Science.gov

Sample records for adult hiv-infected patients

  1. Pneumococcal vaccination among HIV-infected adult patients in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Tsai, Mao-Song; Kuo, Kuang-Che; Tsai, Jen-Chih; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Cheng, Aristine C; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected patients remain at higher risk for pneumococcal disease than the general population despite immune reconstitution and suppression of HIV replication with combination antiretroviral therapy. Vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) composed of T-cell-independent antigens has been recommended to reduce the risk of pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected adults. However, given the heterogeneity of study design, execution and subjects enrolled, studies examining serological responses to PPV23 yielded conflicting results and observational studies of clinical effectiveness only provided moderate evidence to support the routine use of PPV23 in HIV-infected adults. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), with conjugation of the capsular polysaccharide to a protein carrier, is more immunogenic than PPV23 and has been demonstrated to protect against pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected children and recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected adolescents and adults. Guidelines have recently been revised to recommend that HIV-infected patients aged 19 y or older receive one dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) followed by a booster vaccination with PPV23. In this paper, we review the studies using different vaccination strategies to improve immunogenicity among HIV-infected adult patients. PMID:25483681

  2. Adult-onset Still's disease presenting as fever of unknown origin in a patient with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    DelVecchio, Sally; Skidmore, Peter

    2008-02-15

    A 43-year-old African American man with known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was found to have adult-onset Still's disease manifesting as fever of unknown origin. In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected patients are preserving their immune status and, thus, must be evaluated in a manner similar to that for the general population.

  3. Vitamin D in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    JE, Lake; JS, Adams

    2013-01-01

    Observational studies have noted very high rates of low 25(OH)D (vitamin D) levels in both the general and HIV-infected populations. In HIV-infected patients, low 25(OH)D levels are likely a combination of both traditional risk factors and HIV- and antiretroviral therapy-specific contributors. Because of this unique risk profile, HIV-infected persons may be at greater risk for low 25(OH)D levels and frank deficiency and/or may respond to standard repletion regimens differently than HIV-uninfected patients. Currently, the optimal repletion and maintenance dosing regimens for HIV-infected patients remain unknown, as do potential benefits of supplementation that may be unique to the HIV-infected population. This paper reviews data published on HIV infection and vitamin D health in adults over the last year. PMID:21647555

  4. [Guidelines for the management of patients with HIV infection. I. Adolescents and adults. Liege Working Group on HIV Infection].

    PubMed

    Nkoghe, D; Moutschen, M; Demonty, J

    2000-05-01

    The management of HIV infected patient requires an approach that must put in balance profits expected from a tritherapy (suppression of viral replication, immune reconstitution) and problems related to treatment (difficulty of adherence, side effects, long-term toxicity, resistance). Controversies appear currently on the institution of a precocious treatment, on the use of protease inhibitors at initiation, in order to preserve choices when a modification is necessary. Many concepts, in investigation, are described in the management of a therapeutic failure. Resistance testings progressively find their place in the follow-up. Modes of prophylaxis-interruption of opportunistic infections are established, as well as is the management of professional postexposure. The question remains on how best to advise seropositive couples, about conception, and to elaborate recommendations after non-professional postexposure.

  5. Vaccination in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vaccines are critical components for protecting HIV-infected adults from an increasing number of preventable diseases. However, missed opportunities for vaccination among HIV-infected persons persist, likely due to concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of vaccines, as well as the changing nature of vaccine guidelines. In addition, the optimal timing of vaccination among HIV-infected adults in regards to HIV stage and receipt of antiretroviral therapy remain important questions. This article provides a review of the current recommendations regarding vaccines among HIV-infected adults and a comprehensive summary of the evidence-based literature of the benefits and risks of vaccines among this vulnerable population. PMID:25029589

  6. Violence victimization after HIV infection in a US probability sample of adult patients in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Zierler, S; Cunningham, W E; Andersen, R; Shapiro, M F; Nakazono, T; Morton, S; Crystal, S; Stein, M; Turner, B; St Clair, P; Bozzette, S A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study estimated the proportion of HIV-infected adults who have been assaulted by a partner or someone important to them since their HIV diagnosis and the extent to which they reported HIV-seropositive status as a cause of the violence. METHODS: Study participants were from a nationally representative probability sample of 2864 HIV-infected adults who were receiving medical care and were enrolled in the HIV Costs and Service Utilization Study. All interviews (91% in person, 9% by telephone) were conducted with computer-assisted personal interviewing instruments. Interviews began in January 1996 and ended 15 months later. RESULTS: Overall, 20.5% of the women, 11.5% of the men who reported having sex with men, and 7.5% of the heterosexual men reported physical harm since diagnosis, of whom nearly half reported HIV-seropositive status as a cause of violent episodes. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-related care is an appropriate setting for routine assessment of violence. Programs to cross-train staff in antiviolence agencies and HIV care facilities need to be developed for men and women with HIV infection. PMID:10667181

  7. Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  8. Effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy on the survival of HIV-infected adult patients in urban slums of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Muhula, Samuel Opondo; Peter, Memiah; Sibhatu, Biadgilign; Meshack, Ndirangu; Lennie, Kyomuhangi

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in access to Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) have radically reduced hospitalizations and deaths associated with HIV infection in both developed countries and sub-Saharan Africa. Not much is known about survival of patients on ART in slums. The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with mortality among adult patients on ART in resource poor, urban, sub-Saharan African setting. A prospective open cohort study was conducted with adult patients on ART at a clinic in Kibera slums, Nairobi, Kenya. The patients' enrollment to care was between March 2005 and November 2011. Descriptive statistics were computed and Kaplan-Meier (KM) methods used to estimate survival time while Cox's proportional hazards (CPH) model fitted to determine mortality predictors. A total of 2,011 adult patients were studied, 69% being female. Female gender (p=0.0016), zidovudine-based regimen patients (p<0.0001), CD4 count>351 patients (p<0.0001), WHO stage I patients (p<0.0001) and "Working" functional status patients recorded better survival probability on ART. In CPH analysis, the hazard of dying was higher in patients on Stavudine-based regimen(hazard ratio (HR)=.8; 95% CI, 1.5-2.2; p<0.0001),CD4 count<50 cells/µl (HR=1.6; 95% CI, 1.5-1.7;p<0.0001), WHO Stage IV at ART initiation (HR=1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6; p=0.016) and bedridden patients (HR=2.7; 95% CI, 1.7-4.4;p<0.0001). There was increased mortality among the males, those with advanced Immunosuppression, late WHO stage and bedridden patients. The findings further justify the need to switch patients on Stavudine-based regimen as per the WHO recommendations.

  9. [Osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Edgardo G; Figueroa, Raúl H; Scapellato, Pablo G; Vidal, Gabriela I; Rodriguez Brieschke, Maria T; Da Representaçao, Silvia; Seoane, Maria B; Laurido, Marcelo F; Caiafa, Diego; Lopardo, Gustavo; Herrera, Fabian; Cassetti, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Osteonecrosis, also known as avascular necrosis, is chiefly characterized by death of bone caused by vascular compromise. The true incidence of osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients is not well known and the pathogenesis remains undefined. Hypothetical risk factors peculiar to HIV-infected individuals that might play a role in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis include the introduction of protease inhibitors and resulting hyperlipidemia, the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies in serum leading to a hypercoagulable state, immune recovery and vasculitis. Hereby we present a series of 13 HIV-infected patients with osteonecrosis. The most common symptom upon presentation was arthralgia. The majority of the patients had received steroids, 9 had developed hyperlipidemia after the introduction of HAART, 8 were smokers and 4 patients were alcoholics. In 2 patients, seric anticardiolipin antibodies were detected. Twelve patients had AIDS and were on HAART (11 were on protease inhibitors). We believe that osteonecrosis should be included as differential diagnosis of every HIV-infected patient who complains of pain of weight bearing joints. Likewise, it seems prudent to rule out HIV infection in subjects with osteonecrosis.

  10. Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jasper FW; Lau, Susanna KP; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick CY

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei is an important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia. The clinical significance of T. marneffei became evident when the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic arrived in Southeast Asia in 1988. Subsequently, a decline in the incidence of T. marneffei infection among HIV-infected patients was seen in regions with access to highly active antiretroviral therapy and other control measures for HIV. Since the 1990s, an increasing number of T. marneffei infections have been reported among non-HIV-infected patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Their comorbidities included primary adult-onset immunodeficiency due to anti-interferon-gamma autoantibodies and secondary immunosuppressive conditions including other autoimmune diseases, solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, T-lymphocyte-depleting immunsuppressive drugs and novel anti-cancer targeted therapies such as anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors. Moreover, improved immunological diagnostics identified more primary immunodeficiency syndromes associated with T. marneffei infection in children. The higher case-fatality rate of T. marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected than HIV-infected patients might be related to delayed diagnosis due to the lack of clinical suspicion. Correction of the underlying immune defects and early use of antifungals are important treatment strategies. Clinicians should be familiar with the changing epidemiology and clinical management of T. marneffei infection among non-HIV-infected patients. PMID:26956447

  11. Bacterial infections in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Berger, B J; Hussain, F; Roistacher, K

    1994-06-01

    Although the original opportunistic pathogens described in AIDS were protozoal and fungal organisms, bacterial infections are now recognized with increased prevalence and altered expression in patients with HIV infection. Especially since populations outside of North America and populations of i.v. drug abusers have been studied, bacterial infections have been shown to cause substantially increased morbidity and mortality both early and late in the course of HIV infection. Just as strategies have been developed for primary and secondary prophylaxis of classical HIV-related opportunistic infections, prevention of bacterial complications should be a high priority. Good hygiene and avoidance of unsterile needles in illicit drug use, tattooing, ear-piercing, or other cosmetic or ritual activities should be emphasized in patient education. Patients should be counseled to avoid uncooked or poorly cooked eggs and poultry and to avoid unpasteurized milk products. Pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for all HIV-seropositive patients and should be given as early as possible after recognition of HIV infection for maximal efficacy. Influenza vaccine is also recommended. It may have a role in preventing bacterial pneumonia secondary to influenza. Patient management should include regular dental care and nutritional evaluation. The use of intravenous or central catheters should be limited to essential therapies. When patients present with new febrile illness, a high index of suspicion for invasive bacterial disease is appropriate. The signs of serious bacterial infection in HIV-positive patients are subtle. Diagnostic evaluation should include cultures of blood and other relevant clinical specimens. Empiric antimicrobial therapy based on the clinical presentation may be life saving in patients with invasive bacterial disease complicating HIV infection.

  12. Dietary intakes of HIV-infected adults in urban UK.

    PubMed

    Klassen, K; Goff, L M

    2013-08-01

    Maintaining a good nutritional status is important for immune health and for managing metabolic comorbidities in adults with HIV infection. Little is known about the dietary habits of adults living with HIV infection in the United Kingdom. The aims of this study were to characterise their dietary intakes, and to identify subgroups of patients who may require nutritional counselling and/or food support services. An observational study of adults attending a London HIV out-patient clinic who completed a demographics questionnaire and a structured 24 h diet recall interview was conducted. In all, 196 (162 men, 34 women) adults participated. Forty-three percent (n=66) of men and thirty-six percent (n=11) of women did not consume enough energy to meet their basal metabolic requirements and activity factor. The majority of both men (64%) and women (56%) consumed more than the recommended amount of saturated fat. Self-report of lipodystrophy (B coefficient -2.27 (95% CI -3.92 to -0.61), P=0.008) was associated with lower dietary fibre intake/1000 kcal per day, and a more recent diagnosis of HIV (B coefficient -0.11 (95% CI -0.20 to -0.02), P=0.013) was associated with a higher dietary fibre/1000 kcal intake per day. Recreational drug use was associated with a higher overall calorie (P=0.003) and protein (P=0.001) intake than non-usage after adjusting for basal metabolic requirements and weight, respectively. Our data describe the dietary intakes of a diverse group of adults with HIV infection in the United Kingdom. These dietary habits may have an impact on their overall health and development of other metabolic comorbidities common in people with HIV.

  13. Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia in Adult Patients With HIV Infection: Clearance With Topical Imiquimod.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Flores, Silvia; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Hernández-Salazar, Amparo; Charli-Joseph, Yann; Saeb-Lima, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Case 1 A 41-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) 1 diagnosed 16 years prior to his consultation was referred for an 8-month history of multiple painless lumps in his mouth. He had A2 status (CD4 cell count of 273 cells/mm(3) and viral load of 43,000 copies/L) and was taking treatment with lamivudine/zidovudine (combivir) and efavirenz. Physical examination showed multiple small mucosal-colored and lobulated papulonodules located in the palate and lower gingiva and a whitish verrucous plaque on the lower labial mucosa (Figure 1a). The lesions were diagnosed clinically as focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) and further confirmed by classical histopathological findings (Figure 1b). He had previously received unspecified treatment; thus, topical 5% imiquimod cream was initiated every night. Mild erosion and ulceration developed in the upper labial mucosa, which were managed with lubrication (petrolatum ointment). After 2 weeks, all of the small lesions disappeared and the largest plaque resolved 1 week later (Figure 1c). A small residual mass in the area of biopsy, suggesting a scar, remained on the lower lip. The area was removed surgically and corresponded to fibrosis histologically, with no evidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. CD4 cell count (694 cells/mm(3)) and viral load (<40 copies/L) did not show remarkable changes after imiquimod administration. No serious side effects were observed and the patient has remained free of disease after 1 year of follow-up.

  14. Immunologic treatment failure among HIV-infected adult patients in Jiangsu province, China

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Tao; Ding, Ping; Fu, Gengfeng; Huan, Xiping; Xu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Zhi; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Haitao; Mandel, Jeff; Wei, Chongyi; McFarland, Willi; Yan, Hongjing

    2017-01-01

    The National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program was implemented in Jiangsu Province, China in 2005. We conducted a retrospective, open cohort study to determine treatment failure rates and associated risk factors. Data were obtained from the national web-based antiretroviral treatment database. WHO criteria were used to define immunologic treatment failure. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to determine treatment failure rates and Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify risk factors. A total of 5,083 (87.8%) having at least one CD4 cell count measure were included from 2005 to 2013. Overall, 30.4% had immunologic treatment failure with cumulative treatment failure rates increasing to 50.5% at month 60 and 64.1% at month 90. Factors predicting treatment failure included being treated in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention system (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.14–2.50, p = 0.009) or jail hospital (HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.08–1.34, p = 0.001), and having a baseline CD4 count >350 cells/uL (HR 2.37, 95% CI 1.94–2.89. p < 0.001). Immunologic treatment failure was moderate to substantial among treated HIV patients. Providing second-line regimens and shifting treatment providers to professional hospitals should be considered to consolidate gains in averting morbidity and mortality. PMID:28220792

  15. Bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Lucia; Tatarelli, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2016-04-02

    In the combined antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-infected patients remain a vulnerable population for the onset of bloodstream infections (BSI). Worldwide, nontyphoid salmonellae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci are the most important pathogens. Intravenous catheter associated infection, skin-soft tissue infection and endocarditis are associated with Gram-positive bacteremia. Among the Gram-negative, nontyphoidal Salmonella have been previously correlated to sepsis. Other causes of BSI in HIV-infected patients are mycobacteria and fungi. Mycobacteria constitute a major cause of BSI in limited resource countries. Fungal BSI are not frequent and among them Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common life-threatening infection. The degree of immunosuppression remains the key prognostic factor leading to the development of BSI.

  16. Bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Taramasso, Lucia; Tatarelli, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the combined antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-infected patients remain a vulnerable population for the onset of bloodstream infections (BSI). Worldwide, nontyphoid salmonellae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci are the most important pathogens. Intravenous catheter associated infection, skin-soft tissue infection and endocarditis are associated with Gram-positive bacteremia. Among the Gram-negative, nontyphoidal Salmonella have been previously correlated to sepsis. Other causes of BSI in HIV-infected patients are mycobacteria and fungi. Mycobacteria constitute a major cause of BSI in limited resource countries. Fungal BSI are not frequent and among them Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common life-threatening infection. The degree of immunosuppression remains the key prognostic factor leading to the development of BSI. PMID:26950194

  17. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Diagnosis and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate screening for HIV infection is the cornerstone of HIV-related care. There have been several recent changes in testing technology and screening recommendations. The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends universal HIV screening at least once for adolescents and adults ages 15 to 65 years, and additional screening for patients at higher risk, although evidence is insufficient to determine optimum rescreening intervals. All pregnant women should be screened for HIV infection in the first trimester, and pregnant women at high risk should be screened again in the third trimester. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends use of an algorithm using fourth-generation tests for screening; this decreases the window period between infection and detection to as few as 14 days, thereby reducing the number of false-negative results. Home HIV testing kits, which require follow-up confirmatory testing, also are available. Clinicians should be aware of HIV-specific laws in their states, including those criminalizing HIV exposure and transmission. Thorough medical and laboratory evaluations are essential at initiation of care for patients with HIV infection, along with appropriate follow-up monitoring, as recommended in various guidelines.

  18. Liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tan-Tam, Clara C; Frassetto, Lynda A; Stock, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    HIV infection has evolved into a chronic condition as a result of improvements in therapeutic options. Chronic exposure with HIV and associated co-pathogens as well as toxicities from prolonged therapy with antiviral medications has resulted in increased morbidity and mortality rates from end-stage liver and kidney disease in the HIV-infected population. Since the definitive treatment for end-stage organ failure is transplantation, demand has increased among HIV-infected patients. Although the transplant community has been slow to recognize HIV as a chronic condition, many transplant centers have eliminated HIV infection as a contraindication to transplantation as a result of better patient management and demand. This review examines the current clinical strategies and issues surrounding liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

  19. Geriatric Syndromes in Older HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Valcour, Victor; Miao, Yinghui; Madamba, Joy; Lampiris, Harry; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Geriatric syndromes such as falls, frailty, and functional impairment are multifactorial conditions used to identify vulnerable older adults. Limited data exists on these conditions in older HIV-infected adults and no studies have comprehensively examined these conditions. Methods Geriatric syndromes including falls, urinary incontinence, functional impairment, frailty, sensory impairment, depression and cognitive impairment were measured in a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults age 50 and older who had an undetectable viral load on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined both HIV and non-HIV related predictors of geriatric syndromes including sociodemographics, number of co-morbidities and non-antiretroviral medications, and HIV specific variables in multivariate analyses. Results We studied 155 participants with a median age of 57 (IQR 54-62); (94%) were men. Pre-frailty (56%), difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living (46%), and cognitive impairment (47%) were the most frequent geriatric syndromes. Lower CD4 nadir (IRR 1.16, 95% CI 1.06-1.26), non-white race (IRR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10-1.74), and increasing number of comorbidities (IRR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03-1.15) were associated with increased risk of having more geriatric syndromes. Conclusions Geriatric syndromes are common in older HIV infected adults. Treatment of comorbidities and early initiation of ART may help to prevent development of these age related complications. Clinical care of older HIV-infected adults should consider incorporation of geriatric principles. PMID:26009828

  20. [Stroke in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Lino, Ireneia; Sousa, António; Correia, José

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) is changing. New drug treatments have reduced morbidity and mortality of this disease, therefore it is necessary to start treating the HIV infection as a chronical disease. The association of the stroke with the HIV infection was inicially thought to be a result of other opportunistic infeccions and tumors. However, the vascular disease associated with HIV infection has been a subject of research and debate. New evidence shows that the vascular diseases could be a threat for the pacients doing highly active antirretroviral therapy (HAART). In this paper, we review the association between the HIV infection and stroke. Furthermore, we have done an analysis of the risk for the stroke on pacients with HIV infection considering the changes of the infection spectrum by the introduction of HAART.

  1. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Adults in a Large Integrated Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Julia L; Baxter, Roger; Leyden, Wendy A; Muthulingam, Dharushana; Yee, Arnold; Horberg, Michael A; Klein, Daniel B; Towner, William J; Chao, Chun R; Quesenberry, Charles P; Silverberg, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    It is unclear whether HIV-infected individuals remain at higher risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) compared with HIV-uninfected individuals. We conducted a cohort study of HIV-infected and demographically matched HIV-uninfected adults within Kaiser Permanente Northern California during the period 1996-2011. We used Poisson models to obtain rate ratios (RRs) for incident IPD associated with HIV infection and other risk factors. Among 13,079 HIV-infected and 137,643 HIV-uninfected adults, the IPD rate per 100,000 person-years was 160 (n = 109 events) for HIV-infected and 8 (n = 75 events) for HIV-uninfected subjects, with an adjusted RR of 13.0 [95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-18.7]. For HIV-infected individuals, IPD incidence per 100,000 person-years decreased by 71% during study follow-up, from 305 in 1996-1999 to 88 in 2010-2011 (p < 0.001), with an adjusted RR of 6.6 (95% CI: 2.7-16.1) compared with HIV-uninfected subjects in 2010-2011. Risk factors for IPD among HIV-infected individuals included black compared with white race/ethnicity, smoking, cancer, and higher HIV RNA levels. The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination was not associated with a reduced risk of IPD in HIV-infected or HIV-uninfected individuals. Among HIV-infected IPD cases, the most common serotype was 19A (33%), and 59% of serotypes were covered by the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). Despite a dramatic decline in IPD incidence for HIV-infected adults since 1996, IPD rates were nearly sevenfold higher compared with HIV-uninfected adults in recent years, even after adjustment for risk factors. Timely antiretroviral therapy initiation, risk reduction strategies, and recent guidelines recommending PCV13 use may further reduce IPD incidence among HIV patients.

  2. Efficacy of an unsupervised 8-month rifampicin-containing regimen for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J. L.; Okwera, A.; Nsubuga, P.; Nakibali, J. G.; Whalen, C. C.; Hom, D.; Cave, M. D.; Yang, Z. H.; Mugerwa, R. D.; Ellner, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING National Tuberculosis Treatment Centre, Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of a daily, self-administered 8-month rifampicin-containing regimen for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected adults. DESIGN Treatment outcomes in patients with pulmonary TB treated with a single 8-month regimen and followed in a prospective epidemiological study. RESULTS Two hundred and sixty-five HIV-infected and 26 non-HIV-infected adults with initial episodes of pulmonary tuberculosis were treated with 2 months of daily isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP), ethambutol and pyrazinamide followed by 6 months of daily INH + RMP. Median follow-up was 17.8 months. Ninety-five per cent of the HIV-infected and all of the non-HIV-infected patients who had sputum examined were sputum culture negative after 2 months of treatment. Twenty-two HIV-infected and no non-HIV-infected patients died during treatment. Relapse rates were 8.4% (5.9 per 100 person-years of observation [PYO], 95%CI 3.2–8.6) among HIV-infected patients and 4.5% (2.1/100 PYO, 95%CI 0–7.8) for non-HIV-infected patients. Adverse drug reactions occurred in 37% of the HIV-infected patients; most were minor and self-limiting. CONCLUSION An 8-month RMP-containing regimen was well tolerated and effective in the treatment of HIV-infected adults with initial episodes of pulmonary TB. Relapse rates were similar to those reported with 6-month short-course regimens in HIV-infected individuals. Decisions about the duration of anti-tuberculosis treatment for HIV-infected adults must balance programme resources and the likelihood of poor compliance with longer regimens with the potential for a modest decrease in relapses with longer treatment. PMID:11092715

  3. Profile of candidiasis in HIV infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Khan P; Malik, A; Subhan, Khan H

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection in HIV-infected patients. The spectrum of Candida infection is diverse, starting from asymptomatic colonization to pathogenicforms. The low absolute CD4+ T-lymphocyte count has traditionally been cited as the greatest risk factor for the development of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis and current guidelines suggest increased risk once CD4+ T lymphocyte counts fall below 200 cells/µL. Gradual emergence of non-albicans Candida species as a cause of refractory mucosal and invasive Candidiasis, particularly in patients with advanced immunosuppression and problem of resistance to azoles and other antifungal agents in the Candida species is a point of concern. Materials and Methods A prospective study was carried out over a period of 2 years (2010-2011) on patients suffering from AIDS for the presence of candida infection. After thorough clinical examination relevant specimens were collected and processed specifically to ascertain candida infection. Speciation of candida isolates and antifungal sensitivity testing was also done. The CD4 cell counts of all the patients were estimated and correlated with the presence (or absence) of candidiasis. Results Out of a total of 165 HIV positive patients, a definitive diagnosis of candidiasis was made in 80 patients. Candida albicans was the most common yeast isolated. Patients with candidiasis had CD4 counts less than 200 cells/mm3. Maximum resistance was seen with fluconazole while no resistance was seen with voriconazole. Conclusion The most common opportunistic fungal infection in HIV positive patients is candidiasis, affecting the mucocutaneous system mainly but the invasive form is also common. Resistance to azoles and other antifungal agents in the Candida species is a point of concern. PMID:23205253

  4. Substance Use in Older HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, E. Jennifer; Tetrault, Jeanette M.; Fiellin, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Review Substance use may persist throughout the life course and has a substantial impact on health outcomes globally. As HIV-infected individuals are disproportionately impacted by substance use and living longer, it is critical that providers and researchers alike understand the impact of substance use on older, HIV-infected patients and potential treatment options. To this end, we conducted a review of the literature focusing on the most commonly used substances to outline the epidemiology, health consequences, treatment options and latest research relevant to older, HIV-infected patients. Recent Findings Substance use impacts older, HIV-infected patients with regards to HIV-related and non-HIV related outcomes. Counseling strategies are available for marijuana and stimulant use disorders. Brief counseling is useful alongside medications for alcohol, tobacco and opioid use disorders. Many medications for alcohol, tobacco, and opioid use disorders are safe in the setting of antiretroviral therapy. Unfortunately, few interventions targeting substance use in older, HIV-infected patients have been developed and evaluated. Summary As older, HIV-infected patients continue to experience substance use and its related health consequences, there will be a growing need for the development of safe and effective interventions which address the complex needs of this population. PMID:24824888

  5. [Travel medicine for HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Furrer, H

    2001-06-01

    Many HIV-infected persons travel from temperate zones to (sub)tropical destinations. HIV-specific immigration issues, medical resources abroad and problems regarding travelling with multiple medications have to be anticipated. When prescribing immunizations and specific chemoprophylaxis, the stage of immunodeficiency as well as drug interactions with antiretrovirals and medicaments against opportunistic infections have to be taken into account. Live vaccines may be contraindicated. Immunocompromised HIV-infected travellers have a higher risk for serious courses of diseases by enteropathogens. Therefore a good information about food hygiene is important and a prescription of an antibiotic to take in case of severe diarrhea may be indicated. A new antiretroviral combination therapy should not be started immediately before travelling to the tropics. The possibility to continue an established HIV treatment during travel has to be evaluated cautiously. With good pre-travel advice the risk of severe health problems is low for most HIV-infected travellers.

  6. Polyomavirus JCV excretion and genotype analysis in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lednicky, John A.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of shedding of polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) genotypes in urine of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Single samples of urine and blood were collected prospectively from 70 adult HIV-infected patients and 68 uninfected volunteers. Inclusion criteria for HIV-infected patients included an HIV RNA viral load < 1000 copies, CD4 cell count of 200-700 x 106 cells/l, and stable HAART regimen. PCR assays and sequence analysis were carried out using JCV-specific primers against different regions of the virus genome. RESULTS: JCV excretion in urine was more common in HIV-positive patients but not significantly different from that of the HIV-negative group [22/70 (31%) versus 13/68 (19%); P = 0.09]. HIV-positive patients lost the age-related pattern of JCV shedding (P = 0.13) displayed by uninfected subjects (P = 0.01). Among HIV-infected patients significant differences in JCV shedding were related to CD4 cell counts (P = 0.03). Sequence analysis of the JCV regulatory region from both HIV-infected patients and uninfected volunteers revealed all to be JCV archetypal strains. JCV genotypes 1 (36%) and 4 (36%) were the most common among HIV-infected patients, whereas type 2 (77%) was the most frequently detected among HIV-uninfected volunteers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that JCV shedding is enhanced by modest depressions in immune function during HIV infection. JCV shedding occurred in younger HIV-positive persons than in the healthy controls. As the common types of JCV excreted varied among ethnic groups, JCV genotypes associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may reflect demographics of those infected patient populations.

  7. End-Stage Renal Disease Among HIV-Infected Adults in North America

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alison G.; Althoff, Keri N.; Jing, Yuezhou; Estrella, Michelle M.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Wester, C. William; Bosch, Ronald J.; Crane, Heidi; Eron, Joseph; Gill, M. John; Horberg, Michael A.; Justice, Amy C.; Klein, Marina; Mayor, Angel M.; Moore, Richard D.; Palella, Frank J.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Napravnik, Sonia; Lucas, Gregory M.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Benson, Constance A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Moore, Richard D.; Carey, John T.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, particularly those of black race, are at high-risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but contributing factors are evolving. We hypothesized that improvements in HIV treatment have led to declines in risk of ESRD, particularly among HIV-infected blacks. Methods. Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration for Research and Design from January 2000 to December 2009, we validated 286 incident ESRD cases using abstracted medical evidence of dialysis (lasting >6 months) or renal transplant. A total of 38 354 HIV-infected adults aged 18–80 years contributed 159 825 person-years (PYs). Age- and sex-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated by race. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors of ESRD. Results. HIV-infected ESRD cases were more likely to be of black race, have diabetes mellitus or hypertension, inject drugs, and/or have a prior AIDS-defining illness. The overall SIR was 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8–3.6) but was significantly higher among black patients (4.5 [95% CI, 3.9–5.2]). ESRD incidence declined from 532 to 303 per 100 000 PYs and 138 to 34 per 100 000 PYs over the time period for blacks and nonblacks, respectively, coincident with notable increases in both the prevalence of viral suppression and the prevalence of ESRD risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hepatitis C virus coinfection. Conclusions. The risk of ESRD remains high among HIV-infected individuals in care but is declining with improvements in virologic suppression. HIV-infected black persons continue to comprise the majority of cases, as a result of higher viral loads, comorbidities, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:25409471

  8. Nutritional Status and Lipid Profile in HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Stambullian, M; Feliu, M S; Cassetti, L I; Slobodianik, N H

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, there have been many reports of HIV infection and abnormalities in lipid metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aims at describing the nutritional status of HIV-infected adults and its relation to lipid profile through traditional [total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol (HDL), triglycerides (TG), non-HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol (LDL)] and other parameters [Apolipoprotein B (ApoB), fibrinogen, and high sensitive-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP)]. A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and references were taken from WHO. TC, HDL, TG and glucose were determined and non-HDL cholesterol and LDL were calculated. ApoB and fibrinogen were determined by quantitative radial immunodiffusion on agar plates (Diffuplate,Biocientífica SA,Argentina) and hs-CRP by immunoturbidimetric test. Qualitative variables were compared with the Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Quantitative variables were compared applying parametrics or nonparametric tests. Pearson test for correlations. Software SPSS 17.0. 97 patients were analyzed: 69.1% were men. 80% were on antiretroviral treatment. Average (SD) BMI was 24.3 (4.1) kg/m(2). 29.4% were overweight and 5.9% obese. Patients with a BMI ≥25.0 kg/m(2) presented significantly higher levels of TG, ApoB and glycemia than well-nourished people [246.1(169.0) vs. 142.9(78.4) mg/dL;p=0.029, 198.6(69.3) vs. 126.4(50.6) mg/dL;p=0.01 and 100 (3.2) vs. 90.2 (6.9) mg/dL;p=0.008 resp.] and a significantly decreased HDL [37.2(1.5) vs. 49.8(10.4) mg/dL;p<0.01]. No statistically significant correlation was found between ApoB and non-HDL (p=0,063). There was no evidence that there is a direct relation between Apo B and the other lipid parameters. The potential increase in CVD in this group of patients, would be related to the higher levels of TG, ApoB and overweight/obesity. Nutritional education is needed to promote a healthy weight to warn against the risk of

  9. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in HIV-infected patients in Uzbekistan].

    PubMed

    Nurtaev, Kh S; Badalova, N S; Zalialieva, M V; Osipova, S O

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic diseases were diagnosed in 100 HIV-infected patients at different stages of disease (its asymptomatic form, persistent generalized lymphoadenopathy, pre-AIDS, and AIDS) (Group 1), 100 Tashkent residents (Group 2), and 349 patients with gastrointestinal diseases, allergic dermatoses, and skin depigmentation foci (Group 3). The HIV-infected patients were found to have virtually all parasites, such as Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, Chilomastix mesnili, Entamoeba coli, Iodamoeba butschlii, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Endolimax nana, Blastocystis hominis, Enlerobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides, Hymenolepis nana, detectable in the population of Tashkent. The highest infestation with intestinal protozoa, including nonpathogenic amoebas and helmninths, was found in Groups 1 and 3. However, in all the forms of HIV infection, the infestation with E. histolytical/dispar was 10 times greater than that in Groups 2 and 3 (1% and 0.8%, respectively). G. lamblia was detected in 16, 21, and 45.2% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In all the HIV-infected patients, the content of CD8 lymphocytes was increased, but that of CD20 lymphocytes was normal. Parasites were detectable with different levels of CD4 lymphocytes, but C. parvum was found only if its count was > 200/ml. In the HIV-infected patients, the hyperproduction of IgE was caused mainly by helminths rather than protozoa. In these patients, the increased level of IgE was also noted in the absence of parasites.

