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Sample records for adult hearing aid

  1. Use of Hearing Aids by Adults with Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Info » Statistics and Epidemiology Use of Hearing Aids by Adults with Hearing Loss [text version] Note: ... displays time trends in the use of hearing aids for adults (20–69 years) and older adults ( ...

  2. 'Getting used to' hearing aids from the perspective of adult hearing-aid users.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Piers; Maslin, Michael; Munro, Kevin J

    2014-12-01

    To describe getting used to hearing aids from the perspective of adult hearing-aid users. Three focus group discussions were carried out. A topic guide and discussion exercises were used to elicit views on getting used to hearing aids. Discussion was audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to qualitative content analysis. Adult hearing aid users (n = 16). Participants described getting used to hearing aids as a multi-factorial process which included adjusting to altered sensory input, practical matters such as cleaning and maintenance, and managing the psychosocial impact of hearing-aid use, such as on self-image. Users reported a process of discovering benefits and limitations of hearing aids leading to individual patterns of use that was relatively independent of input from audiologists. Getting used to hearing aids is a challenging multi-factorial process with both psychosocial and practical difficulties besides demands of adjusting to hearing-aid input.

  3. Hearing aids for mild to moderate hearing loss in adults.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Melanie A; Kitterick, Pádraig T; Chong, Lee Yee; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; Barker, Fiona; Hoare, Derek J

    2017-09-25

    The main clinical intervention for mild to moderate hearing loss is the provision of hearing aids. These are routinely offered and fitted to those who seek help for hearing difficulties. By amplifying and improving access to sounds, and speech sounds in particular, the aim of hearing aid use is to reduce the negative consequences of hearing loss and improve participation in everyday life. To evaluate the effects of hearing aids for mild to moderate hearing loss in adults. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the ENT Trials Register; the Cochrane Register of Studies Online; MEDLINE; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 23 March 2017. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of hearing aids compared to a passive or active control in adults with mild to moderate hearing loss. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcomes in this review were hearing-specific health-related quality of life and the adverse effect pain. Secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life, listening ability and the adverse effect noise-induced hearing loss. We used GRADE to assess the quality of the evidence for each outcome; this is indicated in italics. We included five RCTs involving 825 participants. The studies were carried out in the USA and Europe, and were published between 1987 and 2017. Risk of bias across the studies varied. Most had low risk for selection, reporting and attrition bias, and a high risk for performance and detection bias because blinding was inadequate or absent.All participants had mild to moderate hearing loss. The average age across all five studies was between 69 and 83 years. The duration of the studies ranged between six weeks and six months.There was a large beneficial effect of hearing aids on hearing-specific health-related quality of life associated with participation in daily life as

  4. Hearing aid user guides: suitability for older adults.

    PubMed

    Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the content, design, and readability of printed hearing aid user guides to determine their suitability for older adults, who are the main users of hearing aids. Hearing aid user guides were assessed using four readability formulae and a standardized tool to assess content and design (SAM - Suitability Assessment of Materials). A sample of 36 hearing aid user guides (four user guides from nine different hearing aid manufacturers) were analysed. Sixty nine percent of user guides were rated 'not suitable' and 31% were rated 'adequate' for their suitability. Many scored poorly for scope, vocabulary, aspects of layout and typography, and learning stimulation and motivation. The mean reading grade level for all user guides was grade 9.6 which is too high for older adults. The content, design, and readability of hearing aid user guides are not optimal for older adults and thus may serve as a barrier to successful hearing aid outcomes for this population.

  5. Hearing Loss, Control, and Demographic Factors Influencing Hearing Aid Use among Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garstecki, Dean C.; Erler, Susan F.

    1998-01-01

    Older adults (N=131) with hearing loss completed measures of hearing, hearing handicap, psychological control, depression, and ego strength. Older adults who accepted advice from hearing professionals to acquire and use hearing aids differed from those not accepting such advice on measures of hearing sensitivity, psychological control, and…

  6. An analysis of hearing aid fittings in adults using cochlear implants and contralateral hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael S; Hay-McCutcheon, Marcia

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the appropriateness of hearing aid fittings within a sample of adult cochlear implant recipients who use a hearing aid in the contralateral ear (i.e., bimodal stimulation). The hearing aid gain was measured using real ear testing for 14 postlingually deaf English-speaking adults who use a cochlear implant in the contralateral ear. Unaided and aided audiometric testing assessed the degree of functional gain derived from hearing aid use. On average, the target to actual output level difference was within 10 dB only at frequencies of 750 Hz and 1,000 Hz. Only 1 of the 14 study participants had a hearing aid for which the majority of the tested frequencies were within 10 dB of the target gain. In addition, a greater amount of functional gain (i.e., the increase in unaided behavioral thresholds after amplification) was provided for lower frequencies than higher frequencies. Hearing aid settings in our sample were suboptimal and may be regarded as a contributing factor to the variability in bimodal benefit. Refining hearing aid fitting strategies tailored to the needs of the concurrent cochlear implant and hearing aid user is recommended.

  7. Factors associated with success with hearing aids in older adults.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly; Lovelock, Karen; Lampert, Michelle; Khan, Asad

    2014-02-01

    To examine associations between audiological and non-audiological factors and successful hearing aid use in older adults. In a retrospective study, audiological factors, attitudinal beliefs (as derived from the health belief model), client demographics, psychological factors, and age-related factors were evaluated. Participants included 160 individuals, 60 years or older, with unilateral or bilateral hearing impairment (HI), fitted with hearing aids for the first time in the previous two years. Participants were assigned to either an unsuccessful hearing aid owner group (n=75) or a successful hearing aid owner group (n=85) based on their self-reported hearing aid use and benefit. A multivariate, binomial logistic regression model indicated five factors associated with group membership: participants who had greater support from significant others; more difficulties with hearing and communication in everyday life before getting hearing aids; more positive attitudes to hearing aids; coupled with greater perceived self-efficacy for advanced handling of hearing aids; or who were receiving more gain from their devices; were more likely to be successful hearing aid owners. These findings highlight the importance of addressing non-audiological factors in order to assist older adults achieve success with hearing aids.

  8. Preference for One or Two Hearing Aids among Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robyn M; Schwartz, Kathryn S.; Noe, Colleen M.; Alexander, Genevieve C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Most practitioners believe that use of two hearing aids is the ideal fitting for adults with bilateral symmetrical hearing loss. However, previous research has consistently shown that a substantial proportion of these patients actually prefer to use only one hearing aid. The current study explored whether this pattern of preferences is seen with technologically advanced hearing aids. In addition, a selection of variables that were available pre-fitting were used to attempt to predict which patients will prefer one hearing aid rather than two. Design The study was designed as a 12-week field trial including structured and unstructured use of one and two hearing aids. Ninety-four subjects with mild to moderate bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss were bilaterally fit with 2005-2007 era hearing aids. Potential predictors included demographic, audiometric, auditory lifestyle, personality, and binaural processing variables. After the field trial, each subject stated his/her preference for one or two hearing aids and completed three self-report outcome questionnaires for their preferred fitting. Results Previous research was confirmed with modern technology hearing aids: after the field trial 46% of the subjects preferred to use one hearing aid rather than two. Subjects who preferred two hearing aids tended to report better real-world outcomes than those who preferred one. Subjects who reported more hearing problems in daily life, who experienced more binaural loudness summation, and whose ears were more equivalent in dichotic listening were more likely to prefer to use two hearing aids. Contrary to conventional wisdom (ideas that are generally accepted as true), audiometric hearing loss and auditory lifestyle were not predictive of aiding preference. However, the best predictive approach from these data yielded accurate predictions for only two-thirds of subjects. Conclusions Evidence-based practice calls for a conscientious melding of current evidence

  9. Perceptions Toward Internet-Based Delivery of Hearing Aids among Older Hearing-Impaired Adults.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Navshika; Searchfield, Grant D

    2016-06-01

    Despite evidence that hearing aids can improve the social and psychological functioning of older hearing-impaired adults, hearing aid uptake is low. High cost of hearing aids and poor access to audiology services in rural areas are potential barriers to hearing aid acquisition. Methods of hearing aid delivery deviating from the traditional clinician-based model have been available to consumers for many years. One such method is Internet hearing aid sales. However, research exploring Internet-based hearing aid delivery, as a method to improve hearing aid uptake in this population, is limited. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of older hearing aid users (aged ≥65 yr) toward Internet-based hearing aid delivery. A qualitative approach was adopted to investigate older adults' perceptions of buying hearing aids online. The sample consisted of 18 participants aged between 64 and 81 yr. Fourteen men and four women participated in this study. Participants were all experienced hearing aid users. Face-to-face semistructured interviews were conducted. An interview schedule guided the interview. Interviews were recorded with a voice recorder and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis of the data was carried out. Seven main themes emerged from the data. A general lack of awareness, but willingness to learn more about Internet hearing aid sales, was found. Two perceived benefits of Internet-based hearing aid delivery were identified: lower cost of hearing aids and greater convenience or physical accessibility. Numerous concerns and limitations were communicated. Concerns regarding the availability of clinical procedures, such as hearing tests, obtaining the correct-sized earmolds, and fine-tuning of hearing aids, were expressed. Participants conveyed distrust in online retailers. However, trust in and a preference for audiologists' expertise, which was not perceived to be available online, was found. Participants further conveyed a preference for face

  10. Formal auditory training in adult hearing aid users

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Daniela; Iorio, Maria Cecília Martinelli

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss are often able to regain some lost auditory function with the help of hearing aids. However, hearing aids are not able to overcome auditory distortions such as impaired frequency resolution and speech understanding in noisy environments. The coexistence of peripheral hearing loss and a central auditory deficit may contribute to patient dissatisfaction with amplification, even when audiological tests indicate nearly normal hearing thresholds. OBJECTIVE This study was designed to validate the effects of a formal auditory training program in adult hearing aid users with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. METHODS Fourteen bilateral hearing aid users were divided into two groups: seven who received auditory training and seven who did not. The training program was designed to improve auditory closure, figure-to-ground for verbal and nonverbal sounds and temporal processing (frequency and duration of sounds). Pre- and post-training evaluations included measuring electrophysiological and behavioral auditory processing and administration of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) self-report scale. RESULTS The post-training evaluation of the experimental group demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in P3 latency, improved performance in some of the behavioral auditory processing tests and higher hearing aid benefit in noisy situations (p-value < 0,05). No changes were noted for the control group (p-value <0,05). CONCLUSION The results demonstrated that auditory training in adult hearing aid users can lead to a reduction in P3 latency, improvements in sound localization, memory for nonverbal sounds in sequence, auditory closure, figure-to-ground for verbal sounds and greater benefits in reverberant and noisy environments. PMID:20186300

  11. A Study of the Combined Use of a Hearing Aid and Tactual Aid in an Adult with Profound Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Charlotte M.; Delhorne, Lorraine A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the benefits of the combined used of a hearing aid and tactual aid to supplement lip-reading in the reception of speech and for the recognition of environmental sounds in an adult with profound hearing loss. Speech conditions included lip-reading alone (L), lip-reading + tactual aid (L+TA) lip-reading + hearing aid (L+HA) and…

  12. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  13. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... hearing aid has three basic parts: a microphone, amplifier, and speaker. The hearing aid receives sound through ... to electrical signals and sends them to an amplifier. The amplifier increases the power of the signals ...

  14. Interventions to improve hearing aid use in adult auditory rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Barker, Fiona; Mackenzie, Emma; Elliott, Lynette; Jones, Simon; de Lusignan, Simon

    2016-08-18

    Acquired adult-onset hearing loss is a common long-term condition for which the most common intervention is hearing aid fitting. However, up to 40% of people fitted with a hearing aid either fail to use it or may not gain optimal benefit from it. This is an update of a review first published in The Cochrane Library in 2014. To assess the long-term effectiveness of interventions to promote the use of hearing aids in adults with acquired hearing loss fitted with at least one hearing aid. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the Cochrane ENT Trials Register; Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 5); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 13 June 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions designed to improve or promote hearing aid use in adults with acquired hearing loss compared with usual care or another intervention. We excluded interventions that compared hearing aid technology. We classified interventions according to the 'chronic care model' (CCM). The primary outcomes were hearing aid use (measured as adherence or daily hours of use) and adverse effects (inappropriate advice or clinical practice, or patient complaints). Secondary patient-reported outcomes included quality of life, hearing handicap, hearing aid benefit and communication. Outcomes were measured over the short ( 12 to < 52 weeks) and long term (one year plus). We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 37 studies involving a total of 4129 participants. Risk of bias across the included studies was variable. We judged the GRADE quality of evidence to be very low or low for the primary outcomes where data were available.The majority of participants were over 65 years of age with mild to moderate adult-onset hearing loss. There was a mix of new and experienced hearing

  15. Rurality and determinants of hearing healthcare in adult hearing aid recipients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stephen; Hixon, Brian; Adkins, Margaret; Shinn, Jennifer B; Bush, Matthew L

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the timing of hearing aid (HA) acquisition between adults in rural and urban communities. We hypothesized that time of acquisition of HA after onset of hearing loss is greater in rural adults compared with urban adults. Secondary objectives included assessment of socioeconomic/educational status and impact of hearing loss and hearing rehabilitation of urban and rural HA recipients. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. We assessed demographics, timing of HA fitting from onset of hearing loss, and impact of hearing impairment in 336 adult HA recipients (273 urban, 63 rural) from a tertiary referral center. Amplification benefit was assessed using the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI). The time to HA acquisition was greater for rural participants compared to urban participants (19.1 vs. 25.7 years, P = 0.024) for those with untreated hearing loss for at least 8 years. Age at hearing loss onset was correlated with time to HA acquisition (P = -0.54, P < 0.001). Rural HA participants experienced longer commutes to hearing specialists (68 vs. 32 minutes, P < 0.001), were less likely to achieve a degree beyond high school (P < 0.001), and were more likely to possess Medicaid coverage (P = 0.012) compared to urban participants. Hearing impairment caused job performance difficulty in 60% of all participants. Rural adults are at risk for delayed HA acquisition, which may be related to distance to hearing specialists. Further research is indicated to investigate barriers to care and expand access for vulnerable populations. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2362-2367, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Hearing Aid-Induced Plasticity in the Auditory System of Older Adults: Evidence from Speech Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavie, Limor; Banai, Karen; Karni, Avi; Attias, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We tested whether using hearing aids can improve unaided performance in speech perception tasks in older adults with hearing impairment. Method: Unaided performance was evaluated in dichotic listening and speech-­in-­noise tests in 47 older adults with hearing impairment; 36 participants in 3 study groups were tested before hearing aid…

  17. Hearing Aid-Induced Plasticity in the Auditory System of Older Adults: Evidence from Speech Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavie, Limor; Banai, Karen; Karni, Avi; Attias, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We tested whether using hearing aids can improve unaided performance in speech perception tasks in older adults with hearing impairment. Method: Unaided performance was evaluated in dichotic listening and speech-­in-­noise tests in 47 older adults with hearing impairment; 36 participants in 3 study groups were tested before hearing aid…

  18. Benefit of contralateral hearing aid in adult cochlear implant bearers.

    PubMed

    Bouccara, D; Blanchet, E; Waterlot, P E; Smadja, M; Frachet, B; Meyer, B; Sterkers, O

    2016-06-01

    The present study assessed the interest of a contralateral hearing aid (HA) in adult cochlear implant (CI) bearers. The study recruited 10 French-speaking adult HA bearers with postlingual bilateral hearing loss, fitted for at least 2 years with a unilateral CI after loss of benefit from HA in one ear but continuing to use their contralateral HA: 4 male, 6 female; mean age, 58 years. All had regularly used bilateral HAs prior to CI. Audiometric assessment comprised: (1) individual ear hearing assessment on pure-tone audiometry and speech discrimination; and (2) free-field testing without aid, with CI only, with HA only and with CI plus HA, on pure-tone audiometry and speech discrimination with quiet background and on speech discrimination in noise. Speech discrimination was significantly improved in the bimodal condition (CI plus HA) as compared to CI alone, on all tests. In quiet, discrimination for disyllabic words was>50% in 7 cases with HA alone, in 2 cases with CI alone and in 1 case in with HA+CI. Under 0dB signal-to-noise ratio, discrimination was>50% in 1 case with HA alone, in 3 cases with CI alone and in 6 cases with HA+CI. The present results showed benefit in auditory perception in quiet and in noise with bimodal stimulation. When there is residual hearing in the non-implanted ear, a HA should be fitted; and in progressive bilateral hearing loss, CI should be suggested when HA benefit decreases in one ear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Health-related quality of life in adults with hearing impairment before and after hearing-aid rehabilitation in Finland.

    PubMed

    Niemensivu, Riina; Manchaiah, Vinaya; Roine, Risto P; Kentala, Erna; Sintonen, Harri

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adults with hearing impairment in Finland before and after hearing rehabilitation. The study was prospective with hearing-aid rehabilitation as the intervention. The data was collected, using the 15D instrument, before and six months after hearing-aid rehabilitation. The data was analysed using t-tests and multiple linear regression methods. The study sample included 949 adults with hearing impairment, and the control group included a sample of age- and gender-standardized general population. The study population had significantly poorer HRQoL on most dimensions of the 15D when compared to the control group both before and after hearing-aid rehabilitation. Hearing-aid rehabilitation resulted in improved mean scores on the dimensions of hearing and in the overall 15D score that were statistically significant, although the mean improvement in the overall score was marginal. Self-reported hearing ability can better predict the change in HRQoL, as a result of a hearing aid, when compared with measured hearing sensitivity. The study supports the hypothesis that on average, use of a unilateral hearing aid results in improved subjective hearing and marginal improvement in HRQoL in adults with hearing impairment.

  20. Hearing Aid Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Progress in hearing aids has come a long way. Yet despite such progress hearing aids are not the perfect answer to many hearing problems. Some adult ears cannot accommodate tightly fitting hearing aids. Mouth movements such as chewing, talking, and athletic or other active endeavors also lead to loosely fitting ear molds. It is well accepted that loosely fitting hearing aids are the cause of feedback noise. Since feedback noise is the most common complaint of hearing aid wearers it has been the subject of various patents. Herein a hearing aid assembly is provided eliminating feedback noise. The assembly includes the combination of a hearing aid with a headset developed to constrict feedback noise.

  1. Types of Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Consumer Products Hearing Aids Types of Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... some features for hearing aids? What are hearing aids? Hearing aids are sound-amplifying devices designed to ...

  2. Relating Hearing Aid Use to Social and Emotional Loneliness in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Barbara E; Sirow, Lynn W; Moser, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Hearing loss is a risk factor for social isolation and loneliness. We investigated the buffering effects of hearing aid use on perceived social and emotional loneliness. Forty older adults participated. Prior to and following the hearing aid fitting, participants completed the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale (De Jong Gierveld & Kamphuis, 1985); a change in feelings of loneliness following hearing aid use was the outcome indicator. There was a significant decline in perceptions of loneliness following 4 to 6 weeks of hearing aid use. A dose effect emerged with persons with moderate-to-severe hearing loss experiencing the greatest reduction in perceived loneliness with hearing aid use. Associated with poorer health status and higher consumption of health care services, perceived loneliness is a challenge to treat. Hearing aid use appears to be a buffer against the experience of loneliness.

  3. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... hair cells (outer and inner rows). When the vibrations move through this fluid, the tiny outer hair ... ear to the brain. Hearing aids intensify sound vibrations that the damaged outer hair cells have trouble ...

  4. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... case goes behind the ear that holds the electronics that make up the actual hearing aid. It's ... there's a hard plastic case that holds the electronic components, but it's joined to the earmold itself, ...

  5. Provision, perception and use of trainable hearing aids in Australia: a survey of clinicians and hearing impaired adults.

    PubMed

    Walravens, Els; Keidser, Gitte; Hickson, Louise

    2016-12-01

    This study set out to obtain information on the impact of trainable hearing aids among clinicians and hearing aid users and candidates. Two online adaptive surveys were developed to evaluate provision, uptake and experience or expectation of trainable hearing aids. Responses from 259 clinicians, 81 hearing aid users and 23 candidates for hearing aids were included. Over half of the clinicians surveyed activated trainable features in hearing aids. Most of these clinicians activated trainable features for selected users and reported positive findings. Most commonly trainable features were not activated because the hearing aid controls had already been disabled for management or client preference. One-third reported that they had no access to trainable aids or they were unsure about the presence or activation of trainable features. The remaining clinicians never activated trainable features. One in five users reported having used trainable aids and 93% would train again. Over 85% of the remaining hearing-impaired adults were interested in trainable aids. Positive reports from most providers and users who had experience with the trainable feature support the provision of trainable aids to selected clients, pending more evidence-based data to support the clinical management of such devices.

  6. An overview of hearing impairment in older adults: perspectives for rehabilitation with hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Natalizia, A; Casale, M; Guglielmelli, E; Rinaldi, V; Bressi, F; Salvinelli, F

    2010-03-01

    Hearing loss is a common problem in modern society due to the combined effects of noise, aging, disease, and heredity. According to 2005 estimates by the World Health Organization (WHO), 278 million people worldwide have moderate to profound hearing loss in both ears. Incidence increases with age. Approximately 31.4% of people over age 65 have hearing loss and 40% to 50% of people 75 and older have a hearing loss. Only 1 out of 5 people who could benefit from a hearing aids actually wears one. To review literature for articles that focus on hearing aids. Hearing aids have continuously evolved over the past 50 years, in term of styles and technology. Technological advances in hearing aids and HATS (Hearing Assistive Technologies, and Rehabilitation Services) have expanded the range of options available to improve the success of a device use. Today's hearing aids differ significantly from their analog predecessors because the application of digital signal processing has permitted many adaptive and/or automatic features. Included in the benefits of digital hearing aids are improved sound quality, multiple listening programs for different listening environments, advanced noise reduction strategies, acoustic feedback reduction, compatibility with remote control options, and flexibility in manipulation of the frequency, compression, and gain. The hearing aids continue to be developed to enhance the characteristics in terms of rehabilitation and acceptability.

  7. Satisfaction and compliance of adult patients using hearing aid and evaluation of factors affecting them.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Mehmet Hakan; Bayır, Ömer; Er, Serap; Işık, Eray; Saylam, Güleser; Tatar, Emel Çadallı; Özdek, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The aims of this study are to reveal patient compliance and satisfaction in hearing aid-prescribed adult population and to determine the relevant clinical factors. The study was designed retrospectively, and those patients who have been using hearing aid for at least 6 months were invited for evaluation. Demographical data, hearing aid type (digital vs analog), general satisfaction, and daily usage time were asked. Then, the Hearing Aid Satisfaction Questionnaire (HASQ) was applied to all patients which included visual analog scale (VAS)-based 10 questions about the effects of hearing aid on social communication, efficiency, cosmetics, life quality and cost. Totally 400 patients were included in the study. The HASQ was confirmed to be highly reliable by "Kaiser Meyer Olkin and Bartlett Sphericity" tests after exclusion of aid-cost question. There was a negative correlation between age and satisfaction, and a positive correlation between hearing aid usage time (years) and satisfaction (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between mean HASQ scores regarding gender, employment status, hearing aid type and the site of hearing aid wearing. HASQ scores were significantly worse in pure sensorineural loss type, lower educational status, shorter daily usage time, but better in higher pure tone threshold levels (p < 0.05). Age, time of hearing aid usage daily, type of hearing impairment, the threshold of hearing and education were the factors affecting satisfaction. Regular daily usage of hearing aid should be encouraged in patients, since by this way aid usage and satisfaction may be improved.

  8. Hearing Aid-Induced Plasticity in the Auditory System of Older Adults: Evidence From Speech Perception.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Limor; Banai, Karen; Karni, Avi; Attias, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    We tested whether using hearing aids can improve unaided performance in speech perception tasks in older adults with hearing impairment. Unaided performance was evaluated in dichotic listening and speech-in-noise tests in 47 older adults with hearing impairment; 36 participants in 3 study groups were tested before hearing aid fitting and after 4, 8, and 14 weeks of hearing-aid use. The remaining 11 participants served as a control group and were similarly evaluated but were not fitted with hearing aids. Three protocols were compared in the study groups: amplification for the nondominant ear, amplification for the dominant ear, and bilateral amplification. Subsequently, after 4 weeks, all participants were afforded bilateral amplification. In the study groups, unaided dichotic listening scores improved significantly in the nondominant ear by 8 weeks and onward. Significant improvements were also observed for unaided speech identification in noise, with some gains apparent after 4 weeks of hearing-aid use. No gains were observed in the control group. Using hearing aids for a relatively short period can induce changes in the way older adults process auditory inputs in perceptual tasks such as speech identification in noise and dichotic listening. These changes suggest that the central auditory system of older adults retains the potential for behaviorally relevant plasticity.

  9. Effectiveness of alternative listening devices to conventional hearing aids for adults with hearing loss: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Maidment, David W; Barker, Alex B; Xia, Jun; Ferguson, Melanie A

    2016-10-27

    Hearing loss is a major public health concern, affecting over 11 million people in the UK. While hearing aids are the most common clinical intervention for hearing loss, the majority of people that would benefit from using hearing aids do not take them up. Recent technological advances have led to a rapid increase of alternative listening devices to conventional hearing aids. These include hearing aids that can be customised using a smartphone, smartphone-based 'hearing aid' apps, personal sound amplification products and wireless hearing products. However, no systematic review has been published evaluating whether alternative listening devices are an effective management strategy for people with hearing loss. The objective of this systematic review is to assess whether alternative listening devices are an effective intervention for adults with hearing loss. Methods are reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses Protocols (PRISMA-P) 2015 checklist. Retrospective or prospective studies, randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, and before-after comparison studies will be eligible for inclusion. We will include studies with adult participants (≥18 years) with a mild or moderate hearing loss. The intervention should be an alternative listening device to a conventional hearing aid (comparison). Studies will be restricted to outcomes associated with the consequences of hearing loss. We will search relevant databases to identify published, completed but unpublished and ongoing trials. The overall quality of included evidence will be evaluated using the GRADE system, and meta-analysis performed if appropriate. No ethical issues are foreseen. The findings will be reported at national and international conferences, primarily audiology, and ear, nose and throat, and in a peer-reviewed journal using the PRISMA guidelines. PROSPERO CRD4201502958. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  10. Hearing Loss in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, John W.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses hearing loss in adults. It begins with an explanation of the anatomy of the ear and then explains the three types of hearing loss: conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, and mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss. Tinnitus, hearing aids, and cochlear implants are also addressed. (CR)

  11. Hearing Loss in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, John W.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses hearing loss in adults. It begins with an explanation of the anatomy of the ear and then explains the three types of hearing loss: conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, and mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss. Tinnitus, hearing aids, and cochlear implants are also addressed. (CR)

  12. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in (Un)aided Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Adults

    PubMed Central

    Van Dun, Bram; Kania, Anna; Dillon, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) are influenced by the characteristics of the stimulus, including level and hearing aid gain. Previous studies have measured CAEPs aided and unaided in individuals with normal hearing. There is a significant difference between providing amplification to a person with normal hearing and a person with hearing loss. This study investigated this difference and the effects of stimulus signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and audibility on the CAEP amplitude in a population with hearing loss. Twelve normal-hearing participants and 12 participants with a hearing loss participated in this study. Three speech sounds—/m/, /g/, and /t/—were presented in the free field. Unaided stimuli were presented at 55, 65, and 75 dB sound pressure level (SPL) and aided stimuli at 55 dB SPL with three different gains in steps of 10 dB. CAEPs were recorded and their amplitudes analyzed. Stimulus SNRs and audibility were determined. No significant effect of stimulus level or hearing aid gain was found in normal hearers. Conversely, a significant effect was found in hearing-impaired individuals. Audibility of the signal, which in some cases is determined by the signal level relative to threshold and in other cases by the SNR, is the dominant factor explaining changes in CAEP amplitude. CAEPs can potentially be used to assess the effects of hearing aid gain in hearing-impaired users. PMID:27587919

  13. Effectiveness of alternative listening devices to conventional hearing aids for adults with hearing loss: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Alex B; Xia, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hearing loss is a major public health concern, affecting over 11 million people in the UK. While hearing aids are the most common clinical intervention for hearing loss, the majority of people that would benefit from using hearing aids do not take them up. Recent technological advances have led to a rapid increase of alternative listening devices to conventional hearing aids. These include hearing aids that can be customised using a smartphone, smartphone-based ‘hearing aid’ apps, personal sound amplification products and wireless hearing products. However, no systematic review has been published evaluating whether alternative listening devices are an effective management strategy for people with hearing loss. Methods and analysis The objective of this systematic review is to assess whether alternative listening devices are an effective intervention for adults with hearing loss. Methods are reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses Protocols (PRISMA-P) 2015 checklist. Retrospective or prospective studies, randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, and before-after comparison studies will be eligible for inclusion. We will include studies with adult participants (≥18 years) with a mild or moderate hearing loss. The intervention should be an alternative listening device to a conventional hearing aid (comparison). Studies will be restricted to outcomes associated with the consequences of hearing loss. We will search relevant databases to identify published, completed but unpublished and ongoing trials. The overall quality of included evidence will be evaluated using the GRADE system, and meta-analysis performed if appropriate. Ethics and dissemination No ethical issues are foreseen. The findings will be reported at national and international conferences, primarily audiology, and ear, nose and throat, and in a peer-reviewed journal using the PRISMA guidelines. Review

  14. Use of technological aids and interpretation services among children and adults with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Jesper; Lehane, Christine; Marschark, Marc

    2017-10-01

    The technological development of communication aids for people with hearing loss has progressed rapidly over the last decades. Quality has improved and the number of different types of aids has increased. However, few studies have examined the prevalence of technology use and interpreting services use among people with hearing loss as they relate to demographic characteristics of this population. This study reports from national surveys of children and adults with hearing loss. Use of hearing aids, cochlear implants, other aids and interpreting services were analysed with regard to gender, age, degree of hearing loss, mode of communication, having an additional disability, level of educational achievement among adults, and whether or not children lived together with both of their parents. 269 children (0-15 years of age) and 839 adults (16-65 years of age). Differences in technology and service use were associated with age, degree of hearing loss, and mode of communication among children and adults, and gender and level of educational achievement among adults. Individual and social factors have an impact on technological hearing aid and interpreter use. More research about individual differences and clinical implications of support services is needed.

  15. Addressing patients' psychosocial concerns regarding hearing aids within audiology appointments for older adults.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, Katie; Grenness, Caitlin; Hickson, Louise

    2014-09-01

    It has long been documented that patients may experience emotional reactions to a diagnosis of hearing impairment and recommendation of hearing aids. Because of this, patients may raise psychosocial concerns regarding their hearing rehabilitation during audiology appointments, particularly in relation to getting hearing aids. However, thus far there has been little systematic research exploring how patients' concerns about hearing aids are addressed by audiologists within appointments. This study used conversation analysis to examine a corpus of 63 video-recorded initial audiology appointments with older adults with hearing impairment. The findings demonstrated that when patients expressed concerns regarding hearing aids, these concerns were typically psychosocial in nature and expressed in a way that carried a negative emotional stance. These types of turns thus invited an empathic response. However, patients' concerns were not typically addressed by audiologists during the appointment. As a consequence, patients persistently re-raised their concerns in subsequent turns, leading to expanded sequences of interaction during the management phase of the appointment. Older adults' psychosocial concerns regarding hearing aids may not always be sufficiently addressed within audiology appointments. A greater emphasis on emotionally focused communication within audiology could result in improved outcomes from hearing health care services.

  16. Measuring cognitive anxiety through the consultation process for hearing aids: Older adults and their significant others.

    PubMed

    Kelly-Campbell, Rebecca J; Wendel, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the level of cognitive anxiety experienced by first-time hearing aid adopters and their significant others before, during, and after hearing aid fitting. A total of 16 couples were interviewed at three points: (1) at the initial consultation for hearing aids, (2) during the hearing aid trial, and (3) 1 month following the final clinical appointment in which the hearing aids were formally adopted. Cognitive anxiety was assessed through a content analysis of the interviews using the Cognitive Anxiety Scale. Results of this study show that the levels of cognitive anxiety generally decreased across the entire consultation process for both adults with hearing impairment and their significant others. The results also indicated that couples generally experienced similar levels of cognitive anxiety at initial consultation, but their levels of cognitive anxiety differed throughout the remainder of the study. These findings highlight the importance of inclusion of significant others in the rehabilitation process. The reader will be able to: (1) discuss the relationship between cognitive anxiety and hearing impairment, (2) define cognitive anxiety, (3) discuss the impact of hearing impairment on significant others, (4) describe the experience of cognitive anxiety through the hearing aid consultation process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Neural Representation of Consonant-Vowel Transitions in Adults Who Wear Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Kelly L.; Kalstein, Laura; Billings, Cuttis J.; Souza, Pamela E.

    2006-01-01

    Hearing aids help compensate for disorders of the ear by amplifying sound; however, their effectiveness also depends on the central auditory system's ability to represent and integrate spectral and temporal information delivered by the hearing aid. The authors report that the neural detection of time-varying acoustic cues contained in speech can be recorded in adult hearing aid users using the acoustic change complex (ACC). Seven adults (50–76 years) with mild to severe sensorineural hearing participated in the study. When presented with 2 identifiable consonant-vowel (CV) syllables (“shee” and “see”), the neural detection of CV transitions (as indicated by the presence of a P1-N1-P2 response) was different for each speech sound. More specifically, the latency of the evoked neural response coincided in time with the onset of the vowel, similar to the latency patterns the authors previously reported in normal-hearing listeners. PMID:16959736

  18. Prevalence and associated factors of hearing aid use among older adults in Chile.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-López, Eduardo; Fuente, Adrian; Cardemil, Felipe; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Albala, Cecilia

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of use of hearing aids by older adults in Chile and the influence of some variables such as education level, income level and geographic area of residence on the prevalence of hearing aids. A national cross-sectional survey which was carried out in 2009. A representative sample of 4766 Chilean older adults aged 60 years and above. The percentage of older adults in Chile who self-reported hearing problems and used hearing aids was 8.9%. Such prevalence increased for adults living in urban areas and for those who knew about the new Chilean programme of universal access to health services (AUGE). For older adults who did not know about this programme, significant associations between the use of hearing aids and the variables of age, geographic area of residence, and income level were found. People's knowledge about AUGE programme may positively influence the use of hearing aids, although a direct effect cannot be attributed.

  19. What makes adults with hearing impairment take up hearing AIDS or communication programs and achieve successful outcomes?

    PubMed

    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Hickson, Louise; Worrall, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Client involvement in health decision making, or shared decision making, is increasingly being advocated. For example, rehabilitation interventions such as hearing aids and communication programs can be presented as options to adults with hearing impairment seeking help for the first time. Our previous research focused on the predictors of intervention decisions when options were presented with a decision aid. However, not all participants took up the intervention they initially decided upon. Although it is interesting to understand what informs adults with hearing impairment's intervention decisions, it is their intervention uptake and outcomes which best represent the ultimate end result of the rehabilitation process. This prospective study investigated the predictors of uptake and of successful outcomes of hearing aids and communication programs in middle-aged and older adults with hearing impairment seeking help for the first time. Using shared decision making, 153 participants with hearing impairment (average of air conduction thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz greater than 25 dB HL in at least one ear) aged 50 yr and older were presented with intervention options: hearing aids, communication programs (group or individual), and no intervention. Each participant received a decision aid and had at least 1 wk to consider intervention options before the intervention decision was made. Outcome measures for both hearing aids and communication programs at 3 mo after intervention completion were benefit (measured with the Client-Oriented Scale of Improvement), composite outcomes (measured with the International Outcome Inventory), and reduction in self-reported hearing disability (measured with the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire). Multivariate analysis (logistic and linear regression) identified predictors of intervention uptake and of successful outcomes when all other variables were held constant. Almost a quarter of the 153 participants (24%) did not take up the

  20. Management of hearing aid assembly by urban-dwelling hearing-impaired adults in a developed country: implications for a self-fitting hearing aid.

    PubMed

    Convery, Elizabeth; Keidser, Gitte; Hartley, Lisa; Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly

    2011-12-01

    A self-fitting hearing aid, designed to be assembled and programmed without audiological or computer support, could bring amplification to millions of people in developing countries, who remain unaided due to the lack of a local, professional, audiological infrastructure. The ability to assemble and insert a hearing aid is fundamental to the successful use of a self-fitting device. In this study, the management of such tasks was investigated. Eighty older, urban-dwelling, hearing-impaired adults in a developed country were asked to follow a set of written, illustrated instructions to assemble two slim-fit behind-the-ear hearing aids. Participants were allowed to access assistance with the task from an accompanying partner. A range of personal and audiometric variables was measured through the use of structured questionnaires and standardized tests of health literacy, cognitive function, and manual dexterity. The results showed that 99% of participants were able to complete the hearing aid assembly task, either on their own or with assistance. Health literacy, or the ability to read and understand health-related text, and gender most strongly influenced participants' ability to complete the assembly task independently and accurately. Higher levels of health literacy were associated with an increased likelihood of independent and successful task completion. Male participants were more likely to complete the task on their own, while female participants were more likely to assemble the device without errors. The results of this study will inform future work regarding development of educational material for the self-fitting hearing aid as well as candidacy for such a device.

  1. Exploring the relationship between technology use, hearing help-seeking, and hearing aid outcomes in older adults.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz Ham, Heidi; Bunn, Paul; Meyer, Carly; Khan, Asad; Hickson, Louise

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to explore technology use and its relationship to help-seeking for hearing impairment (HI) and success with hearing aids among older adults. Previous research had suggested a link between higher levels of technology use and hearing aid success. General technology use was evaluated using a purposefully developed 25-item questionnaire. Twelve items related to everyday technology use (e.g. DVD player) and 13 related to advanced technology use (e.g. Bluetooth). Four groups of older adults with HI participated in the study: (1) non-consulters (n=49), (2) consulters (n=62), (3) unsuccessful hearing aid owners (n=61), and (4) successful hearing aid owners (n=79). Preliminary analyses revealed a main effect in the use of everyday and advanced technology across the four participant groups. However, it was found that age and living arrangements accounted for most of the variance in reported everyday technology use (p=.030; p=.029, respectively) and age and gender accounted for the variance in reported advanced technology use (p<.001; p=.040, respectively). For everyday technology, an increase in age and living alone were associated with decreased technology use and for advanced technology use, age and female gender were associated with decreased technology use. Although we hypothesized that technology use would be less amongst non-consulters and unsuccessful hearing aid owners, our findings did not support this prediction. Technology use did not vary by group membership once the covariates of age, gender, and living arrangements were accounted for.

  2. The influence of hearing-aid compression on forward-masked thresholds for adults with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Marc A; McCreery, Ryan W; Jesteadt, Walt

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes forward-masked thresholds for adults with hearing loss. Previous research has demonstrated that the loss of cochlear compression contributes to deficits in this measure of temporal resolution. Cochlear compression can be mimicked with fast-acting compression where the normal dynamic range is mapped to the impaired dynamic range. To test the hypothesis that fast-acting compression will most-closely approximate the normal ability to perceive forward-masked pure-tones, forward-masked thresholds were measured for two groups of adults (normal hearing, hearing loss). Adults with normal hearing were tested without amplification. Adults with hearing loss were tested with three different compression speeds and two different prescriptive procedures using a hearing-aid simulator. The two prescriptive procedures differed in the extent to which the normal dynamic range was mapped onto the impaired dynamic range. When using a faster compression speed with the prescriptive procedure that best restored the lost dynamic range, forward-masked thresholds for the listeners with hearing loss approximated those observed for the listeners with normal hearing.

  3. Perception of a Self-Fitting Hearing Aid Among Urban-Dwelling Hearing-Impaired Adults in a Developed Country

    PubMed Central

    Keidser, Gitte; Hartley, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    A self-fitting hearing aid is a personal amplification device that is designed to be assembled, programmed, and fine-tuned by the user, without the need for additional equipment or professional support. A written description of the device was presented to 80 older adults with a hearing impairment, all of whom were residents of an urban area in a developed country. In response to a structured questionnaire, the majority of participants reported that the self-fitting hearing aid concept was a good idea (83%), would be of personal benefit (60%), and could be managed independently by the user (90%). Overall, half of the participant group agreed with all three statements. Two were uncertain about the concept, but none of the participants rejected it outright. There were no significant differences between the opinions of participants with previous hearing aid experience and those without. Participant responses to open-ended questions revealed that the main benefits of a self-fitting hearing aid were thought to be the ability to self-adjust the device’s settings (reported by 33% of participants) and increased convenience (20% of participants). The main drawback, mentioned by 25% of participants, was a preference for professional guidance through the fitting process. These results suggest that the self-fitting hearing aid may present as an alternative product in developed countries for those users who prefer to be in control of the fitting process. PMID:22079900

  4. How to Get Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Products Hearing Aids How to get Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... my hearing aids? How do I get hearing aids? Before getting a hearing aid, you should consider ...

  5. Web-based auditory self-training system for adult and elderly users of hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Vitti, Simone Virginia; Blasca, Wanderléia Quinhoneiro; Sigulem, Daniel; Torres Pisa, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Adults and elderly users of hearing aids suffer psychosocial reactions as a result of hearing loss. Auditory rehabilitation is typically carried out with support from a speech therapist, usually in a clinical center. For these cases, there is a lack of computer-based self-training tools for minimizing the psychosocial impact of hearing deficiency. To develop and evaluate a web-based auditory self-training system for adult and elderly users of hearing aids. Two modules were developed for the web system: an information module based on guidelines for using hearing aids; and an auditory training module presenting a sequence of training exercises for auditory abilities along the lines of the auditory skill steps within auditory processing. We built aweb system using PHP programming language and a MySQL database .from requirements surveyed through focus groups that were conducted by healthcare information technology experts. The web system was evaluated by speech therapists and hearing aid users. An initial sample of 150 patients at DSA/HRAC/USP was defined to apply the system with the inclusion criteria that: the individuals should be over the age of 25 years, presently have hearing impairment, be a hearing aid user, have a computer and have internet experience. They were divided into two groups: a control group (G1) and an experimental group (G2). These patients were evaluated clinically using the HHIE for adults and HHIA for elderly people, before and after system implementation. A third web group was formed with users who were invited through social networks for their opinions on using the system. A questionnaire evaluating hearing complaints was given to all three groups. The study hypothesis considered that G2 would present greater auditory perception, higher satisfaction and fewer complaints than G1 after the auditory training. It was expected that G3 would have fewer complaints regarding use and acceptance of the system. The web system, which was named Sis

  6. Sensitivity to temporal fine structure and hearing-aid outcomes in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elvira; McCormack, Abby; Edmonds, Barrie A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) on subjective measures of hearing aid outcome. Design: Prior to receiving hearing aids, participants completed a test to assess sensitivity to TFS and two self-assessment questionnaires; the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile (GHABP), and the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of hearing (SSQ-A). Follow-up appointments, comprised three self-assessment questionnaires; the GHABP, the SSQ-B, and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aid Outcomes (IOI-HA). Study sample: 75 adults were recruited from direct referral clinics. Results: Two thirds of participants were found to have good sensitivity to TFS; listeners with good sensitivity to TFS rated their hearing abilities higher at pre-fitting (SSQ-A) than those with poor sensitivity to TFS. At follow-up, participants with good sensitivity to TFS showed a smaller improvement on SSQ-B over listeners with poor sensitivity to TFS. Among the questionnaires, only the SSQ showed greater sensitivity to measure subjective differences between listeners with good and poor sensitivity to TFS. Conclusions: The clinical identification of a patient's ability to process TFS information at an early stage in the treatment pathway could prove useful in managing expectations about hearing aid outcomes. PMID:24550769

  7. Prevalence of contralateral hearing aid use in adults with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Cintia Tizue; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt

    2013-10-01

    Introduction The exclusive use of a cochlear implant (CI) in one ear allows patients to effectively hear speech in a quiet environment. However, in environments with competing noise, the processing of multiple sounds becomes complex. In an attempt to promote binaural hearing in a noninvasive manner, the use of a hearing aid in the nonimplanted ear is suggested for patients with a unilateral CI. Aims To identify the prevalence of hearing aid use in the contralateral ear in adults who already have a CI; to determine the reasons why some patients do not use contralateral hearing aids (CHAs); and to analyze the effects of residual hearing in CHA users. Materials and Methods This is a clinical study in 82 adult patients with CI implants who responded to a questionnaire designed to determine current use of CHA. Results In our patient sample, 70 CHA nonusers were identified. The prevalence of CHA users was determined to be 12% with a 95% confidence interval of 11 to 13%. About 58.2% of the CHA nonusers reported a lack of noticeable benefit even after wearing hearing aids, and 23.6% reported not having received the option to use a CHA. CHA users had a pure tone average of 107-dB hearing level, whereas CHA nonusers had a pure tone average of 117-dB hearing level. Conclusion The prevalence of the use of a CHA is low in our study. We attribute the low use of a CHA to either a lack of residual hearing or to a lack of benefit from the amplification.

  8. Prevalence of Contralateral Hearing Aid Use in Adults with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Cintia Tizue; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The exclusive use of a cochlear implant (CI) in one ear allows patients to effectively hear speech in a quiet environment. However, in environments with competing noise, the processing of multiple sounds becomes complex. In an attempt to promote binaural hearing in a noninvasive manner, the use of a hearing aid in the nonimplanted ear is suggested for patients with a unilateral CI. Aims To identify the prevalence of hearing aid use in the contralateral ear in adults who already have a CI; to determine the reasons why some patients do not use contralateral hearing aids (CHAs); and to analyze the effects of residual hearing in CHA users. Materials and Methods This is a clinical study in 82 adult patients with CI implants who responded to a questionnaire designed to determine current use of CHA. Results In our patient sample, 70 CHA nonusers were identified. The prevalence of CHA users was determined to be 12% with a 95% confidence interval of 11 to 13%. About 58.2% of the CHA nonusers reported a lack of noticeable benefit even after wearing hearing aids, and 23.6% reported not having received the option to use a CHA. CHA users had a pure tone average of 107-dB hearing level, whereas CHA nonusers had a pure tone average of 117-dB hearing level. Conclusion The prevalence of the use of a CHA is low in our study. We attribute the low use of a CHA to either a lack of residual hearing or to a lack of benefit from the amplification. PMID:25992038

  9. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... use by people with hearing loss, and sound amplifiers for consumers with no hearing loss who want ... are medical devices, it does not consider sound amplifiers to be medical devices when labeled for recreational ...

  10. The Master Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    Curran, James R.

    2013-01-01

    As early as the 1930s the term Master Hearing Aid (MHA) described a device used in the fitting of hearing aids. In their original form, the MHA was a desktop system that allowed for simulated or actual adjustment of hearing aid components that resulted in a changed hearing aid response. Over the years the MHA saw many embodiments and contributed to a number of rationales for the fitting of hearing aids. During these same years, the MHA was viewed by many as an inappropriate means of demonstrating hearing aids; the audio quality of the desktop systems was often superior to the hearing aids themselves. These opinions and the evolution of the MHA have molded the modern perception of hearing aids and the techniques used in the fitting of hearing aids. This article reports on a history of the MHA and its influence on the fitting of hearing aids. PMID:23686682

  11. Association of Using Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants With Changes in Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Janet S; Betz, Joshua; Li, Lingsheng; Blake, Caitlin R; Sung, Yoon K; Contrera, Kevin J; Lin, Frank R

    2016-07-01

    Hearing loss is a common health problem in older adults that is strongly associated with the development of depression. Previous cross-sectional studies have reported lower odds of depression among individuals who use hearing aids. However, there have been limited prospective studies investigating the effect of hearing loss treatments on depressive symptoms. To investigate the association between treatment with a hearing aid or cochlear implant with depressive symptoms in older adults. A prospective observational study was conducted of 113 participants 50 years or older who received hearing aids (n = 63) or cochlear implants (n = 50). Participants were recruited from August 1, 2011, to January 31, 2014, at a tertiary care academic center. Hearing aid or cochlear implantation. Depressive symptoms were evaluated by the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) at baseline and at 6 and 12 months after intervention. The score ranges from 0 to 15, and various scores between 3 and 10 have been used as being suggestive of depression. The median age of the 113 study participants was 69.6 years (interquartile range, 63.5-77.4 years). At baseline, the mean GDS score for the participants was 41% lower (95% CI, 7%-63%) among those receiving hearing aids (mean score, 1.5; 95% CI, 0.7-3.3) compared with those receiving cochlear implants (mean score, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3-5.1). Cochlear implant recipients' GDS scores improved from baseline to 6 months after treatment by 31% (95% CI, 10%-47%) and from baseline to 12 months after treatment by 38% (95% CI, 18%-54%). Hearing aid recipients' GDS scores improved by 28% (95% CI, 0%-48%) at 6 months after treatment but were not significantly different from baseline at 12 months after treatment (16%; 95% CI, -24% to 43%). There was a significant improvement in depressive symptoms at 6 months after treatment for patients receiving cochlear implants and hearing aids; this improvement persisted to 12 months for those who received cochlear

  12. The role of volunteer support in the community for adults with hearing loss and hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Pryce, Helen; Hall, Amanda; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2015-08-01

    To explore interactions between audiology patients and volunteers, to describe encounters and define the role of volunteers. Qualitative ethnographic and interview study of volunteer-patient interactions. Ten volunteer participants from two volunteer schemes in South West England were observed and interviewed. Three patient participants were interviewed. Analysis of observational data showed that volunteers provided support relating to local services and hearing aids, but did not engage in discussions about hearing loss. Interviews with volunteers identified gaps in audiology provision, including accessible services and clear information and highlighted a need for more support from audiology services to enable them to fulfil their role. Volunteer interactions with patients mimicked a clinician-patient encounter and volunteers employed strategies and behaviours used by professional audiologists. Audiology volunteers could provide an accessible bridge between health services and the community but their care is limited to focus on hearing aids. Volunteers enable patients to use hearing aids appropriately and are a core element of current care arrangements. However, volunteers express a need for adequate support from audiology services. Volunteers have the potential to increase service capacity and to bridge the gaps between community and audiology healthcare services. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Management of Hearing Aid Assembly by Urban-Dwelling Hearing-Impaired Adults in a Developed Country

    PubMed Central

    Keidser, Gitte; Hartley, Lisa; Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly

    2011-01-01

    A self-fitting hearing aid, designed to be assembled and programmed without audiological or computer support, could bring amplification to millions of people in developing countries, who remain unaided due to the lack of a local, professional, audiological infrastructure. The ability to assemble and insert a hearing aid is fundamental to the successful use of a self-fitting device. In this study, the management of such tasks was investigated. Eighty older, urban-dwelling, hearing-impaired adults in a developed country were asked to follow a set of written, illustrated instructions to assemble two slim-fit behind-the-ear hearing aids. Participants were allowed to access assistance with the task from an accompanying partner. A range of personal and audiometric variables was measured through the use of structured questionnaires and standardized tests of health literacy, cognitive function, and manual dexterity. The results showed that 99% of participants were able to complete the hearing aid assembly task, either on their own or with assistance. Health literacy, or the ability to read and understand health-related text, and gender most strongly influenced participants’ ability to complete the assembly task independently and accurately. Higher levels of health literacy were associated with an increased likelihood of independent and successful task completion. Male participants were more likely to complete the task on their own, while female participants were more likely to assemble the device without errors. The results of this study will inform future work regarding development of educational material for the self-fitting hearing aid as well as candidacy for such a device. PMID:22200734

  14. Adult hearing-aid users with cochlear dead regions restricted to high frequencies: Implications for amplification.

    PubMed

    Pepler, Anna; Lewis, Kathryn; Munro, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear dead regions (DR) are common in adult hearing-aid users, but are usually restricted to high frequencies. The aim was to determine the benefit of high-frequency amplification for ears with and without high-frequency DRs. Participants were fitted with the study hearing aid and tested under four conditions: unfiltered (NAL-NL2 prescription), and low-pass filtered at 1.5, 2, and 3 kHz. VCV stimuli were presented at 65 dB (A) in quiet and in 20-talker babble at a signal-to-babble ratio of 0 dB. Experienced adult hearing-aid users: one group of 18 with a DR edge frequency above 1.5 kHz, and a group of 18 matched controls. Overall performance was best in the unfiltered condition. There was no significant difference in mean performance between the two groups when tested in quiet. However, the DR group obtained less benefit from high-frequency amplification when tested in babble: the mean difference between the unfiltered and 3-kHz filtered condition was 6% and 13% for the DR group and controls, respectively. In adults with a moderate hearing loss and a restricted DR, speech recognition was always best in the unfiltered condition, although mean performance in babble was lower for the DR group.

  15. Activity limitation and participation restriction in adults seeking hearing aid fitting and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Helvik, Anne-Sofie; Jacobsen, Geir; Wennberg, Siri; Arnesen, Haakon; Ringdahl, Anders; Hallberg, Lillemor R-M

    2006-03-15

    We first aimed to describe demographic and audiological characteristics of adults referred to a university hospital for hearing aid (HA) fitting and rehabilitation. Our second aim was to employ an inventory that assesses life consequences of hearing impairment (HI) in terms of perceived activity limitation and participation restriction for the first time in a Norwegian adult outpatient population. A third aim was to study life consequences by audiological and demographic characteristics. During one year consecutive patients (n = 343) were requested to answer the Hearing Disability and Handicap Scale (HDHS) assessing activity limitation and participation restriction in relation to an audiological examination and medical consultation. The mean threshold of hearing (MTH) was ascertained by pure tone thresholds at 0.5 - 1 - 2 - 4 kHz in the better ear. Activity limitation and participation restriction were both higher for HA experienced than HA naïve subjects ( p < 0.01). In a multivariable model, the explained adjusted variance of activity limitation (R2) was 43.4% with MTH, perceived duration, and severity of hearing problems as predictor variables. Correspondingly, the explained adjusted variance of participation restriction was 28.4% for a model with MTH, age, gender and perceived severity of hearing problems as predictors. As a standard supplement to audiometric tests, HDHS may be successfully applied as a clinical tool among similar hearing impaired outpatients in order to assess activity limitation and participation restriction as part of audiological rehabilitation.

  16. Hearing-aid tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessinger, R.; Polhemus, J. T.; Waring, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Hearing aids are automatically checked by circuit that applies half-second test signal every thirty minutes. If hearing-aid output is distorted, too small, or if battery is too low, a warning lamp is activated. Test circuit is incorporated directly into hearing-aid package.

  17. Aided speech-identification performance in single-talker competition by older adults with impaired hearing

    PubMed Central

    HUMES, LARRY E.; COUGHLIN, MAUREEN

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of increased processing load on the closed-set speech-identification performance of young and older adults in a one-talker background. Since the older adults had impaired hearing, speech-identification performance was measured for spectrally shaped stimuli comparable to those experienced when wearing well-fit hearing aids. There were three groups of listeners: (1) 19 older adults with high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss; (2) 10 young adults with normal hearing who were assessed with the same spectrally shaped stimuli as the older adults; (3) 9 young adults with normal hearing who were assessed without spectral shaping and at a poorer target-to-competition ratio in an effort to equate overall performance to that of the older adults. In addition to this group factor, there were three within-participant repeated-measures independent variables designed to increase the demands on processing for the target and competing speech stimuli. These were: (1) competition meaningfulness (played in forward or reverse direction); (2) gender match between target and competing talkers (same or different gender); and (3) talker uncertainty (either the same target/competition talker pair or one of many such pairs on each trial). These three repeated-measures independent variables were examined in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial design. They showed roughly independent and additive effects on speech-identification such that combinations of these variables decreased performance cumulatively. Older adults performed worse than young adults across the board, but also showed diminished relative improvement as the processing load was decreased. Individual differences in performance among the older adults were also examined. PMID:19778396

  18. Patient-centred audiological rehabilitation: perspectives of older adults who own hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Grenness, Caitlin; Hickson, Louise; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Davidson, Bronwyn

    2014-02-01

    Patient-centred care is a term frequently associated with quality health care. Despite extensive literature from a range of health-care professions that provide description and measurement of patient-centred care, a definition of patient-centredness in audiological rehabilitation is lacking. The current study aimed to define patient-centred care specific to audiological rehabilitation from the perspective of older adults who have owned hearing aids for at least one year. Research interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of older adults concerning their perceptions of patient-centredness in audiological rehabilitation, and qualitative content analysis was undertaken. The participant sample included ten adults over the age of 60 years who had owned hearing aids for at least one year. Data analysis revealed three dimensions to patient-centred audiological rehabilitation: the therapeutic relationship, the players (audiologist and patient), and clinical processes. Individualised care was seen as an overarching theme linking each of these dimensions. This study reported two models: the first model describes what older adults with hearing aids believe constitutes patient-centred audiological rehabilitation. The second provides a guide to operationalised patient-centred care. Further research is required to address questions pertaining to the presence, nature, and impact of patient-centred audiological rehabilitation.

