleep in young adults.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Brand, Serge; Herrmann, Christian; Colledge, Flora; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe

    2014-08-01

    The role of physical activity as a factor that protects against stress-related mental disorders is well documented. Nevertheless, there is still a dearth of research using objective measures of physical activity. The present study examines whether objectively assessed vigorous physical activity (VPA) is associated with mental health benefits beyond moderate physical activity (MPA). Particularly, this study examines whether young adults who accomplish the American College of Sports Medicine's (ACSM) vigorous-intensity exercise recommendations differ from peers below these standards with regard to their level of perceived stress, depressive symptoms, perceived pain, and subjective and objective sleep. A total of 42 undergraduate students (22 women, 20 men; M=21.24years, SD=2.20) volunteered to take part in the study. Stress, pain, depressive symptoms, and subjective sleep were assessed via questionnaire, objective sleep via sleep-EEG assessment, and VPA via actigraphy. Meeting VPA recommendations had mental health benefits beyond MPA. VPA was associated with less stress, pain, subjective sleep complaints and depressive symptoms. Moreover, vigorous exercisers had more favorable objective sleep pattern. Especially, they had increased total sleep time, more stage 4 and REM sleep, more slow wave sleep and a lower percentage of light sleep. Vigorous exercisers also reported fewer mental health problems if exposed to high stress. This study provides evidence that meeting the VPA standards of the ACSM is associated with improved mental health and more successful coping among young people, even compared to those who are meeting or exceeding the requirements for MPA. PMID:24905432

  18. The Impact of Stressful Life Events and Social Support on Drinking among Older Adults: A General Population Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennison, Karen M.

    1992-01-01

    Analyzed stressful life events, buffering hypothesis, and alcohol use in 1,418 older adults. Results indicated that older adults who experienced stressful losses were significantly more likely to drink excessively than those who had not experienced such losses or who had experienced them to lesser extent. Supportive resources appeared to have…

  19. Illinois Community College Board FY 2004 Adult Education and Family Literacy Report to the Governor and General Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community College Board, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Illinois Community College Board (ICCB) continues its commitment to expand Adult Education and Family Literacy programs necessary for individuals and families to have a high quality work and life in Illinois. This report provides a summary of ICCB programs and activities in adult education and family literacy during the fiscal year July 1,…

  20. Filling the Frame. Adult Education and Vocational Training Institute Guidelines for the Implementation of Integrated Curricula within the Certificates of General Education for Adults Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Corrective Services, Sydney (Australia).

    This document contains learning modules for adult basic education courses in Australia, along with teacher information for integrating curricula, using integrated themes, and planning curricula. The learning modules contain learning activities in the following areas: job search skills; occupational health and safety; life skills; ceramics;…

  1. Modelo Pedagogico de Educacion Primaria para Adultos: Guia General de Apoyo para el Estudiante de Primaria (Pedagogical Model for Adult Primary Education: General Guide for the Student).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    This book, part of a Mexican series of instructional materials, is directed toward people over the age of 15 who are interested in beginning, continuing or finishing their basic education. It explains the pedagogical model developed for adult education in Mexico based on the following features: (1) the content of the textbooks must be useful for…

  2. The implementation of a guideline of care for patients with a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube in situ in a general intensive care unit using transitional change theory.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Teresa; Christensen, Martin

    2007-08-01

    The use of the Sengstaken-Blakemore tube as a life-saving treatment for bleeding oesophageal varices is slowly becoming the least preferred method possibly due to the potential complications associated with its placement. Nursing practice pertaining to the care of this patient group appears ad hoc and reliant on local knowledge and experience as opposed to recognised evidence of best practice. Therefore, this paper focuses on the application of Lewin's transitional change theory used to introduce a change in nursing practice with the application of a guideline to enhance the care of patients with a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube in situ within a general intensive care unit. This method identified some of the complexities surrounding the change process including the driving and restraining forces that must be harnessed and minimised in order for the adoption of change to be successful. PMID:17434309

  3. Statistical process control of mortality series in the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) adult patient database: implications of the data generating process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Statistical process control (SPC), an industrial sphere initiative, has recently been applied in health care and public health surveillance. SPC methods assume independent observations and process autocorrelation has been associated with increase in false alarm frequency. Methods Monthly mean raw mortality (at hospital discharge) time series, 1995–2009, at the individual Intensive Care unit (ICU) level, were generated from the Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Society adult patient database. Evidence for series (i) autocorrelation and seasonality was demonstrated using (partial)-autocorrelation ((P)ACF) function displays and classical series decomposition and (ii) “in-control” status was sought using risk-adjusted (RA) exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control limits (3 sigma). Risk adjustment was achieved using a random coefficient (intercept as ICU site and slope as APACHE III score) logistic regression model, generating an expected mortality series. Application of time-series to an exemplar complete ICU series (1995-(end)2009) was via Box-Jenkins methodology: autoregressive moving average (ARMA) and (G)ARCH ((Generalised) Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity) models, the latter addressing volatility of the series variance. Results The overall data set, 1995-2009, consisted of 491324 records from 137 ICU sites; average raw mortality was 14.07%; average(SD) raw and expected mortalities ranged from 0.012(0.113) and 0.013(0.045) to 0.296(0.457) and 0.278(0.247) respectively. For the raw mortality series: 71 sites had continuous data for assessment up to or beyond lag40 and 35% had autocorrelation through to lag40; and of 36 sites with continuous data for ≥ 72 months, all demonstrated marked seasonality. Similar numbers and percentages were seen with the expected series. Out-of-control signalling was evident for the raw mortality series with respect to RA-EWMA control limits; a seasonal ARMA model, with GARCH effects

  4. Effects of Intensive Diet and Exercise on Knee Joint Loads, Inflammation, and Clinical Outcomes Among Overweight and Obese Adults With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.; Mihalko, Shannon L.; Legault, Claudine; Miller, Gary D.; Nicklas, Barbara J.; DeVita, Paul; Beavers, Daniel P.; Hunter, David J.; Lyles, Mary F.; Eckstein, Felix; Williamson, Jeff D.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Guermazi, Ali; Loeser, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Knee osteoarthritis (OA), a common cause of chronic pain and disability, has biomechanical and inflammatory origins and is exacerbated by obesity. OBJECTIVE To determine whether a ≥10% reduction in body weight induced by diet, with or without exercise, would improve mechanistic and clinical outcomes more than exercise alone. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Single-blind, 18-month, randomized clinical trial at Wake Forest University between July 2006 and April 2011. The diet and exercise interventions were center-based with options for the exercise groups to transition to a home-based program. Participants were 454 overweight and obese older community-dwelling adults (age ≥55 years with body mass index of 27–41) with pain and radiographic knee OA. INTERVENTIONS Intensive diet-induced weight loss plus exercise, intensive diet-induced weight loss, or exercise. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Mechanistic primary outcomes: knee joint compressive force and plasma IL-6 levels; secondary clinical outcomes: self-reported pain (range, 0–20), function (range, 0–68), mobility, and health-related quality of life (range, 0–100). RESULTS At 18 months, 399 participants (88%) completed the study. Compared with exercise participants, knee compressive forces were lower in diet participants and IL-6 levels were lower in diet and diet + exercise participants. 18-mo Outcomes, Mean (95% CI) Exercise(E) Diet (D) D + E Difference,E vs D Difference, Evs D+E Weight loss, kg −1.8(−5.7to1.8) −8.9(−12.4 to −5.3) −10.6(−14.1 to −7.1) Knee compressiveforces, N 2687(2590 to 2784) 2487(2393 to 2581) 2543(2448 to 2637) 200(55 to 345)a 144(1 to 287) IL-6, pg/mL 3.1(2.9 to 3.4) 2.7(2.4 to 3.0) 2.7(2.5 to 3.0) 0.43(0.01 to 0.85)a 0.39(−0.03 to 0.81)a Pain 4.7(4.2 to 5.1) 4.8(4.3 to 5.2) 3.6(3.2 to 4.1) −0.11(−0.81 to 0.59) 1.02(0.33 to 1.71)a Function 18.4(16.9 to 19.9) 17.4(15.9 to 18.9) 14.1(12.6 to 15.6) 0.98(−1.24 to 3.20) 4.29(2.07 to 6.50)a SF-36

  5. Thoracic spine pain in the general population: Prevalence, incidence and associated factors in children, adolescents and adults. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Andrew M; Smith, Anne J; Straker, Leon M; Bragge, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Thoracic spine pain (TSP) is experienced across the lifespan by healthy individuals and is a common presentation in primary healthcare clinical practice. However, the epidemiological characteristics of TSP are not well documented compared to neck and low back pain. A rigorous evaluation of the prevalence, incidence, correlates and risk factors needs to be undertaken in order for epidemiologic data to be meaningfully used to develop evidence-based prevention and treatment recommendations for TSP. Methods A systematic review method was followed to report the evidence describing prevalence, incidence, associated factors and risk factors for TSP among the general population. Nine electronic databases were systematically searched to identify studies that reported either prevalence, incidence, associated factors (cross-sectional study) or risk factors (prospective study) for TSP in healthy children, adolescents or adults. Studies were evaluated for level of evidence and method quality. Results Of the 1389 studies identified in the literature, 33 met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The mean (SD) quality score (out of 15) for the included studies was 10.5 (2.0). TSP prevalence data ranged from 4.0–72.0% (point), 0.5–51.4% (7-day), 1.4–34.8% (1-month), 4.8–7.0% (3-month), 3.5–34.8% (1-year) and 15.6–19.5% (lifetime). TSP prevalence varied according to the operational definition of TSP. Prevalence for any TSP ranged from 0.5–23.0%, 15.8–34.8%, 15.0–27.5% and 12.0–31.2% for 7-day, 1-month, 1-year and lifetime periods, respectively. TSP associated with backpack use varied from 6.0–72.0% and 22.9–51.4% for point and 7-day periods, respectively. TSP interfering with school or leisure ranged from 3.5–9.7% for 1-year prevalence. Generally, studies reported a higher prevalence for TSP in child and adolescent populations, and particularly for females. The 1 month, 6 month, 1 year and 25 year incidences were 0–0.9%, 10.3%, 3

  6. Moderation of Adult Depression by a Polymorphism in the FKBP5 Gene and Childhood Physical Abuse in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Katja; Schwahn, Christian; Mahler, Jessie; Schulz, Andrea; Spitzer, Carsten; Fenske, Kristin; Stender, Jan; Barnow, Sven; John, Ulrich; Teumer, Alexander; Biffar, Reiner; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Freyberger, Harald J; Grabe, Hans J

    2011-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment and depressive disorders have both been associated with a dysregulation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. The FKBP5 gene codes for a co-chaperone regulating the glucocorticoid-receptor sensitivity. Previous evidence suggests that subjects carrying the TT genotype of the FKBP5 gene single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1360780 have an increased susceptibility to adverse effects of experimental stress. We therefore tested the hypothesis of an interaction of childhood abuse with rs1360780 in predicting adult depression. In all, 2157 Caucasian subjects from the Study of Health in Pomerania (German general population) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. The DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) was assessed by interview. Genotypes of rs1360780 were taken from the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0. Significant interaction (p=0.006) of physical abuse with the TT genotype of rs1360780 was found increasing the BDI-II score to 17.4 (95% confidence interval (CI)=12.0–22.9) compared with 10.0 (8.2–11.7) in exposed CC/CT carriers. Likewise, the adjusted odds ratio for MDD in exposed TT carriers was 8.2 (95% CI=1.9–35.0) compared with 1.3 (0.8–2.3) in exposed subjects with CC/CT genotypes. Relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) analyses confirmed a significant additive interaction effect (RERI=6.8; 95% CI=0.64–33.7; p<0.05). In explorative analyses, the most severe degree of sexual and emotional abuse also yielded significant interaction effects (p<0.05). This study revealed interactions between physical abuse and rs1360780 of the FKBP5 gene, confirming its role in the individual susceptibility to depression. Given the large effect sizes, rs1360780 could be included into prediction models for depression in individuals exposed to childhood abuse. PMID:21654733

  7. Prevalence estimation of celiac disease in the general adult population of Latvia using serology and HLA genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Shums, Zakera; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Gavars, Mikus; Kikuste, Ilze; Milo, Jay; Daugule, Ilva; Pahomova, Jelena; Pirags, Valdis; Dzerve, Vilnis; Klovins, Janis; Erglis, Andrejs; Norman, Gary L

    2015-01-01

    Background Prevalence estimates for celiac disease (CD) depend on the method used. The role of deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) and genetic testing in epidemiological studies and diagnostic settings of celiac disease (CD) has still to be established. Objectives The objective of this article is to assess the prevalence of CD in Latvia by combining serological tests with DQ2.5/DQ8 testing. Methods A total of 1444 adults from a randomly selected cross-sectional general population sample were tested by ELISA for tTG IgA, DGP IgA and IgG antibodies (QUANTA Lite®, Inova Diagnostics Inc). Samples with tTG IgA ≥20U were tested for EMA IgA by indirect immunofluorescence assay, and all specimens with tTG IgA ≥15U were tested by QUANTA-Flash® chemiluminescent assays (CIA) (Inova Diagnostics Inc) for tTG IgA, DGP IgA and IgG. DQ2.5/8 was detected in individuals with any positive ELISA test and a subgroup of controls. Results Forty-three individuals (2.98%; 95% CI: 2.10–3.86%) tested positive by at least one ELISA test; 41.86% of the serology-positive individuals (any test above the cutoff) were DQ positive. Six individuals (0.42%; 95% CI: 0.09–0.75%) were triple ELISA positive, and DQ2.5 or DQ8 was positive in all; 0.35% (95% CI: 0.05–0.65%) were tTG IgA and EMA positive. Two tTG IgA-negative cases were both DGP IgG and IgA positive, both being DQ positive; including them in the “serology-positive” group would increase the prevalence to 0.49% (95% CI: 0.13–0.85%). CIA tests revealed 2 tTG IgA-positive and EMA-negative cases with a positive genotype. DQ2.5 or DQ8 genotype was positive in 28.6% of the serology-negative population. Conclusions Estimates of the prevalence of CD in Latvia based on the serogenetic testing approach range from 0.35% to 0.49% depending on the criteria used. There is a rationale for combining serological tests and DQ2.5/8 genotyping. PMID:25922680

  8. Valproic Acid versus Lamotrigine as First-line Monotherapy in Newly Diagnosed Idiopathic Generalized Tonic –Clonic Seizures in Adults – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Om Prakash; Khan, Farhan Ahmad; Kumar, Narendra; Kumar, Ajay; Haque, Ataul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures (GTCS) are frequently encountered in adults. Their successful control is necessary to improve the quality of life of these patients. Valproic acid is a simple branched-chain carboxylic acid and lamotrigine is a phenyltriazine derivative. Opinions differ in regards to their effectiveness in idiopathic GTCS. Aim To compare the effectiveness of valproic acid and lamotrigine in newly diagnosed adults with idiopathic generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Materials and Methods The present prospective randomized study was conducted on 60 patients suffering from idiopathic GTCS. Thirty patients received valproic acid and rest 30 patients received lamotrigine. All patients were followed regularly monthly for one year for treatment response and adverse effects. Results After 12 months follow-up, 76.67% patients taking valproic acid and 56.67% patients taking lamotrigine were seizure-free. Common adverse effects recorded were nausea, dyspepsia, headache and skin rash. Conclusion Valproic acid is more effective than lamotrigine as first-line drug in the treatment of adults with newly diagnosed idiopathic generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

  9. Task Engagement in Young Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders: Generalization Effects of Behavioral Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmen, Annemiek; Didden, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a behavioral skills training package on task engagement in six young adults with high-functioning ASD who worked in a regular job-training setting. Experimental sessions were implemented in a small-group training format in a therapy room using unknown tasks. Data were collected on participant's off-task…

  10. On the Plasticity of Semantic Generalizations: Children and Adults Modify Their Verb Lexicalization Biases in Response to Changing Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafto, Carissa L.; Havasi, Catherine; Snedeker, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Languages differ in how they package the components of an event into words to form sentences. For example, while some languages typically encode the manner of motion in the verb (e.g., running), others more often use verbs that encode the path (e.g., ascending). Prior research has demonstrated that children and adults have lexicalization biases;…

  11. Teaching Generalized Reading of Product Warning Labels to Young Adults with Autism Using the Constant Time Delay Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogoe, Maud S.; Banda, Devender R.; Lock, Robin H.; Feinstein, Rita

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the constant timed delay procedure for teaching two young adults with autism to read, define, and state the contextual meaning of keywords on product warning labels of common household products. Training sessions were conducted in the dyad format using flash cards. Results indicated that both participants…

  12. Secondary Education Systems and the General Skills of Less- and Intermediate-Educated Adults: A Comparison of 18 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heisig, Jan Paul; Solga, Heike

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the impact of external differentiation and vocational orientation of (lower and upper) secondary education on country variation in the mean numeracy skills of, and skills gaps between, adults with low and intermediate formal qualifications. We use data on 30- to 44-year-olds in 18 countries from the 2011-12 round of the Program for…

  13. Illinois Community College Board FY 2006 Adult Education and Family Literacy Report to the Governor and General Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community College Board, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Economic and demographic changes are dramatically increasing the need for adult education, basic literacy, and English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) programs. Millions of Illinois residents lack the level of literacy skills needed to obtain good jobs, perform well on the job, and function well in an increasingly complex society. Addressing the scope…

  14. Illinois Community College Board FY 2005 Adult Education and Family Literacy Report to the Governor and General Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community College Board, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Economic and demographic changes are dramatically increasing the need for adult education, basic literacy, and English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) programs. Millions of Illinois residents lack the level of literacy skills needed to obtain good jobs, perform well on the job, and function well in an increasingly complex society. Addressing the scope…

  15. Do prenatally methamphetamine-exposed adult male rats display general predisposition to drug abuse in the conditioned place preference test?

    PubMed

    Šlamberová, R; Pometlová, M; Schutová, B; Hrubá, L; Macúchová, E; Nová, E; Rokyta, R

    2012-01-01

    Drug abuse of pregnant women is a growing problem. The effect of prenatal drug exposure may have devastating effect on development of the offsprings that may be long-term or even permanent. One of the most common drug abused by pregnant women is methamphetamine (MA), which is also the most frequently abused illicit drug in the Czech Republic. Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal MA exposure alters behavior, cognition, pain and seizures in adult rats in sex-specific manner. Our most recent studies demonstrate that prenatal MA exposure makes adult rats more sensitive to acute injection of the same or related drugs than their controls. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of prenatal MA exposure on drug-seeking behavior of adult male rats tested in the Conditioned place preference (CPP). Adult male rats were divided to: prenatally MA-exposed (5 mg/kg daily for the entire prenatal period), prenatally saline-exposed (1 ml/kg of physiological saline) and controls (without maternal injections). The following drugs were used in the CPP test in adulthood: MA (5 mg/kg), amphetamine (5 mg/kg), cocaine (5 and 10 mg/kg), morphine (5 mg/kg), MDMA (5 mg/kg) and THC (2 mg/kg). Our data demonstrated that prenatally MA-exposed rats displayed higher amphetamine-seeking behavior than both controls. MA as well as morphine induced drug-seeking behavior of adult male rats, however this effect did not differ based on the prenatal MA exposure. In contrast, prenatal MA exposure induced rather tolerance to cocaine than sensitization after the conditioning in the CPP. MDMA and THC did not induce significant effects. Even though the present data did not fully confirmed our hypotheses, future studies are planned to test the drug-seeking behavior also in self-administration test. PMID:23130898

  16. A Cross-sectional Study on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and General Psychiatric Morbidity Among Adult Survivors 3 Years After the Wenchuan Earthquake, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Duan, Guangfeng; Xu, Qin; Jia, Zhaobao; Bai, Zhengyang; Liu, Weizhi; Pan, Xiao; Tian, Wenhua

    2015-11-01

    After the Wenchuan earthquake, a large number of studies have focused on postearthquake psychological disorders among survivors; however, most of these studies were conducted within a relatively short period. This study was conducted to examine the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and general psychiatric morbidity among adult survivors 3 years after the Wenchuan earthquake, China. Through a multistage systematic sampling approach, a cross-sectional survey of 360 participants, 18 years or older, was conducted. The prevalence of PTSD and general psychiatric morbidity was 10.3% and 20.6%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed significant predictors for PTSD, including female gender and having felt guilt concerning someone's death or injury. Significant predictors for general psychiatric morbidity included unmarried status and having been in serious danger. These results suggest that mental health services should be continuously available to earthquake survivors. PMID:26316500

  17. Memory and comprehension for health information among older adults: distinguishing the effects of domain-general and domain-specific knowledge.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jessie; Payne, Brennan; Gao, Xuefei; Conner-Garcia, Thembi; Graumlich, James F; Murray, Michael D; Morrow, Daniel G; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L

    2015-01-01

    While there is evidence that knowledge influences understanding of health information, less is known about the processing mechanisms underlying this effect and its impact on memory. We used the moving window paradigm to examine how older adults varying in domain-general crystallised ability (verbal ability) and health knowledge allocate attention to understand health and domain-general texts. Participants (n = 107, age: 60-88 years) read and recalled single sentences about hypertension and about non-health topics. Mixed-effects modelling of word-by-word reading times suggested that domain-general crystallised ability increased conceptual integration regardless of text domain, while health knowledge selectively increased resource allocation to conceptual integration at clause boundaries in health texts. These patterns of attentional allocation were related to subsequent recall performance. Although older adults with lower levels of crystallised ability were less likely to engage in integrative processing, when they did, this strategy had a compensatory effect in improving recall. These findings suggest that semantic integration during reading is an important comprehension process that supports the construction of the memory representation and is engendered by knowledge. Implications of the findings for theories of text processing and memory as well as for designing patient education materials are discussed. PMID:24787361

  18. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of zonisamide in adult patients with partial, generalized, and combined seizures: an open labeled, noncomparative, observational Indian study.