  10. [Organ transplants in HIV infected patients. Update and recommendations].

    PubMed

    Barcan, Laura; Gadano, Adrian; Casetti, Isabel; Villamil, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Until few years ago, HIV infection was an absolute contraindication to consider organ transplants. Since HAART introduction, patient survival increased dramatically, but high mortality due to liver and kidney diseases became evident. For these reasons, this group of patients is now reconsidered for organ transplantation. In 2008, the Argentine Society of Transplants (SAT) and the Argentine Infectious Diseases Society (SADI), encouraged by the increasing published experience on kidney and liver transplants in this population, decided to form a Working Group, to prepare an update on this issue and elaborate practical recommendations for the better management of these patients. The first meeting was held on December 4th 2008. The most important conclusion was that HIV infection did not contraindicate a solid organ transplant. Later on, taking into account the accumulated experience and the available literature, the current document was prepared. HIV infected patients must fulfill certain clinical, immunological, virological and psychosocial criteria to be considered for solid organ transplants. HIV infected recipients of kidney and liver transplants currently show similar short and middle term survival to non HIV infected patients. There is not yet enough data on intrathoracic transplants in these patients in order to include them on a waiting list for these organs-transplants. Interactions between immunosupressors and antiretroviral drugs (specially protease inhibitors) are very important, and require a strict monitoring of immunosupressor levels.

  11. Unusual presentation of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in HIV-infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Anupama; Vedant, Deepak; Gupta, Priyanka; Tegta, G. R.

    2016-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is caused by protozoan parasite of genus leishmania. Visceral leishmaniasis, diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, and atypical forms of cutaneous leishmaniasis are common in HIV-infected patients. Our patient presented with an obstructive mass in nasal cavity and was diagnosed as a case of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Spontaneous healing of lesions in HIV-infected patients is rare rather they are unresponsive to treatment and have frequent relapses, especially in patients with low CD4 count. However, in our patient, the lesion improved significantly after 2 months of highly active antiretroviral therapy and co-trimoxazole prophylaxis. PMID:27890957

  12. [Tuberculosis in HIV-infected and AIDS patients].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanova, A G; Stepanova, E V; Romanova, E I; Evseeva, I D

    2003-01-01

    The course of the combined infection (tuberculosis plus HIV-infection) has been analysed in 41 patients. Of them, 24 patients developed tuberculosis in the presence of HIV-infection (group 1) and 17 were infected with HIV when they already had tuberculosis running up to 5 years. HIV-infection in group 1 ran a more severe course, the patients developed generalized, disseminated and complicated forms of tuberculosis with more frequent lethal outcome. 39 patients of both groups received specific antituberculous therapy including 1-5 drugs. A response to treatment was achieved in 23 (60%) patients (52 and 47.8% at early and late HIV-infection stages, respectively). Treatment failure was explained by development of severe opportunistic infections and secondary diseases (generalized cytomegalovirus infection, advanced candidiasis, toxoplasmosis), poor compliance, asocial life style, advanced tuberculosis process, late diagnosis, inadequate treatment. It is shown that in late HIV-infection positive results of treatment can be expected only in early detection of tuberculosis and active long-term treatment.

  13. Psychopharmacology in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Martin J; Petitto, John M

    2008-06-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders and syndromes may be underdiagnosed and inadequately treated in individuals infected with HIV. Depression in particular is among the most prevalent diagnoses, and data from controlled clinical studies have shown that antidepressant medications are efficacious and safe for treating depression in HIV-infected persons. A significant shortcoming of this literature is that most of the available data are from studies conducted before the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy. In addition, apart from antidepressant medications, controlled studies systematically assessing efficacy and safety issues for other classes of psychotropic drugs (e.g., antipsychotic and anxiolytic medications) in HIV-infected persons are lacking. This review summarizes essential findings pertaining to the use of psychotropic medications to treat depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders in the context of HIV. It includes a discussion of clinically relevant treatment considerations (e.g., side effects, drug-drug interactions) derived from the existing literature as well as judgments that clinicians face in the absence of research data. Despite some shortcomings of the existing literature, overall there is compelling evidence that the appropriate use of psychotropic medications (coupled with behavioral therapy) can improve the quality of life of mentally ill HIV-infected individuals.

  14. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  15. Retinitis due to opportunistic infections in Iranian HIV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Ali; Mohraz, Minoo; Rasoulinejad, Mehrnaz; Shariati, Mona; Kheirandish, Parastou; Abdollahi, Maryam; Soori, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    We tried to evaluate prevalence and characteristics of Iranian HIV infected patients with retinitis due to opportunistic infections. In this cross sectional study, we evaluated 106 HIV infected patients via indirect ophthalmoscopy and slit lamp examination by 90 lens to find retinitis cases. General information and results of ophthalmologic examination were analyzed. Prevalence of retinitis due to opportunistic infections was 6.6%: cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis 1.88%, toxoplasmosis retinochoroiditis 1.88% and tuberculosis chorioretinitis 2.83%. CD4 count was higher than 50 cell/µlit in both cases with CMV retinitis. Along with increasing survival in the HIV infected patients, the prevalence of complications such as ocular manifestation due to opportunistic infections are increasing and must be more considered.

  16. Multimodal neuroimaging evidence of alterations in cortical structure and function in HIV-infected older adults

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Tony W.; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Becker, Katherine M.; Aloi, Joey; Robertson, Kevin R.; Sandkovsky, Uriel; White, Matthew L.; O’Neill, Jennifer; Knott, Nichole L.; Fox, Howard S.; Swindells, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy transformed HIV-infection from a terminal illness to a manageable condition, but these patients remain at a significantly elevated risk of developing cognitive impairments and the mechanisms are not understood. Some previous neuroimaging studies have found hyperactivation in fronto-parietal networks of HIV-infected patients, whereas others reported aberrations restricted to sensory cortices. In this study, we utilize high-resolution structural and neurophysiological imaging to determine whether alterations in brain structure, function, or both contribute to HIV-related cognitive impairments. HIV-infected adults and individually-matched controls completed 3-Tesla structural magnetic-resonance imaging (sMRI) and a mechanoreception task during magnetoencephalography (MEG). MEG data was examined using advanced beamforming methods, and sMRI data was analyzed using the latest voxel-based morphometry methods with DARTEL. We found significantly reduced theta responses in the postcentral gyrus and increased alpha activity in the prefrontal cortices of HIV-infected patients compared with controls. Patients also had reduced gray matter volume in the postcentral gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, and other regions. Importantly, reduced gray matter volume in the left postcentral gyrus was spatially-coincident with abnormal MEG responses in HIV-infected patients. Finally, left prefrontal and postcentral gyrus activity was correlated with neuropsychological performance and, when used in conjunction, these two MEG findings had a sensitivity and specificity of over 87.5% for HIV-associated cognitive impairment. This study is the first to demonstrate abnormally increased activity in association cortices with simultaneously decreased activity in sensory areas. These MEG findings had excellent sensitivity and specificity for HIV-associated cognitive impairment, and may hold promise as a potential disease marker. PMID:25376125

  17. Oral and airway microbiota in HIV-infected pneumonia patients.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Shoko; Fei, Matthew; Huang, Delphine; Fong, Serena; Subramanian, Anuradha; Grieco, Katherine; Lynch, Susan V; Huang, Laurence

    2012-09-01

    Despite the increased frequency of recurrent pneumonia in HIV-infected patients and recent studies linking the airway bacterial community (microbiota) to acute and chronic respiratory infection, little is known of the oral and airway microbiota that exist in these individuals and their propensity to harbor pathogens despite antimicrobial treatment for acute pneumonia. This pilot study compared paired samples of the oral and airway microbiota from 15 hospitalized HIV-infected patients receiving antimicrobial treatment for acute pneumonia. Total DNA was extracted, bacterial burden was assessed by quantitative PCR, and amplified 16S rRNA was profiled for microbiome composition using a phylogenetic microarray (16S rRNA PhyloChip). Though the bacterial burden of the airway was significantly lower than that of the oral cavity, microbiota in both niches were comparably diverse. However, oral and airway microbiota exhibited niche specificity. Oral microbiota were characterized by significantly increased relative abundance of multiple species associated with the mouth, including members of the Bacteroides, Firmicutes, and TM7 phyla, while airway microbiota were primarily characterized by a relative expansion of the Proteobacteria. Twenty-two taxa were detected in both niches, including Streptococcus bovis and Chryseobacterium species, pathogens associated with HIV-infected populations. In addition, we compared the airway microbiota of five of these patients to those of five non-HIV-infected pneumonia patients from a previous study. Compared to the control population, HIV-infected patients exhibited relative increased abundance of a large number of phylogenetically distinct taxa, which included several known or suspected pathogenic organisms, suggesting that recurrent pneumonia in HIV-infected populations may be related to the presence of these species.

  18. Coccidioides thyroiditis in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Sadao; Chang, Shelley; Jacobs, Michael R

    2012-07-01

    We report a case of Coccidioides thyroiditis in an HIV-infected patient with a history of recent Coccidioides pneumonia but with negative Coccidioides serology determined by enzyme immunoassay at presentation. Diagnosis of Coccidioides thyroiditis was made based on histopathologic examination and culture of thyroid abscess material obtained by fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

  19. Nutritional status in patients with HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Stambullian, Marcela; Feliu, Susana; Slobodianik, Nora H

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of adults with HIV infection or with AIDS through the use of biochemical parameters. The study was performed on 43 patients (19 HIV+ and 24 AIDS patients), between 26 and 44 years of age, from low and medium socioeconomic status, with access to health care services; 35 patients were under highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) treatment. Body weight and height were determined, and the Body Mass Index calculated (kg/m2). Blood samples were collected from fasting patients. Plasma cholesterol (total, HDL and LDL), triacylglycerol, total protein, apolipoproteins A-I and B, albumin, transthyretin, retinol binding protein, and ceruloplasmin concentrations were determined. Plasma levels of zinc, copper, and selenium were determined in a haemolysis-free sample by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Statistical analyses were performed with the Student's t-test. AIDS patients showed changes in biochemical parameters, particularly an increase in fibrinogen and a trend to decreased transthyretin levels. These findings stress the importance of the inclusion of functional biochemical parameters in the periodic evaluation of these patients. This would allow an early assessment of the need for appropriate nutritional support, implemented along with the specific retroviral treatment. This would aim at delaying the progression of the disease, and might improve the prospects of survival and quality of life.

  20. Future directions for interventions targeting PTSD in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Applebaum, Allison J; Bedoya, C Andres; Hendriksen, Ellen S; Wilkinson, Jesse L; Safren, Steven A; O'Cleirigh, Conall

    2015-01-01

    Although studies consistently report high rates of comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and HIV infection, development and testing of PTSD treatment interventions in HIV-infected adults is limited. As such, the purpose of this review was twofold. First, this review augments the three existing reviews of research for PTSD in HIV-infected adults conducted within the past 10 years. We found two empirically supported cognitive-behavioral therapy-based interventions for the treatment of trauma-related symptoms in HIV-infected adults. Due to the continued limited number of effective interventions for this population, a second aim of our review was to draw from the expansive field of effective PTSD interventions for the general population to propose ways that future clinical intervention research may be tailored for HIV-infected adults. Therefore, in addition to a review, we conceptualized this paper as an opportunity to generate an ideal preview of the field of intervention research in this population.

  1. Immunogenicity of the Bivalent Oral Cholera Vaccine Shanchol in Haitian Adults With HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Louise C; Charles, Richelle C; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M; Teng, Jessica E; Jerome, J Gregory; Rychert, Jenna; LaRocque, Regina C; Xu, Peng; Kovácˇ, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T; Qadri, Firdausi; Almazor, Charles P; Franke, Molly F; Harris, Jason B

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated immune responses following bivalent oral cholera vaccination (Shanchol [Shantha Biotechnics]; BivWC) in a cohort of 25 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in Haiti. Compared with adults without HIV infection, vaccination in HIV-infected individuals resulted in lower vibriocidal responses against Vibrio cholerae O1, and there was a positive relationship between the CD4(+) T-cell count and vibriocidal responses following vaccination. Nevertheless, seroconversion occurred at a rate of 65% against the Ogawa serotype and 74% against the Inaba serotype in adults with HIV infection. These results suggest that the vaccine retains substantial immunogenicity in adults with HIV infection and may benefit this population by protecting against cholera.

  2. Lung Cancer in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Mena, Álvaro; Meijide, Héctor; Marcos, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of HAART for persons living with HIV since 1996 has resulted in a dramatic decline in AIDS-related mortality. However, other comorbidities are increasing, such as metabolic disturbances or cancers, including solid organ malignancies. Among the latest, lung cancer, especially the adenocarcinoma subtype, is on the rise. HIV infection, even controlling for smoking, is an independent risk factor for developing lung cancer. HIV could promote lung cancers through immunosuppression, chronic inflammation, and a direct oncogenic effect. Smoking, lung infections, and chronic pulmonary diseases are risk factors for lung cancer. All may contribute to the cumulative incidence of lung cancer in persons living with HIV. It is double that in the general population. The role of HAART in lung cancer development in persons living with HIV is not well established. Although data supporting it could be too preliminary, persons living with HIV should be considered within high-risk groups that could benefit from screening strategies with low-dose computed tomography, especially those with airway obstruction and emphysema. Current evidence suggests that quitting smoking strategies in persons living with HIV achieve abstinence rates comparable to those in healthy HIV-negative smokers.

  3. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Beer, Linda; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    National estimates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and adherence support services utilization are needed to inform efforts to improve the health of HIV-infected persons in the United States. In a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care, 86% self-reported taking all ART doses in the past 72 hours. Overall, 20% reported using adherence support services and 2% reported an unmet need for services. If all nonadherent persons not receiving adherence support and all persons with a self-perceived unmet need for adherence support accessed services, resources to support ∼42,673 additional persons would be needed. Factors associated with lower adherence included younger age, female gender, depression, stimulant use, binge alcohol use, greater than once-daily dosing, longer time since HIV diagnosis, and patient beliefs. Predictors of adherence are multifactorial so multiple targeted strategies to improve adherence are warranted. Providing adherence support services to all those in need may require additional resources.

  4. Hyperparathyroidism and complications associated with vitamin D deficiency in HIV-infected adults in New York City, New York.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Candice K; Eckhardt, Benjamin; Baghdadi, Jonathan; Aberg, Judith A

    2012-09-01

    Although recent studies report a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in HIV-infected adults similar to that in the general population, metabolic complications of vitamin D deficiency may be worsened with HIV infection and remain insufficiently characterized. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional cohort study to determine prevalence and correlates of vitamin D deficiency and hyperparathyroidism among HIV-infected patients attending an urban clinic. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)-vitamin D <20 ng/ml and insufficiency as 20 to <30 ng/ml, and hyperparathyroidism as parathyroid-hormone >65 pg/ml. We used the X(2) test to compare proportions and logistic regression to assess for associations. Among 463 HIV-infected patients, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was 59%. The prevalence of hyperparathyroidism was 30% among patients with vitamin D deficiency, 23% among those with insufficiency, and 12% among those with sufficient vitamin D levels. Vitamin D deficiency was associated with increased odds of hyperparathyroidism. Severe vitamin D deficiency was associated with elevated alkaline phosphatase, a marker for increased bone turnover. Although efavirenz use was associated with vitamin D deficiency, and protease inhibitor use with decreased odds of vitamin D deficiency, there was no statistical difference in rates of hyperparathyroidism stratified by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) use. Given the increased risk of osteopenia with HIV infection and cART use, vitamin D supplementation for all HIV-infected patients on cART should be prescribed in accordance with the 2011 Endocrine Society guidelines. In HIV-infected patients with severe vitamin D deficiency or hyperparathyroidism, screening for osteomalacia and osteopenia may be warranted.

  5. Tuberculosis incidence rate and risk factors among HIV-infected adults with access to antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Enju; MAKUBI, Abel; DRAIN, Paul; SPIEGELMAN, Donna; SANDO, David; LI, Nan; CHALAMILLA, Guerino; SUDFELD, Christopher R.; HERTZMARK, Ellen; FAWZI, Wafaie W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence rate and risk factors of tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected adults accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Tanzania. Design A prospective observational study among HIV-infected adults attending 47 HIV clinics in Dar es Salaam. Methods We estimated TB incidence rates among HIV-infected patients prior to and after ART initiation. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to determine the predictors of incident TB among HIV-infected adults enrolled in the HIV care and treatment program. Results We assessed 67,686 patients for a median follow-up period of 24 (interquartile range: 8–49) months; 7,602 patients were diagnosed with active TB. The TB incidence rate was 7.9 (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 7.6–8.2)/100 person-years prior to ART initiation, and 4.4(95%CI, 4.2–4.4)/100 person-years for patients receiving ART. In multivariate analyses, patients on ART in the first 3 months had a 57% higher risk of TB (Hazard Ratio:1.57, 95%CI:1.47–1.68) compared to those not on ART, but the risk significantly decreased with increasing duration of ART. Risk factors for incident TB included being male, having low body mass index or middle upper arm circumference, lower CD4 cell count, and advanced WHO disease stage. There was seasonal variation for incident TB, with higher risk observed following the rainy seasons (May, June, and November). Conclusion In TB endemic regions, HIV-infected patients initiating ART, particularly males and those with poor nutritional status, should be closely monitored for active TB in the months following ART initiation. In addition to increasing the access to ART, interventions should be considered to improve nutritional status among HIV-infected patients. PMID:26091295

  6. Digital clubbing in HIV-infected patients: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Dever, Lisa L; Matta, Jyoti S

    2009-01-01

    Digital clubbing is characterized by bulbous enlargement of the distal phalanges due to an increase in soft tissue. It has been associated with a variety of conditions including cyanotic heart disease, neoplasms and infections of the lungs, bronchiectasis, liver cirrhosis, and inflammatory bowel disease. We conducted an observational study at an urban Veterans Affairs Medical Center outpatient HIV clinic to confirm our clinical impression that clubbing is common in HIV-infected patients and to identify factors that might be associated with it. Clinical, laboratory, and physical examination data including measurement of the circumference of the nail bed and distal phalanx of each finger were obtained on 78 HIV-infected patients seen for their routine care over a 3-month period. A digital index (DI), the ratio of the nail bed:distal phalanx circumference was determined for each patient. Clubbing was found in 28 patients (36%). Clubbed patients did not differ from nonclubbed patients with respect to most patient characteristics; CD4 cell counts and quantitative HIV RNA were similar in both groups. Clubbed patients had a significantly higher DI than controls (1.03 versus 0.96, p < 0.001), were younger (45 versus 49 years, p = 0.04), and had longer duration of HIV disease (48 versus, 42 months, p = 0.03). HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acquired digital clubbing.

  7. Does intravenous immune globulin have a role in HIV-infected patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yap, P L

    1994-01-01

    The main immunological abnormality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, and particularly those with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), is a deficiency in cellular immunity. However, symptomatic HIV-infected children also have evidence of deficiency of specific antibody synthesis, and intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) preparations in doses of 0.2-0.4 g/kg every 2-4 weeks have been shown to reduce the incidence of respiratory infections. IVIG therapy may also reduce the mortality and incidence of bacterial infections in adults but further studies are required. In addition, high-dose IVIG therapy (1-2 g/kg over 2-5 days) produces increased platelet counts in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) associated with HIV infection. Finally, IVIG therapy may have a role in HIV-infected patients suffering from severe parvovirus B19 or measles infection, or in patients suffering from autoimmune disorders where high-dose IVIG therapy has been shown to be efficacious. PMID:8033437

  8. [Improvement of parodontitis therapy of patients with HIV-infection].

    PubMed

    Soboleva, L A; Oseeva, A O; Shul'diakov, A A; Bulkina, N V

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose to determine the clinic-pathogenetic efficacy of cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy of periodontitis of patients with subclinical stage of HIV-infection medical examination and treatment of 40 patients was carried out. It was established that use of liniment cycloferon in the combined treatment of patients with subclinical stage of HIV-infection allowed to accelerate process of normalization of lipid peroxidation parameters and antioxidant potential of blood, to decrease infection load (herpes symplex virus I, Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus) in parodontal recess and evidence of local inflammation with reduction of activity of the tumours necrosis factor and interleukin 1beta, what provided acceleration of recuperation processes, lowering the frequency of parodontitis relapses.

  9. Description and Demonstration of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Enhance Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Treat Depression in HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Michael E; Bedoya, C Andres; Blashill, Aaron J; Lerner, Jonathan A; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Pinkston, Megan M; Safren, Steven A

    2015-11-01

    There are an estimated 1.1 million individuals living with HIV/AIDS in the United States. In addition to the various medical comorbidities of HIV infection, depression is one of the most frequently co-occurring psychiatric conditions among HIV-infected individuals. Furthermore, depression has been found to be associated with nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), as well as HIV disease progression. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has repeatedly been found to effectively treat depression in adult populations, and CBT for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) is an effective treatment for improving depressive symptoms and medication adherence in the context of various chronic health conditions, including diabetes and HIV-infection. This paper provides a description of the CBT-AD approach to treat depression and ART adherence in HIV-infected adults, which we have developed and tested in our clinic, and for which detailed therapist and client guides exist. To augment the description of treatment, the present article provides video component demonstrations of several core modules that highlight important aspects of this treatment, including Life-Steps for medication adherence, orientation to CBT-AD and psychoeducation, and suggestions for adaptation of core CBT modules for HIV-infected adults. Discussion of video demonstrations highlights differences in patient presentations and course of treatment between HIV-infected adults receiving CBT-AD and HIV-uninfected adults receiving traditional CBT for depression. This description and the accompanying demonstrations are intended as a practical guide to assist therapists wishing to conduct such a treatment in the outpatient setting.

  10. Description and Demonstration of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Enhance Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Treat Depression in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, Michael E.; Bedoya, C. Andres; Blashill, Aaron J.; Lerner, Jonathan A.; O’Cleirigh, Conall; Pinkston, Megan M.; Safren, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    There are an estimated 1.1 million individuals living with HIV/AIDS in the United States. In addition to the various medical comorbidities of HIV infection, depression is one of the most frequently co-occurring psychiatric conditions among HIV-infected individuals. Furthermore, depression has been found to be associated with nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), as well as HIV disease progression. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has repeatedly been found to effectively treat depression in adult populations, and CBT for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) is an effective treatment for improving depressive symptoms and medication adherence in the context of various chronic health conditions, including diabetes and HIV-infection. This paper provides a description of the CBT-AD approach to treat depression and ART adherence in HIV-infected adults, which we have developed and tested in our clinic, and for which detailed therapist and client guides exist. To augment the description of treatment, the present article provides video component demonstrations of several core modules that highlight important aspects of this treatment, including Life-Steps for medication adherence, orientation to CBT-AD and psychoeducation, and suggestions for adaptation of core CBT modules for HIV-infected adults. Discussion of video demonstrations highlights differences in patient presentations and course of treatment between HIV-infected adults receiving CBT-AD and HIV-uninfected adults receiving traditional CBT for depression. This description and the accompanying demonstrations are intended as a practical guide to assist therapists wishing to conduct such a treatment in the outpatient setting. PMID:26688659

  11. Revised surveillance case definitions for HIV infection among adults, adolescents, and children aged <18 months and for HIV infection and AIDS among children aged 18 months to <13 years--United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eileen; Whitmore, Suzanne; Glynn, Kathleen M; Dominguez, Kenneth; Mitsch, Andrew; McKenna, Matthew T

    2008-12-05

    For adults and adolescents (i.e., persons aged >/=13 years), the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection classification system and the surveillance case definitions for HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been revised and combined into a single case definition for HIV infection. In addition, the HIV infection case definition for children aged <13 years and the AIDS case definition for children aged 18 months to <13 years have been revised. No changes have been made to the HIV infection classification system, the 24 AIDS-defining conditions for children aged <13 years, or the AIDS case definition for children aged <18 months. These case definitions are intended for public health surveillance only and not as a guide for clinical diagnosis. Public health surveillance data are used primarily for monitoring the HIV epidemic and for planning on a population level, not for making clinical decisions for individual patients. CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists recommend that all states and territories conduct case surveillance of HIV infection and AIDS using the 2008 surveillance case definitions, effective immediately.

  12. STD Clinic Patients' Awareness of Non-AIDS Complications of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castro, José Guillermo; Granovsky, Inna; Jones, Deborah; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Participants were recruited from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Florida and were assessed regarding the knowledge and awareness of non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Questionnaires were administered before and after a brief information session on non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Participants included men (n = 46) and women (n = 51). Prior to the information session, at baseline, only 34% of the participants were worried about HIV infection. Most participants (82%) agreed that HIV could be treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), while only 38% were aware that HIV-associated conditions cannot be easily treated with ART. After the information session, almost all participants reported they were concerned regarding the risk of HIV infection. High-risk patients may have limited knowledge about the consequences of HIV infection beyond the traditional AIDS-associated conditions. Increased awareness of these less known consequences of HIV infection may decrease the potential for complacency regarding acquiring HIV infection. PMID:25331221

  13. Pneumococcal colonisation density: a new marker for disease severity in HIV-infected adults with pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Albrich, Werner C; Madhi, Shabir A; Adrian, Peter V; van Niekerk, Nadia; Telles, Jean-Noel; Ebrahim, N; Messaoudi, Melina; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Giersdorf, Sven; Vernet, Guy; Mueller, Beat; Klugman, Keith P

    2014-01-01

    Objective A high genomic load of Pneumococcus from blood or cerebrospinal fluid has been associated with increased mortality. We aimed to analyse whether nasopharyngeal colonisation density in HIV-infected patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with markers of disease severity or poor outcome. Methods Quantitative lytA real-time PCR was performed on nasopharyngeal swabs in HIV-infected South African adults hospitalised for acute CAP at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto, South Africa. Pneumonia aetiology was considered pneumococcal if any sputum culture or Gram stain, urinary pneumococcal C-polysaccharide-based antigen, blood culture or whole blood lytA real-time PCR revealed pneumococci. Results There was a moderate correlation between the mean nasopharyngeal colonisation densities and increasing CURB65 scores among all-cause patients with pneumonia (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.15, p=0.06) or with the Pitt bacteraemia score among patients with pneumococcal bacteraemia (p=0.63). In patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonisation density was higher among non-survivors than survivors (7.7 vs 6.1 log10 copies/mL, respectively, p=0.02) and among those who had pneumococci identified from blood cultures and/or by whole blood lytA real-time PCR than those with non-bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia (6.6 vs 5.6 log10 copies/mL, p=0.03). Nasopharyngeal colonisation density correlated positively with the biomarkers procalcitonin (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.37, p<0.0001), proadrenomedullin (r=0.39, p=0.008) and copeptin (r=0.30, p=0.01). Conclusions In addition to its previously reported role as a diagnostic tool for pneumococcal pneumonia, quantitative nasopharyngeal colonisation density also correlates with mortality and prognostic biomarkers. It may also be useful as a severity marker for pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected adults. PMID:25113557

  14. [Prevalence of HIV infection in patients with pellagra and pellagra-like erythemas].

    PubMed

    Pitche, P; Kombate, K; Tchangai-Walla, K

    1999-01-01

    Pellagra is a systemic disorder caused by severe niacin deficiency. While uncommon in Europe and North America, pellagra and pellagra-like erythema are frequently encountered in undernourished adults in poor African countries. The purpose of this three-year prospective study was to determine the prevalence of HIV infection in patients with pellagra. Between 1996 and 1998, all documented cases of pellagra and pellagra-like erythema diagnosed in the Dermatology Department and Internal Medicine Department of the Teaching Hospital in Lome, Togo were included. Patients underwent screening tests for HIV infection. During the study period, pellagra or pellagra-like erythema was diagnosed in a total of 108 patients (59 women and 49 men) with a mean age of 41 +/- 3.5 years (range, 18 to 68 years). Serology tests for HIV were positive in 6 of these patients (5.5 p. 100; mean age 35 years). In four asymptomatic patients with no opportunistic infection, detection of HIV was an incidental discovery. The other two patients had AIDS symptoms. The principal causes of pellagra were malnutrition (n = 30), alcoholism (n = 15), and combined malnutrition and alcoholism (n = 60). The findings of this study suggest that the incidence of HIV infection in patients with pellagra and pellagra-like erythema is low, i.e., not higher than in the general population. This study also confirms previous etiologic and epidemiological data concerning pellagra in poor countries, i.e., the preponderant role of nutritional deficiency.

  15. Assessment of nutritional status of HIV-infected patients at a tertiary centre in North India.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sunita; Wanchu, Ajay; Khurana, Sudha

    2007-07-01

    Infection with HIV has an adverse effect on nutritional status, and can result in progressive involuntary weight loss. We assessed the nutritional status of our patients with HIV infection and found that HIV-infected patients had significantly low nutrient intake and body mass index as compared with controls. Involuntary weight loss, altered body composition and reduced nutritional status were present throughout the stages of HIV infection.

  16. [Comparative study of pneumococcal bacteremia in patients with and without HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Roca, V; Pérez-Cecilia, E; Santillana, T; Romero, J; Picazo, J J

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective study of bacteriemias due to S. pneumoniae in adults is performed, from all the cases observed in our hospital during the 1989-1990 period. We compare the clinical characteristics of the disease depending if the affected patients were infected or not by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In the considered period bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae has been diagnosed in 12 patients with HIV infection and 29 without it. Ten of the twelve patients with HIV infection (83.3%) were in Stage IV (CDC) of the disease, staying the rest in a less developed phase of the disease. Age was significantly higher in non-HIV patients (p < 0.001) and a high percentage of patients in this group (75%) showed some disease considered as predisposing to bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae. When a respiratory foci was present, VIH positive individuals showed more frequently bilateral radiologic infiltrates and less frequently pleural effusion. Leucocyte count when diagnosis was done were significantly higher in non-HIV group. Sensibility of isolated S. pneumoniae was similar in the two groups, being the immediate mortality related with bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae higher in the non-HIV group. In our center 29.3% of bacteriemias due to S. pneumoniae are diagnosed in patients with HIV infection. This disease in itself could constitute an added risk factor in the development of bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae.

  17. Determinants for tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia: a multicentre case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Yihun Mulugeta; Awoke, Worku; Wilder-Smith, Annalies

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to identify determinants for tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia. Design Case–control study. Setting Three hospitals and 10 health centres in Northwest Ethiopia. Participants A total of 446 individuals consented to participate in the study (150 cases and 296 controls). Cases were HIV-infected adults diagnosed with active TB, and controls were HIV-infected adults without active TB. Main outcome measure The link between TB and determinants was assessed using logistic regression. Determinants were categorised as sociodemographic, host-related, clinical and environmental. Results Smoking (adjusted OR (AOR) 5.47; 95% CI 2.26 to 13.22), presence of a TB patient in the family (AOR 2.66; 95% CI 1.25 to 5.66), alcohol consumption (AOR 2.49; 95% CI 1.29 to 4.80) and chewing khat (AOR 2.22; 95% CI 1.11 to 4.41) were independent determinants for increased occurrence of TB. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (AOR 0.25; 95% CI 0.13 to 0.51), isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) (AOR 0.22; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.41) and cotrimoxazole preventive therapy (AOR 0.32; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.55) had a protective effect against TB. Conclusions HIV-infected adults with substance abuse (tobacco smoking, khat chewing and alcohol) should be prioritised for TB screening. This study reaffirmed that HAART and IPT are some of the best strategies for reducing TB occurrence in HIV-infected adults. These findings provide impetus to intensify tracing of TB household contacts. PMID:27084271

  18. Screening and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection among HIV-infected patients in resource-rich settings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ada W C; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-01-01

    Current international guidelines recommend screening and treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection in HIV-infected patients in all settings. The main factors affecting the risk of TB in HIV-infected patients include the level of immunosuppression, coverage of antiretroviral therapy and local TB burden. In resource-rich settings where antiretroviral therapy is more accessible and HIV-infected patients are expected to be diagnosed at an earlier stage, local TB burden remains a key factor on their risk of TB. This article reviewed the epidemiology of latent TB infection among the adult HIV-infected patients, and the use and benefit of screening and treatment of latent TB infection in resource-rich settings in the past decade. While such practice should be continued in countries with medium or high TB burden, targeted screening and treatment only for HIV-infected patients with additional risk factors for TB might be a more practical option in resource-rich countries with low TB burden.

  19. Suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected adults in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; McLaughlin, Megan M; Nie, Jing Min; Cai, Weiping; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Despite China's free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program, there are high rates of treatment failure, large sociodemographic disparities in care outcomes and emerging medication resistance. Understanding patient medication adherence behaviors and challenges could inform adherence interventions to maximize the individual and prevention benefits of ART. This study assessed recent nonadherence and treatment interruption among 813 HIV-infected adult outpatients in Guangzhou, China. Participants completed a behavioral survey, underwent chart review, and were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 721 HIV-infected adults receiving ART, 18.9% reported recent nonadherence (any missed ART in the past four weeks) and 6.8% reported treatment interruption (four or more weeks of missed ART in the past year). Lower education, living alone, alcohol use, and being on ART one to three years were associated with recent nonadherence. Male gender, lower education, and being on ART one to three years were associated with treatment interruption. ART medication adherence interventions are needed in China that include individualized, long-term adherence plans sensitive to patients' educational and economic situations. These interventions should also consider possible gender disparities in treatment outcomes and address the use of alcohol during ART. Successful ART medication adherence interventions in China can inform other international settings that face similar adherence challenges and disparities.

