Science.gov

Sample records for adult hematopoietic tissues

  1. Hematopoietic stem cell origin of connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makio; Larue, Amanda C; Watson, Patricia M; Watson, Dennis K

    2010-07-01

    Connective tissue consists of "connective tissue proper," which is further divided into loose and dense (fibrous) connective tissues and "specialized connective tissues." Specialized connective tissues consist of blood, adipose tissue, cartilage, and bone. In both loose and dense connective tissues, the principal cellular element is fibroblasts. It has been generally believed that all cellular elements of connective tissue, including fibroblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and bone cells, are generated solely by mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, a number of studies, including those from our laboratory based on transplantation of single hematopoietic stem cells, strongly suggested a hematopoietic stem cell origin of these adult mesenchymal tissues. This review summarizes the experimental evidence for this new paradigm and discusses its translational implications.

  2. Hematopoietic progenitor migration to the adult thymus

    PubMed Central

    Zlotoff, Daniel A.; Bhandoola, Avinash

    2010-01-01

    While most hematopoietic lineages develop in the bone marrow (BM), T cells uniquely complete their development in the specialized environment of the thymus. Hematopoietic stem cells with long-term self-renewal capacity are not present in the thymus. As a result, continuous T cell development requires that BM-derived progenitors be imported into the thymus throughout adult life. The process of thymic homing begins with the mobilization of progenitors out of the bone marrow, continues with their circulation in the bloodstream, and concludes with their settling in the thymus. This review will discuss each of these steps as they occur in the unirradiated and post-irradiation scenarios, focusing on the molecular mechanisms of regulation. Improved knowledge about these early steps in T cell generation may accelerate the development of new therapeutic options in patients with impaired T cell number or function. PMID:21251013

  3. Aneuploidy impairs hematopoietic stem cell fitness and is selected against in regenerating tissues in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pfau, Sarah J; Silberman, Rebecca E; Knouse, Kristin A; Amon, Angelika

    2016-06-15

    Aneuploidy, an imbalanced karyotype, is a widely observed feature of cancer cells that has long been hypothesized to promote tumorigenesis. Here we evaluate the fitness of cells with constitutional trisomy or chromosomal instability (CIN) in vivo using hematopoietic reconstitution experiments. We did not observe cancer but instead found that aneuploid hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit decreased fitness. This reduced fitness is due at least in part to the decreased proliferative potential of aneuploid hematopoietic cells. Analyses of mice with CIN caused by a hypomorphic mutation in the gene Bub1b further support the finding that aneuploidy impairs cell proliferation in vivo. Whereas nonregenerating adult tissues are highly aneuploid in these mice, HSCs and other regenerative adult tissues are largely euploid. These findings indicate that, in vivo, mechanisms exist to select against aneuploid cells.

  4. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44(-/-) mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells.

  5. Spaceflight Effects on the Hematopoietic Tissue of Ribbed Newts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, E. I.; Almeida, E. A. C.; Butorina, N. N.; Nikonova, T. M.; Grigoryan, E. N.; Poplinskaya, V. A.

    2008-06-01

    The newts Pleurodeles waltl flown on Foton-M2 for 12 days were used for studying the effects of spaceflight on hematopoiesis in lower vertebrates. Prior to the flight, all the animals underwent to removal their lenses and tail tips for regeneration studies. No significant differences in blood cell contents were detected between flight and control animals. Morphological examination of hematopoietic areas of the liver in both groups also showed no significant differences. Experiments with BrdU incorporation revealed labeled cells in the hemopoietic area of the liver as well as in blood. The blood cell composition of newts flown on Foton-M3 was similar to that in intact (nonoperated) newts used in Bion-11 and Foton-M2 experiments. The lack of blood changes in newts during the current experiments distinguishes them from mammals flown in space (rats and mice), which developed significant changes in both blood cell counts, stem and committed cells in the blood-forming tissues.

  6. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seed, T. M.

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). In our laboratory we have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3-26.3 cGy d^-1). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific (three major responding subgroups identified) and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup 1), the failure to augment basic repair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments (particularly marked within erythroid compartments) that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccommodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3) appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high-tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity. The kinetics of these repair-mediated, regenerative hematopoietic

  7. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Are the Major Source of Multilineage Hematopoiesis in Adult Animals.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Catherine M; Babovic, Sonja; Upadhaya, Samik; Knapp, David J H F; Lavin, Yonit; Lau, Colleen M; Goloborodko, Anton; Feng, Jue; Fujisaki, Joji; Ding, Lei; Mirny, Leonid A; Merad, Miriam; Eaves, Connie J; Reizis, Boris

    2016-09-20

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain long-term reconstitution of hematopoiesis in transplantation recipients, yet their role in the endogenous steady-state hematopoiesis remains unclear. In particular, recent studies suggested that HSCs provide a relatively minor contribution to immune cell development in adults. We directed transgene expression in a fraction of HSCs that maintained reconstituting activity during serial transplantations. Inducible genetic labeling showed that transgene-expressing HSCs gave rise to other phenotypic HSCs, confirming their top position in the differentiation hierarchy. The labeled HSCs rapidly contributed to committed progenitors of all lineages and to mature myeloid cells and lymphocytes, but not to B-1a cells or tissue macrophages. Importantly, labeled HSCs gave rise to more than two-thirds of all myeloid cells and platelets in adult mice, and this contribution could be accelerated by an induced interferon response. Thus, classically defined HSCs maintain immune cell development in the steady state and during systemic cytokine responses. PMID:27590115

  8. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.

    1994-12-01

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). We have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3{minus}26.3 cGy d{sup {minus}1}). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup (1), the failure to augment basic m-pair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments particularly marked within erythroid compartments. that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccomodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3 appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high- tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity.

  9. Differential Hematopoietic Activity in White Adipose Tissue Depending on its Localization.

    PubMed

    Luche, Elodie; Sengenès, Coralie; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Laharrague, Patrick; Casteilla, Louis; Cousin, Beatrice

    2015-12-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) can be found in different locations in the body, and these different adipose deposits exhibit specific physiopathological importance according to the subcutaneous or abdominal locations. We have shown previously the presence of functional hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT). These cells exhibit a specific hematopoietic activity that contributes to the renewal of the immune cell compartment within this adipose deposit. In this study, we investigated whether HSPC can be found in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and whether a putative difference in in situ hematopoiesis may be related to anatomical location and to site-specific immune cell content in VAT compared to SCAT. Therein, we identified for the first time the presence of HSPC in VAT. Using both in vitro assays and in vivo competitive repopulation experiments with sorted HSPC from VAT or SCAT, we showed that the hematopoietic activity of HSPC was lower in VAT, compared to SCAT. In addition, this altered hematopoietic activity of HSPC in VAT was due to their microenvironment, and may be related to a specific combination of secreted factors and extracellular matrix molecules expressed by adipose derived stromal cells. Our results indicate that WAT specific hematopoietic activity may be generalized to all adipose deposits, although with specificity according to the fat pad location. Considering the abundance of WAT in the body, this emphasizes the potential importance of this hematopoietic activity in physiopathological situations.

  10. Hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells and leukemic stem cells in adult myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ashley P

    2013-05-01

    The understanding of myeloproliferative neoplasms has changed dramatically since Dameshek proposed his classification over 50 years ago. Our knowledge of the types of cells which constitute the hematopoietic system and of how they are regulated has also appreciated significantly over this time. This review relates what is currently known about the acquired genetic mutations associated with adult myeloproliferative neoplasms to how they lead to the hematopoietic perturbations of myeloproliferative disease. There is a particular focus on how stem and progenitor cell compartments are affected by BCR-ABL1 and JAK2V617F mutations, and the particular issue of resistance of leukemic stem cells to conventional and targeted therapies. PMID:23013358

  11. General Information about Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. Adult stem cells applied to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-López, M D; Zamora-Navas, P; García-Herrera, J M; Godino, M; López-Puertas, J M; Guerado, E; Becerra, J; Andrades, J A

    2008-01-01

    Regeneration takes place in the body at a moment or another throughout life. Bone, cartilage, and tendons (the key components of the structure and articulation in the body) have a limited capacity for self-repair and, after traumatic injury or disease, the regenerative power of adult tissue is often insufficient. When organs or tissues are irreparably damaged, they may be replaced by an artificial device or by a donor organ. However, the number of available donor organs is considerably limited. Generation of tissue-engineered replacement organs by extracting stem cells from the patient, growing them and modifying them in clinical conditions after re-introduction in the body represents an ideal source for corrective treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the multipotential progenitors that give rise to skeletal cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, muscle (skeletal and cardiac muscle), adipocytes (fat tissue) and hematopoietic (blood)-supportive stromal cells. MSCs are found in multiple connective tissues, in adult bone marrow, skeletal muscles and fat pads. The wide representation in adult tissues may be related to the existence of a circulating blood pool or that MSCs are associated to the vascular system.

  13. Immuno-metabolism and adipose tissue: The key role of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cousin, B; Casteilla, L; Laharrague, P; Luche, E; Lorsignol, A; Cuminetti, V; Paupert, J

    2016-05-01

    The field of immunometabolism has come a long way in the past decade, leading to the emergence of a new role for white adipose tissue (WAT) that is now recognized to stand at the junction of immune and metabolic regulations. Interestingly, a crucial role of the abundant and heterogeneous immune population present in WAT has been proposed in the induction and development of metabolic diseases. Although a large body of data focused on mature immune cells, only few scattered studies are dedicated to leukocyte production, and the activity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in these pathological states. Considering that blood cell production and the differentiation of HSCs and their progeny is orchestrated, in part, by complex interacting signals emanating from their microenvironment, it thus seems worth to better understand the relationships between metabolism and HSC. This review discusses the alterations of hematopoietic process described in metabolic diseases and focused on the emerging data concerning HSC present in WAT.

  14. Analysis of the hematopoietic tissue in Pleurodeles waltl newts exposed to 2 g hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, Elena; Nikonova, Tatyana M.; Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Yousuf, Rukhsana; Almeida, Eduardo; Butorina, Nina N.

    2012-07-01

    Gravity is an important factor in creating biologically-relevant mechanical loads, and in spaceflight living organisms encounter both microgravity as well as hypergravity conditions. Here we studied the influence of hypergravity on the hematopoietic tissue of P. waltl newts in parallel with tissue regeneration experiments of the newt lens and tail. At day 9 post-surgery one group of newts was subjected to centrifugation at 2 g (2G, 12 days), while another was kept at 1 g. In addition, a basal control in wet mats, at 1g, (BC, 1G), and an aquarium control, neutrally buoyant, (AC, low G), were also performed. Differential blood counts and histological analysis of the spleen and liver were carried out in experimental and control groups of animals. At day 21 post-surgery in all groups (AC, 1G, and 2G), the number of neutrophils in the blood was significantly lower than in BC indicating a decrease in the inflammation induced by surgery. The 2G group however, showed numbers of neutrophils significantly higher than AC (neutrally buoyant) animals. This result suggests that post-operative inflammation can persist longer at 2 g that under unloaded aquarium conditions. In contrast we did not observe any significant differences in lymphocyte numbers between any experimental and control groups. Histological examination of the liver and spleen also did not show any significant morphological alterations due to hypergravity. These results indicate that 12 day exposure to hypergravity at 2 g, had only partial influence on newt hematopoiesis, possibly extending the duration of surgery-related inflammatory responses. Data obtained with newts in our previous experiments on Foton-M2 and Foton-M3 flights in microgravity also showed only slight effect on blood cells. Furthermore microgravity also did not cause any morphological changes in the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues, and did not impair the proliferative capacity of newt hematopoietic cells. In sum these results indicate the

  15. Critical Role of Jak2 in the Maintenance and Function of Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    AKADA, HAJIME; AKADA, SAEKO; HUTCHISON, ROBERT E.; SAKAMOTO, KAZUHITO; WAGNER, KAY-UWE; MOHI, GOLAM

    2014-01-01

    Jak2, a member of the Janus kinase family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases, is activated in response to a variety of cytokines, and functions in survival and proliferation of cells. An activating JAK2V617F mutation has been found in most patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, and patients treated with Jak2 inhibitors show significant hematopoietic toxicities. However, the role of Jak2 in adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has not been clearly elucidated. Using a conditional Jak2 knockout allele, we have found that Jak2 deletion results in rapid loss of HSCs/progenitors leading to bone marrow failure and early lethality in adult mice. Jak2 deficiency causes marked impairment in HSC function, and the mutant HSCs are severely defective in reconstituting hematopoiesis in recipient animals. Jak2 deficiency also causes significant apoptosis and loss of quiescence in HSC-enriched LSK (Lin−Sca-1+c-kit+) cells. Jak2-deficient LSK cells exhibit elevated reactive oxygen species levels and enhanced p38 MAPK activation. Mutant LSK cells also show defective Stat5, Erk and Akt activation in response to thrombopoietin and stem cell factor. Gene expression analysis reveals significant downregulation of genes related to HSC quiescence and self-renewal in Jak2-deficient LSK cells. These data suggest that Jak2 plays a critical role in the maintenance and function of adult HSCs. PMID:24677703

  16. The transcriptional coactivator Cbp regulates self-renewal and differentiation in adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wai-In; Hannah, Rebecca L; Dawson, Mark A; Pridans, Clare; Foster, Donna; Joshi, Anagha; Göttgens, Berthold; Van Deursen, Jan M; Huntly, Brian J P

    2011-12-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Cbp plays an important role in a wide range of cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although studies have shown its requirement for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development, its role in adult HSC maintenance, as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying Cbp function, is not clear. Here, we demonstrate a gradual loss of phenotypic HSCs and differentiation defects following conditional ablation of Cbp during adult homeostasis. In addition, Cbp-deficient HSCs reconstituted hematopoiesis with lower efficiency than their wild-type counterparts, and this response was readily exhausted under replicative stress. This phenotype relates to an alteration in cellular fate decisions for HSCs, with Cbp loss leading to an increase in differentiation, quiescence, and apoptosis. Genome-wide analyses of Cbp occupancy and differential gene expression upon Cbp deletion identified HSC-specific genes regulated by Cbp, providing a molecular basis for the phenotype. Finally, Cbp binding significantly overlapped at genes combinatorially bound by 7 major hematopoietic transcriptional regulators, linking Cbp to a critical HSC transcriptional regulatory network. Our data demonstrate that Cbp plays a role in adult HSC homeostasis by maintaining the balance between different HSC fate decisions, and our findings identify a putative HSC-specific transcriptional network coordinated by Cbp.

  17. Process of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation decision making for older adults.

    PubMed

    Randall, J; Keven, K; Atli, T; Ustun, C

    2016-05-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) may be the only curative option for some older adults with hematologic malignancies, and its associated risks of significant morbidity and mortality warrant a clear, informed decision-making process. As older adults have not been transplanted routinely until recent years, younger people have been the prototypical group around whom the current process has developed. Yet, this process is applied to older adults who have different considerations than younger patients when making their transplant decision. Older adults do not have the open-ended lives of younger patients and are entitled to consider how to spend their remaining time. They also possess maturity and experience, and with proper knowledge, they can make informed choices rather than moving forward in the transplant process unaware. Notably, older patients face similar problems with the informed decision-making process in nephrology. Strategies such as providing education about alloHCT gradually and repeatedly during induction, presenting recent knowledge from the literature in plain language, and utilizing a team approach to patient education may help older adults make the best decision about transplant in light of their situation and values. Understanding when and how older adults decide on alloHCT is an important first step to further exploring this problem. PMID:26457910

  18. White spot syndrome virus enters crayfish hematopoietic tissue cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiajun; Li, Fang; Wu, Junjun; Yang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen of aquacultured shrimp. However, the mechanism of its entry remains poorly understood. In this study, by analyzing the internalization of WSSV using crayfish hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells, we showed that WSSV virions were engulfed by cell membrane invaginations sharing the features of clathrin-coated pits and then internalized into coated cytoplasmic vesicles. Further investigation indicated that WSSV internalization was significantly inhibited by chlorpromazine (CPZ) but not genistein. The internalized virions were colocalized with endogenous clathrin as well as transferrin which undergoes clathrin-dependent uptake. Preventing endosome acidification by ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) or chloroquine (CQ) dramatically reduced WSSV entry as well. Moreover, disturbance of dynamin activity or depletion of membrane cholesterol also blocked WSSV uptake. These data indicate that WSSV enters crayfish HPT cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a pH-dependent manner, and membrane cholesterol as well as dynamin is critical for efficient viral entry.

  19. Atrial fibrillation is associated with hematopoietic tissue activation and arterial inflammation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Philip; Ishai, Amorina; MacNabb, Megan; Abdelbaky, Amr; Lavender, Zachary R; Ruskin, Jeremy; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Tawakol, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is associated with the development of atrial fibrillation (AF). Activity in hematopoietic tissues, which produce inflammatory leukocytes, is closely related to systemic inflammation, arterial inflammation and cardiovascular events, but its relationship to AF is unknown. Using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we examined the relationships between AF, splenic metabolic activity and vascular inflammation. We conducted a cross sectional study of 70 participants: 35 with AF, who were matched (by age, sex and history of active cancer) to 35 controls without AF. Splenic metabolic activity and vascular aortic inflammation were measured by the mean FDG maximum standard uptake values (SUV Max) by PET. We examined (1) the association between AF and splenic activity, and (2) AF and aortic inflammation. The mean age of the population was 68.13 (standard deviation (SD) 8.98) years and 46 (65 %) participants were male. Splenic activity was higher in AF participants [2.31 (SD 0.45) vs. 2.07 (SD 0.37), p = 0.024], and remained significant after adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates. Aortic inflammation was also higher in AF participants [2.22 (SD 0.44) vs. 1.91 (SD 0.44), p = 0.004], and remained significant on multivariable analysis. Aortic inflammation and splenic activity were highly correlated (Pearson R = 0.61, p < 0.001). Atrial fibrillation is associated with higher hematopoietic tissue activation and arterial inflammation. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms by which this cardio-splenic axis is implicated in AF. PMID:26411879

  20. Adult stem cells and tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Körbling, M; Estrov, Z; Champlin, R

    2003-08-01

    Recently, adult stem cells originating from bone marrow or peripheral blood have been suggested to contribute to repair and genesis of cells specific for liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, gut, and brain tissue. The mechanism involved has been termed transdifferentiation, although other explanations including cell fusion have been postulated. Using adult stem cells to generate or repair solid organ tissue obviates the immunologic, ethical, and teratogenic issues that accompany embryonic stem cells.

  1. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M.; Tripathi, Rati M.; Layer, Justin H.; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P.

    2015-01-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis. PMID:25968920

  2. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M; Tripathi, Rati M; Layer, Justin H; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P

    2015-08-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis.

  3. Pathogenesis of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.M.; Burke, J.; Pascho, R.J.; Jenes, C.K.

    1982-01-01

    The concentration of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus was determined in eight organs and two body fluids from each of 60 adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Included in the sample were 4 males and 56 prespawning, spawning, or spent female fish. All fish were infected, and virus was present in nearly all organs. There was an overall tendency for the mean concentration to increase in many of the organs over time as the fish progressed in ripeness. In prespawning females, IHN virus could be detected in all organs and in ovarian fluid but not in serum; the incidences were highest in the gills, spleen, and pyloric ceca, and the titers were highest in the pyloric ceca and liver. Incidences of infection in the organs were higher in spawning than in prespawning females and higher still in spent females in which the incidence of virus was 100% in all organs except brains (78%) and sera (67%). Virus concentrations in organs or fluids ranged from 5 to 4.0 × 109 plaque-forming units per millilitre. In males, the highest incidences of virus were found in gills, pyloric ceca, and liver. The gills were the only organ in which the virus concentration in males exceeded that of females.Key words: infectious hematopoietic necrosis, IHN, fish virus, viral pathogenesis, sockeye salmon

  4. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1's importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1's functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sor(tm1(Cre/ERT)Nat)/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1's role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  5. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R. Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1’s importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1’s functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sortm1(Cre/ERT)Nat/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1’s role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  6. Contribution of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Adult Mouse Inner Ear: Mesenchymal Cells and Fibrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Schmiedt, Richard A.; Minamiguchi, Hitoshi; Zhou, Daohong; Smythe, Nancy; Liu, Liya; Ogawa, Makio; Schulte, Bradley A.

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells have shown plasticity with a capacity to differentiate into a variety of specialized cells. To test the hypothesis that some cells in the inner ear are derived from BM, we transplanted either isolated whole BM cells or clonally expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) prepared from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into irradiated adult mice. Isolated GFP+ BM cells also were transplanted into conditioned newborn mice derived from pregnant mice injected with busulfan (which ablates HSCs in the newborns). Quantification of GFP+ cells was performed 3-20 months after transplant. GFP+ cells were found in the inner ear with all transplant conditions. They were most abundant within the spiral ligament but were also found in other locations normally occupied by fibrocytes and mesenchymal cells. No GFP+ neurons or hair cells were observed in inner ears of transplanted mice. Dual immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that most of the GFP+ cells were negative for CD45, a macrophage and hematopoietic cell marker. A portion of the GFP+ cells in the spiral ligament expressed immunoreactive Na, K-ATPase or the Na-K-Cl transporter (NKCC), proteins used as markers for specialized ion transport fibrocytes. Phenotypic studies indicated that the GFP+ cells did not arise from fusion of donor cells with endogenous cells. This study provides the first evidence for the origin of inner ear cells from BM and more specifically from HSCs. The results suggest that mesenchymal cells, including fibrocytes in the adult inner ear, may be derived continuously from HSCs. PMID:16538683

  7. TLR-mediated albuminuria needs TNFα-mediated cooperativity between TLRs present in hematopoietic tissues and CD80 present on non-hematopoietic tissues in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nidhi; Khullar, Bhavya; Oswal, Neelam; Banoth, Balaji; Joshi, Prashant; Ravindran, Balachandran; Panda, Subrat; Basak, Soumen; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Sopory, Shailaja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transient albuminuria induced by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in mice through engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is widely studied as a partial model for some forms of human nephrotic syndrome (NS). In addition to TLRs, CD80 has been shown to be essential for PAMP-mediated albuminuria. However, the mechanistic relationships between TLRs, CD80 and albuminuria remain unclear. Here, we show that albuminuria and CD80-uria induced in mice by many TLR ligands are dependent on the expression of TLRs and their downstream signalling intermediate MyD88 exclusively in hematopoietic cells and, conversely, on CD80 expression exclusively in non-hematopoietic cells. TNFα is crucial for TLR-mediated albuminuria and CD80-uria, and induces CD80 expression in cultured renal podocytes. IL-10 from hematopoietic cells ameliorates TNFα production, albuminuria and CD80-uria but does not prevent TNFα-mediated induction of podocyte CD80 expression. Chitohexaose, a small molecule originally of parasite origin, mediates TLR4-dependent anti-inflammatory responses, and blocks TLR-mediated albuminuria and CD80-uria through IL-10. Thus, TNFα is a prominent mediator of renal CD80 induction and resultant albuminuria in this model, and small molecules modulating TLR-mediated inflammatory activation might have contributory or adjunct therapeutic potential in some contexts of NS development. PMID:27125280

  8. Cited2 is required for the maintenance of glycolytic metabolism in adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinwei; Li, Qiang; Tang, Fangqiang; Puchowitz, Michelle A; Fujioka, Hisashi; Dunwoodie, Sally L; Danielpour, David; Yang, Yu-Chung

    2014-01-15

    Mammalian adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment and display a distinct metabolic phenotype compared with their progenitors. It has been proposed that HSCs generate energy mainly through anaerobic glycolysis in a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (Pdk)-dependent manner. Cited2 is an essential regulator for HSC quiescence, apoptosis, and function. Herein, we show that conditional deletion of Cited2 in murine HSCs results in elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, decreased cellular glutathione content, increased mitochondrial activity, and decreased glycolysis. At the molecular level, Cited2 deficiency significantly reduced the expression of genes involved in metabolism, such as Pdk2, Pdk4, and lactate dehydrogenases B and D (LDHB and LDHD). Cited2-deficient HSCs also exhibited increased Akt signaling, concomitant with elevated mTORC1 activity and phosphorylation of FoxOs. Further, inhibition of PI3/Akt, but not mTORC1, partially rescued the repression of Pdk4 caused by deletion of Cited2. Altogether, our results suggest that Cited2 is required for the maintenance of adult HSC glycolytic metabolism likely through regulating Pdk2, Pdk4, LDHB, LDHD, and Akt activity. PMID:24083546

  9. Child-rearing and adult leukemia: Epidemiologic evidence in support of competing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Steven, R.G. ); Severson, R.K. . Japan-Hawaii Cancer Study); Heuser, L. )

    1988-05-01

    The hypothesis that lack of child-rearing increases the risk of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) in adults was examined in a case-control study in western Washington State. Among 159 study subjects over age 50 in 1985, there were 76 cases of ANLL and 83 controls. The crude odds ratio associated with lack of child-rearing was 1.8, with a 95% confidence range of 0.7 to 5.0. The average total number of children ever living with cases was 2.6 and with controls was 3.1 (p = 0.06). The mean total number of years living with a child, or children, under age 18 was 17.6 in cases and 20.2 in controls (p = 0.05). These results were not materially altered after adjustment for age, smoking, race, income, and sex. The data provide evidence that cases of ANLL were less likely to ever have had children and that fewer years were spent rearing children than were spent by controls. The hypothesis was based on the competing stem cell'' theory of hematopoietic ontogeny. If valid, then exposure to children would increase exposure to infection, leading to increased lymphocytic stem cell turnover, and decreased non-lymphocytic stem cell turnover. This, in turn, may reduce risk of ANLL in adults. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Flexible adult flatfoot: soft tissue procedures.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jeremy L; Mendicino, Samuel S

    2014-07-01

    Classically, adult posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) was considered primarily a tendon rupture and was treated as such with soft tissue repair alone. The understanding that PTTD involves more than simply an inflammatory condition or tendon rupture but also a muscle imbalance, leading to a flatfoot, osteoarthritis, and peritalar subluxation, led to surgeons advocating osseous procedures as well. The advancements in knowledge of the pathomechanics of the deformity have modified the role that soft tissue repair plays in surgical treatment, but the importance of soft tissue restoration in flatfoot repair should not be overlooked.

  11. Flexible adult flatfoot: soft tissue procedures.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jeremy L; Mendicino, Samuel S

    2014-07-01

    Classically, adult posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) was considered primarily a tendon rupture and was treated as such with soft tissue repair alone. The understanding that PTTD involves more than simply an inflammatory condition or tendon rupture but also a muscle imbalance, leading to a flatfoot, osteoarthritis, and peritalar subluxation, led to surgeons advocating osseous procedures as well. The advancements in knowledge of the pathomechanics of the deformity have modified the role that soft tissue repair plays in surgical treatment, but the importance of soft tissue restoration in flatfoot repair should not be overlooked. PMID:24980925

  12. Pomalidomide reverses γ-globin silencing through the transcriptional reprogramming of adult hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Dulmovits, Brian M; Appiah-Kubi, Abena O; Papoin, Julien; Hale, John; He, Mingzhu; Al-Abed, Yousef; Didier, Sebastien; Gould, Michael; Husain-Krautter, Sehba; Singh, Sharon A; Chan, Kyle W H; Vlachos, Adrianna; Allen, Steven L; Taylor, Naomi; Marambaud, Philippe; An, Xiuli; Gallagher, Patrick G; Mohandas, Narla; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Liu, Johnson M; Blanc, Lionel

    2016-03-17

    Current therapeutic strategies for sickle cell anemia are aimed at reactivating fetal hemoglobin. Pomalidomide, a third-generation immunomodulatory drug, was proposed to induce fetal hemoglobin production by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that pomalidomide induced a fetal-like erythroid differentiation program, leading to a reversion of γ-globin silencing in adult human erythroblasts. Pomalidomide acted early by transiently delaying erythropoiesis at the burst-forming unit-erythroid/colony-forming unit-erythroid transition, but without affecting terminal differentiation. Further, the transcription networks involved in γ-globin repression were selectively and differentially affected by pomalidomide including BCL11A, SOX6, IKZF1, KLF1, and LSD1. IKAROS (IKZF1), a known target of pomalidomide, was degraded by the proteasome, but was not the key effector of this program, because genetic ablation of IKZF1 did not phenocopy pomalidomide treatment. Notably, the pomalidomide-induced reprogramming was conserved in hematopoietic progenitors from individuals with sickle cell anemia. Moreover, multiple myeloma patients treated with pomalidomide demonstrated increased in vivo γ-globin levels in their erythrocytes. Together, these data reveal the molecular mechanisms by which pomalidomide reactivates fetal hemoglobin, reinforcing its potential as a treatment for patients with β-hemoglobinopathies.

  13. Soft tissue problems in older adults.

    PubMed

    Holland, N W; Gonzalez, E B

    1998-08-01

    This article describes common soft tissue problems encountered in older adults, including fibromyalgia, selected bursitis/tendinitis syndromes, nerve entrapment syndromes, and miscellaneous topics such as Dupuytren's contractures, trigger fingers, palmar fasciitis, and reflex-sympathetic dystrophy. Clinical presentations, diagnosis, and treatment are emphasized. These are conditions that are frequently encountered but are generally diagnosed as arthritis or normal age-related problems. This article will hopefully enlighten the reader in distinguishing between these conditions.

  14. Impact of hematopoietic cyclooxygenase-1 deficiency on obesity-linked adipose tissue inflammation and metabolic disorders in mice

    PubMed Central

    Saraswathi, Viswanathan; Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Wilks, Anson W.; Desouza, Cyrus V.; Eller, Amy A.; Murali, Ganesan; Ramalingam, Ramesh; Milne, Ginger L.; Coate, Katie C.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Adipose tissue (AT)-specific inflammation is considered to mediate the pathological consequences of obesity and macrophages are known to activate inflammatory pathways in obese AT. Because cyclooxygenases play a central role in regulating the inflammatory processes, we sought to determine the role of hematopoietic cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in modulating AT inflammation in obesity. Materials/Methods Bone marrow transplantation was performed to delete COX-1 in hematopoietic cells. Briefly, female wild type (wt) mice were lethally irradiated and injected with bone marrow (BM) cells collected from wild type (COX-1+/+) or COX-1 knock-out (COX-1−/−) donor mice. The mice were fed a high fat diet for 16 wk. Results The mice that received COX-1−/− bone marrow (BM-COX-1−/−) exhibited a significant increase in fasting glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides in the circulation compared to control (BM-COX-1+/+) mice. Markers of AT-inflammation were increased and were associated with increased leptin and decreased adiponectin in plasma. Hepatic inflammation was reduced with a concomitant reduction in TXB2 levels. The hepatic mRNA expression of genes involved in lipogenesis and lipid transport were increased while expression of genes involved in regulating hepatic glucose output were reduced in BM-COX-1−/− mice. Finally, renal inflammation and markers of renal glucose release were increased in BM-COX-1−/− mice. Conclusion Hematopoietic COX-1 deletion results in impairments in metabolic homeostasis which may be partly due to increased AT inflammation and dysregulated adipokine profile. An increase in renal glucose release and hepatic lipogenesis/lipid transport may also play a role, at least in part, in mediating hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, respectively. PMID:23987235

  15. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  17. Stages of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  18. Development of both human connective tissue-type and mucosal-type mast cells in mice from hematopoietic stem cells with identical distribution pattern to human body.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Naotomo; Hiramatsu, Hidefumi; Shimonaka, Mika; Fujino, Hisanori; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Heike, Toshio; Ito, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Kimio; Ueyama, Yoshito; Matsuyoshi, Norihisa; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi

    2004-02-01

    The transplantation of primitive human cells into sublethally irradiated immune-deficient mice is the well-established in vivo system for the investigation of human hematopoietic stem cell function. Although mast cells are the progeny of hematopoietic stem cells, human mast cell development in mice that underwent human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has not been reported. Here we report on human mast cell development after xenotransplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells into nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID)/gamma(c)(null) (NOG) mice with severe combined immunodeficiency and interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor gamma-chain allelic mutation. Supported by the murine environment, human mast cell clusters developed in mouse dermis, but they required more time than other forms of human cell reconstitution. In lung and gastric tract, mucosal-type mast cells containing tryptase but lacking chymase located on gastric mucosa and in alveoli, whereas connective tissue-type mast cells containing both tryptase and chymase located on gastric submucosa and around major airways, as in the human body. Mast cell development was also observed in lymph nodes, spleen, and peritoneal cavity but not in the peripheral blood. Xenotransplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells into NOG mice can be expected to result in a highly effective model for the investigation of human mast cell development and function in vivo.

  19. Altered microRNA expression patterns in irradiated hematopoietic tissues suggest a sex-specific protective mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Zemp, Franz J.; Koturbash, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-12-05

    To investigate involvement of miRNAs in radiation responses we used microRNAome profiling to analyze the sex-specific response of radiation sensitive hematopoietic lymphoid tissues. We show that radiation exposure resulted in a significant and sex-specific deregulation of microRNA expression in murine spleen and thymus tissues. Among the regulated miRNAs, we found that changes in expression of miR-34a and miR-7 may be involved in important protective mechanisms counteracting radiation cytotoxicity. We observed a significant increase in the expression of tumor-suppressor miR-34a, paralleled by a decrease in the expression of its target oncogenes NOTCH1, MYC, E2F3 and cyclin D1. Additionally, we show that miR-7 targets the lymphoid-specific helicase LSH, a pivotal regulator of DNA methylation and genome stability. While miR-7 was significantly down-regulated LSH was significantly up-regulated. These cellular changes may constitute an attempt to counteract radiation-induced hypomethylation. Tissue specificity of miRNA responses and possible regulation of miRNA expression upon irradiation are discussed.

  20. C-Myb(+) erythro-myeloid progenitor-derived fetal monocytes give rise to adult tissue-resident macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hoeffel, Guillaume; Chen, Jinmiao; Lavin, Yonit; Low, Donovan; Almeida, Francisca F; See, Peter; Beaudin, Anna E; Lum, Josephine; Low, Ivy; Forsberg, E Camilla; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Larbi, Anis; Ng, Lai Guan; Chan, Jerry K Y; Greter, Melanie; Becher, Burkhard; Samokhvalov, Igor M; Merad, Miriam; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-04-21

    Although classified as hematopoietic cells, tissue-resident macrophages (MFs) arise from embryonic precursors that seed the tissues prior to birth to generate a self-renewing population, which is maintained independently of adult hematopoiesis. Here we reveal the identity of these embryonic precursors using an in utero MF-depletion strategy and fate-mapping of yolk sac (YS) and fetal liver (FL) hematopoiesis. We show that YS MFs are the main precursors of microglia, while most other MFs derive from fetal monocytes (MOs). Both YS MFs and fetal MOs arise from erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) generated in the YS. In the YS, EMPs gave rise to MFs without monocytic intermediates, while EMP seeding the FL upon the establishment of blood circulation acquired c-Myb expression and gave rise to fetal MOs that then seeded embryonic tissues and differentiated into MFs. Thus, adult tissue-resident MFs established from hematopoietic stem cell-independent embryonic precursors arise from two distinct developmental programs.

  1. Effects of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Plus Thymus Transplantation on Malignant Tumors: Comparison Between Fetal, Newborn, and Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuming; Hosaka, Naoki; Cui, Yunze; Shi, Ming

    2011-01-01

    We have recently shown that allogeneic intrabone marrow–bone marrow transplantation + adult thymus transplantation (TT) is effective for hosts with malignant tumors. However, since thymic and hematopoietic cell functions differ with age, the most effective age for such intervention needed to be determined. We performed hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using the intrabone marrow method with or without TT from fetal, newborn, and adult B6 mice (H-2b) into BALB/c mice (H-2d) bearing Meth-A sarcoma (H-2d). The mice treated with all types of HSCT + TT showed more pronounced regression and longer survival than those treated with HSCT alone in all age groups. Those treated with HSCT + TT showed increased numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells but decreased numbers of Gr-1/Mac-1 myeloid suppressor cells and decreased percentages of FoxP3 cells in CD4+ T cells, compared with those treated with HSCT alone. In all mice, those treated with fetal liver cell (as fetal HSCs) transplantation + fetal TT or with newborn liver cell (as newborn HSCs) transplantation (NLT) + newborn TT (NTT) showed the most regression, and the latter showed the longest survival. The number of Gr-1/Mac-1 cells was the lowest, whereas the percentage of CD62L−CD44+ effector memory T cells and the production of interferon γ (IFN-γ) were highest in the mice treated with NLT + NTT. These findings indicate that, at any age, HSCT + TT is more effective against cancer than HSCT alone and that NLT + NTT is most effective. PMID:20672991

  2. [Radiotherapy of adult soft tissue sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Le Péchoux, C; Moureau-Zabotto, L; Llacer, C; Ducassou, A; Sargos, P; Sunyach, M P; Thariat, J

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of soft tissue sarcoma is low and requires multidisciplinary treatment in specialized centers. The objective of this paper is to report the state of the art regarding indications and treatment techniques of main soft tissue sarcoma localisations.

  3. [Radiotherapy of adult soft tissue sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Le Péchoux, C; Moureau-Zabotto, L; Llacer, C; Ducassou, A; Sargos, P; Sunyach, M P; Thariat, J

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of soft tissue sarcoma is low and requires multidisciplinary treatment in specialized centers. The objective of this paper is to report the state of the art regarding indications and treatment techniques of main soft tissue sarcoma localisations. PMID:27523415

  4. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: potential benefit of medium-dose etoposide conditioning.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Masahiro; Shigematsu, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with chemotherapy or autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are unsatisfactory. Therefore, allogeneic (allo) HSCT has been applied to those patients in first complete remission (CR1), and has shown a long-term survival rate of approximately 50 %. In terms of myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimen, higher dose of cyclophosphamide (CY) and total body irradiation (TBI) (the standard CY + TBI) has been generally applied to allo HSCT. Other MAC regimens such as busulfan-based or etoposide-based regimens have also been used. Among those, medium-dose etoposide (ETP) in addition to the standard CY + TBI conditioning regimen appears to be promising for allo HSCT in adult ALL when transplanted in ALL patients aged under 50 years in CR1 and also in CR2, showing an excellent outcome without increasing relapse or transplant-related mortality (TRM) rates. By contrast, reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have also been applied to adult ALL patients and favorable outcomes have been obtained; however, relapse and TRM rates remain high. Therefore, an allo HSCT conditioning regimen which deserves further study for adult ALL patients aged under 50 years in CR1 and CR2 appears to be medium-dose ETP + CY + TBI and RIC is suitable for patients aged over 50 years or for younger patients with comorbid conditions. On the contrary, new therapeutic strategies for adult ALL patients are increasingly utilized with better outcomes; namely, various tyrosine kinase inhibitors for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive ALL, human leukocyte antigen-haploidentical HSCT, and pediatric-inspired regimens for Ph-negative ALL. Therefore, the optimal treatment modality should be selected considering patient's age, Ph-positivity, donor availability, risk classification, efficacy, and safety. PMID:26322249

  5. Effects of long-term administration of Senna occidentalis seeds on the hematopoietic tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Teles, A V F F; Fock, R A; Górniak, S L

    2015-12-15

    Senna occidentalis (S. occidentalis) is a toxic leguminous plant that contaminates crops and has been shown to be toxic to several animal species. All parts of the plant are toxic, but most of the plant's toxicity is due to its seeds. Despite its toxicity, S. occidentalis is widely used for therapeutic purposes in humans. The aim of the present work was to investigate, for the first time, the effects of the chronic administration of S. occidentalis seeds on hematopoietic organs, including the bone marrow and spleen. Fifty male Wistar rats were divided into five groups of 10 animals. Rats were treated with diets containing 0% (control), 0.5% (So0.5), 1% (So1), or 2% (So2) S. occidentalis seeds for a period of 90 days. Food and water were provided ad libitum, except to pair-fed (PF) group which received the same amount of ration to those of So2 group, however free of S. occidentalis seeds. It was verified that rats treated with 2% S. occidentalis seeds presented changes in hematological parameters. The blood evaluation also showed a significant decrease of the Myeloid/Erythroid (M/E) ratio. Chronic treatment with S. occidentalis promoted a reduction in the cellularity of both the bone marrow and spleen. Additionally, we observed changes in bone marrow smears, iron stores and spleen hemosiderin accumulation. Histological analyses of bone marrow revealed erythroid hyperplasia which was consistent with the increased reticulocyte count. These findings suggest that the long-term administration of S. occidentalis seeds can promote blood toxicity.

  6. A population-based cohort study of late mortality in adult autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Lesley J; Le Marsney, Renate E; Dodds, Anthony J; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Wilcox, Leonie; O'Brien, Tracey A; Vajdic, Claire M

    2014-07-01

    We assessed overall and cause-specific mortality and risk factors for late mortality in a nation-wide population-based cohort of 4547 adult cancer patients who survived 2 or more years after receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in Australia between 1992 and 2005. Deaths after HSCT were identified from the Australasian Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient Registry and through data linkage with the National Death Index. Overall, the survival probability was 56% at 10 years from HSCT, ranging from 34% for patients with multiple myeloma to 90% for patients with testicular cancer. Mortality rates moved closer to rates observed in the age- and sex-matched Australian general population over time but remained significantly increased 11 or more years from HSCT (standardized mortality ratio, 5.9). Although the proportion of deaths from nonrelapse causes increased over time, relapse remained the most frequent cause of death for all diagnoses, 10 or more years after autologous HSCT. Our findings show that prevention of disease recurrence remains 1 of the greatest challenges for autologous HSCT recipients, while the increasing rates of nonrelapse deaths due to the emergence of second cancers, circulatory diseases, and respiratory diseases highlight the long-term health issues faced by adult survivors of autologous HSCT. PMID:24631736

  7. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials.

  8. Second Cancer Risk and Late Mortality in Adult Australians Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vajdic, Claire M; Mayson, Eleni; Dodds, Anthony J; O'Brien, Tracey; Wilcox, Leonie; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Le Marsney, Renate; Daniels, Benjamin; Ashton, Lesley J

    2016-05-01

    We quantified the risk of second cancer and late mortality in a population-based Australian cohort of 3273 adult (≥15 years) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (1992 to 2007). Most recipients received nonradiation-based conditioning and a peripheral blood graft from a matched related donor. Using record linkage with death and cancer registries, 79 second cancers were identified a median of 3.5 years after transplantation. The competing-risk adjusted cumulative incidence of second cancers was 3.35% (95% CI, 2.59 to 4.24) at 10 years, and the cancer risk relative to the matched general population was 2.10 (95% CI, 1.65 to 2.56). We observed an excess risk of melanoma and lip, tongue, esophagus, and soft tissue cancers. Cancer risk relative to the general population was elevated for those transplanted for lymphoma, some leukemia subtypes, and severe aplastic anemia, recipients who developed chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and irrespective of radiation-based conditioning or stem cell source. In those alive 2 years after transplantation (n = 1463), the cumulative incidence of late mortality was 22.2% (95% CI, 19.7 to 24.9) at 10 years, and the risk of death relative to the matched general population was 13.8 (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.6). In multivariable modeling, risk of late death was reduced for females compared with males and those transplanted for chronic myeloid leukemia compared with acute myeloid leukemia; risk was increased for recipients with discordant sex donors, cGVHD, those undergoing second transplants, and disease relapse. Adults undergoing allogeneic transplantation have unique cancer and mortality risk profiles that continue to warrant prevention and surveillance activities targeted at high-risk subgroups.

  9. Risk Assessment before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) most commonly affects patients older than 60 years. Outcomes of treatment of older AML patients have been poor. The advent of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens made allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) an available treatment option with curative intent for older AML patients. Because older patients are often excluded from clinical trials, little is known about the stratification of their risks before allogeneic HCT. While recent studies of RIC and allogeneic HCT have shown little impact of age on outcomes, other variables such as the recipient health status and the AML disease status and chromosomal aberrations have proven to be of prognostic significance. Here, we review recent studies of allogeneic HCT for older patients with AML with detailed evaluation of risk factors for relapse as well as non-relapse mortality. We have integrated the currently available information on transplant risks into a five-category risk-benefit system that could aid in the decision-making in this patient population. PMID:24083472

  10. Cohesin loss alters adult hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis, leading to myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Mullenders, Jasper; Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Lhoumaud, Priscillia; Keller, Matthew; Pae, Juhee; Wang, Kun; Kayembe, Clarisse; Rocha, Pedro P.; Raviram, Ramya; Gong, Yixiao; Premsrirut, Prem K.; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Bonneau, Richard; Skok, Jane A.; Cimmino, Luisa; Hoehn, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The cohesin complex (consisting of Rad21, Smc1a, Smc3, and Stag2 proteins) is critically important for proper sister chromatid separation during mitosis. Mutations in the cohesin complex were recently identified in a variety of human malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To address the potential tumor-suppressive function of cohesin in vivo, we generated a series of shRNA mouse models in which endogenous cohesin can be silenced inducibly. Notably, silencing of cohesin complex members did not have a deleterious effect on cell viability. Furthermore, knockdown of cohesin led to gain of replating capacity of mouse hematopoietic progenitor cells. However, cohesin silencing in vivo rapidly altered stem cells homeostasis and myelopoiesis. Likewise, we found widespread changes in chromatin accessibility and expression of genes involved in myelomonocytic maturation and differentiation. Finally, aged cohesin knockdown mice developed a clinical picture closely resembling myeloproliferative disorders/neoplasms (MPNs), including varying degrees of extramedullary hematopoiesis (myeloid metaplasia) and splenomegaly. Our results represent the first successful demonstration of a tumor suppressor function for the cohesin complex, while also confirming that cohesin mutations occur as an early event in leukemogenesis, facilitating the potential development of a myeloid malignancy. PMID:26438359

  11. Busulfan in infants to adult hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: A population pharmacokinetic model for initial and Bayesian dose personalization

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Jeannine S.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Baker, K. Scott; Gamis, Alan S.; Holford, Nicholas H.G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Personalizing intravenous (IV) busulfan doses to a target plasma concentration at steady state (Css) is an essential component of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We sought to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to predict IV busulfan doses over a wide age spectrum (0.1 – 66 years) that accounts for differences in age and body size. Experimental design A population pharmacokinetic model based on normal fat mass and maturation based on post-menstrual age was built from 12,380 busulfan concentration-time points obtained after IV busulfan administration in 1,610 HCT recipients. Subsequently, simulation results of the initial dose necessary to achieve a target Css with this model were compared with pediatric-only models. Results A two-compartment model with first-order elimination best fit the data. The population busulfan clearance was 12.4 L/h for an adult male with 62kg normal fat mass (equivalent to 70kg total body weight). Busulfan clearance, scaled to body size – specifically normal fat mass, is predicted to be 95% of the adult clearance at 2.5 years post-natal age. With a target Css of 770 ng/mL, a higher proportion of initial doses achieved the therapeutic window with this age- and size-dependent model (72%) compared to dosing recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (57%) or the European Medicines Agency (70%). Conclusion This is the first population pharmacokinetic model developed to predict initial IV busulfan doses and personalize to a target Css over a wide age spectrum, ranging from infants to adults. PMID:24218510

  12. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  13. Epimorphic regeneration approach to tissue replacement in adult mammals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urodeles and fetal mammals are capable of impressive epimorphic regeneration in a variety of tissues, whereas the typical default response to injury in adult mammals consists of inflammation and scar tissue formation. One component of epimorphic regeneration is the recruitment of resident progenitor...

  14. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Estey, Elihu

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of the elderly and the numbers of these patients are increasing. Patients ≥60 years of age continue to have poor prognosis. Preliminary results suggest benefit from reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in selected patients 60-80 years of age. However, although patients in this age range comprise >50% of those with AML, they currently constitute only 17% of those offered HCT. In the absence of prospective randomized studies comparing HCT and chemotherapy, the decision to recommend HCT rests on retrospective analyses of the risks of relapse and nonrelapse mortality after each approach. There is strong evidence that pre-HCT comorbidities can predict HCT-related morbidity and mortality. Age alone does not appear predictive and, particularly if the risk of relapse with chemotherapy is high, should not be the sole basis for deciding against HCT. Use of geriatric assessment tools, inflammatory biomarkers, and genetic polymorphism data may further aid in predicting nonrelapse mortality after HCT. Disease status and pretreatment cytogenetics with FLT3-TID, NPM-1, and CEBP-α status are the main factors predicting relapse and these are likely to be supplemented by incorporation of other molecular markers and the level of minimal residual disease after chemotherapy. HLA-matched related and unrelated donor grafts seem preferable to those from other donor sources. Donor age is of no clear significance. Models combining comorbidities with AML risk factors are useful in risk assessment before HCT. In this chapter, we integrated information on AML-specific, HCT-specific, and patient-specific risk factors into a risk-adapted approach to guide decisions about HCT versus no HCT.

  15. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Seibold, Max A.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  16. The polyomavirus puzzle: is host immune response beneficial in controlling BK virus after adult hematopoietic cell transplantion?

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, G; Marty, F M; Tan, C S

    2014-08-01

    BK virus (BKV), a ubiquitous human polyomavirus, usually does not cause disease in healthy individuals. BKV reactivation and disease can occur in immunosuppressed individuals, such as those who have undergone renal transplantation or hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Clinical manifestations of BKV disease include graft dysfunction and failure in renal transplant recipients; HCT recipients frequently experience hematuria, cystitis, hemorrhagic cystitis (HC), and renal dysfunction. Studies of HCT patients have identified several risk factors for the development of BKV disease including myeloablative conditioning, acute graft-versus-host disease, and undergoing an umbilical cord blood (uCB) HCT. Although these risk factors indicate that alterations in the immune system are necessary for BKV pathogenesis in HCT patients, few studies have examined the interactions between host immune responses and viral reactivation in BKV disease. Specifically, having BKV immunoglobulin-G before HCT does not protect against BKV infection and disease after HCT. A limited number of studies have demonstrated BKV-specific cytotoxic T cells in healthy adults as well as in post-HCT patients who had experienced HC. New areas of research are required for a better understanding of this emerging infectious disease post HCT, including prospective studies examining BK viruria, viremia, and their relationship with clinical disease, a detailed analysis of urothelial histopathology, and laboratory evaluation of systemic and local cellular and humoral immune responses to BKV in patients receiving HCT from different sources, including uCB and haploidentical donors.

  17. Invariant natural killer T cells generated from human adult hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells are poly-functional.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenji; Wang, Yi; East, James E; Kimball, Amy S; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Kesmodel, Susan; Strome, Scott E; Webb, Tonya J

    2015-03-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells constitute an important subset of T cells that can both directly and indirectly mediate anti-tumor immunity. However, cancer patients have a reduction in both iNKT cell number and function, and these deficits limit the potential clinical application of iNKT cells for cancer therapy. To overcome the problem of limited iNKT cell numbers, we investigated whether iNKT cells can be generated in vitro from bone marrow-derived adult hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells (HSPC). Our data demonstrate that co-culture of HSPC with OP9-DL1 stromal cells, results in a functional CD3(+) T cell population. These T cells can be further differentiated into iNKT cells by secondary culture with CD1d-Ig-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC). Importantly, these in vitro-generated iNKT cells are functional, as demonstrated by their ability to proliferate and secrete IFN-γ and GM-CSF following stimulation. PMID:25569376

  18. Invariant natural killer T cells generated from human adult hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells are poly-functional

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenji; Wang, Yi; East, James E.; Kimball, Amy S.; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Kesmodel, Susan; Strome, Scott E.; Webb, Tonya J.

    2014-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells constitute an important subset of T cells that can both directly and indirectly mediate anti-tumor immunity. However, cancer patients have a reduction in both iNKT cell number and function, and these deficits limit the potential clinical application of iNKT cells for cancer therapy. To overcome the problem of limited iNKT cell numbers, we investigated whether iNKT cells can be generated in vitro from bone marrow-derived adult hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells (HSPC). Our data demonstrate that co-culture of HSPC with OP9-DL1 stromal cells, results in a functional CD3+ T cell population. These T cells can be further differentiated into iNKT cells by secondary culture with CD1d-Ig-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC). Importantly, these in vitro-generated iNKT cells are functional, as demonstrated by their ability to proliferate and secrete IFN-γ and GM-CSF following stimulation. PMID:25569376

  19. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to adults with hematologic malignancies: analysis of 66 cases at a single Japanese center.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Toshiro; Ishiyama, Ken; Ozaki, Jun; Yamashita, Yumiko; Iwaki, Noriko; Saito, Chizuru; Arahata, Masahisa; Kaya, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    Sixty-six adult patients with hematologic malignancies underwent haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) without T cell depletion. The patients were preconditioned with a reduced intensity regimen, and tacrolimus was used for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Successful engraftment occurred in 60 patients (90.1%) and graft rejection in only 4 patients (6.1%). Among the 60 engrafted patients, only 5 developed severe (grade III or IV) acute GVHD. Twenty patients, including 19 relapse-free patients were alive at a median follow-up of 48 months (range 6-77 months). The overall survival (OS) at 6 years was 29.3%. The OS of 45 patients < 60 years of age was 43.6%, which was superior to that of 21 patients who were 60 years of age and older (9.5%) (P < 0.01). The OS of 11 patients from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 1 locus-mismatched donors (63.6%) was higher than that of 28 patients from HLA 3 loci-mismatched donors (12.5%) (P < 0.01). Organ injury and infection were the main causes of mortality. Notably, immunosuppressive therapy could be successfully stopped in 9 patients transplanted from HLA 2 or 3 loci-mismatched donors with a median duration of 45 months (range 5-71 months). These data suggest that haplo-HSCT is a promising treatment for patients who need urgent allogeneic transplantation but lack HLA-identical family donors.

  20. Assessment of voluntary exercise behavior and active video gaming among adolescent and young adult patients during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rosipal, Nicole C; Mingle, Lindsay; Smith, Janet; Morris, G Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study sought to examine the exercise behavior and preferences among adolescent and young adult (AYA) hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Eighteen patients aged 19 to 25 years were recruited to engage in unsupervised exercise activities lasting at least 60 minutes/week during hospitalization for HSCT. Enrolled patients had access to standard exercise activities (walking, resistance training, and basketball) and active video gaming equipment. Physical function (6-Minute Walk Test and Timed-Up-and-Go test) and quality of life (Behavioral, Affective, and Somatic Experiences Scale) were assessed at different time points during admission. Participants exercised an average of 76% of the days during admission and spent an average of 36.5 minutes per day exercising. The Nintendo Wii was the preferred active video gaming equipment, but standard exercises accounted for 73% of all exercise time. Neither functional capacity nor quality of life improved. Results suggest that AYAs voluntarily exercise during HSCT admission, prefer to use standard exercise activities, and may require supervision in order to derive maximum benefits from their efforts. These results provide guidance for developing rehabilitation interventions for AYA HSCT recipients.

  1. Inhibition of Thrombopoietin/Mpl Signaling in Adult Hematopoiesis Identifies New Candidates for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Adrian; Kamp, Christel; Brugman, Martijn H.; Breuer, Daniel C.; Büsche, Guntram; Baum, Christopher; Modlich, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (Thpo) signals via its receptor Mpl and regulates megakaryopoiesis, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) maintenance and post-transplant expansion. Mpl expression is tightly controlled and deregulation of Thpo/Mpl-signaling is linked to hematological disorders. Here, we constructed an intracellular-truncated, signaling-deficient Mpl protein which is presented on the cell surface (dnMpl). The transplantation of bone marrow cells retrovirally transduced to express dnMpl into wildtype mice induced thrombocytopenia, and a progressive loss of HSC. The aplastic BM allowed the engraftment of a second BM transplant without further conditioning. Functional analysis of the truncated Mpl in vitro and in vivo demonstrated no internalization after Thpo binding and the inhibition of Thpo/Mpl-signaling in wildtype cells due to dominant-negative (dn) effects by receptor competition with wildtype Mpl for Thpo binding. Intracellular inhibition of Mpl could be excluded as the major mechanism by the use of a constitutive-dimerized dnMpl. To further elucidate the molecular changes induced by Thpo/Mpl-inhibition on the HSC-enriched cell population in the BM, we performed gene expression analysis of Lin-Sca1+cKit+ (LSK) cells isolated from mice transplanted with dnMpl transduced BM cells. The gene expression profile supported the exhaustion of HSC due to increased cell cycle progression and identified new and known downstream effectors of Thpo/Mpl-signaling in HSC (namely TIE2, ESAM1 and EPCR detected on the HSC-enriched LSK cell population). We further compared gene expression profiles in LSK cells of dnMpl mice with human CD34+ cells of aplastic anemia patients and identified similar deregulations of important stemness genes in both cell populations. In summary, we established a novel way of Thpo/Mpl inhibition in the adult mouse and performed in depth analysis of the phenotype including gene expression profiling. PMID:26147434

  2. Cranial irradiation induces bone marrow-derived microglia in adult mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Nana; Suzue, Kazutomo; Kaminuma, Takuya; Nakano, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-07-01

    Postnatal hematopoietic progenitor cells do not contribute to microglial homeostasis in adult mice under normal conditions. However, previous studies using whole-body irradiation and bone marrow (BM) transplantation models have shown that adult BM cells migrate into the brain tissue and differentiate into microglia (BM-derived microglia; BMDM). Here, we investigated whether cranial irradiation alone was sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse brain. Transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter (MSCV-GFP mice) were used. MSCV-GFP mice express GFP in BM cells but not in the resident microglia in the brain. Therefore, these mice allowed us to detect BM-derived cells in the brain without BM reconstitution. MSCV-GFP mice, aged 8-12 weeks, received 13.0 Gy irradiation only to the cranium, and BM-derived cells in the brain were quantified at 3 and 8 weeks after irradiation. No BM-derived cells were detected in control non-irradiated MSCV-GFP mouse brains, but numerous GFP-labeled BM-derived cells were present in the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebral cortex of the irradiated MSCV-GFP mice. These BM-derived cells were positive for Iba1, a marker for microglia, indicating that GFP-positive BM-derived cells were microglial in nature. The population of BMDM was significantly greater at 8 weeks post-irradiation than at 3 weeks post-irradiation in all brain regions examined. Our results clearly show that cranial irradiation alone is sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse.

  3. Alkaline diets favor lean tissue mass in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining muscle mass in aging is important to prevent falls and fractures. The net acid load from diets that are rich in acidogenic protein and cereal grains relative to their content of alkalinogenic fruits and vegetables may contribute to reduced lean tissue mass in older adults. This analysis ...

  4. Tissue adaptations to gravitational stress - Newborn versus adult giraffes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R; Gershuni, David H.; Danzig, Larry A.; Millard, Ronald W.; Pettersson, Knut

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results on developmental alterations in load-bearing tissues of newborn and adult giraffes are presented. Attention is focused on vascular wall thickness in relation to local blood pressure, and on meniscal adaptations to increased load bearing in the developing giraffe. It is believed that the developing giraffe provides an excellent model for investigations of adaptive mechanisms of increased weight bearing.

  5. Adult mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering versus regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arnold I

    2007-11-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from bone marrow or marrow aspirates and because they are culture-dish adherent, they can be expanded in culture while maintaining their multipotency. The MSCs have been used in preclinical models for tissue engineering of bone, cartilage, muscle, marrow stroma, tendon, fat, and other connective tissues. These tissue-engineered materials show considerable promise for use in rebuilding damaged or diseased mesenchymal tissues. Unanticipated is the realization that the MSCs secrete a large spectrum of bioactive molecules. These molecules are immunosuppressive, especially for T-cells and, thus, allogeneic MSCs can be considered for therapeutic use. In this context, the secreted bioactive molecules provide a regenerative microenvironment for a variety of injured adult tissues to limit the area of damage and to mount a self-regulated regenerative response. This regenerative microenvironment is referred to as trophic activity and, therefore, MSCs appear to be valuable mediators for tissue repair and regeneration. The natural titers of MSCs that are drawn to sites of tissue injury can be augmented by allogeneic MSCs delivered via the bloodstream. Indeed, human clinical trials are now under way to use allogeneic MSCs for treatment of myocardial infarcts, graft-versus-host disease, Crohn's Disease, cartilage and meniscus repair, stroke, and spinal cord injury. This review summarizes the biological basis for the in vivo functioning of MSCs through development and aging. PMID:17620285

  6. The Neuropsychological Course of Acute Delirium in Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beglinger, Leigh J.; Mills, James A.; Vik, Stacie M.; Duff, Kevin; Denburg, Natalie L.; Weckmann, Michelle T.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Gingrich, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Although delirium is a common medical comorbidity with altered cognition as its defining feature, few publications have addressed the neuropsychological prodrome, profile, and recovery of patients tested during delirium. We characterize neuropsychological performance in 54 hemapoietic stem cell/bone marrow transplantation (BMT) patients shortly before, during, and after delirium and in BMT patients without delirium and 10 healthy adults. Patients were assessed prospectively before and after transplantation using a brief battery. BMT patients with delirium performed more poorly than comparisons and those without delirium on cross-sectional and trend analyses. Deficits were in expected areas of attention and memory, but also in psychomotor speed and learning. The patients with delirium did not return to normative “average” on any test during observation. Most tests showed a mild decline in the visit before delirium, a sharp decline with delirium onset, and variable performance in the following days. This study adds to the few investigations of neuropsychological performance surrounding delirium and provides targets for monitoring and early detection; Trails A and B, RBANS Coding, and List Recall may be useful for delirium assessment. PMID:21183605

  7. Role of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lussana, Federico; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease, due to the expression of different biological and clinical risk factors, for which allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is an effective consolidation therapy. The non-relapse mortality of alloHSCT remains significantly higher compared with that of conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, one of the main challenges in the care of ALL is to establish a more precise prognostic definition to select patients who could take advantage from an alloHSCT. Currently, the use of minimal residual disease following induction and early consolidation therapy has improved the prognostic accuracy in defining ALL risk class. In Philadelphia-positive ALL, the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors pre and post alloHSCT appears to improve outcomes significantly and, in the absence of specially designed clinical trials, alloHSCT remains the most effective post-remission therapy. Nowadays, alloHSCT can be performed according to various modalities encompassing the use of different conditioning regimens, as well as distinct donors and stem cell source, with a significant accessibility to transplant. PMID:25408851

  8. [Authorization of tissue and blood stem cell preparations for hematopoietic reconstitution: Documentation of clinical and nonclinical data in a central expert report].

    PubMed

    Vahlensieck, Ute; Poley-Ochmann, Susanne; Hilger, Anneliese; Heiden, Margarete; Seitz, Rainer

    2015-11-01

    In order to address the European Directive 2004/23 on human tissues and cells, the authorization obligation for tissue and blood stem cell preparations was introduced (§ 21a AMG) in the year 2007 in the German medicinal products act. Stem cell transplantation for hematopoietic reconstitution has been in use for decades and is well established for the treatment of many malignancies. The manufacture of stem cell preparations varies, but in terms of hematopoietic reconstitution, different products are intended for the same indication. Taking these aspects into account, it was considered inappropriate that every single applicant should provide their own documentation, including an expert report on clinical and nonclinical data. Consequently, the idea came up to create a central expert report, to which all applicants could refer and would include relevant clinical and nonclinical data according to current knowledge. A central expert report was therefore generated, called the "Gemeinsame Stellungnahme der Fachgesellschaften Deutsche Gesellschaft für Transfusionsmedizin und Immunhämatologie (DGTI), Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hämatologie und Onkologie (DGH) und Gesellschaft für Pädiatrische Onkologie und Hämatologie (GPOH)". Applicants are allowed to refer to this central expert report provided their stem cell product is comparable with the cell preparations included in the report. In order to represent current knowledge, the content of the central expert report was already reworked once, but should be updated regularly.

  9. Tissue typing for hematopoietic cell transplantation: newer techniques and newer antigens for which cross-matching is helpful.

    PubMed

    Iannone, Robert; Davies, Stella M

    2005-12-01

    Refinements in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing techniques for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have permitted a more precise assessment of donor-recipient histocompatibility, which has impacted transplantation outcomes. More recently, differences in transplant outcomes associated with killer immunoglobulin-like receptor compatibility have emphasized the potential importance of natural killer (NK) cell typing in HCT. This article reviews the current state of the art for HCT donor selection based on both HLA and NK cell typing. PMID:16305621

  10. Tissue tropism of recombinant coxsackieviruses in an adult mouse model.

    PubMed

    Harvala, Heli; Kalimo, Hannu; Bergelson, Jeffrey; Stanway, Glyn; Hyypiä, Timo

    2005-07-01

    Recombinant viruses, constructed by exchanging the 5' non-coding region (5'NCR), structural and non-structural protein coding sequences were used to investigate determinants responsible for differences between coxsackievirus A9 (CAV9) and coxsackievirus B3 (CBV3) infections in adult mice and two cell lines. Plaque assay titration of recombinant and parental viruses from different tissues from adult BALB/c mice demonstrated that the structural region of CBV3 determined tropism to the liver tissue due to receptor recognition, and the 5'NCR of CBV3 enhanced viral multiplication in the mouse pancreas. Infection with a chimeric virus, containing the structural region from CBV3 and the rest of the genome from CAV9, and the parental CBV3 strain, caused high levels of viraemia in adult mice. The ability of these viruses to infect the central nervous system suggested that neurotropism is associated with high replication levels and the presence of the CBV3 capsid proteins, which also enhanced formation of neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the appearance of neutralizing antibodies correlated directly with the clearance of the viruses from the tissues. These results demonstrate potential pathogenicity of intraspecies recombinant coxsackieviruses, and the complexity of the genetic determinants underlying tissue tropism.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign soft tissue neoplasms in adults.

    PubMed

    Walker, Eric A; Fenton, Michael E; Salesky, Joel S; Murphey, Mark D

    2011-11-01

    This article reviews a spectrum of benign soft tissue tumors found in adults. Rather than presenting a complete review, the focus of this article is on benign tumors for which the diagnosis may be confidently made or strongly suggested on the basis of imaging. Diagnoses presented include nodular fasciitis, superficial and deep fibromatosis, elastofibroma, lipomatous lesions, giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, pigmented villonodular synovitis, peripheral nerve sheath tumors, Morton neuroma, hemangioma, and myxoma.

  12. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine: Astray or on the Path?

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Albrecht M.; Huppertz, Sascha; Henschler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the best characterized adult stem cells and the only stem cell type in routine clinical use. The concept of stem cell transplantation laid the foundations for the development of novel cell therapies within, and even outside, the hematopoietic system. Here, we report on the history of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and of HSC isolation, we briefly summarize the capabilities of HSCs to reconstitute the entire hemato/lymphoid cell system, and we assess current indications for HCT. We aim to draw the lines between areas where HCT has been firmly established, areas where HCT can in the future be expected to be of clinical benefit using their regenerative functions, and areas where doubts persist. We further review clinical trials for diverse approaches that are based on HCT. Finally, we highlight the advent of genome editing in HSCs and critically view the use of HSCs in non-hematopoietic tissue regeneration. PMID:27721700

  13. [Features of glutamate dehydrogenase in fetal and adult rumen tissue].

    PubMed

    Kalachniuk, H I; Fomenko, I S; Kalachniuk, L H; Kavai, Sh; Marounek, M; Savka, O H

    2001-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from rumen mucosa of cow fetus, liver and two forms from mucosa (bacterial and tissue) of the adult animal were partly purified and characterized. The activity of the bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase was shown to depend on qualities of a biomass of microbes, adhered on surface of rumen mucosa. All enzymes from tissues (GDHTRF, TRC, TLC), revealed the hypersensibility to increase in the concentration medium of Zn2+, guanosine triphosphate (GTP), acting here in a role of negative modulators, and also adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and leucine, which acted as activators. However, in the same concentrations these effectors do not influence the activity of the bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase. And if all tissues enzymes are highly specific to coenzyme NADH, the bacterial ones almost in 3 times is more active at NADPH use. PMID:11642036

  14. Analysis of Cell Cycle Status of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Szade, Krzysztof; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Zukowska, Monika; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) act as paradigmatic tissue-specific adult stem cells. While they are quiescent in steady-state conditions, they enter the cell cycle and proliferate in stress conditions and during tissue regeneration. Therefore, analysis of cell cycle status of HSC is crucial for understanding their biology. However, due to low number of HSC in tissue and need to use many surface markers for their identification, analysis of their cycle status is technically complicated. Here, we presented our simple strategy to analyze cell cycle of strictly defined LKS CD48(-)CD150(+)CD34(-) HSC, together with Ki67 and DAPI staining by flow cytometry.