    PubMed

    Dash, Amitabh; Ravat, Sangeeta; Srinivasan, Avathvadi Venkatesan; Shetty, Ashutosh; Kumar, Vivek; Achtani, Renu; Mathur, Vivek Narain; Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Bajpai, Veeresh; Manjunath, Nanjappa C; Narayana, Randhi Venkata; Mehta, Suyog

    2016-01-01

    A prospective, multicentric, noncomparative open-label observational study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy zonisamide in Indian adult patients for the treatment of partial, generalized, or combined seizures. A total of 655 adult patients with partial, generalized, or combined seizures from 30 centers across India were recruited after initial screening. Patients received 100 mg zonisamide as initiating dose as monotherapy/adjunctive therapy for 24 weeks, with titration of 100 mg every 2 weeks if required. Adverse events, responder rates, and seizure freedom were observed every 4 weeks. Efficacy and safety were also assessed using Clinicians Global Assessment of Response to Therapy and Patients Global Assessment of Tolerability to Therapy, respectively. Follow-up was conducted for a period of 24 weeks after treatment initiation. A total of 655 patients were enrolled and received the treatment and 563 completed the evaluation phase. A total of 20.92% of patients received zonisamide as monotherapy or alternative monotherapy and 59.85% patients received zonisamide as first adjunctive therapy. Compared with baseline, 41.22% of patients achieved seizure freedom and 78.6% as responder rate at the end of 24 week study. Most commonly reported adverse events were loss of appetite, weight loss, sedation, and dizziness, but discontinuation due to adverse events of drug was seen in 0.92% of patients. This open label real-world study suggests that zonisamide is an effective and well-tolerated antiepileptic drug in Indian adults for treatment of partial, generalized as well as combined seizures type. No new safety signals were observed. PMID:27013882

  19. Typologies of substance use and illegal behaviors: A comparison of emerging adults with histories of foster care and the general population

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Susan M.; Medeiros, Rose Anne

    2016-01-01

    This study used latent class analysis (LCA) to explore whether patterns of substance use and illegal behaviors among emerging adults, 18 to 28 years old, differ depending on whether they have a prior history in foster care. The study sample, consisting of 316 respondents who had previously been in foster care and 14,301 respondents without a foster care history, was drawn from the third wave of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. A multiple-group LCA compared former foster youth to their peers in the general population. The following four classes were identified: illegal behaviors, substance use, illegal behaviors with problematic substance use and normative behaviors. Most of the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. However, within the illegal behavior class former foster youth were less likely to have bought, sold, or held stolen goods; injured someone in a fight so that she or he needed medical attention; to have sold drugs; and to have been drunk at school or work. Additionally, in the illegal behaviors with problematic substance use class emerging adults in the general population were more likely to have used cocaine. Within the normative behaviors class, former foster youth were more likely to be current smokers, and to have injured someone in a fight so that he or she required medical attention. Within the substance use class, emerging adults from the general population were more likely to have taken place in a fight where one group fought another. Additional statistically significant, but very small differences were also identified.

  20. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of zonisamide in adult patients with partial, generalized, and combined seizures: an open labeled, noncomparative, observational Indian study

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Amitabh; Ravat, Sangeeta; Srinivasan, Avathvadi Venkatesan; Shetty, Ashutosh; Kumar, Vivek; Achtani, Renu; Mathur, Vivek Narain; Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Bajpai, Veeresh; Manjunath, Nanjappa C; Narayana, Randhi Venkata; Mehta, Suyog

    2016-01-01

    A prospective, multicentric, noncomparative open-label observational study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy zonisamide in Indian adult patients for the treatment of partial, generalized, or combined seizures. A total of 655 adult patients with partial, generalized, or combined seizures from 30 centers across India were recruited after initial screening. Patients received 100 mg zonisamide as initiating dose as monotherapy/adjunctive therapy for 24 weeks, with titration of 100 mg every 2 weeks if required. Adverse events, responder rates, and seizure freedom were observed every 4 weeks. Efficacy and safety were also assessed using Clinicians Global Assessment of Response to Therapy and Patients Global Assessment of Tolerability to Therapy, respectively. Follow-up was conducted for a period of 24 weeks after treatment initiation. A total of 655 patients were enrolled and received the treatment and 563 completed the evaluation phase. A total of 20.92% of patients received zonisamide as monotherapy or alternative monotherapy and 59.85% patients received zonisamide as first adjunctive therapy. Compared with baseline, 41.22% of patients achieved seizure freedom and 78.6% as responder rate at the end of 24 week study. Most commonly reported adverse events were loss of appetite, weight loss, sedation, and dizziness, but discontinuation due to adverse events of drug was seen in 0.92% of patients. This open label real-world study suggests that zonisamide is an effective and well-tolerated antiepileptic drug in Indian adults for treatment of partial, generalized as well as combined seizures type. No new safety signals were observed. PMID:27013882

  1. On the plasticity of semantic generalizations: Children and adults modify their verb lexicalization biases in response to changing input

    PubMed Central

    Shafto, Carissa L.; Havasi, Catherine; Snedeker, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Languages differ in how they package the components of an event into words to form sentences. For example, while some languages typically encode the manner of motion in the verb (e.g., running), others more often use verbs that encode the path (e.g., ascending). Prior research has demonstrated that children and adults have lexicalization biases; i.e. they assume that novel motion verbs will reflect the dominant pattern of their own language. These experiments explored the plasticity of these biases. In Experiments 1 and 2 we taught English-speaking adults motion verbs, varying the proportion of manner and path verbs in the training set; their interpretation of subsequent verbs closely reflected the probabilistic variation in the input. In Experiments 3 and 4, five-year-old children also systematically shifted their lexicalization biases to reflect the verbs that they were taught. We conclude that lexicalization biases are adaptive inferences about verb meaning that are updated on the basis of experience. PMID:24001149

  2. Altered self-perception in adult survivors treated for a CNS tumor in childhood or adolescence: population-based outcomes compared with the general population

    PubMed Central

    Hörnquist, Lina; Rickardsson, Jenny; Lannering, Birgitta; Gustafsson, Göran; Boman, Krister K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors are at risk for persistent tumor/treatment-related morbidity, physical disability and social consequences that may alter self-perception, vital for self-identity, mental health and quality of survival. We studied the long-term impact of childhood CNS tumors and their treatment on the self-perception of adult survivors and compared outcomes with those of the general population. Methods The cohort included 697 Swedish survivors diagnosed with a primary CNS tumor during 1982–2001. Comparison data were randomly collected from a stratified general population sample. Survivors and general population individuals were compared as regards self-perception in 5 domains: body image, sports/physical activities, peers, work, and family, and with a global self-esteem index. Within the survivor group, determinants of impact on self-perception were identified. Results The final analyzed sample included 528 survivors, 75.8% of the entire national cohort. The control sample consisted of 995, 41% of 2500 addressed. Survivors had significantly poorer self-perception outcomes in domains of peers, work, body image, and sports/physical activities, and in the global self-perception measure, compared with those of the general population (all P < .001). Within the survivor group, female gender and persistent visible physical sequelae predicted poorer outcomes in several of the studied domains. Tumor type and a history of cranial radiation therapy were associated with outcomes. Conclusion An altered self-perception is a potential late effect in adult survivors of pediatric CNS tumors. Self-perception and self-esteem are significant elements of identity, mental health and quality of survival. Therefore, care and psychosocial follow-up of survivors should include measures for identifying disturbances and for assessing the need for psychosocial intervention. PMID:25332406

  3. House dust as possible route of environmental exposure to cadmium and lead in the adult general population

    SciTech Connect

    Hogervorst, Janneke; Plusquin, Michelle; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Nawrot, Tim; Cuypers, Ann; Van Hecke, Etienne; Roels, Harry A.; Carleer, Robert; Staessen, Jan A. . E-mail: jan.staessen@med.kuleuven.be

    2007-01-15

    Contaminated soil particles and food are established routes of exposure. We investigated the relations between biomarkers of exposure to cadmium and lead, and the metal loading rates in house dust in the adult residents of an area with a soil cadmium concentration of >=3mg/kg (n=268) and a reference area (n=205). We determined the metal concentrations in house dust allowed to settle for 3 months in Petri dishes placed in the participants' bedrooms. The continuously distributed vegetable index was the first principal component derived from the metal concentrations in six different vegetables. The biomarkers of exposure (blood cadmium 9.2 vs. 6.2nmol/L; 24-h urinary cadmium 10.5 vs. 7.0nmol; blood lead 0.31 vs. 0.24{mu}mol/L), the loading rates of cadmium and lead in house dust (0.29 vs. 0.12 and 7.52 vs. 3.62ng/cm{sup 2}/92 days), and the vegetable indexes (0.31 vs. -0.44 and 0.13 vs. -0.29 standardized units) were significantly higher in the contaminated area. A two-fold increase in the metal loading rate in house dust was associated with increases (P<0.001) in blood cadmium (+2.3%), 24-h urinary cadmium (+3.0%), and blood lead (+2.0%), independent of the vegetable index and other covariates. The estimated effect sizes on the biomarkers of internal exposure were three times greater for house dust than vegetables. In conclusion, in the adult population, house dust is potentially an important route of exposure to heavy metals in areas with contaminated soils, and should be incorporated in the assessment of health risks.

  4. Intensity of Aggression in Childhood as a Predictor of Different Forms of Adult Aggression: A Two-Country (Finland and the United States) Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokko, Katja; Pulkkinen, Lea; Huesmann, L. Rowell; Dubow, Eric F.; Boxer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the prediction of different forms of adult aggression in 2 countries from child and adolescent aggression. It was based on 2 longitudinal projects: the Jyvaskyla Longitudinal Study of Personality and Social Development (JYLS; N = 196 boys and 173 girls) conducted in Finland and the Columbia County Longitudinal Study (CCLS; N =…

  5. Multiple roads lead to Rome: combined high-intensity aerobic and strength training vs. gross motor activities leads to equivalent improvement in executive functions in a cohort of healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Nicolas; Bherer, Louis; Nadeau, Sylvie; Lauzière, Séléna; Lehr, Lora; Bobeuf, Florian; Lussier, Maxime; Kergoat, Marie Jeanne; Vu, Thien Tuong Minh; Bosquet, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The effects of physical activity on cognition in older adults have been extensively investigated in the last decade. Different interventions such as aerobic, strength, and gross motor training programs have resulted in improvements in cognitive functions. However, the mechanisms underlying the relationship between physical activity and cognition are still poorly understood. Recently, it was shown that acute bouts of exercise resulted in reduced executive control at higher relative exercise intensities. Considering that aging is characterized by a reduction in potential energy ([Formula: see text] max - energy cost of walking), which leads to higher relative walking intensity for the same absolute speed, it could be argued that any intervention aimed at reducing the relative intensity of the locomotive task would improve executive control while walking. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of a short-term (8 weeks) high-intensity strength and aerobic training program on executive functions (single and dual task) in a cohort of healthy older adults. Fifty-one participants were included and 47 (age, 70.7 ± 5.6) completed the study which compared the effects of three interventions: lower body strength + aerobic training (LBS-A), upper body strength + aerobic training (UBS-A), and gross motor activities (GMA). Training sessions were held 3 times every week. Both physical fitness (aerobic, neuromuscular, and body composition) and cognitive functions (RNG) during a dual task were assessed before and after the intervention. Even though the LBS-A and UBS-A interventions increased potential energy to a higher level (Effect size: LBS-A-moderate, UBS-A-small, GMA-trivial), all groups showed equivalent improvement in cognitive function, with inhibition being more sensitive to the intervention. These findings suggest that different exercise programs targeting physical fitness and/or gross motor skills may lead to equivalent improvement in

  6. Experiences of Parents and General Practitioners with End-of-Life Care in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaal, Suzanne E J; Kuijken, Noortje M J; Verhagen, Constant A H H V M; Jansen, Rosemarie; Servaes, Petra; van der Graaf, Winette T A

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to analyze the experiences of Dutch bereaved parents and general practitioners (GPs) with palliative care of AYAs (18-35 years) in the terminal stage. Fifteen parents and nine GPs involved with nine deceased AYAs filled out questionnaires and were interviewed by telephone, respectively. In general, the parents were satisfied with the emotional care they themselves received and the medical care that their child received. The GPs were very satisfied with the cooperation with the palliative team. Gaps are present in the areas of symptom control, communication between hospital professionals and parents, aftercare, and transition between hospital and GP. PMID:26812457

  7. Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Comparison of Symptom Change in Adults Receiving Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy or Applied Relaxation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donegan, Eleanor; Dugas, Michel J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is characterized by excessive worry and somatic symptoms of anxiety (e.g., restlessness, muscle tension). Several psychological treatments lead to significant reductions in GAD symptoms by posttreatment. However, little is known about how GAD symptoms change over time. Our main goal was to examine how…

  8. Teenage Career Aspirations and Adult Career Attainment: The Role of Gender, Social Background and General Cognitive Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoon, Ingrid; Polek, Elzbieta

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we examine the associations between gender, family background, general cognitive ability (g), teenage career aspirations, and career attainment in mid adulthood drawing on two large representative samples of the British population born in 1958 (N = 6,474) and in 1970 (N = 5,081). A developmental-contextual model of career development…

  9. Generalized method for computation of true thickness and x-ray intensity information in highly blurred sub-millimeter bone features in clinical CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdel, Amirreza; Robert, Normand; Fialkov, Jeffrey; Maloul, Asmaa; Whyne, Cari

    2012-12-01

    In clinical computed tomography (CT) images, cortical bone features with sub-millimeter (sub-mm) thickness are substantially blurred, such that their thickness is overestimated and their intensity appears underestimated. Therefore, any inquiry of the geometry or the density of such bones based on these images is severely error prone. We present a model-based method for estimating the true thickness and intensity magnitude of cortical and trabecular bone layers at localized regions of complex shell bones down to 0.25 mm. The method also computes the width of the corresponding point spread function. This approach is applicable on any CT image data, and does not rely on any scanner-specific parameter inputs beyond what is inherently available in the images themselves. The method applied on CT intensity profiles of custom phantoms mimicking shell-bones produced average cortical thickness errors of 0.07 ± 0.04 mm versus an average error of 0.47 ± 0.29 mm in the untreated cases (t(55) = 10.92, p ≪ 0.001)). Similarly, the average error of intensity magnitude estimates of the method were 22 ± 2.2 HU versus an error of 445 ± 137 HU in the untreated cases (t(55) = 26.48, p ≪ 0.001)). The method was also used to correct the CT intensity profiles from a cadaveric specimen of the craniofacial skeleton (CFS) in 15 different regions. There was excellent agreement between the corrections and µCT intensity profiles of the same regions used as a ‘gold standard’ measure. These results set the groundwork towards restoring cortical bone geometry and intensity information in entire image data sets. This information is essential for the generation of finite element models of the CFS that can accurately describe the biomechanical behavior of its complex thin bone structures.

  10. Gambling and Substance Use: Co-occurrence among Adults in a Recent General Population Study in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Grace M.; Welte, John W.; Tidwell, Marie-Cecile O.; Hoffman, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    This study is an up-to-date examination of gambling behaviors as well as gambling problems and their relationships to substance use and abuse. Further, the co-occurrence between problem gambling and substance abuse is studied using a large-scale, representative sample of adults aged 18 years and older in the United States. This random-digit-dial national survey was carried out in 2011–2013 with completed interviews from 2,963 respondents. Of the four gambling and substance use behaviors considered, past year gambling was the most prevalent (76.9%), followed by alcohol use (67.6%), tobacco use (28.7%) and marijuana use (11.2%). Problem gambling and the three substance abuse measures were highly related. Current problem gambling (3+ DIS criteria) was predicted by being male, being black, having low socioeconomic status and by alcohol abuse/dependence, tobacco dependence, and marijuana abuse/dependence. Thus, problem gambling is linked to other problem behaviors, especially substance abuse. Consequently, effective treatment approaches should screen and intervene for both problem gambling as well as co-occurring substance abuse. PMID:25914605

  11. Association between Self-Reported General and Mental Health and Adverse Outcomes: A Retrospective Cohort Study of 19 625 Scottish Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Zia; Mackay, Daniel F.; Pell, Jill P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Self-reported general health and mental health are independent predictors of all-cause mortality. This study examines whether they are also independent predictors of incident cancer, coronary heart disease and psychiatric hospitalisation. Methods We conducted a retrospective, population cohort study by linking the 19 625 Scottish adults who participated in the Scottish Health Surveys 1995–2003, to hospital admissions, cancer registration and death certificate records. We conducted Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for potential confounders including age, sex, socioeconomic status, alcohol, smoking status, body mass index, hypertension and diabetes. Results Poor general health was reported by 1215 (6.2%) participants and was associated with cancer registrations (adjusted Hazard Ratio [HR] 1.30, 95% CI 1.10, 1.55), coronary heart disease events (adjusted HR 2.30, 95% CI 1.86, 2.84) and psychiatric hospitalisations (adjusted HR 2.42, 95% CI 1.65, 3.56). There was evidence of dose relationships and the associations remained significant after adjustment for mental health. 3172 (16%) participants had poor mental health (GHQ ≥4). After adjustment for general health, the associations between poor mental health and coronary heart disease events (adjusted HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.13, 1.63) and all-cause death (adjusted HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.23, 1.55) became non-significant, but mental health remained associated with psychiatric hospitalisations (fully adjusted HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.48, 2.75). Conclusion Self-reported general health is a significant predictor of a range of clinical outcomes independent of mental health. The association between mental health and non-psychiatric outcomes is mediated by general health but it is an independent predictor of psychiatric outcome. Individuals with poor general health or mental health warrant close attention. PMID:24705574

  12. Fluid accumulation threshold measured by acute body weight change after admission in general surgical intensive care units: how much should be concerning?

    PubMed Central

    Chittawatanarat, Kaweesak; Pichaiya, Todsaporn; Chandacham, Kamtone; Jirapongchareonlap, Tidarat; Chotirosniramit, Narain

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01351506) was to identify the threshold level of fluid accumulation measured by acute body weight (BW) change during the first week in a general surgical intensive care unit (ICU), which is associated with ICU mortality and other adverse outcomes. Methods Four hundred sixty-five patients were prospectively followed for a 28-day period. The maximum BW change threshold during the first week was evaluated by the maximum percentage change in BW from the ICU admission weight (Max%ΔBW). Daily screening of adverse events in the ICU were recorded. The cutoff point of Max%ΔBW on ICU mortality was defined by considering the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, intersection of the sensitivity and specificity, and the Youden Index. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses were used to demonstrate the associations. Statistical significance was defined as P<0.05. Results The appropriate cutoff value of Max%ΔBW threshold was 5%. Regarding the multivariable regression model, in overall patients, the occurrence of the following adverse events (expressed as adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval]) were significantly associated with a Max%ΔBW of >5%: ICU mortality (2.38 [1.25–4.54]) (P=0.008), ICU mortality in patients without renal replacement therapy (RRT) (2.47 [1.21–5.06]) (P=0.013), reintubation within 72 hours (2.51 [1.04–6.00]) (P=0.039), RRT requirement (2.67 [1.13–6.33]) (P=0.026), and delirium (1.97 [1.08–3.57]) (P=0.025). Regarding the postoperative subgroup, a Max%ΔBW value of more than 5% was significantly associated with: ICU mortality (3.87 [1.38–10.85]) (P=0.010), ICU mortality in patients without RRT (6.32 [1.85–21.64]) (P=0.003), reintubation within 72 hours (4.44 [1.30–15.16]) (P=0.017), and vasopressor requirement (2.04 [1.04–4.01]) (P=0.037). Conclusion Fluid accumulation, measured as acute BW change of more than the threshold of 5% during

  13. Science in the General Educational Development (GED) curriculum: Analyzing the science portion of GED programs and exploring adult students' attitudes toward science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, Joya Reena

    The General Educational Development (GED) tests enable people to earn a high school equivalency diploma and help them to qualify for more jobs and opportunities. Apart from this main goal, GED courses aim at enabling adults to improve the condition of their lives and to cope with a changing society. In today's world, science and technology play an exceedingly important role in helping people better their lives and in promoting the national goals of informed citizenship. Despite the current efforts in the field of secondary science education directed towards scientific literacy and the concept of "Science for all Americans", the literature does not reflect any corresponding efforts in the field of adult education. Science education research appears to have neglected a population that could possibly benefit from it. The purpose of this study is to explore: the science component of GED programs, significant features of the science portion of GED curricula and GED science materials, and adult learners' attitudes toward various aspects of science. Data collection methods included interviews with GED students and instructors, content analysis of relevant materials, and classroom observations. Data indicate that the students in general feel that the science they learn should be relevant to their lives and have direct applications in everyday life. Student understanding of science and interest in it appears to be contingent to their perceiving it as relevant to their lives and to society. Findings indicate that the instructional approaches used in GED programs influence students' perceptions about the relevance of science. Students in sites that use strategies such as group discussions and field trips appear to be more aware of science in the world around them and more enthusiastic about increasing this awareness. However, the dominant strategy in most GED programs is individual reading. The educational strategies used in GED programs generally focus on developing reading