  20. Lack of protection from HIV infection by the mutant HIV coreceptor CCR5 in intravenously HIV infected hemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Malo, A; Rommel, F; Bogner, J; Gruber, R; Schramm, W; Goebel, F D; Riethmüller, G; Wank, R

    1998-02-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is an important coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV strains. Homozygous carriers of the mutated CCR5 receptor with a 32 bp deletion (delta 32-CCR5) are highly protected against HIV infection. A protective effect has also been described for heterozygous individuals carrying both mutated and wildtype CCR5 receptors. We compared the frequency of the mutated delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in HIV positive patients infected by sexual contact (N = 160) with intravenously HIV infected hemophilic patients (N = 84) and HIV negative individuals (N = 421). We found no protective effect of delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in hemophilic patients (p = 0.0134). If proteins of plasma concentrates would be responsible for facilitating the entry of HIV macrophages by upregulation of the CCR5 wildtype receptor it would be of therapeutical interest to identify the responsible plasma proteins.

  1. Clinical Spectrum of Oral Secondary Syphilis in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oral lesions may constitute the first clinical manifestation in secondary syphilis, but detailed descriptions in HIV-infected individuals are scarce. Objective. To describe the clinical characteristics of oral secondary syphilis in HIV-infected patients and its relevance in the early diagnosis of syphilis. Methods. Twenty HIV/AIDS adult subjects with oral secondary syphilis lesions presenting at two HIV/AIDS referral centers in Mexico City (2003–2011) are described. An oral examination was performed by specialists in oral pathology and medicine; when possible, a punch biopsy was done, and Warthin-Starry stain and immunohistochemistry were completed. Intraoral herpes virus infection and erythematous candidosis were ruled out by cytological analysis. Diagnosis of oral syphilis was confirmed with positive nontreponemal test (VDRL), and, if possible, fluorescent treponemal antibody test. Results. Twenty male patients (median age 31.5, 21–59 years) with oral secondary syphilis lesions were included. Oral lesions were the first clinical sign of syphilis in 16 (80%) cases. Mucous patch was the most common oral manifestation (17, 85.5%), followed by shallow ulcers (2, 10%) and macular lesions (1, 5%). Conclusions. Due to the recent rise in HIV-syphilis coinfection, dental and medical practitioners should consider secondary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions, particularly in HIV-infected patients. PMID:26316966

  2. Clinical Spectrum of Oral Secondary Syphilis in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oral lesions may constitute the first clinical manifestation in secondary syphilis, but detailed descriptions in HIV-infected individuals are scarce. Objective. To describe the clinical characteristics of oral secondary syphilis in HIV-infected patients and its relevance in the early diagnosis of syphilis. Methods. Twenty HIV/AIDS adult subjects with oral secondary syphilis lesions presenting at two HIV/AIDS referral centers in Mexico City (2003-2011) are described. An oral examination was performed by specialists in oral pathology and medicine; when possible, a punch biopsy was done, and Warthin-Starry stain and immunohistochemistry were completed. Intraoral herpes virus infection and erythematous candidosis were ruled out by cytological analysis. Diagnosis of oral syphilis was confirmed with positive nontreponemal test (VDRL), and, if possible, fluorescent treponemal antibody test. Results. Twenty male patients (median age 31.5, 21-59 years) with oral secondary syphilis lesions were included. Oral lesions were the first clinical sign of syphilis in 16 (80%) cases. Mucous patch was the most common oral manifestation (17, 85.5%), followed by shallow ulcers (2, 10%) and macular lesions (1, 5%). Conclusions. Due to the recent rise in HIV-syphilis coinfection, dental and medical practitioners should consider secondary syphilis in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions, particularly in HIV-infected patients.

  3. Suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected adults in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn E.; McLaughlin, Megan M.; Nie, Jing Min; Cai, Weiping; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite China“s free antiretroviral treatment (ART) program, there are high rates of treatment failure, large sociodemographic disparities in care outcomes and emerging medication resistance. Understanding patient medication adherence behaviors and challenges could inform adherence interventions to maximize the individual and prevention benefits of ART. This study assessed recent non-adherence and treatment interruption among 813 HIV-infected adult outpatients in Guangzhou, China. Participants completed a behavioral survey, underwent chart review, and were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 721 HIV-infected adults receiving ART, 18.9% reported recent non-adherence (any missed ART in the past 4 weeks) and 6.8% reported treatment interruption (four or more weeks of missed ART in the past year). Lower education, living alone, alcohol use and being on ART one to three years were associated with recent non-adherence. Male gender, lower education and being on ART one to three years were associated with treatment interruption. ART medication adherence interventions are needed in China that include individualized, long-term adherence plans sensitive to patients“ educational and economic situations. These interventions should also consider possible gender disparities in treatment outcomes and address the use of alcohol during ART. Successful ART medication adherence interventions in China can inform other international settings that face similar adherence challenges and disparities. PMID:24666239

  4. [Guidelines for the management of patients with HIV infection. II. Pregnant women and children. Liege Working Group on HIV Infection].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, V; Nkoghe, D; Hoyoux, C; Dresse, M F

    2000-05-01

    The management of the HIV infected child is nearly identical to the adult. Nevertheless, there are many clinical, immunological and virological details. Difficulties evoked for the adult have an even bigger importance, in view of the foreseeable longevity of these children under treatment. The reduction of the mother to child transmission, thanks to the AZT-caesarean association, must be continued. The use of anti-retroviral drugs during pregnancy requires a sustained attention because of the potential risks and benefits for the foetus and mother. The long-term impact of these drugs, in children exposed during pregnancy, remains unknown. The follow-up of these children therefore remains important.

  5. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of hepatitis B virus in HIV-infected patients in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, S M; Cai, W P; Hu, F Y; Lan, Y; Liao, B L; Chen, Y P; Tang, X P

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in HIV-infected adults at the time of antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in Guangdong province, China. A total of 2793 HIV-infected adults were enrolled between January 2004 and September 2011. Demographic data and laboratory parameters were collected, HBV-DNA levels were measured, and HBV genotypes were identified before ART initiation. The prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in HIV-infected patients was 13.2%. A total of 266 HIV/HBV co-infected patients and 1469 HIV mono-infected patients were recruited. The median alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels of HIV/HBV co-infected patients were higher than HIV mono-infected patients (32 U/L vs. 22 U/L, p < 0.001 and 35 U/L vs. 24 U/L, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas the median CD4 cell count of HIV/HBV co-infected patients was lower than HIV mono-infected patients (59 cells/mm(3) vs. 141 cells/mm(3), p < 0.001). The level of CD4 cell count was lower in hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg)-positive co-infected patients than HBeAg-negative patients (36 cells/mm(3) vs. 69 cells/mm(3), p = 0.014). A similar result was found in high level of HBV-DNA and low level of HBV-DNA groups (33 cells/mm(3) vs. 89 cells/mm(3), p < 0.001). HBV genotypes were classified as genotypes B and C. Patients infected with genotypes B and C differed significantly in terms of proportion of those who were HBeAg-positive (40.5% vs. 62.2%, p = 0.014). This study indicates a high prevalence of HBsAg in HIV-infected adults in Guangdong. The level of CD4 cell count in HIV/HBV co-infected patients was much lower than HIV mono-infected patients, especially in patients who were HBeAg-positive and had a high level of HBV-DNA. The predominant HBV genotype in HIV/HBV co-infected patients is genotype B.

  6. Prevalence and correlates of obstructive sleep apnea among patients with and without HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    KUNISAKI, Ken M.; AKGÜN, Kathleen M.; FIELLIN, David A.; GIBERT, Cynthia L.; KIM, Joon W.; RIMLAND, David; RODRIGUEZ-BARRADAS, Maria C.; YAGGI, H. Klar; CROTHERS, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In HIV-uninfected populations, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is commonly associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and cognitive impairment. These comorbidities are common in HIV-infected patients, but there are scarce data regarding OSA in HIV-infected patients. Therefore, we examined the prevalence and correlates of OSA in a cohort of HIV-infected and uninfected patients. Design Observational cohort study. Methods Electronic medical record and self-report data were examined in patients enrolled in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) between 2002-2008 and followed through 2010. The primary outcome was OSA diagnosis, determined using ICD-9 codes, in HIV-infected compared with uninfected. We used regression analyses to determine the association between OSA diagnosis, symptoms and comorbidities in adjusted models. Results Of 3,683 HIV-infected and 3,641 uninfected patients, 143 (3.9%) and 453 (12.4%) had a diagnosis of OSA (p<0.0001), respectively. HIV-infected patients were more likely to report symptoms associated with sleep and OSA such as tiredness and fatigue. Compared with uninfected patients with OSA, HIV-infected patients with OSA were younger, had lower BMIs, and were less likely to have hypertension. In models adjusting for these traditional OSA risk factors, HIV infection was associated with markedly reduced odds of OSA diagnosis (odds ratio=0.48; 95% confidence interval 0.39—0.60). Conclusions HIV-infected patients are less likely to receive a diagnosis of OSA. Future studies are needed to determine whether the lower prevalence of OSA diagnoses in HIV-infected patients is due to decreased screening and detection or due to a truly decreased likelihood of OSA in the setting of HIV. PMID:25230851

  7. The Association of Gender, Age, Efavirenz Use, and Hypovitaminosis D Among HIV-Infected Adults Living in the Tropics.

    PubMed

    Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Kerr, Stephen J; Ramautarsing, Reshmie A; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat; Sophonphan, Jiratchaya; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Khovidhunkit, Weerapan; Hiransuthikul, Narin; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin D, which is important for calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism, has several noncalcemic actions. Low vitamin D levels have been observed in HIV-infected patients from high latitudes, with consequently reduced bone mineral density (BMD), but data from the tropics are scarce. We aimed to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for hypovitaminosis D among HIV-infected patients in the tropics. This was a cross-sectional study to determine serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels in HIV-infected patients who attended our HIV clinic in Bangkok, Thailand from July 2010 to June 2011. Hypovitaminosis D was defined as vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency [25(OH)D 20-30 ng/ml and <20 ng/ml, respectively]. Hypovitaminosis D prevalence was calculated and risk factors were determined using multivariate logistic regression. A total of 673 HIV-infected adults were included. The median age was 41 years and 47% were females. The median body mass index (BMI) was 21.9 kg/m(2) and 93% were using antiretroviral therapy (ART), with a median (IQR) duration of 8.9 (5.0-10.4) years. Thirty-one percent were using efavirenz (EFV). The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was 40.6% and 29.9%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, female gender [odds ratio: OR (95% confidence interval: 95% CI) 1.7 (1.2-2.3), p = 0.005], age >37 years [OR (95% CI) 1.6 (1.1-2.4), p = 0.01], and EFV use [OR (95% CI) 2.0 (1.3-3.2), p = 0.004] were independent predictors of hypovitaminosis D. Even in tropical areas where the sun is abundant, hypovitaminosis D is highly prevalent. Thus, treatment of low vitamin D in HIV-infected patients at high risk should not be ignored to prevent reductions in BMD and other hypovitaminosis D-related comorbidities.

  8. Future directions for interventions targeting PTSD in HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Allison J.; Bedoya, C. Andres; Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Wilkinson, Jesse L.; Safren, Steven A.; O’Cleirigh, Conall

    2015-01-01

    Although studies consistently report high rates of comorbid Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and HIV infection, development and testing of PTSD treatment interventions in HIV-infected adults is limited. As such, the purpose of this review was twofold. First, this review augments the 3 existing reviews of research for PTSD in HIV-infected adults conducted within the past 10 years. We found 2 empirically supported cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)-based interventions for the treatment of trauma-related symptoms in HIV-infected adults. Due to the continued limited number of effective interventions for this population, a second aim of our review was to draw from the expansive field of effective PTSD interventions for the general population to propose ways that future clinical intervention research may be tailored for HIV-infected adults. Therefore, in addition to a review, we conceptualized this paper as an opportunity to generate an ideal preview of the field of intervention research in this population. PMID:25665885

  9. The HIV-Infected Patient and Family Social Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Thomas M.; And Others

    The goal of this study was to examine the complex interplay among family, neuropsychological, psychosocial, psychiatric, and immunological variables with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected homosexual/bisexual men and their families. The subjects were a broad spectrum of 29 outpatient HIV-infected homosexual/bisexual men between the ages…

  10. Oral care of HIV infected patients: the knowledge and attitudes of Irish dentists.

    PubMed

    McCartan, B E; Samaranayake, L P

    1991-01-01

    As the numbers of people with HIV infection and AIDS increase, so will the contribution required from dental practitioners. A postal questionnaire survey was therefore conducted among dental practitioners in Ireland to determine their knowledge and attitudes towards HIV infection and the issues it raises for them. Although a majority of dentists were aware of the facts related to AIDS and the spread and oral manifestations of HIV infection, there were considerable gaps in their knowledge with regard to dental management. Only 41% were prepared to be engaged in continued care of HIV infected patients while contradicting opinions were expressed on the risk of HIV transmission in dentistry and attitudes towards HIV seropositive patients and staff. Further educational efforts on HIV infection and its implications in dentistry should be directed towards dentists in Ireland.

  11. Pattern, Clinical Characteristics, and Outcome of Meningitis among HIV-Infected Adults Admitted in a Tertiary Hospital in North Western Tanzania: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Limited information exists on the etiologies, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of meningitis among HIV-infected patients in Africa. We conducted a study to determine the etiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of meningitis among HIV-infected adults. Methods. A prospective cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted among HIV-infected patients aged ≥18 years admitted to the medical wards with symptoms and signs of meningitis. Sociodemographic and clinical information were collected using a standardized data collection tool. Lumbar puncture was performed to all patients; cerebrospinal fluid samples were sent for analysis. Results. Among 60 HIV-infected adults clinically diagnosed to have meningitis, 55 had CSF profiles consistent with meningitis. Of these, 14 (25.5%) had a laboratory-confirmed etiology while 41 (74.5%) had no isolate identified. Cryptococcus neoformans was the commonest cause of meningitis occurring in 11 (18.3%) of patients followed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (6.7%). The in-hospital mortality was 20/55 (36.4%). Independent predictors of mortality were low baseline CD4 count and turbid CSF appearance. Conclusion. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most prevalent laboratory-confirmed etiological agent among adult HIV-infected patients with suspected meningitis admitted to medical wards in Western Tanzania. Mortality rate in this population remains unacceptably high. Improving diagnostic capacity and early treatment may help to decrease the mortality rate. PMID:27651801

  12. [Incidence and etiology of psychotic disorders in HIV infected patients].

    PubMed

    Niederecker, M; Naber, D; Riedel, R; Perro, C; Goebel, F D

    1995-05-01

    There are numerous case reports on psychoses in AIDS patients and, although more seldom, also in HIV-positive patients in early stages of infection; however, systematic investigations on the frequency, e.g., relevant for the indication of an HIV test in psychiatric patients, are missing. For this study, 1046 HIV-positive patients were examined regarding psychoses. A total of 301 patients (28.8%) were HIV-positive but asymptomatic, and 380 patients (36.2%) had the lymphadenopathy syndrome. One hundred thirty-two patients (12.6%) suffered from an AIDS-related complex and 233 patients (22.3%) from AIDS. Of these 1046 patients, only 9 (0.9%) suffered from psychoses. One patient with a paranoid-hallucinatory syndrome was asymptomatic; one in the lymphadenopathy syndrome was manic. The other 7 patients were all in late stages of the infection. A causal relationship between HIV infection and psychosis and probable in only 3 patients. These data do not indicate a markedly elevated prevalence of psychosis in HIV-positive or AIDS patients.

  13. Meaning of care for terminally Ill HIV-infected patients by HIV-infected peer caregivers in a simulation-based training program in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghee; Shin, Gisoo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a simulation-based training program for people living with HIV (PLWH) as peer caregivers who would take care of terminally ill, HIV-infected patients. We used qualitative research methods and standardized patients to explore the meaning of caring for patients as peer caregivers. Study participants included 32 patients registered as PLWH at the South Korea Federation for HIV/AIDS. The meanings of peer caregiving were categorized into four dimensions: physical, psychological, relational, and economic. Our study had benefits in knowledge acquisition for caregivers as well as care recipients, empathy with HIV-infected care recipients, improvement in self-esteem and social participation, and financial self-sufficiency to enable independent living for caregivers. The simulation training program for PLWH peer caregivers for terminally ill HIV-infected patients demonstrated value, for both PLWH caregivers and terminally ill HIV-infected patients in South Korea, to improve the quality of care.

  14. Patterns of cardiovascular disease in a group of HIV-infected adults in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Menanga, Alain Patrick; Ngomseu, Christelle Kougang; Jingi, Ahmadou M.; Mfangam, Brigitte Molu; Gweth, Marie Ntep; Blackett, Kathleen Ngu; Kingue, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is an increasingly important issue in human immunodeficiency viral (HIV)-infected individuals. There is dearth of information on the patterns of cardiovascular disease especially in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) patients. This study reports on the clinical, biological, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic characteristics of a group of HIV-infected patients presenting with symptoms of heart disease in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the Yaoundé Central Hospital and Jamot Hospital. Consenting HIV-infected adults aged ≥18 years with symptoms suggestive of heart disease were consecutively recruited between February and July 2014. All participants underwent a complete clinical examination; biological analyses including CD4 cell counts, fasting blood glucose, and serum lipids, resting electrocardiography and cardiac ultrasound, and a venous ultrasound where necessary. Results Forty four subjects (21 men) were included. Their mean age was 48 (SD 13) years. Thirty patients (68.2%) were in WHO clinical stages 3 and 4 of HIV infection, 27 (61.4%) had a CD4 cell count <200/mm3, and 31 (70.5%) were on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Hypertension (43.2%, n=19) was the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor; and dyslipidemia which was found in 17 subjects (38.6%) was significantly associated with ART (48.4% vs. 15.4%, P=0.04). Only men where smokers (23% vs. 0%, P=0.019). Exertional dyspnea (86.4%, n=38) and cough (59.1%, n=26) were the most frequent symptoms, and the clinical presentation was dominated by heart failure (75%, n=33). The most frequent echocardiographic abnormalities were pericardial effusion (45.5%, n=20) and dilated cardiomyopathy (22.7%, n=10). Dilated cardiomyopathy was significantly associated with CD4 cell counts <200/mm3 (100%, P=0.003). Primary pulmonary hypertension (PH) rate was 11.4% (n=5) and all cases occurred at CD4 cell counts ≥200/mm3 (P=0.005). The most frequent

  15. Adherence with isoniazid for prevention of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Szakacs, Tom A; Wilson, Douglas; Cameron, D William; Clark, Michael; Kocheleff, Paul; Muller, F James; McCarthy, Anne E

    2006-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV-infected adults in developing countries. Isoniazid (INH) is recommended for treatment of latent TB infection, however non-adherence is common. The purpose of this study was to apply in-house prepared isoniazid (INH) urine test strips in a clinical setting, and identify predictors of positive test results in an adherence questionnaire in HIV-infected adults taking INH for prevention of TB. Methods Cross-sectional study of adherence using a questionnaire and urine test strips for detection of INH metabolites at two hospitals in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Participants were aged at least 18 years, HIV positive, and receiving INH for prevention of tuberculosis disease. Univariate and multivariate analyses are used to identify factors relevant to adherence. Results 301 consecutive patients were recruited. 28% of participants had negative urine tests. 32 (37.2%, 95% CI25.4, 45.0) of the 86 patients who received INH from peripheral pharmacies said the pharmacy had run out of INH at some time, compared with central hospital pharmacies (p = 0.0001). In univariate analysis, a negative test was associated with self-reported missed INH doses (p = 0.043). Each 12-hour increment since last reported dose increased the likelihood of a negative test by 34% (p = 0.0007). Belief in INH safety was associated with a positive test (p = 0.021). In multivariate analysis, patients who believed INH is important for prevention of TB disease were more likely to be negative (p = 0.0086). Conclusion Adequate drug availability at peripheral pharmacies remains an important intervention for TB prevention. Key questions may identify potentially non-adherent patients. In-house prepared urine tests strips are an effective and cheap method of objectively assessing INH adherence, and could be used an important tool in TB control programs. PMID:16772037

  16. Investigation of Small Bowel Abnormalities in HIV-Infected Patients Using Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Eiji; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Hosono, Kuhihiro; Ueda, Atsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    HIV infection is reportedly associated with an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and can cause HIV enteropathy, which occurs independently of opportunistic infections. However, the characteristics of small bowel abnormalities attributable to HIV infection are rarely investigated. In the present study, we assessed the intestinal mucosal changes found in HIV-infected patients and compared them with the mucosa of healthy control subjects using capsule endoscopy (CE). Three of the 27 HIV-infected patients harbored gastrointestinal opportunistic infections and were thus excluded from subsequent analyses. The endoscopic findings of CE in HIV-infected patients were significantly higher than those in control subjects (55% versus 10%, P = 0.002); however, most lesions, such as red spots or tiny erosions, were unlikely to cause abdominal symptoms. After validating the efficacy of CE for the diagnosis of villous atrophy, we found that the prevalence of villous atrophy was 54% (13/24) among HIV-infected patients. Interestingly, villous atrophy persisted in patients receiving long-term antiretroviral therapy, though most of them exhibited reconstituted peripheral blood CD4+ T cells. Although we could not draw any conclusions regarding the development of small bowel abnormalities in HIV-infected patients, our results may provide some insight regarding the pathogenesis of HIV enteropathy.

  17. Prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections and other coinfections in HIV-infected patients: May 2015.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, José Antonio; Rubio, Rafael; Aguirrebengoa, Koldo; Arribas, Jose Ramón; Baraia-Etxaburu, Josu; Gutiérrez, Félix; Lopez Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Losa, Juan Emilio; Miró, José Ma; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez Molina, José; Podzamczer, Daniel; Pulido, Federico; Riera, Melchor; Rivero, Antonio; Sanz Moreno, José; Amador, Concha; Antela, Antonio; Arazo, Piedad; Arrizabalaga, Julio; Bachiller, Pablo; Barros, Carlos; Berenguer, Juan; Caylá, Joan; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Knobel, Hernando; Locutura, Jaime; López Aldeguer, José; Llibre, Josep Ma; Lozano, Fernando; Mallolas, Josep; Malmierca, Eduardo; Miralles, Celia; Miralles, Pilar; Muñoz, Agustín; Ocampo, Agustín; Olalla, Julián; Pérez, Inés; Pérez Elías, Ma Jesús; Pérez Arellano, José Luis; Portilla, Joaquín; Ribera, Esteban; Rodríguez, Francisco; Santín, Miguel; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Téllez, Ma Jesús; Torralba, Miguel; Valencia, Eulalia; Von Wichmann, Miguel Angel

    2016-10-01

    Despite the huge advance that antiretroviral therapy represents for the prognosis of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), opportunistic infections (OIs) continue to be a cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. OIs often arise because of severe immunosuppression resulting from poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy, failure of antiretroviral therapy, or unawareness of HIV infection by patients whose first clinical manifestation of AIDS is an OI. The present article updates our previous guidelines on the prevention and treatment of various OIs in HIV-infected patients, namely, infections by parasites, fungi, viruses, mycobacteria, and bacteria, as well as imported infections. The article also addresses immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

  18. Providers' lack of knowledge about herpes zoster in HIV-infected patients is among barriers to herpes zoster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M; Kessler, H; Huhn, G

    2013-06-01

    Identification of perceptions about herpes zoster (HZ) disease, vaccine effectiveness and safety, and vaccine recommendations may impact immunization practices of physicians for HIV-infected patients. A survey was used to quantify knowledge of HZ as well as determine physician immunization perceptions and practices. There were 272/1700 respondents (16%). Correct answers for the incidence of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in adults and incidence of HZ in HIV-infected patients were recorded by 14% and 10% of providers, respectively. Providers reported poor knowledge of the incidence of disease recurrence in HIV-infected patients (41% correct), potency of HZ vaccine (47.5% correct) and mechanism of protection against reactivation of VZV (66% correct). Most (88%) agreed that HZ was a serious disease, and 73% believed that the burden of disease made vaccination important. A majority (75%) did not vaccinate HIV patients with HZ vaccine regardless of antiretroviral therapy status. Barriers to administration included safety concerns, concern that vaccine would not prevent HZ, risk of HZ dissemination, reimbursement issues and lack of Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines. Only 38% of providers agreed that CDC guidelines were clear and 50% believed that clinical trials were needed prior to use of HZ vaccine in HIV-infected patients. Education about HZ is needed among HIV providers. Providers perceived vaccination as important, but data on vaccine safety and clear guidance from the CDC on this issue are lacking.

  19. Children Living with HIV-Infected Adults: Estimates for 23 Countries in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Short, Susan E.; Goldberg, Rachel E.

    2015-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa many children live in extreme poverty and experience a burden of illness and disease that is disproportionately high. The emergence of HIV and AIDS has only exacerbated long-standing challenges to improving children’s health in the region, with recent cohorts experiencing pediatric AIDS and high levels of orphan status, situations which are monitored globally and receive much policy and research attention. Children’s health, however, can be affected also by living with HIV-infected adults, through associated exposure to infectious diseases and the diversion of household resources away from them. While long recognized, far less research has focused on characterizing this distinct and vulnerable population of HIV-affected children. Methods Using Demographic and Health Survey data from 23 countries collected between 2003 and 2011, we estimate the percentage of children living in a household with at least one HIV-infected adult. We assess overlaps with orphan status and investigate the relationship between children and the adults who are infected in their households. Results The population of children living in a household with at least one HIV-infected adult is substantial where HIV prevalence is high; in Southern Africa, the percentage exceeded 10% in all countries and reached as high as 36%. This population is largely distinct from the orphan population. Among children living in households with tested, HIV-infected adults, most live with parents, often mothers, who are infected; nonetheless, in most countries over 20% live in households with at least one infected adult who is not a parent. Conclusion Until new infections contract significantly, improvements in HIV/AIDS treatment suggest that the population of children living with HIV-infected adults will remain substantial. It is vital to on-going efforts to reduce childhood morbidity and mortality to consider whether current care and outreach sufficiently address the distinct

  20. Cardiovascular risk factor knowledge and risk perception among HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Cioe, Patricia A.; Crawford, Sybil L.; Stein, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected adults. Research in non-infected populations has suggested that knowledge of CVD risk factors significantly influences perceptions of risk. This cross-sectional study describes CVD risk factor knowledge and risk perception in HIV-infected adults. We recruited 130 HIV-infected adults (mean age = 48 years, 62% male, 56% current smokers, mean years since HIV diagnosis, 14.7). The mean CVD risk factor knowledge score was fairly high. However, controlling for age, CVD risk factor knowledge was not predictive of perceived risk (F[1,117] = 0.13, p > .05). Estimated risk and perceived risk were weakly, but significantly, correlated, r(126) = .24, p = .01. HIV-infected adults are at increased risk for CVD. Despite having adequate risk factor knowledge, CVD risk perception was inaccurate. Improving risk perception and developing CVD risk reduction interventions for this population are imperative. PMID:24070645

  1. Physical exercise is associated with less neurocognitive impairment among HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Catherine A; Marquine, Maria J; Fazeli, Pariya L; Henry, Brook L; Ellis, Ronald J; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J

    2013-10-01

    Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) remains prevalent in HIV infection. Randomized trials have shown that physical exercise improves NCI in non-HIV-infected adults, but data on HIV-infected populations are limited. Community-dwelling HIV-infected participants (n = 335) completed a comprehensive neurocognitive battery that was utilized to define both global and domain-specific NCI. Participants were divided into "exercise" (n = 83) and "no exercise" (n = 252) groups based on whether they self-reported engaging in any activity that increased heart rate in the last 72 h or not. We also measured and evaluated a series of potential confounding factors, including demographics, HIV disease characteristics, substance use and psychiatric comorbidities, and physical functioning. Lower rates of global NCI were observed among the exercise group (15.7 %) as compared to those in the no exercise group (31.0 %; p < 0.01). A multivariable logistic regression controlling for potential confounds (i.e., education, AIDS status, current CD4+ lymphocyte count, self-reported physical function, current depression) showed that being in the exercise group remained significantly associated with lower global NCI (odds ratio = 2.63, p < 0.05). Similar models of domain-specific NCI showed that exercise was associated with reduced impairment in working memory (p < 0.05) and speed of information processing (p < 0.05). The present findings suggest that HIV-infected adults who exercise are approximately half as likely to show NCI as compared to those who do not. Future longitudinal studies might be best suited to address causality, and intervention trials in HIV-infected individuals will determine whether exercise can prevent or ameliorate NCI in this population.

  2. Physical Exercise is Associated with Less Neurocognitive Impairment Among HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Catherine A.; Marquine, Maria J.; Fazeli, Pariya L.; Henry, Brook L.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) remains prevalent in HIV-infection. Randomized trials have shown that physical exercise improves NCI in non HIV-infected adults, but data on HIV-infected populations is limited. Community-dwelling HIV-infected participants (n=335) completed a comprehensive neurocognitive battery that was utilized to define both global and domain-specific NCI. Participants were divided into “Exercise” (n=83) and “No Exercise” (n=252) groups based on whether they self-reported engaging in any activity that increased heart rate in the last 72 hours or not. We also measured and evaluated a series of potential confounding factors, including demographics, HIV-disease characteristics, substance use and psychiatric comorbidities, and physical functioning. Lower rates of global NCI were observed among the Exercise group (15.7%) as compared to those in the No Exercise group (31.0%; p<.01). A multivariable logistic regression controlling for potential confounds (i.e., education, AIDS status, current CD4+ lymphocyte count, self-reported physical function, current depression) showed that being in the Exercise group remained significantly associated with lower global NCI (OR=2.63, p<.05). Similar models of domain-specific NCI showed that Exercise was associated with reduced impairment in working memory (p<.05) and speed of information processing (p<.05). The present findings suggest that HIV-infected adults who exercise are approximately half as likely to show NCI as compared to those who do not. Future longitudinal studies might be best suited to address causality and intervention trials in HIV-infected individuals will determine whether exercise can prevent or ameliorate NCI in this population. PMID:23934585

  3. Cryptococcal meningitis associated with tuberculosis in HIV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Urvinderpal; Aditi; Aneja, Pooja; Kapoor, B K; Singh, S P; Purewal, Sukhpreet Singh

    2013-07-01

    Opportunistic infections are common complications of advanced immuno-deficiency in individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Following involvement of the lung, the central nervous system (CNS) is the second most commonly affected organ. We report two cases of concurrent cryptococcal meningitis and tuberculosis (TB) in HIV infected persons. A high suspicion of multiple opportunistic infections should be kept in mind in HIV seropositive individuals.

  4. Serious infection from Staphylococcus aureus in 2 HIV-infected patients receiving fusion inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Elizabeth M; Ritter, Michelle L; Kumar, Princy N; Timpone, Joseph G

    2008-05-01

    Fusion inhibitors are novel antiretroviral agents, administered as subcutaneous injections, approved for use in treatment-experienced HIV-infected patients. HIV-infected patients are at increased risk for Staphylococcus aureus colonization, specifically with methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA), and subsequent systemic infection. We present the cases of 2 patients without a history of MRSA infection in whom a series of severe S aureus infections developed after fusion inhibitor therapy.

  5. HIV-Infected Adolescent, Young Adult and Pregnant Smokers: Important Targets for Effective Tobacco Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Escota, Gerome; Önen, Nur

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco use is inextricably linked to a number of health risks both in the general and HIV-infected populations. There is, however, a dearth of research on effective tobacco control programs among people living with HIV, and especially among adolescents, young adults and pregnant women, groups with heightened or increased vulnerability secondary to tobacco use. Adolescents and young adults constitute a growing population of persons living with HIV infection. Early and continued tobacco use in this population living with a disease characterized by premature onset multimorbidity and chronic inflammation is of concern. Additionally, there is an increased acuity for tobacco control among HIV-infected pregnant women to reduce pregnancy morbidity and improve fetal outcome. This review will provide an important summary of current knowledge of tobacco use among HIV-infected adolescents, young adults and pregnant women. The effects of tobacco use in these specific populations will be presented and the current state of tobacco control within these populations, assessed. PMID:23778059

  6. Social isolation in HIV-infected patients according to subjective patient assessment and DEXA-confirmed severity of lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Casado, José L; Iglesias, Verónica; del Palacio, María; Marín, Ana; Perez-Elías, María J; Moreno, Ana; Moreno, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the persistence of lipodystrophy (LD)-related social distress and isolation in HIV-infected patients in the current era, according to confirmatory dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) measurements. Cross-sectional interview data were collected from 168 HIV-positive adult patients taking more than 2 years of antiretroviral therapy (133 cases with LD diagnosed a mean of 7.2 years before; 35 without LD, controls). Mean time of HIV infection was 16.2 years (2.1-27.3), and the mean time of exposure to highly active antiretroviral therapy of 11.7 years (2.1-21.1). The presence and severity of LD, confirmed by DEXA measurements, correlated with social isolation through a validated scale, including avoidance of social relationships, sex, work, or sport activities. In comparison with control patients, social distress was observed for patients having moderate body changes. The significant correlation between LD and social isolation was irrespective of age, CD4+ count, HIV RNA level, AIDS diagnosis, time of HIV infection, anxiety, or depressive symptoms. These results confirm that patient assessment of LD is correlated with whole-body DEXA scan, and they highlight the role of LD as an independent cause of social isolation even after years of the diagnosis.