  15. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (Thymoglobulin®) impairs the thymic output of both conventional and regulatory CD4+ T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Na, Il-Kang; Wittenbecher, Friedrich; Dziubianau, Mikalai; Herholz, Anne; Mensen, Angela; Kunkel, Désirée; Blau, Olga; Blau, Igor; Thiel, Eckhard; Uharek, Lutz; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Rieger, Kathrin; Thiel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ is used to prevent graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Common disadvantages of treatment are infectious complications. The effects of rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ on thymic function have not been well-studied. Multicolor flow cytometry was used to analyze the kinetics of conventional and regulatory T cells in adult patients treated (n=12) or not treated (n=8) with rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ during the first 6 months after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Patients treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ had almost undetectable levels of recent thymic emigrants (CD45RA+CD31+) of both conventional and regulatory CD4T cells throughout the 6 months after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation whereas CD4+CD45RA-memory T cells were less affected, but their levels were also significantly lower than in patients not treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™. In vitro, rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ induced apoptosis and cytolysis of human thymocytes, and its cytotoxic effects were greater than those of rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Fresenius™. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ in combination with a conditioning regimen strongly impairs thymic recovery of both conventional and regulatory CD4+ T cells. The sustained depletion of conventional and regulatory CD4+T cells carries a high risk of both infections and graft-versus-host disease. Our data indicate that patients treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ could benefit from thymus-protective therapies and that trials comparing this product with other rabbit antithymocyte globulin preparations or lymphocyte-depleting compounds would be informative. PMID:22801968

  16. Epimorphic regeneration approach to tissue replacement in adult mammals

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vineet; Johnson, Scott A.; Reing, Janet; Zhang, Li; Tottey, Stephen; Wang, Gang; Hirschi, Karen K.; Braunhut, Susan; Gudas, Lorraine J.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Urodeles and fetal mammals are capable of impressive epimorphic regeneration in a variety of tissues, whereas the typical default response to injury in adult mammals consists of inflammation and scar tissue formation. One component of epimorphic regeneration is the recruitment of resident progenitor and stem cells to a site of injury. Bioactive molecules resulting from degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor and stem cells in vitro in adult mammals. The ability to recruit multipotential cells to the site of injury by in vivo administration of chemotactic ECM degradation products in a mammalian model of digit amputation was investigated in the present study. Adult, 6- to 8-week-old C57/BL6 mice were subjected to midsecond phalanx amputation of the third digit of the right hind foot and either treated with chemotactic ECM degradation products or left untreated. At 14 days after amputation, mice treated with ECM degradation products showed an accumulation of heterogeneous cells that expressed markers of multipotency, including Sox2, Sca1, and Rex1 (Zfp42). Cells isolated from the site of amputation were capable of differentiation along neuroectodermal and mesodermal lineages, whereas cells isolated from control mice were capable of differentiation along only mesodermal lineages. The present findings demonstrate the recruitment of endogenous stem cells to a site of injury, and/or their generation/proliferation therein, in response to ECM degradation products. PMID:19966310

  17. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  18. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-06-21

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  19. Multipotent progenitor cells isolated from adult human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I; Nair, I; Ferreri, K; Rawson, J; Kuroda, A; Pascual, M; Omori, K; Valiente, L; Orr, C; Al-Abdullah, I; Riggs, A; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2005-10-01

    The supply of islet cells is a limiting factor for the widespread application of islet transplantation of type-1 diabetes. Islets constitute 1% to 2% of pancreatic tissue, leaving approximately 98% as discard after islet isolation and purification. In this report we present our data on the isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from discarded adult human pancreatic tissue. The collected cells from discarded nonislet fractions, after enzymatic digestion and gradient purification of islets, were dissociated for suspension culture in a serum-free medium. The cell clusters grown to a size of 100 to 150 mum contained cells staining for stage-specific embryonic antigens, but not insulin or C-peptide. To direct cell differentiation toward islets, clusters were recultured in a pancreatic differentiation medium. Insulin and C-peptide-positive cells by immunocytochemistry appeared within a week, reaching over 10% of the cell population. Glucagon and somatostatin-positive cells were also detected. The cell clusters were found to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Cells from the same clusters also had the capacity for differentiation into neural cells, as documented by staining for neural and glial cell markers when cultured as monolayers in media containing neurotrophic factors. These data suggest that multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells exist within the human pancreatic tissue that is typically discarded during islet isolation procedures. These adult progenitor cells can be successfully differentiated into insulin-producing cells, and thus they have the potential for treatment of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:16298614

  20. In search of the best candidate for regeneration of ischemic tissues: are embryonic/fetal stem cells more advantageous than adult counterparts?

    PubMed

    Emanueli, Costanza; Lako, Majlinda; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Madeddu, Paolo

    2005-10-01

    Human stem cells and progenitor cells from the bone marrow have been proposed for the regeneration of ischemic cardiac tissues. Early clinical trials indicate that infusion of autologous bone-marrow cells into the infarcted heart enhances ventricular function, albeit the long-term benefit remains to be ascertained. Alternatively, angiogenic growth factors could be used to stimulate the recruitment of vascular progenitor cells into tissues in need of regeneration. Unfortunately, in atherosclerotic patients, the curative potential of autologous stem cells might be impoverished by underlying disease and associated risk factors. Thus, research is focusing on the use of embryonic stem cells which are capable of unlimited self-renewal and have the potential to give rise to all tissue types in the body. Ethical problems and technical hurdles may limit the immediate application of embryonic stem cells. In the meanwhile, fetal hematopoietic stem cells,which have been routinely used to reconstitute the hematopoietic system in man, could represent an alternative, owing to their juvenile phenotype and ability to differentiate into vascular endothelial, muscular, and neuronal cell lineages. With progresses in stem cell expansion, the blood of a single cord could be sufficient to transplant an adult. These observations raise the exciting possibility of using fetal cells as a new way to speed up the healing of damaged tissues.

  1. Hematopoietic bone marrow cells participate in endothelial, but not epithelial or mesenchymal cell renewal in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Odörfer, Kathrin I; Egerbacher, Monika; Unger, Nina J; Weber, Karin; Jamnig, Angelika; Lepperdinger, Günter; Kleiter, Miriam; Sandgren, Eric P; Erben, Reinhold G

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which bone marrow (BM) contributes to physiological cell renewal is still controversial. Using the marker human placental alkaline phosphatase (ALPP) which can readily be detected in paraffin and plastic sections by histochemistry or immunohistochemistry, and in ultrathin sections by electron microscopy after pre-embedding staining, we examined the role of endogenous BM in physiological cell renewal by analysing tissues from lethally irradiated wild-type inbred Fischer 344 (F344) rats transplanted (BMT) with unfractionated BM from ALPP-transgenic F344 rats ubiquitously expressing the marker. Histochemical, immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic analysis showed that the proportion of ALPP+ capillary endothelial cells (EC) profoundly increased from 1 until 6 months after BMT in all organs except brain and adrenal medulla. In contrast, pericytes and EC in large blood vessels were ALPP–. Epithelial cells in kidney, liver, pancreas, intestine and brain were recipient-derived at all time-points. Similarly, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, striated muscle and smooth muscle cells were exclusively of recipient origin. The lack of mesenchymal BM-derived cells in peripheral tissues prompted us to examine whether BMT resulted in engraftment of mesenchymal precursors. Four weeks after BMT, all haematopoietic BM cells were of donor origin by flow cytometric analysis, whereas isolation of BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) failed to show engraftment of donor MSC. In conclusion, our data show that BM is an important source of physiological renewal of EC in adult rats, but raise doubt whether reconstituted irradiated rats are an apt model for BM-derived regeneration of mesenchymal cells in peripheral tissues. PMID:21091631

  2. DNA Damage: A Sensible Mediator of the Differentiation Decision in Hematopoietic Stem Cells and in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Cary N.; Ito, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    In the adult, the source of functionally diverse, mature blood cells are hematopoietic stem cells, a rare population of quiescent cells that reside in the bone marrow niche. Like stem cells in other tissues, hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew, in order to maintain the stem cell population for the lifetime of the organism, and to differentiate, in order to give rise to the multiple lineages of the hematopoietic system. In recent years, increasing evidence has suggested a role for the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in the decision for hematopoietic stem cells to exit quiescence and to differentiate. In this review, we will examine recent work supporting the idea that detection of cell stressors, such as oxidative and genetic damage, is an important mediator of cell fate decisions in hematopoietic stem cells. We will explore the benefits of such a system in avoiding the development and progression of malignancies, and in avoiding tissue exhaustion and failure. Additionally, we will discuss new work that examines the accumulation of DNA damage and replication stress in aging hematopoietic stem cells and causes us to rethink ideas of genoprotection in the bone marrow niche. PMID:25789504

  3. Evidence for tissue-resident mesenchymal stem cells in human adult lung from studies of transplanted allografts.

    PubMed

    Lama, Vibha N; Smith, Lisa; Badri, Linda; Flint, Andrew; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Murray, Susan; Wang, Zhuo; Liao, Hui; Toews, Galen B; Krebsbach, Paul H; Peters-Golden, Marc; Pinsky, David J; Martinez, Fernando J; Thannickal, Victor J

    2007-04-01

    The origin and turnover of connective tissue cells in adult human organs, including the lung, are not well understood. Here, studies of cells derived from human lung allografts demonstrate the presence of a multipotent mesenchymal cell population, which is locally resident in the human adult lung and has extended life span in vivo. Examination of plastic-adherent cell populations in bronchoalveolar lavage samples obtained from 76 human lung transplant recipients revealed clonal proliferation of fibroblast-like cells in 62% (106 of 172) of samples. Immunophenotyping of these isolated cells demonstrated expression of vimentin and prolyl-4-hydroxylase, indicating a mesenchymal phenotype. Multiparametric flow cytometric analyses revealed expression of cell-surface proteins, CD73, CD90, and CD105, commonly found on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Hematopoietic lineage markers CD14, CD34, and CD45 were absent. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. Cytogenetic analysis of cells from 7 sex-mismatched lung transplant recipients harvested up to 11 years after transplant revealed that 97.2% +/- 2.1% expressed the sex genotype of the donor. The presence of MSCs of donor sex identity in lung allografts even years after transplantation provides what we believe to be the first evidence for connective tissue cell progenitors that reside locally within a postnatal, nonhematopoietic organ.

  4. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wabik, Agnieszka; Jones, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept of the niche, the micro-environment that sustains and regulates stem cells, is broadening, with a new appreciation of the role of physical factors and hormonal signals. Here, we review different functions of SCs, the cellular mechanisms that underlie them and the signals that bias the fate of SCs as they switch between roles. PMID:25812989

  5. Adult stem cell plasticity: will engineered tissues be rejected?

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Te-Chao; Alison, Malcolm R; Wright, Nicholas A; Poulsom, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The dogma that adult tissue-specific stem cells remain committed to supporting only their own tissue has been challenged; a new hypothesis, that adult stem cells demonstrate plasticity in their repertoires, is being tested. This is important because it seems possible that haematopoietic stem cells, for example, could be exploited to generate and perhaps deliver cell-based therapies deep within existing nonhaematopoietic organs. Much of the evidence for plasticity derives from histological studies of tissues from patients or animals that have received grafts of cells or whole organs, from a donor bearing (or lacking) a definitive marker. Detection in the recipient of appropriately differentiated cells bearing the donor marker is indicative of a switch in phenotype of a stem cell or a member of a transit amplifying population or of a differentiated cell. In this review, we discuss evidence for these changes occurring but do not consider the molecular basis of cell commitment. In general, the extent of engraftment is low but may be increased if tissues are damaged. In model systems of liver regeneration, the repeated application of a selection pressure increases levels of engraftment considerably; how this occurs is unclear. Cell fusion plays a part in regeneration and remodelling of the liver, skeletal muscle and even regions of the brain. Genetic disease may be amenable to some forms of cell therapy, yet immune rejection will present challenges. Graft-vs.-host disease will continue to present problems, although this may be avoided if the cells were derived from the recipient or they were tolerized. Despite great expectations for cellular therapies, there are indications that attempts to replace missing proteins could be confounded simply by the development of specific immunity that rejects the new phenotype. PMID:15255965

  6. Unrelated transplantation for poor-prognosis adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: long-term outcome analysis and study of the impact of hematopoietic graft source.

    PubMed

    Ferrá, Christelle; Sanz, Jaime; de la Cámara, Rafael; Sanz, Guillermo; Bermúdez, Arancha; Valcárcel, David; Rovira, Montserrat; Serrano, David; Caballero, Dolores; Espigado, Ildefonso; Morgades, Mireia; Heras, Inmaculada; Solano, Carlos; Duarte, Rafael; Barrenetxea, Cristina; García-Noblejas, Ana; Díez-Martin, José L; Iriondo, Arturo; Carreras, Enric; Sierra, Jordi; Sanz, Miguel-Angel; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-07-01

    Adults with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (HR-ALL) have a poor outcome with standard chemotherapy and usually undergo unrelated stem cell transplantation (SCT) if a matched sibling donor is not available. We analyzed the outcome of adult patients with unrelated SCT for HR-ALL and studied the possible effect of the hematopoietic stem cell source of the transplant. A total of 149 adult patients (median age, 29 years, range, 15-59 years) with HR-ALL underwent unrelated SCT in 13 Spanish institutions between 2000 and 2007. Patients in first complete remission (CR1) at transplantation had at least one adverse prognostic factor (advanced age, adverse cytogenetics, hyperleukocytosis, or slow response to induction therapy). ALL was in CR1 in 81 patients (54%), in second CR (CR2) in 37 patients (25%), in third CR (CR3) in 11 patients (7%), and with overt disease in 20 patients (13%). The hematopoietic source was unrelated cord blood (UCB) in 62 patients and an unrelated donor (UD) in 87 patients. The patients undergoing UCB-SCT and UD-SCT were comparable in terms of the main clinical and biological features of ALL, except for a higher frequency of patients with more overt disease in the UCB-SCT group. There was no statistically significant difference in overall survival (OS) or disease-free survival (DFS) at 5 years between the 2 groups. Treatment-related mortality (TRM) was significantly lower in the UCB-SCT group (P = .021). The probability of relapse at 1 year was 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-27%) for the UD-SCT group and 27% (95% CI, 14%-40%) for the UCB-SCT group (P = .088), respectively. Only disease status at transplantation (CR1, 41% [95% CI, 18%-64%] vs CR2, 51% [95% CI, 17%-85%] vs advanced disease, 66% [95% CI, 46%-86%]; P = .001) and the absence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (74% [95% CI, 46%-100%] vs 33% [95% CI, 17%-49%]; P = .034) were significant factors for relapse. All unrelated transplantation modalities were associated with high

  7. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on cells cultured from the hematopoietic tissue of the Dublin Bay prawn, Nephrops norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Mothersill, C; Lyng, F; Mulford, A; Seymour, C; Cottell, D; Lyons, M; Austin, B

    2001-09-01

    Explant cultures from the hematopoietic tissue of the Dublin Bay prawn, Nephrops norvegicus, were exposed to low doses of (60)Co gamma radiation. Cells growing from the explants were examined 7 days after irradiation using light and transmission electron microscopy and were also tested for their ability to produce signals indicative of a bystander effect. The exposed cultures displayed pronounced damage and were orders of magnitude more sensitive than the data in the literature would suggest for arthropod cells. The cultures were also more sensitive than mammalian cells that were exposed to similar doses. Cellular abnormalities included damage to cytoplasmic organelles, particularly the cytoskeleton. Abnormal mitochondria were also prominent. At low doses (0.5 Gy), nuclear damage was not apparent in the cultures, but there was evidence of a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis. The irradiated cultures released a factor into the medium that was capable of inducing apoptosis and cell death in unirradiated fish and human cells. This bystander effect was of a similar magnitude to that reported for mammalian cell systems. It is suggested that these crustaceans may be highly sensitive to radiation, unlike terrestrial arthropods and certain other invertebrates, which are generally considered to be radioresistant.

  8. Arabinoxylan rice bran (MGN-3/Biobran) provides protection against whole-body γ-irradiation in mice via restoration of hematopoietic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Badr El-Din, Nariman K.; Abdel Fattah, Salma M.; Tolentino, Lucilene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to examine the protective effect of MGN-3 on overall maintenance of hematopoietic tissue after γ-irradiation. MGN-3 is an arabinoxylan from rice bran that has been shown to be a powerful antioxidant and immune modulator. Swiss albino mice were treated with MGN-3 prior to irradiation and continued to receive MGN-3 for 1 or 4 weeks. Results were compared with mice that received radiation (5 Gy γ rays) only, MGN-3 (40 mg/kg) only and control mice (receiving neither radiation nor MGN-3). At 1 and 4 weeks post-irradiation, different hematological, histopathological and biochemical parameters were examined. Mice exposed to irradiation alone showed significant depression in their complete blood count (CBC) except for neutrophilia. Additionally, histopathological studies showed hypocellularity of their bone marrow, as well as a remarkable decrease in splenic weight/relative size and in number of megakaryocytes. In contrast, pre-treatment with MGN-3 resulted in protection against irradiation-induced damage to the CBC parameters associated with complete bone marrow cellularity, as well as protection of the aforementioned splenic changes. Furthermore, MGN-3 exerted antioxidative activity in whole-body irradiated mice, and provided protection from irradiation-induced loss of body and organ weight. In conclusion, MGN-3 has the potential to protect progenitor cells in the bone marrow, which suggests the possible use of MGN-3/Biobran as an adjuvant treatment to counteract the severe adverse side effects associated with radiation therapy. PMID:23287771

  9. Outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation in adult patients with acquired aplastic anemia using intermediate-dose alemtuzumab-based conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Nada; Del Bel, Ryan; Messner, Hans A; Kim, Dennis; Kuruvilla, John; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Uhm, Jieun; Seftel, Matthew; Alam, Naheed; Xu, Wei; Gupta, Vikas

    2014-11-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has no therapeutic benefit after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for patients with acquired aplastic anemia (AA), and its prevention is highly desirable. We designed a conditioning regimen using an intermediate dose of alemtuzumab (50 to 60 mg) and describe our institutional experience of 41 patients who underwent HCT for AA. The median age at HCT was 37 years (range, 17 to 59). The conditioning regimen was high-dose cyclophosphamide (n = 9) or fludarabine based (n = 32). Additional GVHD prophylaxis was with cyclosporine. With a median follow-up of 3.6 years, overall survival at 3 years was 85%. Survival in patients <40 years and ≥40 years was 96% and 67%, respectively (P = .04). Graft failure occurred in 4 (10%) patients; 2 primary and 2 secondary. The cumulative incidences of acute (grades 1 to 2) and chronic GVHD were 27% and 15%, respectively. No patients developed grade 3 to 4 acute GVHD or severe chronic GVHD. The following viral complications were frequent: cytomegalovirus reactivation (79%), herpes simplex (18%), varicella zoster (25%), and BK virus hemorrhagic cystitis (8%). The majority of patients had no significant long-term health issues. This intermediate-dose alemtuzumab-based conditioning regimen results in excellent survival with a favorable impact on GVHD and long-term health outcomes, but close monitoring for viral complications is important.

  10. Adult human adipose tissue contains several types of multipotent cells.

    PubMed

    Tallone, Tiziano; Realini, Claudio; Böhmler, Andreas; Kornfeld, Christopher; Vassalli, Giuseppe; Moccetti, Tiziano; Bardelli, Silvana; Soldati, Gianni

    2011-04-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cells that can be easily isolated from various tissues and expanded in vitro. Many reports on their pluripotency and possible clinical applications have raised hopes and interest in MSCs. In an attempt to unify the terminology and the criteria to label a cell as MSC, in 2006 the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) proposed a standard set of rules to define the identity of these cells. However, MSCs are still extracted from different tissues, by diverse isolation protocols, are cultured and expanded in different media and conditions. All these variables may have profound effects on the selection of cell types and the composition of heterogeneous subpopulations, on the selective expansion of specific cell populations with totally different potentials and ergo, on the long-term fate of the cells upon in vitro culture. Therefore, specific molecular and cellular markers that identify MSCs subsets as well as standardization of expansion protocols for these cells are urgently needed. Here, we briefly discuss new useful markers and recent data supporting the rapidly emerging concept that many different types of progenitor cells are found in close association with blood vessels. This knowledge may promote the necessary technical improvements required to reduce variability and promote higher efficacy and safety when isolating and expanding these cells for therapeutic use. In the light of the discussed data, particularly the identification of new markers, and advances in the understanding of fundamental MSC biology, we also suggest a revision of the 2006 ISCT criteria.

  11. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, FITNESS, AND CARDIOMETABOLIC RISK FACTORS IN ADULT SURVIVORS OF CHILDHOOD CANCER WITH A HISTORY OF HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Megan E.; Steinberger, Julia; Ross, Julie A.; Kelly, Aaron S.; Chow, Eric J.; Koves, Ildiko H.; Hoffmeister, Paul; Sinaiko, Alan R.; Petryk, Anna; Moran, Antoinette; Lee, Jill; Chow, Lisa S.; Baker, K. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Along with other childhood cancer survivors (CCS), hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) survivors are at high risk of treatment-related late effects, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Cardiometabolic risk factor abnormalities may be exacerbated by inadequate physical activity (PA). Relationships between PA and cardiometabolic risk factors have not been well described in CCS with HCT. Methods PA (self-report), mobility (Timed Up and Go test), endurance (six-minute walk test), handgrip strength, and cardiometabolic risk factors were measured in 119 HCT survivors and 66 sibling controls aged ≥18 years. Adjusted comparisons between HCT survivors and controls and between categories of low and high PA, mobility, endurance, and strength were performed with linear regression. Results Among HCT survivors, the high PA group had lower waist circumference (WC) (81.9±2.5 v 88.6±3.1 cm±standard error (SE), P=.009) than the low PA group, while the high endurance group had lower WC (77.8±2.6 v 87.8±2.5 cm±SE, P=.0001) and percent fat mass (33.6±1.8 v 39.4±1.7 %±SE, P=.0008) and greater insulin sensitivity (IS) (10.9±1.0 v 7.42±1.14 mg/kg/min±SE via euglycemic insulin clamp, P=.001) than the low endurance group. Differences were greater in HCT survivors than in controls for WC between low and high PA groups, triglycerides between low and high mobility groups, and WC, systolic blood pressure, and IS between low and high endurance groups (all Pinteraction <.05). Conclusions Higher endurance was associated with a more favorable cardiometabolic profile in HCT survivors, suggesting that interventions directed to increase endurance in survivors may reduce the risk of future cardiovascular disease. PMID:25865649

  12. Incidence, risk factors, and outcome of bacteremia following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in 720 adult patients.

    PubMed

    Piñana, José Luis; Montesinos, Pau; Martino, Rodrigo; Vazquez, Lourdes; Rovira, Montserrat; López, Javier; Batlle, Montserrat; Figuera, Ángela; Barba, Pere; Lahuerta, Juan José; Debén, Guillermo; Perez-Lopez, Cristina; García, Raimundo; Rosique, Pedro; Lavilla, Esperanza; Gascón, Adriana; Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Sanz, Miguel Ángel

    2014-02-01

    Bacteremia is the most frequent infectious complication during neutropenia in patients receiving autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). The objective of this study was to analyze the incidence, characteristics, risk factors, and outcome of bacteremia during the early period after ASCT. A total of 720 patients undergoing ASCT in two observational prospective consecutive multicenter studies of the Programa Español para el Tratamiento de las Hemopatías group were analyzed. Bacteremia occurred in 20 % of patients. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most frequent (66 %) among the gram-positive agents and Escherichia coli (49 %) among the gram-negative agents. Multivariate analysis showed that the length of neutropenia <1 × 10(9)/L (more than 9 days) [relative risk (RR) of 2.6, p < 0.001] was the sole risk factor for overall bacteremia. We identified the length of neutropenia <1 × 10(9)/L (more than 9 days) (RR 4.98, p < 0.001) and the use of prophylactic fluoroquinolones (RR 0.46, p < 0.01) as specific risk factors for gram-negative bacteremia. Risk factors for gram-positive bacteremia were the use of total parenteral nutrition (RR 1.92, p < 0.01) and deep neutropenia (<0.1 × 10(9)/L), with duration over 5 days (RR 1.67, p < 0.027). Bacteremia showed an increased morbidity with no impact on neither overall nor infectious related mortality. The identification of such risk factors may be helpful to implement prophylactic and therapeutic risk-adapted strategies to reduce the incidence of bacteremia in ASCT. PMID:23995612

  13. Low-, medium- and high-dose steroids with or without aminocaproic acid in adult hematopoietic SCT patients with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rathi, N K; Tanner, A R; Dinh, A; Dong, W; Feng, L; Ensor, J; Wallace, S K; Haque, S A; Rondon, G; Price, K J; Popat, U; Nates, J L

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a poorly understood complication of transplantation carrying a high mortality. Patients commonly deteriorate and require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Treatment with high-dose steroids and aminocaproic acid (ACA) has been suggested. The current study examined 119 critically ill adult hematopoietic transplant patients treated for DAH. Patients were subdivided into low-, medium- and high-dose steroid groups with or without ACA. All groups had similar baseline characteristics and severity of illness scores. Primary objectives were 30, 60, 100 day, ICU and hospital mortality. Overall mortality (n=119) on day 100 was high at 85%. In the steroids and ACA cohort (n=82), there were no significant differences in 30, 60, 100, day, ICU and hospital mortality between the dosing groups. In the steroids only cohort (n=37), the low-dose steroid group had a lower ICU and hospital mortality (P=0.02). Adjunctive treatment with ACA did not produce differences in outcomes. In the multivariate analysis, medium- and high-dose steroids were associated with a higher ICU mortality (P=0.01) as compared with the low-dose group. Our data suggest that treatment strategies may need to be reanalyzed to avoid potentially unnecessary and potentially harmful therapies.

  14. Structure-function relationships in radiation-induced cell and tissue lesions: special references to the contributions of scanning electron microscopy and hematopoietic tissue responses

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.

    1987-03-01

    Contributions of scanning electron microscopy to the field of radiation biology are briefly reviewed and presented in terms of an overall goal to identify and characterize the structural features of radiation-induced lesions in vital cell and tissue targets. In the context of lesion production, the major radiation-elicited response sequences, the types and nature of measured end points, and governing temporal and radiobiological parameters are discussed and illustrated by using results derived from both in vitro cell systems and in vivo studies that measured tissue responses from various organ systems (respiratory, digestive, circulatory, and central nervous systems). Work in our laboratory on the nature of early and late hematopathologic tissue responses (aplastic anemia and myeloid leukemia) induced by protracted radiation exposure and the bridging effect of repair processes relative to the expression of these pathologies is highlighted.

  15. Gene expression analysis distinguishes tissue-specific and gender-related functions among adult Ascaris suum tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengyuan; Gao, Xin; Martin, John; Yin, Yong; Abubucker, Sahar; Rash, Amy C; Li, Ben-Wen; Nash, Bill; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-06-01

    Over a billion people are infected by Ascaris spp. intestinal parasites. To clarify functional differences among tissues of adult A. suum, we compared gene expression by various tissues of these worms by expression microarray methods. The A. suum genome was sequenced and assembled to allow generation of microarray elements. Expression of over 40,000 60-mer elements was investigated in a variety of tissues from both male and female adult worms. Nearly 50 percent of the elements for which signal was detected exhibited differential expression among different tissues. The unique profile of transcripts identified for each tissue clarified functional distinctions among tissues, such as chitin binding in the ovary and peptidase activity in the intestines. Interestingly, hundreds of gender-specific elements were characterized in multiple non-reproductive tissues of female or male worms, with most prominence of gender differences in intestinal tissue. A. suum genes from the same family were frequently expressed differently among tissues. Transcript abundance for genes specific to A. suum, by comparison to Caenorhabditis elegans, varied to a greater extent among tissues than for genes conserved between A. suum and C. elegans. Analysis using C. elegans protein interaction data identified functional modules conserved between these two nematodes, resulting in identification of functional predictions of essential subnetworks of protein interactions and how these networks may vary among nematode tissues. A notable finding was very high module similarity between adult reproductive tissues and intestine. Our results provide the most comprehensive assessment of gene expression among tissues of a parasitic nematode to date. PMID:23572074

  16. Cost utility analysis of reduced intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adolescence and young adult with severe thalassemia compared to hypertransfusion and iron chelation program

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hematopoieticic stem cell transplantation is the only therapeutic option that can cure thalassemia disease. Reduced intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (RI-HSCT) has demonstrated a high cure rate with minimal complications compared to other options. Because RI-HSCT is very costly, economic justification for its value is needed. This study aimed to estimate the cost-utility of RI-HSCT compared with blood transfusions combined with iron chelating therapy (BT-ICT) for adolescent and young adult with severe thalassemia in Thailand. Methods A Markov model was used to estimate the relevant costs and health outcomes over the patients’ lifetimes using a societal perspective. All future costs and outcomes were discounted at a rate of 3% per annum. The efficacy of RI-HSCT was based a clinical trial including a total of 18 thalassemia patients. Utility values were derived directly from all patients using EQ-5D and SF-6D. Primary outcomes of interest were lifetime costs, quality adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) in US ($) per QALY gained. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA) were conducted to investigate the effect of parameter uncertainty. Results In base case analysis, the RI-HSCT group had a better clinical outcomes and higher lifetime costs. The incremental cost per QALY gained was US $ 3,236 per QALY. The acceptability curve showed that the probability of RI-HSCT being cost-effective was 71% at the willingness to pay of 1 time of Thai Gross domestic product per capita (GDP per capita), approximately US $ 4,210 per QALY gained. The most sensitive parameter was utility of severe thalassemia patients without cardiac complication patients. Conclusion At a societal willingness to pay of 1 GDP per capita, RI-HSCT was a cost-effective treatment for adolescent and young adult with severe thalassemia in Thailand compared to BT-ICT. PMID:23379888

  17. Reassessing the approach to informed consent: the case of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult thalassemia patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The informed consent process is the legal embodiment of the fundamental right of the individual to make decisions affecting his or her health., and the patient’s permission is a crucial form of respect of freedom and dignity, it becomes extremely important to enhance the patient’s understanding and recall of the information given by the physician. This statement acquires additional weight when the medical treatment proposed can potentially be detrimental or even fatal. This is the case of thalassemia patients pertaining to class 3 of the Pesaro classification where Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only potentially curative treatment. Unfortunately, this kind of intervention is burdened by an elevated transplantation-related mortality risk (TRM: all deaths considered related to transplantation), equal to 30% according to published reports. In thalassemia, the role of the patient in the informed consent process leading up to HSCT has not been fully investigated. This study investigated the hypothesis that information provided by physicians in the medical scenario of HSCT is not fully understood by patients and that misunderstanding and communication biases may affect the clinical decision-making process. Methods A questionnaire was either mailed or given personally to 25 patients. A second questionnaire was administered to the 12 physicians attending the patients enrolled in this study. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the communication factors. Results The results pointed out the difference between the risks communicated by physicians and the risks perceived by patients. Besides the study highlighted the mortality risk considered to be acceptable by patients and that considered to be acceptable by physicians. Conclusions Several solutions have been suggested to reduce the gap between communicated and perceived data. A multi-disciplinary approach may possibly help to attenuate some aspects of

  18. Stable multilineage xenogeneic replacement of definitive hematopoiesis in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hess, Isabell; Boehm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bony fishes are the most numerous and phenotypically diverse group of vertebrates inhabiting our planet, making them an ideal target for identifying general principles of tissue development and function. However, lack of suitable experimental platforms prevents the exploitation of this rich source of natural phenotypic variation. Here, we use a zebrafish strain lacking definitive hematopoiesis for interspecific analysis of hematopoietic cell development. Without conditioning prior to transplantation, hematopoietic progenitor cells from goldfish stably engraft in adult zebrafish homozygous for the c-myb(I181N) mutation. However, in competitive repopulation experiments, zebrafish hematopoietic cells exhibit an advantage over their goldfish counterparts, possibly owing to subtle species-specific functional differences in hematopoietic microenvironments resulting from over 100 million years of independent evolution. Thus, our unique animal model provides an unprecedented opportunity to genetically and functionally disentangle universal and species-specific contributions of the microenvironment to hematopoietic progenitor cell maintenance and development. PMID:26777855

  19. Impact of Cranial Irradiation Added to Intrathecal Conditioning in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Central Nervous System Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Mayadev, Jyoti S.; Douglas, James G.; Storer, Barry E.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Storb, Rainer

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Neither the prognostic importance nor the appropriate management of central nervous system (CNS) involvement is known for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We examined the impact of a CNS irradiation boost to standard intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC). Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2005, a total of 648 adult AML patients received a myeloablative HCT: 577 patients were CNS negative (CNS-), and 71 were CNS positive (CNS+). Of the 71 CNS+ patients, 52 received intrathecal chemotherapy alone (CNS+ITC), and 19 received ITC plus an irradiation boost (CNS+RT). Results: The CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT patients had 1- and 5-year relapse-free survivals (RFS) of 43% and 35%, 15% and 6%, and 37% and 32%, respectively. CNS+ITC patients had a statistically significant worse RFS compared with CNS- patients (hazard ratio [HR], 2.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-3.6; p < 0.0001). CNS+RT patients had improved relapse free survival over that of CNS+ITC patients (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; p = 0.01). The 1- and 5-year overall survivals (OS) of patients with CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT, were 50% and 38%, 21% and 6%, and 53% and 42%, respectively. The survival of CNS+RT were significantly better than CNS+ITC patients (p = 0.004). After adjusting for known risk factors, CNS+RT patients had a trend toward lower relapse rates and reduced nonrelapse mortality. Conclusions: CNS+ AML is associated with a poor prognosis. The role of a cranial irradiation boost to intrathecal chemotherapy appears to mitigate the risk of CNS disease, and needs to be further investigated to define optimal treatment strategies.

  20. Designer blood: creating hematopoietic lineages from embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Abby L.; Stachura, David L.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells exhibit the remarkable capacity to become virtually any differentiated tissue upon appropriate manipulation in culture, a property that has been beneficial for studies of hematopoiesis. Until recently, the majority of this work used murine ES cells for basic research to elucidate fundamental properties of blood-cell development and establish methods to derive specific mature lineages. Now, the advent of human ES cells sets the stage for more applied pursuits to generate transplantable cells for treating blood disorders. Current efforts are directed toward adapting in vitro hematopoietic differentiation methods developed for murine ES cells to human lines, identifying the key interspecies differences in biologic properties of ES cells, and generating ES cell-derived hematopoietic stem cells that are competent to repopulate adult hosts. The ultimate medical goal is to create patient-specific and generic ES cell lines that can be expanded in vitro, genetically altered, and differentiated into cell types that can be used to treat hematopoietic diseases. PMID:16254136

  1. Multicellular spheroids of bone marrow stromal cells: a three-dimensional in vitro culture system for the study of hematopoietic cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M I D; Barros, A P D N; Baptista, L S; Garzoni, L R; Meirelles, M N; Takiya, C M; Pascarelli, B M O; Dutra, H S; Borojevic, R

    2005-10-01

    Cell fate decisions are governed by a complex interplay between cell-autonomous signals and stimuli from the surrounding tissue. In vivo cells are connected to their neighbors and to the extracellular matrix forming a complex three-dimensional (3-D) microenvironment that is not reproduced in conventional in vitro systems. A large body of evidence indicates that mechanical tension applied to the cytoskeleton controls cell proliferation, differentiation and migration, suggesting that 3-D in vitro culture systems that mimic the in vivo situation would reveal biological subtleties. In hematopoietic tissues, the microenvironment plays a crucial role in stem and progenitor cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, and migration. In adults, hematopoiesis takes place inside the bone marrow cavity where hematopoietic cells are intimately associated with a specialized three 3-D scaffold of stromal cell surfaces and extracellular matrix that comprise specific niches. The relationship between hematopoietic cells and their niches is highly dynamic. Under steady-state conditions, hematopoietic cells migrate within the marrow cavity and circulate in the bloodstream. The mechanisms underlying hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell homing and mobilization have been studied in animal models, since conventional two-dimensional (2-D) bone marrow cell cultures do not reproduce the complex 3-D environment. In this review, we will highlight some of the mechanisms controlling hematopoietic cell migration and 3-D culture systems.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cells: can old cells learn new tricks?

    PubMed

    Ho, Anthony D; Punzel, Michael

    2003-05-01

    Since the establishment of cell lines derived from human embryonic stem (ES) cells, it has been speculated that out of such "raw material," we could some day produce all sorts of replacement parts for the human body. Human pluripotent stem cells can be isolated from embryonic, fetal, or adult tissues. Enormous self-renewal capacity and developmental potential are the characteristics of ES cells. Somatic stem cells, especially those derived from hematopoietic tissues, have also been reported to exhibit developmental potential heretofore not considered possible. The initial evidences for the plasticity potential of somatic stem cells were so encouraging that the opponents of ES cell research used them as arguments for restricting ES cell research. In the past months, however, critical issues have been raised challenging the validity and the interpretation of the initial data. Whereas hematopoietic stem-cell therapy has been a clinical reality for almost 40 years, there is still a long way to go in basic research before novel therapy strategies with stem cells as replacement for other organ systems can be established. Given the present status, we should keep all options open for research in ES cells and adult stem cells to appreciate the complexity of their differentiation pathways and the relative merits of various types of stem cells for regenerative medicine. PMID:12714568

  3. Concise Review: Quiescence in Adult Stem Cells: Biological Significance and Relevance to Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rumman, Mohammad; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-10-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) are tissue resident stem cells responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration following injury. In uninjured tissues, ASCs exist in a nonproliferating, reversibly cell cycle-arrested state known as quiescence or G0. A key function of the quiescent state is to preserve stemness in ASCs by preventing precocious differentiation, and thus maintaining a pool of undifferentiated ASCs. Recent evidences suggest that quiescence is an actively maintained state and that excessive or defective quiescence may lead to compromised tissue regeneration or tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to provide an update regarding the biological mechanisms of ASC quiescence and their role in tissue regeneration.

  4. Converging roads: evidence for an adult hemangioblast.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Alexis S; Fleming, William H

    2003-11-01

    Classical studies of the developing embryo first suggested the existence of the hemangioblast, a precursor cell with the potential to differentiate into both blood and blood vessels. Several lines of investigation demonstrated that many of the genes activated during early hematopoietic development are also expressed in the vascular endothelium. Gene-targeting studies using embryonic stem cells have identified Flk-1, SCL, and Runx-1 as important regulatory molecules that specify both hematopoietic and vascular outcomes. Although it was anticipated that the hemangioblast would be present only during the earliest stages of vascular development in the yolk sac, accumulating evidence now indicates that hematopoietic cells with hemangioblast activity persist into adulthood. In the adult, bone marrow-derived, circulating endothelial progenitors contribute to postnatal neovascularization and enhance vascular repair following ischemic injury. Highly purified populations of hematopoietic stem cells from humans and mice can differentiate into both blood cells and vascular tissue at the single cell level. These recent findings suggest that bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells or their progeny may contribute to the maintenance and repair of both the hematopoietic and the vascular systems during adult life.

  5. Plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makio; LaRue, Amanda C; Mehrotra, Meenal

    2015-01-01

    Almost two decades ago, a number of cell culture and preclinical transplantation studies suggested the striking concept of the tissue-reconstituting ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). While this heralded an exciting time of radically new therapies for disorders of many organs and tissues, the concept was soon mired by controversy and remained dormant. This chapter provides a brief review of evidence for HSC plasticity including our findings based on single HSC transplantation in mouse. These studies strongly support the concept that HSCs are pluripotent and may be the source for the majority, if not all, of the cell types in our body. PMID:26590762

  6. Quantitation of two endogenous lactose-inhibitable lectins in embryonic and adult chicken tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, E.C.; Barondes, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two lactose-binding lectins from chicken tissues, chicken-lactose-lectin-I (CLL-I) and chicken-lactose-lectin-II (CLL-II) were quantified with a radioimmunoassay in extracts of a number of developing and adult chicken tissues. Both lectins could be measured in the same extract without separation, because they showed no significant immunological cross- reactivity. Many embryonic and adult tissues, including brain, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, pancreas, and spleen, contained one or both lectins, although their concentrations differed markedly. For example, embryonic muscle, the richest source of CLL-I contained only traces of CLL-II whereas embryonic kidney, a very rich source of CLL-II contained substantial CLL-I. In both muscle and kidney, lectin levels in adulthood were much lower than in the embryonic state. In contrast, CLL-I in liver and CLL-II in intestine were 10-fold to 30-fold more concentrated in the adult than in the 15-d embryo. CLL-I and CLL-II from several tissues were purified by affinity chromatography and their identity in the various tissues was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and peptide mapping. The results suggest that these lectins might have different functions in the many developing and adult tissues in which they are found.

  7. The molecular nature of very small embryonic-like stem cells in adult tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, YongHwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Kang, Hyunsook; Lim, Jisun; Heo, Jinbeom; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Shin, Dong-Myung

    2014-11-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have been considered as the most important cells in regenerative medicine as they are able to differentiate into all types of cells in the human body. PSCs have been established from several sources of embryo tissue or by reprogramming of terminally differentiated adult tissue by transduction of so-called Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc). Interestingly, accumulating evidence has demonstrated the residence of PSCs in adult tissue and with the ability to differentiate into multiple types of tissue-committed stem cells (TCSCs). We also recently demonstrated that a population of pluripotent Oct4(+) SSEA-1(+)Sca-1(+)Lin(-)CD45(-) very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) resides in the adult murine bone marrow (BM) and in other murine tissue. These very small (∼3-6 μm) cells express pluripotent markers such as Oct4, Nanog, and SSEA-1. VSELs could be specified into several tissue-residing TCSCs in response to tissue/organ injury, and thus suggesting that these cells have a physiological role in the rejuvenation of a pool of TCSCs under steady-state conditions. In this review article, we discuss the molecular nature of the rare population of VSELs which have a crucial role in regulating the pluripotency, proliferation, differentiation, and aging of these cells. PMID:25473442

  8. Real-time qPCR for chimerism assessment in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants from unrelated adult and double umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Frankfurt, Olga; Zitzner, Jennifer R; Tambur, Anat R

    2015-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the standard therapy for patients with various malignant hematologic disorders. A successful treatment results in complete engraftment of donor cells in the absence of the patient's own hematopoietic system. Chimerism analysis, aimed at determining the coexistence of genetically different cell populations, is considered a useful method to measure treatment success. A new, qPCR based, commercially available chimerism assay was recently introduced. Here we report our results of comparing STR with qPCR-based chimerism analysis, and assessment of sensitivity and reproducibility of the qPCR chimerism assay. A specific emphasis is put on analyzing chimerism in recipients of double cord blood transplantation. We conclude that the qPCR chimerism assay for engraftment monitoring is a reliable and sensitive assay. Advantages and limitations of the assay in its current format are summarized.

  9. Human Term Placenta as a Source of Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Serikov, Vladimir; Hounshell, Catherine; Larkin, Sandra; Green, William; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Walters, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    The main barrier to a broader clinical application of umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation is its limiting cellular content. Thus, the discovery of hematopoietic progenitor cells in murine placental tissue led us investigate whether the human placenta contains hematopoietic cells, sites of hematopoiesis, and to develop a procedure of processing and storing placental hematopoietic cells for transplantation. Here we show that the human placenta contains large numbers of CD34-expressing hematopoietic cells, with the potential to provide a cellular yield several-fold greater than that of a typical UCB harvest. Cells from fresh or cryopreserved placental tissue generated erythroid and myeloid colonies in culture, and also produced lymphoid cells after transplantation in immunodeficient mice. These results suggest that human placenta could become an important new source of hematopoietic cells for allogeneic transplantation. PMID:19429852

  10. Immunohistochemical Study of Expression of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 in Normal Adult Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Liu, Ruihua; Su, Zhongxue; Zhang, Yuecun; Zhang, Wenfang; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Fuwu; Guo, Yuji; Li, Chuangang; Hao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The expression pattern of Sohlh1 (spermatogenesis and oogenesis specific basic helix-loop-helix 1) and Sohlh2 in mice has been reported in previous studies. Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 are specifically expressed in spermatogonia, prespermatogonia in male mice and oocytes of primordial and primary follicles in female mice. In this report, we studied the expression pattern of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 in human adult tissues. Immunohistochemical staining of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 was performed in 5 samples of normal ovaries and testes, respectively. The results revealed that Sohlh genes are not only expressed in oocytes and spermatogonia, but also in granular cells, theca cells, Sertoli cells and Leydig cells, and in smooth muscles of blood vessel walls. To further investigate the expression of Sohlh genes in other adult human tissues, we collected representative normal adult tissues developed from three embryonic germ layers. Compared with the expression in mice, Sohlhs exhibited a much more extensive expression pattern in human tissues. Sohlhs were detected in testis, ovary and epithelia developed from embryonic endoderm, ectoderm and tissues developed from embryonic mesoderm. Sohlh signals were found in spermatogonia, Sertoli cells and also Leydig cells in testis, while in ovary, the expression was mainly in oocytes of primordial and primary follicles, granular cells and theca cells of secondary follicles. Compared with Sohlh2, the expression of Sohlh1 was stronger and more extensive. Our study explored the expression of Sohlh genes in human tissues and might provide insights for functional studies of Sohlh genes. PMID:26375665

  11. Brain tissue pressure measurements in perinatal and adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hornig, G W; Lorenzo, A V; Zavala, L M; Welch, K

    1987-12-01

    Brain tissue pressure (BTP) in pre- and post-natal anesthetized rabbits, held in a stereotactic head holder, was measured with a fluid filled 23 gauge open-ended cannula connected distally to a pressure transducer. By advancing the cannula step wise through a hole in the cranium it was possible to sequentially measure pressure from the cranial subarachnoid space, cortex, ventricle and basal ganglia. Separate cannulas and transducers were used to measure CSFP from the cisterna magna and arterial and/or venous pressure. Pressure recordings obtained when the tip of the BTP cannula was located in the cranial subarachnoid space or ventricle exhibited respiratory and blood pressure pulsations equivalent to and in phase with CSF pulsations recorded from the cisterna magna. When the tip was advanced into brain parenchymal sites such pulsations were suppressed or non-detectable unless communication with a CSF compartment had been established inadvertently. Although CSF pressures in the three spinal fluid compartments were equivalent, in most animals BTP was higher than CSFP. However, after momentary venting of the system BTP equilibrated at a pressure below that of CSFP. We speculate that venting of the low compliance system (1.20 x 10(-5) ml/mmHg) relieves the isometric pressure build-up due to insertion of the cannula into brain parenchyma. Under these conditions, and at all ages examined, BTP in the rabbit is consistently lower than CSFP and, as with CSFP, it increases as the animal matures.

  12. Comparison of human fetal liver, umbilical cord blood, and adult blood hematopoietic stem cell engraftment in NOD-scid/gammac-/-, Balb/c-Rag1-/-gammac-/-, and C.B-17-scid/bg immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lepus, Christin M; Gibson, Thomas F; Gerber, Scott A; Kawikova, Ivana; Szczepanik, Marian; Hossain, Jaber; Ablamunits, Vitaly; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy; Herold, Kevan C; Donis, Ruben O; Bothwell, Alfred L; Pober, Jordan S; Harding, Martha J

    2009-10-01

    Immunodeficient mice bearing components of a human immune system present a novel approach for studying human immune responses. We investigated the number, phenotype, developmental kinetics, and function of developing human immune cells following transfer of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) preparations originating from second trimester human fetal liver (HFL), umbilical cord blood (UCB), or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized adult blood (G-CSF-AB) delivered via intrahepatic injection into sublethally irradiated neonatal NOD-scid/gammac(-/-), Balb/c-Rag1(-/-)gammac(-/-), and C.B-17-scid/bg mice. HFL and UCB HSC provided the greatest number and breadth of developing cells. NOD-scid/gammac(-/-) and Balb/c-Rag1(-/-)gammac(-/-) harbored human B and dendritic cells as well as human platelets in peripheral blood, whereas NOD-scid/gammac(-/-) mice harbored higher levels of human T cells. NOD-scid/gammac(-/-) mice engrafted with HFL CD34(+) HSC demonstrated human immunological competence evidenced by white pulp expansion and increases in total human immunoglobulin following immunization with T-dependent antigens and delayed-type hypersensitivity-infiltrating leukocytes in response to antigenic challenge. In conclusion, we describe an encouraging base system for studying human hematopoietic lineage development and function utilizing human HFL or UCB HSC-engrafted NOD-scid/gammac(-/-) mice that is well suited for future studies toward the development of a fully competent humanized mouse model.

  13. A Novel Population of Cells Expressing Both Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Markers Is Present in the Normal Adult Bone Marrow and Is Augmented in a Murine Model of Marrow Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohishi, Masanobu; Ono, Wanida; Ono, Noriaki; Khatri, Richa; Marzia, Marilena; Baker, Emma K.; Root, Sierra H.; Wilson, Tremika Le-Shan; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Aguila, Hector L.; Purton, Louise E.; Schipani, Ernestina

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) fibrosis is a feature of severe hyperparathyroidism. Consistent with this observation, mice expressing constitutively active parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptors (PPR) in osteoblasts (PPR*Tg) display BM fibrosis. To obtain insight into the nature of BM fibrosis in such a model, a double-mutant mouse expressing constitutively active PPR and green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the type I collagen promoter (PPR*Tg/GFP) was generated. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry revealed the presence of a cell population expressing GFP (GFP+) that was also positive for the hematopoietic marker CD45 in the BM of both PPR*Tg/GFP and control animals. This cell population was expanded in PPR*Tg/GFP. The existence of cells expressing both type I collagen and CD45 in the adult BM was confirmed by IHC and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. An analysis of total RNA extracted from sorted GFP+CD45+ cells showed that these cells produced type I collagen and PTH/PTH-related peptide receptor and receptor activator for NF-κB mRNAs, further supporting their features of being both mesenchymal and hematopoietic lineages. Similar cells, known as fibrocytes, are also present in pathological fibroses. Our findings, thus, indicate that the BM is a permissive microenvironment for the differentiation of fibrocyte-like cells and raise the possibility that these cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of BM fibrosis. PMID:22155108

  14. High prevalence of thymic tissue in adults with human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    McCune, J M; Loftus, R; Schmidt, D K; Carroll, P; Webster, D; Swor-Yim, L B; Francis, I R; Gross, B H; Grant, R M

    1998-01-01

    The thymus in adults infected with the HIV-1 is generally thought to be inactive, both because of age-related involution and viral destruction. We have revisited the question of thymic function in adults, using chest-computed tomography (CT) to measure thymic tissue in HIV-1-seropositive (n = 99) or HIV-1-seronegative (n = 32) subjects, and correlating these results with the level of circulating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that are phenotypically described as naive thymic emigrants. Abundant thymic tissue was detectable in many (47/99) HIV-1-seropositive adults, aged 20-59. Independent of age, radiographic demonstration of thymic tissue was significantly associated with both a higher CD4(+) T cell count (P = 0.02) and a higher percentage and absolute number of circulating naive (CD45RA+CD62L+) CD4(+) T cells (P < 0.04). The prevalence of an abundant thymus was especially high in younger HIV-1-seropositive adults ( 40 yr) regardless of CD4 count (P = 0.03). These studies suggest that the thymus is functional in some but not all adults with HIV-1 disease. PMID:9616201

  15. JH Biosynthesis by Reproductive Tissues and Corpora Allata in Adult Longhorned Beetles, Apriona germari

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on juvenile hormone (JH) biosynthesis from long-chain intermediates by specific reproductive system tissues and the corpora allata (CA) prepared from adult longhorned beetles, Apriona germari. Testes, male accessory glands (MAGs), ovaries and CA contain the long-chain intermediates in the ...

  16. The osmotic stability of lysosomes from adult and foetal guinea-pig liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, J M; Neil, M W

    1969-02-01

    1. Lysosome-rich fractions were obtained from foetal liver tissues as early as 35 days uterine age. Foetal lysosomes showed the same ;structure-linked latency' and acid hydrolytic potentiality characteristic of their adult counterparts. 2. The osmotic stability of lysosome-rich fraction from foetal guinea-pig liver tissue was greater than that of the corresponding adult lysosome fractions, p-nitrophenyl-phosphatase being used as marker enzyme. 3. The observation was confirmed by using beta-glycerophosphatase and phenolphthalein beta-glucuronidase as alternative marker enzymes. p-Nitrophenyl phosphate and beta-glycerophosphate appear to act as substrates for the same enzyme. 4. By using p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity measurements it was shown that the osmotic stability of foetal lysosomal fractions decreased with increasing foetal age, but at no time achieved the degree of osmotic instability characteristic of adult lysosomal fractions. 5. The correlation of these findings with the intracellular environment of lysosomes is discussed.

  17. Spontaneous myogenic differentiation of Flk-1-positive cells from adult pancreas and other nonmuscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Tritarelli, Alessandra; Toietta, Gabriele; Gatto, Ilaria; Iachininoto, Maria Grazia; Pagani, Francesca; Mangoni, Antonella; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2008-02-01

    At the embryonic or fetal stages, autonomously myogenic cells (AMCs), i.e., cells able to spontaneously differentiate into skeletal myotubes, have been identified from several different sites other than skeletal muscle, including the vascular compartment. However, in the adult animal, AMCs from skeletal muscle-devoid tissues have been described in only two cases. One is represented by thymic myoid cells, a restricted population of committed myogenic progenitors of unknown derivation present in the thymic medulla; the other is represented by a small subset of adipose tissue-associated cells, which we recently identified. In the present study we report, for the first time, the presence of spontaneously differentiating myogenic precursors in the pancreas and in other skeletal muscle-devoid organs such as spleen and stomach, as well as in the periaortic tissue of adult mice. Immunomagnetic selection procedures indicate that AMCs derive from Flk-1(+) progenitors. Individual clones of myogenic cells from nonmuscle organs are morphologically and functionally indistinguishable from skeletal muscle-derived primary myoblasts. Moreover, they can be induced to proliferate in vitro and are able to participate in muscle regeneration in vivo. Thus, we provide evidence that fully competent myogenic progenitors can be derived from the Flk-1(+) compartment of several adult tissues that are embryologically unrelated to skeletal muscle. PMID:18094147

  18. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb 14C

    PubMed Central

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the 14C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of 14C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955–1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of 14C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945–1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of 14C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of 14C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, 14C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.—Heinemeier, K. M., Schjerling, P., Heinemeier, J., Magnusson, S. P., Kjaer, M. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb 14C. PMID:23401563

  19. Distribution of bisphenol A into tissues of adult, neonatal, and fetal Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Brown, Ronald P.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2011-09-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA metabolites in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 suggests ubiquitous and frequent exposure in the range of 0.02-0.2 {mu}g/kg bw/d (25th-95th percentiles). The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure placental transfer and concentrations of aglycone (receptor-active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in tissues from Sprague-Dawley rats administered deuterated BPA (100 {mu}g/kg bw) by oral and IV routes. In adult female rat tissues, the tissue/serum concentration ratios for aglycone BPA ranged from 0.7 in liver to 5 in adipose tissue, reflecting differences in tissue perfusion, composition, and metabolic capacity. Following IV administration to dams, placental transfer was observed for aglycone BPA into fetuses at several gestational days (GD), with fetal/maternal serum ratios of 2.7 at GD 12, 1.2 at GD 16, and 0.4 at GD 20; the corresponding ratios for conjugated BPA were 0.43, 0.65, and 3.7. These ratios were within the ranges observed in adult tissues and were not indicative of preferential accumulation of aglycone BPA or hydrolysis of conjugates in fetal tissue in vivo. Concentrations of aglycone BPA in GD 20 fetal brain were higher than in liver or serum. Oral administration of the same dose did not produce measurable levels of aglycone BPA in fetal tissues. Amniotic fluid consistently contained levels of BPA at or below those in maternal serum. Concentrations of aglycone BPA in tissues of neonatal rats decreased with age in a manner consistent with the corresponding circulating levels. Phase II metabolism of BPA increased with fetal age such that near-term fetus was similar to early post-natal rats. These results show that concentrations of aglycone BPA in fetal tissues are similar to those in other maternal and neonatal tissues and that maternal Phase II metabolism, especially following oral

  20. In Vivo Deletion of the Cebpa +37 kb Enhancer Markedly Reduces Cebpa mRNA in Myeloid Progenitors but Not in Non-Hematopoietic Tissues to Impair Granulopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hong; Cooper, Stacy; Friedman, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains a +37 kb, evolutionarily conserved 440 bp enhancer that directs high-level expression to myeloid progenitors in transgenic mice. The enhancer is bound and activated by Runx1, Scl, GATA2, C/EBPα, c-Myb, Pu.1, and additional Ets factors in myeloid cells. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated replacement of the wild-type enhancer with a variant mutant in its seven Ets sites leads to 20-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in the 32Dcl3 myeloid cell line. To determine the effect of deleting the enhancer in vivo, we now characterize C57BL/6 mice in which loxP sites flank a 688 bp DNA segment containing the enhancer. CMV-Cre mediated germline deletion resulted in diminution of the expected number of viable Enh(f/f);CMV-Cre offspring, with 28-fold reduction in marrow Cebpa mRNA but normal levels in liver, lung, adipose, intestine, muscle, and kidney. Cre-transduction of lineage-negative marrow cells in vitro reduced Cebpa mRNA 12-fold, with impairment of granulocytic maturation, morphologic blast accumulation, and IL-3 dependent myeloid colony replating for >12 generations. Exposure of Enh(f/f);Mx1-Cre mice to pIpC led to 14-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in GMP or CMP, 30-fold reduction in LSK, and <2-fold reduction in the LSK/SLAM subset. FACS analysis of marrow from these mice revealed 10-fold reduced neutrophils, 3-fold decreased GMP, and 3-fold increased LSK cells. Progenitor cell cycle progression was mildly impaired. Granulocyte and B lymphoid colony forming units were reduced while monocytic and erythroid colonies were increased, with reduced Pu.1 and Gfi1 and increased Egr1 and Klf4 in GMP. Finally, competitive transplantation indicated preservation of functional long-term hematopoietic stem cells upon enhancer deletion and confirmed marrow-intrinsic impairment of granulopoiesis and B cell generation with LSK and monocyte lineage expansion. These findings demonstrate a critical role for the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer for hematopoietic-specific Cebpa expression

  1. Gene expression profiling of adult female tissues in feeding Rhipicephalus microplus cattle ticks.

    PubMed

    Stutzer, Christian; van Zyl, Willem A; Olivier, Nicholas A; Richards, Sabine; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2013-06-01

    The southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, is an economically important pest, especially for resource-poor countries, both as a highly adaptive invasive species and prominent vector of disease. The increasing prevalence of resistance to chemical acaricides and variable efficacy of current tick vaccine candidates highlight the need for more effective control methods. In the absence of a fully annotated genome, the wealth of available expressed sequence tag sequence data for this species presents a unique opportunity to study the genes that are expressed in tissues involved in blood meal acquisition, digestion and reproduction during feeding. Utilising a custom oligonucleotide microarray designed from available singletons (BmiGI Version 2.1) and expressed sequence tag sequences of R. microplus, the expression profiles in feeding adult female midgut, salivary glands and ovarian tissues were compared. From 13,456 assembled transcripts, 588 genes expressed in all three tissues were identified from fed adult females 20 days post infestation. The greatest complement of genes relate to translation and protein turnover. Additionally, a number of unique transcripts were identified for each tissue that relate well to their respective physiological/biological function/role(s). These transcripts include secreted anti-hemostatics and defense proteins from the salivary glands for acquisition of a blood meal, proteases as well as enzymes and transporters for digestion and nutrient acquisition from ingested blood in the midgut, and finally proteins and associated factors involved in DNA replication and cell-cycle control for oogenesis in the ovaries. Comparative analyses of adult female tissues during feeding enabled the identification of a catalogue of transcripts that may be essential for successful feeding and reproduction in the cattle tick, R. microplus. Future studies will increase our understanding of basic tick biology, allowing the identification of shared proteins

  2. The connective tissue of the adductor canal--a morphological study in fetal and adult specimens.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Flavia; de Vasconcellos Fontes, Ricardo Bragança; da Silva Baptista, Josemberg; Mayer, William Paganini; de Campos Boldrini, Silvia; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2009-03-01

    The adductor canal is a conical or pyramid-shaped pathway that contains the femoral vessels, saphenous nerve and a varying amount of fibrous tissue. It is involved in adductor canal syndrome, a claudication syndrome involving young individuals. Our objective was to study modifications induced by aging on the connective tissue and to correlate them to the proposed pathophysiological mechanism. The bilateral adductor canals and femoral vessels of four adult and five fetal specimens were removed en bloc and analyzed. Sections 12 microm thick were obtained and the connective tissue studied with Sirius Red, Verhoeff, Weigert and Azo stains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs of the surfaces of each adductor canal were also analyzed. Findings were homogeneous inside each group. The connective tissue of the canal was continuous with the outer layer of the vessels in both groups. The pattern of concentric, thick collagen type I bundles in fetal specimens was replaced by a diffuse network of compact collagen bundles with several transversal fibers and an impressive content of collagen III fibers. Elastic fibers in adults were not concentrated in the thick bundles but dispersed in line with the transversal fiber system. A dynamic compression mechanism with or without an evident constricting fibrous band has been proposed previously for adductor canal syndrome, possibly involving the connective tissue inside the canal. The vessels may not slide freely during movement. These age-related modifications in normal individuals may represent necessary conditions for this syndrome to develop.

  3. The connective tissue of the adductor canal – a morphological study in fetal and adult specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Flavia; de Vasconcellos Fontes, Ricardo Bragança; da Silva Baptista, Josemberg; Mayer, William Paganini; de Campos Boldrini, Silvia; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2009-01-01

    The adductor canal is a conical or pyramid-shaped pathway that contains the femoral vessels, saphenous nerve and a varying amount of fibrous tissue. It is involved in adductor canal syndrome, a claudication syndrome involving young individuals. Our objective was to study modifications induced by aging on the connective tissue and to correlate them to the proposed pathophysiological mechanism. The bilateral adductor canals and femoral vessels of four adult and five fetal specimens were removed en bloc and analyzed. Sections 12 µm thick were obtained and the connective tissue studied with Sirius Red, Verhoeff, Weigert and Azo stains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs of the surfaces of each adductor canal were also analyzed. Findings were homogeneous inside each group. The connective tissue of the canal was continuous with the outer layer of the vessels in both groups. The pattern of concentric, thick collagen type I bundles in fetal specimens was replaced by a diffuse network of compact collagen bundles with several transversal fibers and an impressive content of collagen III fibers. Elastic fibers in adults were not concentrated in the thick bundles but dispersed in line with the transversal fiber system. A dynamic compression mechanism with or without an evident constricting fibrous band has been proposed previously for adductor canal syndrome, possibly involving the connective tissue inside the canal. The vessels may not slide freely during movement. These age-related modifications in normal individuals may represent necessary conditions for this syndrome to develop. PMID:19245505

  4. Identification of a population of cells with hematopoietic stem cell properties in mouse aorta-gonad-mesonephros cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Nobuhisa, Ikuo; Ohtsu, Naoki; Okada, Seiji; Nakagata, Naomi; Taga, Tetsuya . E-mail: taga@kaiju.medic.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-10

    The aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region is a primary source of definitive hematopoietic cells in the midgestation mouse embryo. In cultures of dispersed AGM regions, adherent cells containing endothelial cells are observed first, and then non-adherent hematopoietic cells are produced. Here we report on the characterization of hematopoietic cells that emerge in the AGM culture. Based on the expression profiles of CD45 and c-Kit, we defined three cell populations: CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells that had the ability to form hematopoietic cell colonies in methylcellulose media and in co-cultures with stromal cells; CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup -} cells that showed a granulocyte morphology; CD45{sup high} c-Kit{sup low/-} that exhibited a macrophage morphology. In co-cultures of OP9 stromal cells and freshly prepared AGM cultures, CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells from the AGM culture had the abilities to reproduce CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells and differentiate into CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup -} and CD45{sup high} c-Kit{sup low/-} cells, whereas CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup -} and CD45{sup high} c-Kit{sup low/-} did not produce CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells. Furthermore, CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells displayed a long-term repopulating activity in adult hematopoietic tissue when transplanted into the liver of irradiated newborn mice. These results indicate that CD45{sup low} c-Kit{sup +} cells from the AGM culture have the potential to reconstitute multi-lineage hematopoietic cells.

  5. Identifying proteins in zebrafish embryos using spectral libraries generated from dissected adult organs and tissues.

    PubMed

    van der Plas-Duivesteijn, Suzanne J; Mohammed, Yassene; Dalebout, Hans; Meijer, Annemarie; Botermans, Anouk; Hoogendijk, Jordy L; Henneman, Alex A; Deelder, André M; Spaink, Herman P; Palmblad, Magnus

    2014-03-01

    Spectral libraries provide a sensitive and accurate method for identifying peptides from tandem mass spectra, complementary to searching genome-derived databases or sequencing de novo. Their application requires comprehensive libraries including peptides from low-abundant proteins. Here we describe a method for constructing such libraries using biological differentiation to "fractionate" the proteome by harvesting adult organs and tissues and build comprehensive libraries for identifying proteins in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos and larvae (an important and widely used model system). Hierarchical clustering using direct comparison of spectra was used to prioritize organ selection. The resulting and publicly available library covers 14,164 proteins, significantly improved the number of peptide-spectrum matches in zebrafish developmental stages, and can be used on data from different instruments and laboratories. The library contains information on tissue and organ expression of these proteins and is also applicable for adult experiments. The approach itself is not limited to zebrafish but would work for any model system.

  6. Immunohistochemical characterization of selected cell markers for the detection of hematopoietic cells in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded lymphoid tissues of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and walruses (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus).

    PubMed

    Seibel, H; Stimmer, L; Siebert, U; Beineke, A

    2010-10-15

    To facilitate a detailed investigation of pinniped lymphoid organs, 30 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) as well as eight polyclonal antibodies (pAb) of different species specificities directed against cell antigens of the hematopoietic system were tested for immunohistochemical cross-reactivity on formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissues of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and a walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus). Six monoclonal and eight polyclonal antibodies showed specific immunoreactivities. Lymphocytes were immunolabeled by an anti-CD3 pAb, anti-Foxp3 mAb and anti-CD79 alpha mAb, while plasma cell subpopulations were recognized by anti-IgA pAb, anti-IgG pAb and anti-IgM pAb as well as by anti-kappa- and anti-lambda light chain pAb. Cells of the histiocytic lineage were recognized by lysozyme-, myeloid/histiocyte antigen-, and CD68-specific markers. Furthermore, dendritic cell-like cells were detected by an anti-S100 protein pAb. The MHC class II antigen was labeled on the majority of immune cells of the harbor seal and walrus using a bovine mAb. Mast cells were stained by an anti-mast cell tryptase mAb. Thus, using these antibodies from various species, it is now possible to determine phenotypical changes in lymphoid organs and detect different leukocyte subsets involved in inflammatory responses in archived tissue samples of these pinniped species.

  7. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived insulin-secreting mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells: viable therapy for type III.C. a diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Umang G; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2013-01-01

    Transition from acute pancreatitis to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is a rare manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism caused by parathyroid adenoma because of impaired glucose tolerance and suppresses insulin secretion. We report the case of a 26-year-old male with pancreatic diabetes caused by parathyroid adenoma induced chronic pancreatitis. He had serum C-peptide 0.12 ng/ml, glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody 5.0 IU/ml, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) 8.9%, and required 72 IU/day of biphasic-isophane insulin injection for uncontrolled hyperglycemia. We treated him with his own adipose tissue derived insulin-secreting mesenchymal stem-cells (IS-ADMSC) along with his bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (BM-HSC). Autologous IS-ADMSC + BM-HSC were infused into subcutaneous tissue, portal and thymic circulation without any conditioning. Over a follow-up of 27 months, the patient is maintaining fasting and postprandial blood sugar levels of 132 and 165 mg/dl, respectively, with HbA1C 6.8% and requiring 36 IU/day of biphasic-isophane insulin. Co-infusion of IS-ADMSC + BM-HSC offers a safe and viable therapy for type III.C.a Diabetes Mellitus.