  14. Parent Inclusion in Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention: The Influence of Parental Stress, Parent Treatment Fidelity and Parent-Mediated Generalization of Behavior Targets on Child Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Kristin; Vicari, Stefano; Valeri, Giovanni; D'Elia, Lidia; Arima, Serena; Fava, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Although early intensive behavior interventions have been efficient in producing positive behavior outcome in young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, there is a considerable variety in the children's progress. Research has suggested that parental and treatment factors are likely to affect children's response to treatment. The purpose of the…

  15. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus-1 Associated with Adult T-Cell Lymphoma/ Leukemia and Generalized Expansion of Palatal and Jaw Bones: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dalirsani, Zohreh; Javadzade Bolouri, Abbas; Delavarian, Zahra; Bidad, Salma; Sanatkhani, Majid; Amirchaghmaghi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) can cause adult T-cell leukemia/ lymphoma (ATL/L), which is a rare and aggressive type of blood cancer. Herein, we report a case of ATL/L in a middle-aged man with unusual jaw presentations. The patient presented with mandibular, maxillary and palatal bony hard expansion, accompanied by generalized tooth mobility six months prior to admission to the Department of Oral Medicine. The panoramic radiograph showed generalized rarefaction of jaw bones. After laboratory examinations and bone marrow aspiration, ATL/L was diagnosed in association with HTLV-1. The patient underwent chemotherapy. Although the majority of infections associated with HTLV-1 are asymptomatic, some patients may develop blood diseases such as ATL/L and neurological disorders, mainly HTLV-1 associated myelopathy and tropical spastic paraparesis. ATL/L is a rare hematological malignancy in oral cavity that should be included in the differential diagnosis of cases with jaw swelling or generalized demineralization. Serum levels of anti-HTLV-1 antibodies should be examined in suspicious patients, particularly in endemic regions. PMID:26331152

  16. Impact of dental treatment under general anesthesia on the oral health-related quality of life of adolescents and adults with special needs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Juhea; Patton, Lauren L; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the perception of the family's primary caregiver on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), and the impact on family dynamics, of dental treatment under general anesthesia (GA) in adolescent and adult patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and neurocognitive disorders. Self-administered questionnaires were completed, before dental treatment, by 116 primary family caregivers of patients who received dental treatment under GA, and 102 (88%) of these caregivers completed the same questionnaires within 4 wk after treatment. The Child Oral Health Impact Profile (COHIP) and the Family Impact Scale (FIS) were shortened to a 14-item COHIP (COHIP-14) and a 12-item FIS (FIS-12) based on the limitations of patients' communication. The COHIP-14 and FIS-12 scores and each subscale improved after treatment. The baseline scores varied based on certain characteristics of the patients, such as age, disabilities, medications, caregivers, meal types, cooperation levels, and treatment needs. The postoperative improvement in OHRQoL was significant in the patients who were older than 30 yr of age, originally eating soft meals, displaying no or very low levels of cooperation, or receiving endodontic treatment. Based on the primary caregiver perceptions, the OHRQoL of adolescents and adults with IDD and neurocognitive disorders was improved by dental treatment under GA. PMID:25292335

  17. Factors Associated with Higher Sitting Time in General, Chronic Disease, and Psychologically-Distressed, Adult Populations: Findings from the 45 & Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Costigan, Sarah A.; Short, Camille; Grunseit, Anne; James, Erica; Johnson, Natalie; Bauman, Adrian; D’Este, Catherine; van der Ploeg, Hidde P.; Rhodes, Ryan E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with higher sitting time in general, chronic disease, and psychologically-distressed, adult populations (aged ≥45 years). A series of logistic regression models examined potential socio-demographic and health factors associated with higher sitting (≥6hrs/day) in adults from the 45 and Up Study (n = 227,187), including four separate subsamples for analysis comprising those who had ever had heart disease (n = 26,599), cancer (n = 36,381), diabetes (n = 19,550) or psychological distress (n = 48,334). Odds of higher sitting were significantly (p<.01) associated with a number of factors across these groups, with an effect size of ORs≥1.5 observed for the high-income ≥$70,000AUD, employed full-time and severe physical limitations demographics. Identification of key factors associated with higher sitting time in this population-based sample will assist development of broad-based, public health and targeted strategies to reduce sitting-time. In particular, those categorized as being high-income earners, full-time workers, as well as those with severe physical limitations need to be of priority, as higher sitting appears to be substantial across these groups. PMID:26039739

  18. Screening instruments for a population of older adults: The 10-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7).

    PubMed

    Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria; Chudzinski, Veronica; Gontijo-Guerra, Samantha; Préville, Michel

    2015-07-30

    Screening tools that appropriately detect older adults' mental disorders are of great public health importance. The present study aimed to establish cutoff scores for the 10-item Kessler Psychological Distress (K10) and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scales when screening for depression and anxiety. We used data from participants (n = 1811) in the Enquête sur la Santé des Aînés-Service study. Depression and anxiety were measured using DSM-V and DSM-IV criteria. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis provided an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.767 and 0.833 for minor and for major depression when using K10. A cutoff of 19 was found to balance sensitivity (0.794) and specificity (0.664) for minor depression, whereas a cutoff of 23 was found to balance sensitivity (0.692) and specificity (0.811) for major depression. When screening for an anxiety with GAD-7, ROC analysis yielded an AUC of 0.695; a cutoff of 5 was found to balance sensitivity (0.709) and specificity (0.568). No significant differences were found between subgroups of age and gender. Both K10 and GAD-7 were able to discriminate between cases and non-cases when screening for depression and anxiety in an older adult population of primary care service users. PMID:25956759

  19. The Geography of Diabetes among the General Adults Aged 35 Years and Older in Bangladesh: Recent Evidence from a Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Mobarak Hossain; Gruebner, Oliver; Kraemer, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report geographical variations of sex-specific diabetes by place of residence (large cities/city corporations, small towns/other urban areas, rural areas) and region of residence (divided into seven divisions) among general adults (35+ years of age) in Bangladesh. Methods The recent cross-sectional data, extracted from the nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2011, was used. A total of 3,720 men and 3,823 women aged 35+ years, who participated in the fasting blood sugar testing, were analysed. Any person with either fasting plasma glucose level (mmol/L) ≥7.0 or taking medication for diabetes was considered as a person with diabetes. Results The prevalence of diabetes was 10.6% in men and 11.3% in women. Bivariable analyses indicated significant variations of diabetes by both geographical variables. The prevalence was highest in city corporations (men 18.0%, women 22.3%), followed by small towns (men 13.6%, women 15.2%) and rural areas (men 9.3%, women 9.5%). Regional disparities in diabetes prevalence were also remarkable, with the highest prevalence in Chittagong division and lowest prevalence in Khulna division. Multivariable logistic regression analyses provided mixed patterns of geographical disparities (depending on the adjusted variables). Some other independent risk factors for diabetes were advancing age, higher level of education and wealth, having TV (a proxy indicator of physical activity), overweight/obesity and hypertension. Conclusions Over 10% of the general adults aged 35 years and older were having diabetes. Most of the persons with diabetes were unaware of this before testing fasting plasma glucose level. Although significant disparities in diabetes prevalence by geographical variables were observed, such disparities are very much influenced by the adjusted variables. Finally, we underscore the necessities of area-specific strategies including early diagnosis and health education programmes for changing

  20. [Social inequities regarding annoyance to noise and road traffic intensity: results of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1)].

    PubMed

    Laussmann, D; Haftenberger, M; Lampert, T; Scheidt-Nave, C

    2013-05-01

    To study the associations of annoyance to noise and exposure to residential traffic with sociodemographic, socioeconomic and regional characteristics as well as housing conditions, a population-based sample of 7,988 adults 18-79 years of age was studied in the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1). Annoyance to noise and exposure to residential traffic were assessed by self-administered questionnaires. A total of 6.3 % of the participants reported a high to very high exposure to residential traffic noise, 3.7 % to neighbourhood noise and 2.1 % to aircraft noise. An excessive exposure to residential traffic was reported by 21.3 % of the participants. A high annoyance to traffic and neighborhood noise was associated with a lower equivalised disposable income and poor housing conditions. Additionally annoyance to neighborhood noise was associated with low socioeconomic and occupational status. A high annoyance to aircraft noise was only associated with a low equivalised disposable income and living in apartment blocks. Exposure to residential traffic was associated with all investigated indicators. At present in Germany environmental exposures are social unequally distributed and may lead to negative health consequences in social disadvantaged groups. An English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink as supplemental. PMID:23703504

  1. Elderly Benefit from Intensive Blood Pressure Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_158958.html Elderly Benefit From Intensive Blood Pressure Treatment No greater risk of complications such as ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive treatment of high blood pressure reduces older adults' risk of heart disease without ...

  2. The general practitioner's role in promoting physical activity to older adults: a review based on program theory.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Timo; Brach, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Positive influences of physical activity both on many chronic diseases and on preservation of mobility are well documented. But chronically ill or mobility restricted elderly living in their own homes are difficult to reach for interventions. The general practitioner's (GP) surgery offers one of the few opportunities to give advice for physical activity to those people. We used program theory to sound out knowledge on GP-centered physical activity counseling. The "conceptual theory" (evidence for training effects in old age) and the "implementation theory" (unique position of the GP) were reviewed narratively. The "action theory" (effects of GP counseling) was reviewed systematically. According to program theory, appropriate MeSH (Medical subject headings) concepts were Aged OR Aged, 80 and over (Target group), Physicians, Family OR Primary Health Care (Implementation/Setting), Counseling OR Patient Education as Topic OR Disease Management OR Health promotion (Intervention), Exercise OR Motor Activity OR Physical Fitness OR Sports (Determinants). The resulting six review papers (Pubmed, 2000-2009) were presented using the STARLITE mnemonic. Authors agree, that the GP plays a central role in the promotion of physical activity to elderly people, but there is conflicting evidence concerning counseling effectiveness. Utilizing behavioral change strategies and the collaboration between GPs and specialised professions are recommended and currently under research. PMID:21762090

  3. Prevalence of Peripheral Arterial Disease among Adult Patients Attending Outpatient Clinic at a General Hospital in South Angola.

    PubMed

    Paquissi, Feliciano Chanana; Cuvinje, Arminda Bimbi Paquissi; Cuvinje, Almeida Bailundo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis, whose prevalence is increasing worldwide, and is associated with all-cause mortality. However, no study has assessed this disease in Huambo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD in patients attending an outpatient clinic at a general hospital in Huambo, South Angola. Methods. A cross-sectional study, including 115 patients aged 40 years and older attending an outpatient service. The evaluation included a basic questionnaire for lifestyle and medical history and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement using hand-held Doppler. PAD was defined as an ABI ≤0.9 in either lower limb. Results. Of 115 patients, 62.60% were women with a median age of 52.5 (range of 40 to 91) years. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6% (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 95%: 33.91-52.17%). Among patients with PAD, 95.92% had mild disease and 4.08% moderate to severe disease. The main risk factor for PAD was age (≥60 years) (χ (2) = 3.917, P ≤ 0.05). The prevalence was slightly higher in men and hypertensive subjects, but without statistical significance with ORs of 1.5 (95% CI: 0.69-3.21) and 1.42 (95% CI: 0.64-3.17), respectively. Hypertension was also high in the group (66.95%). Conclusion. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6%, higher in those aged 60 years and older. More studies, with representative samples, are necessary to clarify PAD prevalence and associated risk factors. PMID:27293966

  4. Prevalence of Peripheral Arterial Disease among Adult Patients Attending Outpatient Clinic at a General Hospital in South Angola

    PubMed Central

    Paquissi, Feliciano Chanana; Cuvinje, Arminda Bimbi Paquissi; Cuvinje, Almeida Bailundo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis, whose prevalence is increasing worldwide, and is associated with all-cause mortality. However, no study has assessed this disease in Huambo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD in patients attending an outpatient clinic at a general hospital in Huambo, South Angola. Methods. A cross-sectional study, including 115 patients aged 40 years and older attending an outpatient service. The evaluation included a basic questionnaire for lifestyle and medical history and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement using hand-held Doppler. PAD was defined as an ABI ≤0.9 in either lower limb. Results. Of 115 patients, 62.60% were women with a median age of 52.5 (range of 40 to 91) years. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6% (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 95%: 33.91–52.17%). Among patients with PAD, 95.92% had mild disease and 4.08% moderate to severe disease. The main risk factor for PAD was age (≥60 years) (χ2 = 3.917, P ≤ 0.05). The prevalence was slightly higher in men and hypertensive subjects, but without statistical significance with ORs of 1.5 (95% CI: 0.69–3.21) and 1.42 (95% CI: 0.64–3.17), respectively. Hypertension was also high in the group (66.95%). Conclusion. The prevalence of PAD was 42.6%, higher in those aged 60 years and older. More studies, with representative samples, are necessary to clarify PAD prevalence and associated risk factors. PMID:27293966

  5. 20 CFR 663.220 - Who may receive intensive services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.220 Who may receive intensive services? There are two categories of adults and dislocated workers who may receive intensive services: (a) Adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed,...

  6. 20 CFR 663.220 - Who may receive intensive services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.220 Who may receive intensive services? There are two categories of adults and dislocated workers who may receive intensive services: (a) Adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed,...

  7. General fluid-type intelligence is related to indices of white matter structure in middle-aged and old adults.

    PubMed

    Haász, Judit; Westlye, Erling T; Fjær, Sveinung; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Arvid; Lundervold, Astri J

    2013-12-01

    General fluid-type intelligence (gF) reflects abstract reasoning and problem solving abilities, and is an important predictor for lifetime trajectories of cognition, and physical and mental health. Structural and functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated the role of parieto-frontal gray matter, but the white matter (WM) underpinnings of gF and the contribution of individual gF components to gF-WM relationship still need to be explored. The aim of this study was to characterize, in a sample of 100 healthy middle-aged and old subjects (mean=63.8 years), the relationship between gF and indices of WM structure obtained from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) (fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD)). gF was estimated by principal component analysis including measures of episodic memory, reasoning, and processing speed. Tract-based spatial statistics and permutation-based inference statistics were used to test the association between gF and WM indices, while controlling for the effect of age and sex. We hypothesized a positive relationship between gF and WM structure. Based on previous studies, we further hypothesized that this relationship was heavily influenced by the processing speed component of gF. We found a robust relationship between gF and DT-MRI measures of FA, RD and MD in all major WM tracts. Higher gF score was related to higher degree of WM integrity, in middle-aged as well as old individuals. Thus, the distributed relationship between gF and indices of WM microstructure is consistent with the notion that gF reflects efficient signaling between cortical areas. Furthermore, analysis of relationships between WM measures and gF components revealed an association with information processing speed and reasoning ability, but not with episodic memory. Thus, although all subcomponents loaded high on gF factor, the speed-related components were most strongly associated with DT

  8. Effects of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program on Dependence in Activities of Daily Living and Balance in Older Adults with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Toots, Annika; Littbrand, Håkan; Lindelöf, Nina; Wiklund, Robert; Holmberg, Henrik; Nordström, Peter; Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor; Gustafson, Yngve; Rosendahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of a high-intensity functional exercise program on independence in activities of  daily living (ADLs) and balance in older people with dementia and whether exercise effects differed between dementia types. Design Cluster-randomized controlled trial: Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study. Setting Residential care facilities, Umeå, Sweden. Participants Individuals aged 65 and older with a dementia diagnosis, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 10 or greater, and dependence in ADLs (N = 186). Intervention Ninety-three participants each were allocated to the high-intensity functional exercise program, comprising lower limb strength and balance exercises, and 93 to a seated control activity. Measurements Blinded assessors measured ADL independence using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and Barthel Index (BI) and balance using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) at baseline and 4 (directly after intervention completion) and 7 months. Results Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect on ADL independence at 4 (FIM=1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI)=−1.6–4.3; BI=0.6, 95% CI=−0.2–1.4) or 7 (FIM=0.8, 95% CI=−2.2–3.8; BI=0.6, 95% CI=−0.3–1.4) months. A significant between-group effect on balance favoring exercise was observed at 4 months (BBS=4.2, 95% CI=1.8–6.6). In interaction analyses, exercise effects differed significantly between dementia types. Positive between-group exercise effects were found in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia according to the FIM at 7 months and BI and BBS at 4 and 7 months. Conclusion In older people with mild to moderate dementia living in residential care facilities, a 4-month high-intensity functional exercise program appears to slow decline in ADL independence and improve balance, albeit only in participants with non-Alzheimer's dementia. PMID:26782852

  9. Rich Environments for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentham, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Unaware of the messages a bare adult learning environment sends and its effect on adult learners, a trainer attends an intensive Reggio Emilia course and learns that the physical environment is the "third teacher"--for adults as well as for children. Using principles of Reggio, she offers suggestions for enhancing adult learning spaces and…

  10. Risk factors for intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome among adult intensive care unit patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality among critically ill adults, it remains unknown if prevention or treatment of these conditions improves patient outcomes. We sought to identify evidence-based risk factors for IAH and ACS in order to guide identification of the source population for future IAH/ACS treatment trials and to stratify patients into risk groups based on prognosis. Methods We searched electronic bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Database from 1950 until January 21, 2013) and reference lists of included articles for observational studies reporting risk factors for IAH or ACS among adult ICU patients. Identified risk factors were summarized using formal narrative synthesis techniques alongside a random effects meta-analysis. Results Among 1,224 citations identified, 14 studies enrolling 2,500 patients were included. The 38 identified risk factors for IAH and 24 for ACS could be clustered into three themes and eight subthemes. Large volume crystalloid resuscitation, the respiratory status of the patient, and shock/hypotension were common risk factors for IAH and ACS that transcended across presenting patient populations. Risk factors with pooled evidence supporting an increased risk for IAH among mixed ICU patients included obesity (four studies; odds ratio (OR) 5.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.92 to 13.58), sepsis (two studies; OR 2.38; 95% CI, 1.34 to 4.23), abdominal surgery (four studies; OR 1.93; 95% CI, 1.30 to 2.85), ileus (two studies; OR 2.05; 95% CI, 1.40 to 2.98), and large volume fluid resuscitation (two studies; OR 2.17; 95% CI, 1.30 to 3.63). Among trauma and surgical patients, large volume crystalloid resuscitation and markers of shock/hypotension and metabolic derangement/organ failure were risk factors for IAH and ACS while increased disease severity scores and elevated creatinine were

  11. Association between Body Mass Index and Health-Related Quality of Life: The "Obesity Paradox" in 21,218 Adults of the Chinese General Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanbo; Wang, Qi; Pang, Guoming; Lin, Lin; Origasa, Hideki; Wang, Yangyang; Di, Jie; Shi, Mai; Fan, Chunpok; Shi, Huimei

    2015-01-01

    Background There was no consistent recognition of the association between high or low body mass index (BMI) and health related quality of life (HRQL). The aim of this research was to study the association between BMI and HRQL in Chinese adults, and to further explore the stability of that association in the subgroup analysis stratified by status of chronic conditions. Methods A total of 21,218 adults aged 18 and older were classified as underweight, normal weight, overweight, class I obese, and class II obese based on their BMI. HRQL was measured by the SF-36 Health Survey. The independent impact of each BMI category on HRQL was examined through standard least squares regression by comparing the difference of SF-36 scores and the minimum clinically important differences (MCID), which was defined as 3 points. Results Compared to the normal weight, the class I obese was significantly associated with better HRQL scores in the mental component summary (MCS) (75.1 vs. 73.4, P<0.001). The underweight had the lowest score in both the physical components summary (PCS) (75.4 vs. 77.5, P<0.001) and mental components summary (MCS) (71.8 vs. 73.4, P<0.001). For the MCID, the HRQL score was reduced by more than 3 points in the physical functioning for the class II obese (D=-3.43) and the general health for the underweight (D=-3.71). Stratified analyses showed a similar result in the health subjects and chronic conditions, and it was significant in the chronic conditions. Conclusions The class I obese showed the best HRQL, especially in the mental domain. The worst HRQL was found in the underweight. The class II obese reduced HRQL in the physical functioning only. “Obesity paradox” was more obvious in the participants with chronic conditions. PMID:26087128

  12. The Role of Communication and Writing Intensive Courses in General Education: A Five-Year Case Study of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal-Johnson, Nancy; Fitzpatrick, Mary Anne

    2002-01-01

    Examines the development and implementation of a communication component of the general education curriculum at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Describes the model as incorporating a decentralized approach to teaching speech and writing. Details organizational and practical issues surrounding this major change in the undergraduate general…

  13. Higher Early Monocyte and Total Lymphocyte Counts Are Associated with Better Overall Survival after Standard Total Body Irradiation, Cyclophosphamide, and Fludarabine Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Double Umbilical Cord Blood Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Adults.