  19. Clinical reasons for returning hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ju Young; Oh, In-Hwan; Jung, Tae Suk; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Ho Min; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2014-04-01

    Increases in older aged populations and exposure to complicated noise environments have increased the number of hearing-impaired patients, creating greater demands for hearing aids. We have assessed the reasons that individuals rejected wearing and returned properly prescribed hearing aids, as well as differences in individual factors between younger and elderly adults. Of 1138 patients for whom hearing aids were prescribed at Kyung Hee University Medical Center Hearing Aid Clinic, 81 (6.14%) returned their hearing aids, including 36 patients aged <65 years and 45 aged ≥65 years. Patient-related, hearing-related, and hearing aid-related factors were assessed by retrospective chart analysis and phone survey and compared in the two groups. The primary symptoms reported by the 81 patients who returned their hearing aids were hearing disturbance, ringing, and fullness in the ear, in that order and in both groups. The rate of hearing aid return was similar in elderly females and males (p=0.288). The spondee recognition threshold was significantly higher in younger than in elderly adults (63.3±14.0 dB vs. 55.6±14.74 dB, p=0.019), but the hearing aid return rate was highest in patients with moderate hearing loss in both groups. In evaluating the reasons for return of hearing aids, we found that ineffectiveness of the device was the most frequent reason, accounting for 32.0% of returns, the highest percentage in both groups, with the most frequent patient problem caused by management difficulty in elderly and financial difficulty in younger adults. The reasons for hearing aid return were different in two groups. Financial considerations were cited more by younger adults, while difficulties in managing hearing aids were cited more frequently by elderly adults. Patients in both groups, however, reported that the most frequent reasons for return were inadequate hearing improvement and inconvenience wearing the hearing aid due to noise amplification.

  20. [Hearing loss in adults].

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Adrien A; Frachet, Bruno; Van De Water, Tom R; Eter, Elias

    2009-05-20

    The management of hearing loss in adults depends of etiology and its severity. It can be as simple as treating an external otitis, removing an impacted cerumen or a more complex one such as a surgery for otosclerosis. The hearing loss is managed mainly by new advances in hearing aids technology and implantable hearing devices which include BAHA, middle ear implant and cochlear implants. The research is focused on developing new molecules for intracochlear drug therapy to treat noise induced hearing loss, drug ototoxicity as well as hearing loss related to cochlear implant insertion trauma. Antioxidant molecules, molecules against apoptosis are at this time the most promising molecules than need further investigations.

  1. Music and hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Sara M K; Moore, Brian C J

    2014-10-31

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Music and Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. PMID:25361601

  3. Speech Perception in Noise and Listening Effort of Older Adults With Nonlinear Frequency Compression Hearing Aids.

    PubMed

    Shehorn, James; Marrone, Nicole; Muller, Thomas

    2017-08-10

    The purpose of this laboratory-based study was to compare the efficacy of two hearing aid fittings with and without nonlinear frequency compression, implemented within commercially available hearing aids. Previous research regarding the utility of nonlinear frequency compression has revealed conflicting results for speech recognition, marked by high individual variability. Individual differences in auditory function and cognitive abilities, specifically hearing loss slope and working memory, may contribute to aided performance. The first aim of the study was to determine the effect of nonlinear frequency compression on aided speech recognition in noise and listening effort using a dual-task test paradigm. The hypothesis, based on the Ease of Language Understanding model, was that nonlinear frequency compression would improve speech recognition in noise and decrease listening effort. The second aim of the study was to determine if listener variables of hearing loss slope, working memory capacity, and age would predict performance with nonlinear frequency compression. A total of 17 adults (age, 57-85 years) with symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss were tested in the sound field using hearing aids fit to target (NAL-NL2). Participants were recruited with a range of hearing loss severities and slopes. A within-subjects, single-blinded design was used to compare performance with and without nonlinear frequency compression. Speech recognition in noise and listening effort were measured by adapting the Revised Speech in Noise Test into a dual-task paradigm. Participants were required trial-by-trial to repeat the last word of each sentence presented in speech babble and then recall the sentence-ending words after every block of six sentences. Half of the sentences were rich in context for the recognition of the final word of each sentence, and half were neutral in context. Extrinsic factors of sentence context and nonlinear frequency compression were manipulated, and

  4. Hearing-aid assembly management among adults from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds: toward the feasibility of self-fitting hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Convery, Elizabeth; Keidser, Gitte; Caposecco, Andrea; Swanepoel, De Wet; Wong, Lena L N; Shen, Eed

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the study was twofold: (1) to assess the ability of hearing-impaired adults in the developing world to independently and accurately assemble a pair of hearing aids by following instructions that were written and illustrated according to best-practice health literacy principles; and (2) to determine which factors influence independent and accurate task completion. Correlational study. Forty South African and 40 Chinese adults with a hearing loss and their partners. The participant group included 42 females and 38 males ranging in age from 32 to 92 years. Ninety-five percent of South African and 60% of Chinese participants completed the assembly task, either on their own or with assistance from their partners. Better health literacy, younger age, and a more prestigious occupation were significantly associated with independent task completion for the South African and Chinese participants. Task accuracy was significantly linked to higher levels of cognitive function among South African participants, while a paucity of valid data prevented an analysis of accuracy from being conducted with the Chinese data. Individuals of diverse backgrounds can manage the self-fitting hearing-aid assembly task as long as health literacy levels and cultural differences are considered.

  5. Working memory training for adult hearing aid users: study protocol for a double-blind randomized active controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Henshaw, Helen; Ferguson, Melanie A

    2013-12-05

    One in ten people aged between 55 to 74 years have a significant hearing impairment in their better hearing ear (as defined by audiometric hearing thresholds). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the challenges faced by older listeners cannot be explained by the audiogram alone. The ability for people with hearing loss to use cognition to support speech perception allows for compensation of the degraded auditory input. This in turn offers promise for new cognitive-based rehabilitative interventions. Working memory is known to be highly associated with language comprehension and recent evidence has shown significant generalization of learning from trained working memory tasks to improvements in sentence-repetition skills of children with severe to profound hearing loss. This evidence offers support for further investigation into the potential benefits of working memory training to improve speech perception abilities in other hearing impaired populations. This is a double-blind randomized active controlled trial aiming to assess whether a program of working memory training results in improvements in untrained measures of cognition, speech perception and self-reported hearing abilities in adult hearing aid users aged (50 to 74 years) with mild-to-moderate hearing loss hearing aid users, compared with an active control group who receive a placebo version of the working memory training program. The present study aims to generate high-quality preliminary evidence for the efficacy of working memory training for adult hearing aid users with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss who are existing hearing aid users. This trial addresses a number of gaps in the published literature assessing training interventions for people with hearing loss, and in the general literature surrounding working memory training, such as the inclusion of an active control group, participant and tester blinding, and increased transparency in reporting. Clinical

  6. Self-Assessment of Hearing and Purchase of Hearing Aids by Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults

    PubMed Central

    Otavio, Andressa Colares da Costa; Coradini, Patricia Pérez; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Presbycusis is a consequence of aging. Prescription of hearing aids is part of the treatment, although the prevalence of use by elderly people is still small. Objective To verify whether or not self-assessment of hearing is a predictor for purchase of hearing aids. Methods Quantitative, cross-sectional, descriptive, and observational study. Participants were subjects who sought a private hearing center for selection of hearing aids. During the diagnostic interview, subjects answered the following question: “On a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being the worst and 10 the best, how would you rate your overall hearing ability?” After that, subjects underwent audiometry, selected a hearing aid, performed a home trial, and decided whether or not to purchase the hearing aid. The variables were associated and analyzed statistically. Results The sample was comprised of 32 subjects, both men and women, with a higher number of women. Mean age was 71.41 ± 12.14 years. Self-assessment of hearing ranged from 2 to 9 points. Overall, 71.9% of the subjects purchased hearing aids. There was no association between scores in the self-assessment and the purchase of hearing aids (p = 0.263). Among those who scored between 2 and 5 points, 64.7% purchased the device; between 6 and 7 points, 76.09% purchased the device; and between 8 and 9 points, 50% purchased the device, respectively. Conclusion There is evidence that low self-assessment scores lead to the purchase of hearing aids, although no significant association was observed in the sample. PMID:26722346

  7. Self-Assessment of Hearing and Purchase of Hearing Aids by Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults.

    PubMed

    Otavio, Andressa Colares da Costa; Coradini, Patricia Pérez; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Presbycusis is a consequence of aging. Prescription of hearing aids is part of the treatment, although the prevalence of use by elderly people is still small. Objective To verify whether or not self-assessment of hearing is a predictor for purchase of hearing aids. Methods Quantitative, cross-sectional, descriptive, and observational study. Participants were subjects who sought a private hearing center for selection of hearing aids. During the diagnostic interview, subjects answered the following question: "On a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being the worst and 10 the best, how would you rate your overall hearing ability?" After that, subjects underwent audiometry, selected a hearing aid, performed a home trial, and decided whether or not to purchase the hearing aid. The variables were associated and analyzed statistically. Results The sample was comprised of 32 subjects, both men and women, with a higher number of women. Mean age was 71.41 ± 12.14 years. Self-assessment of hearing ranged from 2 to 9 points. Overall, 71.9% of the subjects purchased hearing aids. There was no association between scores in the self-assessment and the purchase of hearing aids (p = 0.263). Among those who scored between 2 and 5 points, 64.7% purchased the device; between 6 and 7 points, 76.09% purchased the device; and between 8 and 9 points, 50% purchased the device, respectively. Conclusion There is evidence that low self-assessment scores lead to the purchase of hearing aids, although no significant association was observed in the sample.

  8. Qualitative interviews on the beliefs and feelings of adults towards their ownership, but non-use of hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Linssen, Anouk M; Joore, Manuela A; Minten, Rianne K H; van Leeuwen, Yvonne D; Anteunis, Lucien J C

    2013-10-01

    Up to a quarter of the adults who own hearing aids never use them. To provide these 'non-users' with the best help, hearing care professionals need to have an in-depth understanding of the non-users' beliefs and feelings with regard to the non-use. This qualitative study explored these beliefs and feelings in order to increase our understanding of hearing aid non-users. Individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews were completed. Eleven hearing aid owners (aged 54-80 years) who reported that they never or hardly ever used their hearing aids. The participants expressed a variety of feelings towards their non-use, including indifference, self-annoyance, frustration, powerlessness, shame, and guilt. Their feelings were related to beliefs about: (1) the severity of their hearing handicap with and without hearing aids, (2) whom or what was responsible for the non-use, and (3) the attitudes of significant others towards the non-use. Hearing-aid non-users differ in their beliefs and feelings towards the non-use. A patient-centred approach is needed.

  9. The effects of frequency lowering on speech perception in noise with adult hearing aid users

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christi W.; Bates, Emily; Brennan, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Objective Frequency lowering (FL) strategies move high frequency sound into a lower frequency range. This study determined if speech perception differences are observed between some of the different frequency lowering strategies that are available. Design A cross-sectional, repeated-measures design was used to compare three hearing aids that used wide-dynamic range compression (WDRC) and either non-linear frequency compression (NFC), linear frequency transposition (LFT), or frequency translation (FT). The hearing aids were matched to prescriptive real ear targets for WDRC. The settings for each FL strategy were adjusted to provide audibility for a 6300 Hz filtered speech signal. Sentence recognition in noise, subjective measures of sound quality, and a modified version of the speech intelligibility index (SII) were measured. Study Sample Ten adults between the ages of 63 to 82 years with bilateral, high frequency hearing loss. Results LFT and FT led to poorer sentence recognition compared to WDRC for most individuals. No difference in sentence recognition occurred with and without NFC. The quality questionnaire and SII showed few differences between conditions. Conclusion Under similar fitting and testing conditions of this study, FL techniques may not provide speech understanding benefit in certain background noise situations. PMID:26938846

  10. The effects of frequency lowering on speech perception in noise with adult hearing-aid users.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christi W; Bates, Emily; Brennan, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Frequency lowering (FL) strategies move high frequency sound into a lower frequency range. This study determined if speech perception differences are observed between some of the different frequency lowering strategies that are available. A cross-sectional, repeated-measures design was used to compare three hearing aids that used wide-dynamic range compression (WDRC) and either non-linear frequency compression (NFC), linear frequency transposition (LFT), or frequency translation (FT). The hearing aids were matched to prescriptive real ear targets for WDRC. The settings for each FL strategy were adjusted to provide audibility for a 6300 Hz filtered speech signal. Sentence recognition in noise, subjective measures of sound quality, and a modified version of the speech intelligibility index (SII) were measured. Ten adults between the ages of 63 to 82 years with bilateral, high frequency hearing loss. LFT and FT led to poorer sentence recognition compared to WDRC for most individuals. No difference in sentence recognition occurred with and without NFC. The quality questionnaire and SII showed few differences between conditions. Under similar fitting and testing conditions of this study, FL techniques may not provide speech understanding benefit in certain background noise situations.

  11. Speech Perception for Adults Who Use Hearing Aids in Conjunction with Cochlear Implants in Opposite Ears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Mansze; Grayden, David; Dowell, Richard C.; Lawrence, David

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to (a) investigate the effect of using a hearing aid in conjunction with a cochlear implant in opposite ears on speech perception in quiet and in noise, (b) identify the speech information obtained from a hearing aid that is additive to the information obtained from a cochlear implant, and (c) explore the relationship between…

  12. Hearing Aid Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Hearing aids often develop malfunctions that are not detected by the wearer. This is particularly true when the wearers are school-age children. Studies of selected groups showed that from 30 to more than 50 percent of school children were not getting adequate benefit from their hearing aids because of unrecognized malfunctions, usually low or dead batteries. This can be serious because hearing impairment retards a child's educational progress. NASA technology incorporated in the Hearing Aid Malfunction Detection Unit (HAMDU), the device pictured, is expected to provide an effective countermeasure to the childrens' hearing aid problem. A patent license has been awarded to a minority-owned firm, Hopkins International Company, a subsidiary of H. H. Aerospace Design Co., Inc., Elmford, New York. The company plans early commercial availability of its version of the device.

  13. Hearing aid use in everyday life: managing contextual variability.

    PubMed

    Williger, Bettina; Lang, Frieder R

    2015-01-01

    We investigated usage of and satisfaction with hearing aid devices in everyday life among older adults with hearing loss. Our research further advances the role of hearing contexts for hearing aid use and satisfaction. A central assumption was that hearing aid owners adapt the usage of the hearing aid devices to contextual demands of hearing depending on their personal resources. In a sample of 158 hearing aid owners aged 50-88 years, we examined proactive hearing aid use in everyday life and its association with the usage of, and satisfaction with, hearing aids. The study was administered online. Using an adapted version of the day-reconstruction method, participants reported hearing episodes during the preceding day. Hearing aid use was assessed via the proportion of waking time with hearing aids. Satisfaction with hearing aids was measured via the Satisfaction with Daily Amplification scale. When using the hearing aids more often, and when reporting greater satisfaction, older adults indicated more diverse listening situations and experienced less variability in hearing quality with hearing aids. Our findings suggest that hearing aid owners may proactively use the hearing devices to master situation-specific demands and difficulties in hearing quality. Such findings underline that hearing aid use and satisfaction depend on the extent to which the devices help to manage everyday life successfully. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Hearing AIDS and music.

    PubMed

    Chasin, Marshall; Russo, Frank A

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the primary concern for hearing aid design and fitting is optimization for speech inputs. However, increasingly other types of inputs are being investigated and this is certainly the case for music. Whether the hearing aid wearer is a musician or merely someone who likes to listen to music, the electronic and electro-acoustic parameters described can be optimized for music as well as for speech. That is, a hearing aid optimally set for music can be optimally set for speech, even though the converse is not necessarily true. Similarities and differences between speech and music as inputs to a hearing aid are described. Many of these lead to the specification of a set of optimal electro-acoustic characteristics. Parameters such as the peak input-limiting level, compression issues-both compression ratio and knee-points-and number of channels all can deleteriously affect music perception through hearing aids. In other cases, it is not clear how to set other parameters such as noise reduction and feedback control mechanisms. Regardless of the existence of a "music program,'' unless the various electro-acoustic parameters are available in a hearing aid, music fidelity will almost always be less than optimal. There are many unanswered questions and hypotheses in this area. Future research by engineers, researchers, clinicians, and musicians will aid in the clarification of these questions and their ultimate solutions.

  15. Hearing Aids and Music

    PubMed Central

    Chasin, Marshall; Russo, Frank A.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the primary concern for hearing aid design and fitting is optimization for speech inputs. However, increasingly other types of inputs are being investigated and this is certainly the case for music. Whether the hearing aid wearer is a musician or merely someone who likes to listen to music, the electronic and electro-acoustic parameters described can be optimized for music as well as for speech. That is, a hearing aid optimally set for music can be optimally set for speech, even though the converse is not necessarily true. Similarities and differences between speech and music as inputs to a hearing aid are described. Many of these lead to the specification of a set of optimal electro-acoustic characteristics. Parameters such as the peak input-limiting level, compression issues—both compression ratio and knee-points—and number of channels all can deleteriously affect music perception through hearing aids. In other cases, it is not clear how to set other parameters such as noise reduction and feedback control mechanisms. Regardless of the existence of a “music program,” unless the various electro-acoustic parameters are available in a hearing aid, music fidelity will almost always be less than optimal. There are many unanswered questions and hypotheses in this area. Future research by engineers, researchers, clinicians, and musicians will aid in the clarification of these questions and their ultimate solutions. PMID:15497032

  16. Does clinician continuity influence hearing aid outcomes?

    PubMed

    Bennett, Rebecca J; Meyer, Carly; Eikelboom, Robert H

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate whether clinician continuity is associated with successful hearing aid outcomes. A prospective cohort study. Clinician continuity was defined as occurring when a patient was cared for by the same clinician for the hearing assessment, hearing aid selection process, hearing aid fitting and programming, and subsequent hearing aid fine tuning appointments. The hearing aid outcome measures included self-reported hearing aid use, benefit and satisfaction as well as self-reported handling skills and problems experienced with hearing aids. Four hundred and sixty-eight adult hearing aid users (mean age 73.9 years ±10.9) and 26 qualified audiologists (mean age 34 years ±6.34) recruited from a single hearing clinic in Perth, Western Australia. There were no significant differences in hearing aid outcomes between participants who experienced clinician continuity and those who did not. Within a controlled practice setting, hearing aid outcomes may not be adversely effected if services are provided by more than one clinician.

  17. Do Hearing Aids Improve Affect Perception?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Juliane; Herzog, Diana; Scharenborg, Odette; Janse, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Normal-hearing listeners use acoustic cues in speech to interpret a speaker's emotional state. This study investigates the effect of hearing aids on the perception of the emotion dimensions arousal (aroused/calm) and valence (positive/negative attitude) in older adults with hearing loss. More specifically, we investigate whether wearing a hearing aid improves the correlation between affect ratings and affect-related acoustic parameters. To that end, affect ratings by 23 hearing-aid users were compared for aided and unaided listening. Moreover, these ratings were compared to the ratings by an age-matched group of 22 participants with age-normal hearing.For arousal, hearing-aid users rated utterances as generally more aroused in the aided than in the unaided condition. Intensity differences were the strongest indictor of degree of arousal. Among the hearing-aid users, those with poorer hearing used additional prosodic cues (i.e., tempo and pitch) for their arousal ratings, compared to those with relatively good hearing. For valence, pitch was the only acoustic cue that was associated with valence. Neither listening condition nor hearing loss severity (differences among the hearing-aid users) influenced affect ratings or the use of affect-related acoustic parameters. Compared to the normal-hearing reference group, ratings of hearing-aid users in the aided condition did not generally differ in both emotion dimensions. However, hearing-aid users were more sensitive to intensity differences in their arousal ratings than the normal-hearing participants.We conclude that the use of hearing aids is important for the rehabilitation of affect perception and particularly influences the interpretation of arousal.

  18. Implantable digital hearing aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kissiah, A. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Hearing aid converts analog output of microphone into digital pulses in about 10 channels of audiofrequencies. Each pulse band could be directly connected to portion of auditory nerve most sensitive to that range.

  19. The effect of hearing loss and hearing aids on the use of information and communication technologies by community-living older adults.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Chris; Pichora-Fuller, Margaret Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Innovations in information and communication technologies are changing society, but only 1 in 15 Canadian seniors used a computer at the turn of the millennium (Statistics Canada, 2000). Furthermore, about 1 in 5 Canadian seniors has difficulty hearing, seeing, or communicating. The primary goal of the study was to investigate the relationship between hearing impairment and the use of information and communication technologies by older adults. A questionnaire about use of technologies was administered to 135 older adults and hearing was measured using audiometry. Hearing was found to be related to the extent of use of communication technologies, especially newer and more specialized technologies. Those with hearing loss who did not use a hearing aid did not use other technologies as much as peers with good hearing or hearing-aid users. Overall, the extent of and ability to use information and communication technologies was greater for the study sample than in previous findings for a national sample; however, the patterns of usage of various technologies and the factors influencing use were similar in the two samples. Recommendations are made for future research, health education programs, and universal design.

  20. The Effects of Hearing Aid Directional Microphone and Noise Reduction Processing on Listening Effort in Older Adults with Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Jamie L

    2016-01-01

    Older listeners with hearing loss may exert more cognitive resources to maintain a level of listening performance similar to that of younger listeners with normal hearing. Unfortunately, this increase in cognitive load, which is often conceptualized as increased listening effort, may come at the cost of cognitive processing resources that might otherwise be available for other tasks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent and combined effects of a hearing aid directional microphone and a noise reduction (NR) algorithm on reducing the listening effort older listeners with hearing loss expend on a speech-in-noise task. Participants were fitted with study worn commercially available behind-the-ear hearing aids. Listening effort on a sentence recognition in noise task was measured using an objective auditory-visual dual-task paradigm. The primary task required participants to repeat sentences presented in quiet and in a four-talker babble. The secondary task was a digital visual pursuit rotor-tracking test, for which participants were instructed to use a computer mouse to track a moving target around an ellipse that was displayed on a computer screen. Each of the two tasks was presented separately and concurrently at a fixed overall speech recognition performance level of 50% correct with and without the directional microphone and/or the NR algorithm activated in the hearing aids. In addition, participants reported how effortful it was to listen to the sentences in quiet and in background noise in the different hearing aid listening conditions. Fifteen older listeners with mild sloping to severe sensorineural hearing loss participated in this study. Listening effort in background noise was significantly reduced with the directional microphones activated in the hearing aids. However, there was no significant change in listening effort with the hearing aid NR algorithm compared to no noise processing. Correlation analysis between objective and self

  1. Paired comparisons of nonlinear frequency compression, extended bandwidth, and restricted bandwidth hearing aid processing for children and adults with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Marc A; McCreery, Ryan; Kopun, Judy; Hoover, Brenda; Alexander, Joshua; Lewis, Dawna; Stelmachowicz, Patricia G

    2014-01-01

    Preference for speech and music processed with nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) and two controls (restricted bandwidth [RBW] and extended bandwidth [EBW] hearing aid processing) was examined in adults and children with hearing loss. The purpose of this study was to determine if stimulus type (music, sentences), age (children, adults), and degree of hearing loss influence listener preference for NFC, RBW, and EBW. Design was a within-participant, quasi-experimental study. Using a round-robin procedure, participants listened to amplified stimuli that were (1) frequency lowered using NFC, (2) low-pass filtered at 5 kHz to simulate the RBW of conventional hearing aid processing, or (3) low-pass filtered at 11 kHz to simulate EBW amplification. The examiner and participants were blinded to the type of processing. Using a two-alternative forced-choice task, participants selected the preferred music or sentence passage. Participants included 16 children (ages 8-16 yr) and 16 adults (ages 19-65 yr) with mild to severe sensorineural hearing loss. All participants listened to speech and music processed using a hearing aid simulator fit to the Desired Sensation Level algorithm v5.0a. Children and adults did not differ in their preferences. For speech, participants preferred EBW to both NFC and RBW. Participants also preferred NFC to RBW. Preference was not related to the degree of hearing loss. For music, listeners did not show a preference. However, participants with greater hearing loss preferred NFC to RBW more than participants with less hearing loss. Conversely, participants with greater hearing loss were less likely to prefer EBW to RBW. Both age groups preferred access to high-frequency sounds, as demonstrated by their preference for either the EBW or NFC conditions over the RBW condition. Preference for EBW can be limited for those with greater degrees of hearing loss, but participants with greater hearing loss may be more likely to prefer NFC. Further

  2. Paired comparisons of nonlinear frequency compression, extended bandwidth, and restricted bandwidth hearing-aid processing for children and adults with hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Marc A.; McCreery, Ryan; Kopun, Judy; Hoover, Brenda; Alexander, Joshua; Lewis, Dawna; Stelmachowicz, Patricia G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preference for speech and music processed with nonlinear frequency compression and two controls (restricted and extended bandwidth hearing-aid processing) was examined in adults and children with hearing loss. Purpose Determine if stimulus type (music, sentences), age (children, adults) and degree of hearing loss influence listener preference for nonlinear frequency compression, restricted bandwidth and extended bandwidth. Research Design Within-subject, quasi-experimental study. Using a round-robin procedure, participants listened to amplified stimuli that were 1) frequency-lowered using nonlinear frequency compression, 2) low-pass filtered at 5 kHz to simulate the restricted bandwidth of conventional hearing aid processing, or 3) low-pass filtered at 11 kHz to simulate extended bandwidth amplification. The examiner and participants were blinded to the type of processing. Using a two-alternative forced-choice task, participants selected the preferred music or sentence passage. Study Sample Sixteen children (8–16 years) and 16 adults (19–65 years) with mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss. Intervention All subjects listened to speech and music processed using a hearing-aid simulator fit to the Desired Sensation Level algorithm v.5.0a (Scollie et al, 2005). Results Children and adults did not differ in their preferences. For speech, participants preferred extended bandwidth to both nonlinear frequency compression and restricted bandwidth. Participants also preferred nonlinear frequency compression to restricted bandwidth. Preference was not related to degree of hearing loss. For music, listeners did not show a preference. However, participants with greater hearing loss preferred nonlinear frequency compression to restricted bandwidth more than participants with less hearing loss. Conversely, participants with greater hearing loss were less likely to prefer extended bandwidth to restricted bandwidth. Conclusion Both age groups preferred access to

  3. Comparison of Performance of Transcranial Contralateral Routing of Signal, Pre-Implanted Trimmer Digital and Digital Bone Anchored Hearing Aid in Adults with Unilateral Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Chatni, Suma; Ramadevi, Kasetty Jagannathaiah S.; Fakruddin, Darga Baba

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with unilateral hearing loss of severe-profound degree face listening difficulties while localizing a sound source and while perceiving speech in the presence of noise. The objective was to compare the efficacy of the digitally programmable bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA), trimmer digital BAHA and the transcranial contralateral routing of signal (T-CROS) in improving the listening performance in adults with unilateral hearing loss. Twenty-four adults with unilateral hearing loss was assessed for sound field thresholds, speech perception performance in quiet and noise (direct and indirect conditions) and the subjective quality rating of speech in unaided and aided with either T-CROS or digitally programmable BAHA or trimmer digital BAHA attached to the headband. Results indicated that the participants performed better with both the digitally programmable and the trimmer digital BAHA than the T-CROS in both quiet and noise. However, the digitally programmable BAHA performed better when the speech arrived from the poorer ear side. The current study helps in prioritizing the hearing amplification devices for the trial and also helps in arriving at the appropriate hearing amplification device for the individuals with unilateral hearing loss. PMID:26779328

  4. Recognition and localization of speech by adult cochlear implant recipients wearing a digital hearing aid in the nonimplanted ear (bimodal hearing).

    PubMed

    Potts, Lisa G; Skinner, Margaret W; Litovsky, Ruth A; Strube, Michael J; Kuk, Francis

    2009-06-01

    The use of bilateral amplification is now common clinical practice for hearing aid users but not for cochlear implant recipients. In the past, most cochlear implant recipients were implanted in one ear and wore only a monaural cochlear implant processor. There has been recent interest in benefits arising from bilateral stimulation that may be present for cochlear implant recipients. One option for bilateral stimulation is the use of a cochlear implant in one ear and a hearing aid in the opposite nonimplanted ear (bimodal hearing). This study evaluated the effect of wearing a cochlear implant in one ear and a digital hearing aid in the opposite ear on speech recognition and localization. A repeated-measures correlational study was completed. Nineteen adult Cochlear Nucleus 24 implant recipients participated in the study. The participants were fit with a Widex Senso Vita 38 hearing aid to achieve maximum audibility and comfort within their dynamic range. Soundfield thresholds, loudness growth, speech recognition, localization, and subjective questionnaires were obtained six-eight weeks after the hearing aid fitting. Testing was completed in three conditions: hearing aid only, cochlear implant only, and cochlear implant and hearing aid (bimodal). All tests were repeated four weeks after the first test session. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. Significant effects were further examined using pairwise comparison of means or in the case of continuous moderators, regression analyses. The speech-recognition and localization tasks were unique, in that a speech stimulus presented from a variety of roaming azimuths (140 degree loudspeaker array) was used. Performance in the bimodal condition was significantly better for speech recognition and localization compared to the cochlear implant-only and hearing aid-only conditions. Performance was also different between these conditions when the location (i.e., side of the loudspeaker array that

  5. Recognition and Localization of Speech by Adult Cochlear Implant Recipients Wearing a Digital Hearing Aid in the Nonimplanted Ear (Bimodal Hearing)

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Lisa G.; Skinner, Margaret W.; Litovsky, Ruth A.; Strube, Michael J; Kuk, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of bilateral amplification is now common clinical practice for hearing aid users but not for cochlear implant recipients. In the past, most cochlear implant recipients were implanted in one ear and wore only a monaural cochlear implant processor. There has been recent interest in benefits arising from bilateral stimulation that may be present for cochlear implant recipients. One option for bilateral stimulation is the use of a cochlear implant in one ear and a hearing aid in the opposite nonimplanted ear (bimodal hearing). Purpose This study evaluated the effect of wearing a cochlear implant in one ear and a digital hearing aid in the opposite ear on speech recognition and localization. Research Design A repeated-measures correlational study was completed. Study Sample Nineteen adult Cochlear Nucleus 24 implant recipients participated in the study. Intervention The participants were fit with a Widex Senso Vita 38 hearing aid to achieve maximum audibility and comfort within their dynamic range. Data Collection and Analysis Soundfield thresholds, loudness growth, speech recognition, localization, and subjective questionnaires were obtained six–eight weeks after the hearing aid fitting. Testing was completed in three conditions: hearing aid only, cochlear implant only, and cochlear implant and hearing aid (bimodal). All tests were repeated four weeks after the first test session. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. Significant effects were further examined using pairwise comparison of means or in the case of continuous moderators, regression analyses. The speech-recognition and localization tasks were unique, in that a speech stimulus presented from a variety of roaming azimuths (140 degree loudspeaker array) was used. Results Performance in the bimodal condition was significantly better for speech recognition and localization compared to the cochlear implant–only and hearing aid–only conditions. Performance

  6. Effect of hearing aids on hearing.

    PubMed

    Podoshin, L; Kremer, M; Fradis, M; Feiglin, H

    1984-01-01

    We examined 114 patients aged 10 to 91 years with different kinds of hearing aids fitted in one ear only, the unaided ear acting as a control. They were re-examined several times during a period of follow-up from 1 to 9 years comparing the relative change in hearing due to hearing aid usage with various degrees of amplification of the aid. We compared the degree of hearing loss in the aided and unaided ear looking for evidence of a possible change in hearing related to the frequency of hearing aid usage in hours per day and in years, the maximum power output (MPO) and the gain of the aid. According to our findings there is no change in hearing between the aided and the unaided ear at the alpha = 0.05 probability level at least for 8 years. There is no effect of the long-term amplification of the hearing aid on deterioration of hearing comparing the aided ear and the unaided ear, but with high MPO of the aid, the patient should be followed up more frequently than with low MPO amplification.

  7. Parent Hearing Aid Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen; Roberts, Mallory; Mullings, Day; Harward, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses parent experiences in obtaining and managing hearing aids for their young child. The purpose was to identify challenges parents encounter to determine what state agencies can do to improve parent access to amplification. Data were collected July through September of 2010; 40 parents of children ages birth to 3 years old…

  8. Parent Hearing Aid Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen; Roberts, Mallory; Mullings, Day; Harward, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses parent experiences in obtaining and managing hearing aids for their young child. The purpose was to identify challenges parents encounter to determine what state agencies can do to improve parent access to amplification. Data were collected July through September of 2010; 40 parents of children ages birth to 3 years old…

  9. Hearing-aid outcomes in Chinese adults: clinical application and psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kam, Anna Chi Shan

    2012-06-01

    To adapt the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life questionnaire into Chinese (the SADL-CH questionnaire) and investigate hearing-aid satisfaction in a group of adult Hong Kong Chinese fitted with free hearing aids. Cross-sectional survey. One hundred and twenty-five experienced hearing-aid users. The subjects completed a history form seeking demographic data and a questionnaire combining the SADL-CH instrument with questions seeking subjects' subjective ratings of satisfaction with some hearing-aid features and overall satisfaction with their hearing aid. The SADL-CH questionnaire had a good internal consistency reliability estimate (α = 0.79) comparable to that of the original version. SADL-CH scores were observed to have significant correlations with other satisfaction ratings on some hearing-aid features and the overall satisfaction measure. A high degree of test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.79) was observed. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the SADL-CH questionnaire had a four-factor structure. Interim norms were derived for the SADL-CH questionnaire. The level of hearing-aid satisfaction in Chinese adults was generally lower than that reported in studies conducted among Western populations. The SADL-CH questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring hearing-aid satisfaction.

  10. Hearing aids. I. Conventional hearing devices.

    PubMed

    Stach, B A; Gulya, A J

    1996-03-01

    State-of-the-art hearing aids incorporate advances in signal processing, miniaturization, and programmability. This technological progress has been accompanied by parallel enhancements in evaluating and fitting strategies. In addition, in the past several years, knowledge has increased about the influences of amplification on hearing ability and about the influences of hearing ability on benefit from amplification.

  11. Directional Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M.; Lin, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    Hearing-aid device indicates visually whether sound is coming from left, right, back, or front. Device intended to assist individuals who are deaf in at least one ear and unable to discern naturally directions to sources of sound. Device promotes safety in street traffic, on loading docks, and in presence of sirens, alarms, and other warning sounds. Quadraphonic version of device built into pair of eyeglasses and binaural version built into visor.

  12. Directional Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M.; Lin, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    Hearing-aid device indicates visually whether sound is coming from left, right, back, or front. Device intended to assist individuals who are deaf in at least one ear and unable to discern naturally directions to sources of sound. Device promotes safety in street traffic, on loading docks, and in presence of sirens, alarms, and other warning sounds. Quadraphonic version of device built into pair of eyeglasses and binaural version built into visor.

  13. Social Support Predicts Hearing Aid Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurjit; Lau, Sin-Tung; Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The goals of the current research were to determine: (1) whether there is a relationship between perceived social support and hearing aid satisfaction, and (2) how well perceived social support predicts hearing aid satisfaction relative to other correlates previously identified in the literature. In study 1, 173 adult ((Equation is included in full-text article.)age = 68.9 years; SD = 13.4) users of hearing aids completed a survey assessing attitudes toward health, hearing, and hearing aids, as well as a questionnaire assessing Big-Five personality factors (Openness to Experience, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism) either using paper and pencil or the Internet. In a follow-up study designed to replicate and extend the results from study 1, 161 adult ((Equation is included in full-text article.)age = 32.8 years; SD = 13.3) users of hearing aids completed a similar survey on the Internet. In study 2, participants also completed a measure of hearing aid benefit and reported the style of their hearing aid. In studies 1 and 2, perceived social support was significantly correlated with hearing aid satisfaction (respectively, r = 0.34, r = 0.51, ps < 0.001). The results of a regression analysis revealed that in study 1, 22% of the variance in hearing aid satisfaction scores was predicted by perceived social support, satisfaction with one's hearing health care provider, duration of daily hearing aid use, and openness. In study 2, 43% of the variance in hearing aid satisfaction was predicted by perceived social support, hearing aid benefit, neuroticism, and hearing aid style. Overall, perceived social support was the best predictor of hearing aid satisfaction in both studies. After controlling for response style (i.e., acquiescence or the tendency to respond positively), the correlation between perceived social support and hearing aid satisfaction remained the same in study 1 (r = 0.34, p < 0.001) and was lower in study 2 (r = 0.39, p < 0

  14. An introduction to hearing aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrlund, Ole

    2003-04-01

    This presentation reviews hearing-aid development from analog to advanced digital technology. A basic hearing aid consists of a microphone, an amplification circuit that provides a gain that varies with frequency to accommodate variations in hearing loss with frequency, and a small earphone. In recent years, hearing aid technology has developed rapidly. Digital hearing aids have become commonplace and their share of the marketplace is increasing rapidly. Therefore, the main focus of this talk is signal-processing schemes in advanced digital hearing aids, including microphones with digitally controlled directional characteristics, wide-dynamic-range compression in multiple channels that allow the compression characteristics to vary with frequency, noise reduction, and feedback cancellation. Each of these signal-processing functions help address the needs of individuals with hearing losses.

  15. Evaluation of Hearing Aid Frequency Response Fittings in Pediatric and Young Adult Bimodal Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lisa S.; Firszt, Jill B.; Brenner, Chris; Cadieux, Jamie H.

    2015-01-01

    Background A coordinated fitting of a cochlear implant (CI) and contralateral hearing aid (HA) for bimodal device use should emphasize balanced audibility and loudness across devices. However, guidelines for allocating frequency information to the CI and HA are not well established for the growing population of bimodal recipients. Purpose The study aim was to compare the effects of three different HA frequency responses, when fitting a CI and an HA for bimodal use, on speech recognition and localization in children/young adults. Specifically, the three frequency responses were wideband, restricted high frequency, and nonlinear frequency compression (NLFC), which were compared with measures of word recognition in quiet, sentence recognition in noise, talker discrimination, and sound localization. Research Design The HA frequency responses were evaluated using an A B1 A B2 test design: wideband frequency response (baseline-A), restricted high-frequency response (experimental-B1), and NLFC-activated (experimental-B2). All participants were allowed 3–4 weeks between each test session for acclimatization to each new HA setting. Bimodal benefit was determined by comparing the bimodal score to the CI-alone score. Study Sample Participants were 14 children and young adults (ages 7–21 yr) who were experienced users of bimodal devices. All had been unilaterally implanted with a Nucleus CI24 internal system and used either a Freedom or CP810 speech processor. All received a Phonak Naida IX UP behind-the-ear HA at the beginning of the study. Data Collection and Analysis Group results for the three bimodal conditions (HA frequency response with wideband, restricted high frequency, and NLFC) on each outcome measure were analyzed using a repeated measures analysis of variance. Group results using the individual “best bimodal” score were analyzed and confirmed using a resampling procedure. Correlation analyses examined the effects of audibility (aided and unaided hearing

  16. Restoration of hearing by hearing aids: conventional hearing aids – implantable hearing aids – cochlear implants – auditory brainstem implants

    PubMed Central

    Leuwer, R.; Müller, J.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this report is to explain the current concept of hearing restoration using hearing aids. At present the main issues of conventional hearing aids are the relative benefits of analogue versus digital devices and different strategies for the improvement of hearing in noise. Implantable hearing aids provide a better sound quality and less distortion. The lack of directional microphones is the major disadvantage of the partially implantable hearing aids commercially available. Two different clinical studies about fully implantable hearing aids have been started in 2004. One of the most-promising developments seems to be the electric-acoustic stimulation. PMID:22073051

  17. Frequency-Shift Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hearing aid maps spectrum of speech into band of lower frequencies at which ear remains sensitive. By redirecting normal speech frequencies into frequency band from 100 to 1,500 Hz, hearing aid allows people to understand normal conversation, including telephone calls. Principle operation of hearing aid adapted to other uses such as, clearing up noisy telephone or radio communication. In addition, loud-speakers more easily understood in presence of high background noise.

  18. Frequency-Shift Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hearing aid maps spectrum of speech into band of lower frequencies at which ear remains sensitive. By redirecting normal speech frequencies into frequency band from 100 to 1,500 Hz, hearing aid allows people to understand normal conversation, including telephone calls. Principle operation of hearing aid adapted to other uses such as, clearing up noisy telephone or radio communication. In addition, loud-speakers more easily understood in presence of high background noise.

  19. Satisfaction of Elderly Hearing Aid Users

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Lorena; Ribas, Angela; Almeida, Gleide; Luz, Idalina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The impact of auditory sensory deprivation in the life of an individual is enormous because it not only affects one's ability to properly understand auditory information, but also the way people relate to their environment and their culture. The monitoring of adult and elderly subjects with hearing loss is intended to minimize the difficulties and handicaps that occur as a consequence of this pathology. Objective To evaluate the level of user satisfaction with hearing aids. Methods A clinical and experimental study involving 91 elderly hearing aid users. We used the questionnaire Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life to determine the degree of the satisfaction provided by hearing aids. We evaluated mean global score, subscales, as well as the variables time to use, age, and degree of hearing loss. Results Mean global score was 4.73, the score for Positive Effects 5.45, Negative Factors 3.2, demonstrating that they were satisfied; Services and Costs 5.98: very satisfied ; 3.65 Personal Image: dissatisfied. We observed statistically significant difference for the time of hearing aid use, age, and degree of hearing loss. Conclusion The SADL is a tool, simple and easy to apply and in this study we can demonstrate the high degree of satisfaction with the hearing aids by the majority of the sample collected, increasing with time of use and a greater degree of hearing loss. PMID:28050214

  20. Satisfaction of Elderly Hearing Aid Users.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Lorena; Ribas, Angela; Almeida, Gleide; Luz, Idalina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The impact of auditory sensory deprivation in the life of an individual is enormous because it not only affects one's ability to properly understand auditory information, but also the way people relate to their environment and their culture. The monitoring of adult and elderly subjects with hearing loss is intended to minimize the difficulties and handicaps that occur as a consequence of this pathology. Objective To evaluate the level of user satisfaction with hearing aids. Methods A clinical and experimental study involving 91 elderly hearing aid users. We used the questionnaire Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life to determine the degree of the satisfaction provided by hearing aids. We evaluated mean global score, subscales, as well as the variables time to use, age, and degree of hearing loss. Results Mean global score was 4.73, the score for Positive Effects 5.45, Negative Factors 3.2, demonstrating that they were satisfied; Services and Costs 5.98: very satisfied ; 3.65 Personal Image: dissatisfied. We observed statistically significant difference for the time of hearing aid use, age, and degree of hearing loss. Conclusion The SADL is a tool, simple and easy to apply and in this study we can demonstrate the high degree of satisfaction with the hearing aids by the majority of the sample collected, increasing with time of use and a greater degree of hearing loss.

  1. Auditory Distraction and Acclimatization to Hearing Aids.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Piers; Munro, Kevin J

    It is widely recognized by hearing aid users and audiologists that a period of auditory acclimatization and adjustment is needed for new users to become accustomed to their devices. The aim of the present study was to test the idea that auditory acclimatization and adjustment to hearing aids involves a process of learning to "tune out" newly audible but undesirable sounds, which are described by new hearing aid users as annoying and distracting. It was hypothesized that (1) speech recognition thresholds in noise would improve over time for new hearing aid users, (2) distractibility to noise would reduce over time for new hearing aid users, (3) there would be a correlation between improved speech recognition in noise and reduced distractibility to background sounds, (4) improvements in speech recognition and distraction would be accompanied by self-report of reduced annoyance, and (5) improvements in speech recognition and distraction would be associated with higher general cognitive ability and more hearing aid use. New adult hearing aid users (n = 35) completed a test of aided speech recognition in noise (SIN) and a test of auditory distraction by background sound amplified by hearing aids on the day of fitting and 1, 7, 14, and 30 days post fitting. At day 30, participants completed self-ratings of the annoyance of amplified sounds. Daily hearing aid use was measured via hearing aid data logging, and cognitive ability was measured with the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence block design test. A control group of experienced hearing aid users (n = 20) completed the tests over a similar time frame. At day 30, there was no statistically significant improvement in SIN among new users versus experienced users. However, levels of hearing loss and hearing aid use varied widely among new users. A subset of new users with moderate hearing loss who wore their hearing aids at least 6 hr/day (n = 10) had significantly improved SIN (by ~3-dB signal to noise ratio

  2. Why do people fitted with hearing aids not wear them?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Age-related hearing loss is an increasingly important public health problem affecting approximately 40% of 55–74 year olds. The primary clinical management intervention for people with hearing loss is hearing aids, however, the majority (80%) of adults aged 55–74 years who would benefit from a hearing aid, do not use them. Furthermore, many people given a hearing aid do not wear it. The aim was to collate the available evidence as to the potential reasons for non-use of hearing aids among people who have been fitted with at least one. Design: Data were gathered via the use of a scoping study. Study sample: A comprehensive search strategy identified 10 articles reporting reasons for non-use of hearing aids. Results: A number of reasons were given, including hearing aid value, fit and comfort and maintenance of the hearing aid, attitude, device factors, financial reasons, psycho-social/situational factors, healthcare professionals attitudes, ear problems, and appearance. Conclusions: The most important issues were around hearing aid value, i.e. the hearing aid not providing enough benefit, and comfort related to wearing the hearing aid. Identifying factors that affect hearing aid usage are necessary for devising appropriate rehabilitation strategies to ensure greater use of hearing aids. PMID:23473329

  3. Fit to targets, preferred listening levels, and self-reported outcomes for the DSL v5.0 a hearing aid prescription for adults.

    PubMed

    Polonenko, Melissa J; Scollie, Susan D; Moodie, Sheila; Seewald, Richard C; Laurnagaray, Diana; Shantz, Juliane; Richards, Andrea

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated how closely the DSL v5.0 a prescription could be approximated with hearing aids, its relationship to preferred listening levels (PLLs) of adults with acquired hearing loss, and the self-reported outcomes of the resulting fittings. Thirty adults with varying degrees and configurations of hearing loss ranging from mild to severe. Hearing aid output was measured after the initial fitting to DSL v5.0 a targets and after determination of the PLL after approximately 90 days. The Client Oriented Scale of Improvement (COSI) was used to evaluate outcome. The 95% confidence interval of fits to target ranged from 5.8 to 8.4 dB across frequency. The DSL v5.0 a adult algorithm approximated the PLLs of the participants within 2.6 dB on average. Hearing aid fittings provided positive subjective outcome improvements on the COSI. Findings suggest that the use of DSL v5.0 a for the fitting of hearing aids on adults with acquired hearing loss was feasible and provided an appropriate initial fitting.

  4. Hearing aid and hearing assistance technology use in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Kelly-Campbell, Rebecca J; Lessoway, Kamea

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe factors that are related to hearing aid and hearing assistance technology ownership and use in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Adults with hearing impairment living in New Zealand were surveyed regarding health-related quality of life and device usage. Audiometric data (hearing sensitivity and speech in noise) were collected. Data were obtained from 123 adults with hearing impairment: 73 reported current hearing-aid use, 81 reported current hearing assistance technology use. In both analyses, device users had more difficulty understanding speech in background noise, had poor hearing in both their better and worse hearing ears, and perceived more consequences of hearing impairment in their everyday lives (both emotionally and socially) than non-hearing-aid users. Discriminant analyses showed that the social consequences of hearing impairment and the better ear hearing best classified hearing aid users from non-users but social consequences and worse ear hearing best classified hearing assistance technology users from non-users. Quality of life measurements and speech-in-noise assessments provide useful clinical information. Hearing-impaired adults in New Zealand who use hearing aids also tend to use hearing assistance technology, which has important clinical implications.

  5. The Effects of Service-Delivery Model and Purchase Price on Hearing-Aid Outcomes in Older Adults: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Humes, Larry E; Rogers, Sara E; Quigley, Tera M; Main, Anna K; Kinney, Dana L; Herring, Christine

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine efficacy of hearing aids in older adults using audiology best practices, to evaluate the efficacy of an alternative over-the-counter (OTC) intervention, and to examine the influence of purchase price on outcomes for both service-delivery models. The design of this study was a single-site, prospective, double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial with three parallel branches: (a) audiology best practices (AB), (b) consumer decides OTC model (CD), and (c) placebo devices (P). Outcome measures were obtained after a typical 6-week trial period with follow-up 4-week AB-based trial for those initially assigned to CD and P groups. Older adults from the general community were recruited via newspaper and community flyers to participate at a university research clinic. Participants were adults, ages 55-79 years, with mild-to-moderate hearing loss. There were 188 eligible participants: 163 enrolled as a volunteer sample, and 154 completed the intervention. All participants received the same high-end digital mini-behind-the-ear hearing aids fitted bilaterally. AB and P groups received best-practice services from audiologists; differing mainly in use of appropriate (AB) or placebo (P) hearing aid settings. CD participants self-selected their own pre-programmed hearing aids via an OTC model. Primary outcome measure was a 66-item self-report, Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (Cox & Gilmore, 1990). Secondary outcome measure was the Connected Speech Test (Cox, Alexander, & Gilmore, 1987) benefit. Additional measures of hearing-aid benefit, satisfaction, and usage were also obtained. Per-protocol analyses were performed. AB service-delivery model was found to be efficacious for most of the outcome measures, with moderate or large effect sizes (Cohen's d). CD service-delivery model was efficacious, with similar effect sizes. However, CD group had a significantly (p < .05) lower satisfaction and percentage (CD: 55%; AB: 81%; P: 36

  6. The Effects of Service-Delivery Model and Purchase Price on Hearing-Aid Outcomes in Older Adults: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Sara E.; Quigley, Tera M.; Main, Anna K.; Kinney, Dana L.; Herring, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine efficacy of hearing aids in older adults using audiology best practices, to evaluate the efficacy of an alternative over-the-counter (OTC) intervention, and to examine the influence of purchase price on outcomes for both service-delivery models. Design The design of this study was a single-site, prospective, double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial with three parallel branches: (a) audiology best practices (AB), (b) consumer decides OTC model (CD), and (c) placebo devices (P). Outcome measures were obtained after a typical 6-week trial period with follow-up 4-week AB-based trial for those initially assigned to CD and P groups. Setting Older adults from the general community were recruited via newspaper and community flyers to participate at a university research clinic. Participants Participants were adults, ages 55–79 years, with mild-to-moderate hearing loss. There were 188 eligible participants: 163 enrolled as a volunteer sample, and 154 completed the intervention. Intervention(s) All participants received the same high-end digital mini-behind-the-ear hearing aids fitted bilaterally. AB and P groups received best-practice services from audiologists; differing mainly in use of appropriate (AB) or placebo (P) hearing aid settings. CD participants self-selected their own pre-programmed hearing aids via an OTC model. Primary and Secondary Outcome Measures Primary outcome measure was a 66-item self-report, Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (Cox & Gilmore, 1990). Secondary outcome measure was the Connected Speech Test (Cox, Alexander, & Gilmore, 1987) benefit. Additional measures of hearing-aid benefit, satisfaction, and usage were also obtained. Results Per-protocol analyses were performed. AB service-delivery model was found to be efficacious for most of the outcome measures, with moderate or large effect sizes (Cohen's d). CD service-delivery model was efficacious, with similar effect sizes. However

  7. A Cheaper Alternative to Hearing Aids?

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_167033.html A Cheaper Alternative to Hearing Aids? Devices performed almost as well and are much ... almost 30 million people could benefit from hearing aids. But hearing aids can cost thousands of dollars, ...

  8. Perceived Benefit From Hearing Aid Use and Life-Space Mobility Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Polku, Hannele; Mikkola, Tuija M; Gagné, Jean-Pierre; Rantakokko, Merja; Portegijs, Erja; Rantanen, Taina; Viljanen, Anne

    2016-12-01

    To examine the association between perceived benefit from hearing aid (HA) use and life-space mobility among older adults. Cross-sectional analysis of 76- to 91-year-old community-dwelling adults ( n = 702). Data on perceived hearing with and without a HA were obtained via postal questionnaire and data on life-space mobility (Life-Space Assessment, range = 0-120) via phone interview. Participants who perceived more benefit from HA use, had a better life-space mobility score ( M = 65, SD = 2.6) than participants who had less benefit from using a HA ( M = 55, SD = 3.2). Participants who benefitted more from HA use did not differ from those who did not have a HA ( M = 63, SD = 0.9) in their life-space mobility score. Perceived benefit from HA use is associated with higher life-space mobility among community-dwelling older adults. Future studies are needed to examine whether use of an appropriate HA promotes life-space mobility among those with difficulties in hearing.

  9. A systematic review of studies measuring and reporting hearing aid usage in older adults since 1999: a descriptive summary of measurement tools.

    PubMed

    Perez, Elvira; Edmonds, Barrie A

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify and quality assess how studies published since 1999 have measured and reported the usage of hearing aids in older adults. The relationship between usage and other dimensions of hearing aid outcome, age and hearing loss are summarised. Articles were identified through systematic searches in PubMed/MEDLINE, The University of Nottingham Online Catalogue, Web of Science and through reference checking. (1) participants aged fifty years or over with sensori-neural hearing loss, (2) provision of an air conduction hearing aid, (3) inclusion of hearing aid usage measure(s) and (4) published between 1999 and 2011. Of the initial 1933 papers obtained from the searches, a total of 64 were found eligible for review and were quality assessed on six dimensions: study design, choice of outcome instruments, level of reporting (usage, age, and audiometry) and cross validation of usage measures. Five papers were rated as being of high quality (scoring 10-12), 35 papers were rated as being of moderate quality (scoring 7-9), 22 as low quality (scoring 4-6) and two as very low quality (scoring 0-2). Fifteen different methods were identified for assessing the usage of hearing aids. Generally, the usage data reviewed was not well specified. There was a lack of consistency and robustness in the way that usage of hearing aids was assessed and categorised. There is a need for more standardised level of reporting of hearing aid usage data to further understand the relationship between usage and hearing aid outcomes.

  10. A Systematic Review of Studies Measuring and Reporting Hearing Aid Usage in Older Adults since 1999: A Descriptive Summary of Measurement Tools

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elvira; Edmonds, Barrie A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective A systematic review was conducted to identify and quality assess how studies published since 1999 have measured and reported the usage of hearing aids in older adults. The relationship between usage and other dimensions of hearing aid outcome, age and hearing loss are summarised. Data sources Articles were identified through systematic searches in PubMed/MEDLINE, The University of Nottingham Online Catalogue, Web of Science and through reference checking. Study eligibility criteria: (1) participants aged fifty years or over with sensori-neural hearing loss, (2) provision of an air conduction hearing aid, (3) inclusion of hearing aid usage measure(s) and (4) published between 1999 and 2011. Results Of the initial 1933 papers obtained from the searches, a total of 64 were found eligible for review and were quality assessed on six dimensions: study design, choice of outcome instruments, level of reporting (usage, age, and audiometry) and cross validation of usage measures. Five papers were rated as being of high quality (scoring 10–12), 35 papers were rated as being of moderate quality (scoring 7–9), 22 as low quality (scoring 4–6) and two as very low quality (scoring 0–2). Fifteen different methods were identified for assessing the usage of hearing aids. Conclusions Generally, the usage data reviewed was not well specified. There was a lack of consistency and robustness in the way that usage of hearing aids was assessed and categorised. There is a need for more standardised level of reporting of hearing aid usage data to further understand the relationship between usage and hearing aid outcomes. PMID:22479312

  11. [Implantable middle ear hearing aids].