  8. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived insulin-secreting mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells: viable therapy for type III.C. a diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Umang G; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2013-01-01

    Transition from acute pancreatitis to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is a rare manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism caused by parathyroid adenoma because of impaired glucose tolerance and suppresses insulin secretion. We report the case of a 26-year-old male with pancreatic diabetes caused by parathyroid adenoma induced chronic pancreatitis. He had serum C-peptide 0.12 ng/ml, glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody 5.0 IU/ml, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) 8.9%, and required 72 IU/day of biphasic-isophane insulin injection for uncontrolled hyperglycemia. We treated him with his own adipose tissue derived insulin-secreting mesenchymal stem-cells (IS-ADMSC) along with his bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (BM-HSC). Autologous IS-ADMSC + BM-HSC were infused into subcutaneous tissue, portal and thymic circulation without any conditioning. Over a follow-up of 27 months, the patient is maintaining fasting and postprandial blood sugar levels of 132 and 165 mg/dl, respectively, with HbA1C 6.8% and requiring 36 IU/day of biphasic-isophane insulin. Co-infusion of IS-ADMSC + BM-HSC offers a safe and viable therapy for type III.C.a Diabetes Mellitus. PMID:24385073

  9. Soft Tissue Deformations Contribute to the Mechanics of Walking in Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiao-Yu; Zelik, Karl E.; Board, Wayne J.; Browning, Raymond C.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity not only adds to the mass that must be carried during walking, but also changes body composition. Although extra mass causes roughly proportional increases in musculoskeletal loading, less well understood is the effect of relatively soft and mechanically compliant adipose tissue. Purpose To estimate the work performed by soft tissue deformations during walking. The soft tissue would be expected to experience damped oscillations, particularly from high force transients following heel strike, and could potentially change the mechanical work demands for walking. Method We analyzed treadmill walking data at 1.25 m/s for 11 obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) and 9 non-obese (BMI < 30 kg/m2) adults. The soft tissue work was quantified with a method that compares the work performed by lower extremity joints as derived using assumptions of rigid body segments, with that estimated without rigid body assumptions. Results Relative to body mass, obese and non-obese individuals perform similar amounts of mechanical work. But negative work performed by soft tissues was significantly greater in obese individuals (p= 0.0102), equivalent to about 0.36 J/kg vs. 0.27 J/kg in non-obese individuals. The negative (dissipative) work by soft tissues occurred mainly after heel strike, and for obese individuals was comparable in magnitude to the total negative work from all of the joints combined (0.34 J/kg vs. 0.33 J/kg for obese and non-obese adults, respectively). Although the joints performed a relatively similar amount of work overall, obese individuals performed less negative work actively at the knee. Conclusion The greater proportion of soft tissues in obese individuals results in substantial changes in the amount, location, and timing of work, and may also impact metabolic energy expenditure during walking. PMID:25380475

  10. Enrichment of a bipotent hepatic progenitor cell from naive adult liver tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Natasha; Samuelson, Lisa; Walkup, Maggie H.; Chandrasekaran, Prakash; Gerber, David A.

    2008-02-08

    Background/Aim: Recent interest in the liver stem cell field has led to the identification and characterization of several hepatic progenitor cell populations from fetal and adult tissues. We isolated a hepatic progenitor cell from naive adult liver and the current studies focus on differentiation and growth. Results: A Sca-1{sup +} hepatic progenitor cell was identified within the liver parenchyma. This cell expresses numerous liver related genes and transcription found in the developing and/or adult liver. It is located in the peri-portal region and expresses markers associated with undifferentiated hepatic cell populations, mature hepatocytes and biliary cells which distinguish it from the Sca-1{sup -} fraction. Conclusion: This hepatic progenitor cell from uninjured liver has features of both hepatocytic and biliary populations and demonstrates proliferative potential. Further studies will focus on sca-HPC subsets and conditions that regulate differentiation towards hepatic or biliary lineages.

  11. [Hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic neoplasias].

    PubMed

    Wickenhauser, C

    2002-11-01

    Pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells have been defined as cells with extensive self-renewal capacity and lympho-hematopoietic differentiation potential. Clonal selection of a stem cell as a first step in the progression to neoplasia can be achieved by an alteration of this self-renewal potency. Our current understanding of the pathogenesis of the myeloproliferative disorders including acute myeloid leukemias, chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), is based on the assumption that they represent a clonal disorder resulting from transformation of a hematopoietic stem cell. However, when performing methods for determining X-chromosome inactivation in female patients as a clonality marker, a significant minority of the patients with Philadelphia chromosome negative (Ph(-)) CMPD and MDS exhibit polyclonal proliferation. The implications of these results are not yet clarified and the lack of a proven target cell impairs the understanding of the underlying molecular defect. In this context, altered response to cytokine stimulation in vitro provides indirect information concerning molecular dysregulation. A subset of patients with MPD present with translocations that facilitate molecular investigation and clonality proof. They nearly always result in rearrangements of at least one transcription factor gene. Most of these fusion genes are constitutively active, sending out continuous proliferative and antiapoptotic signals or activate an overlapping set of signalling pathways. The classical example for a balanced translocation is the t(9;22) bcr-abl aberration in chronic myelogeneous leukemia. Many other karyotypic abnormalities have also been associated with CMPD and MDS and involve deletions of chromosomes 20q, 13q, 1q, 7q and 5q as well as trisomy of 8 and 9. Our increased understanding of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment and the molecular basis of regulation of its self-renewal and differentiation bears a direct impact on

  12. Soluble factor cross-talk between human bone marrow-derived hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells enhances in vitro CFU-F and CFU-O growth and reveals heterogeneity in the mesenchymal progenitor cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Baksh, Dolores; Davies, John E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2005-11-01

    The homeostatic adult bone marrow (BM) is a complex tissue wherein physical and biochemical interactions serve to maintain a balance between the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments. To focus on soluble factor interactions occurring between mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells, a serum-free adhesion-independent culture system was developed that allows manipulation of the growth of both mesenchymal and hematopoietic human BM-derived progenitors and the balance between these compartments. Factorial experiments demonstrated a role for stem cell factor (SCF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3) in the concomitant growth of hematopoietic (CD45+) and nonhematopoietic (CD45-) cells, as well as their derivatives. Kinetic tracking of IL-3alpha receptor (CD123) and SCF receptor (CD117) expression on a sorted CD45- cell population revealed the emergence of CD45-CD123+ cells capable of osteogenesis. Of the total fibroblast colony-forming units (CFU-Fs) and osteoblast colony-forming units (CFU-O), approximately 24% of CFU-Fs and about 22% of CFU-Os were recovered from this population. Cell-sorting experiments demonstrated that the CD45+ cell population secreted soluble factors that positively affect the survival and proliferation of CFU-Fs and CFU-Os generated from the CD45- cells. Together, our results provide insight into the intercellular cytokine network between hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells and provide a strategy to mutually culture both mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells in a defined scalable bioprocess.

  13. Aberrant Synaptic Integration in Adult Lamina I Projection Neurons Following Neonatal Tissue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Kritzer, Elizabeth; Craig, Paige E.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that neonatal tissue damage evokes alterations in spinal pain reflexes which persist into adulthood. However, less is known about potential concomitant effects on the transmission of nociceptive information to the brain, as the degree to which early injury modulates synaptic integration and membrane excitability in mature spinal projection neurons remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that neonatal surgical injury leads to a significant shift in the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition onto identified lamina I projection neurons of the adult mouse spinal cord. The strength of direct primary afferent input to mature spino-parabrachial neurons was enhanced following neonatal tissue damage, whereas the efficacy of both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition onto the same population was compromised. This was accompanied by reorganization in the pattern of sensory input to adult projection neurons, which included a greater prevalence of monosynaptic input from low-threshold A-fibers when preceded by early tissue damage. In addition, neonatal incision resulted in greater primary afferent-evoked action potential discharge in mature projection neurons. Overall, these results demonstrate that tissue damage during early life causes a long-term increase in the gain of spinal nociceptive circuits, and suggest that the prolonged consequences of neonatal trauma may not be restricted to the spinal cord but rather include excessive ascending signaling to supraspinal pain centers. PMID:25673839

  14. [The three-dimensional culture of adult mesenchymal stem cells for intervertebral disc tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ganjun; Liu, Hao; Deng, Li; Chen, Xiaohe; Zhao, Xianfeng; Liang, Tao; Li, Xiuqiong

    2009-12-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the major causes of low back pain. As current clinical treatments are aimed at restoring biomechanical function and providing symptomatic relief, the methods focused on biological repair have aroused interest and several tissue engineering approaches using different cell types have been proposed. Owing to the unsuitable nature of degenerate cells for tissue engineering, attention has been given to the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this connection, we have made a study on the characteristics of MSCs derived from adult bone marrow and on the feasibility of constructing IVD tissue-engineering cell under a Three-Dimensional Pellet Culture System. The human bone marrow MSCs were isolated and purified with density gradient solution and attachment-independent culture system. MSCs isolated using this method are a homogeneous population as indicated by morphology and other criteria. They have the capacity for self-renewal and proliferation, and the multilineage potential to differentiate.

  15. Rumba and Haus3 are essential factors for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells during zebrafish hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Du, Linsen; Xu, Jin; Li, Xiuling; Ma, Ning; Liu, Yanmei; Peng, Jinrong; Osato, Motomi; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zilong

    2011-02-01

    The hallmark of vertebrate definitive hematopoiesis is the establishment of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) pool during embryogenesis. This process involves a defined ontogenic switching of HSPCs in successive hematopoietic compartments and is evolutionarily conserved from teleost fish to human. In zebrafish, HSPCs originate from the ventral wall of the dorsal aorta (VDA), from which they subsequently mobilize to an intermediate hematopoietic site known as the caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT) and finally colonize the kidney for adult hematopoiesis. Despite substantial understanding of the ontogeny of HSPCs, the molecular basis governing migration, colonization and maintenance of HSPCs remains to be explored fully. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two zebrafish mutants, rumba(hkz1) and samba(hkz2), that are defective in generating definitive hematopoiesis. We find that HSPC initiation in the VDA and subsequent homing to the CHT are not affected in these two mutants. However, the further development of HSPCs in the CHT is compromised in both mutants. Positional cloning reveals that Rumba is a novel nuclear C2H2 zinc-finger factor with unknown function and samba encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein that is homologous to human augmin complex subunit 3 (HAUS3). Furthermore, we show that these two factors independently regulate cell cycle progression of HSPCs and are cell autonomously required for HPSC development in the CHT. Our study identifies Rumba and Haus3 as two essential regulators of HSPC maintenance during zebrafish fetal hematopoiesis.

  16. Challenges and strategies for generating therapeutic patient-specific hemangioblasts and hematopoietic stem cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    PETERS, ANN; BURRIDGE, PAUL W.; PRYZHKOVA, MARINA V.; LEVINE, MICHAL A.; PARK, TEA-SOON; ROXBURY, CHRISTOPHER; YUAN, XUAN; PÉAULT, BRUNO; ZAMBIDIS, ELIAS T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent characterization of hemangioblasts differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) has further confirmed evidence from murine, zebrafish and avian experimental systems that hematopoietic and endothelial lineages arise from a common progenitor. Such progenitors may provide a valuable resource for delineating the initial developmental steps of human hemato-endotheliogenesis, which is a process normally difficult to study due to the very limited accessibility of early human embryonic/fetal tissues. Moreover, efficient hemangioblast and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) generation from patient-specific pluripotent stem cells has enormous potential for regenerative medicine, since it could lead to strategies for treating a multitude of hematologic and vascular disorders. However, significant scientific challenges remain in achieving these goals, and the generation of transplantable hemangioblasts and HSC derived from hESC currently remains elusive. Our previous work has suggested that the failure to derive engraftable HSC from hESC is due to the fact that current methodologies for differentiating hESC produce hematopoietic progenitors developmentally similar to those found in the human yolk sac, and are therefore too immature to provide adult-type hematopoietic reconstitution. Herein, we outline the nature of this challenge and propose targeted strategies for generating engraftable human pluripotent stem cell-derived HSC from primitive hemangioblasts using a developmental approach. We also focus on methods by which reprogrammed somatic cells could be used to derive autologous pluripotent stem cells, which in turn could provide unlimited sources of patient-specific hemangioblasts and HSC. PMID:20563986

  17. Pathology, physiologic parameters, tissue contaminants, and tissue thiamine in morbid and healthy central Florida adult American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Ross, J.P.; Carbonneau, D.A.; Terrell, S.P.; Woodward, A.R.; Schoeb, T.R.; Perceval, H.F.; Hinterkopf, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of adult alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) mortalities in Lake Griffin, central Florida, was conducted from 1998-2004. Alligator mortality was highest in the months of April and May and annual death count peaked in 2000. Bacterial pathogens, heavy metals, and pesticides were not linked with the mortalities. Blood chemistry did not point to any clinical diagnosis, although differences between impaired and normal animals were noted. Captured alligators with signs of neurologic impairment displayed unresponsive and uncoordinated behavior. Three of 21 impaired Lake Griffin alligators were found to have neural lesions characteristic of thiamine deficiency in the telencephalon, particularly the dorsal ventricular ridge. In some cases, lesions were found in the thalamus, and parts of the midbrain. Liver and muscle tissue concentrations of thiamine (vitamin B"1) were lowest in impaired Lake Griffin alligators when compared to unimpaired alligators or to alligators from Lake Woodruff. The consumption of thiaminase-positive gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) is thought to have been the cause of the low tissue thiamine and resulting mortalities. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  18. Tissue-specific mutation accumulation in human adult stem cells during life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokzijl, Francis; de Ligt, Joep; Jager, Myrthe; Sasselli, Valentina; Roerink, Sophie; Sasaki, Nobuo; Huch, Meritxell; Boymans, Sander; Kuijk, Ewart; Prins, Pjotr; Nijman, Isaac J.; Martincorena, Inigo; Mokry, Michal; Wiegerinck, Caroline L.; Middendorp, Sabine; Sato, Toshiro; Schwank, Gerald; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Vries, Robert G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Stratton, Michael R.; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin; van Boxtel, Ruben

    2016-10-01

    The gradual accumulation of genetic mutations in human adult stem cells (ASCs) during life is associated with various age-related diseases, including cancer. Extreme variation in cancer risk across tissues was recently proposed to depend on the lifetime number of ASC divisions, owing to unavoidable random mutations that arise during DNA replication. However, the rates and patterns of mutations in normal ASCs remain unknown. Here we determine genome-wide mutation patterns in ASCs of the small intestine, colon and liver of human donors with ages ranging from 3 to 87 years by sequencing clonal organoid cultures derived from primary multipotent cells. Our results show that mutations accumulate steadily over time in all of the assessed tissue types, at a rate of approximately 40 novel mutations per year, despite the large variation in cancer incidence among these tissues. Liver ASCs, however, have different mutation spectra compared to those of the colon and small intestine. Mutational signature analysis reveals that this difference can be attributed to spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine residues in the colon and small intestine, probably reflecting their high ASC division rate. In liver, a signature with an as-yet-unknown underlying mechanism is predominant. Mutation spectra of driver genes in cancer show high similarity to the tissue-specific ASC mutation spectra, suggesting that intrinsic mutational processes in ASCs can initiate tumorigenesis. Notably, the inter-individual variation in mutation rate and spectra are low, suggesting tissue-specific activity of common mutational processes throughout life.

  19. Hematopoiesis and hematopoietic organs in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Grigorian, Melina; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-03-01

    Hemocytes (blood cells) are motile cells that move throughout the extracellular space and that exist in all clades of the animal kingdom. Hemocytes play an important role in shaping the extracellular environment and in the immune response. Developmentally, hemocytes are closely related to the epithelial cells lining the vascular system (endothelia) and the body cavity (mesothelia). In vertebrates and insects, common progenitors, called hemangioblasts, give rise to the endothelia and blood cells. In the adult animal, many differentiated hemocytes seem to retain the ability to proliferate; however, in most cases investigated closely, the bulk of hemocyte proliferation takes place in specialized hematopoietic organs. Hematopoietic organs provide an environment where undifferentiated blood stem cells are able to self-renew, and at the same time generate offspring that differentiate into different blood cell types. Hematopoiesis in vertebrates, taking place in the bone marrow, has been subject to intensive research by immunologists and stem cell biologists. Much less is known about blood cell formation in invertebrate animals. In this review, we will survey structural and functional properties of invertebrate hematopoietic organs, with a main focus on insects and other arthropod taxa. We will then discuss similarities, at the molecular and structural level, that are apparent when comparing the development of blood cells in hematopoietic organs of vertebrates and arthropods. Our comparative review is intended to elucidate aspects of the biology of blood stem cells that are more easily missed when focusing on one or a few model species.

  20. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells, a viable therapy for post-traumatic brachial plexus injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Umang G; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is emerging as a viable approach in regenerative medicine. A 31-year-old male with brachial plexus injury had complete sensory-motor loss since 16 years with right pseudo-meningocele at C5-D1 levels and extra-spinal extension up to C7-D1, with avulsion on magnetic resonance imaging and irreversible damage. We generated adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (N-AD-MSC) and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC-BM). Neuronal stem cells expressed β-3 tubulin and glial fibrillary acid protein which was confirmed on immunofluorescence. On day 14, 2.8 ml stem cell inoculum was infused under local anesthesia in right brachial plexus sheath by brachial block technique under ultrasonography guidance with a 1.5-inch-long 23 gauge needle. Nucleated cell count was 2 × 10 4 /μl, CD34+ was 0.06%, and CD45-/90+ and CD45-/73+ were 41.63% and 20.36%, respectively. No untoward effects were noted. He has sustained recovery with re-innervation over a follow-up of 4 years documented on electromyography-nerve conduction velocity study. PMID:25116721

  1. [Research Progress on the Development and Regulation of Embryonic Hematopoietic Stem Cells].

    PubMed

    Mu, Weiyun; Yao, Weijuan

    2015-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are tissue specific stem cells that replenish all mature blood lineages during the lifetime of an individual. Hematopoietic cell clusters in the aorta of vertebrate embryos play a pivotal role in the formation of the adult blood system. Recently, people have learned a lot about the embryonic HSCs on their development and homing. During their differentiation, HSCs are regulated by the transcription factors, such as Runx1 and Notch signaling pathway, etc. MicroRNAs also regulate the self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells on the post-transcriptional levels. Since the onset of circulation, the formation of HSCs and their differentiation into blood cells, especially red blood cells, are regulated by the hemodynamic forces. It would be of great significance if we could treat hematologic diseases with induced HSCs in vitro on the basis of fully understanding of hemotopoietic stem cell development. This review is focused on the advances in the research of HSCs' development and regulation.

  2. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adult acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission - a review from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Sengsayadeth, Salyka; Savani, Bipin N.; Blaise, Didier; Malard, Florent; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common indication for an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. The introduction of reduced intensity conditioning has expanded the recipient pool for transplantation, which has importantly made transplant an option for the more commonly affected older age groups. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplantation is currently the standard of care for patients with intermediate or high-risk acute myeloid leukemia and is now most often employed in older patients and those with medical comorbidities. Despite being curative for a significant proportion of patients, post-transplant relapse remains a challenge in the reduced intensity conditioning setting. Herein we discuss the studies that demonstrate the feasibility of reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplants, compare the outcomes of reduced intensity conditioning versus chemotherapy and conventional myeloablative conditioning regimens, describe the optimal donor and stem cell source, and consider the impact of post-remission consolidation, comorbidities, center experience, and more intensive (reduced toxicity conditioning) regimens on outcomes. Additionally, we discuss the need for further prospective studies to optimize transplant outcomes. PMID:26130513

  3. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: analysis of 533 adult patients who underwent transplantation at King's College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wang, Wenjia; Abeywardane, Ayesha; Adikarama, Malinthi; McLornan, Donal; Raj, Kavita; de Lavallade, Hugues; Devereux, Stephen; Mufti, Ghulam J; Pagliuca, Antonio; Potter, Victoria T; Mijovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); it is often refractory to treatment and carries a high mortality. To improve understanding of the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcome of post-transplantation AIHA, we analyzed 533 patients who received allogeneic HSCT, and we identified 19 cases of AIHA after HSCT (overall incidence, 3.6%). The median time to onset, from HSCT to AIHA, was 202 days. AIHA was associated with HSCT from unrelated donors (hazard ratio [HR], 5.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22 to 22.9; P = .026). In the majority (14 of 19; 74%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with only 9 of 19 (47%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. Patients with post-transplantation AIHA had a higher overall mortality (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.33 to 4.63; P = .004), with 36% (4 of 11 cases) of deaths attributable to AIHA. PMID:25262883

  4. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: analysis of 533 adult patients who underwent transplantation at King's College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wang, Wenjia; Abeywardane, Ayesha; Adikarama, Malinthi; McLornan, Donal; Raj, Kavita; de Lavallade, Hugues; Devereux, Stephen; Mufti, Ghulam J; Pagliuca, Antonio; Potter, Victoria T; Mijovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); it is often refractory to treatment and carries a high mortality. To improve understanding of the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcome of post-transplantation AIHA, we analyzed 533 patients who received allogeneic HSCT, and we identified 19 cases of AIHA after HSCT (overall incidence, 3.6%). The median time to onset, from HSCT to AIHA, was 202 days. AIHA was associated with HSCT from unrelated donors (hazard ratio [HR], 5.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22 to 22.9; P = .026). In the majority (14 of 19; 74%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with only 9 of 19 (47%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. Patients with post-transplantation AIHA had a higher overall mortality (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.33 to 4.63; P = .004), with 36% (4 of 11 cases) of deaths attributable to AIHA.

  5. Neonatal tissue injury reduces the intrinsic excitability of adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Baccei, M L

    2014-01-01

    Tissue damage during the neonatal period evokes long-lasting changes in nociceptive processing within the adult spinal cord which contribute to persistent alterations in pain sensitivity. However, it remains unclear if the observed modifications in neuronal activity within the mature superficial dorsal horn (SDH) following early injury reflect shifts in the intrinsic membrane properties of these cells. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to identify the effects of neonatal surgical injury on the intrinsic excitability of both GABAergic and presumed glutamatergic neurons within lamina II of the adult SDH using in vitro patch clamp recordings from spinal cord slices prepared from glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein (Gad-GFP) mice. The results demonstrate that hindpaw surgical incision at postnatal day (P) 3 altered the passive membrane properties of both Gad-GFP and adjacent, non-GFP neurons in the mature SDH, as evidenced by decreased membrane resistance and more negative resting potentials in comparison to naïve littermate controls. This was accompanied by a reduction in the prevalence of spontaneous activity within the GABAergic population. Both Gad-GFP and non-GFP neurons displayed a significant elevation in rheobase and decreased instantaneous firing frequency after incision, suggesting that early tissue damage lowers the intrinsic membrane excitability of adult SDH neurons. Isolation of inward-rectifying K(+) (K(ir)) currents revealed that neonatal incision significantly increased K(ir) conductance near physiological membrane potentials in GABAergic, but not glutamatergic, lamina II neurons. Overall, these findings suggest that neonatal tissue injury causes a long-term dampening of intrinsic firing across the general population of lamina II interneurons, but the underlying ionic mechanisms may be cell-type specific.

  6. Cell secretion from the adult lamprey supraneural body tissues possesses cytocidal activity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yue; Wang, Shiyue; Ba, Wei; Li, Qingwei

    2015-01-01

    The supraneural body was identified in the adult lamprey, and its secretions induced the death of a variety of tumor cells but had no effect on normal cells. The cell secretions from different lamprey tissues were separated, and these secretions killed human tumor cells to varying degrees. The cell secretions induced remarkable cell morphological alterations such as cell blebbing, and the plasma membrane was destroyed by the secretions. In addition, the secretions induced morphological alterations of the mitochondria, cytoskeletal structure, and endoplasmic reticulum, eventually leading to cell death. These observations suggest the presence of a novel protein in the lamprey and the possibility of new applications for the protein in the medical field.

  7. Periodontal implications of orthodontic treatment in adults with reduced or normal periodontal tissues versus those of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Leggott, P J; Quinn, R S; Eakle, W S; Chambers, D

    1989-09-01

    This longitudinal study monitored periodontal status in 20 adults and 20 adolescents undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Ten adults had generalized periodontitis and received periodontal treatment, including periodontal surgery, before orthodontic treatment. They also received periodontal maintenance at 3-month intervals during orthodontic treatment. The other 10 adults had normal periodontal tissues. Neither these latter adults nor the adolescents received periodontal maintenance during orthodontic treatment. Periodontal status was determined (1) at six standard sites before fixed appliances were placed (baseline), (2) at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after appliances had been placed, and (3) 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after appliances had been removed. At each of these visits, these sites were assessed for plaque index, gingival index, bleeding tendency, and pocket depth. Loss of attachment between baseline and 3 months after appliances were removed and tooth loss were also determined. Complete data were obtained for 15 adolescents and 14 adults. During orthodontic treatment the adolescent group showed significantly more (p less than 0.05) periodontal inflammation and supragingival plaque than the adults; after appliances were removed, this pattern was no longer statistically significant. For loss of attachment, there were no significant differences among adolescents, adults with normal periodontal tissues, or adults with reduced but healthy periodontal tissues who had undergone treatment for periodontal disease. For tooth loss, three nonstudy site teeth with pockets deeper than 6 mm and/or furcation involvements were lost because of periodontal abscesses in the adult group treated for periodontal disease. PMID:2773862

  8. Fourier analysis of human soft tissue facial shape: sex differences in normal adults.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Schmitz, J H; Miani, A; Taroni, G

    1995-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in human facial form involves both size and shape variations of the soft tissue structures. These variations are conventionally appreciated using linear and angular measurements, as well as ratios, taken from photographs or radiographs. Unfortunately this metric approach provides adequate quantitative information about size only, eluding the problems of shape definition. Mathematical methods such as the Fourier series allow a correct quantitative analysis of shape and of its changes. A method for the reconstruction of outlines starting from selected landmarks and for their Fourier analysis has been developed, and applied to analyse sex differences in shape of the soft tissue facial contour in a group of healthy young adults. When standardised for size, no sex differences were found between both cosine and sine coefficients of the Fourier series expansion. This shape similarity was largely overwhelmed by the very evident size differences and it could be measured only using the proper mathematical methods. PMID:8586558

  9. Immunohistochemical characterization of selected cell markers for the detection of hematopoietic cells in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded lymphoid tissues of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and walruses (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus).

    PubMed

    Seibel, H; Stimmer, L; Siebert, U; Beineke, A

    2010-10-15

    To facilitate a detailed investigation of pinniped lymphoid organs, 30 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) as well as eight polyclonal antibodies (pAb) of different species specificities directed against cell antigens of the hematopoietic system were tested for immunohistochemical cross-reactivity on formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissues of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and a walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus). Six monoclonal and eight polyclonal antibodies showed specific immunoreactivities. Lymphocytes were immunolabeled by an anti-CD3 pAb, anti-Foxp3 mAb and anti-CD79 alpha mAb, while plasma cell subpopulations were recognized by anti-IgA pAb, anti-IgG pAb and anti-IgM pAb as well as by anti-kappa- and anti-lambda light chain pAb. Cells of the histiocytic lineage were recognized by lysozyme-, myeloid/histiocyte antigen-, and CD68-specific markers. Furthermore, dendritic cell-like cells were detected by an anti-S100 protein pAb. The MHC class II antigen was labeled on the majority of immune cells of the harbor seal and walrus using a bovine mAb. Mast cells were stained by an anti-mast cell tryptase mAb. Thus, using these antibodies from various species, it is now possible to determine phenotypical changes in lymphoid organs and detect different leukocyte subsets involved in inflammatory responses in archived tissue samples of these pinniped species. PMID:20566219

  10. Radioimmunotherapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2013-04-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) represents an attractive strategy to deliver radiation selectively to tumor and other target organs while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. RIT with β-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45 and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in leukemia. Similarly, RIT directed against CD20 has shown promise in the setting of autologous and allogeneic HCT for B-cell lymphomas. α-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213, actinium-225 and astatinine-211 offers the possibility of more selective and efficient killing of target cells while sparing the surrounding normal cells. Pretargeting strategies may further improve target:normal organ dose ratios. While RIT has demonstrated significant antitumor activity, ultimately, randomized studies will be required to determine if conditioning regimens that include this therapeutic modality can improve patient outcomes after HCT. PMID:23557421

  11. Generation of axolotl hematopoietic chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, David; Scott, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Wound repair is an extremely complex process that requires precise coordination between various cell types including immune cells. Unfortunately, in mammals this usually results in scar formation instead of restoration of the original fully functional tissue, otherwise known as regeneration. Various animal models like frogs and salamanders are currently being studied to determine the intracellular and intercellular pathways, controlled by gene expression, that elicit cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration of cells during regenerative healing. Now, the necessary genetic tools to map regenerative pathways are becoming available for the axolotl salamander, thus allowing comparative studies between scarring and regeneration. Here, we describe in detail three methods to produce axolotl hematopoietic cell-tagged chimeras for the study of hematopoiesis and regeneration. PMID:26366424

  12. Altered expression of Lewis blood group and related antigens in fetal, normal adult and malignant tissues of the uterine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Nakayama, M; Tanizawa, O

    1990-01-01

    The expression of the Lewis blood group and its related antigens in fetal, normal adult and malignant tissues of the uterine endometrium was examined immunohistochemically using a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies with specificities for Lewis-a (La), Sialyl Lewis-a (SLa), Lewis-b (Lb), Lewis-X (LX), Sialyl Lewis-X (SLX) and Lewis-Y (LY) antigens. La, SLa and SLX having one fucose residue were detected in a small number of fetal tissues, while Lb and LY having two fucose residues were found in most cases. In the adult endometrium, expression of Lb and LY was considerably lower than those in fetal tissues, although expression of La and SLa was not different between these two tissues. Expression of LX and SLX was pronounced in adult when compared with fetal tissues. Malignant endometrial glands expressed La, SLa, Lb and LY, extensively, while LX and SLX were expressed less than in normal tissues. Lb and LY can thus be considered oncofetal antigens, extensively expressed in fetal and malignant tissues but not in normal adult tissues. Expression of Lb and LY was greater than that of La and SLA in carcinoma; an increase in the activity of fucose transferase might be associated with malignant transformation in the uterine endometrium.

  13. Cell Competition Modifies Adult Stem Cell and Tissue Population Dynamics in a JAK-STAT-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Kolahgar, Golnar; Suijkerbuijk, Saskia J.E.; Kucinski, Iwo; Poirier, Enzo Z.; Mansour, Sarah; Simons, Benjamin D.; Piddini, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Throughout their lifetime, cells may suffer insults that reduce their fitness and disrupt their function, and it is unclear how these potentially harmful cells are managed in adult tissues. We address this question using the adult Drosophila posterior midgut as a model of homeostatic tissue and ribosomal Minute mutations to reduce fitness in groups of cells. We take a quantitative approach combining lineage tracing and biophysical modeling and address how cell competition affects stem cell and tissue population dynamics. We show that healthy cells induce clonal extinction in weak tissues, targeting both stem and differentiated cells for elimination. We also find that competition induces stem cell proliferation and self-renewal in healthy tissue, promoting selective advantage and tissue colonization. Finally, we show that winner cell proliferation is fueled by the JAK-STAT ligand Unpaired-3, produced by Minute−/+ cells in response to chronic JNK stress signaling. PMID:26212135

  14. Non-myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Adults with Relapsed and Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma: A Single Center Analysis in the Rituximab Era

    PubMed Central

    Mussetti, Alberto; Devlin, Sean M.; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo R; Barker, Juliet N.; Giralt, Sergio A.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed and refractory (rel/ref) mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) portends a dismal prognosis. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) represents the only potentially curative therapy in this setting. We analyzed survival outcomes of 29 recipients of non-myeloablative allo-HSCT for rel/ref MCL, and studied possible prognostic factors in this setting. The cumulative incidence of disease progression and non-relapse mortality at 3 years were 28% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 13-46%) and 29% (95%CI: 13-47%), respectively. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at days +100 and +180 were 34% (95%CI: 18-52%) and 45% (95%CI: 26-62%), respectively. With a median follow-up in survivors of 53 (range 24-83) months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 54% (95%CI: 38-76%) and 41% (95%CI: 26-64%), respectively. In vivo T-cell depletion with alemtuzumab (n=6) was associated with inferior 3-year PFS (0% vs. 51%, p=0.007) and OS (17% vs. 64%, p=0.014). Conversely, a second line international prognostic index (sIPI) at transplantation equal to 0 (no risk factors) was associated with an improved 3-year PFS (52% vs. 22%, p=0.020) and OS (71% vs. 22%, p=0.006) compared to sIPI ≥1. Performing an allo-HSCT before 2007 was associated with a decreased 3-year OS (25% vs. 76%, p=0.015) but not with a significantly inferior PFS (17% vs. 59%, p=0.058). In this single center series, we report encouraging results with allo-HSCT for patients with rel/ref MCL. High alemtuzumab doses should probably be avoided in this context. PMID:26146802

  15. Life satisfaction in young adults 10 or more years after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for childhood malignant and nonmalignant diseases does not show significant impairment compared with healthy controls: a case-matched study.

    PubMed

    Uderzo, Cornelio; Corti, Paola; Pappalettera, Marco; Baldini, Valentina; Lucchini, Giovanna; Meani, Dario; Rovelli, Attilio

    2012-11-01

    Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may experience physical and psychological deterioration that impairs their life satisfaction (LS). This study focused on LS in long-term survivors at 10 or more years after HSCT. Fifty-five patients (39 males, median age 25 years) undergoing allogeneic HSCT for childhood malignant (n = 52) or nonmalignant diseases (n = 3) were enrolled. A control group of 98 young adults (59 males, median age 24 years) was considered. A questionnaire with a modified Satisfaction Life Domain Scale was administered. We assessed such domains as education, employment, leisure time, social relationships, and perception of physical status with a 30-item questionnaire. To investigate the association between the domains and the probability of diminished LS, we performed a logistical procedure using the maximum likelihood method. Predictive factors of LS were adjusted for sociodemographic variables. In the multivariate analysis, the participant's level of LS was not significantly correlated with sociodemographic factors or with HSCT status. The same analysis showed a slight trend in favor of the control group (P = .06) for body perception. Our data suggest that the patients who undergo HSCT in childhood have no significant difference in long-term LS compared with healthy controls.

  16. High-efficiency immunomagnetic isolation of solid tissue-originated integrin-expressing adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palmon, Aaron; David, Ran; Neumann, Yoav; Stiubea-Cohen, Raluca; Krief, Guy; Aframian, Doron J

    2012-02-01

    Isolation of highly pure specific cell types is crucial for successful adult stem cell-based therapy. As the number of such cells in adult tissue is low, an extremely efficient method is needed for their isolation. Here, we describe cell-separation methodologies based on magnetic-affinity cell sorting (MACS) MicroBeads with monoclonal antibodies against specific membrane proteins conjugated to superparamagnetic particles. Cells labeled with MACS MicroBeads are retained in a magnetic field within a MACS column placed in a MACS separator, allowing fast and efficient separation. Both positively labeled and non-labeled fractions can be used directly for downstream applications as the separated cell fractions remain viable with no functional impairment. As immunomagnetic separation depends on the interaction between a cell's membrane and the magnetically labeled antibody, separation of specific cells originating from solid tissues is more complex and demands a cell-dissociating pretreatment. In this paper, we detail the use of immunomagnetic separation for the purpose of regenerating damaged salivary gland (SG) function in animal and human models of irradiated head and neck cancer. Each year 500,000 new cases of head and neck cancer occur worldwide. Most of these patients lose SG function following irradiation therapy. SGs contain integrin α6β1-expressing epithelial stem cells. We hypothesized that these cells can be isolated, multiplied in culture and auto-implanted into the irradiated SGs to regenerate damaged SG function.

  17. BAF180 regulates cellular senescence and hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis through p21

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyemin; Dai, Fangyan; Zhuang, Li; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; Kim, Jongchan; Zhang, Yilei; Ma, Li; You, M. James; Wang, Zhong; Gan, Boyi

    2016-01-01

    BAF180 (also called PBRM1), a subunit of the SWI/SNF complex, plays critical roles in the regulation of chromatin remodeling and gene transcription, and is frequently mutated in several human cancers. However, the role of mammalian BAF180 in tumor suppression and tissue maintenance in vivo remains largely unknown. Here, using a conditional somatic knockout approach, we explored the cellular and organismal functions of BAF180 in mouse. BAF180 deletion in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) triggers profound cell cycle arrest, premature cellular senescence, without affecting DNA damage response or chromosomal integrity. While somatic deletion of BAF180 in adult mice does not provoke tumor development, BAF180 deficient mice exhibit defects in hematopoietic system characterized by progressive reduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), defective long-term repopulating potential, and hematopoietic lineage developmental aberrations. BAF180 deletion results in elevated p21 expression in both MEFs and HSCs. Mechanistically, we showed that BAF180 binds to p21 promoter, and BAF180 deletion enhances the binding of modified histones associated with transcriptional activation on p21 promoter. Deletion of p21 rescues cell cycle arrest and premature senescence in BAF180 deficient MEFs, and partially rescues hematopoietic defects in BAF180 deficient mice. Together, our study identifies BAF180 as a critical regulator of cellular senescence and HSC homeostasis, which is at least partially regulated through BAF180-mediated suppression of p21 expression. Our results also suggest that senescence triggered by BAF180 inactivation may serve as a failsafe mechanism to restrain BAF180 deficiency-associated tumor development, providing a conceptual framework to further understand BAF180 function in tumor biology. PMID:26992241

  18. BAF180 regulates cellular senescence and hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis through p21.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyemin; Dai, Fangyan; Zhuang, Li; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; Kim, Jongchan; Zhang, Yilei; Ma, Li; You, M James; Wang, Zhong; Gan, Boyi

    2016-04-12

    BAF180 (also called PBRM1), a subunit of the SWI/SNF complex, plays critical roles in the regulation of chromatin remodeling and gene transcription, and is frequently mutated in several human cancers. However, the role of mammalian BAF180 in tumor suppression and tissue maintenance in vivo remains largely unknown. Here, using a conditional somatic knockout approach, we explored the cellular and organismal functions of BAF180 in mouse. BAF180 deletion in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) triggers profound cell cycle arrest, premature cellular senescence, without affecting DNA damage response or chromosomal integrity. While somatic deletion of BAF180 in adult mice does not provoke tumor development, BAF180 deficient mice exhibit defects in hematopoietic system characterized by progressive reduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), defective long-term repopulating potential, and hematopoietic lineage developmental aberrations. BAF180 deletion results in elevated p21 expression in both MEFs and HSCs. Mechanistically, we showed that BAF180 binds to p21 promoter, and BAF180 deletion enhances the binding of modified histones associated with transcriptional activation on p21 promoter. Deletion of p21 rescues cell cycle arrest and premature senescence in BAF180 deficient MEFs, and partially rescues hematopoietic defects in BAF180 deficient mice. Together, our study identifies BAF180 as a critical regulator of cellular senescence and HSC homeostasis, which is at least partially regulated through BAF180-mediated suppression of p21 expression. Our results also suggest that senescence triggered by BAF180 inactivation may serve as a failsafe mechanism to restrain BAF180 deficiency-associated tumor development, providing a conceptual framework to further understand BAF180 function in tumor biology.

  19. Fetal and adult fibroblasts display intrinsic differences in tendon tissue engineering and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiao-Mei; Chen, Jia Lin; Shen, Wei Liang; Yin, Zi; Liu, Huan Huan; Fang, Zhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Chen, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Injured adult tendons do not exhibit optimal healing through a regenerative process, whereas fetal tendons can heal in a regenerative fashion without scar formation. Hence, we compared FFs (mouse fetal fibroblasts) and AFs (mouse adult fibroblasts) as seed cells for the fabrication of scaffold-free engineered tendons. Our results demonstrated that FFs had more potential for tendon tissue engineering, as shown by higher levels of tendon-related gene expression. In the in situ AT injury model, the FFs group also demonstrated much better structural and functional properties after healing, with higher levels of collagen deposition and better microstructure repair. Moreover, fetal fibroblasts could increase the recruitment of fibroblast-like cells and reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells to the injury site during the regeneration process. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanisms of better regeneration with FFs should be elucidated and be used to enhance adult tendon healing. This may assist in the development of future strategies to treat tendon injuries. PMID:24992450

  20. Fetal and adult fibroblasts display intrinsic differences in tendon tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiao-Mei; Chen, Jia Lin; Shen, Wei Liang; Yin, Zi; Liu, Huan Huan; Fang, Zhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Chen, Xiao

    2014-07-03

    Injured adult tendons do not exhibit optimal healing through a regenerative process, whereas fetal tendons can heal in a regenerative fashion without scar formation. Hence, we compared FFs (mouse fetal fibroblasts) and AFs (mouse adult fibroblasts) as seed cells for the fabrication of scaffold-free engineered tendons. Our results demonstrated that FFs had more potential for tendon tissue engineering, as shown by higher levels of tendon-related gene expression. In the in situ AT injury model, the FFs group also demonstrated much better structural and functional properties after healing, with higher levels of collagen deposition and better microstructure repair. Moreover, fetal fibroblasts could increase the recruitment of fibroblast-like cells and reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells to the injury site during the regeneration process. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanisms of better regeneration with FFs should be elucidated and be used to enhance adult tendon healing. This may assist in the development of future strategies to treat tendon injuries.

  1. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence

    PubMed Central

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L.; Campbell, Clyde A.; García-Moreno, Diana; Cid, Natasha Del; Kim, Albert D.; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNFα activates the Notch and NF-κB signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNFα, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  2. Localization and osteoblastic differentiation potential of neural crest-derived cells in oral tissues of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Miki; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Gou; Hosono, Tomohiko; Yamada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Dai; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Watahiki, Junichi; Hayashi, Ryuhei; Arata, Satoru; Mishima, Kenji; Nishida, Kohji; Osumi, Noriko; Maki, Koutaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-09-01

    In embryos, neural crest cells emerge from the dorsal region of the fusing neural tube and migrate throughout tissues to differentiate into various types of cells including osteoblasts. In adults, subsets of neural crest-derived cells (NCDCs) reside as stem cells and are considered to be useful cell sources for regenerative medicine strategies. Numerous studies have suggested that stem cells with a neural crest origin persist into adulthood, especially those within the mammalian craniofacial compartment. However, their distribution as well as capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts in adults is not fully understood. To analyze the precise distribution and characteristics of NCDCs in adult oral tissues, we utilized an established line of double transgenic (P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP) mice in which NCDCs express green fluorescent protein (GFP) throughout their life. GFP-positive cells were scattered like islands throughout tissues of the palate, gingiva, tongue, and buccal mucosa in adult mice, with those isolated from the latter shown to form spheres, typical cell clusters composed of stem cells, under low-adherent conditions. Furthermore, GFP-positive cells had markedly increased alkaline phosphatase (a marker enzyme of osteoblast differentiation) activity and mineralization as shown by alizarin red staining, in the presence of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. These results suggest that NCDCs reside in various adult oral tissues and possess potential to differentiate into osteoblastic cells. NCDCs in adults may be a useful cell source for bone regeneration strategies.

  3. Human T-cell leukemia virus infection of human hematopoietic progenitor cells: maintenance of virus infection during differentiation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, G; Fraser, J K; Zack, J A; Lee, F; Feuer, R; Chen, I S

    1996-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy-tropical spastic paraparesis. We examined whether HTLV could productively infect human hematopoietic progenitor cells. CD34+ cells were enriched from human fetal liver cells and cocultivated with cell lines transformed with HTLV-1 and -2. HTLV-1 infection was established in between 10 and >95% of the enriched CD34+ cell population, as demonstrated by quantitative PCR analysis. HTLV-1 p19 Gag expression was also detected in infected hematopoietic progenitor cells. HTLV-1-infected hematopoietic progenitor cells were cultured in semisolid medium permissive for the development of erythbroid (BFU-E), myeloid (CFU-GM), and primitive progenitor (CFU-GEMM, HPP-CFC, or CFU-A) colonies. HTLV-1 sequences were detected in colonies of all hematopoietic lineages; furthermore, the ratio of HTLV genomes to the number of human cells in each infected colony was 1:1, consistent with each colony arising from a single infected hematopoietic progenitor cell. Severe combined immunodeficient mice engrafted with human fetal thymus and liver tissues (SCID-hu) develop a conjoint organ which supports human thymocyte differentiation and maturation. Inoculation of SCID-hu mice with HTLV-1-infected T cells or enriched populations of CD34+ cells established viral infection of thymocytes 4 to 6 weeks postreconstitution. Thymocytes from two mice with the greatest HTLV-1 proviral burdens showed increased expression of the CD25 marker and the interleukin 2 receptor alpha chain and perturbation of CD4+ and CD8+ thymocyte subset distribution profiles. Hematopoietic progenitor cells and thymuses may be targets for HTLV infection in humans, and these events may play a role in the pathogenesis associated with infection. PMID:8648741

  4. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  5. The sequential tissue distribution of duck Tembusu virus in adult ducks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Liu, Jinxiong; Chen, Pucheng; Jiang, Yongping; Ding, Leilei; Lin, Yuan; Li, Qimeng; He, Xijun; Chen, Qiusheng; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a novel Tembusu virus (TMUV) that caused a severe decrease in the egg production of ducks was isolated in southeast China. Given the novelty of this duck pathogen, little information is available regarding its pathogenesis. Here, we systematically investigated the replication kinetics of TMUV PTD2010 in adult male and female ducks. We found that PTD2010 was detectable in most of the parenchymatous organs as well as the oviduct and intestinal tract from days 1 to 7 after inoculation. Viral titers were maintained at high levels for at least 9 days in the spleen, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, brain, and ovary. No virus was detected in any of these organs or tissues at 18 days after inoculation. PTD2010, thus, causes systemic infections in male and female ducks; its replication kinetics show similar patterns in most organs, with the exception of the ovaries and testes.

  6. Clinical guide to fertility preservation in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, S; Savani, BN; Chow, EJ; Gilleece, MH; Halter, J; Jacobsohn, DA; Pidala, J; Quinn, GP; Cahn, J-Y; Jakubowski, AA; Kamani, NR; Lazarus, HM; Rizzo, JD; Schouten, HC; Socie, G; Stratton, P; Sorror, ML; Warwick, AB; Wingard, JR; Loren, AW; Majhail, NS

    2014-01-01

    With broadening indications, more options for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and improvement in survival, the number of long-term HCT survivors is expected to increase steadily. Infertility is a frequent problem that long-term HCT survivors and their partners face and it can negatively impact on the quality of life. The most optimal time to address fertility issues is before the onset of therapy for the underlying disease; however, fertility preservation should also be addressed before HCT in all children and patients of reproductive age, with referral to a reproductive specialist for patients interested in fertility preservation. In vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo cryopreservation, oocyte cryopreservation and ovarian tissue banking are acceptable methods for fertility preservation in adult women/pubertal females. Sperm banking is the preferred method for adult men/pubertal males. Frequent barriers to fertility preservation in HCT recipients may include the perception of lack of time to preserve fertility given an urgency to move ahead with transplant, lack of patient–physician discussion because of several factors (for example, time constraints, lack of knowledge), inadequate access to reproductive specialists, and costs and lack of insurance coverage for fertility preservation. There is a need to raise awareness in the medical community about fertility preservation in HCT recipients. PMID:24419521

  7. Use of Adult Stem Cells for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Current Status and Future Developments

    PubMed Central

    Baugé, Catherine; Boumédiene, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. So, in recent years, researchers and surgeons have been working hard to elaborate cartilage repair interventions for patients who suffer from cartilage damage. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or hypertrophic cartilage. In the next years, the development of new strategies using adult stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium and/or culture in low oxygen tension should improve the quality of neoformed cartilage. Through these solutions, some of the latest technologies start to bring very promising results in repairing cartilage from traumatic injury or chondropathies. This review discusses the current knowledge about the use of adult stem cells in the context of cartilage tissue engineering and presents clinical trials in progress, as well as in the future, especially in the field of bioprinting stem cells. PMID:26246809

  8. Maternal undernutrition programs tissue-specific epigenetic changes in the glucocorticoid receptor in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Begum, Ghazala; Davies, Alison; Stevens, Adam; Oliver, Mark; Jaquiery, Anne; Challis, John; Harding, Jane; Bloomfield, Frank; White, Anne

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that an adverse maternal environment during pregnancy predisposes offspring to metabolic syndrome with increased obesity, and type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms are still unclear although epigenetic modifications are implicated and the hypothalamus is a likely target. We hypothesized that maternal undernutrition (UN) around conception in sheep would lead to epigenetic changes in hypothalamic neurons regulating energy balance in the offspring, up to 5 years after the maternal insult. We found striking evidence of decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) promoter methylation, decreased histone lysine 27 trimethylation, and increased histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation in hypothalami from male and female adult offspring of UN mothers. These findings are entirely compatible with the increased GR mRNA and protein observed in the hypothalami. The increased GR predicted the decreased hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin expression and increased obesity that we observed in the 5-year-old adult males. The epigenetic and expression changes in GR were specific to the hypothalamus. Hippocampal GR mRNA and protein were decreased in UN offspring, whereas pituitary GR was altered in a sex-specific manner. In peripheral polymorphonuclear leukocytes there were no changes in GR methylation or protein, indicating that this epigenetic analysis did not predict changes in the brain. Overall, these results suggest that moderate changes in maternal nutrition, around the time of conception, signal life-long and tissue-specific epigenetic alterations in a key gene regulating energy balance in the hypothalamus.

  9. Predicting visceral adipose tissue by MRI using DXA and anthropometry in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Laddu, Deepika R.; Lee, Vinson R.; Blew, Robert M.; Sato, Tetsuya; Lohman, Timothy G.; Going, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Accumulation of intra-abdominal (visceral) adipose tissue, independent of total adiposity, is associated with development of metabolic abnormalities such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes in children and adults. The objective of this study was to develop prediction equations for estimating visceral adiposity (VAT) measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using anthropometric variables and measures of abdominal fat mass from DXA in adolescents and young adults. Methods Cross-sectional data was collected from a multiethnic population of seventy males and females, aged 12–25 years, with BMI ranging from 14.5–38.1 kg/m2. Android (AFM; android region as defined by manufacturers instruction) and lumbar L1-L4 regional fat masses were assessed using DXA (GE Lunar Prodigy; GE Lunar Corp, Madison, WI, USA). Criterion measures of intra-abdominal visceral fat were obtained using single-slice MRI (General Electric Signa Model 5x 1.5T) and VAT area was analyzed at the level OF L4–L5. Image analysis was carried out using ZedView 3.1. Results DXA measures of AFM (r=0.76) and L1-L4 (r=0.71) were significantly (P<0.0001) correlated with MRI-measured VAT. DXA AFM, together with gender and weight, explained 62% of the variance in VAT (SEE=10.06 cm2). DXA L1-L4 fat mass with gender explained 54% of the variance in VAT (SEE=11.08 cm2). Addition of the significant interaction, gender × DXA fat mass, improved prediction of VAT from AFM (Radj2=0.61, SEE=10.10cm2) and L1-L4 (Radj2=0.59, SEE=10.39cm2). Conclusion These results demonstrate that VAT is accurately estimated from regional fat masses measured by DXA in adolescents and young adults. PMID:26097436

  10. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator is an essential regulator of murine hematopoietic stem cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Krock, Bryan L.; Eisinger-Mathason, Tzipora S.; Giannoukos, Dionysios N.; Shay, Jessica E.; Gohil, Mercy; Lee, David S.; Nakazawa, Michael S.; Sesen, Julie; Skuli, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are master regulators of the transcriptional response to low oxygen and play essential roles in embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and disease. Recent studies have demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) within the bone marrow localize to a hypoxic niche and that HIF-1α promotes HSC adaptation to stress. Because the related factor HIF-2α is also expressed in HSCs, the combined role of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in HSC maintenance is unclear. To this end, we have conditionally deleted the HIF-α dimerization partner, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) in the hematopoietic system to ablate activity of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α and assessed the functional consequence of ARNT deficiency on fetal liver and adult hematopoiesis. We determined that ARNT is essential for adult and fetal HSC viability and homeostasis. Importantly, conditional knockout of both Hif-1α and Hif-2α phenocopied key aspects of these HSC phenotypes, demonstrating that the impact of Arnt deletion is primarily HIF dependent. ARNT-deficient long-term HSCs underwent apoptosis, potentially because of reduced B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) expression. Our results suggest that HIF activity may regulate HSC homeostasis through these prosurvival factors. PMID:25855602

  11. Identification and characterization of the pumilio-2 expressed in zebrafish embryos and adult tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan Nan; Xu, Yan; Tao, Ling Jie; Zhou, Jian; Qiu, Meng Xi; Teng, Yu Hang; Deng, Feng Jiao

    2012-03-01

    Pumilio proteins regulate the translation of specific proteins required for germ cell development and morphogenesis. In the present study, we have identified the pumilio-2 in zebrafish and analyze its expression in adult tissues and early embryos. Pumilio-2 codes for the full-length Pumilio-2 protein and contains a PUF-domain. When compared to the mammalian and avian Pumilio-2 proteins, zebrafish Pumilio-2 protein was found to contain an additional sequence of 24 amino acid residues within the PUF-domain. Zebrafish pumilio-2 mRNA is expressed in the ovary, testis, liver, kidney and brain but is absent in the heart and muscle as detected by RT-PCR. The results of in situ hybridization indicate that transcripts of pumilio-2 are distributed in all blastomeres from the 1-cell stage to the sphere stage and accumulate in the head and tail during the 60%-epiboly and 3-somite stages. Transcripts were also detected in the brain and neural tube of the 24 h post-fertilization (hpf) embryos. Western blot analyses indicate that the Pumilio-2 protein is strongly expressed in the ovary, testis and brain but not in other tissues. These data suggest that pumilio-2 plays an important role in the development of the zebrafish germ cells and nervous system.

  12. Osteosarcomas and adult soft tissue sarcomas: is there a place for high LET radiation therapy?

    PubMed

    Chauvel, P

    1992-04-01

    The treatment policy for non-operable or unresectable osteosarcoma and adult soft tissue sarcoma remains unclear or controversial, despite the progress achieved in multimodality treatments. The poor results obtained by radiotherapy alone led to consider these tumours as radioresistant and to use high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) particles, such as neutrons. These particles benefit from a higher Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE) and other biological properties tending to decrease radioresistance phenomenas. From the non randomized studies previously published, neutron-therapy seems to give better local control rates, compared to photons and/or electrons. But these results are not strongly convincing, due to the large heterogeneities in patient recruitment, histological types, sizes, sites and moreover to the high complication rates encountered in some studies, even if they are mainly imputable to the use of low energy machines. The use of high-energy hospital-based accelerators combined to the possibilities of accurate dose distribution offered by conformal therapy, the potential value of light ion beam therapy combining the dose distribution advantages of protons to the biological properties of high LET particles, represent the directions in which progresses might be made for further improvement of non-operable or unresectable osteosarcoma and soft tissue sarcomas treatment results. PMID:1622850

  13. Assessment of the interstitial fluid in the subcutaneous tissue of healthy adults using ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ueda-Iuchi, Terumi; Ohno, Naoki; Miyati, Tosiaki; Dai, Misako; Okuwa, Mayumi; Nakatani, Toshio; Sanada, Hiromi; Sugama, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Lymphoedema involves swelling, especially in the subcutaneous tissues. For lymphoedema management to be successful, it is necessary to remove the interstitial fluid. Subcutaneous echogenicity may be associated with interstitial fluid, but echogenicity is not an indicator for the evaluation of management because we do not directly compare echogenicity with the interstitial fluid. We aimed to identify an outcome indicator for the evaluation of interstitial fluid using ultrasonography. We assessed the correlation between echogenicity and transverse relaxation rate (R2) on magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: This was an observational study. Healthy adults with leg swelling after activity for >8 h were recruited. The legs of 13 women were evaluated using ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging and measurements of the limb circumference before and after an intervention to reduce the swelling. Results: Echogenicity in the oedema group was greater than that of the controls. Echogenicity decreased with reductions in oedema. The range of the strongest correlations with the changes in R2 occurred at echogenicity values of 48–144 (Pearson’s correlation coefficient: r = −0.63 and p < 0.01). Thus, it was possible to evaluate the interstitial fluid using echogenicity. Conclusion: The outcome indicators for the evaluation of interstitial fluid using ultrasonography were echogenicities in the range of 48–144, and these values were valid for assessing the interstitial fluid in the subcutaneous tissue. PMID:27092255

  14. In vivo facial tissue depth for Canadian Mi'kmaq adults: a case study from Nova Scotia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Peckmann, Tanya R; Harris, Mikkel; Huculak, Meaghan; Pringle, Ashleigh; Fournier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This study examines facial tissue depth in Canadian Mi'kmaq adults. Using ultrasound, measurements were taken at 19 landmarks on the faces of 152 individuals aged 18-75 years old. The relationships between tissue thickness, age, and sex were investigated. A positive linear trend exists between tissue thickness and age for Mi'kmaq males and females at multiple landmarks. Seven landmarks show significant differences in facial tissue depth between males and females aged 18-34 years old; no landmarks show significant differences in facial tissue depth between males and females aged 35-45 years old and 46-55 years old. Significant differences were shown in facial tissue depth between Mi'kmaq and White Americans and Mi'kmaq and African Americans. These data can assist in 3-D facial reconstructions and aid in establishing the identity of unknown Mi'kmaq individuals.

  15. Randomized Clinical Trial of Therapeutic Music Video Intervention for Resilience Outcomes in Adolescents/Young Adults Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Sheri L.; Burns, Debra S.; Stegenga, Kristin A.; Haut, Paul R.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Meza, Jane; Stump, Timothy E.; Cherven, Brooke O.; Docherty, Sharron L.; Hendricks-Ferguson, Verna L.; Kintner, Eileen K.; Haight, Ann E.; Wall, Donna A.; Haase, Joan E.

    2013-01-01

    Background To reduce the risk of adjustment problems associated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) for adolescents/young adults (AYA), we examined efficacy of a therapeutic music video (TMV) intervention delivered during the acute phase of HSCT to: (a) increase protective factors of spiritual perspective, social integration, family environment, courageous coping, and hope-derived meaning; (b) decrease risk factors of illness-related distress and defensive coping; and (c) increase outcomes of self-transcendence and resilience. Methods A multi-site, randomized controlled trial (COG-ANUR0631) conducted at 8 Children’s Oncology Group sites involving 113 AYA aged 11–24 years undergoing myeloablative HSCT. Participants, randomized to the TMV or low-dose control (audiobooks) group, completed 6 sessions over 3 weeks with a board-certified music therapist. Variables were based on Haase’s Resilience in Illness Model. Participants completed measures related to latent variables of illness-related distress, social integration, spiritual perspective, family environment, coping, hope-derived meaning and resilience at baseline (T1), post-intervention (T2), and 100-days post-transplant (T3). Results At T2, the TMV group reported significantly better courageous coping (ES=0.505; P=0.030). At T3, the TMV group reported significantly better social integration (ES=0.543; P=.028) and family environment (ES=0.663; P=0.008), as well as moderate non-significant effect sizes for spiritual perspective (E=0.450; P=0.071) and self-transcendence (ES=0.424; P=0.088). Conclusion The TMV intervention improves positive health outcomes of courageous coping, social integration, and family environment during a high risk cancer treatment. We recommend the TMV be examined in a broader population of AYA with high risk cancers. PMID:24469862

  16. OUTCOME OF HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION AS SALVAGE THERAPY FOR HODGKIN’S LYMPHOMA IN ADOLESENCE AND YOUNG ADULTS AT A SINGLE INSTITUTION

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, JA; Heslop, HE; Brenner, MK; Carrum, G; Wu, MF; Liu, H; Ahmed, N; Gottschalk, S; Kamble, R; Leung, KS; Myers, GD; Bollard, C. M.; Krance, RA

    2010-01-01

    For patients with relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma, high dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue may improve survival over chemotherapy alone. We assessed outcomes of HDCT-SCT in 37 consecutive adolescent and young adult patients with relapsed HL whose malignancy was categorized based on sensitivity to chemotherapy. We determined whether current outcomes supported the use of HDCT-SCT in all of our patients or just those patients with lower risk characteristics such as chemosensitivity. With a median follow up of 6.5 years, the 2 year overall survival was 89% (95% CI: 62%–97%) for the chemo-sensitive patients (n=21). Whereas for patients with resistant disease (n=16) OS was 53% (95%CI: 25%–74%). Both autologous and allogeneic transplants were well tolerated, with 100 day treatment related mortality under 10%. Our data show encouraging outcomes for patients with chemosensitive relapsed HL who receives HSCT and supports the value of the procedure even when the disease is chemoresistant. PMID:20367182

  17. Zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, survival, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Clyde; Su, Tammy; Lau, Ryan P; Shah, Arpit; Laurie, Payton C; Avalos, Brenda; Aggio, Julian; Harris, Elena; Traver, David; Stachura, David L

    2015-12-01

    Forward genetic screens in zebrafish have been used to identify genes essential for the generation of primitive blood and the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but have not elucidated the genes essential for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation and differentiation because of the lack of methodologies to functionally assess these processes. We previously described techniques used to test the developmental potential of HSPCs by culturing them on zebrafish kidney stromal (ZKS) cells, derived from the main site of hematopoiesis in the adult teleost. Here we describe an additional primary stromal cell line we refer to as zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells, derived from tissue surrounding the embryonic dorsal aorta, the site of HSC emergence in developing fish. ZEST cells encouraged HSPC differentiation toward the myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid pathways when assessed by morphologic and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses. Additionally, ZEST cells significantly expanded the number of cultured HSPCs in vitro, indicating that these stromal cells are supportive of both HSPC proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Examination of ZEST cells indicates that they express numerous cytokines and Notch ligands and possess endothelial characteristics. Further characterization of ZEST cells should prove to be invaluable in understanding the complex signaling cascades instigated by the embryonic hematopoietic niche required to expand and differentiate HSPCs. Elucidating these processes and identifying possibilities for the modulation of these molecular pathways should allow the in vitro expansion of HSPCs for a multitude of therapeutic uses.

  18. Tissue response of defined collagen-elastin scaffolds in young and adult rats with special attention to calcification.

    PubMed

    Daamen, W F; Nillesen, S T M; Hafmans, T; Veerkamp, J H; van Luyn, M J A; van Kuppevelt, T H

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-elastin scaffolds may be valuable biomaterials for tissue engineering because they combine tensile strength with elasticity. In this study, the tissue response to and the calcification of these scaffolds were evaluated. In particular, the hypothesis was tested that calcification, a common phenomenon in biomaterials, may be due to microfibrils within the elastic fibre, and that these microfibrils might generate a tissue response. Four scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted, viz. collagen, collagen + pure elastin, collagen+microfibril-containing, and collagen + pulverised elastic ligament (the source for elastin). Explants were evaluated at day 3, 7 and 21. In young Sprague Dawley rats, collagen + ligament calcified substantially, whereas collagen + elastin (with and without microfibrils) calcified less, and collagen did not. Calcification started at elastic fibres. In both Sprague Dawley and Wistar adult rats, however, none of the scaffolds calcified. Mononuclear cell infiltration was prominent in young and adult Sprague Dawley rats. In adult Wistar rats, this infiltration was associated with the presence of microfibrils. Degradation of scaffolds and new matrix formation were related with cellular influx and degree of vascularisation. In conclusion, absence of microfibrils from the elastic fibre does not prevent calcification in young Sprague Dawley rats, but does reduce the tissue response in adult Wistar rats. Cellular response and calcification differs with age and strain and therefore the choice of animal model is of key importance in biomaterial evaluation.

  19. A Digital Gene Expression-Based Bovine Gene Atlas Evaluating 92 Adult, Juvenile and Fetal Cattle Tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive transcriptome survey, or “Gene Atlas,” provides information essential for a complete understanding of the genomic biology of an organism. Using a digital gene expression approach, we developed a Gene Atlas of RNA abundance in 92 adult, juvenile and fetal cattle tissues. The samples...