    PubMed

    Le Bourgeois, Amandine; Peterlin, Pierre; Guillaume, Thierry; Delaunay, Jacques; Duquesne, Alix; Le Gouill, Steven; Moreau, Philippe; Mohty, Mohamad; Campion, Loïc; Chevallier, Patrice

    2016-08-01

    This single-center retrospective study aimed to report the impact of early hematopoietic and immune recoveries after a standard total body irradiation, cyclophosphamide, and fludarabine (TCF) reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen for double umbilical cord blood (dUCB) allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) in adults. We analyzed 47 consecutive patients older than 17 years who engrafted after a dUCB TCF allo-SCT performed between January 2006 and April 2013 in our department. Median times for neutrophil and platelet recoveries were 17 (range, 6 to 59) and 37 days (range, 0 to 164), respectively. The 3-year overall (OS) and disease-free survivals, relapse incidence, and nonrelapse mortality were 65.7%, 57.2%, 27.1%, and 19%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, higher day +30 monocyte (≥615/mm(3); hazard ratio [HR], .04; 95% confidence interval [CI], .004 to .36; P < .01) and day +42 lymphocyte (≥395/mm(3); HR, .16; 95% CI, .03 to .78; P = .02) counts were independently associated with better OS. These results suggest that early higher hematopoietic and immune recovery is predictive of survival after dUCB TCF RIC allo-SCT in adults. Factors other than granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, which was used in all cases, favoring expansion of monocytes or lymphocytes, should be tested in the future as part of the UCB transplantation procedure. PMID:27118570

  14. Validity of Self-Reports of Height and Weight among the General Adult Population in Japan: Findings from National Household Surveys, 1986

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Nayu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Growing evidence indicates that self-reported height and weight are biased, but little is known about systematic errors in the general adult population in Japan. This study takes advantage of the unique opportunity to examine this issue provided by the 1986 National Nutrition Survey. Subjects/Methods Individual-level data on a nationally representative sample aged 20–89 years from the National Nutrition Survey (November 1986) were merged with Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions (September 1986) data to obtain a dataset containing both self-reported and measured data on height and weight for each person (n = 10,469). Discrepancies between self-reported and measured means of height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) were tested across measured BMI categories (<18.5, 18.5–24.9, 25.0–27.4, 27.5–29.9, and ≥30.0 kg/m2), age groups (20–44, 45–64, and 65–89 years), and sexes. Reporting bias in mean BMI was decomposed into the contributions of misreporting height and weight. The sensitivity and specificity of self-reported BMI categories were estimated. Results Mean self-reported BMI was substantially underestimated in older women (P<0.001; Cohen’s d, -0.4), and the major contributor to the bias was their over-reported height. Mean self-reported BMI was also considerably underestimated in both men and women who were overweight and obese (P<0.001; Cohen’s d, -1.0 to -0.6), due mainly to their underreported weight. In contrast, mean self-reported BMI was considerably overestimated in underweight men (P<0.001; Cohen’s d, 0.5), due largely to their over-reported weight. The sensitivity of self-reported BMI categories was particularly low for individuals who had a measured BMI of 27.5–29.9 kg/m2 (40.9% for men and 26.8% for women). Conclusions Self-reported anthropometric data were not sufficiently accurate to assert the validity of their use in epidemiological studies on the general adult population in Japan in the late 1980s

  15. Retigabine for the adjunctive treatment of adults with partial-onset seizures in epilepsy with and without secondary generalization : a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Craig, Dawn; Rice, Stephen; Paton, Fiona; Fox, David; Woolacott, Nerys

    2013-02-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of retigabine (GlaxoSmithKline) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of this drug for the treatment of adults with partial-onset seizures in epilepsy, with and without secondary generalization, as part of the Institute's single technology appraisal (STA) process. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG undertakes a critical review of the clinical and cost-effectiveness evidence of the technology based upon the manufacturer's submission to NICE. The ERG also independently searches for relevant evidence and evaluates modifications to the manufacturer's decision-analytic model. This paper provides a description of the company submission, the ERG review and NICE's subsequent decisions. The clinical effectiveness data were derived from three placebo-controlled randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A meta-analysis pooling across all doses of retigabine found beneficial effects of retigabine in terms of responder rate (odds ratio [OR] 2.79; 95 % CI 2.08, 3.76) and rate of seizure freedom (OR 2.54; 95 % CI 0.92, 6.98) [both double-blind phase analyses]. When compared in a network meta-analysis with the selected comparator antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) [eslicarbazepine acetate, lacosamide, pregabalin, tiagabine and zonisamide], retigabine offered broadly similar efficacy in terms of responder rate and freedom from seizure. The de novo decision-analytic model presented within the submission evaluated the cost effectiveness of retigabine compared with these AEDs and no treatment (i.e. maintenance therapy). After numerous additional analyses, the ERG considered the use of retigabine to be not cost effective for NICE at thresholds below £43,000 if no treatment was considered a relevant comparator. The NICE Appraisal Committee decided that an appropriate comparator was an active treatment. The

  16. Low 25(OH) Vitamin D3 Levels Are Associated with Adverse Outcome in Newly-Diagnosed Intensively-Treated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hun Ju; Muindi, Josephia R.; Tan, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Liu, Song; Wilding, Gregory E.; Ford, Laurie A.; Sait, Sheila N.J.; Block, Annemarie W.; Adjei, Araba A.; Barcos, Maurice; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Thompson, James E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L.; Wetzler, Meir

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies suggest that low 25(OH) vitamin D3 levels may be prognostic in some malignancies, but no studies have evaluated their impact on treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Methods VD levels were evaluated in 97 consecutive newly diagnosed, intensively-treated AML patients. MicroRNA-expression profiles and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 25(OH) vitamin D3 pathway genes were evaluated and correlated with 25(OH) vitamin D3 levels and treatment outcome. Results Thirty-four (35%) patients had normal 25(OH) vitamin D3 levels (32–100 ng/ml), 34 (35%) insufficient (20–31.9 ng/ml) and 29 (30%) deficient levels (<20 ng/ml). Insufficient/deficient 25(OH) vitamin D3 levels were associated with worse relapse-free survival (RFS) compared to normal vitamin D3 levels. In multivariate analyses, deficient 25(OH) vitamin D3, smoking, European LeukemiaNet Genetic Groups and white blood cell count retained their statistical significance for RFS. A number of microRNAs and SNPs were found to be associated with 25(OH) vitamin D3 level, although none remained significant after multiple test corrections; one 25(OH) vitamin D3 receptor SNP, rs10783219, was associated with lower complete remission rate (p=0.0442), shorter RFS (p=0.0058) and overall survival (p=0.0011). Conclusions It remains to be determined what role microRNA and SNP profiles play in contributing to low 25(OH) vitamin D3 level and/or outcome and whether supplementation will improve AML outcome. PMID:24166051

  17. Relaxed Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    Relaxed intensity refers to a professional philosophy, demeanor, and way of life. It is the key to being an effective educational leader. To be successful one must be relaxed, which means managing stress efficiently, having fun, and enjoying work. Intensity allows one to get the job done and accomplish certain tasks or goals. Educational leaders…

  18. Current sources of lead exposure and their relative contributions to the blood lead levels in the general adult population of Northern France: The IMEPOGE Study, 2008-2010.

    PubMed

    Tagne-Fotso, Romuald; Leroyer, Ariane; Howsam, Mike; Dehon, Betty; Richeval, Camille; Nisse, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    There is justification for limiting lead (Pb) exposure as much as possible, given its impact on health at low concentrations. Consequently, the aim of this study was to measure blood lead levels (BLL) and examine exposure factors related to BLL variations in the general adult population of northern France, a current and past industrial area. Two thousand inhabitants of northern France, aged between 20 and 59 years, were recruited using the quota method with caution. Blood lead levels were quantified by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and variation factors were studied separately in men and women using multivariate stepwise linear and logistic regression models. The geometric mean of the BLL was 18.8 μg/L (95% confidence interval [CI]: 18.3-19.3). Occupational factors affected BLL only in men and represented 14% of total explained variance of BLL. External occupational factors significantly increasing mean levels of BLL were tobacco, consumption of some beverages (wine, coffee, tea, and/or tap water), raw vegetables, housing characteristics (built prior to 1948, Pb piping in the home) and do-it-yourself or leisure activities (paint stripping or rifle shooting). Consumption habits accounted together for 25% and 18% of the total explained variance, respectively, in men and women. Industrial environment did not significantly contribute to BLL variations. Blood lead levels observed in the general population of this industrial part of France did not appear to be excessively elevated compared to values found internationally. Nonetheless, these BLL remain a public health issue in regard to nonthreshold toxicity attributed to Pb. PMID:27074096

  19. First results about recovery of walking function in patients with intensive care unit-acquired muscle weakness from the General Weakness Syndrome Therapy (GymNAST) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrholz, Jan; Mückel, Simone; Oehmichen, Frank; Pohl, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe the time course of recovery of walking function and other activities of daily living in patients with intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired muscle weakness. Design This is a cohort study. Participants We included critically ill patients with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Setting Post-acute ICU and rehabilitation units in Germany. Measures We measured walking function, muscle strength, activities in daily living, motor and cognitive function. Results We recruited 150 patients (30% female) who fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. The primary outcome recovery of walking function was achieved after a median of 28.5 days (IQR=45) after rehabilitation onset and after a median of 81.5 days (IQR=64) after onset of illness. Our final multivariate model for recovery of walking function included two clinical variables from baseline: the Functional Status Score ICU (adjusted HR=1.07 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.12) and the ability to reach forward in cm (adjusted HR=1.02 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.04). All secondary outcomes but not pain improved significantly in the first 8 weeks after study onset. Conclusions We found good recovery of walking function for most patients and described the recovery of walking function of people with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Trials registrations number Sächsische Landesärztekammer EK-BR-32/13-1; DRKS00007181, German Register of Clinical Trials. PMID:26700274

  20. Confirmation of the factorial structure of the Japanese short version of the TEMPS-A in psychiatric patients and general adults

    PubMed Central

    Nakato, Yasuya; Inoue, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shin; Kitaichi, Yuji; Kameyama, Rie; Wakatsuki, Yumi; Kitagawa, Kan; Omiya, Yuki; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background The Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Auto-questionnaire (TEMPS-A) is a 110-item questionnaire that assesses five affective temperaments. However, a valid shortened version is desired for large-scale investigations to enhance the compliance of respondents. Methods A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted among 320 psychiatric patients and 61 general adults. The participants completed the Japanese 39-item short version of the TEMPS-A, and a portion of the participants completed the 110-item version. An exploratory factor analysis with the principal factor method and varimax rotation was conducted to identify a more suitable model of the short version of the TEMPS-A. Results The confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the 39-item version exhibited a poor model fit. However, we found that the 18-item version exhibited a firm five-factor structure based on the exploratory factor analysis, and this model exhibited an acceptable model fit. It had good or acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach’s αs: 0.672–0.819). Limitations The majority of the subjects in the present study were patients, and the temperament data may have been affected by psychiatric symptoms. Conclusion A firm five-factor structure was not found in the 39-item short version of the Japanese TEMPS-A. Therefore, an 18-item version was proposed. This new 18-item version of the TEMPS-A might be useful for clinical applications and large-scale investigations. PMID:27601911

  1. Triple Comorbid Trajectories of Tobacco, Alcohol, and Marijuana Use as Predictors of Antisocial Personality Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Among Urban Adults

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Judith S.; Lee, Jung Yeon; Rubenstone, Elizabeth; Brook, David W.; Finch, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We modeled triple trajectories of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use from adolescence to adulthood as predictors of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods. We assessed urban African American and Puerto Rican participants (n = 816) in the Harlem Longitudinal Development Study, a psychosocial investigation, at 4 time waves (mean ages = 19, 24, 29, and 32 years). We used Mplus to obtain the 3 variable trajectories of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use from time 2 to time 5 and then conducted logistic regression analyses. Results. A 5-trajectory group model, ranging from the use of all 3 substances (23%) to a nonuse group (9%), best fit the data. Membership in the trajectory group that used all 3 substances was associated with an increased likelihood of both ASPD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 6.83; 95% CI = 1.14, 40.74; P < .05) and GAD (AOR = 4.35; 95% CI = 1.63, 11.63; P < .001) in adulthood, as compared with the nonuse group, with control for earlier proxies of these conditions. Conclusions. Adults with comorbid tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use should be evaluated for use of other substances and for ASPD, GAD, and other psychiatric disorders. Treatment programs should address the use of all 3 substances to decrease the likelihood of comorbid psychopathology. PMID:24922120

  2. Ad Hoc Conference on the Education of Migrants: Introductory Report on Theme III, "Opportunities for Vocational and Technical Training and General Education for Adults and Adolescents" (Strasbourg, France, November 5-8, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egger, Eugene

    Theme III of the Ad Hoc Conference on the Education of Migrants was "measures to secure the satisfactory provision of opportunities for vocational and technical training and general education for adults and adolescents". This report briefly summarizes the situation in member countries regarding the vocational and technical training and general…

  3. Adult Education and the Elderly. Case Studies from Latin America, Africa, Asia and Europe. Background Materials. The Literacy Debate. General Discussion. Literacy and Women. Literacy and Health-Programmes. Adult Education and Development. Number 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Education and Development, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This journal issue contains 18 solicited articles on two major topics: adult education and the elderly, and the literacy debate. The articles on adult education and the elderly include "A Ripe Old Age," republished from a newsletter of the British aid organization OXFAM; "Special Programme for Retirees: A Model Project in Cali, Colombia," by…

  4. Adults and GNVQs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Aidan

    1996-01-01

    This document is intended for further education colleges in the United Kingdom wishing to extend their General National Vocational Qualification (GNVQ) provision to adults, extend their adult students' options for accreditation, or review the suitability of different qualification routes for adults. It presents information about the development of…

  5. Adult Education in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkos, Alexios

    2008-01-01

    The central aim of this article is to analyse the current situation of adult education in Greece. The article focuses on the following points: (a) the degree of participation in programmes of continuing professional training and general adult education courses, (b) the quality and the outcomes of the adult education provision in Greece, and (c)…

  6. Baby, You Light-Up My Face: Culture-General Physiological Responses to Infants and Culture-Specific Cognitive Judgements of Adults

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Gianluca; Nakazawa, Jun; Ogawa, Shota; Stival, Rita; Kawashima, Akiko; Putnick, Diane L.; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2014-01-01

    Infants universally elicit in adults a set of solicitous behaviors that are evolutionarily important for the survival of the species. However, exposure, experience, and prejudice appear to govern adults' social choice and ingroup attitudes towards other adults. In the current study, physiological arousal and behavioral judgments were assessed while adults processed unfamiliar infant and adult faces of ingroup vs. outgroup members in two contrasting cultures, Japan and Italy. Physiological arousal was investigated using the novel technique of infrared thermography and behavioral judgments using ratings. We uncovered a dissociation between physiological and behavioral responses. At the physiological level, both Japanese and Italian adults showed significant activation (increase of facial temperature) for both ingroup and outgroup infant faces. At the behavioral level, both Japanese and Italian adults showed significant preferences for ingroup adults. Arousal responses to infants appear to be mediated by the autonomic nervous system and are not dependent on direct caregiving exposure, but behavioral responses appear to be mediated by higher-order cognitive processing based on social acceptance and cultural exposure. PMID:25353362

  7. Baby, you light-up my face: culture-general physiological responses to infants and culture-specific cognitive judgements of adults.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Gianluca; Nakazawa, Jun; Ogawa, Shota; Stival, Rita; Kawashima, Akiko; Putnick, Diane L; Bornstein, Marc H

    2014-01-01

    Infants universally elicit in adults a set of solicitous behaviors that are evolutionarily important for the survival of the species. However, exposure, experience, and prejudice appear to govern adults' social choice and ingroup attitudes towards other adults. In the current study, physiological arousal and behavioral judgments were assessed while adults processed unfamiliar infant and adult faces of ingroup vs. outgroup members in two contrasting cultures, Japan and Italy. Physiological arousal was investigated using the novel technique of infrared thermography and behavioral judgments using ratings. We uncovered a dissociation between physiological and behavioral responses. At the physiological level, both Japanese and Italian adults showed significant activation (increase of facial temperature) for both ingroup and outgroup infant faces. At the behavioral level, both Japanese and Italian adults showed significant preferences for ingroup adults. Arousal responses to infants appear to be mediated by the autonomic nervous system and are not dependent on direct caregiving exposure, but behavioral responses appear to be mediated by higher-order cognitive processing based on social acceptance and cultural exposure. PMID:25353362

  8. Food Assistance: Efforts To Control Fraud and Abuse in the Child and Adult Care Food Program Should Be Strengthened. United States General Accounting Office Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Robert E.

    The Child and Adult Care Food Program provides over $1.5 billion in benefits annually to children and adults in day care. In order to address the longstanding problems of fraud and abuse present in the program, state agencies have been charged with the responsibility for implementing Food and Nutrition Service's (FNS) regulations to prevent and…

  9. Harmonizing influenza primary-care surveillance in the United Kingdom: piloting two methods to assess the timing and intensity of the seasonal epidemic across several general practice-based surveillance schemes.

    PubMed

    Green, H K; Charlett, A; Moran-Gilad, J; Fleming, D; Durnall, H; Thomas, D Rh; Cottrell, S; Smyth, B; Kearns, C; Reynolds, A J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J; Ellis, J; Zambon, M; Watson, J M; McMenamin, J; Pebody, R G

    2015-01-01

    General Practitioner consultation rates for influenza-like illness (ILI) are monitored through several geographically distinct schemes in the UK, providing early warning to government and health services of community circulation and intensity of activity each winter. Following on from the 2009 pandemic, there has been a harmonization initiative to allow comparison across the distinct existing surveillance schemes each season. The moving epidemic method (MEM), proposed by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control for standardizing reporting of ILI rates, was piloted in 2011/12 and 2012/13 along with the previously proposed UK method of empirical percentiles. The MEM resulted in thresholds that were lower than traditional thresholds but more appropriate as indicators of the start of influenza virus circulation. The intensity of the influenza season assessed with the MEM was similar to that reported through the percentile approach. The MEM pre-epidemic threshold has now been adopted for reporting by each country of the UK. Further work will continue to assess intensity of activity and apply standardized methods to other influenza-related data sources. PMID:25023603

  10. The effects of multivitamin supplementation on mood and general well-being in healthy young adults. A laboratory and at-home mobile phone assessment.

    PubMed

    Pipingas, A; Camfield, D A; Stough, C; Cox, K H M; Fogg, E; Tiplady, B; Sarris, J; White, D J; Sali, A; Wetherell, M A; Scholey, A B

    2013-10-01

    Previous research has suggested that multivitamin (MV) supplementation may be associated with beneficial effects for mood and general well-being, although treatment durations have typically been less than 90 days, samples have often been restricted to males only and acute effects have not been adequately differentiated from chronic effects. In the current study a MV supplement containing high levels of B-vitamins was administered daily to 138 healthy young adult participants between the ages of 20 and 50 years over a 16-week period. Chronic mood measures (GHQ-28, POMS, Chalder fatigue, PILL, Bond-Lader and custom visual analogue scales) were administered pre-dose at baseline, 8- and 16-weeks. Changes in Bond-Lader and VAS in response to a multi-tasking framework (MTF) were also assessed at 8- and 16-weeks. For a subset of participants, at-home mobile-phone assessments of mood were assessed on a weekly basis using Bond-Lader and VAS. No significant treatment effects were found for any chronic laboratory mood measures. In response to the MTF, a significant treatment x time interaction was found for STAI-S, with a trend towards a greater increase in stress ratings for male participants in the MV group at 16 weeks. However, this finding may have been attributable to a larger proportion of students in the male MV group. In contrast, at-home mobile-phone assessments, where assessments were conducted post-dose, revealed significantly reduced stress, physical fatigue and anxiety in the MV group in comparison to placebo across a number of time points. Further research using both acute and chronic dosing regimens are required in order to properly differentiate these effects. PMID:23727255

  11. General Healthcare Maintenance of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... health care provider about other important issues including: Vaccinations: Adults with IBD should generally follow the same vaccination schedules as the general population. The only exceptions ...

  12. Comparison of outcomes after two standards-of-care reduced-intensity conditioning regimens and two different graft sources for allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adults with hematologic diseases: a single-center analysis.