    PubMed

    à Wengen, D F

    2004-01-01

    Conventional acoustic hearing aids are limited in their performance. Due to physical laws their amplification of sound is limited to within 5 kHz. However, the frequencies between 5 and 10 kHz are essential for understanding consonants. Words can only be understood correctly if their consonants can be understood. Furthermore noise amplification remains a problem with hearing aids. Other problems consist of recurrent infections of the external auditory canal, intolerance for occlusion of the ear canal, feedback noise, and resonances in speech or singing. Implantable middle ear hearing aids like the Soundbridge of Symphonix-Siemens and the MET of Otologics offer improved amplification and a more natural sound. Since the first implantation of a Soundbridge in Switzerland in 1996 almost one thousand patients have been implanted worldwide. The currents systems are semi-implantable. The external audio processor containing the microphone, computer chip, battery and radio system is worn in the hair bearing area behind the ear. Implantation is only considered after unsuccessful fitting of conventional hearing aids. In Switzerland the cost for these implantable hearing aids is covered by social insurances. Initially the cost for an implant is higher than for hearing aids. However, hearing aids need replacement every 5 or 6 years whereas implants will last 20 to 30 years. Due to the superior sound quality and the improved understanding of speech in noise, the number of patients with implantable hearing aids will certainly increase in the next years. Other middle ear implants are in clinical testing.

  12. Identifying the barriers and facilitators to optimal hearing aid self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Carly; Hickson, Louise; Fletcher, Amanda

    2014-02-01

    Many older adults with hearing impairment are not confident in their ability to use hearing aids (i.e. experience low hearing aid self-efficacy), which has been found to be a barrier to hearing help-seeking and hearing aid use. This study aimed to determine what factors were associated with achieving adequate hearing aid self-efficacy. A retrospective research design was employed wherein hearing aid self-efficacy was the primary outcome. Explanatory variables included personal demographics, visual disability, and experiences related to participants' hearing ability and hearing aids. A total of 307 older adults with hearing impairment participated in the study (147 non hearing aid owners and 160 hearing aid owners). Non-hearing aid owners were more likely to report adequate hearing aid self-efficacy if they reported no visual disability, had experienced hearing loss for longer, reported more positive support from a significant other, and were not anxious about wearing hearing aids. Hearing aid owners were more likely to report adequate hearing aid self-efficacy if they had had a positive hearing aid experience and no visual disability. More research is needed to develop and evaluate intervention approaches that promote optimal levels of hearing aid self-efficacy among older adults with hearing impairment.

  13. Contribution of a Contralateral Hearing Aid to Perception of Consonant Voicing, Intonation, and Emotional State in Adult Cochlear Implantees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Gaon-Sivan, Gal; Shpak, Talma; Luntz, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Binaural hearing in cochlear implant (CI) users can be achieved either by bilateral implantation or bimodally with a contralateral hearing aid (HA). Binaural-bimodal hearing has the advantage of complementing the high-frequency electric information from the CI by low-frequency acoustic information from the HA. We examined the contribution of a…

  14. Hearing aid malfunction detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessinger, R. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A malfunction detection system for detecting malfunctions in electrical signal processing circuits is disclosed. Malfunctions of a hearing aid in the form of frequency distortion and/or inadequate amplification by the hearing aid amplifier, as well as weakening of the hearing aid power supply are detectable. A test signal is generated and a timed switching circuit periodically applies the test signal to the input of the hearing aid amplifier in place of the input signal from the microphone. The resulting amplifier output is compared with the input test signal used as a reference signal. The hearing aid battery voltage is also periodically compared to a reference voltage. Deviations from the references beyond preset limits cause a warning system to operate.

  15. Improvement of Adult BTE Hearing Aid Wearers' Front/Back Localization Performance Using Digital Pinna-Cue Preserving Technologies: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Han, Woojae

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review evaluated the impact of using digital pinna-cue preserving technologies (PPT) on front/back sound localization for adult hearing aid users. Two peer-reviewed studies and two non-peer-reviewed studies were included. Lab-based and self-report outcomes were both assessed. The overall findings suggested that PPT was superior to omni-directional and full directional settings in a relatively quiet, well-controlled laboratory environment but not in the real world. However, observed individual differences in self-report measures suggested that PPT was potentially beneficial to certain hearing aid users. PPT candidacy was discussed and the importance of a pre-fitting interview/consultation was emphasized to assist clinicians in making a solid evidence-based and cost-effectiveness decision when prescribing hearing aids to adults with hearing impairment.

  16. Contralateral acoustic hearing aid use in adult unilateral cochlear implant recipients: Current provision, practice, and clinical experience in the UK.

    PubMed

    Fielden, Claire A; Kitterick, Pádraig T

    2016-05-01

    The study surveyed practising cochlear implant (CI) audiologists with the aim of: (1) characterizing UK clinical practice around the management and fitting of a contralateral hearing aid (HA) in adult unilateral CI users ('bimodal aiding'); (2) identifying factors that may limit the provision of bimodal aiding; and (3) ascertaining the views of audiologists on bimodal aiding. An online survey was distributed to audiologists working at the 20 centres providing implantation services to adults in the UK. Responses were received from 19 of the 20 centres. The majority of centres reported evaluating HAs as part of the candidacy assessment for cochlear implantation. However, a majority also indicated that they do not take responsibility for the contralateral HA following implantation, despite identifying few practical limiting factors. Bimodal aiding was viewed as more beneficial than wearing the implant alone, with most respondents actively encouraging bimodal listening where possible. Respondents reported that fitting bimodal devices to take account of each other's settings was potentially more beneficial than independently fit devices, but such sympathetic fitting was not routine practice in any centre. The results highlight some potential inconsistencies in the provision of bimodal aiding across the UK as reported by practising audiologists. The views of audiologists about what is best practice appear to be at odds with the nature and structure of the services currently offered. Stronger evidence that bimodal aiding can be beneficial for UK patients would be required in order for service providers to justify the routine provision of bimodal aiding and to inform guidelines to shape routine clinical practice.

  17. Benefit of Wearing a Hearing Aid on the Unimplanted Ear in Adult Users of a Cochlear Implant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Camille C.; Tyler, Richard S.; Witt, Shelley A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to document performance of participants wearing a cochlear implant and hearing aid in opposite ears on speech-perception and localization tests. Twelve individuals who wore a cochlear implant and a hearing aid on contralateral ears were tested on their abilities to understand words in quiet and sentences in…

  18. Benefit of Wearing a Hearing Aid on the Unimplanted Ear in Adult Users of a Cochlear Implant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Camille C.; Tyler, Richard S.; Witt, Shelley A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to document performance of participants wearing a cochlear implant and hearing aid in opposite ears on speech-perception and localization tests. Twelve individuals who wore a cochlear implant and a hearing aid on contralateral ears were tested on their abilities to understand words in quiet and sentences in…

  19. Impact of compression and hearing aid style on directional hearing aid benefit and performance.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, T; Lindley, G; Henry, P

    2001-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of low-threshold compression and hearing aid style (in-the-ear [ITE] versus behind-the-ear [BTE]) on the directional benefit and performance of commercially available directional hearing aids. Forty-seven adult listeners with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss were fit bilaterally with one BTE and four different ITE hearing aids. Speech recognition performance was measured through the Connected Speech Test (CST) and Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) for a simulated noisy restaurant environment. For both the HINT and CST, speech recognition performance was significantly greater for subjects fit with directional in comparison with omnidirectional microphone hearing aids. Performance was significantly poorer for the BTE instrument in comparison with the ITE hearing aids when using omnidirectional microphones. No differences were found for directional benefit between compression and linear fitting schemes. No systematic relationship was found between the relative directional benefit and hearing aid style; however, the speech recognition performance of the subjects was somewhat predictable based on Directivity Index measures of the individual hearing aid models. The fact that compression did not interact significantly with microphone type agrees well with previously reported electroacoustic data.

  20. Can audiometric results predict qualitative hearing improvements in bone-anchored hearing aid recipients?

    PubMed

    McNeil, M L; Gulliver, M; Morris, D P; Makki, F M; Bance, M

    2014-01-01

    Patients receiving a bone-anchored hearing aid have well-documented improvements in their quality of life and audiometric performance. However, the relationship between audiometric measurements and subjective improvement is not well understood. Adult patients enrolled in the Nova Scotia bone-anchored hearing aid programme were identified. The pure tone average for fitting the sound-field threshold, as well as the better and worse hearing ear bone conduction and air conduction levels, were collected pre-operatively. Recipients were asked to complete the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing questionnaire; their partners were asked to complete a pre- and post-bone anchored hearing aid fitting Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults questionnaire. Forty-eight patients who completed and returned the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing questionnaire had partners who completed the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults questionnaire. The results from the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing questionnaire correlated with the sound-field hearing threshold post-bone-anchored hearing aid fitting and the pure tone average of the better hearing ear bone conduction (total Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale to the pre-operative better hearing ear air curve (r = 0.3); worse hearing ear air curve (r = 0.27); post-operative, bone-anchored hearing aid-aided sound-field thresholds (r = 0.35)). An improvement in sound-field threshold correlated only with spatial abilities. In the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults questionnaire, there was no correlation between the subjective evaluation of each patient and their partner. The subjective impressions of hearing aid recipients with regards to speech reception and the spatial qualities of hearing correlate well with pre-operative audiometric results. However, the overall magnitude of sound-field improvement predicts an improvement of spatial perception, but not other aspects of hearing, resulting in hearing aid

  1. Hearing Aids and Hearing Impaired Students in Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodford, Charles

    This paper describes functions of the components of hearing aids and provides a detailed procedure to detect hearing aid dysfunctions. The most common type of hearing aids for school children are the behind the ear type. Various hearing aid components change sound into an electrical signal, which is amplified and adjusted by a volume control. The…

  2. The impact of self-efficacy, expectations, and readiness on hearing aid outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Melanie A; Woolley, Annie; Munro, Kevin J

    2016-07-01

    To examine the impact of self-efficacy and expectations for hearing aids, and readiness to improve hearing, on hearing aid outcome measures in first-time adult hearing aid users Design: A prospective, single centre design. Predictor variables measured at the hearing assessment included measures of self-efficacy, expectations and readiness to improve hearing. Outcome measures obtained at six-week follow-up were the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile and Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life. A sample of 30 first-time adult hearing aid users were recruited through a public-sector funded audiology clinic. When measured prior to hearing aid fitting, self-efficacy for hearing aids predicted satisfaction with hearing aids but was not related to other hearing aid outcomes. Expectations of hearing aids, in particular positive expectations, and readiness to improve hearing predicted outcomes for hearing aid satisfaction and benefit, although not hearing aid use. Hearing sensitivity was not correlated with hearing aid outcomes. These results suggest that assessment of expectations of hearing aids, and readiness to improve hearing, may be useful to help identify individuals attending audiology clinics who would most likely benefit from hearing aid provision.

  3. Autonomous motivation is associated with hearing aid adoption.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Jason; Hickson, Louise; Lind, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    To use the self-determination theory of motivation to investigate whether different forms of motivation were associated with adults' decisions whether or not to adopt hearing aids. A quantitative approach was used in this cohort study. Participants completed the treatment self-regulation questionnaire (TSRQ), which measured autonomous and controlled motivation for hearing aid adoption. Sociodemographic data and audiometric information were also obtained. Participants were 253 adults who had sought information about their hearing but had not consulted with a hearing professional. Participants were categorized as hearing aid adopters if they had been fitted with hearing aids 4-6 months after completing the TSRQ, and as non-adopters if they had not. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between autonomous and controlled motivation, sociodemographic and audiometric variables, and hearing aid adoption (n = 160). Three factors were significantly associated with increased hearing aid adoption when the influence of other variables was accounted for: autonomous motivation, perceived hearing difficulty, and poorer hearing. Controlled motivation was not found to influence hearing aid adoption. These empirical findings that link autonomous motivation to decisions of hearing help-seekers have implications for the ways practitioners may evaluate motivation and could inform discussions with clients about hearing aid adoption.

  4. The hearing aid effect in 2013.

    PubMed

    Rauterkus, Erik P; Palmer, Catherine V

    2014-10-01

    The hearing aid effect is the term used to describe the assignment of negative attributes to individuals using hearing aids. The effect was first empirically identified in 1977 when it was reported that adults rating young children with and without hearing aids assigned negative attributes to the children depicted with hearing aids. Investigations in the 1980s and 1990s reported mixed results related to the extent of the hearing aid effect but continued to identify, on average, some negative attributes assigned to individuals wearing hearing aids. The specific aim of this research was to investigate whether the hearing aid effect has diminished in the past several decades by replicating the methods of previous studies for testing the hearing aid effect while using updated devices. Five device configurations were rated across eight attributes. RESULTS for each attribute were considered separately. A total of 24 adults judged pictures of young men wearing various ear level technologies across 8 attributes on a 7-point Likert scale. Five young men between ages 15 and 17 yr were photographed wearing each of five device configurations including (1) a standard-sized behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid coupled to an earmold with #13 tubing, (2) a mini-BTE hearing aid with a slim tube open-fit configuration, (3) a completely-in-the-canal hearing aid that could not be seen because of its location in the ear canal, (4) an earbud, and (5) a Bluetooth receiver. The 24 raters saw pictures of each of the 5 young men with each wearing one of the 5 devices so that devices and young men were never judged twice by the same observer. All judgments of each device, regardless of the young man modeling the device, were combined in the data analysis. The effect of device types on judgments was tested using a one-way between-participant analysis of variance. There was a significant difference on the judgment of age and trustworthiness level among the five devices. However, our post hoc

  5. Learning Aids for the Hearing Impaired Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Learning Resource Center of Pennsylvania, King of Prussia.

    Intended for parents, the booklet provides a practical guide to the types of learning aids that are helpful to the hearing impaired child. Sections cover the following: an explanation of residual hearing; types of hearing aids and hearing aid equipment; language development aids (brief descriptions are provided for materials in beginning language,…

  6. Restaurant noise, hearing loss, and hearing aids.

    PubMed Central

    Lebo, C P; Smith, M F; Mosher, E R; Jelonek, S J; Schwind, D R; Decker, K E; Krusemark, H J; Kurz, P L

    1994-01-01

    Our multidisciplinary team obtained noise data in 27 San Francisco Bay Area restaurants. These data included typical minimum, peak, and average sound pressure levels; digital tape recordings; subjective noise ratings; and on-site unaided and aided speech discrimination tests. We report the details and implications of these noise measurements and provide basic information on selecting hearing aids and suggestions for coping with restaurant noise. Images PMID:7941506

  7. Restaurant noise, hearing loss, and hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Lebo, C P; Smith, M F; Mosher, E R; Jelonek, S J; Schwind, D R; Decker, K E; Krusemark, H J; Kurz, P L

    1994-07-01

    Our multidisciplinary team obtained noise data in 27 San Francisco Bay Area restaurants. These data included typical minimum, peak, and average sound pressure levels; digital tape recordings; subjective noise ratings; and on-site unaided and aided speech discrimination tests. We report the details and implications of these noise measurements and provide basic information on selecting hearing aids and suggestions for coping with restaurant noise.

  8. A Hearing Aid Primer 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yetter, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    This hearing aid primer is designed to define the differences among the three levels of hearing instrument technology: conventional analog circuit technology (most basic), digitally programmable/analog circuit technology (moderately advanced), and fully digital technology (most advanced). Both moderate and advanced technologies mean that hearing…

  9. A Hearing Aid Primer 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yetter, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    This hearing aid primer is designed to define the differences among the three levels of hearing instrument technology: conventional analog circuit technology (most basic), digitally programmable/analog circuit technology (moderately advanced), and fully digital technology (most advanced). Both moderate and advanced technologies mean that hearing…

  10. Preliminary support for a brief psychological intervention to improve first-time hearing aid use among adults.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Christopher J; Lees, Deborah; Lewis, Kathryn; Munro, Kevin J

    2017-05-09

    Suboptimal hearing aid use extorts significant social, health, and economic costs. The aims of this study were to (1) test the novel hypothesis that the threat associated with being diagnosed with hearing loss could be ameliorated with a self-affirmation manipulation and (2) gauge the feasibility of deploying the manipulation in routine clinical practice. Parallel groups randomized controlled trial with 10-week follow-up. Fifty people, newly prescribed with a hearing aid, completed either a questionnaire that included a brief self-affirming exercise or an identical questionnaire with no self-affirming exercise. The main outcome measure was derived from data logging automatically stored by the hearing aid. Perceived threat ('anxiety about ageing'), behavioural intention, and self-efficacy were measured as potential mediators. Objectively measured hours of daily hearing aid use were marginally higher in the intervention group compared with the control group (between-group difference = 1.94 hr, 95%CI = -1.24, 5.12, d = 0.43). At follow-up, participants in the intervention group were significantly less anxious about ageing and more accepting of older people than were participants in the control group (between-group difference = 0.75, 95%CI = 0.26, 1.22, d = 0.87). There was no statistically significant effect of the intervention on behavioural intention or self-efficacy. Although not statistically significant, the magnitude of the effect of the intervention on hearing aid use (d = 0.43) suggests that it would be worthwhile working towards a fully powered randomized controlled trial. The ability to reduce anxieties about ageing with this brief intervention could have far-reaching benefits for multiple patient and general population groups. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Hearing impairment is more disabling than diabetes, yet hearing aid use is suboptimal. Anxieties about ageing may undermine hearing aid use. What does

  11. A naturalistic approach to assessing hearing aid candidacy and motivating hearing aid use.

    PubMed

    Walden, Therese C; Walden, Brian E; Summers, Van; Grant, Ken W

    2009-01-01

    Although the benefits of amplification for persons with impaired hearing are well established, many potential candidates do not obtain and use hearing aids. In some cases, this is because the individual is not convinced that amplification will be of sufficient benefit in those everyday listening situations where he or she is experiencing difficulties. To describe the development of a naturalistic approach to assessing hearing aid candidacy and motivating hearing aid use based on patient preferences for unamplified and amplified sound samples typical of those encountered in everyday living and to assess the validity of these preference ratings to predict hearing aid candidacy. Prospective experimental study comparing preference ratings for unamplified and amplified sound samples of patients with a clinical recommendation for hearing aid use and patients for whom amplification was not prescribed. Forty-eight adults self-referred to the Army Audiology and Speech Center for a hearing evaluation. Unamplified and amplified sound samples were presented to potential hearing aid candidates using a three-alternative forced-choice paradigm. Participants were free to switch at will among the three processing options (no gain, mild gain, moderate gain) until the preferred option was determined. Following this task, each participant was seen for a diagnostic hearing evaluation by one of eight staff audiologists with no knowledge of the preference data. Patient preferences for the three processing options were used to predict the attending audiologists' recommendations for amplification based on traditional audiometric measures. Hearing aid candidacy was predicted with moderate accuracy from the patients' preferences for amplified sounds typical of those encountered in everyday living, although the predictive validity of the various sound samples varied widely. Preferences for amplified sounds were generally predictive of hearing aid candidacy. However, the predictive validity of

  12. Exploring Hearing Aid Problems: Perspectives of Hearing Aid Owners and Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Rebecca J; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Meyer, Carly J; Eikelboom, Robert H

    2017-08-03

    To gather perspectives of hearing aid owners and hearing healthcare clinicians with regard to problems that arise after hearing aid fitting and use these perspectives to generate a conceptual framework to gain a better understanding of these problems. Participants included a group of 17 hearing aid owners and a group of 21 hearing healthcare clinicians; data collection occurred separately for each group. Participants each attended two group sessions in Perth, Western Australia, wherein they: (1) generated statements describing the problems associated with hearing aids and (2) grouped and rated the statements to identify key themes. Concept mapping was used to generate a conceptual framework. Participants identified four concepts regarding hearing aid problems as follows: (1) hearing aid management; (2) hearing aid sound quality and performance; (3) feelings, thoughts, and behaviors; and (4) information and training. While hearing aid owners and clinicians generated similar results regarding the concepts derived, the clinicians reported that the problems identified had a greater negative impact on hearing aid success than did hearing aid owners. The magnitude and diversity of hearing aid problems identified in this study highlight the ongoing challenges that hearing aid owners face and suggest that current processes for hearing aid fitting can be improved. Problems relating to hearing aid management were most often deemed to have the greatest impact on hearing aid success and be the most preventable/solvable, and thus are a good starting point when addressing hearing aid-related problems.

  13. Different Styles of Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... aids available and offer some cosmetic and listening advantages. Photo courtesy of Phonak Click for larger image ... in place. These aids offer cosmetic and listening advantages and are used typically for adults. Photo courtesy ...

  14. Hearing loss and cognition: the role of hearing AIDS, social isolation and depression.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Piers; Emsley, Richard; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Moore, David R; Fortnum, Heather; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; McCormack, Abby; Munro, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is associated with poor cognitive performance and incident dementia and may contribute to cognitive decline. Treating hearing loss with hearing aids may ameliorate cognitive decline. The purpose of this study was to test whether use of hearing aids was associated with better cognitive performance, and if this relationship was mediated via social isolation and/or depression. Structural equation modelling of associations between hearing loss, cognitive performance, social isolation, depression and hearing aid use was carried out with a subsample of the UK Biobank data set (n = 164,770) of UK adults aged 40 to 69 years who completed a hearing test. Age, sex, general health and socioeconomic status were controlled for as potential confounders. Hearing aid use was associated with better cognition, independently of social isolation and depression. This finding was consistent with the hypothesis that hearing aids may improve cognitive performance, although if hearing aids do have a positive effect on cognition it is not likely to be via reduction of the adverse effects of hearing loss on social isolation or depression. We suggest that any positive effects of hearing aid use on cognition may be via improvement in audibility or associated increases in self-efficacy. Alternatively, positive associations between hearing aid use and cognition may be accounted for by more cognitively able people seeking and using hearing aids. Further research is required to determine the direction of association, if there is any direct causal relationship between hearing aid use and better cognition, and whether hearing aid use results in reduction in rates of cognitive decline measured longitudinally.

  15. Hearing Loss and Cognition: The Role of Hearing Aids, Social Isolation and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Piers; Emsley, Richard; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Moore, David R.; Fortnum, Heather; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; McCormack, Abby; Munro, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is associated with poor cognitive performance and incident dementia and may contribute to cognitive decline. Treating hearing loss with hearing aids may ameliorate cognitive decline. The purpose of this study was to test whether use of hearing aids was associated with better cognitive performance, and if this relationship was mediated via social isolation and/or depression. Structural equation modelling of associations between hearing loss, cognitive performance, social isolation, depression and hearing aid use was carried out with a subsample of the UK Biobank data set (n = 164,770) of UK adults aged 40 to 69 years who completed a hearing test. Age, sex, general health and socioeconomic status were controlled for as potential confounders. Hearing aid use was associated with better cognition, independently of social isolation and depression. This finding was consistent with the hypothesis that hearing aids may improve cognitive performance, although if hearing aids do have a positive effect on cognition it is not likely to be via reduction of the adverse effects of hearing loss on social isolation or depression. We suggest that any positive effects of hearing aid use on cognition may be via improvement in audibility or associated increases in self-efficacy. Alternatively, positive associations between hearing aid use and cognition may be accounted for by more cognitively able people seeking and using hearing aids. Further research is required to determine the direction of association, if there is any direct causal relationship between hearing aid use and better cognition, and whether hearing aid use results in reduction in rates of cognitive decline measured longitudinally. PMID:25760329

  16. Disability, handicap and benefit analysis with the bone-anchored hearing aid: the Glasgow hearing aid benefit and difference profiles.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Ann-Louise; Dutt, Sunil N; Tziambazis, Elia; Reid, Andrew P; Proops, David W

    2002-01-01

    The Birmingham bone-anchored hearing aid programme began in 1988 and by autumn 2000 a total of 351 patients had been fitted with such an aid. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of hearing rehabilitation with the bone-anchored hearing aid. This was a prospective interview-based questionnaire study carried out in the autumn 2000. A total of 84 adult patients were interviewed. Each patient had worn their BAHA for more than one year. The questionnaire used during these interviews was the Glasgow hearing aid benefit profile (GHABP) and the Glasgow hearing aid difference profile (GHADP). This was first derived and validated by Gatehouse in 1999. The use of bone-anchored hearing aids was found to reduce the level of disability and handicap and provided the most patient benefit and satisfaction.

  17. Evaluation of Speech-Evoked Envelope Following Responses as an Objective Aided Outcome Measure: Effect of Stimulus Level, Bandwidth, and Amplification in Adults With Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Easwar, Vijayalakshmi; Purcell, David W; Aiken, Steven J; Parsa, Vijay; Scollie, Susan D

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated a novel test paradigm based on speech-evoked envelope following responses (EFRs) as an objective aided outcome measure for individuals fitted with hearing aids. Although intended for use in infants with hearing loss, this study evaluated the paradigm in adults with hearing loss, as a precursor to further evaluation in infants. The test stimulus was a naturally male-spoken token /susa∫i/, modified to enable recording of eight individual EFRs, two from each vowel for different formants and one from each fricative. In experiment I, sensitivity of the paradigm to changes in audibility due to varying stimulus level and use of hearing aids was tested. In experiment II, sensitivity of the paradigm to changes in aided audible bandwidth was evaluated. As well, experiment II aimed to test convergent validity of the EFR paradigm by comparing the effect of bandwidth on EFRs and behavioral outcome measures of hearing aid fitting. Twenty-one adult hearing aid users with mild to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss participated in the study. To evaluate the effects of level and amplification in experiment I, the stimulus was presented at 50 and 65 dB SPL through an ER-2 insert earphone in unaided conditions and through individually verified hearing aids in aided conditions. Behavioral thresholds of EFR carriers were obtained using an ER-2 insert earphone to estimate sensation level of EFR carriers. To evaluate the effect of aided audible bandwidth in experiment II, EFRs were elicited by /susa∫i/ low-pass filtered at 1, 2, and 4 kHz and presented through the programmed hearing aid. EFRs recorded in the 65 dB SPL aided condition in experiment I represented the full bandwidth condition. EEG was recorded from the vertex to the nape of the neck over 300 sweeps. Speech discrimination using the University of Western Ontario Distinctive Feature Differences test and sound quality rating using the Multiple-Stimulus Hidden Reference and Anchor

  18. Improvements in Gait With Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Shayman, Corey S; Earhart, Gammon M; Hullar, Timothy E

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate whether wearing auditory assistive devices can improve gait and dynamic balance. Three adult users of bilateral hearing assistive devices: one with cytomegalovirus exposure wearing cochlear implants, one with Ménière's disease wearing hearing aids, and one with presbystasis wearing hearing aids. Rehabilitative intervention involved participants performing gait and dynamic posture tasks with and without their hearing assistive devices. Gait velocity and Mini-BESTest score. The participant with Ménière's disease showed a clinically significant improvement in gait in the aided versus the unaided condition (20.5 cm/s higher velocity and five point better Mini-BESTest score). The other two participants also improved with augmented audition, but to a lesser degree. Bilateral hearing augmentation may promote clinically significant improvements in gait, although the effects are not uniform among patients. Hearing aids or cochlear implants may be important interventions for improving stability during walking in some people with hearing loss.

  19. Finally, Proof That Hearing Aids Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163889.html Finally, Proof That Hearing Aids Help High-quality digital devices provide 'significant benefit' ... but solid evidence about the value of hearing aids has been lacking -- until now. New research findings " ...

  20. A historical perspective on digital hearing AIDS: how digital technology has changed modern hearing AIDS.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Harry

    2007-03-01

    This article provides the author's perspective on the development of digital hearing aids and how digital signal processing approaches have led to changes in hearing aid design. Major landmarks in the evolution of digital technology are identified, and their impact on the development of digital hearing aids is discussed. Differences between analog and digital approaches to signal processing in hearing aids are identified.

  1. Teachers' Knowledge of, Exposure to, and Attitudes toward Hearing Aids and Hearing Aid Wearers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lass, Norman J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A questionnaire concerned with various aspects of hearing aids and hearing aid wearers was completed by 113 West Virginia teachers. Results indicated some deficiencies in knowledge of, and academic and experiential exposure to, as well as attitudes toward, hearing aids and hearing aid wearers. (Author/DB)

  2. 21 CFR 874.3300 - Hearing Aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes the air-conduction hearing aid and the bone-conduction hearing aid, but... subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to § 874.9. (2) Class II for the bone-conduction hearing aid....

  3. 21 CFR 874.3300 - Hearing Aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes the air-conduction hearing aid and the bone-conduction hearing aid, but... subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to § 874.9. (2) Class II for the bone-conduction hearing aid....

  4. 21 CFR 874.3300 - Hearing Aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes the air-conduction hearing aid and the bone-conduction hearing aid, but... subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to § 874.9. (2) Class II for the bone-conduction hearing aid....

  5. Buying a Hearing Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... in price according to style, features, and local market prices. Price can range from hundreds of dollars ... are connected with tubing to custom-fitted earpieces. Open fit receiver-in-the-ear (RITE) aids are ...

  6. Hearing Lost, Hearing Gained. Hearing Aids Make a Difference. Tune in to Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandal, Ronda

    This illustrated booklet is intended to assist special education consultants, teachers, and parents to monitor hearing aid use by children with hearing impairments in the Northwest Territories (Canada). The first section presents basic information on what hearing aids are, types of personal hearing aids, and FM (frequency modulation) hearing aid…

  7. Predictors of Hearing-Aid Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Poveda, Enrique A; Johannesen, Peter T; Pérez-González, Patricia; Blanco, José L; Kalluri, Sridhar; Edwards, Brent

    2017-01-01

    Over 360 million people worldwide suffer from disabling hearing loss. Most of them can be treated with hearing aids. Unfortunately, performance with hearing aids and the benefit obtained from using them vary widely across users. Here, we investigate the reasons for such variability. Sixty-eight hearing-aid users or candidates were fitted bilaterally with nonlinear hearing aids using standard procedures. Treatment outcome was assessed by measuring aided speech intelligibility in a time-reversed two-talker background and self-reported improvement in hearing ability. Statistical predictive models of these outcomes were obtained using linear combinations of 19 predictors, including demographic and audiological data, indicators of cochlear mechanical dysfunction and auditory temporal processing skills, hearing-aid settings, working memory capacity, and pretreatment self-perceived hearing ability. Aided intelligibility tended to be better for younger hearing-aid users with good unaided intelligibility in quiet and with good temporal processing abilities. Intelligibility tended to improve by increasing amplification for low-intensity sounds and by using more linear amplification for high-intensity sounds. Self-reported improvement in hearing ability was hard to predict but tended to be smaller for users with better working memory capacity. Indicators of cochlear mechanical dysfunction, alone or in combination with hearing settings, did not affect outcome predictions. The results may be useful for improving hearing aids and setting patients' expectations.

  8. Predictors of Hearing-Aid Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Johannesen, Peter T.; Pérez-González, Patricia; Blanco, José L.; Kalluri, Sridhar; Edwards, Brent

    2017-01-01

    Over 360 million people worldwide suffer from disabling hearing loss. Most of them can be treated with hearing aids. Unfortunately, performance with hearing aids and the benefit obtained from using them vary widely across users. Here, we investigate the reasons for such variability. Sixty-eight hearing-aid users or candidates were fitted bilaterally with nonlinear hearing aids using standard procedures. Treatment outcome was assessed by measuring aided speech intelligibility in a time-reversed two-talker background and self-reported improvement in hearing ability. Statistical predictive models of these outcomes were obtained using linear combinations of 19 predictors, including demographic and audiological data, indicators of cochlear mechanical dysfunction and auditory temporal processing skills, hearing-aid settings, working memory capacity, and pretreatment self-perceived hearing ability. Aided intelligibility tended to be better for younger hearing-aid users with good unaided intelligibility in quiet and with good temporal processing abilities. Intelligibility tended to improve by increasing amplification for low-intensity sounds and by using more linear amplification for high-intensity sounds. Self-reported improvement in hearing ability was hard to predict but tended to be smaller for users with better working memory capacity. Indicators of cochlear mechanical dysfunction, alone or in combination with hearing settings, did not affect outcome predictions. The results may be useful for improving hearing aids and setting patients’ expectations. PMID:28929903

  9. Are hearing aid owners able to identify and self-report handling difficulties? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Rebecca J; Meyer, Carly; Olaithe, Michelle; Schmulian, Dunay; Eikelboom, Robert H

    2017-11-01

    Although clinician administered surveys evaluating hearing aid handling skills exist, the development of a self-administered version may reduce clinical load, save consultation time, and facilitate more frequent use than face-to-face consultations allow. However, there is currently no evidence to support whether hearing aid owners can accurately self-report hearing aid handling skills via self-report survey that systematically evaluates the ability to accurately perform the individual aspects of hearing aid handling required for effective hearing aid management. An explorative pilot study using a prospective research design. Nineteen adult hearing aid owners, aged between 65 and 93 years. The self-administered survey demonstrated high sensitivity when compared with clinician evaluation of skills, with 93% of participants accurately self-identifying and reporting whether hearing aid handling skill training was required. Hearing aid owners are able to accurately self-report hearing aid handling difficulties when provided with an itemised list of skills.

  10. Self-Fitting Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Convery, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    A self-contained, self-fitting hearing aid (SFHA) is a device that enables the user to perform both threshold measurements leading to a prescribed hearing aid setting and fine-tuning, without the need for audiological support or access to other equipment. The SFHA has been proposed as a potential solution to address unmet hearing health care in developing countries and remote locations in the developed world and is considered a means to lower cost and increase uptake of hearing aids in developed countries. This article reviews the status of the SFHA and the evidence for its feasibility and challenges and predicts where it is heading. Devices that can be considered partly or fully self-fitting without audiological support were identified in the direct-to-consumer market. None of these devices are considered self-contained as they require access to other hardware such as a proprietary interface, computer, smartphone, or tablet for manipulation. While there is evidence that self-administered fitting processes can provide valid and reliable results, their success relies on user-friendly device designs and interfaces and easy-to-interpret instructions. Until these issues have been sufficiently addressed, optional assistance with the self-fitting process and on-going use of SFHAs is recommended. Affordability and a sustainable delivery system remain additional challenges for the SFHA in developing countries. Future predictions include a growth in self-fitting products, with most future SFHAs consisting of earpieces that connect wirelessly with a smartphone and providers offering assistance through a telehealth infrastructure, and the integration of SFHAs into the traditional hearing health-care model. PMID:27072929

  11. 21 CFR 874.3300 - Hearing Aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3300 Hearing Aid. (a) Identification. A hearing aid is wearable sound-amplifying device that is intended to compensate for impaired hearing....

  12. 21 CFR 874.3300 - Hearing Aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3300 Hearing Aid. (a) Identification. A hearing aid is wearable sound-amplifying device that is intended to compensate for impaired hearing....

  13. Power supplies for hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, J E

    1982-08-01

    The design of a hearing-aid system involves three disciplines of applied science--electrochemistry, electrical engineering and audio engineering. This paper is concerned with the interface between the first two. Batteries are essentially non-linear components. Optimum performance is only achievable when the electrical requirements of the hearing aid are closely matched with the voltage, rate capability and impedance of the battery. After years of optimalization, the modern '675' button cell has earned universal acceptability and is now used in most 'behind-the-ear' hearing aids. When more power is required, the larger and less specialized LR6 'penlight' cell is typically specified. Higher voltage might lead to better circuit efficiency, and there is some pressure to introduce a 3 V lithium-based product. Lithium should give superior energy density, but there are problems which remain to be solved. In the end, it is quite possible that the market might settle for an ecologically acceptable long-life lower voltage metal-air cell. If so, the recent zinc-air system may well have a future and could conceivably succeed both the mercury '675' and the alkaline 'penlight' cells.

  14. Implications of High-Frequency Cochlear Dead Regions for Fitting Hearing Aids to Adults with Mild to Moderately-Severe Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robyn M.; Johnson, Jani A.; Alexander, Genevieve C.

    2012-01-01

    Short Summary It has been suggested that existence of high-frequency cochlear dead regions (DRs) has implications for hearing aid fitting, and that the optimal amount of high-frequency gain is reduced for these patients. This investigation used laboratory and field measurements to examine the effectiveness of reduced high-frequency gain in typical hearing aid users with high-frequency DRs. Both types of data revealed that speech understanding was better with the evidence-based prescription than with reduced high-frequency gain, and that this was seen for listeners with and without DRs. Nevertheless, subjects did not always prefer the amplification condition that produced better speech understanding. PMID:22555183

  15. An Evaluation of Two Signal-Processing Hearing Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, James J.; Linzalone, Tanya G.

    1991-01-01

    This study, involving 15 older adults with hearing impairments, investigated the relationship between sentence recognition ability and two types of signal processing in hearing aids. Results indicated a significant improvement in sentence recognition when employing an instrument with adaptive compression versus an instrument with an adaptive…

  16. Speech Auditory Brainstem Response through hearing aid stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bellier, Ludovic; Veuillet, Evelyne; Vesson, Jean-François; Bouchet, Patrick; Caclin, Anne; Thai-Van, Hung

    2015-07-01

    Millions of people across the world are hearing impaired, and rely on hearing aids to improve their everyday life. Objective audiometry could optimize hearing aid fitting, and is of particular interest for non-communicative patients. Speech Auditory Brainstem Response (speech ABR), a fine electrophysiological marker of speech encoding, is presently seen as a promising candidate for implementing objective audiometry; yet, unlike lower-frequency auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) such as cortical AEPs or auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), aided-speech ABRs (i.e., speech ABRs through hearing aid stimulation) have almost never been recorded. This may be due to their high-frequency components requesting a high temporal precision of the stimulation. We assess here a new approach to record high-quality and artifact-free speech ABR while stimulating directly through hearing aids. In 4 normal-hearing adults, we recorded speech ABR evoked by a /ba/ syllable binaurally delivered through insert earphones for quality control or through hearing aids. To assess the presence of a potential stimulus artifact, recordings were also done in mute conditions with the exact same potential sources of stimulus artifacts as in the main runs. Hearing aid stimulation led to artifact-free speech ABR in each participant, with the same quality as when using insert earphones, as shown with signal-to-noise (SNR) measurements. Our new approach consisting in directly transmitting speech stimuli through hearing aids allowed for a perfect temporal precision mandatory in speech ABR recordings, and could thus constitute a decisive step in hearing impairment investigation and in hearing aid fitting improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of a Modified User Guide for Hearing Aid Management.

    PubMed

    Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly; Khan, Asaduzzaman

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated if a hearing aid user guide modified using best practice principles for health literacy resulted in superior ability to perform hearing aid management tasks, compared with the user guide in the original form. This research utilized a two-arm study design to compare the original manufacturer's user guide with a modified user guide for the same hearing aid--an Oticon Acto behind-the-ear aid with an open dome. The modified user guide had a lower reading grade level (4.2 versus 10.5), used a larger font size, included more graphics, and had less technical information. Eighty-nine adults ages 55 years and over were included in the study; none had experience with hearing aid use or management. Participants were randomly assigned either the modified guide (n = 47) or the original guide (n = 42). All participants were administered the Hearing Aid Management test, designed for this study, which assessed their ability to perform seven management tasks (e.g., change battery) with their assigned user guide. The regression analysis indicated that the type of user guide was significantly associated with performance on the Hearing Aid Management test, adjusting for 11 potential covariates. In addition, participants assigned the modified guide required significantly fewer prompts to perform tasks and were significantly more likely to perform four of the seven tasks without the need for prompts. The median time taken by those assigned the modified guide was also significantly shorter for three of the tasks. Other variables associated with performance on the Hearing Aid Management test were health literacy level, finger dexterity, and age. Findings indicate that the need to design hearing aid user guides in line with best practice principles of health literacy as a means of facilitating improved hearing aid management in older adults.

  18. Exploring the Factors Influencing Discontinued Hearing Aid Use in Patients With Unilateral Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M.; Leblanc, Stéphanie

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown that unilateral cochlear implant users who have residual hearing in the contralateral ear can benefit from combining a hearing aid in the nonimplanted ear with their cochlear implant. The purpose of this study was to better understand the factors influencing decision making by adults. Adults who had discontinued hearing aid use shortly after cochlear implantation were selected from one Canadian cochlear implant program. An examination of hearing aid use revealed that of 96 patients, who used hearing aids preimplant, 49 had discontinued hearing aid use. Patient perspectives on the decision and experience of combining a hearing aid and a cochlear implant were collected through 12 individual semistructured interviews. The interviews were analyzed qualitatively to identify key themes. Questionnaires, based on the interview findings, were developed and sent to the 49 adults to further explore the factors affecting hearing aid decisions. Interview and questionnaire findings from 28 adults indicated that three factors primarily influenced patients' decision to discontinue hearing aid use: their perceptions of the experience with hearing aids prior to implantation, their views of superiority of a unilateral cochlear implant in comparison with hearing aids, and their perceptions of interference with sound quality when a cochlear implant and hearing aid were combined. This study provides information about patient perceptions, experiences, and understanding of the potential difficulties of a bimodal fitting that may assist clinicians in pre- and postimplant counseling. PMID:21406420

  19. Exploring the factors influencing discontinued hearing aid use in patients with unilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M; Leblanc, Stéphanie

    2010-12-01

    Studies have shown that unilateral cochlear implant users who have residual hearing in the contralateral ear can benefit from combining a hearing aid in the nonimplanted ear with their cochlear implant. The purpose of this study was to better understand the factors influencing decision making by adults. Adults who had discontinued hearing aid use shortly after cochlear implantation were selected from one Canadian cochlear implant program. An examination of hearing aid use revealed that of 96 patients, who used hearing aids preimplant, 49 had discontinued hearing aid use. Patient perspectives on the decision and experience of combining a hearing aid and a cochlear implant were collected through 12 individual semistructured interviews. The interviews were analyzed qualitatively to identify key themes. Questionnaires, based on the interview findings, were developed and sent to the 49 adults to further explore the factors affecting hearing aid decisions. Interview and questionnaire findings from 28 adults indicated that three factors primarily influenced patients' decision to discontinue hearing aid use: their perceptions of the experience with hearing aids prior to implantation, their views of superiority of a unilateral cochlear implant in comparison with hearing aids, and their perceptions of interference with sound quality when a cochlear implant and hearing aid were combined. This study provides information about patient perceptions, experiences, and understanding of the potential difficulties of a bimodal fitting that may assist clinicians in pre- and postimplant counseling.

  20. Allergic contact dermatitis from hearing aid materials.

    PubMed

    Sood, Apra; Taylor, James S

    2004-03-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with dermatitis of the ear canal. The dermatitis had developed after she started wearing hearing aids that fit into the ear canals. Patch-test results were positive for (1) several acrylics, including polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, which were present in the hearing aid shell; (2) the hearing aid shell materials; and (3) the finish coat. The dermatitis resolved after she discontinued wearing the hearing aid, and a device with a silicone earpiece to be worn behind the ear was recommended as an alternative.

  1. A Historical Perspective on Digital Hearing Aids: How Digital Technology Has Changed Modern Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Harry

    2007-01-01

    This article provides the author's perspective on the development of digital hearing aids and how digital signal processing approaches have led to changes in hearing aid design. Major landmarks in the evolution of digital technology are identified, and their impact on the development of digital hearing aids is discussed. Differences between analog and digital approaches to signal processing in hearing aids are identified. PMID:17301334

  2. Effect of hearing aids on static balance function in elderly with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Negahban, Hossein; Bavarsad Cheshmeh Ali, Mahtab; Nassadj, Gholamhossein

    2017-07-24

    While a few studies have investigated the relationship between hearing acuity and postural control, little is known about the effect of hearing aids on postural stability in elderly with hearing loss. The aim was to compare static balance function between elderly with hearing loss who used hearing aids and those who did not use. The subjects asked to stand with (A) open eyes on rigid surface (force platform), (B) closed eyes on rigid surface, (C) open eyes on a foam pad, and (D) closed eyes on a foam pad. Subjects in the aided group (n=22) were tested with their hearing aids turned on and hearing aids turned off in each experimental condition. Subjects in the unaided group (n=25) were tested under the same experimental conditions as the aided group. Indicators for postural stability were center of pressure (COP) parameters including; mean velocity, standard deviation (SD) velocity in anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) directions, and sway area (95% confidence ellipse). The results showed that within open eyes-foam surface condition, there was greater SD velocity in the off-aided than the on-aided and the unaided than the on-aided (p<0.0001 for SD velocity in AP and ML). Also, no significant differences were found between the off-aided and unaided group (p=0.56 and p=0.77 for SD velocity in AP and ML, respectively). Hearing aids improve static balance function by reducing the SD velocity. Clinical implications may include improving hearing inputs in order to increase postural stability in older adults with hearing loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Social Context and Hearing Aid Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Launer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Hearing rehabilitation tends to focus on the influence of intraindividual factors and concepts such as readiness for change and health beliefs. In contrast, less is known about the role of social context and the potential role of significant others on hearing aid adoption. This explorative retrospective study investigated whether hearing aid adoption is associated with significant other attendance at audiology appointments. The study sample consisted of 33,933 and 27,031 individuals who attended appointments either alone or with a significant other, respectively (n = 60,964). It was found that hearing aid adoption was significantly greater when patients attended audiology appointments with a significant other (63.8%) than when attending appointments alone (50.6%). The association between hearing aid adoption and attendance by a significant other was hearing dependent, with 96% higher hearing aid adoption for patients with mild hearing losses when patients attended appointments with a significant other than when attending appointments alone. Hearing aid return rates were comparable when patients attended appointments alone (27%) or with a significant other (24%). Several potential explanations for the observed association are discussed. The pattern of results is consistent with the view that greater adherence is observed when audiologic care is provided from a patient-centered care perspective. Future research should establish whether there is a causal relationship between attendance at appointments by significant others and hearing aid adoption and should attempt to better understand the mechanisms underpinning the relationship between these variables. PMID:27733672

  4. Social Context and Hearing Aid Adoption.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurjit; Launer, Stefan

    2016-10-12

    Hearing rehabilitation tends to focus on the influence of intraindividual factors and concepts such as readiness for change and health beliefs. In contrast, less is known about the role of social context and the potential role of significant others on hearing aid adoption. This explorative retrospective study investigated whether hearing aid adoption is associated with significant other attendance at audiology appointments. The study sample consisted of 33,933 and 27,031 individuals who attended appointments either alone or with a significant other, respectively (n = 60,964). It was found that hearing aid adoption was significantly greater when patients attended audiology appointments with a significant other (63.8%) than when attending appointments alone (50.6%). The association between hearing aid adoption and attendance by a significant other was hearing dependent, with 96% higher hearing aid adoption for patients with mild hearing losses when patients attended appointments with a significant other than when attending appointments alone. Hearing aid return rates were comparable when patients attended appointments alone (27%) or with a significant other (24%). Several potential explanations for the observed association are discussed. The pattern of results is consistent with the view that greater adherence is observed when audiologic care is provided from a patient-centered care perspective. Future research should establish whether there is a causal relationship between attendance at appointments by significant others and hearing aid adoption and should attempt to better understand the mechanisms underpinning the relationship between these variables. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. General Framework of Hearing Aid Fitting Management

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Soo Hee

    2016-01-01

    Hearing aids are one of the most widely used treatment options for the hearing impaired and optimal outcomes of hearing aids are supported by comprehensive hearing aid fitting protocols. Currently, the term 'hearing aid fitting' is prevalently used among service and industry sectors with its comprehensive procedures not systematically explicated. In addition, a variety of non-normalized guidelines for hearing aid fitting has led to non-uniform care, outcome variability, and dissatisfaction of the use of hearing aids. The main purpose of the present study is to suggest a general framework of standardized practice for hearing aid fitting management including its pre- and post-fitting stages. The management framework centers on its fitting process with its prior steps of assessment as well as its posterior steps of follow-up, thereby eliminating diverging interpretations and non-uniform practices. Outcomes of this study are also expected to improve potential benefits such as quality of hearing aid fitting, user satisfaction, and cost effectiveness across relevant stakeholders. PMID:27144226

  6. General Framework of Hearing Aid Fitting Management.

    PubMed

    Oh, Soo Hee; Lee, Junghak

    2016-04-01

    Hearing aids are one of the most widely used treatment options for the hearing impaired and optimal outcomes of hearing aids are supported by comprehensive hearing aid fitting protocols. Currently, the term 'hearing aid fitting' is prevalently used among service and industry sectors with its comprehensive procedures not systematically explicated. In addition, a variety of non-normalized guidelines for hearing aid fitting has led to non-uniform care, outcome variability, and dissatisfaction of the use of hearing aids. The main purpose of the present study is to suggest a general framework of standardized practice for hearing aid fitting management including its pre- and post-fitting stages. The management framework centers on its fitting process with its prior steps of assessment as well as its posterior steps of follow-up, thereby eliminating diverging interpretations and non-uniform practices. Outcomes of this study are also expected to improve potential benefits such as quality of hearing aid fitting, user satisfaction, and cost effectiveness across relevant stakeholders.

  7. Evidence on Self-Fitting Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The research on self-fitting hearing aids is reviewed using evidence-based principles. The evaluation begins with a definition of the research questions followed by a detailed search of the literature and then a review of the relevant studies. Four features of self-fitting hearing aids are reviewed: in-situ threshold measurement, whether an initial fitting prescribed using standard prescription formulae will approximate user preferences, outcomes with training of hearing aids for preferred responses, and assembly and use of the aids. There is at least good quality evidence suggesting that in-situ thresholds can be reliably obtained, that prescribed initial fittings approximate preferred responses, and that users are able to train the hearing aids and would prefer the trained responses. However, evidence on other outcomes and the ability of users to assemble and use such instruments is limited. Gaps in research with self-fitting hearing aids are identified. PMID:22528820

  8. Expectations, prefitting counseling, and hearing aid outcome.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Gabrielle H; Lewis, M Samantha; Forsline, Anna

    2009-05-01

    Data suggest that having high expectations about hearing aids results in better overall outcome. However, some have postulated that excessively high expectations will result in disappointment and thus poor outcome. It has been suggested that counseling patients with unrealistic expectations about hearing aids prior to fitting may be beneficial. Data, however, are mixed as to the effectiveness of such counseling, in terms of both changes in expectations and final outcome. The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether supplementing prefitting counseling with demonstration of real-world listening can (1) alter expectations of new hearing aid users and (2) increase satisfaction over verbal-only counseling. Secondary goals of the study were to examine (1) the relationship between prefitting expectations and postfitting outcome, and (2) the effect of hearing aid fine-tuning on hearing aid outcome. Sixty new hearing aid users were fitted binaurally with Beltone Oria behind-the-ear digital hearing aids. Forty participants received prefitting counseling and demonstration of listening situations with the Beltone AVE (Audio Verification Environment) system; 20 received prefitting counseling without a demonstration of listening situations. Hearing aid expectations were measured at initial contact and following prefitting counseling. Reported hearing aid outcome was measured after eight to ten weeks of hearing aid use. Sixty new hearing aid users aged between 55 and 81 years with symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups, between which the prefitting counseling and follow-up differed: Group 1 received prefitting counseling in combination with demonstration of listening situations. Additionally, if the participant had complaints about sound quality at the follow-up visit, the hearing aids were fine-tuned using the Beltone AVE system. Group 2 received prefitting counseling in combination with

  9. Components and determinants of hearing aid benefit.

    PubMed

    Gatehouse, S

    1994-02-01

    This study investigates the measured and perceived disabilities and handicaps and associated auditory performance in 309 first-time hearing aid candidates. The results suggest that both disability and hearing aid benefit may be divided into separate components having particular and separate relationships to predictor variables in terms of both auditory and nonauditory characteristics. This division leads to a better understanding of the problems associated with a hearing impairment and their alleviation (or lack of) by provision of a hearing aid. In addition, the results support the development of more appropriate speech identification measures and suggest a potentially important role for measures of the temporal properties of the impaired auditory system.

  10. Examination of the CROS Type Hearing Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotterman, Stephen H.; Kasten, Roger N.

    1971-01-01

    Speech intelligibility scores obtained with unilaterally hearing impaired subjects under aided and unaided experimental listening conditions suggest that, while the CROS (Contralateral Routing of Signals) hearing aid enhances intelligibility under favorable use conditions, it degrades speech intelligibility in some demanding situations. (Author/KW)

  11. The effect of hearing aids on postural stability.

    PubMed

    Rumalla, Kavelin; Karim, Adham M; Hullar, Timothy E

    2015-03-01

    In the United States, falls are the leading cause of accidental deaths in adults aged over 65 years. Epidemiologic studies indicate that there is a correlation between hearing loss and the risk of falling among older people. The vestibular, proprioceptive, and visual systems are known to contribute to postural stability, but the contribution of audition to maintaining balance has not yet been determined. Cross-sectional study to measure postural stability in bilateral hearing-aid users aged over 65 years in aided and unaided conditions. Balance was assessed using the Romberg on foam test and the tandem stance test. Tests were administered in the presence of a point-source broadband white-noise sound (0-4 kHz) source in both unaided and aided conditions in the dark. Subjective measures of balance were made using the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale. Performance was significantly better in the aided than the unaided condition (P = 0.005 for both tests). No statistically significant relationship between improvement in balance, and hearing was identified. Participants did not report that they perceived a difference in balance between the two conditions. These results indicate that hearing aids are a novel treatment modality for imbalance in older adults with hearing loss and suggest that wearing hearing aids may offer a significant public-health benefit for avoiding falls in this population. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Degree of satisfaction among hearing aid users

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia; Rocha, Andressa Vital; Honório, Heitor Marques

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Hearing loss (HL) is defined as the complete or partial loss of hearing ability. Aims: To characterize (1) the degree of satisfaction among adult and elderly hearing aid (HA) users who were treated by a public hearing health service and (2) the relationship between satisfaction and the variables of gender, age, degree of HL, and type of HA. Method: The clinical and experimental study included the administration of the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire to 110 patients who had used HAs for more than 3 months and were 18 years of age or older. Results: Test patients were sex-balanced (48% were women) and had a mean age of 67 years. A relatively high incidence of sensorineural moderate HL was detected in the study patients (66%) and device B was the most commonly used HA type (48%). No significant differences were evident between HA satisfaction and sex. The importance placed on services/costs and personal image varied between age groups. Correlation was evident at all levels between user satisfaction and amplification. Decreased satisfaction was observed in individuals with severe and/or profound HL. The type of HA used yielded statistically significant differences in the positive effects referring. Conclusion: No correlations were evident between the different factors proposed. HA users exhibited high levels of satisfaction in all SADL areas. PMID:25991994

  13. Management of Children Using Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Psarros, Colleen; Incerti, Paula; Hill, Mandy

    2001-01-01

    Four case studies identify six factors affecting successful use of a hearing aid with a cochlear implant: duration of hearing aid use prior to implantation, amount of residual hearing in the non-implanted ear, educational and listening demands, cosmetic issues, hearing aid rejection, and extended period of non-use of hearing aid. (Contains…

  14. Management of Children Using Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Psarros, Colleen; Incerti, Paula; Hill, Mandy

    2001-01-01

    Four case studies identify six factors affecting successful use of a hearing aid with a cochlear implant: duration of hearing aid use prior to implantation, amount of residual hearing in the non-implanted ear, educational and listening demands, cosmetic issues, hearing aid rejection, and extended period of non-use of hearing aid. (Contains…

  15. Making sense of directional microphone hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, T; Mueller, H G

    1999-12-01

    We have witnessed a large increase in the availability of directional microphone hearing aids over the past few years. Directional microphone technology is now available in analog, digitally controlled analog, and digital hearing aids, and has been implemented into both behind-the-ear and in-the-ear styles. This Short Course reviews basic design differences across directional microphone hearing aids. A number of different laboratory and clinical evaluation methods used for assessment of both electroacoustic and behavioral directivity are then reviewed. In addition, the potential impact of test conditions such as room reverberation and type and position of competing noise(s), on listener performance when fit with directional hearing aids are considered. Recommendations and suggestions relating to the clinical and laboratory assessment of directional hearing aids are provided.