  20. Subcutaneous adipose tissue topography (SAT-Top) development in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Tafeit, Erwin; Möller, Reinhard; Jurimae, Toivo; Sudi, Karl; Wallner, Sandra Johanna

    2007-06-01

    The importance of body composition measurements to elucidate the dynamics of related diseases in pediatrics is gaining recognition. The methods used should not expose subjects to high doses of radiation and require substantial cooperation. The Lipometer is a new optical device that enables the non-invasive, quick and safe determination of the thickness of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) layers (in mm) at any site of the human body. The topographic specification of 15 evenly distributed body sites, which makes it possible to precisely measure subcutaneous body fat distribution, is called subcutaneous adipose tissue topography (SAT-Top). SAT-Top was determined in more than 1000 children and young adults between the ages of 7 and 21. In this paper we describe the SAT-Top development of these subjects through different age groups and the differences between male and female SAT-Top development in each age group. SAT layer profiles (medians of the 15 body sites) for boys and girls in age group 1 (7-9 yrs) show a very similar pattern for both sexes, followed by slightly decreasing SAT layer thicknesses in boys and increasing values in girls in the subsequent age groups. Between age group 3 (11-13 yrs) and age group 7 (19-21 yrs) male and female SAT-Top is significantly different. The discriminating power between male and female SAT-Top was investigated by stepwise discriminant analysis, which provided no significant results for age group 1 (7-9 yrs), about 73% correct classification for age group 2 (9-11 yrs) and 3 (11-13 yrs), 83% for age group 4 (13-15 yrs), and about 91-93% for the following age groups (15-21 yrs). It is known that SAT development is the same in both sexes until puberty, when girls gain relatively more fat mass than boys to reach a higher body-fat percentage as adults. This paper presents a precise description of SAT development in boys and girls from childhood to adolescence, which provides a basis for further investigations. PMID:17847915

  1. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Pediatric and Young Adult Nonrhabdomyosarcoma Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kristy B.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Knapik, Jacquelyn A.; Lagmay, Joanne P.; Morris, Christopher; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors, outcomes, and complications in patients aged {<=}30 years with resectable nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma treated at the University of Florida with radiotherapy (RT) during a 34-year period. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 pediatric or young adult patients with nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma were treated with curative intent with surgery and RT at the University of Florida between 1973 and 2007. The most common histologic tumor subtypes were synovial sarcoma in 22 patients, malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 19, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 11 patients. The mean age at RT was 22 years (range, 6-30). Of the 95 patients, 73 had high-grade tumors; 45 had undergone preoperative RT and 50 postoperative RT. The prognostic factors for survival, local recurrence, and distant recurrence were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 7.2 years (range, 0.4-30.5). The actuarial 5-year local control rate was 88%. A microscopically negative margin was associated with superior local control. Although 83% of local recurrence cases initially developed in the absence of metastases, all patients with local failure ultimately died of their disease. The actuarial estimate of 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival was 65% and 63%, respectively. Of all the deaths, 92% were disease related. An early American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, tumor <8 cm, and the absence of neurovascular invasion were associated with superior disease-free survival. The National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, Grade 3-4 treatment complication rate was 9%. No secondary malignancies were observed. Conclusion: In the present large single-institution study, we found positive margins and locally advanced features to be poor prognostic factors for both local progression and survival. The results from the present study have helped to characterize the therapeutic ratio of RT in pediatric and young

  2. Temporally and spatially controlled expression of transgenes in embryonic and adult tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Triplett, Aleata A.; Harms, Don W.; Lin, Wan-chi; Creamer, Bradley A.; Rizzino, Angie; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Using ES cell-mediated transgenesis, we generated a novel mouse strain that permits a temporally and spatially controlled expression of responder genes in embryonic and multiple adult tissues. The transgene was constructed in a way that a CMV enhancer linked to the chicken β-actin promoter (CAG) drives the expression of the tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA) in particular tissues upon Cre-mediated excision of a floxed βgeo marker located between the promoter and the tTA. Based on the enzymatic activity of lacZ, the CAG-βgeo-tTA construct exhibits a widespread expression and appears to be very strong in the brain, heart, muscle, pancreas, and skin. Like the embryonic stem cell line that was used to generate this strain, the CAG-βgeo-tTA transgene is already highly active in preimplantation embryos. Using in vivo bioluminescence imaging on MMTV-Cre, CAG-βgeo-tTA, TetO-Luciferase triple transgenic mice and their controls, we demonstrated that the expression of the tTA, which is strictly dependent on the presence of Cre recombinase, induces the activation of the reporter transgene in the absence of any ligands. The tTA-mediated transactivation can be completely ablated through administration of doxycycline, and its subsequent withdrawal lifts the transcriptional block. Based on these characteristics, this novel strain may be useful in experiments that require a sustained expression of transgenes in particular cell types over a prolonged period followed by a rapid downregulation, for example in studies that examine the therapeutic value of cancer-initiating oncogenes during disease progression. PMID:19821046

  3. New aspects in fenestrated capillary and tissue dynamics in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult brains

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) generally consists of endothelial tight junction barriers that prevent the free entry of blood-derived substances, thereby maintaining the extracellular environment of the brain. However, the circumventricular organs (CVOs), which are located along the midlines of the brain ventricles, lack these endothelial barriers and have fenestrated capillaries; therefore, they have a number of essential functions, including the transduction of information between the blood circulation and brain. Previous studies have demonstrated the extensive contribution of the CVOs to body fluid and thermal homeostasis, energy balance, the chemoreception of blood-derived substances, and neuroinflammation. In this review, recent advances have been discussed in fenestrated capillary characterization and dynamic tissue reconstruction accompanied by angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis in the sensory CVOs of adult brains. The sensory CVOs, including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), subfornical organ (SFO), and area postrema (AP), have size-selective and heterogeneous vascular permeabilities. Astrocyte-/tanycyte-like neural stem cells (NSCs) sense blood- and cerebrospinal fluid-derived information through the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, a mechanical/osmotic receptor, Toll-like receptor 4, a lipopolysaccharide receptor, and Nax, a Na-sensing Na channel. They also express tight junction proteins and densely and tightly surround mature neurons to protect them from blood-derived neurotoxic substances, indicating that the NSCs of the CVOs perform BBB functions while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into new neurons and glial cells. In addition to neurogliogenesis, the density of fenestrated capillaries is regulated by angiogenesis, which is accompanied by the active proliferation and sprouting of endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling may be involved in angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis, both

  4. Management of Uterine Bleeding During Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Purisch, Stephanie E.; Shanis, Dana; Zerbe, Christa; Merideth, Melissa; Cuellar-Rodriguez, Jennifer; Stratton, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic stem cell transplant is an effective treatment strategy for a variety of hematologic disorders, but patients are at risk for dysfunctional coagulation and abnormal bleeding. Gynecologists are often consulted before transplant for management of abnormal uterine bleeding, which may be particularly challenging in this context. CASE A premenopausal woman with MonoMAC (a rare adult-onset immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by monocytopenia and Mycobacterium avium complex infections resulting from mutations in GATA2, a crucial gene in early hematopoiesis) presented with pancytopenia, evolving leukemia, and recent strokes, necessitating anticoagulation. During preparation for hematopoietic stem cell transplant, she experienced prolonged menorrhagia requiring transfusions. Surgical therapy was contraindicated, and medical management was successful only when combined with balloon tamponade. CONCLUSION Balloon tamponade may be a potentially life-saving adjunct to medical therapy for control of uterine hemorrhage before hematopoietic stem cell transplant. PMID:23344397

  5. A mystery unraveled: nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells in human adult tissues

    PubMed Central

    Simerman, Ariel A; Perone, Marcelo J; Gimeno, María L; Dumesic, Daniel A; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have emerged as the gold standard of pluripotent stem cells and the class of stem cell with the highest potential for contribution to regenerative and therapeutic application; however, their translational use is often impeded by teratoma formation, commonly associated with pluripotency. We discuss a population of nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress Enduring (Muse) cells, which offer an innovative and exciting avenue of exploration for the potential treatment of various human diseases. Areas covered: This review discusses the origin of Muse cells, describes in detail their various unique characteristics, and considers future avenues of their application and investigation with respect to what is currently known of adult pluripotent stem cells in scientific literature. We begin by defining cell potency, then discuss both mesenchymal and various reported populations of pluripotent stem cells, and finally delve into Muse cells and the characteristics that set them apart from their contemporaries. Expert opinion: Muse cells derived from adipose tissue (Muse-AT) are efficiently, routinely and painlessly isolated from human lipoaspirate material, exhibit tripoblastic differentiation both spontaneously and under media-specific induction, and do not form teratomas. We describe qualities specific to Muse-AT cells and their potential impact on the field of regenerative medicine and cell therapy. PMID:24745973

  6. Organotypical tissue cultures from adult murine colon as an in vitro model of intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bareiss, Petra M.; Metzger, Marco; Sohn, Kai; Rupp, Steffen; Frick, Julia S.; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Lang, Florian; Schwarz, Heinz; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Together with animal experiments, organotypical cell cultures are important models for analyzing cellular interactions of the mucosal epithelium and pathogenic mechanisms in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional culture model from the adult mouse colon for cell biological investigations in an in vivo-like environment. These explant cultures were cultured for up to 2 weeks and maintained typical characteristics of the intestinal mucosa, including a high-prismatic epithelium with specific epithelial cell-to-cell connections, a basal lamina and various connective tissue cell types, as analyzed with immunohistological and electron microscopic methods. The function of the epithelium was tested by treating the cultures with dexamethasone, which resulted in a strong upregulation of the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 similar to that found in vivo. The culture system was investigated in infection experiments with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Wildtype but not Δcph1/Δefg1-knockout Candida adhered to, penetrated and infiltrated the epithelial barrier. The results demonstrate the potential usefulness of this intestinal in vitro model for studying epithelial cell-cell interactions, cellular signaling and microbiological infections in a three-dimensional cell arrangement. PMID:18320204

  7. Comparative potential of juvenile and adult human articular chondrocytes for cartilage tissue formation in three-dimensional biomimetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Behn, Anthony W; Goodman, Stuart B; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human articular cartilage is inherently limited and extensive efforts have focused on engineering the cartilage tissue. Various cellular sources have been studied for cartilage tissue engineering including adult chondrocytes, and embryonic or adult stem cells. Juvenile chondrocytes (from donors below 13 years of age) have recently been reported to be a promising cell source for cartilage regeneration. Previous studies have compared the potential of adult and juvenile chondrocytes or adult and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. To comprehensively characterize the comparative potential of young, old, and diseased chondrocytes, here we examined cartilage formation by juvenile, adult, and OA chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogels composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate. All three human articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels and cultured for 3 or 6 weeks to allow maturation and extracellular matrix formation. Outcomes were analyzed using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. After 3 and 6 weeks, juvenile chondrocytes showed a greater upregulation of chondrogenic gene expression than adult chondrocytes, while OA chondrocytes showed a downregulation. Aggrecan and type II collagen deposition and glycosaminoglycan accumulation were high for juvenile and adult chondrocytes but not for OA chondrocytes. Similar trend was observed in the compressive moduli of the cartilage constructs generated by the three different chondrocytes. In conclusion, the juvenile, adult and OA chondrocytes showed differential responses in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels. The 3D culture model described here may also provide a useful tool to further study the molecular differences among chondrocytes from different stages, which can help elucidate the mechanisms for age-related decline in the intrinsic capacity for cartilage repair. PMID:25054343

  8. [PREVALENCE OF NON-CARIOUS CERVICAL LESIONS AND ABFRACTIONS OF DENTAL HARD TISSUES IN AN ADULT IN DIFFERENT AGES].

    PubMed

    Iordanishvili, A K; Chernyj, D A; Jankovskij, V V; Orlov, A K; Drobkova, K O

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to gerontostomatological and gender-specific prevalence of non-carious lesions of the hard tissue of teeth in adults. The paper presents data of epidemiological study on prevalence of non-carious lesions of dental hard tissues (high abrasion, erosion, wedge-shaped defects, hyperesthesia). Allocated to four age groups: young adults surveyed--from 22 to 39 years; middle ages--from 40 to 59 years; older--from 60 to 74 years of age; senile age--from 75 to 87 years. To determine the frequency of occurrence of different forms of non-carious lesions of the hard tissue of teeth we have used the following: general scientific and special methods: poll, dental examination, groupings, statistical and mathematical methods of processing sample. We have ranked low incidence of non-carious lesions of the hard tissue of the teeth in the sample surveyed: high abrasion, erosion, wedge-shaped defects of solid tissues, hyperesthesia. The features of clinical course of non-carious lesions have been determined. In particular a rare combined lesion of the teeth with advanced erasibility, wedge defects and erosion has been noted. Significant combination of the pathological processes of the hard tissue of teeth with their hyperesthesia has been found. Features of different forms of non-carious lesions of the hard tissue of teeth in different age periods of life have been determined. Noted that older people, due to non-carious esions of the hard tissue of teeth were more likely to require medical intervention aimed at addressing the ncreased sensitivity and loss of hard tissue of teeth by dental therapeutic activities or dental prosthetics. PMID:26856106

  9. Facial soft tissue depths in craniofacial identification (part II): An analytical review of the published sub-adult data.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N; Simpson, Ellie K

    2008-11-01

    Prior research indicates that while statistically significant differences exist between subcategories of the adult soft tissue depth data, magnitudes of difference are small and possess little practical meaning when measurement errors and variations between measurement methods are considered. These findings raise questions as to what variables may or may not hold meaning for the sub-adult data. Of primary interest is the effect of age, as these differences have the potential to surpass the magnitude of measurement error. Data from the five studies in the literature on sub-adults which describe values for single integer age groups were pooled and differences across the ages examined. From 1 to 18 years, most soft tissue depth measurements increased by less than 3 mm. These results suggest that dividing the data for children into more than two age groups is unlikely to hold many advantages. Data were therefore split into two groups with the division point corresponding to the mid-point of the observed trends and main data density (0-11 and 12-18 years; division point = 11.5 years). Published sub-adult data for seven further studies which reported broader age groups were pooled with the data above to produce the final tallied soft tissue depth tables. These tables hold the advantages of increased sample sizes (pogonion has greater than 1770 individuals for either age group) and increased levels of certainty (as random and opposing systematic errors specific to each independent study should average out when the data are combined).

  10. Megakaryocyte growth and development factor is a potent growth factor for primitive hematopoietic progenitors in the human fetus.

    PubMed

    Muench, Marcus O; Bárcena, Alicia

    2004-06-01

    Megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF), or thrombopoietin, has received considerable attention as a therapeutic agent for treating thrombocytopenia or for its use in the ex vivo culture of hematopoietic stem cells. MGDF is known to support the growth of a broad spectrum of hematopoietic precursors obtained from adult or neonatal tissues, but its effects on the growth of fetal progenitors and stem cells has not been studied. Human CD38(+)CD34(2+) progenitors and CD38(-)CD34(2+) cells, a population that contains stem cells, were isolated from midgestation liver and grown under defined conditions with MGDF and various cytokines known to support the growth of primitive hematopoietic precursors. In clonal assays of colony-forming cells (CFCs), MGDF supported the growth of 15-25% of candidate stem cells when combined with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), flk-2/flt3 ligand, or stem cell factor. MGDF was observed to strongly support the early stages of hematopoiesis and expansion of high proliferative potential CFCs. More mature progenitors were expanded nearly 78-fold in 1 wk of culture with MGDF+SCF+GM-CSF. MGDF alone was also found to support the short-term (2 d) survival of CD38(-)CD34(2+) high proliferative potential CFCs. The effects of MGDF were more modest on CD38(+)CD34(2+) progenitors with only additive increases in colony formation being observed. These findings suggest that MGDF administration in fetuses and neonates may strongly affect the growth and mobilization of primitive hematopoietic progenitors and that MGDF may find use in the ex vivo growth and expansion of fetal stem cells.

  11. Dynamic Gene Regulatory Networks Drive Hematopoietic Specification and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Goode, Debbie K; Obier, Nadine; Vijayabaskar, M S; Lie-A-Ling, Michael; Lilly, Andrew J; Hannah, Rebecca; Lichtinger, Monika; Batta, Kiran; Florkowska, Magdalena; Patel, Rahima; Challinor, Mairi; Wallace, Kirstie; Gilmour, Jane; Assi, Salam A; Cauchy, Pierre; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Westhead, David R; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; Göttgens, Berthold; Bonifer, Constanze

    2016-03-01

    Metazoan development involves the successive activation and silencing of specific gene expression programs and is driven by tissue-specific transcription factors programming the chromatin landscape. To understand how this process executes an entire developmental pathway, we generated global gene expression, chromatin accessibility, histone modification, and transcription factor binding data from purified embryonic stem cell-derived cells representing six sequential stages of hematopoietic specification and differentiation. Our data reveal the nature of regulatory elements driving differential gene expression and inform how transcription factor binding impacts on promoter activity. We present a dynamic core regulatory network model for hematopoietic specification and demonstrate its utility for the design of reprogramming experiments. Functional studies motivated by our genome-wide data uncovered a stage-specific role for TEAD/YAP factors in mammalian hematopoietic specification. Our study presents a powerful resource for studying hematopoiesis and demonstrates how such data advance our understanding of mammalian development. PMID:26923725

  12. Dynamic Gene Regulatory Networks Drive Hematopoietic Specification and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Debbie K.; Obier, Nadine; Vijayabaskar, M.S.; Lie-A-Ling, Michael; Lilly, Andrew J.; Hannah, Rebecca; Lichtinger, Monika; Batta, Kiran; Florkowska, Magdalena; Patel, Rahima; Challinor, Mairi; Wallace, Kirstie; Gilmour, Jane; Assi, Salam A.; Cauchy, Pierre; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Westhead, David R.; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; Göttgens, Berthold; Bonifer, Constanze

    2016-01-01

    Summary Metazoan development involves the successive activation and silencing of specific gene expression programs and is driven by tissue-specific transcription factors programming the chromatin landscape. To understand how this process executes an entire developmental pathway, we generated global gene expression, chromatin accessibility, histone modification, and transcription factor binding data from purified embryonic stem cell-derived cells representing six sequential stages of hematopoietic specification and differentiation. Our data reveal the nature of regulatory elements driving differential gene expression and inform how transcription factor binding impacts on promoter activity. We present a dynamic core regulatory network model for hematopoietic specification and demonstrate its utility for the design of reprogramming experiments. Functional studies motivated by our genome-wide data uncovered a stage-specific role for TEAD/YAP factors in mammalian hematopoietic specification. Our study presents a powerful resource for studying hematopoiesis and demonstrates how such data advance our understanding of mammalian development. PMID:26923725

  13. Three-dimensional cartography of hematopoietic clusters in the vasculature of whole mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Tomomasa; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2010-11-01

    Hematopoietic cell clusters in the aorta of vertebrate embryos play a pivotal role in the formation of the adult blood system. Despite their importance, hematopoietic clusters have not been systematically quantitated or mapped because of technical limitations posed by the opaqueness of whole mouse embryos. Here, we combine an approach to make whole mouse embryos transparent, with multicolor marking, to allow observation of hematopoietic clusters using high-resolution 3-dimensional confocal microscopy. Our method provides the first complete map and temporal quantitation of all hematopoietic clusters in the mouse embryonic vasculature. We show that clusters peak in number at embryonic day 10.5, localize to specific vascular subregions and are heterogeneous, indicating a basal endothelial to non-basal (outer cluster) hematopoietic cell transition. Clusters enriched with the c-Kit(+)CD31(+)SSEA1(-) cell population contain functional hematopoietic progenitors and stem cells. Thus, three-dimensional cartography of transparent mouse embryos provides novel insight into the vascular subregions instrumental in hematopoietic progenitor/stem cell development, and represents an important technological advancement for comprehensive in situ hematopoietic cluster analysis.

  14. Requirement for Ssbp2 in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance and Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Li, June; Kurasawa, Yasuhiro; Wang, Yang; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Klumpp, Sherry A.; Liang, Hong; Tailor, Ramesh C.; Raymond, Aaron C.; Estrov, Zeev; Brandt, Stephen J.; Davis, Richard E.; Zweidler–McKay, Patrick; Amin, Hesham M.; Nagarajan, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional mechanisms governing hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation are not fully understood. Sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding protein 2 (SSBP2) is a candidate acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) suppressor gene located at chromosome 5q14. SSBP2 binds the transcriptional adaptor protein Lim-domain binding protein 1 (LDB1) and enhances LDB1 stability to regulate gene expression. Notably, Ldb1 is essential for HSC specification during early development and maintenance in adults. We previously reported shortened lifespan and greater susceptibility to B cell lymphomas and carcinomas in Ssbp2 −/− mice. However, whether Ssbp2 plays a regulatory role in normal HSC function and leukemogenesis is unknown. Here, we provide several lines of evidence to demonstrate a requirement for Ssbp2 in the function and transcriptional program of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in vivo. We found that hematopoietic tissues were hypoplastic in Ssbp2−/− mice and the frequency of lymphoid-primed multipotent progenitor cells in bone marrow was reduced. Other significant features of these mice were delayed recovery from 5-fluorouracil treatment and diminished multilineage reconstitution in lethally irradiated bone marrow recipients. Dramatic reduction of Notch1 transcripts and increased expression of transcripts encoding the transcription factor E2a and its downstream target Cdkn1a also distinguished Ssbp2−/− HSPCs from wild-type HSPCs. Finally, a tendency towards coordinated expression of SSBP2 and the AML suppressor NOTCH1 in a subset of The Cancer Genome Atlas AML cases suggested a role for SSBP2 in AML pathogenesis. Collectively, our results uncovered a critical regulatory function for SSBP2 in HSPC gene expression and function. PMID:25238756

  15. Measuring ATP Concentration in a Small Number of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Szade, Krzysztof; Zukowska, Monika; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of quiescent adult stem cells differs from the metabolism of differentiated cells. The metabolic processes are tightly regulated and their alterations disturb function of stem cells. One of the indicators of metabolic status of cells is the ATP level. While the method of measuring the ATP levels has been known for many years, estimating ATP levels in small population of defined stem cells isolated directly from the tissue has remained challenging. Here, we show our method of measuring the ATP levels in hematopoietic stem cells sorted from murine bone marrow. We used magnetic sorting as well as cell sorter and adopted the commonly used bioluminescence-based detection kits in described protocol. Our strategy allows to measure ATP levels in 1000 highly purified HSC.

  16. Detection and transmission of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.

    1975-01-01

    Detection and transmission of Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) was studied at a commercial trout hatchery. Transmission of virus was demonstrated via water, feed and contaminated eggs. If eggs from carrier females were incubated several weeks in virus-free water, the resulting fry did not become infected. However, if fry subsequently became infected they were lifetime carriers. Infectious virus was readily detectable in most tissues of moribund fish; in carriers it was detected in sex products of spawning fish, and in samples from the intestine of post-spawning fish, but not in samples from blood, feces, kidney, or liver. The carrier rate was not significantly different between sexes. It was concluded that adult carriers are the reservoir of infection and that transmission occurs primarily when carriers shed virus and expose susceptible fish or eggs.

  17. Reconstructing the in vivo dynamics of hematopoietic stem cells from telomere length distributions.

    PubMed

    Werner, Benjamin; Beier, Fabian; Hummel, Sebastian; Balabanov, Stefan; Lassay, Lisa; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Dingli, David; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Traulsen, Arne

    2015-10-15

    We investigate the in vivo patterns of stem cell divisions in the human hematopoietic system throughout life. In particular, we analyze the shape of telomere length distributions underlying stem cell behavior within individuals. Our mathematical model shows that these distributions contain a fingerprint of the progressive telomere loss and the fraction of symmetric cell proliferations. Our predictions are tested against measured telomere length distributions in humans across all ages, collected from lymphocyte and granulocyte sorted telomere length data of 356 healthy individuals, including 47 cord blood and 28 bone marrow samples. We find an increasing stem cell pool during childhood and adolescence and an approximately maintained stem cell population in adults. Furthermore, our method is able to detect individual differences from a single tissue sample, i.e. a single snapshot. Prospectively, this allows us to compare cell proliferation between individuals and identify abnormal stem cell dynamics, which affects the risk of stem cell related diseases.

  18. Measuring ATP Concentration in a Small Number of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Szade, Krzysztof; Zukowska, Monika; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of quiescent adult stem cells differs from the metabolism of differentiated cells. The metabolic processes are tightly regulated and their alterations disturb function of stem cells. One of the indicators of metabolic status of cells is the ATP level. While the method of measuring the ATP levels has been known for many years, estimating ATP levels in small population of defined stem cells isolated directly from the tissue has remained challenging. Here, we show our method of measuring the ATP levels in hematopoietic stem cells sorted from murine bone marrow. We used magnetic sorting as well as cell sorter and adopted the commonly used bioluminescence-based detection kits in described protocol. Our strategy allows to measure ATP levels in 1000 highly purified HSC. PMID:27138010

  19. The adult brain tissue response to hollow fiber membranes of varying surface architecture with or without cotransplanted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning

    A variety of biomaterials have been chronically implanted into the central nervous system (CNS) for repair or therapeutic purposes. Regardless of the application, chronic implantation of materials into the CNS induces injury and elicits a wound healing response, eventually leading to the formation of a dense extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich scar tissue that is associated with the segregation of implanted materials from the surrounding normal tissue. Often this reaction results in impaired performance of indwelling CNS devices. In order to enhance the performance of biomaterial-based implantable devices in the CNS, this thesis investigated whether adult brain tissue response to implanted biomaterials could be manipulated by changing biomaterial surface properties or further by utilizing the biology of co-transplanted cells. Specifically, the adult rat brain tissue response to chronically implanted poly(acrylonitrile-vinylchloride) (PAN-PVC) hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) of varying surface architecture were examined temporally at 2, 4, and 12 weeks postimplantation. Significant differences were discovered in the brain tissue response to the PAN-PVC HFMs of varying surface architecture at 4 and 12 weeks. To extend this work, whether the soluble factors derived from a co-transplanted cellular component further affect the brain tissue response to an implanted HFM in a significant way was critically exploited. The cells used were astrocytes, whose ability to influence scar formation process following CNS injury by physical contact with the host tissue had been documented in the literature. Data indicated for the first time that astrocyte-derived soluble factors ameliorate the adult brain tissue reactivity toward HFM implants in an age-dependent manner. While immature astrocytes secreted soluble factors that suppressed the brain tissue reactivity around the implants, mature astrocytes secreted factors that enhanced the gliotic response. These findings prove the feasibility

  20. Cellular complexity of the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Calvi, Laura M; Link, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    The skeleton serves as the principal site for hematopoiesis in adult terrestrial vertebrates. The function of the hematopoietic system is to maintain homeostatic levels of all circulating blood cells, including myeloid cells, lymphoid cells, red blood cells, and platelets. This action requires the daily production of more than 500 billion blood cells. The vast majority of these cells are synthesized in the bone marrow, where they arise from a limited number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that are multipotent and capable of extensive self-renewal. These attributes of HSCs are best demonstrated by marrow transplantation, where even a single HSC can repopulate the entire hematopoietic system. HSCs are therefore adult stem cells capable of multilineage repopulation, poised between cell fate choices which include quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, and apoptosis. While HSC fate choices are in part determined by multiple stochastic fluctuations of cell autonomous processes, according to the niche hypothesis, signals from the microenvironment are also likely to determine stem cell fate. While it had long been postulated that signals within the bone marrow could provide regulation of hematopoietic cells, it is only in the past decade that advances in flow cytometry and genetic models have allowed for a deeper understanding of the microenvironmental regulation of HSCs. In this review, we will highlight the cellular regulatory components of the HSC niche.

  1. Fetal Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Fails to Fully Regenerate the B-Lymphocyte Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Waters, Jeffrey; Phillips, Megan; Yamamoto, Ryo; Long, Brian R.; Yang, Yang; Gerstein, Rachel; Stoddart, Cheryl A.; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Herzenberg, Leonore A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary B cells are key components of cellular and humoral immunity and, like all lymphocytes, are thought to originate and renew from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, our recent single-HSC transfer studies demonstrate that adult bone marrow HSCs do not regenerate B-1a, a subset of tissue B cells required for protection against pneumonia, influenza, and other infections. Since B-1a are regenerated by transfers of fetal liver, the question arises as to whether B-1a derive from fetal, but not adult, HSCs. Here we show that, similar to adult HSCs, fetal HSCs selectively fail to regenerate B-1a. We also show that, in humanized mice, human fetal liver regenerates tissue B cells that are phenotypically similar to murine B-1a, raising the question of whether human HSC transplantation, the mainstay of such models, is sufficient to regenerate human B-1a. Thus, our studies overtly challenge the current paradigm that HSCs give rise to all components of the immune system. PMID:26724903

  2. Comparison of the relationship between bone marrow adipose tissue and volumetric bone mineral density in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Velasquez, Gilbert; Chen, Jun; Jin, Ye; Heymsfield, Steven B; Gallagher, Dympna; Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Several large-scale studies have reported the presence of an inverse relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) in adults. We aim to determine if there is an inverse relationship between pelvic volumetric BMD (vBMD) and pelvic BMAT in children and to compare this relationship in children and adults. Pelvic BMAT and bone volume (BV) was evaluated in 181 healthy children (5-17yr) and 495 healthy adults (≥18yr) with whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Pelvic vBMD was calculated using whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to measure pelvic bone mineral content and MRI-measured BV. An inverse correlation was found between pelvic BMAT and pelvic vBMD in both children (r=-0.374, p<0.001) and adults (r=-0.650, p<0.001). In regression analysis with pelvic vBMD as the dependent variable and BMAT as the independent variable, being a child or adult neither significantly contribute to the pelvic BMD (p=0.995) nor did its interaction with pelvic BMAT (p=0.415). The inverse relationship observed between pelvic vBMD and pelvic BMAT in children extends previous findings that found the inverse relationship to exist in adults and provides further support for a reciprocal relationship between adipocytes and osteoblasts.

  3. Interleukin-17 and Its Implication in the Regulation of Differentiation and Function of Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mojsilović, Slavko; Jauković, Aleksandra; Santibañez, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells have a great potential applicability in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies. However, there are still many unresolved issues concerning their biology, and the influence of the local microenvironment on properties of stem cells has been increasingly recognized. Interleukin (IL-) 17, as a cytokine implicated in many physiological and pathological processes, should be taken into consideration as a part of a regulatory network governing tissue-associated stem cells' fate. This review is focusing on the published data on the effects of IL-17 on the properties and function of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells and trying to discuss that IL-17 achieves many of its roles by acting on adult stem cells. PMID:25999667

  4. Adult Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraerts, Martine; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    The discovery of adult stem cells in most adult tissues is the basis of a number of clinical studies that are carried out, with therapeutic use of hematopoietic stem cells as a prime example. Intense scientific debate is still ongoing as to whether adult stem cells may have a greater plasticity than previously thought. Although cells with some features of embryonic stem cells that, among others, express Oct4, Nanog and SSEA1 are isolated from fresh tissue, it is not clear if the greater differentiation potential is acquired during cell culture. Moreover, adult more pluripotent cells do not have all pluripotent characteristics typical for embryonic stem cells. Recently, some elegant studies were published in which adult cells could be completely reprogrammed to embryonic stem cell-like cells by overexpression of some key transcription factors for pluripotency (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). It will be interesting for the future to investigate the exact mechanisms underlying this reprogramming and whether similar transcription factor pathways are present and/or can be activated in adult more pluripotent stem cells.

  5. Association between subcutaneous white adipose tissue and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cholecalciferol is known to be deposited in human adipose tissue, but the distribution of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in adipose tissue is not known. Objectives: To determine whether 25(OH)D is detectable in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (SWAT) in overweight and obese persons an...

  6. A resource of ribosomal RNA-depleted RNA-Seq data from different normal adult and fetal human tissues.

    PubMed

    Choy, Jocelyn Y H; Boon, Priscilla L S; Bertin, Nicolas; Fullwood, Melissa J

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is the most fundamental level at which the genotype leads to the phenotype of the organism. Enabled by ultra-high-throughput next-generation DNA sequencing, RNA-Seq involves shotgun sequencing of fragmented RNA transcripts by next-generation sequencing followed by in silico assembly, and is rapidly becoming the most popular method for gene expression analysis. Poly[A]+ RNA-Seq analyses of normal human adult tissue samples such as Illumina's Human BodyMap 2.0 Project and the RNA-Seq atlas have provided a useful global resource and framework for comparisons with diseased tissues such as cancer. However, these analyses have failed to provide information on poly[A]-RNA, which is abundant in our cells. The most recent advances in RNA-Seq analyses use ribosomal RNA-depletion to provide information on both poly[A]+ and poly[A]-RNA. In this paper, we describe the use of Illumina's HiSeq 2000 to generate high quality rRNA-depleted RNA-Seq datasets from human fetal and adult tissues. The datasets reported here will be useful in understanding the different expression profiles in different tissues.

  7. Pancreatic-derived pathfinder cells enable regeneration of critically damaged adult pancreatic tissue and completely reverse streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Karen; Chen, Daxin; MacIntyre, Alan; McGlynn, Liane M; Montague, Paul; Charif, Rawiya; Subramaniam, Murali; George, W D; Payne, Anthony P; Davies, R Wayne; Dorling, Anthony; Shiels, Paul G

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate that intravenous delivery of human, or rat, pancreas-derived pathfinder (PDP) cells can totally regenerate critically damaged adult tissue and restore normal function across a species barrier. We have used a mouse model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes to demonstrate this. Normoglycemia was restored and maintained for up to 89 days following the induction of diabetes and subsequent intravenous delivery of PDP cells. Normal pancreatic histology also appeared to be restored, and treated diabetic animals gained body weight. Regenerated tissue was primarily of host origin, with few rat or human cells detectable by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Crucially, the insulin produced by these animals was overwhelmingly murine in origin and was both types I and II, indicative of a process of developmental recapitulation. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using intravenous administration of adult cells to regenerate damaged tissue. Critically, they enhance our understanding of the mechanisms relating to such repair and suggest a means for novel therapeutic intervention in loss of tissue and organ function with age.

  8. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    SciTech Connect

    Beerman, Isabel

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  9. Fancb deficiency impairs hematopoietic stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Erden, Ozlem; Wilson, Andrew; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Andreassen, Paul R; Namekawa, Satoshi H; Pang, Qishen

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, variable congenital malformations and a predisposition to malignancies. FANCB (also known as FAAP95), is the only X-linked FA gene discovered thus far. In the present study, we investigated hematopoiesis in adult Fancb deficient (Fancb(-/y)) mice and found that Fancb(-/y) mice have decreased hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence accompanied by reduced progenitor activity in vitro and reduced repopulating capacity in vivo. Like other FA mouse models previously reported, the hematopoietic system of Fancb(-/y) mice is hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C (MMC), which induces bone marrow failure in Fancb(-/y) mice. Furthermore, Fancb(-/y) BM exhibits slower recovery kinetics and less tolerance to myelotoxic stress induced by 5-fluorouracil than wild-type littermates. RNA-seq analysis reveals altered expression of genes involved in HSC function and cell cycle regulation in Fancb(-/y) HSC and progenitor cells. Thus, this Fancb(-/y) mouse model provides a novel approach for studying the critical role of the FA pathway not only in germ cell development but also in the maintenance of HSC function. PMID:26658157

  10. Characterizing active and inactive brown adipose tissue in adult humans using PET-CT and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Aliya; Towse, Theodore F; Walker, Ronald C; Avison, Malcolm J; Welch, E Brian

    2016-07-01

    Activated brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermogenesis and whole body metabolism in mammals. Positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) imaging has identified depots of BAT in adult humans, igniting scientific interest. The purpose of this study is to characterize both active and inactive supraclavicular BAT in adults and compare the values to those of subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT). We obtained [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) PET-CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 25 healthy adults. Unlike [(18)F]FDG PET, which can detect only active BAT, MRI is capable of detecting both active and inactive BAT. The MRI-derived fat signal fraction (FSF) of active BAT was significantly lower than that of inactive BAT (means ± SD; 60.2 ± 7.6 vs. 62.4 ± 6.8%, respectively). This change in tissue morphology was also reflected as a significant increase in Hounsfield units (HU; -69.4 ± 11.5 vs. -74.5 ± 9.7 HU, respectively). Additionally, the CT HU, MRI FSF, and MRI R2* values are significantly different between BAT and WAT, regardless of the activation status of BAT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify PET-CT and MRI FSF measurements and utilize a semiautomated algorithm to identify inactive and active BAT in the same adult subjects. Our findings support the use of these metrics to characterize and distinguish between BAT and WAT and lay the foundation for future MRI analysis with the hope that some day MRI-based delineation of BAT can stand on its own. PMID:27166284

  11. Ophthalmic Manifestations of Hematopoietic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the ocular findings in patients with hematopoietic malignancy with optic nerve involvement and abducens nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of all cases of hematopoietic cancer with ophthalmic involvements seen in the Department of Ophthalmology of the National Center for Global Health and Medicine between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Results. Eight patients with hematopoietic cancer with optic nerve invasion or abducens nerve palsy were studied. The primary diseases were 3 cases of multiple myeloma, 1 case of acute lymphocytic leukemia, 1 case of follicular lymphoma, and 3 cases of AIDS-related lymphoma. Six cases had optic nerve invasion, 2 cases had abducens nerve palsy, and 1 case had optic nerve invasion of both eyes. The median visual acuity of eyes with optic nerve invasion was 0.885 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) units. The final visual acuity of eyes with optic nerve invasion was 1.25 logMAR units, and that of those with sixth-nerve palsy was −0.1 logMAR units. Six cases died during the five-year follow-up period. An ophthalmic involvement in patients with hematopoietic cancer, especially AIDS-related lymphoma, was associated with poor prognosis. Conclusion. Because ophthalmic involvement in patients with hematopoietic malignancy has a poor prognosis, an early diagnosis of the cancers by the ophthalmologic findings by ophthalmologists could improve the prognosis. PMID:27375913

  12. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus strains augment NLRP3 expression in newborn and adult porcine gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Tohno, Masanori; Shimosato, Takeshi; Aso, Hisashi; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2011-12-15

    We isolated cDNA encoding porcine nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) from Peyer's patches. The complete nucleotide open reading frame of porcine NLRP3 contains 3108-bp encoding a deduced polypeptide of 1036-amino acid residues. The porcine NLRP3 amino acid sequence is more similar to the longest isoform of human than the mouse counterpart. The predicted amino acid sequence of porcine NLRP3 presented nine C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domains. In newborn swine, the expression of NLRP3 was detected at higher levels in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, while lower levels were observed in intestinal tissues. In adult swine, NLRP3 was strongly expressed in Peyer's patches and the mesenteric lymph nodes, and the expression level in the lower intestinal tissues was comparable to that in spleen. Toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding domain ligands, as well as Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus gasseri, enhanced NLRP3 expression in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) of newborn and adult swine. Our results should aid in understanding the intestinal immunoregulatory mechanisms underlying NLRP3 activation and the priming ability of immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria in porcine GALT.

  13. Current Understanding of the Pathways Involved in Adult Stem and Progenitor Cell Migration for Tissue Homeostasis and Repair.

    PubMed

    Goichberg, Polina

    2016-08-01

    With the advancements in the field of adult stem and progenitor cells grows the recognition that the motility of primitive cells is a pivotal aspect of their functionality. There is accumulating evidence that the recruitment of tissue-resident and circulating cells is critical for organ homeostasis and effective injury responses, whereas the pathobiology of degenerative diseases, neoplasm and aging, might be rooted in the altered ability of immature cells to migrate. Furthermore, understanding the biological machinery determining the translocation patterns of tissue progenitors is of great relevance for the emerging methodologies for cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine. The present article provides an overview of studies addressing the physiological significance and diverse modes of stem and progenitor cell trafficking in adult mammalian organs, discusses the major microenvironmental cues regulating cell migration, and describes the implementation of live imaging approaches for the exploration of stem cell movement in tissues and the factors dictating the motility of endogenous and transplanted cells with regenerative potential. PMID:27209167

  14. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the (14)C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of (14)C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955-1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of (14)C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of (14)C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of (14)C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, (14)C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.

  15. Long-Term Neurotoxicity of Chemotherapy in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated for Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Sean; Latoufis, Christos; Eagle, Karen; Ash, Catherine M.; Fowler, Clare; Souhami, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To study the long-term neurotoxicity of chemotherapy in adolescents and young adults treated for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods. Thirty-six adolescents and young adults (median age 17 years) were examined following chemotherapy for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Twenty-nine (29/36) had received cisplatin (median 400 mg/m2), 15/36 ifosfamide (median 20 g/m2), and 12/36 vincristine (median 16 mg). Neurotoxicity was assessed at a median of 8 months (range, 1–54 months) after completion of chemotherapy by clinical examination, nerve conduction studies, audiograms and autonomic function tests. The same nerve conduction studies were carried out in 20 normal volunteers to define normal ranges in this age group. Results. Sixteen patients (44%) had a significant reduction in deep tendon reflexes, and this clinical parameter correlated well with abnormalities detected in nerve conduction studies. Vibration perception threshold (VPT) was raised in 20/36 patients (55%) and this was the most sensitive single test in the assessment of neuropathy. There was a significant correlation between VPT and cumulative cisplatin dose received in mg/m-2 (r=0.607, p<0.01). Ten of 29 patients (35%) had abnormal nerve conduction studies with a pattern characteristic of sensory axonal neuropathy. No patient complained of auditory symptoms, but minor high tone hearing loss was detected by audiograms in 5/28 patients who had received cisplatin. No patients had symptoms of autonomic neuropathy, but autonomic function tests showed minor abnormalities in 4/22 patients tested, and all had received cisplatin. Conclusions. This study demonstrates significant, although asymptomatic, long-term neurotoxicity of cisplatin in adolescents and young adults receiving chemotherapy for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Follow-up studies are planned to assess whether these neurological deficits improve with time. PMID:18521240

  16. Preweaning growth hormone treatment ameliorates adipose tissue insulin resistance and inflammation in adult male offspring following maternal undernutrition.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, C M; Li, M; Gray, C; Vickers, M H

    2013-08-01

    It is well established that early-life nutritional alterations lead to increased risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in adult life. Although it is clear that obesity gives rise to chronic low-grade inflammation, there is little evidence regarding the role of inflammation in the adipose tissue of undernourished (UN) offspring. GH reduces fat mass and has antiinflammatory properties. The present study examined the effect of maternal UN on adipose inflammation in adult offspring and whether GH treatment during a critical period of developmental plasticity could ameliorate metabolic dysfunction associated with a poor start to life. Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to chow (C) or UN (50% ad libitum; UN) diet throughout gestation. Male C and UN pups received saline (control saline [CS]/UN) or GH (2.5 μg/g/d; control growth hormone [CGH]/undernourished growth hormone [UNGH]) from days 3-21. Postweaning males were further randomized and fed either chow or high-fat diet until day 160. An ex vivo glucose uptake assay demonstrated adipose tissue from UN offspring displayed attenuated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake compared with CS, CGH, and UNGH. This was associated with increased insulin receptor, glucose transporter 4, and insulin receptor substrate 1 gene expression. Furthermore, UN demonstrated enhanced TNFα and IL-1β secretion from adipose explants and stromal vascular fraction cultures accompanied by increased adipose tissue gene expression of several key proinflammatory genes and markers of macrophage infiltration. Overall, UN offspring displayed a more potent immunophenotype, which correlated with decreased insulin sensitivity. Preweaning GH treatment negates these detrimental effects, indicating the potential for reversing metabolic dysfunction in UN adult offspring.

  17. Effects of mycobacterial infection on proliferation of hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Kyu; Kim, Kwang Dong; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial infection can affect hematopoietic precursor cells in bone marrow, because the infected tissues produce various cytokines and chemokines. Little is known about hematopoietic precursor cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and their progenitors, during mycobacterial infection. Here, we showed that mycobacterial infections result in the expansion of not only the lin-c-kit+sca-1+ (LKS+) cell population, but also granulocyte-monocyte progenitor cells in a chronic murine tuberculosis model. Interestingly, stimulation of LKS+ cells with attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra culture filtrate (RaCF) was significantly stronger than that by virulent H37Rv culture filtrate (RvCF). Lower TNF-α and IL-6 levels were observed in RvCF-stimulated bone marrow cells. Neutralization of TNF-α or IL-6 in RaCF-stimulated bone marrow cells markedly suppressed LKS+ cell clonal expansion. Additionally, numbers of LKS+ cells were lower in TLR2(-/-) and MyD88(-/-) mice after mycobacterial infection. Taken together, LKS+ cell proliferation related to mycobacterial virulence may be related to the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 associated with TLR signaling. Expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells may, therefore, play an important role during mycobacterial infection.

  18. Histological image data of limb skeletal tissue from larval and adult Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Catherine D; Diaz-Castillo, Carlos; Sosnik, Julian; Phan, Anne; Gardiner, David M

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the article entitled "Cartilage and bone cells do not participate in skeletal regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum limbs" [1]. Here we present image data of the post-embryonic development of the forelimb skeletal tissue of Ambystoma Mexicanum. Histological staining was performed on sections from the intact limbs of young (6.5 cm) and old (25 cm) animals, and on dissected skeletal tissues (cartilage, bone, and periosteum) from these animals.

  19. Tissue localization of the endosymbiotic bacterium "Candidatus Blochmannia floridanus" in adults and larvae of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Christina; Dudaczek, Dieter; Hölldobler, Bert; Gross, Roy

    2002-09-01

    The distribution of endosymbiotic bacteria in different tissues of queens, males, and workers of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus was investigated by light and electron microscopy and by in situ hybridization. A large number of bacteria could be detected in bacteriocytes within the midguts of workers, young virgin queens, and males. Large amounts of bacteria were also found in the oocytes of workers and queens. In contrast, bacteria were not present in oocyte-associated cells or in the spermathecae of mature queens, although occasionally a small number of bacteria could be detected in the testis follicles of males. Interestingly, the number of bacteriocytes in mature queens was strongly reduced and the bacteriocytes contained only very few or no bacteria at all, although the endosymbionts were present in huge amounts in the ovaries of the same animals. During embryogenesis of the deposited egg, the bacteria were concentrated in a ring of endodermal tissue destined to become the midgut in later developmental stages. However, during larval development, bacteria could also be detected in other tissues although to a lesser extent. Only in the last-instar larvae were bacteria found exclusively in the midgut tissue within typical bacteriocytes. Tetracycline and rifampin efficiently cleansed C. floridanus workers of their symbionts and the bacteriocytes of these animals still remained empty several months after treatment had ceased. Despite the lack of their endosymbionts, these adult animals were able to survive without any obvious negative effect under normal cultivation conditions.

  20. In vivo adeno-associated viral vector-mediated genetic engineering of white and brown adipose tissue in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Veronica; Muñoz, Sergio; Casana, Estefania; Mallol, Cristina; Elias, Ivet; Jambrina, Claudia; Ribera, Albert; Ferre, Tura; Franckhauser, Sylvie; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue is pivotal in the regulation of energy homeostasis through the balance of energy storage and expenditure and as an endocrine organ. An inadequate mass and/or alterations in the metabolic and endocrine functions of adipose tissue underlie the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. To fully understand the metabolic and molecular mechanism(s) involved in adipose dysfunction, in vivo genetic modification of adipocytes holds great potential. Here, we demonstrate that adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, especially serotypes 8 and 9, mediated efficient transduction of white (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult lean and obese diabetic mice. The use of short versions of the adipocyte protein 2 or uncoupling protein-1 promoters or micro-RNA target sequences enabled highly specific, long-term AAV-mediated transgene expression in white or brown adipocytes. As proof of concept, delivery of AAV vectors encoding for hexokinase or vascular endothelial growth factor to WAT or BAT resulted in increased glucose uptake or increased vessel density in targeted depots. This method of gene transfer also enabled the secretion of stable high levels of the alkaline phosphatase marker protein into the bloodstream by transduced WAT. Therefore, AAV-mediated genetic engineering of adipose tissue represents a useful tool for the study of adipose pathophysiology and, likely, for the future development of new therapeutic strategies for obesity and diabetes. PMID:24043756

  1. Tissue localization of the endosymbiotic bacterium "Candidatus Blochmannia floridanus" in adults and larvae of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Christina; Dudaczek, Dieter; Hölldobler, Bert; Gross, Roy

    2002-09-01

    The distribution of endosymbiotic bacteria in different tissues of queens, males, and workers of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus was investigated by light and electron microscopy and by in situ hybridization. A large number of bacteria could be detected in bacteriocytes within the midguts of workers, young virgin queens, and males. Large amounts of bacteria were also found in the oocytes of workers and queens. In contrast, bacteria were not present in oocyte-associated cells or in the spermathecae of mature queens, although occasionally a small number of bacteria could be detected in the testis follicles of males. Interestingly, the number of bacteriocytes in mature queens was strongly reduced and the bacteriocytes contained only very few or no bacteria at all, although the endosymbionts were present in huge amounts in the ovaries of the same animals. During embryogenesis of the deposited egg, the bacteria were concentrated in a ring of endodermal tissue destined to become the midgut in later developmental stages. However, during larval development, bacteria could also be detected in other tissues although to a lesser extent. Only in the last-instar larvae were bacteria found exclusively in the midgut tissue within typical bacteriocytes. Tetracycline and rifampin efficiently cleansed C. floridanus workers of their symbionts and the bacteriocytes of these animals still remained empty several months after treatment had ceased. Despite the lack of their endosymbionts, these adult animals were able to survive without any obvious negative effect under normal cultivation conditions. PMID:12200264

  2. In vivo adeno-associated viral vector-mediated genetic engineering of white and brown adipose tissue in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Veronica; Muñoz, Sergio; Casana, Estefania; Mallol, Cristina; Elias, Ivet; Jambrina, Claudia; Ribera, Albert; Ferre, Tura; Franckhauser, Sylvie; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue is pivotal in the regulation of energy homeostasis through the balance of energy storage and expenditure and as an endocrine organ. An inadequate mass and/or alterations in the metabolic and endocrine functions of adipose tissue underlie the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. To fully understand the metabolic and molecular mechanism(s) involved in adipose dysfunction, in vivo genetic modification of adipocytes holds great potential. Here, we demonstrate that adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, especially serotypes 8 and 9, mediated efficient transduction of white (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult lean and obese diabetic mice. The use of short versions of the adipocyte protein 2 or uncoupling protein-1 promoters or micro-RNA target sequences enabled highly specific, long-term AAV-mediated transgene expression in white or brown adipocytes. As proof of concept, delivery of AAV vectors encoding for hexokinase or vascular endothelial growth factor to WAT or BAT resulted in increased glucose uptake or increased vessel density in targeted depots. This method of gene transfer also enabled the secretion of stable high levels of the alkaline phosphatase marker protein into the bloodstream by transduced WAT. Therefore, AAV-mediated genetic engineering of adipose tissue represents a useful tool for the study of adipose pathophysiology and, likely, for the future development of new therapeutic strategies for obesity and diabetes.

  3. A hematopoietic virus disease of rainbow trout and sockeye salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.; Yasutake, William T.; Mead, Robert W.

    1969-01-01

    A previously undescribed virus disease epizootic of hatchery rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in British Columbia, Canada is presented. In the same locality, a similar virus disease was experienced among hatchery sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Typical symptoms included flashing, fecal casts, hemorrhagic areas at the base of fins, and petechial hemorrhages on the visceral fat and membranes in the abdominal cavity. Histopathologic changes were typified by extensive degeneration and necrosis in the hematopoietic tissues of the kidney and spleen. A virus was isolated from both species of fish on tissue culture and the viruses showed cross-infectivity. Based upon the pathological changes in the hematopoietic tissue and the demonstration of a vital infection, a tentative descriptive name was designated Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis. The isolated viruses were distinctly different from the infectious pancreatic necrosis or viral hemorrhagic septicemia viruses of trout, but did show similarities to the Oregon sockeye and Sacramento River chinook viruses. Positive identification awaits further tests. The significance of these observations is the reporting of a new viral disease of rainbow trout and the extension of the geographic range of sockeye salmon viruses.

  4. Mass spectral determination of phenylacetonitrile (PAN) levels in body tissues of adult desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Wings and legs of the gregarious desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria have been shown to be release sites of phenylacetonitrile (PAN), the major adult male-produced pheromone. However, there is limited information on the distribution of PAN within the locust. Here we show, using gas chromatograph...

  5. Histological image data of limb skeletal tissue from larval and adult Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Catherine D; Diaz-Castillo, Carlos; Sosnik, Julian; Phan, Anne; Gardiner, David M

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the article entitled "Cartilage and bone cells do not participate in skeletal regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum limbs" [1]. Here we present image data of the post-embryonic development of the forelimb skeletal tissue of Ambystoma Mexicanum. Histological staining was performed on sections from the intact limbs of young (6.5 cm) and old (25 cm) animals, and on dissected skeletal tissues (cartilage, bone, and periosteum) from these animals. PMID:27547798

  6. Anterior eye tissue morphology: Scleral and conjunctival thickness in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Read, Scott A.; Alonso-Caneiro, David; Vincent, Stephen J.; Bremner, Alexander; Fothergill, Annabel; Ismail, Brittney; McGraw, Rebecca; Quirk, Charlotte J.; Wrigley, Elspeth

    2016-01-01

    The sclera and conjunctiva form part of the eye’s tough, protective outer coat, and play important roles in the eye’s mechanical protection and immune defence, as well as in determining the size and shape of the eye globe. Advances in ocular imaging technology now allow these tissues in the anterior eye to be imaged non-invasively and with high resolution, however there is a paucity of data examining the dimensions of these tissues in paediatric populations. In this study, we have used optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to examine the normal in vivo thickness profile of the anterior sclera and overlying conjunctiva in 111 healthy young participants, including a large proportion of paediatric subjects. We demonstrate that the thickness of the anterior sclera varies significantly with measurement location and meridian. Tissue thickness also varied significantly with age, with younger subjects exhibiting significantly thinner scleras and significantly greater conjunctival thickness. Males were also found to exhibit significantly greater scleral thickness. Refractive error however was not significantly associated with either scleral or conjunctival thickness in this population. These findings provide new data describing the normative dimensions of anterior eye tissues in children and the factors that can influence these dimensions in young populations. PMID:27646956

  7. Anterior eye tissue morphology: Scleral and conjunctival thickness in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Read, Scott A; Alonso-Caneiro, David; Vincent, Stephen J; Bremner, Alexander; Fothergill, Annabel; Ismail, Brittney; McGraw, Rebecca; Quirk, Charlotte J; Wrigley, Elspeth

    2016-01-01

    The sclera and conjunctiva form part of the eye's tough, protective outer coat, and play important roles in the eye's mechanical protection and immune defence, as well as in determining the size and shape of the eye globe. Advances in ocular imaging technology now allow these tissues in the anterior eye to be imaged non-invasively and with high resolution, however there is a paucity of data examining the dimensions of these tissues in paediatric populations. In this study, we have used optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to examine the normal in vivo thickness profile of the anterior sclera and overlying conjunctiva in 111 healthy young participants, including a large proportion of paediatric subjects. We demonstrate that the thickness of the anterior sclera varies significantly with measurement location and meridian. Tissue thickness also varied significantly with age, with younger subjects exhibiting significantly thinner scleras and significantly greater conjunctival thickness. Males were also found to exhibit significantly greater scleral thickness. Refractive error however was not significantly associated with either scleral or conjunctival thickness in this population. These findings provide new data describing the normative dimensions of anterior eye tissues in children and the factors that can influence these dimensions in young populations. PMID:27646956

  8. Embryonic hematopoiesis in vertebrate somites gives rise to definitive hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Juhui; Fan, Xiaoying; Wang, Yixia; Jin, Hongbin; Song, Yixiao; Han, Yang; Huang, Shenghong; Meng, Yaping; Tang, Fuchou; Meng, Anming

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) replenish all types of blood cells. It is debating whether HSCs in adults solely originate from the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, more specifically, the dorsal aorta, during embryogenesis. Here, we report that somite hematopoiesis, a previously unwitnessed hematopoiesis, can generate definitive HSCs (dHSCs) in zebrafish. By transgenic lineage tracing, we found that a subset of cells within the forming somites emigrate ventromedially and mix with lateral plate mesoderm-derived primitive hematopoietic cells before the blood circulation starts. These somite-derived hematopoietic precursors and stem cells (sHPSCs) subsequently enter the circulation and colonize the kidney of larvae and adults. RNA-seq analysis reveals that sHPSCs express hematopoietic genes with sustained expression of many muscle/skeletal genes. Embryonic sHPSCs transplanted into wild-type embryos expand during growth and survive for life time with differentiation into various hematopoietic lineages, indicating self-renewal and multipotency features. Therefore, the embryonic origin of dHSCs in adults is not restricted to the AGM.

  9. Facilitating cells: Translation of hematopoietic chimerism to achieve clinical tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ildstad, Suzanne T; Leventhal, Joseph; Wen, Yujie; Yolcu, Esma

    2015-04-01

    For over 50 y the association between hematopoietic chimerism and tolerance has been recognized. This originated with the brilliant observation by Dr. Ray Owen that freemartin cattle twins that shared a common placental blood supply were red blood cell chimeras, which led to the discovery that hematopoietic chimerism resulted in actively acquired tolerance. This was first confirmed in neonatal mice by Medawar et al. and subsequently in adult rodents. Fifty years later this concept has been successfully translated to solid organ transplant recipients in the clinic. The field is new, but cell-based therapies are being used with increasing frequency to induce tolerance and immunomodulation. The future is bright. This review focuses on chimerism and tolerance: past, present and prospects for the future.

  10. Epidemiology and survivorship of soft tissue sarcomas in adults: a national cancer database reporta

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Robert M; Swett, Katrina; Ward, William G

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of the American College of Surgeons gather demographic and survival data on ∼70% of cancers in the USA. We wanted to investigate the demographic and survivorship data on this potentially more representative cohort of patients with soft tissue sarcomas. We selected 34 of the most commonly encountered soft tissue sarcomas reported to the NCDB, provided that each entity contained a minimum of 50 cases. This report summarizes the demographic and survivorship data on 63,714 patients with these 34 histologically distinct soft tissue sarcomas reported to the NCDB from 1998 to 2010. The overall survivorships of these sarcomas were near the lower limits of many prior reports due to the all-inclusive, minimally biased inclusion criteria. The overall best prognosis was Dermatofibrosarcoma NOS (not otherwise specified). (5-year survivorship 92%). The worst prognosis was Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma (5-year survivorship 19%). New observations included Biphasic Synovial Sarcoma demonstrating a better 5-year survivorship (65%) compared to spindle-cell synovial sarcoma (56%, P < 0.031) and Synovial Sarcoma, NOS (52%, P < 0.001). The demographic and 2- and 5-year survivorship data for all 34 soft tissue sarcomas are presented herein. This extent of demographic and survival data in soft tissue sarcomas is unprecedented. Because of the large number of cases and the inclusive nature of the NCDB, without restriction to certain stages, categories, or treatments, it is less subject to selection bias. Therefore, these data are thought to be more reflective of the true overall prognosis given the current management of sarcoma across the NCDB contributing sites. PMID:25044961

  11. Cannabinoid Receptor-2 Regulates Embryonic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Development via Prostaglandin E2 and P-Selectin Activity.

    PubMed

    Esain, Virginie; Kwan, Wanda; Carroll, Kelli J; Cortes, Mauricio; Liu, Sarah Y; Frechette, Gregory M; Sheward, Lea M V; Nissim, Sahar; Goessling, Wolfram; North, Trista E

    2015-08-01

    Cannabinoids (CB) modulate adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPCs) function, however, impact on the production, expansion, or migration of embryonic HSCs is currently uncharacterized. Here, using chemical and genetic approaches targeting CB-signaling in zebrafish, we show that CB receptor (CNR) 2, but not CNR1, regulates embryonic HSC development. During HSC specification in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, CNR2 stimulation by AM1241 increased runx1;cmyb(+) HSPCs, through heightened proliferation, whereas CNR2 antagonism decreased HSPC number; FACS analysis and absolute HSC counts confirmed and quantified these effects. Epistatic investigations showed AM1241 significantly upregulated PGE2 synthesis in a Ptgs2-dependent manner to increase AGM HSCs. During the phases of HSC production and colonization of secondary niches, AM1241 accelerated migration to the caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT), the site of embryonic HSC expansion, and the thymus; however these effects occurred independently of PGE2. Using a candidate approach for HSC migration and retention factors, P-selectin was identified as the functional target of CNR2 regulation. Epistatic analyses confirmed migration of HSCs into the CHT and thymus was dependent on CNR2-regulated P-selectin activity. Together, these data suggest CNR2-signaling optimizes the production, expansion, and migration of embryonic HSCs by modulating multiple downstream signaling pathways.

  12. Formaldehyde exposure induces autophagy in testicular tissues of adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Shui-Ping; Zhou, Dang-Xia; Lin, Pu; Qin, Zhen; An, Lu; Zheng, Lie-Rui; Lei, Li

    2015-03-01

    Formaldehyde, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, has long been suspected of causing adverse male reproductive effects. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain elusive. The overall aim of this study is to clarify the role of autophagy in male reproductive injuries induced by formaldehyde exposure, by which we can further understand the molecular mechanism of spermatogenesis and develop new targets for prevention and treatment of male infertility. In this study, electron microscopy, Western blot, and RT-PCR analysis were used to detect autophagy in testicular tissues. Moreover, testicular weights, histopathology, and morphometry were used to evaluate the reproductive injuries of formaldehyde exposure. We found that formaldehyde exposure-induced autophagy in testicular tissues was dose dependent. Increasing autophagosomes in spermatogenetic cells was observed by electron microscopy in formaldehyde exposure group. In addition, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed the transcription levels of the LC3-II, as well as the conversion from LC3-I to LC3-II, an indicator of autophagy, significantly increased in testicular tissue of formaldehyde exposure group in a dose dependent manner when compared with those in control group. Furthermore, the alterations of autophage were basically consistent with the changes in testicular weight and morphologic findings. In summary, formaldehyde exposure triggered autophagy, and autophagy may be a scathing factor responsible for male reproductive impairment induced by formaldehyde.

  13. A CT-scan database for the facial soft tissue thickness of Taiwan adults.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ju-Hui; Chen, Hsiao-Ting; Hsu, Wan-Yi; Huang, Guo-Shu; Shaw, Kai-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Facial reconstruction is a branch of forensic anthropology used to assist in the identification of skeletal remains. The majority of facial reconstruction techniques use facial soft tissue depth chart data to recreate facial tissue on a skull or a model of a skull through the use of modeling clay. This study relied on 193 subjects selected from the Taiwanese population on the basis of age and gender to determine the average values of 32 landmarks, include midline and bilateral measures, by means of CT scans. The mean age of the subjects was 46.9±16.4 years, with a mean age of 43.8±16.6 for males and 49.9±15.8 for females respectively. There were 16 landmarks with statistically significant differences between male and female subjects, namely S, G, N, Na, Ph, Sd and Id in the midline portion, FE, LO, ZA and Sub M2 in the bilateral-right and left portion, and IM point in the bilateral-left portion (abbreviations adapted from Karen T. Taylor's work). The mean soft tissue depth was greater in males than in females, and there was significant difference between the right and left sides of the face in Za point. This study's findings were compared with those of Bulut et al. PMID:26028278

  14. Association between Subcutaneous White Adipose Tissue and Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Overweight and Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Brian D.; Dolnikowski, Gregory; Seyoum, Elias; Thomas, Anthony P.; Gertz, Erik R.; Souza, Elaine C.; Woodhouse, Leslie R.; Newman, John W.; Keim, Nancy L.; Adams, Sean H.; Van Loan, Marta D.

    2013-01-01

    Cholecalciferol is known to be deposited in human adipose tissue, but it is not known whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is found in detectable concentrations. Therefore, our objective was to determine whether 25(OH)D is detectable in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (SWAT) in overweight and obese persons enrolled in a twelve week energy restricted diet. Baseline and post-intervention gluteal SWAT biopsies were collected from 20 subjects participating in a larger clinical weight loss intervention. LC-MS/MS was utilized to determine SWAT 25(OH)D concentrations. Serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were measured by RIA. Body composition was assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. SWAT 25(OH)D concentrations were 5.8 ± 2.6 nmol/kg tissue and 6.2 ± 2.7 nmol/kg tissue pre- and post-intervention SWAT, respectively. There was a significant positive association between SWAT 25(OH)D concentration and serum 25(OH)D concentration (r = 0.52, P < 0.01). Both SWAT and serum 25(OH)D concentrations did not significantly change after a twelve-week period of energy restriction with approximately 5 kg of fat loss. In conclusion, we have demonstrated our LC-MS/MS method can detect 25(OH)D3 in human subcutaneous fat tissue from overweight and obese individuals and is consistent with previously reported concentrations in swine. Additionally, our findings of no significant changes in SWAT 25(OH)D3 or serum 25(OH)D after a 6% loss of total body weight and 13% reduction in total fat provides the first human evidence that adipose 25(OH)D does not likely contribute to serum 25(OH)D with moderate weight loss; whether this is also the case with larger amounts of weight loss is unknown. Weight loss alone is not sufficient to increase serum 25(OH)D and increases in dietary or dermal biosynthesis of vitamin D appear to be the most critical contributors to in vitamin D status. PMID:24067385

  15. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Most hematological malignancies occur in older patients. Until recently these patients and those with comorbidities were not candidates for treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation because they were unable to tolerate the heretofore used high-dose conditioning regimens. The finding that many of the cures achieved with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation were due to graft-versus-tumor effects led to the development of less toxic and well-tolerated reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative regimens. These regimens enabled allogeneic engraftment, thereby setting the stage for graft-versus-tumor effects. This review summarizes the encouraging early results seen with the new regimens and discusses the two hurdles that need to be overcome for achieving even greater success, disease relapse and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27132278

  16. Regulation of stem cells in the zebra fish hematopoietic system.

    PubMed

    Huang, H-T; Zon, L I

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been used extensively as a model for stem cell biology. Stem cells share the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell types, making them ideal candidates for tissue regeneration or replacement therapies. Current applications of stem cell technology are limited by our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that control their proliferation and differentiation, and various model organisms have been used to fill these gaps. This chapter focuses on the contributions of the zebra fish model to our understanding of stem cell regulation within the hematopoietic system. Studies in zebra fish have been valuable for identifying new genetic and signaling factors that affect HSC formation and development with important implications for humans, and new advances in the zebra fish toolbox will allow other aspects of HSC behavior to be investigated as well, including migration, homing, and engraftment.

  17. ETS Transcription Factor ETV2/ER71/Etsrp in Hematopoietic and Vascular Development.

    PubMed

    Sumanas, S; Choi, K

    2016-01-01

    Effective establishment of the hematopoietic and vascular systems is prerequisite for successful embryogenesis. The ETS transcription factor Etv2 has proven to be essential for hematopoietic and vascular development. Etv2 expression marks the onset of the hematopoietic and vascular development and its deficiency leads to an absolute block in hematopoietic and vascular development. Etv2 is transiently expressed during development and is mainly expressed in testis in adults. Consistent with its expression pattern, Etv2 is transiently required for the generation of the optimal levels of the hemangiogenic cell population. Deletion of this gene after the hemangiogenic progenitor formation leads to normal hematopoietic and vascular development. Mechanistically, ETV2 induces the hemangiogenic program by activating blood and endothelial cell lineage specifying genes and enhancing VEGF signaling. Moreover, ETV2 establishes an ETS hierarchy by directly activating other Ets genes, which in the face of transient Etv2 expression, presumably maintain blood and endothelial cell program initiated by ETV2 through an ETS switching mechanism. Current studies suggest that the hemangiogenic progenitor population is exclusively sensitive to ETV2-dependent FLK1 signaling. Any perturbation in the ETV2, VEGF, and FLK1 balance causing insufficient hemangiogenic progenitor cell generation would lead to defects in hematopoietic and endothelial cell development.

  18. Comparative analysis of paracrine factor expression in human adult mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, adipose, and dermal tissue.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sarah Tzu-Feng; Asgari, Azar; Lokmic, Zerina; Sinclair, Rodney; Dusting, Gregory James; Lim, Shiang Yong; Dilley, Rodney James

    2012-08-10

    Human adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) support the engineering of functional tissue constructs by secreting angiogenic and cytoprotective factors, which act in a paracrine fashion to influence cell survival and vascularization. MSCs have been isolated from many different tissue sources, but little is known about how paracrine factor secretion varies between different MSC populations. We evaluated paracrine factor expression patterns in MSCs isolated from adipose tissue (ASCs), bone marrow (BMSCs), and dermal tissues [dermal sheath cells (DSCs) and dermal papilla cells (DPCs)]. Specifically, mRNA expression analysis identified insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor-D (VEGF-D), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) to be expressed at higher levels in ASCs compared with other MSC populations whereas VEGF-A, angiogenin, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) were expressed at comparable levels among the MSC populations examined. Analysis of conditioned media (CM) protein confirmed the comparable level of angiogenin and VEGF-A secretion in all MSC populations and showed that DSCs and DPCs produced significantly higher concentrations of leptin. Functional assays examining in vitro angiogenic paracrine activity showed that incubation of endothelial cells in ASC(CM) resulted in increased tubulogenic efficiency compared with that observed in DPC(CM). Using neutralizing antibodies we concluded that VEGF-A and VEGF-D were 2 of the major growth factors secreted by ASCs that supported endothelial tubulogenesis. The variation in paracrine factors of different MSC populations contributes to different levels of angiogenic activity and ASCs maybe preferred over other MSC populations for augmenting therapeutic approaches dependent upon angiogenesis.

  19. Quantitative RT-PCR comparison of the urea and nitric oxide cycle gene transcripts in adult human tissues.

    PubMed

    Neill, Meaghan Anne; Aschner, Judy; Barr, Frederick; Summar, Marshall L

    2009-06-01

    The urea cycle and nitric oxide cycle play significant roles in complex biochemical and physiologic reactions. These cycles have distinct biochemical goals including the clearance of waste nitrogen; the production of the intermediates ornithine, citrulline, and arginine for the urea cycle; and the production of nitric oxide for the nitric oxide pathway. Despite their disparate functions, the two pathways share two enzymes, argininosuccinic acid synthase and argininosuccinic acid lyase, and a transporter, citrin. Studying the gene expression of these enzymes is paramount in understanding these complex biochemical pathways. Here, we examine the expression of genes involved in the urea cycle and the nitric oxide cycle in a panel of eleven different tissue samples obtained from individual adults without known inborn errors of metabolism. In this study, the pattern of co-expressed enzymes provides a global view of the metabolic activity of the urea and nitric oxide cycles in human tissues. Our results show that these transcripts are differentially expressed in different tissues. Using the co-expression profiles, we discovered that the combination of expression of enzyme transcripts as detected in our study, might serve to fulfill specific physiologic function(s) including urea production/nitrogen removal, arginine/citrulline production, nitric oxide production, and ornithine production. Our study reveals the importance of studying not only the expression profile of an enzyme of interest, but also studying the expression profiles of the other enzymes involved in a particular pathway so as to better understand the context of expression. The tissue patterns we observed highlight the variety of important functions of these enzymes and provides insight into the many clinical observations that result from their disruption. These results have implications for the management of urea cycle patients and raise considerations for the care of those patients receiving liver

  20. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Van Spyk, Elyse Noelani; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-01-01

    Historically work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as liver, fat and muscle. In recent years, skin is emerging as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging and carcinogenesis. Morphologically skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration -- the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell-type specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of the skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar UV radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. The skin also provides opportunities to interrogate clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model for investigating the

  1. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V; Van Spyk, Elyse N; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as the liver, fat, and muscle. In recent years, skin has emerged as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging, and carcinogenesis. Morphologically, skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable, and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration: the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell type-specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it also represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. Skin also provides opportunities to interrogate the clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model

  2. Subcutaneous adipose tissue fatty acid desaturation in adults with and without rare adipose disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Elevated stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity has been described in obese states, with an increased desaturation index (DI) suggesting enhanced lipogenesis. Differences in the DI among various phenotypes of abnormal adiposity have not been studied. Abnormal accumulation of subcutaneous adipose tissue occurs in rare adipose disorders (RADs) including Dercum's disease (DD), multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), and familial multiple lipomatosis (FML). Examining the DI in subcutaneous fat of people with DD, MSL and FML may provide information on adipose tissue fatty acid metabolism in these disorders. The aims of this pilot study were: 1) to determine if differences in adipose tissue DIs are present among RADs, and 2) to determine if the DIs correlate to clinical or biochemical parameters. Methods Subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained from human participants with DD (n = 6), MSL (n = 5), FML (n = 8) and obese Controls (n = 6). Fatty acid composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The DIs (palmitoleic/palmitic, oleic/stearic, vaccenic/stearic ratios) were calculated from the gas chromatogram peak intensities. SCD1 gene expression was determined. Spearman's correlations between the DIs and available clinical or biochemical data were performed. Results In DD subjects, the vaccenic/stearic index was lower (p < 0.05) in comparison to Controls. Percent of total of the saturated fatty acid myristic acid was higher in DD compared with Controls and FML. Percent of monounsaturated vaccenic acid in DD trended lower when compared with Controls, and was decreased in comparison to FML. In MSL, total percent of the polyunsaturated fatty acids was significantly lower than in the Control group (p < 0.05). In the total cohort of subjects, the palmitoleic/palmitic and oleic/stearic DIs positively correlated with age, BMI, and percent body fat. Conclusions The positive associations between the DIs and measures of adiposity (BMI and percent body fat

  3. Comparison of Human Fetal Liver, Umbilical Cord Blood, and Adult Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment in NOD-scid/γc−/−, Balb/c-Rag1−/−γc−/−, and C.B-17-scid/bg Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lepus, Christin M.; Gibson, Thomas F.; Gerber, Scott A.; Kawikova, Ivana; Szczepanik, Marian; Hossain, Jaber; Ablamunits, Vitaly; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy; Herold, Kevan C.; Donis, Ruben O.; Bothwell, Alfred L.; Pober, Jordan S.; Harding, Martha J.