    PubMed

    Le Bourgeois, Amandine; Mohr, Catherine; Guillaume, Thierry; Delaunay, Jacques; Malard, Florent; Loirat, Marion; Peterlin, Pierre; Blin, Nicolas; Dubruille, Viviane; Mahe, Beatrice; Gastinne, Thomas; Le Gouill, Steven; Moreau, Philippe; Mohty, Mohamad; Planche, Lucie; Lode, Laurence; Bene, Marie-Christine; Chevallier, Patrice

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) have included the advent of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens to decrease the toxicity of myeloablative allo-SCT and the use of double umbilical cord blood (dUCB) units as a graft source in adults lacking a suitable donor. The FB2A2 regimen (fludarabine 30 mg/kg/day for 5-6 days + i.v. busulfan 3.6 mg/kg/day for 2 days + rabbit antithymocyte globulin 2.5 mg/kg/day for 2 days) supported by peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) and the TCF regimen (fludarabine 200 mg/m² for 5 days + cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg for 1 day + low-dose [2 Gy] total body irradiation) supported by dUCB units are currently the most widely used RIC regimens in many centers and could be considered standard of care in adults eligible for an RIC allo-SCT. Here we compared, retrospectively, the outcomes of adults patients who received the FB2A2-PBSC RIC regimen (n = 52; median age, 59 years; median follow-up, 19 months) and those who received the dUCB-TCF RIC regimen (n = 39; median age, 56 years; median follow-up, 20 months) for allo-SCT between January 2007 and November 2010. There were no significant between-group differences in patient and disease characteristics. Cumulative incidences of engraftment, acute grade II-IV and chronic graft-versus-host disease were similar in the 2 groups. The median time to platelet recovery, incidence of early death (before day +100), and 2-year nonrelapse mortality were significantly higher in the dUCB-TCF group (38 days versus 0 days [P <.0001]; 20.5% versus 4% [P = .05], and 26.5% versus 6% [P = .02], respectively). The groups did not differ in terms of 2-year overall survival (62% for FB2A2-PBSC versus 61% for dUCB-TCF), disease-free survival (59% versus 50.5%), or relapse incidence (35.5% versus 23%). In multivariate analysis, the presence of a lymphoid disorder was associated with a significantly higher 2-year overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0

  13. Sequential myeloablative autologous stem cell transplantation and reduced intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is safe and feasible in children, adolescents and young adults with poor-risk refractory or recurrent Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Satwani, P; Jin, Z; Martin, P L; Bhatia, M; Garvin, J H; George, D; Chaudhury, S; Talano, J; Morris, E; Harrison, L; Sosna, J; Peterson, M; Militano, O; Foley, S; Kurtzberg, J; Cairo, M S

    2015-02-01

    The outcome of children, adolescents and young adults (CAYA) with poor-risk recurrent/refractory lymphoma is dismal (⩽30%). To overcome this poor prognosis, we designed an approach to maximize an allogeneic graft vs lymphoma effect in the setting of low disease burden. We conducted a multi-center prospective study of myeloablative conditioning (MAC) and autologous stem cell transplantation (AutoSCT), followed by a reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (AlloHCT) in CAYA, with poor-risk refractory or recurrent lymphoma. Conditioning for MAC AutoSCT consisted of carmustine/etoposide/cyclophosphamide, RIC consisted of busulfan/fludarabine. Thirty patients, 16 Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and 14 non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), with a median age of 16 years and median follow-up of 5years, were enrolled. Twenty-three patients completed both MAC AutoSCT and RIC AlloHCT. Allogeneic donor sources included unrelated cord blood (n=9), unrelated donor (n=8) and matched siblings (n=6). The incidence of transplant-related mortality following RIC AlloHCT was only 12%. In patients with HL and NHL, 10 year EFS was 59.8% and 70% (P=0.613), respectively. In summary, this approach is safe, and long-term EFS with this approach is encouraging considering the poor-risk patient characteristics and the use of unrelated donors for RIC AlloHCT in the majority of cases. PMID:24938649

  14. A General Practice-Based Prevalence Study of Epilepsy among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and of Its Association with Psychiatric Disorder, Behaviour Disturbance and Carer Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, T.; Weston, N.; Baxter, H.; Felce, D.; Kerr, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although the elevated occurrence of epilepsy in people with intellectual disabilities (ID) is well recognized, the nature of seizures and their association with psychopathology and carer strain are less clearly understood. The aims were to determine the prevalence and features of epilepsy in a community-based population of adults with…

  15. Personality and Biography: Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on the History of Adult Education. Volume I: General, Comparative, and Synthetic Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedenthal-Haase, Martha, Ed.

    This volume includes the following papers: "Foreword: The Standing International Conference on the History of Adult Education (AE)" (Franz Poeggeler); "Editor's Introduction: Perspectives on the Sixth International Conference on the History of AE" (Martha Friedenthal-Haase); two special addresses by Joerg Prinzhausen and Ursula Giere; "History of…

  16. Effect of the Web-Based Intervention MyPlan 1.0 on Self-Reported Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Adults Who Visit General Practice: A Quasi-Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Crombez, Geert; Van der Mispel, Celien; Verloigne, Maite; Van Stappen, Vicky; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-based interventions typically have small intervention effects on adults’ health behavior because they primarily target processes leading to an intention to change leaving individuals in an intention-behavior gap, they often occur without contact with health care providers, and a limited amount of feedback is provided only at the beginning of these interventions, but not further on in the behavior change process. Therefore, we developed a Web-based intervention (“MyPlan 1.0”) to promote healthy behavior in adults. The intervention was based on a self-regulation perspective that also targets postintentional processes and guides individuals during all phases of behavior change. Objective The study investigated the effectiveness of MyPlan1.0 on fruit and vegetable intake of Flemish adults visiting general practice (3 groups: control group, intervention group recruited by researchers, and intervention group recruited and guided by general practitioners [GPs]). Second, it examined whether there was a larger intervention effect for the intervention group guided by GPs compared to the intervention group recruited by researchers. Methods Adults (≥18 years) were recruited in 19 Flemish general practices. In each general practice, patients were systematically allocated by a researcher either for the intervention group (researchers’ intervention group) or the waiting-list control group that received general advice. In a third group, the GP recruited adults for the intervention (GPs intervention group). The two intervention groups filled in evaluation questionnaires and received MyPlan 1.0 for a behavior of choice (fruit, vegetable, or physical activity). The waiting-list control group filled in the evaluation questionnaires and received only general information. Self-reported fruit and vegetable intake were assessed at baseline (T0), 1 week (T1), and 1 month (T2) postbaseline. Three-level (general practice, adults, time) linear regression models were

  17. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  18. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  20. Internal exposure from the ingestion of foods contaminated by 137Cs after the Chernobyl accident. Report 1. General model: ingestion doses and countermeasure effectiveness for the adults of Rovno Oblast of Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Likhtarev, I A; Kovgan, L N; Vavilov, S E; Gluvchinsky, R R; Perevoznikov, O N; Litvinets, L N; Anspaugh, L R; Kercher, J R; Bouville, A

    1996-03-01

    The Chernobyl accident, which occurred in April 1986, resulted in the atmospheric release of about 70--100 PBq of 137Cs. This paper examines the doses to the adult population of the northern part of Rovno Oblast, Ukraine, from ingestion of 137Cs. Fallout of 137Cs in these regions was lower than in other regions of Ukraine. However, the transfer of 137Cs from soil to milk in the region considered is high (up to 20 Bq L-1 per kBq m-2) and results in the predominance of internal doses compared to those from external exposure. Numerous measurements of 137Cs soil deposition, 137Cs milk contamination, and 137Cs body burden have been made in the area and form the basis of a general model of internal exposure from the ingestion of foods contaminated by 137Cs. This paper has two main purposes. The first is to develop the general phenomenological description of the process leading to internal exposure from the ingestion of 137Cs contaminated foods in the situation where different countermeasures are realized. The second is to apply the model for the adult population of the northern part of the Rovno Oblast (first report) for the limited time period of up to six years after the accident. The doses actually received by the adults are estimated to be four to eight times smaller than the doses calculated for the situation without countermeasures. PMID:8609023

  1. A non-comparative phase II study of dose intensive chemotherapy with doxorubicin and ifosfamide followed by high dose ICE consolidation with PBSCT in non-resectable, high grade, adult type soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jörg Thomas; Horger, M; Kluba, T; Königsrainer, A; de Zwart, P; von Weyhern, C Hann; Eckert, F; Budach, W; Bokemeyer, C

    2013-12-01

    The objective was to determine the role of dose intensive induction chemotherapy in patients with soft tissue sarcomas (STS) that were considered unresectable. Treatment consisted of 2-3 cycles of doxorubicin (Dox) and ifosfamide (Ifo) followed by high dose chemotherapy with ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide (HD-ICE) plus peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). 30 out of 631 consecutive patients, median age 46 years (21-62), with high grade STS were included. 29 patients completed at least 2 cycles of Dox/Ifo. HD-ICE was withheld because of progressive disease (PD) in 5 patients, neurotoxicity in 6 cases, insufficient peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization, complete remission (CR) and refusal in 1 patient each. HD-ICE was associated with non-haematological grade III toxicity including emesis, mucositis, fever, neurotoxicity, and transaminase level elevation. Two additional patients attained a partial response after HD-ICE. Overall, 24 of 30 (80%) patients underwent surgery, with complete tumor resections in 19 patients (63% of all patients, 79% of the operated subgroup); however, 2 of these required amputation. After a median follow up period of 50 months in surviving patients (range, 26-120), 5-year PFS and OS rates were 39% and 48%, respectively. Induction chemotherapy plus consolidation HD-ICE is generally feasible, but is associated with significant neurotoxicity. The advantage of HD-ICE over conventional dose chemotherapy plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in non-resectable disease remains unproven. PMID:24091981

  2. Recruiting Adult Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Resources Network, Manhattan, KS.

    This document is the first nationwide compilation of successful recruiting techniques for students in adult basic education, literacy, General Educational Development classes, and adult high school degree programs. Information for the publication was gathered from a literature search and other sources, especially "Reaching the Least Educated," a…

  3. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Part II: Intensive Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

    1992-04-01

    Project 83-7 was established under the Northeast Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 704 (d) (1) to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration habitat improvement project, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two sub-projects: general and intensive monitoring. Results of the intensive monitoring sub-project are reported here. Results from the general monitoring sub-project will be reported in a separate document. The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. Field work began in 1987 in upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). Methods include using weirs to trap adults, conducting ground and aerial redd counts, snorkeling to estimate parr populations, PIT-tagging juveniles to determine parr-tosmolt survival, trapping fall and spring downstream emigrants with scoop traps, and outplanting adults to determine juvenile carrying capacity. PIT tags also provide a wide range of other information such as migration timing, effects of flow and passage conditions on smolt survival, other factors affecting smolt survival, and growth.

  4. Older Adults and Drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking Older Adults and Drinking Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Generally, ... liver problems, osteoporosis, memory problems, and mood disorders. Drinking and Medications Many medications, such as the ones ...

  5. The Colonial Adult Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.

    1975-01-01

    The adult evening schools of colonial America served a mixed clientele and provided instruction in a variety of subjects. Although most historians have described evening schoolmasters as incompetent frauds, research indicates that such descriptions are generally unjust and unfounded. (NHM)

  6. Wise Choices: Nutrition and Exercise for Older Adults: A Community-Based Health Promotion Intervention.

    PubMed

    Turk, Melanie T; Elci, Okan U; Resick, Lenore K; Kalarchian, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Effective interventions for older adults are needed to address lifestyle behaviors linked to chronic illnesses. We implemented a 12-week group behavioral intervention for 118 racially diverse older adults at 6 community-based senior centers to improve eating and physical activity. Assessments were completed pre- and postintervention, with 85.6% retention. We documented increases in fruit, vegetable, and whole grain intake; pace of walking; number of city blocks walked; daily steps walked; functional mobility; and self-rated general health (P < .05). Findings indicate that a relatively low-intensity lifestyle intervention can effectively be implemented for community-dwelling older adults. Further development of this approach is warranted. PMID:27536931

  7. Adult Development. What do Teachers of Adults Need To Know?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Susan; And Others

    The first part of this two-part paper provides a general review of adult development and is premised on an understanding of andragogy. Andragogy is the art and science of helping adults learn. It is based on the following four assumptions about adults: (1) as people mature they become less dependent and more self-directed; (2) experiences serve as…

  8. General Information about Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Screening Research Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Melanoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  9. Act To Promote Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1970

    An act of the German Lower Saxony Parliament to promote adult education is presented. It has 24 general provisions relating to the following: purpose of adult education, principle for promotion, conditions for promotions of establishments, independence of adult education, prerequisites and form of acknowledgement of entitlement to promotion,…

  10. The Benefit of a General, Systematic Use of Mapping Systems During Electrophysiological Procedures in Children and Teenagers: The Experience of an Adult EP Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Marini, Massimiliano; Del Greco, Maurizio; Ravanelli, Daniele; Cima, Anna; Coser, Alessio; Porcedda, Giulio; Guarracini, Fabrizio; Valentini, Aldo; Bonmassari, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Standard imaging during electrophysiological procedures (EPs) uses fluoroscopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, safety and effect of an extended use of non-fluoroscopic mapping systems (NMSs) for imaging during paediatric EPs in an adult EP laboratory focusing on the amount of X-ray exposure. This study is a retrospective analysis that includes consecutive young patients (83 pts, aged between 8 and 18) who underwent EPs from March 2005 to February 2015. We compare the fluoroscopy data of two groups of pts: Group I, pts who underwent EPs from 2005 to 2008 using only fluoroscopy and Group II, pts who underwent EPs from 2008 to 2015 performed also using NMSs. The use of an NMS resulted in reduced fluoroscopy time in Group II {median value 0.1 min (95 % CI [0.00-1.07])} compared to Group I {median value 3.55 min (95 % CI [1.93-7.83]) (MW test, P < 0.05)}. There was a complementary reduction in the total X-ray exposure from 2.53 Gy cm(2) (95 % CI [1.51-4.66]) in Group I to 0.05 Gy cm(2) in Group II (95 % CI [0.00-1.22]) (MW test, P < 0.05). Regarding ablation procedures, the median effective dose decreased from 3.04 mSv (95 % CI [1.22-6.89]) to 0.25 mSv (95 % CI [0.00-0.60]) (MW test, P < 0.05). The use of an NMS dramatically reduces fluoroscopy time and total X-ray exposure during EPs in children and teenagers in an adult EP laboratory. In our experience, this reduction is mainly related to the systematic day-to-day use of NMSs. PMID:26932365

  11. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Krister; Ekström-Jodal, Barbro; Meretoja, Olli; Valentin, Niels; Wagner, Kari

    2015-05-01

    The initiation and development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care have much in common in the Scandinavian countries. The five countries had to initiate close relations and cooperation in all medical disciplines. The pediatric anesthesia subspecialty took its first steps after the Second World War. Relations for training and exchange of experiences between Scandinavian countries with centers in Europe and the USA were a prerequisite for development. Specialized pediatric practice was not a full-time position until during the 1950s, when the first pediatric anesthesia positions were created. Scandinavian anesthesia developed slowly. In contrast, Scandinavia pioneered both adult and certainly pediatric intensive care. The pioneers were heavily involved in the teaching and training of anesthetists and nurses. This was necessary to manage the rapidly increasing work. The polio epidemics during the 1950s initiated a combination of clinical development and technical innovations. Blood gas analyses technology and interpretation in combination with improved positive pressure ventilators were developed in Scandinavia contributing to general and pediatric anesthesia and intensive care practice. Scandinavian specialist training and accreditation includes both anesthesia and intensive care. Although pediatric anesthesia/intensive care is not a separate specialty, an 'informal accreditation' for a specialist position is obtained after training. The pleasure of working in a relatively small group of devoted colleagues and staff has persisted from the pioneering years. It is still one of the most inspiring and pleasant gifts for those working in this demanding specialty. PMID:25641001

  12. Changes in tooth mortality between 1990 and 2002 among adults in Västerbotten County, Sweden: influence of socioeconomic factors, general health, smoking, and dental care habits on tooth mortality.

    PubMed

    Pihlgren, Karin; Forsberg, Hans; Sjödin, Lars; Lundgren, Per; Wänman, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to analyse changes in tooth mortality among adults in Västerbotten County, Sweden, between 1990 and 2002 and determine whether socioeconomic factors, general health, smoking, and dental care habits influenced tooth mortality. The study was based on samples drawn from the adult population in Västerbotten County in 1990 and 2002. The studied age groups were 35-, 50-, and 65-year-olds. In 2002 75-year-olds were included. The surveys comprised a clinical examination and a questionnaire.The latter focused on oro-facial symptoms, socioeconomic factors, general health, smoking, and dental care habits. Complete data were obtained from 715 individuals in 1990 and from 768 individuals in 2002.Variables used to depict tooth mortality were edentulousness, occlusal supporting zones (Eichner index), and number of teeth. The prevalence of edentulousness in Västerbotten County decreased from 12.7% in 1990 to 3.7% in 2002 (P < 0.001). The mean number of teeth increased in all age groups between 1990 and 2002, and so did the number of individuals with tooth contact in all occlusal supporting zones and no gaps between teeth. Low educational level, weak economic status, smoking, and irregular visits to the dental clinic were all significantly related to increased tooth mortality. Between 1990 and 2002 tooth mortality decreased significantly in the adult population of Västerbotten County, Sweden. Cross-sectional analysis identified socioeconomic factors, smoking, and irregular use of dental care services as being related to tooth mortality in both 1990 and 2002. PMID:21827017

  13. Helical Tomotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Whole Pelvis Irradiation in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients: Dosimetric, Normal Tissue Complication Probability, and Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Widesott, Lamberto; Pierelli, Alessio; Fiorino, Claudio; Lomax, Antony J.; Amichetti, Maurizio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Soukup, Martin; Schneider, Ralf; Hug, Eugen; Di Muzio, Nadia; Calandrino, Riccardo; Schwarz, Marco

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) treatment plans for high-risk prostate cancer (HRPCa) patients. Methods and Materials: The plans of 8 patients with HRPCa treated with HT were compared with IMPT plans with two quasilateral fields set up (-100{sup o}; 100{sup o}) and optimized with the Hyperion treatment planning system. Both techniques were optimized to simultaneously deliver 74.2 Gy/Gy relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) in 28 fractions on planning target volumes (PTVs)3-4 (P + proximal seminal vesicles), 65.5 Gy/Gy(RBE) on PTV2 (distal seminal vesicles and rectum/prostate overlapping), and 51.8 Gy/Gy(RBE) to PTV1 (pelvic lymph nodes). Normal tissue calculation probability (NTCP) calculations were performed for the rectum, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was estimated for the bowel cavity, penile bulb and bladder. Results: A slightly better PTV coverage and homogeneity of target dose distribution with IMPT was found: the percentage of PTV volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 95%}) was on average >97% in HT and >99% in IMPT. The conformity indexes were significantly lower for protons than for photons, and there was a statistically significant reduction of the IMPT dosimetric parameters, up to 50 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the rectum and bowel and 60 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the bladder. The NTCP values for the rectum were higher in HT for all the sets of parameters, but the gain was small and in only a few cases statistically significant. Conclusions: Comparable PTV coverage was observed. Based on NTCP calculation, IMPT is expected to allow a small reduction in rectal toxicity, and a significant dosimetric gain with IMPT, both in medium-dose and in low-dose range in all OARs, was observed.

  14. The Association Between Blood Mercury Levels and Risk for Overweight in a General Adult Population: Results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Won, Jong-Uk; Lee, Wanhyung; Lee, June-Hee; Seok, Hongdeok; Kim, Yeong-Kwang; Kim, Chi-Nyon; Roh, Jaehoon

    2016-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the association between blood mercury levels and overweight in Korean adults. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 9228 participants (4283 men and 4945 women) who completed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2007-2013. The population was divided into two groups according to the body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Blood mercury levels were analyzed using a gold amalgam method with a DMA-80 instrument, categorized into quartiles, and stratified by sex. After adjusting for all covariates, blood mercury was significantly associated with overweight in all subjects. According to the BMI criteria, the adjusted odds ratio of being in the highest blood mercury quartile was 1.75 (95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.53-2.01) overall, 2.09 (95 % CI, 1.71-2.55) in men, and 1.58 (95 % CI, 1.32-1.89) in women. According to the WC criteria, the adjusted odds ratio of being in the highest blood mercury quartile was 1.85 (95 % CI, 1.49-2.30) in men and 1.96 (95 % CI, 1.62-2.36) in women compared to the lowest quartile. Additionally, a trend in overweight across increasing blood mercury levels was observed by the p for trend test in the multiple diagnostic criteria. PMID:26458904

  15. Data-Intensive Benchmarking Suite

    2008-11-26

    The Data-Intensive Benchmark Suite is a set of programs written for the study of data-or storage-intensive science and engineering problems, The benchmark sets cover: general graph searching (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce breadth-first search), genome sequence searching, HTTP request classification (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce), low-level data communication, and storage device micro-beachmarking

  16. Measurement of Itch Intensity.

    PubMed

    Reich, Adam; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of itch intensity is essential to properly evaluate pruritic disease severity, to understand the patients' needs and burden, and especially to assess treatment efficacy, particularly in clinical trials. However, measurement of itch remains a challenge, as, per definition, it is a subjective sensation and assessment of this symptom represents significant difficulty. Intensity of itch must be considered in relation to its duration, localization, course of symptoms, presence and type of scratch lesions, response to antipruritic treatment, and quality of life impairment. Importantly, perception of itch may also be confounded by different cofactors including but not limited to patient general condition and other coexisting ailments. In the current chapter we characterize the major methods of itch assessments that are used in daily clinical life and as research tools. Different methods of itch assessment have been developed; however, so far none is without limitations and any data on itch intensity should always be interpreted with caution. Despite these limitations, it is strongly recommended to implement itch measurement tools in routine daily practice, as it would help in proper assessment of patient clinical status. In order to improve evaluation of itch in research studies, it is recommended to use at least two independent methods, as such an approach should increase the validity of achieved results. PMID:27578068

  17. A generalized estimating equation approach to analysis of maintenance of wakefulness testing in a study of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, armodafinil, and placebo in sleep-deprived adults.