  7. Intestinal parasitic infections in Thai HIV-infected patients with different immunity status

    PubMed Central

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2001-01-01

    Background One of the major health problems among HIV seropositive patients is superimposed infection due to the defect of immunity. Furthermore, intestinal parasite infection, which is also one of the basic health problems in tropical region, is common in these patients. In this study, a cross sectional study to document the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in Thai HIV-infected patients with different immune status was performed. Methods A study of stool samples from 60 Thai HIV-infected patients with different immune status was performed at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thailand. Each patient was examined for CD4 count and screened for diarrheal symptoms. Results The prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among the HIV-infected patients in this study was 50 %. Non- opportunistic intestinal parasite infections such as hookworms, Opisthorchis viverrini and Ascaris lumbricoides were commonly found in HIV-infected people regardless of immune status with or without diarrheal symptoms. Opportunistic intestinal parasites such as Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Microsporidia and Strongyloides stercoralis infection were significantly more frequent in the low immunity group with diarrhea. Conclusion Therefore, opportunistic intestinal parasite infection should be suspected in any HIV infected patient with advanced disease presenting with diarrhea. The importance of tropical epidemic non-opportunistic intestinal parasite infections among HIV-infected patients should not be neglected. PMID:11394966

  8. Searching for biomarkers of comorbidities in sera of treated HIV-infected patients by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Malvoisin, Etienne; Makhloufi, Djamila; Livrozet, Jean-Michel

    2015-06-01

    Based on their characteristics, we hypothesized that the following parameters, namely collagen IV, glutathione S-transferase, secretory component (SC), and AMP-activated protein kinase α1α2 may be useful serum markers in the detection of comorbidities in treated HIV-infected patients. These parameters were determined in 204 HIV-infected patients and 35 controls by using IEF and densitometry. Collagen IV was undetectable in controls and the majority of HIV-infected patients. Twenty-two HIV-infected patients presented significantly elevated levels of collagen IV, most of them were coinfected with hepatitis C virus and/or hepatitis B virus. SC was undetectable in controls. SC was significantly increased in 81 HIV-infected patients and significantly correlated with aspartate aminotransferase (r = 0.267, p = 0.0049), alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.309, p = 0.0011), and γ-glutamyl-transferase (r = 0.264, p = 0.0054). Glutathione S-transferase levels of HIV-infected patients were significantly higher than the controls (3779 ± 5860 vs. 785 ± 71 DU, p = 0.0007) and significantly correlated with serum urea (r = 0.204, p = 0.0038), triglycerides (r = 0.209, p = 0.0033), and lipase (r = 0.219, p = 0.0025). AMP-activated protein kinase α1α2 levels of HIV-infected patients were significantly higher than the controls (5676 ± 6248 vs. 1189 ± 6248 DU, p = 0.0009). Further studies are needed to demonstrate the relevance of these results to diagnose non-AIDS-related illnesses in HIV-infected patients.

  9. Lipodystrophy among patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lana, Lorena Gomes Cunha; Junqueira, Daniela Rezende Garcia; Perini, Edson; Menezes de Pádua, Cristiane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lipodystrophy is a frequent and disfiguring adverse effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in patients with HIV. It affects the quality of life of the patient and adherence to treatment, and generates new needs for comprehensive healthcare services. The aim of this study will be to conduct a systematic review of the literature from observational studies and describe lipodystrophy among patients with HIV infection during current or previous use of ART. Methods and analysis A systematic review of observational studies published in MEDLINE, CINAHL, LILACS, EMBASE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts will be carried out. Citations of included studies will be checked to identify additional studies not identified in the electronic searches. It will include any observational study that considered lipodystrophy as the primary or secondary outcome and that had enrolled adolescent and adult patients with HIV infection who were on current or previous ART for at least 6 months. Data extraction and analysis will be performed independently by two reviewers. The extracted data will be discussed, decisions documented and, where necessary, the authors of the studies will be contacted for clarification. Measures of frequency, prevalence and incidence of lipodystrophy will be stratified according to definition, method of diagnosis and risk factors of the outcome. Ethics and dissemination Ethics is not required given this is a protocol for a systematic review. The findings of this study will be widely disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Updates of the review will be conducted to inform and guide healthcare practice. Protocol registration PROSPERO—42013005450. PMID:24625638

  10. Periodontal disease in HIV-infected adults in the HAART era: Clinical, immunological, and microbiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Lucio Souza; Gonçalves, Barbara Mulatinho Lopo; Fontes, Tatiana Vasconcellos

    2013-10-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has decreased the incidence and prevalence of several oral manifestations such as oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, and Kaposi's sarcoma in HIV-infected patients. Regarding periodontal disease the findings are not clear. This disease represents a group of chronic oral diseases characterized by infection and inflammation of the periodontal tissues. These tissues surround the teeth and provide periodontal protection (the gingival tissue) and periodontal support (periodontal ligament, root cementum, alveolar bone). Clinical, immunological, and microbiological aspects of these diseases, such as linear gingival erythema (LGE), necrotizing periodontal diseases (NPD) (necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis [NUG], necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis [NUP] and necrotizing stomatitis), and chronic periodontitis, have been widely studied in HIV-infected individuals, but without providing conclusive results. The purpose of this review was to contribute to a better overall understanding of the probable impact of HIV-infection on the characteristics of periodontal infections.

  11. Fifteen-Year Trends in the Prevalence of Diabetes among Hospitalized HIV-Infected Patients in Spain (1997-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Jimenez-Trujillo, Isabel; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentin; de Miguel-Diez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe trends in the prevalence of diabetes among hospitalized HIV-infected patients between 1997 and 2012 in Spain and compare them with those of age- and sex-matched non–HIV-infected patients. Methods The study was based on Spanish national hospital discharge data. We performed a retrospective study for the period 1997–2012. HIV infection (HIV-infected versus non–HIV-infected [control group])and calendar period in relation to widespread use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) (1997–1999; 2000–2003; 2004–2007 and 2008–2012), were the exposure variables The outcome variables were diagnosis of diabetes and in-hospital mortality (IHM). Results From 1997 to 2012, we identified 91,752 cases of diabetes: 15,398 in the HIV-infected group (403,277 hospital admissions) and 76,354 in the non–HIV-infected group (1,503,467 hospital admissions). Overall, HIV-infected patients had lower prevalence values for diabetes than non–HIV-infected patients throughout the follow-up (3.8% vs. 5.1%; p<0.001). The prevalence of diabetes increased 1.56-fold among non–HIV-infected patients and 4.2-fold among HIV-infected patients. The prevalence of diabetes in females was almost twice as high in HIV-infected patients as in non–HIV-infected patients during the last study period (4.72% vs. 2.88%; p<0.001). Diabetes showed a protective effect against IHM throughout the study period (aOR = 0.70; 95%CI, 0.65–0.75). Conclusions During the cART era, the prevalence of diabetes has increased sharply among HIV-infected hospitalized patients compared with matched non–HIV-infected subjects. The prevalence of diabetes is rising very fast among HIV-infected women. Diabetes has a protective effect on IHM among HIV-infected patients. Nevertheless, our study has several limitations. No information is available in the database used on important sociodemographic characteristics and relevant clinical variables including duration of the HIV infection, treatments

  12. Effects of Smoking on Non-AIDS-Related Morbidity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Daniel K.; Kaner, Robert J.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking has many adverse health consequences. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection smoke at very high rates, and many of the comorbidities associated with smoking in the general population are more prevalent in this population. It is likely that a combination of higher smoking rates along with an altered response to cigarette smoke throughout the body in persons with HIV infection leads to increased rates of the known conditions related to smoking. Several AIDS-defining conditions associated with smoking have been reviewed elsewhere. This review aims to summarize the data on non-AIDS-related health consequences of smoking in the HIV-infected population and explore evidence for the potential compounding effects on chronic systemic inflammation due to HIV infection and smoking. PMID:23572487

  13. Contrasting Adult and Infant Immune Responses to HIV Infection and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, David R.; Permar, Sallie R.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive studies have demonstrated that infant immune responses are distinct from those of adults. Despite these differences, infant immunization can elicit protective immune responses at levels comparable to or, in some cases, higher than adult immune responses to many vaccines. To date, only a few HIV vaccine candidates have been tested in infant populations, and none of them evaluated vaccine efficacy. Recent exciting studies showing that HIV-infected infants can develop broad neutralizing antibody responses and that some HIV vaccine regimens can elicit high levels of potentially protective antibodies in infants provide support for the development and testing of HIV vaccines in pediatric populations. In this review, we discuss the differences in adult and infant immune responses in the setting of HIV infection and vaccination. PMID:26656117

  14. Radiological characteristics of pulmonary cryptococcosis in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiliang; Chen, Jun; Wang, Juan; Xiong, Qingfang; Zhong, Yandan; Yang, Yongfeng; Xu, Chuanjun; Wei, Hongxia

    2017-01-01

    Background Current understanding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated pulmonary cryptococcosis (PC) is largely based on studies performed about 2 decades ago which reported that the most common findings on chest radiograph were diffuse interstitial infiltrates. Few studies are available regarding the computed tomography (CT) findings. The aim of this study was to characterize chest CT features of HIV-associated PC. Methods HIV patients with cryptococccal infection and pulmonary abnormalities on Chest CT between September 2010 and May 2016 in the Second Affiliated Hospital of the Southeast University were retrospectively analyzed. Confirmed cases of tumors, mycobacterial infections and other fungal infections were excluded from the analysis. Results 60 cases were identified. The median CD4 T-cell counts were 20 cells/μL (range, 0–205 cells/μL). Chest CT scans demonstrated nodular lesions in 93.3% of the studied patients. Those nodular lesions were usually cavitated and solitary nodule was the most common form. Pleural effusions and pneumonic infiltrates occurred in 11.6% and 31.7% of the cases respectively. Those lesions were usually had co-existing nodular lesions. Etiological analysis suggested that 76.8% of the nodular lesions could have a relationship with PC that 12.5% of the nodular lesions were “laboratory-confirmed” cases, 48.2% were “clinically confirmed” cases and 16.1% were “clinically probable” cases. 85.7% of the pleural effusions could be “clinically confirmed” cases of PC. At least, 38.5% of the diffuse pneumonic infiltrates may be clinically attributed to pneumocystis pneumonia. Conclusions This study suggested that pulmonary nodules but not diffuse pneumonia are the most common radiological characteristics of HIV-associated PC. HIV-infected patients with pulmonary nodules on Chest CT should particularly be screened for cryptococcal infection. PMID:28301552

  15. Antibodies from the sera of HIV-infected patients efficiently hydrolyze all human histones.

    PubMed

    Baranova, Svetlana V; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-08-01

    Histones and their post-translational modifications have key roles in chromatin remodeling and gene transcription. Besides intranuclear functions, histones act as damage-associated molecular pattern molecules when they are released into the extracellular space. Administration of exogenous histones to animals leads to systemic inflammatory and toxic responses through activating Toll-like receptors and inflammasome pathways. Here, using ELISA it was shown that sera of HIV-infected patients and healthy donors contain autoantibodies against histones. Autoantibodies with enzymic activities (abzymes) are a distinctive feature of autoimmune diseases. It was interesting whether antibodies from sera of HIV-infected patients can hydrolyze human histones. Electrophoretically and immunologically homogeneous IgGs were isolated from sera of HIV-infected patients by chromatography on several affinity sorbents. We present first evidence showing that 100% of IgGs purified from the sera of 32 HIV-infected patients efficiently hydrolyze from one to five human histones. Several rigid criteria have been applied to show that the histone-hydrolyzing activity is an intrinsic property of IgGs of HIV-infected patients. The relative efficiency of hydrolysis of histones (H1, H2a, H2b, H3, and H4) significantly varied for IgGs of different patients. IgGs from the sera of 40% of healthy donors also hydrolyze histones but with an average efficiency approximately 16-fold lower than that of HIV-infected patients. Similar to proteolytic abzymes from the sera of patients with several autoimmune diseases, histone-hydrolyzing IgGs from HIV-infected patients were inhibited by specific inhibitors of serine and of metal-dependent proteases, but an unexpected significant inhibition of the activity by specific inhibitor of thiol-like proteases was also observed. Because IgGs can efficiently hydrolyze histones, a negative role of abzymes in development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome cannot be

  16. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in non-HIV-infected patients in the era of novel immunosuppressive therapies.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Sadatomo; Tokuda, Hitoshi

    2012-12-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is a well-known opportunistic infection, and its management has been established. However, PCP is an emerging threat to immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, such as those receiving novel immunosuppressive therapeutics for malignancy, organ transplantation, or connective tissue diseases. Clinical manifestations of PCP are quite different between patients with and without HIV infections. In patients without HIV infection, PCP rapidly progresses, is difficult to diagnose correctly, and causes severe respiratory failure with a poor prognosis. High-resolution computed tomography findings are different between PCP patients with HIV infection and those without. These differences in clinical and radiologic features are the result of severe or dysregulated inflammatory responses that are evoked by a relatively small number of Pneumocystis organisms in patients without HIV infection. In recent years, the usefulness of PCR and serum β-D-glucan assay for rapid and noninvasive diagnosis of PCP has been revealed. Although corticosteroid adjunctive to anti-Pneumocystis agents has been shown to be beneficial in some populations, the optimal dose and duration remain to be determined. Recent investigations revealed that Pneumocystis colonization is prevalent, and that asymptomatic carriers are at risk for developing PCP and can serve as the reservoir for the spread of Pneumocystis by person-to-person transmission. These findings suggest the need for chemoprophylaxis in immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, although its indication and duration are still controversial. Because a variety of novel immunosuppressive therapeutics have been emerging in medical practice, further innovations in the diagnosis and treatment of PCP are needed.

  17. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in non-HIV-infected patients in the era of novel immunosuppressive therapies.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Sadatomo; Tokuda, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is a well-known opportunistic infection, and its management has been established. However, PCP is an emerging threat to immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, such as those receiving novel immunosuppressive therapeutics for malignancy, organ transplantation, or connective tissue diseases. Clinical manifestations of PCP are quite different between patients with and without HIV-infections. In patients without HIV infection, PCP rapidly progresses, is difficult to diagnose correctly, and causes severe respiratory failure with a poor prognosis. High-resolution computed tomography findings are different between PCP patients with HIV infection and those without. These differences in clinical and radiologic features are the result of severe or dysregulated inflammatory responses that are evoked by a relatively small number of Pneumocystis organisms in patients without HIV infection. In recent years, the usefulness of PCR and serum β-D-glucan assay for rapid and noninvasive diagnosis of PCP has been revealed. Although corticosteroid adjunctive to anti-Pneumocystis agents has been shown to be beneficial in some populations, the optimal dose and duration remain to be determined. Recent investigations revealed that Pneumocystis colonization is prevalent, and that asymptomatic carriers are at riskfor developing PCP and can serve as the reservoir for the spread of Pneumocystis by person-to-person transmission. These findings suggest the need for chemoprophylaxis in immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, although its indication and duration are still controversial. Because a variety of novel immunosuppressive therapeutics have been emerging in medical practice, further innovations in the diagnosis and treatment of PCP are needed.

  18. [Mortality and morbidity in HIV-infected patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery: a case control study].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Expósito, María J; Mestres, Carlos A; Claramonte, Xavier; Cartañá, Ramón; Josa, Miquel; Pomar, José L; Mulet, Jaume; Miró, José M

    2006-03-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in patients with HIV infection has improved survival. This improvement combined with the metabolic effects of treatment has increased cardiovascular risk and the need for cardiac surgery in these patients. We compared morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients (cases, n=7) and non-HIV-infected patients (controls, n=21) who underwent isolated coronary artery surgery between 1997 and 2004. The durations of extracorporeal circulation and aortic cross-clamping were shorter in HIV-infected patients (P=.002 and P=.014, respectively). The percentage of patients who experienced complications was similar, at 57.1% in both groups, but there was a slightly higher number of complications per patient in non-HIV-infected individuals. The mean length of total hospitalization was greater in HIV-infected patients (27.1 [13.3] versus 8.8 [5.3] days; P=.003), as was that of postoperative hospitalization (18.2 [15.4] vs 7.9 [4.2] days; P=.08). No HIV-infected patient died or needed a repeat cardiac operation. No progression of the HIV infection was observed. Isolated coronary artery surgery in HIV-infected patients produces good results, and there is no increase in morbidity or mortality. Extracorporeal circulation did not influence disease progression.

  19. A trial of 7-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in HIV-infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    French, Neil; Gordon, Stephen B; Mwalukomo, Thandie; White, Sarah A; Mwafulirwa, Gershom; Longwe, Herbert; Mwaiponya, Martin; Zijlstra, Eduard E; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Gilks, Charles F

    2010-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading and serious co-infection of HIV-infected adults, particularly in Africa. Prevention of disease by vaccination with the current 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine is sub-optimal. Protein conjugate vaccines offer a further option for protection but no data exist on their clinical efficacy in any adult population. Methods: We conducted a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical efficacy trial of the seven-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in predominantly HIV-infected Malawian adults who had recovered from documented invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Vaccine was given as a two dose schedule four weeks apart. The primary end-point was a further episode of IPD caused by a vaccine-serotype or serotype-6A (VST/6A) pneumococcus. Results: Between February 2003 and October 2007, 496 individuals (44% male, 88% HIV seropositive) were followed for 798 person years of observation. There were 67 IPD events in 52 individuals, all in the HIV infected sub-group. There were 24 VST/6A events (19 VST, five 6A) in 24 participants, 5 in vaccine and 19 in the placebo recipients, a vaccine efficacy of 74% (95% CI 30% - 90%). There were 73 deaths in the vaccine arm and 63 in the placebo arm, Hazard Ratio 1.18 (95% confidence intervals 0.84 -1.66). Compared to placebo, serious adverse events were significantly lower (3 vs 17, p = 0.002) and minor adverse events significantly higher (41 vs 13, p = 0.003 ) in vaccine recipients. Conclusions: The seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine protects HIV infected adults from recurrent IPD of vaccine serotype or serotype 6A. PMID:20200385

  20. Comprehensively Assessing Cognitive and Behavioral Risks for HIV Infection among Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paniagua, Freddy A.; O'Boyle, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of HIV/AIDS with middle-aged and older adults should include six domains (e.g., factual knowledge regarding the acquisition and transmission of HIV, traditionally-accepted behavioral risks for HIV infection). A sample of 23 women (54.8%) and 19 men (45.2%), ranging in age from 51 to 85 were surveyed across such domains.…

  1. Alarming Levels of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Patients in Metropolitan Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Isaakidis, Petros; Das, Mrinalini; Kumar, Ajay M V; Peskett, Christopher; Khetarpal, Minni; Bamne, Arun; Adsul, Balkrishna; Manglani, Mamta; Sachdeva, Kuldeep Singh; Parmar, Malik; Kanchar, Avinash; Rewari, B.B.; Deshpande, Alaka; Rodrigues, Camilla; Shetty, Anjali; Rebello, Lorraine; Saranchuk, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a looming threat to tuberculosis control in India. However, no countrywide prevalence data are available. The burden of DR-TB in HIV-co-infected patients is likewise unknown. Undiagnosed and untreated DR-TB among HIV-infected patients is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We aimed to assess the prevalence of DR-TB (defined as resistance to any anti-TB drug) in patients attending public antiretroviral treatment (ART) centers in greater metropolitan Mumbai, India. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among adults and children ART-center attendees. Smear microscopy, culture and drug-susceptibility-testing (DST) against all first and second-line TB-drugs using phenotypic liquid culture (MGIT) were conducted on all presumptive tuberculosis patients. Analyses were performed to determine DR-TB prevalence and resistance patterns separately for new and previously treated, culture-positive TB-cases. Results Between March 2013 and January 2014, ART-center attendees were screened during 14135 visits, of whom 1724 had presumptive TB. Of 1724 attendees, 72 (4%) were smear-positive and 202 (12%) had a positive culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Overall DR-TB was diagnosed in 68 (34%, 95% CI: 27%–40%) TB-patients. The proportions of DR-TB were 25% (29/114) and 44% (39/88) among new and previously treated cases respectively. The patterns of DR-TB were: 21% mono-resistant, 12% poly-resistant, 38% multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), 21% pre-extensively-drug-resistant (MDR-TB plus resistance to either a fluoroquinolone or second-line injectable), 6% extensively drug-resistant (XDR-TB) and 2% extremely drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB plus resistance to any group-IV/V drug). Only previous history of TB was significantly associated with the diagnosis of DR-TB in multivariate models. Conclusion The burden of DR-TB among HIV-infected patients attending public ART-centers in Mumbai was alarmingly high, likely representing ongoing

  2. Antibody to hepatitis E virus in HIV-infected individuals and AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Balayan, M S; Fedorova, O E; Mikhailov, M I; Rytick, P G; Eremin, V F; Danilova, T I; Shevelev, B I; Gorbacheva, E C; Pankova, G Y

    1997-07-01

    Antibody to hepatitis E virus of IgG class (anti-HEV IgG) is regularly detected in industrialized countries, where HEV is non-endemic, at levels not exceeding 2-3%; seropositive individuals are often found in certain groups of patients and professionals exposed to an increased risk of blood-borne infections. The present study was aimed at the identification of anti-HEV IgG in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, including acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), living in Russia and Belarus, an area of low anti-HEV prevalence with a moderate spread of HIV infection and AIDS. In Russia, 13 out of 117 HIV-infected patients (11.1%) were found to be anti-HEV seropositive. This differed significantly from the frequency observed in the normal population (1.7%) but not from the frequency in a matching control, high-risk group consisting of male prisoners (8.0%). No difference in the frequency of anti-HEV IgG seropositivity was found between groups of HIV-infected men subdivided by sexual orientation. The rate of anti-HEV seropositivity increased with the progression of HIV infection, reaching 43.3% in AIDS patients and 38.1% in those who died from AIDS. In Belarus, anti-HEV IgG seropositivity was not found among 20 HIV-infected subjects nor among individuals from the control risk group, which consisted of 25 intravenous drug users. In conclusion, HEV infection may have common transmission mechanisms (risk factors) with HIV infection rather than represent an additional opportunistic infection in AIDS.

  3. Treatment of Prolapsing Hemorrhoids in HIV-Infected Patients with Tissue-Selecting Technique

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome of a tissue-selecting therapy stapler (TST) for prolapsing hemorrhoids in HIV-infected patients. Sixty-two patients with stage III-IV hemorrhoidal prolapse were treated with TST by a single surgeon between June and November 2014. The TST group comprised 32 patients (4 females), and the TST + HIV group comprised 30 HIV-infected patients (3 females). Age, gender, and preoperative examination as well as intraoperative and postoperative features were assessed. There was no marked difference in hemorrhoidal prolapse between the TST and HIV + TST groups, except for patient satisfaction at 12 months. TST is an effective and safe technique for treatment of prolapsing hemorrhoids in HIV-infected patients. PMID:28356909

  4. Neurocognitive Function in HIV Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Alan; Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Fisher, Martin; Orkin, Chloe M.; Aderogba, Kazeem; De Burgh-Thomas, Andrew; O'Farrell, Nigel; Lacey, Charles JN.; Leen, Clifford; Dunn, David; Paton, Nicholas I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe factors associated with neurocognitive (NC) function in HIV-positive patients on stable combination antiretroviral therapy. Design We undertook a cross-sectional analysis assessing NC data obtained at baseline in patients entering the Protease-Inhibitor-Monotherapy-Versus-Ongoing-Triple therapy (PIVOT) trial. Main outcome measure NC testing comprised of 5 domains. Raw results were z-transformed using standard and demographically adjusted normative datasets (ND). Global z-scores (NPZ-5) were derived from averaging the 5 domains and percentage of subjects with test scores >1 standard deviation (SD) below population means in at least two domains (abnormal Frascati score) calculated. Patient characteristics associated with NC results were assessed using multivariable linear regression. Results Of the 587 patients in PIVOT, 557 had full NC results and were included. 77% were male, 68% Caucasian and 28% of Black ethnicity. Mean (SD) baseline and nadir CD4+ lymphocyte counts were 553(217) and 177(117) cells/µL, respectively, and HIV RNA was <50 copies/mL in all. Median (IQR) NPZ-5 score was −0.5 (−1.2/−0) overall, and −0.3 (−0.7/0.1) and −1.4 (−2/−0.8) in subjects of Caucasian and Black ethnicity, respectively. Abnormal Frascati scores using the standard-ND were observed in 51%, 38%, and 81%, respectively, of subjects overall, Caucasian and Black ethnicity (p<0.001), but in 62% and 69% of Caucasian and Black subjects using demographically adjusted-ND (p = 0.20). In the multivariate analysis, only Black ethnicity was associated with poorer NPZ-5 scores (P<0.001). Conclusions In this large group of HIV-infected subjects with viral load suppression, ethnicity but not HIV-disease factors is closely associated with NC results. The prevalence of abnormal results is highly dependent on control datasets utilised. Trial registry ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01230580 PMID:23646111

  5. HIV infection in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nancy; Holodniy, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In the US, an estimated 1 million people are infected with HIV, although one-third of this population are unaware of their diagnosis. While HIV infection is commonly thought to affect younger adults, there are an increasing number of patients over 50 years of age living with the condition. UNAIDS and WHO estimate that of the 40 million people living with HIV/AIDS in the world, approximately 2.8 million are 50 years and older. With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the mid-1990s, survival following HIV diagnosis has risen dramatically and HIV infection has evolved from an acute disease process to being managed as a chronic medical condition. As treated HIV-infected patients live longer and the number of new HIV diagnoses in older patients rise, clinicians need to be aware of these trends and become familiar with the management of HIV infection in the older patient. This article is intended for the general clinician, including geriatricians, and will review epidemiologic data and HIV treatment as well as provide a discussion on medical management issues affecting the older HIV-infected patient. PMID:18982916

  6. Improvements in depression and changes in quality of life among HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, Angela M; Pence, Brian W; O'Donnell, Julie; Thielman, Nathan; Heine, Amy; Zinski, Anne; Modi, Riddhi; McGuinness, Teena; Gaynes, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of life (QOL) for HIV-infected individuals is an important objective of HIV care, given the considerable physical and emotional burden associated with living with HIV. Although worse QOL has been associated with depression, no research has quantified the potential of improvement in depression to prospectively improve QOL among HIV-infected adults. We analyzed data from 115 HIV-infected adults with depression enrolled in a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of improved depression care on antiretroviral drug adherence. Improvement in depression, the exposure of interest, was defined as the relative change in depression at six months compared to baseline and categorized as full response (≥50% improvement), partial response (25-49% improvement), and no response (<25% improvement). Multivariable linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between improvement in depression and four continuous measures of QOL at six months: physical QOL, mental QOL, HIV symptoms, and fatigue intensity. In multivariable analyses, physical QOL was higher among partial responders (mean difference [MD] = 2.51, 95% CI: -1.51, 6.54) and full responders (MD = 3.68, 95% CI: -0.36, 7.72) compared to individuals who did not respond. Mental QOL was an average of 4.01 points higher (95% CI: -1.01, 9.03) among partial responders and 14.34 points higher (95% CI: 9.42, 19.25) among full responders. HIV symptoms were lower for partial responders (MD = -0.69; 95% CI: -1.69, 0.30) and full responders (MD = -1.51; 95% CI: -2.50, -0.53). Fatigue intensity was also lower for partial responders (MD = -0.94; 95% CI: -1.94, 0.07) and full responders (MD = -3.00; 95% CI: -3.98, -2.02). Among HIV-infected adults with depression, improving access to high-quality depression treatment may also improve important QOL outcomes.

  7. Anemia is associated with monocyte activation in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Hannah M; Hileman, Corrilynn O; Ahuja, Sanjay; Funderburg, Nicholas T; McComsey, Grace A

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia has been linked with mortality in HIV infection. The mechanism of anemia in the era of contemporary antiretroviral therapy is not understood. The aim of this study was to describe the association between anemia and markers of immune activation and inflammation in a cohort of HIV-infected adults on stable antiretroviral therapy. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy with HIV-1 RNA < 1000 copies/ml. Soluble and cellular markers of inflammation and immune activation were measured. Relationships between hemoglobin levels, anemia (hemoglobin <13 g/dL for men and <12 g/dL for women) and mild anemia (hemoglobin <14 g/dL for men and <13 g/dL for women) and these markers were explored using multivariable linear regression. Results Among the 147 participants, median age was 46 years, 78% were men, 68% were African American and 29% were Caucasian. Median BMI was 26.7 kg/m2, nadir and current CD4+ T cell counts were 179 and 613 cells/mm3, respectively, and 78% had HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml (range 20–600 copies/ml). Median (IQR) hemoglobin was 14.3 (13.1–15.1) g/dl; 14% were anemic and 33% had at least mild anemia. In multivariable analyses, mild anemia was independently associated with female sex, older age, shorter duration of ART, lower WBC count, higher platelet count, higher sCD14 and a greater number of CD14dimCD16+ cells or “patrolling” monocytes, which remained significant after further adjusting for race and BMI. Conclusions Having hemoglobin <14 g/dL for men and <13 g/dL for women was independently associated with monocyte activation (sCD14 and CD14dimCD16+ cells) in HIV-infected adults on stable antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25668820

  8. Acute Kidney Injury, Risk Factors, and Prognosis in Hospitalized HIV-Infected Adults in South Africa, Compared by Tenofovir Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Neil; Motlhaoleng, Katlego; Abraham, Pattamukkil; Mancama, Dalu; Naicker, Saraladevi; Variava, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There are limited data describing acute kidney injury (AKI) in HIV-infected adult patients in resource-limited settings where tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), which is potentially nephrotoxic, is increasingly prescribed. We describe risk factors for and prognosis of AKI in HIV-infected individuals, stratified by those receiving and those naive to TDF. A prospective case cohort study of hospitalized HIV-infected adults with AKI stratified by TDF exposure. Adults (≥18 years) were recruited: clinical and biochemical data were collected at admission; their renal recovery, discharge, or mortality was ascertained as an in-patient and, subsequently, to a scheduled 3-month follow-up. Among this predominantly female (61%), almost exclusively black African cohort of 175 patients with AKI, 93 (53%) were TDF exposed; median age was 41 years (interquartile range 35–50). Median CD4 count and viral load and creatinine at baseline were 116 cells/mm3 and 110,159 copies/ml, respectively. A greater proportion of the TDF group had severe AKI on admission (61% vs. 43%, p = .014); however, both groups had similar rates of newly diagnosed tuberculosis (TB; 52%) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID; 32%) use. Intravenous fluid was the therapeutic mainstay; only seven were dialyzed. Discharge median serum creatinine (SCr) was higher in the TDF group (p = .032) and fewer in the TDF group recovered renal function after 3 months (p = .043). Three-month mortality was 27% in both groups, but 55% of deaths occurred in hospital. Those that died had a higher SCr and more severe AKI than survivors; TB was diagnosed in 33 (70%) of those who died. AKI was more severe and renal recovery slower in the TDF group; comorbidities, risk factors, and prognosis were similar regardless of TDF exposure. Because TB is linked to higher mortality, TB coinfection in HIV-infected patients with AKI warrants more intensive monitoring. In all those with poor renal recovery, our

  9. Circulating HIV DNA Correlates With Neurocognitive Impairment in Older HIV-infected Adults on Suppressive ART

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Michelli Faria de; Murrel, Ben; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Vargas, Milenka; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Smith, Davey M.; Woods, Steven Paul; Gianella, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Older HIV-infected adults have a higher risk of neurocognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the associations between levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood, soluble markers of inflammation and cellular trafficking in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neurocognitive functioning among 18 younger (22–40 years) and 26 older (50–71 years) HIV-infected subjects, who were administered a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. Older HIV-infected individuals presented higher levels of inflammation in CSF and blood compared to younger individuals, but no difference was observed in HIV DNA levels. Among older participants, higher HIV DNA levels were significantly associated with more severe neurocognitive impairment (p = 0.005), particularly in the Executive Functions domain (p = 0.004). No association was observed between HIV DNA and neurocognition among younger individuals. Despite significantly increased inflammation observed in the older group, none of the inflammatory markers were associated with neurocognitive impairment among older HIV+ individuals (p > 0.05). Our study supports the involvement of peripheral HIV DNA reservoir in the pathogenesis of neurocognitive disorder during suppressive ART. Correlates of neurocognitive impairment might differ between younger and older adults, suggesting that future treatment and prevention strategies for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders likely need to be tailored based on age. PMID:26603568

  10. Neuronal surface antibodies in HIV-infected patients with isolated psychosis.

    PubMed

    Cunill, Vanessa; Arboleya, Susana; Jiménez, Maria de Los Reyes; Campins, Antoni; Herbera, Patricia; Mestre, LLuïsa; Clemente, Antonio; Barceló, Maria Inés; Leyes, Maria; Canellas, Francesca; Julià, Maria Rosa

    2016-12-15

    Neuronal surface antibodies (NSA) involved in autoimmune encephalitis (AE) have been related to relapses in HVS encephalitis. Their role in non-encephalitic psychosis is controversial. We previously reported an HIV-infected patient, NSA-positive, only presenting psychosis. Therefore, we determined the NSA prevalence in a prospective cohort of 22 HIV-positive patients with psychosis and we analyzed the frequency of HIV infection among NSA tested patients due to AE suspicion. We found no NSA in the prospective cohort. In the retrospective analysis, 22% of NSA-positive versus 4.6% of negative patients were HIV-positive. Wider studies are required to clarify the relationship between NSA and HIV infection.