  16. Is there a link between hearing aid use, employment, and income?

    PubMed

    Winn, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines hearing aid use by 60 congenitally deaf individuals who attended special education units in South Australia. The study indicates that only one-third to half of deaf adults wore their hearing aids in social situations for speech detection. Just over one-third (n = 22) of the deaf adults involved in this study wore their hearing aids at work and less than half (n = 27) wore their hearing aids at home. Younger deaf adults were more likely to wear their hearing aids in the home than older deaf adults. Younger deaf adults tended to wear their hearing aids more frequently when they were at school if they had perceived their teachers had a positive attitude to deafness. This study found that there was no statistically significant relationship between wearing hearing aids and employment status. There was also no statistically significant difference in hearing aid use between men and women. The low use of hearing aids could be attributed at least in part to the current Australian policy regarding supply and servicing of hearing aids to congenitally deaf individuals which ceases to be free after the individual reaches 21 years of age.

  17. Personal Sound Amplifiers for Adults with Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Mamo, Sara K; Reed, Nicholas S; Nieman, Carrie L; Oh, Esther S; Lin, Frank R

    2016-03-01

    Age-related hearing loss is highly prevalent and often untreated. Use of hearing aids has been associated with improvements in communication and quality of life, but such treatment is unaffordable or inaccessible for many adults. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical guide for physicians who work with older adults who are experiencing hearing and communication difficulties. Specifically, we review direct-to-consumer amplification products that can be used to address hearing loss in adults. Helping adults with hearing loss navigate hearing loss treatment options ranging from being professionally fitted with hearing aids to using direct-to-consumer amplification options is important for primary care clinicians to understand given our increasing understanding of the impact of hearing loss on cognitive, social, and physical functioning.

  18. Personal Sound Amplifiers for Adults with Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mamo, Sara K.; Reed, Nicholas S.; Nieman, Carrie L.; Oh, Esther S.; Lin, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss is highly prevalent and often untreated. Use of hearing aids has been associated with improvements in communication and quality of life, but such treatment is unaffordable and/or inaccessible for many adults. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical guide for physicians who work with older adults who are experiencing hearing and communication difficulties. Specifically, we review direct-to-consumer amplification products that can be used to address hearing loss in adults. Helping adults with hearing loss navigate hearing loss treatment options ranging from being professionally fit with hearing aids to using direct-to-consumer amplification options is important for primary care clinicians to understand given our increasing understanding of the impact of hearing loss on cognitive, social, and physical functioning. PMID:26498713

  19. Factors Influencing Help Seeking, Hearing Aid Uptake, Hearing Aid Use and Satisfaction With Hearing Aids: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Line Vestergaard; Öberg, Marie; Nielsen, Claus; Naylor, Graham; Kramer, Sophia E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This descriptive summary of the literature provides an overview of the available studies (published between January 1980 and January 2009) on correlates of help-seeking behavior for hearing loss, hearing-aid uptake, hearing-aid use, and satisfaction with the device. Methods: Publications were identified by structured searches in Pubmed and Cinahl and by inspecting the reference lists of relevant articles. The articles covered different stages that a person with hearing impairment may go through: prior to hearing aid fitting, the period covering the fitting and the period post hearing aid fitting. Inclusion of articles occurred according to strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted by two independent researchers. Thirty-nine papers were included that identified 31 factors examined in relation to the four outcome measures. These covered personal factors (e.g., source of motivation, expectation, attitude), demographic factors (e.g., age, gender) and external factors (e.g., cost, counseling). Only two studies covered the actual fitting process. There was only one factor positively affecting all four outcome variables. This was self-reported hearing disability. The vast majority of studies showed no relationship of age and gender with any of the outcome domains. Discussion and conclusion: Whereas research of the last 28 years yielded valuable information regarding relevant and irrelevant factors in hearing aid health care, there are still many relevant issues that have never been investigated in controlled studies. These are discussed. PMID:21109549

  20. Do Modern Hearing Aids Meet ANSI Standards?

    PubMed

    Holder, Jourdan T; Picou, Erin M; Gruenwald, Jill M; Ricketts, Todd A

    2016-09-01

    The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) provides standards used to govern standardization of all hearing aids. If hearing aids do not meet specifications, there are potential negative implications for hearing aid users, professionals, and the industry. Recent literature has not investigated the proportion of new hearing aids in compliance with the ANSI specifications for quality control standards when they arrive in the clinic before dispensing. The aims of this study were to determine the percentage of new hearing aids compliant with the relevant ANSI standard and to report trends in electroacoustic analysis data. New hearing aids were evaluated for quality control via the ANSI S3.22-2009 standard. In addition, quality control of directional processing was also assessed. Seventy-three behind-the-ear hearing aids from four major manufacturers, that were purchased for clinical patients were evaluated before dispensing. Audioscan Verifit (version 3.1) hearing instrument fitting system was used to complete electroacoustic analysis and directional processing evaluation of the hearing aids. Frye's Fonix 8000 test box system (Fonix 8000) was also used to cross-check equivalent input noise (EIN) measurements. These measurements were then analyzed for trends across brands and specifications. All of the hearing aids evaluated were found to be out of specification for at least one measure. EIN and attack and release times were the measures most frequently out of specification. EIN was found to be affected by test box isolation for two of the four brands tested. Systematic discrepancies accounted for ∼93% of the noncompliance issues, while unsystematic quality control issues accounted for the remaining 7%. The high number of systematic discrepancies between the data collected and the specifications published by the manufacturers suggests there are clear issues related to the specific protocols used for quality control testing. These issues present a significant

  1. Solar recharging system for hearing aid cells.

    PubMed

    Gòmez Estancona, N; Tena, A G; Torca, J; Urruticoechea, L; Muñiz, L; Aristimuño, D; Unanue, J M; Torca, J; Urruticoechea, A

    1994-09-01

    We present a solar recharging system for nickel-cadmium cells of interest in areas where batteries for hearing aids are difficult to obtain. The charger has sun cells at the top. Luminous energy is converted into electrical energy, during the day and also at night if there is moonlight. The cost of the charger and hearing aid is very low at 35 US$. The use of solar recharging for hearing aids would be useful in alleviating the problems of deafness in parts of developing countries where there is no electricity.

  2. Is There a Link between Hearing Aid Use, Employment, and Income?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines hearing aid use by 60 congenitally deaf individuals who attended special education units in South Australia. The study indicates that only one-third to half of deaf adults wore their hearing aids in social situations for speech detection. Just over one-third (n = 22) of the deaf adults involved in this study wore their hearing…

  3. Is There a Link between Hearing Aid Use, Employment, and Income?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines hearing aid use by 60 congenitally deaf individuals who attended special education units in South Australia. The study indicates that only one-third to half of deaf adults wore their hearing aids in social situations for speech detection. Just over one-third (n = 22) of the deaf adults involved in this study wore their hearing…

  4. Hearing Aid Buying Guide: Sound Advice

    MedlinePlus

    ... and converts that energy into sound. An audio induction loop, or hearing loop , which is a wire ... purchased their aids. Audiologists may also be on staff at wholesale clubs like Costco (where 15 percent ...

  5. Users' experience of a cochlear implant combined with a hearing aid.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth Mary; Séguin, Christiane; Schramm, David; Chenier, Josée; Armstrong, Shelly

    2009-04-01

    This study examined: (1) the prevalence of hearing-aid use in a clinical population of adults with unilateral cochlear implants, (2) the relationship between hearing-aid use, severity of hearing loss, duration of deafness and duration of cochlear implant use, and (3) the benefits of bimodal hearing from the users' perspective. Using a retrospective design, 31 adults were identified as bimodal users, and 93 adults implanted in the same period were identified as non hearing-aid users. The two groups were similar in regards to duration of deafness but differed in severity of hearing loss and time since implantation. Questionnaires examining frequency and situations of hearing-aid use were completed by 24 of 31 bimodal users. Fifteen of these 24 adults reported hearing-aid use more than 50% of the time. These findings suggest that, of the 72 adults in this study with useable hearing (pure-tone average better than 110 dB), about 30% or less regularly combined a hearing aid and cochlear implant. The questionnaire results suggest that regular bimodal users prefer bimodal hearing across a variety of listening environments such as music, noise, and reverberation.

  6. Personal Style and Hearing Aid Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Traynor, Robert M.; Holmes, Alice E.

    2002-01-01

    Why do I have to drag information out of some patients? Why is another patient so talkative? Why didn't this patient like the XYZ 2002 digital hearing aid when she had the same degree, type, and configuration of hearing impairment as the patient I successfully fit last month? Could the answer be as basic as a difference in personality? PMID:25425907

  7. Objective and subjective hearing aid assessment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Lisa Lucks

    2007-12-01

    To determine whether specific sentence recognition assessments were sensitive enough to serve as objective outcome measurements that document subjective improvements in speech understanding with hearing aids. The Revised Speech Perception in Noise test (R-SPIN; R. C. Bilger, J. M. Nuetzel, W. M. Rabinowitz, & C. Rzeczkowski, 1984), the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT; M. Nilsson, S. D. Soli, & J. A. Sullivan, 1994), and the Quick Speech-in-Noise test (QuickSIN; Etymotic Research, 2001; M. C. Killion, P. A. Niquette, G. I. Gudmundsen, L. J. Revit, & S. Banerjee, 2004) were administered to 21 hearing aid users to determine whether the tests could adequately document improvements in speech understanding with hearing aids compared with the research participants' self-assessments of their own performance. Comparisons were made between unaided and aided performance on these sentence tests and on the Hearing Aid Performance Inventory (HAPI; B. E. Walden, M. Demorest, & E. Hepler, 1984). The R-SPIN, the HINT Quiet threshold, and the QuickSIN signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss were the most sensitive of the sentence recognition tests to objectively assess improvements in speech perception performance with hearing aids. Comparisons among the subjective and objective outcome measures documented that HAPI ratings improved as performance on the R-SPIN, the HINT Quiet threshold, and the QuickSIN SNR loss improved. Objective documentation of subjective impressions is essential for determining the efficacy of treatment outcomes in hearing aid fitting. The findings reported here more clearly define the relationship between objective and subjective outcome measures in an attempt to better define true hearing aid benefit.

  8. Directional hearing aids: then and now.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Todd A

    2005-01-01

    Directional microphone hearing aids can lead to improved speech recognition when speech and noise are coming from different directions. This technology provides limited benefits, however, and in specific instances use of a directional hearing aid mode can be detrimental. This article discusses the benefits and limitations of directional amplification, summarizes some current work in directional amplification, and recommends clinical application relative to the use of directional amplification.

  9. Hearing Loss and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the most common ones: Hearing aids are electronic instruments you wear in or behind your ear. ... information.) Cochlear (COKE-lee-ur) implants are small electronic devices surgically implanted in the inner ear that ...

  10. Applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss: a review.

    PubMed

    Manchaiah, Vinaya; Taylor, Brian; Dockens, Ashley L; Tran, Nicole R; Lane, Kayla; Castle, Mariana; Grover, Vibhu

    2017-01-01

    This systematic literature review is aimed at investigating applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss. This review discusses three categories of direct-to-consumer hearing devices: 1) personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), 2) direct-mail hearing aids, and 3) over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids. A literature review was conducted using EBSCOhost and included the databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO. After applying prior agreed inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 reports were included in the review. Included studies fell into three domains: 1) electroacoustic characteristics, 2) consumer surveys, and 3) outcome evaluations. Electroacoustic characteristics of these devices vary significantly with some meeting the stringent acoustic criteria used for hearing aids, while others producing dangerous output levels (ie, over 120-dB sound pressure level). Low-end (or low-cost) devices were typically poor in acoustic quality and did not meet gain levels necessary for most adult and elderly hearing loss patterns (eg, presbycusis), especially in high frequencies. Despite direct-mail hearing aids and PSAPs being associated with lower satisfaction when compared to hearing aids purchased through hearing health care professionals, consumer surveys suggest that 5%-19% of people with hearing loss purchase hearing aids through direct-mail or online. Studies on outcome evaluation suggest positive outcomes of OTC devices in the elderly population. Of note, OTC outcomes appear better when a hearing health care professional supports these users. While some direct-to-consumer hearing devices have the capability to produce adverse effects due to production of dangerously high sound levels and internal noise, the existing literature suggests that there are potential benefits of these devices. Research of direct-to-consumer hearing devices is limited, and current published studies are of weak quality. Much effort is needed to understand the

  11. Applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss: a review

    PubMed Central

    Manchaiah, Vinaya; Taylor, Brian; Dockens, Ashley L; Tran, Nicole R; Lane, Kayla; Castle, Mariana; Grover, Vibhu

    2017-01-01

    Background This systematic literature review is aimed at investigating applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss. This review discusses three categories of direct-to-consumer hearing devices: 1) personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), 2) direct-mail hearing aids, and 3) over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids. Method A literature review was conducted using EBSCOhost and included the databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO. After applying prior agreed inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 reports were included in the review. Results Included studies fell into three domains: 1) electroacoustic characteristics, 2) consumer surveys, and 3) outcome evaluations. Electroacoustic characteristics of these devices vary significantly with some meeting the stringent acoustic criteria used for hearing aids, while others producing dangerous output levels (ie, over 120-dB sound pressure level). Low-end (or low-cost) devices were typically poor in acoustic quality and did not meet gain levels necessary for most adult and elderly hearing loss patterns (eg, presbycusis), especially in high frequencies. Despite direct-mail hearing aids and PSAPs being associated with lower satisfaction when compared to hearing aids purchased through hearing health care professionals, consumer surveys suggest that 5%–19% of people with hearing loss purchase hearing aids through direct-mail or online. Studies on outcome evaluation suggest positive outcomes of OTC devices in the elderly population. Of note, OTC outcomes appear better when a hearing health care professional supports these users. Conclusion While some direct-to-consumer hearing devices have the capability to produce adverse effects due to production of dangerously high sound levels and internal noise, the existing literature suggests that there are potential benefits of these devices. Research of direct-to-consumer hearing devices is limited, and current published studies are of weak quality. Much

  12. Stethoscopes with hearing aid use: Case studies

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Regina Tangerino de Souza; Zambonato, Ticiana Cristina de Souza; Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Description for using stethoscopes adapted to hearing aids. Aim: To describe the adaptation of HAs to stethoscopes used by 2 students in the health field with bilateral hearing impairment. Case reports: Two subjects with hearing loss had their stethoscopes coupled to HAs because of the individual requirements of their professions (healthcare) to perform auscultation. Conclusion: The improvement was measured in situ, and satisfaction was evaluated using a subjective questionnaire. The use of a stethoscope coupled to an HA allowed students with hearing loss to perform auscultation. PMID:25992000

  13. Quality of life in bimodal hearing users (unilateral cochlear implants and contralateral hearing aids).

    PubMed

    Farinetti, A; Roman, S; Mancini, J; Baumstarck-Barrau, K; Meller, R; Lavieille, J P; Triglia, J M

    2015-11-01

    The main objective was to evaluate the bimodal self-rated benefits on auditory performance under real conditions and the quality of life in two groups of cochlear-implanted adults, with or without a contralateral hearing aid. The secondary objective was to investigate correlations between the use of a hearing aid and residual hearing on the non-implanted ear. This retrospective study was realized between 2000 and 2010 in two referral centers. A population of 183 postlingually deaf adults, implanted with a cochlear experience superior to 6 months, was selected. The Speech, Spatial, and other Qualities of Hearing Scale were administered to evaluate the auditory performances, and the Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire to evaluate the quality of life. The population was divided into two groups: a group with unilateral cochlear implants (Cochlear Implant-alone, n = 54), and a bimodal group with a cochlear implant and a contralateral hearing aid (n = 62). Both groups were similar in terms of auditory deprivation duration, duration of cochlear implant use, and pure-tone average on the implanted ear. There was a significant difference in terms of pure-tone average on low and low-to-mid frequencies on the non-implanted ear. The scores on both questionnaires showed an improvement in the basic sound perception and quality of social activities for the bimodal group. The results suggest that the bimodal stimulation (cochlear implant and contralateral hearing aid) improved auditory perception in quiet and the quality of life domain of social activities.

  14. The Future of Hearing Aid Technology

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Hearing aids have advanced significantly over the past decade, primarily due to the maturing of digital technology. The next decade should see an even greater number of innovations to hearing aid technology, and this article attempts to predict in which areas the new developments will occur. Both incremental and radical innovations in digital hearing aids will be driven by research advances in the following fields: (1) wireless technology, (2) digital chip technology, (3) hearing science, and (4) cognitive science. The opportunities and limitations for each of these areas will be discussed. Additionally, emerging trends such as connectivity and individualization will also drive new technology, and these are discussed within the context of the areas given here. PMID:17301336

  15. Cognitive hearing aids? Insights and possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Eline Borch; Lunner, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The working memory plays an important role in successfully overcoming adverse listening conditions and should consequently be considered when designing and testing hearing aids. A number of studies have established the relationship between hearing in noise and working memory involvement, but with the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall (SWIRL) test, it is possible to show that working memory is also involved in listening under favorable conditions and that noise reduction has a positive influence in situation with very little noise. Although the capacity of the working memory is a finite individual size, its involvement can differ with fatigue and other factors and individualization of hearing aids should take this into account to obtain the best performance. A way of individually adapting hearing aids is based on changes in the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). Here we present the possibilities that arise from using EEG and show that ear-mounted electrodes is able to record useful EEG that can be explored for individualization of hearing aids. Such an adaptation could be done based on changes in the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). Here we present the possibilities that arise from using EEG and show that ear-mounted electrodes is able to record useful EEG that can be explored for individualization of hearing aids.

  16. Internet Competency Predicts Practical Hearing Aid Knowledge and Skills in First-Time Hearing Aid Users.

    PubMed

    Maidment, David; Brassington, William; Wharrad, Heather; Ferguson, Melanie

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess whether Internet competency predicted practical hearing aid knowledge and handling skills in first-time hearing aid users. The design was a prospective, randomized controlled trial of a multimedia educational intervention consisting of interactive video tutorials (or reusable learning objects [RLOs]). RLOs were delivered through DVD for TV or PC, and online. Internet competency was measured at the hearing aid fitting appointment, whereas hearing aid knowledge and practical handling skills were assessed 6 weeks postfitting. Internet competency predicted practical hearing aid knowledge and handling skills, controlling for age, hearing sensitivity, educational status, and gender for the group that received the RLOs. Internet competency was inversely related to the number of times the RLOs were watched. Associations between Internet competency and practical hearing aid knowledge, handling skills, and watching the RLOs fewer times may have arisen because of improved self-efficacy. Therefore, first-time hearing aid users who are more competent Internet users may be better equipped to apply newly learned information to effectively manage their hearing loss.

  17. Comparison of the benefits of cochlear implantation versus contra-lateral routing of signal hearing aids in adult patients with single-sided deafness: study protocol for a prospective within-subject longitudinal trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with a unilateral severe-to-profound hearing loss, or single-sided deafness, report difficulty with listening in many everyday situations despite having access to well-preserved acoustic hearing in one ear. The standard of care for single-sided deafness available on the UK National Health Service is a contra-lateral routing of signals hearing aid which transfers sounds from the impaired ear to the non-impaired ear. This hearing aid has been found to improve speech understanding in noise when the signal-to-noise ratio is more favourable at the impaired ear than the non-impaired ear. However, the indiscriminate routing of signals to a single ear can have detrimental effects when interfering sounds are located on the side of the impaired ear. Recent published evidence has suggested that cochlear implantation in individuals with a single-sided deafness can restore access to the binaural cues which underpin the ability to localise sounds and segregate speech from other interfering sounds. Methods/Design The current trial was designed to assess the efficacy of cochlear implantation compared to a contra-lateral routing of signals hearing aid in restoring binaural hearing in adults with acquired single-sided deafness. Patients are assessed at baseline and after receiving a contra-lateral routing of signals hearing aid. A cochlear implant is then provided to those patients who do not receive sufficient benefit from the hearing aid. This within-subject longitudinal design reflects the expected care pathway should cochlear implantation be provided for single-sided deafness on the UK National Health Service. The primary endpoints are measures of binaural hearing at baseline, after provision of a contra-lateral routing of signals hearing aid, and after cochlear implantation. Binaural hearing is assessed in terms of the accuracy with which sounds are localised and speech is perceived in background noise. The trial is also designed to measure the impact of

  18. Background sounds and hearing-aid users: A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Gygi, Brian; Ann Hall, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    A scoping review focused on background sounds and adult hearing-aid users, including aspects of aversiveness and interference. The aim was to establish the current body of knowledge, identify knowledge gaps, and to suggest possible future directions for research. Data were gathered using a systematic search strategy, consistent with scoping review methodology. Searches of public databases between 1988 and 2014 returned 1182 published records. After exclusions for duplicates and out-of- scope works, 75 records remained for further analysis. Content analysis was used to group the records into five separate themes. Content analysis indicated numerous themes relating to background sounds. Five broad emergent themes addressed the development and validation of outcome instruments, satisfaction surveys, assessments of hearing-aid technology and signal processing, acclimatization to the device post-fitting, and non-auditory influences on benefit and satisfaction. A large proportion of hearing-aid users still find particular hearing-aid features and attributes dissatisfying when listening in background sounds. Many conclusions are limited by methodological drawbacks in study design and too many different outcome instruments. Future research needs to address these issues, while controlling for hearing-aid fitting.

  19. No Association Between Time of Onset of Hearing Loss (Childhood Versus Adulthood) and Self-Reported Hearing Handicap in Adults.

    PubMed

    Aarhus, Lisa; Tambs, Kristian; Engdahl, Bo

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the association between time of onset of hearing loss (childhood vs. adulthood) and self-reported hearing handicap in adults. This is a population-based cohort study of 2,024 adults (mean = 48 years) with hearing loss (binaural pure-tone average 0.5-4 kHz ≥ 20 dB HL) who completed a hearing handicap questionnaire. In childhood, the same persons (N = 2,024) underwent audiometry in a school investigation (at ages 7, 10, and 13 years), in which 129 were diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss (binaural pure-tone average 0.5-4 kHz ≥ 20 dB HL), whereas 1,895 had normal hearing thresholds. Hearing handicap was measured in adulthood as the sum-score of various speech perception and social impairment items (15 items). The sum-score increased with adult hearing threshold level (p < .001). After adjustment for adult hearing threshold level, hearing aid use, adult age, sex, and socioeconomic status, there was no significant difference in hearing handicap sum-score between the group with childhood-onset hearing loss (n = 129) and the group with adult-onset hearing loss (n = 1,895; p = .882). Self-reported hearing handicap in adults increased with hearing threshold level. After adjustment for adult hearing threshold level, this cohort study revealed no significant association between time of onset of hearing loss (childhood vs. adulthood) and self-reported hearing handicap.

  20. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit.

    PubMed

    Meister, Hartmut; Rählmann, Sebastian; Walger, Martin; Margolf-Hackl, Sabine; Kießling, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons. Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated. Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity - as determined by the fluid intelligence measure - was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered. The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive function in experienced hearing aid users. However, it was found that lower fluid intelligence scores were related to higher hearing thresholds. Since greater hearing loss was associated with a greater objective benefit, these results strongly support the advice of using hearing aids regardless of age and cognitive function to counter hearing loss and the adverse effects of age-related hearing impairment. Still, individual cognitive capacity might

  1. Pinnaplasty: reshaping ears to improve hearing aid retention.

    PubMed

    Gault, David; Grob, Marion; Odili, Joy

    2007-01-01

    The hearing aid is extremely important to the deaf. A small number have difficulty in retaining the device because the ear is prominent or cup-shaped. This report describes 11 children whose ear shape was modified to improve hearing aid retention and one adult in whom an over set back ear was released to allow fitment of a postaural device. In eight of the 11 children treated, conservative measures such as double-sided tape and retention bands (Huggies) had been tried previously without success. The creation of an antihelical fold in a misshapen ear lacking such a fold provides a reinforcing strut which is useful to support a hearing aid. In patients whose ear had been excessively tethered by previous surgery, projection was restored by inserting a cartilage block behind the ear. In one child with ears tethered by previous surgery, costal cartilage was used not only to release both ears, but also to reconstruct a new helical rim on one side. Surgery enabled a normal postaural hearing aid to be worn in 17 of the 19 ears treated. The two failures deserve special mention. In one patient with a unilateral deformity and severe mental retardation, the dressings were pulled off immediately after surgery. In another patient with a bilateral problem, the appearance and hearing aid retention was improved, but there was not enough room in the postauricular sulcus on one side for the battery component to fit comfortably and an in-the-ear device is now used on that side. Pinnaplasty is a helpful strategy to improve hearing aid retention. Care must be taken not to overdo the set back so that enough room is left to retain the hearing device.

  2. Speech intelligibility benefits of hearing AIDS at various input levels.

    PubMed

    Kuk, Francis; Lau, Chi-Chuen; Korhonen, Petri; Crose, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    Although the benefits of hearing aids are generally recognized for soft- and conversational-level sounds, most studies have reported negative benefits (i.e., poorer aided than unaided performance) at high noise inputs. Advances in digital signal processing such as compression, noise reduction, and directional microphone could improve speech perception at high input levels. This could alter our view on the efficacy of hearing aids in loud, noisy situations. The current study compared the aided versus the unaided speech intelligibility performance of hearing-impaired (HI) listeners at various input levels (from 50-100 dB SPL) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs; quiet, +6, +3, and -3 dB) in order to document the benefits of modern hearing aids. In addition, subjective preference between aided and unaided sounds (speech and music) at various input levels was also compared. The experiment used a factorial repeated-measures design. A total of 10 HI adults with symmetrical moderate to severe hearing losses served as test participants. In addition, speech intelligibility scores of five normal-hearing (NH) listeners were also measured for comparison. Speech perception was studied at 50 and 65 dB SPL input levels in quiet and also in noise at levels of 65, 85, and 100 dB SPL with SNRs of +6, +3, and -3 dB. This was done for all participants (HI and NH). In addition, the HI participants compared subjective preference between the aided and unaided presentations of speech and music stimuli at 50, 65, 85, and 100 dB SPL in quiet. The data were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance. The results showed a decrease in aided benefits as input levels increased. However, even at the two highest input levels (i.e., 85 and 100 dB SPL), aided speech scores were still higher than the unaided speech scores. Furthermore, NH listeners and HI listeners in the aided condition showed stable speech-in-noise performance between 65 and 100 dB SPL input levels, except that the absolute

  3. Speech intelligibility benefits of frequency-lowering algorithms in adult hearing aid users: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Andrea; Bond, Alicia; Loeliger, Michelle; Clarke, Sandy

    2017-09-18

    This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of two frequency-lowering schemes, non-linear frequency compression and frequency transposition, at improving speech intelligibility for adult hearing-impaired populations. A systematic search of 10 electronic databases was carried out using pre-defined inclusion criteria. Accepted articles were then critically appraised using the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) Critical Appraisal Tool. Outcome results were further synthesised where possible using random effects meta-analysis to provide overall combined estimates of the treatment differences along with 95% confidence intervals. A total of 20 articles were accepted for final review. Overall, study quality was of moderate strength. Meta-analysis found a statistically significant benefit in favour of frequency-lowering for consonant recognition testing in quiet across 145 participants with both algorithms providing comparable gains. Equivalent results were found between frequency-lowering and conventional processing on all other speech measures. Based on the available data, frequency-lowering does seem to provide some improvement in an individual's speech intelligibility dependant on the stimulus type, although the benefits were modest. This improvement was not seen across all measures, however those who do not benefit from the technology will also not be harmed by trialling it.

  4. Level of user satisfaction with hearing AIDS and environment: the international outcome inventory for hearing AIDS.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Lorena; Almeida, Gleide; Ribas, Angela

    2014-07-01

    Introduction The main function of hearing is to enable oral communication. Hearing loss impairs communication skills. Objective To evaluate the level of user satisfaction with hearing aids. Methods This is a cross-sectional group study comprising 108 subjects (56% men and 44% women). The average age of the subjects was 77 years. These subjects had been recently fitted with their hearing aids and showed sensorineural (90%) and mixed (10%) hearing loss as determined via the Questionnaire International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids Outcome Inventory (IOI-HA), which determined the benefit and satisfaction obtained by sound amplification. Results The hearing aids improved the quality of life of 52.78% of the patients, which was revealed by their high scores (mean = 27.3). The relationship of the user with the environment was significantly better (p < 0.001) than that of the user with the hearing aid. Conclusion IOI-HA is a simple and easy-to-use tool. Based on the results of this study, we can show a high degree of satisfaction with their hearing aids in the majority of the participants, which improved the quality of life.

  5. Level of User Satisfaction with Hearing Aids and Environment: The International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Lorena; Almeida, Gleide; Ribas, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The main function of hearing is to enable oral communication. Hearing loss impairs communication skills. Objective To evaluate the level of user satisfaction with hearing aids. Methods This is a cross-sectional group study comprising 108 subjects (56% men and 44% women). The average age of the subjects was 77 years. These subjects had been recently fitted with their hearing aids and showed sensorineural (90%) and mixed (10%) hearing loss as determined via the Questionnaire International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids Outcome Inventory (IOI-HA), which determined the benefit and satisfaction obtained by sound amplification. Results The hearing aids improved the quality of life of 52.78% of the patients, which was revealed by their high scores (mean = 27.3). The relationship of the user with the environment was significantly better (p < 0.001) than that of the user with the hearing aid. Conclusion IOI-HA is a simple and easy-to-use tool. Based on the results of this study, we can show a high degree of satisfaction with their hearing aids in the majority of the participants, which improved the quality of life. PMID:25992097

  6. Beyond the hearing aid: Assistive listening devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Alice E.

    2003-04-01

    Persons with hearing loss can obtain great benefit from hearing aids but there are many situations that traditional amplification devices will not provide enough help to ensure optimal communication. Assistive listening and signaling devices are designed to improve the communication of the hearing impaired in instances where traditional hearing aids are not sufficient. These devices are designed to help with problems created by listening in noise or against a competing message, improve distance listening, facilitate group conversation (help with problems created by rapidly changing speakers), and allow independence from friends and family. With the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, assistive listening devices (ALDs) are becoming more accessible to the public with hearing loss. Employers and public facilities must provide auxiliary aids and services when necessary to ensure effective communication for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing. However many professionals and persons with hearing loss are unaware of the various types and availability of ALDs. An overview of ALDs along with a discussion of their advantages and disadvantages will be given.

  7. A Self-Fitting Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    Keidser, Gitte; Dillon, Harvey; Hartley, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The need for reliable access to hearing health care services is growing globally, particularly in developing countries and in remotely located, underserved regions in many parts of the developed world. Individuals with hearing loss in these areas are at a significant disadvantage due to the scarcity of local hearing health care professionals and the high cost of hearing aids. Current approaches to making hearing rehabilitation services more readily available to underserved populations include teleaudiology and the provision of amplification devices outside of the traditional provider-client relationship. Both strategies require access to such resources as dedicated equipment and/or specially trained staff. Another possible strategy is a self-fitting hearing aid, a personal amplification device that is equipped with an onboard tone generator to enable user-controlled, automated, in situ audiometry; an onboard prescription to determine the initial hearing aid settings; and a trainable algorithm to enable user-controlled fine-tuning. The device is thus assembled, fitted, and managed by the user without the need for audiological or computer support. This article details the self-fitting concept and its potential application in both developing and developed countries. Potential advantages and disadvantages of such a device are discussed, and considerations for further investigations into the concept are presented. Overall, the concept is considered technologically viable with the main challenges anticipated to be development of clear, simple user instructions and a delivery model that ensures reliable supplies of instant-fit ear tips and batteries. PMID:22143873

  8. Consumer Preferences for Hearing Aid Attributes

    PubMed Central

    Lataille, Angela T.; Buttorff, Christine; White, Sharon; Niparko, John K.

    2012-01-01

    Low utilization of hearing aids has drawn increased attention to the study of consumer preferences using both simple ratings (e.g., Likert scale) and conjoint analyses, but these two approaches often produce inconsistent results. The study aims to directly compare Likert scales and conjoint analysis in identifying important attributes associated with hearing aids among those with hearing loss. Seven attributes of hearing aids were identified through qualitative research: performance in quiet settings, comfort, feedback, frequency of battery replacement, purchase price, water and sweat resistance, and performance in noisy settings. The preferences of 75 outpatients with hearing loss were measured with both a 5-point Likert scale and with 8 paired-comparison conjoint tasks (the latter being analyzed using OLS [ordinary least squares] and logistic regression). Results were compared by examining implied willingness-to-pay and Pearson’s Rho. A total of 56 respondents (75%) provided complete responses. Two thirds of respondents were male, most had sensorineural hearing loss, and most were older than 50; 44% of respondents had never used a hearing aid. Both methods identified improved performance in noisy settings as the most valued attribute. Respondents were twice as likely to buy a hearing aid with better functionality in noisy environments (p < .001), and willingness to pay for this attribute ranged from US$2674 on the Likert to US$9000 in the conjoint analysis. The authors find a high level of concordance between the methods—a result that is in stark contrast with previous research. The authors conclude that their result stems from constraining the levels on the Likert scale. PMID:22514094

  9. Intelligent hearing aids: the next revolution.

    PubMed

    Tao Zhang; Mustiere, Fred; Micheyl, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The first revolution in hearing aids came from nonlinear amplification, which allows better compensation for both soft and loud sounds. The second revolution stemmed from the introduction of digital signal processing, which allows better programmability and more sophisticated algorithms. The third revolution in hearing aids is wireless, which allows seamless connectivity between a pair of hearing aids and with more and more external devices. Each revolution has fundamentally transformed hearing aids and pushed the entire industry forward significantly. Machine learning has received significant attention in recent years and has been applied in many other industries, e.g., robotics, speech recognition, genetics, and crowdsourcing. We argue that the next revolution in hearing aids is machine intelligence. In fact, this revolution is already quietly happening. We will review the development in at least three major areas: applications of machine learning in speech enhancement; applications of machine learning in individualization and customization of signal processing algorithms; applications of machine learning in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical tests. With the advent of the internet of things, the above developments will accelerate. This revolution will bring patient satisfactions to a new level that has never been seen before.

  10. Subjective ratings of noise-reduction hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Kuk, F K; Tyler, R S; Mims, L

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness of seven commercially available noise-reduction hearing aids was evaluated using subjective ratings of continuous discourse. Subjective scales of listening comfort, speech quality, speech understanding, noise interference, and overall liking were used. Fifteen experienced hearing-aid users participated. Two hearing aids that used amplitude compression (Audiotone A-54 and Telex 363C), two hearing aids that used the Zeta Noise Blocker (two versions of a Maico SP147), and three hearing aids that proportionally attenuated the low-frequencies (Rion HB-69AS, Richards ASE-B, and Siemens 283 ASP) were evaluated. None of the noise-reduction hearing aids significantly altered group performance on any subjective scale. Individually, however, subjects responded differently to different noise-reduction hearing aids, indicating that some noise-reduction hearing aids may help some hearing-impaired individuals.

  11. Predicting hearing aid microphone preference in everyday listening.

    PubMed

    Walden, Brian E; Surr, Rauna K; Cord, Mary T; Dyrlund, Ole

    2004-05-01

    Seventeen hearing-impaired adults were fit with omnidirectional/directional hearing aids, which they wore during a four-week trial. For each listening situation encountered in daily living during a total of seven days, participants selected the preferred microphone mode and described the listening situation in terms of five environmental variables, using a paper and pencil form. Results indicated that hearing-impaired adults typically spend the majority of their active listening time in situations with background noise present and surrounding the listener, and the signal source located in front and relatively near. Microphone preferences were fairly evenly distributed across listening situations but differed depending on the characteristics of the listening environment. The omnidirectional mode tended to be preferred in relatively quiet listening situations or, in the presence of background noise, when the signal source was relatively far away. The directional mode tended to be preferred when background noise was present and the signal source was located in front of and relatively near the listener. Results suggest that knowing only signal location and distance and whether background noise is present or absent, omnidirectional/directional hearing aids can be set in the preferred mode in most everyday listening situations. These findings have relevance for counseling patients when to set manually switchable omnidirectional/directional hearing aids in each microphone mode, as well as for the development of automatic algorithms for selecting omnidirectional versus directional microphone processing.

  12. Evaluation method for hearing aid fitting under reverberation: comparison between monaural and binaural hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Kimio; Inoue, Megumi; Yonemoto, Kiyoshi; Imamura, Akihide

    2004-11-01

    Some hearing-impaired persons with hearing aids complain of listening difficulty under reverberation. No method, however, is currently available for hearing aid fitting that permits evaluation of hearing difficulty caused by reverberations. In this study, we produced speech materials with a reverberation time of 2.02 s that mimicked a reverberant environment (a classroom). Speech materials with reverberation times of 0 and 1.01 s were also made. Listening tests were performed with these materials in hearing-impaired subjects and normal-hearing subjects in a soundproof booth. Listening tests were also done in a classroom. Our results showed that speech material with a reverberation time of 2.02 s had a decreased listening-test score in hearing-impaired subjects with both monaural and binaural hearing aids. Similar results were obtained in a reverberant environment. Our findings suggest the validity of using speech materials with different reverberation times to predict the listening performance under reverberation of hearing-impaired persons with hearing aids.

  13. Physiological modeling for hearing aid design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Ian C.; Young, Eric D.; Sachs, Murray B.

    2002-05-01

    Physiological data from hearing-impaired cats suggest that conventional hearing aid signal-processing schemes do not restore normal auditory-nerve responses to a vowel [Miller et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 101, 3602 (1997)] and can even produce anomalous and potentially confounding patterns of activity [Schilling et al., Hear. Res. 117, 57 (1998)]. These deficits in the neural representation may account at least partially for poor speech perception in some hearing aid users. An amplification scheme has been developed that produces neural responses to a vowel more like those seen in normal cats and that reduces confounding responses [Miller et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 106, 2693 (1999)]. A physiologically accurate model of the normal and impaired auditory periphery would provide simpler and quicker testing of such potential hearing aid designs. Details of such a model, based on that of Zhang et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 648 (2001)], will be presented. Model predictions suggest that impairment of both outer- and inner-hair cells contribute to the degraded representation of vowels in hearing-impaired cats. The model is currently being used to develop and test a generalization of the Miller et al. speech-processing algorithm described above to running speech. [Work supported by NIDCD Grants DC00109 and DC00023.] a)Now with the Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster Univ., 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada.

  14. Impact of Hearing Aid Technology on Outcomes in Daily Life III: Localization.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jani A; Xu, Jingjing; Cox, Robyn M

    2017-07-11

    Compared to basic-feature hearing aids, premium-feature hearing aids have more advanced technologies and sophisticated features. The objective of this study was to explore the difference between premium-feature and basic-feature hearing aids in horizontal sound localization in both laboratory and daily life environments. We hypothesized that premium-feature hearing aids would yield better localization performance than basic-feature hearing aids. Exemplars of premium-feature and basic-feature hearing aids from two major manufacturers were evaluated. Forty-five older adults (mean age 70.3 years) with essentially symmetrical mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss were bilaterally fitted with each of the four pairs of hearing aids. Each pair of hearing aids was worn during a 4-week field trial and then evaluated using laboratory localization tests and a standardized questionnaire. Laboratory localization tests were conducted in a sound-treated room with a 360°, 24-loudspeaker array. Test stimuli were high frequency and low frequency filtered short sentences. The localization test in quiet was designed to assess the accuracy of front/back localization, while the localization test in noise was designed to assess the accuracy of locating sound sources throughout a 360° azimuth in the horizontal plane. Laboratory data showed that unaided localization was not significantly different from aided localization when all hearing aids were combined. Questionnaire data showed that aided localization was significantly better than unaided localization in everyday situations. Regarding the difference between premium-feature and basic-feature hearing aids, laboratory data showed that, overall, the premium-feature hearing aids yielded more accurate localization than the basic-feature hearing aids when high-frequency stimuli were used, and the listening environment was quiet. Otherwise, the premium-feature and basic-feature hearing aids yielded essentially the same performance in

  15. Restoring hearing symmetry with two cochlear implants or one cochlear implant and a contralateral hearing aid.

    PubMed

    Firszt, Jill B; Reeder, Ruth M; Skinner, Margaret W

    2008-01-01

    With today's technology and the demonstrated success of cochlear implantation, along with expanded candidacy criteria, the opportunity to provide optimal hearing to both ears for individuals with severe-to-profound hearing loss is greater than ever. This article reviews the advantages of binaural hearing and the disadvantages of hearing with only one ear or hearing with two ears with significantly different sound thresholds. A case study is presented that demonstrates the benefit of bimodal hearing (i.e., a cochlear implant [CI] in one ear and a contralateral hearing aid [HA]) in a nontraditional CI candidate with asymmetrical hearing thresholds. Then, selected studies in adult recipients who use a CI and contralateral HA or who use two CIs are summarized. The data overall demonstrate that bilateral CI recipients, traditional bimodal recipients, and nontraditional bimodal recipients experience substantial binaural hearing advantages, including improved speech recognition in noise, localization, and functional everyday communication. These results indicate that bilateral stimulation of the auditory system through a CI and contralateral HA or two CIs is beneficial and should become standard clinical practice.

  16. Direction discriminating hearing aid system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M.; Lin, H. C.; Ward, G.

    1991-01-01

    A visual display was developed for people with substantial hearing loss in either one or both ears. The system consists of three discreet units; an eyeglass assembly for the visual display of the origin or direction of sounds; a stationary general purpose noise alarm; and a noise seeker wand.

  17. Hearing disability assessment in evaluating hearing aid benefit.

    PubMed

    Marttila, T I; Jauhiainen, T

    1996-01-01

    The aim was to study the applicability of an eight-item questionnaire in evaluating the benefit derived from hearing-aid use. Since 1977, 3402 hard-of-hearing patients have been fitted with a hearing aid for the first time and followed up for 3 months in the Helsinki University Central Hospital. The questionnaire included eight situation-specific items in hearing: speech face-to-face, speech in a small and large group, loud speech, in telephone and radio/TV, doorbell, telephone signal. The scoring ranged from 0 to 16. After a 3 months' use of amplification, the questionnaire was completed again. The median (interquartile range) and arithmetic mean (standard deviation) of the prefitting scores were 5.0 (4.0-6.0) and 5.3 (2.33). The postfitting scores were 1.0 (0.0-2.0) and 1.1 (1.17), respectively. The difference was highly significant. An eight-item questionnaire in the evaluation of hearing problems provided a reliable numerical score of disability. Follow-up is important to secure satisfactory results in rehabilitation, especially in old age.

  18. Teachers' Perceptions of Adolescent Girls Who Wear Hearing Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Linda R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Females, aged 10-14, were photographed wearing a body aid, a postauricular aid, or no hearing aid. Ratings by 60 college education majors indicated that subjects pictured wearing a hearing aid were rated lower on achievement but higher on factors of appearance, personality, and assertiveness than subjects without the aid. (Author/JDD)

  19. [User benefit of modern hearing aids. A comparative study].

    PubMed

    Kießling, J; Kreikemeier, S

    2013-08-01

    In the face of the rapid development of hearing aid system technology it is helpful to regularly study the user benefit of the current generation. To contribute to the question on how the user benefit of current hearing aids compares with the benefit of the previous generation of hearing aids, a multicentre study was carried out in cooperation with 79 hearing aid acoustics companies in Germany. The user benefit of modern hearing aids in everyday life was assessed by asking end users to participate in a survey by completing a questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of 20 items, 10 of which were taken from validated international inventories (SSQ: Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing scale, IOI-HA: International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids) and the other 10 were formulated particularly for this purpose. A total of 664 usable questionnaires were returned whereby 421 responders were first time users and 243 responders were previous hearing aid users. The results of the present study showed that modern hearing aid system technology provides significant extra benefits at the 5 % level relative to the previous generation of hearing aids for all variables tested in this study. Even though the amount of gain in terms of user benefit may be overestimated due to well-known placebo effects, an obvious net effect was evident. Correlations between the level of hearing aid benefit and possible influencing factors, such as age, gender, subjects own hearing aid, duration of use or hearing loss, could not be identified.

  20. Health behavior theories as predictors of hearing-aid uptake and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Gabrielle H; Frederick, Melissa T; Silverman, ShienPei C; Nielsen, Claus; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane

    2016-07-01

    To understand hearing behaviors of adults seeking help for the first time through the application of two models of health behavior change: the transtheoretical model and the health belief model. The relationships between attitudes and beliefs were examined relative to hearing-aid uptake and outcomes six months later. One hundred and sixty adults completed the University of Rhode Island change assessment (targeting the transtheoretical model), and the hearing beliefs questionnaire (targeting the health belief model), as well as the hearing handicap inventory and the psychosocial impact of hearing loss scale, within two months of an initial hearing assessment. Six months later, participants completed these same questionnaires, while those who had taken up hearing aids also completed hearing-aid outcome questionnaires. (1) Attitudes and beliefs were associated with future hearing-aid uptake, and were effective at modeling this behavior; (2) attitudes and beliefs changed following behavior change, and (3) attitudes and beliefs following behavior change were better predictors of hearing-aid outcomes than pre-behavior change attitudes and beliefs. A counseling-based intervention targeting the attitudes and beliefs assessed by the transtheoretical model and the health belief model has the potential to increase uptake of hearing health care.

  1. 47 CFR 68.4 - Hearing aid-compatible telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... if it provides internal means for effective use with hearing aids that are designed to be compatible... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatible telephones. 68.4 Section... (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK General § 68.4 Hearing aid-compatible...

  2. Acceptance of Noise Growth Patterns in Hearing Aid Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freyaldenhoven, Melinda C.; Plyler, Patrick N.; Thelin, James W.; Muenchen, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether the effects of speech presentation level on acceptance of noise could differentiate full-time, part-time, and nonusers of hearing aids and whether these effects could predict hearing aid use. Method: Participants were separated into 3 groups on the basis of hearing aid use: (a) full-time use, (b) part-time use, or (c)…

  3. 21 CFR 874.3330 - Master hearing aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3330 Master hearing aid. (a) Identification. A master hearing aid is an electronic device intended to simulate a hearing aid during...

  4. 21 CFR 874.3330 - Master hearing aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3330 Master hearing aid. (a) Identification. A master hearing aid is an electronic device intended to simulate a hearing aid during...

  5. The Effect of Hearing Loss and Hearing Aids on the Use of Information and Communication Technologies by Community-Living Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonsalves, Chris; Pichora-Fuller, Margaret Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Innovations in information and communication technologies are changing society, but only 1 in 15 Canadian seniors used a computer at the turn of the millennium (Statistics Canada, 2000). Furthermore, about 1 in 5 Canadian seniors has difficulty hearing, seeing, or communicating. The primary goal of the study was to investigate the relationship…

  6. Satisfaction with Hearing Aids Based on Technology and Style among Hearing Impaired Persons.

    PubMed

    Faraji-Khiavi, Farzad; Dashti, Rezvan; Sameni, Seyyed-Jalal; Bayat, Arash

    2016-09-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most disabling impairments. Using a hearing aid as an attempt to improve the hearing problem can positively affect the quality of life for these people. This research was aimed to assess satisfaction of hearing impaired patients with their hearing aids regarding the employed technology and style. This descriptive-analytic cross-sectional research was conducted on 187 subjects with hearing loss who were using a hearing aid. The subjects were over 18 years of age and were using a hearing aid for at least 6 months. The Persian version of Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire was the instrument which was used for assessing satisfaction with the hearing aid. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to be 0.80 for instrument reliability. A significant difference was observed among satisfaction subscales' mean scores with hearing aid technology. Also a significant difference was observed between the total satisfaction score and the hearing aid model. With respect to the analysis of satisfaction with the hearing aid and its style, cost and services was the only subscale which showed a significant difference (P=0.005). Respondents using hearing aids with different technology and style were estimated to be quite satisfied. Training audiologists in using more appropriate and fitting hearing aids in addition to using self-reporting questionnaires like SADL for estimating patients' social condition and participation in their life can essentially change their disability condition and countervail their hearing loss.

  7. Satisfaction with Hearing Aids Based on Technology and Style among Hearing Impaired Persons

    PubMed Central

    Faraji- Khiavi, Farzad; Dashti, Rezvan; Sameni, Seyyed-Jalal; Bayat, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hearing loss is one of the most disabling impairments. Using a hearing aid as an attempt to improve the hearing problem can positively affect the quality of life for these people. This research was aimed to assess satisfaction of hearing impaired patients with their hearing aids regarding the employed technology and style. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic cross-sectional research was conducted on 187 subjects with hearing loss who were using a hearing aid. The subjects were over 18 years of age and were using a hearing aid for at least 6 months. The Persian version of Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire was the instrument which was used for assessing satisfaction with the hearing aid. Cronbach’s alpha was calculated to be 0.80 for instrument reliability. Results: A significant difference was observed among satisfaction subscales’ mean scores with hearing aid technology. Also a significant difference was observed between the total satisfaction score and the hearing aid model. With respect to the analysis of satisfaction with the hearing aid and its style, cost and services was the only subscale which showed a significant difference (P=0.005). Conclusion: Respondents using hearing aids with different technology and style were estimated to be quite satisfied. Training audiologists in using more appropriate and fitting hearing aids in addition to using self-reporting questionnaires like SADL for estimating patients’ social condition and participation in their life can essentially change their disability condition and countervail their hearing loss. PMID:27738608

  8. Speech-Language Pathologists' Knowledge of, Exposure to, and Attitudes toward Hearing Aids and Hearing Aid Wearers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lass, Norman J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A questionnaire concerned with various aspects of hearing aids was completed by 88 speech-language pathologists from six southern states. Results indicated some deficiencies in knowledge, exposure, and attitudes concerning hearing aids and hearing aid wearers. Implications and suggestions for graduate education and continuing education are…

  9. Societal effects of hearing aid fitting among the moderately hearing impaired.

    PubMed

    Joore, Manuela A; Brunenberg, Danielle E M; Chenault, Michelene N; Anteunis, Lucien J C

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate hearing aid fitting from a societal viewpoint, rather than the more traditional patient perspective. The effects of hearing aid fitting on generic quality of life (EuroQol), social functioning (SF36), auditory disability, productivity at paid and unpaid labour, and medical consumption, were assessed in a prospective study among 80 moderately hearing-impaired first-time hearing aid applicants. The study showed that hearing aid fitting solved problems with paid employment, but did not seem to affect unpaid work. Use of medical services remained relatively stable after first-time hearing aid fitting. The Amsterdam Inventory proved to be a useful questionnaire to assess the effects on hearing disability. No effects of hearing aid fitting on generic quality of life could be determined with the EuroQol, while hearing aid fitting did lead to an improvement in one aspect of generic quality of life; namely social functioning.

  10. Vibrant soundbridge: a new implantable alternative to conventional hearing AIDS in children.

    PubMed

    Sia, K J; Chai, C K; Tang, I P; Prepageran, N

    2012-12-01

    The Vibrant Soundbridge is a new middle ear implantable hearing device. It was first introduced for adult patients with moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss. With the innovation of the surgical techniques, its usage had been broadened for children and those patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss. We report first two cases of monoaural Vibrant Soundbridge implantation in Malaysia. They were children with bilateral conductive hearing loss who had failed to benefit from previous hearing aids. Floating mass transducers were attached in oval window and long process of incus respectively. Remarkable hearing yield was observed without surgical complication.

  11. Acceptable noise level (ANL) and real-world hearing-aid success in Taiwanese listeners.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Hsiao, Shih-Hsuan; Zhang, Xuyang

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to investigate the relationship between acceptable noise level (ANL), which was measured using Taiwanese and the international speech test signal (ISTS), and real-world hearing-aid success for listeners who were representative of the population commonly seen in clinics. Unaided ANLs were measured pre-hearing-aid fitting. Hearing-aid success was assessed three months post-fitting using the international outcome inventory for hearing aids (IOI-HA) and a hearing-aid use questionnaire. Eighty adults with hearing impairment completed the study. Both Taiwanese and ISTS ANLs were significantly associated with hearing-aid success, with higher ANLs suggesting poorer outcomes. However, the ANL's prediction accuracy for the probability of hearing-aid success was either much lower than that suggested by some literature, or was not much different from that of simply predicting all listeners as successful users. The current study suggested the possibility of using ANL to predict hearing-aid success. However, the usefulness of ANL as a clinical tool is unlikely to be as great as indicated by the literature.

  12. Hearing Aid Benefit in Patients with Mild Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Carole E; Danhauer, Jeffrey L; Ellis, Blakely B; Jilla, Anna Marie

    2016-04-01

    Untreated sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is associated with chronic health-care conditions, isolation, loneliness, and reduced quality of life. Although hearing aids can minimize the negative effects of SNHL, only about one in five persons with SNHL seeks help for communication problems. Many persons wait 10 yr or more from the time they first notice a problem before pursuing amplification. Further, little information about the benefits of amplification is available for persons with mild SNHL (MSNHL), who likely defer treatment even longer. To conduct a systematic review to weigh the evidence regarding benefits derived from the use of amplification by adults with MSNHL. Systematic review with meta-analysis. Adult hearing aid wearers with bilateral average pure-tone thresholds ≤45 dB HL at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz. PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied-Health Literature, Cochrane Collaboration, and Google Scholar were searched independently by the authors during September 2013. The authors used a consensus approach to assess the quality and extract data for the meta-analysis. Of 106 articles recovered for full-text review, only 10 met inclusion criteria (at least Level IV of evidence and involved and reported separate pre-/postfitting hearing aid outcomes for patients with MSNHL). Included studies involved mainly middle-aged to elderly patients using hearing aids of various styles and circuitry. Results from all of the studies indicated positive benefits from amplification for patients with MSNHL. Data from five studies were suitable for a meta-analysis, which produced a small-to-medium effect size of 0.85 (95% confidence intervals = 0.44-1.25) after adjusting for a small publication bias. This evidence confirmed benefits from the use of amplification in adults with MSNHL. Evidence exists supporting the notion that adults with MSNHL benefit from hearing aids. This information is important and useful to audiologists, patients, and third-party payers

  13. Nonlinear Hearing Aids and Verification of Fitting Targets

    PubMed Central

    Fabry, David A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of initial verification of hearing aid gain and output for nonlinear hearing aids. Specifically, “urban legend” has it that nonlinear hearing aids with digital noise reduction circuitry may not be accurately measured using functional gain and/or probe microphone measures. Discussed are the advantages and disadvantages of both measurement strategies, and how they may be used to “acoustically match” hearing aids to individual patients. An evaluation protocol that employs both optimal aided thresholds and probe microphone measurements to assess gain, output, and audibility in hearing-impaired patients. PMID:15004649

  14. Vibrant SoundBridge application to middle ear windows versus conventional hearing aids: a comparative study based on international outcome inventory for hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Atas, Ahmet; Tutar, Hakan; Gunduz, Bulent; Bayazıt, Yıldırım A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the outcomes of satisfaction of the patients who used hearing aids preceding the vibrant sound bridge (VSB) application on middle ear windows (14 oval window and 5 round window). Nineteen adult patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss were included in the study. All patients used behind the ear hearing aids on the site which was selected for VSB application. The patients used hearing aids for at least 3 months before the VSB operation. The floating mass transducer (FMT) was placed on one of the middle ear windows (oval or round) in VSB operation. The patients were evaluated with International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) preoperatively after at least 3 months trial of conventional hearing aid and postoperatively after 3 months use of VSB. No perioperative problem was encountered. The total score of IOI-HA was significantly higher with VSB compared with conventional hearing aids (p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference was found between the daily use, residual activity limitations, satisfaction, impact on others, quality of life between middle ear implant and hearing aid (p > 0.05). The IOI-HA scores were significantly higher with the middle ear implant than the conventional hearing aid regarding benefit and residual participation restrictions (p < 0.05). Although the scores for quality of life assessment was similar between VSB and hearing aid use, there was a superiority of VSB in terms of benefit and residual participation restrictions as well as overall IOI-HA scores as the FMT was placed on one of the middle ear windows.