    PubMed

    Roth, Thomas; Freeman, Jon; Zammit, Gary; Donnelly, Patricia; Gao, Joseph; Ferreira-Cornwell, M Celeste; Gasior, Maria

    2014-10-01

    In a study of acute sleep deprivation in healthy male volunteers randomized to double-blind treatment with lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (20, 50, or 70 mg), placebo control, or an active control (armodafinil 250 mg), Maintenance of Wakefulness Test data were compared using a generalized estimating equation analysis to eliminate the need for unequivocal sleep latency imputation. Compared with placebo across all Maintenance of Wakefulness Tests, all active treatments were associated with lower risk of falling asleep (risk ratio [95% confidence interval]): 0.45 (0.27-0.76; P = 0.0026), 0.10 (0.05-0.20; P < 0.0001), and 0.05 (0.02-0.14; P < 0.0001) for 20, 50, and 70 mg lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, respectively, and 0.11 (0.06-0.21; P < 0.0001) for the active control. Sleep-risk ratios were similar for lisdexamfetamine dimesylate 50 or 70 mg and for the active control, but lisdexamfetamine 20 mg was associated with a greater risk of falling asleep compared with the active control (4.13 [1.97-8.67]; P = 0.0002). Generalized estimating equation analysis detected wake-promoting effects of active treatments and eliminating data imputation, suggesting model utility in future studies. PMID:25180798

  18. Prospectively Collected Characteristics of Adult Patients, Their Consultations and Outcomes as They Report Breathlessness When Presenting to General Practice in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Currow, David C.; Clark, Katherine; Mitchell, Geoffrey K.; Johnson, Miriam J.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Breathlessness is a subjective sensation, so understanding its impacts requires patients’ reports, including prospective patient-defined breathlessness as a reason for presenting to general practitioners (GP).The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of breathlessness as a reason for GP consultations while defining the clinico-demographic factors of these patients and the characteristics and outcomes of those consultations. Methods Using nine years of the Family Medicine Research Centre database of 100 consecutive encounters from 1,000 practices annually, the patient-defined reason for encounter ‘breathlessness’ was explored using prospectively collected data in people ≥18 years with clinical data coded using the International Classification for Primary Care V2. Dichotomous variables were analysed using chi square and 95% confidence intervals calculated using Kish’s formula for a single stage clustered design. Results Of all the 755,729 consultations collected over a nine year period from 1 April, 2000, 7255 included breathlessness as a reason for encounter (0.96%; 95% CI 0.93 to 0.99) most frequently attributed to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Only 48.3% of GPs saw someone reporting breathlessness. The proportion of consultations with breathlessness increased with age. Breathlessness trebled the likelihood that the consultation occurred in the community rather than the consulting room (p<0.0001) and increased 2.5 fold the likelihood of urgent referral to hospital (p<0.0001). Of those with breathlessness, 12% had undiagnosed breathlessness at the end of the consultation (873/7255) with higher likelihood of being younger females. Discussion Breathlessness is a prevalent symptom in general practitioner. Such prevalence enables future research focused on understanding the temporal pattern of breathlessness and the longitudinal care offered to, and outcomes for these patients, including those who leave the consultation without a

  19. White blood cell count, sex and age are major determinants of heterogeneity of platelet indices in an adult general population: results from the MOLI-SANI project

    PubMed Central

    Santimone, Iolanda; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; De Curtis, Amalia; Spinelli, Maria; Cugino, Daniela; Gianfagna, Francesco; Zito, Francesco; Donati, Maria Benedetta; Cerletti, Chiara; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2011-01-01

    Background The understanding of non-genetic regulation of platelet indices - platelet count, plateletcrit, mean platelet volume, and platelet distribution width - is limited. The association of these platelet indices with a number of biochemical, environmental and clinical variables was studied in a large cohort of the general population. Design and Methods Men and women (n=18,097, 52% women, 56±12 years) were randomly recruited from various villages in Molise (Italy) in the framework of the population-based cohort study “Moli-sani”. Hemochromocytometric analyses were performed using an automatic analyzer (Beckman Coulter, IL, Milan, Italy). Associations of platelet indices with dependent variables were investigated by multivariable linear regression analysis. Results Full models including age, sex, body mass index, blood pressure, smoking, menopause, white and red blood cell counts, mean corpuscular volume, D-dimers, C-reactive protein, high-density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins, triglycerides, glucose, and drug use explained 16%, 21%, 1.9% and 4.7% of platelet count, plateletcrit, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width variability, respectively; variables that appeared to be most strongly associated were white blood cell count, age, and sex. Platelet count, mean platelet volume and plateletcrit were positively associated with white blood cell count, while platelet distribution width was negatively associated with white blood cell count. Platelet count and plateletcrit were also positively associated with C-reactive protein and D-dimers (P<0.0001). Each of the other variables, although associated with platelet indices in a statistically significant manner, only explained less than 0.5% of their variability. Platelet indices varied across Molise villages, independently of any other platelet count determinant or characteristics of the villages. Conclusions The association of platelet indices with white blood cell count, C-reactive protein

  20. Brainstem Glioma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jethro; Western, Stephen; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem gliomas are not nearly as common in adults as they are in children. They are likely the final common consequence not of a single disease process but of several. They can be difficult to diagnose, and are challenging to treat. Clinical studies of this diagnosis are few and generally small. Because of these factors, our understanding of the biology of adult brainstem glioma is incomplete. However, the knowledge base is growing and progress is being made. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge for brainstem glioma in adults and identify key areas for which additional information is required. PMID:27556016

  1. Sleep and Sleep Disorders in Rare Hereditary Diseases: A Reminder for the Pediatrician, Pediatric and Adult Neurologist, General Practitioner, and Sleep Specialist

    PubMed Central

    Gadoth, Natan; Oksenberg, Arie

    2014-01-01

    Although sleep abnormalities in general and sleep-related breathing disorders (SBD) in particular are quite common in healthy children; their presence is notably under-recognized. Impaired sleep is a frequent problem in subjects with inborn errors of metabolism as well as in a variety of genetic disorders; however, they are commonly either missed or underestimated. Moreover, the complex clinical presentation and the frequently life-threatening symptoms are so overwhelming that sleep and its quality may be easily dismissed. Even centers, which specialize in rare genetic-metabolic disorders, are expected to see only few patients with a particular syndrome, a fact that significantly contributes to the under-diagnosis and treatment of impaired sleep in this particular population. Many of those patients suffer from reduced life quality associated with a variable degree of cognitive impairment, which may be worsened by poor sleep and abnormal ventilation during sleep, abnormalities which can be alleviated by proper treatment. Even when such problems are detected, there is a paucity of publications on sleep and breathing characteristics of such patients that the treating physician can refer to. In the present paper, we provide an overview of sleep and breathing characteristics in a number of rare genetic–metabolic disorders with the hope that it will serve as a reminder for the medical professional to look for possible impaired sleep and SBD in their patients and when present to apply the appropriate evaluation and treatment options. PMID:25101051

  2. Internet-based self-management support for adults with asthma: a qualitative study among patients, general practitioners and practice nurses on barriers to implementation

    PubMed Central

    van Gaalen, Johanna L; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Bakker, Moira J; Snoeck-Stroband, Jiska B; Sont, Jacob K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore barriers among patients, general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses to implement internet-based self-management support as provided by PatientCoach for asthma in primary care. Setting Primary care within South Holland, the Netherlands. Participants Twenty-two patients (12 women, mean age 38 years), 21 GPs (6 women, mean age 52 years) and 13 practice nurses (all women, mean age 41 years). Design A qualitative study using focus groups and interviews. Outcomes Barriers as perceived by patients, GPs and practice nurses to implementation of PatientCoach. Methods 10 focus groups and 12 interviews were held to collect data: 4 patient focus groups, 4 GP focus groups, 2 practice nurse focus group, 2 patient interviews, 5 GP interviews and 5 practice nurse interviews. A prototype of PatientCoach that included modules for coaching, personalised information, asthma self-monitoring, medication treatment plan, feedback, e-consultations and a forum was demonstrated. A semistructured topic guide was used. Directed content analysis was used to analyse data. Reported barriers were classified according to a framework by Grol and Wensing. Results A variety of barriers emerged among all participant groups. Barriers identified among patients include a lack of a patient–professional partnership in using PatientCoach and a lack of perceived benefit in improving asthma symptoms. Barriers identified among GPs include a low sense of urgency towards asthma care and current work routines. Practice nurses identified a low level of structured asthma care and a lack of support by colleagues as barriers. Among all participant groups, insufficient ease of use of PatientCoach, lack of financial arrangements and patient characteristics such as a lack of asthma symptoms were reported as barriers. Conclusions We identified a variety of barriers to implementation of PatientCoach. An effective implementation strategy for internet-based self

  3. Youth and young adult physical activity and body composition of young adult women: findings from the dietary intervention study in children.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Melissa G; Hovinga, Mary; Shepherd, John A; Egleston, Brian; Gabriel, Kelley; Van Horn, Linda; Robson, Alan; Snetselaar, Linda; Stevens, Victor K; Jung, Seungyoun; Dorgan, Joanne

    2015-02-01

    This study prospectively investigates associations between youth moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and body composition in young adult women using data from the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC) and the DISC06 Follow-Up Study. MVPA was assessed by questionnaire on 5 occasions between the ages 8 and 18 years and at age 25-29 years in 215 DISC female participants. Using whole body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), overall adiposity and body fat distribution were assessed at age 25-29 years by percent body fat (%fat) and android-to-gynoid (A:G) fat ratio, respectively. Linear mixed effects models and generalized linear latent and mixed models were used to assess associations of youth MVPA with both outcomes. Young adult MVPA, adjusted for other young adult characteristics, was significantly inversely associated with young adult %fat (%fat decreased from 37.4% in the lowest MVPA quartile to 32.8% in the highest (p-trend = 0.02)). Adjusted for youth and young adult characteristics including young adult MVPA, youth MVPA also was significantly inversely associated with young adult %fat (β=-0.40 per 10 MET-hrs/wk, p = .02) . No significant associations between MVPA and A:G fat ratio were observed. Results suggest that youth and young adult MVPA are important independent predictors of adiposity in young women. PMID:25387239

  4. Adult Compacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin focuses on adult compacts, three-way agreements among employers, potential employees, and trainers to provide the right kind of quality training to meet the employers' requirements. Part 1 is an executive summary of a report of the Adult Compacts Project, which studied three adult compacts in Birmingham and Loughborough, England, and…

  5. Adult Attachment as a Moderator of Treatment Outcome for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Comparison Between Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Plus Supportive Listening and CBT Plus Interpersonal and Emotional Processing Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Michelle G.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Jacobson, Nicholas C.; Moore, Ginger A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether baseline dimensions of adult insecure attachment (avoidant and anxious) moderated outcome in a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) plus supportive listening (CBT + SL) versus CBT plus interpersonal and emotional processing therapy (CBT + I/EP). Method Eighty-three participants diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) were recruited from the community and assigned randomly to CBT + SL (n = 40) or to CBT + I/EP (n = 43) within a study using an additive design. PhD-level psychologists treated participants. Blind assessors evaluated participants at pretreatment, posttreatment, 6-month, 12-month, and 2-year follow-up with a composite of self-report and assessor-rated GAD symptom measures (Penn State Worry Questionnaire, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Clinician’s Severity Rating). Avoidant and anxious attachment were assessed using self-reported dismissing and angry states of mind, respectively, on the Perceptions of Adult Attachment Questionnaire. Results Consistent with our prediction, at all assessments higher levels of dismissing styles in those who received CBT + I/EP predicted greater change in GAD symptoms compared with those who received CBT + SL for whom dismissiveness was unrelated to the change. At postassessment, higher angry attachment was associated with less change in GAD symptoms for those receiving CBT + I/EP, compared with CBT + SL, for whom anger was unrelated to change in GAD symptoms. Pretreatment attachment-related anger failed to moderate outcome at other time points and therefore, these moderation effects were more short-lived than the ones for dismissing attachment. Conclusions When compared with CBT + SL, CBT + I/EP may be better for individuals with GAD who have relatively higher dismissing styles of attachment. PMID:26052875

  6. 49 CFR 572.131 - General description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.131 General description. (a) The Hybrid III fifth percentile adult... Small Adult Female Crash Test Dummy (HIII-5F, Alpha Version) (June 2002) (refer to §...

  7. 49 CFR 572.131 - General description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.131 General description. (a) The Hybrid III fifth percentile adult... Small Adult Female Crash Test Dummy (HIII-5F, Alpha Version) (June 2002) (refer to §...

  8. 49 CFR 572.131 - General description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.131 General description. (a) The Hybrid III fifth percentile adult... Small Adult Female Crash Test Dummy (HIII-5F, Alpha Version) (June 2002) (refer to §...

  9. 49 CFR 572.131 - General description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.131 General description. (a) The Hybrid III fifth percentile adult... Small Adult Female Crash Test Dummy (HIII-5F, Alpha Version) (June 2002) (refer to §...

  10. An Adult Education Program for Mentally Retarded Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starnes, Jean; Damron, Imogene

    This curriculum guide is intended for use with mentally retarded adults who are enrolled in adult basic education classes. The curriculum provides guidelines to improve students' competencies in three main areas: general functioning skills and independence (transportation, interpersonal relationships, health and safety, goal setting, planning and…

  11. Luminous efficiency functions at higher intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Lawrence Kent

    Two psychophysical measurement techniques, flicker photometry and successive heterochromatic brightness matching, were used to measure changes in luminance efficiency functions with increasing levels of light adaptation. Both measurement techniques were performed using the same optical system and the same seven healthy adults as subjects. Measurements were taken at four reference stimulus intensities, 1, 10, 100 and 1000 foot-lamberts. Luminous efficiency was found to depend on both the technique and the reference stimulus intensity with which the measurements were taken. For heterochromatic brightness matching, luminous efficiency increased for longer wavelengths as reference intensity increased. Peak luminous efficiency shifted from approximately 540nm to greater than 600nm with increasing intensity for all seven subjects. Peak luminous efficiency was constant for flicker photometry across all intensities but the function narrowed slightly at 100 foot-lamberts.

  12. Fungal microbiota in air-conditioning installed in both adult and neonatal intensive treatment units and their impact in two university hospitals of the central western region, Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Simões, Sara de Almeida Alves; Leite Júnior, Diniz Pereira; Hahn, Rosane Christine

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate fungal microbiota in air-conditioning units installed in intensive care units in two university hospitals in Cuiaba city, Mato Grosso, central western region of Brazil, 525 solid environmental samples were collected, 285 from Hospital A and 240 from Hospital B. Collections were performed using sterile swabs on air-conditioning unit components: cooling coils, ventilators, and filters. Mycelial fungi identification was achieved by observation of the macroscopic and micromorphological characteristics in different culture mediums (maize meal, oatmeal and potato dextrose agars and malt extract) using the Ridell technique. Eleven genera and 27 distinct species belonging to the hyphomycetes and ascomycetes classes were isolated and identified. The most frequently detected genera in both hospitals were Aspergillus spp, Penicillium spp, and Cladosporium spp. Values for colony-forming units per gram were 64 and 75%, well above the limits recommended by Health Ministry resolution 176/00 at the locations selected for analysis in Hospitals A and B, respectively. In conclusion, evaluation of fungal microbiota in the air-conditioning units indirectly determined that the air quality was compromised in both university hospitals analyzed, which constitutes a risk factor for the acquisition of infection in the intensive care units. PMID:21424438

  13. Placing Advocacy at the Heart of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    Adult educators know that adults and families change their lives through adult education. Adult education also positively impacts a host of social and economic issues. Yet this fact is largely unknown or misunderstood by the general public. Resources have become increasingly scarce, while at the same time adult educators are asked to do more with…

  14. The Problems of the Adult Learner: A Handbook for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Gregory C.; And Others

    This handbook on the adult learner and adult learning problems or disabilities is designed to serve as a practical tool for the Adult Basic Education instructor. It is divided into two main sections. Section 1 contains information concerning the nature of the adult learner. The first part deals with general characteristics of the adult learner and…

  15. General Information about Adult Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate ...

  16. Perceived Stress among Deaf Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elaine G.; Ouellette, Sue E.; Kang, Youngmi

    2006-01-01

    The Present Article describes the effectiveness of stress management classes in decreasing perceived stress among Deaf adults. Deaf adults may experience unique stressors, in addition to circumstances associated with increased stress in the general population. The Perceived Stress Scale (S. Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) was used as a…

  17. Adult Functional Competency: A Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Div. of Extension.

    The Adult Performance Level (APL) project summary specifies the competencies which are functional to economic and educational success in society and describes devices developed for assessing those competencies. The APL theory of functional competency identifies adult needs in general knowledge areas (consumer economics, occupational knowledge,…

  18. Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional survey of general medical outpatient clinics using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Omech, Bernard; Tshikuka, Jose-Gaby; Mwita, Julius C; Tsima, Billy; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Amone-P’Olak, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    Background Low- and middle-income countries, including Botswana, are facing rising prevalence of obesity and obesity-related cardiometabolic complications. Very little information is known about clustering of cardiovascular risk factors in the outpatient setting during routine visits. We aimed to assess the prevalence and identify the determinants of metabolic syndrome among the general outpatients’ attendances in Botswana. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from August to October 2014 involving outpatients aged ≥20 years without diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. A precoded questionnaire was used to collect data on participants’ sociodemographics, risk factors, and anthropometric indices. Fasting blood samples were drawn and analyzed for glucose and lipid profile. Metabolic syndrome was assessed using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results In total, 291 participants were analyzed, of whom 216 (74.2%) were females. The mean age of the total population was 50.1 (±11) years. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 27.1% (n=79), with no significant difference between the sexes (female =29.6%, males =20%, P=0.11). A triad of central obesity, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and elevated blood pressure constituted the largest proportion (38 [13.1%]) of cases of metabolic syndrome, followed by a combination of low high-density lipoprotein, elevated triglycerides, central obesity, and elevated blood pressure, with 17 (5.8%) cases. Independent determinants of metabolic syndrome were antihypertensive use and increased waist circumference. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in the general medical outpatients clinics. Proactive approaches are needed to screen and manage cases targeting its most important predictors. PMID:27616893

  19. Prior Infections With Seasonal Influenza A/H1N1 Virus Reduced the Illness Severity and Epidemic Intensity of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Atmar, Robert L.; Franco, Luis M.; Quarles, John M.; Niño, Diane; Wells, Janet M.; Arden, Nancy; Cheung, Sheree; Belmont, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Background. A new influenza A/H1N1 (pH1N1) virus emerged in April 2009, proceeded to spread worldwide, and was designated as an influenza pandemic. A/H1N1 viruses had circulated in 1918–1957 and 1977–2009 and were in the annual vaccine during 1977–2009. Methods. Serum antibody to the pH1N1 and seasonal A/H1N1 viruses was measured in 579 healthy adults at enrollment (fall 2009) and after surveillance for illness (spring 2010). Subjects reporting with moderate to severe acute respiratory illness had illness and virus quantitation for 1 week; evaluations for missed illnesses were conducted over holiday periods and at the spring 2010 visit. Results. After excluding 66 subjects who received pH1N1 vaccine, 513 remained. Seventy-seven had reported with moderate to severe illnesses; 31 were infected with pH1N1 virus, and 30 with a rhinovirus. Determining etiology from clinical findings was not possible, but fever and prominent myalgias favored influenza and prominent rhinorrhea favored rhinovirus. Tests of fall and spring antibody indicated pH1N1 infection of 23% had occurred, with the rate decreasing with increasing anti-pH1N1 antibody; a similar pattern was seen for influenza-associated illness. A reducing frequency of pH1N1 infections was also seen with increasing antibody to the recent seasonal A/H1N1 virus (A/Brisbane/59/07). Preexisting antibody to pH1N1 virus, responses to a single vaccine dose, a low infection-to-illness ratio, and a short duration of illness and virus shedding among those with influenza indicated presence of considerable preexisting immunity to pH1N1 in the population. Conclusions. The 2009 A/H1N1 epidemic among healthy adults was relatively mild, most likely because of immunity from prior infections with A/H1N1 viruses. PMID:22075792

  20. Urinary tract infection - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder infection - adults; UTI - adults; Cystitis - bacterial - adults; Pyelonephritis - adults; Kidney infection - adults ... to the hospital if you: Are an older adult Have kidney stones or changes in the anatomy ...

  1. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  2. General Information about Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Vaginal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Vaginal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. General Information about Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Gallbladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gallbladder Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. General Information about Laryngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Laryngeal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Laryngeal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  5. General Information about Kaposi Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Kaposi Sarcoma Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. General Information about Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  7. General Information About Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Endometrial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Endometrial Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  8. General Information about Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Vulvar Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Vulvar Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  9. General Information about Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Thyroid Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  10. General Information about Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gastric Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  11. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Esophageal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Esophageal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. General Information About Uterine Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Uterine Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Uterine Sarcoma Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  13. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. General Information about Penile Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Penile Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Penile Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. General Information about Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hypopharyngeal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  16. Intensive Intervention in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sarah R.; Fuchs, Lynn S.

    2015-01-01

    Students who demonstrate persistent mathematics difficulties and whose performance is severely below grade level require "intensive intervention". Intensive intervention is an individualized approach to instruction that is more demanding and concentrated than Tier 2 intervention efforts. We present the elements of intensive intervention…

  17. Adult Basic Education. State Plan for Fiscal Year 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka.

    This plan seeks generally to improve literacy skills and specifically to aid adults in progressing through three adult performance levels to obtain the general educational development (GED) diploma. The introduction discusses the general growth of adult basic education; a chart depicts that growth in Kansas. The document is then divided into five…

  18. Teaching the Adult of the "80"s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreitlow, Burton W.

    Intended for reading specialists and adult education teachers, this paper assesses the current state of adult basic skills, the general education degree, and English as a second language teaching. The first part of the paper consists of a series of tables representing demographics of participants in adult education programs. The second part…

  19. Teaching Adult Learners: An Assessment, A Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Susan C.; And Others

    A resource for adult educators, this guide was developed as a teacher aid to be used with "Learning Activities for Adults," a curriculum supplement developed by adult education teachers in Florida that is based on Florida's Minimum Student Performance Standards. This assessment and resource is divided into five general knowledge areas: adult…

  20. Credit Traps Can Hurt Your Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Tom, Ed.; Sandlin, Jenny, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document, which was written for adult educators in Georgia, offers instructional plans and practical strategies for helping students in adult literacy, adult basic education (ABE), General Educational Development, and English-as-a-second-language (ESL) programs understand the credit traps that can hurt them. The document begins with a…

  1. Kentucky Competency-Based Adult Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Univ., Lexington. Coll. of Education.