  11. Bacteremia as a Cause of Fever in Ambulatory, HIV-Infected Mozambican Adults: Results and Policy Implications from a Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Troy D.; Silva, Wilson P.; Buene, Manuel; Morais, Luís; Valverde, Emilio; Vermund, Sten H.; Brentlinger, Paula E.

    2013-01-01

    Fever is typically treated empirically in rural Mozambique. We examined the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of bacterial pathogens isolated from blood-culture specimens, and clinical characteristics of ambulatory HIV-infected febrile patients with and without bacteremia. This analysis was nested within a larger prospective observational study to evaluate the performance of new Mozambican guidelines for fever and anemia in HIV-infected adults (clinical trial registration NCT01681914, www.clinicaltrials.gov); the guidelines were designed to be used by non-physician clinicians who attended ambulatory HIV-infected patients in very resource-constrained peripheral health units. In 2012 (April-September), we recruited 258 HIV-infected adults with documented fever or history of recent fever in three sites within Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Although febrile patients were routinely tested for malaria, blood culture capacity was unavailable in Zambézia prior to study initiation. We confirmed bacteremia in 39 (15.1%) of 258 patients. The predominant organisms were non-typhoid Salmonella, nearly all resistant to multiple first-line antibiotics (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Features most associated with bacteremia included higher temperature, lower CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, lower hemoglobin, and headache. Introduction of blood cultures allowed us to: 1) confirm bacteremia in a substantial proportion of patients; 2) tailor specific antimicrobial therapy for confirmed bacteremia based on known susceptibilities; 3) make informed choices of presumptive antibiotics for patients with suspected bacteremia; and 4) construct a preliminary clinical profile to help clinicians determine who would most likely benefit from presumptive bacteremia treatment. Our findings demonstrate that in resource-limited settings, there is urgent need to expand local microbiologic capacity to better identify and treat cases of bacteremia in HIV-infected

  12. Increased mortality associated with treated active tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kabali, Conrad; Mtei, Lillian; Brooks, Daniel R; Waddell, Richard; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky; Arbeit, Robert D; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C Fordham; Horsburgh, C Robert

    2013-07-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected patients, even when successfully treated, may be associated with excess mortality. We conducted a prospective cohort study nested in a randomized TB vaccine trial to compare mortality between HIV-infected patients diagnosed and treated for TB (TB, n = 77) and HIV-infected patients within the same CD4 range, who were not diagnosed with or treated for active TB (non-TB, n = 308) in the period 2001-2008. Only twenty four subjects (6%) were on antiretroviral therapy at the beginning of this study. After accounting for covariate effects including use of antiretroviral therapy, isoniazid preventive therapy, and receipt of vaccine, we found a four-fold increase in mortality in TB patients compared with non-TB patients (adjusted Hazard Ratio 4.61; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.63, 13.05). These findings suggest that treatment for TB alone is not sufficient to avert the excess mortality associated with HIV-related TB and that prevention of TB may provide a mortality benefit.

  13. The impact of B-cell perturbations on pneumococcal conjugate vaccine response in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Thomas G; Søgaard, Ole S; Tolstrup, Martin; Petersen, Mikkel S; Bernth-Jensen, Jens M; Østergaard, Lars; Erikstrup, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Untreated HIV infection results in severe perturbations of the B-cell population and hyporesponsiveness to vaccination. We studied associations between circulating B-cell subsets and antibody response to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in treated and untreated HIV patients.Ninety-five HIV-infected adults were grouped according to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and CD4+ cell count as follows: 20 ART-naïve (no prior ART), 62 ART-responders (received ART, and CD4 count >500 cells/µl), and 13 impaired responders (received ART for more than 3 years, and CD4 count <500 cells/µl). All subjects were immunized twice with double-dose 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine with or without 1 mg CPG 7909 (toll-like receptor 9 agonist) at baseline and after three months. Pre-vaccination B-cell subpopulations were assessed by flow cytometry. Serum IgG concentrations for vaccine serotypes were quantified by ELISA at baseline and 3, 4, and 9 months post-vaccination. ART responders had more isotype-switched memory B cells and more marginal-zone (MZ)-like B cells compared with impaired responders. Furthermore, ART-naïve patients had higher concentration of transitional B cells and plasmablasts compared with B cells of other patient groups. The concentration of MZ-like, isotype switched memory cells and plasmablasts correlated positively with post-vaccination IgG concentration at 3, 4, and 9 months. Low concentrations of isotype-switched memory B cells was the strongest independent predictor of poor pneumococcal conjugate vaccine responsiveness, emphasizing that B-cell subset disturbances are associated with poor vaccine response among HIV-infected patients.

  14. Central Nervous System Strongyloidiasis and Cryptococcosis in an HIV-Infected Patient Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mónica; Flores, Paúl; Ahumada, Víctor; Vázquez-Vázquez, Lorena; Alvarado-de la Barrera, Claudia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome with central nervous system involvement, in a patient with late human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection starting antiretroviral therapy, in whom Strongyloides stercoralis larvae and Cryptococcus neoformans were isolated antemortem from cerebrospinal fluid. Our patient was not from an endemic region for the parasite, so strongyloidiasis was not originally suspected. For this reason, we conclude that Strongyloides stercoralis infection should be suspected in HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in order to avoid potential fatal outcomes. PMID:22924046

  15. BK Virus Encephalitis in HIV-Infected Patients: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniolli, Luciana; Borges, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Encephalitis and meningitis due to BKPyV are unusual and emerging condition. Only a few cases of BKPyV encephalitis have been reported in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, with the majority of cases presenting with concurrent hemorrhagic cystitis and HIV-infected patients. The authors report two HIV-infected patients with the diagnosis of BKPyV encephalitis and discuss the main clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of this infection in patients with AIDS. Physicians should be aware to recognize the main clinical features and diagnose BKPyV central nervous infection in the setting of AIDS. PMID:28326104

  16. Solid organ transplantation: referral, management, and outcomes in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Roland, Michelle E; Carlson, Laurie L; Frassetto, Lynda A; Stock, Peter G

    2006-12-01

    Advances in HIV management make it difficult to deny solid organ transplantation to HIV-infected patients based on futility arguments. Preliminary studies suggest that both patient and graft survival are similar in HIV-negative and HIV-positive transplant recipients. While there has been no significant HIV disease progression, substantial interactions between immunosuppressants and antiretroviral drugs necessitate careful monitoring. The evaluation and management of HIV-infected transplant candidates and recipients require excellent communication among a multidisciplinary team, the primary HIV care provider, and the patient. Timely referral for transplant evaluation will prevent unnecessary mortality during the pre-transplant evaluation process.

  17. HIV-Infected Patient Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Regarding the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Rozin, Irina; Sayles, Harlan; Anderson, Matthew J; Furl, Renae; Stimpson, Jim P; Swindells, Susan; Bares, Sara H

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated patient knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding changes present with the Affordable Care Act (ACA). HIV-infected adults attending an academic medical center HIV clinic in Omaha, Nebraska were asked to complete a self-administered survey between November 2013 and March 2014. Information collected included demographics, knowledge regarding healthcare reform policies, as well as attitudes and beliefs regarding the potential impact of the ACA on patient access to healthcare. Basic descriptive statistics were used to assess demographic characteristics of respondents and outcomes of interest. Chi-square tests were used for comparisons of interest among participants; some trends were evaluated with Cochran-Armitage trend tests. Four hundred and six patients completed the questionnaire. Of the respondents 90% were between the ages of 27 and 64, 61% were white, 27% had no health insurance, and 21% reported that they felt they had or will eventually benefit from the ACA. The proportion who responded "I don't know" to this question decreased over the study period (p=0.036). Overall, 57% reported they do not believe that they are informed enough to make decisions about the ACA. In answering four knowledge-based questions, only 3% answered all of them correctly. Knowledge about the ACA was significantly associated with perception of benefit (p=0.018). HIV-infected patients are not well informed about the ACA and few perceive that they will benefit from healthcare reform. Targeted education and outreach are necessary to reduce the knowledge gap for this population that stands to benefit greatly from the ACA.

  18. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adults with skin complaints in northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mavura, Daudi R.; Masenga, E. John; Minja, Eli; Grossmann, Henning; Crump, John A.; Bartlett, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal skin findings are identified in over 90% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons globally. A prospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients with skin complaints commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in northern Tanzania was undertaken. Consecutive HIV-infected subjects presenting with skin complaints, who met criteria for ART initiation, were recruited at a Tanzanian Regional Dermatology Training Center. A single dermatologist evaluated all subjects; baseline skin biopsies were performed, and CD4+ cell counts and plasma HIV RNA levels were measured. All subjects received a fixed-dose combination of stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine. A total of 100 subjects were enrolled; 86 subjects completed six months of follow-up. Median baseline CD4+ cell counts and plasma HIV RNA levels were 120 cells/μl and 5.2 log10 copies/ml. The most common dermatologic condition was papular pruritic eruption (47%). The median baseline score on the Burn Scale was 38%. After six months, 10 subjects had achieved the complete resolution of skin abnormalities. In those without complete resolution, the median Burn Scale score improved to 7%. Five patients developed new eruptions by month 3, which in two cases were attributed to drug reactions. In the 86 subjects remaining on ART after six months, the median CD4+ cell count had increased to 474 cells/μl, and plasma HIV RNA levels were <400 copies/ml in 85 (99%) subjects. Patients with HIV infection with skin complaints experienced marked clinical improvements following ART initiation. PMID:25256912

  19. Factors associated with tuberculosis treatment default among HIV-infected tuberculosis patients in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kittikraisak, Wanitchaya; Burapat, Channawong; Kaewsa-ard, Samroui; Watthanaamornkiet, Wanpen; Sirinak, Chawin; Sattayawuthipong, Wanchai; Jittimanee, Suksont; Pobkeeree, Vallerut; Varma, Jay K

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring completion of tuberculosis (TB) treatment remains a major public health problem. In HIV-infected patients, TB is the most common severe opportunistic infection. Few studies have evaluated risk factors for TB treatment default in HIV-infected patients. We conducted a prospective, observational study of HIV-infected TB patients in Thailand. Patients underwent standardised evaluations at the beginning of TB treatment, at the end of the intensive phase and at the end of TB treatment. TB treatment outcomes were assessed according to WHO guidelines. The analysis was limited to patients who defaulted or who had treatment success. Of the 554 patients analysed, 61 (11%) defaulted. In multivariate analysis, factors associated with TB treatment default included incarceration history [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.7), smoking (AOR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-4.1) and having a symptom complaint score >15 (AOR 3.4, 95% CI 1.4-8.0); one marker of wealth, namely owning a refrigerator, was protective (AOR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8). Default during TB treatment was a significant problem in HIV-infected patients. Reducing default may require enhancing services for patients with a history of incarceration or smoking and designing patient-centred systems to address poverty and patient wellness.

  20. Comparison of methods for assessing nutritional status in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Niyongabo, T; Melchior, J C; Henzel, D; Bouchaud, O; Larouzé, B

    1999-10-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and is associated with a poor prognosis. To compare different measures of nutritional status in HIV-infected patients, we prospectively studied 88 outpatients seen at a Paris AIDS outpatient clinic for routine follow-up examinations. Nutritional status was assessed according to body weight loss (BWL, 4 classes), anthropometry, bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA), and subjective global assessment of nutritional status (SGA). Malnutrition was diagnosed in 22.4% of subjects using SGA, and 37.1% by BWL. SGA rapidly detected a worsening of nutritional status, while BWL detected malnutrition at an earlier stage. A good correlation was found between SGA class and body composition assessed by anthropometry and BIA. Deteriorating nutritional status diagnosed by SGA correlated with the CDC HIV disease class. SGA, a simple nutritional assessment, can serve as a basis for prescribing artificial nutrition, while BWL detects malnutrition at an earlier stage.

  1. Role of the dental surgeon in the early detection of adults with underlying HIV infection / AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Jorge; del Romero, Jorge; Hernando, Victoria; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    A review is made of the late diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a subject of growing interest in public health. It has been estimated that in Europe 30% of all HIV-infected people are unaware of their seropositive condition, and this in turn is associated with a poorer long-term disease prognosis and an increased risk of transmission to other individuals. The role of the dental surgeon in this context could be of great importance, since there are many oral lesions that can suggest the existence of underlying infection. The study also addresses the controversial subject of rapid HIV testing, and whether these tests should be performed on a routine basis in the dental clinic, or whether it is preferable to refer the patient to a specialized center. Key words:HIV in Spain, HIV screening, early diagnosis. PMID:22143719

  2. HIV-Resistant Gene Modified Stem Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    HIV Infection; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  3. Intestinal helminth infections amongst HIV-infected adults in Mthatha General Hospital, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Wright, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Background In South Africa, studies on the prevalence of intestinal helminth co-infection amongst HIV-infected patients as well as possible interactions between these two infections are limited. Aim To investigate the prevalence of intestinal helminth infestation amongst adults living with HIV or AIDS at Mthatha General Hospital. Setting Study participants were recruited at the outpatient department of Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between October and December 2013 amongst consecutive consenting HIV-positive adult patients. Socio-demographic and clinical information were obtained using data collection forms and structured interviews. Stool samples were collected to investigate the presence of helminths whilst blood samples were obtained for the measurement of CD4+ T-cell count and viral load. Results Data were obtained on 231 participants, with a mean age of 34.9 years, a mean CD4 count of 348 cells/µL and a mean viral load of 4.8 log10 copies/mL. Intestinal helminth prevalence was 24.7%, with Ascaris Lumbricoides (42.1%) the most prevalent identified species. Statistically significant association was found between CD4 count of less than 200 cells/µL and helminth infection (p = 0.05). No statistically significant association was found between intestinal helminth infection and the mean CD4 count (p = 0.79) or the mean viral load (p = 0.98). Conclusion A high prevalence of intestinal helminth infections was observed amongst the study population. Therefore, screening and treatment of helminths should be considered as part of the management of HIV and AIDS in primary health care. PMID:26842519

  4. Screening for subclinical Leishmania infection in HIV-infected patients living in eastern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ena, Javier; Pasquau, Francisco; López-Perezagua, María del Mar; Martinez-Peinado, Carmen; Arjona, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Background: We anticipated that patients with HIV infection living in endemic areas were at greater risk of infection which can reactivate due to immunosuppression; therefore, we analyzed the prevalence of latent Leishmania infantum infection in patients infected with HIV. Methods: A total of 179 patients with HIV infection were screened for the presence of anti-Leishmania antibodies using indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) (Leishmania-spot IF; bioMérieux, Marcy l’Etoile, France). All patients were followed up for at least 1 year. The primary end-point was to confirm the presence of Leishmania infection. Results: Significant titer of antibodies to Leishmania was detected in six (3%; 95% confidence interval: 0.5–5.5%) asymptomatic patients. Two of them had visceral leishmaniasis that was confirmed by parasite visualization in clinical samples, the presence of Leishmania promastigotes in Novy–MacNeal–Nicolle culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods, and/or urinary antigen test. Among 173 patients with indirect immunofluorescent antibody test below 1∶40, one HIV-infected patient severely immunosuppressed, confirmed negative by IFAT, was diagnosed of visceral leishmaniasis. Conclusion: The use of indirect immunofluorescent antibody test for Leishmania screening is not justified in asymptomatic patients with HIV infection living in endemic areas due to the small rate of significant antibody titer and the low frequency of clinical disease. PMID:25468205

  5. Clinical review: Respiratory failure in HIV-infected patients - a changing picture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory failure in HIV-infected patients is a relatively common presentation to ICU. The debate on ICU treatment of HIV-infected patients goes on despite an overall decline in mortality amongst these patients since the AIDS epidemic. Many intensive care physicians feel that ICU treatment of critically ill HIV patients is likely to be futile. This is mainly due to the unfavourable outcome of HIV patients with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia who need mechanical ventilation. However, the changing spectrum of respiratory illness in HIV-infected patients and improved outcome from critical illness remain under-recognised. Also, the awareness of certain factors that can affect their outcome remains low. As there are important ethical and practical implications for intensive care clinicians while making decisions to provide ICU support to HIV-infected patients, a review of literature was undertaken. It is notable that the respiratory illnesses that are not directly related to underlying HIV disease are now commonly encountered in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. The overall incidence of P. jirovecii as a cause of respiratory failure has declined since the AIDS epidemic and sepsis including bacterial pneumonia has emerged as a frequent cause of hospital and ICU admission amongst HIV patients. The improved overall outcome of HIV patients needing ICU admission is related to advancement in general ICU care, including adoption of improved ventilation strategies. An awareness of respiratory illnesses in HIV-infected patients along with an appropriate diagnostic and treatment strategy may obviate the need for invasive ventilation and improve outcome further. HIV-infected patients presenting with respiratory failure will benefit from early admission to critical care for treatment and support. There is evidence to suggest that continuing or starting HAART in critically ill HIV patients is beneficial and hence should be considered after multidisciplinary

  6. Prevalence and genotypic variability of TTV in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sherman, K E; Rouster, S D; Feinberg, J

    2001-11-01

    TT virus is a small, circular DNA virus, that has been associated with transfusion hepatitis. We sought to determine the prevalence of TT virus (TTV) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and to characterize the virus in terms of genotypic variability and in the relationship to CD4+, HIV viral loads, HCV/HIV coinfection, and ALT abnormalities. A cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected patients in the United States, including 86 HIV-positive subjects and 118 HIV-negative controls was performed. TTV was detected using a seminested PCR technique. Samples underwent cloning and sequence analysis and/or RFLP to determine genotype. Thirty-eight percent of HIV-positive patients had TTV infection versus 14.4% of patients within the matching cohort (P = 0.0009). The highest rate of TTV infection was in patients with concurrent HCV/HIV infection (54% vs 30%, P = 0.038). HIV-infected subjects with TTV had lower ALT levels than those without TTV (P = 0.036). Intravenous drug use was the leading factor associated with TTV positivity among HIV-positive subjects. Mixed genotypes were more common in those with HIV. Therefore, TTV prevalence, ALT levels, and genomic heterogeneity of TTV all seem to be altered in patients with HIV.

  7. Identifying factors associated with changes in CD4+ count in HIV-infected adults in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Kelsey; Mondal, Prosanta; Konrad, Stephanie; Skinner, Stuart; Gartner, Kali; Lim, Hyun J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of clinical and social factors unique to HIV-infected adults in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, regarding the rate of CD4+ count change, and to identify factors associated with a risk of CD4+ count decline. METHODS: A retrospective longitudinal cohort study from medical chart reviews at two clinics was conducted in Saskatoon. Univariate and multivariate linear mixed effects models were used to assess the impact of selected factors on CD4+ count change. RESULTS: Four hundred eleven HIV-infected patients were identified from January 1, 2003 to November 30, 2011. Two hundred eighteen (53%) were male, mean (± SD) age was 35.6 ±10.1 years, 257 (70.8%) were First Nations or Métis, 312 (80.2%) were hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected and 300 (73.3%) had a history of injection drug use (IDU). In univariate models, age, ethnicity, HCV, IDU, antiretroviral therapy and social assistance were significant. Using ethnicity, HCV and IDU, three multivariate models (models 1, 2, 3) were built due to high correlation. First Nations or Métis ethnicity, HCV coinfection and a history of IDU were associated with significantly lower CD4+ counts in multivariate models. Older age and social assistance were associated with significantly lower CD4+ counts in models 1 and 3. Age was marginally significant in model 2 (P=0.055). Not prescribed antiretroviral therapy was associated with a significantly negative CD4+ count slope in all multivariate models. CONCLUSION: The unique epidemiology of this HIV-infected population may be contributing to CD4+ count change. Increased attention and resources focused on this high-risk population are needed to prevent disease progression and to improve overall health and quality of life. PMID:26361489

  8. Latent toxoplasmosis is associated with neurocognitive impairment in young adults with and without chronic HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Ene, L; Marcotte, T D; Umlauf, A; Grancea, C; Temereanca, A; Bharti, A; Achim, C L; Letendre, S; Ruta, S M

    2016-10-15

    We evaluated the impact of latent toxoplasmosis (LT) on neurocognitive (NC) and neurobehavioural functioning in young adults with and without chronic HIV infection, using a standardised NC test battery, self-reported Beck Depression Inventory, Frontal System Behavior Scale, MINI-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and risk-assessment battery. 194 young adults (median age 24years, 48.2% males) with chronic HIV infection (HIV+) since childhood and 51 HIV seronegative (HIV-) participants were included. HIV+ individuals had good current immunological status (median CD4: 479 cells/μl) despite a low CD4 nadir (median: 93 cells/μl). LT (positive anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies) was present in one third of participants. The impairment rates in the HIV- with and without Toxo were not significantly different (p=0.17). However, we observed an increasing trend (p<0.001) in impairment rates with HIV and LT status: HIV-/LT- (6.1%); HIV-/LT+ (22%), HIV+/LT- (31%), HIV+/LT+ (49%). In a multivariable analysis using the entire study group there were main effects on cognition for HIV and also for LT. Within the HIV+ group LT was associated with worse performance globally (p=0.006), in memory (p=0.009), speed of information processing (p=0.01), verbal (p=0.02) and learning (p=0.02) domains. LT was not associated with depressive symptoms, frontal systems dysfunction or risk behaviors in any of the groups. HIV participants with lower Toxoplasma antibody concentration had worse NC performance, with higher GDS values (p=0.03) and worse learning (p=0.002), memory (p=0.006), speed of information processing (p=0.01) T scores. Latent Toxoplasmosis may contribute to NC impairment in young adults, including those with and without chronic HIV infection.

  9. Facial Emotion Processing in Aviremic HIV-infected Adults.

    PubMed

    González-Baeza, A; Carvajal, F; Bayón, C; Pérez-Valero, I; Montes-Ramírez, M; Arribas, J R

    2016-08-01

    The emotional processing in human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive individuals (HIV+) has been scarcely studied. We included HIV+ individuals (n = 107) on antiretroviral therapy (≥2 years) who completed 6 facial processing tasks and neurocognitive testing. We compared HIV+ and healthy adult (HA) participants (n = 40) in overall performance of each facial processing task. Multiple logistic regressions were conducted to explore predictors of poorer accuracy in those measures in which HIV+ individuals performed poorer than HA participants. We separately explored the impact of neurocognitive status, antiretroviral regimen, and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection on the tasks performance. We found similar performance in overall facial emotion discrimination, recognition, and recall between HIV+ and HA participants. The HIV+ group had poorer recognition of particular negative emotions. Lower WAIS-III Vocabulary scores and active HCV predicted poorer accuracy in recognition of particular emotions. Our results suggest that permanent damage of emotion-related brain systems might persist despite long-term effective antiretroviral therapy.

  10. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Burden in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Popovich, Kyle J.; Hota, Bala; Aroutcheva, Alla; Kurien, Lisa; Patel, Janki; Lyles-Banks, Rosie; Grasso, Amanda E.; Spec, Andrej; Beavis, Kathleen G.; Hayden, Mary K.; Weinstein, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The epidemic of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has had a disproportionate impact on patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods. We evaluated CA-MRSA colonization burden (number of colonized sites per total number sampled) among HIV-infected and HIV-negative inpatients within 72 hours of hospitalization. From March 2011 through April 2012, we obtained cultures from nasal and extranasal sites (throat, axilla, inguinal, perirectal, and chronic wound if present) and collected risk factor data. Results. Of 745 patients (374 HIV-infected, 371 HIV-negative), 15.7% were colonized with CA-MRSA at any site: 20% of HIV and 11% of HIV-negative patients (relative prevalence = 1.8, P = .002). HIV-infected patients had a higher prevalence of nasal, extranasal, and exclusive extranasal colonization as well as higher colonization burden. Perirectal and inguinal areas were the extranasal sites most frequently colonized, and 38.5% of colonized patients had exclusive extranasal colonization. Seventy-three percent of isolates were identified as USA300. Among HIV-infected patients, male sex, younger age, and recent incarceration were positively associated whereas Hispanic ethnicity was negatively associated with higher colonization burden. Among HIV-negative patients, temporary housing (homeless, shelter, or substance abuse center) was the only factor associated with higher colonization burden. Predictors of USA300 included HIV, younger age, illicit drug use, and male sex; all but 1 colonized individual with current or recent incarceration carried USA300. Conclusions. HIV-infected patients were more likely to have a higher CA-MRSA colonization burden and carry USA300. In certain populations, enhanced community and outpatient-based infection control strategies may be needed to prevent CA-MRSA cross-transmission and infection. PMID:23325428

  11. Risk of Cancer among Commercially Insured HIV-Infected Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Ishwori; Casper, Corey; Noy, Ariela; Palefsky, Joel M.; Haigentz, Missak; Krown, Susan E.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the cancer incidence rates among HIV-infected persons with commercial insurance who were on antiretroviral therapy and compare them with those rates in the general population. Paid health insurance claims for 63,221 individuals 18 years or older, with at least one claim with a diagnostic code for HIV and at least one filled prescription for an antiretroviral medication between January 1, 2006, and September 30, 2012, were obtained from the LifeLink® Health Plan Claims Database. The expected number of cancer cases in the general population for each gender-age group (<30, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59, and >60 years) was estimated using incidence rates from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated using their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Compared to the general population, incidence rates for HIV-infected adults were elevated (SIR, 95% CI) for Kaposi sarcoma (46.08; 38.74–48.94), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (4.22; 3.63–4.45), Hodgkin lymphoma (9.83; 7.45–10.84), and anal cancer (30.54; 25.62–32.46) and lower for colorectal cancer (0.69; 0.52–0.76), lung cancer (0.70; 0.54, 0.77), and prostate cancer (0.54; 0.45–0.58). Commercially insured, treated HIV-infected adults had elevated rates for infection-related cancers, but not for common non-AIDS defining cancers. PMID:27882054

  12. Immunological efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine strategies in HIV-infected adults: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sadlier, C; O'Dea, S; Bennett, K; Dunne, J; Conlon, N; Bergin, C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immunologic response to a prime-boost immunization strategy combining the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) with the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) versus the PPSV23 alone in HIV-infected adults. HIV-infected adults were randomized to receive PCV13 at week 0 followed by PPSV23 at week 4 (n = 31, prime-boost group) or PPSV23 alone at week 4 (n = 33, PPSV23-alone group). Serotype specific IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and functional oposonophagocytic (OPA) geometric mean titer (GMT) were compared for 12 pneumococcal serotypes shared by both vaccines at week 8 and week 28. The prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥2-fold increase in IgG GMC and a GMC >1 ug/ml at week 8 (odds ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46-2.74, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.40-2.70, p < 0.01). Similarly, the prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase in GMT at week 8 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22-2.39, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.15-2.3, p < 0.01). This study adds to evidence supporting current pneumococcal vaccination recommendations combining the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines in the United States and Europe for HIV-infected individuals.

  13. Mechanisms by Which Interleukin-12 Corrects Defective NK Cell Anticryptococcal Activity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kyei, Stephen K.; Ogbomo, Henry; Li, ShuShun; Timm-McCann, Martina; Xiang, Richard F.; Huston, Shaunna M.; Ganguly, Anutosh; Colarusso, Pina; Gill, M. John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast and a leading cause of life-threatening meningitis in AIDS patients. Natural killer (NK) cells are important immune effector cells that directly recognize and kill C. neoformans via a perforin-dependent cytotoxic mechanism. We previously showed that NK cells from HIV-infected patients have aberrant anticryptococcal killing and that interleukin-12 (IL-12) restores the activity at least partially through restoration of NKp30. However, the mechanisms causing this defect or how IL-12 restores the function was unknown. By examining the sequential steps in NK cell killing of Cryptococcus, we found that NK cells from HIV-infected patients had defective binding of NK cells to C. neoformans. Moreover, those NK cells that bound to C. neoformans failed to polarize perforin-containing granules to the microbial synapse compared to healthy controls, suggesting that binding was insufficient to restore a defect in perforin polarization. We also identified lower expression of intracellular perforin and defective perforin release from NK cells of HIV-infected patients in response to C. neoformans. Importantly, treatment of NK cells from HIV-infected patients with IL-12 reversed the multiple defects in binding, granule polarization, perforin content, and perforin release and restored anticryptococcal activity. Thus, there are multiple defects in the cytolytic machinery of NK cells from HIV-infected patients, which cumulatively result in defective NK cell anticryptococcal activity, and each of these defects can be reversed with IL-12. PMID:27555306

  14. Poor Aerobic Fitness May Contribute to Cognitive Decline in HIV-infected Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mapstone, Mark; Hilton, Tiffany N.; Yang, Hongmei; Guido, Joseph J.; Luque, Amneris E.; Hall, William J.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Shah, Krupa

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-infected older adult (HOA) community is particularly vulnerable to cognitive impairment. Previous studies in the general older adult population have reported that lower scores on tests of cognitive function often correlate negatively with aerobic fitness [5–7]. HIV-infected individuals have significantly reduced aerobic fitness and physical function compared to HIV-uninfected individuals. Determining important correlates of cognitive ability may be beneficial in not only detecting precursors to future cognitive impairments, but also target areas for interventions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive ability and aerobic fitness in HIV-infected older adults. We conducted a cross-sectional study of HOA on antiretroviral therapy (ART) >50 years of age. Domain specific cognitive function was assessed by means of a neuropsychological battery. Aerobic fitness (VO2peak) was assessed using a graded, progressive treadmill test. Thirty-seven HOA on ART (mean±SD: age 59±6 years, BMI 28±5, CD4 663±337 cells/ml, duration since HIV diagnosis 17±7 years; 81% males) completed the cognitive tests. Several domains of cognition were significantly associated with VO2peak by Spearman correlation analysis (p<0.05). By step-wise adjusted regression VO2peak was most frequently and significantly related to many cognitive domains such as verbal and visual memory, visual perception, and language (p<0.05). We found that participants with higher Vo2peak were less likely to have more severe forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) such as mild neurocognitive disorder (OR=0.65; p=0.01) and HIV-associated dementia (OR=0.64; p=0.0006). In HOA and in conclusion, aerobic fitness is related to cognitive performance on various tasks. The likelihood of cognitive impairment increased with lower fitness levels. Therefore, increased fitness may serve an important factor in maintenance of cognition and neural integrity for aging HIV-infected

  15. Alcohol Drinking Pattern: A Comparison between HIV-Infected Patients and Individuals from the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Maria Leticia R.; Barcellos, Nemora T.; Alencastro, Paulo R.; Wolff, Fernando H.; Moreira, Leila B.; Gus, Miguel; Brandão, Ajacio B. M.; Fuchs, Flavio D.; Fuchs, Sandra C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol consumption is highly prevalent in the general population and among HIV-infected population. This study aimed to compare the pattern of alcohol consumption and to describe characteristics associated with heavy alcohol consumption in individuals from the general population with patients infected with HIV. Methods Participants for this analysis came from a population-based cross-sectional study and from a consecutive sampling of patients infected with HIV. Participants aged 18 years or older were interviewed using similar questionnaires with questions pertaining to socio-demographic characteristics, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, and HIV-related characteristics, among others. Blood pressure and anthropometric measures were measured using standardized procedures. Results Weekly alcohol consumption was more prevalent among individuals from the general population than HIV-infected patients: 57.0 vs. 31.1%, P<0.001. The prevalence of heavy episodic drinking was higher in the population sample as well: 46.1 vs. 17.0%, P<0.001. In the general population, heavy alcohol consumption was more prevalent in men. Cigarette smoking was independently associated with heavy alcohol consumption among HIV infected (Prevalence Ratio; PR = 5.9; 95%CI 2.6–13.9; P<0,001) and general population (PR = 2.6; 95%CI 1.9–3.0; P<0.001). Years at school were inversely associated with heavy alcohol consumption among HIV-infected patients and directly associated among participants from the general population, even after controlling for sex, age, skin color, and smoking. Conclusions Heavy alcohol consumption is more prevalent in the general population than among HIV-infected patients. Individuals aware about their disease may reduce the amount of alcoholic beverages consumption comparatively to healthy individuals from the general population. PMID:27362541

  16. Protein changes in CSF of HIV-infected patients: evidence for loss of neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Meeker, Rick B; Poulton, Winona; Markovic-Plese, Silva; Hall, Colin; Robertson, Kevin

    2011-06-01

    To begin to unravel the complexity of HIV-associated changes in the brain, broader, multifaceted analyses of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are needed that examine a wide range of proteins reflecting different functions. To provide the first broad profiles of protein changes in the CSF of HIV-infected patients, we used antibody arrays to measure 120 cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and other proteins. CSF from HIV-infected patients with a range of cognitive deficits was compared to CSF from uninfected, cognitively normal patients to begin to identify protein changes associated with HIV infection and neurological disease progression. Uninfected patients showed relatively consistent patterns of protein expression. Highly expressed proteins in CSF included monocyte chemotactic protein-1, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, adiponectin, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2. Inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were expressed at low levels. HIV-infected patients showed increases in inflammatory proteins (interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha), anti-inflammatory proteins (IL-13), and chemokines but these correlated poorly with neurological status. The strongest correlation with increasing severity of neurological disease was a decline in growth factors, particularly, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and NT-3. These studies illustrate that HIV infection is associated with parallel changes in both inflammatory and neuroprotective proteins in the CSF. The inverse relationship between growth factors and neurological disease severity suggests that a loss of growth factor neuroprotection may contribute to the development of neural damage and may provide useful markers of disease progression.