  15. Clinical measures of hearing aid directivity: assumption, accuracy, and reliability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Bentler, Ruth A

    2012-01-01

    A number of clinical measures of directivity, including the front-to-back ratio (FBR) and front-to-side ratio (FSR), have been suggested to audiologists to monitor the functionality of hearing aids with directional microphones. These suggestions, however, are based on the assumption that directivity measured clinically changes monotonically when compared with changes measured using the directivity index (DI) and perceptual directional benefit. The objective of the present study was to empirically examine this assumption. In addition, the reliability of the clinical directivity measure was estimated to establish a referral threshold for defective directional microphone hearing aids. The directivity of the directional microphones of two behind-the-ear hearing aids was systematically degraded by plugging the microphone ports. The directivity was measured using four clinical measures: the FBR and FSR performed in the test chamber of a hearing aid analyzer and in sound field. Each measure was repeated four times in each directivity-degraded condition. The degraded directivity was also assessed using the DI measure in an anechoic chamber. The perceptual directional benefit in each directivity-degraded condition was obtained by testing 10 hearing-impaired adults in a sound field with diffuse noise using the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT). The results of the DI and HINT measures showed strong correlation between the two FSRs (test chamber and sound field), while the two FBRs showed no correlation. The directivity generated by the FBRs could remain unchanged even when the directional microphone had lost more than 50% of its directivity. The results further indicated that the measures performed in the sound field were more reliable than those performed in the test chamber. Based on the results of the reliability measures, a 30% change in directivity was suggested as the referral threshold signifying defective directional systems. Because the FSR predicts the DI and HINT

  16. Hearing Aid Use and Associated Factors in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Il Joon; Baek, Sun Young; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite the high prevalence of hearing impairment in the elderly, the rate of hearing aid use is still low. The objectives of this study were to report the nation-wide prevalence of hearing aid use in the Korean population and to determine the associated factors with hearing aid use utilizing a nationally representative data set. We obtained data from the 2010 to 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which were cross-sectional surveys of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the Republic of Korea at age ≥40 years (N = 12,709). A field survey team performed interviews as well as physical examinations. Hearing aid use was assessed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire and pure-tone audiometry was administered for all participants in a sound-attenuating booth. Prevalence of hearing aid acquisition and regular use were calculated in participants who reported perceived hearing loss and who have bilateral hearing thresholds exceeding the 40 dB hearing level. Multivariable analyses were used to examine the associated factors with hearing aid use. The prevalence of hearing aid acquisition and regular use was 17.4% and 12.6%, respectively, in South Korea. Increased hearing threshold (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.03–1.07), severe perceived hearing loss (OR 10.73, 95% CI 4.52–25.46), annoying tinnitus (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.61–6.74), balance problems (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.18–0.86), and myopia (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.12–0.76) were associated factors of regular use of hearing aids. The prevalence of hearing aid use in Korea is relatively low. Finding relevant factors of hearing aid use could provide further insight in setting up hearing-rehabilitation strategy for the elderly with significant hearing loss. PMID:26496259

  17. Hearing Aid Use and Associated Factors in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Il Joon; Baek, Sun Young; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2015-10-01

    Despite the high prevalence of hearing impairment in the elderly, the rate of hearing aid use is still low. The objectives of this study were to report the nation-wide prevalence of hearing aid use in the Korean population and to determine the associated factors with hearing aid use utilizing a nationally representative data set.We obtained data from the 2010 to 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which were cross-sectional surveys of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the Republic of Korea at age ≥40 years (N = 12,709). A field survey team performed interviews as well as physical examinations. Hearing aid use was assessed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire and pure-tone audiometry was administered for all participants in a sound-attenuating booth. Prevalence of hearing aid acquisition and regular use were calculated in participants who reported perceived hearing loss and who have bilateral hearing thresholds exceeding the 40 dB hearing level. Multivariable analyses were used to examine the associated factors with hearing aid use.The prevalence of hearing aid acquisition and regular use was 17.4% and 12.6%, respectively, in South Korea. Increased hearing threshold (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.03-1.07), severe perceived hearing loss (OR 10.73, 95% CI 4.52-25.46), annoying tinnitus (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.61-6.74), balance problems (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.18-0.86), and myopia (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.12-0.76) were associated factors of regular use of hearing aids.The prevalence of hearing aid use in Korea is relatively low. Finding relevant factors of hearing aid use could provide further insight in setting up hearing-rehabilitation strategy for the elderly with significant hearing loss.

  18. Masking Release in Children and Adults with Hearing Loss When Using Amplification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Marc; McCreery, Ryan; Kopun, Judy; Lewis, Dawna; Alexander, Joshua; Stelmachowicz, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared masking release for adults and children with normal hearing and hearing loss. For the participants with hearing loss, masking release using simulated hearing aid amplification with 2 different compression speeds (slow, fast) was compared. Method: Sentence recognition in unmodulated noise was compared with recognition…

  19. Masking Release in Children and Adults with Hearing Loss When Using Amplification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Marc; McCreery, Ryan; Kopun, Judy; Lewis, Dawna; Alexander, Joshua; Stelmachowicz, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared masking release for adults and children with normal hearing and hearing loss. For the participants with hearing loss, masking release using simulated hearing aid amplification with 2 different compression speeds (slow, fast) was compared. Method: Sentence recognition in unmodulated noise was compared with recognition…

  20. Hearing aid fine-tuning based on Dutch descriptions.

    PubMed

    Thielemans, Thijs; Pans, Donné; Chenault, Michelene; Anteunis, Lucien

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to derive an independent fitting assistant based on expert consensus. Two questions were asked: (1) what (Dutch) terms do hearing impaired listeners use nowadays to describe their specific hearing aid fitting problems? (2) What is the expert consensus on how to resolve these complaints by adjusting hearing aid parameters? Hearing aid dispensers provided descriptors that impaired listeners use to describe their reactions to specific hearing aid fitting problems. Hearing aid fitting experts were asked "How would you adjust the hearing aid if its user reports that the aid sounds…?" with the blank filled with each of the 40 most frequently mentioned descriptors. 112 hearing aid dispensers and 15 hearing aid experts. The expert solution with the highest weight value was considered the best solution for that descriptor. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to identify a factor structure in fitting problems. Nine fitting problems could be identified resulting in an expert-based, hearing aid manufacturer independent, fine-tuning fitting assistant for clinical use. The construction of an expert-based, hearing aid manufacturer independent, fine-tuning fitting assistant to be used as an additional tool in the iterative fitting process is feasible.

  1. Effect of hearing aids on hearing disability and quality of life in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Vuorialho, Arja; Karinen, Petri; Sorri, Martti

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of fitting a hearing aid by measuring the benefits derived from hearing aid use. Besides audiologic tests, a short version of the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly, and the EuroQol questionnaire were used in a prospective study. Ninety-eight first-time hearing aid users were interviewed prior to, and six months after, the fitting of their first hearing aids. The total HHIE-S score changed from 28.7 before, to 12.7 six months after, hearing aid fitting. Altogether 40%-60% of the users reported fewer social or emotional problems. There was a statistically significant positive change in the EQ-VAS score. According to the HHIE-S, hearing aids clearly alleviated hearing disability. The EQ-5D questionnaire was not sensitive enough for measuring the health-related quality of life of subjects with hearing impairment.

  2. Self-reported disability and handicap after hearing-aid fitting and benefit of hearing aids: comparison of fitting procedures, degree of hearing loss, experience with hearing aids and uni- and bilateral fittings.

    PubMed

    Metselaar, Mick; Maat, Bert; Krijnen, Pieta; Verschuure, Hans; Dreschler, Wouter A; Feenstra, Louw

    2009-06-01

    Self-reported outcome on hearing disability and handicap as well as overall health-related quality of life were measured after hearing-aid fitting in a large-scale clinical population. Fitting was performed according to two different procedures in a double-blind study design. We used a comparative procedure based on optimizing speech intelligibility scores and a strictly implemented fitting formula. Hearing disability and handicap were assessed with the hearing handicap and disability inventory and benefit of hearing aids with the abbreviated profile of hearing aid benefit. Effects on health-related quality of life and depression were assessed with the EuroQol-5D questionnaire and the geriatric depression scale. We found that hearing-aid fitting according to either procedure had a significantly positive effect on disability and handicap associated with hearing loss. This effect lasted for several months. Only the effect on disability persisted after 1-year of follow-up. Self-reported benefit from hearing aids was comparable for both fitting procedures. Unaided hearing disability was more pronounced in groups of participants with greater hearing loss, while the benefit of hearing aids was independent from the degree of hearing impairment. First-time hearing aid users reported greater benefit from their hearing aids. The added value from a bilateral hearing-aid fitting was not significant. Overall health-related quality of life and incidence of depression did not alter after hearing-aid fitting.

  3. Study of hearing aid effectiveness and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kayabaşoğlu, Gürkan; Kaymaz, Recep; Erkorkmaz, Ünal; Güven, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate hearing aid using rate, patient satisfaction rate and achievements in social communication of patients by assessing the hearing thresholds before and after device use in patients who were determined as suitable for hearing aid use. Hundred eighty patients who were admitted to Otolaryngology Clinic of Sakarya University Medical Faculty and approved of hearing aid usage between January 2013 and May 2013 were included in the study. Patients (21 males, 26 females; mean age 61.91±12.82; range 24 to 85 years) were performed free field audiometry with and without the device by the same audiometrist and Turkish version of the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids by the same otolaryngologist. Of patients, 14.28% did not obtain the hearing aid even though they received a hearing aid approval report. Assessment of the answers of inventory questions revealed that 87% of patients used hearing aid more than four hours a day, 72% benefited significantly from hearing aid, and 64% had no complaint or had few complaints compared to the before-hearing aid period. Using hearing aid affects daily activities of patients slightly or moderately and increases their communication skills.

  4. Guidelines for the evaluation of hearing aid fitting (2010).

    PubMed

    Kodera, Kazuoki; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Makito; Manabe, Toshiki; Kanda, Yukihiko; Shiraishi, Kimio; Sugiuchi, Tomoko; Suzuki, Keiko; Tauchi, Hikaru; Nishimura, Tadashi; Matsuhira, Toshimasa; Ishikawa, Kotaro

    2016-06-01

    The methods to evaluate the efficacy of the adjusted hearing aid for a hearing-impaired person are fitting tests. The tests include those presently carried out for evaluating hearing aid fitting, and the methods of testing and evaluation have been published as "Guidelines for the evaluation of hearing aid fitting (2010)" by the Japan Audiological Society. Guidelines for the following 8 test methods are presented. (1) Measurements of speech performance-intensity functions and speech recognition scores; (2) Assessment of hearing aid fitting from the aspect of tolerance of environmental noise; (3) Measurement of real-ear insertion gain (measurement of sound pressure levels at the eardrum); (4) Measurement of the hearing threshold level and the uncomfortable loudness level (UCL) in sound pressure level (SPL) with an inserted earphone; (5) Aided threshold test in a sound field (functional gain measurement); (6) Prediction of insertion gain and aided threshold from hearing aid characteristics and the pure tone audiogram; (7) Measurement of speech recognition in noise; (8) Assessment of hearing aid fitting using questionnaires. In the above tests, (1) and (2) are mandatory tests, and (3) to (8) are informative tests. By performing test combinations properly selected from the above 8 tests, the benefits of a hearing aid could be determined. The above test methods were useful and valuable in determining the efficacy of the adjusted hearing aid for a hearing-impaired person during clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Improvement of older-person-specific QOL after hearing aid fitting and its relation to social interaction.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yukari; Švejdíková, Barbora; Kisvetrová, Helena

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether hearing aids use is associated with improvement of older-person-specific QOL and whether social interactions modify the association. The WHOQOL-OLD questionnaire was answered by 105 older adults aged 60 to 90 years who were newly fitted hearing aids on the day of fitting and at 2 - 6 months afterward. The associations between the daily hours of hearing aid usage and social relations with changes in the WHOQOL-OLD total score after hearing aids fitting were estimated adjusting for possible confounders. Older persons with hearing loss experienced significant increases in WHOQOL-OLD total score after hearing aid fitting. Regular use of hearing aid was associated with a greater increase in the total score. The combined categorical variable of social relations and hearing aid usage revealed no separate effects of these two variables, but a combined effect; only those with frequent social interactions who used their hearing aid regularly had a significantly greater increase in WHOQOL-OLD total score. This study's findings indicate that hearing aid fitting may be associated with a subsequent improvement in older-person-specific QOL by improvements in hearing due to the hearing aid, and possibly enhanced communication opportunities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Assembly and Insertion of a Self-Fitting Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly

    2011-01-01

    A self-fitting hearing aid has been proposed as a viable option to meet the need for rehabilitation in areas where audiology services are unreliable. A successful outcome with a self-fitting hearing aid pivots in part on the clarity of the instructions accompanying the device. The aims of this article are (a) to review the literature to determine features that should be incorporated into written health-care materials and factors to consider in the design process when developing written instructions for a target audience of older adults and (b) to apply this information to the development of a set of written instructions as the first step in self-fitting of a hearing aid, assembling four parts and inserting the aid into the ear. The method involved a literature review of published peer reviewed research. The literature revealed four steps in the development of written health-care materials: planning, design, assessment of suitability, and pilot testing. Best practice design principles for each step were applied in the development of instructions for how to assemble and insert a hearing aid. Separate booklets were developed for the left and right aids and the content of each consisted of simple line drawings accompanied by captions. The reading level was Grade 3.5 equivalent and the Flesch Reading Ease Score was 91.1 indicating that the materials were “very easy” to read. It is essential to follow best practice design principles when developing written health-care materials to motivate the reader, maximize comprehension, and increase the likelihood of successful application of the content. PMID:22389434

  7. Real-world benefit from directional microphone hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Gnewikow, David; Ricketts, Todd; Bratt, Gene W; Mutchler, Laura C

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes data from a 3-year, double-blinded study of directional hearing aid benefit. Ninety-four subjects in three hearing loss groups, all previous users of omnidirectional output-compression hearing aids, completed all aspects of the study. Participants were fit with new hearing aids for 1 month in a directional mode and 1 month in an omnidirectional mode. Following 1 month of use, subjects completed a number of objective and subjective measures of hearing aid outcome. Objective and subjective data were analyzed across hearing aid and hearing loss conditions. Subjects in all hearing loss groups exhibited better performance in the directional conditions for objective speech-in-noise measures; however, subjective data did not indicate a clear advantage for directional amplification. Results and clinical implications are discussed.

  8. Evaluation of the Hearing Aid Rehabilitation Questionnaire in Dutch: Examination of its Psychometric Properties and Potential Use as a Screening Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Chenault, Michelene N.; Anteunis, Lucien J.C.; Berger, Martijn P.F.

    2013-01-01

    Items pertaining to hearing and hearing aids from the Hearing Aid Rehabilitation Questionnaire were applied to a heterogeneous sample of Dutch patients aged 55 years and more to evaluate their potential use in hearing screening. Subjects aged 55+ were recruited from a large general practitioners practice to participate. Three groups were formed: a group of 63 persons with a hearing aid, a group of 64 without a hearing aid but with sufficient hearing impairment to qualify for hearing aid reimbursement, and a group of 85 non-hearing impaired persons. Factor and reliability analyses revealed a structure with two scales regarding hearing, namely functionality and social hearing and three scales pertaining to hearing aids, namely hearing aid stigma, pressure to be assessed and not wanting a hearing aid. Scale validity was assessed with pure tone averages over the frequencies 1, 2 and 4 kHz and with a visual analogue scale for subjective hearing. The derived scales can be applied reliably in audiological assessment in an adult hearing screen setting to detect experienced hearing problems as well as attitudes related to hearing and hearing aids. PMID:26557343

  9. Music and hearing aids--an introduction.

    PubMed

    Chasin, Marshall

    2012-09-01

    Modern digital hearing aids have provided improved fidelity over those of earlier decades for speech. The same however cannot be said for music. Most modern hearing aids have a limitation of their "front end," which comprises the analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. For a number of reasons, the spectral nature of music as an input to a hearing aid is beyond the optimal operating conditions of the "front end" components. Amplified music tends to be of rather poor fidelity. Once the music signal is distorted, no amount of software manipulation that occurs later in the circuitry can improve things. The solution is not a software issue. Some characteristics of music that make it difficult to be transduced without significant distortion include an increased sound level relative to that of speech, and the crest factor- the difference in dB between the instantaneous peak of a signal and its RMS value. Clinical strategies and technical innovations have helped to improve the fidelity of amplified music and these include a reduction of the level of the input that is presented to the A/D converter.

  10. The cost-effectiveness of hearing-aid fitting in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Joore, Manuela A; Van Der Stel, Hans; Peters, Hans J M; Boas, Gijs M; Anteunis, Lucien J C

    2003-03-01

    To determine the cost-effectiveness of hearing-aid fitting. Cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov model based on aggregate data and results from a prospective intervention study. The cost-effectiveness study was based in the general community. The prospective study was hospital based, as 85% of the first-time hearing-aid users attend a hospital in the process of hearing-aid fitting. The prospective intervention study included adult first-time hearing-aid users with no contraindications for hearing-aid use. The usual process of hearing-aid fitting in the Netherlands. Costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). The QALYs were based on EuroQol scores. We included direct and indirect costs in the analysis. The mean improvement on the EuroQol measure was 0.03 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.03 to 0.08), and on the hearing-specific visual analog scale, 0.27 (95% CI, 0.22-0.31). The base-case outcome based on the EuroQol was 15 807/QALY (US dollars 17 072/QALY) (CI, -24 239/QALY to 3718/QALY). On the basis of this base-case estimate, fitting of hearing aids is considered a cost-effective health care intervention. The CI indicates that the result is not unambiguously positive, probably because the EuroQol lacked sensitivity for the evaluation of hearing-aid fitting. Until now, no study has found an effect of hearing-aid fitting on generic quality of life. Therefore, measures are needed that are suitable for the evaluation of the effects of interventions for sensory disabilities, such as the fitting of hearing aids, on generic quality of life.

  11. Evaluation of Hearing Handicap in Adults with Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    The present study attempted to evaluate hearing handicap in adults with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD). The study also attempted to determine if gender, pure tone average, speech identification scores (SIS), and reported duration of hearing loss could predict the hearing handicap in adults with ANSD. Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults and Hearing Handicap Questionnaire were administered to 50 adults with ANSD. Using both the scales, there was a significant hearing handicap in both the social and emotional domains in adults with ANSD. SIS was a good predictor of hearing handicap compared to other variables. The poor SIS can affect communication skills leading to higher degree of social handicap. The ignorance regarding the exact cause for their hearing problems and lack of appropriate management strategies could lead to emotional problems in individuals with ANSD. However, further studies are essential for determining hearing handicap with the use of hearing aids and cochlear implants.

  12. Evaluating hearing aid handling skills: A systematic and descriptive review.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Rebecca J; Taljaard, Dunay S; Brennan-Jones, Christopher G; Tegg-Quinn, Susan; Eikelboom, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    To review and appraise the content and quality of surveys that evaluate hearing aid handling. A systematic and descriptive review. Twelve surveys were identified as containing at least one item evaluating hearing aid handling. Fifteen aspects of hearing aid handling were evaluated. None of the surveys evaluated all aspects of handling skills identified. While the majority of studies reported some psychometric evaluation during survey development, the quality of the methodology used and extent of psychometric evaluation reported varied considerably. There is currently no single survey that evaluates handling skills comprehensively. In the absence of an ideal survey, the Practical Hearing aid Skills Test appears to be the most inclusive clinician-administered survey and the Hearing aid User's Questionnaire appears to be the most inclusive self-report survey evaluating hearing aid handling precision; however, there are limitations in the analysis of their psychometric properties. Nonetheless, use of these surveys in clinical practice could identify areas of handling that warrant additional training in order to improve hearing aid success. Research identifying the full range of hearing aid handling skills necessary for successful hearing aid use will further contribute knowledge to the complex construct of successful hearing aid-use.

  13. External auditory canal microbiology and hearing aid use.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Çiğdem Tepe; Akçay, Seniha Şenbayrak; Toros, Sema Zer; Oysu, Çağatay; Verim, Ayşegül; Çelebi, Şaban; Aksaray, Sebahat

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence and nature of bacterial flora on hearing aids and the ears of this population. We wonder if the microbiology of the ears with hearing aid wearing differs from the other ear. Tertiary referral center. A prospective, clinical study. Three samples were taken, one from the surface of the hearing aid's ear mold; one from the hearing aid-wearing ear canal and the last one from the ear without hearing aid. Samples were cultured to determine qualitatively and quantitatively the pathogenic microorganisms present. A total of 123 samples, obtained from 41 hearing aid users, were analyzed. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter species, Staphylococcus auricularis, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were identified organisms. We identified unexpected microorganisms both on hearing aids and hearing aid using ears. This study demonstrates that using hearing aid alters the ear canal flora. To avoid otitis externa, it is important to use an appropriate hygiene routine to clean and disinfect hearing aids and ear molds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hearing aid use and long-term health outcomes: hearing handicap, mental health, social engagement, cognitive function, physical health and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Piers; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Fischer, Mary E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Nondahl, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To clarify the impact of hearing aids on mental health, social engagement, cognitive function, and physical health outcomes in older adults with hearing impairment. Design We assessed hearing handicap (Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly; HHIE-S), cognition (Mini Mental State Exam, Trail Making, Auditory Verbal Learning, Digit-Symbol Substitution, Verbal Fluency, incidence of cognitive impairment), physical health (SF-12 physical component, basic and instrumental activities of daily living, mortality), social engagement (hours per week spent in solitary activities) and mental health (SF-12 mental component) at baseline, 5 years prior to baseline, and 5 and 11 years after baseline. Study sample Community-dwelling older adults with hearing impairment (N=666) from the Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study cohort. Results There were no significant differences between hearing aid users and non-users in cognitive, social engagement or mental health outcomes at any time point. Aided HHIE-S was significantly better than unaided HHIE-S. At 11 years hearing aid users had significantly better SF-12 physical health scores (46.2 versus 41.2; p=0.03). There was no difference in incidence of cognitive impairment or mortality. Conclusion There was no evidence that hearing aids promote cognitive function, mental health, or social engagement. Hearing aids may reduce hearing handicap and promote better physical health. PMID:26140300

  15. Amplification with hearing aids for patients with tinnitus and co-existing hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Hoare, Derek J; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; Sereda, Magdalena; Akeroyd, Michael A; Hall, Deborah

    2014-01-31

    Tinnitus is described as the perception of sound or noise in the absence of real acoustic stimulation. In the current absence of a cure for tinnitus, clinical management typically focuses on reducing the effects of co-morbid symptoms such as distress or hearing loss. Hearing loss is commonly co-morbid with tinnitus and so logic implies that amplification of external sounds by hearing aids will reduce perception of the tinnitus sound and the distress associated with it. To assess the effects of hearing aids specifically in terms of tinnitus benefit in patients with tinnitus and co-existing hearing loss. We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 19 August 2013. Randomised controlled trials and non-randomised controlled trials recruiting adults with subjective tinnitus and some degree of hearing loss, where the intervention involves amplification with hearing aids and this is compared to interventions involving other medical devices, other forms of standard or complementary therapy, or combinations of therapies, no intervention or placebo interventions. Three authors independently screened all selected abstracts. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed those potentially suitable studies for risk of bias. For studies meeting the inclusion criteria, we used the mean difference (MD) to compare hearing aids with other interventions and controls. One randomised controlled trial (91 participants) was included in this review. We judged the trial to have a low risk of bias for method of randomisation and outcome reporting, and an unclear risk of bias for other criteria. No non-randomised controlled trials meeting our inclusion criteria were identified. The included study measured change in tinnitus

  16. [Hearing aid efficacy according to the data from the Tula regional Deaf and Dumb Centre].

    PubMed

    Pekarskiĭ, S I; Kiriushin, P V

    2009-01-01

    Auditory inefficiency creates a serious social problem due to the ever increasing number of people with this pathology. The use of hearing aids constitutes the basis of rehabilitative measures for these patients. The authors present results of the analysis of hearing aid efficacy among adult subjects residing in the Tula region carried out in the framework of the relevant Federal program during the last 3 years. Criteria for the assessment of the efficacy of hearing aids are proposed and factors on which it depends are considered.

  17. The Nonfunctioning Hearing Aid: A Case of Double Jeopardy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedley, Thayne; Plapinger, Donald

    1988-01-01

    Insertion of a dead hearing aid in 15 otologically normal children (ages 4-6) resulted in a mean hearing loss of 25-30 dB. Results suggest that sensorineural hearing losses of 50 dB may increase to 80 dB with nonfunctioning aids in place, compounding a hearing-impaired child's existing communication and educational difficulties. (Author/VW)

  18. No Association Between Time of Onset of Hearing Loss (Childhood Versus Adulthood) and Self-Reported Hearing Handicap in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tambs, Kristian; Engdahl, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the association between time of onset of hearing loss (childhood vs. adulthood) and self-reported hearing handicap in adults. Methods This is a population-based cohort study of 2,024 adults (mean = 48 years) with hearing loss (binaural pure-tone average 0.5–4 kHz ≥ 20 dB HL) who completed a hearing handicap questionnaire. In childhood, the same persons (N = 2,024) underwent audiometry in a school investigation (at ages 7, 10, and 13 years), in which 129 were diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss (binaural pure-tone average 0.5–4 kHz ≥ 20 dB HL), whereas 1,895 had normal hearing thresholds. Results Hearing handicap was measured in adulthood as the sum-score of various speech perception and social impairment items (15 items). The sum-score increased with adult hearing threshold level (p < .001). After adjustment for adult hearing threshold level, hearing aid use, adult age, sex, and socioeconomic status, there was no significant difference in hearing handicap sum-score between the group with childhood-onset hearing loss (n = 129) and the group with adult-onset hearing loss (n = 1,895; p = .882). Conclusion Self-reported hearing handicap in adults increased with hearing threshold level. After adjustment for adult hearing threshold level, this cohort study revealed no significant association between time of onset of hearing loss (childhood vs. adulthood) and self-reported hearing handicap. PMID:26649831

  19. Students' Attitudes toward the Use of Hearing Aids in Al-Ahsa, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alodail, Abdullah Kholifh

    2011-01-01

    Hearing aid devices are worn within people's ears to help them hear the sounds around them. Teachers have to accept the use of hearing aids in the classroom as a device to assist students with hearing loss (Plumley, 2008). Further study is helpful to hearing aid research because it demonstrates the importance of hearing aid benefit awareness in…

  20. Students' Attitudes toward the Use of Hearing Aids in Al-Ahsa, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alodail, Abdullah Kholifh

    2011-01-01

    Hearing aid devices are worn within people's ears to help them hear the sounds around them. Teachers have to accept the use of hearing aids in the classroom as a device to assist students with hearing loss (Plumley, 2008). Further study is helpful to hearing aid research because it demonstrates the importance of hearing aid benefit awareness in…

  1. Speech-recognition performance after long-term hearing aid use.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Janet E; Wilson, Richard H; Stelmachowicz, Patricia; Bratt, Gene W; Williams, David W

    2007-04-01

    Larson et al (2000) reported the findings of a multicenter, NIDCDNA clinical trial that compared hearing aid performance for three output limiting circuits in 360 adults with symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. The current study was undertaken to examine long-term hearing aid benefit in this same group of participants following five to six years of hearing aid use. The speech-recognition portion of the follow-up study enrolled 108 participants from the original study, 85% of whom were current hearing aid users and 15% of whom had not worn hearing aids during the past month (nonusers). Recognition performance in sound field on the NU-6 (quiet at 62 dB SPL) and the CST (quiet at 74 dB SPL and with -3 and 3 dB signal-to-babble ratios [S/B] at 62 and 74 dB SPL) was measured unaided and aided whenever possible. Speech-recognition abilities decreased significantly since the original study. Speech-recognition decrements were observed regardless of the speech materials (NU-6 and CST), test condition (quiet and noise), S/B (-3 and 3 dB), or stimulus level (62 and 74 dB SPL). Despite decreases in speech recognition, hearing aid benefit remained largely unchanged since the original study; aided performance exceeded unaided performance regardless of presentation level or noise condition. As in the original study, the relations among stimulus level, S/B, and speech-recognition performance were complex.

  2. Screening of Cognitive Function and Hearing Impairment in Older Adults: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lena Lar Nar; Yu, Joannie Ka Yin; Chan, Shaina Shing; Tong, Michael Chi Fai

    2014-01-01

    Background. Previous research has found that hearing loss is associated with poorer cognitive function. The question is that when a hearing impairment is being compensated for by appropriately fitted monaural hearing aids, special precautions are still needed when screening cognitive function in older adults. Objective. This research examined cognitive function in elderly hearing aid users who used monaural hearing aids and whether the presence of a hearing impairment should be accounted for when screening cognitive function in these individuals. Methods. Auditory thresholds, sentence reception thresholds, and self-reported outcomes with hearing aids were measured in 34 older hearing aid users to ensure hearing aids were appropriately fitted. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) results obtained in these participants were then compared to normative data obtained in a general older population exhibiting similar demographic characteristics. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to examine the effects of demographic and auditory variables on MMSE scores. Conclusions. Results showed that, even with appropriately fitted hearing aids, cognitive decline was significant. Besides the factors commonly measured in the literature, we believed that auditory deprivation was not being fully compensated for by hearing aids. Most importantly, screening of cognitive function should take into account the effects of hearing impairment, even when hearing devices have been appropriately fitted. PMID:25140321

  3. Audiological manifestations in children and adults with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Matas, Carla Gentile; Santos Filha, Valdete Alves Valentins dos; Juan, Kleber Ramos de; Pinto, Fernanda Rodrigues; Gonçalves, Isabela Crivellaro

    2010-01-01

    according to the literature, the incidence of hearing impairment in patients with HIV / AIDS might be caused by alterations in external, middle and / or internal ear. to characterize and to compare the results of audiological assessment and Auditory Brainstem Response in children and adults with AIDS. audiological and electrophysiological (Auditory Brainstem Response) assessment of hearing was carried out in 51 children and 22 adults with HIV/AIDS (research groups I and II, respectively) and in 50 healthy children and 25 healthy adults (control groups I and II, respectively). Participants ranged in age between 3 and 10 years (children) and between 18 and 50 years (adults). the most frequent observed alteration for children with AIDS was related to the middle ear whereas for adults with AIDS it was related to the internal ear. Higher occurrence of abnormal results was observed for adults with AIDS as compared to children with AIDS. children and adults with AIDS present alterations in audiological assessment and Auditory Brainstem Response. This suggests the involvement of peripheral and central auditory pathways. Findings of the present study emphasize the effectiveness of using electrophysiological hearing measures in order to better identify the brain injury level in patients with AIDS, besides allowing the monitoring of the development rate of the disease.

  4. Effectiveness of a teleaudiology approach to hearing aid fitting.

    PubMed

    Blamey, Peter J; Blamey, Jeremy K; Saunders, Elaine

    2015-12-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of an online speech perception test (SPT) for the measurement of hearing and hearing aid fitting in comparison with conventional methods. Phase 1 was performed with 88 people to evaluate the SPT for the detection of significant hearing loss. The SPT had high sensitivity (94%) and high selectivity (98%). In Phase 2, phonetic stimulus-response matrices derived from the SPT results for 408 people were used to calculate "Infograms™." At every frequency, there was a highly significant correlation (p < 0.001) between hearing thresholds derived from the Infogram and conventional audiograms. In Phase 3, initial hearing aid fittings were derived from conventional audiograms and Infograms for two groups of hearing impaired people. Unaided and aided SPTs were used to measure the perceptual benefit of the aids for the two groups. The mean increases between unaided and aided SPT scores were 19.6%, and 22.2% (n = 517, 484; t = 2.2; p < 0.05) for hearing aids fitted using conventional audiograms and Infograms respectively. The research provided evidence that the SPT is a highly effective tool for the detection and measurement of hearing loss and hearing aid fitting. Use of the SPT reduces the costs and increases the effectiveness of hearing aid fitting, thereby enabling a sustainable teleaudiology business model. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Hearing Aid Patient Education Materials: Is There Room for Improvement?

    PubMed

    Joseph, John; Svider, Peter F; Shaigany, Kevin; Eloy, Jean Anderson; McDonald, Paulette G; Folbe, Adam J; Hong, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare the readability of patient education materials (PEMs) from leading manufacturers of behind-the-ear style hearing aids and popular hearing aid information Web sites to determine if they meet guidelines recommended by public health agencies. Analysis of hearing aid PEMs. Printed user guides from six of the leading manufacturers of BTE hearing aids and 15 of the most popular hearing aid-information Web sites were accessed online and analyzed for readability using the Gunning-Fog Index, New Fog Count, Raygor Estimate Graph, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Flesch Reading Ease score. Overall average grade-level readability for all six printed manufacturer user manuals was calculated to be written at a 10th grade reading level. Overall average grade-level readabilities for all 15 popular online hearing aid-information Web sites representing professional organizations, suppliers, and health information services were calculated to be written at 10th, 10th, and 11th grade reading levels, respectively. Average Flesch Reading Ease scores for all printed guides and online patient information Web sites were calculated to fall within the fairly difficult category for readability. PEMs provided by top hearing aid manufactures and popular hearing aid Web sites are written well above the reading level recommended by the National Institutes of Health. Consideration should be given toward simplifying these materials in order to enhance user experience and increase compliance among behind-the-ear hearing aid users. American Academy of Audiology.

  6. Hearing aids' electromagnetic immunity to environmental RF fields.

    PubMed

    Facta, S; Benedetto, A; Anglesio, L; d'Amore, G

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the electromagnetic interference on hearing aids was evaluated. Electromagnetic (EM) immunity tests on different types of hearing aids were carried out, using signals of intensity and modulation comparable to those present in the environment. The purpose of this work is to characterise the interference, establishing the immunity threshold for different frequencies and finding out which types of hearing aids are more susceptible, and in which frequency range. The tests were carried out in a GTEM cell on seven hearing aids, using AM and GSM signals in the radiofrequency (RF) range.

  7. Effect of a Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid on speech recognition performance: subjective and objective measurement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Beom; Chung, Won-Ho; Choi, Jeesun; Hong, Sung Hwa; Cho, Yang-Sun; Park, Gyuseok; Lee, Sangmin

    2014-06-01

    The object was to evaluate speech perception improvement through Bluetooth-implemented hearing aids in hearing-impaired adults. Thirty subjects with bilateral symmetric moderate sensorineural hearing loss participated in this study. A Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid was fitted unilaterally in all study subjects. Objective speech recognition score and subjective satisfaction were measured with a Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid to replace the acoustic connection from either a cellular phone or a loudspeaker system. In each system, participants were assigned to 4 conditions: wireless speech signal transmission into hearing aid (wireless mode) in quiet or noisy environment and conventional speech signal transmission using external microphone of hearing aid (conventional mode) in quiet or noisy environment. Also, participants completed questionnaires to investigate subjective satisfaction. Both cellular phone and loudspeaker system situation, participants showed improvements in sentence and word recognition scores with wireless mode compared to conventional mode in both quiet and noise conditions (P < .001). Participants also reported subjective improvements, including better sound quality, less noise interference, and better accuracy naturalness, when using the wireless mode (P < .001). Bluetooth-implemented hearing aids helped to improve subjective and objective speech recognition performances in quiet and noisy environments during the use of electronic audio devices.

  8. [The usefulness of today's hearing aids--possibilities and limitations].

    PubMed

    Kiessling, J

    1999-06-17

    Some ten to twelve million people in Germany are estimated to need hearing aids. Many of the hard of hearing suffer from inner ear deafness with hair cell dysfunction, and not only hear sounds at too low a level of intensity, but also distorted and unintelligible. Modern special digital hearing aids are able, by appropriate amplification of certain frequencies or frequency bands or, e.g. through the use of directional microphones, to improve discrimination of speech from surrounding noise. In patients with mild hearing losses in particular, the use of bilateral hearing aids is recommended to improve speech recognition. Attention is drawn to the importance of individual counselling and the testing of the hearing aids by the patient.

  9. Impact of Hearing Aid Technology on Outcomes in Daily Life I: The Patients' Perspective.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robyn M; Johnson, Jani A; Xu, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    One of the challenges facing hearing care providers when recommending hearing aids is the choice of device technology level. Major manufacturers market families of hearing aids that are described as spanning the range from basic technology to premium technology. Premium technology hearing aids include acoustical processing capabilities (features) that are not found in basic technology instruments. These premium features are intended to yield improved hearing in daily life compared with basic-feature devices. However, independent research that establishes the incremental effectiveness of premium-feature devices compared with basic-feature devices is lacking. This research was designed to explore reported differences in hearing abilities for adults using premium- and basic-feature hearing aids in their daily lives. This was a single-blinded, repeated, crossover trial in which the participants were blinded. All procedures were carefully controlled to limit researcher bias. Forty-five participants used carefully fitted bilateral hearing aids for 1 month and then provided data to describe the hearing improvements or deficiencies noted in daily life. Typical participants were 70 years old with mild to moderate adult-onset hearing loss bilaterally. Each participant used four pairs of hearing aids: premium- and basic-feature devices from brands marketed by each of two major manufacturers. Participants were blinded about the devices they used and about the research questions. All of the outcomes were designed to capture the participant's point of view about the benefits of the hearing aids. Three types of data were collected: change in hearing-related quality of life, extent of agreement with six positively worded statements about everyday hearing with the hearing aids, and reported preferences between the premium- and basic-feature devices from each brand as well as across all four research hearing aids combined. None of these measures yielded a statistically significant

  10. Impact of Hearing Aid Technology on Outcomes in Daily Life I: the Patients’ Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robyn M; Johnson, Jani A; Xu, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives One of the challenges facing hearing care providers when recommending hearing aids is the choice of device technology level. Major manufacturers market families of hearing aids that are described as spanning the range from basic technology to premium technology. Premium technology hearing aids include acoustical processing capabilities (features) that are not found in basic technology instruments. These premium features are intended to yield improved hearing in daily life compared to basic-feature devices. However, independent research that establishes the incremental effectiveness of premium-feature devices compared to basic-feature devices is lacking. This research was designed to explore reported differences in hearing abilities for adults using premium-feature and basic-feature hearing aids in their daily lives. Design This was a single-blinded, repeated, crossover trial in which the participants were blinded. All procedures were carefully controlled to limit researcher bias. Forty-five participants used carefully fitted bilateral hearing aids for one month and then provided data to describe the hearing improvements or deficiencies noted in daily life. Typical participants were 70 years old with mild to moderate adult-onset hearing loss bilaterally. Each participant used 4 pairs of hearing aids: premium- and basic-feature devices from brands marketed by each of two major manufacturers. Participants were blinded about the devices they used and about the research questions. Results All of the outcomes were designed to capture the participant’s point of view about the benefits of the hearing aids. Three types of data were collected: change in hearing-related quality of life, extent of agreement with six positively worded statements about everyday hearing with the hearing aids, and reported preferences between the premium- and basic-feature devices from each brand as well as across all four research hearing aids combined. None of these measures yielded

  11. Full time directional versus user selectable microphone modes in hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Todd; Henry, Paula; Gnewikow, David

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to systematically examine hearing aid benefit as measured by speech recognition and self-assessment methods across omnidirectional and directional hearing aid modes. These data were used to compare directional benefit as measured by speech recognition in the laboratory to hearing aid wearer's perceptions of benefit in everyday environments across full-time directional, full-time omnidirectional, and user selectable directional fittings. Identification of possible listening situations that resulted in different self reported hearing aid benefit as a function of microphone type was a secondary objective of this experiment. Fifteen adults with symmetrical, sloping sensorineural hearing loss were fitted bilaterally with in-the-ear (ITE) directional hearing aids. Measures of hearing aid benefit included the Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (PHAB), the Connected Sentence Test (CST), the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT), and a daily use log. Additionally, two new subscales were developed for administration with the PHAB. These subscales were developed to specifically address situations in which directional hearing aids may provide different degrees of benefit than omnidirectional hearing aids. Participants completed these measures in three conditions: omnidirectional only (O), directional only with low-frequency gain compensation (D), and user-selectable directional/omnidirectional (DO). Results from the speech intelligibility in noise testing indicated significantly more hearing aid benefit in directional modes than omnidirectional. PHAB results indicated more benefit on the background noise subscale (BN) in the DO condition than in the O condition; however, this directional advantage was not present for the D condition. Although the reliability of the newly proposed subscales is as yet unknown, the data were interpreted as revealing a directional advantage in situations where the signal of interest was in front of the participant and a

  12. Pediatric Hearing Aid Management: Challenges among Hispanic Families.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Ana; Muñoz, Karen; White, Karl; Nelson, Lauri; Domenech-Rodriguez, Melanie; Twohig, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Hearing aid fitting in infancy has become more common in the United States as a result of earlier identification of hearing loss. Consistency of hearing aid use is an area of concern for young children, as well as other hearing aid management challenges parents encounter that may contribute to less-than-optimal speech and language outcomes. Research that describes parent hearing aid management experiences of Spanish-speaking Hispanic families, or the extent of their needs, is not available. To effectively support parent learning, in a culturally sensitive manner, providers may benefit from having a better understanding of the needs and challenges Hispanic families experience with hearing aid management. The purpose of the current study was to describe challenges with hearing aid management and use for children from birth to 5 yr of age, as reported by Spanish-speaking parents in the United States, and factors that may influence hearing aid use. This study used a cross-sectional survey design. Forty-two Spanish-speaking parents of children up to 5 yr of age who had been fitted with hearing aids. Responses were obtained from surveys mailed to parents through early intervention programs and audiology clinics. Descriptive statistics were used to describe frequencies and variance in responses. Forty-seven percent of the parents reported the need for help from an interpreter during audiology appointments. Even though parents received information and were taught skills by their audiologist, many wanted to receive more information. For example, 59% wanted to know how to meet other parents of children who have hearing loss, although 88% had previously received this information; 56% wanted to know how to do basic hearing aid maintenance, although 71% had previously received instruction. The two most frequently reported hearing aid use challenges were fear of losing the hearing aids, and not seeing benefit from the hearing aids. Hearing aid use during all waking hours was

  13. Measurement of hearing aid internal noise1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James D.; Goodman, Shawn S.; Bentler, Ruth A.

    2010-01-01

    Hearing aid equivalent input noise (EIN) measures assume the primary source of internal noise to be located prior to amplification and to be constant regardless of input level. EIN will underestimate internal noise in the case that noise is generated following amplification. The present study investigated the internal noise levels of six hearing aids (HAs). Concurrent with HA processing of a speech-like stimulus with both adaptive features (acoustic feedback cancellation, digital noise reduction, microphone directionality) enabled and disabled, internal noise was quantified for various stimulus levels as the variance across repeated trials. Changes in noise level as a function of stimulus level demonstrated that (1) generation of internal noise is not isolated to the microphone, (2) noise may be dependent on input level, and (3) certain adaptive features may contribute to internal noise. Quantifying internal noise as the variance of the output measures allows for noise to be measured under real-world processing conditions, accounts for all sources of noise, and is predictive of internal noise audibility. PMID:20370034

  14. Permanent Threshold Shift Associated with Overamplification by Hearing Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macrae, John H.

    1991-01-01

    The study evaluated use of the Modified Power Law to predict permanent threshold shift (PTS) resulting from noise exposure in eight children with severe sensorineural hearing loss attributed to overamplification by hearing aids. The PTS tended to be flat across frequency with its course similar to PTS in persons with normal hearing exposed to…

  15. Cochlear implant and hearing aid: a new approach to optimizing the fitting in this bimodal situation.

    PubMed

    Keilmann, Annerose M; Bohnert, Andrea M; Gosepath, Jan; Mann, Wolf J

    2009-12-01

    More and more patients with residual hearing on the contralateral side are becoming candidates for cochlear implants (CI) surgery due to increasing CI. The major benefits of regular binaural hearing are spatial hearing, localization, and signal source discrimination in both quiet and noisy surroundings. In most of the reports, hearing aid fitting was carried out without balancing both the devices. Twelve children and eight adults with residual hearing on the non-operated side were binaurally fitted. Our fitting procedure for the hearing aid was based on the desired sensation level [i/o] method. A loudness scaling was used to adjust the loudness perception monaurally and to balance the volume of both devices. Speech audiometry in quiet and noisy surroundings was conducted both monaurally and in the bimodal mode. The fitting was modified according to the respective test results. In all children and six adults, a measurable gain and/or a subjective improvement of speech perception was achieved. Two adult patients did not accept the new fitting. In seven younger children, loudness scaling was impossible to perform because of age. This was also the case with speech audiometry for two children. A structured bimodal fitting using loudness scaling for both the cochlear implant and the hearing aid results in a subjective and objective amelioration of the patient's hearing and speech perception.

  16. Dichotic Hearing in Elderly Hearing Aid Users Who Choose to Use a Single-Ear Device

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Angela; Mafra, Nicoli; Marques, Jair; Mottecy, Carla; Silvestre, Renata; Kozlowski, Lorena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Elderly individuals with bilateral hearing loss often do not use hearing aids in both ears. Because of this, dichotic tests to assess hearing in this group may help identify peculiar degenerative processes of aging and hearing aid selection. Objective To evaluate dichotic hearing for a group of elderly hearing aid users who did not adapt to using binaural devices and to verify the correlation between ear dominance and the side chosen to use the device. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study involving 30 subjects from 60 to 81 years old, of both genders, with an indication for bilateral hearing aids for over 6 months, but using only a single device. Medical history, pure tone audiometry, and dichotic listening tests were all completed. Results All subjects (100%) of the sample failed the dichotic digit test; 94% of the sample preferred to use the device in one ear because bilateral use bothered them and affected speech understanding. In 6%, the concern was aesthetics. In the dichotic digit test, there was significant predominance of the right ear over the left, and there was a significant correlation between the dominant side with the ear chosen by the participant for use of the hearing aid. Conclusion In elderly subjects with bilateral hearing loss who have chosen to use only one hearing aid, there is dominance of the right ear over the left in dichotic listening tasks. There is a correlation between the dominant ear and the ear chosen for hearing aid fitting. PMID:25992120

  17. The placebo effect and the influence of participant expectation on hearing aid trials.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Piers; Powell, Samantha; Munro, Kevin J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of participant expectation on the outcome of a trial that compared two behind-the-ear hearing aids with identical electroacoustic performance, except that one was called a "new" hearing aid and the other a "conventional" hearing aid. Twenty experienced adult hearing aid users were told that they were taking part in a trial that compared new and conventional hearing aid technology. They attended a single test session where they were fitted with each hearing aid, in a balanced design, set to the same National Acoustic Laboratories' nonlinear fitting procedure (Version 1) prescription target for a typical age-related hearing impairment. Outcome measures were selected to be representative of hearing aids trials and included (i) the Four Alternative Auditory Feature test (presented at 65 dB (A) and SNR ratio of +2 dB), (ii) sound quality ratings for six different sound samples (a selection of speech, music, and environmental sounds), and (iii) overall personal preference. There was marginally better mean performance with the new hearing aid on the Four Alternative Auditory Feature test (M = 62.3%, SD = 10.4 versus M = 60.7%, SD = 9.0; z = -1.84, p = 0.03, one-tailed, effect size Pearson's r = 0.08; although p = 0.06, two-tailed). The new hearing aid was also consistently rated more highly on all sound quality ratings and this difference was statistically significant (M = 9.12, SD = 1.02 versus M = 8.35, SD 1.17; z = -2.88, p < 0.01, two-tailed, r = 0.33). Fifteen (75%) participants expressed an overall personal preference for the new hearing aid with the remainder expressing no preference (p = 0.02, r = 0.50). These results suggest a need to control for placebo effects in hearing aid trials and to interpret cautiously any hearing aid trial that did not control for this effect.

  18. Effects of acoustical stimuli delivered through hearing aids on tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Sweetow, Robert W; Sabes, Jennifer Henderson

    2010-01-01

    The use of acoustic signals to mask, mix with, or ease the distress associated with tinnitus has been clinically employed for decades. It has been proposed that expanding acoustic options for tinnitus sufferers due to personal preferences is desirable. Fractal tones incorporate many useful characteristics of music while avoiding certain features that could be distracting to some individuals. To assess the effects on relaxation, tinnitus annoyance, tinnitus handicap, and tinnitus reaction from the use of a hearing aid that incorporates combinations of amplification, fractal tones, and white noise. Participants listened to experimental hearing aids containing several acoustic options and were asked to rate the signals in terms of their effect on relaxation and tinnitus annoyance. They subsequently wore the hearing aids for 6 mo and completed tinnitus handicap and reaction scales. Fourteen hearing-impaired adults with primary complaints of subjective tinnitus. Participants were tested wearing hearing aids containing several programs including amplification only, fractal tones only, and a combination of amplification, noise, and/or fractal tones. The fractal tones (now commercially available as the "Zen" feature) were generated by the Widex Mind hearing aid. Rating procedures were conducted in the laboratory, and tinnitus reaction and handicap were assessed during and following a 6 mo field trial. Data were collected at the initial visit, one week, 1 mo, 3 mo, and 6 mo. Nonparametric statistics included Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank, chi(2), and repeated-measures analyses of variance. Thirteen of 14 participants reported that their tinnitus annoyance, as measured by the Tinnitus Annoyance Scale, was reduced for at least one of the amplified conditions (with or without fractal tones or noise), relative to the unaided condition. Nine assigned a lower tinnitus annoyance rating when listening to fractal tones alone versus the amplification-alone condition. There was a

  19. Prevalence and factors associated with hearing loss and hearing aid use in korean elders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Su

    2015-03-01

    This study examined hearing loss prevalence and hearing aid usage rates among Korean elders by comparing the differences between those with and without hearing loss, and between those who used and did not use hearing aids. This study was based on data collected during the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010-2012). The study sample consisted of 5,447 Koreans aged ≥60 years who received a hearing assessment. Hearing loss was measured using a pure tone audiometry test and classified according to the World Health Organization's criteria. Hearing aid use was assessed by self-report. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the associations between hearing loss, hearing aid use, and related variables. Hearing loss was found in 16.8% of the elders and only 15.9% of them used a hearing aid. Male (95% CI: 1.27-2.15), tinnitus (95% CI: 1.58-2.32), dizziness (95% CI: 1.05-1.73), and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.32-2.38) were the variables most strongly associated with hearing loss after multivariate adjustment. Tinnitus (95% CI: 1.34-4.13) and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.01-5.02) were strongly associated with hearing aid use after multivariate adjustment. More than half of South Korean elders aged ≥60 and older have hearing loss but the rate of hearing aid use is very low. An aural public health program should address modifiable risk factors, such as tinnitus and noise exposure, and non-modifiable risk factors associated with hearing loss in the elderly.

  20. [The assessment of hearing impairment in patients over 60 years of age using hearing aids].

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Aleksandra; Sekula, Alicja; Deryło, Maria Bratumiła; Kuśmierczyk, Joanna; Talar, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    To assess the hearing impairment in people over 60 years old using hearing aids. This was a single-center study, but it is planned to extend it further to the whole country. The study was focused on patients with hearing aids. During the assessment 57 people were included in the observation in order to control the status of their hearing loss and benefit from traditional hearing aids as well as the possibility to apply the auditory implants in case of a little benefit from hearing aids. The otoscopy and pure tone audiometry were performed as well as the questionnaires on demographic and epidemiological data of patients were collected as well as the quality of their life with hearing aids was subjectively assessed. The results show that 91% of patients have sensorineural hearing loss (SHL), the remaining 9%--severe mixed hearing loss. Severe SHL was found in 22 patients, the moderate hearing loss was observed in 37%, and the profound SHL was the case in 5 patients. Minimal SHL was observed in 7% of patients (n=4). More than 73% of the study subjects were male (n=38). The average age of the patients who completed the survey was 74 years old. Thirty-five patients used their hearing aid over 3 years and less than 70% of them used it every day all day. Hearing aid was not actively used by 10 patients. Over the last year 51.92% of the patients underwent a hearing examination. The bone anchored hearing aid was suggested to 2% of subjects and the cochlear implant was offered to 10 patients. The data analysis shows the need to educate and inform the elderly about alternative methods of hearing loss treatment. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  1. Hearing Aids and Room Acoustics: an Entrepreneurial Physics Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caner, Edward

    2002-10-01

    We present an acoustics-based physics entrepreneurship project that identifies problems associated with hearing aids and listening environments such as restaurants and churches. The proposed company "Earcrafters" deals with the alarmingly low market penetration of hearing aids--especially amongst baby boomers--in two key ways: 1) Offering hearing instruments that "sound better" by way of improved frequency response throughout the audio spectrum and 2) applying marketing forces to effectively change the public perception that hearing aids are bulky and tinny-sounding. In contrast, the proposed company "US Sound" recognizes low hearing aid market penetration as a trend that will continue. The company is developing efficient methods to improve the acoustical environment of public areas such as restaurants and churches in order to fill the demand of baby boomers with hearing impairment--a number that has reached staggering proportions.

  2. 47 CFR 68.4 - Hearing aid-compatible telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatible telephones. 68.4 Section 68.4 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK General § 68.4 Hearing aid-compatible...

  3. 47 CFR 68.4 - Hearing aid-compatible telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatible telephones. 68.4 Section 68.4 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK General § 68.4 Hearing aid-compatible...

  4. 47 CFR 68.4 - Hearing aid-compatible telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatible telephones. 68.4 Section 68.4 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK General § 68.4 Hearing aid-compatible...

  5. 47 CFR 68.4 - Hearing aid-compatible telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatible telephones. 68.4 Section 68.4 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK General § 68.4 Hearing aid-compatible...

  6. Concerns regarding Direct-to-Consumer Hearing Aid Purchasing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Suzanne H.

    2010-01-01

    An individual over age 18 can purchase a hearing aid online or through mail order if they sign a waiver declining a medical evaluation, while those under 18 are required to be seen by a physician to obtain medical consent. However, in many states there is nothing to prevent a parent or caregiver from purchasing hearing aids for their child from a…

  7. Parental and Child Perception of Hearing Aid Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleton, Jennifer Ann; Bamford, John

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates whether children give different questionnaire-assessed hearing aid benefit scores than their parents. Sixteen children (age seven to 11 years) who wear hearing aids completed the child version of the Listening Situations Questionnaire while their parents completed the parent version. The mean difference between parent and…

  8. Candidacy for Bilateral Hearing Aids: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boymans, Monique; Goverts, S. Theo; Kramer, Sophia E.; Festen, Joost M.; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to find factors for refining candidacy criteria for bilateral hearing aid fittings. Clinical files of 1,000 consecutive hearing aid fittings were analyzed. Method: Case history, audiometric, and rehabilitation data were collected from clinical files, and an extensive questionnaire on long-term outcome measures…

  9. Candidacy for Bilateral Hearing Aids: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boymans, Monique; Goverts, S. Theo; Kramer, Sophia E.; Festen, Joost M.; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to find factors for refining candidacy criteria for bilateral hearing aid fittings. Clinical files of 1,000 consecutive hearing aid fittings were analyzed. Method: Case history, audiometric, and rehabilitation data were collected from clinical files, and an extensive questionnaire on long-term outcome measures…

  10. Adaptive modeling of compression hearing aids: Convergence and tracking issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Vijay; Jamieson, Donald

    2003-10-01

    Typical measurements of electroacoustic performance of hearing aids include frequency response, compression ratio, threshold and time constants, equivalent input noise, and total harmonic distortion. These measurements employ artificial test signals and do not relate well to perceptual indices of hearing aid performance. Speech-based electroacoustic measures provide means to quantify the real world performance of hearing aids and have been shown to correlate better with perceptual data. This paper investigates the application of system identification paradigm for deriving the speech-based measures, where the hearing aid is modeled as a linear time-varying system and its response to speech stimuli is predicted using a linear adaptive filter. The performance of three adaptive filtering algorithms, viz. the Least Mean Square (LMS), Normalized LMS, and the Affine Projection Algorithm (APA) was investigated using simulated and real digital hearing aids. In particular, the convergence and tracking behavior of these algorithms in modeling compression hearing aids was thoroughly investigated for a range of compression ratio and threshold parameters, and attack and release time constants. Our results show that the NLMS and APA algorithms are capable of modeling digital hearing aids under a variety of compression conditions, and are suitable for deriving speech-based metrics of hearing aid performance.