    This curriculum was developed to assist adult education teachers (especially in Kentucky) to prepare adults to function in today's society and that of the next century. Materials in the guide go beyond preparing adults to pass the General Educational Development (GED) test to preparing them with life skills. The curriculum includes traditional…

  2. Physical Criteria for Adult Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Sally

    The development of learning environments especially for adults has been neglected and research in planning such environments is fragmented and minimal. There is general agreement that facilities for adults should have an aura of adulthood to contribute to an adult's feeling of ease, confidence, and capability; that they should be flexible in room…

  3. Hazards from High Intensity Lamps and Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    The principal occupational health problem generally associated with high intensity arc lamps results from exposure of the eye and skin to ultraviolet radiation. Occasionally, the chorioretinal burns are of concern. The eye is generally more susceptible than the skin to injury from high intensity optical radiation sources whether ultraviolet, visible or infrared. Recent developments in technology have shown that some high intensity optical radiation sources which have output parameters greatly different from those encountered in the natural environment present a serious chorioretinal burn hazard.

  4. Insulin therapy in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the intensive care unit. Insulin therapy has emerged in adult intensive care units, and several pediatric studies are currently being conducted. This review discusses hyperglycemia and the effects of insulin on metabolic a...

  5. Speaking-Related Dyspnea in Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoit, Jeannette D.; Lansing, Robert W.; Perona, Kristen E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To reveal the qualities and intensity of speaking-related dyspnea in healthy adults under conditions of high ventilatory drive, in which the behavioral and metabolic control of breathing must compete. Method: Eleven adults read aloud while breathing different levels of inspired carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]). After the highest level,…

  6. Effective literacy instruction for adults with specific learning disabilities: implications for adult educators.

    PubMed

    Hock, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    Adults with learning disabilities (LD) attending adult basic education, GED programs, or community colleges are among the lowest performers on measures of literacy. For example, on multiple measures of reading comprehension, adults with LD had a mean reading score at the third grade level, whereas adults without LD read at the fifth grade level. In addition, large numbers of adults perform at the lowest skill levels on quantitative tasks. Clearly, significant instructional challenges exist for adults who struggle with literacy issues, and those challenges can be greater for adults with LD. In this article, the literature on adults with LD is reviewed, and evidenced-based instructional practices that significantly narrow the literacy achievement gap for this population are identified. Primary attention is given to instructional factors that have been shown to affect literacy outcomes for adults with LD. These factors include the use of explicit instruction, instructional technology, and intensive tutoring in skills and strategies embedded in authentic contexts. PMID:22064951

  7. [Psychiatric complications in patients under intensive care].

    PubMed

    Brand, M P; Suter, P; Gunn-Séchéhaye, A; Gardaz, J P; Gemperlé, M

    1978-01-01

    Ten adult patients with psychiatric disorders in the intensive care ward were examined. The length of stay varied from one week to four months and mechanical ventilation was necessary for all patients. Their experience of intensive care and their psychosensorial problems were as follows: temperospatial disorientation, perturbation of the sense of posture, hallucinations which could go as far as oneiric delirium, anguish and symptoms of depression. No psychotic syndrome, literraly speaking, was observed objectively. In the monthes that followed the stay under intensive care many patients presented important psychosomatic disorders. Organic factors are responsible for these complications, though the environment of the intensive care could induce a marked disafferentation. An effort by the attending staff, aimed at orientating or "reafferenting" these patients, could reduce these problems. PMID:30349

  8. Adult Personality Development: Dynamics and Processes

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Manfred; Hooker, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this special issue of Research in Human Development is on adult personality and how personality may contribute to and be involved in adult development. Specifically, the contributions in this issue focus on the links between personality structures (e.g., traits) and personality processes (e.g., goal pursuit, self--regulation) and emphasize the contributions that intensive repeated measurement approaches can make to the understanding of personality and development across the adult life span. PMID:24068889

  9. General Dentist

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your desktop! more... What Is a General Dentist? Article Chapters What Is a General Dentist? General ... Reviewed: January 2012 ?xml:namespace> Related Articles: General Dentists FAGD and MAGD: What Do These Awards Mean? ...

  10. Generalized Fibonacci photon sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong

    2015-08-01

    We propose a family of zone plates which are produced by the generalized Fibonacci sequences and their axial focusing properties are analyzed in detail. Compared with traditional Fresnel zone plates, the generalized Fibonacci zone plates present two axial foci with equal intensity. Besides, we propose an approach to adjust the axial locations of the two foci by means of different optical path difference, and further give the deterministic ratio of the two focal distances which attributes to their own generalized Fibonacci sequences. The generalized Fibonacci zone plates may allow for new applications in micro and nanophotonics.

  11. Adult Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic-recurrent inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects adults; however, a more transient infantile form also occurs. The definitive cause of seborrheic dermatitis is unknown. However, proliferation of Malassezia species has been described as a contributing factor. The adult form of seborrheic dermatitis affects up to approximately five percent of the general population. The disorder commonly affects the scalp, face, and periauricular region, with the central chest, axillae, and genital region also involved in some cases. Pruritus is not always present and is relatively common, especially with scalp disease. A variety of treatments are available including topical corticosteroids, topical antifungal agents, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and more recently, a nonsteroidal “device ”cream. This article reviews the practical topical management of seborrheic dermatitis in the United States, focusing on the adult population. PMID:21607192

  12. Adult Strabismus

    MedlinePlus

    ... will likely improve the double vision and depth perception. Also, strabismus affects adults in emotional, social, and ... muscle surgery is usually not severe. Headache, pulling sensation with eye movement and foreign body sensation in ...

  13. Acute Migraine Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2015-06-01

    There are many options for acute migraine attack treatment, but none is ideal for all patients. This study aims to review current medical office-based acute migraine therapy in adults and provides readers with an organized approach to this important facet of migraine treatment. A general literature review includes a review of several recent published guidelines. Acetaminophen, 4 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], naproxen sodium, and diclofenac potassium), and 7 triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, and zolmitriptan) have good evidence for efficacy and form the core of acute migraine treatment. NSAID-triptan combinations, dihydroergotamine, non-opioid combination analgesics (acetaminophen, ASA, and caffeine), and several anti-emetics (metoclopramide, domperidone, and prochlorperazine) are additional evidence-based options. Opioid containing combination analgesics may be helpful in specific patients, but should not be used routinely. Clinical features to be considered when choosing an acute migraine medication include usual headache intensity, usual rapidity of pain intensity increase, nausea, vomiting, degree of disability, patient response to previously used medications, history of headache recurrence with previous attacks, and the presence of contraindications to specific acute medications. Available acute medications can be organized into 4 treatment strategies, including a strategy for attacks of mild to moderate severity (strategy one: acetaminophen and/or NSAIDs), a triptan strategy for patients with severe attacks and for attacks not responding to strategy one, a refractory attack strategy, and a strategy for patients with contraindications to vasoconstricting drugs. Acute treatment of migraine attacks during pregnancy, lactation, and for patients with chronic migraine is also discussed. In chronic migraine, it is particularly important that medication

  14. Information Systems: An Introduction for Adult Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Phyllis A.

    In this paper, the author's primary focus is on a marketing information system and its potential importance for adult educators. The content is in seven sections. The first two sections briefly introduce information systems in general and their relevance for adult educators. The third section briefly describes general management information…

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... the upper airway for obstructive sleep apnea in adults. Sleep . 2010;33:1408-1413. PMID: 21061864 www. ...

  16. Access to health insurance and the use of inpatient medical care: evidence from the Affordable Care Act young adult mandate.

    PubMed

    Akosa Antwi, Yaa; Moriya, Asako S; Simon, Kosali I

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 expanded coverage to young adults by allowing them to remain on their parent's private health insurance until they turn 26 years old. While there is evidence on insurance effects, we know very little about use of general or specific forms of medical care. We study the implications of the expansion on inpatient hospitalizations. Given the prevalence of mental health needs for young adults, we also specifically study mental health related inpatient care. We find evidence that compared to those aged 27-29 years, treated young adults aged 19-25 years increased their inpatient visits by 3.5 percent while mental illness visits increased 9.0 percent. The prevalence of uninsurance among hospitalized young adults decreased by 12.5 percent; however, it does not appear that the intensity of inpatient treatment changed despite the change in reimbursement composition of patients. PMID:25544401

  17. Intensive Care, Intense Conflict: A Balanced Approach.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Erin Talati; Kolaitis, Irini N

    2015-01-01

    Caring for a child in a pediatric intensive care unit is emotionally and physically challenging and often leads to conflict. Skilled mediators may not always be available to aid in conflict resolution. Careproviders at all levels of training are responsible for managing difficult conversations with families and can often prevent escalation of conflict. Bioethics mediators have acknowledged the important contribution of mediation training in improving clinicians' skills in conflict management. Familiarizing careproviders with basic mediation techniques is an important step towards preventing escalation of conflict. While training in effective communication is crucial, a sense of fairness and justice that may only come with the introduction of a skilled, neutral third party is equally important. For intense conflict, we advocate for early recognition, comfort, and preparedness through training of clinicians in de-escalation and optimal communication, along with the use of more formally trained third-party mediators, as required. PMID:26752393

  18. Impact of 24 hour critical care physician staffing on case-mix adjusted mortality in paediatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Goh, A Y; Lum, L C; Abdel-Latif, M E

    2001-02-10

    The 24 h availability of intensive care consultants (intensivists) has been shown to improve outcomes in adult intensive care units (ICU) in the UK. We tested whether such availability would improve standardised mortality ratios when compared to out-of-hours cover by general paediatricians in the paediatric ICU setting of a medium-income developing country. The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) improved significantly from 1.57 (95%CI 1.25-1.95) with non-specialist care to 0.88 (95%CI 0.63-1.19) with intensivist care (rate ratio 0.56, 95% CI 0.47-0.67). Mortality odds ratio decreased by 0.234, 0.246 and 0.266 in the low, moderate and high-risk patients. 24 h availability of intensivists was associated with improved outcomes and use of resources in paediatric intensive care in a developing country. PMID:11273070

  19. Impact of Work Environments and Occupational Hazards on Smoking Intensity in Korean Workers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ju

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of work environments and occupational hazards on smoking intensity by occupation type in Korean workers. This study used the data from the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2009. The sample of this study included 3,769 adults who were aged 18 years or older and had an occupation of office work, sales, or manufacturing. After controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, the generalized linear models revealed that office workers and the sales force who had smoking co-workers at the workplace were more likely to smoke than those who did not. A dirty workplace and exposure to occupational noise were significant factors increasing the smoking intensity for manufacturers. A smoking cessation program considering physical work environments and co-workers' support should be developed for Korean workers. PMID:26681605

  20. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  1. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-02-06

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  2. Adult Education in Portugal. Adult Education in Europe Studies and Documents No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melo, Alberto

    This report on Portuguese adult education is focused on the principles and practices adopted by the Directorate-General, due to adult education's present embryonic state. Basic statistics and a brief introduction appear first. Part I, The System of Adult Education, is presented as a succession of initiatives and takes practically the entire length…

  3. The System of Adult Education in Yugoslavia. Notes and Essays on Education for Adults, 59.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savicevic, Dusan M.

    Now an integral part of the Yugoslav national educational system, adult education in Yugoslavia is based on the principles of permanence, democracy, decentralization, functional unity, diversity and dynamism, and voluntarism. Adult basic, vocational, general, and other forms of adult education are offered in varying degrees and forms by primary…

  4. Cataract - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... seeing at night or in dim light Double vision Loss of color intensity Problems seeing shapes against a background or the difference between shades of colors Seeing halos around lights ... vision, even in daylight. Most people with cataracts have ...

  5. Physical activity patterns in adults who are blind as assessed by accelerometry.

    PubMed

    Marmeleira, José; Laranjo, Luis; Marques, Olga; Pereira, Catarina

    2014-07-01

    The main purpose of our study was to quantify, by using accelerometry, daily physical activity (PA) in adults with visual impairments. Sixty-three adults (34.9% women) who are blind (18-65 years) wore an accelerometer for at least 3 days (minimum of 10 hr per day), including 1 weekend day. Nineteen participants (~30%) reached the recommendation of 30 min per day of PA, when counting every minute of moderate or greater intensity. No one achieved that goal when considering bouts of at least 10 min. No differences were found between genders in PA measures. Chronological age, age of blindness onset, and body mass index were not associated with PA. We conclude that adults who are blind have low levels of PA and are considerably less active compared with the general population. Health promotion strategies should be implemented to increase daily PA for people with visual impairments. PMID:25028478

  6. Differences in Amounts and Types of Physical Activity by Obesity Status in US Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spees, Colleen K.; Scott, Jonathan M.; Taylor, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the physical activity patterns across levels of obesity among US adults. Methods: The frequency, intensity, and duration of physical activities were compared across obesity status in 7695 adults from NHANES, 1999-2006. Results: Significantly more normal-weight adults engaged in moderate- and vigorous- intensity activities…

  7. Adult Education in Texas: A Survey of GED Candidates and Hispanic Adult Education Students. Report Number 87-415.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Michael B.; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine demographic characteristics, motivation, and program satisfaction of General Educational Development (GED) candidates and adult education (including adult basic education, secondary adult education, and English as a second language) students in Texas. Between June and December 1985, about 6,000 adult education…

  8. Intensity Biased PSP Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.; Amer, Tahani R.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The current pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique assumes a linear relationship (Stern-Volmer Equation) between intensity ratio (I(sub 0)/I) and pressure ratio (P/P(sub 0)) over a wide range of pressures (vacuum to ambient or higher). Although this may be valid for some PSPs, in most PSPs the relationship is nonlinear, particularly at low pressures (less than 0.2 psia when the oxygen level is low). This non-linearity can be attributed to variations in the oxygen quenching (de-activation) rates (which otherwise is assumed constant) at these pressures. Other studies suggest that some paints also have non-linear calibrations at high pressures; because of heterogeneous (non-uniform) oxygen diffusion and c quenching. Moreover, pressure sensitive paints require correction for the output intensity due to light intensity variation, paint coating variation, model dynamics, wind-off reference pressure variation, and temperature sensitivity. Therefore to minimize the measurement uncertainties due to these causes, an in- situ intensity correction method was developed. A non-oxygen quenched paint (which provides a constant intensity at all pressures, called non-pressure sensitive paint, NPSP) was used for the reference intensity (I(sub NPSP)) with respect to which all the PSP intensities (I) were measured. The results of this study show that in order to fully reap the benefits of this technique, a totally oxygen impermeable NPSP must be available.

  9. Intensity Biased PSP Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.; Amer, Tahani R.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The current pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique assumes a linear relationship (Stern-Volmer Equation) between intensity ratio (I(sub o)/I) and pressure ratio (P/P(sub o)) over a wide range of pressures (vacuum to ambient or higher). Although this may be valid for some PSPs, in most PSPs the relationship is nonlinear, particularly at low pressures (less than 0.2 psia when the oxygen level is low). This non-linearity can be attributed to variations in the oxygen quenching (de-activation) rates (which otherwise is assumed constant) at these pressures. Other studies suggest that some paints also have non-linear calibrations at high pressures; because of heterogeneous (non-uniform) oxygen diffusion and quenching. Moreover, pressure sensitive paints require correction for the output intensity due to light intensity variation, paint coating variation, model dynamics, wind-off reference pressure variation, and temperature sensitivity. Therefore to minimize the measurement uncertainties due to these causes, an insitu intensity correction method was developed. A non-oxygen quenched paint (which provides a constant intensity at all pressures, called non-pressure sensitive paint, NPSP) was used for the reference intensity (I(sub NPSP) with respect to which all the PSP intensities (I) were measured. The results of this study show that in order to fully reap the benefits of this technique, a totally oxygen impermeable NPSP must be available.

  10. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... light distribution and intensities. (a) General. The intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with light covers and color filters in place. Intensities must be determined with... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Position light distribution and intensities. (a) General. The intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with light covers and color filters in place. Intensities must be... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  12. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... light distribution and intensities. (a) General. the intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with light covers and color filters in place. Intensities must be determined with... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... light distribution and intensities. (a) General. The intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with light covers and color filters in place. Intensities must be determined with... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... light distribution and intensities. (a) General. the intensities prescribed in this section must be provided by new equipment with light covers and color filters in place. Intensities must be determined with... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Position light distribution and...

  15. Adult Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John M.

    In its broadest context, play can be interpreted as any pleasurable use of discretionary time. Playfulness is an intrinsic feature of being human, and should be viewed in the light of a total lifestyle, not as an occurrence in an isolated time of life. Adult play appears to be an indefinable and controversial concept. A holistic approach should be…

  16. CPR: Adult

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Adult (2:03) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  17. Exploring intense attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambidis, D.; Tzallas, P.; Benis, E. P.; Skantzakis, E.; Maravelias, G.; Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Peralta Conde, A.; Tsakiris, G. D.

    2008-02-01

    After introducing the importance of non-linear processes in the extreme-ultra-violet (XUV) spectral regime to the attosecond (asec) pulse metrology and time domain applications, we present two successfully implemented techniques with excellent prospects in generating intense asec pulse trains and isolated asec pulses, respectively. For the generation of pulse trains two-color harmonic generation is exploited. The interferometric polarization gating technique appropriate for the generation of intense isolated asec pulses is discussed and compared to other relevant approaches.

  18. Expressive suppression and enhancement during music-elicited emotions in younger and older adults.

    PubMed

    Vieillard, Sandrine; Harm, Jonathan; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    When presented with emotional visual scenes, older adults have been found to be equally capable to regulate emotion expression as younger adults, corroborating the view that emotion regulation skills are maintained or even improved in later adulthood. However, the possibility that gaze direction might help achieve an emotion control goal has not been taken into account, raising the question whether the effortful processing of expressive regulation is really spared from the general age-related decline. Since it does not allow perceptual attention to be redirected away from the emotional source, music provides a useful way to address this question. In the present study, affective, behavioral, and physiological consequences of free expression of emotion, expressive suppression and expressive enhancement were measured in 31 younger and 30 older adults while they listened to positive and negative musical excerpts. The main results indicated that compared to younger adults, older adults reported experiencing less emotional intensity in response to negative music during the free expression of emotion condition. No age difference was found in the ability to amplify or reduce emotional expressions. However, an age-related decline in the ability to reduce the intensity of emotional state and an age-related increase in physiological reactivity were found when participants were instructed to suppress negative expression. Taken together, the current data support previous findings suggesting an age-related change in response to music. They also corroborate the observation that older adults are as efficient as younger adults at controlling behavioral expression. But most importantly, they suggest that when faced with auditory sources of negative emotion, older age does not always confer a better ability to regulate emotions. PMID:25741278

  19. Expressive suppression and enhancement during music-elicited emotions in younger and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Vieillard, Sandrine; Harm, Jonathan; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    When presented with emotional visual scenes, older adults have been found to be equally capable to regulate emotion expression as younger adults, corroborating the view that emotion regulation skills are maintained or even improved in later adulthood. However, the possibility that gaze direction might help achieve an emotion control goal has not been taken into account, raising the question whether the effortful processing of expressive regulation is really spared from the general age-related decline. Since it does not allow perceptual attention to be redirected away from the emotional source, music provides a useful way to address this question. In the present study, affective, behavioral, and physiological consequences of free expression of emotion, expressive suppression and expressive enhancement were measured in 31 younger and 30 older adults while they listened to positive and negative musical excerpts. The main results indicated that compared to younger adults, older adults reported experiencing less emotional intensity in response to negative music during the free expression of emotion condition. No age difference was found in the ability to amplify or reduce emotional expressions. However, an age-related decline in the ability to reduce the intensity of emotional state and an age-related increase in physiological reactivity were found when participants were instructed to suppress negative expression. Taken together, the current data support previous findings suggesting an age-related change in response to music. They also corroborate the observation that older adults are as efficient as younger adults at controlling behavioral expression. But most importantly, they suggest that when faced with auditory sources of negative emotion, older age does not always confer a better ability to regulate emotions. PMID:25741278

  20. 7 CFR 226.1 - General purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Child and Adult Care Food Program. Section 17 of the National School Lunch Act, as amended, authorizes... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM General § 226.1 General purpose and... service programs for children or adult participants in nonresidential institutions which provide care....

  1. 7 CFR 226.1 - General purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Child and Adult Care Food Program. Section 17 of the National School Lunch Act, as amended, authorizes... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM General § 226.1 General purpose and... service programs for children or adult participants in nonresidential institutions which provide care....

  2. 7 CFR 226.1 - General purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Child and Adult Care Food Program. Section 17 of the National School Lunch Act, as amended, authorizes... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM General § 226.1 General purpose and... service programs for children or adult participants in nonresidential institutions which provide care....

  3. 7 CFR 226.1 - General purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Child and Adult Care Food Program. Section 17 of the National School Lunch Act, as amended, authorizes... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM General § 226.1 General purpose and... service programs for children or adult participants in nonresidential institutions which provide care....

  4. 7 CFR 226.1 - General purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Child and Adult Care Food Program. Section 17 of the National School Lunch Act, as amended, authorizes... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM General § 226.1 General purpose and... service programs for children or adult participants in nonresidential institutions which provide care....