    2010-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice bearing components of a human immune system present a novel approach for studying human immune responses. We investigated the number, phenotype, developmental kinetics and function of developing human immune cells following transfer of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) preparations, originating from second trimester human fetal liver (HFL), umbilical cord blood (UCB), or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized adult blood (G-CSF-AB) delivered via intrahepatic injection into sublethally irradiated neonatal NOD-scid/γc−/−, Balb/c-Rag1−/−γc−/−, and C.B-17-scid/bg mice. HFL and UCB HSC provided the greatest number and breadth of developing cells. NOD-scid/γc−/− and Balb/c-Rag1−/−γc−/− harbored human B and dendritic cells as well as human platelets in peripheral blood, whereas NOD-scid/γc−/− mice harbored higher levels of human T cells. NOD-scid/γc−/− mice engrafted with HFL CD34+ HSC demonstrated human immunological competence evidenced by white pulp expansion and increases in total human immunoglobulin following immunization with T-dependent antigens, and delayed type hypersensitivity-infiltrating leukocytes in response to antigenic challenge. In conclusion, we describe an encouraging base system for studying human hematopoietic lineage development and function utilizing human HFL or UCB HSC-engrafted NOD-scid/γc−/− mice that is well suited for future studies toward the development of a fully competent humanized mouse model. PMID:19524633

  4. [Prolonged effects of training on adipose tissue glucose metabolism and insulin responsiveness in adult rats (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gommers, A; Dehez-Delhaye, M; Caucheteux, D

    1981-06-01

    Physical training (forced swimming for 6 weeks) led in resting adult rats modifications of circulating hormones, fuels and substrates, of epididymal adipose tissue composition and of its glucose metabolism. Plasma concentrations of free fatty acids, cholesterol and insulin were decreased by training. The weight of the epididymal fat pad, its triglyceride content and the mean cell size of adipocytes were significantly diminished. Twenty four hours after the end of the final exercise period, incorporation of D-U-14C-glucose into triglycerides was reduced (P less than 0.01) but the response to insulin was greatly enhanced for swimming rats both for oxidation of labelled glucose (P less than 0.001) and its incorporation into lipids (P less than 0.001) (respectively 215 and 225%). This enhancement of insulin sensitivity by training persisted and became more marked one week after the end of the exercise period (respectively 258 and 363%).

  5. Correction of Class II malocclusion and soft tissue profile in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Aditi; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Class II malocclusion in nongrowing individuals is a challenging situation for the clinician. Class II malocclusion with bialveolar protrusion often dictates premolar extractions with maximum anchorage. The present article describes the case of an adult female with skeletal Class II malocclusion, bimaxillary protrusion, increased overjet, deep bite, lip protrusion, everted lower lip, deep mentolabial sulcus, and lip incompetence. To correct the malocclusion, all four first premolars were extracted. Direct anchorage from miniscrews was used for retraction of the anterior segment. The mandibular buccal segment was protracted into the extraction space using Class II mechanics. Ideal Class I canine and molar relation were achieved in 24 months. There was a significant improvement in facial profile and smile esthetics of the patient.

  6. Correction of Class II malocclusion and soft tissue profile in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Aditi; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Class II malocclusion in nongrowing individuals is a challenging situation for the clinician. Class II malocclusion with bialveolar protrusion often dictates premolar extractions with maximum anchorage. The present article describes the case of an adult female with skeletal Class II malocclusion, bimaxillary protrusion, increased overjet, deep bite, lip protrusion, everted lower lip, deep mentolabial sulcus, and lip incompetence. To correct the malocclusion, all four first premolars were extracted. Direct anchorage from miniscrews was used for retraction of the anterior segment. The mandibular buccal segment was protracted into the extraction space using Class II mechanics. Ideal Class I canine and molar relation were achieved in 24 months. There was a significant improvement in facial profile and smile esthetics of the patient. PMID:27630505

  7. Correction of Class II malocclusion and soft tissue profile in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Aditi; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Class II malocclusion in nongrowing individuals is a challenging situation for the clinician. Class II malocclusion with bialveolar protrusion often dictates premolar extractions with maximum anchorage. The present article describes the case of an adult female with skeletal Class II malocclusion, bimaxillary protrusion, increased overjet, deep bite, lip protrusion, everted lower lip, deep mentolabial sulcus, and lip incompetence. To correct the malocclusion, all four first premolars were extracted. Direct anchorage from miniscrews was used for retraction of the anterior segment. The mandibular buccal segment was protracted into the extraction space using Class II mechanics. Ideal Class I canine and molar relation were achieved in 24 months. There was a significant improvement in facial profile and smile esthetics of the patient. PMID:27630505

  8. Soft Tissue Tumors in Adults: ESSR-Approved Guidelines for Diagnostic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris M; Weber, Marc-André; Lalam, Radhesh K; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bohndorf, Klaus; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Tagliafico, Alberto; van Rijswijk, Carla; Vilanova, Joan C; Afonso, P Diana; Breitenseher, Martin; Beggs, Ian; Robinson, Philip; de Jonge, Milko C; Krestan, Christian; Bloem, Johan L

    2015-12-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare, but early, accurate diagnosis with subsequent appropriate treatment is crucial for the clinical outcome. The ESSR guidelines are intended to help radiologists in their decision-making and support discussion among clinicians who deal with patients with suspected or proven soft tissue tumors. Potentially malignant lesions recognized by ultrasound should be referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which also serves as a preoperative local staging modality, with specific technical requirements and mandatory radiological report elements. Radiography may add information about matrix calcification and osseous involvement. Indeterminate lesions, or lesions in which therapy is dependent on histology results, should be biopsied. For biopsy, we strongly recommend referral to a specialist sarcoma center, where an interdisciplinary tumor group, with a specialized pathologist, radiologist, and the surgeon are involved. In sarcoma, a CT scan of the chest is mandatory. Additional staging modalities are entity-specific. There are no evidence-based recommendations for routine follow-up in surgically treated sarcomas. However, we would recommend regular follow-up with intervals dependent on tumor grade, for 10 years after the initial diagnosis. PMID:26696086

  9. Adjuvant epirubicin with or without Ifosfamide for adult soft-tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Petrioli, Roberto; Coratti, Andrea; Correale, Pierpaolo; D'Aniello, Carlo; Grimaldi, Luca; Tanzini, Gabriello; Civitelli, Serenella; Marsili, Stefania; Messinese, Simona; Marzocca, Giuseppe; Pirtoli, Luigi; Francini, Guido

    2002-10-01

    This randomized study compared the efficacy of epirubicin-based adjuvant chemotherapy on the disease-free interval (DFI) and overall survival of patients with high-risk soft-tissue sarcomas. After curative surgery, 43 of the 88 enrolled patients were assigned to surgery with or without radiotherapy and 45 to surgery plus chemotherapy (26 epirubicin, 19 epirubicin + ifosfamide) with or without radiotherapy. The trial closed prematurely because of poor patient accrual. There was a statistical significant difference in the 5-year disease-free survival of the patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy (69%) and that of those treated with surgery with or without radiotherapy (44%) ( p= 0.01). The 5-year survival of the patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy was 72% as against 47% of those treated with surgery with or without radiotherapy ( p= 0.06). The power of the study was 0.65 for both the DFI and overall survival. The results of the study suggest a possible advantage of epirubicin-based adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcoma at high risk of relapse. PMID:12393986

  10. Maternal hypertension programs increased cerebral tissue damage following stroke in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Nicole M; Jin, Albert Y; Tse, M Yat; Peterson, Nichole T; Andrew, R David; Mewburn, Jeffrey D; Pang, Stephen C

    2015-10-01

    The maternal system is challenged with many physiological changes throughout pregnancy to prepare the body to meet the metabolic needs of the fetus and for delivery. Many pregnancies, however, are faced with pathological stressors or complications that significantly impact maternal health. A shift in this paradigm is now beginning to investigate the implication of pregnancy complications on the fetus and their continued influence on offspring disease risk into adulthood. In this investigation, we sought to determine whether maternal hypertension during pregnancy alters the cerebral response of adult offspring to acute ischemic stroke. Atrial natriuretic peptide gene-disrupted (ANP(-/-)) mothers exhibit chronic hypertension that escalates during pregnancy. Through comparison of heterozygote offspring born from either normotensive (ANP(+/-WT)) or hypertensive (ANP(+/-KO)) mothers, we have demonstrated that offspring exposed to maternal hypertension exhibit larger cerebral infarct volumes following middle cerebral artery occlusion. Observation of equal baseline cardiovascular measures, cerebrovascular structure, and cerebral blood volumes between heterozygote offspring suggests no added influences on offspring that would contribute to adverse cerebral response post-stroke. Cerebral mRNA expression of endothelin and nitric oxide synthase vasoactive systems demonstrated up-regulation of Et-1 and Nos3 in ANP(+/-KO) mice and thus an enhanced acute vascular response compared to ANP(+/-WT) counterparts. Gene expression of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase channel isoforms, Atp1a1, Atp1a3, and Atp1b1, displayed no significant differences. These investigations are the first to demonstrate a fetal programming effect between maternal hypertension and adult offspring stroke outcome. Further mechanistic studies are required to complement epidemiological evidence of this phenomenon in the literature. PMID:26169981

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in utero produces sheep-goat chimeras.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, S M; Muench, M O; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Moyer, A L; BonDurant, R H; Rowe, J D; Anderson, G B

    2001-01-01

    Both allogeneic and xenogeneic hematopoietic chimera models have been developed, including fetal sheep models that demonstrated high levels of stable, multilineage engraftment created by in utero hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of in utero transplantation to create xenogeneic sheep-goat hematopoietic chimeras. Fetal liver cells and T-cell-depleted adult bone marrow were tested as sources of hematopoietic stem cells. Donor cells were injected intraperitoneally into 130 recipient fetuses between 49 and 62 days of gestation. Groups 1 and 2 received crude fetal liver cell preparations. Group 3 received fetal liver cells that were incubated overnight in a phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocyte-conditioned medium (PHA-LCM). In Group 4, hematopoietic stem cells were concentrated by using additional density separations. Group 5 fetal recipients received low-density, T-cell-depleted adult bone marrow cells. In Group 1, fetuses were accessed via hysterotomy. Hematopoietic stem cells were injected into Groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 without cutting through the uterine wall. Fetal survival in the five groups ranged from 56 to 100%. The percentage of chimeras from injected fetuses ranged from 43 to 92% by FACS and PCR analyses; however, levels of chimerism were low (<1%). The highest rates of chimerism were found among recipients of low-density fetal liver cells. Despite the pre-immunocompetent status of the fetal recipients and the genetic similarities between sheep and goats, high levels of engraftment were not observed. The consistently low levels of chimerism observed in this study, as well as the poor results recently reported by others using these procedures, indicate that significant barriers exist to transplanting hematopoietic stem cells in utero. PMID:11358392

  12. TopBP1 Governs Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Survival in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Li, Dantong; Ma, Ke; Zhang, Wenjuan; Xu, Tao; Fu, Cong; Jing, Changbin; Jia, Xiaoe; Wu, Shuang; Sun, Xin; Dong, Mei; Deng, Min; Chen, Yi; Zhu, Wenge; Peng, Jinrong; Wan, Fengyi; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I; Pan, Weijun

    2015-07-01

    In vertebrate definitive hematopoiesis, nascent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) migrate to and reside in proliferative hematopoietic microenvironment for transitory expansion. In this process, well-established DNA damage response pathways are vital to resolve the replication stress, which is deleterious for genome stability and cell survival. However, the detailed mechanism on the response and repair of the replication stress-induced DNA damage during hematopoietic progenitor expansion remains elusive. Here we report that a novel zebrafish mutantcas003 with nonsense mutation in topbp1 gene encoding topoisomerase II β binding protein 1 (TopBP1) exhibits severe definitive hematopoiesis failure. Homozygous topbp1cas003 mutants manifest reduced number of HSPCs during definitive hematopoietic cell expansion, without affecting the formation and migration of HSPCs. Moreover, HSPCs in the caudal hematopoietic tissue (an equivalent of the fetal liver in mammals) in topbp1cas003 mutant embryos are more sensitive to hydroxyurea (HU) treatment. Mechanistically, subcellular mislocalization of TopBP1cas003 protein results in ATR/Chk1 activation failure and DNA damage accumulation in HSPCs, and eventually induces the p53-dependent apoptosis of HSPCs. Collectively, this study demonstrates a novel and vital role of TopBP1 in the maintenance of HSPCs genome integrity and survival during hematopoietic progenitor expansion.

  13. TopBP1 Governs Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Survival in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Li, Dantong; Ma, Ke; Zhang, Wenjuan; Xu, Tao; Fu, Cong; Jing, Changbin; Jia, Xiaoe; Wu, Shuang; Sun, Xin; Dong, Mei; Deng, Min; Chen, Yi; Zhu, Wenge; Peng, Jinrong; Wan, Fengyi; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.; Pan, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrate definitive hematopoiesis, nascent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) migrate to and reside in proliferative hematopoietic microenvironment for transitory expansion. In this process, well-established DNA damage response pathways are vital to resolve the replication stress, which is deleterious for genome stability and cell survival. However, the detailed mechanism on the response and repair of the replication stress-induced DNA damage during hematopoietic progenitor expansion remains elusive. Here we report that a novel zebrafish mutantcas003 with nonsense mutation in topbp1 gene encoding topoisomerase II β binding protein 1 (TopBP1) exhibits severe definitive hematopoiesis failure. Homozygous topbp1cas003 mutants manifest reduced number of HSPCs during definitive hematopoietic cell expansion, without affecting the formation and migration of HSPCs. Moreover, HSPCs in the caudal hematopoietic tissue (an equivalent of the fetal liver in mammals) in topbp1cas003 mutant embryos are more sensitive to hydroxyurea (HU) treatment. Mechanistically, subcellular mislocalization of TopBP1cas003 protein results in ATR/Chk1 activation failure and DNA damage accumulation in HSPCs, and eventually induces the p53-dependent apoptosis of HSPCs. Collectively, this study demonstrates a novel and vital role of TopBP1 in the maintenance of HSPCs genome integrity and survival during hematopoietic progenitor expansion. PMID:26131719

  14. New insights into the regulation by RUNX1 and GFI1(s) proteins of the endothelial to hematopoietic transition generating primordial hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Thambyrajah, Roshana; Patel, Rahima; Mazan, Milena; Lie-a-Ling, Michael; Lilly, Andrew; Eliades, Alexia; Menegatti, Sara; Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Florkowska, Magdalena; Batta, Kiran; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first hematopoietic cells are generated very early in ontogeny to support the growth of the embryo and to provide the foundation to the adult hematopoietic system. There is a considerable therapeutic interest in understanding how these first blood cells are generated in order to try to reproduce this process in vitro. This would allow generating blood products, or hematopoietic cell populations from embryonic stem (ES) cells, induced pluripotent stem cells or through directed reprogramming. Recent studies have clearly established that the first hematopoietic cells originate from a hemogenic endothelium (HE) through an endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms underlining this transition remain largely unknown with the exception that the transcription factor RUNX1 is critical for this process. In this Extra Views report, we discuss our recent studies demonstrating that the transcriptional repressors GFI1 and GFI1B have a critical role in the EHT. We established that these RUNX1 transcriptional targets are actively implicated in the downregulation of the endothelial program and the loss of endothelial identity during the formation of the first blood cells. In addition, our results suggest that GFI1 expression provides an ideal novel marker to identify, isolate and study the HE cell population. PMID:27399214

  15. Expression of spicule matrix protein gene SM30 in embryonic and adult mineralized tissues of sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitajima, T.; Tomita, M.; Killian, C. E.; Akasaka, K.; Wilt, F. H.

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone for spicule matrix protein, SM30, from sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus and have studied the expression of this gene in comparison with that of another spicule matrix protein gene, SM50. In cultured micromeres as well as in intact embryos transcripts of SM30 were first detectable around the onset of spicule formation and rapidly increased with the growth of spicules, which accompanied accumulation of glycosylated SM30 protein(s). When micromeres were cultured in the presence of Zn2+, spicule formation and SM30 expression were suppressed, while both events resumed concurrently after the removal of Zn2+ from the culture medium. Expression of SM50, in contrast, started before the appearance of spicules and was not sensitive to Zn2+. Differences were also observed in adult tissues; SM30 mRNA was detected in spines and tube feet but not in the test, while SM50 mRNA was apparent in all of these mineralized tissues at similar levels. These results strongly suggest that the SM30 gene is regulated by a different mechanism to that of the SM50 gene and that the products of these two genes are differently involved in sea urchin biomineralization. A possible role of SM30 protein in skeleton formation is discussed.

  16. Three-dimensional hard tissue palatal size and shape: a 10-year longitudinal evaluation in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Sforza, Chiarella; Dellavia, Claudia; Colombo, Anna; Ferrari, Raffaella P

    2002-01-01

    A 10-year longitudinal evaluation of the morphology (size and shape) of hard tissue palate was performed in 6 female and 6 male healthy adults (mean age at the second evaluation was 33 years, SD = 2.2). All subjects had a complete permanent dentition, including the second molars, and were free from respiratory problems. Palatal landmarks were digitized with a computerized 3D instrument, and their coordinates were used to derive a mathematical model of palatal form. Palatal shape (size-independent) was assessed by a fourth-grade polynomial in the sagittal and frontal plane projections. Palatal dimensions in the frontal and sagittal planes were computed and compared between the 2 evaluations by paired Student t tests. A great variability was observed, and no significant modifications in size were found (P > .05 for all variables). No variations in shape were observed. Sex had no significant effect for any variable (Student t for independent samples, P > .05). This study showed that in healthy subjects, hard tissue palatal morphology does not seem to change between the third and the fourth decades of life.

  17. Immunomodulatory effect of human adipose tissue-derived adult stem cells: comparison with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Puissant, Bénédicte; Barreau, Corinne; Bourin, Philippe; Clavel, Cyril; Corre, Jill; Bousquet, Christine; Taureau, Christine; Cousin, Béatrice; Abbal, Michel; Laharrague, Patrick; Penicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis; Blancher, Antoine

    2005-04-01

    Like mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow (BM-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived adult stem cells (ADAS cells) can differentiate into several lineages and present therapeutical potential for repairing damaged tissues. The use of allogenic stem cells can enlarge their therapeutical interest, provided that the grafted cells could be tolerated. We investigate here, for the first time, the immunosuppressive properties of ADAS cells compared with the well-characterized immunosuppressive properties of BM-MSCs. ADAS cells did not provoke in vitro alloreactivity of incompatible lymphocytes and, moreover, suppressed mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogens. The impairment of inhibition when ADAS cells and BM-MSCs were separated from lymphocytes by a permeable membrane suggests that cell contact is required for a full inhibitory effect. Hepatocyte growth factor is secreted by both stem cells but, similar to interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), the levels of which were undetectable in supernatants of MLR inhibited by ADAS cells or BM-MSCs, it did not seem implicated in the stem cell suppressive effect. These findings support that ADAS cells share immunosuppressive properties with BM-MSCs. Therefore, ADAS cell-based reconstructive therapy could employ allogenic cells and because of their immunosuppressive properties, ADAS cells could be an alternative source to BM-MSCs to treat allogenic conflicts.

  18. A quantitative three-dimensional assessment of soft tissue facial asymmetry of cleft lip and palate adult patients.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Sforza, Chiarella; Dellavia, Claudia; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Colombo, Anna; Carù, Armando

    2003-09-01

    The three-dimensional coordinates of 23 selected soft-tissue facial landmarks were digitized on 18 cleft lip and palate (CLP) white patients (11 male and 7 female patients aged 19-27 years) and 161 healthy controls (73 female and 89 male subjects aged 18-30 years) by an electromagnetic instrument. Facial asymmetry was quantified by detecting a plane of symmetry and the centers of gravity (CG) of the right and left hemifaces and by calculating the distance between the two CG (distance from symmetry [DFS]). Both absolute (millimeters) and percentage (of the nasion center of gravity distance) DFS was obtained. The asymmetry of single landmarks was also quantified. Overall, asymmetry in operated CLP patients appeared only moderately larger than that measured in the healthy reference population, with the largest value being only 5% larger than the maximum normal asymmetry. Female patients had a somewhat larger lateral asymmetry than male patients, and unilateral CLP patients (particularly the men) were more asymmetrical than bilateral CLP patients. Pronasale and subnasale landmarks were asymmetrical in 8 patients, whereas endocanthion, zygion, cheilion, and gonion landmarks were symmetrical in all patients. In conclusion, the facial soft-tissue structures of CLP patients operated on as adults were only moderately more asymmetrical than those measured in a reference group of the same age, sex, and ethnicity.

  19. Tissue specific uptake and elimination of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in adult rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Falk, Sandy; Failing, Klaus; Georgii, Sebastian; Brunn, Hubertus; Stahl, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Tissue specific uptake and elimination of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) were studied in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Adult trout were exposed to perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) via food over a time period of 28d. In the following 28-d depuration period the fish were fed PFAA-free food. At defined sampling times four animals were removed from the experimental tank, euthanized and dissected. Muscle, liver, kidneys, gills, blood, skin and carcass were examined individually. At the end of the accumulation phase between 0.63% (PFOA) and 15.5% (PFOS) of the absolute, applied quantity of PFAAs was recovered in the whole fish. The main target organ was the liver with recovery rates between 0.11% (PFBS) and 4.01% (PFOS) of the total amount of ingested PFAAs. Perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids were taken up more readily and had longer estimated elimination half-lives than perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids of the same chain length. The longest estimated elimination half-lives were found to be for PFOS between 8.4d in muscle tissue and 20.4d in the liver and for PFNA between 8.2d in the blood and 11.6d in the liver.

  20. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: clinical use and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barriga, Francisco; Ramírez, Pablo; Wietstruck, Angélica; Rojas, Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the accepted therapy of choice for a variety of malignant and non-malignant diseases in children and adults. Initially developed as rescue therapy for a patient with cancer after high doses of chemotherapy and radiation as well as the correction of severe deficiencies in the hematopoietic system, it has evolved into an adoptive immune therapy for malignancies and autoimmune disorders. The procedure has helped to obtain key information about the bone marrow environment, the biology of hematopoietic stem cells and histocompatibility. The development of this new discipline has allowed numerous groups working around the world to cure patients of diseases previously considered lethal. Together with the ever growing list of volunteer donors and umbilical cord blood banks, this has resulted in life saving therapy for thousands of patients yearly. We present an overview of the procedure from its cradle to the most novel applications, as well as the results of the HSC transplant program developed at our institution since 1989. PMID:23283440

  1. Comparative Analysis of the Expression Profile of Wnk1 and Wnk1/Hsn2 Splice Variants in Developing and Adult Mouse Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Shekarabi, Masoud; Lafrenière, Ron G.; Gaudet, Rébecca; Laganière, Janet; Marcinkiewicz, Martin M.; Dion, Patrick A.; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    The With No lysine (K) family of serine/threonine kinase (WNK) defines a small family of kinases with significant roles in ion homeostasis. WNK1 has been shown to have different isoforms due to what seems to be largely tissue specific splicing. Here, we used two distinct in situ hybridization riboprobes on developing and adult mouse tissues to make a comparative analysis of Wnk1 and its sensory associated splice isoform, Wnk1/Hsn2. The hybridization signals in developing mouse tissues, which were prepared at embryonic day e10.5 and e12.5, revealed a homogenous expression profile with both probes. At e15.5 and in the newborn mouse, the two probes revealed different expression profiles with prominent signals in nervous system tissues and also other tissues such as kidney, thymus and testis. In adult mouse tissues, the two expression profiles appeared even more restricted to the nervous tissues, kidney, thymus and testis, with no detectable signal in the other tissues. Throughout the nervous system, sensory tissues, as well as in Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA1), CA2 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus, were strongly labeled with both probes. Hybridization signals were also strongly detected in Schwann and supporting satellite cells. Our results show that the expression profiles of Wnk1 isoforms change during the development, and that the expression of the Wnk1 splice variant containing the Hsn2 exon is prominent during developing and in adult mouse tissues, suggesting its important role in the development and maintenance of the nervous system. PMID:23451271

  2. Cellular distribution of the new growth factor pleiotrophin (HB-GAM) mRNA in developing and adult rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Vanderwinden, J M; Mailleux, P; Schiffmann, S N; Vanderhaeghen, J J

    1992-09-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN), also known as HB-GAM, belongs to an emerging cytokine family unrelated to other growth factors. We report here the first comprehensive study using in situ hybridization on the cellular distribution of this new heparin-binding growth factor mRNA in rat tissues. PTN mRNA was developmentally expressed in many--but not all--neuroectodermal and mesodermal lineages, whilst no PTN mRNA was detected in endoderm, ectoderm and trophoblast. PTN mRNA was found in the nervous system throughout development, with a post-natal peak of expression. In the adult nervous system, significant expression persisted in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and in cortical neurons, but also in different non-neuronal cells types in various locations (olfactory nerve, cerebellar astrocytes, pituicytes, Schwann cells surrounding the neurons in sensory ganglia). PTN mRNA was also found during development in the mesenchyme of lung, gut, kidney and reproductive tract, in bone and cartilage progenitors, in dental pulp, in myoblasts, and in several other sites. Expression was differently regulated in each location, but usually faded around birth. In the adult, PTN mRNA was still present in the meninges, the iris, the Leydig cells of the testis and in the uterus. PTN mRNA was also strongly expressed in the basal layers of the tongue epithelium, which is the only epithelium and ectodermal derivative to express PTN mRNA, and this only after birth. PTN is known to be a growth factor for perinatal brain neurons and a mitogen for fibroblasts in vitro. Recently, trophic effects on epithelial cells and a role as a tumour growth factor have been reported. The mechanisms of regulation and the functions of PTN are however still uncertain. Its expression pattern during development suggests important roles in growth and differentiation. Moreover, the presence of PTN mRNA in several adult tissues and the up-regulation of PTN mRNA expression in the gravid uterus indicate that PTN also has

  3. Ontogeny of Tissue-Resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hoeffel, Guillaume; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-01-01

    The origin of tissue-resident macrophages, crucial for homeostasis and immunity, has remained controversial until recently. Originally described as part of the mononuclear phagocyte system, macrophages were long thought to derive solely from adult blood circulating monocytes. However, accumulating evidence now shows that certain macrophage populations are in fact independent from monocyte and even from adult bone marrow hematopoiesis. These tissue-resident macrophages derive from sequential seeding of tissues by two precursors during embryonic development. Primitive macrophages generated in the yolk sac (YS) from early erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs), independently of the transcription factor c-Myb and bypassing monocytic intermediates, first give rise to microglia. Later, fetal monocytes, generated from c-Myb+ EMPs that initially seed the fetal liver (FL), then give rise to the majority of other adult macrophages. Thus, hematopoietic stem cell-independent embryonic precursors transiently present in the YS and the FL give rise to long-lasting self-renewing macrophage populations. PMID:26441990

  4. [Attraction of Sphenophorus levis Vaurie adults (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to vegetal tissues at different conservation levels].

    PubMed

    Girón-Pérez, Katherine; Nakano, Octávio; Silva, Amanda C; Oda-Souza, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of the sugarcane weevil Sphenophorus levis Vaurie is important in sugarcane in some regions in Brazil. Damage is caused by the larvae as they bore into the nodes and can reach 30 ton/ha/year. Many control alternatives have been attempted, but none were satisfactory, except for the use of toxic baits. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize their efficiency or to propose new techniques. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the attractiveness of adults of S. levis to sugarcane nodes and pineapple peelings in an 'Y' tube olfactometer. The sugarcane internodes were treated with 10% molasses, and tested after different periods of fermentation (24, 48 e 72h), at different times of the day (diurnal and nocturnal) and with both sexes. These tests were carried out in order to correlate the response of S. levis to ethyl acetate and ethanol release as a result of the fermentation process. The release of both compounds was monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our data indicated that sugarcane internodes mixed with 10% molasses fermented for 24h and 48h were the most attractive to S. levis (up to 90%). Pineapple peelings attracted 62.5% of the tested insects. The olfactory response was higher during the day, and no differences were found between the sexes. The production of ethanol in all plant substrates was higher than ethyl acetate, but we could not establish a clear correlation with the insect response to baits. PMID:20098932

  5. Isolated Limb Perfusion of Melphalan With or Without Tumor Necrosis Factor in Treating Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Arm or Leg

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-14

    Stage IVB Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IIB Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IIC Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IVA Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  6. Modeling pO(2) distributions in the bone marrow hematopoietic compartment. I. Krogh's model.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, D C; Wenning, L A; Miller, W M; Papoutsakis, E T

    2001-01-01

    Human bone marrow (BM) is a tissue of complex architectural organization, which includes granulopoietic loci, erythroblastic islets, and lymphocytic nodules. Oxygen tension (pO(2)) is an important determinant of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Thus, understanding the impact of the BM architectural organization on pO(2) levels in extravascular hematopoietic tissue is an important biophysical problem. However, currently it is impossible to measure pO(2) levels and their spatial variations in the BM. Homogeneous Kroghian models were used to estimate pO(2) distribution in the BM hematopoietic compartment (BMHC) and to conservatively simulate pO(2)-limited cellular architectures. Based on biophysical data of hematopoietic cells and characteristics of BM physiology, we constructed a tissue cylinder solely occupied by granulocytic progenitors (the most metabolically active stage of the most abundant cell type) to provide a physiologically relevant limiting case. Although the number of possible cellular architectures is large, all simulated pO(2) profiles fall between two extreme cases: those of homogeneous tissues with adipocytes and granulocytic progenitors, respectively. This was illustrated by results obtained from a parametric criterion derived for pO(2) depletion in the extravascular tissue. Modeling results suggest that stem and progenitor cells experience a low pO(2) environment in the BMHC. PMID:11463616

  7. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  8. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cells in the niche.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng; Li, LinHeng

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoiesis provides a suitable model for understanding adult stem cells and their niche. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) continuously produce blood cells through orchestrated proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation in the bone marrow (BM). Within the BM exists a highly organized microenvironment termed "niche" where stem cells reside and are maintained. HSC niche is the first evidence that a microenvironment contributes to protecting stem cell integrity and functionality in mammals. Although multiple models exist, recent progress has principally elucidated the cellular complexity of the HSC niche that maintains and regulates HSCs in BM. Here we introduce the development and summarize the achievements of HSC niche studies.

  9. Densely calculated facial soft tissue thickness for craniofacial reconstruction in Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Shui, Wuyang; Zhou, Mingquan; Deng, Qingqiong; Wu, Zhongke; Ji, Yuan; Li, Kang; He, Taiping; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-09-01

    Craniofacial reconstruction (CFR) is used to recreate a likeness of original facial appearance for an unidentified skull; this technique has been applied in both forensics and archeology. Many CFR techniques rely on the average facial soft tissue thickness (FSTT) of anatomical landmarks, related to ethnicity, age, sex, body mass index (BMI), etc. Previous studies typically employed FSTT at sparsely distributed anatomical landmarks, where different landmark definitions may affect the contrasting results. In the present study, a total of 90,198 one-to-one correspondence skull vertices are established on 171 head CT-scans and the FSTT of each corresponding vertex is calculated (hereafter referred to as densely calculated FSTT) for statistical analysis and CFR. Basic descriptive statistics (i.e., mean and standard deviation) for densely calculated FSTT are reported separately according to sex and age. Results show that 76.12% of overall vertices indicate that the FSTT is greater in males than females, with the exception of vertices around the zygoma, zygomatic arch and mid-lateral orbit. These sex-related significant differences are found at 55.12% of all vertices and the statistically age-related significant differences are depicted between the three age groups at a majority of all vertices (73.31% for males and 63.43% for females). Five non-overlapping categories are given and the descriptive statistics (i.e., mean, standard deviation, local standard deviation and percentage) are reported. Multiple appearances are produced using the densely calculated FSTT of various age and sex groups, and a quantitative assessment is provided to examine how relevant the choice of FSTT is to increasing the accuracy of CFR. In conclusion, this study provides a new perspective in understanding the distribution of FSTT and the construction of a new densely calculated FSTT database for craniofacial reconstruction. PMID:27544400

  10. [A medical-pharmaceutical partnership model as a contributor to the success in conditioning regimen for allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adults: a cross-reflection on our organizations].

    PubMed

    Bourget, Philippe; Falaschi, Ludivine; Suarez, Felipe; Galland, Valérie; Blot, Dominique; Trompette, Caroline; Sibon, David; Fontbrune, Flore Sicre de; Merlette, Christophe; Vidal, Fabrice; Corriol, Odile; Giraud, Bérénice; Broissand, Christine; Clement, Rozenn; Hermine, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplant (allo-SCT) remains the only cure for many hematological malignancies and some benign and congenital diseases. Busulfan, proposed in its injectable form, has quickly become a mainstay of pharmacological and myeloablative (or non-myeloablative) conditioning. This is following the outbreak in 2010 of a multicenter international clinical phase II trial, we tested the robustness and reliability of our organization in a complex model of organization and multifactorial partnership. In this type "BuCy2" protocol based on a classical treatment duration of 4 consecutive days, the administration of IV busulfan is given in one single daily infusion instead of the conventional 16 infusions, while keeping the same total dose. Under these conditions, the treatment is totally secured using a therapeutic drug monitoring of busulfan, applied in real-time. The process is technically complex and requires the very close cooperation of the teams involved. A strength, weakness, opportunity and threat (SWOT) analysis has been constructed; it fully supports continuous quality improvement to the triple benefit of the nursing chain, the patients and their environment. Several critical points were identified and corrected. The experiment strongly contributes to the safety and security of the medication circuit at the hospital and, improves the performance of allo-SCT. It also contributes to the protection of all actors in the health field and their working environment via a well-functioning quality management system.

  11. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, JingJing; Zhang, ChengCheng

    2015-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) would benefit clinical applications in several aspects, to improve patient survival, utilize cord blood stem cells for adult applications, and selectively propagate stem cell populations after genetic manipulation. In this review we summarize and discuss recent advances in the culture systems of mouse and human HSCs, which include stroma/HSC co-culture, continuous perfusion and fed-batch cultures, and those supplemented with extrinsic ligands, membrane transportable transcription factors, complement components, protein modification enzymes, metabolites, or small molecule chemicals. Some of the expansion systems have been tested in clinical trials. The optimal condition for ex vivo expansion of the primitive and functional human HSCs is still under development. An improved understanding of the mechanisms for HSC cell fate determination and the HSC culture characteristics will guide development of new strategies to overcome difficulties. In the future, development of a combination treatment regimen with agents that enhance self-renewal, block differentiation, and improve homing will be critical. Methods to enhance yields and lower cost during collection and processing should be employed. The employment of an efficient system for ex vivo expansion of HSCs will facilitate the further development of novel strategies for cell and gene therapies including genome editing.

  12. Somatomedin-C/insulin-like growth factor-I and Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNAs in rate fetal and adult tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, P.K.; Moats-Staats, B.M.; Hynes, M.A.; Simmons, J.G.; Jansen, M.; D'ercole, A.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.

    1986-11-05

    Somatomedin-C or insulin-like growth factor I (Sm-C/IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) have been implicated in the regulation of fetal growth and development. In the present study /sup 32/P-labeled complementary DNA probes encoding human and mouse Sm-C/IGF-I and human IGF-II were used in Northern blot hybridizations to analyze rat Sm-C/IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs in poly(A/sup +/) RNAs from intestine, liver, lung, and brain of adult rats and fetal rats between day 14 and 17 of gestation. In fetal rats, all four tissues contained a major mRNA of 1.7 kilobase (kb) that hybridized with the human Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA and mRNAs of 7.5, 4.7, 1.7, and 1.2 kb that hybridized with the mouse Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA. Adult rat intestine, liver, and lung also contained these mRNAs but Sm-C/IGF-I mRNAs were not detected in adult rat brain. These findings provide direct support for prior observations that multiple tissues in the fetus synthesize immunoreactive Sm-C/IGF-I and imply a role for Sm-C/IGF-I in fetal development as well as postnatally. Multiple IGF-II mRNAs of estimated sizes 4.7, 3.9, 2.2, 1.75, and 1.2 kb were observed in fetal rat intestine, liver, lung, and brain. The 4.7- and 3.9-kb mRNAs were the major hybridizing IGF-II mRNAs in all fetal tissues. Higher abundance of IGF-II mRNAs in rat fetal tissues compared with adult tissues supports prior hypotheses, based on serum IGF-II concentrations, that IGF-II is predominantly a fetal somatomedin. IGF-II mRNAs are present, however, in some poly(A/sup +/) RNAs from adult rat tissues. The brain was the only tissue in the adult rat where the 4.7- and 3.9-kb IGF-II mRNAs were consistently detected. These findings suggest that a role for IGF-II in the adult rat, particularly in the central nervous system, cannot be excluded.

  13. Assessing the effects of model Maillard compound intake on iron, copper and zinc retention and tissue delivery in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Roncero-Ramos, Irene; Pastoriza, Silvia; Navarro, M Pilar; Delgado-Andrade, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of dietary Maillard reaction compounds (MRP) as metal chelating polymers can alter mineral absorption and/or retention. Our aim in this study was to analyse the long-term effects of the consumption of model MRP from glucose-lysine heated for 90 min at 150 °C (GL) on iron, copper and zinc whole-body retention and tissue delivery. For 88 days, weaning rats were fed a Control diet or one containing 3% GL, until reaching the adult stage. During the experimental period a mineral balance was conducted to investigate the mineral retention. At day 88, the animals were sacrificed, blood was drawn for haemoglobin determination and some organs were removed. Copper and zinc balances were unaffected (Cu: 450 vs. 375 μg; Zn: 6.7 vs. 6.2 mg for Control and GL groups, respectively) and no change was observed in whole-body delivery. Iron retention, too, was unaltered (11.2 mg for Control and GL groups) but due to the tendency toward decreased body weight in the GL group (248 vs. 233 g for the Control and GL groups), whole-body iron concentration was 13% higher in the GL group than in the Control group. Absorbed iron accumulated particularly in the liver (144 vs. 190 μg g(-1) for the Control and GL groups), thus reducing haemoglobin levels. The long-term intake of MRP induced iron accumulation in the body but this did not result in enhanced iron functionality, since the haemoglobin concentration declined. Taking into account the findings of our research group's studies of young and adult rats, we now corroborate the hypothesis that the negative effect of GL MRP consumption on iron functionality takes place regardless of the animals' stage of life.

  14. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates proliferation maintaining the multipotency of human adult bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoli; H'ng, Shiau-Chen; Leong, David T; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Melendez, Alirio J

    2010-08-01

    High renewal and maintenance of multipotency of human adult stem cells (hSCs), are a prerequisite for experimental analysis as well as for potential clinical usages. The most widely used strategy for hSC culture and proliferation is using serum. However, serum is poorly defined and has a considerable degree of inter-batch variation, which makes it difficult for large-scale mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expansion in homogeneous culture conditions. Moreover, it is often observed that cells grown in serum-containing media spontaneously differentiate into unknown and/or undesired phenotypes. Another way of maintaining hSC development is using cytokines and/or tissue-specific growth factors; this is a very expensive approach and can lead to early unwanted differentiation. In order to circumvent these issues, we investigated the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), in the growth and multipotency maintenance of human bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSCs. We show that S1P induces growth, and in combination with reduced serum, or with the growth factors FGF and platelet-derived growth factor-AB, S1P has an enhancing effect on growth. We also show that the MSCs cultured in S1P-supplemented media are able to maintain their differentiation potential for at least as long as that for cells grown in the usual serum-containing media. This is shown by the ability of cells grown in S1P-containing media to be able to undergo osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation. This is of interest, since S1P is a relatively inexpensive natural product, which can be obtained in homogeneous high-purity batches: this will minimize costs and potentially reduce the unwanted side effects observed with serum. Taken together, S1P is able to induce proliferation while maintaining the multipotency of different human stem cells, suggesting a potential for S1P in developing serum-free or serum-reduced defined medium for adult stem cell cultures.

  15. Epithelial-connective tissue interactions induced by thyroid hormone receptor are essential for adult stem cell development in the Xenopus laevis intestine.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Takashi; Buchholz, Daniel R; Shi, Yun-Bo; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko

    2011-01-01

    In the amphibian intestine during metamorphosis, stem cells appear and generate the adult absorptive epithelium, analogous to the mammalian one, under the control of thyroid hormone (TH). We have previously shown that the adult stem cells originate from differentiated larval epithelial cells in the Xenopus laevis intestine. To clarify whether TH signaling in the epithelium alone is sufficient for inducing the stem cells, we have now performed tissue recombinant culture experiments using transgenic X. laevis tadpoles that express a dominant-positive TH receptor (dpTR) under a control of heat shock promoter. Wild-type (Wt) or dpTR transgenic (Tg) larval epithelium (Ep) was isolated from the tadpole intestine, recombined with homologous or heterologous nonepithelial tissues (non-Ep), and then cultivated in the absence of TH with daily heat shocks to induce transgenic dpTR expression. Adult epithelial progenitor cells expressing sonic hedgehog became detectable on day 5 in both the recombinant intestine of Tg Ep and Tg non-Ep (Tg/Tg) and that of Tg Ep and Wt non-Ep (Tg/Wt). However, in Tg/Wt intestine, they did not express other stem cell markers such as Musashi-1 and never generated the adult epithelium expressing a marker for absorptive epithelial cells. Our results indicate that, while it is unclear why some larval epithelial cells dedifferentiate into adult progenitor/stem cells, TR-mediated gene expression in the surrounding tissues other than the epithelium is required for them to develop into adult stem cells, suggesting the importance of TH-inducible epithelial-connective tissue interactions in establishment of the stem cell niche in the amphibian intestine.

  16. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L F; Oomen, Pim J A; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W J T; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J; Bogers, Ad J J C; Goumans, Marie-José T H; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  17. Effects of FGF-2 on human adipose tissue derived adult stem cells morphology and chondrogenesis enhancement in Transwell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kabiri, Azadeh; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Hashemibeni, Batool; Kazemi, Mohammad; Mardani, Mohammad; Esmaeili, Abolghasem

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated effects of FGF-2 on hADSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the level of gene expressions of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF-2 induces chondrogenesis in hADSCs, which Bullet Increasing information will decrease quality if hospital costs are very different. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result of this study may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering. -- Abstract: Injured cartilage is difficult to repair due to its poor vascularisation. Cell based therapies may serve as tools to more effectively regenerate defective cartilage. Both adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs) are regarded as potential stem cell sources able to generate functional cartilage for cell transplantation. Growth factors, in particular the TGF-b superfamily, influence many processes during cartilage formation, including cell proliferation, extracellular matrix synthesis, maintenance of the differentiated phenotype, and induction of MSCs towards chondrogenesis. In the current study, we investigated the effects of FGF-2 on hADSC morphology and chondrogenesis in Transwell culture. hADSCs were obtained from patients undergoing elective surgery, and then cultured in expansion medium alone or in the presence of FGF-2 (10 ng/ml). mRNA expression levels of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The morphology, doubling time, trypsinization time and chondrogenesis of hADSCs were also studied. Expression levels of SOX-9, collagen type II, and aggrecan were all significantly increased in hADSCs expanded in presence of FGF-2. Furthermore FGF-2 induced a slender morphology, whereas doubling time and trypsinization time decreased. Our results suggest that FGF-2 induces hADSCs chondrogenesis in Transwell culture, which may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering.

  18. Immunohistochemical evidence that gonads and gonad-associated tissues are sites for enrichment with immunoglobulin-containing cells in adult chickens.

    PubMed

    Zettergren, L D

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining of tissue sections prepared from gonads and gonad-associated tissues obtained from adult chickens was performed in order to assess the possibility that these tissues may be sites of enrichment with IgM-containing cells in various B lineages. Evidence is presented which suggests that IgM-containing B lineage cells are present in 1) the ovarian stroma and subcapsular areas of the ovary and 2) the interstitium and subcapsular areas of the epididymis of the testes. These represent new sites reported for B lineage cells in adult chickens. Some questions relevant to the physiologic, ontogenetic, and phylogenetic implications of these observations relative to vertebrate hematolymphopoietic processes are included.

  19. In vitro flubendazole-induced damage to vital tissues in adult females of the filarial nematode Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Maeghan; Geary, James F.; Agnew, Dalen W.; Mackenzie, Charles D.; Geary, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a microfilaricidal drug for the control of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis necessitates prolonged yearly dosing. Prospects for elimination or eradication of these diseases would be enhanced by availability of a macrofilaricidal drug. Flubendazole (FLBZ), a benzimidazole anthelmintic, is an appealing candidate macrofilaricide. FLBZ has demonstrated profound and potent macrofilaricidal effects in a number of experimental filarial rodent models and one human trial. Unfortunately, FLBZ was deemed unsatisfactory for use in mass drug administration (MDA) campaigns due to its markedly limited oral bioavailability. However, a new formulation that provided sufficient bioavailability following oral administration could render FLBZ an effective treatment for onchocerciasis and LF. This study characterized the effects of FLBZ and its reduced metabolite (FLBZ-R) on filarial nematodes in vitro to determine the exposure profile which results in demonstrable damage. Adult female Brugia malayi were exposed to varying concentrations of FLBZ or FLBZ-R (100 nM–10 μM) for up to five days, after which worms were fixed for histology. Morphological damage following exposure to FLBZ was observed prominently in the hypodermis and developing embryos at concentrations as low as 100 nM following 24 h exposure. The results indicate that damage to tissues required for reproduction and survival can be achieved at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. PMID:26288741

  20. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  1. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  2. Role of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Inflammation of the Pancreas during Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Skurikhin, E G; Pershina, O V; Ermakova, N N; Krupin, V A; Ermolaeva, L A; Stakheeva, M N; Choinzonov, E L; Goldberg, V E; Reikhart, D V; Ellinidi, V N; Kravtsov, V Yu

    2016-02-01

    The model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus in C57Bl/6 mice was employed to study the role of precursors of insulin-producing β-cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor hematopoietic cells in inflammation. In addition to provoking hyperglycemia, streptozotocin elevated serum levels of IL-1β and hyaluronic acid, induced edema in the pancreatic insular tissue and its infiltration by inflammatory cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages) and fibroblasts. Inflammation in pancreatic islets was accompanied by necrotic processes and decreasing counts of multipotent progenitor β-cells (CD45(-), TER119(-), c-kit-1(-), and Flk-1(-)), oligopotent progenitor β-cells (CD45(-), TER119(-), CD133(+), and CD49f(low)), and insulinproducing β-cells (Pdx1(+)). Pancreatic infl ammation was preceded by elevation of the number of short-term hematopoietic stem cells (Lin-Sca-1(+)c-kit(+)CD34(+)) relative to long-term cells (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+)CD34(-)) in the bone marrow as well as recruitment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into circulation. Transplantation of bone marrow hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from diabetic C57Bl/6 donor mice to recipient CBA mice with 5-fluorouracilinduced leukopenia accelerated regeneration of granulocytopoiesis in recipient mice. PMID:26906195

  3. The human placenta is a hematopoietic organ during the embryonic and fetal periods of development

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Alicia; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Muench, Marcus O.; Gormley, Matthew; Scott, Marvin A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Fisher, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the potential role of the human placenta as a hematopoietic organ during embryonic and fetal development. Placental samples contained two cell populations—CD34++CD45low and CD34+CD45low—that were found in chorionic villi and in the chorioamniotic membrane. CD34++CD45low cells express many cell surface antigens found on multipotent primitive hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. CD34++CD45low cells contained colony-forming units culture (CFU-C) with myeloid and erythroid potential in clonogenic in vitro assays, and they generated CD56+ natural killer cells and CD19+CD20+sIgM+ B cells in polyclonal liquid cultures. CD34+CD45low cells mostly comprised erythroid- and myeloid-committed progenitors, while CD34− cells lacked CFU-C. The placenta-derived precursors were fetal in origin, as demonstrated by FISH using repeat-sequence chromosome-specific probes for X and Y. The number of CD34++CD45low cells increased with gestational age, but their density (cells per gram of tissue) peaked at 5–8 wk, decreasing more than sevenfold at the onset of the fetal phase (9 wk of gestation). In addition to multipotent progenitors, the placenta contained myeloid- and erythroid-committed progenitors indicative of active in situ hematopoiesis. These data suggest that the human placenta is an important hematopoietic organ, raising the possibility of banking placental hematopoietic stem cells along with cord blood for transplantation. PMID:19073167

  4. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of hematopoietic lesions from multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Silverman, J F; McLeod, D L; Park, H K

    1990-01-01

    We reviewed 130 fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from 118 patients with a variety of benign and malignant hematopoietic lesions. There were 74 (57%) malignant, 45 (35%) benign, and 11 (8%) atypical diagnoses. Immunocytochemistry of the aspirated material was performed in 47 (36%) and electron microscopy in 4 (3%) of the cases. FNA cytology was utilized to make a primary hematopoietic malignant diagnosis in approximately half of the cases and to confirm recurrence in the remainder. The malignant cases included non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Hodgkin's disease, medullary and extramedullary plasmacytoma, and granulocytic sarcoma. Forty-two malignant cases had either previous or follow-up surgical biopsy with no false-positive diagnoses. Of the 11 atypical cases, seven had surgical confirmation with five malignant and two benign diagnoses. The benign hematopoietic lesions correctly identified included acute and chronic lymphadenitis, granulomatous processes, and eosinophilic granuloma. Only 5 of the 45 benign FNA biopsies had surgical pathology follow-up, with no false-negative diagnoses. The most commonly aspirated sites were lymph nodes (71%), although hematopoietic lesions were correctly identified in a number of extranodal locations, including soft tissue (8%), abdominal viscera (6%), lungs (5%), mediastinum (2.5%), bone (3%), and thyroid, salivary gland, and breast (1.5% each). This study demonstrates the clinical utility and diagnostic accuracy of FNA cytology in the evaluation of benign and malignant hematopoietic disorders from multiple sites. Ancillary studies performed on the aspirated material aided in making a specific and accurate diagnosis.

  5. Adult soft tissue sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain chemicals, such as vinyl chloride or certain herbicides Having swelling in the arms or legs for ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  6. Dietary restriction improves repopulation but impairs lymphoid differentiation capacity of hematopoietic stem cells in early aging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Duozhuang; Tao, Si; Chen, Zhiyang; Koliesnik, Ievgen Oleksandrovich; Calmes, Philip Gerald; Hoerr, Verena; Han, Bing; Gebert, Nadja; Zörnig, Martin; Löffler, Bettina; Morita, Yohei; Rudolph, Karl Lenhard

    2016-04-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) improves health, delays tissue aging, and elongates survival in flies and worms. However, studies on laboratory mice and nonhuman primates revealed ambiguous effects of DR on lifespan despite improvements in health parameters. In this study, we analyzed consequences of adult-onset DR (24 h to 1 yr) on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. DR ameliorated HSC aging phenotypes, such as the increase in number of HSCs and the skewing toward myeloid-biased HSCs during aging. Furthermore, DR increased HSC quiescence and improved the maintenance of the repopulation capacity of HSCs during aging. In contrast to these beneficial effects, DR strongly impaired HSC differentiation into lymphoid lineages and particularly inhibited the proliferation of lymphoid progenitors, resulting in decreased production of peripheral B lymphocytes and impaired immune function. The study shows that DR-dependent suppression of growth factors and interleukins mediates these divergent effects caused by DR. Supplementation of insulin-like growth factor 1 partially reverted the DR-induced quiescence of HSCs, whereas IL-6/IL-7 substitutions rescued the impairment of B lymphopoiesis exposed to DR. Together, these findings delineate positive and negative effects of long-term DR on HSC functionality involving distinct stress and growth signaling pathways.

  7. Tissue- and sex-specific effects of β-carotene 15,15′ oxygenase (BCO1) on retinoid and lipid metabolism in adult and developing mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Kyung; Zuccaro, Michael V.; Costabile, Brianna K.; Rodas, Rebeka; Quadro, Loredana

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, β-carotene-15,15′-oxygenase (BCO1) is the main enzyme that cleaves β-carotene, the most abundant vitamin A precursor, to generate retinoids (vitamin A derivatives), both in adult and developing tissues. We previously reported that, in addition to this function, BCO1 can also influence the synthesis of retinyl esters, the storage form of retinoids, in the mouse embryo at mid-gestation. Indeed, lack of embryonic BCO1 impaired both lecithin-dependent and acyl CoA-dependent retinol esterification, mediated by lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) and acyl CoA:retinol acyltransferase (ARAT), respectively. Furthermore, embryonic BCO1 also influenced the ester pools of cholesterol and diacylglycerol. In this report, we gained novel insights into this alternative function of BCO1 by investigating whether BCO1 influenced embryonic retinoid and lipid metabolism in a tissue-dependent manner. To this end, livers and brains from wild-type and BCO1−/− embryos at mid-gestation were analyzed for retinoid and lipid content, as well as gene expression levels. We also asked whether or not the role of BCO1 as a regulator of lecithin- and acyl CoA-dependent retinol esterification was exclusively restricted to the developing tissues. Thus, a survey of retinol and retinyl ester levels in adult tissues of wild-type, BCO1−/−, LRAT−/− and LRAT−/−BCO1−/− mice was performed. We showed that the absence of BCO1 affects embryonic retinoid and lipid homeostasis in a tissue-specific manner and that retinyl ester formation is also influenced by BCO1 in a few adult tissues (pancreas, lung, heart and adipose) in a sex- dependent manner. PMID:25602705

  8. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation is associated with decreased abdominal visceral adipose tissue in overweight and obese adults1234

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Jennifer L; Castro, Victor M; Moore, Carolyn E; Kaplan, Lee M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several studies suggest that calcium and vitamin D (CaD) may play a role in the regulation of abdominal fat mass. Objective: This study investigated the effect of CaD-supplemented orange juice (OJ) on weight loss and reduction of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in overweight and obese adults (mean ± SD age: 40.0 ± 12.9 y). Design: Two parallel, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were conducted with either regular or reduced-energy (lite) orange juice. For each 16-wk trial, 171 participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. The treatment groups consumed three 240-mL glasses of OJ (regular or lite) fortified with 350 mg Ca and 100 IU vitamin D per serving, and the control groups consumed either unfortified regular or lite OJ. Computed tomography scans of VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue were performed by imaging a single cut at the lumbar 4 level. Results: After 16 wk, the average weight loss (∼2.45 kg) did not differ significantly between groups. In the regular OJ trial, the reduction of VAT was significantly greater (P = 0.024) in the CaD group (−12.7 ± 25.0 cm2) than in the control group (−1.3 ± 13.6 cm2). In the lite OJ trial, the reduction of VAT was significantly greater (P = 0.039) in the CaD group (−13.1 ± 18.4 cm2) than in the control group (−6.4 ± 17.5 cm2) after control for baseline VAT. The effect of calcium and vitamin D on VAT remained highly significant when the results of the 2 trials were combined (P = 0.007). Conclusions: The findings suggest that calcium and/or vitamin D supplementation contributes to a beneficial reduction of VAT. This trial is registered at clinicaltrial.gov as NCT00386672, NCT01363115. PMID:22170363

  9. Localization of 5'-ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase in regenerating (and normal) limb tissues of the adult newt Notophthalmus viridescens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A J; Woerthwein, K F

    1975-08-11

    The regenerating forelimb of the adult newt, Notophthalmus viridescens was investigated for 5'-nucleotidase (5' ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase, 3.1.3.5) acitivity. The newt's humeri were surgically removed, and after a twenty-one-day recovery period, the forelimbs amputated above the elbows. Regenerates were sampled at predetermined times for specific phases in the progress of regeneration, frozen, sectioned in a cryostat, and the sections fixed in 10% cold formol calcium. The Wachstein and Meisel [25] lead procedure at neutral pH was used predominately in these experiments, although tests were also conducted with Gomori's [14] calcium, Allen's [21] highly alkaline procedures. The substrates used to obtain specific enzyme reactions were adenine, cytosine, guanine, uracil and inosine 5'-monophosphate nucleotides. Sodium beta-glycerophosphate served as a non-specific phosphomonoesterase substrate, distilled water replaced substrate, and inhibitors such as zinc and cyanide ions were used as control measures to assist in increasing the precision in interpreting the results obtained. The most reactive 5'-nucleotidase (5'-Nase) loci were in the walls of the blood vascular system, mysial and neural sheaths, dermis, and periosteum: the principal cells involved were macrophages, endothelium of blood vessels, and fibrocytes of connective tissues. A moderate enzyme response was elicited from secretory cells of some of the subcutaneous glands, hypertrophied chondrocytes and osteogenic centers, chondrocytes in the articular regions and within red blood cells and leucocytes. Normal, injured and degenerating, or regenerating striated muscle and nerve fibers were judged unreactive for 5'-Nase. The epidermis and wound epithelium displayed negative responses for 5'-Nase. Cells forming the regeneration blastema were 5'-Nase reactive during the early formative phase, but with growth and development of the blastema into bulb and conic forms, these cells did not respond for this enzyme

  10. Fibrogenic Cell Plasticity Blunts Tissue Regeneration and Aggravates Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pessina, Patrizia; Kharraz, Yacine; Jardí, Mercè; Fukada, So-ichiro; Serrano, Antonio L; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2015-06-01

    Preservation of cell identity is necessary for homeostasis of most adult tissues. This process is challenged every time a tissue undergoes regeneration after stress or injury. In the lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), skeletal muscle regenerative capacity declines gradually as fibrosis increases. Using genetically engineered tracing mice, we demonstrate that, in dystrophic muscle, specialized cells of muscular, endothelial, and hematopoietic origins gain plasticity toward a fibrogenic fate via a TGFβ-mediated pathway. This results in loss of cellular identity and normal function, with deleterious consequences for regeneration. Furthermore, this fibrogenic process involves acquisition of a mesenchymal progenitor multipotent status, illustrating a link between fibrogenesis and gain of progenitor cell functions. As this plasticity also was observed in DMD patients, we propose that mesenchymal transitions impair regeneration and worsen diseases with a fibrotic component. PMID:25981413

  11. Fibrogenic Cell Plasticity Blunts Tissue Regeneration and Aggravates Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pessina, Patrizia; Kharraz, Yacine; Jardí, Mercè; Fukada, So-ichiro; Serrano, Antonio L; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2015-06-01

    Preservation of cell identity is necessary for homeostasis of most adult tissues. This process is challenged every time a tissue undergoes regeneration after stress or injury. In the lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), skeletal muscle regenerative capacity declines gradually as fibrosis increases. Using genetically engineered tracing mice, we demonstrate that, in dystrophic muscle, specialized cells of muscular, endothelial, and hematopoietic origins gain plasticity toward a fibrogenic fate via a TGFβ-mediated pathway. This results in loss of cellular identity and normal function, with deleterious consequences for regeneration. Furthermore, this fibrogenic process involves acquisition of a mesenchymal progenitor multipotent status, illustrating a link between fibrogenesis and gain of progenitor cell functions. As this plasticity also was observed in DMD patients, we propose that mesenchymal transitions impair regeneration and worsen diseases with a fibrotic component.

  12. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinming; Shao, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs) and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH)/uniparental disomy (UPD) that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants. PMID:27600067

  13. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinming; Shao, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs) and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH)/uniparental disomy (UPD) that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants.

  14. The rate of protein synthesis in hematopoietic stem cells is limited partly by 4E-BPs

    PubMed Central

    Signer, Robert A.J.; Qi, Le; Zhao, Zhiyu; Thompson, David; Sigova, Alla A.; Fan, Zi Peng; DeMartino, George N.; Young, Richard A.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Morrison, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells must limit their rate of protein synthesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Differences in protein synthesis among hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells did not correlate with differences in proteasome activity, total RNA content, mRNA content, or cell division rate. However, adult HSCs had more hypophosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and 4E-BP2 as compared with most other hematopoietic progenitors. Deficiency for 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2 significantly increased global protein synthesis in HSCs, but not in other hematopoietic progenitors, and impaired their reconstituting activity, identifying a mechanism that promotes HSC maintenance by attenuating protein synthesis. PMID:27492367

  15. Morphology of certain viruses of Salmonid fishes. II. In vivo studies of infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.; Chambers, Velma C.

    1970-01-01

    Juvenile sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) were injected with the infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus, and tissue samples from the anterior kidney, spleen, liver, intestine, and pyloric caeca of moribund fish were prepared for electron microscopy. Bullet-shaped virus particles measuring 158 × 90 mμ were observed in the hematopoietic tissues of the anterior kidney and spleen. Virus particles were also observed in the outer connective tissues of the pancreas or pyloric caeca, or both. No virus was found in the intestine or liver. The healthy appearance of erythrocytes, reticular cells, and endothelial cells in necrotic areas of the spleen and anterior kidney, and the absence of lymphocytes in these areas, suggested that lymphocytes might be one source of the virus.

  16. Depsipeptide (Romidepsin) in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Adult Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Malignant Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Neurofibrosarcoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  17. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Allana Nicole; Brezo, Jelena

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. While the cause of these symptoms are not yet fully delineated, one possible explanation could be the inhibition of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) growth and hematopoiesis in space. HSCs differentiate into all types of blood cells, and growing evidence indicates that the HSCs also have the ability to transdifferentiate to various tissues, including muscle, skin, liver, neuronal cells and possibly bone. Therefore, a hypothesis was advanced in this laboratory that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), could mitigate some of the disorders described above. Due to the magnitude of this project our laboratory has subdivided it into 3 sections: a) HSCT for space anemia; b) HSCT for muscle and bone losses; and c) HSCT for immunodeficiency. Toward developing the HSCT protocol for space anemia, the HSC transplantation procedure was established using a mouse model of beta thalassemia. In addition, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system was used to grow HSCs in space condition. To investigate the HSCT for muscle loss and bone loss, donor HSCs were genetically marked either by transfecting the beta-galactosidase-containing plasmid, pCMV.SPORT-beta-gal or by preparing from b-galactosidase transgenic mice. The transdifferentiation of HSCs to muscle is traced by the reporter gene expression in the hindlimb suspended mice with some positive outcome, as studied by the X-gal staining procedure. The possible structural contribution of HSCs against muscle loss is being investigated histochemically.

  18. Economics of hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khera, Nandita; Zeliadt, Steven B; Lee, Stephanie J

    2012-08-23

    Given the rapidly rising healthcare costs, it is important to understand the economic costs of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), a procedure that is being used more frequently in the treatment of various hematologic disorders. Studies have reported a wide range of costs for HCT, from $36 000 to $88 000 (USD) for a single autologous transplantation for the initial hospitalization, to $200 000 (USD) or more for a myeloablative allogeneic procedure involving an unrelated donor. Common posttransplantation complications, such as infections and GVHD, have been shown to be significant cost drivers. Comparisons across studies are limited by differences in patient populations, cost ascertainment methods, and length of follow-up. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge about costs and cost-effectiveness of HCT, highlighting the challenges in conducting these studies and identifying important areas for future research. We discuss the need for more value-based assessments of HCT using high-quality approaches to measuring costs and outcomes so that potential future efforts to contain costs are well informed and appropriate.

  19. Prdm16 is a physiologic regulator of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Aguilo, Francesca; Avagyan, Serine; Labar, Amy; Sevilla, Ana; Lee, Dung-Fang; Kumar, Parameet; Lemischka, Ihor R.; Zhou, Betty Y.

    2011-01-01

    Fetal liver and adult bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) renew or differentiate into committed progenitors to generate all blood cells. PRDM16 is involved in human leukemic translocations and is expressed highly in some karyotypically normal acute myeloblastic leukemias. As many genes involved in leukemogenic fusions play a role in normal hematopoiesis, we analyzed the role of Prdm16 in the biology of HSCs using Prdm16-deficient mice. We show here that, within the hematopoietic system, Prdm16 is expressed very selectively in the earliest stem and progenitor compartments, and, consistent with this expression pattern, is critical for the establishment and maintenance of the HSC pool during development and after transplantation. Prdm16 deletion enhances apoptosis and cycling of HSCs. Expression analysis revealed that Prdm16 regulates a remarkable number of genes that, based on knockout models, both enhance and suppress HSC function, and affect quiescence, cell cycling, renewal, differentiation, and apoptosis to various extents. These data suggest that Prdm16 may be a critical node in a network that contains negative and positive feedback loops and integrates HSC renewal, quiescence, apoptosis, and differentiation. PMID:21343612

  20. Population Pharmacokinetics of Busulfan in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplant: A Model-Based Dosing Algorithm for Personalized Therapy and Implementation into Routine Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Long-Boyle, Janel; Savic, Rada; Yan, Shirley; Bartelink, Imke; Musick, Lisa; French, Deborah; Law, Jason; Horn, Biljana; Cowan, Morton J.; Dvorak, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Population pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of busulfan in children have shown that individualized model-based algorithms provide improved targeted busulfan therapy when compared to conventional dosing. The adoption of population PK models into routine clinical practice has been hampered by the tendency of pharmacologists to develop complex models too impractical for clinicians to use. The authors aimed to develop a population PK model for busulfan in children that can reliably achieve therapeutic exposure (concentration-at-steady-state, Css) and implement a simple, model-based tool for the initial dosing of busulfan in children undergoing HCT. Patients and Methods Model development was conducted using retrospective data available in 90 pediatric and young adult patients who had undergone HCT with busulfan conditioning. Busulfan drug levels and potential covariates influencing drug exposure were analyzed using the non-linear mixed effects modeling software, NONMEM. The final population PK model was implemented into a clinician-friendly, Microsoft Excel-based tool and used to recommend initial doses of busulfan in a group of 21 pediatric patients prospectively dosed based on the population PK model. Results Modeling of busulfan time-concentration data indicates busulfan CL displays non-linearity in children, decreasing up to approximately 20% between the concentrations of 250–2000 ng/mL. Important patient-specific covariates found to significantly impact busulfan CL were actual body weight and age. The percentage of individuals achieving a therapeutic Css was significantly higher in subjects receiving initial doses based on the population PK model (81%) versus historical controls dosed on conventional guidelines (52%) (p = 0.02). Conclusion When compared to the conventional dosing guidelines, the model-based algorithm demonstrates significant improvement for providing targeted busulfan therapy in children and young adults. PMID:25162216

  1. High-Dose [131I]Tositumomab (anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Adults ≥ 60 Years Old with Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Ajay K.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Gooley, Ted; Pagel, John M.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Petersdorf, Stephen; Maloney, David G.; Eary, Janet F.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2007-04-10

    Purpose: The majority of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) are over 60 years of age, yet they are often denied potentially curative high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT) due to the risk of excessive treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Myeloablative anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) can deliver curative radiation doses to tumor sites while limiting exposure to normal organs and may be particularly suited for older adults requiring high-dose therapy. Methods: Patients over age 60 with relapsed B-NHL received infusions of tositumomab anti-CD20 antibody labeled with 5-10mCi I-131 tracer for dosimetry purposes followed 10 days later by individualized therapeutic infusions of I-131-tositumomab (median 525 mCi, range 328-1154 mCi) to deliver 25-27Gy to the critical normal organ receiving the highest radiation dose. ASCT was performed approximately 2 weeks after therapy. Results: Twenty-four patients with a median age of 64 (range 60-76) who had received a median of four prior regimens (range 2-14) were treated. Thirteen (54%) had chemotherapy-resistant disease. The estimated 3-year overall and progression-free survivals were 59% and 51%, respectively with a median follow-up of 2.9 years (range 1-6 years). All patients experienced expected myeloablation with engraftment of platelets (≥20K/µL) and neutrophils (≥500/µL) occurring a median of 9 and 15 days, respectively following ASCT. There were no treatment-related deaths, and only two patients experienced grade 4 non-hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Myeloablative RIT and ASCT is a safe and effective therapeutic option for older adults with relapsed B-NHL.