  17. Outcomes of HIV-infected patients receiving care at multiple clinics.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Baligh R; Schranz, Asher J; Momplaisir, Florence; Keller, Sara C; Gross, Robert; Frank, Ian; Metlay, Joshua P; Brady, Kathleen A

    2014-08-01

    Receiving care at multiple clinics may compromise the therapeutic patient-provider alliance and adversely affect the treatment of people living with HIV. We evaluated 12,759 HIV-infected adults in Philadelphia, PA between 2008 and 2010 to determine the effects of using multiple clinics for primary HIV care. Using generalized estimating equations with logistic regression, we examined the relationship between receiving care at multiple clinics (≥ 1 visit to two or more clinics during a calendar year) and two outcomes: (1) use of ART and (2) HIV viral load ≤ 200 copies/mL for patients on ART. Overall, 986 patients (8 %) received care at multiple clinics. The likelihood of attending multiple clinics was greater for younger patients, women, blacks, persons with public insurance, and for individuals in their first year of care. Adjusting for sociodemographic factors, patients receiving care at multiple clinics were less likely to use ART (AOR = 0.62, 95 % CI 0.55-0.71) and achieve HIV viral suppression (AOR = 0.78, 95 % CI 0.66-0.94) than individuals using one clinic. Qualitative data are needed to understand the reasons for visiting multiple clinics.

  18. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  19. Lay beliefs about hypertension among HIV-infected adults in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Temu, Tecla M; Bahiru, Ehete; Bukachi, Fredrick; Bloomfield, Gerald S; Muiruri, Peter; Farquhar, Carey

    2017-01-01

    Objective Hypertension affects 23% of Kenyans and is the most prevalent modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Despite this, hypertension awareness and treatment adherence is very low. We conducted a qualitative study to explore lay beliefs about hypertension among HIV-infected adults to inform the development of culture sensitive hypertension prevention and control program. Methods Eight focus group discussions were held for 53 HIV-infected adults at the HIV clinic in Kenya. Results Respondents had difficulties in describing hypertension. Hypertension was considered a temporary illness that is fatal and more serious than HIV. Stress was perceived as a main cause for hypertension with a large majority claiming stress reduction as the best treatment modality. Alcohol and tobacco use were not linked to hypertension. Obesity was cited as a cause of hypertension but weight control was not considered as a treatment modality even though the majority of our participants were overweight. Most participants did not believe hypertension could be prevented. Conclusion Our findings suggest a limited understanding of hypertension among people living with HIV and points to an urgent need to integrate hypertension education programmes in HIV care facilities in Kenya. To effect change, these programmes will need to tie in the culture meaning of hypertension.

  20. Prevalence of HIV infection among burn patients: is there a relationship with patients' outcomes?

    PubMed

    Salehi, Seyed Hamid; As'adi, Kamran; Tabatabaeenezhad, Seyedeh Azam; Naderan, Mohammad; Shoar, Saeed

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among acute burn patients and its impacts on patient's outcomes in an Iranian burn care hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary burn care hospital in Iran, retrospectively reviewing the data records of all patients admitted between February 2011 and February 2012. The HIV status of all the patients was assessed in relation to clinical outcomes and the patient's prognosis. A total of 969 patients were included in this study. Five patients (0·5%) were HIV positive, and all of them were male. Mean burn area was significantly larger in HIV-positive patients than the healthy group (P < 0·05). HIV-positive patients had a longer period of hospitalisation than HIV-negative patients (23·2 ± 16·3 versus 13·1 ± 14·6, P = 0·008). Nonetheless, the average number of procedures and the mortality rate did not significantly differ between the study groups (P > 0·05). Comparison of age, sex and burn extent between HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative cases also revealed similar results. Prevalence of HIV infection among our burn population was 0·5%; thus, HIV status may be related with more extensive injuries and longer hospital stays.

  1. Markers of Atherosclerosis and Inflammation and Mortality in Patients with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    MANGILI, Alexandra; POLAK, Joseph F.; QUACH, Lien A.; GERRIOR, Jul; WANKE, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected patients are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, which may be mediated in part by inflammation. Surrogate marker studies suggest an increased prevalence of vascular abnormalities in HIV infection. We examined the association of all-cause mortality in HIV-infected patients with carotid artery intima-media thickness (cIMT) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Design and Methods Baseline risk factors, cIMT and hsCRP were prospectively measured in 327 HIV-infected participants. Follow-up time with median of 3.1 years was calculated from baseline to death or censored dated 7/31/07. Cox Proportional Hazards models were used to study risk factors associated with mortality. Results Thirty eight (11.6 %) of participants have died since study enrollment. CIMT was significantly higher in those who died and decedents were significantly more likely to have cIMT above the 75th percentile. Those who died had higher hsCRP than those alive and more had hsCRP values above 3 mg/L. CD4 count was lower and log10 viral load was higher in decedents, but antiretroviral regimens were similar in both groups. CIMT and hsCRP levels were significantly associated with mortality (HR=2.74, 95% CI 1.26 to 5.97, p=0.01; HR=2.38, 95% CI 1.15 to 4.9, p=0.02). Conclusions Our study demonstrated a strong association of carotid IMT and hsCRP with all-cause death in this HIV-infected population despite being similar with respect to exposure to antiretroviral medications. Together these surrogate markers may be indices of chronic inflammation and unfavorable outcomes in HIV-positive patients. PMID:21130995

  2. Occurrence of occult HCV infection among Hiv infected patients in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Gatserelia, L; Sharvadze, L; Karchava, M; Dolmazashvili, E; Tsertsvadze, T

    2014-01-01

    Occult hepatitis C (OCI) infection has been known as detectable HCV-RNA in the liver or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the absence of detectable serum or plasma HCV-RNA. OCI has been detected among different patients groups worldwide, it has been found not only in chronic hepatitis patients of unknown origin, but also among several groups at risk for HCV infection (hemodialysis patients or family members of patients with occult HCV). This occult infection has been reported also in healthy populations without evidence of liver disease. Prevalence of occult Hepatitis C virus has not been investigated in Georgian population, where a rate of HCV infection is highest (6.7%) among Eastern European Countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of occult HCV infection among HIV infected individuals in Georgia. As a pilot study, we have selected three groups of HIV infected patients for analyses: Group 1- HIV infected patients without evidence of liver disease (n=98), group 2- HIV infected patients with cryptogenic liver disease (n=34) and group 3- HIV/HBV co infected patients (n=29). HCV RNA was tested in PBMCs samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction. HCV genotyping was performed by Line-probe assay based on reverse-hybridization technology. Liver fibrosis was evaluated by transient elastography (FibroScan®). HCV-RNA was detected in PBMCs specimens among 2 (2%) subjects from group 1, 4 (12%) subjects from group 2, and 9 (31%) subjects from group 3. HCV genotypes were determined for 14 of 15 OCI subjects resulting following genotype distribution: 6 (46%) - 1b, 3 (23%) - 2a/2c and 5 (38%) - 3a. One samples failed to be genotyped due to extremely low HCV viral load. Our data revealed the occurrence of occult HCV infection in HIV infected patients. No single HCV genotype was predominant in the present study. Liver fibrosis was found more frequently and the fibrosis score was significantly higher in OCI patients versus negative ones

  3. Neurocognitive functioning in a Romanian cohort of young adults with parenterally-acquired HIV-infection during childhood

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Donald R.; Burlacu, Ruxandra; Luca, Anca E.; Blaglosov, Andreea G.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Alexander, Terry J.; Umlauf, Anya; Grant, Igor; Duiculescu, Dan C.; Achim, Cristian L.; Marcotte, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The Romanian cohort can provide valuable information about the effect of chronic HIV-infection and exposure to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the developing brain, based on its unique characteristics: young adults infected parenterally with HIV clade F in the late 1980s and exposed to cART for a decade. We conducted a prospective study using a neuropsychological test battery validated in other international HIV cohorts, in order to evaluate the rate and severity of neurocognitive impairment in a group of young Romanian adults. The 49 HIV-infected (HIV+) participants and the 20 HIV negative (HIV−) controls were similar for age and gender, although the HIV− group tended to be more educated. We found higher cognitive impairment prevalence in the HIV+ group (59.1 %) versus the HIV− group (10 %), and the impairment rate remained significantly higher even when the groups were matched based on the educational level (38.7 % for the HIV+ group vs. 10.0 % for the HIV− controls; p=0.025). The nadir CD4 count was <200 in 71.4 % of patients, but at the time of neurocognitive assessment, 89.5 % of patients had normal immunological status and 81.8 % undetectable HIV load. Among the HIV-impaired group, 26 % of the participants had syndromic impairment while the other 74 % had asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment. We found a high prevalence of neurocognitive dysfunction in the Romanian young adults growing-up with HIV. The greatest HIV-related cognitive deficits were in the domains of executive and motor functioning, consistent with a frontosubcortical pattern. PMID:25185868

  4. Correlates of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Katryna; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Balderson, Benjamin H.; Mahoney, Christine; Catz, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-infected older African Americans experience higher mortality rates compared to their white counterparts. This disparity may be partly attributable to the differences in ART adherence by different racial and gender groups. The purpose of this study was to describe demographic, psychosocial, and HIV disease-related factors that influence ART adherence and to determine whether race and gender impact ART adherence among HIV-infected adults aged 50 years and older. Methods This descriptive study involved a secondary analysis of baseline data from 426 participants in “PRIME,” a telephone-based ART adherence and quality-of-life intervention trial. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between independent variables and ART adherence. Results Higher annual income and increased self-efficacy were associated with being ≥95% ART adherent. Race and gender were not associated with ART adherence. Conclusion These findings indicated that improvements in self-efficacy for taking ART may be an effective strategy to improve adherence regardless of race or gender. PMID:27071744

  5. Hepatitis B and A vaccination in HIV-infected adults: A review.

    PubMed

    Mena, G; García-Basteiro, A L; Bayas, J M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B and A account for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Immunization is the most effective means of preventing hepatitis B and A. However, the immune response to both hepatitis vaccines seems to be reduced in HIV-infected subjects. The aim of this review was to analyze the immunogenicity, safety, long-term protection and current recommendations of hepatitis B and A vaccination among HIV-infected adults. The factors most frequently associated with a deficient level of anti-HBs or IgG anti-HAV after vaccination are those related to immunosuppression (CD4 level and HIV RNA viral load) and to the frequency of administration and/or the amount of antigenic load per dose. The duration of the response to both HBV and HAV vaccines is associated with suppression of the viral load at vaccination and, in the case of HBV vaccination, with a higher level of antibodies after vaccination. In terms of safety, there is no evidence of more, or different, adverse effects compared with HIV-free individuals. Despite literature-based advice on the administration of alternative schedules, revaccination after the failure of primary vaccination, and the need for periodic re-evaluation of antibody levels, few firm recommendations are found in the leading guidelines.

  6. A randomized clinical trial of a coping improvement group intervention for HIV-infected older adults

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Hansen, Nathan; Kochman, Arlene; Heh, Victor; Neufeld, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    This research tested if a 12-session coping improvement group intervention (n = 104) reduced depressive symptoms in HIV-infected older adults compared to an interpersonal support group intervention (n = 105) and an individual therapy upon request (ITUR) control condition (n = 86). Participants were 295 HIV-infected men and women 50-plus years of age living in New York City, Cincinnati, OH, and Columbus, OH. Using A-CASI assessment methodology, participants provided data on their depressive symptoms using the Geriatric Depression Screening Scale (GDS) at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 4- and 8-month follow-up. Whether conducted with all participants (N = 295) or only a subset of participants diagnosed with mild, moderate, or severe depressive symptoms (N = 171), mixed models analyses of repeated measures found that both coping improvement and interpersonal support group intervention participants reported fewer depressive symptoms than ITUR controls at post-intervention, 4-month follow-up, and 8-month follow-up. The effect sizes of the differences between the two active interventions and the control group were greater when outcome analyses were limited to those participants with mild, moderate, or severe depressive symptoms. At no assessment period did coping improvement and interpersonal support group intervention participants differ in depressive symptoms. PMID:20857188

  7. A randomized clinical trial of a coping improvement group intervention for HIV-infected older adults.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy G; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Hansen, Nathan; Kochman, Arlene; Heh, Victor; Neufeld, Sharon

    2011-04-01

    This research tested if a 12-session coping improvement group intervention (n = 104) reduced depressive symptoms in HIV-infected older adults compared to an interpersonal support group intervention (n = 105) and an individual therapy upon request (ITUR) control condition (n = 86). Participants were 295 HIV-infected men and women 50-plus years of age living in New York City, Cincinnati, OH, and Columbus, OH. Using A-CASI assessment methodology, participants provided data on their depressive symptoms using the Geriatric Depression Screening Scale (GDS) at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 4- and 8-month follow-up. Whether conducted with all participants (N = 295) or only a subset of participants diagnosed with mild, moderate, or severe depressive symptoms (N = 171), mixed models analyses of repeated measures found that both coping improvement and interpersonal support group intervention participants reported fewer depressive symptoms than ITUR controls at post-intervention, 4-month follow-up, and 8-month follow-up. The effect sizes of the differences between the two active interventions and the control group were greater when outcome analyses were limited to those participants with mild, moderate, or severe depressive symptoms. At no assessment period did coping improvement and interpersonal support group intervention participants differ in depressive symptoms.

  8. First detection of autochthonous Zika virus transmission in a HIV-infected patient in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Guilherme A; Filippis, Ana Maria B; Mendonça, Marcos Cesar L; Sequeira, Patricia C; Siqueira, Andre M; Veloso, Valdilea G; Nogueira, Rita M; Brasil, Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    Since May 2015, Brazil's Ministry of Health has reported autochthonous transmission of Zika virus (ZIKV) in some states of the country. Simultaneous circulation of Dengue, Chikungunya and ZIKV in the country hinder both the diagnosis and the therapeutic approach of patients seeking care with acute febrile illnesses especially in patients with comorbidities. The association between HIV infection and endemic diseases has been described especially in tropical regions with varying levels of complications, although there has been no report of ZIKV in HIV-infected patients. We report the first autochthonous case of laboratory confirmed ZIKV infection in a HIV-infected patient in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He evolved with only mild symptoms and recovered well without major laboratory abnormalities. Phylogenetic analysis of the ZIKV detected in the patient sera clustered within the Asian clade. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that Zika virus co-infection is reported in a HIV-infected patient.

  9. Effect of SLCO1B1 Polymorphisms on Rifabutin Pharmacokinetics in African HIV-Infected Patients with Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Stefanie; Naiker, Suhashni; Reddy, Tarylee; Egan, Deirdre; Kellerman, Tracy; Wiesner, Lubbe; Owen, Andrew; McIlleron, Helen; Pym, Alexander

    2015-10-19

    Rifabutin, used to treat HIV-infected tuberculosis, shows highly variable drug exposure, complicating dosing. Effects of SLCO1B1 polymorphisms on rifabutin pharmacokinetics were investigated in 35 African HIV-infected tuberculosis patients after multiple doses. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling found that influential covariates for the pharmacokinetics were weight, sex, and a 30% increased bioavailability among heterozygous carriers of SLCO1B1 rs1104581 (previously associated with low rifampin concentrations). Larger studies are needed to understand the complex interactions of host genetics in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00640887.).

  10. Effect of SLCO1B1 Polymorphisms on Rifabutin Pharmacokinetics in African HIV-Infected Patients with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Naiker, Suhashni; Reddy, Tarylee; Egan, Deirdre; Kellerman, Tracy; Wiesner, Lubbe; Owen, Andrew; McIlleron, Helen; Pym, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Rifabutin, used to treat HIV-infected tuberculosis, shows highly variable drug exposure, complicating dosing. Effects of SLCO1B1 polymorphisms on rifabutin pharmacokinetics were investigated in 35 African HIV-infected tuberculosis patients after multiple doses. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling found that influential covariates for the pharmacokinetics were weight, sex, and a 30% increased bioavailability among heterozygous carriers of SLCO1B1 rs1104581 (previously associated with low rifampin concentrations). Larger studies are needed to understand the complex interactions of host genetics in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00640887.) PMID:26482301

  11. Rising Levels of HIV Infection in Older Adults in Eastern Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Negin, Joel; Gregson, Simon; Eaton, Jeffrey W.; Schur, Nadine; Takaruza, Albert; Mason, Peter; Nyamukapa, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Background With the scale-up of antiretroviral treatment across Africa, many people are living longer with HIV. Understanding the ageing of the HIV cohort and sexual behaviour among older adults are important for appropriately responding to the changing demographics of people living with HIV. Methods We used data from a large population-based open cohort in eastern Zimbabwe to examine HIV prevalence trends and incidence among those aged 45 years and older. Five survey rounds have been completed between 1998 and 2011. Incidence was analysed using midpoint between last negative and first positive HIV test. Results Across the survey rounds, 13,071 individuals were followed for 57,676 person years. While HIV prevalence among people aged 15–44 has fallen across the five rounds, HIV prevalence among those aged 45–54 has increased since the 2006–08 survey round. In the 2009–11 round, HIV prevalence among men aged 45–54 was 23.4% compared to 11.0% among those aged 15–44. HIV positive people aged 45–54 now represent more than 20% of all those living with HIV in Manicaland. Among those aged 45 years and older, there were 85 seroconversions in 11,999 person years for an HIV incidence of 0.708 per 100 person years. Analysis of cohort data and assessment of behavioural risk factors for HIV infection among older people shows significantly lower levels of condom use among older adults and a number of seroconversions past the age of 50. Conclusions The cohort of people living with HIV is ageing in Zimbabwe and the behaviour of older adults puts them at risk of HIV infection. Older adults must be included in both HIV prevention and treatment programs. PMID:27828979

  12. Trends in Epidemiology of COPD in HIV-Infected Patients in Spain (1997–2012)

    PubMed Central

    de Miguel-Díez, Javier; López-de-Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Puente-Maestu, Luis; Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to estimate trends of incidence of hospital admissions and in-hospital mortality (IHM) in HIV-infected patients with COPD in the combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) era in Spain (1997–2012). Methods A retrospective study with data from nationwide population-based COPD diagnoses in the Spanish Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS) was performed. We established groups according to their HIV and HCV infections: 1) HIV-uninfected patients; 2) HIV-infected patients (with or without HCV coinfection). Results 1,580,207 patients discharge with a COPD diagnosis were included in the study, 8902 of them were HIV-infected patients (5000 HIV-monoinfected patients and 3902 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients). The HIV-infected patients had higher incidence rates of hospital admissions for COPD than the HIV-uninfected patients during the study period. The HIV-monoinfected patients had higher rates of hospitalizations for COPD than the HIV/HCV-coinfected patients in the early-period cART (1997–1999), but these rates decreased in the first group and increased in the second, being even similar in both groups in the late-period cART (2004–2011). On the other hand, the HIV-infected patients with COPD had higher IHM than the HIV-uninfected patients with COPD. The mortality rates were higher in the HIV-monoinfected patients with COPD than in the HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with COPD in the early-period cART; however, in the late-period cART, the mortality rates trends seems higher in the HIV/HCV group. The likelihood of death in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with COPD was similar to than in HIV-monoinfected patients with COPD. Conclusions Incidence of hospital admissions for COPD and IHM have decreased among HIV-monoinfected individuals but have increased steadily among HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in the cART era. PMID:27846297

  13. Validation Protocol of Vitamin D Supplementation in Patients with HIV-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Güerri-Fernández, Roberto; Villar García, Judit; González Mena, Alicia; Guelar Grinberg, Ana; Montero, María Milagro; Sorli, Luisa; Calzado, Sonia; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Knobel Freud, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    Hypovitaminosis D and secondary hyperparathyroidism are frequent among HIV-infected patients. As there are no data about the best supplementation therapy both in treatment and in maintenance, we conducted an observational study of 300 HIV-infected patients for whom vitamin D and parathormone (PTH) had been measured in order to validate a protocol of vitamin D supplementation in patients with HIV-infection. Patients with vitamin D deficiency (defined as 25(OH)D < 10 ng/mL), insufficiency (defined as 25(OH)D < 20 ng/mL), or hyperparathyroidism (PTH > 65 pg/mL) were supplemented with cholecalciferol 16.000IU (0.266 mg) weekly (if deficiency) or fortnightly (if insufficiency or high PTH levels). Rates of normalization of 25(OH)D (levels above 20 ng/mL) and PTH levels (<65 pg/mL) were analyzed. Multivariate analysis of factors related to normalization was carried out. With a median follow-up of 2 years, 82.1% of patients with deficiency and 83.9% of cases with insufficiency reached levels above 20 ng/mL. However, only 67.2% of individuals with hyperparathyroidism at baseline reached target levels (<65 pg/mL). Independent factors for not achieving PTH objective were tenofovir (TDF) and protease inhibitors use. In HIV-infected patients with hypovitaminosis, the protocol of cholecalciferol supplementation normalized vitamin D levels regardless of antiretroviral regimen in a high proportion of patients but it was less effective to correct hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27699068

  14. Estimated Prevalence of Cryptococcus Antigenemia (CrAg) among HIV-Infected Adults with Advanced Immunosuppression in Namibia Justifies Routine Screening and Preemptive Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Makumbi, Boniface; Purfield, Anne; Ndjavera, Christophine; Mutandi, Gram; Maher, Andrew; Kaindjee-Tjituka, Francina; Kaplan, Jonathan E.; Park, Benjamin J.; Lowrance, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cryptococcal meningitis is common and associated with high mortality among HIV infected persons. The World Health Organization recommends that routine Cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) screening in ART-naïve adults with a CD4+ count <100 cells/μL followed by pre-emptive antifungal therapy for CrAg-positive patients be considered where CrAg prevalence is ≥3%. The prevalence of CrAg among HIV adults in Namibia is unknown. We estimated CrAg prevalence among HIV-infected adults receiving care in Namibia for the purpose of informing routine screening strategies. Methods The study design was cross-sectional. De-identified plasma specimens collected for routine CD4+ testing from HIV-infected adults enrolled in HIV care at 181 public health facilities from November 2013 to January 2014 were identified at the national reference laboratory. Remnant plasma from specimens with CD4+ counts <200 cells/μL were sampled and tested for CrAg using the IMMY® Lateral Flow Assay. CrAg prevalence was estimated and assessed for associations with age, sex, and CD4+ count. Results A total of 825 specimens were tested for CrAg. The median (IQR) age of patients from whom specimens were collected was 38 (32–46) years, 45.9% were female and 62.9% of the specimens had CD4 <100 cells/μL. CrAg prevalence was 3.3% overall and 3.9% and 2.3% among samples with CD4+ counts of CD4+<100 cells/μL and 100–200 cells/μL, respectively. CrAg positivity was significantly higher among patients with CD4+ cells/μL < 50 (7.2%, P = 0.001) relative to those with CD4 cells/μL 50–200 (2.2%). Conclusion This is the first study to estimate CrAg prevalence among HIV-infected patients in Namibia. CrAg prevalence of ≥3.0% among patients with CD4+<100 cells/μL justifies routine CrAg screening and preemptive treatment among HIV-infected in Namibia in line with WHO recommendations. Patients with CD4+<100 cells/μL have a significantly greater risk for CrAg positivity. Revised guidelines for ART in

  15. Alcohol use and non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Jaquet; Ekouevi Didier, K; Jules, Bashi; Maiga, Aboubakrine; Eugène, Messou; Moussa, Maiga; Alassane, Traore Hamar; Djimon, Zannou Marcel; Calixte, Guehi; Olivier, Ba-Gomis Franck; Albert, Minga; Gérard, Allou; Paul, Eholie Serge; Emmanuel, Bissagnene; Sasco Annie, J; Francois, Dabis

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association between alcohol use and adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment (HAART) among HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa. DESIGN and MEASURES Cross sectional survey conducted in eight adult HIV treatment centers from Benin, Côte d’Ivoire and Mali. During a four-week period, health workers administered the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test to HAART-treated patients and assessed treatment adherence using the AIDS Clinical Trials Group follow-up questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 2920 patients were enrolled with a median age of 38 years (IQR 32–45 years) and a median duration on HAART of 3 years (IQR 1–4 years). Overall, 91.8% of patients were identified as adherent to HAART. Non-adherence was associated with current drinking (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1–2.0), hazardous drinking (OR 4.7; 95% CI 2.6–8.6) and was inversely associated with a history of counseling on adherence (OR 0.7; 95% CI 0.5–0.9). CONCLUSION Alcohol consumption and hazardous drinking is associated with non-adherence to HAART among HIV-infected patients from West Africa. thus providing a framework for developing and reinforcing the necessary prevention and intervention strategies. PMID:20528816

  16. Immune Activation Response in Chronic HIV-Infected Patients: Influence of Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Mercedes; Romero-Cores, Paula; Montes-Oca, Monserrat; Martín-Aspas, Andrés; Soto-Cárdenas, María-José; Guerrero, Francisca; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Clotilde; Girón-González, José-Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We have analyzed the parameters (bacterial translocation, immune activation and regulation, presence of HCV coinfection) which could be implicated in an inappropriate immune response from individuals with chronic HIV infection. The influence of them on the evolution of CD4+ T cell count has been investigated. Patients and methods Seventy HIV-infected patients [monoinfected by HIV (n = 20), HCV-coinfected (with (n = 25) and without (n = 25) liver cirrhosis)] and 25 healthy controls were included. Median duration of HIV infection was 20 years. HIV- and HCV-related parameters, as well as markers relative to bacterial translocation, monocyte and lymphocyte activation and regulation were considered as independent variables. Dependent variables were the increase of CD4+ T cell count during the follow-up (12 months). Results Increased values of bacterial translocation, measured by lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, monocyte and lymphocyte activation markers and T regulatory lymphocytes were detected in HIV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Serum sCD14 and IL-6 were increased in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with liver cirrhosis in comparison with those with chronic hepatitis or HIV-monoinfected individuals. Time with undetectable HIV load was not related with these parameters. The presence of cirrhosis was negatively associated with a CD4+ T cell count increase. Conclusion In patients with a chronic HIV infection, a persistent increase of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and monocyte and lymphocyte modifications are present. HCV-related cirrhosis is associated with more elevated serum concentrations of monocyte-derived markers. Cirrhosis influences the continued immune reconstitution of these patients. PMID:25775475

  17. Clinical prediction and diagnosis of neurosyphilis in HIV-infected patients with early Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Dumaresq, Jeannot; Langevin, Stéphanie; Gagnon, Simon; Serhir, Bouchra; Deligne, Benoît; Tremblay, Cécile; Tsang, Raymond S W; Fortin, Claude; Coutlée, François; Roger, Michel

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis of neurosyphilis (NS) is a challenge, especially in HIV-infected patients, and the criteria for deciding when to perform a lumbar puncture (LP) in HIV-infected patients with syphilis are controversial. We retrospectively reviewed demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from 122 cases of HIV-infected patients with documented early syphilis who underwent an LP to rule out NS, and we evaluated 3 laboratory-developed validated real-time PCR assays, the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay, the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) assay, and the line immunoassay INNO-LIA Syphilis, for the diagnosis of NS from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of these patients. NS was defined by a reactive CSF-VDRL test result and/or a CSF white blood cell (WBC) count of >20 cells/μl. Thirty of the 122 patients (24.6%) had early NS. Headache, visual symptoms, a CD4 cell count of <500 cells/μl, and viremia, as defined by an HIV-1 RNA count of ≥50 copies/ml, were associated with NS in multivariate analysis (P = <0.001 for each factor). Blood serum rapid plasma reagin (RPR) titers were not associated with early NS (P = 0.575). For the diagnosis of NS, the PCR, FTA-ABS, TPPA, and INNO-LIA assays had sensitivities of 58%, 100%, 68%, and 100%, specificities of 67%, 12%, 49%, and 13%, and negative predictive values of 85%, 100%, 84%, and 100%, respectively. Visual disturbances, headache, uncontrolled HIV-1 viremia, and a CD4 cell count of <500 cells/μl were predictors of NS in HIV-infected patients with early syphilis, while blood serum RPR titers were not; therefore, RPR titers should not be used as the sole criterion for deciding whether to perform an LP in early syphilis. When applied to CSF samples, the INNO-LIA Syphilis assay easily helped rule out NS.

  18. Pulmonary mucormycosis due to Lichtheimia ramosa in a patient with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Murat; Ergin, Cağrı; Bir, Ferda; Hilmioğlu-Polat, Süleyha; Gümral, Ramazan; Necan, Ceyda; Koçyiğit, Ali; Sayın-Kutlu, Selda

    2014-08-01

    Mucormycosis is increasingly common in patients with risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, neutropenia, and corticosteroid therapy. However, mucormycosis seems to be less common in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared to patients with other risk factors. Despite their lower virulence, Lichtheimia species should be regarded as emerging pathogens among Mucoralean fungi. We report a fatal case of pulmonary mucormycosis due to Lichtheimia ramosa in a 52-year-old man with an end-stage HIV infection. He had a cachectic appearance and his CD4 count was 8 cells/mm(3). The fungal infection was diagnosed based on a positive sputum culture with histopathologic confirmation. The fungus was resistant to caspofungin, anidulafungin, and voriconazole [minimum inhibitory concentration (MCI) >32 µg/ml], whereas the E test MIC values of itraconazole, posaconazole, and amphotericin B were 0.38, 0.38, and 0.5 µg/ml, respectively. Although intravenous drug use is the main risk factor for the development of mucormycosis in HIV-infected patients, it may also develop in patients with low CD4 count, opportunistic infections and/or additional diseases, such as Kaposi's sarcoma or severe immunodeficiency, as in our case.

  19. The prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in HIV-infected patients in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Stensvold, Christen Rune; Nielsen, Susanne Dam; Badsberg, Jens-Henrik; Engberg, Jørgen; Friis-Møller, Nina; Nielsen, Sanne Søgaard; Nielsen, Henrik Vedel; Friis-Møller, Alice

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, faecal specimens from 96 HIV-infected patients were submitted to microbiological analyses, including microscopy and polymerase chain reaction for protozoa and enteropathogenic bacteria. Results of microbiological analyses were compared with self-reported gastrointestinal complaints collected using a validated questionnaire. Thirty-two (33%) patients were positive for parasites. However, opportunistic parasites (Isospora and Cryptosporidium) were detected in only 2 instances. Entamoeba dispar was detected in 10 cases, 9 of which represented men who have sex with men (MSM). Despite generally low HIV RNA loads and high CD4+ T-cell counts, 42% of the 76 patients reporting symptoms complained of diarrhoea, 31% of whom were parasite-positive. The presence of diarrhoea was not associated with the presence or absence of parasites; neither was it associated with receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in general, or protease inhibitors (PI) in particular. A CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/mm³ was not associated with parasitic infection or with diarrhoea. The data show that diarrhoea is a common symptom among HIV-infected patients in Denmark, but do not indicate that the diarrhoea is due to intestinal parasites.

  20. Statins in HIV-Infected Patients: Potential Beneficial Effects and Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Enrique; Masiá, Mar; Marín, Irene; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2017-02-09

    Patients living with HIV have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease that is considered to be the result of an interaction between traditional cardiovascular risk factors, particularly smoking and dyslipidemia, and persistent chronic inflammation and immune activation associated with HIV infection, along with side effects of antiretroviral therapy. In the general population, the administration of statins has been associated with a reduction in cardiovascular disease-associated mortality, and these drugs are among the most common class of medication prescribed in high-income countries. The beneficial effect of statins extends beyond reducing cholesterol levels as they have been shown to have anti- inflammatory, antithrombotic, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, and vasodilatory effects, and to improve endothelial function. Despite the widespread use of statins in the general population, cohort studies show that these drugs are underutilized in HIV-infected patients, probably due to safety concerns by clinicians and limited data evaluating clinical outcomes in patients on antiretroviral therapy. In this article we review and update the most important clinical studies of statins in HIV- infected patients, describe their side effects and interaction profiles, and discuss the anti-atherosclerotic and pleiotropic effects of these drugs. Finally, we propose recommendations for clinical use of statins in patients living with HIV.