  11. 21 CFR 874.3330 - Master hearing aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Master hearing aid. 874.3330 Section 874.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3330 Master hearing aid. (a)...

  12. 21 CFR 874.3330 - Master hearing aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Master hearing aid. 874.3330 Section 874.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3330 Master hearing aid. (a)...

  13. 21 CFR 874.3330 - Master hearing aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Master hearing aid. 874.3330 Section 874.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3330 Master hearing aid. (a)...

  14. Is Measured Hearing Aid Benefit Affected by Seeing Baseline Outcome Questionnaire Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, ShienPei; Cates, Megan; Saunders, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether hearing aid outcome measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory (HHI) for the Elderly/Adults (Newman, Weinstein, Jacobson, & Hug, 1990; Ventry & Weinstein, 1982) is differentially affected by informed vs. blind administration of the postfitting questionnaire. Method Participants completed the HHI at their hearing aid evaluation and again at their hearing aid follow-up visit. At follow-up, half received a clean HHI form (blind administration), whereas the remainder responded on their original form (informed administration) and could thus base their follow-up responses on those they gave at the hearing aid evaluation. Results The data show that for the population examined here, informed administration of the follow-up HHI did not yield a different outcome to blind administration of the follow-up HHI. This was not influenced by past hearing aid use, age of the participant, or the duration of time between baseline questionnaire completion and follow-up completion. Conclusion These data suggest that completion of follow-up questionnaires in either informed or blind format will have little impact on HHI responses, most likely because of the many other factors that combined to influence hearing aid outcome. PMID:21940983

  15. Comprehensive Hearing Aid Intervention at a Free Subspecialty Clinic.

    PubMed

    Wertz, Aileen P; Mannarelli, Gregory; Shuman, Andrew G; McKean, Erin L

    2017-09-01

    Providing a model of a comprehensive free audiologic program may assist other health care professionals in developing their own similar program. To describe the structure, feasibility, and outcomes of a free subspecialty clinic providing hearing aids to develop a paradigm for other programs interested in implementing similar projects. A retrospective case series was conducted from September 1, 2013, through March 31, 2016. In a partnership between a free independent clinic for indigent patients and an academic medical center, 54 indigent patients were referred to the clinic for audiograms. A total of 50 of these patients had results of audiograms available for review and were therefore included in the study; 34 of these 50 patients were determined to be eligible for hearing aid fitting based on audiometric results. Free audiometric testing, hearing aid fitting, and hearing aid donation. The number of hearing aids donated, number of eligible patients identified, number of patients fitted with hearing aids, and work effort (hours) and start-up costs associated with implementation of this program were quantified. A total of 54 patients (31 women [57.4%] and 23 men [42.6%]; median age, 61 years; range, 33-85 years) had audiograms performed, and 84 hearing aids were donated to the program. The patients were provided with free audiograms, hearing aid molds, and hearing aid programming, as well as follow-up appointments to ensure continued proper functioning of their hearing aids. Since 2013, a total of 34 patients have been determined to be eligible for the free program and were offered hearing aid services. Of these, 20 patients (59%) have been fitted or are being fitted with free hearing aids. The value of services provided is estimated to be $2260 per patient. It is feasible to provide free, comprehensive audiologic care, including hearing aids and fitting, in a well-established, free clinic model. The opportunity for indigent patients to use hearing aids at minimal

  16. Numerical Estimation in Deaf and Hearing Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Rebecca; Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patty; Davidson, Wendy A.; Murphy, Derek; Nordmann, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Deaf students often lag behind hearing peers in numerical and mathematical abilities. Studies of hearing children with mathematical difficulties highlight the importance of estimation skills as the foundation for formal mathematical abilities, but research with adults is limited. Deaf and hearing college students were assessed on the…

  17. Evidence-based practice in audiology: rehabilitation options for adults with hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Louise; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Wong, Lena

    2013-12-01

    The authors address 3 questions: (a) What is evidence-based practice (EBP), and why is it important for adults with hearing impairment? (b) What is the evidence about intervention options for adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment? (c) What intervention options do adults choose when identified with hearing impairment for the first time? The 5 steps of the EBP process are discussed in relation to a clinical question about whether hearing aids and communication programs reduce activity limitations and participation restrictions compared with no treatment for adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment. Systematic reviews of the evidence indicate that both hearing aids and communication programs reduce activity limitations and participation restrictions for this population and are therefore appropriate options. A study is then described in which these options were presented to 153 clients identified with hearing impairment for the first time: 43% chose hearing aids, 18% chose communication programs, and the remaining 39% chose not to take any action. EBP supports the offer of intervention options to adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment.

  18. Some characteristics of amplified music through hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Chasin, Marshall; Hockley, Neil S

    2014-02-01

    Hearing aids are a relatively non-invasive means of reducing the negative effects of hearing loss on an individual who does not require a cochlear implant. Music amplified through hearing aids has some interesting characteristics but high fidelity is not typically one of them. This poses a serious problem for the investigator who wants to perform research on music with hearing impaired individuals who wear hearing aids. If the signal at the tympanic membrane is somewhat distorted then this has consequences for the assessment of music processing when examining both the peripheral and the central auditory system. In this review article on the subject of hearing aids and music, some of the acoustical differences between speech and music will be described. Following this, a discussion about what hearing aids do well and also less well for music as an input will be presented. Finally, some recommendations are made about what can be done for hearing-impaired individuals who wear hearing aids to listen to music. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Perception of Suprasegmental Speech Features via Bimodal Stimulation: Cochlear Implant on One Ear and Hearing Aid on the Other

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Harel, Tamar; Shpak, Talma; Luntz, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the contribution of acoustic hearing to the perception of suprasegmental features by adults who use a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in opposite ears. Method: 23 adults participated in this study. Perception of suprasegmental features--intonation, syllable stress, and word…

  20. Perception of Suprasegmental Speech Features via Bimodal Stimulation: Cochlear Implant on One Ear and Hearing Aid on the Other

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Harel, Tamar; Shpak, Talma; Luntz, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the contribution of acoustic hearing to the perception of suprasegmental features by adults who use a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in opposite ears. Method: 23 adults participated in this study. Perception of suprasegmental features--intonation, syllable stress, and word…

  1. The contribution of a frequency-compression hearing aid to contralateral cochlear implant performance.

    PubMed

    Perreau, Ann E; Bentler, Ruth A; Tyler, Richard S

    2013-02-01

    Frequency-lowering signal processing in hearing aids has re-emerged as an option to improve audibility of the high frequencies by expanding the input bandwidth. Few studies have investigated the usefulness of the scheme as an option for bimodal users (i.e., combined use of a cochlear implant and a contralateral hearing aid). In this study, that question was posed. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine if frequency compression was a better bimodal option than conventional amplification and (2) to determine the impact of a frequency-compression hearing aid on speech recognition abilities. There were two separate experiments in this study. The first experiment investigated the contribution of a frequency-compression hearing aid to contralateral cochlear implant (CI) performance for localization and speech perception in noise. The second experiment assessed monaural consonant and vowel perception in quiet using the frequency-compression and conventional hearing aid without the use of a contralateral CI or hearing aid. Ten subjects fitted with a cochlear implant and hearing aid participated in the first experiment. Seventeen adult subjects with a cochlear implant and hearing aid or two hearing aids participated in the second experiment. To be included, subjects had to have a history of postlingual deafness, a moderate or moderate-to-severe hearing loss, and have not worn this type of frequency-lowering hearing aid previously. In the first experiment, performance using the frequency-compression and conventional hearing aids was assessed on tests of sound localization, speech perception in a background of noise, and two self-report questionnaires. In the second experiment, consonant and vowel perception in quiet was assessed monaurally for the two conditions. In both experiments, subjects alternated daily between a frequency-compression and conventional hearing aid for 2 mo. The parameters of frequency compression were set individually for each subject, and

  2. Electronic filters, hearing aids and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An electronic filter for an electroacoustic system. The system has a microphone for generating an electrical output from external sounds and an electrically driven transducer for emitting sound. Some of the sound emitted by the transducer returns to the microphone means to add a feedback contribution to its electrical output. The electronic filter includes a first circuit for electronic processing of the electrical output of the microphone to produce a first signal. An adaptive filter, interconnected with the first circuit, performs electronic processing of the first signal to produce an adaptive output to the first circuit to substantially offset the feedback contribution in the electrical output of the microphone, and the adaptive filter includes means for adapting only in response to polarities of signals supplied to and from the first circuit. Other electronic filters for hearing aids, public address systems and other electroacoustic systems, as well as such systems and methods of operating them are also disclosed.

  3. Electronic filters, hearing aids and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor); O'Connell, Michael P. (Inventor); Zheng, Baohua (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electronic filter for an electroacoustic system. The system has a microphone for generating an electrical output from external sounds and an electrically driven transducer for emitting sound. Some of the sound emitted by the transducer returns to the microphone means to add a feedback contribution to its electical output. The electronic filter includes a first circuit for electronic processing of the electrical output of the microphone to produce a filtered signal. An adaptive filter, interconnected with the first circuit, performs electronic processing of the filtered signal to produce an adaptive output to the first circuit to substantially offset the feedback contribution in the electrical output of the microphone, and the adaptive filter includes means for adapting only in response to polarities of signals supplied to and from the first circuit. Other electronic filters for hearing aids, public address systems and other electroacoustic systems, as well as such systems, and methods of operating them are also disclosed.

  4. Visual aid for the hearing impaired

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhabvala, Murzban D.; Lin, Hung C.

    1991-07-01

    A multichannel electronic visual aid device which is able to signal to the user whether sound is coming from the left or right, front or back, or both is presented. For the plurality of channels, which may operate in pairs, the sound is picked up by a respective microphone and amplified and rectified into a DC voltage. The DC voltage is next fed to an analog to digital converter and then to a digital encoder. The binary code from the encoder is coupled into a logic circuit where the binary code is decoded to proved a plurality of output levels which are used to drive an indicator which, in turn, provides a visual indication of the sound level received. The binary codes for each pair of channels are also fed into a digital comparator. The output of the comparator is used to enable the logic circuits of the two channels such that if, for example, the signal coming from the right is louder than that coming from the left, the output of the logic unit of the right channel will be enabled and the corresponding indicator activated, indicating the sound source on the right. An indication of the loudness is also provided. One embodiment of the invention may be carried by the hearing impaired or deaf, as a system which is embedded into eye glasses or a cap. Another embodiment of the invention may be integrated with a vehicle to give a hearing impaired or deaf driver a warning, with a directional indication, that an emergency vehicle is in the vicinity. In this second embodiment, the emergency vehicle transmits a radio frequency signal which would be used as an enabling signal for the visual aid device to avoid false alarms from traffic and other sound sources in the vicinity of the driver's vehicle.

  5. Comparison of Carina active middle-ear implant with conventional hearing aids for mixed hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Savaş, V A; Gündüz, B; Karamert, R; Cevizci, R; Düzlü, M; Tutar, H; Bayazit, Y A

    2016-04-01

    To compare the auditory outcomes of Carina middle-ear implants with those of conventional hearing aids in patients with moderate-to-severe mixed hearing loss. The study comprised nine patients (six males, three females) who underwent middle-ear implantation with Carina fully implantable active middle-ear implants to treat bilateral moderate-to-severe mixed hearing loss. The patients initially used conventional hearing aids and subsequently received the Carina implants. The hearing thresholds with implants and hearing aids were compared. There were no significant differences between: the pre-operative and post-operative air and bone conduction thresholds (p > 0.05), the thresholds with hearing aids and Carina implants (p > 0.05), or the pre-operative (mean, 72.8 ± 19 per cent) and post-operative (mean, 69.9 ± 24 per cent) speech discrimination scores (p > 0.05). One of the patients suffered total sensorineural hearing loss three months following implantation despite an initial 38 dB functional gain. All except one patient showed clinical improvements after implantation according to quality of life questionnaire (Glasgow Benefit Inventory) scores. Acceptance of Carina implants is better than with conventional hearing aids in patients with mixed hearing loss, although both yield similar hearing amplification. Cosmetic reasons appear to be critical for patient acceptance.

  6. Auditory profiling and hearing-aid satisfaction in hearing-aid candidates.

    PubMed

    Thorup, Nicoline; Santurette, Sébastien; Jørgensen, Søren; Kjærbøl, Erik; Dau, Torsten; Friis, Morten

    2016-10-01

    Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often complain about difficulties communicating in the presence of background noise, although audibility may be restored by a hearing-aid (HA). The audiogram typically forms the basis for HA fitting, i.e. people with similar audiograms are given the same prescription by default. This study aimed at identifying clinically relevant tests that may serve as an informative addition to the audiogram and which may relate more directly to HA satisfaction than the audiogram does. A total of 29 HI and 26 normal-hearing listeners performed tests of spectral and temporal resolution, binaural hearing, speech intelligibility in stationary and fluctuating noise and a working-memory test. Six weeks after HA fitting, the HI listeners answered a questionnaire evaluating HA treatment. No other measures than masking release between fluctuating and stationary noise correlated significantly with audibility. The HI listeners who obtained the least advantage from fluctuations in background noise in terms of speech intelligibility experienced greater HA satisfaction. HI listeners have difficulties in different hearing domains that are not predictable from their audiogram. Measures of temporal resolution or speech perception in both stationary and fluctuating noise could be relevant measures to consider in an extended auditory profile. The study was supported by Grosserer L.F. Foghts Fond. The protocol was approved by the Science Ethics Committee of the Capital Region of Denmark (reference H-3-2013-004).

  7. Assessment of hearing aid algorithms using a master hearing aid: the influence of hearing aid experience on the relationship between speech recognition and cognitive capacity.

    PubMed

    Rählmann, Sebastian; Meis, Markus; Schulte, Michael; Kießling, Jürgen; Walger, Martin; Meister, Hartmut

    2017-04-27

    Model-based hearing aid development considers the assessment of speech recognition using a master hearing aid (MHA). It is known that aided speech recognition in noise is related to cognitive factors such as working memory capacity (WMC). This relationship might be mediated by hearing aid experience (HAE). The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of WMC and speech recognition with a MHA for listeners with different HAE. Using the MHA, unaided and aided 80% speech recognition thresholds in noise were determined. Individual WMC capacity was assed using the Verbal Learning and Memory Test (VLMT) and the Reading Span Test (RST). Forty-nine hearing aid users with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss divided into three groups differing in HAE. Whereas unaided speech recognition did not show a significant relationship with WMC, a significant correlation could be observed between WMC and aided speech recognition. However, this only applied to listeners with HAE of up to approximately three years, and a consistent weakening of the correlation could be observed with more experience. Speech recognition scores obtained in acute experiments with an MHA are less influenced by individual cognitive capacity when experienced HA users are taken into account.

  8. Hearing Loss Prevalence and Risk Factors Among Older Adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Roland; Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Background. Hearing loss has been associated with cognitive and functional decline in older adults and may be amenable to rehabilitative interventions, but national estimates of hearing loss prevalence and hearing aid use in older adults are unavailable. Methods. We analyzed data from the 2005–2006 cycle of the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey, which is the first cycle to ever incorporate hearing assessment in adults aged 70 years and older. Audiometry was performed in 717 older adults, and data on hearing aid use, noise exposure, medical history, and demographics were obtained from interviews. Analyses incorporated sampling weights to account for the complex sampling design and yield results that are generalizable to the U.S. population. Results. The prevalence of hearing loss defined as a speech frequency pure tone average of more than 25 dB in the better ear was 63.1% (95% confidence interval: 57.4–68.8). Age, sex, and race were the factors most strongly associated with hearing loss after multivariate adjustment, with black race being substantially protective against hearing loss (odds ratio 0.32 compared with white participants [95% confidence interval: 0.19–0.53]). Hearing aids were used in 40.0% (95% confidence interval: 35.1–44.8) of adults with moderate hearing loss, but in only 3.4% (95% confidence interval: 0.8–6.0) of those with a mild hearing loss. Conclusion. Hearing loss is prevalent in nearly two thirds of adults aged 70 years and older in the U.S. population. Additional research is needed to determine the epidemiological and physiological basis for the protective effect of black race against hearing loss and to determine the role of hearing aids in those with a mild hearing loss. PMID:21357188

  9. Exploring the influence of culture on hearing help-seeking and hearing-aid uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Manchaiah, Vinaya; St Claire, Lindsay; Danermark, Berth; Jones, Lesley; Brandreth, Marian; Krishna, Rajalakshmi; Goodwin, Robin

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was to highlight the importance of cultural influence in understanding hearing-help seeking and hearing-aid uptake. Information on audiological services in different countries and 'theories related to cross-culture' is presented, followed by a general discussion. Twenty-seven relevant literature reviews on hearing impairment, cross-cultural studies, and the health psychology model and others as secondary resources. Despite the adverse consequences of hearing impairment and the significant potential benefits of audiological rehabilitation, only a small number of those with hearing impairment seek professional help and take up appropriate rehabilitation. Therefore, hearing help-seeking and hearing-aid uptake has recently become the hot topic for clinicians and researchers. Previous research has identified many contributing factors for hearing help-seeking with self-reported hearing disability being one of the main factors. Although significant differences in help-seeking and hearing-aid adoption rates have been reported across countries in population studies, limited literature on the influence of cross-cultural factors in this area calls for an immediate need for research. This paper highlights the importance of psychological models and cross-cultural research in the area of hearing help-seeking and hearing-aid uptake, and consequently some directions for future research are proposed.

  10. [Influence of hearing aids on monosyllabic test score and subjective everyday hearing].

    PubMed

    Thümmler, R; Liebscher, T; Hoppe, U

    2016-08-01

    Pure tone and speech audiometry are essential methods for examining the indication for hearing aids, as well as for hearing aid evaluation. Additionally, the subjective benefit of hearing aids has to be evaluated with appropriate questionnaires. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between speech audiometry data and the results of a simple and user-friendly questionnaire, as well as to provide normative data for subjective benefit. Data from 136 hearing aid users with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss were analyzed retrospectively. Pure tone thresholds and Freiburg monosyllabic speech perception in the binaural situation were measured at 65 dB in quiet and in noise (signal-to-noise ratio, SNR = +5 dB), with and without hearing aids. Additionally, subjective hearing in everyday life was recorded using the 12-item Oldenburg Inventory. Improvement of speech perception with hearing aids for the Freiburg monosyllabic test in quiet was 32.0 percentage points on average; in noise, there was an average improvement of 16.4 percentage points. There was a strong correlation between the results of pure tone and speech audiometry. With hearing aids, patients scored their everyday hearing using the Oldenburg Inventory on average 1.4 scale points better than without hearing aids. Results of the Oldenburg Inventory correlate with both pure tone and speech audiometry. Hearing aid evaluation should include both speech audiometry and systematic measurement of the subjective benefit using a suitable questionnaire. In combination, the Freiburg monosyllabic test and the Oldenburg Inventory allow for quick and comprehensive evaluation.

  11. Referrals to a hearing aid clinic: scope for improvement.

    PubMed Central

    Keay, D G

    1990-01-01

    This study followed on from a recent national publicity campaign aiming to get earlier provision of hearing aids for elderly people, improve both patient and general practitioner awareness of hearing impairments and increase knowledge of alternative environmental aids among sufferers. The study intended to examine present patterns of patient presentation and general practitioner management within a major Scottish city. A random sample of patients over the age of 55 years referred to a hearing aid clinic were questioned on the nature of their hearing difficulty. Patients who attended their general practitioner at the suggestion of a relative were less likely to be referred at their initial visit and significantly less likely to have had their ears syringed than those who were self-motivated. Respondents had little knowledge of alternatives to hearing aids, although these are relevant to the disability experienced by the majority of these subjects. PMID:2107853

  12. Rate-Constrained Beamforming in Binaural Hearing Aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Sriram; den Brinker, Albertus C.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, hearing aid systems where the left and right ear devices collaborate with one another have received much attention. Apart from supporting natural binaural hearing, such systems hold great potential for improving the intelligibility of speech in the presence of noise through beamforming algorithms. Binaural beamforming for hearing aids requires an exchange of microphone signals between the two devices over a wireless link. This paper studies two problems: which signal to transmit from one ear to the other, and at what bit-rate. The first problem is relevant as modern hearing aids usually contain multiple microphones, and the optimal choice for the signal to be transmitted is not obvious. The second problem is relevant as the capacity of the wireless link is limited by stringent power consumption constraints imposed by the limited battery life of hearing aids.

  13. Perceptions of adults with hearing impairment regarding the promotion of trust in hearing healthcare service delivery.

    PubMed

    Preminger, Jill E; Oxenbøll, Maria; Barnett, Margaret B; Jensen, Lisbeth D; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes how trust is promoted in adults with hearing impairment within the context of hearing healthcare (HHC) service delivery. Data were analysed from a previously published descriptive qualitative study that explored perspectives of adults with hearing impairment on hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation. Interview transcripts from 29 adults from four countries with different levels of hearing impairment and different experience with the HHC system were analysed thematically. Patients enter into the HHC system with service expectations resulting in a preconceived level of trust that can vary from low to high. Relational competence, technical competence, commercialized approach, and clinical environment (relevant to both the clinician and the clinic) influence a patient's resulting level of trust. Trust is evolving rather than static in HHC: Both clinicians and clinics can promote trust. The characteristics of HHC that engender trust are: practicing good communication, supporting shared decision making, displaying technical competence, offering comprehensive hearing rehabilitation, promoting self-management, avoiding a focus on hearing-aid sales, and offering a professional clinic setting.

  14. Hearing aid effectiveness after aural rehabilitation - individual versus group (HEARING) trial: RCT design and baseline characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Hearing impairment is the most common body system disability in veterans. In 2008, nearly 520,000 veterans had a disability for hearing loss through the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Changes in eligibility for hearing aid services, along with the aging population, contributed to a greater than 300% increase in the number of hearing aids dispensed from 1996 to 2006. In 2006, the VA committed to having no wait times for patient visits while providing quality clinically-appropriate care. One approach to achieving this goal is the use of group visits as an alternative to individual visits. We sought to determine: 1) if group hearing aid fitting and follow-up visits were at least as effective as individual visits, and 2) whether group visits lead to cost savings through the six month period after the hearing aid fitting. We describe the rationale, design, and characteristics of the baseline cohort of the first randomized clinical trial to study the impact of group versus individual hearing aid fitting and follow-up visits. Methods Participants were recruited from the VA Puget Sound Health Care System Audiology Clinic. Eligible patients had no previous hearing aid use and monaural or binaural air-conduction hearing aids were ordered at the evaluation visit. Participants were randomized to receive the hearing aid fitting and the hearing aid follow-up in an individual or group visit. The primary outcomes were hearing-related function, measured with the first module of the Effectiveness of Aural Rehabilitation (Inner EAR), and hearing aid adherence. We tracked the total cost of planned and unplanned audiology visits over the 6-month interval after the hearing aid fitting. Discussion A cohort of 659 participants was randomized to receive group or individual hearing aid fitting and follow-up visits. Baseline demographic and self-reported health status and hearing-related measures were evenly distributed across the treatment arms. Outcomes after the 6-month

  15. Hearing aid effectiveness after aural rehabilitation - individual versus group (HEARING) trial: RCT design and baseline characteristics.

    PubMed

    Collins, Margaret P; Souza, Pamela E; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Heagerty, Patrick J; Amtmann, Dagmar; Yueh, Bevan

    2009-12-15

    Hearing impairment is the most common body system disability in veterans. In 2008, nearly 520,000 veterans had a disability for hearing loss through the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Changes in eligibility for hearing aid services, along with the aging population, contributed to a greater than 300% increase in the number of hearing aids dispensed from 1996 to 2006. In 2006, the VA committed to having no wait times for patient visits while providing quality clinically-appropriate care. One approach to achieving this goal is the use of group visits as an alternative to individual visits. We sought to determine: 1) if group hearing aid fitting and follow-up visits were at least as effective as individual visits, and 2) whether group visits lead to cost savings through the six month period after the hearing aid fitting. We describe the rationale, design, and characteristics of the baseline cohort of the first randomized clinical trial to study the impact of group versus individual hearing aid fitting and follow-up visits. Participants were recruited from the VA Puget Sound Health Care System Audiology Clinic. Eligible patients had no previous hearing aid use and monaural or binaural air-conduction hearing aids were ordered at the evaluation visit. Participants were randomized to receive the hearing aid fitting and the hearing aid follow-up in an individual or group visit. The primary outcomes were hearing-related function, measured with the first module of the Effectiveness of Aural Rehabilitation (Inner EAR), and hearing aid adherence. We tracked the total cost of planned and unplanned audiology visits over the 6-month interval after the hearing aid fitting. A cohort of 659 participants was randomized to receive group or individual hearing aid fitting and follow-up visits. Baseline demographic and self-reported health status and hearing-related measures were evenly distributed across the treatment arms.Outcomes after the 6-month follow-up period are needed to

  16. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  17. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  18. Successful bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, M B; Marques, C; Mendes, G J; Gonçalves, C

    2015-11-01

    To report a case of successful bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in an adult patient with type III osteogenesis imperfecta, which is commonly regarded as a contraindication to this procedure. A 45-year-old man with type III osteogenesis imperfecta presented with mixed hearing loss. There was a mild sensorineural component in both ears, with an air-bone gap between 45 and 50 dB HL. He was implanted with a bone-anchored hearing aid. The audiological outcome was good, with no complications and good implant stability (as measured by resonance frequency analysis). To our knowledge, this is the first recorded case of bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

  19. Self-reported Hearing Trouble in Adults Aged 18 and Over: United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Zelaya, Carla E; Lucas, Jacqueline W; Hoffman, Howard J

    2015-09-01

    Age is typically the most significant determinant of hearing loss (5,6). Among U.S. adults in 2014, self-reported hearing loss was most prevalent among adults aged 70 and over (43.2%), compared with adults aged 40-69 (19.0%) and aged 18-39 (5.5%). Age-related hearing loss is often overlooked due to its deceptively slow progression, lack of attention from providers, and public acceptance as a condition that is perceived to be a "normal" consequence of aging (7). Among U.S. adults aged 70 and over who had any trouble hearing, 56.8% had seen a doctor or other health care professional about their hearing or ear problems in the past 5 years, but only 42.0% had ever used a hearing aid. Younger adults (aged 18-39) who had any trouble hearing were even less likely to have seen a doctor or used a hearing aid, but they were more likely to have used other assistive technology because of their hearing compared with adults aged 40-69 or 70 and over. Among U.S. adults who had any trouble hearing without a hearing aid, 1.7% were deaf, but the majority (62.6%) had mild hearing loss (defined as "a little trouble hearing"). Men were more likely than women to have self-reported trouble hearing, a sex disparity that has been documented globally among all age groups (8). Men were also more likely than women to state they had moderate trouble hearing.

  20. The benefit of amplification on auditory working memory function in middle-aged and young-older hearing impaired adults

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Karen A.; Desjardins, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    Untreated hearing loss can interfere with an individual’s cognitive abilities and intellectual function. Specifically, hearing loss has been shown to negatively impact working memory function, which is important for speech understanding, especially in difficult or noisy listening conditions. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of hearing aid use on auditory working memory function in middle-aged and young-older adults with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Participants completed two objective measures of auditory working memory in aided and unaided listening conditions. An aged matched control group followed the same experimental protocol except they were not fit with hearing aids. All participants’ aided scores on the auditory working memory tests were significantly improved while wearing hearing aids. Thus, hearing aids worn during the early stages of an age-related hearing loss can improve a person’s performance on auditory working memory tests. PMID:26097461

  1. The benefit of amplification on auditory working memory function in middle-aged and young-older hearing impaired adults.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Karen A; Desjardins, Jamie L

    2015-01-01

    Untreated hearing loss can interfere with an individual's cognitive abilities and intellectual function. Specifically, hearing loss has been shown to negatively impact working memory function, which is important for speech understanding, especially in difficult or noisy listening conditions. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of hearing aid use on auditory working memory function in middle-aged and young-older adults with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Participants completed two objective measures of auditory working memory in aided and unaided listening conditions. An aged matched control group followed the same experimental protocol except they were not fit with hearing aids. All participants' aided scores on the auditory working memory tests were significantly improved while wearing hearing aids. Thus, hearing aids worn during the early stages of an age-related hearing loss can improve a person's performance on auditory working memory tests.

  2. Bimodal Stimulation with Cochlear Implant and Hearing Aid in Cases of Highly Asymmetrical Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza, Ignacio; Manrique, Raquel; Huarte, Alicia; de Erenchun, Iñigo Ruiz; Manrique, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Bimodal stimulation is a possible treatment for asymmetrical hearing loss, wherein 1 ear is stimulated with a cochlear implant and the other is stimulated with a hearing aid. This emerging indication has gained significance over the last few years. However, little research has been conducted regarding the performance in different types of asymmetric Hearing loss. This study seeks to prove the bilateral-binaural advantage in a group of patients treated with bimodal stimulation (cochlear implant and hearing aid), with different degrees of hearing loss in their best ear. In total, 31 patients were recruited for the study. They were divided into 3 groups on the basis of the ear with the hearing aid: Group A, pure tone average (PTA) between 41 and 70 dB HL; Group B, PTA between 71 and 80 dB HL; and Group C, PTA between 81 and 90 dB HL. The performance in PTA and disyllabic word recognition were analyzed separately in each ear and then bimodally. The minimum follow-up period was 2 years. There were statistically significant differences between bimodal and monaural conditions both in PTA and in disyllabic word recognition. The better the residual hearing in the ear with the hearing aid, the greater were the benefits obtained with bilateralism-binaurality. Bimodal stimulation provides better results than any monaural hearing mode, regardless of whether it involves the use of a hearing aid alone or a cochlear implant alone.

  3. Positive, Neutral, and Negative Connotations Associated with Social Representation of 'Hearing Loss' and 'Hearing Aids'.

    PubMed

    Manchaiah, Vinaya; Stein, Gretchen; Danermark, Berth; Germundsson, Per

    2015-12-01

    In our previous studies we explored the social representation of hearing loss and hearing aids. In this study we aimed at exploring if the positive, neutral and negative connotations associated with the social representation of 'hearing loss' and 'hearing aids' for the same categories vary across countries. In addition, we also looked at if there is an association between connotations and demographic variables. A total of 404 individuals from four countries were asked to indicate the words and phrases that comes to mind when they think about 'hearing loss' and 'hearing aids'. They also indicated if the words and phrases they reported had positive, neutral or negative association, which were analyzed and reported in this paper. There are considerable differences among the countries in terms of positive, neutral and negative associations report for each category in relation to hearing loss and hearing aids. However, there is limited connection between demographic variables and connotations reported in different countries. These results suggesting that the social representation about the phenomenon hearing loss and hearing aids are relatively stable within respondents of each country.

  4. The Need for Improved Detection and Management of Adult-Onset Hearing Loss in Australia

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Catherine M.; Gopinath, Bamini; Schneider, Julie; Reath, Jennifer; Hickson, Louise; Leeder, Stephen R.; Mitchell, Paul; Cowan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Adult-onset hearing loss is insidious and typically diagnosed and managed several years after onset. Often, this is after the loss having led to multiple negative consequences including effects on employment, depressive symptoms, and increased risk of mortality. In contrast, the use of hearing aids is associated with reduced depression, longer life expectancy, and retention in the workplace. Despite this, several studies indicate high levels of unmet need for hearing health services in older adults and poor use of prescribed hearing aids, often leading to their abandonment. In Australia, the largest component of financial cost of hearing loss (excluding the loss of well-being) is due to lost workplace productivity. Nonetheless, the Australian public health system does not have an effective and sustainable hearing screening strategy to tackle the problem of poor detection of adult-onset hearing loss. Given the increasing prevalence and disease burden of hearing impairment in adults, two key areas are not adequately met in the Australian healthcare system: (1) early identification of persons with chronic hearing impairment; (2) appropriate and targeted referral of these patients to hearing health service providers. This paper reviews the current literature, including population-based data from the Blue Mountains Hearing Study, and suggests different models for early detection of adult-onset hearing loss. PMID:23710184

  5. Quality of life after intervention with a cochlear implant or hearing aid.

    PubMed

    Contrera, Kevin J; Betz, Joshua; Li, Lingsheng; Blake, Caitlin R; Sung, Yoon K; Choi, Janet S; Lin, Frank R

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the impact of hearing aid and cochlear implant use on quality of life in adults. Prospective observational cohort study. One hundred thirteen adults aged ≥50 years with postlingual hearing loss receiving routine clinical care at a tertiary academic medical center were evaluated with the Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36 before and 6 and 12 months after intervention with hearing aids or cochlear implants. Change in score was assessed using linear mixed effect models adjusted for age, gender, education, and history of hypertension, diabetes, and smoking. A significant increase in Mental Component Summary score was observed in both hearing aid and cochlear implant users from baseline to 12 months, with cochlear implant users increasing nearly twice that of hearing aid users (hearing aid: 2.49 [95% confidence interval: 0.11, 4.88], P = .041; cochlear implant: 4.20 [95% confidence interval: 1.85, 6.55], P < .001). The most substantial increases were observed in individuals with the lowest baseline scores. There was no significant difference in physical component summary score from baseline to 12 months. Treatment of hearing loss with hearing aids and cochlear implants results in significant increases in mental health quality of life. The majority of the increase is observed by 6 months post-treatment, and we observed differential effects of treatment depending on the level of baseline quality of life score with the greatest gains observed in those with the lowest scores. 2b. Laryngoscope, 126:2110-2115, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Auditory and language skills of children using hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Penna, Leticia Macedo; Lemos, Stela Maris Aguiar; Alves, Cláudia Regina Lindgren

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss may impair the development of a child. The rehabilitation process for individuals with hearing loss depends on effective interventions. To describe the linguistic profile and the hearing skills of children using hearing aids, to characterize the rehabilitation process and to analyze its association with the children's degree of hearing loss. Cross-sectional study with a non-probabilistic sample of 110 children using hearing aids (6-10 years of age) for mild to profound hearing loss. Tests of language, speech perception, phonemic discrimination, and school performance were performed. The associations were verified by the following tests: chi-squared for linear trend and Kruskal-Wallis. About 65% of the children had altered vocabulary, whereas 89% and 94% had altered phonology and inferior school performance, respectively. The degree of hearing loss was associated with differences in the median age of diagnosis; the age at which the hearing aids were adapted and at which speech therapy was started; and the performance on auditory tests and the type of communication used. The diagnosis of hearing loss and the clinical interventions occurred late, contributing to impairments in auditory and language development. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of hearing aid amplification and stimulus intensity on cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Billings, Curtis J; Tremblay, Kelly L; Souza, Pamela E; Binns, Malcolm A

    2007-01-01

    Hearing aid amplification can be used as a model for studying the effects of auditory stimulation on the central auditory system (CAS). We examined the effects of stimulus presentation level on the physiological detection of sound in unaided and aided conditions. P1, N1, P2, and N2 cortical evoked potentials were recorded in sound field from 13 normal-hearing young adults in response to a 1000-Hz tone presented at seven stimulus intensity levels. As expected, peak amplitudes increased and peak latencies decreased with increasing intensity for unaided and aided conditions. However, there was no significant effect of amplification on latencies or amplitudes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that 20 dB of hearing aid gain affects neural responses differently than 20 dB of stimulus intensity change. Hearing aid signal processing is discussed as a possible contributor to these results. This study demonstrates (1) the importance of controlling for stimulus intensity when evoking responses in aided conditions, and (2) the need to better understand the interaction between the hearing aid and the CAS.

  8. Choosing which ear to implant in adult candidates with functional residual hearing.

    PubMed

    Fielden, Claire A; Mehta, Rajnikant L; Kitterick, Pádraig T

    2016-04-01

    This study examined whether audiologists consider the potential benefits of contralateral hearing aid use following cochlear implantation when recommending which ear to implant in UK adult candidates with residual hearing. Thirty-four audiologists from providers of adult implantation services completed a decision-choice experiment. Clinicians were willing to consider recommending that the poorer ear be implanted, provided it had been aided continuously, suggesting that their decision making seeks to preserve access to residual hearing in the non-implanted ear where possible. Future approaches to determining candidacy should therefore consider that a sub-set of patients may obtain additional benefit from this residual hearing following implantation.

  9. Hearing handicap, rather than measured hearing impairment, predicts poorer quality of life over 10 years in older adults.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Schneider, Julie; Hickson, Louise; McMahon, Catherine M; Burlutsky, George; Leeder, Stephen R; Mitchell, Paul

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to determine the prospective association between measured hearing impairment, self-reported hearing handicap and hearing aid use with quality of life. 829 Blue Mountains Hearing Study participants (≥ 55 years) were examined between 1997-1999 and 2007-2009. The shortened version of the hearing handicap inventory was administered. Hearing levels were measured using pure-tone audiometry. Quality of life was assessed using the 36-Item Short-Form Survey (SF-36); higher scores reflect better quality of life. Hearing impairment at baseline compared with no impairment was associated with lower mean SF-36 mental composite score 10 years later (multivariable-adjusted p=0.03). Physical composite score and mean scores for seven of the eight SF-36 domains after 10-year follow-up were significantly lower among participants who self-reported hearing handicap at baseline. Differences in the adjusted means between participants with and without hearing handicap ranged from 2.7 (physical composite score) to 10.4 units ('role limitations due to physical problems' domain). Individuals who developed incident hearing impairment compared to those who did not, had adjusted mean scores 9.5- and 7.7-units lower in the 'role limitation due to physical problems', and 'bodily pain' domains, respectively, at the 10-year follow-up. Hearing aid users versus non-users at baseline showed a 1.82-point (p=0.03) and 3.32-point (p=0.01) increase in SF-36 mental composite score and mental health domain over the 10-year follow-up, respectively. Older adults with self-perceived hearing handicap constitute a potential risk group for overall deterioration in quality of life, while hearing aid use could help improve the well-being of hearing impaired adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Digital hearing AIDS from the perspective of one consumer/audiologist.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mark

    2007-03-01

    Recent developments in hearing aids are reviewed in the context of the author's personal experience as an audiologist and as a hearing aid wearer. The need for evidence of benefit specific to digital signal processing in hearing aids is stressed, as well as addressing cost-benefit ratios in view of the high cost of digital hearing aids.

  11. Digital Hearing Aids From the Perspective of One Consumer/Audiologist

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in hearing aids are reviewed in the context of the author's personal experience as an audiologist and as a hearing aid wearer. The need for evidence of benefit specific to digital signal processing in hearing aids is stressed, as well as addressing cost-benefit ratios in view of the high cost of digital hearing aids. PMID:17301335

  12. 21 CFR 874.3305 - Wireless air-conduction hearing aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wireless air-conduction hearing aid. 874.3305...-conduction hearing aid. (a) Identification. A wireless air-conduction hearing aid is a wearable sound... notification. The wireless air-conduction hearing aid is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  13. 21 CFR 874.3950 - Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system... Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid... occluding the ear canal. The device consists of an air conduction hearing aid attached to a...

  14. 21 CFR 874.3950 - Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system... Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid... occluding the ear canal. The device consists of an air conduction hearing aid attached to a...

  15. 21 CFR 874.3950 - Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system... Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid... occluding the ear canal. The device consists of an air conduction hearing aid attached to a...

  16. Low-frequency gain compensation in directional hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Todd; Henry, Paula

    2002-06-01

    Hearing aids currently available on the market with both omnidirectional and directional microphone modes often have reduced amplification in the low frequencies when in directional microphone mode due to better phase matching. The effects of this low-frequency gain reduction for individuals with hearing loss in the low frequencies was of primary interest. Changes in sound quality for quiet listening environments following gain compensation in the low frequencies was of secondary interest. Thirty participants were fit with bilateral in-the-ear hearing aids, which were programmed in three ways while in directional microphone mode: no-gain compensation, adaptive-gain compensation, and full-gain compensation. All participants were tested with speech in noise tasks. Participants also made sound quality judgments based on monaural recordings made from the hearing aid. Results support a need for gain compensation for individuals with low-frequency hearing loss of greater than 40 dB HL.

  17. Factors in Client–Clinician Interaction That Influence Hearing Aid Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Mary Beth; Shaw, Lynn; Meston, Christine N.; Cheesman, Margaret F.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of client–clinician interactions has not been emphasized in hearing health care, despite the extensive evidence of the impact of the provider–patient interaction on health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to identify factors in the client–clinician interaction that may influence hearing aid adoption. Thirteen adults who had received a hearing aid recommendation within the previous 3 months and 10 audiologists participated in a study to generate, sort, and rate the importance of factors in client–clinician interaction that may influence the hearing aid purchase decision. A concept mapping approach was used to define meaningful clusters of factors. Quantitative analysis and qualitative interpretation of the statements resulted in eight concepts. The concepts in order of their importance are (a) Ensuring client comfort, (b) Understanding and meeting client needs, (c) Client-centered traits and actions, (d) Acknowledging client as an individual, (e) Imposing undue pressure and discomfort, (f) Conveying device information by clinician, (g) Supporting choices and shared decision making, and (h) Factors in client readiness. Two overarching themes of client-centered interaction and client empowerment were identified. Results highlight the influence of the client–clinician interaction in hearing aid adoption and suggest the possibility of improving hearing aid adoption by empowering clients through a client-centered interaction. PMID:22155784

  18. Over-the-counter hearing aids: electroacoustic characteristics and possible target client groups.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C M; McPherson, B

    2000-01-01

    Over-the-counter hearing aids (OTCs) are those directly purchased from retail outlets, without the benefit of prior professional hearing health care. They are particularly common in developing countries. This study examined the amplification characteristics of a selected sample of OTCs to determine if any target client group or groups were suitable for the OTCs. The electroacoustical performance of 10 OTCs was measured. The measurements included saturated sound pressure level curve, high-frequency average full-on gain, frequency response, total harmonic distortion, equivalent input noise level, and input-output curve. The full-on gain curve of each hearing aid was used to estimate the hypothetical hearing loss of target clients for each aid as it would be calculated by four hearing aid prescription formulae. Real-ear probe tube measurements were also performed on 10 adult subjects to determine the amplification that could be achieved by the OTCs before audible feedback occurred. The OTC hearing aids were not able to meet the prescription gain requirements of the majority of elderly clients who usually purchased them.

  19. Factors in client-clinician interaction that influence hearing aid adoption.

    PubMed

    Poost-Foroosh, Laya; Jennings, Mary Beth; Shaw, Lynn; Meston, Christine N; Cheesman, Margaret F

    2011-09-01

    The influence of client-clinician interactions has not been emphasized in hearing health care, despite the extensive evidence of the impact of the provider-patient interaction on health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to identify factors in the client-clinician interaction that may influence hearing aid adoption. Thirteen adults who had received a hearing aid recommendation within the previous 3 months and 10 audiologists participated in a study to generate, sort, and rate the importance of factors in client-clinician interaction that may influence the hearing aid purchase decision. A concept mapping approach was used to define meaningful clusters of factors. Quantitative analysis and qualitative interpretation of the statements resulted in eight concepts. The concepts in order of their importance are (a) Ensuring client comfort, (b) Understanding and meeting client needs, (c) Client-centered traits and actions, (d) Acknowledging client as an individual, (e) Imposing undue pressure and discomfort, (f) Conveying device information by clinician, (g) Supporting choices and shared decision making, and (h) Factors in client readiness. Two overarching themes of client-centered interaction and client empowerment were identified. Results highlight the influence of the client-clinician interaction in hearing aid adoption and suggest the possibility of improving hearing aid adoption by empowering clients through a client-centered interaction.

  20. [The effects of hearing level on auditory performance in infants with hearing aids].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueqing; Li, Jing; Wu, Yanjun; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Haihong; Wang, Shuo; Kong, Ying; Liu, Sha; Liu, Bo; Mo, Lingyan; Qi, Beier

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of hearing level on auditory performance in infants with hearing aids and provide a clinical database for their hearing and speech habilitation. A total of 32 infants with prelingual hearing loss participated in this study, ranging in age at hearing aid fitting from 3 to 34 months with a mean of 16 months. According to their hearing level, they were divided into three groups. Infants in group A were with moderate hearing loss (41-60 dB HL). Infants in group B were with severe hearing loss (61-80 dB HL). Infants in group C were with profound hearing loss (>81 dB HL). The infant-toddler meaningful auditory integration scale (IT-MAIS) was used to evaluate their auditory performance. The evaluation was performed before hearing aid fitting and 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 months after fitting. The mean scores of auditory performance showed significant improvements with time of hearing aid use for the three groups of infants (P < 0.05). The mean score of auditory performance for group A at 3 months after fitting was significantly superior in comparison with the scores before hearing aid fitting and at 1 month after fitting (P < 0.05). The mean score of auditory performance for group B at 6 months after fitting was significantly superior in comparison with the scores before hearing aid fitting and at 1, 3 months after fitting (P < 0.05). The mean score of auditory performance for group C at 9 months after fitting was significantly superior in comparison with the scores before hearing aid fitting and at 1, 3, 6 months after fitting (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in mean scores between group A and B at each evaluating interval (P > 0.05). However, significant differences were observed between group A and C at 3, 6, 9, 12 months after fitting (P < 0.05). Significant differences were also shown between group B and C at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 months after fitting (P < 0.05). Auditory performance of infants with prelingual

  1. Hearing rehabilitation in Treacher Collins Syndrome with bone anchored hearing aid

    PubMed Central

    Polanski, José Fernando; Plawiak, Anna Clara; Ribas, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe a case of hearing rehabilitation with bone anchored hearing aid in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome. Case description: 3 years old patient, male, with Treacher Collins syndrome and severe complications due to the syndrome, mostly related to the upper airway and hearing. He had bilateral atresia of external auditory canals, and malformation of the pinna. The initial hearing rehabilitation was with bone vibration arch, but there was poor acceptance due the discomfort caused by skull compression. It was prescribed a model of bone-anchored hearing aid, in soft band format. The results were evaluated through behavioral hearing tests and questionnaires Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (MUSS) and Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS). Comments: The patient had a higher acceptance of the bone-anchored hearing aid compared to the traditional bone vibration arch. Audiological tests and the speech and auditory skills assessments also showed better communication and hearing outcomes. The bone-anchored hearing aid is a good option in hearing rehabilitation in this syndrome. PMID:26298651

  2. [Hearing rehabilitation in Treacher Collins Syndrome with bone anchored hearing aid].

    PubMed

    Polanski, José Fernando; Plawiak, Anna Clara; Ribas, Angela

    2015-12-01

    To describe a case of hearing rehabilitation with bone anchored hearing aid in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome. 3 years old patient, male, with Treacher Collins syndrome and severe complications due to the syndrome, mostly related to the upper airway and hearing. He had bilateral atresia of external auditory canals, and malformation of the pinna. The initial hearing rehabilitation was with bone vibration arch, but there was poor acceptance due the discomfort caused by skull compression. It was prescribed a model of bone-anchored hearing aid, in soft band format. The results were evaluated through behavioral hearing tests and questionnaires Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (Muss) and Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-Mais). The patient had a higher acceptance of the bone-anchored hearing aid compared to the traditional bone vibration arch. Audiological tests and the speech and auditory skills assessments also showed better communication and hearing outcomes. The bone-anchored hearing aid is a good option in hearing rehabilitation in this syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplifiers: Know the Difference

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Consumer Updates Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplifiers: Know the Difference Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... seen them advertised on television—small electronic sound amplifiers that allow users to enjoy nighttime TV without ...

  4. 47 CFR 68.316 - Hearing aid compatibility: Technical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with public telephones, have been introduced to provide hearing-aid coupling and trials were conducted... with part 68 of the FCC Rules and Regulations, but it is not limited to the scope of those rules (Ref...

  5. 47 CFR 68.316 - Hearing aid compatibility: Technical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... with public telephones, have been introduced to provide hearing-aid coupling and trials were conducted... with part 68 of the FCC Rules and Regulations, but it is not limited to the scope of those rules (Ref...

  6. Hearing Aids: How to Choose the Right One

    MedlinePlus

    ... and all are powered with a hearing aid battery. Small microphones collect sounds from the environment. A ... to pick up wind noise Uses very small batteries, which have shorter life and can be difficult ...

  7. Biofilm formation on bone-anchored hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Monksfield, P; Chapple, I L C; Matthews, J B; Grant, M M; Addison, O; Reid, A P; Proops, D W; Sammons, R L

    2011-11-01

    To investigate microbiological biofilm contamination of retrieved bone-anchored hearing aids. Nine failed, retrieved bone-anchored hearing aids and 16 internal screws were examined by scanning electron microscopy. A fixture from a failing implant, which had been removed and disassembled under aseptic conditions, was cultured. Finally, an internal screw from a new, unimplanted fixture was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Debris was seen on the fixture and abutment of all bone-anchored hearing aids, and on the heads of the 16 internal screws. On eight screws, biofilm extended down the shaft to the threads, where it was several micrometres thick. Culture of a failing fixture yielded staphylococcus. The new, unimplanted fixture internal screw showed evidence of scratching and metallic debris on the threads, which may interfere with close fitting of the screw and subsequently facilitate microleakage. There may be a link between internal microbial contamination and failure of bone-anchored hearing aids.

  8. The benefits of using bluetooth accessories with hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pauline; Davis, Adrian

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the benefits in reported outcomes after providing bluetooth accessories for established hearing aid users. Prospective observational study using validated quantitative outcome measures and detailed patient narrative before and two months after patients were provided with bluetooth accessories. Twelve patients with bilateral NHS hearing aids participated. They had a wide range of ages and hearing loss. After two months, 10 patients reported substantial additional benefit and kept the accessories; two returned them for various reasons. Statistically significant changes were seen in two validated outcome measures: the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile and the International Outcome Inventory - Hearing Aids, but not in the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale. Two notable benefits were reported: some described hearing the emotion and mood in a voice for the first time; others were amazed to report an improved ability to hear film or to hold conversations over the telephone. The provision of bluetooth accessories can give additional reported benefit for some patients - we need better knowledge about who benefits, and whether further support/training to individuals would make a difference.

  9. 47 CFR 68.414 - Hearing aid-compatibility: Enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatibility: Enforcement. 68.414 Section 68.414 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Complaint Procedures § 68.414 Hearing...

  10. 47 CFR 68.414 - Hearing aid-compatibility: Enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatibility: Enforcement. 68.414 Section 68.414 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Complaint Procedures § 68.414 Hearing...

  11. 47 CFR 68.414 - Hearing aid-compatibility: Enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatibility: Enforcement. 68.414 Section 68.414 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Complaint Procedures § 68.414 Hearing...

  12. Prelingual deafness: Benefits from cochlear implants versus conventional hearing aids

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Torre, Ana Adelina Giantomassi Della; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens de

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The majority of patients with hearing loss, including those with severe hearing loss, benefits from the use of hearing aids. The cochlear implant is believed to achieve better results in a child with hearing loss in cases where the severity of disability renders hearing aids incapable of providing adequate sound information, as they require sufficient cochlear reserve so that acoustic detention occurs. Objective: To assess if cochlear implants provide more benefit than conventional hearing aids in prelingually deaf patients. Summary of the findings: The study was a systematic review of scientific papers selected by a search of the SciELO, Cochrane, MEDLINE, and LILACS-BIREME databases. Among the 2169 articles found, 12 studies proved relevant to the issue and presented an evidence strength rating of B. No publications rated evidence strength A. Seven of the studies analyzed were prospective cohorts and 5 were cross-sectional studies. Conclusion: Based on several studies, cochlear implants were demonstrated to be the best current alternative for bilateral severe or profound hearing loss, achieving better results in speech perception and development in prelingual children when compared to conventional hearing aids. PMID:25991962

  13. Temporary Threshold Shift Caused by Hearing Aid Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macrae, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Temporary threshold shift over a wide range of frequencies was found after 4 hours of hearing aid use by a 15-year-old student with severe sensorineural hearing loss who was using real-ear insertion gains 10 to 20 decibels greater than those recommended by current standards. Less gain was recommended at frequencies from 500 to 1500 hertz.…

  14. [The hearing manifestations of 350 patients of AIDS].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Haibo; Dong, Mingmin

    2006-11-01

    To asses hearing loss in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and its relationship with AIDS clinical stage. Pure-tone audiometry was carried out in 350 HIV-infected patients determined by ELISA and KIP methods. Among 350 HIV positive patients, 45. 4% (159 case) had hearing loss. The incidence was higher than that (69/350, 19. 7%) in control group. There were 56 cases of sensorineural hearing loss,34 cases of conductive hearing loss and 69 cases of mixed type. Forty-nine patients suffered mild hearing loss with threshold of (30+/-5) dBHL on average, 69 cases suffered moderate hearing loss with threshold of (54+/-7)dBHL and 41 cases suffered severe hearing loss with threshold of (84+/-9)dBHL. The hearing loss was dominant at high frequencies [(37+/-78) : 44, P <0. 05], while it had no relationship with the severity of the AIDS disease itself( P >0. 05). The hearing loss was dominant at high frequencies in HIV infected patients, while it may have no relationship with the severity of the AIDS disease itself.