  2. G-CSF administration to adult mice stimulates the proliferation of microglia but does not modify the outcome of ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Alice; Vigliani, Maria-Claudia; Magrassi, Lorenzo; Vercelli, Alessandro; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2011-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that adult bone marrow stem cells reduce tissue damage and promote repair following CNS ischemic injury. Since granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes hematopoietic stem cells to the circulating compartment, here we tested whether administration of this drug modifies the outcome of a permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in adult mice. To elucidate the behavior and fate of blood-borne cells in the ischemic brain, we produced chimeric animals, in which hematopoietic derivatives are genetically tagged. G-CSF administration enhances the proliferation of microglia in the uninjured CNS but has no effect on the amount of hematopoietic cells that infiltrate the ischemic tissue and on the size of the lesion. The blood-borne elements acquire different mesodermal identities but fail to adopt neural phenotypes, even though they occasionally fuse with Purkinje neurons. These results indicate that G-CSF treatment does not exert a significant beneficial effect on the ischemic injury. PMID:21111821

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Battiwalla, Minoo; Hematti, Peiman

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) of bone marrow (BM) origin not only provide the supportive microenvironmental niche for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) but are also capable of differentiating into various cell types of mesenchymal origin, such as bone, fat, and cartilage. In vitro and in vivo data suggest that MSCs have low inherent immunogenicity, modulate/suppress immunological responses through interactions with immune cells, and home to damaged tissues to participate in regeneration processes through their diverse biological properties. MSCs derived from BM are being evaluated for a wide range of clinical applications including disorders as diverse as myocardial infarction or newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus type-1. However, their use in HSC transplantation, either for enhancement of hematopoietic engraftment or for treatment/prevention of graft versus host disease, is far ahead of other indications. Ease of isolation and ex vivo expansion of MSCs, combined with their intriguing immunomodulatory properties, and their impressive record of safety in a wide variety of clinical trials make these cells promising candidates for further investigation. PMID:19728189

  4. ETS transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Wang, Lu; Patient, Roger; Liu, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essential for the maintenance of the hematopoietic system. However, these cells cannot be maintained or created in vitro, and very little is known about their generation during embryogenesis. Many transcription factors and signaling pathways play essential roles at various stages of HSC development. Members of the ETS ('E twenty-six') family of transcription factors are recognized as key regulators within the gene regulatory networks governing hematopoiesis, including the ontogeny of HSCs. Remarkably, although all ETS transcription factors bind the same DNA consensus sequence and overlapping tissue expression is observed, individual ETS transcription factors play unique roles in the development of HSCs. Also, these transcription factors are recurrently used throughout development and their functions are context-dependent, increasing the challenge of studying their mechanism of action. Critically, ETS factors also play roles under pathological conditions, such as leukemia and, therefore, deciphering their mechanism of action will not only enhance our knowledge of normal hematopoiesis, but also inform protocols for their creation in vitro from pluripotent stem cells and the design of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of malignant blood cell diseases. In this review, we summarize the key findings on the roles of ETS transcription factors in HSC development and discuss novel mechanisms by which they could control hematopoiesis.

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cells and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Maria Ester; Fibbe, Willem E

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of multipotent cells that can be isolated from various human tissues and culture-expanded ex vivo for clinical use. Due to their immunoregulatory properties and their ability to secrete growth factors, MSCs play a key role in the regulation of hematopoiesis and in the modulation of immune responses against allo- and autoantigens. In light of these properties, MSCs have been employed in clinical trials in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to facilitate engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and to prevent graft failure, as well as to treat steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). The available clinical evidence derived from these studies indicates that MSC administration is safe. Moreover, promising preliminary results in terms of efficacy have been reported in some clinical trials, especially in the treatment of acute GvHD. In this review we critically discuss recent advances in MSC therapy by reporting on the most relevant studies in the field of HSCT.

  6. Epidemiological characteristics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV): a review.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Peter; Paley, Richard; Alegria-Moran, Raul; Oidtmann, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV, Rhabdoviridae), is the causative agent of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN), a disease notifiable to the World Organisation for Animal Health, and various countries and trading areas (including the European Union). IHNV is an economically important pathogen causing clinical disease and mortalities in a wide variety of salmonid species, including the main salmonid species produced in aquaculture, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We reviewed the scientific literature on IHNV on a range of topics, including geographic distribution; host range; conditions required for infection and clinical disease; minimum infectious dose; subclinical infection; shedding of virus by infected fish; transmission via eggs; diagnostic tests; pathogen load and survival of IHNV in host tissues. This information is required for a range of purposes including import risk assessments; parameterisation of disease models; for surveillance planning; and evaluation of the chances of eradication of the pathogen to name just a few. The review focuses on issues that are of relevance for the European context, but many of the data summarised have relevance to IHN globally. Examples for application of the information is presented and data gaps highlighted. PMID:27287024

  7. A multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized cardiac tissue constructs using adult stem sells, dynamic cell cultures, and porous scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Pagliari, Stefania; Tirella, Annalisa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Duim, Sjoerd; Goumans, Marie-Josè; Aoyagi, Takao; Forte, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The vascularization of tissue engineered products represents a key issue in regenerative medicine which needs to be addressed before the translation of these protocols to the bedside can be foreseen. Here we propose a multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized three-dimensional (3D) cardiac bio-substitutes using dynamic cell cultures and highly porous biocompatible gelatin scaffolds. The strategy adopted exploits the peculiar differentiation potential of two distinct subsets of adult stem cells to obtain human vascularized 3D cardiac tissues. In the first step of the procedure, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are seeded onto gelatin scaffolds to provide interconnected vessel-like structures, while human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (hCMPCs) are stimulated in vitro to obtain their commitment toward the cardiac phenotype. The use of a modular bioreactor allows the perfusion of the whole scaffold, providing superior performance in terms of cardiac tissue maturation and cell survival. Both the cell culture on natural-derived polymers and the continuous medium perfusion of the scaffold led to the formation of a densely packaged proto-tissue composed of vascular-like and cardiac-like cells, which might complete maturation process and interconnect with native tissue upon in vivo implantation. In conclusion, the data obtained through the approach here proposed highlight the importance to provide stem cells with complementary signals in vitro able to resemble the complexity of cardiac microenvironment. PMID:24917827

  8. Association between vitamin D metabolites in fat tissue and serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D in overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cholecalciferol has been measured in human white adipose tissue (WAT), but little is known about the relationship between the other circulating vitamin D metabolites and WAT. We measured concentrations of 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D in subcutaneous fat tissue from 20 overweight and obese subjects partic...

  9. Site-specific concentrations of carotenoids in adipose tissue: relations with dietary and serum carotenoid concentrations in healthy adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary carotenoids are related to decreased risk of certain diseases. Serum and adipose tissue carotenoid concentrations are used as biomarkers of intake. This study examined relationships among concentrations of carotenoids in diet, serum and adipose tissue. Twelve women and thirteen healthy men p...

  10. Tissue-resident Eomes(hi) T-bet(lo) CD56(bright) NK cells with reduced proinflammatory potential are enriched in the adult human liver.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Cathal; Robinson, Mark W; Fahey, Ronan; Whelan, Sarah; Houlihan, Diarmaid D; Geoghegan, Justin; O'Farrelly, Cliona

    2016-09-01

    The adult human liver is enriched with natural killer (NK) cells, accounting for 30-50% of hepatic lymphocytes, which include tissue-resident hepatic NK-cell subpopulations, distinct from peripheral blood NK cells. In murine liver, a subset of liver-resident hepatic NK cells have altered expression of the two highly related T-box transcription factors, T-bet and eomesodermin (Eomes). Here, we investigate the heterogeneity of T-bet and Eomes expression in NK cells from healthy adult human liver with a view to identifying human liver-resident populations. Hepatic NK cells were isolated from donor liver perfusates and biopsies obtained during orthotopic liver transplantation (N = 28). Hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells were Eomes(hi) T-bet(lo) , a phenotype virtually absent from peripheral blood. These NK cells express the chemokine receptor CXCR6 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 6), a marker of tissue residency, which is absent from hepatic CD56(dim) and blood NK cells. Compared to blood populations, these hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells have increased expression of activatory receptors (NKp44, NKp46, and NKG2D). They show reduced ability to produce IFN-γ but enhanced degranulation in response to challenge with target cells. This functionally distinct population of hepatic NK cells constitutes 20-30% of the total hepatic lymphocyte repertoire and represents a tissue-resident immune cell population adapted to the tolerogenic liver microenvironment.

  11. Absence of a red blood cell phenotype in mice with hematopoietic deficiency of SEC23B.

    PubMed

    Khoriaty, Rami; Vasievich, Matthew P; Jones, Morgan; Everett, Lesley; Chase, Jennifer; Tao, Jiayi; Siemieniak, David; Zhang, Bin; Maillard, Ivan; Ginsburg, David

    2014-10-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II (CDAII) is an autosomal recessive disease of ineffective erythropoiesis characterized by increased bi/multinucleated erythroid precursors in the bone marrow. CDAII results from mutations in SEC23B. The SEC23 protein is a core component of coat protein complex II-coated vesicles, which transport secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. Though the genetic defect underlying CDAII has been identified, the pathophysiology of this disease remains unknown. We previously reported that SEC23B-deficient mice die perinatally, exhibiting massive pancreatic degeneration, with this early mortality limiting evaluation of the adult hematopoietic compartment. We now report that mice with SEC23B deficiency restricted to the hematopoietic compartment survive normally and do not exhibit anemia or other CDAII characteristics. We also demonstrate that SEC23B-deficient hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) do not exhibit a disadvantage at reconstituting hematopoiesis when compared directly to wild-type HSC in a competitive repopulation assay. Secondary bone marrow transplants demonstrated continued equivalence of SEC23B-deficient and WT HSC in their hematopoietic reconstitution potential. The surprising discordance in phenotypes between SEC23B-deficient mice and humans may reflect an evolutionary shift in SEC23 paralog function and/or expression, or a change in a specific COPII cargo critical for erythropoiesis. PMID:25071156

  12. The thrombopoietin receptor, c-Mpl, is a selective surface marker for human hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ninos, John M; Jefferies, Leigh C; Cogle, Christopher R; Kerr, William G

    2006-01-01

    Background Thrombopoietin (TPO), the primary cytokine regulating megakaryocyte proliferation and differentiation, exerts significant influence on other hematopoietic lineages as well, including erythroid, granulocytic and lymphoid lineages. We previously demonstrated that the receptor for TPO, c-mpl, is expressed by a subset of human adult bone marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/PC) that are enriched for long-term multilineage repopulating ability in the SCID-hu Bone in vivo model of human hematopoiesis. Methods Here, we employ flow cytometry and an anti-c-mpl monoclonal antibody to comprehensively define the surface expression pattern of c-mpl in four differentiation stages of human CD34+ HSC/PC (I: CD34+38--, II: CD34+38dim, III: CD34+38+, IV: CD34dim38+) for the major sources of human HSC: fetal liver (FL), umbilical cord blood (UCB), adult bone marrow (ABM), and cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (mPBSC). We use a surrogate in vivo model of human thymopoiesis, SCID-hu Thy/Liv, to compare the capacity of c-mpl+ vs. c-mpl-- CD34+38--/dim HSC/PC for thymocyte reconstitution. Results For all tissue sources, the percentage of c-mpl+ cells was significantly highest in stage I HSC/PC (FL 72 ± 10%, UCB 67 ± 19%, ABM 82 ± 16%, mPBSC 71 ± 15%), and decreased significantly through stages II, III, and IV ((FL 3 ± 3%, UCB 8 ± 13%, ABM 0.6 ± 0.6%, mPBSC 0.2 ± 0.1%) [ANOVA: P < 0.0001]. The relative median fluorescence intensity of c-mpl expression was similarly highest in stage I, decreasing through stage IV [ANOVA: P < 0.0001]. No significant differences between tissue sources were observed for either % c-mpl+ cells [P = 0.89] or intensity of c-mpl expression [P = 0.21]. Primary Thy/Liv grafts injected with CD34+38--/dimc-mpl+ cells showed slightly higher levels of donor HLA+ thymocyte reconstitution vs. CD34+38--/dimc-mpl---injected grafts and non-injected controls (c-mpl+ vs. c-mpl--: CD2+ 6.8 ± 4.5% vs. 2.8 ± 3.3%, CD4+8-- 54 ± 35% vs

  13. Update of hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a curative therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD) that is utilized very rarely because of limited allogeneic donor availability, limited healthcare resources needed to expand the treatment to regions in the world where most affected individuals reside, and by a view among SCD experts that HCT lacks the evidential rigor with short and long-term toxicity profiles that together might support its broader application. Recent findings In this update, recent advances focused on donor selection, reduced toxicity preparation for HCT, and treatment of young adults will be presented. The current status of conventional bone marrow transplantation with a human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling donor is summarized. Summary HCT for SCD is curative in almost all children who have a human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling donor. The future of this therapy will hinge on expanding the number of individuals who might be treated. PMID:25767957

  14. Hematopoietic Stem and Immune Cells in Chronic HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jielin; Crumpacker, Clyde

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) belongs to multipotent adult somatic stem cells. A single HSC can reconstitute the entire blood system via self-renewal, differentiation into all lineages of blood cells, and replenishment of cells lost due to attrition or disease in a person's lifetime. Although all blood and immune cells derive from HSC, immune cells, specifically immune memory cells, have the properties of HSC on self-renewal and differentiation into lineage effector cells responding to the invading pathogens. Moreover, the interplay between immune memory cell and viral pathogen determines the course of a viral infection. Here, we state our point of view on the role of blood stem and progenitor cell in chronic HIV infection, with a focus on memory CD4 T-cell in the context of HIV/AIDS eradication and cure. PMID:26300920

  15. Dietary lipid levels impact lipoprotein lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase, and fatty acid synthetase gene expression in three tissues of adult GIFT strain of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Juan; Wu, Fan; Yang, Chang-Geng; Jiang, Ming; Liu, Wei; Wen, Hua

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of dietary lipids on growth performance, body composition, serum parameters, and expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT strain) of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. We randomly assigned adult male Nile tilapia (average initial body weight = 220.00 ± 9.54 g) into six groups consisting of four replicates (20 fish per replicate). Fish in each group were hand-fed a semi-purified diets containing different lipid levels [3.3 (the control group), 28.4, 51.4, 75.4, 101.9, and 124.1 g kg(-1)] for 8 weeks. The results indicated that there was no obvious effect in feeding rate among all groups (P > 0.05). The highest weight gain, specific growth rate, and protein efficiency ratio in 75.4 g kg(-1) diet group were increased by 23.31, 16.17, and 22.02 % than that of fish in the control group (P < 0.05). Protein retention ratio was highest in 51.4 g kg(-1) diet group. The results revealed that the optimum dietary lipid level for maximum growth performance is 76.6-87.9 g kg(-1). Increasing dietary lipid levels contributed to increased tissue and whole body lipid levels. Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) decreased, and polyunsaturated fatty acids increased with increasing dietary lipid levels. With the exception of MUFAs, the fatty acid profiles of liver and muscle were similar. Dietary lipid levels were negatively correlated with low-density lipoprotein- cholesterol content and positively with triacylglycerol and glucose contents. In the lipid-fed groups, there was a significant down-regulation of fatty acid synthase (FAS) mRNA in liver, muscle, and visceral adipose tissues. There was a rapid up-regulation of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mRNA in muscle and liver with increasing dietary lipid levels. In visceral adipose tissue, LPL mRNA was significantly down-regulated in the lipid-fed groups. Dietary lipids increased hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) m

  16. Challenges in Consolidated Reporting of Hematopoietic Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Ohgami, Robert S; Arber, Daniel A

    2013-12-01

    This article focuses on the challenges of generating comprehensive diagnostic reports in hematopathology. In particular, two main challenges that diagnosticians face are (1) interpreting and understanding the rapid advances in molecular and genetic pathology, which have gained increasing importance in classifications of hematopoietic neoplasms, and (2) managing the logistics of reporting ancillary studies and incorporating them effectively into a final synthesized report. This article summarizes many important genetic findings in hematopoietic neoplasms, which are required for accurate diagnoses, and discusses practical issues to generating accurate and complete hematopathology reports.

  17. In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Derderian, S. Christopher; Jeanty, Cerine; Walters, Mark C.; Vichinsky, Elliott; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx) is a promising strategy to circumvent the challenges of postnatal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. The goal of IUHCTx is to introduce donor cells into a naïve host prior to immune maturation, thereby inducing donor–specific tolerance. Thus, this technique has the potential of avoiding host myeloablative conditioning with cytotoxic agents. Over the past two decades, several attempts at IUHCTx have been made to cure numerous underlying congenital anomalies with limited success. In this review, we will briefly review the history of IUHCTx and give a perspective on alpha thalassemia major, one target disease for its clinical application. PMID:25628564

  18. Signal, Transduction, and the Hematopoietic Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Louria-Hayon, Igal

    2014-01-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is a unique cell positioned highest in the hematopoietic hierarchical system. The HSC has the ability to stay in quiescence, to self-renew, or to differentiate and generate all lineages of blood cells. The path to be actualized is influenced by signals that derive from the cell’s microenvironment, which activate molecular pathways inside the cell. Signaling pathways are commonly organized through inducible protein–protein interactions, mediated by adaptor proteins that link activated receptors to cytoplasmic effectors. This review will focus on the signaling molecules and how they work in concert to determine the HSC’s fate. PMID:25386349

  19. Identification and Characterization of Lineage(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) VSEL Phenotypic Cells Residing in Adult Mouse Bone Tissue.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Ryusuke; Iwaki, Ryuji; Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Sumide, Keisuke; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Yutaka; Uemura, Yasushi; Asano, Hiroaki; Kwon, A-Hon; Sonoda, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Murine bone marrow (BM)-derived very small embryonic-like stem cells (BM VSELs), defined by a lineage-negative (Lin(-)), CD45-negative (CD45(-)), Sca-1-positive (Sca-1(+)) immunophenotype, were previously reported as postnatal pluripotent stem cells (SCs). We developed a highly efficient method for isolating Lin(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) small cells using enzymatic treatment of murine bone. We designated these cells as bone-derived VSELs (BD VSELs). The incidences of BM VSELs in the BM-derived nucleated cells and that of BD VSELs in bone-derived nucleated cells were 0.002% and 0.15%, respectively. These BD VSELs expressed a variety of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), and endothelial cell markers. The gene expression profile of the BD VSELs was clearly distinct from those of HSCs, MSCs, and ES cells. In the steady state, the BD VSELs proliferated slowly, however, the number of BD VSELs significantly increased in the bone after acute liver injury. Moreover, green fluorescent protein-mouse derived BD VSELs transplanted via tail vein injection after acute liver injury were detected in the liver parenchyma of recipient mice. Immunohistological analyses suggested that these BD VSELs might transdifferentiate into hepatocytes. This study demonstrated that the majority of the Lin(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) VSEL phenotypic cells reside in the bone rather than the BM. However, the immunophenotype and the gene expression profile of BD VSELs were clearly different from those of other types of SCs, including BM VSELs, MSCs, HSCs, and ES cells. Further studies will therefore be required to elucidate their cellular and/or SC characteristics and the potential relationship between BD VSELs and BM VSELs.

  20. Tissue-resident macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Luke C.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; Allen, Judith E.; Taylor, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-resident macrophages are a heterogeneous population of immune cells that fulfill tissue-specific and niche-specific functions. These range from dedicated homeostatic functions, such as clearance of cellular debris and iron processing, to central roles in tissue immune-surveillance, response to infection and the resolution of inflammation. Recent studies highlight marked heterogeneity in the origins of tissue macrophages that arise from hematopoietic versus self-renewing embryo-derived populations. We discuss the tissue–niche-specific factors that dictate cell phenotype, the definition of which will allow novel strategies to promote the restoration of tissue homeostasis. Understanding the mechanisms that dictate tissue macrophage heterogeneity should explain why simplified paradigms of macrophage activation do not explain the extent of heterogeneity seen in vivo. PMID:24048120

  1. National Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplant Registry in Poland: Nationwide Internet Reporting System and Results.

    PubMed

    Łęczycka, A; Dudkiewicz, M; Czerwiński, J; Malanowski, P; Żalikowska-Hołoweńko, J; Danielewicz, R

    2016-06-01

    History of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in Poland begins in early 1980s; the 1st bone marrow allotransplantation was performed in 1983 in the Central Clinical Hospital of the Military Medical Academy in Warsaw. Following years brought the 1st autologous stem cell transplantations. Ten years later, unrelated bone marrow transplantation was performed for the 1st time by the team of the Hematology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit in Katowice. Since then, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation developed to be standard procedure and one of the most important therapies applied in leukemia treatment. The number of allotransplantations in Poland has grown significantly in the past 2 decades, which generated new needs and problems. In 2005, based on a new Transplant Law, a National Transplants Registry was created. Its main role is to collect data (registration of procedures and follow-up data) related to every transplantation case for stem cells and tissues as well as for organs. We present statistics concerning stem cell transplantations performed in Poland, as collected in the National Transplants Registry in the years 2006-2014. There are 18 centers transplanting hematopoietic stem cells in Poland. The total number of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations performed in 2006-2014 was 3,537, with allotransplantations from relatives accounted for 1,491 and from unrelated donors for 2,046. The main indication for allotransplantation in past years was acute leukemia. PMID:27496493

  2. Intercellular network structure and regulatory motifs in the human hematopoietic system

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wenlian; Wang, Weijia; Laurenti, Elisa; Turinsky, Andrei L; Wodak, Shoshana J; Bader, Gary D; Dick, John E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    The hematopoietic system is a distributed tissue that consists of functionally distinct cell types continuously produced through hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation. Combining genomic and phenotypic data with high-content experiments, we have built a directional cell–cell communication network between 12 cell types isolated from human umbilical cord blood. Network structure analysis revealed that ligand production is cell type dependent, whereas ligand binding is promiscuous. Consequently, additional control strategies such as cell frequency modulation and compartmentalization were needed to achieve specificity in HSC fate regulation. Incorporating the in vitro effects (quiescence, self-renewal, proliferation, or differentiation) of 27 HSC binding ligands into the topology of the cell–cell communication network allowed coding of cell type-dependent feedback regulation of HSC fate. Pathway enrichment analysis identified intracellular regulatory motifs enriched in these cell type- and ligand-coupled responses. This study uncovers cellular mechanisms of hematopoietic cell feedback in HSC fate regulation, provides insight into the design principles of the human hematopoietic system, and serves as a foundation for the analysis of intercellular regulation in multicellular systems. PMID:25028490

  3. National Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplant Registry in Poland: Nationwide Internet Reporting System and Results.

    PubMed

    Łęczycka, A; Dudkiewicz, M; Czerwiński, J; Malanowski, P; Żalikowska-Hołoweńko, J; Danielewicz, R

    2016-06-01

    History of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in Poland begins in early 1980s; the 1st bone marrow allotransplantation was performed in 1983 in the Central Clinical Hospital of the Military Medical Academy in Warsaw. Following years brought the 1st autologous stem cell transplantations. Ten years later, unrelated bone marrow transplantation was performed for the 1st time by the team of the Hematology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit in Katowice. Since then, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation developed to be standard procedure and one of the most important therapies applied in leukemia treatment. The number of allotransplantations in Poland has grown significantly in the past 2 decades, which generated new needs and problems. In 2005, based on a new Transplant Law, a National Transplants Registry was created. Its main role is to collect data (registration of procedures and follow-up data) related to every transplantation case for stem cells and tissues as well as for organs. We present statistics concerning stem cell transplantations performed in Poland, as collected in the National Transplants Registry in the years 2006-2014. There are 18 centers transplanting hematopoietic stem cells in Poland. The total number of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations performed in 2006-2014 was 3,537, with allotransplantations from relatives accounted for 1,491 and from unrelated donors for 2,046. The main indication for allotransplantation in past years was acute leukemia.

  4. Lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue cancer in a chemical manufacturing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, M.G.; Teta, M.J.; Greenberg, H.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Nested case-control studies of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (52 cases), multiple myeloma (20 cases), nonlymphocytic leukemia (39 cases), and lymphocytic leukemia (18 cases) were conducted within a cohort of employed men from two chemical manufacturing facilities and a research and development center. Exposure odds ratios were examined in relation to 111 work areas, 21 specific chemicals, and 52 chemical activity groups. Associations were observed for a maintenance and construction subgroup (non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and a chlorohydrin production unit (nonlymphocytic leukemia). The odds ratio for the association of foremen and others with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was 3.2 (CI95 = 1.47-7.2) based on 11 cases. A duration-response trend was observed for the chlorohydrin unit with three of four cases assigned 5+ years to that unit. An association between non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and assignment to strong acid alcohol production units (OR = 8.3; CI95 = 2.3-30.7) was not supported by a duration-response trend. Two highly correlated chemical groups, antioxidants (five cases) and nitriles (four cases), were over-represented among multiple myeloma cases. A duration effect was observed. However, examination of work histories did not reveal common jobs or departments among these cases.

  5. Bone marrow–derived circulating progenitor cells fail to transdifferentiate into adipocytes in adult adipose tissues in mice

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Young Jun; Kang, Shinae; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Choi, Tae-Saeng; Lee, Ho Sub; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Koh, Gou Young

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about whether bone marrow–derived circulating progenitor cells (BMDCPCs) can transdifferentiate into adipocytes in adipose tissues or play a role in expanding adipocyte number during adipose tissue growth. Using a mouse bone marrow transplantation model, we addressed whether BMDCPCs can transdifferentiate into adipocytes under standard conditions as well as in the settings of diet-induced obesity, rosiglitazone treatment, and exposure to G-CSF. We also addressed the possibility of transdifferentiation to adipocytes in a murine parabiosis model. In each of these settings, our findings indicated that BMDCPCs did not transdifferentiate into either unilocular or multilocular adipocytes in adipose tissues. Most BMDCPCs became resident and phagocytic macrophages in adipose tissues — which resembled transdifferentiated multilocular adipocytes by appearance, but displayed cell surface markers characteristic for macrophages — in the absence of adipocyte marker expression. When exposed to adipogenic medium in vitro, bone marrow cells differentiated into multilocular, but not unilocular, adipocytes, but transdifferentiation was not observed in vivo, even in the contexts of adipose tissue regrowth or dermal wound healing. Our results suggest that BMDCPCs do not transdifferentiate into adipocytes in vivo and play little, if any, role in expanding the number of adipocytes during the growth of adipose tissues. PMID:18060029

  6. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 is expressed in the interstitial matrix in adult mouse organs and during embryonic development.

    PubMed Central

    Blavier, L; DeClerck, Y A

    1997-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) is a member of a family of inhibitors of matrix-degrading metalloproteinases. A better insight into the role of this inhibitor during development and in organ function was obtained by examining the temporospatial expression of TIMP-2 in mice. Northern blot analysis indicated high levels of TIMP-2 mRNA in the lung, skin, reproductive organs, and brain. Lower levels of expression were found in all other organs with the exception of the liver and gastrointestinal tissue, which were negative of these tissues with complete absence of TIMP-2 mRNA in the epithelium. In the testis, TIMP-2 was present in the Leydig cells, and in the brain, it was expressed in pia matter and in neuronal tissues. TIMP-2 expression in the placenta increased during late gestation and was particularly abundant in spongiotrophoblasts In mouse embryo (day 10.5-18.5), TIMP-2 mRNA was abundant in mesenchymal tissues that surrounded developing epithelia and maturing skeleton. The pattern of expression significantly differs from that observed with TIMP-1 and TIMP-3, therefore, suggesting specific roles for each inhibitor during tissue remodeling and development. Images PMID:9285822

  7. Collecting and Storing Tissue, Blood, and Bone Marrow Samples From Patients With Rhabdomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-23

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  8. RNA polymerase III component Rpc9 regulates hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell maintenance in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yonglong; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zilong; Liu, Feng

    2016-06-15

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are capable of self-renewal and replenishing all lineages of blood cells throughout life and are thus crucial for tissue homeostasis. However, the mechanism regulating HSPC development is still incompletely understood. Here, we isolate a zebrafish mutant with defective T lymphopoiesis and positional cloning identifies that Rpc9, a component of DNA-directed RNA polymerase III (Pol III) complex, is responsible for the mutant phenotype. Further analysis shows that rpc9 deficiency leads to the impairment of HSPCs and their derivatives in zebrafish embryos. Excessive apoptosis is observed in the caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT; the equivalent of fetal liver in mammals) of rpc9(-/-) embryos and the hematopoietic defects in these embryos can be fully rescued by suppression of p53 Thus, our work illustrates that Rpc9, a component of Pol III, plays an important tissue-specific role in HSPC maintenance during zebrafish embryogenesis and might be conserved across vertebrates, including mammals. PMID:27151951

  9. Proteoglycan synthesis by hematopoietic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Minguell, J.J.; Tavassoli, M. )

    1989-05-15

    The synthesis of proteoglycans (PG) by hematopoietic stromal cells has been reported. But PG synthesis by hematopoietic progenitor cells has not been explored. We have studied synthesis, cellular distribution, and molecular characteristics of PG by a cloned interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line, FDCP-1, which is cloned from murine long-term marrow cultures. Under appropriate conditions the cell can differentiate into granulocytes and macrophages, and therefore, can be considered CFU-GM equivalent. The pattern of PG synthesis was studied by 35SO4 labeling. FDCP-1 cells actively synthesize PG, which are distributed in the intracellular, membrane-associated (MP), and extracellular pools. After purification of the 35S-labeled material by ion-exchange and gel filtration techniques, a single chondroitin sulfate-PG (CIS-PG) was observed to be present in the three studied pools. By Sepharose CL-4B chromatography, this PG has a Kav of 0.47, which after alkaline treatment is shifted to a Kav of 0.67. This indicates the proteoglycan nature of the 35SO4-labeled material. The MP CIS-PG is not stable. It is released to the culture medium where it is subsequently processed. However, in the presence of hematopoietic stromal cells D2X, the stability of MP proteoglycan of FDCP-1 cells is enhanced, suggesting that the synthesis of PG by progenitor cells and its accumulation in the membrane may have a role in the interaction between progenitor and stromal cells.

  10. Supportive Care of Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather S. L.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Rizzo, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplant survivors face a number of challenges including low energy and stamina, “chemo-brain” and emotional distress, and late effects that can compromise functioning or lead to early mortality. This session will review the most recent interventions and recommendations to avoid or mitigate these complications. PMID:22226095

  11. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Ramsahai, Shweta; Kim, Bak C.; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2004-02-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological and cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. Exploiting the extraordinary plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which differentiate not only to all types of blood cells, but also to various tissues, including muscle, bone, skin, liver, and neuronal cells, we advanced a hypothesis that some of the space-caused disorders might be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using mouse models of human anemia (β-thalassemia) and spaceflight (hindlimb suspension unloading system), we have obtained feasibility results of HSCT for space anemia, muscle loss, and immunodeficiency. For example, the β-thalassemic mice were successfully transplanted with isologous HSCs, resulting in chimerism of hemoglobin species and alleviation of the hemoglobinopathy. In the case of HSCT for muscle loss, β-galactosidase-marked HSCs, which were prepared from β-galactosidase-transgenic mice, were detected by the X-gal wholemount staining procedure in the hindlimbs of unloaded mice following transplantation. Histochemical and physical analyses indicated structural contribution of HSCs to the muscle. To investigate HSCT for immunodeficiency, β-galactosidase-transformed Escherichia coli was used as the reporter bacteria, and infected to control and the hindlimb suspended mice. Results of the X-gal stained tissues indicated that the HSCT could help eliminate the E. coli infection. In an effort to facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs has been optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  12. Potential of Newborn and Adult Stem Cells for the Production of Vascular Constructs Using the Living Tissue Sheet Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bourget, Jean-Michel; Gauvin, Robert; Duchesneau, David; Remy, Murielle; Auger, François A.; Germain, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Bypass surgeries using native vessels rely on the availability of autologous veins and arteries. An alternative to those vessels could be tissue-engineered vascular constructs made by self-organized tissue sheets. This paper intends to evaluate the potential use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from two different sources: (1) bone marrow-derived MSCs and (2) umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs. When cultured in vitro, a proportion of those cells differentiated into smooth muscle cell- (SMC-) like cells and expressed contraction associated proteins. Moreover, these cells assembled into manipulable tissue sheets when cultured in presence of ascorbic acid. Tubular vessels were then produced by rolling those tissue sheets on a mandrel. The architecture, contractility, and mechanical resistance of reconstructed vessels were compared with tissue-engineered media and adventitia produced from SMCs and dermal fibroblasts, respectively. Histology revealed a collagenous extracellular matrix and the contractile responses measured for these vessels were stronger than dermal fibroblasts derived constructs although weaker than SMCs-derived constructs. The burst pressure of bone marrow-derived vessels was higher than SMCs-derived ones. These results reinforce the versatility of the self-organization approach since they demonstrate that it is possible to recapitulate a contractile media layer from MSCs without the need of exogenous scaffolding material. PMID:26504783

  13. Potential of Newborn and Adult Stem Cells for the Production of Vascular Constructs Using the Living Tissue Sheet Approach.

    PubMed

    Bourget, Jean-Michel; Gauvin, Robert; Duchesneau, David; Remy, Murielle; Auger, François A; Germain, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Bypass surgeries using native vessels rely on the availability of autologous veins and arteries. An alternative to those vessels could be tissue-engineered vascular constructs made by self-organized tissue sheets. This paper intends to evaluate the potential use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from two different sources: (1) bone marrow-derived MSCs and (2) umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs. When cultured in vitro, a proportion of those cells differentiated into smooth muscle cell- (SMC-) like cells and expressed contraction associated proteins. Moreover, these cells assembled into manipulable tissue sheets when cultured in presence of ascorbic acid. Tubular vessels were then produced by rolling those tissue sheets on a mandrel. The architecture, contractility, and mechanical resistance of reconstructed vessels were compared with tissue-engineered media and adventitia produced from SMCs and dermal fibroblasts, respectively. Histology revealed a collagenous extracellular matrix and the contractile responses measured for these vessels were stronger than dermal fibroblasts derived constructs although weaker than SMCs-derived constructs. The burst pressure of bone marrow-derived vessels was higher than SMCs-derived ones. These results reinforce the versatility of the self-organization approach since they demonstrate that it is possible to recapitulate a contractile media layer from MSCs without the need of exogenous scaffolding material. PMID:26504783

  14. Epigenetic Regulation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shilpa; Gurudutta, Gangenahalli

    2016-05-30

    Hematopoietic stem cells are endowed with a distinct potential to bolster self-renewal and to generate progeny that differentiate into mature cells of myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Both hematopoietic stem cells and mature cells have the same genome, but their gene expression is controlled by an additional layer of epigenetics such as DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications, enabling each cell-type to acquire various forms and functions. Until recently, several studies have largely focussed on the transcription factors andniche factors for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which hematopoietic cells replicate and differentiate. Several lines of emerging evidence suggest that epigenetic modifications eventually result in a defined chromatin structure and an "individual" gene expression pattern, which play an essential role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Distinct epigenetic marks decide which sets of genes may be expressed and which genes are kept silent. Epigenetic mechanisms are interdependent and ensure lifelong production of blood and bone marrow, thereby contributing to stem cell homeostasis. The epigenetic analysis of hematopoiesis raises the exciting possibility that chromatin structure is dynamic enough for regulated expression of genes. Though controlled chromatin accessibility plays an essential role in maintaining blood homeostasis; mutations in chromatin impacts on the regulation of genes critical to the development of leukemia. In this review, we explored the contribution of epigenetic machinery which has implications for the ramification of molecular details of hematopoietic self-renewal for normal development and underlying events that potentially co-operate to induce leukemia.

  15. Determination of malachite green residues in the eggs, fry, and adult muscle-tissue of rainbow-trout (Oncorhynchus-mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, John L.; Gofus, J.E.; Meinertz, Jeffery R.

    1994-01-01

    Malachite green, an effective antifungal therapeutant used in fish culture, is a known teratogen. We developed a method to simultaneously detect both the chromatic and leuco forms of malachite green residues in the eggs, fry, and adult muscle tissue of rainbow trout (oncorhynchus mykiss). Homogenates of these tissues were fortified with [c-14] malachite green chloride and extracted with 1% (v/v) acetic acid in acetonitrile or in methanol. The extracts were partitioned with chloroform, dried, redissolved in mobile phase, and analyzed by liquid chromatography (lc) with postcolumn oxidation of leuco malachite green to the chromatic form. Lc fractions were collected every 30 s for quantitation by scintillation counting. Recoveries of total [c-14] malachite green chloride residue were 85 and 98% in eggs fortified with labeled malachite green at concentrations of 0.5 And 1.00 Mug/g, respectively; 68% in fry similarly fortified at a concentration of 0.65 Mug/g; and 66% in muscle homogenate similarly fortified at a level of 1.00 Mug/g. The method was tested under operational conditions by exposing adult rainbow trout to 1.00 Mg/l [c-14] malachite green chloride bath for 1 h. Muscle samples analyzed by sample oxidation and scintillation counting contained 1.3 And 0.5 Mug/g total malachite green chloride residues immediately after exposure and after a 5-day withdrawal period, respectively.

  16. Alpha/Beta Interferon Protects Adult Mice from Fatal Sindbis Virus Infection and Is an Important Determinant of Cell and Tissue Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Ryman, Kate D.; Klimstra, William B.; Nguyen, Khuong B.; Biron, Christine A.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    Infection of adult 129 Sv/Ev mice with consensus Sindbis virus strain TR339 is subclinical due to an inherent restriction in early virus replication and viremic dissemination. By comparing the pathogenesis of TR339 in 129 Sv/Ev mice and alpha/beta interferon receptor null (IFN-α/βR−/−) mice, we have assessed the contribution of IFN-α/β in restricting virus replication and spread and in determining cell and tissue tropism. In adult 129 Sv/Ev mice, subcutaneous inoculation with 100 PFU of TR339 led to extremely low-level virus replication and viremia, with clearance under way by 96 h postinoculation (p.i.). In striking contrast, adult IFN-α/βR−/− mice inoculated subcutaneously with 100 PFU of TR339 succumbed to the infection within 84 h. By 24 h p.i. a high-titer serum viremia had seeded infectious virus systemically, coincident with the systemic induction of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-12 (IL-12) p40, IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-6. Replicating virus was located in macrophage-dendritic cell (DC)-like cells at 24 h p.i. in the draining lymph node and in the splenic marginal zone. By 72 h p.i. virus replication was widespread in macrophage-DC-like cells in the spleen, liver, lung, thymus, and kidney and in fibroblast-connective tissue and periosteum, with sporadic neuroinvasion. IFN-α/β-mediated restriction of TR339 infection was mimicked in vitro in peritoneal exudate cells from 129 Sv/Ev versus IFN-α/βR−/− mice. Thus, IFN-α/β protects the normal adult host from viral infection by rapidly conferring an antiviral state on otherwise permissive cell types, both locally and systemically. Ablation of the IFN-α/β system alters the apparent cell and tissue tropism of the virus and renders macrophage-DC-lineage cells permissive to infection. PMID:10708454

  17. Cocaine exposure impairs multilineage hematopoiesis of human hematopoietic progenitor cells mediated by the sigma-1 receptor [corrected].

    PubMed

    Nixon, Christopher C; Schwartz, Brandon H; Dixit, Dhaval; Zack, Jerome A; Vatakis, Dimitrios N

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to cocaine is a significant source of fetal and neonatal developmental defects. While cocaine associated neurological and cardiac pathologies are well-documented, it is apparent that cocaine use has far more diverse physiological effects. It is known that in some cell types, the sigma-1 receptor mediates many of cocaine's cellular effects. Here we present a novel and concise investigation into the mechanism that underlies cocaine associated hematopoietic pathology. Indeed, this is the first examination of the effects of cocaine on hematopoiesis. We show that cocaine impairs multilineage hematopoiesis from human progenitors from multiple donors and tissue types. We go on to present the first demonstration of the expression of the sigma-1 receptor in human CD34 + human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these cocaine-induced hematopoietic defects can be reversed through sigma-1 receptor blockade. PMID:25728014

  18. Use of Anthropometry for the Prediction of Regional Body Tissue Distribution in Adults: Benefits and Limitations in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Scafoglieri, Aldo; Clarys, Jan Pieter; Cattrysse, Erik; Bautmans, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Regional body composition changes with aging. Some of the changes in composition are considered major risk factors for developing obesity related chronic diseases which in turn may lead to increased mortality in adults. The role of anthropometry is well recognized in the screening, diagnosis and follow-up of adults for risk classification, regardless of age. Regional body composition is influenced by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Therapeutic measures recommended to lower cardiovascular disease risk include lifestyle changes. The aim of this review is to systematically summarize studies that assessed the relationships between anthropometry and regional body composition. The potential benefits and limitations of anthropometry for use in clinical practice are presented and suggestions for future research given. PMID:25489489

  19. Histological and immunohistochemical study of estrogen and progesterone receptors in normal human breast tissue in adult age groups vulnerable to malignancy.

    PubMed

    Goyal, R; Gupta, T; Gupta, R; Aggarwal, A; Sahni, D; Singh, G

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of receptor status has become standard procedure for assessing breast cancer patients. Estrogen causes epithelial proliferation in breast tissue via the estrogen receptor (ER). The progesterone receptor (PR) is also regulated by the estrogen gene. Analyzing ER and PR together gives information regarding the likely response of carcinoma patients to hormonal therapy. The aim of the present study was to record the expression patterns of ER and PR in normal mammary tissue in different age groups to provide reference data to facilitate histological diagnosis. Breast tissues from the upper outer quadrant of each side of 27 adult female cadavers were examined after H & E staining. ER and PR were identified and examined by immunohistochemistry. The percentage area occupied by parenchyma relative to stromal tissue was calculated in different age groups and was about 4:6, 3.5:6.5, 3:7, 2:8, and 1.5:8.5 in the 3rd, 4th and 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th, and 10th decades of life, respectively. Both ER and PR were present in all age groups and the numbers of both receptors were maximal during the 4th decade. The distribution and staining patterns for both ER and PR were recorded in different age groups. The contiguous pattern of ER, which is considered pathognomonic of breast carcinoma, was not seen except in one case in the 6th decade. Moderately stained ER and PR receptor sites predominated throughout. The study of normal breast tissue of similar age might provide comparisons that will help histopathologists to make clinical diagnoses from breast biopsies. Clin. Anat. 29:729-737, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27038435

  20. A more alkaline diet may enhance the favorable impact of dietary protein on lean tissue mass in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining muscle mass in aging is important to prevent falls and fractures. Dietary protein is required to preserve muscle mass, however the acid load from diets rich in acidogenic protein foods and cereal grains relative to alkalinogenic fruits and vegetables may contribute to loss of lean tissue...

  1. Tissue Mercury Concentrations and Survival of Tree Swallow Embryos, Nestlings and Young Adult Females on a Contaminated Site.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Capwell E; Cristol, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    Tree swallows nesting on mercury-contaminated sites along the South River in Virginia, USA were monitored for reproductive success. The bodies of nestlings found deceased in their nest boxes were collected, along with blood and feather samples from the adult parents and surviving siblings. We also measured hatching and fledging success of the clutches and the annual recapture rate of adults. We found that the body feathers of deceased nestlings contained significantly higher concentrations of mercury (12.89 ± 8.42 μg/g, n = 15) than those of nestlings that survived to fledge (7.41 ± 4.79 μg/g, n = 15). However, mothers of more successful clutches (>75 % hatching) did not differ in mercury concentrations from females with less successful clutches (<50 % hatching). Additionally, adult females breeding for the first time that returned to breed the following year did not differ in blood mercury from females of the same age that bred once but never returned. Our results suggest that mercury had its greatest effect on these songbirds during the nestling stage, whereas for embryos or first-time breeding females, other factors likely played larger roles in mortality.

  2. Comparison of specific absorption rate induced in brain tissues of a child and an adult using mobile phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2012-04-01

    The steady increase of mobile phone usage, especially mobile phones by children, has led to a rising concern about the possible adverse health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure. The objective of this work is to study whether there is a larger radio frequency energy absorption in the brain of a child compared to that of an adult. For this reason, three high-resolution models, two child head models (6 - and 11-year old) and one adult head model (34-year old) have been used in the study. A finite-difference time-domain method was employed to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the models from exposure to a generic handset at 1750 MHz. The results show that the SAR distributions in the human brain are age-dependent, and there is a deeper penetration of the absorbed SAR in the child's brain. The induced SAR can be significantly higher in subregions of the child's brain. In all of the examined cases, the SAR values in the brains of a child and an adult are well below the IEEE safety standard.

  3. Increasing dietary linoleic acid does not increase tissue arachidonic acid content in adults consuming Western-type diets: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Linoleic acid, with a DRI of 12-17 g/d, is the most highly consumed polyunsaturated fatty acid in the Western diet and is found in virtually all commonly consumed foods. The concern with dietary linoleic acid, being the metabolic precursor of arachidonic acid, is its consumption may enrich tissues with arachidonic acid and contribute to chronic and overproduction of bioactive eicosanoids. However, no systematic review of human trials regarding linoleic acid consumption and subsequent changes in tissue levels of arachidonic acid has been undertaken. Objective In this study, we reviewed the human literature that reported changes in dietary linoleic acid and its subsequent impact on changing tissue arachidonic acid in erythrocytes and plasma/serum phospholipids. Design We identified, reviewed, and evaluated all peer-reviewed published literature presenting data outlining changes in dietary linoleic acid in adult human clinical trials that reported changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition (specifically arachidonic acid) in plasma/serum and erythrocytes within the parameters of our inclusion/exclusion criteria. Results Decreasing dietary linoleic acid by up to 90% was not significantly correlated with changes in arachidonic acid levels in the phospholipid pool of plasma/serum (p = 0.39). Similarly, when dietary linoleic acid levels were increased up to six fold, no significant correlations with arachidonic acid levels were observed (p = 0.72). However, there was a positive relationship between dietary gamma-linolenic acid and dietary arachidonic acid on changes in arachidonic levels in plasma/serum phospholipids. Conclusions Our results do not support the concept that modifying current intakes of dietary linoleic acid has an effect on changing levels of arachidonic acid in plasma/serum or erythrocytes in adults consuming Western-type diets. PMID:21663641

  4. Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy Improves the Prognosis of Unresectable Adult Bone and Soft-Tissue Sarcoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Jingu, Keiichi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Hasegawa, Azusa; Bessho, Hiroki; Takagi, Ryo; Morikawa, Takamichi; Tonogi, Morio; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Yamada, Shogo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) with 70.4 GyE for unresectable bone and soft-tissue sarcoma of the adult head and neck. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients (mean age, 46.2 years) were enrolled in this prospective study on C-ion RT with 70.4 GyE/16 fractions (fr) between April 2001 and February 2008. The primary end points were acute and late reactions of normal tissues, local control rate, and overall survival rate. The secondary end point was efficacy of the treatment in comparison to historical results with 57.6 or 64.0 GyE/16 fr. Results: The 3-year local control rate and overall survival rate for all patients were 91.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 81.0-100%) and 74.1% (95% CI = 57.5-90.6%), respectively. Acute reaction of Grade 3 or more was observed in only 1 patient. With regard to late reactions, visual loss was observed in 1 patient and a Grade 3 reaction of the maxillary bone was observed in 4 patients. A comparison with historical results revealed that the local control rate with 70.4 GyE was significantly higher than that with 57.6 or 64.0 GyE (3-year, 91.8% vs. 23.6%, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the overall survival with 70.4 GyE tended to be higher than that with 57.6 or 64.0 GyE (3-year, 74.1% vs. 42.9%, p = 0.09). Conclusion: C-ion RT with 70.4 GyE/16 fr for bone and soft-tissue sarcoma of the adult head and neck appears to be effective with acceptable toxicities in comparison to conventional RT and C-ion RT with lower doses.

  5. Replication stress caused by low MCM expression limits fetal erythropoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell functionality

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Silvia; Díaz, Marcos; Flach, Johanna; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; López-Contreras, Andrés J.; Martínez, Dolores; Cañamero, Marta; Fernández-Capetillo, Oscar; Isern, Joan; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Méndez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Replicative stress during embryonic development influences ageing and predisposition to disease in adults. A protective mechanism against replicative stress is provided by the licensing of thousands of origins in G1 that are not necessarily activated in the subsequent S-phase. These ‘dormant' origins provide a backup in the presence of stalled forks and may confer flexibility to the replication program in specific cell types during differentiation, a role that has remained unexplored. Here we show, using a mouse strain with hypomorphic expression of the origin licensing factor mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM)3 that limiting origin licensing in vivo affects the functionality of hematopoietic stem cells and the differentiation of rapidly-dividing erythrocyte precursors. Mcm3-deficient erythroblasts display aberrant DNA replication patterns and fail to complete maturation, causing lethal anemia. Our results indicate that hematopoietic progenitors are particularly sensitive to replication stress, and full origin licensing ensures their correct differentiation and functionality. PMID:26456157

  6. TISSUE REGENERATION. Inhibition of the prostaglandin-degrading enzyme 15-PGDH potentiates tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongyou; Desai, Amar; Yang, Sung Yeun; Bae, Ki Beom; Antczak, Monika I; Fink, Stephen P; Tiwari, Shruti; Willis, Joseph E; Williams, Noelle S; Dawson, Dawn M; Wald, David; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Zhenghe; Kasturi, Lakshmi; Larusch, Gretchen A; He, Lucy; Cominelli, Fabio; Di Martino, Luca; Djuric, Zora; Milne, Ginger L; Chance, Mark; Sanabria, Juan; Dealwis, Chris; Mikkola, Debra; Naidoo, Jacinth; Wei, Shuguang; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Gerson, Stanton L; Ready, Joseph M; Posner, Bruce; Willson, James K V; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2015-06-12

    Agents that promote tissue regeneration could be beneficial in a variety of clinical settings, such as stimulating recovery of the hematopoietic system after bone marrow transplantation. Prostaglandin PGE2, a lipid signaling molecule that supports expansion of several types of tissue stem cells, is a candidate therapeutic target for promoting tissue regeneration in vivo. Here, we show that inhibition of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a prostaglandin-degrading enzyme, potentiates tissue regeneration in multiple organs in mice. In a chemical screen, we identify a small-molecule inhibitor of 15-PGDH (SW033291) that increases prostaglandin PGE2 levels in bone marrow and other tissues. SW033291 accelerates hematopoietic recovery in mice receiving a bone marrow transplant. The same compound also promotes tissue regeneration in mouse models of colon and liver injury. Tissues from 15-PGDH knockout mice demonstrate similar increased regenerative capacity. Thus, 15-PGDH inhibition may be a valuable therapeutic strategy for tissue regeneration in diverse clinical contexts.

  7. Dnmt3a Regulates Myeloproliferation and Liver-Specific Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guryanova, Olga A.; Lieu, Yen K.; Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E.; Spitzer, Barbara; Glass, Jacob L.; Shank, Kaitlyn; Valencia Martinez, Ana Belen; Rivera, Sharon A.; Durham, Benjamin H.; Rapaport, Franck; Keller, Matthew D.; Pandey, Suveg; Bastian, Lennart; Tovbin, Daniel; Weinstein, Abby R.; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Santini, Valeria; Mason, Christopher E.; Melnick, Ari M.; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Levine, Ross L.

    2015-01-01

    DNMT3A mutations are observed in myeloid malignancies, including myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Transplantation studies have elucidated an important role for Dnmt3a in stem cell self-renewal and in myeloid differentiation. Here we investigated the impact of conditional hematopoietic Dnmt3a loss on disease phenotype in primary mice. Mx1-Cre-mediated Dnmt3a ablation led to the development of a lethal, fully penetrant myeloproliferative neoplasm with myelodysplasia (MDS/MPN) characterized by peripheral cytopenias and by marked, progressive hepatomegaly. We detected expanded stem/progenitor populations in the liver of Dnmt3a-ablated mice. The MDS/MPN induced by Dnmt3a ablation was transplantable, including the marked hepatomegaly. Homing studies showed that Dnmt3a-deleted bone marrow cells preferentially migrated to the liver. Gene expression and DNA methylation analyses of progenitor cell populations identified differential regulation of hematopoietic regulatory pathways, including fetal liver hematopoiesis transcriptional programs. These data demonstrate that Dnmt3a ablation in the hematopoietic system leads to myeloid transformation in vivo, with cell autonomous aberrant tissue tropism and marked extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) with liver involvement. Hence, in addition to the established role of Dnmt3a in regulating self-renewal, Dnmt3a regulates tissue tropism and limits myeloid progenitor expansion in vivo. PMID:26710888

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The apparent cure of an HIV-infected person following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an allogeneic donor homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 mutation has stimulated the search for strategies to eradicate HIV or to induce long-term remission without requiring ongoing antiretroviral therapy. A variety of approaches, including allogeneic HSCT from CCR5-deficient donors and autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells, are currently under investigation. This Review covers the experience with HSCT in HIV infection to date and provides a survey of ongoing work in the field. The challenges of developing HSCT for HIV cure in the context of safe, effective, and convenient once-daily antiretroviral therapy are also discussed.

  9. Epigenomics in hematopoietic transplantation: novel treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Engel, Nicole; Rank, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a high risk but curative treatment option for leukemia, myelodysplasia and other hematological malignancies. After high dose radio- or chemo-therapy, recipient's hematopoiesis is replaced by a new immunosystem and residual malignant cells are eliminated by the graft-versus-leukemia reaction. The benefit of this immunological effect is limited by the most frequent complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: graft-versus-host disease. In addition to their well-known anti-tumor activity, epigenetic drugs mediate immunotolerance without reducing alloreactivity or even enhance graft-versus-leukemia effect without inducing graft-versus-host disease by regulating cytokine release, increasing the circulating number of regulatory T cells and interacting with natural killer cells. We focus on the use of epigenetic drugs in the allogeneic transplantation setting in relation to their anti-tumor and immunomodulatory potential.

  10. Making sense of hematopoietic stem cell niches

    PubMed Central

    Boulais, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche commonly refers to the pairing of hematopoietic and mesenchymal cell populations that regulate HSC self-renewal, differentiation, and proliferation. Anatomic localization of the niche is a dynamic unit from the developmental stage that allows proliferating HSCs to expand before they reach the bone marrow where they adopt a quiescent phenotype that protects their integrity and functions. Recent studies have sought to clarify the complexity behind the HSC niche by assessing the contributions of specific cell populations to HSC maintenance. In particular, perivascular microenvironments in the bone marrow confer distinct vascular niches that regulate HSC quiescence and the supply of lineage-committed progenitors. Here, we review recent data on the cellular constituents and molecular mechanisms involved in the communication between HSCs and putative niches. PMID:25762174

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell engineering at a crossroads.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Isabelle; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Sadelain, Michel

    2012-02-01

    The genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells is the basis for potentially treating a large array of hereditary and acquired diseases, and stands as the paradigm for stem cell engineering in general. Recent clinical reports support the formidable promise of this approach but also highlight the limitations of the technologies used to date, which have on occasion resulted in clonal expansion, myelodysplasia, or leukemogenesis. New research directions, predicated on improved vector designs, targeted gene delivery or the therapeutic use of pluripotent stem cells, herald the advent of safer and more effective hematopoietic stem cell therapies that may transform medical practice. In this review, we place these recent advances in perspective, emphasizing the solutions emerging from a wave of new technologies and highlighting the challenges that lie ahead.

  12. Hematopoietic stem cell engineering at a crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Isabelle; Dunbar, Cynthia E.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells is the basis for potentially treating a large array of hereditary and acquired diseases, and stands as the paradigm for stem cell engineering in general. Recent clinical reports support the formidable promise of this approach but also highlight the limitations of the technologies used to date, which have on occasion resulted in clonal expansion, myelodysplasia, or leukemogenesis. New research directions, predicated on improved vector designs, targeted gene delivery or the therapeutic use of pluripotent stem cells, herald the advent of safer and more effective hematopoietic stem cell therapies that may transform medical practice. In this review, we place these recent advances in perspective, emphasizing the solutions emerging from a wave of new technologies and highlighting the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:22096239

  13. Herpesviral Hematopoietic Necrosis in Goldfish in Switzerland: Early Lesions in Clinically Normal Goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Giovannini, S; Bergmann, S M; Keeling, C; Lany, C; Schütze, H; Schmidt-Posthaus, H

    2016-07-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 2 is a pathogen of goldfish, inducing a disease referred to as herpesviral hematopoietic necrosis. The disease is described so far in Japan, North America, Taiwan, Australia, the United Kingdom, and recently also Italy. Here the authors describe histologic lesions in clinically affected fish in comparison with clinically normal but virus DNA-positive goldfish in Switzerland. While necrosis or enhanced single-cell necrosis in the hematopoietic tissue in the pronephros or mesonephros was evident in dead and sick animals, in clinically normal goldfish, only single-cell necrosis was observed. Virus DNA was demonstrated in dead as well as clinically affected and subclinically infected goldfish by polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. This study identifies the presence of goldfish herpesvirus in Switzerland and highlights the fact that the virus might be more widespread than assumed, as clinically normal goldfish can also carry cyprinid herpesvirus 2, showing histologically similar lesions but of lesser extent and severity. PMID:26553521

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell compartment: Acute and late effects of radiation therapy an chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mauch, P.; Constine, L.; Greenberger, J.

    1995-03-30

    The bone marrow is an important dose-limiting cell renewal tissue for chemotherapy, wide-field irradiation, and autologous bone marrow transplantion. Over the past 5-10 years a great deal has been discovered about the hematopoietic stem cell compartment. Although the toxicity associated with prolonged myelosuppression continue to limit the wider use of chemotherapy and irradiation, ways are being discovered to circumvent this toxicity such as with the increasing use of cytokines. This review describes what is known of how chemotherapy and irradiation damage stem cells and the microenvironment, how cytokines protect hematopoietic cells from radiation damage and speed marrow recovery after chemotherapy or marrow transplantation, and how various types of blood marrow cells contribute to engraftment and long-term hematopoiesis after high doses of cytotoxic agents and/or total body irradiation. 167 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Effects of the bone marrow microenvironment on hematopoietic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Askmyr, Maria; Quach, Julie; Purton, Louise E

    2011-01-01

    The bone marrow (BM) is contained within the bone cavity and is the main site of hematopoiesis, the continuous development of blood cells from immature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The bone marrow consists of developing hematopoietic cells and non-hematopoietic cells, the latter collectively termed the bone marrow microenvironment. These non-hematopoietic cells include cells of the osteoblast lineage, adipocytes and endothelial cells. For many years these bone marrow microenvironment cells were predicted to play active roles in regulating hematopoiesis, and recent studies have confirmed such roles. Importantly, more recent data has indicated that cells of the BM microenvironment may also contribute to hematopoietic diseases. In this review we provide an overview of the roles of the data suggesting that the cells of the bone marrow microenvironment may play an active role in the initiation and progression of hematopoietic malignancy.

  16. Assessment of Antero-Posterior Skeletal and Soft Tissue Relationships of Adult Indian Subjects in Natural Head Position and Centric Relation

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Vishnu Ben; Keshavaraj; Rai, Rohan; Hegde, Gautham; Shajahan, Shabna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to verify the intra-individual reproducibility of natural head position (NHP) in centric relation (CR) position, to prove the inter-individual differences in the Frankfort horizontal plane and sella-nasion line compared with the true horizontal line, and to establish linear norms from A-point, B-point, Pog as well as soft tissue A-point, soft tissue B-point, and soft tissue Pog to nasion true vertical line (NTVL) in adult Indian subjects. Methods: Lateral cephalograms (T1) of Angle’s Class I subjects were taken in NHP and with bite in CR. A second lateral cephalogram (T2) of these subjects with ANB angle in the range 1-4° were taken after 1 week using the same wax bite and both the radiographs were analyzed based on six angular parameters using cephalometric software (Do-it, Dental studio NX version 4.1) to assess the reproducibility of NHP. Linear values of six landmarks were taken in relation to NTVL, and the mean values were calculated. A total of 116 subjects were included in this study. Results: When the cephalometric values of T1 and T2 were analyzed, it was found that, the parameters showed a P < 0.001, indicating the reproducibility of NHP in CR. Mean values for point A, point B, Pog and their soft tissue counterparts were also obtained. Conclusion: The study proved that NHP is a reproducible and accurate when recorded with the mandible in CR. Linear norms for skeletal Class I subjects in relation to NTVL were established. PMID:26124598

  17. Red blood cell-incompatible allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rowley, S D; Donato, M L; Bhattacharyya, P

    2011-09-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells from red cell-incompatible donors occurs in 30-50% of patients. Immediate and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions are expected complications of red cell-disparate transplantation and both ABO and other red cell systems such as Kidd and rhesus can be involved. The immunohematological consequences of red cell-incompatible transplantation include delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and delayed hemolysis from viable lymphocytes carried in the graft ('passenger lymphocytes'). The risks of these reactions, which may be abrupt in onset and fatal, are ameliorated by graft processing and proper blood component support. Red blood cell antigens are expressed on endothelial and epithelial tissues in the body and could serve to increase the risk of GvHD. Mouse models indicate that blood cell antigens may function as minor histocompatibility antigens affecting engraftment. Similar observations have been found in early studies of human transplantation for transfused recipients, although current conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens appear to overcome this affect. No deleterious effects from the use of red cell-incompatible hematopoietic grafts on transplant outcomes, such as granulocyte and platelet engraftments, the incidences of acute or chronic GvHD, relapse risk or OS, have been consistently demonstrated. Most studies, however, include limited number of patients, varying diagnoses and differing treatment regimens, complicating the detection of an effect of ABO-incompatible transplantation. Classification of patients by ABO phenotype ignoring the allelic differences of these antigens also may obscure the effect of red cell-incompatible transplantation on transplant outcomes. PMID:21897398

  18. Chronic variable stress activates hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Courties, Gabriel; Dutta, Partha; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Zaltsman, Alex; von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Bode, Christoph; Fricchione, Gregory L.; Denninger, John; Lin, Charles P.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Libby, Peter; Swirski, Filip K.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to psychosocial stress is a risk factor for many diseases, including atherosclerosis1,2. While incompletely understood, interaction between the psyche and the immune system provides one potential mechanism linking stress and disease inception and progression. Known crosstalk between the brain and immune system includes the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which centrally drives glucocorticoid production in the adrenal cortex, and the sympathetic–adrenal–medullary axis, which controls stress–induced catecholamine release in support of the fight–or–flight reflex3,4. It remains unknown however if chronic stress changes hematopoietic stem cell activity. Here we show that stress increases proliferation of these most primitive progenitors, giving rise to higher levels of disease–promoting inflammatory leukocytes. We found that chronic stress induced monocytosis and neutrophilia in humans. While investigating the source of leukocytosis in mice, we discovered that stress activates upstream hematopoietic stem cells. Sympathetic nerve fibers release surplus noradrenaline, which uses the β3 adrenergic receptor to signal bone marrow niche cells to decrease CXCL12 levels. Consequently, elevated hematopoietic stem cell proliferation increases output of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. When atherosclerosis–prone ApoE−/− mice encounter chronic stress, accelerated hematopoiesis promotes plaque features associated with vulnerable lesions that cause myocardial infarction and stroke in humans. PMID:24952646

  19. Arsenic induced changes in growth development and apoptosis in neonatal and adult brain cells in vivo and in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sukumar; Bhaumik, Sraboni; Nag Chaudhury, Aditi; Das Gupta, Shyamal

    2002-03-10

    Arsenic at a nonlethal level in drinking water consumed over a period of time has been reported to produce chronic toxicity and various types of health problems ranging from skin cancer to disturbance in memory. Neurotoxic effects have been reported in clinical cases with chronic exposure to arsenic. Physiological detoxication of arsenic occurs partially through methylation. Arsenic and its methylated derivatives are distributed in different organs and systems. The present study examined the possible interference in the neuronal development and differentiation due to the exposure to arsenic during gestation. The experiments were carried out to examine short and long term effects of arsenic on brain explants and cells grown and maintained in tissue culture system. The effects of arsenic exposure showed changes in brain cell membrane function indicated by generation and release of reactive oxygen-nitrogen intermediates. On the morphological aspect the explants' growth was reduced, ground matrix was lost and neural networking was inhibited. Cells showed signs of apoptotic changes. Arsenic toxicity may induce damage to brain cells prior to more visible clinical conditions. The deleterious effects also pass from the maternal to fetal tissue across the transplacental barrier.

  20. Ecdysone Receptor-based Singular Gene Switches for Regulated Transgene Expression in Cells and Adult Rodent Tissues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoghyun; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Won, Minho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Ju, Sung-Kyu; Kang, Kidong; Bae, Young-Ki; Hur, Gang Min; Ro, Hyunju

    2016-01-01

    Controlled gene expression is an indispensable technique in biomedical research. Here, we report a convenient, straightforward, and reliable way to induce expression of a gene of interest with negligible background expression compared to the most widely used tetracycline (Tet)-regulated system. Exploiting a Drosophila ecdysone receptor (EcR)-based gene regulatory system, we generated nonviral and adenoviral singular vectors designated as pEUI(+) and pENTR-EUI, respectively, which contain all the required elements to guarantee regulated transgene expression (GAL4-miniVP16-EcR, termed GvEcR hereafter, and 10 tandem repeats of an upstream activation sequence promoter followed by a multiple cloning site). Through the transient and stable transfection of mammalian cell lines with reporter genes, we validated that tebufenozide, an ecdysone agonist, reversibly induced gene expression, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with negligible background expression. In addition, we created an adenovirus derived from the pENTR-EUI vector that readily infected not only cultured cells but also rodent tissues and was sensitive to tebufenozide treatment for regulated transgene expression. These results suggest that EcR-based singular gene regulatory switches would be convenient tools for the induction of gene expression in cells and tissues in a tightly controlled fashion. PMID:27673563

  1. Adult Stromal Cells Derived from Human Adipose Tissue Provoke Pancreatic Cancer Cell Death both In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, Beatrice; Ravet, Emmanuel; Poglio, Sandrine; De Toni, Fabienne; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Lulka, Hubert; Touil, Ismahane; André, Mireille; Grolleau, Jean-Louis; Péron, Jean-Marie; Chavoin, Jean-Pierre; Bourin, Philippe; Pénicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis; Buscail, Louis; Cordelier, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. Disrupting this homeostasis can induce aberrant cell proliferation, adhesion, function and migration that might promote malignant behavior. Indeed, aberrant stromal-epithelial interactions contribute to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) spread and metastasis, and this raises the possibility that novel stroma-targeted therapies represent additional approaches for combating this malignant disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of human stromal cells derived from adipose tissue (ADSC) on pancreatic tumor cell proliferation. Principal Findings Co-culturing pancreatic tumor cells with ADSC and ADSC-conditioned medium sampled from different donors inhibited cancer cell viability and proliferation. ADSC-mediated inhibitory effect was further extended to other epithelial cancer-derived cell lines (liver, colon, prostate). ADSC conditioned medium induced cancer cell necrosis following G1-phase arrest, without evidence of apoptosis. In vivo, a single intra-tumoral injection of ADSC in a model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced a strong and long-lasting inhibition of tumor growth. Conclusion These data indicate that ADSC strongly inhibit PDAC proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo and induce tumor cell death by altering cell cycle progression. Therefore, ADSC may constitute a potential cell-based therapeutic alternative for the treatment of PDAC for which no effective cure is available. PMID:19609435

  2. Ecdysone Receptor-based Singular Gene Switches for Regulated Transgene Expression in Cells and Adult Rodent Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seoghyun; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Won, Minho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Ju, Sung-Kyu; Kang, Kidong; Bae, Young-Ki; Hur, Gang Min; Ro, Hyunju

    2016-01-01

    Controlled gene expression is an indispensable technique in biomedical research. Here, we report a convenient, straightforward, and reliable way to induce expression of a gene of interest with negligible background expression compared to the most widely used tetracycline (Tet)-regulated system. Exploiting a Drosophila ecdysone receptor (EcR)-based gene regulatory system, we generated nonviral and adenoviral singular vectors designated as pEUI(+) and pENTR-EUI, respectively, which contain all the required elements to guarantee regulated transgene expression (GAL4-miniVP16-EcR, termed GvEcR hereafter, and 10 tandem repeats of an upstream activation sequence promoter followed by a multiple cloning site). Through the transient and stable transfection of mammalian cell lines with reporter genes, we validated that tebufenozide, an ecdysone agonist, reversibly induced gene expression, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with negligible background expression. In addition, we created an adenovirus derived from the pENTR-EUI vector that readily infected not only cultured cells but also rodent tissues and was sensitive to tebufenozide treatment for regulated transgene expression. These results suggest that EcR-based singular gene regulatory switches would be convenient tools for the induction of gene expression in cells and tissues in a tightly controlled fashion. PMID:27673563

  3. Development of the definitive hematopoietic hierarchy in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Medvinsky, A L; Dzierzak, E A

    1998-01-01

    Recent research on the ontogeny of the hematopoietic system in mammals has shown that a simple textbook steady-state hematopoietic hierarchy can not be strictly applied to the hematopoietic cells found within the embryo. During embryonic development, hematopoietic cells originate, migrate and differentiate in a number of distinct anatomical sites such as the yolk sac AGM region and liver and thus represent various classes of cells within diverse microenvironments. In this manuscript we review both cellular and molecular aspects of developmental hematopoiesis and present our current views on the numerous complex mechanisms underlying the establishment of definitive hematopoiesis. PMID:9700459

  4. Chimerism of bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Miura, Yasuo; Yoshioka, Satoshi; Yao, Hisayuki; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Maekawa, Taira; Ichinohe, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been extensively used as a transplantable cell source for regenerative medicine and immunomodulatory therapy. Specifically in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), co-transplantation or post-transplant infusion of MSCs derived from bone marrow (BM) of non-self donors has been implicated in accelerating hematopoietic recovery, ameliorating graft-vs.-host disease, and promoting tissue regeneration. However, irrespective of the use of MSC co-administration, post-transplant chimerism of BM-derived MSCs after allogeneic HSCT has been reported to remain of host origin, suggesting that the infused donor MSCs are immunologically rejected or not capable of long-term engraftment in the host microenvironment. Also, hematopoietic cell allografts currently used for HSCT do not seem to contain sufficient amount of MSCs or their precursors to reconstitute host BM microenvironment. Since the toxic conditioning employed in allo-HSCT may impair the function of host MSCs to maintain hematopoietic/regenerative stem cell niches and to provide a local immunomodulatory milieu, we propose that new directions for enhancing immunohematopoietic reconstitution and tissue repair after allogeneic HSCT include the development of strategies to support functional replenishment of residual host MSCs or to support more efficient engraftment of infused donor MSCs. Future areas of research should include in vivo tracking of infused MSCs and detection of their microchimeric presence in extra-marrow sites as well as in BM.