  1. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-induced Steven Johnson syndrome in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Taqi, Syed Ahmed; Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Nilofer, Angadi Rajasab; Sami, Lateef Begum

    2012-01-01

    Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) is a widely prescribed antimicrobial for the management of several uncomplicated infections. It is commonly used for the treatment and prophylaxis of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in the HIV-infected population. The adverse reaction to TMP/SMX is more frequent and severe in HIV-infected patients as compared to the general population. Here, we report a case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) secondary to TMP/SMX. The patient had a generalized cutaneous reaction with involvement of the eyes, oral cavity, and genitals. He had elevated hepatic alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase enzyme. TMP/SMX therapy was stopped and supportive treatment was started. His condition improved after eight days of stopping TMP/SMX therapy.

  2. [MEDICO-SOCIAL CHARACTERISTIC OF HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS RECEIVING ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY].

    PubMed

    Rostova, N B; Ivanova, E S; Ivanova, Yu N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was medico-social characteristic of HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in 2006-2012 based on the logical and comparative analysis of medical cards with the use of systemic informational approach. The study yielded the medico-social characteristic of HIV-infected patients suggesting the presence of concomitant disorders requiring prescription of several medications to be used either simultaneously or alternatively (in case of poor efficiency or side effects of primary treatment). The data obtained indicate the necessity of optimization of the choice and prescription of pharmacotherapy taking account of its effects and safety based on the analysis of the potential and cost-effectiveness of different therapeutic modalities. The results of the study can be used to develop organizational measures for the improvement of public drug supply.

  3. Pharmacokinetic interactions of CEP-1347 and atazanavir in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qing; Gelbard, Harris A.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Gendelman, Howard E.; Peterson, Derick R.; DiFrancesco, Robin; Hochreiter, Jill S.; Morse, Gene D.

    2013-01-01

    CEP-1347 is a potent inhibitor of mixed lineage kinase (MLK), which was investigated for ameliorating HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. CEP-1347 and atazanavir pharmacokinetics were determined when CEP-1347 50 mg twice daily was administered to HIV-infected patients (n=20) receiving combination antiretroviral therapy including atazanavir and ritonavir (ATV/RTV, 300/100 mg) once daily continuously. Co-administration of CEP-1347 and ATV/RTV resulted with significant changes in pharmacokinetics of ATV but not RTV. Specifically, an increase in ATV accumulation ratio of 15 % (p=0.007) and a prolongation of T1/2 from 12.7 to 15.9 h (p=0.002) were observed. The results suggested that co-administration of CEP-1347 with ATV/RTV in HIV-infected patients might result in limited impact on ATV but not on RTV pharmacokinetics. PMID:23737347

  4. [THE MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES OF DIAGNOSTIC OF GINGIVITIS AND PERIODONTITIS IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N; Iagodina, E V; Trefilova, Yu A; Ippolitov, E V

    2016-01-01

    The examination was carried out in the Moscow clinical infectious hospital No 2 concerning 102 patients with verified diagnosis "AIDS-infection" and seropositive according results of detection of anti-HIV-antibodies in blood serum. The study was organized to analyze rate ofcolonization of gums with virulent anaerobic bacteria in HIV-infected (polymerase chain reaction) and antibodies to HIV in gingival fluid (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). It is established that in HIV-infected patients, in scrape from gingival sulcus dominate anaerobic bacteria P. gigngivalis and A. ctinomycetemcomitans and in case of periodontitis--P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. The received data permits recommending the test-system "Multident-5" for polymerase chain reaction diagnostic. The reagents kit "Calypte®HIV-1/2"--for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay gingival fluid. The results of polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have no impact of concomitant stomatological (periodontitis, gingivitis) and somatic pathology.

  5. Executive summary: Prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections and other coinfections in HIV-infected patients: May 2015.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, José Antonio; Rubio, Rafael; Aguirrebengoa, Koldo; Arribas, Jose Ramón; Baraia-Etxaburu, Josu; Gutiérrez, Félix; Lopez Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Losa, Juan Emilio; Miró, José Ma; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez Molina, José; Podzamczer, Daniel; Pulido, Federico; Riera, Melchor; Rivero, Antonio; Sanz Moreno, José; Amador, Concha; Antela, Antonio; Arazo, Piedad; Arrizabalaga, Julio; Bachiller, Pablo; Barros, Carlos; Berenguer, Juan; Caylá, Joan; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Knobel, Hernando; Locutura, Jaime; López Aldeguer, José; Llibre, Josep Ma; Lozano, Fernando; Mallolas, Josep; Malmierca, Eduardo; Miralles, Celia; Miralles, Pilar; Muñoz, Agustín; Ocampo, Agustín; Olalla, Julián; Pérez, Inés; Pérez Elías, Ma Jesús; Pérez Arellano, José Luis; Portilla, Joaquín; Ribera, Esteban; Rodríguez, Francisco; Santín, Miguel; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Téllez, Ma Jesús; Torralba, Miguel; Valencia, Eulalia; Von Wichmann, Miguel Angel

    2016-10-01

    Opportunistic infections continue to be a cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. They often arise because of severe immunosuppression resulting from poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy, failure of antiretroviral therapy, or unawareness of HIV infection by patients whose first clinical manifestation of AIDS is an opportunistic infection. The present article is an executive summary of the document that updates the previous recommendations on the prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV-infected patients, namely, infections by parasites, fungi, viruses, mycobacteria, and bacteria, as well as imported infections. The article also addresses immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This document is intended for all professionals who work in clinical practice in the field of HIV infection.

  6. Toxoplasma gondii infection and cerebral toxoplasmosis in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Chioccola, Vera Lucia; Vidal, José Ernesto; Su, Chunlei

    2009-12-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients, particularly from developing countries. This article summarizes current literature on cerebral toxoplasmosis. It focuses on: Toxoplasma gondii genetic diversity and its possible relationship with disease presentation; host responses to the parasite antigens; host immunosupression in HIV and cerebral toxoplasmosis as well as different diagnostic methods; clinical and radiological features; treatment; and the direction that studies on cerebral toxoplasmosis will likely take in the future.

  7. A case of secondary syphilis mimicking palmoplantar psoriasis in HIV infected patient.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; Brito, Arival Cardoso de; Nascimento, Bianca Angelina Macêdo do; Carvalho, Alessandra Haber; Nascimento, Manoel Dias do

    2015-01-01

    Due to diverse clinical and histopathological presentations, diagnosis of secondary syphilis can occasionally prove challenging. Variable clinical presentations of secondary syphilis in HIV disease may result in an incorrect diagnosis and an inappropriate treatment regimen. Similarly, the histology of secondary syphilitic lesions may show considerable variation, depending on the clinical morphology of the eruption. We report a case of secondary syphilis in an HIV infected patient with cutaneous palmoplantar lesions simulating palmoplantar psoriasis.

  8. [Species composition of yeast-like fungi isolated from HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, O I; Pokas, O V; V'ialykh, Zh E; Vasylenko, L H; Koltukova, N V

    2007-01-01

    The strains of yeast-like fungi isolated from HIV-infected people in 1994-2005 were examined. It was found that a share of non-albicans strains increased up to 46.2%, in monoculture they were present in 40% of examined patients, Candida glabrata (21.3%) being the dominant species. The definition of proteolytic activity as one of the factors of pathogenicity showed that it was typical of 90% of museum strains and 58% of fresh isolates.

  9. Disseminated Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in HIV-Infected Patients, Oregon, USA, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Jennifer H.; Henkle, Emily; Schafer, Sean D.; Winthrop, Kevin L.

    2017-01-01

    We determined disseminated nontuberculous mycobacteria incidence in the HIV-infected population of Oregon, USA, during 2007–2012 by using statewide laboratory surveillance. We identified 37 disseminated nontuberculous mycobacteria cases among 7,349 patients with median annual incidence of 110/100,000 HIV person-years and the highest incidence in those with CD4 counts <50 cells/mm3 (5,300/100,000 person-years). PMID:28221103

  10. Comorbidities of HIV infection and health care seeking behavior among HIV infected patients attending public sector healthcare facilities in KwaZulu-Natal: A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Nlooto, Manimbulu

    2017-01-01

    Background HIV-infected people may present with co-infections, comorbidities, and side effects associated with antiretroviral therapy. This study explored the prevalence of comorbid health problems and determined the extent of the use of traditional medicine for treatment of co-infections, comorbidities of HIV infection and side effects. Methods A cross sectional study, using researcher-administered questionnaires, was carried out among HIV-infected patients in eight public sector healthcare facilities in KwaZulu-Natal between April and October 1024. Self-reports of comorbidities, co-infections and side effects were analyzed with respect to factors such as age, gender, race, and health care seeking behavior including the use of traditional medicine. Cross-tabulations were conducted to test the association between factors and the use of traditional medicine, using Pearson chi-squared (χ2) test. Simple and multiple logistic regression models tested the association of the use of traditional medicine with age, gender, race, side effects and comorbidities. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated. Missing values were handled, defined and treated as missing values in the final analysis. Results Overall, 29.5% (n = 516) of the survey participants reported having other comorbidities and or co-infections besides their HIV condition. Same participants reported two or more comorbidities. Almost forty percent of participants (208/531, 39.17%) reported having hypertension as the most noninfectious comorbidity while 21.65% of participants (115/531) had tuberculosis accounting for the most infectious comorbidity. Almost eight percent of participants (142/1748, 8.12%) reported using traditional medicine after starting with cART. Sixty out of 142 participants (60/142, 42.25%) on cART resorted to the use of traditional medicine for the management of comorbidities and or co-infections of their HIV infection. Overall, 311 out of 1748 participants (17.80%) complained

  11. Antibody response of HIV-infected patients to latent, cerebral and recently acquired toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Machala, L; Malý, M; Hrdá, S; Rozsypal, H; Stanková, M; Kodym, P

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study with 626 HIV-infected patients was to evaluate the capability of serological tests in diagnosing the presence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV-infected patients, as well as the potential impact of various treatment regimes on serological results. Low IgG antibody levels and stable or declining titres predominated. IgM positivity occurred in ten patients (one seroconversion, seven latent, two cerebral toxoplasmosis). Complement fixation test (CFT) titres >or=1:32 imply that the relative risk of cerebral toxoplasmosis is 6.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-32.5) but with a predictive value of only 14.0% (95% CI 5.3-27.9). Values of specific antibodies are not biassed by antiretroviral treatment and/or prophylaxis for toxoplasmosis, and the detection of specific antibodies is very useful in the identification of T. gondii infection in the HIV-infected population, but the role of serology in predicting the clinical manifestation of T. gondii infection is limited.

  12. The Effect of Latent Toxoplasma gondii Infection on the Immune Response in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Beran, Ondrej; Kodym, Petr; Maly, Marek; Davidova, Alzbeta; Reinvartova, Gabriela; Jilich, David; Holub, Michal; Rozsypal, Hanus

    2015-01-01

    A relationship between latent toxoplasmosis and the immune system during HIV disease is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this follow-up study was to characterize immunological parameters in HIV-infected patients with latent toxoplasmosis and noninfected individuals. A total of 101 HIV-infected patients were enrolled in the study. The patients were classified into two groups based on anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies: a group of 55 toxoplasma-positive persons (TP) and a group of 46 toxoplasma-negative persons (TN). Absolute counts of several lymphocyte subsets decreased in the TP group, namely, T cells (p = 0.007), B cells (p = 0.002), NK cells (p = 0.009), CD4 T cells (p = 0.028), and CD8 T cells (p = 0.004). On the other hand, the percentage of CD8 T cells expressing CD38 and HLA-DR significantly increased during the follow-up in the TP group (p = 0.003, p = 0.042, resp.) as well as the intensity of CD38 and HLA-DR expression (MFI) on CD8 T cells (p = 0.001, p = 0.057, resp.). In the TN group, analysis of the kinetics of immunological parameters revealed no significant changes over time. In conclusion, the results suggest that latent T. gondii infection modulates the immune response during HIV infection.

  13. YELLOW FEVER PREVENTION STRATEGIES AWARENESS AMONG HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS IN SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Avelino-Silva, Vivian Iida; Francelino, Hilario Sousa; Kallás, Esper Georges

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vaccination is the main preventive strategy against Yellow Fever (YF), which is a public health concern in Brazil. However, HIV-infected patients might have insufficient knowledge regarding YF, YF prevention, and vaccines in general. Methods: In this questionnaire-based study, data from 158 HIV-infected individuals were addressed in three distinct outpatient clinics in São Paulo. Information was collected on demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as patients' knowledge of vaccines, YF and YF preventive strategies. In addition, individual YF vaccine recommendations and vaccine status were investigated. Results: Although most participants adequately ascertain the vaccine as the main prevention strategy against YF, few participants were aware of the severity and lack of specific treatment for YF. Discrepancy in YF vaccine (patients who should have taken the vaccine, but did not) was observed in 18.8% of participants. Conclusion: YF is an important and preventable public health concern, and these results demonstrate that more information is necessary for the HIV-infected population. PMID:25229222

  14. Physical Function Impairment of Older, HIV-Infected Adults Is Associated with Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin Response

    PubMed Central

    Allshouse, Amanda A.; Rapaport, Eric; Palmer, Brent E.; Wilson, Cara C.; Weinberg, Adriana; MaWhinney, Samantha; Campbell, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is associated with poor outcomes, including physical function impairment, in older HIV-uninfected adults. Whether CMV is associated with physical functional impairment in HIV-infected adults is unknown. The primary objective of this study was to determine the relationship between CMV-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses with functional impairment in well-controlled HIV infection. In a case-control study, low-function cases were matched by age, gender, and time from HIV diagnosis to high-function controls. Quantitative CMV IgG and %CMV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells (interferon-γ expression following CMV pp65 stimulation) were used to estimate physical function. Among 30 low-function cases and 48 high-function matched controls, CMV IgG ranged from <10 to 8,830 EU/ml, including four controls with results <10 EU/ml. Each log10 increase in CMV IgG was associated with 5-fold greater odds of low function (p=0.01); these findings were robust to adjustment for concomitant CD4+ count, tobacco use, and age; to exclusion of subjects with CMV IgG <10 EU/ml; and to adjustment for hepatitis C viremia. %CMV-specific CD4+ or CD8+ T cells were not associated with low function. In bivariable models, the relationship between CMV IgG and physical function was attenuated and was no longer significant when including IL-6, CD4/CD8 ratio, or the Veterans Aging Cohort Study Index score. High levels of CMV-specific IgG were associated with impaired physical function. Attenuation of the strength of this association in bivariable models suggests an indirect relationship mediated by systemic inflammation and immune suppression. PMID:26061347

  15. Cancer Knowledge and Opportunities for Education Among HIV-Infected Patients in an Urban Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Lydia H; Stafford, Kristen A; Fantry, Lori E; Gilliam, Bruce L; Riedel, David J

    2015-06-01

    HIV-infected patients frequently present with advanced stage cancer. It is possible that late stage presentation may be related to lack of cancer knowledge and/or barriers to care. Questionnaires were administered to 285 adult HIV-infected patients to evaluate knowledge of cancer risk factors and symptoms and barriers to care between 2011 and 2012. Differences in mean and percent scores by group were assessed using a t test for independent samples and chi-square analysis, respectively. Respondents were predominantly male (64%), African-American (86%), and low income (60% < $10,000/year). Thirty-four (12%) had been diagnosed with cancer, and 169 (59%) had a family history of cancer. The mean knowledge score was 17.5 out of 24 questions (73%). Mean scores were not significantly different by sex, age, race, or income. Respondents with a college education scored significantly higher than those with less than a high school education (p < 0.01). In unadjusted analysis, a higher proportion of patients with a personal/family history of cancer (74%) scored in the highest quartile (>70% correct) compared to those without any personal history of cancer (62%) (p = 0.03). There was a higher level of cancer knowledge in this population compared to studies that have evaluated the HIV-uninfected population. Nevertheless, there were knowledge deficits, suggesting the need for further education about cancer to improve earlier detection rates and, ultimately, outcomes.

  16. Evaluation of five conventional and molecular approaches for diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis in non-HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Zhou, Jie; Li, Juan; Li, Meng; Sun, Jun; Fang, Wen J; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Xu, Jianping; Boekhout, Teun; Liao, Wan Q; Pan, Wei H

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a life-threatening mycosis primarily occurring in HIV-infected individuals. Recently, non-HIV-infected hosts were increasingly reported to form a considerable proportion. However, the majority of the reported studies on the diagnosis of CM patients were performed on HIV-infected patients. For evaluation of various diagnostic approaches for CM in non-HIV-infected patients, a range of conventional and molecular assays used for diagnosis of CM were verified on 85 clinical CSFs from non-HIV-infected CM patients, including India ink staining, culture, a newly developed loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), the lateral flow assay (LFA) of cryptococcal antigen detection and a qPCR assay. The LFA had the highest positive detection rate (97.6%; 95% CI, 91.8-99.7%) in non-HIV-infected CM patients, followed by the LAMP (87.1%; 95% CI, 78.0-93.4%), the qPCR (80.0%; 95% CI, 69.9-87.9%), India ink staining (70.6%; 95% CI, 59.7-80.0%) and culture (35.3%; 95% CI, 25.2-46.4%). All culture positive specimens were correctly identified by the LFA.

  17. Patient Experiences following Acute HIV Infection Diagnosis and Counseling in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wolpaw, Benjamin J.; Mathews, Catherine; Mtshizana, Yolisa; Chopra, Mickey; Hardie, Diana; Lurie, Mark N.; De Azevedo, Virginia; Jennings, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Individuals in the acute stage of HIV infection (AHI) have an elevated potential to transmit HIV and play a critical role in the growth of the epidemic. Routine identification and counseling of individuals during AHI could decrease transmission behavior during this key period. However, diagnosis of AHI may present challenges distinct from those experienced through diagnosis of established HIV infection. A study was conducted in a public youth clinic outside of Cape Town, South Africa, to identify and counsel individuals with acute stage HIV infection. In-depth interviews were conducted with patients following diagnosis. After counseling, patients were accepting of the testing regimen used to diagnose AHI. They used the knowledge of having been recently infected to identify the source of their infection, but did not retain or place importance on information regarding the increased ability to transmit HIV during the acute stage. Future interventions directed at the reduction of HIV transmission following diagnosis with AHI will need to find ways of making this information more salient, possibly through more culturally meaningful educational approaches. PMID:25153674

  18. Pericardial effusion of HIV-infected patients - results of a prospective multicenter cohort study in the era of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Previous publications described pericardial effusion as one of the most common HlV-associated cardiac affiliations. The aim of the current study was to investigate if pericardial effusion still has a relevant meaning of HIV-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy. Methods The HIV-HEART (HIV-infection and HEART disease) study is a cardiology driven, prospective and multicenter cohort study. Outpatients with a known HIV-infection were recruited during a 20 month period in a consecutive manner from September 2004 to May 2006. The study comprehends classic parameters of HIV-infection, comprising CD4-cell count (cluster of differentiation) and virus load, as well as non-invasive tests of cardiac diseases, including a thorough transthoracic echocardiography. Results 802 HIV-infected patients (female: 16.6%) with a mean age of 44.2 ± 10.3 years, were included. Duration of HIV-infection since initial diagnosis was 7.6 ± 5.8 years. Of all participants, 85.2% received antiretroviral therapy. Virus load was detectable in 34.4% and CD4 - cell count was in 12.4% less than 200 cells/μL. Pericardial effusions were present in only two patients of the analysed population. None of the participants had signs of a relevant cardiovascular impairment by pericardial effusion. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the era of antiretroviral therapy goes along with low rates of pericardial effusions in HIV-infected outpatients. Our findings are in contrast to the results of publications, performed before the common use of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:22027640

  19. Spectrum of tuberculosis in patients with HIV infection in British Columbia: report of 40 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniewska-Kosela, M; FitzGerald, J M; Vedal, S; Allen, E A; Schechter, M T; Lawson, L; Phillips, P; Black, W; Montaner, J S

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the clinical features, treatment and outcome of all known cases of tuberculosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in British Columbia between 1984 and 1990. DESIGN: Retrospective case review. SETTING: Provincial tuberculosis registry and university-affiliated HIV clinic. PATIENTS: All people with HIV infection in whom active tuberculosis was diagnosed during the study period. RESULTS: All 40 patients identified were men; their mean age was 38 years. Of the subjects 30 (75%) were homosexual, 6 (15%) were homosexual and used intravenous drugs, 2 (5%) just used intravenous drugs, and 1 (2%) had had heterosexual contact with prostitutes; for the remaining subject the risk factor for HIV infection was not established. In all cases cultures of specimens from 15 body sources yielded Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thirty-five of the patients had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and five had HIV infection uncomplicated except for tuberculosis. In 28 (70%) of the cases no AIDS-defining disease had previously been diagnosed, and in 23 (58%) extrapulmonary tuberculosis represented the AIDS-defining disease. Symptoms at presentation included weight loss (in 80% of the cases), fever (in 75%), cough (in 70%) and night sweats (in 55%). The mean CD4 lymphocyte count was 0.2 x 10(9)/L (in 15 cases). Tuberculin skin test results were positive in 8 of 16 cases. The most striking radiologic finding was intrathoracic adenopathy. All except one of the 36 patients who received appropriate treatment responded favourably at first. Adverse reactions necessitating changes in treatment occurred in 12 (33%) of the cases. Relapse occurred after completion of therapy in two cases (one at 3 weeks and the other at 9 months after treatment was stopped). Tuberculosis was the cause of death in five cases. CONCLUSIONS: Tuberculosis in people with HIV infection commonly presents as extrapulmonary disease and precedes or coincides with other AIDS

  20. In vivo analysis of Fas/FasL interactions in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Badley, A D; Dockrell, D H; Algeciras, A; Ziesmer, S; Landay, A; Lederman, M M; Connick, E; Kessler, H; Kuritzkes, D; Lynch, D H; Roche, P; Yagita, H; Paya, C V

    1998-01-01

    Recent insights into the pharmacological control of HIV replication and the molecular mechanisms of peripheral T cells homeostasis allowed us to investigate in vivo the mechanisms mediating T cell depletion in HIV-infected patients. Before the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a high degree of lymphoid tissue apoptosis is present, which is reduced upon HAART initiation (P < 0.001) and directly correlates with reduction of viral load and increases of peripheral T lymphocytes (P < 0.01). Because Fas/FasL interactions play a key role in peripheral T lymphocyte homeostasis, we investigated the susceptibility to Fas-mediated apoptosis in peripheral T lymphocytes and of FasL expression in lymphoid tissue before and during HAART. High levels of Fas-susceptibility found in peripheral CD4 T lymphocytes before HAART were significantly reduced after HAART, coinciding with decreases in viral load (P = 0.018) and increases in peripheral CD4 T lymphocyte counts (P < 0.01). However, the increased FasL expression in the lymphoid tissue of HIV-infected individuals was not reduced after HAART. These results demonstrate that lymphoid tissue apoptosis directly correlates with viral load and peripheral T lymphocyte numbers, and suggest that HIV-induced susceptibility to Fas-dependent apoptosis may play a key role in the regulation of T cell homeostasis in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:9649560

  1. Durability of response to vaccination against viral hepatitis A in HIV-infected patients: a 5-year observation.

    PubMed

    Jabłonowska, E; Kuydowicz, J

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of total antibodies to hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV-T) in the group of HIV-positive adults in Lodz region of Poland, and to evaluate the response and long-term immunity after vaccination against hepatitis A virus. In the group of 234 HIV-infected patients, 72 persons (30.8%) were anti-HAV-T positive (>20 IU/L). In multivariate analysis, two independent factors associated with the presence of anti-HAV-T were identified: the age of patients (OR = 1.07) and the presence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus (OR = 2.87). Vaccination was completed in 83 patients. Good response (anti-HAV-T >20 IU/L one month after the booster dose) was obtained in 79.5% of patients. In patients with CD4 >200 cells/µL in multivariate analysis only presence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus was a prognostic factor for the response to vaccination (OR = 0.13). Among responders available for the follow-up, 82% (50 out of 61) had detectable anti-HAV-T at 1 year and 75.5% (37 out of 49) at 5 years. Our results demonstrate that most of the studied HIV-positive patients were susceptible to hepatitis A virus infection. Most HIV-infected adults with high CD4 counts had a durable response even up to 5 years after vaccination. Patients with a HIV/hepatitis C virus coinfection displayed a worse response to vaccination.

  2. Frequency of tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in HIV infected patients from Bogota, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Murcia-Aranguren, Martha I; Gómez-Marin, Jorge E; Alvarado, Fernando S; Bustillo, José G; de Mendivelson, Ellen; Gómez, Bertha; León, Clara I; Triana, William A; Vargas, Erwing A; Rodríguez, Edgar

    2001-01-01

    Background The prevalence of infections by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species in the HIV-infected patient population in Colombia was uncertain despite some pilot studies. We determined the frequency of isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and of non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species in diverse body fluids of HIV-infected patients in Bogota, Colombia. Methods Patients who attended the three major HIV/AIDS healthcare centres in Bogota were prospectively studied over a six month period. A total of 286 patients were enrolled, 20% of them were hospitalized at some point during the study. Sixty four percent (64%) were classified as stage C, 25% as stage B, and 11% as stage A (CDC staging system, 1993). A total of 1,622 clinical samples (mostly paired samples of blood, sputum, stool, and urine) were processed for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) stain and culture. Results Overall 43 of 1,622 cultures (2.6%) were positive for mycobacteria. Twenty-two sputum samples were positive. Four patients were diagnosed with M. tuberculosis (1.4%). All isolates of M. tuberculosis were sensitive to common anti-tuberculous drugs. M. avium was isolated in thirteen patients (4.5%), but only in three of them the cultures originated from blood. The other isolates were obtained from stool, urine or sputum samples. In three cases, direct AFB smears of blood were positive. Two patients presented simultaneously with M. tuberculosis and M. avium. Conclusions Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium infections are frequent in HIV infected patients in Bogota. The diagnostic sensitivity for infection with tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria can be increased when diverse body fluids are processed from each patient. PMID:11722797

  3. Thinking about HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, Evelyn P; Siberry, George K; Hutton, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of HIV can occur during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and breastfeeding. Evidence-based interventions (routine screening of pregnant women, initiation of antiretroviral drugs for mother's treatment or prevention of MTCT, and avoiding breastfeeding) have reduced transmission rates in the United States from 25% to 30% to less than 2%. Triple-drug combination antiretroviral therapy effectively controls HIV infection and improves survival and quality of life for HIV-infected children and adolescents. Initial regimens use combinations of two NRTIs together with an NNRTI or a ritonavir-boosted PI. These regimens have been shown to increase CD4 counts and achieve virologic suppression. Prevention of serious and opportunistic infections reduces morbidity and mortality in children and adolescents who have HIV infection. Recommendations for immunizations and chemoprophylaxis vary with the patient's CD4 count. Condoms made from latex, polyurethane, or other synthetic materials have been shown to decrease the transmission of STIs, including HIV infection.

  4. Receipt of HIV/STD Prevention Counseling by HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    MIZUNO, Yuko; ZHU, Julia; CREPAZ, Nicole; BEER, Linda; PURCELL, David W.; JOHNSON, Christopher H.; VALVERDE, Eduardo E.; SKARBINSKI, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Objective Guidelines recommend risk-reduction counseling by HIV providers to all HIV-infected persons. Among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States, we estimated prevalence of exposure to three types of HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk-reduction interventions and described the characteristics of persons who received these interventions. Design Data were from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a supplemental HIV surveillance system designed to produce nationally representative estimates of behavioral and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Methods Descriptive analyses were conducted to estimate the exposure to each type of HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess associations between the selected correlates with each exposure variable. Results About 44% of participants reported a one-on-one conversation with a health care provider about HIV/STD prevention, 30% with a prevention program worker, 16% reported participation in a small group risk-reduction intervention, and 52% reported receiving at least one of the three interventions in the past 12 months. Minority race/ethnicity, low income, and risky sexual behavior consistently predicted greater intervention exposure. However, 39% of persons who reported risky sex did not receive any HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. Conclusions HIV-infected persons in care with fewer resources or those who engaged in risk behaviors were more likely to receive HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. However, less than half of HIV-infected persons in care received HIV/STD prevention counseling from their provider, an intervention that has been shown to be effective and is supported by guidelines. PMID:24056066

  5. Pharmacogenetics of plasma efavirenz exposure in HIV-infected adults and children in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sinxadi, Phumla Z; Leger, Paul D; McIlleron, Helen M; Smith, Peter J; Dave, Joel A; Levitt, Naomi S; Maartens, Gary; Haas, David W

    2015-01-01

    Aims Genetic factors, notably CYP2B6 516G→T [rs3745274] and 983T→C [rs28399499], explain much of the interindividual variability in efavirenz pharmacokinetics, but data from Africa are limited. We characterized relationships between genetic polymorphisms and plasma efavirenz concentrations in HIV-infected Black South African adults and children. Methods Steady-state mid-dosing interval efavirenz concentrations were measured. We genotyped 241 polymorphisms in genes potentially relevant to efavirenz metabolism and transport, including ABCB1, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, NR1I2 and NR1I3. Results Among 113 participants (59 adults and 54 children), minor allele frequencies for CYP2B6 516G→T, 983T→C, and 15582C→T [rs4803419] were 0.36, 0.07, and 0.09, respectively. Based on composite CYP2B6 15582/516/983 genotype, there were 33 extensive metabolizer, 62 intermediate metabolizer and 18 slow metabolizer genotypes. Median (IQR) mid-dose efavirenz concentrations were 1.44 (1.21–1.93) µg ml–1, 2.08 (1.68–2.94) µg ml–1 and 7.26 (4.82–8.34) µg ml–1 for extensive, intermediate and slow metabolizers, respectively. In univariate analyses, a model that included composite genotype best predicted efavirenz concentrations (β = 0.28, 95% CI 0.21, 0.35, P = 2.4 × 10–11). Among individual CYP2B6 polymorphisms, 516G→T best predicted efavirenz concentrations (β = 0.22, 95% CI 0.13, 0.30, P = 1.27 × 10−6). There was also associations with 983T→C (β = 0.27, 95% CI 0.10, 0.44, P = 0.002) and 15582C→T (β = 0.11, 95% CI 0.01, 0.22, P = 0.04). Associations were consistent in adults and children. No other polymorphisms were independently associated with efavirenz concentrations. Conclusions Composite CYP2B6 genotype based on CYP2B6 516G→T, 983T→C, and 15582C→T best described efavirenz exposure in HIV-infected Black South African adults and children. PMID:25611810

  6. A Longitudinal Analysis of the Impact of Physical Activity on Neurocognitive Functioning Among HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Catherine A; Marquine, María J; Fazeli, Pariya L; Umlauf, Anya; Henry, Brook L; Zlatar, Zvinka; Montoya, Jessica L; Ellis, Ronald J; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J

    2016-12-19

    Higher levels of physical activity (PA) have been linked to better neurocognitive functioning in many populations. The current study examines the longitudinal association between PA and neurocognitive functioning among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected persons. Community-dwelling adults (N = 291) self-reported level of PA and completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery at two to four study visits (Mean follow-up time = 2.6 years). Participants were divided into three PA groups: "No PA" (no PA at any visit), "consistent PA" (PA at ≥50% of visits), and "inconsistent PA" (PA < 50% of visits). A mixed effect model, adjusting for significant covariates showed that all PA groups had statistically significant, yet modest, neurocognitive decline over time; and, the consistent PA group began with, and maintained, significantly better neurocognitive function compared to the other two PA groups. This effect was evident among both HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected persons, despite the fact that HIV-infected persons showed lower baseline neurocognitive function. PA is a modifiable lifestyle behavior that may help to protect against neurocognitive impairment regardless of HIV status, however, given the proportion of HIV-infected individuals who evidence neurocognitive difficulties, a focus on increasing PA seems warranted.

  7. Neurocognitive Function in HIV-Infected Patients: Comparison of Two Methods to Define Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Winston, Alan; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Day, John; Wiggins, Rebecca; Quah, Say Pheng; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Fleck, Sue; Dunn, David; Accoroni, Alex; Paton, Nicholas I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare two definitions of neurocognitive impairment (NCI) in a large clinical trial of effectively-treated HIV-infected adults at baseline. Methods Hopkins Verbal Learning test-Revised (HVLT-R), Colour Trail (CTT) and Grooved Pegboard (GPT) tests were applied exploring five cognitive domains. Raw scores were transformed into Z-scores and NCI defined as summary NPZ-5 score one standard deviation below the mean of the normative dataset (i.e. <−1SD) or Z-scores <−1SD in at least two individual domains (categorical scale). Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to explore the contribution of individual tests to the total variance. Results Mean NPZ-5 score was −0.72 (SD 0.98) and 178/548 (32%) participants had NPZ-5 scores <−1SD. When impairment was defined as <−1SD in at least two individual tests, 283 (52%) patients were impaired. Strong correlations between the two components of the HVLT-R test (learning/recall) (r = 0.73), and the CTT and (attention/executive functioning) (r = 0.66) were observed. PCA showed a clustering with three components accounting for 88% of the total variance. When patients who scored <−1SD only in two correlated tests were considered as not impaired, prevalence of NCI was 43%. When correlated test scores were averaged, 36% of participants had NPZ-3 scores <−1SD and 32% underperformed in at least two individual tests. Conclusion Controlling for differential contribution of individual test-scores on the overall performance and the level of correlation between components of the test battery used appear to be important when testing cognitive function. These two factors are likely to affect both summary scores and categorical scales in defining cognitive impairment. Trial registration EUDRACT: 2007-006448-23 and ISRCTN04857074. PMID:25078406

  8. Rural habitat as risk factor for hepatitis E virus seroconversion in HIV-infected patients: A prospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Juarez, A; Cuenca-Lopez, F; Martinez-Peinado, A; Camacho, A; Real, L M; Frias, M; Gordon, A; Cantisán, S; Torre-Cisneros, J; Pineda, J A; Rivero, A

    2017-02-25

    Our objective was to determine the incidence and clinical manifestations of acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) in HIV-infected patients. A prospective longitudinal study including HIV-infected HEV-seronegative patients was conducted; HEV seroconversion (to IgG and/or IgM) was the main outcome variable. All patients were tested for HEV antibodies every 3-6 months. For patients who developed HEV seroconversion, a data collection protocol was followed to identify associated clinical manifestations and analytical alterations. A total of 627 patients (89.9%) were followed during a median of 11.96 months (IQR: 8.52-14.52 months) and formed the study population. Forty-one patients developed detectable anti-HEV antibodies (7.2 cases per 100 patients/year). Our study found a high incidence of HEV in HIV-infected patients in southern Spain strongly associated with a rural habitat.