  5. Severe Imported Falciparum Malaria: A Cohort Study in 400 Critically Ill Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bruneel, Fabrice; Tubach, Florence; Corne, Philippe; Megarbane, Bruno; Mira, Jean-Paul; Peytel, Eric; Camus, Christophe; Schortgen, Frederique; Azoulay, Elie; Cohen, Yves; Georges, Hugues; Meybeck, Agnes; Hyvernat, Herve; Trouillet, Jean-Louis; Frenoy, Eric; Nicolet, Laurent; Roy, Carine; Durand, Remy; Le Bras, Jacques; Wolff, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Background Large studies on severe imported malaria in non-endemic industrialized countries are lacking. We sought to describe the clinical spectrum of severe imported malaria in French adults and to identify risk factors for mortality at admission to the intensive care unit. Methodology and Principal Findings Retrospective review of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria episodes according to the 2000 World Health Organization definition and requiring admission to the intensive care unit. Data were collected from medical charts using standardised case-report forms, in 45 French intensive care units in 2000–2006. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Data from 400 adults admitted to the intensive care unit were analysed, representing the largest series of severe imported malaria to date. Median age was 45 years; 60% of patients were white, 96% acquired the disease in sub-Saharan Africa, and 65% had not taken antimalarial chemoprophylaxis. Curative quinine treatment was used in 97% of patients. Intensive care unit mortality was 10.5% (42 deaths). By multivariate analysis, three variables at intensive care unit admission were independently associated with hospital death: older age (per 10-year increment, odds ratio [OR], 1.72; 95% confidence interval [95%CI], 1.28–2.32; P = 0.0004), Glasgow Coma Scale score (per 1-point decrease, OR, 1.32; 95%CI, 1.20–1.45; P<0.0001), and higher parasitemia (per 5% increment, OR, 1.41; 95%CI, 1.22–1.62; P<0.0001). Conclusions and Significance In a large population of adults treated in a non-endemic industrialized country, severe malaria still carried a high mortality rate. Our data, including predictors of death, can probably be generalized to other non-endemic countries where high-quality healthcare is available. PMID:20949045

  6. ADULT EDUCATION OF MIGRANT ADULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEAL, CATHERINE; AND OTHERS

    UNITS ON MIGRANT ADULT EDUCATION, AND A UNIT ON ORGANIZING INFORMAL GROUPS OF MIGRANT WOMEN TO DISCUSS MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING THEIR TEMPORARY HOMES, ARE PRESENTED. THE GOALS OF THE UNIT ON EDUCATION FOR MIGRANT MEN ARE ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE, BETTER HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND BETTER HANDLING OF RESPONSIBILITIES. THE MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE…

  7. Feasibility and effectiveness of a walking program for community-dwelling older adults with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    van Uffelen, Jannique G Z; Chinapaw, Marijke J M; Hopman-Rock, Marijke; van Mechelen, Willem

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the feasibility and effect on aerobic fitness of a 1-yr, twice-weekly, group-based moderate-intensity walking program (MI-WP, n = 77) compared with a low-intensity activity program (LI-AP, n = 75) for community-dwelling older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Thirty participants did not start a program; median attendance in the other 122 participants was 71%. Small but significant associations were observed between attendance and memory in the MI-WP and general cognition in the LI-AP. Associations were no longer significant when both groups were analyzed together. Intensity, assessed using percentage of heart-rate reserve and the Borg scale, equaled intended intensity for both programs. Aerobic fitness improved significantly in participants in the MI-WP. In conclusion, cognition was not clearly associated with attendance in the 62 participants starting the MI-WP, and average attendance was good. The intensity was feasible for participants who continued the MI-WP. The findings support the proposal that regular moderate-intensity walking improves aerobic fitness in adults with MCI. PMID:19940321

  8. Adult Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraerts, Martine; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    The discovery of adult stem cells in most adult tissues is the basis of a number of clinical studies that are carried out, with therapeutic use of hematopoietic stem cells as a prime example. Intense scientific debate is still ongoing as to whether adult stem cells may have a greater plasticity than previously thought. Although cells with some features of embryonic stem cells that, among others, express Oct4, Nanog and SSEA1 are isolated from fresh tissue, it is not clear if the greater differentiation potential is acquired during cell culture. Moreover, adult more pluripotent cells do not have all pluripotent characteristics typical for embryonic stem cells. Recently, some elegant studies were published in which adult cells could be completely reprogrammed to embryonic stem cell-like cells by overexpression of some key transcription factors for pluripotency (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). It will be interesting for the future to investigate the exact mechanisms underlying this reprogramming and whether similar transcription factor pathways are present and/or can be activated in adult more pluripotent stem cells.

  9. [Adult twins].

    PubMed

    Charlemaine, Christiane

    2006-12-31

    This paper explores the deep roots of closeness that twins share in their youngest age and their effect on their destiny at the adult age. Psychologists believe the bond between twins begins in utero and develops throughout the twins' lives. The four patterns of twinship described show that the twin bond is determined by the quality of parenting that twins receive in their infancy and early childhood. Common problems of adult twins bring about difficulties to adapt in a non-twin world. The nature versus nurture controversy has taken on new life focusing on inter-twin differences and the importance of parent-child interaction as fundamental to the growth and development of personality. PMID:17352324

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  11. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  12. Rainfall intensity-duration-frequency formulas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.

    1983-01-01

    A new general rainfall intensity-duration-frequency formula is presented, utilizing a method similar to, but more accurate than one previously developed. The previously developed formula was based on the average depth-duration ratio of about 40% and the mean depth-frequency ratio of 1.48. It is shown that this formula is only a particular form of the writer's more general formulation. -from Author

  13. Individuals Underestimate Moderate and Vigorous Intensity Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Karissa L.; Brown, Ruth E.; Jamnik, Veronica K.; Salmon, Art; Ardern, Chris I.; Kuk, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether the common physical activity (PA) intensity descriptors used in PA guidelines worldwide align with the associated percent heart rate maximum method used for prescribing relative PA intensities consistently between sexes, ethnicities, age categories and across body mass index (BMI) classifications. Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine whether individuals properly select light, moderate and vigorous intensity PA using the intensity descriptions in PA guidelines and determine if there are differences in estimation across sex, ethnicity, age and BMI classifications. Methods 129 adults were instructed to walk/jog at a “light,” “moderate” and “vigorous effort” in a randomized order. The PA intensities were categorized as being below, at or above the following %HRmax ranges of: 50–63% for light, 64–76% for moderate and 77–93% for vigorous effort. Results On average, people correctly estimated light effort as 51.5±8.3%HRmax but underestimated moderate effort as 58.7±10.7%HRmax and vigorous effort as 69.9±11.9%HRmax. Participants walked at a light intensity (57.4±10.5%HRmax) when asked to walk at a pace that provided health benefits, wherein 52% of participants walked at a light effort pace, 19% walked at a moderate effort and 5% walked at a vigorous effort pace. These results did not differ by sex, ethnicity or BMI class. However, younger adults underestimated moderate and vigorous intensity more so than middle-aged adults (P<0.05). Conclusion When the common PA guideline descriptors were aligned with the associated %HRmax ranges, the majority of participants underestimated the intensity of PA that is needed to obtain health benefits. Thus, new subjective descriptions for moderate and vigorous intensity may be warranted to aid individuals in correctly interpreting PA intensities. PMID:24835105

  14. Adult Development and Learning of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    This summary of adult development covers a wide range of authors. Adult development is one way of understanding how the internal and external changes in our lives have an impact on learning. Of particular importance in this work are the developmental issues of older adults. I present various theories of adult development such as linear and…

  15. Learning and Intensive Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Dennis R.

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the results of an intensive two-week economics institute conducted at Emory University in 1978 to help high school classroom teachers comply with a mandate that all students must take a course in principles of economics, business, and free enterprise. (DB)

  16. Evaluation of adult aphasics with the Pediatric Speech Intelligibility test.

    PubMed

    Jerger, S; Oliver, T A; Martin, R C

    1990-04-01

    Results of conventional adult speech audiometry may be compromised by the presence of speech/language disorders, such as aphasia. The purpose of this project was to determine the efficacy of the speech intelligibility materials and techniques developed for young children in evaluating central auditory function in aphasic adults. Eight adult aphasics were evaluated with the Pediatric Speech Intelligibility (PSI) test, a picture-pointing approach that was carefully developed to be relatively insensitive to linguistic-cognitive skills and relatively sensitive to auditory-perceptual function. Results on message-to-competition ratio (MCR) functions or performance-intensity (PI) functions were abnormal in all subjects. Most subjects served as their own controls, showing normal performance on one ear coupled with abnormal performance on the other ear. The patterns of abnormalities were consistent with the patterns seen (1) on conventional speech audiometry in brain-lesioned adults without aphasia and (2) on the PSI test in brain-lesioned children without aphasia. An exception to this general observation was an atypical pattern of abnormality on PI-function testing in the subgroup of nonfluent aphasics. The nonfluent subjects showed substantially poorer word-max scores than sentence-max scores, a pattern seen previously in only one other patient group, namely young children with recurrent otitis media. The unusually depressed word-max abnormality was not meaningfully related to clinical diagnostic data regarding the degree of hearing loss and the location and severity of the lesions or to experimental data regarding the integrity of phonologic processing abilities. The observations of ear-specific and condition-specific abnormalities suggest that the linguistically- and cognitively-simplified PSI test may be useful in the evaluation of auditory-specific deficits in the aphasic adult. PMID:2132591

  17. 34 CFR 491.1 - What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE HOMELESS PROGRAM General § 491.1 What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program? The Adult Education for...

  18. 34 CFR 491.1 - What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE HOMELESS PROGRAM General § 491.1 What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program? The Adult Education for...

  19. 34 CFR 460.1 - What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act? 460.1... VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 460.1 What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act? The purpose of the Adult Education Act (the Act) is to...

  20. 34 CFR 460.1 - What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act? 460.1... VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 460.1 What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act? The purpose of the Adult Education Act (the Act) is to...

  1. 34 CFR 460.1 - What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act? 460.1... VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 460.1 What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act? The purpose of the Adult Education Act (the Act) is to...

  2. 34 CFR 491.1 - What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE HOMELESS PROGRAM General § 491.1 What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program? The Adult Education for...

  3. 34 CFR 460.1 - What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act? 460.1... VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 460.1 What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act? The purpose of the Adult Education Act (the Act) is to...

  4. 34 CFR 491.1 - What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE HOMELESS PROGRAM General § 491.1 What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program? The Adult Education for...

  5. Shrub control by browsing: Targeting adult plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira Pontes, Laíse; Magda, Danièle; Gleizes, Benoît; Agreil, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Reconciling the well known benefits of shrubs for forage with environmental goals, whilst preventing their dominance, is a major challenge in rangeland management. Browsing may be an economical solution for shrubby rangelands as herbivore browsing has been shown to control juvenile shrub growth. Less convincing results have been obtained for adult plants, and long-term experiments are required to investigate the cumulative effects on adult plants. We therefore assessed the impact of different levels of browsing intensity on key demographic parameters for a major dominant shrub species (broom, Cytisus scoparius), focusing on adult plants. We assigned individual broom plants to one of three age classes: 3-5 years (young adults); 5-7 years (adults); and 7-9 years (mature adults). These plants were then left untouched or had 50% or 90% of their total edible stem biomass removed in simulated low-intensity and high-intensity browsing treatments, respectively. Morphological, survival and fecundity data were collected over a period of four years. Browsing affected the morphology of individual plants, promoting changes in subsequent regrowth, and decreasing seed production. The heavily browsed plants were 17% shorter, 32% narrower, and their twigs were 28% shorter. Light browsing seemed to control the growth of young adult plants more effectively than that of older plants. Reproductive output was considerably lower than for control plants after light browsing, and almost 100% lower after heavy browsing. High-intensity browsing had a major effect on survival causing high levels of plant mortality. We conclude that suitable browsing practices could be used to modify adult shrub demography in the management of shrub dominance and forage value.

  6. GENERAL INTRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This unique resource reviews progress made by scientists researching into how ambient changes in the wavelength, intensity, direction and duration of light environment affect plant growth and development - explaining how combinations of new research with classical photobiology and physiology made fe...

  7. Psychological distress among homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, L; Linn, L S

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies have reported a high prevalence of mental illness among the homeless. As part of a community-based survey of 529 homeless adults, we developed and tested a model to increase our understanding of the factors related to their psychological distress. Using a previously validated and reliable scale of perceived psychological distress, we found that homeless adults were more likely to report psychological distress than the general population (80% vs. 49%). Distress levels were not associated with most demographic or homeless characteristics or general appearance. However, distress was related to unemployment, greater cigarette and alcohol use, worse physical health, fewer social supports, and perceived barriers to obtaining needed medical care. Since mental, physical, and social health are strongly related among homeless adults, alleviating distress among them may be most effectively done by implementing a broad-based health services package coupled with employment programs provided in an accessible service delivery setting. PMID:2785158

  8. Rapid onset pressor and sympathetic responses to static handgrip in older hypertensive adults.

    PubMed

    Greaney, J L; Edwards, D G; Fadel, P J; Farquhar, W B

    2015-07-01

    Exaggerated pressor and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responses have been reported during static handgrip in hypertensive (HTN) adults. Recent work suggests that such responses may occur much more rapidly in HTN patients; however, this has not been extensively studied. Thus, we examined the blood pressure (BP) and MSNA responses at the immediate onset of muscle contraction and tested the hypothesis that older HTN adults would exhibit rapid onset pressor and sympathetic responses compared with normotensive (NTN) adults. Heart rate (HR), BP (Finometer) and MSNA (peroneal microneurography) were retrospectively analyzed in 15 HTN (62 ± 1 years; resting BP 153 ± 3/91 ± 5 mm Hg) and 23 age-matched NTN (60 ± 1 years; resting BP 112 ± 1/67 ± 2 mm Hg) subjects during the first 30 s of static handgrip at 30 and 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). HTN adults demonstrated exaggerated increases in mean BP during the first 10 s of both 30% (NTN: Δ1 ± 1 vs HTN: Δ7 ± 2 mm Hg; P < 0.05) and 40% (NTN: Δ2 ± 1 vs HTN: Δ8 ± 2 mm Hg; P < 0.05) intensity handgrip. Likewise, HTN adults exhibited atypical increases in MSNA within 10 s. Increases in HR were also greater in HTN adults at 10 s of 30% MVC handgrip, although not at 40% MVC. There were no group differences in 10 s pressor or sympathetic responses to a cold pressor test, suggesting no differences in generalized sympathetic responsiveness. Thus, static handgrip evokes rapid onset pressor and sympathetic responses in older HTN adults. These findings suggest that older HTN adults likely have greater cardiovascular risk even during short duration activities of daily living that contain an isometric component. PMID:25471615

  9. Superior Visual Search in Adults with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Riordan, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that children with autism perform better than matched controls on visual search tasks and that this stems from a superior visual discrimination ability. This study assessed whether these findings generalize from children to adults with autism. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that, like children, adults with autism were…

  10. Adult Education Alternative Diploma. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gacka, Richard

    The Adult Education Alternative Diploma project was conducted to develop an alternative program to the General Educational Development (GED) diploma program through which adult students in Pennsylvania could earn actual high school diplomas. During the year-long project, a competency diploma program was developed and implemented in conjunction…

  11. Support Groups for Adults with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantz, Kathryn Mederise

    2011-01-01

    A total of 35 adults (24-77 years; 24 males and 11 females) with Asperger syndrome (AS) who were in, were waiting to get in, or had been in support groups participated in the study. In general, the adults were highly educated but unemployed or underemployed and living alone with family members as friends. The participants were interviewed,…

  12. The older adult driver.

    PubMed

    Carr, D B

    2000-01-01

    More adults aged 65 and older will be driving in the next few decades. Many older drivers are safe behind the wheel and do not need intensive testing for license renewal. Others, however, have physiologic or cognitive impairments that can affect their mobility and driving safety. When an older patient's driving competency is questioned, a comprehensive, step-by-step assessment is recommended. Many diseases that impair driving ability can be detected and treated effectively by family physicians. Physicians should take an active role in assessing and reducing the risk for injury in a motor vehicle and, when possible, prevent or delay driving cessation in their patients. Referral to other health care professionals, such as an occupational or physical therapist, may be helpful for evaluation and treatment. When an older patient is no longer permitted or able to drive, the physician should counsel the patient about using alternative methods of transportation. PMID:10643955

  13. Rural Adult Education in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Hew

    Adult education in rural areas in Australia provides a contrast both in its general mood and intentions and in its organization with that in the United States. Particularly in rural areas, there seems to be less of the compulsion to organize groups (there are usually no school boards, no chambers of commerce, no women's clubs, no youth centers)…

  14. Adult Vaccination--A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, vaccines have been associated with childhood. Historically, many of the most-feared communicable diseases attacked infants and toddlers, and those who survived were generally protected from those diseases as adults. During the past century tremendous advances in vaccination spared millions the morbidity and mortality associated with…

  15. The serologic screening for celiac disease in the general population (blood donors) and in some high-risk groups of adults (patients with autoimmune diseases, osteoporosis and infertility) in the Czech republic.

    PubMed

    Vanciková, Z; Chlumecký, V; Sokol, D; Horáková, D; Hamsíková, E; Fucíková, T; Janatková, I; Ulcová-Gallová, Z; Stĕpán, J; Límanová, Z; Dvorák, M; Kocna, P; Sánchez, D; Tucková, L; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) was determined in healthy blood donors and in high-risk groups of adults (a total of 1835 adults--randomly selected 1312 healthy blood donors, 102 patients with primary osteoporosis, 58 patients with autoimmune diseases and 365 infertile women). It was calculated on the basis of a two-step serologic screening method--in the first step IgA and IgG antigliadin antibodies (AGA) and IgA anti-gamma-glutamyltransferase ('transglutaminase') antibodies (ATG) were estimated, in the second step sera positive for IgA AGA and/or IgA ATG were examined for antiendomysial IgA (AEA) antibodies. Immunoenzymic assay (ELISA) was used for determining of AGA and ATG antibodies; immunofluorescence method, performed on human umbilical cord tissue, was used for assaying of AEA antibodies. Total serum IgA level in only IgG AGA positive subjects was measured by routine turbidimetric method. 0.45% of healthy blood donors, 0.98% of osteoporotic patients, 2.7% of patients suffering from autoimmune disease and 1.13% of women with infertility considered as immunologically mediated were found to be positive in both steps of serologic screening (AGA and/or ATG and antiendomysium positive). The presumed high prevalence of seropositivity for CD in apparently healthy Czech adult population was confirmed. In the high-risk groups, the prevalence of seropositivity for CD was approximately 2-4 times higher than in healthy blood donors. The real prevalence of CD in the tested groups, however, can be estimated after performing small intestinal biopsy in the seropositive patients. PMID:12630332

  16. 21-cm Intensity Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; GBT-HIM Team

    2016-01-01

    The redshifted 21-cm emission from neutral hydrogen has emerged as a powerful probe for large-scale structure; a significant fraction of the observable universe can be mapped in the Intensity Mapping regime out to high redshifts. At redshifts around unity, the 21-cm emission traces the matter distribution and can be used to measure the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signature and constrain dark energy properties. I will describe our HI Intensity Mapping program at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), aiming at measuring the 21cm power spectrum at z=0.8. A 800-MHz multi-beam focal-plane array for the GBT is currently under construction in order to facilitate a large-scale survey for BAO and the redshift-space distortion measurements for cosmological constraints.

  17. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  18. NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.T.

    1964-04-21

    A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

  19. Water intensity of transportation.

    PubMed

    King, Carey W; Webber, Michael E

    2008-11-01

    As the need for alternative transportation fuels increases, it is important to understand the many effects of introducing fuels based upon feedstocks other than petroleum. Water intensity in "gallons of water per mile traveled" is one method to measure these effects on the consumer level. In this paper we investigate the water intensity for light duty vehicle (LDV) travel using selected fuels based upon petroleum, natural gas, unconventional fossil fuels, hydrogen, electricity, and two biofuels (ethanol from corn and biodiesel from soy). Fuels more directly derived from fossil fuels are less water intensive than those derived either indirectly from fossil fuels (e.g., through electricity generation) or directly from biomass. The lowest water consumptive (<0.15 gal H20/mile) and withdrawal (<1 gal H2O/mile) rates are for LDVs using conventional petroleum-based gasoline and diesel, nonirrigated biofuels, hydrogen derived from methane or electrolysis via nonthermal renewable electricity, and electricity derived from nonthermal renewable sources. LDVs running on electricity and hydrogen derived from the aggregate U.S. grid (heavily based upon fossil fuel and nuclear steam-electric power generation) withdraw 5-20 times and consume nearly 2-5 times more water than by using petroleum gasoline. The water intensities (gal H20/mile) of LDVs operating on biofuels derived from crops irrigated in the United States at average rates is 28 and 36 for corn ethanol (E85) for consumption and withdrawal, respectively. For soy-derived biodiesel the average consumption and withdrawal rates are 8 and 10 gal H2O/mile. PMID:19031873

  20. Null Stellar Intensity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, P. K.; Chia, C. M.; Han, W. D.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2014-04-01

    Since the discovery of the first exoplanet in 1989, though over 850 candidates have been verified (Schneider 2012), few are similar to our Earth in terms of mass and size. Hence here we would like to propose the revival and improvement of optical intensity interferometry to achieve sub-milliarcsecond resolution, which promises also to be less sensitive to weather conditions, light pollution and optomechanical alignments, yet only requiring baselines <100m.