  5. Mitochondrial MTHFD2L is a dual redox cofactor-specific methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase/methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase expressed in both adult and embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minhye; Bryant, Joshua D; Momb, Jessica; Appling, Dean R

    2014-05-30

    Mammalian mitochondria are able to produce formate from one-carbon donors such as serine, glycine, and sarcosine. This pathway relies on the mitochondrial pool of tetrahydrofolate (THF) and several folate-interconverting enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. We recently identified MTHFD2L as the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH2-THF) in adult mammalian mitochondria. We show here that the MTHFD2L enzyme is bifunctional, possessing both CH2-THF dehydrogenase and 5,10-methenyl-THF cyclohydrolase activities. The dehydrogenase activity can use either NAD(+) or NADP(+) but requires both phosphate and Mg(2+) when using NAD(+). The NADP(+)-dependent dehydrogenase activity is inhibited by inorganic phosphate. MTHFD2L uses the mono- and polyglutamylated forms of CH2-THF with similar catalytic efficiencies. Expression of the MTHFD2L transcript is low in early mouse embryos but begins to increase at embryonic day 10.5 and remains elevated through birth. In adults, MTHFD2L is expressed in all tissues examined, with the highest levels observed in brain and lung. PMID:24733394

  6. Middle-term expansion of hematopoietic cord blood cells with new human stromal cell line feeder-layers and different cytokine cocktails.

    PubMed

    De Angeli, S; Baiguera, S; Del Pup, L; Pavan, E; Gajo, G B; Di Liddo, R; Conconi, M T; Grandi, C; Schiavon, O; Parnigotto, P P

    2009-12-01

    Cord blood (CB) is a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and is an alternative to bone marrow for allogenic transplantation in patients with hematological disorders. The improvement of HSC in vitro expansion is one of the main challenges in cell therapy. Stromal components and soluble factors, such as cytokines, can be useful to induce in vitro cell expansion. Hence, we investigated whether feeder-layers from new stromal cell lines and different exogenous cytokine cocktails induce HSC expansion in middle-term cultures. CB HSC middle-term expansion was carried out in co-cultures on different feeder-layers exposed to three different cytokine cocktails. CB HSC expansion was also carried out in stroma-free cultures in the presence of different cytokine cocktails. Clonogenic tests were performed, and cell growth levels were evaluated. Moreover, the presence of VCAM-1 mRNA was assessed, and the mesenchymal cell-like phenotype expression was detected. All feeder-layers were able to induce a significant clonogenic growth with respect to the control culture, and all of the cytokine cocktails induced a significant increase in CB cell expansion indexes, even though no potential variation dependent on their composition was noted. The modulative effects of the different cocktails, exerted on each cell line used, was dependent on their composition. Finally, all cell lines were positive for CD73, CD117 and CD309, similar to mesenchymal stem cells present in adult bone marrow and in other human tissues, and negative for the hematopoietic markers. These data indicate that our cell lines have, not only a stromal cell-like phenotype, but also a mesenchymal cell-like phenotype, and they have the potential to support in vitro expansion of CB HSCs. Moreover, exogenous cytokines can be used in synergism with feeder-layers to improve the expansion levels of CB HSCs in preparation for their clinical use in allogenic transplantation. PMID:19885627

  7. Observation, Radiation Therapy, Combination Chemotherapy, and/or Surgery in Treating Young Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-08

    Adult Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Malignant Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Neurofibrosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Childhood Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Neurofibrosarcoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  8. Hematopoietic specification from human pluripotent stem cells: current advances and challenges toward de novo generation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Slukvin, Igor I

    2013-12-12

    Significant advances in cellular reprogramming technologies and hematopoietic differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have already enabled the routine production of multiple lineages of blood cells in vitro and opened novel opportunities to study hematopoietic development, model genetic blood diseases, and manufacture immunologically matched cells for transfusion and cancer immunotherapy. However, the generation of hematopoietic cells with robust and sustained multilineage engraftment has not been achieved. Here, we highlight the recent advances in understanding the molecular and cellular pathways leading to blood development from hPSCs and discuss potential approaches that can be taken to facilitate the development of technologies for de novo production of hematopoietic stem cells.

  9. Integrin Activation Through the Hematopoietic Adapter Molecule ADAP Regulates Dendritic Development of Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thiere, Marlen; Kliche, Stefanie; Müller, Bettina; Teuber, Jan; Nold, Isabell; Stork, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion and signaling is of critical importance for neuronal differentiation. Recent evidence suggests that an “inside-out” activation of β1-integrin, similar to that observed in hematopoietic cells, contributes to the growth and branching of dendrites. In this study, we investigated the role of the hematopoietic adaptor protein adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP) in these processes. We demonstrate the expression of ADAP in the developing and adult nervous hippocampus, and in outgrowing dendrites of primary hippocampal neurons. We further show that ADAP occurs in a complex with another adaptor protein signal-transducing kinase-associated phosphoprotein-homolog (SKAP-HOM), with the Rap1 effector protein RAPL and the Hippo kinase macrophage-stimulating 1 (MST1), resembling an ADAP/SKAP module that has been previously described in T-cells and is critically involved in “inside-out” activation of integrins. Knock down of ADAP resulted in reduced expression of activated β1-integrin on dendrites. It furthermore reduced the differentiation of developing neurons, as indicated by reduced dendrite growth and decreased expression of the dendritic marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2). Our data suggest that an ADAP-dependent integrin-activation similar to that described in hematopoietic cells contributes to the differentiation of neuronal cells. PMID:27746719

  10. CD34 expression on long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells changes during developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, S; Ebihara, Y; Xu, M; Ishii, T; Sugiyama, D; Yoshino, H; Ueda, T; Manabe, A; Tanaka, R; Ikeda, Y; Nakahata, T; Tsuji, K

    2001-01-15

    The CD34 antigen serves as an important marker for primitive hematopoietic cells in therapeutic transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and gene therapy, but it has remained an open question as to whether or not most HSC express CD34. Using a competitive long-term reconstitution assay, the results of this study confirm developmental changes in CD34 expression on murine HSC. In fetuses and neonates, CD34 was expressed on Lin(-)c-Kit(+) long-term repopulating HSC of bone marrow (BM), liver, and spleen. However, CD34 expression on HSC decreased with aging, and in mice older than 10 weeks, HSC were most enriched in the Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) marrow cell fraction. A second transplantation was performed from primary recipients who were transplanted with neonatal Lin(-)c-Kit(+) CD34(high) HSC marrow. Although donor-type HSC resided in CD34-expressing cell fraction in BM cells of the first recipients 4 weeks after the first transplantation, the stem cell activity had shifted to Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) cells after 16 weeks, indicating that adult Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) HSC are the progeny of neonatal CD34-expresssing HSC. Assays for colony-forming cells showed that hematopoietic progenitor cells, unlike HSC, continue to express CD34 throughout murine development. The present findings are important because the clinical application of HSC can be extended, in particular as related to CD34-enriched HSC and umbilical cord blood HSC.

  11. Distinct Functions of Different scl Isoforms in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoietic Stem Cell Initiation and Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yahui

    2011-07-01

    The establishment of entire blood system relies on the multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), thus identifying the molecular mechanism in HSC generation is of importance for not only complementing the fundamental knowledge in stem cell biology, but also providing insights to the regenerative therapies. Recent researches have documented the formation of nascent HSCs through a direct transition from ventral aortic endothelium, named as endothelial hematopoietic transition (EHT) process. However, the precise genetic program engaged in this process remains largely elusive. The transcription factor scl plays pivotal and conserved roles in embryonic and adult hematopoiesis from teleosts to mammals. Our lab have previously identified a new truncated scl isoform, scl-beta, which is indispensible for the specification of HSCs in the ventral wall of dorsal aorta (VDA), the zebrafish equivalent of mammalian fetal hematopoietic organ. Here we observe that, by combining time-lapse confocal imaging of transgenic zebrafish and genetic epistasis analysis, scl-beta is expressed in a subset of ventral aortic endothelial cells and critical for their forthcoming transformation to hemogenic endothelium; in contrast, runx1 is required downstream to govern the successful egress of the hemogenic endothelial cells to become naive HSCs. In addition, the traditional known full-length scl-alpha isoform is firstly evidenced to be required for the maintenance or survival of newly formed HSCs in VDA. Collectively our data has established the genetic hierarchy controlling discrete steps in the consecutive process of HSC formation from endothelial cells and further development in VDA.

  12. (Lymph)angiogenic influences on hematopoietic cells in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Kim, Hee-Je

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of (lymph)angiogenic cytokines on hematopoietic cells involved in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis occurs in pathophysiological conditions but not in healthy adults. AML is closely associated with the vasculature system, and the interplay between lymphangiogenic cytokines maintains leukemic blast survival in the bone marrow (BM). Once AML is induced, proangiogenic cytokines function as angiogenic or lymphangiogenic factors and affect hematopoietic cells, including BM-derived immune cells. Simultaneously, the representative cytokines, VEGFs and their receptors are expressed on AML blasts in vascular and osteoblast niches in both the BM and the peripheral circulation. After exposure to (lymph)angiogenic cytokines in leukemogenesis and infiltration, immune cell phenotypes and functions are affected. These dynamic behaviors in the BM reflect the clinical features of AML. In this review, we note the importance of lymphangiogenic factors and their receptors in hematopoietic cells in AML. Understanding the functional characterization of (lymph)angiogenic factors in the BM niche in AML will also be helpful in interrupting the engraftment of leukemic stem cells and for enhancing immune cell function by modulating the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25412683

  13. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohi, S.

    Departments of Biochemistry &Molecular Biology, Genetics &Human Genetics, Pediatrics &Child Long-duration space missions require countermeasures against severe/invasive disorders in astronauts that are caused by space environments, such as hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone/muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Some, if not all, of these disorders may be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy and gene therapy. Growing evidence indicates that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess extraordinary plasticity to differentiate not only to all types of blood cells but also to various tissues, including bone, muscle, skin, liver and neuronal cells. Therefore, our working hypothesis is that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called as the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), might provide countermeasure/prevention for hematological abnormalities, bone and muscle losses in space, thereby maintaining astronauts' homeostasis. Our expertise lies in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene therapy for the hemoglobinopathies, -thalassemia and sickle cell disease (Ohi S, Kim BC, J Pharm Sci 85: 274-281, 1996; Ohi S, et al. Grav Space Biol Bull 14: 43, 2000). As the requisite steps in this protocol, we established procedures for purification of HSCs from both mouse and human bone marrow in 1 G. Furthermore, we developed an easily harvestable, long-term liquid suspension culture system, which lasts more than one year, for growing/expanding HSCs without stromal cells. Human globin cDNAs/gene were efficiently expressed from the rAAVs in the mouse HSCs in culture. Additionally, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system is being optimized for the HSC growth/expansion. Thus, using these technologies, the above hypothesis is being investigated by the ground-based experiments as follows: 1) -thalassemic mice (C57BL/6-Hbbth/Hbbth, Hbd-minor) are transplanted with normal isologous HSCs to correct the

  14. Developmental changes of cytochrome P450 dependent monooxygenase functions after transplantation of fetal liver tissue suspension into spleens of adult syngenic rats.

    PubMed

    Lupp, A; Trautmann, A K; Krausse, T; Klinger, W

    1998-06-01

    Fetal liver tissue suspensions were transplanted into the spleens of adult male syngenic Fisher 344 inbred rats. Animals were sacrificed at 3 days, 1, 2, 4 weeks, and 2, 4 and 6 months after transplantation and cytochrome P450 (P450) dependent monooxygenase functions in spleen and liver 9000 g supernatants were assessed by measuring three model reactions for different P450 subtypes: ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD; mainly 1A), ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation (ECOD; predominantly 1A, 2A, 2B) and ethylmorphine N-demethylation (END; mainly 3A). Values of transplant recipients were compared to those of sham operated and age matched control rats. Spleen weights were significantly higher in transplanted rats, compared to controls or sham operated animals, but there was no influence of the transplants within the spleens on liver weights. With fetal livers at the 21st day of gestation, the day of transplantation, a weak EROD and ECOD, but no END activity was seen. Spleens of controls or sham operated animals displayed nearly no P450 mediated monooxygenase functions. In the explant containing spleens a significant and increasing EROD activity was found from 4 weeks after surgery on and an ECOD activity already 2 weeks after transplantation. END was only slightly enhanced at 6 months after surgery. The livers of all three groups of rats displayed normal EROD, ECOD and END activities. Transplantation of fetal liver tissue suspensions into the spleens did not influence the P450 dependent monooxygenase functions within the livers of the animals. From these results it can be concluded that intrasplenically transplanted liver cells originating from syngenic fetal liver tissue suspensions proliferate and differentiate within the host organs. They display P450 dependent monooxygenase functions with some developmental changes during the observed time period of 6 months.

  15. Synthesis of calcium phosphate-zirconia scaffold and human endometrial adult stem cells for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Aliakbar; Moztarzadeh, Fathollah; Ostad, Seyed Naser; Azami, Mahmoud; Geramizadeh, Bita; Hatam, Gholamreza; Bizari, Davood; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Vasei, Mohammad; Ai, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    To address the hypothesis that using a zirconia (ZrO2)/ β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) composite might improve both the mechanical properties and cellular compatibility of the porous material, we fabricated ZrO2/β-TCP composite scaffolds with different ZrO2/β-TCP ratios, and evaluated their physical and mechanical characteristics, also the effect of three-dimensional (3D) culture (ZrO2/β-TCP scaffold) on the behavior of human endometrial stem cells. Results showed the porosity of a ZrO2/β-TCP scaffold can be adjusted from 65% to 84%, and the compressive strength of the scaffold increased from 4.95 to 6.25 MPa when the ZrO2 content increased from 30 to 50 wt%. The cell adhesion and proliferation in the ZrO2/β-TCP scaffold was greatly improved when ZrO2 decreased. Moreover, in vitro study showed that an osteoblasts-loaded ZrO2/β-TCP scaffold provided a suitable 3D environment for osteoblast survival and enhanced bone regeneration. We thus showed that a porous ZrO2/β-TCP composite scaffold has excellent mechanical properties, and cellular/tissue compatibility, and would be a promising substrate to achieve both bone reconstruction and regeneration needed during in vivo study for treatment of large bone defects.

  16. Slug deficiency enhances self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells during hematopoietic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Shao, Lijian; Bai, Hao; Wang, Zack Z; Wu, Wen-Shu

    2010-03-01

    Both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms tightly govern hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) decisions of self-renewal and differentiation. However, transcription factors that can selectively regulate HSC self-renewal division after stress remain to be identified. Slug is an evolutionarily conserved zinc-finger transcription factor that is highly expressed in primitive hematopoietic cells and is critical for the radioprotection of these key cells. We studied the effect of Slug in the regulation of HSCs in Slug-deficient mice under normal and stress conditions using serial functional assays. Here, we show that Slug deficiency does not disturb hematopoiesis or alter HSC homeostasis and differentiation in bone marrow but increases the numbers of primitive hematopoietic cells in the extramedullary spleen site. Deletion of Slug enhances HSC repopulating potential but not its homing and differentiation ability. Furthermore, Slug deficiency increases HSC proliferation and repopulating potential in vivo after myelosuppression and accelerates HSC expansion during in vitro culture. Therefore, we propose that Slug is essential for controlling the transition of HSCs from relative quiescence under steady-state condition to rapid proliferation under stress conditions. Our data suggest that inhibition of Slug in HSCs may present a novel strategy for accelerating hematopoietic recovery, thus providing therapeutic benefits for patients after clinical myelosuppressive treatment.

  17. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy in patients with iron overload after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Krahl, Rainer; Jaekel, Nadja; Niederwieser, Dietger; Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Excess body iron could persist for years after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with possible deleterious sequels. An iron depletive therapy with phlebotomy seems rational. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy without erythropoietin support in non-thalassemic adult patients with iron overload after HCT and the impact of pre- and post-HCT hemochromatosis (HFE) genotype on iron mobilization were investigated. Patients and methods: Phlebotomy was initiated in 61 recipients of allografts due to hematologic malignancies (median age 48 years) after a median of 18 months. The prephlebotomy median serum ferritin (SF) was 1697ng/ml and the median number of blood transfusions 28 units. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT)/aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphates (AP), and bilirubin were elevated in 55.7%, 64% and 11.5% patients respectively. HFE-genotype was elucidated by polymerase chain reaction using hybridization probes and melting curve analysis. Results: Phlebotomy was well-tolerated irrespective of age or conditioning. A negative iron balance in 80% of patients (median SF 1086 ng/ml) and a rise in hemoglobin were observed (p<0.0001). Higher transfusional burden and SF were associated with a greater iron mobilization per session (p=0.02). In 58% of patients, a plateau after an initial steady decline in SF was followed by a second decline under further phlebotomy. The improvement in ALT (p=0.002), AST (p=0.03), AP (p=0.01), and bilirubin (p<0.0001) did not correlate with the decline in SF. Mutant HFE-gene variants were detected in 14/55 (25%) pre-HCT and 22/55 (40%) patients post-HCT. Overall, dissimilar pre- and posttransplantational HFE-genotypes were detected in 20/55 (40%) patients. Posttransplantational mutant HFE variants correlated with a slower decline in SF (p=0.007). Conclusions: Phlebotomy is a convenient therapy of iron overload in survivors of HCT. A negative iron balance and a rise in hemoglobin were observed in the majority of

  18. Epigenetic and in vivo comparison of diverse MSC sources reveals an endochondral signature for human hematopoietic niche formation

    PubMed Central

    Etchart, Nathalie; Thomas, Daniel; Hofmann, Nicole A.; Fruehwirth, Margareta; Sinha, Subarna; Chan, Charles K.; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Seo, Eun-Young; Wearda, Taylor; Hartwig, Udo F.; Beham-Schmid, Christine; Trajanoski, Slave; Lin, Qiong; Wagner, Wolfgang; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Andreeff, Michael; Weissman, Irving L.; Longaker, Michael T.; Schallmoser, Katharina; Majeti, Ravindra; Strunk, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade there has been a rapid expansion in clinical trials using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from a variety of tissues. However, despite similarities in morphology, immunophenotype, and differentiation behavior in vitro, MSCs sourced from distinct tissues do not necessarily have equivalent biological properties. We performed a genome-wide methylation, transcription, and in vivo evaluation of MSCs from human bone marrow (BM), white adipose tissue, umbilical cord, and skin cultured in humanized media. Surprisingly, only BM-derived MSCs spontaneously formed a BM cavity through a vascularized cartilage intermediate in vivo that was progressively replaced by hematopoietic tissue and bone. Only BM-derived MSCs exhibited a chondrogenic transcriptional program with hypomethylation and increased expression of RUNX3, RUNX2, BGLAP, MMP13, and ITGA10 consistent with a latent and primed skeletal developmental potential. The humanized MSC–derived microenvironment permitted homing and maintenance of long-term murine SLAM+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), as well as human CD34+/CD38−/CD90+/CD45RA+ HSCs after cord blood transplantation. These studies underscore the profound differences in developmental potential between MSC sources independent of donor age, with implications for their clinical use. We also demonstrate a tractable human niche model for studying homing and engraftment of human hematopoietic cells in normal and neoplastic states. PMID:25406351

  19. The Effects of Partial Mechanical Loading and Ibandronate on Skeletal Tissues in the Adult Rat Hindquarter Suspension Model for Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultheis, Lester W.

    1999-01-01

    We report initial data from a suspended rat model that quantitatively relates chronic partial weightbearing to bone loss. Chronic partial weightbearing is our simulation of the effect of limited artificial gravity aboard spacecraft or reduced planetary gravity. Preliminary analysis of bone by PQCT, histomorphometry, mechanical testing and biochemistry suggest that chronic exposure to half of Earth gravity is insufficient to prevent severe bone loss. The effect of episodic full weightbearing activity (Earth Gravity) on rats otherwise at 50% weightbearing was also explored. This has similarity to treatment by an Earth G-rated centrifuge on a spacecraft that normally maintained artificial gravity at half of Earth G. Our preliminary evidence, using the above techniques to analyze bone, indicate that 2 hours daily of full weightbearing was insufficient to prevent the bone loss observed in 50% weightbearing animals. The effectiveness of partial weightbearing and episodic full weightbearing as potential countermeasures to bone loss in spaceflight was compared with treatment by ibandronate. Ibandronate, a long-acting potent bisphosphonate proved more effective in preventing bone loss and associated functionality based upon structure than our first efforts at mechanical countermeasures. The effectiveness of ibandronate was notable by each of the testing methods we used to study bone from gross structure and strength to tissue and biochemistry. These results appear to be independent of generalized systemic stress imposed by the suspension paradigm. Preliminary evidence does not suggest that blood levels of vitamin D were affected by our countermeasures. Despite the modest theraputic benefit of mechanical countermeasures of partial weightbearing and episodic full weightbearing, we know that some appropriate mechanical signal maintains bone mass in Earth gravity. Moreover, the only mechanism that correctly assigns bone mass and strength to oppose regionally specific force

  20. The Effects of Partial Mechanical Loading and Ibandronate on Skeletal Tissues in the Adult Rat Hindquarter Suspension Model for Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultheis, Lester W.

    1999-01-01

    We report initial data from a suspended rat model that quantitatively relates chronic partial weightbearing to bone loss. Chronic partial weightbearing is our simulation of the effect of limited artificial gravity aboard spacecraft or reduced planetary gravity. Preliminary analysis of bone by PQCT, histomorphometry, mechanical testing and biochemistry suggest that chronic exposure to half of Earth gravity is insufficient to prevent severe bone loss. The effect of episodic full weightbearing activity (Earth Gravity) on rats otherwise at 50% weightbearing was also explored. This has similarity to treatment by an Earth G-rated centrifuge on a spacecraft that normally maintained artificial gravity at half of Earth G. Our preliminary evidence, using the above techniques to analyze bone, indicate that 2 hours daily of full weightbearing was insufficient to prevent the bone loss observed in 50% weightbearing animals. The effectiveness of partial weightbearing and episodic full weightbearing as potential countermeasures to bone loss in spaceflight was compared with treatment by ibandronate. Ibandronate, a long-acting potent bisphosphonate proved more effective in preventing bone loss and associated functionality based upon structure than our first efforts at mechanical countermeasures. The effectiveness of ibandronate was notable by each of the testing methods we used to study bone from gross structure and strength to tissue and biochemistry. These results appear to be independent of generalized systemic stress imposed by the suspension paradigm. Preliminary evidence does not suggest that blood levels of vitamin D were affected by our countermeasures. Despite the modest theraputic benefit of mechanical countermeasures of partial weightbearing and episodic full weightbearing, we know that some appropriate mechanical signal maintains bone mass in Earth gravity. Moreover, the only mechanism that correctly assigns bone mass and strength to oppose regionally specific force

  1. Reticular dysgenesis–associated AK2 protects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development from oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Rissone, Alberto; Weinacht, Katja Gabriele; la Marca, Giancarlo; Bishop, Kevin; Giocaliere, Elisa; Jagadeesh, Jayashree; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Dobbs, Kerry; Al-Herz, Waleed; Jones, Marypat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Kirby, Martha; Wincovitch, Stephen; Simon, Karen Lyn; Itan, Yuval; DeVine, Alex; Schlaeger, Thorsten; Schambach, Axel; Sood, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Adenylate kinases (AKs) are phosphotransferases that regulate the cellular adenine nucleotide composition and play a critical role in the energy homeostasis of all tissues. The AK2 isoenzyme is expressed in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is mutated in reticular dysgenesis (RD), a rare form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in humans. RD is characterized by a maturation arrest in the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, leading to early onset, recurrent, and overwhelming infections. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of RD, we studied the effects of AK2 deficiency using the zebrafish model and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from fibroblasts of an RD patient. In zebrafish, Ak2 deficiency affected hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. AK2-deficient iPSCs recapitulated the characteristic myeloid maturation arrest at the promyelocyte stage and demonstrated an increased AMP/ADP ratio, indicative of an energy-depleted adenine nucleotide profile. Antioxidant treatment rescued the hematopoietic phenotypes in vivo in ak2 mutant zebrafish and restored differentiation of AK2-deficient iPSCs into mature granulocytes. Our results link hematopoietic cell fate in AK2 deficiency to cellular energy depletion and increased oxidative stress. This points to the potential use of antioxidants as a supportive therapeutic modality for patients with RD. PMID:26150473

  2. Electrophysiological validation of total atrial conduction time measurement by tissue doppler echocardiography according to age and sex in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Fatma Hizal; Erdem, Alim; Özlü, Fatih; Ozturk, Serkan; Ayhan, Suzi Selim; Çağlar, Sabri Onur; Yazici, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to validate total atrial conduction time (TACT) measurement via tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) by comparing the electrophysiological study (EPS) measurements of healthy subjects, according to age and sex. Methods Eighty patients with normal EPS results were included. TACT was measured by EPS and TDI. For validation, the results of TDI were compared with those of EPS. TACT was assessed by measuring the time interval between the beginning of the P-wave on the surface ECG, and the peak A-wave on TDI from the left atrial lateral wall, just over the mitral annulus. Electrophysiological TACT was defined as the time from the high right atrial electrogram to the distal coronary sinus atrial electrogram around the left lateral portion of the mitral ring. Results EPS and TDI measurements of the TACT were significantly and positively correlated among men and women in 20–30 years (p=0.008, r=0.412; p>0.001, r=0.706, respectively), and those in the 30–40 years group (p=0.001, r=0.649; p=0.001, r=0.696). In contrast, EPS and TDI measurements of TACT were not significantly different among men and women in the 20–30 years and those in the 30–40 years group (p>0.05, for both). On univariate regression analyses, TACT was independently associated with age (β=0.342, =0.001). Conclusions When assessed according to the age and sex of healthy participants, TDI and EPS measurements during TACT assessments were similar and correlated with each other. The measurement of TACT via TDI may be used accurately and confidently than the measurement via EPS in healthy individuals. PMID:27092194

  3. Seasonal variation in plasma catecholamines and adipose tissue lipolysis in adult female green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Hamann, Mark; Limpus, Colin J; Whittier, Joan M

    2003-02-15

    We investigated three aspects of potential interrenal regulation of reproduction in female green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas. First, seasonal trends in plasma catecholamines were examined from female C. mydas at different stages of their reproductive cycles. Second, variation in catecholamine levels during a nesting season were analysed in relation to restraint time, and ecological variables such as nesting habitat, body size, and reproductive investment. Third, catecholamine and corticosterone (CORT) induced lipolysis was investigated with adipose tissue collected from gravid green turtles, using in vitro incubations. Plasma epinephrine (EPI) was lowest in non-vitellogenic (1.55 +/- 0.26 ng/ml) and post-breeding (1.57 +/- 0.22 ng/ml) females, and highest in courting females (2.87 +/- 0.28). Concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) and EPI were relatively constant throughout a nesting season, and not significantly related to restraint time, reproductive investment or nesting habitat. In vitro concentrations of CORT (>3 ng/ml) and NE (2 ng/ml) induced significant release of glycerol after 6h of incubation. Epinephrine tended to induce an antilipolytic affect at low concentrations (0.25 ng/ml) and a net lipolytic response at higher concentrations (>1 ng/ml). Our data suggest that EPI may play a role in regulating body condition during vitellogenesis, and maintaining energy stores during prolonged aphagia during courtship and nesting in female green sea turtles. Furthermore, we provide preliminary evidence that suggests that catecholamine production may be either down regulated or de-sensitised in gravid female C. mydas.

  4. Connective tissue growth factor is expressed in bone marrow stromal cells and promotes interleukin-7-dependent B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Laurence C; Strickland, Deborah H; Howlett, Meegan; Ford, Jette; Charles, Adrian K; Lyons, Karen M; Brigstock, David R; Goldschmeding, Roel; Cole, Catherine H; Alexander, Warren S; Kees, Ursula R

    2014-07-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in a complex bone marrow microenvironment in which bone marrow stromal cells provide critical support to the process through direct cell contact and indirectly through the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. We report that connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf, also known as Ccn2) is highly expressed in murine bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, connective tissue growth factor is barely detectable in unfractionated adult bone marrow cells. While connective tissue growth factor has been implicated in hematopoietic malignancies, and is known to play critical roles in skeletogenesis and regulation of bone marrow stromal cells, its role in hematopoiesis has not been described. Here we demonstrate that the absence of connective tissue growth factor in mice results in impaired hematopoiesis. Using a chimeric fetal liver transplantation model, we show that absence of connective tissue growth factor has an impact on B-cell development, in particular from pro-B to more mature stages, which is linked to a requirement for connective tissue growth factor in bone marrow stromal cells. Using in vitro culture systems, we demonstrate that connective tissue growth factor potentiates B-cell proliferation and promotes pro-B to pre-B differentiation in the presence of interleukin-7. This study provides a better understanding of the functions of connective tissue growth factor within the bone marrow, showing the dual regulatory role of the growth factor in skeletogenesis and in stage-specific B lymphopoiesis.

  5. Release properties and functional integration of noradrenergic-rich tissue grafted to the denervated spinal cord of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Leanza, G; Cataudella, T; Dimauro, R; Monaco, S; Stanzani, S

    1999-05-01

    Noradrenaline- (NA-) containing grafts of central (embryonic locus coeruleus, LC) or peripheral (juvenile adrenal medullary, AM, autologous superior cervical ganglionic, SCG) tissue were implanted unilaterally into rat lumbar spinal cord previously depleted of its NA content by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) intraventricularly. A microdialysis probe was implanted in the spinal cord 3-4 months after transplantation, and extracellular levels of noradrenaline were monitored in freely moving animals during basal conditions and following administration of pharmacological or behavioural stimuli. Age-matched normal and lesioned animals both served as controls. Morphometric analyses were carried out on horizontal spinal sections processed for dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) immunocitochemistry, in order to assess lesion- or graft-induced changes in the density of spinal noradrenergic innervation, relative to the normal patterns. In lesioned animals, the entire spinal cord was virtually devoid of DBH-positive fibers, resulting in a dramatic 88% reduction in baseline NA, compared with that in controls, which did not change in response to the various stimuli. LC and SCG grafts reinstated approximately 80% and 50% of normal innervation density, respectively, but they differed strikingly in their release ability. Thus, LC grafts restored baseline NA levels up to 60% of those in controls, and responded with significantly increased NA release to KCl-induced depolarization, neuronal uptake blockade and handling. In contrast, very low NA levels and only poor and inconsistent responses to the various stimuli were observed in the SCG-grafted animals. In AM-grafted animals, spinal extracellular NA levels were restored up to 45% of those in controls, probably as a result of nonsynaptic, endocrine-like release, as grafted AM cells retained the chromaffine phenotype, showed no detectable fibre outgrowth and did not respond to any of the pharmacological or behavioural challenges. Thus, both a

  6. Transplantation of fetal liver tissue suspension into the spleens of adult syngenic rats: inducibility of cytochrome P450 dependent monooxygenase functions by beta-naphthoflavone, phenobarbital and dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Lupp, A; Lau, K; Trautmann, A K; Krausse, T; Klinger, W

    1999-01-01

    In the present study the effects of beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), phenobarbital (PB) and dexamethasone (DEX) on cytochrome P450 (P450) dependent monooxygenase functions were investigated in intrasplenic liver cell explants in comparison to adult liver. Fetal liver tissue suspensions were transplanted into the spleens of 60-90 days old adult male syngenic Fisher 344 inbred rats. 2, 4 or 6 months after surgery, transplant recipients and age matched controls were orally treated with BNF (1x50 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.)), PB (1x50 mg/kg b.wt.), DEX (for 3 days 4 mg/kg b.wt. per day), or the respective solvents (dimethylsulfoxide or 0.9% NaCl). The animals were sacrificed 24 (BNF, DEX) or 48 (PB) hours after the last treatment. P450 mediated monooxygenase functions were measured in spleen and liver 9000 g supernatants by three model reactions for different P450 subtypes: ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD; 1A), ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation (ECOD; 1A, 2A, 2B), and ethylmorphine N-demethylation (END; 3A). Spleen weights were significantly higher in transplanted rats, compared to controls, at all three time points after surgery. Induction with PB or DEX, and in some cases also with BNF, lead to a significant increase in liver weights of transplant recipients and control rats independent of the time after transplantation. In contrast, there was no influence on spleen weights due to BNF or PB. At all time points after surgery, with DEX a marked decrease in body weights, weights of adrenal glands and of lymphatic organs like thymus glands and spleens was observed, with the weights of the transplant containing spleens being still higher in comparison to control organs. Spleens of control animals displayed nearly no P450 mediated monooxygenase functions neither without nor with induction. After transplantation, however, significant EROD and ECOD, but hardly any END activities were seen in the host organs at all three time points after surgery. In transplant containing spleens

  7. Distribution of the lipolysis stimulated receptor in adult and embryonic murine tissues and lethality of LSR-/- embryos at 12.5 to 14.5 days of gestation.

    PubMed

    Mesli, Samir; Javorschi, Sandrine; Bérard, Annie M; Landry, Marc; Priddle, Helen; Kivlichan, David; Smith, Andrew J H; Yen, Frances T; Bihain, Bernard E; Darmon, Michel

    2004-08-01

    The lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR) recognizes apolipoprotein B/E-containing lipoproteins in the presence of free fatty acids, and is thought to be involved in the clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL). The distribution of LSR in mice was studied by Northern blots, quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. In the adult, LSR mRNA was detectable in all tissues tested except muscle and heart, and was abundant in liver, lung, intestine, kidney, ovaries and testes. During embryogenesis, LSR mRNA was detectable at 7.5 days post-coitum (E7) and increased up to E17 in parallel to prothrombin, a liver marker. In adult liver, immunofluorescence experiments showed a staining at the periphery of hepatocytes as well as in fetal liver at E12 and E15. These results are in agreement with the assumption that LSR is a plasma membrane receptor involved in the clearance of lipoproteins by liver, and suggest a possible role in steroidogenic organs, lung, intestine and kidney). To explore the role of LSR in vivo, the LSR gene was inactivated in 129/Ola ES cells by removing a gene segment containing exons 2-5, and 129/Ola-C57BL/6 mice bearing the deletion were produced. Although heterozygotes appeared normal, LSR homozygotes were not viable, with the exception of three males, while the total progeny of genotyped wild-type and heterozygote pups was 345. Mortality of the homozygote embryos was observed between days 12.5 and 15.5 of gestation, a time at which their liver was much smaller than that of their littermates, indicating that the expression of LSR is critical for liver and embryonic development.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress regulation in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Miharada, Kenichi

    2016-08-01

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in bone marrow and are maintained in a dormant state within a special microenvironment, their so-called "niche". Detaching from the niche induces cell cycle progression, resulting in a reduction of the reconstitution capacity of HSCs. In contrast, fetal liver HSCs actively divide without losing their stem cell potentials. Thus, it has been unclear what types of cellular responses and metabolic changes occur in growing HSCs. We previously discovered that HSCs express relatively low levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone proteins governing protein folding, making HSCs vulnerable to an elevation of stress signals caused by accumulation of un-/misfolded proteins (ER stress) upon in vitro culture. Interestingly, fetal liver HSCs do not show ER stress elevation despite unchanged levels of chaperone proteins. Our latest studies utilizing multiple mouse models revealed that in the fetal liver bile acids as chemical chaperones play a key role supporting the protein folding which results in the suppression of ER stress induction. These findings highlight the importance of ER stress regulations in hematopoiesis. PMID:27599423

  9. Potential for a pluripotent adult stem cell treatment for acute radiation sickness

    PubMed Central

    Rodgerson, Denis O; Reidenberg, Bruce E; Harris, Alan G; Pecora, Andrew L

    2012-01-01

    Accidental radiation exposure and the threat of deliberate radiation exposure have been in the news and are a public health concern. Experience with acute radiation sickness has been gathered from atomic blast survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and from civilian nuclear accidents as well as experience gained during the development of radiation therapy for cancer. This paper reviews the medical treatment reports relevant to acute radiation sickness among the survivors of atomic weapons at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, among the victims of Chernobyl, and the two cases described so far from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi disaster. The data supporting the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the new efforts to expand stem cell populations ex vivo for infusion to treat bone marrow failure are reviewed. Hematopoietic stem cells derived from bone marrow or blood have a broad ability to repair and replace radiation induced damaged blood and immune cell production and may promote blood vessel formation and tissue repair. Additionally, a constituent of bone marrow-derived, adult pluripotent stem cells, very small embryonic like stem cells, are highly resistant to ionizing radiation and appear capable of regenerating radiation damaged tissue including skin, gut and lung. PMID:24520532

  10. Potential for a pluripotent adult stem cell treatment for acute radiation sickness.

    PubMed

    Rodgerson, Denis O; Reidenberg, Bruce E; Harris, Alan G; Pecora, Andrew L

    2012-06-20

    Accidental radiation exposure and the threat of deliberate radiation exposure have been in the news and are a public health concern. Experience with acute radiation sickness has been gathered from atomic blast survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and from civilian nuclear accidents as well as experience gained during the development of radiation therapy for cancer. This paper reviews the medical treatment reports relevant to acute radiation sickness among the survivors of atomic weapons at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, among the victims of Chernobyl, and the two cases described so far from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi disaster. The data supporting the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the new efforts to expand stem cell populations ex vivo for infusion to treat bone marrow failure are reviewed. Hematopoietic stem cells derived from bone marrow or blood have a broad ability to repair and replace radiation induced damaged blood and immune cell production and may promote blood vessel formation and tissue repair. Additionally, a constituent of bone marrow-derived, adult pluripotent stem cells, very small embryonic like stem cells, are highly resistant to ionizing radiation and appear capable of regenerating radiation damaged tissue including skin, gut and lung.

  11. AZD0530 in Treating Patients With Recurrent Locally Advanced or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

  12. Cell growth characteristics, differentiation frequency, and immunophenotype of adult ear mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Staszkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Frazier, Trivia P; Rowan, Brian G; Bunnell, Bruce A; Chiu, Ernest S; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Ear mesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs) represent a readily accessible population of stem-like cells that are adherent, clonogenic, and have the ability to self-renew. Previously, we have demonstrated that they can be induced to differentiate into adipocyte, osteocyte, chondrocyte, and myocyte lineages. The purpose of the current study was to characterize the growth kinetics of the cells and to determine their ability to form colonies of fibroblasts, adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. In addition, the immunophenotypes of freshly isolated and culture-expanded cells were evaluated. From 1 g of tissue, we were able to isolate an average of 7.8 x 10(6) cells exhibiting a cell cycle length of approximately 2-3 days. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assays indicated high proliferation potential, and confirmed previously observed multipotentiality of the cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) showed that EMSCs were negative for hematopoietic markers (CD4, CD45), proving that they did not derive from circulating hematopoietic cells. The FACS analyses also showed high expression of stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) with only a minor population of cells expressing CD117, thus identifying Sca-1 as the more robust stem cell biomarker. Additionally, flow cytometry data revealed that the expression patterns of hematopoietic, stromal, and stem cell markers were maintained in the passaged EMSCs, consistent with the persistence of an undifferentiated state. This study indicates that EMSCs provide an alternative model for in vitro analyses of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Further studies will be necessary to determine their utility for tissue engineering and regenerative medical applications. PMID:19400629

  13. MRI-measured pelvic bone marrow adipose tissue is inversely related to DXA-measured bone mineral in younger and older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei; Chen, Jun; Gantz, Madeleine; Punyanitya, Mark; Heymsfield, Steven B; Gallagher, Dympna; Albu, Jeanine; Engelson, Ellen; Kotler, Donald; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objective Recent research has shown an inverse relationship between bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) and bone mineral density (BMD). There is a lack of evidence at the macro-imaging level to establish whether increased BMAT is a cause or effect of bone loss. This cross-sectional study compared the BMAT and BMD relationship between a younger adult group at or approaching peak bone mass (PBM) (age 18.0-39.9 yrs) and an older group with potential bone loss (PoBL) (age 40.0-88 yrs). Subjects/Methods Pelvic BMAT was evaluated in 560 healthy men and women with T1-weighted whole body magnetic resonance imaging. BMD was measured using whole body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results An inverse correlation was observed between pelvic BMAT and pelvic, total, and spine BMD in the younger PBM group (r=-0.419 to -0.461, P<0.001) and in the older PoBL group (r=-0.405 to -0.500, P<0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, menopausal status, total body fat, skeletal muscle, subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, neither subject group (younger PBM vs. older PoBL) nor its interaction with pelvic BMAT significantly contributed to the regression models with BMD as dependent variable and pelvic BMAT as independent variable (P=0.434 to 0.928). Conclusion Our findings indicate that an inverse relationship between pelvic BMAT and BMD is present both in younger subjects who have not yet experienced bone loss and also in older subjects. These results provide support at the macro-imaging level for the hypothesis that low BMD may be a result of preferential differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from osteoblasts to adipocytes. PMID:22491495

  14. Nutritional status induces divergent variations of GLUT4 protein content, but not lipoprotein lipase activity, between adipose tissues and muscles in adult cattle.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Muriel; Faulconnier, Yannick; Hocquette, Jean-François; Bocquier, François; Leroux, Christine; Martin, Patrice; Chilliard, Yves

    2004-10-01

    Metabolic adaptations to variations in food supply are incompletely understood in ruminant animal adipose tissue (AT) and muscle. To explore this, we studied lipid metabolism and glucose transport potential in one internal and one external AT, as well as in one oxidative and one glycolytic muscle from control, 7 d underfed and 21 d refed adult cows. Refeeding increased (+79 to +307 %) the activities of enzymes involved in de novo lipogenesis (fatty acid synthase, malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) in perirenal and subcutaneous AT; underfeeding did not modify these variables. Underfeeding decreased the activities of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in perirenal AT (-70 %) and cardiac muscle (-67 %), but did not modify the activities in subcutaneous AT and longissimus thoracis. Refeeding increased LPL activities in all tissues (+40 to +553 %) to levels comparable with (cardiac muscle) or greater than (AT, longissimus thoracis) those observed in control cows. Such variations in perirenal and cardiac muscle LPL activities did not result from variations in LPL mRNA levels, but suggest a post-transcriptional regulation of LPL in these nutritional conditions. Underfeeding did not modify GLUT4 contents in perirenal AT and muscles, while refeeding increased it only in perirenal AT (+250 %). Our present results contrast with previous results in rats, where LPL is regulated in opposite directions in AT and muscles, and GLUT4 is generally increased by fasting and decreased by refeeding in skeletal muscles. The present results highlight the bovine specificity of the response, which probably arises in part from peculiarities of ruminant animals for nutrient digestion and absorption.

  15. Targeting autophagy to fight hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Puissant, Alexandre; Robert, Guillaume; Auberger, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Macroautophagy, referred hereafter to as autophagy is an evolutionary conserved catabolic process for the degradation and recycling of macromolecules, bulk cytoplasm and dammaged organelles. Autophagy is activated under stress conditions induced by nutrient deprivation, hypoxia and drug treatments. Morphologically, autophagic cells are characterized by the accumulation of double membrane cytoplasmic vesicules called autophagosomes that surrounds cytoplasmic proteins and/or organelles. Autophagosomes next fuse with lysosomes to generate autolysosomes, the structures in which the retained constituents are digested before recycling into the cytoplasm. In this context, autophagy promotes cell survival under adverse conditions. In contrast, under certain circumstances autophagic cells may engage a specific mode of cell death called type II cell death or autophagic cell death (ACD). Considering the strategic positionnement of this process at the crossroads of cell death and survival, it is not surprising that defects in autophagy have been linked to a plethora of human diseases, including hematopoietic malignancies. Finally, autophagy induction is repressed by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and favored by the adenosine-monophosphate activated-protein kinase (AMPK). In the present review, we focus on the functions of autophagy in normal and malignant hematopoiesis and discuss the opportunity to target the AMPK/mTOR pathways as a new therapeutic strategy to fight hematopoietic malignancies with a special emphasis on Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML).

  16. Functions of TET Proteins in Hematopoietic Transformation.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-A; An, Jungeun; Ko, Myunggon

    2015-11-01

    DNA methylation is a well-characterized epigenetic modification that plays central roles in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and silencing of retrotransposon elements. Aberrant DNA methylation pattern is a characteristic feature of cancers and associated with abnormal expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes or repair genes. Ten-eleven-translocation (TET) proteins are recently characterized dioxygenases that catalyze progressive oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and further oxidized derivatives. These oxidized methylcytosines not only potentiate DNA demethylation but also behave as independent epigenetic modifications per se. The expression or activity of TET proteins and DNA hydroxymethylation are highly dysregulated in a wide range of cancers including hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies, and accumulating evidence points TET proteins as a novel tumor suppressor in cancers. Here we review DNA demethylation-dependent and -independent functions of TET proteins. We also describe diverse TET loss-of-function mutations that are recurrently found in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies and their potential roles in hematopoietic transformation. We discuss consequences of the deficiency of individual Tet genes and potential compensation between different Tet members in mice. Possible mechanisms underlying facilitated oncogenic transformation of TET-deficient hematopoietic cells are also described. Lastly, we address non-mutational mechanisms that lead to suppression or inactivation of TET proteins in cancers. Strategies to restore normal 5mC oxidation status in cancers by targeting TET proteins may provide new avenues to expedite the development of promising anti-cancer agents.

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell mobilization: updated conceptual renditions

    PubMed Central

    Bonig, H; Papayannopoulou, T

    2013-01-01

    Despite its specific clinical relevance, the field of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization has received broad attention, owing mainly to the belief that pharmacologic stem cell mobilization might provide clues as to how stem cells are retained in their natural environment, the bone marrow ‘niche’. Inherent to this knowledge is also the desire to optimally engineer stem cells to interact with their target niche (such as after transplantation), or to lure malignant stem cells out of their protective niches (in order to kill them), and in general to decipher the niche’s structural components and its organization. Whereas, with the exception of the recent addition of CXCR4 antagonists to the armamentarium for mobilization of patients refractory to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone, clinical stem cell mobilization has not changed significantly over the last decade or so, much effort has been made trying to explain the complex mechanism(s) by which hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells leave the marrow. This brief review will report some of the more recent advances about mobilization, with an attempt to reconcile some of the seemingly inconsistent data in mobilization and to interject some commonalities among different mobilization regimes. PMID:22951944

  18. Characterization of feline glomerulonephritis associated with viral-induced hematopoietic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Glick, A D; Horn, R G; Holscher, M

    1978-08-01

    Light, electron, and immunofluorescence microscopy on tissues from 63 domestic cats revealed that glomerulonephritis occurred in almost one third of cats with hematopoietic neoplasms of the type linked with feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Glomerular lesions were of the immune complex type with subepithelial, subendothelial, and mesangial dense deposits and reticular aggregates, similar to the nephropathy associated with systemic lupus erythematosus in humans. Evidence that the glomerular lesions may be viral-induced raises the possibility of similar pathogenetic mechanisms in human disease. PMID:677265

  19. The binding site of a steroid hormone receptor-like protein within the Drosophila Adh adult enhancer is required for high levels of tissue-specific alcohol dehydrogenase expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, S; Benyajati, C

    1992-01-01

    Developmental and tissue-specific transcription from the Adh distal promoter is regulated in part by the Adh adult enhancer, located 450 to 600 bp upstream from the distal RNA start site. We have characterized four proteins (DEP1 to DEP4), present in Drosophila tissue culture cell nuclear extracts, which bind to this enhancer. DEP1 and DEP2 bind to a positive cis-acting element (-492 to -481) and share nucleotide contacts. A small linker replacement deletion mutation, which disrupts the overlapping DEP1- and DEP2-binding sites, reduces Adh distal transcription in an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-expressing cultured cell line, in the adult fat body (the major tissue of ADH expression), as well as in some but not all adult tissues where ADH is normally expressed. This enhancer element contains an imperfect palindromic sequence similar to steroid hormone receptor superfamily response elements. Binding-site screening of a lambda gt11 expression library has identified the steroid receptor superfamily member fushi tarazu factor 1 (FTZ-F1) as a protein that binds to this site. Anti-FTZ-F1 antibodies have identified DEP1 as FTZ-F1. DEP2 also binds to the FTZ-F1 site from the fushi tarazu zebra element, suggesting that DEP2 may also be a steroid receptor superfamily member. Our results raise the possibility that Adh regulation in certain adult tissues involves a hormone-mediated pathway. Because DEP1 (FTZ-F1) and DEP2 contact some of the same nucleotides within the positive cis element, it is unlikely that they can bind simultaneously. Such alternative binding may play a role in the tissue-specific and developmental transcription of Adh. Images PMID:1732738

  20. Hypoxia and Metabolic Properties of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The effect of redox signaling on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function is not clearly understood. Recent Advances: A growing body of evidence suggests that adult HSCs reside in the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment or niche during homeostasis. It was recently shown that primitive HSCs in the bone marrow prefer to utilize anaerobic glycolysis to meet their energy demands and have lower rates of oxygen consumption and lower ATP levels. Hypoxia-inducible factor-α (Hif-1α) is a master regulator of cellular metabolism. With hundreds of downstream target genes and crosstalk with other signaling pathways, it regulates various aspects of metabolism from the oxidative stress response to glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Hif-1α is highly expressed in HSCs, where it regulates their function and metabolic phenotype. However, the regulation of Hif-1α in HSCs is not entirely understood. The homeobox transcription factor myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Meis1) is expressed in the most primitive HSCs populations, and it is required for primitive hematopoiesis. Recent reports suggest that Meis1 is required for normal adult HSC function by regulating the metabolism and redox state of HSCs transcriptionally through Hif-1α and Hif-2α. Critical Issues: Given the profound effect of redox status on HSC function, it is critical to fully characterize the intrinsic, and microenvironment-related mechanisms of metabolic and redox regulation in HSCs. Future Directions: Future studies will be needed to elucidate the link between HSC metabolism and HSC fates, including quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1891–1901. PMID:23621582

  1. Delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics by genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Christopher B.; Archer, David; Spencer, H. Trent

    2010-01-01

    Several populations of adult human stem cells have been identified, but only a few of these are in routine clinical use. The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is arguably the most well characterized and the most routinely transplanted adult stem cell. Although details regarding several aspects of this cell’s phenotype are not well understood, transplant of HSCs has advanced to become the standard of care for the treatment of a range of monogenic diseases and several types of cancer. It has also proven to be an excellent target for genetic manipulation, and clinical trials have already demonstrated the usefulness of targeting this cell as a means of delivering nucleic acid therapeutics for the treatment of several previously incurable diseases. It is anticipated that additional clinical trials will soon follow, such as genetically engineering HSCs with vectors to treat monogenic diseases such as hemophilia A. In addition to the direct targeting of HSCs, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have the potential to replace virtually any engineered stem cell therapeutic, including HSCs. We now know that for the broad use of genetically-modified HSCs for the treatment of non-lethal diseases, e.g. hemophilia A, we must be able to regulate the introduction of nucleic acid sequences into these target cells. We can begin to refine transduction protocols to provide safer approaches to genetically manipulate HSCs and strategies are being developed to improve the overall safety of gene transfer. This review focuses on recent advances in the systemic delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics using genetically-modified stem cells, specifically focusing on i) the use of retroviral vectors to genetically modify HSCs, ii) the expression of fVIII from hematopoietic stem cells for the treatment of hemophilia A, and iii) the use of genetically engineered hematopoietic cells generated from iPS cells as treatment for disorders of hematopoiesis. PMID:20869414

  2. Radioprotection of hematopoietic progenitors by low dose amifostine prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Seed, Thomas M.; Inal, Cynthia E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Amifostine is a highly efficacious cytoprotectant when administered in vivo at high doses. However, at elevated doses, drug toxicity manifests for general, non-clinical radioprotective purposes. Various strategies have been developed to avoid toxic side-effects: The simplest is reducing the dose. In terms of protecting hematopoietic tissues, where does this effective, non-toxic minimum dose lie? Material and methods C3H/HEN mice were administered varying doses of amifostine (25–100 mg/kg) 30 min prior to cobalt-60 irradiation and euthanized between 4–14 days for blood and bone marrow collection and analyses. Results Under steady-state, amifostine had little effect on bipotential and multi-potential marrow progenitors but marginally suppressed a more primitive, lineage negative progenitor subpopulation. In irradiated animals, prophylactic drug doses greater than 50 mg/kg resulted in significant regeneration of bipotential progenitors, moderate regeneration of multipotential progenitors, but no significant and consistent regeneration of more primitive progenitors. The low amifostine dose (25 mg/kg) failed to elicit consistent and positive, radioprotective actions on any of the progenitor subtypes. Conclusions Radioprotective doses for amifostine appear to lie between 25 and 50 mg/kg. Mature, lineage-restricted progenitors appear to be more responsive to the protective effects of low doses of amifostine than the more primitive, multipotential progenitors. PMID:24597748

  3. Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Y; Shah, N N; Savani, B N; Shaw, B E; Abraham, A A; Ahmed, I A; Akpek, G; Atsuta, Y; Baker, K S; Basak, G W; Bitan, M; DeFilipp, Z; Gregory, T K; Greinix, H T; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, B K; Hayashi, R J; Jacobsohn, D A; Kamble, R T; Kasow, K A; Khera, N; Lazarus, H M; Malone, A K; Lupo-Stanghellini, M T; Margossian, S P; Muffly, L S; Norkin, M; Ramanathan, M; Salooja, N; Schoemans, H; Wingard, J R; Wirk, B; Wood, W A; Yong, A; Duncan, C N; Flowers, M E D; Majhail, N S

    2015-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients.

  4. Inherited BCL10 deficiency impairs hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity.

    PubMed

    Torres, Juan Manuel; Martinez-Barricarte, Rubén; García-Gómez, Sonia; Mazariegos, Marina S; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Rholvarez, Rita; Jiménez-Reinoso, Anaïs; del Pino, Lucia; Rodríguez-Pena, Rebeca; Ferreira, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Toledano, Victor; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Díaz-Almirón, Mariana; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Unzueta-Roch, José L; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Regueiro, Jose R; López-Granados, Eduardo; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pérez de Diego, Rebeca

    2014-12-01

    Heterotrimers composed of B cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1), and caspase recruitment domain-containing (CARD) family adaptors play a role in NF-κB activation and have been shown to be involved in both the innate and the adaptive arms of immunity in murine models. Moreover, individuals with inherited defects of MALT1, CARD9, and CARD11 present with immunological and clinical phenotypes. Here, we characterized a case of autosomal-recessive, complete BCL10 deficiency in a child with a broad immunodeficiency, including defects of both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity. The patient died at 3 years of age and was homozygous for a loss-of-expression, loss-of-function BCL10 mutation. The effect of BCL10 deficiency was dependent on the signaling pathway, and, for some pathways, the cell type affected. Despite the noted similarities to BCL10 deficiency in mice, including a deficient adaptive immune response, human BCL10 deficiency in this patient resulted in a number of specific features within cell populations. Treatment of the patient's myeloid cells with a variety of pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (PAMPs) elicited a normal response; however, NF-κB-mediated fibroblast functions were dramatically impaired. The results of this study indicate that inherited BCL10 deficiency should be considered in patients with combined immunodeficiency with B cell, T cell, and fibroblast defects. PMID:25365219

  5. Inherited BCL10 deficiency impairs hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Juan Manuel; Martinez-Barricarte, Rubén; García-Gómez, Sonia; Mazariegos, Marina S.; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; ρlvarez, Rita; Jiménez-Reinoso, Anaïs; del Pino, Lucia; Rodríguez-Pena, Rebeca; Ferreira, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Toledano, Victor; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Díaz-Almirón, Mariana; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Unzueta-Roch, José L.; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Regueiro, Jose R.; López-Granados, Eduardo; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pérez de Diego, Rebeca

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimers composed of B cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1), and caspase recruitment domain–containing (CARD) family adaptors play a role in NF-κB activation and have been shown to be involved in both the innate and the adaptive arms of immunity in murine models. Moreover, individuals with inherited defects of MALT1, CARD9, and CARD11 present with immunological and clinical phenotypes. Here, we characterized a case of autosomal-recessive, complete BCL10 deficiency in a child with a broad immunodeficiency, including defects of both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity. The patient died at 3 years of age and was homozygous for a loss-of-expression, loss-of-function BCL10 mutation. The effect of BCL10 deficiency was dependent on the signaling pathway, and, for some pathways, the cell type affected. Despite the noted similarities to BCL10 deficiency in mice, including a deficient adaptive immune response, human BCL10 deficiency in this patient resulted in a number of specific features within cell populations. Treatment of the patient’s myeloid cells with a variety of pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (PAMPs) elicited a normal response; however, NF-κB–mediated fibroblast functions were dramatically impaired. The results of this study indicate that inherited BCL10 deficiency should be considered in patients with combined immunodeficiency with B cell, T cell, and fibroblast defects. PMID:25365219

  6. Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Y; Shah, NN; Savani, BN; Shaw, BE; Abraham, AA; Ahmed, IA; Akpek, G; Atsuta, Y; Baker, KS; Basak, GW; Bitan, M; DeFilipp, Z; Gregory, TK; Greinix, HT; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, BK; Hayashi, RJ; Jacobsohn, DA; Kamble, RT; Kasow, KA; Khera, N; Lazarus, HM; Malone, AK; Lupo-Stanghellini, MT; Margossian, SP; Muffly, LS; Norkin, M; Ramanathan, M; Salooja, N; Schoemans, H; Wingard, JR; Wirk, B; Wood, WA; Yong, A; Duncan, CN; Flowers, MED; Majhail, NS

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients. PMID:25822223

  7. DNA-methylation dependent regulation of embryo-specific 5S ribosomal DNA cluster transcription in adult tissues of sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Naselli, Flores; Caradonna, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    We have previously reported a molecular and cytogenetic characterization of three different 5S rDNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and recently, demonstrated the presence of high heterogeneity in functional 5S rRNA. In this paper, we show some important distinctive data on 5S rRNA transcription for this organism. Using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, we demonstrate the existence of two classes of 5S rRNA, one which is embryo-specific and encoded by the smallest (700 bp) cluster and the other which is expressed at every stage and encoded by longer clusters (900 and 950 bp). We also demonstrate that the embryo-specific class of 5S rRNA is expressed in oocytes and embryonic stages and is silenced in adult tissue and that this phenomenon appears to be due exclusively to DNA methylation, as indicated by sensitivity to 5-azacytidine, unlike Xenopus where this mechanism is necessary but not sufficient to maintain the silenced status.

  8. Connective tissue growth factor is critical for proper β-cell function and pregnancy-induced β-cell hyperplasia in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Raymond C; Dunn, Jennifer C; Elsakr, Joseph M; Aramandla, Mounika; Matta, Anveetha R; Gannon, Maureen

    2016-09-01

    During pregnancy, maternal β-cells undergo compensatory changes, including increased β-cell mass and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Failure of these adaptations to occur results in gestational diabetes mellitus. The secreted protein connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is critical for normal β-cell development and promotes regeneration after partial β-cell ablation. During embryogenesis, CTGF is expressed in pancreatic ducts, vasculature, and β-cells. In adult pancreas, CTGF is expressed only in the vasculature. Here we show that pregnant mice with global Ctgf haploinsufficiency (Ctgf(LacZ/+)) have an impairment in maternal β-cell proliferation; no difference was observed in virgin Ctgf(LacZ/+) females. Using a conditional CTGF allele, we found that mice with a specific inactivation of CTGF in endocrine cells (Ctgf(ΔEndo)) develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but this is due to a reduction in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion rather than impaired maternal β-cell proliferation. Moreover, virgin Ctgf(ΔEndo) females also display impaired GSIS with glucose intolerance, indicating that underlying β-cell dysfunction precedes the development of gestational diabetes in this animal model. This is the first time a role for CTGF in β-cell function has been reported. PMID:27460898

  9. The gene encoding the VP16-accessory protein HCF (HCFC1) resides in human Xq28 and is highly expressed in fetal tissues and the adult kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.C.; Herr, W.; Parrish, J.E.; Massa, H.F.

    1995-01-20

    After herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, the viral regulatory protein VP16 activates transcription of the HSV immediate-early promoters by directing complex formation with two cellular proteins, the POU-homeodomain transcription factor Oct-1 and the host cell factor HCF. The function of HCF in uninfected cells is unknown. Here we show by fluorescence in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid analysis that the gene encoding human HCF, HCFC1, maps to the q28 region of the X chromosome. Yeast artificial chromosome and cosmid mapping localizes the HCFC1 gene within 100 kb distal of the renal vasopressin type-2 receptor (V2R) gene and adjacent to the renin-binding protein gene (RENBP). The HCFC1 gene is apparently unique. HCF transcripts and protein are most abundant in fetal and placental tissues and cell lines, suggesting a role in cell proliferation. In adults, HCF protein is abundant in the kidney, but not in the brain, a site of latent HSV infection and where HCF levels may influence progression of HSV infection. 42 refs., 3 figs.

  10. DNA-methylation dependent regulation of embryo-specific 5S ribosomal DNA cluster transcription in adult tissues of sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Naselli, Flores; Caradonna, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    We have previously reported a molecular and cytogenetic characterization of three different 5S rDNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and recently, demonstrated the presence of high heterogeneity in functional 5S rRNA. In this paper, we show some important distinctive data on 5S rRNA transcription for this organism. Using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, we demonstrate the existence of two classes of 5S rRNA, one which is embryo-specific and encoded by the smallest (700 bp) cluster and the other which is expressed at every stage and encoded by longer clusters (900 and 950 bp). We also demonstrate that the embryo-specific class of 5S rRNA is expressed in oocytes and embryonic stages and is silenced in adult tissue and that this phenomenon appears to be due exclusively to DNA methylation, as indicated by sensitivity to 5-azacytidine, unlike Xenopus where this mechanism is necessary but not sufficient to maintain the silenced status. PMID:23933480

  11. [The methods used to collect hematopoietic stem cells].

    PubMed

    Hequet, O

    2011-04-01

    The methods used to collect hematopoietic stem cells in their natural environment (bone marrow or cord blood) or in the peripheral blood after stimulation are well-defined and ruled both to ensure the donor security and perform a quality hematopoietic transplantation. Safety of the familial or non-familial donor must be ensured not only during the collection but also on a medium- or a long-term basis. The stem cells amount in a graft and its characterisation depend on the collection site of hematopoietic stem cells and on the technique used. The knowledge of conditions influencing these amounts allows optimising the hematopoietic stem cells collection while preventing conditions in which the donor safety could be decreased. The collection site also influences the collection of significant amounts of other blood cells. This knowledge conditions the preparation procedures of the graft in cell therapy units or the management of per- or post-transplantations complications in haematology units. Thus, hematopoietic transplantations concern not only hematological units but also the teams involved in various stages of donor selection, hematopoietic stem cells collection and graft preparation. In order to allow an appropriate care of both donor and recipient, a concomitant knowledge of all the stages involved in hematopoietic collection conditions, characterisation of collected cells, hematological diseases and conditioning must be brought to hematological, collection and cell therapy teams. PMID:21397542

  12. CD166 regulates human and murine hematopoietic stem cells and the hematopoietic niche

    PubMed Central

    Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Cheng, Yinghua; Zhang, Huajia; Poteat, Bradley A.; Broxmeyer, Hal E.; Pelus, Louis M.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Zollman, Amy; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Carlesso, Nadia; Cardoso, Angelo A.; Kacena, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that immature CD166+ osteoblasts (OB) promote hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. Here, we demonstrate that CD166 is a functional HSC marker that identifies both murine and human long-term repopulating cells. Both murine LSKCD48−CD166+CD150+ and LSKCD48−CD166+CD150+CD9+ cells, as well as human Lin−CD34+CD38−CD49f+CD166+ cells sustained significantly higher levels of chimerism in primary and secondary recipients than CD166− cells. CD166−/− knockout (KO) LSK cells engrafted poorly in wild-type (WT) recipients and KO bone marrow cells failed to radioprotect lethally irradiated WT recipients. CD166−/− hosts supported short-term, but not long-term WT HSC engraftment, confirming that loss of CD166 is detrimental to the competence of the hematopoietic niche. CD166−/− mice were significantly more sensitive to hematopoietic stress. Marrow-homed transplanted WT hematopoietic cells lodged closer to the recipient endosteum than CD166−/− cells, suggesting that HSC-OB homophilic CD166 interactions are critical for HSC engraftment. STAT3 has 3 binding sites on the CD166 promoter and STAT3 inhibition reduced CD166 expression, suggesting that both CD166 and STAT3 may be functionally coupled and involved in HSC competence. These studies illustrate the significance of CD166 in the identification and engraftment of HSC and in HSC-niche interactions, and suggest that CD166 expression can be modulated to enhance HSC function. PMID:24740813

  13. BMP and Hedgehog Regulate Distinct AGM Hematopoietic Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Crisan, Mihaela; Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Neagu, Alex; Karkanpouna, Sofia; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Purini, Caterina; Vink, Chris S.; van der Linden, Reinier; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.; Monteiro, Rui; Mummery, Christine; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the self-renewing cells of the adult blood differentiation hierarchy, are generated during embryonic stages. The first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the embryo through endothelial to a hematopoietic transition. BMP4 and Hedgehog affect their production and expansion, but it is unknown whether they act to affect the same HSCs. In this study using the BRE GFP reporter mouse strain that identifies BMP/Smad-activated cells, we find that the AGM harbors two types of adult-repopulating HSCs upon explant culture: One type is BMP-activated and the other is a non-BMP-activated HSC type that is indirectly controlled by Hedgehog signaling through the VEGF pathway. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that the two HSC types express distinct but overlapping genetic programs. These results revealing the bifurcation in HSC types at early embryonic stages in the AGM explant model suggest that their development is dependent upon the signaling molecules in the microenvironment. PMID:26923823

  14. Risk factors for mortality in patients with bloodstream infections during the pre-engraftment period after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Karpov, Igor; Milanovich, Natalia; Uss, Anatoly; Iskrov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections (BSI) remain a frequent complication during the pre-engraftment period after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), resulting in high mortality rates. This study evaluated risk factors for mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with BSI in the pre-engraftment period. Methods This prospective case control study was performed at the Center of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation in Minsk, Republic of Belarus. Data relating to patient age and gender, date and type of transplantation, conditioning chemotherapy regimen, microorganisms isolated from blood, and antibacterial therapy were prospectively collected from all hematopoietic stem cell recipients with microbiologically proven cases of BSI in the pre-engraftment period. The primary outcome was all-cause 30-day mortality after onset of febrile neutropenia. Results A total of 135 adult patients with microbiologically proven BSI after HSCT were studied, with 65.2% of cases caused by gram-negative microorganisms and 21.5% by non-fermenting bacteria. Inadequate empiric antibacterial therapy and isolation of carbapenem-resistant non-fermenting gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were independently associated with increased all-cause 30-day mortality in these patients. Conclusion The risk factors for mortality in adult patients with BSI in the pre-engraftment period after HSCT were inadequacy of empirical antibacterial therapy and isolation of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii or P. aeruginosa. PMID:27382554

  15. Cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic cells with low mitochondrial mass are enriched in hematopoietic repopulating stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Romero-Moya, Damia; Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Navarro-Montero, Oscar; Iborra, Francisco J; López, Luis Carlos; Martin, Miguel; Menendez, Pablo

    2013-07-01

    The homeostasis of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell pool relies on a fine-tuned balance between self-renewal, differentiation and proliferation. Recent studies have proposed that mitochondria regulate these processes. Although recent work has contributed to understanding the role of mitochondria during stem cell differentiation, it remains unclear whether the mitochondrial content/function affects human hematopoietic stem versus progenitor function. We found that mitochondrial mass correlates strongly with mitochondrial membrane potential in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We, therefore, sorted cord blood CD34(+) cells on the basis of their mitochondrial mass and analyzed the in vitro homeostasis and clonogenic potential as well as the in vivo repopulating potential of CD34(+) cells with high (CD34(+) Mito(High)) versus low (CD34(+) Mito(Low)) mitochondrial mass. The CD34(+) Mito(Low) fraction contained 6-fold more CD34(+)CD38(-) primitive cells and was enriched in hematopoietic stem cell function, as demonstrated by its significantly greater hematopoietic reconstitution potential in immuno-deficient mice. In contrast, the CD34(+) Mito(High) fraction was more enriched in hematopoietic progenitor function with higher in vitro clonogenic capacity. In vitro differentiation of CD34(+) Mito(Low) cells was significantly delayed as compared to that of CD34(+) Mito(High) cells. The eventual complete differentiation of CD34(+) Mito(Low) cells, which coincided with a robust expansion of the CD34(-) differentiated progeny, was accompanied by mitochondrial adaptation, as shown by significant increases in ATP production and expression of the mitochondrial genes ND1 and COX2. In conclusion, cord blood CD34(+) cells with low levels of mitochondrial mass are enriched in hematopoietic repopulating stem cell function whereas high levels of mitochondrial mass identify hematopoietic progenitors. A mitochondrial response underlies hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell

  16. Cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic cells with low mitochondrial mass are enriched in hematopoietic repopulating stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Moya, Damia; Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Navarro-Montero, Oscar; Iborra, Francisco J.; López, Luis Carlos; Martin, Miguel; Menendez, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    The homeostasis of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell pool relies on a fine-tuned balance between self-renewal, differentiation and proliferation. Recent studies have proposed that mitochondria regulate these processes. Although recent work has contributed to understanding the role of mitochondria during stem cell differentiation, it remains unclear whether the mitochondrial content/function affects human hematopoietic stem versus progenitor function. We found that mitochondrial mass correlates strongly with mitochondrial membrane potential in CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We, therefore, sorted cord blood CD34+ cells on the basis of their mitochondrial mass and analyzed the in vitro homeostasis and clonogenic potential as well as the in vivo repopulating potential of CD34+ cells with high (CD34+ MitoHigh) versus low (CD34+ MitoLow) mitochondrial mass. The CD34+ MitoLow fraction contained 6-fold more CD34+CD38− primitive cells and was enriched in hematopoietic stem cell function, as demonstrated by its significantly greater hematopoietic reconstitution potential in immuno-deficient mice. In contrast, the CD34+ MitoHigh fraction was more enriched in hematopoietic progenitor function with higher in vitro clonogenic capacity. In vitro differentiation of CD34+ MitoLow cells was significantly delayed as compared to that of CD34+ MitoHigh cells. The eventual complete differentiation of CD34+ MitoLow cells, which coincided with a robust expansion of the CD34− differentiated progeny, was accompanied by mitochondrial adaptation, as shown by significant increases in ATP production and expression of the mitochondrial genes ND1 and COX2. In conclusion, cord blood CD34+ cells with low levels of mitochondrial mass are enriched in hematopoietic repopulating stem cell function whereas high levels of mitochondrial mass identify hematopoietic progenitors. A mitochondrial response underlies hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell differentiation and proliferation of

  17. Automated quantification of hematopoietic cell - stromal cell interactions in histological images of undecalcified bone.