  15. Pediatric hearing aid use: parent-reported challenges.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Karen; Olson, Whitney A; Twohig, Michael P; Preston, Elizabeth; Blaiser, Kristina; White, Karl R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate parent-reported challenges related to hearing aid management and parental psychosocial characteristics during the first 3 years of the child's life. Using a cross-sectional survey design, surveys were distributed to parents of children with hearing loss via state Early Intervention programs in Utah and Indiana. Packets contained one family demographic form and two sets of three questionnaires to obtain responses from mothers and fathers separately: the Parent Hearing Aid Management Inventory explored parent access to information, parent confidence in performing skills, expectations, communication with the audiologist, and hearing aid use challenges. The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire measured psychological flexibility, experiential avoidance, and internal thought processes that can affect problem-solving ability and decrease an individual's ability to take value-based actions. The Patient Health Questionnaire identified symptoms of depression. Thirty-seven families completed questionnaires (35 mothers and 20 fathers). Most responses were parents of toddlers (M = 22 months) who had been wearing binaural hearing aids for an average of 15 months. Both mothers and fathers reported that even though the amount of information they received was overwhelming, most (84%) preferred to have all the information at the beginning, rather than to receive it over an extended time period. Parents reported an array of challenges related to hearing aid management, with the majority related to daily management, hearing aid use, and emotional adjustment. Sixty-six percent of parents reported an audiologist taught them how to complete a listening check using a stethoscope, however, only one-third reported doing a daily hearing aid listening check. Both mothers and fathers reported a wide range of variability in their confidence in performing activities related to hearing aid management, and most reported minimal confidence in their ability to

  16. Tracking of Noise Tolerance to Measure Hearing Aid Benefit.

    PubMed

    Kuk, Francis; Seper, Eric; Lau, Chi-Chuen; Korhonen, Petri

    2017-09-01

    The benefits offered by noise reduction (NR) features on a hearing aid had been studied traditionally using test conditions that set the hearing aids into a stable state of performance. While adequate, this approach does not allow the differentiation of two NR algorithms that differ in their timing characteristics (i.e., activation and stabilization time). The current study investigated a new method of measuring noise tolerance (Tracking of Noise Tolerance [TNT]) as a means to differentiate hearing aid technologies. The study determined the within-session and between-session reliability of the procedure. The benefits provided by various hearing aid conditions (aided, two NR algorithms, and a directional microphone algorithm) were measured using this procedure. Performance on normal-hearing listeners was also measured for referencing. A single-blinded, repeated-measures design was used. Thirteen experienced hearing aid wearers with a bilaterally symmetrical (≤10 dB) mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss participated in the study. In addition, seven normal-hearing listeners were tested in the unaided condition. Participants tracked the noise level that met the criterion of tolerable noise level (TNL) in the presence of an 85 dB SPL continuous discourse passage. The test conditions included an unaided condition and an aided condition with combinations of NR and microphone modes within the UNIQUE hearing aid (omnidirectional microphone, no NR; omnidirectional microphone, NR; directional microphone, no NR; and directional microphone, NR) and the DREAM hearing aid (omnidirectional microphone, no NR; omnidirectional microphone, NR). Each tracking trial lasted 2 min for each hearing aid condition. Normal-hearing listeners tracked in the unaided condition only. Nine of the 13 hearing-impaired listeners returned after 3 mo for retesting in the unaided and aided conditions with the UNIQUE hearing aid. The individual TNL was estimated for each participant for all test

  17. Threshold Measurements by Self-Fitting Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Harvey; Zhou, Dan; Carter, Lyndal

    2011-01-01

    A self-fitting, self-contained hearing aid is a device that can be managed entirely by the user, without assistance from a hearing health care professional or the need for special equipment. A key component of such a device is an automated audiometer that will enable the user to self-administer measurements of in situ thresholds, which the hearing aid will use to prescribe a baseline setting for the wearer. The success of the device therefore depends on the validity and reliability of in situ threshold measurements and automatically measured thresholds. To produce a complete and self-contained device, the self-fitting hearing aid will also enable identification of audiograms that are contraindicative of hearing aid usage. The feasibility and challenges of achieving these characteristics are explored and discussed. While the overall concept seems feasible, several challenges were identified that need thorough investigation and/or development. These include the use of instructions to self-manage hearing aid insertion and in situ threshold measurements, selection of an appropriate transducer and instant-fit tip that will allow measurements of a wide range of threshold levels, control of ambient noise during threshold measurements, and self-manageable procedures that enable identification of such audiogram characteristics as asymmetry and conductive hearing loss. PMID:22397803

  18. Clinical experience of bone anchored hearing aid: a case report.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Muneo; Akamatsu, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Akihisa; Tanaka, Rica

    2008-04-20

    To improve conventional bone conduction hearing aids, Tjellstrom, Branemark, developed an implant system consisting of a maxillofacial implant that derived from dental implants and a bone conduction hearing aid that was attached directly to the implant. This system has been commercially available as a bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA). More than 10,000 patients have benefited from BAHA in Scandinavia, North America, and many other regions. BAHA first became available in 1977 in Sweden but has not been used in Japan as widely as expected. This paper reports a case of a 8-year use of BAHA for hearing loss caused by microtia and external auditory canal atresia, with a review of literature. The patient has been followed up for 9 years after implant placement. Play audiometry with a loudspeaker showed a hearing loss of 25 dB. The patient says that BAHA is superior to conventional transcutaneous bone conduction hearing aids in easiness of attachment, esthetics, and speech recognition and music recognition. The skin and the bone around the implants remain in favorable condition. She has been free from the use of a headband for a conventional hearing aid.

  19. Chosen Listening Levels for Music With and Without the Use of Hearing Aids.

    PubMed

    Croghan, Naomi B H; Swanberg, Anne M; Anderson, Melinda C; Arehart, Kathryn H

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to describe chosen listening levels (CLLs) for recorded music for listeners with hearing loss in aided and unaided conditions. The study used a within-subject, repeated-measures design with 13 adult hearing-aid users. The music included rock and classical samples with different amounts of audio-industry compression limiting. CLL measurements were taken at ear level (i.e., at input to the hearing aid) and at the tympanic membrane. For aided listening, average CLLs were 69.3 dBA at the input to the hearing aid and 80.3 dBA at the tympanic membrane. For unaided listening, average CLLs were 76.9 dBA at the entrance to the ear canal and 77.1 dBA at the tympanic membrane. Although wide intersubject variability was observed, CLLs were not associated with audiometric thresholds. CLLs for rock music were higher than for classical music at the tympanic membrane, but no differences were observed between genres for ear-level CLLs. The amount of audio-industry compression had no significant effect on CLLs. By describing the levels of recorded music chosen by hearing-aid users, this study provides a basis for ecologically valid testing conditions in clinical and laboratory settings.

  20. [Evaluation of hearing aid rehabilitation using the Freiburg Monosyllabic Test].

    PubMed

    Hoppe, U

    2016-08-01

    The benefit of hearing aids is not always directly subjectively perceivable. Therefore, objective and quantifiable speech audiometric measurements are required. Beside acoustic gain measurements and structured interviews, speech audiometry in quiet and in noise is one of the three pillars of hearing aid evaluation.The Freiburg monosyllabic test has been used for decades for hearing aid prescription and evaluation in German speaking countries. Relative and absolute targets can be individually defined for the rehabilitation of speech perception by hearing aids as assessed by the Freiburg monosyllabic test in quiet and at conversational levels.The general applicability of speech audiometric measurements in noise is limited. Alternative ("modern") methods and the definitions of noise situations relevant to everyday life have been discussed for years. However, the introduction of these methods into everyday use has proven difficult. On one hand, there is comparatively little practical experience; on the other, it has not yet been demonstrated what additional benefits these more complicated measurements might have for standard hearing aid evaluations and hearing aid users.

  1. Extended bandwidth nonlinear frequency compression in Mandarin-speaking hearing-aid users.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wen-Hsuan; Hsieh, Dun-Lieh; Shih, Wan-Ting; Liu, Tien-Chen

    2017-04-06

    The high frequency information of consonant messages is important for recognition of speech. Recently, the nonlinear frequency compression (NLFC) technique has been shown to improve the speech perception in patients with high frequency hearing loss. In Mandarin, seven consonants are located over 10-16 kHz. Extended-bandwidth (EB) NLFC may provide an additional benefit for recognition of Mandarin words. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of NLFC and EB-NLFC on Mandarin word recognition in patients with high frequency hearing loss. Fourteen native Mandarin-speaking adult patients, aged 20-65 years with bilateral, moderate to severe, sensorineural hearing loss, specifically high frequency hearing loss were included in single-blind randomized study. The assessment tools included the Mandarin Monosyllable Recognition Test (MMRT), Mandarin Hearing in Noise Test (MHINT), and International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) and sound quality scale of the hearing aids. The patients were tested under unaided condition, after which they were randomly assigned to wear NLFC and EB-NLFC hearing aids, alternatively, in a crossover fashion. After each 4-week block, the patients were tested again to obtain the test outcomes. Patients with hearing aids with EB-NLFC had a significantly better word and consonant recognition using the MMRT (p<0.05). The MHINT was better for the EB-NLFC group without significant differences. The EB-NLFC group had better scores in both the IOI-HA and sound quality scale but not statistically significant. Patients with high-frequency hearing loss may benefit more from using EB-NLFC for word and consonant recognition; however, the improvement was small under a noisy listening environment. The subjective questionnaires did not show significant benefit of EB-NLFC either. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Tolerable delay for speech production and perception: effects of hearing ability and experience with hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Tobias; Chapman, Josie L; Bleeck, Stefan; Monaghan, Jessica J M

    2017-08-24

    Processing delay is one of the important factors that limit the development of novel algorithms for hearing devices. In this study, both normal-hearing listeners and listeners with hearing loss were tested for their tolerance of processing delay up to 50 ms using a real-time setup for own-voice and external-voice conditions based on linear processing to avoid confounding effects of time-dependent gain. Participants rated their perceived subjective annoyance for each condition on a 7-point Likert scale. Twenty normal-hearing participants and twenty participants with a range of mild to moderate hearing losses. Delay tolerance was significantly greater for the participants with hearing loss in two out of three voice conditions. The average slopes of annoyance ratings were negatively correlated with the degree of hearing loss across participants. A small trend of higher tolerance of delay by experienced users of hearing aids in comparison to new users was not significant. The increased tolerance of processing delay for speech production and perception with hearing loss and reduced sensitivity to changes in delay with stronger hearing loss may be beneficial for novel algorithms for hearing devices but the setup used in this study differed from commercial hearing aids.

  3. Auditory handicap of hearing impairment and the limited benefit of hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Plomp, R

    1978-02-01

    The aim of this article is to promote a better understanding of hearing impairment as a communicative handicap, primarily in noisy environments, and to explain by means of a quantitative model the essentially limited applicability of hearing aids. After data on the prevalence of hearing impairment and of auditory handicap have been reviewed, it is explained that every hearing loss for speech can be interpreted as the sum of a loss class A (attenuation), characterized by a reduction of the levels of both speech signal and noise, and a loss D (distortion), comparable with a decrease in speech-to-noise ratio. On the average, the hearing loss of class D (hearing loss in noise) appears to be about one-third (in decibels) of the total hearing loss (A + D, hearing loss in quiet). A hearing aid can compensate for class-A-hearing losses, giving difficulties primarily in quiet, but not for class-D hearing losses, giving difficulties primarily in noise. The latter class represents the first stage of auditory handicap, beginning at an average hearing loss of about 24 dB.

  4. Internet access and use in adults with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Thorén, Elisabet Sundewall; Oberg, Marie; Wänström, Gunilla; Andersson, Gerhard; Lunner, Thomas

    2013-05-09

    The future rehabilitation of adults with hearing loss is likely to involve online tools used by individuals at home. Online tools could also be useful for people who are not seeking professional help for their hearing problems. Hearing impairment is a disability that increases with age, and increased age is still associated with reduced use of the Internet. Therefore, to continue the research on online audiological rehabilitative tools for people with hearing loss, it is important to determine if and to what extent adults with hearing loss use the Internet. To evaluate the use of the Internet and email in a group of adults with hearing loss and to investigate if their use of Internet and email differed between genders, among different age groups, and how it compared with the general population in Sweden. Questionnaires containing multiple-choice questions about Internet access, email use, and educational level were mailed to individuals with hearing loss, who were registered as patients at a hearing aid clinic. Out of the 269 invited participants, 158 returned a completed questionnaire, which was a response rate of 58.7%. The results showed that 60% (94/158) of the participants with hearing loss used computers and the Internet. The degree of hearing loss in the group of participants did not explain the level of Internet usage, while factors of age, gender, and education did (P<.001). More men than women used the Internet (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.32-4.91, P<.001). Use of the Internet was higher in the youngest age group (25-64 years) compared to the oldest age group (75-96 years, P=.001). A higher usage of the Internet was observed in the participants with hearing loss, especially the elderly, when compared with the general population of Sweden (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.23-3.17, P=.04). We conclude that the use of computers and the Internet overall is at least at the same level for people with hearing loss as for the general age-matched population in Sweden, but that this use is

  5. Vowel production of Mandarin-speaking hearing aid users with different types of hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Chen; Lee, Ya-Jung; Tsai, Li-Chiun

    2017-01-01

    In contrast with previous research focusing on cochlear implants, this study examined the speech performance of hearing aid users with conductive (n = 11), mixed (n = 10), and sensorineural hearing loss (n = 7) and compared it with the speech of hearing control. Speech intelligibility was evaluated by computing the vowel space area defined by the Mandarin Chinese corner vowels /a, u, i/. The acoustic differences between the vowels were assessed using the Euclidean distance. The results revealed that both the conductive and mixed hearing loss groups exhibited a reduced vowel working space, but no significant difference was found between the sensorineural hearing loss and normal hearing groups. An analysis using the Euclidean distance further showed that the compression of vowel space area in conductive hearing loss can be attributed to the substantial lowering of the second formant of /i/. The differences in vowel production between groups are discussed in terms of the occlusion effect and the signal transmission media of various hearing devices.

  6. Benefit From Directional Microphone Hearing Aids: Objective and Subjective Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Sung; Jin, Sun Hwa; Choi, Ji Eun; Cho, Yang-Sun; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to find and compare the effect of directional (DIR) processing of two different hearing aids via both subjective and objective methods, to determine the association between the results of the subjective and objective evaluations, and to find out individual predictive factors influencing the DIR benefit. Methods Twenty-six hearing aid users fitted unilaterally with each two different experimental hearing aid performed modified Korean Hearing in Noise Test (K-HINT) in three DIR conditions; omnidirectional (OMNI) mode, OMNI plus noise reduction feature, fixed DIR mode. In order to determine benefits from DIR benefit within a hearing aid and compare performance of the DIR processing between hearing aids, a subjective questionnaire was administrated on speech quality (SQ) and discomfort in noise (DN) domain. Correlation analysis of factors influencing DIR benefit was accomplished. Results Benefits from switching OMNI mode to DIR mode within both hearing aids in K-HINT were about 2.8 (standard deviation, 3.5) and 2.1 dB SNR (signal to ratio; SD, 2.5), but significant difference in K-HINT results between OMNI and OMNI plus noise reduction algorithm was not shown. The subjective evaluation resulted in the better SQ and DN scores in DIR mode than those in OMNI mode. However, the difference of scores on both SQ and DN between the two hearing aids with DIR mode was not statistically significant. Any individual factors did not significantly affect subjective and objective DIR benefits. Conclusion DIR benefit was found not only in the objective measurement performed in the laboratory but also in the subjective questionnaires, but the subjective results was failed to have significant correlation with the DIR benefit obtained in the K-HINT. Factors influencing individual variation in perceptual DIR benefit were still hard to explain. PMID:26330918

  7. Benefit From Directional Microphone Hearing Aids: Objective and Subjective Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Sung; Moon, Il Joon; Jin, Sun Hwa; Choi, Ji Eun; Cho, Yang-Sun; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2015-09-01

    The aims of this study were to find and compare the effect of directional (DIR) processing of two different hearing aids via both subjective and objective methods, to determine the association between the results of the subjective and objective evaluations, and to find out individual predictive factors influencing the DIR benefit. Twenty-six hearing aid users fitted unilaterally with each two different experimental hearing aid performed modified Korean Hearing in Noise Test (K-HINT) in three DIR conditions; omnidirectional (OMNI) mode, OMNI plus noise reduction feature, fixed DIR mode. In order to determine benefits from DIR benefit within a hearing aid and compare performance of the DIR processing between hearing aids, a subjective questionnaire was administrated on speech quality (SQ) and discomfort in noise (DN) domain. Correlation analysis of factors influencing DIR benefit was accomplished. Benefits from switching OMNI mode to DIR mode within both hearing aids in K-HINT were about 2.8 (standard deviation, 3.5) and 2.1 dB SNR (signal to ratio; SD, 2.5), but significant difference in K-HINT results between OMNI and OMNI plus noise reduction algorithm was not shown. The subjective evaluation resulted in the better SQ and DN scores in DIR mode than those in OMNI mode. However, the difference of scores on both SQ and DN between the two hearing aids with DIR mode was not statistically significant. Any individual factors did not significantly affect subjective and objective DIR benefits. DIR benefit was found not only in the objective measurement performed in the laboratory but also in the subjective questionnaires, but the subjective results was failed to have significant correlation with the DIR benefit obtained in the K-HINT. Factors influencing individual variation in perceptual DIR benefit were still hard to explain.

  8. Subjective Ratings of Fatigue and Vigor in Adults With Hearing Loss Are Driven by Perceived Hearing Difficulties Not Degree of Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Hornsby, Benjamin W Y; Kipp, Aaron M

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal reports and qualitative research suggests that fatigue is a common, but often overlooked, accompaniment of hearing loss which negatively affects quality of life. However, systematic research examining the relationship between hearing loss and fatigue is limited. In this study, the authors examined relationships between hearing loss and various domains of fatigue and vigor using standardized and validated measures. Relationships between subjective ratings of multidimensional fatigue and vigor and the social and emotional consequences of hearing loss were also explored. Subjective ratings of fatigue and vigor were assessed using the profile of mood states and the multidimensional fatigue symptom inventory-short form. To assess the social and emotional impact of hearing loss participants also completed, depending on their age, the hearing handicap inventory for the elderly or adults. Responses were obtained from 149 adults (mean age = 66.1 years, range 22 to 94 years), who had scheduled a hearing test and/or a hearing aid selection at the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center Audiology clinic. These data were used to explore relationships between audiometric and demographic (i.e., age and gender) factors, fatigue, and hearing handicap scores. Compared with normative data, adults seeking help for their hearing difficulties in this study reported significantly less vigor and more fatigue. Reports of severe vigor/fatigue problems (ratings exceeding normative means by ±1.5 standard deviations) were also increased in the study sample compared with that of normative data. Regression analyses, with adjustments for age and gender, revealed that the subjective percepts of fatigue, regardless of domain, and vigor were not strongly associated with degree of hearing loss. However, similar analyses controlling for age, gender, and degree of hearing loss showed a strong association between measures of fatigue and vigor (multidimensional fatigue symptom inventory-short form

  9. Prevalence of hearing loss among people aged 65 years and over: screening and hearing aid provision.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P S; Fleming, D M; Donaldson, I

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of hearing loss among people aged 65 years and over and to offer hearing aids where necessary. The study was carried out in a large health centre practice in Birmingham with a computerized record system. All patients aged 65 years, and a 20% random sample of patients aged 66 years and over were invited for interview. They were questioned about hearing loss and examined audiometrically. All patients with a hearing loss in the better ear of 35 decibels or more over the speech frequencies (0.5-4 kHz) were offered a hearing aid. A total of 322 patients attended (72% of those invited) and of these 34 patients already had a hearing aid. A further 142 patients were identified for whom an aid was recommended and 69 of these accepted. The acceptance rate was higher among men than women (57% compared with 43%). Sixty one patients (19% of those screened) had an asymmetrical hearing loss and of these 24 required consultant assessment; none had serious underlying pathology. There is a large unmet need for hearing aid provision. Simple audiometric assessment in health centres provides an opportunity to meet this need. PMID:8260217

  10. Current process in hearing-aid fitting appointments: An analysis of audiologists' use of behaviour change techniques using the behaviour change technique taxonomy (v1).

    PubMed

    Barker, Fiona; Mackenzie, Emma; de Lusignan, Simon

    2016-11-01

    To observe and analyse the range and nature of behaviour change techniques (BCTs) employed by audiologists during hearing-aid fitting consultations to encourage and enable hearing-aid use. Non-participant observation and qualitative thematic analysis using the behaviour change technique taxonomy (version 1) (BCTTv1). Ten consultations across five English NHS audiology departments. Audiologists engage in behaviours to ensure the hearing-aid is fitted to prescription and is comfortable to wear. They provide information, equipment, and training in how to use a hearing-aid including changing batteries, cleaning, and maintenance. There is scope for audiologists to use additional BCTs: collaborating with patients to develop a behavioural plan for hearing-aid use that includes goal-setting, action-planning and problem-solving; involving significant others; providing information on the benefits of hearing-aid use or the consequences of non-use and giving advice about using prompts/cues for hearing-aid use. This observational study of audiologist behaviour in hearing-aid fitting consultations has identified opportunities to use additional behaviour change techniques that might encourage hearing-aid use. This information defines potential intervention targets for further research with the aim of improving hearing-aid use amongst adults with acquired hearing loss.

  11. Options for Auditory Training for Adults with Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Anne D.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing aid devices alone do not adequately compensate for sensory losses despite significant technological advances in digital technology. Overall use rates of amplification among adults with hearing loss remain low, and overall satisfaction and performance in noise can be improved. Although improved technology may partially address some listening problems, auditory training may be another alternative to improve speech recognition in noise and satisfaction with devices. The literature underlying auditory plasticity following placement of sensory devices suggests that additional auditory training may be needed for reorganization of the brain to occur. Furthermore, training may be required to acquire optimal performance from devices. Several auditory training programs that are readily accessible for adults with hearing loss, hearing aids, or cochlear implants are described. Programs that can be accessed via Web-based formats and smartphone technology are reviewed. A summary table is provided for easy access to programs with descriptions of features that allow hearing health care providers to assist clients in selecting the most appropriate auditory training program to fit their needs. PMID:27587915

  12. Performance analysis of ten brands of batteries for hearing aids

    PubMed Central

    Penteado, Silvio Pires; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Comparison of the performance of hearing instrument batteries from various manufacturers can enable otologists, audiologists, or final consumers to select the best products, maximizing the use of these materials. Aim: To analyze the performance of ten brands of batteries for hearing aids available in the Brazilian marketplace. Methods: Hearing aid batteries in four sizes were acquired from ten manufacturers and subjected to the same test conditions in an acoustic laboratory. Results: The results obtained in the laboratory contrasted with the values reported by manufacturers highlighted significant discrepancies, besides the fact that certain brands in certain sizes perform better on some tests, but does not indicate which brand is the best in all sizes. Conclusions: It was possible to investigate the performance of ten brands of hearing aid batteries and describe the procedures to be followed for leakage, accidental intake, and disposal. PMID:25992026

  13. Directional Microphone Hearing Aids in School Environments: Working Toward Optimization.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Todd A; Picou, Erin M; Galster, Jason

    2017-01-01

    The hearing aid microphone setting (omnidirectional or directional) can be selected manually or automatically. This study examined the percentage of time the microphone setting selected using each method was judged to provide the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the talkers of interest in school environments. A total of 26 children (aged 6-17 years) with hearing loss were fitted with study hearing aids and evaluated during 2 typical school days. Time-stamped hearing aid settings were compared with observer judgments of the microphone setting that provided the best SNR on the basis of the specific listening environment. Despite training for appropriate use, school-age children were unlikely to consistently manually switch to the microphone setting that optimized SNR. Furthermore, there was only fair agreement between the observer judgments and the hearing aid setting chosen by the automatic switching algorithm. Factors contributing to disagreement included the hearing aid algorithm choosing the directional setting when the talker was not in front of the listener or when noise arrived only from the front quadrant and choosing the omnidirectional setting when the noise level was low. Consideration of listener preferences, talker position, sound level, and other factors in the classroom may be necessary to optimize microphone settings.

  14. [New aspects of hearing aid fitting in noise-induced hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Kiessling, J

    2006-07-01

    In the past hearing aid fitting frequently turned out to be a problem in patients with noise-induced hearing loss. Selective amplification in the high frequency range and at the same time natural sound and appropriate wearing comfort (open fitting) could not be achieved in numerous cases. Today these problems can be tackled by modern hearing aid technology providing us with efficient feedback suppression algorithms making open fittings possible for many more patients. This development is particularly beneficial for patients with noise-induced hearing loss. Unfortunately, open fitting is in opposition to wearing hearing aids at noisy workplaces. Tight fittings, however, can be used at work if a special listening program for noisy conditions is available. This dilemma is discussed and possible solutions are pointed out.

  15. In situ Hearing Tests for the Purpose of a Self-Fit Hearing Aid.

    PubMed

    Boymans, Monique; Dreschler, Wouter A

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the potential and limitations of a self-fit hearing aid. This can be used in the "developing" world or in countries with large distances between the hearing-impaired subjects and the professional. It contains an on-board tone generator for in situ user-controlled, automated audiometry, and other tests for hearing aid fitting. Twenty subjects with mild hearing losses were involved. In situ audiometry showed a test-retest reliability (SD <3.7 dB) that compared well with the precision of diagnostic audiometry using headphones. There was good correspondence (SD <5.2 dB) with traditional pure-tone audiometry. In situ loudness scaling yielded important information about suprathreshold perception, which will have an added value for the selection of compression and the selection of maximum power output to be allowed in hearing aids. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Audiologist Practices: Parent Hearing Aid Education and Support.

    PubMed

    Meibos, Alex; Muñoz, Karen; White, Karl; Preston, Elizabeth; Pitt, Cache; Twohig, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Early identification of hearing loss has led to routine fitting of hearing aids in infants and young children. Amplification provides opportunities to optimize child development, although it also introduces challenges for parents to navigate. Audiologists have a central role in providing parents with support to achieve effective management strategies and habits. The purpose of this study was to explore current practices of pediatric audiologists who work with children birth to 5 yr of age, regarding their support of parent learning in achieving effective hearing aid management, identify existing gaps in service delivery, and to determine if audiologists were receptive to receiving training related to effective approaches to provide counseling and support to parents. A cross-sectional, population-based survey was used. Three hundred and forty-nine surveys were analyzed from pediatric audiologists who provided services to children birth to 5 yr of age. Responses were received from 22 states in the United States. Responses were collected through the mail and online. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the information. More than half (61%) of the audiologists in the study had been providing pediatric hearing aid services to children birth to 5 yr of age for >10 yr. Of the audiologists who reported monitoring hours of hearing aid use, the majority reported that they used data logging (90%). More than half of the audiologists (57%) who shared data logging with parents reported that they encountered defensiveness from parents when addressing hearing aid use. Information and skills that were not routinely provided by one-third to one-half of the audiologists included the following: how to get access to loaner hearing aids (30%), available hearing aid options/accessories (33%), available financial assistance (36%), how to teach hearing aid management to other caregivers (38%), how to do hearing aid maintenance (44%), and how to do a Ling 6 sound check (52%). Many

  17. Measuring hearing aid outcomes using the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire: Australian data.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Margaret; Denzin, Lauren; Dunstan, Amy; Sellars, Jillian; Hickson, Louise

    2005-06-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate hearing aid satisfaction for a group of older Australians fitted with government-funded hearing aids using the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire; to compare the Australian data gathered with the provisional normative data reported by Cox and Alexander (1999); and to investigate the relationship between SADL satisfaction and several participant variables, hearing aid variables, and other outcome measures. The SADL questionnaire and a Client Satisfaction Survey (CSS) were distributed by mail to 1284 adults fitted with government-funded hearing aids three to six months previously. 1014 surveys were returned. The mean age of participants was 75.32 years; 54.4% of participants were male, and 54.8% were fitted binaurally. Participants were fitted primarily with digitally programmable hearing aids of various styles (22.5% BTEs, 34.8% ITEs, 41.8% ITCs, 0.9% nonstandard [NS] devices). Overall, participants reported a considerable level of satisfaction with their devices. SADL Global and subscale scores were significantly higher for the Australian sample than the U.S. norms described by Cox and Alexander (1999).

  18. Feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of motivational interviewing on hearing-aid use.

    PubMed

    Aazh, Hashir

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on the effect of motivational interviewing (MI) on hearing-aid use. This was a pilot single-blind, randomized parallel-group study conducted in the UK. Thirty-seven adult patients who reported using their hearing aid(s) less than four hours per day were randomized to MI combined with Standard Care (MISC) (n = 20), and Standard Care only (SC) (n = 17). Of 220 patients invited, 37 were enrolled giving the recruitment rate of 17%. One participant withdrew giving the retention rate of 97%. It was feasible to combine MI with SC for facilitating hearing-aid use and deliver the intervention with high fidelity in an audiology setting. The measure on hearing-aid use (data logging) one month after interventions favoured the MISC group. This pilot study suggests that conducting an RCT on using MI for facilitating hearing-aid use in people who do not use their hearing aids is feasible, and that MI combined with SC may have more positive effects on hearing-aid use compared to SC only.

  19. Directivity quantification in hearing aids: fitting and measurement effects.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, T

    2000-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of venting, microphone port orientation, and compression on the electroacoustically measured directivity of directional and omnidirectional behind-the-ear hearing aids. In addition, the average directivity provided across three brands of directional and omnidirectional behind-the-ear hearing aids was compared with that provided by the open ear. Three groups of hearing aids (four instruments in each group) representing three commercial models (a total of 12) were selected for electroacoustic evaluation of directivity. Polar directivity patterns were measured and directivity index was calculated across four different venting configurations, and for five different microphone port angles. All measurements were made for instruments in directional and omnidirectional modes. Single source traditional, and two-source modified front-to-back ratios were also measured with the hearing aids in linear and compression modes. The directivity provided by the open (Knowles Electronics Manikin for Acoustic Research) ear was superior to that of the omnidirectional hearing aids in this study. Although the directivity measured for directional hearing aids was significantly better than that of omnidirectional models, significant variability was measured both within and across the tested models both on average and at specific test frequencies. Both venting and microphone port orientation affected the measured directivity. Although compression reduced the magnitude of traditionally measured front-to-back ratios, no difference from linear amplification was noted using a modified methodology. The variation in the measured directivity both within and across the directional microphone hearing aid brands suggests that manufacturer's specification of directivity may not provide an accurate index of the actual performance of all individual instruments. The significant impact of venting and microphone port orientation on directivity indicate that these variables must be

  20. 75 FR 77781 - Amendment of the Commission's Rules Governing Hearing Aid-Compatible Mobile Handsets...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... that consumers with hearing loss are able to access wireless communications services. DATES: The... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 20 Amendment of the Commission's Rules Governing Hearing Aid- Compatible Mobile.../13. Title: Hearing Aid Compatibility Status Report and Section 20.19, Hearing Aid-Compatible Mobile...

  1. Association of Hearing Impairment and Emotional Vitality in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Contrera, Kevin J.; Betz, Josh; Deal, Jennifer A.; Choi, Janet S.; Ayonayon, Hilsa N.; Harris, Tamara; Helzner, Elizabeth; Martin, Kathryn R.; Mehta, Kala; Pratt, Sheila; Rubin, Susan M.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Yaffe, Kristine; Garcia, Melissa; Simonsick, Eleanor M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To better understand the potential impact of hearing impairment (HI) and hearing aid use on emotional vitality and mental health in older adults. Method: We investigated the cross-sectional association of HI with emotional vitality in 1,903 adults aged 76–85 years in the Health ABC study adjusted for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. Hearing was defined by the speech frequency pure tone average (no impairment < 25 dB, mild impairment 25–40 dB, and moderate or greater impairment > 40 dB). Emotional vitality was defined as having a high sense of personal mastery, happiness, low depressive symptomatology, and low anxiety. Results: Compared with individuals with no HI, participants with moderate or greater HI had a 23% lower odds of emotional vitality (odds ratio [OR] = 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59–0.99). Hearing aid use was not associated with better emotional vitality (OR = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.81–1.20). Discussion: HI is associated with lower odds of emotional vitality in older adults. Further studies are needed to examine the longitudinal impact of HI on mental health and well-being. PMID:26883806

  2. Association of Hearing Impairment and Emotional Vitality in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Contrera, Kevin J; Betz, Josh; Deal, Jennifer A; Choi, Janet S; Ayonayon, Hilsa N; Harris, Tamara; Helzner, Elizabeth; Martin, Kathryn R; Mehta, Kala; Pratt, Sheila; Rubin, Susan M; Satterfield, Suzanne; Yaffe, Kristine; Garcia, Melissa; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Lin, Frank R

    2016-05-01

    To better understand the potential impact of hearing impairment (HI) and hearing aid use on emotional vitality and mental health in older adults. We investigated the cross-sectional association of HI with emotional vitality in 1,903 adults aged 76-85 years in the Health ABC study adjusted for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. Hearing was defined by the speech frequency pure tone average (no impairment < 25 dB, mild impairment 25-40 dB, and moderate or greater impairment > 40 dB). Emotional vitality was defined as having a high sense of personal mastery, happiness, low depressive symptomatology, and low anxiety. Compared with individuals with no HI, participants with moderate or greater HI had a 23% lower odds of emotional vitality (odds ratio [OR] = 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59-0.99). Hearing aid use was not associated with better emotional vitality (OR = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.81-1.20). HI is associated with lower odds of emotional vitality in older adults. Further studies are needed to examine the longitudinal impact of HI on mental health and well-being. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Outcome of Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant in Cantonese-Speaking Mixed Hearing Loss Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Joannie Ka Yin; Tsang, Willis Sung Shan; Wong, Terence Ka Cheong

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the aided benefits, speech recognition in quiet and in noise, change in hearing and subjective report of satisfaction on mixed hearing loss adults implanted with Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB) middle ear implant. Methods Eight Cantonese speaking adult patients with mixed hearing loss were enrolled in a single-subject, repeated measures prospective study design. Audiometric testing, including air and bone conduction and word recognition under sound-field were conducted before surgery. Device activation was arranged 8 weeks after operation. Audiometric testing was taken to evaluate the change in hearing. Patients were asked to wear the device and come back for fine tuning as needed. Outcome measurements were undertaken at 3 and 6 months after device activation. The outcome measures included sound-field thresholds, Cantonese Hearing in Noise Test (CHINT), Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) and International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA). Results The application of the VSB improved the aided thresholds and improved speech intelligibility in quiet and noise without significant changes in hearing thresholds. Conclusion VSB is considered as a safe, effective and reliable auditory rehabilitation option for Cantonese speaking adults with mixed hearing loss. PMID:22701155

  4. Hearing loss screening tests for adults.

    PubMed

    Becerril-Ramírez, Perla B; González-Sánchez, Dina F; Gómez-García, Angélica; Figueroa-Moreno, Rafael; Bravo-Escobar, Gerardo A; García de la Cruz, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    The early detection of hearing loss has been studied widely in newborns due to the emerging technologies for diagnosis and treatment. There are detailed protocols for this goal. Nonetheless, hearing loss screening in adults has become more important lately with the increase of the life expectancy, an expected change in the Mexican population pyramid towards a rectangular shape in the next 50 years (with increased hearing loss prevalence) and the creation of public policies for social security such as the "Seguro Popular". There are no Mexican studies about hearing loss screening in adults. The aim of this work was to assess a tone emission and a questionnaire as screening tools for hearing loss in adults. A sample size of 500 individuals without otology pathology from the outpatient clinics at a general hospital. An otoscopy, 2 screening tests (tone emission and questionnaire) and tonal audiometry were performed on all subjects. The questionnaire turned out to be a sensitive test but with low specificity, while the tone emission was less sensitive but more specific with a higher rate of precision. In this study, the best result was achieved by a combined strategy using the two tests above, with a precision of 90%. The best screening strategy proposed by this study for hearing loss in adults is a questionnaire and tone emission test, which guarantees complete hearing assessment in objective and subjective manners, performed quickly and without special training. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. A Technical Comparison of Digital Frequency-Lowering Algorithms Available in Two Current Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Hugh J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently two major manufacturers of hearing aids introduced two distinct frequency-lowering techniques that were designed to compensate in part for the perceptual effects of high-frequency hearing impairments. The Widex “Audibility Extender” is a linear frequency transposition scheme, whereas the Phonak “SoundRecover” scheme employs nonlinear frequency compression. Although these schemes process sound signals in very different ways, studies investigating their use by both adults and children with hearing impairment have reported significant perceptual benefits. However, the modifications that these innovative schemes apply to sound signals have not previously been described or compared in detail. Methods The main aim of the present study was to analyze these schemes'technical performance by measuring outputs from each type of hearing aid with the frequency-lowering functions enabled and disabled. The input signals included sinusoids, flute sounds, and speech material. Spectral analyses were carried out on the output signals produced by the hearing aids in each condition. Conclusions The results of the analyses confirmed that each scheme was effective at lowering certain high-frequency acoustic signals, although both techniques also distorted some signals. Most importantly, the application of either frequency-lowering scheme would be expected to improve the audibility of many sounds having salient high-frequency components. Nevertheless, considerably different perceptual effects would be expected from these schemes, even when each hearing aid is fitted in accordance with the same audiometric configuration of hearing impairment. In general, these findings reinforce the need for appropriate selection and fitting of sound-processing schemes in modern hearing aids to suit the characteristics and preferences of individual listeners. PMID:21789254

  6. Phonological Abilities of Hearing-Impaired Cantonese-Speaking Children with Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Zoe W. Y.; So, Lydia K. H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article examined the phonological skills of 2 groups of Cantonese-speaking children with prelingual, profound bilateral hearing loss. The phonological abilities of 7 children fitted with hearing aids were compared with the abilities of 7 children who wore cochlear implants. Method: Participants in each group ranged in age from 5;1…

  7. Solar-powered hearing aids for children with impaired hearing in Vietnam: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quang Thanh; Pham, Dung; Choi, Kevin J; Nguyen, Uyen T T; Le, Lan; Shanewise, Trudy; Tran, Lien; Nguyen, Nga; Lee, Walter T

    2017-01-25

    Hearing loss is a barrier to speech and social and cognitive development. This can be especially pronounced in children living in low- and middle-income countries with limited resources. To determine the feasibility, durability and social impact of ComCare GLW solar-powered hearing aids provided for Vietnamese children with hearing impairment. A retrospective review of data from an international, multi-discipline humanitarian visit was performed. Hearing aids were given to 28 children enrolled at the Khoai Chau Functional Rehabilitation School, Hung Yen Province, Vietnam. Device inspection and observational assessments were performed by teachers using a modified Parents' Evaluation of Aural/Oral Performance of Children and an Infant Hearing Program Amplification Benefit Questionnaire. Qualitative interviews were undertaken to assess the study aims. Hearing aids were well tolerated for use during regular school hours. All units remained functional during the study period (12 months). Teachers noted increased student awareness and responsiveness to surrounding sounds, but the degree of response to amplification varied between children. There was no significant improvement in speech development as all subjects had prelingual deafness. Teachers felt confident in troubleshooting any potential device malfunction. A solar-powered hearing aid may be a viable option for children in low- and middle-income countries. This study demonstrates that device distribution, maintenance and function can be established in countries with limited resources, while providing feasibility data to support future studies investigating how similar devices may improve the quality of life of those with hearing loss.

  8. Predictors of Hearing Aid Use Time in Children with Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Spratford, Meredith; Moeller, Mary Pat; Oleson, Jacob; Ou, Hua; Roush, Patricia; Jacobs, Shana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated predictors of hearing aid (HA) use time for children with mild-to-severe hearing loss (HL). Barriers to consistent HA use and reliability of parent report measures were also examined. Method: Participants included parents of 272 children with HL. Parents estimated the amount of time the child used HAs daily.…

  9. Predictors of Hearing Aid Use Time in Children with Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Spratford, Meredith; Moeller, Mary Pat; Oleson, Jacob; Ou, Hua; Roush, Patricia; Jacobs, Shana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated predictors of hearing aid (HA) use time for children with mild-to-severe hearing loss (HL). Barriers to consistent HA use and reliability of parent report measures were also examined. Method: Participants included parents of 272 children with HL. Parents estimated the amount of time the child used HAs daily.…

  10. The Influence of Hearing Aid Use on Outcomes of Children with Mild Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Holte, Lenore; McCreery, Ryan W.; Spratford, Meredith; Page, Thomas; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of consistent hearing aid (HA) use on outcomes in children with mild hearing loss (HL). Method: Five- or 7-year-old children with mild HL were separated into 3 groups on the basis of patterns of daily HA use. Using analyses of variance, we compared outcomes between groups on speech and language tests and a…

  11. The Influence of Hearing Aid Use on Outcomes of Children with Mild Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Holte, Lenore; McCreery, Ryan W.; Spratford, Meredith; Page, Thomas; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of consistent hearing aid (HA) use on outcomes in children with mild hearing loss (HL). Method: Five- or 7-year-old children with mild HL were separated into 3 groups on the basis of patterns of daily HA use. Using analyses of variance, we compared outcomes between groups on speech and language tests and a…

  12. Visual Attention in Children with Normal Hearing, Children with Hearing Aids, and Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharpe, Anne Marie; Ashmead, Daniel H.; Rothpletz, Ann M.

    2002-01-01

    This study compared visual attention in 18 prelingually deaf children (half with cochlear implants and half with hearing aids) and 10 normal hearing children. Unlike previous studies, children in all three groups performed similarly on a continuous-performance visual attention task and on a letter cancellation task. Only age and nonverbal…

  13. A Comparative Study on Hearing Aid Benefits of Digital Hearing Aid Use (BTE) from Six Months to Two Years.

    PubMed

    Verma, Lukeshwari; Sanju, Himanshu Kumar; Scaria, Bibina; Awasthi, Mayank; Ravichandran, Aparna; Kaki, Ashritha; Prakash, Savalam Gnana Rathna

    2017-07-01

    Introduction  For many reasons, it is important for audiologists and consumers to document improvement and benefit from amplification device at various stages of uses of amplification device. Professional are also interested to see the impact of amplification device on the consumer's auditory performance at different stages i.e. immediately after fitting and over several months of use. Objective  The objective of the study was to measure the hearing aid benefit following 6 months - 1-year usage, 1 year - 1.5 yeaŕs usage, and 1.5 yeaŕs - 2 years' usage. Methods  A total of 45 subjects participated in the study and were divided equally in three groups: hearing aid users from 6 months to 1 year, 1 year to 1.5 year, and 1.5 year to two years. All subjects responded to the Hearing Aid Benefit Questionnaire (63 questions), which assesses six domains of listening skills. Result  Results showed the mean scores obtained were higher for all domains in the aided condition, as compared with unaided condition for all groups. Results also showed a significant improvement in the overall score between first-time users with hearing aid experience of six months to one year and hearing aid users using hearing aids for a period between 1.5 and 2 years. Conclusion  It is possible to conclude that measuring the hearing aid benefit with the self-assessment questionnaires will assist the clinicians in making judgments about the areas in which a patient is experiencing more difficulty in everyday listening environment and in revising the possible technologies.

  14. A Comparative Study on Hearing Aid Benefits of Digital Hearing Aid Use (BTE) from Six Months to Two Years

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Lukeshwari; Sanju, Himanshu Kumar; Scaria, Bibina; Awasthi, Mayank; Ravichandran, Aparna; Kaki, Ashritha; Prakash, Savalam Gnana Rathna

    2017-01-01

    Introduction  For many reasons, it is important for audiologists and consumers to document improvement and benefit from amplification device at various stages of uses of amplification device. Professional are also interested to see the impact of amplification device on the consumer's auditory performance at different stages i.e. immediately after fitting and over several months of use. Objective  The objective of the study was to measure the hearing aid benefit following 6 months – 1-year usage, 1 year – 1.5 yeaŕs usage, and 1.5 yeaŕs – 2 years' usage. Methods  A total of 45 subjects participated in the study and were divided equally in three groups: hearing aid users from 6 months to 1 year, 1 year to 1.5 year, and 1.5 year to two years. All subjects responded to the Hearing Aid Benefit Questionnaire (63 questions), which assesses six domains of listening skills. Result  Results showed the mean scores obtained were higher for all domains in the aided condition, as compared with unaided condition for all groups. Results also showed a significant improvement in the overall score between first-time users with hearing aid experience of six months to one year and hearing aid users using hearing aids for a period between 1.5 and 2 years. Conclusion  It is possible to conclude that measuring the hearing aid benefit with the self-assessment questionnaires will assist the clinicians in making judgments about the areas in which a patient is experiencing more difficulty in everyday listening environment and in revising the possible technologies. PMID:28680489

  15. Use of the Satisfaction With Amplification in Daily Life Questionnaire to Assess Patient Satisfaction Following Remote Hearing Aid Adjustments (Telefitting)

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2014-01-01

    Background Hearing loss can affect approximately 15% of the pediatric population and up to 40% of the adult population. The gold standard of treatment for hearing loss is amplification of hearing thresholds by means of a hearing aid instrument. A hearing aid is an electronic device equipped with a topology of only three major components of aggregate cost. The gold standard of hearing aid fittings is face-to-face appointments in hearing aid centers, clinics, or hospitals. Telefitting encompasses the programming and adjustments of hearing aid settings remotely. Fitting hearing aids remotely is a relatively simple procedure, using minimal computer hardware and Internet access. Objective This project aimed to examine the feasibility and outcomes of remote hearing aid adjustments (telefitting) by assessing patient satisfaction via the Portuguese version of the Satisfaction With Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire. Methods The Brazilian Portuguese version of the SADL was used in this experimental research design. Participants were randomly selected through the Rehabilitation Clinical (Espaco Reouvir) of the Otorhinolaryngology Department Medical School University of Sao Paulo. Of the 8 participants in the study, 5 were female and 3 were male, with a mean age of 71.5 years. The design consisted of two face-to-face sessions performed within 15 working days of each other. The remote assistance took place 15 days later. Results The average scores from this study are above the mean scores from the original SADL normative data. These indicate a high level of satisfaction in participants who were fitted remotely. Conclusions The use of an evaluation questionnaire is a simple yet effective method to objectively assess the success of a remote fitting. Questionnaire outcomes can help hearing stakeholders improve the National Policy on Hearing Health Care in Brazil. The results of this project indicated that patient satisfaction levels of those fitted remotely were

  16. Wind noise in hearing aids with directional and omnidirectional microphones: polar characteristics of behind-the-ear hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Chung, King; Mongeau, Luc; McKibben, Nicholas

    2009-04-01

    Wind noise can be a significant problem for hearing instrument users. This study examined the polar characteristics of flow noise at outputs of two behind-the-ear digital hearing aids, and a microphone mounted on the surface of a cylinder at flow velocities ranging from a gentle breeze (4.5 m/s) to a strong gale (22.5 m/s) . The hearing aids were programed in an anechoic chamber, and tested in a quiet wind tunnel for flow noise recordings. Flow noise levels were estimated by normalizing the overall gain of the hearing aids to 0 dB. The results indicated that the two hearing aids had similar flow noise characteristics: The noise level was generally the lowest when the microphone faced upstream, higher when the microphone faced downstream, and the highest for frontal and rearward incidence angles. Directional microphones often generated higher flow noise level than omnidirectional microphones but they could reduce far-field background noise, resulting in a lower ambient noise level than omnidirectional microphones. Data for the academic microphone- on-cylinder configuration suggested that both turbulence and flow impingement might have contributed to the generation of flow noise in the hearing aids. Clinical and engineering design applications are discussed.

  17. Predictors of Rehabilitation Intervention Decisions in Adults with Acquired Hearing Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane; Hickson, Louise; Worrall, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the predictors of rehabilitation intervention decisions in middle-age and older adults with acquired hearing impairment seeking help for the first time. Method: Using shared decision making, 139 participants were offered intervention options: hearing aids, communication programs (group or individual), and no…

  18. A self-fitting hearing aid: need and concept.

    PubMed

    Convery, Elizabeth; Keidser, Gitte; Dillon, Harvey; Hartley, Lisa

    2011-12-01

    The need for reliable access to hearing health care services is growing globally, particularly in developing countries and in remotely located, underserved regions in many parts of the developed world. Individuals with hearing loss in these areas are at a significant disadvantage due to the scarcity of local hearing health care professionals and the high cost of hearing aids. Current approaches to making hearing rehabilitation services more readily available to underserved populations include teleaudiology and the provision of amplification devices outside of the traditional provider-client relationship. Both strategies require access to such resources as dedicated equipment and/or specially trained staff. Another possible strategy is a self-fitting hearing aid, a personal amplification device that is equipped with an onboard tone generator to enable user-controlled, automated, in situ audiometry; an onboard prescription to determine the initial hearing aid settings; and a trainable algorithm to enable user-controlled fine-tuning. The device is thus assembled, fitted, and managed by the user without the need for audiological or computer support. This article details the self-fitting concept and its potential application in both developing and developed countries. Potential advantages and disadvantages of such a device are discussed, and considerations for further investigations into the concept are presented. Overall, the concept is considered technologically viable with the main challenges anticipated to be development of clear, simple user instructions and a delivery model that ensures reliable supplies of instant-fit ear tips and batteries.

  19. Access to aidable residual hearing in adult candidates for cochlear implantation in the UK.

    PubMed

    Fielden, Claire A; Hampton, Rosa; Smith, Sandra; Kitterick, Pádraig T

    2016-04-01

    Guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) permits candidates to receive a cochlear implant provided they only hear sounds louder than 90 dB HL at 2 and 4 kHz. In some patients, their level of residual hearing may be sufficient to warrant the use of a hearing aid in their non-implanted ear. A survey of unilaterally implanted adults indicated that those implanted since the publication of NICE guidance were almost seven times more likely to use a hearing aid than those implanted prior to this. If contralateral hearing aid use provides additional benefits over implant use alone, it may be appropriate to consider the capacity to use residual hearing following implantation when determining candidacy.

  20. Functionality of hearing aids: state-of-the-art and future model-based solutions.

    PubMed

    Kollmeier, Birger; Kiessling, Jürgen

    2016-12-13

    A review about technical and perceptual factors in hearing aid technology, research and development is provided, covering current commercial solutions, underlying models of hearing loss for usage in hearing devices and emerging future technical solutions for hearing aid functionalities. A chain of techniques has provided incremental, but steady increases in user benefit, e.g. in the fields of hearing aid amplification, feedback suppression, dynamic compression, noise reduction and situation adaptation. The models describing the perceptual consequences of sensorineural hearing impairment describe the effects on the acoustical level, the neurosensory level and the cognitive level and provide the framework for compensatory (or even substitutional) functions of hearing aids in terms of the attenuation component, the distortion component and the neural component of the hearing loss. A major factor is the requirement of a strong individualisation of hearing aid solutions calling for an appropriate assessment of the different sensorineural components of a hearing loss, especially with respect to bilateral and binaural hearing aid solutions.

  1. Masking Release in Children and Adults With Hearing Loss When Using Amplification

    PubMed Central

    McCreery, Ryan; Kopun, Judy; Lewis, Dawna; Alexander, Joshua; Stelmachowicz, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared masking release for adults and children with normal hearing and hearing loss. For the participants with hearing loss, masking release using simulated hearing aid amplification with 2 different compression speeds (slow, fast) was compared. Method Sentence recognition in unmodulated noise was compared with recognition in modulated noise (masking release). Recognition was measured for participants with hearing loss using individualized amplification via the hearing-aid simulator. Results Adults with hearing loss showed greater masking release than the children with hearing loss. Average masking release was small (1 dB) and did not depend on hearing status. Masking release was comparable for slow and fast compression. Conclusions The use of amplification in this study contrasts with previous studies that did not use amplification. The results suggest that when differences in audibility are reduced, participants with hearing loss may be able to take advantage of dips in the noise levels, similar to participants with normal hearing. Although children required a more favorable signal-to-noise ratio than adults for both unmodulated and modulated noise, masking release was not statistically different. However, the ability to detect a difference may have been limited by the small amount of masking release observed. PMID:26540194

  2. Wind noise in hearing aids: II. Effect of microphone directivity.

    PubMed

    Chung, King

    2012-01-01

    The objectives were: (1) to examine the effects of a directional microphone with different directivity patterns and different microphone combinations on wind noise levels at the hearing aid output; and (2) to derive strategies appropriate for hearing aid selection and future designs. The in-situ frequency responses of a behind-the-ear hearing aid (BTE1) were matched when the hearing aid was programmed to dipole, hypercardioid, cardioids, or adaptive microphone mode. The in-situ frequency responses of another hearing aid (BTE2) were matched among an omnidirectional microphone (OMNI), an adaptive directional microphone (ADM), and a combination of an omnidirectional microphone at low frequencies and an adaptive directional microphone at high frequencies (MIXED). Flow noise was recorded at flow velocities of 0, 4.5, 9.0, and 13.5 m/s. Measurements were repeated for the hypercardioid pattern of BTE1. Flow noise recorded using directional microphones with four directivity patterns and using OMNI, ADM, and MIXED. Directional microphones with different directivity patterns generated similar flow noise levels. ADM yielded higher overall levels than OMNI and MIXED, which had similar overall levels. The adaptive directional microphone is the most versatile microphone for use in wind. The mixed microphone mode is a viable wind noise reduction option.

  3. Modeling and experiment of future hearing aid device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Houwen; Yi, Yun-Bo; Matin, M. A.

    2008-08-01

    During the past few years, many new technologies have been introduced to hearing aids for a better performance. Recently, we proposed an implantable piezoelectric hearing aid. The simulation of our hearing aid is presented with a detail study of its physical properties. However, an accurate experimental study of its performance is needed. Vibration frequency is a major factor that affects the quality of a hearing aid. Among various of existing measurement technologies, laser measurement is always considered to be a precise approach for measuring the frequency properties for MEMS (micro-mechanical-electrical-system) devices. In this paper, a piezoelectric transducer used as hearing aid speaker is demonstrated and an optical measurement method for frequency measurement of our device is discussed in detail. Our measurement system is based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer system. Experimental results show that the vibration of our sample can be accurately detected using a laser beam and spectrum analyzer. The vibration frequency is calculated by measuring the intensity variance. This system aims to provide a simultaneous optical measurement with high accuracy.

  4. [The application of implantable hearing aids using the Vibrant Soundbridge as an example].

    PubMed

    Strenger, T; Stark, T

    2012-02-01

    Over the last decade, bone conducting hearing aids, cochlear implants and implantable hearing aids have come to represent additional treatment options in clinical routine-alongside conventional hearing aids-for hearing impaired patients. Thanks to experience gained in recent years with implantable hearing aids and the consistent evaluation of functional results, the original spectrum of indications has been progressively extended. Today, implantable hearing aids are available for the hearing (re)habilitation of various forms of middle ear pathology as well as sensorineural hearing loss within the audiological criteria. With CE certification for children, the treatment of younger patients with implantable hearing aids has also become possible. Using the Vibrant Soundbridge as an example, the function, indications and contraindications of implantable hearing aids are described and the surgical procedure and post-operative care discussed.

  5. The influence of hearing aids on the speech and language development of children with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Tomblin, J Bruce; Oleson, Jacob J; Ambrose, Sophie E; Walker, Elizabeth; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2014-05-01

    IMPORTANCE Hearing loss (HL) in children can be deleterious to their speech and language development. The standard of practice has been early provision of hearing aids (HAs) to moderate these effects; however, there have been few empirical studies evaluating the effectiveness of this practice on speech and language development among children with mild-to-severe HL. OBJECTIVE To investigate the contributions of aided hearing and duration of HA use to speech and language outcomes in children with mild-to-severe HL. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational cross-sectional design was used to examine the association of aided hearing levels and length of HA use with levels of speech and language outcomes. One hundred eighty 3- and 5-year-old children with HL were recruited through records of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and referrals from clinical service providers in the general community in 6 US states. INTERVENTIONS All but 4 children had been fitted with HAs, and measures of aided hearing and the duration of HA use were obtained. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Standardized measures of speech and language ability were obtained. RESULTS Measures of the gain in hearing ability for speech provided by the HA were significantly correlated with levels of speech (ρ179 = 0.20; P = .008) and language: ρ155 = 0.21; P = .01) ability. These correlations were indicative of modest levels of association between aided hearing and speech and language outcomes. These benefits were found for children with mild and moderate-to-severe HL. In addition, the amount of benefit from aided hearing interacted with the duration of HA experience (Speech: F4,161 = 4.98; P < .001; Language: F4,138 = 2.91; P < .02). Longer duration of HA experience was most beneficial for children who had the best aided hearing. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The degree of improved hearing provided by HAs was associated with better speech and language development in

  6. The effect of hearing aid bandwidth on speech recognition performance of listeners using a cochlear implant and contralateral hearing aid (bimodal hearing)

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Arlene C.; Svirsky, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine how the bandwidth of the hearing aid (HA) fitting affects bimodal speech recognition of listeners with a cochlear implant (CI) in one ear and severe-to-profound hearing loss in the unimplanted ear (but with residual hearing sufficient for wideband amplification using NAL-RP prescriptive guidelines; unaided thresholds no poorer than 95 dB HL through 2000 Hz). Design Recognition of sentence material in quiet and in noise was measured with the CI alone and with CI plus HA as the amplification provided by the hearing aid in the high and mid-frequency regions was systematically reduced from the wideband condition (NAL-RP prescription). Modified bandwidths included upper frequency cutoffs of 2,000, 1,000 or 500 Hz. Results On average, significant bimodal benefit was obtained when the hearing aid provided amplification at all frequencies with aidable residual hearing. Limiting the hearing aid bandwidth to only low frequency amplification (below 1000 Hz) did not yield significant improvements in performance over listening with the CI alone. Conclusion These data suggest the importance of providing amplification across as wide a frequency region as permitted by audiometric thresholds in the hearing aid used by bimodal users. PMID:23632973

  7. Contralateral routing of signal hearing aid versus transcutaneous bone conduction in single-sided deafness.

    PubMed

    Leterme, Gaëlle; Bernardeschi, Daniele; Bensemman, Anissa; Coudert, Cyrille; Portal, Jean-Jacques; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Vicaut, Eric; Frachet, Bruno; Bozorg Grayeli, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a contralateral routing of signal (CROS) hearing aid to a transcutaneous bone-anchored device in the same conditions. This prospective crossover study included 18 adult patients with a single-sided deafness (SSD). After a trial period of 60 days with CROS and 7 days with a transcutaneous bone-anchored device (Alpha 1®, Sophono, Boulder, Colo., USA) on a headband, 13 (72%) patients opted for Alpha 1, 2 patients for CROS, and 3 rejected both rehabilitation methods. Clinical tolerance, satisfaction, hearing performances (pure-tone audiometry, speech test in quiet and in noise, stereo audiometry, sound localization, and Hearing in Noise Test), and quality of life (Glasgow Benefit Inventory, Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit and Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit questionnaires) were measured at 3 and 12 months after the implantation. Both devices improved equally the hearing in noise and the quality of life. Transcutaneous devices represent an effective option in SSD. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Consensus on Hearing Aid Candidature and Fitting for Mild Hearing Loss, With and Without Tinnitus: Delphi Review.