    PubMed

    Zehentmeier, Sandra; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Escribano Navarro, Juan; Niesner, Raluca A; Hauser, Anja E

    2015-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is the method of choice for the analysis of localization of multiple cell types within complex tissues such as the bone marrow. However, the analysis and quantification of cellular localization is difficult, as in many cases it relies on manual counting, thus bearing the risk of introducing a rater-dependent bias and reducing interrater reliability. Moreover, it is often difficult to judge whether the co-localization between two cells results from random positioning, especially when cell types differ strongly in the frequency of their occurrence. Here, a method for unbiased quantification of cellular co-localization in the bone marrow is introduced. The protocol describes the sample preparation used to obtain histological sections of whole murine long bones including the bone marrow, as well as the staining protocol and the acquisition of high-resolution images. An analysis workflow spanning from the recognition of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cell types in 2-dimensional (2D) bone marrow images to the quantification of the direct contacts between those cells is presented. This also includes a neighborhood analysis, to obtain information about the cellular microenvironment surrounding a certain cell type. In order to evaluate whether co-localization of two cell types is the mere result of random cell positioning or reflects preferential associations between the cells, a simulation tool which is suitable for testing this hypothesis in the case of hematopoietic as well as stromal cells, is used. This approach is not limited to the bone marrow, and can be extended to other tissues to permit reproducible, quantitative analysis of histological data.

  18. Putative population of adipose-derived stem cells isolated from mediastinal tissue during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amit N; Yockman, James; Vargas, Vanessa; Bull, David A

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been isolated from various adult human tissues and are valuable for not only therapeutic applications but for the study of tissue homeostasis and disease progression. Subcutaneous adipose depots have been shown to contain large amounts of stem cells. There is little information that has been reported to date describing the isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from visceral adipose tissue. In this study, we describe a mesenchymal stem cell population isolated from mediastinal adipose depots. The cells express CD44, CD105, CD166, and CD90 and are negative for hematopoietic markers CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. In addition, the cells have a multilineage potential, with the ability to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic cell types. The biological function of visceral adipose tissue remains largely unknown and uncharacterized. However, the proximity of adipose tissue to the heart suggests a potential role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in obesity. In addition, with the ability of fat to regulate metabolic activity in humans, this novel stem cell source may be useful to further study the mechanisms involved in metabolic disorders.

  19. Unmet Needs for Psychosocial Care in Hematologic Malignancies and Hematopoietic Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Barata, Anna; Wood, William A; Choi, Sung Won; Jim, Heather S L

    2016-08-01

    Individuals diagnosed with hematologic malignancies experience significant unmet psychological, physical, informational, financial, and spiritual needs. The goal of the current review is to summarize and highlight recent research focused on these issues in the diagnosis and treatment periods and beyond. The review also describes the needs of adolescent and young adult (AYA) and pediatric patients. While a large body of research has reported on unmet needs among adult hematologic cancer patients, there is far less data regarding the challenges confronted by AYA and pediatric populations. Available data suggests that among all age groups, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a risk factor for greater unmet needs. Recommendations for screening and evidence-based interventions to prevent or ameliorate unmet needs are provided. Future research is needed to develop additional evidence-based psychosocial interventions with a focus on hematologic cancer. PMID:27113094

  20. Enhanced thrombopoietin but not G-CSF receptor stimulation induces self-renewing hematopoietic stem cell divisions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kovtonyuk, Larisa V; Manz, Markus G; Takizawa, Hitoshi

    2016-06-23

    In steady-state adult hematopoiesis, most hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are in the resting phase of the cell cycle. Upon enhanced hematopoietic demand, HSCs can be induced to divide and self-renew or differentiate. However, the cell-extrinsic signals inducing HSC cycling remain to be elucidated. Using in vivo high-resolution single HSC divisional tracking, we directly demonstrate that clinically applied thrombopoietin receptor but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor agonists drive HSCs into self-renewing divisions leading to quantitative expansion of functional HSC as defined by their in vivo serial multilineage and long-term repopulating potential. These results suggest that thrombopoietin mimetics might be applicable to expand HSCs in vivo and to sensitize thrombopoietin receptor-expressing HSCs to cell cycle-dependent cytotoxic agents. PMID:27146433

  1. Effect of alpha lipoic acid co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical changes in subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult male albino rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation

    PubMed Central

    Mazroa, Shireen A; Asker, Samar A; Asker, Waleed; Abd Ellatif, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Polypropylene mesh is commonly used in the treatment of abdominal hernia. Different approaches were addressed to improve their tissue integration and consequently reduce long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical (IHC) changes in the subcutaneous tissues of the anterior abdominal wall of the adult rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation. Forty adult male albino rats were divided into: group I (control), group II (receiving ALA), group III (polypropylene mesh implantation) and group IV (mesh implantation + ALA co-administration). After 4 weeks, subcutaneous tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy and IHC study of CD34 as a marker for angiogenesis. In groups I and II rats, positive CD34 expression was demonstrated by IHC reaction, localized to endothelial cells lining small blood vessels. Group III showed an excess inflammatory reaction, deposition of both regular and irregularly arranged collagen fibres around mesh pores and few elastic fibres. CD34-positive was detected not only in cells lining small blood vessels but also in other cells scattered in the connective tissue indicating angiogenesis. In group IV, ALA co-administration resulted in less inflammatory reaction, regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and a significant increase in CD34-positive cells and small blood vessels reflecting improved angiogenesis. ALA co-administration with polypropylene mesh implantation controlled the inflammatory reaction, helped regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and improved angiogenesis in the subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult albino rats, suggesting a possible role of ALA in optimizing mesh integration in subcutaneous tissue. PMID:25891652

  2. Effect of alpha lipoic acid co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical changes in subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult male albino rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation.

    PubMed

    Mazroa, Shireen A; Asker, Samar A; Asker, Waleed; Abd Ellatif, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Polypropylene mesh is commonly used in the treatment of abdominal hernia. Different approaches were addressed to improve their tissue integration and consequently reduce long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical (IHC) changes in the subcutaneous tissues of the anterior abdominal wall of the adult rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation. Forty adult male albino rats were divided into: group I (control), group II (receiving ALA), group III (polypropylene mesh implantation) and group IV (mesh implantation + ALA co-administration). After 4 weeks, subcutaneous tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy and IHC study of CD34 as a marker for angiogenesis. In groups I and II rats, positive CD34 expression was demonstrated by IHC reaction, localized to endothelial cells lining small blood vessels. Group III showed an excess inflammatory reaction, deposition of both regular and irregularly arranged collagen fibres around mesh pores and few elastic fibres. CD34-positive was detected not only in cells lining small blood vessels but also in other cells scattered in the connective tissue indicating angiogenesis. In group IV, ALA co-administration resulted in less inflammatory reaction, regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and a significant increase in CD34-positive cells and small blood vessels reflecting improved angiogenesis. ALA co-administration with polypropylene mesh implantation controlled the inflammatory reaction, helped regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and improved angiogenesis in the subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult albino rats, suggesting a possible role of ALA in optimizing mesh integration in subcutaneous tissue.

  3. Virus Detection and Semiquantitation in Explanted Heart Tissues of Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy Adult Patients by Use of PCR Coupled with Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Yohan; Renois, Fanny; Leveque, Nicolas; Giusti, Delphine; Picard-Maureau, Marcus; Bruneval, Patrick; Fornes, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Viral detection in heart tissues has become a central issue for the diagnosis and exploration of the pathogenesis of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). In the present study, common cardiotropic viruses in 67 explanted heart samples of 31 IDCM adult patients were detected and semiquantified by using for the first time a new technology based on PCR assay coupled to electrospray ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis (PCR-MS), with comparison to reference quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assay. PCR-MS identified single or mixed enterovirus (EV) and parvovirus B19 (PVB19) infections in 27 (40.2%) of 67 samples, corresponding to 15 (48.3%) of the 31 patients, whereas RT-qPCR identified viral infections in 26 (38.8%) samples, corresponding to 16 (51.6%) of the patients. The PCR-MS results correlated well with EV and PVB19 detection by RT-qPCR (kappa = 0.85 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.72 to 1.00] and kappa = 0.82 [95% CI, 0.66 to 0.99], respectively). The levels of EV RNA (median, 550 [range, 178 to 3,200] copies/μg of total extracted nucleic acids) and of PVB19 DNA (median, 486 [range, 80 to 1,157] copies/μg of total extracted nucleic acids) were measured using PCR-MS and correlated with those obtained by RT-qPCR (r2 = 0.57, P = 0.002 and r2 = 0.64, P < 0.001 for EV and PVB19, respectively). No viruses other than EV and PVB19 strains were detected using the new PCR-MS technology, which is capable of simultaneously identifying 84 known human viruses in one assay. In conclusion, we identified single or mixed EV and PVB19 cardiac infections as potential causes of IDCM. The PCR-MS analysis appeared to be a valuable tool to rapidly detect and semiquantify common viruses in cardiac tissues and may be of major interest to better understand the role of viruses in unexplained cardiomyopathies. PMID:23658274

  4. Nutritional status of patients submitted to transplantation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Érika Elias; Guerra, Daiane Cristina; Baluz, Kátia; de Resende Furtado, Wander; da Silva Bouzas, Luis Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the nutritional status of adult patients submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at two different time points (admission and discharge). Methods A retrospective, descriptive and quantitative study was performed based on clinical, laboratory and nutritional data obtained from medical records of adult patients of both genders submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a bone marrow transplantation reference center in Rio de Janeiro in the period from 2010 to 2013. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software (version 22.0). Results Sixty-four patients were evaluated. The mean age was 42.1 ± 3.2 years and the most prevalent disease was acute myeloid leukemia (39%). There was a high prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms including nausea (100%), vomiting (97%) and mucositis (93%). Between admission and discharge there was a significant decrease in the median weight (−2.5 kg; 71.5 vs. 68.75 kg; p-value < 0.001), body mass index (−0.9 kg/m2; 24.8 vs. 24.4 kg/m2; p-value < 0.001), and serum albumin levels (−0.2 g/dL; 3.7 vs. 3.6 g/dL; p-value = 0.024). The survival time after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation correlated negatively with C-reactive protein at discharge (CC = −0.72; p-value < 0.001) and positively with serum albumin levels (CC = 0.56; p-value = 0.004) and with high total protein level at discharge (CC = 0.53; p-value = 0.006). Conclusion Our results suggest that patients submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have compromised nutritional status during the hospital stay for transplantation. PMID:25453651

  5. Local Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cells Are a Preferential Target for Initiation of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcomas Associated with p53 and Rb Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhyang; Curtis, Stephen J.; Roy, David M.; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2010-01-01

    The cell of origin and pathogenesis of the majority of adult soft tissue sarcomas (STS) remains poorly understood. Because mutations in both the P53 and RB tumor suppressor genes are frequent in STS in humans, we inactivated these genes by Cre-loxP–mediated recombination in mice with floxed p53 and Rb. Ninety-three percent of mice developed spindle cell/pleomorphic sarcomas after a single subcutaneous injection of adenovirus carrying Cre-recombinase. Similar to human STS, these sarcomas overexpress Cxcr4, which contributes to their invasive properties. Using irradiation chimeras generated by transplanting bone marrow cells from mice carrying either the Rosa26StoploxPLacZ or the Z/EG reporter, as well as the floxed p53 and Rb genes, into irradiated p53loxP/loxPRbloxP/loxP mice, it was determined that sarcomas do not originate from bone marrow–derived cells, such as macrophages, but arise from the local resident cells. At the same time, dermal mesenchymal stem cells isolated by strict plastic adherence and low levels of Sca-1 expression (Sca-1low, CD31negCD45neg) have shown enhanced potential for malignant transformation according to soft agar, invasion, and tumorigenicity assays, after the conditional inactivation of both p53 and Rb. Sarcomas formed after transplantation of these cells have features typical for undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcomas. Taken together, our studies indicate that local Sca-1low dermal mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells are preferential targets for malignant transformation associated with deficiencies in both p53 and Rb. PMID:20864684

  6. The adhesion molecule CD44v6 is associated with a high risk for local recurrence in adult soft tissue sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Maula, S; Huuhtanen, R L; Blomqvist, C P; Wiklund, T A; Laurila, P; Ristamäki, R

    2001-01-01

    In many malignant diseases the expression levels of CD44 and its splice variant v6 (CD44v6) have been associated with the prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of CD44 in adult soft tissue sarcomas (STS). 133 STS patients with a limb or superficial trunk tumour treated at the Helsinki University Central Hospital in 1987–1993 with a median follow-up time of 68 months were included in this study. The expression of CD44 and CD44v6 was determined immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded tumour samples. 95% of the tumours expressed CD44 and CD44v6 was detected in 57%. Strong CD44 expression was associated with low grade (P = 0.04) and small tumour size (P = 0.02). In diploid tumours the CD44 expression was correlated with low S-phase fraction (P = 0.001). High expression of both, CD44 in general as well as that of CD44v6, predicted a higher risk for local recurrence (CD44: P = 0.01 and CD44v6: P = 0.05). Low CD44v6 content of the primary tumour correlated with poor survival (P = 0.02). Determining the expression of CD44 or CD44v6 in a primary STS could be a valuable tool for selecting the group of patients who might benefit from intensified local tumour treatment. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11161384

  7. Hospital infection control in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Dykewicz, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections Among Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients contains a section on hospital infection control including evidence-based recommendations regarding ventilation, construction, equipment, plants, play areas and toys, health-care workers, visitors, patient skin and oral care, catheter-related infections, drug-resistant organisms, and specific nosocomial infections. These guidelines are intended to reduce the number and severity of hospital infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:11294720

  8. Clearance of senescent cells by ABT263 rejuvenates aged hematopoietic stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianhui; Wang, Yingying; Shao, Lijian; Laberge, Remi-Martin; Demaria, Marco; Campisi, Judith; Janakiraman, Krishnamurthy; Sharpless, Norman E; Ding, Sheng; Feng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Wang, Xiaoyan; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Krager, Kimberly; Ponnappan, Usha; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Meng, Aimin; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Senescent cells (SCs) accumulate with age and after genotoxic stress, such as total-body irradiation (TBI). Clearance of SCs in a progeroid mouse model using a transgenic approach delays several age-associated disorders, suggesting that SCs play a causative role in certain age-related pathologies. Thus, a 'senolytic' pharmacological agent that can selectively kill SCs holds promise for rejuvenating tissue stem cells and extending health span. To test this idea, we screened a collection of compounds and identified ABT263 (a specific inhibitor of the anti-apoptotic proteins BCL-2 and BCL-xL) as a potent senolytic drug. We show that ABT263 selectively kills SCs in culture in a cell type- and species-independent manner by inducing apoptosis. Oral administration of ABT263 to either sublethally irradiated or normally aged mice effectively depleted SCs, including senescent bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and senescent muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Notably, this depletion mitigated TBI-induced premature aging of the hematopoietic system and rejuvenated the aged HSCs and MuSCs in normally aged mice. Our results demonstrate that selective clearance of SCs by a pharmacological agent is beneficial in part through its rejuvenation of aged tissue stem cells. Thus, senolytic drugs may represent a new class of radiation mitigators and anti-aging agents. PMID:26657143

  9. The potential use of mesenchymal stem cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Nayoun; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2013-01-01

    In the last 10 years, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as a therapeutic approach to regenerative medicine, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and many more due to their potential to differentiate into various tissues, to repair damaged tissues and organs, and also for their immunomodulatory properties. Findings in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated immune regulatory function of MSCs and have facilitated their application in clinical trials, such as those of autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases. There has been an increasing interest in the role of MSCs in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), including hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and the prevention and treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and their therapeutic potential has been reported in numerous clinical trials. Although the safety of clinical application of MSCs is established, further modifications to improve their efficacy are required. In this review, we summarize advances in the potential use of MSCs in HSCT. In addition, we discuss their use in clinical trials of the treatment of GVHD following HSCT, the immunomodulatory capacity of MSCs, and their regenerative and therapeutic potential in the field of HSCT. PMID:23306700

  10. Clearance of senescent cells by ABT263 rejuvenates aged hematopoietic stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianhui; Wang, Yingying; Shao, Lijian; Laberge, Remi-Martin; Demaria, Marco; Campisi, Judith; Janakiraman, Krishnamurthy; Sharpless, Norman E; Ding, Sheng; Feng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Wang, Xiaoyan; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Krager, Kimberly; Ponnappan, Usha; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Meng, Aimin; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Senescent cells (SCs) accumulate with age and after genotoxic stress, such as total-body irradiation (TBI). Clearance of SCs in a progeroid mouse model using a transgenic approach delays several age-associated disorders, suggesting that SCs play a causative role in certain age-related pathologies. Thus, a 'senolytic' pharmacological agent that can selectively kill SCs holds promise for rejuvenating tissue stem cells and extending health span. To test this idea, we screened a collection of compounds and identified ABT263 (a specific inhibitor of the anti-apoptotic proteins BCL-2 and BCL-xL) as a potent senolytic drug. We show that ABT263 selectively kills SCs in culture in a cell type- and species-independent manner by inducing apoptosis. Oral administration of ABT263 to either sublethally irradiated or normally aged mice effectively depleted SCs, including senescent bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and senescent muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Notably, this depletion mitigated TBI-induced premature aging of the hematopoietic system and rejuvenated the aged HSCs and MuSCs in normally aged mice. Our results demonstrate that selective clearance of SCs by a pharmacological agent is beneficial in part through its rejuvenation of aged tissue stem cells. Thus, senolytic drugs may represent a new class of radiation mitigators and anti-aging agents.

  11. Cutting the brakes on hematopoietic regeneration by blocking TGFβ to limit chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression.

    PubMed

    Brenet, Fabienne; Scandura, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stressors such as infection, bleeding, or toxic injury trigger a hematopoietic adaptation that sacrifices hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) quiescence to meet an urgent need for new blood cell production. Once the hematopoietic demands are adequately met, homeostasis must be restored. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling is a central mediator mandating the return of HSPCs to quiescence after stress. Blockade of TGFβ signaling after hematopoietic stress delays the return of cycling HSPCs to quiescence and in so doing promotes hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and accelerates hematopoietic reconstitution. These findings open the door to new therapeutics that modulate the hematopoietic adaptation to stress. In this review, we will discuss the complex context-dependent activities of TGFβ in hematopoiesis and the potential benefits and limitations of using TGFβ pathway inhibitors to promote multilineage hematopoietic reconstitution after myelosuppressive chemotherapy.

  12. Cutting the brakes on hematopoietic regeneration by blocking TGFβ to limit chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression.

    PubMed

    Brenet, Fabienne; Scandura, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stressors such as infection, bleeding, or toxic injury trigger a hematopoietic adaptation that sacrifices hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) quiescence to meet an urgent need for new blood cell production. Once the hematopoietic demands are adequately met, homeostasis must be restored. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling is a central mediator mandating the return of HSPCs to quiescence after stress. Blockade of TGFβ signaling after hematopoietic stress delays the return of cycling HSPCs to quiescence and in so doing promotes hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and accelerates hematopoietic reconstitution. These findings open the door to new therapeutics that modulate the hematopoietic adaptation to stress. In this review, we will discuss the complex context-dependent activities of TGFβ in hematopoiesis and the potential benefits and limitations of using TGFβ pathway inhibitors to promote multilineage hematopoietic reconstitution after myelosuppressive chemotherapy. PMID:27308454

  13. Expression of MALT1 oncogene in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells recapitulates the pathogenesis of human lymphoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Fontán, Lorena; Gonzalez-Herrero, Ines; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Segura, Victor; Aznar, M. Angela; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Barajas-Diego, Marcos; Sagardoy, Ainara; Martinez-Ferrandis, Jose I.; Abollo-Jimenez, Fernando; Bertolo, Cristina; Peñuelas, Ivan; Garcia-Criado, Francisco J.; García-Cenador, María B.; Tousseyn, Thomas; Agirre, Xabier; Prosper, Felipe; Garcia-Bragado, Federico; McPhail, Ellen D.; Lossos, Izidore S.; Du, Ming-Qing; Flores, Teresa; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesus M.; Gonzalez, Marcos; Salar, Antonio; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Conde, Eulogio; Siebert, Reiner; Sagaert, Xavier; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MALT1 gene are hallmarks of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. To date, targeting these translocations to mouse B cells has failed to reproduce human disease. Here, we induced MALT1 expression in mouse Sca1+Lin− hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which showed NF-κB activation and early lymphoid priming, being selectively skewed toward B-cell differentiation. These cells accumulated in extranodal tissues and gave rise to clonal tumors recapitulating the principal clinical, biological, and molecular genetic features of MALT lymphoma. Deletion of p53 gene accelerated tumor onset and induced transformation of MALT lymphoma to activated B-cell diffuse large-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). Treatment of MALT1-induced lymphomas with a specific inhibitor of MALT1 proteolytic activity decreased cell viability, indicating that endogenous Malt1 signaling was required for tumor cell survival. Our study shows that human-like lymphomas can be modeled in mice by targeting MALT1 expression to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, demonstrating the oncogenic role of MALT1 in lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, this work establishes a molecular link between MALT lymphoma and ABC-DLBCL, and provides mouse models to test MALT1 inhibitors. Finally, our results suggest that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of human mature B-cell lymphomas. PMID:22689981

  14. Differences in Hematopoietic Stem Cells Contribute to Sexually Dimorphic Inflammatory Responses to High Fat Diet-induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Singer, Kanakadurga; Maley, Nidhi; Mergian, Taleen; DelProposto, Jennifer; Cho, Kae Won; Zamarron, Brian F; Martinez-Santibanez, Gabriel; Geletka, Lynn; Muir, Lindsey; Wachowiak, Phillip; Demirjian, Chaghig; Lumeng, Carey N

    2015-05-22

    Women of reproductive age are protected from metabolic disease relative to postmenopausal women and men. Most preclinical rodent studies are skewed toward the use of male mice to study obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction because of a similar protection observed in female mice. How sex differences in obesity-induced inflammatory responses contribute to these observations is unknown. We have compared and contrasted the effects of high fat diet-induced obesity on glucose metabolism and leukocyte activation in multiple depots in male and female C57Bl/6 mice. With both short term and long term high fat diet, male mice demonstrated increased weight gain and CD11c(+) adipose tissue macrophage content compared with female mice despite similar degrees of adipocyte hypertrophy. Competitive bone marrow transplant studies demonstrated that obesity induced a preferential contribution of male hematopoietic cells to circulating leukocytes and adipose tissue macrophages compared with female cells independent of the sex of the recipient. Sex differences in macrophage and hematopoietic cell in vitro activation in response to obesogenic cues were observed to explain these results. In summary, this report demonstrates that male and female leukocytes and hematopoietic stem cells have cell-autonomous differences in their response to obesity that contribute to an amplified response in males compared with females.

  15. The Role of Toll-Like Receptors in Hematopoietic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Monlish, Darlene A.; Bhatt, Sima T.; Schuettpelz, Laura G.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of pattern recognition receptors that shape the innate immune system by identifying pathogen-associated molecular patterns and host-derived damage-associated molecular patterns. TLRs are widely expressed on both immune cells and non-immune cells, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, effector immune cell populations, and endothelial cells. In addition to their well-known role in the innate immune response to acute infection or injury, accumulating evidence supports a role for TLRs in the development of hematopoietic and other malignancies. Several hematopoietic disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes, which possess a high risk of transformation to leukemia, have been linked to aberrant TLR signaling. Furthermore, activation of TLRs leads to the induction of a number of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which can promote tumorigenesis by driving cell proliferation and migration and providing a favorable microenvironment for tumor cells. Beyond hematopoietic malignancies, the upregulation of a number of TLRs has been linked to promoting tumor cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis in a variety of cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and lung. This review focuses on the contribution of TLRs to hematopoietic malignancies, highlighting the known direct and indirect effects of TLR signaling on tumor cells and their microenvironment. In addition, the utility of TLR agonists and antagonists as potential therapeutics in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies is discussed. PMID:27733853

  16. Eicosanoid Regulation of Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Pelus, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a potentially curative treatment for numerous hematologic malignancies. The transplant procedure as performed today takes advantage of HSC trafficking; either egress of HSC from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood, i.e. mobilization, for acquisition of the hematopoietic graft, and/or trafficking of HSC from the peripheral blood to bone marrow niches in the recipient patient, i.e. HSC homing. Numerous studies, many of which are reviewed herein, have defined hematopoietic regulatory mechanisms mediated by the 20-carbon lipid family of eicosanoids, and recent evidence strongly supports a role for eicosanoids in regulation of hematopoietic trafficking, adding a new role whereby eicosanoids regulate hematopoiesis. Short-term exposure of HSC to the eicosanoid prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases CXCR4 receptor expression, migration and in vivo homing of HSC. In contrast, cannabinoids reduce hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) CXCR4 expression and induce HPC mobilization when administered in vivo. Leukotrienes have been shown to alter CD34+ cell adhesion, migration, and regulate HSC proliferation, suggesting that eicosanoids have both opposing and complimentary roles in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Since numerous FDA approved compounds regulate eicosanoid signaling or biosynthesis, the utility of eicosanoid based therapeutic strategies to improve hematopoietic transplantation can be rapidly evaluated. PMID:20882043

  17. Two new routes to make blood: Hematopoietic specification from pluripotent cell lines versus reprogramming of somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Singbrant, Sofie; van Galen, Peter; Lucas, Daniel; Challen, Grant; Rossi, Derrick J; Daley, George Q

    2015-09-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to treat hematologic disorders is routinely used in the clinic. However, HSC therapy is hindered by the requirements of finding human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched donors and attaining sufficient numbers of long-term HSCs in the graft. Therefore, ex vivo expansion of transplantable HSCs remains one of the "holy grails" of hematology. Without the ability to maintain and expand human HSCs in vitro, two complementary approaches involving cellular reprogramming to generate transplantable HSCs have emerged. Reprogrammed HSCs represent a potentially inexhaustible supply of autologous tissue. On March 18th, 2015, Dr. George Q. Daley and Dr. Derrick J. Rossi, two pioneers in the field, presented and discussed their most recent research on these topics in a webinar organized by the International Society for Experimental Hematology (ISEH). Here, we summarize these seminars and discuss the possibilities and challenges in the field of hematopoietic specification.

  18. Repercussion of Megakaryocyte-Specific Gata1 Loss on Megakaryopoiesis and the Hematopoietic Precursor Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Meinders, Marjolein; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Scheenstra, Maaike R.; De Cuyper, Iris M.; Papadopoulos, Petros; Németh, Tamás; Mócsai, Attila; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2016-01-01

    During hematopoiesis, transcriptional programs are essential for the commitment and differentiation of progenitors into the different blood lineages. GATA1 is a transcription factor expressed in several hematopoietic lineages and essential for proper erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Megakaryocyte-specific genes, such as GP1BA, are known to be directly regulated by GATA1. Mutations in GATA1 can lead to dyserythropoietic anemia and pseudo gray-platelet syndrome. Selective loss of Gata1 expression in adult mice results in macrothrombocytopenia with platelet dysfunction, characterized by an excess of immature megakaryocytes. To specifically analyze the impact of Gata1 loss in mature committed megakaryocytes, we generated Gata1-Lox|Pf4-Cre mice (Gata1cKOMK). Consistent with previous findings, Gata1cKOMK mice are macrothrombocytopenic with platelet dysfunction. Supporting this notion we demonstrate that Gata1 regulates directly the transcription of Syk, a tyrosine kinase that functions downstream of Clec2 and GPVI receptors in megakaryocytes and platelets. Furthermore, we show that Gata1cKOMK mice display an additional aberrant megakaryocyte differentiation stage. Interestingly, these mice present a misbalance of the multipotent progenitor compartment and the erythroid lineage, which translates into compensatory stress erythropoiesis and splenomegaly. Despite the severe thrombocytopenia, Gata1cKOMK mice display a mild reduction of TPO plasma levels, and Gata1cKOMK megakaryocytes show a mild increase in Pf4 mRNA levels; such a misbalance might be behind the general hematopoietic defects observed, affecting locally normal TPO and Pf4 levels at hematopoietic stem cell niches. PMID:27152938

  19. Repercussion of Megakaryocyte-Specific Gata1 Loss on Megakaryopoiesis and the Hematopoietic Precursor Compartment.

    PubMed

    Meinders, Marjolein; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Scheenstra, Maaike R; De Cuyper, Iris M; Papadopoulos, Petros; Németh, Tamás; Mócsai, Attila; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2016-01-01

    During hematopoiesis, transcriptional programs are essential for the commitment and differentiation of progenitors into the different blood lineages. GATA1 is a transcription factor expressed in several hematopoietic lineages and essential for proper erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Megakaryocyte-specific genes, such as GP1BA, are known to be directly regulated by GATA1. Mutations in GATA1 can lead to dyserythropoietic anemia and pseudo gray-platelet syndrome. Selective loss of Gata1 expression in adult mice results in macrothrombocytopenia with platelet dysfunction, characterized by an excess of immature megakaryocytes. To specifically analyze the impact of Gata1 loss in mature committed megakaryocytes, we generated Gata1-Lox|Pf4-Cre mice (Gata1cKOMK). Consistent with previous findings, Gata1cKOMK mice are macrothrombocytopenic with platelet dysfunction. Supporting this notion we demonstrate that Gata1 regulates directly the transcription of Syk, a tyrosine kinase that functions downstream of Clec2 and GPVI receptors in megakaryocytes and platelets. Furthermore, we show that Gata1cKOMK mice display an additional aberrant megakaryocyte differentiation stage. Interestingly, these mice present a misbalance of the multipotent progenitor compartment and the erythroid lineage, which translates into compensatory stress erythropoiesis and splenomegaly. Despite the severe thrombocytopenia, Gata1cKOMK mice display a mild reduction of TPO plasma levels, and Gata1cKOMK megakaryocytes show a mild increase in Pf4 mRNA levels; such a misbalance might be behind the general hematopoietic defects observed, affecting locally normal TPO and Pf4 levels at hematopoietic stem cell niches. PMID:27152938

  20. Necdin, a p53 target gene, regulates the quiescence and response to genotoxic stress of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Asai, Takashi; Liu, Yan; Di Giandomenico, Silvana; Bae, Narae; Ndiaye-Lobry, Delphine; Deblasio, Anthony; Menendez, Silvia; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Reva, Boris; Wevrick, Rachel; Nimer, Stephen D

    2012-08-23

    We recently defined a critical role for p53 in regulating the quiescence of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and identified necdin as a candidate p53 target gene. Necdin is a growth-suppressing protein and the gene encoding it is one of several that are deleted in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. To define the intrinsic role of necdin in adult hematopoiesis, in the present study, we transplanted necdin-null fetal liver cells into lethally irradiated recipients. We show that necdin-null adult HSCs are less quiescent and more proliferative than normal HSCs, demonstrating the similar role of necdin and p53 in promoting HSC quiescence during steady-state conditions. However, wild-type recipients repopulated with necdin-null hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells show enhanced sensitivity to irradiation and chemotherapy, with increased p53-dependent apoptosis, myelosuppression, and mortality. Necdin controls the HSC response to genotoxic stress via both cell-cycle-dependent and cell-cycle-independent mechanisms, with the latter occurring in a Gas2L3-dependent manner. We conclude that necdin functions as a molecular switch in adult hematopoiesis, acting in a p53-like manner to promote HSC quiescence in the steady state, but suppressing p53-dependent apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress.

  1. Protothecosis in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: case report and review of previous cases.

    PubMed

    Macesic, N; Fleming, S; Kidd, S; Madigan, V; Chean, R; Ritchie, D; Slavin, M

    2014-06-01

    Prototheca species are achlorophyllus algae. Prototheca wickerhamii and Prototheca zopfii cause human disease. In immunocompetent individuals, they cause soft tissue infections and olecranon bursitis, but in transplant recipients, these organisms can cause disseminated disease. We report a fatal case of disseminated P. zopfii infection in an hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipient with bloodstream infection and involvement of multiple soft tissue sites. We review all previous cases of protothecosis in HSCT reported in the literature. Protothecosis is uncommon after HSCT, but has a disseminated presentation that is frequently fatal. It is commonly misidentified as a yeast. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors and contamination of central venous catheters may contribute to development of protothecosis. Optimal treatment approaches are yet to be defined. New agents such as miltefosine may be possible future therapies. PMID:24797402

  2. Hematopoietic Akt2 deficiency attenuates the progression of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rotllan, Noemi; Chamorro-Jorganes, Aránzazu; Araldi, Elisa; Wanschel, Amarylis C.; Aryal, Binod; Aranda, Juan F.; Goedeke, Leigh; Salerno, Alessandro G.; Ramírez, Cristina M.; Sessa, William C.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of death and disability in diabetic and obese subjects with insulin resistance. Akt2, a phosphoinositide-dependent serine-threonine protein kinase, is highly express in insulin-responsive tissues; however, its role during the progression of atherosclerosis remains unknown. Thus, we aimed to investigate the contribution of Akt2 during the progression of atherosclerosis. We found that germ-line Akt2-deficient mice develop similar atherosclerotic plaques as wild-type mice despite higher plasma lipids and glucose levels. It is noteworthy that transplantation of bone marrow cells isolated from Akt2−/− mice to Ldlr−/− mice results in marked reduction of the progression of atherosclerosis compared with Ldlr−/− mice transplanted with wild-type bone marrow cells. In vitro studies indicate that Akt2 is required for macrophage migration in response to proatherogenic cytokines (monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Moreover, Akt2−/− macrophages accumulate less cholesterol and have an alternative activated or M2-type phenotype when stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines. Together, these results provide evidence that macrophage Akt2 regulates migration, the inflammatory response and cholesterol metabolism and suggest that targeting Akt2 in macrophages might be beneficial for treating atherosclerosis.—Rotllan, N., Chamorro-Jorganes, A., Araldi, E., Wanschel, A. C., Aryal, B., Aranda, J. F., Goedeke, L., Salerno, A. G., Ramírez, C. M., Sessa,W. C., Suárez, Y., Fernández-Hernando, C. Hematopoietic Akt2 deficiency attenuates the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25392271

  3. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Hale, Gregory A

    2005-10-01

    While advances in the treatment of pediatric cancers have increased cure rates, children with metastatic or recurrent solid tumors have a dismal prognosis despite initial transient responses to therapy. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation takes advantage of the steep dose-response relationship observed with many chemotherapeutic agents. While clearly demonstrated to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic neuroblastoma, autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is also frequently used to treat patients with other high-risk diseases such as Ewing sarcoma, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms' tumor, retinoblastoma, germ cell tumors, lymphomas and brain tumors. Most published experience consists of retrospective, single-arm studies; randomized clinical trials are lacking, due in part to the rarity of pediatric cancers treatable by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These published literature demonstrate that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation results in most cases in equivalent or superior outcomes when compared with conventional therapies. However, patient heterogeneity, patient selection, graft characteristics and processing and the varied conditioning regimens are additional factors to consider. Since the inception of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, regimen-related toxicity has markedly decreased and the vast majority of treatment failures are now due to disease recurrence. Prospective clinical trials are needed to identify specific high-risk patient populations, with randomization (when possible) to compare outcomes of patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with those receiving standard therapy. In addition, investigators need to better define the role of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in these solid tumors, particularly in combination with other therapeutic modalities such as immunotherapy and novel cell processing methodologies.

  4. Gene regulatory networks controlling hematopoietic progenitor niche cell production and differentiation in the Drosophila lymph gland.

    PubMed

    Tokusumi, Yumiko; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Shoue, Douglas A; Schulz, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in two phases in Drosophila, with the first completed during embryogenesis and the second accomplished during larval development. The lymph gland serves as the venue for the final hematopoietic program, with this larval tissue well-studied as to its cellular organization and genetic regulation. While the medullary zone contains stem-like hematopoietic progenitors, the posterior signaling center (PSC) functions as a niche microenvironment essential for controlling the decision between progenitor maintenance versus cellular differentiation. In this report, we utilize a PSC-specific GAL4 driver and UAS-gene RNAi strains, to selectively knockdown individual gene functions in PSC cells. We assessed the effect of abrogating the function of 820 genes as to their requirement for niche cell production and differentiation. 100 genes were shown to be essential for normal niche development, with various loci placed into sub-groups based on the functions of their encoded protein products and known genetic interactions. For members of three of these groups, we characterized loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes. Gene function knockdown of members of the BAP chromatin-remodeling complex resulted in niche cells that do not express the hedgehog (hh) gene and fail to differentiate filopodia believed important for Hh signaling from the niche to progenitors. Abrogating gene function of various members of the insulin-like growth factor and TOR signaling pathways resulted in anomalous PSC cell production, leading to a defective niche organization. Further analysis of the Pten, TSC1, and TSC2 tumor suppressor genes demonstrated their loss-of-function condition resulted in severely altered blood cell homeostasis, including the abundant production of lamellocytes, specialized hemocytes involved in innate immune responses. Together, this cell-specific RNAi knockdown survey and mutant phenotype analyses identified multiple genes and their regulatory networks required for

  5. Proteomic Cornerstones of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation: Distinct Signatures of Multipotent Progenitors and Myeloid Committed Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Trumpp, Andreas; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, LinnegSca-1+c-Kit+) or myeloid committed precursors (LinnegSca-1−c-Kit+). By employing stable isotope dimethyl labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry, more than 5000 proteins were quantified. From biological triplicate experiments subjected to rigorous statistical evaluation, 893 proteins were found differentially expressed between multipotent and myeloid committed cells. The differential protein content in these cell populations points to a distinct structural organization of the cytoskeleton including remodeling activity. In addition, we found a marked difference in the expression of metabolic enzymes, including a clear shift of specific protein isoforms of the glycolytic pathway. Proteins involved in translation showed a collective higher expression in myeloid progenitors, indicating an increased translational activity. Strikingly, the data uncover a unique signature related to immune defense mechanisms, centering on the RIG-I and type-1 interferon response systems, which are installed in multipotent progenitors but not evident in myeloid committed cells. This suggests that specific, and so far unrecognized, mechanisms protect these immature cells before they mature. In conclusion, this study indicates that the transition of hematopoietic stem/progenitors toward myeloid commitment is accompanied by a profound change in processing of

  6. Myelin repair is accelerated by inactivating CXCR2 on non-hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, LiPing; Darnall, Lindsey; Hu, Taofang; Choi, Karen; Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and remyelination in MS ultimately fails. Although strategies to promote myelin repair are eagerly sought, mechanisms underlying remyelination in vivo have been elusive. CXCR2 is expressed on neutrophils and oligodendrocyte lineage cells in the central nervous system (CNS). CXCR2 positive neutrophils facilitate inflammatory demyelination in demyelination models such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and cuprizone intoxication. Systemic injection of a small molecule CXCR2 antagonist at the onset of EAE decreased demyelinated lesions. These results left the cellular target of the CXCR2 antagonist uncertain, and did not clarify whether CXCR2 blockade prevented demyelination or promoted remyelination. Here, we show that the actions of CXCR2 on non-hematopoietic cells unexpectedly delay myelin repair. Bone marrow chimeric mice (Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2−/− and Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2+/+) were subjected to two distinct models of myelin injury. In all cases, myelin repair was more efficient in Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2−/− animals. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in demyelinated lesions of Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2−/− mice proliferated earlier and more vigorously than in tissues from Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2+/+ animals. In vitro demyelinated CNS slice cultures also showed better myelin repair when CXCR2 was blocked with neutralizing antibodies, or was genetically deleted. Our results suggest that CXCR2 inactivation permits optimal spatiotemporal positioning of OPCs in demyelinating lesions to receive local proliferative and differentiating signals. Given that CXCR2 exerts dual functions which promote demyelination and decrease remyelination by actions towards hematopoietic cells and non-hematopoietic cells respectively, our findings identify CXCR2 as a promising drug target for clinical demyelinating disorders. PMID:20610741

  7. Architecture of the marrow vasculature in three amphibian species and its significance in hematopoietic development.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y

    1976-04-01

    Architecture of the bone marrow vasculature, particularly that of the femur, was analyzed in three amphibian species in relation to the early phylogeny of marrow hematopoiesis. A dye-injection method and histological techniques, including both serial sectioning and reconstruction methods, were used for this purpose. From these observations the following conclusions may be drawn. (1) Marrow hematopoiesis is absent from the femur of the urodelan (Triturus pyrrhogaster) and appears first in the femur of the primitive anuran (Xenopus laevis) (2) The site of primitive hematopoiesis (granulopoiesis) is the subendosteal region where the venous vascular net develops. (3) The primitive vascular architecture observed in the femur of Xenopus is characterized by the absence of a central vein. Subendosteal veins drain the blood from the bone marrow. A vein collateral to the primary artery appears in the femur of Rana catesbeiana, an advanced anuran, in which further development of both the subendosteal venous plexus and hematopoietic activity are noted. In both anura examined, the primitive blood sinuses form near the mid-shaft of the femur. The proliferation of mesenchymal elements containing dark pigment, presumably melanin, was also noted in this area. (4) The architecture of marrow vessels in Rana approaches the structure noted in mammalian bone marrow. (5) Fat tissue is observed in the urodelan bone marrow prior to the appearance of hematopoietic activity. This indicates that the formation of marrow fat is phylogenetically unrelated to the development of hematopoiesis. The present investigation on primitive hematopoiesis suggests that the development of hematopoietic activity is intimately related to the development of the marrow vasculature, particularly that of the subendosteal venous plexus. A favorable vascular arrangement may be necessary to allow active hematopoiesis.

  8. Anatomic Tumor Location Influences the Success of Contemporary Limb-Sparing Surgery and Radiation Among Adults With Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Korah, Mariam P.; Deyrup, Andrea T.; Monson, David K.; Oskouei, Shervin V.; Weiss, Sharon W.; Landry, Jerome; Godette, Karen D.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the influence of anatomic location in the upper extremity (UE) vs. lower extremity (LE) on the presentation and outcomes of adult soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2008, 118 patients underwent limb-sparing surgery (LSS) and external beam radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent for nonrecurrent extremity STS. RT was delivered preoperatively in 96 and postoperatively in 22 patients. Lesions arose in the UE in 28 and in the LE in 90 patients. Patients with UE lesions had smaller tumors (4.5 vs. 9.0 cm, p < 0.01), were more likely to undergo a prior excision (43 vs. 22%, p = 0.03), to have close or positive margins after resection (71 vs. 49%, p = 0.04), and to undergo postoperative RT (32 vs. 14%, p = 0.04). Results: Five-year actuarial local recurrence-free and distant metastasis-free survival rates for the entire group were 85 and 74%, with no difference observed between the UE and LE cohorts. Five-year actuarial probability of wound reoperation rates were 4 vs. 29% (p < 0.01) in the UE and LE respectively. Thigh lesions accounted for 84% of the required wound reoperations. The distribution of tumors within the anterior, medial, and posterior thigh compartments was 51%, 26%, and 23%. Subset analysis by compartment showed no difference in the probability of wound reoperation between the anterior and medial/posterior compartments (29 vs. 30%, p = 0.68). Neurolysis was performed during resection in (15%, 5%, and 67%, p < 0.01) of tumors in the anterior, medial, and posterior compartments. Conclusions: Tumors in the UE and LE differ significantly with respect to size and management details. The anatomy of the UE poses technical impediments to an R0 resection. Thigh tumors are associated with higher wound reoperation rates. Tumor resection in the posterior thigh compartment is more likely to result in nerve injury. A better understanding of the inherent differences between tumors in various extremity sites will assist in

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell characterization and isolation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Lara; Challen, Grant A; Sirin, Olga; Lin, Karen Kuan-Yin; Goodell, Margaret A

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are defined by the capabilities of multi-lineage differentiation and long-term self-renewal. Both these characteristics contribute to maintain the homeostasis of the system and allow the restoration of hematopoiesis after insults, such as infections or therapeutic ablation. Reconstitution after lethal irradiation strictly depends on a third, fundamental property of HSCs: the capability to migrate under the influence of specific chemokines. Directed by a chemotactic compass, after transplant HSCs find their way to the bone marrow, where they eventually home and engraft. HSCs represent a rare population that primarily resides in the bone marrow with an estimated frequency of 0.01% of total nucleated cells. Separating HSCs from differentiated cells that reside in the bone marrow has been the focus of intense investigation for years. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the strategy routinely used by our laboratory to purify murine HSCs, by exploiting their antigenic phenotype (KSL), combined with the physiological capability to efficiently efflux the vital dye Hoechst 33342, generating the so-called Side Population, or SP.

  10. The regulation of hematopoietic stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Mayani, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Evidence presented over the last few years indicates that the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment comprises not just one but a number of different cell populations. Based on HSCs’ proliferation and engraftment potential, it has been suggested that there are two classes of HSC, with long- and short-term engraftment potential. HSC heterogeneity seems to involve differentiation capacities as well, since it has been shown that some HSC clones are able to give rise to both myeloid and lymphoid progeny, whereas others are lymphoid deficient. It has been recognized that HSC function depends on intrinsic cell regulators, which are modulated by external signals. Among the former, we can include transcription factors and non-coding RNAs as well as epigenetic modifiers. Among the latter, cytokines and extracellular matrix molecules have been implicated. Understanding the elements and mechanisms that regulate HSC populations is of significant relevance both in biological and in clinical terms, and research in this area still has to face several complex and exciting challenges. PMID:27408695

  11. The Hematopoietic Niche in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Graeff, Annette H.; Nitschke, Roland; Zeiser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Specialized microanatomical areas of the bone marrow provide the signals that are mandatory for the maintenance and regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells. A complex microenvironment adjacent to the marrow vasculature (vascular niche) and close to the endosteum (endosteal niche) harbors multiple cell types including mesenchymal stromal cells and their derivatives such as CAR cells expressing high levels of chemokines C-X-C motif ligand 12 and early osteoblastic lineage cells, endothelial cells, and megakaryocytes. The characterization of the cellular and molecular networks operating in the HSC niche has opened new perspectives for the understanding of the bidirectional cross-talk between HSCs and stromal cell populations in normal and malignant conditions. A structural and functional remodeling of the niche may contribute to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Malignant HSCs may alter the function and survival of MSCs that do not belong to the neoplastic clone. For example, a regression of nestin+ MSCs by apoptosis has been attributed to neuroglial damage in MPN. Nonneoplastic MSCs in turn can promote aggressiveness and drug resistance of malignant cells. In the future, strategies to counteract the pathological interaction between the niche and neoplastic HSCs may offer additional treatment strategies for MPN patients. PMID:26696752

  12. Iron overload in hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Majhail, N S; Lazarus, H M; Burns, L J

    2008-06-01

    Iron overload, primarily related to RBC transfusions, is a relatively common complication in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Iron overload increases the risk of infections, veno-occlusive disease and hepatic dysfunction post transplant. Elevated pretransplant ferritin levels have been reported to increase the risk of nonrelapse mortality following HCT and might influence the risk of acute and chronic GVHD. Serum ferritin is sensitive but not specific for iron overload and is a poor predictor of body iron burden. Estimation of hepatic iron content with a liver biopsy or magnetic resonance imaging should be considered prior to initiating therapy for post transplant iron overload. A subgroup of transplant survivors with mild iron overload and no end-organ damage may not need therapy. Phlebotomy is the treatment of choice with iron-chelation therapy reserved for patients not eligible for phlebotomy. Natural history, evolution and treatment of iron overload in transplant survivors have not been adequately investigated and more studies are needed to determine its impact on short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. PMID:18438425

  13. Hematopoietic stem cells: interplay with immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Ample evidence indicated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) receive signaling from infection or other immune responses to adjust their differentiation and self-renewal. More recent reports also suggested that, while the bone marrow microenvironment or niche may provide the immune privilege for HSCs, HSCs can present surface immune inhibitors per se to suppress innate immunity and adaptive immunity to evade potential immune surveillance and attack. These findings support the hypothesis that HSCs are capable of interacting with the immune system as signal “receivers” and signal “providers”. On the one hand, HSCs are capable of directly sensing the signals from the immune system through their surface receptors to modulate their self-renewal and differentiation (“in” signaling); on the other hand, HSCs display surface immune inhibitory molecules to evade the attack from the innate and adaptive immune systems (“out” signaling). The continuing investigation of the interplay between HSCs and immunity may lead to the open-up of a new research filed – the immunology of stem cells. PMID:23226622

  14. Origin, Development, and Homeostasis of Tissue-resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Malay; Murphy, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Macrophages are versatile cells of the hematopoietic system that display remarkable functional diversity encompassing innate immune responses, tissue development, and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages are present in almost all tissues of the body and display distinct location-specific phenotypes and gene expression profiles. Recent studies also demonstrate distinct origins of tissue-resident macrophages. This emerging picture of ontological, functional, and phenotypic heterogeneity within tissue macrophages has altered our understanding of these cells, which play important roles in many human diseases. In this review, we discuss the different origins of tissue macrophages, the transcription factors regulating their development, and the mechanisms underlying their homeostasis at steady state. PMID:25319325

  15. Terminal differentiation induction as DNA damage response in hematopoietic stem cells by GADD45A.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Susanne; Rieger, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain lifelong blood cell regeneration by balancing their ability for self-renewal with their ability to differentiate into all blood cell types. To prevent organ exhaustion and malignant transformation, long-lived HSCs, in particular, must be protected from exogenous and endogenous stress, which cause severe DNA damage. When DNA is damaged, distinct DNA repair mechanisms and cell fate controls occur in adult HSCs compared with committed cells. Growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is known to coordinate a variety of cellular stress responses, indicating the molecule is an important stress mediator. So far, the function of GADD45A in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is controversial and appears highly dependent on the cell type and stress stimulus. Recent studies have analyzed its role in cell fate decision control of prospectively isolated HSCs and have revealed unexpected functions of GADD45A, as discussed here. The upregulation of GADD45A by DNA damage-causing conditions results in enhanced HSC differentiation, probably to efficiently eliminate aberrant HSCs from the system. These findings, in concert with a few studies on other stem cell systems, have led us to propose DNA damage-induced differentiation as a novel DNA damage response mechanism in stem cells that circumvents the fatal consequences of cumulative DNA damage in the stem cell compartment. PMID:27262218

  16. Polycomb-group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell regulation and hematopoietic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Radulović, V; de Haan, G; Klauke, K

    2013-03-01

    The equilibrium between self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms. In particular, Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins have been shown to be involved in this process by repressing genes involved in cell-cycle regulation and differentiation. PcGs are histone modifiers that reside in two multi-protein complexes: Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 and 2 (PRC1 and PRC2). The existence of multiple orthologs for each Polycomb gene allows the formation of a multitude of distinct PRC1 and PRC2 sub-complexes. Changes in the expression of individual PcG genes are likely to cause perturbations in the composition of the PRC, which affect PRC enzymatic activity and target selectivity. An interesting recent development is that aberrant expression of, and mutations in, PcG genes have been shown to occur in hematopoietic neoplasms, where they display both tumor-suppressor and oncogenic activities. We therefore comprehensively reviewed the latest research on the role of PcG genes in normal and malignant blood cell development. We conclude that future research to elucidate the compositional changes of the PRCs and methods to intervene in PRC assembly will be of great therapeutic relevance to combat hematological malignancies.

  17. Unrelated hematopoietic stem cell registry and the role of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank

    PubMed Central

    Beom, Su-Hee; Kim, Eung Jo; Kim, Miok

    2016-01-01

    Background The hematopoietic stem cell bank has been actively recruiting registrants since 1994. This study systematically reviews its operations and outcomes over the last 20 years. Methods Retrospective data on a total of 47,711 registrants were reviewed. Relevant data were processed using PASW Statistics for Windows, version 18.0. Results As of 2013, the Korean Network for Organ Sharing database contained 265,307 registrants. Of these, 49,037 (18%) registrants committed to hematopoietic cell donation from 1994 to 2013. Fifty-seven percent of the registrants were men, and 43% were women. The reasons for opting out of the registry included refusal to donate (70%), family refusal (28%), and others (2%). The donation willingness of registrants was significantly higher than those who refused to receive a mail to confirm their continued enrollment (χ2=6.103, P=0.013). The bank successfully coordinated a total of 512 donors among newly matched donors from 1995 to 2013, of which the bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell accounted for 40.8% and 59.2% of the total donations, respectively. Conclusion Our recruitment activities focus on promoting voluntary registration and the importance of updating personal contact information. We expect that these data may be useful for diverse studies and demonstrate the positive impacts on the donation program. PMID:27382555

  18. Hematopoietic organs of Manduca sexta and hemocyte lineages.

    PubMed

    Nardi, James B; Pilas, Barbara; Ujhelyi, Elizabeth; Garsha, Karl; Kanost, Michael R

    2003-10-01

    Cells of the moth immune system are derived from organs that loosely envelop the four wing imaginal discs. The immune response in these insects is believed to depend on the activities of two main classes of hemocytes: plasmatocytes and granular cells. The fates of cells that arise from these hematopoietic organs have been followed by immunolabeling with plasmatocyte-specific and granular-cell-specific antibodies. Cells within each hematopoietic organ differ in their coherence and in their expression of two plasmatocyte-specific surface proteins, integrin and neuroglian. Within an organ there is no overlap in the expression of these two surface proteins; neuroglian is found on the surfaces of the coherent cells while integrin is expressed on cells that are losing coherence, rounding up, and dispersing. A granular-cell-specific marker for the protein lacunin labels the basal lamina that delimits each organ but only a small number of granular cells that lie on or near the periphery of the hematopoietic organ. When organs are cultured in the absence of hemolymph, all cells derived from hematopoietic organs turn out to immunolabel with the plasmatocyte-specific antibody MS13. The circulating plasmatocytes derived from hematopoietic organs have higher ploidy levels than the granular cells and represent a separate lineage of hemocytes. PMID:14551769

  19. Adipocytes in both brown and white adipose tissue of adult mice are functionally connected via gap junctions: implications for Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Burke, Shoshana; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Thi, Mia M; Hanani, Menachem; Scherer, Philipp E; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Spray, David C

    2014-11-01

    Adipose tissue serves as a host reservoir for the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative organism in Chagas disease. Gap junctions interconnect cells of most tissues, serving to synchronize cell activities including secretion in glandular tissue, and we have previously demonstrated that gap junctions are altered in various tissues and cells infected with T. cruzi. Herein, we examined the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) expression in infected adipose tissues. Adipose tissue is the largest endocrine organ of the body and is also involved in other physiological functions. In mammals, it is primarily composed of white adipocytes. Although gap junctions are a prominent feature of brown adipocytes, they have not been explored extensively in white adipocytes, especially in the setting of infection. Thus, we examined functional coupling in both white and brown adipocytes in mice. Injection of electrical current or the dye Lucifer Yellow into adipocytes within fat tissue spread to adjacent cells, which was reduced by treatment with agents known to block gap junctions. Moreover, Cx43 was detected in both brown and white fat tissue. At thirty and ninety days post-infection, Cx43 was downregulated in brown adipocytes and upregulated in white adipocytes. Gap junction-mediated intercellular communication likely contributes to hormone secretion and other functions in white adipose tissue and to nonshivering thermogenesis in brown fat, and modulation of the coupling by T. cruzi infection is expected to impact these functions.

  20. Adipocytes in both brown and white adipose tissue of adult mice are functionally connected via gap junctions: implications for Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Shoshana; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Thi, Mia M.; Hanani, Menachem; Scherer, Philipp E.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Spray, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue serves as a host reservoir for the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative organism in Chagas disease. Gap junctions interconnect cells of most tissues, serving to synchronize cell activities including secretion in glandular tissue, and we have previously demonstrated that gap junctions are altered in various tissues and cells infected with T. cruzi. Herein, we examined the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) expression in infected adipose tissues. Adipose tissue is the largest endocrine organ of the body and is also involved in other physiological functions. In mammals, it is primarily composed of white adipocytes. Although gap junctions are a prominent feature of brown adipocytes, they have not been explored extensively in white adipocytes, especially in the setting of infection. Thus, we examined functional coupling in both white and brown adipocytes in mice. Injection of electrical current or the dye Lucifer Yellow into adipocytes within fat tissue spread to adjacent cells, which was reduced by treatment with agents known to block gap junctions. Moreover, Cx43 was detected in both brown and white fat tissue. At thirty and ninety days post-infection, Cx43 was downregulated in brown adipocytes and upregulated in white adipocytes. Gap junction-mediated intercellular communication likely contributes to hormone secretion and other functions in white adipose tissue and to nonshivering thermogenesis in brown fat, and modulation of the coupling by T. cruzi infection is expected to impact these functions. PMID:25150689

  1. Angiogenin Promotes Hematopoietic Regeneration by Dichotomously Regulating Quiescence of Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Kevin A; Silberstein, Lev; Li, Shuping; Severe, Nicolas; Hu, Miaofen G; Yang, Hailing; Scadden, David T; Hu, Guo-Fu

    2016-08-11

    Regulation of stem and progenitor cell populations is critical in the development, maintenance, and regeneration of tissues. Here, we define a novel mechanism by which a niche-secreted RNase, angiogenin (ANG), distinctively alters the functional characteristics of primitive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) compared with lineage-committed myeloid-restricted progenitor (MyePro) cells. Specifically, ANG reduces the proliferative capacity of HSPC while simultaneously increasing proliferation of MyePro cells. Mechanistically, ANG induces cell-type-specific RNA-processing events: tRNA-derived stress-induced small RNA (tiRNA) generation in HSPCs and rRNA induction in MyePro cells, leading to respective reduction and increase in protein synthesis. Recombinant ANG protein improves survival of irradiated animals and enhances hematopoietic regeneration of mouse and human HSPCs in transplantation. Thus, ANG plays a non-cell-autonomous role in regulation of hematopoiesis by simultaneously preserving HSPC stemness and promoting MyePro proliferation. These cell-type-specific functions of ANG suggest considerable therapeutic potential. PMID:27518564

  2. Hematopoietic Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Lyase Deficiency Decreases Atherosclerotic Lesion Development in LDL-Receptor Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Martine; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Johnson, Jason; Nijstad, Niels; Van Santbrink, Peter J.; Westra, Marijke M.; Van Der Hoeven, Gerd; Gijbels, Marion J.; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Varga, Georg; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kuiper, Johan; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2013-01-01

    Aims Altered sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) homeostasis and signaling is implicated in various inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. As S1P levels are tightly controlled by S1P lyase, we investigated the impact of hematopoietic S1P lyase (Sgpl1−/−) deficiency on leukocyte subsets relevant to atherosclerosis. Methods and Results LDL receptor deficient mice that were transplanted with Sgpl1−/− bone marrow showed disrupted S1P gradients translating into lymphopenia and abrogated lymphocyte mitogenic and cytokine response as compared to controls. Remarkably however, Sgpl1−/− chimeras displayed mild monocytosis, due to impeded stromal retention and myelopoiesis, and plasma cytokine and macrophage expression patterns, that were largely compatible with classical macrophage activation. Collectively these two phenotypic features of Sgpl1 deficiency culminated in diminished atherogenic response. Conclusions Here we not only firmly establish the critical role of hematopoietic S1P lyase in controlling S1P levels and T cell trafficking in blood and lymphoid tissue, but also identify leukocyte Sgpl1 as critical factor in monocyte macrophage differentiation and function. Its, partly counterbalancing, pro- and anti-inflammatory activity spectrum imply that intervention in S1P lyase function in inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis should be considered with caution. PMID:23700419

  3. Background and Future Considerations for Human Cord Blood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, Including Economic Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Broxmeyer, Hal E.; Farag, Sherif

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cord blood (CB) has been used since 1988 as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders. CB has both advantages and disadvantages when compared with other tissue sources of HSCs such as bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood, which are also being used in the setting of HCT. This short review focuses on some historical information, as well as current efforts that are being assessed to enhance the efficacy of CB HCT. Also of importance are the costs of CB, and the feasibility and economics of using such to be identified, and newly confirmed improvements worldwide for the greatest number of patients. In this context, simple methods that would not necessarily entail the need for selected cell-processing facilities to ex vivo expand or improve the CB graft's functional activity may be of interest, with one such possibility being the use of an orally active inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidylpeptidase 4, alone or in combination with other new and innovative approaches for improving HSC engraftment and in vivo repopulating capability of CB. PMID:24304086

  4. HPK1, a hematopoietic protein kinase activating the SAPK/JNK pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, F; Tibbles, L A; Anafi, M; Janssen, A; Zanke, B W; Lassam, N; Pawson, T; Woodgett, J R; Iscove, N N

    1996-01-01

    In mammalian cells, a specific stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) pathway is activated in response to inflammatory cytokines, injury from heat, chemotherapeutic drugs and UV or ionizing radiation. The mechanisms that link these stimuli to activation of the SAPK/JNK pathway in different tissues remain to be identified. We have developed and applied a PCR-based subtraction strategy to identify novel genes that are differentially expressed at specific developmental points in hematopoiesis. We show that one such gene, hematopoietic progenitor kinase 1 (hpk1), encodes a serine/threonine kinase sharing similarity with the kinase domain of Ste20. HPK1 specifically activates the SAPK/JNK pathway after transfection into COS1 cells, but does not stimulate the p38/RK or mitogen-activated ERK signaling pathways. Activation of SAPK requires a functional HPK1 kinase domain and HPK1 signals via the SH3-containing mixed lineage kinase MLK-3 and the known SAPK activator SEK1. HPK1 therefore provides an example of a cell type-specific input into the SAPK/JNK pathway. The developmental specificity of its expression suggests a potential role in hematopoietic lineage decisions and growth regulation. Images PMID:9003777

  5. Retroviral Infection of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Embryoid Body Cells for Analysis of Hematopoietic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bikorimana, Emmanuel; Lapid, Danica; Choi, Hyewon; Dahl, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are an outstanding model for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of cellular differentiation. They are especially useful for investigating the development of early hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Gene expression in ESCs can be manipulated by several techniques that allow the role for individual molecules in development to be determined. One difficulty is that expression of specific genes often has different phenotypic effects dependent on their temporal expression. This problem can be circumvented by the generation of ESCs that inducibly express a gene of interest using technology such as the doxycycline-inducible transgene system. However, generation of these inducible cell lines is costly and time consuming. Described here is a method for disaggregating ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) into single cell suspensions, retrovirally infecting the cell suspensions, and then reforming the EBs by hanging drop. Downstream differentiation is then evaluated by flow cytometry. Using this protocol, it was demonstrated that exogenous expression of a microRNA gene at the beginning of ESC differentiation blocks HPC generation. However, when expressed in EB derived cells after nascent mesoderm is produced, the microRNA gene enhances hematopoietic differentiation. This method is useful for investigating the role of genes after specific germ layer tissue is derived. PMID:25350134

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy to Countermeasure Cancer in Astronauts during Exploration of Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, S.; Kindred, R. P.; Roach, A-N.; Edossa, A.; Kim, B. C.; Gonda, S. R.; Emami, K.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation can cause chromosomal mutations, which may lead to cancer in astronauts engaged in space exploration. Therefore, our goals are to develop countermeasures to prevent space-induced cancer using hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) and gene therapy. This presentation focuses on HSCT for cancer. Our previous experiments on a simulated, space-induced immuno-deficiency model (mouse hind limb unloading ) indicated that transplanted hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) could enhance the host's immunity by effectively eliminating bacterial infection (Ohi S, et. al. J Grav Physiol 10, P63-64, 2003; Ohi S, et. al. Proceedings of the Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF) . American Institute of Physics, New York, pp. 938-950, 2004). Hence, we hypothesized that the HSCs might be effective in combating cancer as well. Studies of cocultured mouse HSCs with beta-galactosidase marked rat gliosarcoma spheroids (9L/lacZ), a cancer model, indicated antagonistic interactions , resulting in destruction of the spheroids by HSCs. Trypan Blue dye-exclusion assays were consistent with the conclusion. These results show potential usehlness of HSCT for cancer. Currently, the NASA Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB), a space analog tissue/cell culture system, is being used to study invasion of the gliosarcoma (GS) spheroids into mouse brain with or without co-cultured HSCs. This may simulate the metastasis of gliosarcoma to brain. There is a tendency for the HSCs to inhibit invasion of GS spheroids into brain, as evidenced by the X-gal staining.

  7. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas (Extremity Sarcoma Closed to Entry as of 5/30/07)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-01

    Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  8. Elevated fluoride levels and periostitis in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients receiving long-term voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Tarlock, Katherine; Johnson, Darren; Cornell, Cathy; Parnell, Shawn; Meshinchi, Soheil; Baker, K Scott; Englund, Janet A

    2015-05-01

    Azole therapy is widely utilized in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients for the treatment of aspergillus. Complications of voriconazole treatment related to its elevated fluoride content have been described in adults, including reports of symptomatic skeletal fluorosis. We review fluoride levels, clinical, and laboratory data in five pediatric HCT recipients on long-term voriconazole therapy, all found to have elevated serum fluoride levels. Two patients had toxic fluoride levels, one infant had symptoms of significant pain with movement and radiographs confirmed skeletal fluorosis. Monitoring fluoride levels in children, especially with skeletal symptoms, should be considered in patients on long-term voriconazole.

  9. Prion protein is expressed on long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells and is important for their self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Steele, Andrew D; Lindquist, Susan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-02-14

    Although the wild-type prion protein (PrP) is abundant and widely expressed in various types of tissues and cells, its physiological function(s) remain unknown, and PrP knockout mice do not exhibit overt and undisputed phenotypes. Here we showed that PrP is expressed on the surface of several bone marrow cell populations successively enriched in long-term (LT) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) using flow cytometry analysis. Affinity purification of the PrP-positive and -negative fractions from these populations, followed by competitive bone marrow reconstitution assays, shows that all LT HSCs express PrP. HSCs from PrP-null bone marrow exhibited impaired self-renewal in serial transplantation of lethally irradiated mouse recipients both in the presence and absence of competitors. When treated with a cell cycle-specific myelotoxic agent, the animals reconstituted with PrP-null HSCs exhibit increased sensitivity to hematopoietic cell depletion. Ectopic expression of PrP in PrP-null bone marrow cells by retroviral infection rescued the defective hematopoietic engraftment during serial transplantation. Therefore, PrP is a marker for HSCs and supports their self-renewal.