    PubMed

    Sereda, Magdalena; Hoare, Derek J; Nicholson, Richard; Smith, Sandra; Hall, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    In many countries including the United Kingdom, hearing aids are a first line of audiologic intervention for many people with tinnitus and aidable hearing loss. Nevertheless, there is a lack of high quality evidence to support that they are of benefit for tinnitus, and wide variability in their use in clinical practice especially for people with mild hearing loss. The aim of this study was to identify a consensus among a sample of UK clinicians on the criteria for hearing aid candidature and clinical practice in fitting hearing aids specifically for mild hearing loss with and without tinnitus. This will allow professionals to establish clinical benchmarks and to gauge their practice with that used elsewhere. The Delphi technique, a systematic methodology that seeks consensus amongst experts through consultation using a series of iterative questionnaires, was used. A three-round Delphi survey explored clinical consensus among a panel of 29 UK hearing professionals. The authors measured panel agreement on 115 statements covering: (i) general factors affecting the decision to fit hearing aids, (ii) protocol-driven factors affecting the decision to fit hearing aids, (iii) general practice, and (iv) clinical observations. Consensus was defined as a priori ≥70% agreement across the panel. Consensus was reached for 58 of the 115 statements. The broad areas of consensus were around factors important to consider when fitting hearing aids; hearing aid technology/features offered; and important clinical assessment to verify hearing aid fit (agreement of 70% or more). For patients with mild hearing loss, the greatest priority was given by clinicians to patient-centered criteria for fitting hearing aids: hearing difficulties, motivation to wear hearing aids, and impact of hearing loss on quality of life (chosen as top five by at least 64% of panelists). Objective measures were given a lower priority: degree of hearing loss and shape of the audiogram (chosen as top five by

  9. Consensus on Hearing Aid Candidature and Fitting for Mild Hearing Loss, With and Without Tinnitus: Delphi Review

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Derek J.; Nicholson, Richard; Smith, Sandra; Hall, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In many countries including the United Kingdom, hearing aids are a first line of audiologic intervention for many people with tinnitus and aidable hearing loss. Nevertheless, there is a lack of high quality evidence to support that they are of benefit for tinnitus, and wide variability in their use in clinical practice especially for people with mild hearing loss. The aim of this study was to identify a consensus among a sample of UK clinicians on the criteria for hearing aid candidature and clinical practice in fitting hearing aids specifically for mild hearing loss with and without tinnitus. This will allow professionals to establish clinical benchmarks and to gauge their practice with that used elsewhere. Design: The Delphi technique, a systematic methodology that seeks consensus amongst experts through consultation using a series of iterative questionnaires, was used. A three-round Delphi survey explored clinical consensus among a panel of 29 UK hearing professionals. The authors measured panel agreement on 115 statements covering: (i) general factors affecting the decision to fit hearing aids, (ii) protocol-driven factors affecting the decision to fit hearing aids, (iii) general practice, and (iv) clinical observations. Consensus was defined as a priori ≥70% agreement across the panel. Results: Consensus was reached for 58 of the 115 statements. The broad areas of consensus were around factors important to consider when fitting hearing aids; hearing aid technology/features offered; and important clinical assessment to verify hearing aid fit (agreement of 70% or more). For patients with mild hearing loss, the greatest priority was given by clinicians to patient-centered criteria for fitting hearing aids: hearing difficulties, motivation to wear hearing aids, and impact of hearing loss on quality of life (chosen as top five by at least 64% of panelists). Objective measures were given a lower priority: degree of hearing loss and shape of the

  10. When hearing aids go bad: an FM success story.

    PubMed

    McArdle, Rachel; Abrams, Harvey B; Chisolm, Theresa Hnath

    2005-01-01

    Both clinical and research findings support the effectiveness of frequency-modulated (FM) technology among individuals who continue to encounter significant communication problems despite the use of conventional hearing instruments. The use rate of FM devices throughout the nation, however, remains disappointingly low. The authors present a case of a longtime hearing aid user whose hearing aids provided decreasing benefit as his hearing impairment increased to the extent that cochlear implantation was considered. Through the establishment of patient-specific treatment goals, the provision of appropriate FM technology as verified through real-ear measurements, and careful and deliberate counseling and follow-up, this patient was able to realize significant communication benefits as reported through several self-assessment measures. The cost-benefit implications of FM technology versus cochlear implantation are discussed.

  11. [Speech audiometry for indication of conventional and implantable hearing aids].

    PubMed

    Hoppe, U; Hast, A

    2017-03-01

    The social function of the human hearing apparatus is comprehension of speech. Auditory rehabilitation aims to enhance speech perception in everyday life. Consequently, audiological evaluation contains speech perception measurement. Many speech audiometric methods have been developed in German-speaking countries, which are suitable for quantification of speech perception abilities in quiet and in noise to address specific diagnostic questions. For establishment of the indication for technical hearing systems such as hearing aids and cochlear implants, the Freiburg monosyllabic test has been employed successfully for many years. Particularly sentence tests have been suggested as a complementary measure for hearing aid indication and assessment. This paper describes the characteristics and range of application of various speech audiometric methods, and highlights the methodological limitations of the individual tests.

  12. Investigating lifestyle factors affecting hearing aid candidature in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Dafydd; Vetter, Norman; Lewis, Peter

    2003-07-01

    Within this presentation, the authors consider briefly the published data on the effects of hearing impairment on lifestyle in the elderly, and suggest that the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) would provide a framework for standardizing the study of effects of impairments. This is followed by two studies. In the first study, we asked a consecutive sample of elderly patients (hearing aid candidates and users) to list the activities, transactions and interactions in which they participated, and classified these using the ICF. We then took the main categories, and, in a second study, explored how often individuals participated in them, how much difficulty they had because of their hearing loss, and how much they enjoyed them. This highlighted the considerable difficulties that most such individuals experience in common activities and communication situations, and which seem to be little influenced by whether or not they use hearing aids.

  13. Effects of hearing aid amplification on voice F0 variability in speakers with prelingual hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guo-She; Liu, Chialin; Lee, Shao-Hsuan

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the audio-vocal feedback responses of (F0) to hearing amplification in severe-to-profound prelingual hearing loss (SPHL) using power spectral analysis of F0 contour of sustained vowels. Sustained phonations of vowel/a/of seventeen participants with SPHL were acquired with and without hearing-aid amplifications. The vocal intensity was visually fed back to the participants to help controlling the vocal intensity at 65-75 dBA and 85-95 dBA. The F0 contour of the phonations was extracted and submitted to spectral analysis to measure the extent of F0 fluctuations at different frequency ranges. The results showed that both high vocal intensity and hearing-aid amplification significantly improved voice F0 control by reducing the low-frequency fluctuations (low-frequency power, LFP, 0.2-3 Hz) in F0 spectrum. However, the enhanced feedback from higher vocal intensity and/or hearing amplification was not adequate to reduce the LFP to the level of a normal hearing person. Moreover, we found significant and negative correlations between LFP and supra-threshold feedback intensity (phonation intensity - hearing threshold level) for the frequencies of 500-2000 Hz. Increased vocal intensity, as well as hearing-aid amplification, improved voice F0 control by reducing the LFP of F0 spectrum, and the subtle changes in voices could be well explored using spectral analysis of F0. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A self-report outcome measure for the evaluation of hearing aid fittings and services.

    PubMed

    Gatehouse, S

    1999-11-01

    To design, optimise and validate an outcome measure for the evaluation of adult hearing aid fittings. A multi-dimensional subject-specific and situation-specific questionnaire (the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile--GHABP) to assess initial disability, handicap, use, benefit, residual disability and satisfaction before and after hearing aid provision. Hearing-impaired adults attending National Health Service clinics for the first time for whom amplification is an appropriate management option. A self-report instrument of length compatible with the requirements of routine clinical practice which retains psychometric leverage. The GHABP demonstrates sensitivity to the technological content and rehabilitative context of interventions. The scale properties facilitate the use of the GHABP in decision-making for individual hearing-impaired patients. An outcome measure such as the GHABP offers the various interested parties (purchasers, providers and patients) a tool for use in the evaluation of the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of existing services and future developments. Many of the design concepts embodied in the GHABP are applicable in other healthcare contexts.

  15. Objective and perceptual comparisons of two bluetooth hearing aid assistive devices.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jackie L; Pustejovsky, Carmen; Vanneste, Sven

    2017-08-01

    With the advent of Bluetooth technology, many of the assistive listening devices for hearing have become manufacturer specific, with little objective information about the performance provided. Thirty native English-speaking adults (mean age 29.8) with normal hearing were tested pseudo-randomly with two major hearing aid manufacturers' proprietary Bluetooth connectivity devices paired to the accompanying manufacturer's specific hearing aids. Sentence recognition performance was objectively measured for each system with signals transmitted via a land-line to the same iPhone in two conditions. There was a significant effect of participant's performance according to listening condition. There was no significant effect between device manufacturers according to listening condition, but there was a significant effect in participant's perception of "quality of sound". Despite differences in signal transmission for each devise, when worn by participants both the systems performed equally. In fact, participants expressed personal preferences for specific technology that was largely due to their perceived quality of sound while listening to recorded signals. While further research is necessary to investigate other measures of benefit for Bluetooth connectivity devices, preliminary data suggest that in order to ensure comfort and compatibility, not only should objective measures of the patient benefit be completed, but also assessing the patient's perception of benefit is equally important. Implications for Rehabilitation All professionals who work with individuals with hearing loss, become aware of the differences in the multiple choices for assistive technology readily available for hearing loss. With the ever growing dispensing of Bluetooth connectivity devices coupled to hearing aids, there is an increased burden to determine whether performance differences could exist between manufacturers. There is a growing need to investigate other measures of benefit for Bluetooth

  16. Costs of screening children for hearing disorders and delivery of hearing aids in China

    PubMed Central

    Baltussen, Rob; Li, Ju; Wu, Li Dong; Ge, Xiao Hui; Teng, Bai Yu; Sun, Xi Bin; Han, Rui; Wang, Xiao Li; McPherson, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Background The burden of disease of hearing disorders among children is high, but a large part goes undetected. School-based screening programs in combination with the delivery of hearing aids can alleviate this situation, but the costs of such programs are unknown. Aim To evaluate the costs of a school-based screening program for hearing disorders, among approximately 216,000 school children, and the delivery of hearing aids to 206 children at three different care levels in China. Methods In a prospective study design, screening and hearing aid delivery costs were estimated on the basis of program records and an empirical assessment of health personnel time input. Household costs for seeking and undergoing hearing health care were collected with a questionnaire, administered to the parents of the child. Data were collected at three study sites representing primary, secondary and tertiary care levels. Results Total screening and hearing aid delivery costs ranged between RMB70,000 (US$9,000) and RMB133,000 (US$17,000) in the three study sites. Health care cost per child fitted ranged from RMB5,900 (US$760) at the primary care level, RMB7,200 (US$940) at the secondary care level, to RMB8,600 (US$1,120) at the tertiary care level. Household costs were only a small fraction of the overall costs. Cost per child fitted ranged between RMB1,608 and RMB2,812 (US$209–US$365), depending on perspective of analysis and study site. The program was always least costly in the primary care setting. Conclusion Hearing screening and the delivery of hearing aids in China is least costly in a primary care setting. Important questions remain concerning its implementation. PMID:19371419

  17. Hearing aids reduce overestimation in pre-fitting self-assessment.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Tadashi; Uratani, Yuka; Fukuda, Fumi; Saito, Osamu; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    When asking about hearing disability, the self-reported answers are not always equivalent to those of their family and neighbors. It is often experienced that family and neighbors indicate more severe hearing disability. Hearing difficulty itself may prevent hearing impaired subjects from understanding the degree of their own hearing disability. If their hearing impairment interferes with self-assessment of unaided hearing ability, it may change after a non-hearing aid user begins using hearing aids. Thirty-four adults who had almost no experience with using hearing aids participated in this study. Unaided hearing disability was assessed with visual analog scale (VAS) and ten 5-point category scales. The assessment was performed not only by the subject (pre-fitting self-assessment) but also by his/her family members, presumed to be understanding persons regarding the degree of his/her hearing disability (family-assessment). For evaluating the effect of amplification on self-assessment, re-assessment was performed more than three months later (post-fitting self-assessment). The overestimation in the pre-fitting self-assessment and the effect of amplification were investigated in comparison to the family- and post-fitting self-assessments. The pre-fitting self-, family- and post-fitting self-VAS values for total hearing abilities were 50.5±15.6, 45.1±14.7 and 34.3±18.8, respectively. The pre-fitting self-VAS value was significantly higher than the family- and post-fitting self-VAS values (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). For the 5-point category scale, the pre-fitting self-assessment was better than the family- and post-fitting self-assessments. Significant differences were observed in 1 and 2 situations, as compared with the family- and post-fitting self-assessments, respectively. These findings suggest the involvement of overestimation in pre-fitting self-assessment and its reduction after amplification with hearing aids. Although the pre-fitting self- and the

  18. Hearing Aid Use and Mild Hearing Impairment: Learnings from Big Data.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Barbra H B; Hickson, Louise; Launer, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Previous research, mostly reliant on self-reports, has indicated that hearing aid (HA) use is related to the degree of hearing impairment (HI). No large-scale investigation of the relationship between data-logged HA use and HI has been conducted to date. This study aimed to investigate if objective measures of overall daily HA use and HA use in various listening environments are different for adults with mild HI compared to adults with moderate HI. This retrospective study used data extracted from a database of fitting appointments from an international group of HA providers. Only data from the participants' most recent fitting appointment were included in the final dataset. A total of 8,489 bilateral HA fittings of adults over the age of 18 yr, conducted between January 2013 and June 2014, were included. Participants were subsequently allocated to HI groups, based on British Society of Audiology and American Speech-Language-Hearing Association audiometric descriptors. Fitting data from participating HA providers were regularly transferred to a central server. The data, with all personal information except age and gender removed, contained participants' four-frequency average (at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) as well as information on HA characteristics and usage. Following data cleaning, bivariate and post hoc statistical analyses were conducted. The total sample of adults' average daily HA use was 8.52 hr (interquartile range [IQR] = 5.49-11.77) in the left ear and 8.51 hr (IQR = 5.49-11.72) in the right ear. With a few exceptions, there were no statistical differences between hours of HA use for participants with mild HI compared to those with moderate impairment. Across all mild and moderate HI groups, the most common overall HA usage was between 8 and 12 hr per day. Other factors such as age, gender, and HA style also showed no relationship to hours of use. HAs were used, on average, for 7 hr (IQR = 4.27-9.96) per day in quiet and 1 hr (IQR = 0.33-1.41) per

  19. Opening the Market for Lower Cost Hearing Aids: Regulatory Change Can Improve the Health of Older Americans

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is a leading cause of disability among older people. Yet only one in seven US adults who could benefit from a hearing aid uses one. This fraction has not increased over the past 30 years, nor have hearing aid prices dropped, despite trends of steady improvements and price reductions in the consumer electronics industry. The President’s Council on Science and Technology has proposed changes in the regulation of hearing aids, including the creation of a “basic” low-cost over-the-counter category of devices. We discuss the potential to reduce disability as well as to improve public health, stakeholder responses to the president’s council’s proposal, and public health efforts to further mitigate the burden of disability stemming from age-related hearing loss. PMID:27077339

  20. Opening the Market for Lower Cost Hearing Aids: Regulatory Change Can Improve the Health of Older Americans.

    PubMed

    Blustein, Jan; Weinstein, Barbara E

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is a leading cause of disability among older people. Yet only one in seven US adults who could benefit from a hearing aid uses one. This fraction has not increased over the past 30 years, nor have hearing aid prices dropped, despite trends of steady improvements and price reductions in the consumer electronics industry. The President's Council on Science and Technology has proposed changes in the regulation of hearing aids, including the creation of a "basic" low-cost over-the-counter category of devices. We discuss the potential to reduce disability as well as to improve public health, stakeholder responses to the president's council's proposal, and public health efforts to further mitigate the burden of disability stemming from age-related hearing loss.

  1. The Hearing-Aid Audio Quality Index (HAAQI).

    PubMed

    Kates, James M; Arehart, Kathryn H

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an index designed to predict music quality for individuals listening through hearing aids. The index is "intrusive", that is, it compares the degraded signal being evaluated to a reference signal. The index is based on a model of the auditory periphery that includes the effects of hearing loss. Outputs from the auditory model are used to measure changes in the signal time-frequency envelope modulation, temporal fine structure, and long-term spectrum caused by the hearing aid processing. The index is constructed by combining a term sensitive to noise and nonlinear distortion with a second term sensitive to changes in the long-term spectrum. The index is fitted to an existing database of music quality judgments made by listeners having normal or impaired hearing. The data comprise ratings for three music excerpts (classical orchestra, jazz trio, and jazz singer), each processed through 100 conditions representative of hearing-aid processing and listening situations. The overall accuracy of the index is high, with a correlation coefficient of 0.970 when computed over all of the processing conditions and averaged over the combined groups of listeners having normal and impaired hearing.

  2. The Hearing-Aid Audio Quality Index (HAAQI)

    PubMed Central

    Kates, James M.; Arehart, Kathryn H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an index designed to predict music quality for individuals listening through hearing aids. The index is “intrusive”, that is, it compares the degraded signal being evaluated to a reference signal. The index is based on a model of the auditory periphery that includes the effects of hearing loss. Outputs from the auditory model are used to measure changes in the signal time-frequency envelope modulation, temporal fine structure, and long-term spectrum caused by the hearing aid processing. The index is constructed by combining a term sensitive to noise and nonlinear distortion with a second term sensitive to changes in the long-term spectrum. The index is fitted to an existing database of music quality judgments made by listeners having normal or impaired hearing. The data comprise ratings for three music excerpts (classical orchestra, jazz trio, and jazz singer), each processed through 100 conditions representative of hearing-aid processing and listening situations. The overall accuracy of the index is high, with a correlation coefficient of 0.970 when computed over all of the processing conditions and averaged over the combined groups of listeners having normal and impaired hearing. PMID:27135042

  3. Using trainable hearing aids to examine real-world preferred gain.

    PubMed

    Mueller, H Gustav; Hornsby, Benjamin W Y; Weber, Jennifer E

    2008-01-01

    While there have been many studies of real-world preferred hearing aid gain, few data are available from participants using hearing aids with today's special features activated. Moreover, only limited data have been collected regarding preferred gain for individuals using trainable hearing aids. To determine whether real-world preferred hearing aid gain with trainable modern hearing aids is in agreement with previous work in this area, and to determine whether the starting programmed gain setting influences preferred gain outcome. An experimental crossover study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups. Following initial treatment, each subject crossed to the opposite group and experienced that treatment. Twenty-two adults with downward sloping sensorineural hearing loss served as participants (mean age 64.5; 16 males, 6 females). All were experienced users of bilateral amplification. Using a crossover design, participants were fitted to two different prescriptive gain conditions: VC (volume control) start-up 6 dB above NAL-NL1 (National Acoustic Laboratories-Non-linear 1) target or VC start-up 6 dB below NAL-NL1 target. The hearing aids were used in a 10 to 14 day field trial for each condition, and using the VC, the participants could "train" the overall hearing aid gain to their preferred level. During the field trial, daily hearing aid use was logged, as well as the listening situations experienced by the listeners based on the hearing instrument's acoustic scene analysis. The participants completed a questionnaire at the start and end of each field trial in which they rated loudness perceptions and their satisfaction with aided loudness levels. Because several participants potentially experienced floor or ceiling effects for the range of trainable gain, the majority of the statistical analysis was conducted using 12 of the 22 participants. For both VC-start conditions, the trained preferred gain differed significantly from the NAL

  4. Effect of age on directional microphone hearing aid benefit and preference.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang

    2010-02-01

    Despite the recognition that the directional microphone hearing aid (DMHA) is an important intervention aimed at helping older hearing-impaired adults understand speech in noisy environments, there is little evidence that older listeners can actually benefit from directional processing. The objective of this study was to determine if older and younger adults can obtain and perceive comparable benefit afforded by DMHAs. Twenty-four hearing-impaired adults aged 36 through 79 yr were fit with switchable-microphone hearing aids and tested in the laboratory and the field. In the laboratory, the listeners' directional benefit and preferences for microphone modes (directional vs. omnidirectional) were assessed using various speech-recognition-in-noise tests. In the four-week field trial, a paired-comparison technique and paper-and-pencil journals were used to determine the benefit provided by directional processing. The effects of age on directional benefit/preference were analyzed using generalized linear models with controlling for the effect of hearing loss. The results revealed that age did not have a significant effect on directional benefit and preference as measured in the laboratory. However, the field data showed that older age was significantly associated with a lower preference for the directional mode. These results indicate that although listeners of different ages may obtain and perceive comparable benefit from DMHAs in laboratory testing, older users tend to perceive less benefit than do younger users in the real world. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Comparison of speech recognition with adaptive digital and FM remote microphone hearing assistance technology by listeners who use hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Linda

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the benefits of 3 types of remote microphone hearing assistance technology (HAT), adaptive digital broadband, adaptive frequency modulation (FM), and fixed FM, through objective and subjective measures of speech recognition in clinical and real-world settings. Participants included 11 adults, ages 16 to 78 years, with primarily moderate-to-severe bilateral hearing impairment (HI), who wore binaural behind-the-ear hearing aids; and 15 adults, ages 18 to 30 years, with normal hearing. Sentence recognition in quiet and in noise and subjective ratings were obtained in 3 conditions of wireless signal processing. Performance by the listeners with HI when using the adaptive digital technology was significantly better than that obtained with the FM technology, with the greatest benefits at the highest noise levels. The majority of listeners also preferred the digital technology when listening in a real-world noisy environment. The wireless technology allowed persons with HI to surpass persons with normal hearing in speech recognition in noise, with the greatest benefit occurring with adaptive digital technology. The use of adaptive digital technology combined with speechreading cues would allow persons with HI to engage in communication in environments that would have otherwise not been possible with traditional wireless technology.

  6. Developmental tendency of hearing aid semi-auto-manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarng, Soon Suck; Lee, Yanbo

    2010-01-01

    What's the developmental tendency of the hearing aid manufacturing in the future? The answer is a rapid production or/and CAD/CAM technology. The new technology is quite different from the conventional manufacturing method. This article shows the differences between the 2 types of approach in detail, and analyzes these differences. The authors figure out where and how to cut an ear shell impression that will give help to the hearing aid manufacturing process, and make the CAD/CAM method to fit for the Asians' ears.

  7. Developmental tendency of hearing aid semi-auto-manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarng, Soon Suck; Lee, Yanbo

    2009-12-01

    What's the developmental tendency of the hearing aid manufacturing in the future? The answer is a rapid production or/and CAD/CAM technology. The new technology is quite different from the conventional manufacturing method. This article shows the differences between the 2 types of approach in detail, and analyzes these differences. The authors figure out where and how to cut an ear shell impression that will give help to the hearing aid manufacturing process, and make the CAD/CAM method to fit for the Asians' ears.

  8. Listeners who prefer monaural to binaural hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Carter, A S; Noe, C M; Wilson, R H

    2001-05-01

    Four patients who preferred monaural as compared with binaural amplification were evaluated. For these patients, audiometric data, recognition performance on a dichotic digit task, and monaural and binaural hearing aid performance using four amplification strategies (National Acoustic Laboratories-Revised, a speech in noise algorithm, multiple-microphone arrays, and frequency modulated [FM]) are described. The results of dichotic testing using a one-, two-, and three-pair dichotic digit task in free- and directed-recall conditions indicated a left-ear deficit for all subjects that could not be explained by peripheral auditory findings or by a cognitive-based deficit. The results of soundfield testing using a speech in multitalker babble paradigm indicated that when listening in noise, there was little difference between aided and unaided word-recognition performance, suggesting that the binaural hearing aids originally fit for each patient were not providing substantial benefit when listening in a competing babble background. Word-recognition performance when aided monaurally in the right ear was superior to performance when aided monaurally in the left ear and when aided binaurally. The only successful binaural amplification strategy was the FM system. The results indicate that listeners with an auditory-based deficit in dichotic listening may function better with a monaural hearing aid fitting or with an assistive listening device such as an FM system. The findings also suggest that a test of dichotic listening is an important component in the evaluation of patients being considered for amplification.

  9. Encoding of speech sounds at auditory brainstem level in good and poor hearing aid performers.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Hemanth Narayan; Puttabasappa, Manjula

    Hearing aids are prescribed to alleviate loss of audibility. It has been reported that about 31% of hearing aid users reject their own hearing aid because of annoyance towards background noise. The reason for dissatisfaction can be located anywhere from the hearing aid microphone till the integrity of neurons along the auditory pathway. To measure spectra from the output of hearing aid at the ear canal level and frequency following response recorded at the auditory brainstem from individuals with hearing impairment. A total of sixty participants having moderate sensorineural hearing impairment with age range from 15 to 65 years were involved. Each participant was classified as either Good or Poor Hearing aid Performers based on acceptable noise level measure. Stimuli /da/ and /si/ were presented through loudspeaker at 65dB SPL. At the ear canal, the spectra were measured in the unaided and aided conditions. At auditory brainstem, frequency following response were recorded to the same stimuli from the participants. Spectrum measured in each condition at ear canal was same in good hearing aid performers and poor hearing aid performers. At brainstem level, better F0 encoding; F0 and F1 energies were significantly higher in good hearing aid performers than in poor hearing aid performers. Though the hearing aid spectra were almost same between good hearing aid performers and poor hearing aid performers, subtle physiological variations exist at the auditory brainstem. The result of the present study suggests that neural encoding of speech sound at the brainstem level might be mediated distinctly in good hearing aid performers from that of poor hearing aid performers. Thus, it can be inferred that subtle physiological changes are evident at the auditory brainstem in a person who is willing to accept noise from those who are not willing to accept noise. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier

  10. Characteristics of Patients with Hearing Aids according to the Degree and Pattern of Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Young Seok; Kim, Sung Su; Park, Sang Hyun; Park, Eun Bin; Kim, Ho Joong; Kim, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives This study was designed to assess the characteristics of patients according to the degree and audiogram shape of hearing loss and the association of these characteristics with hearing aids (HA) choice, return rate, and cause of return. Subjects and Methods This study included 460 individuals who received HAs from 2011 to 2015. The relationships between type of HA and age, primary and accompanying symptoms, HA choice and return and cause of return were evaluated according to the degree and pattern of hearing loss. Results HA type did not differ significantly according to the degree and pattern of hearing loss. Intensity of hearing loss was greater in male than in female (p<0.05). Open and completely-in-canal types of HA decreased with age (p<0.05). As degree of hearing loss intensified, behind-the-ear and in-the-ear types increased and Open type decreased (p<0.05). The HA return rate was 9.7%, but was not associated with degree or pattern of hearing loss. The main causes of HA return were costs, psychological fears and adaptive failure. Conclusions Choice of HA is affected by age, sex, and degree and pattern of hearing loss. HA for hearing rehabilitation in patients with hearing loss can be personalized according to each patient's characteristics and tendencies. PMID:27942600

  11. Rehabilitative online education versus internet discussion group for hearing aid users: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thorén, Elisabet; Svensson, Monica; Törnqvist, Anna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Lunner, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    By using the Internet in the audiological rehabilitation process, it might be possible in a cost-effective way to include additional rehabilitation components by informing and guiding hearing aid users about such topics as communication strategies, hearing tactics, and how to handle hearing aids. To evaluate the effectiveness of an online education program for adult experienced hearing aid users including professional guidance by an audiologist and compare it with the effects of participation in an online discussion forum without any professional contact. A randomized controlled study with two groups of participants. Repeated measures at prestudy, immediate follow-up, and a 6 mo follow-up. Fifty-nine experienced hearing aid users participated in the study, ranging in age from 24 to 84 yr (mean 63.5 yr). The intervention group (N = 29) underwent a five-week rehabilitative online education in which activities for each week included information, tasks, and assignments, and contact with a professional audiologist was included. The participants in the control group (N = 30) were referred to an online discussion forum without any audiologist contact. A set of questionnaires administered online were used as outcome measures: (1) Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly, (2) International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids, (3) Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life, and (4) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Significant improvements measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly were found in both groups of participants, and the effects were maintained at the 6 mo follow-up. The results on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale showed that the participants in the intervention group showed reduced symptoms of depression immediately/6 mo after the intervention. At the 6 mo follow-up participants in the control group reported fewer symptoms of anxiety than they did before the intervention started. This study provides preliminary evidence that the

  12. The Performance-Perceptual Test (PPT) and its relationship to aided reported handicap and hearing aid satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Gabrielle H; Forsline, Anna

    2006-06-01

    Results of objective clinical tests (e.g., measures of speech understanding in noise) often conflict with subjective reports of hearing aid benefit and satisfaction. The Performance-Perceptual Test (PPT) is an outcome measure in which objective and subjective evaluations are made by using the same test materials, testing format, and unit of measurement (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N), permitting a direct comparison between measured and perceived ability to hear. Two variables are measured: a Performance Speech Reception Threshold in Noise (SRTN) for 50% correct performance and a Perceptual SRTN, which is the S/N at which listeners perceive that they can understand the speech material. A third variable is computed: the Performance-Perceptual Discrepancy (PPDIS); it is the difference between the Performance and Perceptual SRTNs and measures the extent to which listeners "misjudge" their hearing ability. Saunders et al. in 2004 examined the relation between PPT scores and unaided hearing handicap. In this publication, the relations between the PPT, residual aided handicap, and hearing aid satisfaction are described. Ninety-four individuals between the ages of 47 and 86 yr participated. All had symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss and had worn binaural hearing aids for at least 6 wk before participating. All subjects underwent routine audiological examination and completed the PPT, the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly/Adults (HHIE/A), and the Satisfaction for Amplification in Daily Life questionnaire. Sixty-five subjects attended one research visit for participation in this study, and 29 attended a second visit to complete the PPT a second time. Performance and Perceptual SRTN and PPDIS scores were normally distributed and showed excellent test-retest reliability. Aided SRTNs were significantly better than unaided SRTNs; aided and unaided PPDIS values did not differ. Stepwise multiple linear regression showed that the PPDIS, the Performance SRTN, and age were

  13. Localization ability with bimodal hearing aids and bilateral cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeber, Bernhard U.; Baumann, Uwe; Fastl, Hugo

    2004-09-01

    After successful cochlear implantation in one ear, some patients continue to use a hearing aid at the contralateral ear. They report an improved reception of speech, especially in noise, as well as a better perception of music when the hearing aid and cochlear implant are used in this bimodal combination. Some individuals in this bimodal patient group also report the impression of an improved localization ability. Similar experiences are reported by the group of bilateral cochlear implantees. In this study, a survey of 11 bimodally and 4 bilaterally equipped cochlear implant users was carried out to assess localization ability. Individuals in the bimodal implant group were all provided with the same type of hearing aid in the opposite ear, and subjects in the bilateral implant group used cochlear implants of the same manufacturer on each ear. Subjects adjusted the spot of a computer-controlled laser-pointer to the perceived direction of sound incidence in the frontal horizontal plane by rotating a trackball. Two subjects of the bimodal group who had substantial residual hearing showed localization ability in the bimodal configuration, whereas using each single device only the subject with better residual hearing was able to discriminate the side of sound origin. Five other subjects with more pronounced hearing loss displayed an ability for side discrimination through the use of bimodal aids, while four of them were already able to discriminate the side with a single device. Of the bilateral cochlear implant group one subject showed localization accuracy close to that of normal hearing subjects. This subject was also able to discriminate the side of sound origin using the first implanted device alone. The other three bilaterally equipped subjects showed limited localization ability using both devices. Among them one subject demonstrated a side-discrimination ability using only the first implanted device.

  14. Phonological abilities of hearing-impaired Cantonese-speaking children with cochlear implants or hearing AIDS.

    PubMed

    Law, Zoe W Y; So, Lydia K H

    2006-12-01

    This article examined the phonological skills of 2 groups of Cantonese-speaking children with prelingual, profound bilateral hearing loss. The phonological abilities of 7 children fitted with hearing aids were compared with the abilities of 7 children who wore cochlear implants. Participants in each group ranged in age from 5;1 to 6;4 years. The participants were asked to name 57 pictures and retell 2 stories. Phonological abilities were described in terms of the participants' phonological units and the phonological processes used. The participants' perception of single words was assessed using a Cantonese phonology test that includes tonal, segmental, and semantic distracters. All except 1 participant had incomplete phonetic repertories. All participants showed complete vowel and tone inventories. The study group used both developmental rules and nondevelopmental phonological rules. For perception of single words, participants chose the target word most often. The cochlear implant users had a significantly higher percentage correct score for consonant production than hearing aid users. The prediction that Cantonese children wearing cochlear implants would have better phonological skills than children having hearing aids with a similar degree of hearing loss was confirmed. Cochlear implant usage appeared to promote consonant feature production development to a greater degree than did the use of a hearing aid.

  15. Bone-anchored hearing aids in conductive and mixed hearing losses: why do patients reject them?

    PubMed

    Siau, Richard T K; Dhillon, Baljeet; Siau, Derrick; Green, Kevin M J

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to report the bone-anchored hearing aid uptake rate and the reasons for their rejection by patients with conductive and mixed hearing losses. A retrospective review was performed of 113 consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral conductive or mixed hearing loss referred to the Greater Manchester bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) programme between September 2008 and August 2011. 98 (86.7 %) patients were deemed audiologically suitable for BAHA implantation. Of these, 38 (38.8 %) had BAHA implanted; 60 (61.2 %) patients declined. Of those who declined, 27 (45 %) cited anxiety over surgery, 18 (30 %) cited cosmetic reasons, 16 (26.7 %) perceived limited benefit from the device and six (10 %) preferred conventional hearing aids. Our study highlights a 38.8 % BAHA uptake rate in audiologically suitable patients. The main reasons cited for rejection of BAHA were anxiety over surgery and cosmetic concerns. It is important that clinicians address these early during consultation with prospective BAHA recipients and avoid rushing to implant these patients with a bone-anchored hearing aid.

  16. Digital processing technology for bone-anchored hearing aids: randomised comparison of two devices in hearing aid users with mixed or conductive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Hill-Feltham, P; Roberts, S A; Gladdis, R

    2014-02-01

    This study compared the performance of two new bone-anchored hearing aids with older bone-anchored hearing aids that were not fully digital. Fourteen experienced bone-anchored hearing aid users participated in this cross-over study. Performance of their existing bone-anchored hearing aid was assessed using speech-in-noise testing and questionnaires. Participants were then fitted with either a Ponto Pro or a BP100 device. After four weeks of use with each new device, the same assessments were repeated. Speech-in-noise testing for the 50 per cent signal-to-noise ratio (the ratio at which 50 per cent of responses were correct) showed no significant differences between the Ponto Pro and the BP100 devices (p = 0.1) However, both devices showed significant improvement compared with the participants' previous bone-anchored hearing aid devices (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences between the two new devices in the questionnaire data. Both fully digital bone-anchored hearing aids demonstrated superior speech processing compared with the previous generation of devices. There were no substantial differences between the two digital devices in either objective or subjective tests.

  17. Radio Frequency Hearing Aids: The Need for Complementary and Compatible Channel Allocation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Vic; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The article discusses the use of radio frequency hearing aids, which provide a practical means of improving the signal-to-noise ratio of conventional hearing aids used by the aurally handicapped. (Author/DLS)

  18. The Effects of Hearing Aids on Localization of White Noise by Blind Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Bruce R.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to observe the effects of hearing aids on the ability of 20 blind veterans to localize white noise. In all cases, Ss performed more poorly on a localization task while wearing a hearing aid. (Author)

  19. Speech Intelligibility in Persian Hearing Impaired Children with Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Emadi, Maryam; Zamani, Peyman; Farahani, Farhad; Lotfi, Gohar

    2017-04-01

    The aim of present study is to evaluate and compare speech intelligibility in hearing impaired children with cochlear implants (CI) and hearing aid (HA) users and children with normal hearing (NH). The sample consisted of 45 Persian-speaking children aged 3 to 5-years-old. They were divided into three groups, and each group had 15, children, children with CI and children using hearing aids in Hamadan. Participants was evaluated by the test of speech intelligibility level. Results of ANOVA on speech intelligibility test showed that NH children had significantly better reading performance than hearing impaired children with CI and HA. Post-hoc analysis, using Scheffe test, indicated that the mean score of speech intelligibility of normal children was higher than the HA and CI groups; but the difference was not significant between mean of speech intelligibility in children with hearing loss that use cochlear implant and those using HA. It is clear that even with remarkabkle advances in HA technology, many hearing impaired children continue to find speech production a challenging problem. Given that speech intelligibility is a key element in proper communication and social interaction, consequently, educational and rehabilitation programs are essential to improve speech intelligibility of children with hearing loss.

  20. A programmable sound processor for advanced hearing aid research.

    PubMed

    McDermott, H

    1998-03-01

    A portable sound processor has been developed to facilitate research on advanced hearing aids. Because it is based on a digital signal processing integrated circuit (Motorola DSP56001), it can readily be programmed to execute novel algorithms. Furthermore, the parameters of these algorithms can be adjusted quickly and easily to suit the specific hearing characteristics of users. In the processor, microphone signals are digitized to a precision of 12 bits at a sampling rate of approximately 12 kHz for input to the DSP device. Subsequently, processed samples are delivered to the earphone by a novel, fully-digital class-D driver. This driver provides the advantages of a conventional class-D amplifier (high maximum output, low power consumption, low distortion) without some of the disadvantages (such as the need for precise analog circuitry). In addition, a cochlear implant driver is provided so that the processor is suitable for hearing-impaired people who use an implant and an acoustic hearing aid together. To reduce the computational demands on the DSP device, and therefore the power consumption, a running spectral analysis of incoming signals is provided by a custom-designed switched-capacitor integrated circuit incorporating 20 bandpass filters. The complete processor is pocket-sized and powered by batteries. An example is described of its use in providing frequency-shaped amplification for aid users with severe hearing impairment. Speech perception tests confirmed that the processor performed significantly better than the subjects' own hearing aids, probably because the digital filter provided a frequency response generally closer to the optimum for each user than the simpler analog aids.

  1. HIV/AIDS and disability: differences in HIV/AIDS knowledge between deaf and hearing people in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Groce, N E; Yousafzai, A K; van der Maas, F

    2007-03-15

    Studies both in North America and Europe have found that deaf individuals lack access to AIDS information, due to problems in communication, low literacy and tightly woven social networks within the deaf community. However few comparable studies are available from countries in the Developing World. The present study was undertaken in Nigeria where there is an estimated adult HIV prevalence rate of 5.4%. We sought to compare HIV knowledge among deaf and hearing individuals in order to identify how effectively deaf members of the community are being reached by HIV/AIDS messages. A survey comparing knowledge about HIV/AIDS among deaf and hard of hearing adolescents (n = 50) and young adults (n = 50) was undertaken. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in levels of understanding about certain aspects of how AIDS is spread were identified as well as differences in available resources for access to accurate information among deaf members of the population. These findings from Nigeria speak strongly to the need for the development of interventions that include people with disabilities in public health and HIV/AIDS strategies and that address their specific vulnerabilities. Evaluating the adaptation of education material and the inclusion of the deaf population in HIV awareness programmes is an urgent 'next step.'

  2. [Benefit of Bimodal Stimulation with Cochlear Implant and Hearing Aid in Elderly Patients].

    PubMed

    Hinder, Dominik; Linder, Thomas E; Schlegel-Wagner, Christoph; Candreia, Claudia

    2017-07-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) surgery is the standard of care for postlingual deafness in adults. A hearing aid (HA) for the non-implanted ear is normally used if residual hearing is available. There is limited data on bimodal stimulation in elderly patients. We compare the outcome of bimodal stimulation and analyzed the correlation of bimodal benefit and residual hearing in elderly patients. 22 patients≥70 years were implanted with a single-sided CI from 2002 till 2014. 17 patients use a HA on the non-implanted ear (bimodal). In a retrospective chart review we analyzed the audiological benefit (pure tone average, speech recognition). Time to follow-up was 6 month to 12 years. The subjective benefit was assessed using a structured questionnaire. The speech recognition (monosyllabic word testing in quiet @ 65 dB SPL) showed a score of 61% in bimodal condition vs. 53% with CI alone (p=0.35). There was no statistically significant correlation between residual hearing in the lower frequencies (250 Hz, 500 Hz and 1 kHz) and bimodal benefit. Most elderly patients benefit from bimodal stimulation. In quiet and in comparison with CI alone, most patients showed some improvement in word recognition scores using bimodal fitting, and all of them were using the contralateral hearing aid all day long. Postlingual deafened elderly patients fitted with a unilateral CI require a short rehabilitation period. In case of contralateral hearing aid fitting, regular control of the hearing aid should not be overlooked. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. 47 CFR 68.224 - Notice of non-hearing aid compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of non-hearing aid compatibility. 68.224... § 68.224 Notice of non-hearing aid compatibility. Every non-hearing aid compatible telephone offered... telephone is not hearing aid compatible, as is defined in §§ 68.4(a)(3) and 68.316, or if offered for sale...

  4. Exploration of a physiologically-inspired hearing-aid algorithm using a computer model mimicking impaired hearing.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Tim; Clark, Nicholas R; Lecluyse, Wendy; Meddis, Ray

    2016-01-01

    To use a computer model of impaired hearing to explore the effects of a physiologically-inspired hearing-aid algorithm on a range of psychoacoustic measures. A computer model of a hypothetical impaired listener's hearing was constructed by adjusting parameters of a computer model of normal hearing. Absolute thresholds, estimates of compression, and frequency selectivity (summarized to a hearing profile) were assessed using this model with and without pre-processing the stimuli by a hearing-aid algorithm. The influence of different settings of the algorithm on the impaired profile was investigated. To validate the model predictions, the effect of the algorithm on hearing profiles of human impaired listeners was measured. A computer model simulating impaired hearing (total absence of basilar membrane compression) was used, and three hearing-impaired listeners participated. The hearing profiles of the model and the listeners showed substantial changes when the test stimuli were pre-processed by the hearing-aid algorithm. These changes consisted of lower absolute thresholds, steeper temporal masking curves, and sharper psychophysical tuning curves. The hearing-aid algorithm affected the impaired hearing profile of the model to approximate a normal hearing profile. Qualitatively similar results were found with the impaired listeners' hearing profiles.

  5. Biologically inspired binaural hearing aid algorithms: Design principles and effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Albert

    2002-05-01

    Despite rapid advances in the sophistication of hearing aid technology and microelectronics, listening in noise remains problematic for people with hearing impairment. To solve this problem two algorithms were designed for use in binaural hearing aid systems. The signal processing strategies are based on principles in auditory physiology and psychophysics: (a) the location/extraction (L/E) binaural computational scheme determines the directions of source locations and cancels noise by applying a simple subtraction method over every frequency band; and (b) the frequency-domain minimum-variance (FMV) scheme extracts a target sound from a known direction amidst multiple interfering sound sources. Both algorithms were evaluated using standard metrics such as signal-to-noise-ratio gain and articulation index. Results were compared with those from conventional adaptive beam-forming algorithms. In free-field tests with multiple interfering sound sources our algorithms performed better than conventional algorithms. Preliminary intelligibility and speech reception results in multitalker environments showed gains for every listener with normal or impaired hearing when the signals were processed in real time with the FMV binaural hearing aid algorithm. [Work supported by NIH-NIDCD Grant No. R21DC04840 and the Beckman Institute.

  6. Identifying the needs of elderly, hearing-impaired persons: the importance and utility of hearing aid attributes.

    PubMed

    Meister, Hartmut; Lausberg, Isabel; Kiessling, Juergen; von Wedel, Hasso; Walger, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Older patients represent the majority of hearing-aid users. The needs of elderly, hearing-impaired subjects are not entirely identified. The present study aims to determine the importance of fundamental hearing-aid attributes and to elicit the utility of associated hypothetical hearing aids for older patients. This was achieved using a questionnaire-based conjoint analysis--a decompositional approach to preference measurement offering a realistic study design. A random sample of 200 experienced hearing-aid users participated in the study. Though three out of the six examined attributes revealed age-related dependencies, the only significant effect was found for the attribute "handling", which was considerably more important for older than younger hearing-aid users. A trend of decreasing importance of speech intelligibility in noise and increasing significance of speech in quiet was observed for subjects older than 70 years. In general, the utility of various hypothetical hearing aids was similar for older and younger subjects. Apart from the attribute "handling", older and younger subjects have comparable needs regarding hearing-aid features. On the basis of the examined attributes, there is no requirement for hearing aids designed specifically for elderly hearing-aid users, provided that ergonomic features are considered and the benefits of modern technology are made fully available for older patients.

  7. Effect of aided hearing in the nonimplanted ear on bimodal hearing.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jeong Hun; Lee, Jun Ho; Chang, Sun O; Oh, Seung Ha

    2014-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the binaural effects from bimodal hearing according to the aided hearing threshold in the nonimplanted ear. Subjects included 17 individuals who continued to use a hearing aid (HA) in the nonimplanted ear for more than 6 months postoperatively. Speech perception and sound localization were tested with unilateral cochlear implantation (CI) and bimodal hearing with and without background noise. Materials were presented at an average of 70 dB sound pressure level from a front loudspeaker in a quiet condition and then with background noise at a signal-to-noise ratio of +10 dB HL. Speech perception scores were based on percent-correct performance of repeating a spoken word under each condition. Sound localization scores were obtained by averaging the sum of angle differences between the active loudspeaker and the loudspeaker indicated by the subject. Speech perception scores (mean ± SD) of unilateral CI and bimodal hearing were 63.3% ± 17.7% and 73.1% ± 18.5% under the quiet condition (p = 0.029) and 65.5% ± 21.9% and 70.9% ± 23.6% under the noisy condition (p = 0.01), respectively. Angle differences (mean ± SD) of unilateral CI and bimodal hearing were 72.8 ± 27.4 degrees and 84.1 ± 29.9 degrees under the quiet condition (p = 0.052) and 79.3 ± 26.9 degrees and 77.3 ± 22.0 degrees under the noisy condition (p = 0.906), respectively. Patients were divided into two groups according to their aided hearing thresholds: Group 1 (aided hearing threshold ≤50 dB HL; n = 8) and Group 2 (aided hearing threshold >50 dB HL; n = 9). The speech perception scores of bimodal hearing in each group were 85.3% ± 13.3% and 60.8% ± 17.5% (p = 0.023) under the quiet condition and 82.7% ± 9.0% and 59.4% ± 26.8% under the noisy condition (p = 0.052), respectively. For sound localization, the angle differences of bimodal hearing in each group were 54 ± 28.6 degrees and 83.9 ± 11.9 degrees under the quiet condition (p = 0.042) and 63.0 ± 23

  8. Numerical Estimation in Deaf and Hearing Adults.

    PubMed

    Bull, Rebecca; Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patty; Davidson, Wendy A; Murphy, Derek; Nordmann, Emily

    2011-08-01

    Deaf students often lag behind hearing peers in numerical and mathematical abilities. Studies of hearing children with mathematical difficulties highlight the importance of estimation skills as the foundation for formal mathematical abilities, but research with adults is limited. Deaf and hearing college students were assessed on the Number-to-Position task as a measure of estimation, and completed standardised assessments of arithmetical and mathematical reasoning. Deaf students performed significantly more poorly on all measures, including making less accurate number-line estimates. For deaf students, there was also a strong relationship showing that those more accurate in making number-line estimates achieved higher scores on the math achievement tests. No such relationship was apparent for hearing students. Further insights into the estimation abilities of deaf individuals should be made, including tasks that require symbolic and non-symbolic estimation and which address the quality of estimation strategies being used.

  9. Tinnitus Management: Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Extended-Wear Hearing Aids, Conventional Hearing Aids, and Combination Instruments.

    PubMed

    Henry, James A; McMillan, Garnett; Dann, Serena; Bennett, Keri; Griest, Susan; Theodoroff, Sarah; Silverman, Shien Pei; Whichard, Susan; Saunders, Gabrielle

    2017-06-01

    Whereas hearing aids have long been considered effective for providing relief from tinnitus, controlled clinical studies evaluating this premise have been very limited. The purpose of this study was to systematically determine the relative efficacy of conventional receiver-in-the-canal hearing aids (HA), the same hearing aids with a sound generator (HA+SG), and extended-wear, deep fit hearing aids (EWHA), to provide relief from tinnitus through a randomized controlled trial. Each of these ear-level devices was a product of Phonak, LLC. Participants were randomized to HA, HA+SG, or EWHA and wore bilaterally fit devices for about 4 months. Fittings, adjustments, and follow-up appointments were conducted to comply with company guidelines and to ensure that all participants attended appointments on the same schedule. At 4-5 months, participants returned to complete final outcome measures, which concluded their study participation. Participants were 55 individuals (mean age: 63.1 years) with mild to moderately-severe hearing loss who: (a) did not currently use hearing aids; (b) reported tinnitus that was sufficiently bothersome to warrant intervention; and (c) were suitable candidates for each of the study devices. The primary outcome measure was the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). Secondary outcome measures included hearing-specific questionnaires and the Quick Speech in Noise test (QuickSIN). The goal of the analysis was to evaluate efficacy of the EWHA and HA+SG devices versus the HA standard device. There were 18 participants in each of the HA and EWHA groups and 19 in the HA+SG group. Gender, age, and baseline TFI severity were balanced across treatment groups. Nearly all participants had a reduction in tinnitus symptoms during the study. The average TFI change (improvement) from baseline was 21 points in the HA group, 31 points in the EWHA group, and 33 points in the HA+SG group. A "clinically significant" improvement in reaction to tinnitus (at least 13-point

  10. 47 CFR 64.608 - Provision of hearing aid compatible telephones by exchange carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provision of hearing aid compatible telephones... Provision of hearing aid compatible telephones by exchange carriers. In the absence of alternative suppliers in an exchange area, an exchange carrier must provide a hearing aid compatible telephone, as defined...

  11. 75 FR 63764 - Hearing Aid Compatibility Proceeding; Request That Comments Address Effects of New Legislation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 20 Hearing Aid Compatibility Proceeding; Request That Comments Address Effects of New..., the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau requests that the comments in the pending Hearing Aid.... Section 102 of the Act extends hearing aid compatibility requirements to customer premises equipment...

  12. The Effectiveness of an Intervention Program on Hearing Aid Maintenance for Teenagers and Their Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova

    2002-01-01

    The impact of an intervention program on hearing aid functioning and maintenance was evaluated using 29 adolescents who wore hearing aids and 7 of their teachers. The number of functioning hearing aids increased significantly following the 6-week intervention and continued to increase even after intervention ended. (Contains references.)…

  13. 21 CFR 874.3320 - Group hearing aid or group auditory trainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Group hearing aid or group auditory trainer. 874.3320 Section 874.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... hearing aid or group auditory trainer. (a) Identification. A group hearing aid or group auditory...

  14. 21 CFR 874.3320 - Group hearing aid or group auditory trainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Group hearing aid or group auditory trainer. 874.3320 Section 874.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... hearing aid or group auditory trainer. (a) Identification. A group hearing aid or group auditory...

  15. 21 CFR 874.3320 - Group hearing aid or group auditory trainer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Group hearing aid or group auditory trainer. 874.3320 Section 874.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... hearing aid or group auditory trainer. (a) Identification. A group hearing aid or group auditory...

  16. Directional Microphone Hearing Aids in School Environments: Working toward Optimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, Todd A.; Picou, Erin M.; Galster, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The hearing aid microphone setting (omnidirectional or directional) can be selected manually or automatically. This study examined the percentage of time the microphone setting selected using each method was judged to provide the best signalto-noise ratio (SNR) for the talkers of interest in school environments. Method: A total of 26…

  17. An Introduction to Neural Networks for Hearing Aid Noise Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jun W.; Tyler, Richard S.

    1995-01-01

    This article introduces the use of multilayered artificial neural networks in hearing aid noise recognition. It reviews basic principles of neural networks, and offers an example of an application in which a neural network is used to identify the presence or absence of noise in speech. The ability of neural networks to "learn" the…

  18. Directional Microphone Hearing Aids in School Environments: Working toward Optimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, Todd A.; Picou, Erin M.; Galster, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The hearing aid microphone setting (omnidirectional or directional) can be selected manually or automatically. This study examined the percentage of time the microphone setting selected using each method was judged to provide the best signalto-noise ratio (SNR) for the talkers of interest in school environments. Method: A total of 26…

  19. Remote probe microphone measurement to verify hearing aid performance.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Deborah Viviane; Bernardez-Braga, Gabriela Rosito Alvarez

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the feasibility of obtaining probe microphone measurements of hearing aids at a distance. Face-to-face and remote probe microphone measurements were carried out in 60 hearing aid users (mean age 67 yrs) with uni- or bilateral hearing losses (105 ears tested). The participant and a facilitator were located in a room equipped with a probe microphone system interfaced to a PC. Desktop videoconferencing and application sharing was used to allow an audiologist in another room to instruct the facilitator and control the equipment via the LAN. There were significant correlations between face-to-face and remote real ear unaided response (REUR), aided response (REAR) and insertion gain (REIG) at seven discrete frequencies from 250 to 6000 Hz. Differences between face-to-face and remote responses were within the reported variability for probe microphone measurements themselves. The results show that remote probe microphone measurements are feasible and might improve the quality of public hearing aid services and professional training in Brazil.

  20. An Introduction to Neural Networks for Hearing Aid Noise Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jun W.; Tyler, Richard S.

    1995-01-01

    This article introduces the use of multilayered artificial neural networks in hearing aid noise recognition. It reviews basic principles of neural networks, and offers an example of an application in which a neural network is used to identify the presence or absence of noise in speech. The ability of neural networks to "learn" the…

  1. 47 CFR 68.112 - Hearing aid-compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... motel guest rooms, and in any other establishment open to the general public for the purpose of... § 68.316, except that, for establishments with eighty or more guest rooms, the telephones are not... establishments with fewer than eighty guest rooms, the telephones are not required to be hearing aid...

  2. 47 CFR 68.112 - Hearing aid-compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... motel guest rooms, and in any other establishment open to the general public for the purpose of... § 68.316, except that, for establishments with eighty or more guest rooms, the telephones are not... establishments with fewer than eighty guest rooms, the telephones are not required to be hearing aid...

  3. 47 CFR 68.112 - Hearing aid-compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... motel guest rooms, and in any other establishment open to the general public for the purpose of... § 68.316, except that, for establishments with eighty or more guest rooms, the telephones are not... establishments with fewer than eighty guest rooms, the telephones are not required to be hearing aid...

  4. 47 CFR 68.112 - Hearing aid-compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... motel guest rooms, and in any other establishment open to the general public for the purpose of... § 68.316, except that, for establishments with eighty or more guest rooms, the telephones are not... establishments with fewer than eighty guest rooms, the telephones are not required to be hearing aid...

  5. Hearing-related quality of life outcomes for Singaporean children using hearing aids or cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Looi, V; Lee, Z Z; Loo, J H Y

    2016-06-01

    The Children Using Hearing Devices Quality of Life Questionnaire (CuHDQOL) is a new parent-administered hearing-specific questionnaire for children fitted with hearing devices. The aim of this study was to assess outcomes for hearing-impaired children in Singapore using this measure, as well as to examine its applicability for use in a clinical setting. The CuHDQOL has 26 items, uses a recall period of 1 month, and is divided into three sections: parental perspectives and expectations (eight items), impact on the family (eight items) and hearing-related quality of life (QOL) of the child (10 items). R