  9. COPD in HIV-Infected Patients: CD4 Cell Count Highly Correlated

    PubMed Central

    Guillouet-de-Salvador, Francine; Valerio, Laure; Puglièse, Pascal; Naqvi, Alissa; Durant, Jacques; Demonchy, Elisa; Perbost, Isabelle; Cua, Eric; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Roger, Pierre-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background COPD is a frequent and significant cause of respiratory morbidity in HIV-infected patients despite the control of HIV. We aimed to analyze the factors correlated with COPD in this population to evaluate the existence of specific indicators of vulnerability in this population. Methods and Findings 623 HIV-infected outpatients were enrolled during one year. This population was characterised by a dedicated questionnaire and electronic patient records. COPD screening was performed according to recommended spirometric criteria. The prevalence of COPD was 9.0%. Age and smoking were independently correlated with COPD (OR, 1.61 per 10 years increase, P = 0.007; OR, 1.28 per 10 pack-year increase, P = 0.003, respectively). Body mass index (BMI) and CD4 cell-count were independently and negatively correlated with COPD (OR, 0.78, P < 0.001; 0R, 0.77 per 100 cell/mm3 increase, P < 0.001, respectively). Among COPD patients, 77% did not know their diagnosis. Five COPD-patients never smoked and 44.2% did not have any respiratory symptoms and so were not eligible to perform a spirometry according to the guidelines. Conclusions In addition to known risk factors, immune defect through CD4 cell count was independently and strongly correlated with COPD. COPD is largely underdiagnosed and thus unmanaged. However, early management and urgent smoking cessation are essential to improve prognosis. Clinicians’ awareness on the particular vulnerability for COPD in HIV-infected patients is crucial. Moreover, indications to perform conventional spirometry to diagnose COPD may include more parameters than tobacco-smoking and respiratory complaints with a particular concern toward patients with a profound CD4 cell count defect. PMID:28056048

  10. Carotid intima media thickness is associated with body fat abnormalities in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-infected patients may be at increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events, and lipodystrophy is generally associated with proatherogenic metabolic disturbances. Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) has been used as a surrogate marker for atherosclerosis and it has been shown to be an independent risk factor for CV disease. Our objective was to evaluate cIMT in HIV-infected patients on combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART) with and without lipodystrophy defined by fat mass ratio (L-FMR), and to determine the association of lipodystrophy and visceral obesity [(visceral (VAT), subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) volume and VAT/SAT ratio, objectively evaluated by CT scan] with cIMT. Methods Cross-sectional study of 199 HIV-infected patients. Body composition by DXA and abdominal CT, lipids, blood pressure, inflammatory markers, and cIMT by ultrasonography were performed. L-FMR was defined as the ratio of the percentage of trunk fat mass to the percentage of lower limb fat mass by DXA. Categorical variables were compared using the chi-square or Fisher’s exact test. Spearman correlation coefficients were estimated to study the association between cIMT and clinical and metabolic characteristics. Means of cIMT, adjusted for age, were calculated, using generalized linear models. Results L-FMR was present in 41.2% of patients and cIMT was higher in these patients [0.81 (0.24) vs. 0.76 (0.25); p = 0.037)]. Lipodystrophic patients had higher VAT and VAT/SAT ratio and lower SAT. cIMT was associated with lipodystrophy evaluated by FMR, trunk fat, total abdominal fat, VAT and VAT/SAT ratio. No association was observed between cIMT and leg fat mass. Using generalized linear models, cIMT means were adjusted for age and no significant differences remained after this adjustment. The adjusted mean of cIMT was 0.787 (95% CI: 0.751-0.823) in patients without lipodystrophy, and 0.775 (95% CI: 0.732-0.817) in those with lipodystrophy (p = 0.671). Conclusions

  11. Dumping HIV-infected patients from private practice.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacman, S. H.

    1991-01-01

    Physicians in private practice believe they have the freedom to accept or exclude patients. While this may be true on an individual basis, discrimination towards a patient subpopulation violates professional principles and the law. Once the doctor-patient relationship is formed, physicians may not unilaterally and arbitrarily withdraw from the relationship based solely on the patient's human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serostatus. This article reviews civil and human rights laws along with professional position statements on excluding individuals from care because of their serostatus. PMID:1766019

  12. HIV-infected presumptive tuberculosis patients without tuberculosis: How many are eligible for antiretroviral therapy in Karnataka, India?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay M V; Singarajipura, Anil; Naik, Balaji; Guddemane, Deepak K; Patel, Yogesh; Shastri, Suresh; Kumar, Sunil; Deshmukh, Rajesh; Rewari, B B; Harries, Anthony David

    2017-03-01

    For certain subgroups within people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) [active tuberculosis (TB), pregnant women, children <5years old, and serodiscordant couples], the World Health Organization recommends antiretroviral therapy (ART) irrespective of CD4 count. Another subgroup which has received increased attention is "HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB". In this study, we assess the proportion of HIV-infected presumptive TB patients eligible for ART in Karnataka State (population 60million), India. This was a cross-sectional analysis of data of HIV-infected presumptive TB patients diagnosed in May 2015 abstracted from national TB and HIV program records. Of 42,585 presumptive TB patients, 28,964 (68%) were tested for HIV and 2262 (8%) were HIV positive. Of the latter, 377 (17%) had active TB. Of 1885 "presumptive TB patients without active TB", 1100 (58%) were already receiving ART. Of the remaining 785 who were not receiving ART, 617 (79%) were assessed for ART eligibility and of those, 548 (89%) were eligible for ART. About 90% of "HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB" were eligible for ART. This evidence supports a public health approach of starting all "HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB" on ART irrespective of CD4 count in line with global thinking about 'test and treat'.

  13. [HIV infection in tuberculosis patients in Madagascar. Situation in 1-93].

    PubMed

    Morvan, J M; Auregan, G; Rasamindrakotroka, A J; de Ravel, T; Roux, J F

    1994-01-01

    In Madagascar, the estimated incidence of tuberculosis is high (320 per 100,000) when human immunodeficiency virus (VIH) infection progress slowly. The authors have studied HIV seroprevalence in a group of tubercular patients and in two reference groups (general population and outpatients of the Clinical Biology Centre of Institut Pasteur). Circulation of HIV1 virus was observed with a low prevalence rate in all the 3 groups. There was no significant difference between tubercular patients and healthy population. Tubercular people ought to be a watch group for the epidemiological surveillance of HIV infection evolution in Madagascar.

  14. Biomarkers and Bacterial Pneumonia Risk in Patients with Treated HIV Infection: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjerk, Sonja M.; Baker, Jason V.; Emery, Sean; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Angus, Brian; Gordin, Fred M.; Pett, Sarah L.; Stephan, Christoph; Kunisaki, Ken M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advances in HIV treatment, bacterial pneumonia continues to cause considerable morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. Studies of biomarker associations with bacterial pneumonia risk in treated HIV-infected patients do not currently exist. Methods We performed a nested, matched, case-control study among participants randomized to continuous combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy trial. Patients who developed bacterial pneumonia (cases) and patients without bacterial pneumonia (controls) were matched 1∶1 on clinical center, smoking status, age, and baseline cART use. Baseline levels of Club Cell Secretory Protein 16 (CC16), Surfactant Protein D (SP-D), C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and d-dimer were compared between cases and controls. Results Cases (n = 72) and controls (n = 72) were 25.7% female, 51.4% black, 65.3% current smokers, 9.7% diabetic, 36.1% co-infected with Hepatitis B/C, and 75.0% were on cART at baseline. Median (IQR) age was 45 (41, 51) years with CD4+ count of 553 (436, 690) cells/mm3. Baseline CC16 and SP-D were similar between cases and controls, but hsCRP was significantly higher in cases than controls (2.94 µg/mL in cases vs. 1.93 µg/mL in controls; p = 0.02). IL-6 and d-dimer levels were also higher in cases compared to controls, though differences were not statistically significant (p-value 0.06 and 0.10, respectively). Conclusions In patients with cART-treated HIV infection, higher levels of systemic inflammatory markers were associated with increased bacterial pneumonia risk, while two pulmonary-specific inflammatory biomarkers, CC16 and SP-D, were not associated with bacterial pneumonia risk. PMID:23457535

  15. Immune response to 2009 H1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected adults in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chotirosniramit, Nuntisa; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Aurpibul, Linda; Thetket, Sunida; Kosashunhanan, Natthapol; Supindham, Taweewat; Wongkulab, Panuwat; Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai; Chaiklang, Kanokporn; Kaewthip, Oranitcha; Sroysuwan, Piyathida; Wongthanee, Antika; Lerdsamran, Hatairat; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Suparatpinyo, Khuanchai

    2012-01-01

    Background: In late 2009, the Thai Ministry of Public Health provided two million doses of the monovalent pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 vaccine (Panenza® Sanofi Pasteur), which was the only vaccine formulation available in Thailand, to persons at risk of more severe manifestations of the disease including HIV infection. Several studies have shown poorer immune responses to the 2009 H1N1 vaccines in HIV-infected individuals. There are limited data in this population in resource-limited countries. Results: At day 28 post-vaccination, seroconversion was found in 32.0% (95%CI 24.5 - 40.2) of the HIV-infected group and 35.0% (95%CI 15.4- 59.2) of the healthy controls (p = 0.79). Seroprotection rate was observed in 33.3% (95%CI 25.8–41.6) and 35.0% (95%CI 15.4–59.2) of the HIV-infected group and the control group, respectively (p = 0.88). Among HIV-infected participants, the strongest factor associated with vaccine response was age 42 y or younger (p = 0.05). Methods: We evaluated the immunogenicity of a single, 15µg/0.5ml dose of a monovalent, non-adjuvanted 2009 H1N1 vaccine in 150 HIV-infected Thai adults and 20 healthy controls. Immunogenicity was measured by hemagglutination inhibition assay (HI) at baseline and 28 d after vaccination. Seroconversion was defined as 1) pre-vaccination HI titer < 1:10 and post-vaccination HI titer ≥ 1:40, or 2) pre-vaccination HI titer ≥ 1:10 and a minimum of 4-fold rise in post-vaccination HI titer. Seroprotection was defined as a post-vaccination HI titer of ≥ 1:40. Conclusions: A low seroconversion rate to the 2009 H1N1 vaccine in both study groups, corresponding with data from trials in the region, may suggest that the vaccine used in our study is not very immunogenic. Further studies on different vaccines, dosing, adjuvants, or schedule strategies may be needed to achieve effective immunization in HIV-infected population. PMID:22906932

  16. [Prevalence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*57:01 in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Deveci, Aydın; Çoban, Ahmet Yılmaz; Durupınar, Belma

    2016-10-01

    Deaths related with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections have been decreased by the introduction of combined anti-retroviral therapy (ART) into the clinical practice. Combined ART usually consists of two nucleoside/nucleotide analogs reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) that is called backbone and a third drug that belongs to either non-nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), protease inhibitors (PI), integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI) or entry inhibitors. During abacavir therapy which is a member of NRTI, hypersensitivity reactions can occur approximately 4-9% of the patients that lead difficulties for the management of HIV infections. It is known that, the development of hypersensitivity reactions to abacavir is strongly associated with the presence of HLA-B*57:01 allel, therefore, HLA-B*57:01 screening should be performed prior to abacavir use. Since there is no data on HLA-B*57:01 prevalence in HIV-1-infected cases in Turkey, this is the first study that screened HLA-B*57:01 allels among HIV-1 infected adults in Turkey. A total of 100 HIV-1-infected patients (81 male, 19 female; mean age: 42.31±11.97 years) who have admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology of Ondokuz Mayıs University School of Medicine, Samsun, Turkey, were included in the study. Genomic DNAs were isolated from the blood samples of patients by using a commercial spin column procedure (QIAamp® DNA Blood Mini Kit; QIAGEN GmbH, Germany). HLA-B*57:01 genotyping was performed by the method of sequence-specific primer (SSP)-based amplification using a commercial OlerupSSP® HLA-B*57:01 high-resolution test kit (Olerup SSP AB, Sweden) according to the manufacturer's protocol. The products of polymerase chain reaction were electrophoresed on a 2% agarose gel stained with Olerup SSP GelRed dye (Olerup SSP AB, Sweden), and the bands were evaluated under UV light. In our study, three (2 male, 1 female) out of 100 patients

  17. An Active Lifestyle is Associated with Better Neurocognitive Functioning in Adults Living with HIV-infection

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pariya L.; Woods, Steven Paul; Heaton, Robert K.; Umlauf, Anya; Gouaux, Ben; Rosario, Debra; Moore, Raeanne C.; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of healthy adults show that engagement in physical, social, and mental activities is associated with better cognitive outcomes, suggesting these activities may increase cognitive reserve. Given the prevalence and real-world impact of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), the present study examined the association between neurocognitive outcomes and self-reported proxies for physical exercise, social activity, and mental activity (employment was used as a proxy for mental activity) among 139 HIV-infected adults (Mage = 48.7; 48% age 50+). Participants completed a neuromedical and neuropsychological battery and were classified based on the number of self-reported active lifestyle factors (ALFs; 0 to 3), including physical exercise, social activity, and current employment. The association between ALFs and both demographically-adjusted average neuropsychological T-scores and HAND diagnoses were examined. Results revealed that an increased number of ALFs was associated with better global neurocognitive performance as well as a lower prevalence of HAND. These cross-sectional findings suggest that an active engagement in life may bolster neurocognitive functioning, perhaps by enhancing cognitive and/or brain reserve. However, an alternative explanation might be that persons with better neurocognitive functioning are more inclined and able to engage in these life activities. Future studies should utilize neuroimaging methodology, longitudinal data, and interventional approaches to establish cause-effect relationships and uncover the neural mechanisms whereby physical, social, and mental stimulation may protect neurocognition via cognitive reserve among those living with HIV. PMID:24554483

  18. Hepatitis B Infection, Viral Load and Resistance in HIV-Infected Patients in Mozambique and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Wandeler, Gilles; Musukuma, Kalo; Zürcher, Samuel; Vinikoor, Michael J.; Llenas-García, Jara; Aly, Mussa M.; Mulenga, Lloyd; Chi, Benjamin H.; Ehmer, Jochen; Hobbins, Michael A.; Bolton-Moore, Carolyn; Hoffmann, Christopher J.; Egger, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background Few data on the virological determinants of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are available from southern Africa. Methods We enrolled consecutive HIV-infected adult patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) at two urban clinics in Zambia and four rural clinics in Northern Mozambique between May 2013 and August 2014. HBsAg screening was performed using the Determine® rapid test. Quantitative real-time PCR and HBV sequencing were performed in HBsAg-positive patients. Risk factors for HBV infection were evaluated using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests and associations between baseline characteristics and high level HBV replication explored in multivariable logistic regression. Results Seventy-eight of 1,032 participants in Mozambique (7.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.1–9.3) and 90 of 797 in Zambia (11.3%, 95% CI: 9.3–13.4) were HBsAg-positive. HBsAg-positive individuals were less likely to be female compared to HBsAg-negative ones (52.3% vs. 66.1%, p<0.001). Among 156 (92.9%) HBsAg-positive patients with an available measurement, median HBV viral load was 13,645 IU/mL (interquartile range: 192–8,617,488 IU/mL) and 77 (49.4%) had high values (>20,000 UI/mL). HBsAg-positive individuals had higher levels of ALT and AST compared to HBsAg-negative ones (both p<0.001). In multivariable analyses, male sex (adjusted odds ratio: 2.59, 95% CI: 1.22–5.53) and CD4 cell count below 200/μl (2.58, 1.20–5.54) were associated with high HBV DNA. HBV genotypes A1 (58.8%) and E (38.2%) were most prevalent. Four patients had probable resistance to lamivudine and/or entecavir. Conclusion One half of HBsAg-positive patients demonstrated high HBV viremia, supporting the early initiation of tenofovir-containing ART in HIV/HBV-coinfected adults. PMID:27032097

  19. High Incidence of Zidovudine Induced Anaemia in HIV Infected Patients in Southern Odisha.

    PubMed

    Dash, Kaibalya Ranjan; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Hui, P K; Behera, S K; Nayak, S N

    2015-06-01

    Zidovudine (AZT), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor was the first breakthrough in AIDS therapy in 1990.This study was conducted with an aim to determine prevalence of AZT induced anaemia in HIV infected patients initiated on AZT containing anti retroviral therapy(ART) regimen and also to find out any risk factor for causing AZT induced anaemia. Study was carried out in ART centre, M.K.C.G, MCH, Berhampur between Jan 2009 and Dec 2011. HIV infected patients registered at ART centre were treated according to National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO) guidelines. Patients (n = 1221) with Hb >8 gm/dl were prescribed AZT based ART regimen. Patients having anaemia (<8 gm/dl) were excluded from the study. Correlation of baseline characteristics (age, sex, weight, Hb level, CD4 count, World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage) with risk of developing anaemia was also calculated. 178 (14.6 %) patients on AZT regimen developed anaemia. Patients with low CD4 count were more prone to develop severe anaemia. Age, sex, weight, WHO clinical stage had no relation with development of anaemia. Incidence of AZT induced anaemia was very high and patients having low CD4 count were more susceptible to develop anaemia.

  20. Response of HIV-infected patients with syphilis to therapy with penicillin or intravenous ceftriaxone

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ceftriaxone is commonly used as an alternative antibiotic drug in treating syphilis but clinical data on its efficacy are limited. Objective: To evaluate the response of HIV-infected patients with active syphilis to treatment with penicillin or ceftriaxone. Methods A retrospective study involving 24 consecutive patients with a positive Veneral Disease Research Laboratory test (VDRL) and at least one specific treponemal test. 12 patients were treated with different regimens of high-dose penicillin G for at least 2 weeks. Another 12 patients were treated with ceftriaxone 1-2 g per day intravenously for 10-21 days. Results After a median follow up of 18,3 months all patients of the penicillin-treated group and 11 of 12 ceftriaxone-treated patients showed a ≥ 4-fold decline in VDRL-titers; 91% of them already within 6 months after therapy. Conclusion Our serological data demonstrate a comparable efficacy of currently recommened penicillin and ceftriaxone treatment regimens for active syphilis in HIV-infected patients. PMID:21463980

  1. Hepatitis B and/or C co-infection in HIV infected patients: A study in a tertiary care centre from south India

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Naval; Joshi, Nayana; Raju, Y.S.N.; Kumar, Ajit; Teja, Vijay D.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals results in increased hepatic complications. We undertook this study to evaluate the presence of HBV and HCV in HIV infected individuals attending a tertiary care centre in southern India. Methods: A total of 120 cases with HIV infection and 120 healthy adult control subjects were included in the study. Samples were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV antibodies by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. HBsAg and anti-HCV positive serum samples were further tested for the presence of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), anti-HBe antibodies, HBV-DNA and HCV-RNA. Results: The most common mode of transmission was sexual promiscuity (79%), followed by spouse positivity (15%) and history of blood transfusion (6%). HBsAg and anti-HCV were positive in 18 (15%) and 10 (8.3%) HIV infected patients; the corresponding figures in healthy controls being 2 (1.6%) 0 (0%) (P<0.0001). Among HIV infected patients, presence of HBeAg and anti-HBe antibodies was seen in 33.3 and 55.5 per cent, respectively; both HBeAg and anti-HBe antibodies were negative in 11.1 per cent. HBV DNA and HCV RNA were positive in 10 of 18 and in all anti-HCV positive samples. Triple infection with HBV, HCV and HIV was seen in three patients. CD4+ T-lymphocyte count less than 200/μl was seen in 22 of 28 co-infected cases. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of our study showed presence of HBV (15%) and HCV (8.3%) co-infections in HIV positive patients which was higher than that seen in HIV negative controls. Co-infection with HBV and HCV is a common problem in HIV infected patients in India. Hence, all HIV patients need to be routinely tested for markers of HBV and HCV infection. PMID:24521641

  2. Hepatitis A vaccination and immunological parameters in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Kourkounti, Sofia; Papaizos, Vassilios; Leuow, Kirsten; Kordosis, Theodoros; Antoniou, Christina

    2013-10-01

    Vaccination against hepatitis A is an important intervention to prevent disease in HIV-patients. There are insufficient data on the association of the response to hepatitis A vaccine with immunological parameters, including subpopulations of T-cells. We studied HIV-infected adults with CD4 T-cells>200 cells/mm(3) who received two doses of hepatitis A vaccine (Havrix or Vaqta). The counts of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4+T-cells, NK, NK CD8+, NK CD8 - cells, and HIV RNA were measured at the time of first dose administration and one month after the end of the vaccination period. The geometric mean titer of antibodies to hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV) and factors affecting response were evaluated. 113 patients (50 antiretroviral treatment-naïve and 63 treatment-experienced) were enrolled in the study. There was no change in the immunological parameters and in the HIV-RNA post-vaccination, except for a decrease in CD8 and in double positive CD4+CD8+t-cell count. The immune response and geometric mean titer of anti-HAV were similar among treated and naïve patients (78% vs. 76% and 237 mIU/mL vs. 158 mIU/mL). Vaccine response was achieved in 71% of patients with CD4=200-499 cells/mm(3) compared with 80% of participants with CD4 ≥500 cells/mm(3) (p>0.05). Logistic regression revealed that immunological cells tested do not affect response differently in treatment-naïve vs. experienced patients. The only factor affecting response is the CD4 T-cell count at vaccination (OR 1.320; 95% CI 1.052-1.656; p=0.016). Patients with CD4 T-cell count ≥500 cells/mm(3) were 4.3 times more likely to respond to the vaccine than patients with CD4 T-cell count 200-499 cells/mm(3) (p=0.005). In conclusion, successful vaccination is associated with CD4 T-cells. The count of other immune cells or the administration of antiretroviral therapy does not predict response to hepatitis A vaccine in HIV patient with baseline CD4 T-cell>200 cells/mm(3).

  3. Optimal management of oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis in patients living with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Jose A

    2010-01-01

    Mucocutaneous candidiasis is frequently one of the first signs of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Over 90% of patients with AIDS will develop oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) at some time during their illness. Although numerous antifungal agents are available, azoles, both topical (clotrimazole) and systemic (fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole) have replaced older topical antifungals (gentian violet and nystatin) in the management of oropharyngeal candidiasis in these patients. The systemic azoles, are generally safe and effective agents in HIV-infected patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis. A constant concern in these patients is relapse, which is dependent on the degree of immunosuppression commonly seen after topical therapy, rather than with systemic azole therapy. Candida esophagitis (CE) is also an important concern since it occurs in more than 10% of patients with AIDS and can lead to a decrease in oral intake and associated weight loss. Fluconazole has become the most widely used antifungal in the management of mucosal candidiasis. However, itraconazole and posaconazole have similar clinical response rates as fluconazole and are also effective alternative agents. In patients with fluconazole-refractory mucosal candidiasis, treatment options now include itraconazole solution, voriconazole, posaconazole, and the newer echinocandins (caspofungin, micafungin, and anidulafungin). PMID:22096388

  4. [Intestinal parasitic infections and leishmaniasis in patients with HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Camacho, A; López-Vélez, R; Muñoz Sanz, A; Labarga-Echevarría, P

    1998-01-01

    Intestinal parasite infections are very frequent in HIV patients with severe immunodeficiency (CD4 < 100/mm3) causing chronic diarrhea and malabsorption in the majority of cases. The most frequent microorganisms are microsporidia and Cryptosporidium parvum while Cyclospora cayetanensis and Isospora belli are more prevalent in subtropical and tropical areas and rare in industrialized areas. The diagnosis can be obtained by stool examination (differences in size and form of cysts), although microsporidia is frequently demonstrated by intestinal biopsy and/or duodenal aspirate. The treatment with cotrimoxazole for C. cayetanensis and I. belli is very effective and does not present any problems in the acute phase, however, due to a high percentage of relapses the treatment must be maintained while the patient is in a severe immunodeficiency state. E. intestinalis usually responds satisfactorily to albendazole while E. bieneusi is resistant to some drugs except in some cases (albendazole, atovaquone ad fumagillin). C parvum is also resistant to most medicaments but shows an adequate or partial clinical: response to paramomicine (< 50%). When there is no response, it is advised to administer octreotide since in half the cases the response is positive either total or partial. Nowadays with the use of protease inhibitors in the antiretroviral treatment a decrease in the incidence of these infections has been observed (microsporidia and C. parvum) even in the stools samples taken from the patients who had them before. As primary prophylaxis for C. parvum, it is better to avoid been exposed to the microorganism taking into account the 1997 preventive measures recommended by the USPHS/IDSA Prevention of Opportunistic Infections Working Group. The coinfection Leishmania-HIV is frequent in the mediterranean area. The most common specie is L. infantum. The incidence is most frequent in immunosuppressed patients (CD4 < 200 mm3) and in parenteral drug addicts. The symptomatology

  5. [Management of HIV infected patients. Experience of the Liege University Hospital Center].

    PubMed

    Nkoghe, D; Léonard, P; Nnegue, S; Moutschen, M; Demonty, J

    2002-08-01

    We present data from 112 patients followed in the Infectious Diseases Unit of the Liege University Hospital (CHU Sart-Tilman). The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on surrogate immunological and virological parameters. The study also aimed at determining the prevalence of opportunistic infections and iatrogenic metabolical abnormalities in the era of HAART. Data from HIV infected patients under combined treatment were collected from March 1996 till July 1999. The follow-up focused on the variation of the CD4 cell counts and viral load, and the occurrence of opportunistic infections. The average age was 39 +/- 10 years and the sex ratio (M/F) was 2.3. At baseline, the CD4 count was 352 +/- 244/mm3 and the viral load was 4.1 +/- 1.2 log. After 12 months, the CD4 cells were at 540 +/- 374 and the viral load at 2.5 +/- 1.5 log. This favourable outcome was observed in 70% of patients (naive and experienced). Clinically, patients in therapeutic success presented few opportunistic infections, but many drugs related toxicity. Our data demonstrate the efficiency of combined treatment in the management of HIV infected patients. However, the apparition of toxicity problems could limit the benefit brought by these drugs.

  6. Cutaneous histoplasmosis disclosing an HIV-infection*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Silvares, Maria Regina Cavariani; de Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis endemic in extensive areas of the Americas. The authors report on an urban adult male patient with uncommon oral-cutaneous lesions proven to be histoplasmosis. Additional investigation revealed unnoticed HIV infection with CD4+ cell count of 7/mm3. The treatment was performed with amphotericin B, a 2065 mg total dose followed by itraconazole 200mg/daily plus antiretroviral therapy with apparent cure. Histoplasmosis is an AIDS-defining opportunistic disease process; therefore, its clinical diagnosis must drive full laboratory investigation looking for unnoted HIV-infection. PMID:23793220

  7. The Impact of Marijuana Use on the Successful Aging of HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Allshouse, Amanda A; MaWhinney, Sam; Jankowski, Catherine M; Kohrt, Wendy M; Campbell, Tom B; Erlandson, Kristine M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of self-reported marijuana use on the components of successful aging of human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons. Methods Cross-sectional study of 45- to 65-year-old HIV-infected subjects on anti-retroviral therapy >6 months with undetectable HIV-1 viral load. Successful aging was defined as absence of disease; adequate physical function; high Quality of Life (QOL) and social engagement. Clinical characteristics, physical function assessments, and QOL from short-form 36 (SF-36) were compared between groups defined by self-reported Recent Marijuana Use (RMU), adjusted for tobacco use, CD4+ T-cell count and time since HIV diagnosis, using logistic or linear regression for binary or continuous measures. Results 93 of 359 total subjects (26%) reported RMU. Demographically, patients reporting RMU had been diagnosed with HIV less recently (14 [13–16] vs 11 [10–12] years), reported smoking (48% vs 25%) and lower income (92% vs 80%) with greater prevalence than non-RMU patients; other demographics and clinical characteristics (age, CD4+ T-cell count) were similar. Gender, race/ethnicity, physical outcomes, physical function and disease burden were not significantly different. Patients reporting RMU demonstrated lower mental QOL and increased odds of low social engagement and un- or underemployment compared to non-users. Conclusions The negative association between RMU and mental or social QOL should be considered when assessing the success with which HIV patients reporting RMU are aging. PMID:25647530

  8. Physical and psychosocial nursing care for patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M E; Pheifer, W G

    1993-06-01

    As suggested earlier we have chosen in this article to discuss only a small group of key physical and psychosocial concerns and needs associated with HIV and AIDS. These were the issues most frequently discussed by a study group of people living with HIV. We recognize, however, that holistic nursing intervention considers the totality of the individual living with HIV: body, mind, and spirit. It is to that end that the discussed nursing diagnoses and interventions are directed. Ultimately, the successful identification of and intervention in HIV related problems rests in the unique relationship between nurse and patient sharing as collaborators in the healing experience. The body of contemporary nursing and behavioral science research in the area of HIV/AIDS continues to grow. Presently the National Center for Nursing Research is supporting studies focusing on such areas as the use of designated versus general care settings for HIV patient care, quality of nursing care in HIV/AIDS, the effects of nurse-managed home care for AIDS patients, stress and coping in caregivers of AIDS children, the testing of interventions for black women with AIDS, and prevention studies (National Center for Nursing Research, personal communication, 1992). Nevertheless, as the HIV pandemic continues to grow and expand its demographic parameters, more research, particularly with such populations as women and children, is urgently needed. Studies exploring prevention issues and symptom management also are most important. Some suggestions for future study include examination of cultural variables associated with coping with HIV and AIDS; longitudinal research on surviving HIV over time; intervention studies to test specific nursing therapeutics in various settings such as hospital, home, and clinic; and finally, research describing the impact of HIV and AIDS on family functioning and adaptation. It is only through continued study of the impact of HIV, on both the individual living with HIV

  9. Executive summary of the consensus document on metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Polo Rodríguez, Rosa; Galindo Puerto, María José; Dueñas, Carlos; Gómez Candela, Carmen; Estrada, Vicente; Villar, Noemí G P; Locutura, Jaime; Mariño, Ana; Pascua, Javier; Palacios, Rosario; Von Wichmman, Miguel Ángel; Álvarez, Julia; Asensi, Victor; Lopez Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Negredo, Eugenia; Ortega, Enrique; Pedrol, Enric; Gutiérrez, Félix; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Martínez Chamorro, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the metabolic disorders and their impact on patients with HIV infection requires an individualized study and continuous updating. HIV patients have the same cardiovascular risk factors as the general population. The HIV infection per se increases the cardiovascular risk, and metabolic disorders caused by some antiretroviral drugs are added risk factors. For this reason, the choice of drugs with a good metabolic profile is essential. The most common metabolic disorders of HIV infected-patients (insulin resistance, diabetes, hyperlipidemia or osteopenia), as well as other factors of cardiovascular risk, such as hypertension, should also be dealt with according to guidelines similar to the general population, as well as insisting on steps to healthier lifestyles. The aim of this document is to provide a query tool for all professionals who treat HIV-patients and who may present or display any metabolic disorders listed in this document.

  10. Smoking behaviors in a community-based cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Maya; Penko, Joanne; Vittinghoff, Eric; Bangsberg, David R; Miaskowski, Christine; Kushel, Margot B

    2014-03-01

    We conducted a longitudinal study of a community-based cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults to examine smoking behaviors and factors associated with quitting. We assessed "hardcore" smoking behaviors associated with a low probability of quitting. Of the 296 participants, 218 were current smokers (73.6 %). The prevalence of "hardcore" smoking was high: 59.6 % smoked ≥15 cigarettes per day, and 67.3 % were daily smokers. During the study interval, 20.6 % made at least one quit attempt. Of these, 53.3 % were abstinent at 6 months. The successful quit rate over 2 years was 4.6 %. Illegal substance use (adjusted odds ratio, AOR 0.2, 95 % CI 0.1-0.6) and smoking within 30 min of waking (AOR 0.2, 95 % CI 0.1-0.7) were associated with lower likelihood of making a quit attempt. Interventions that reduce nicotine dependence prior to smoking cessation and those that are integrated with substance use treatment may be effective for this population.

  11. Duration of Influenza Virus Shedding Among HIV-Infected Adults in the cART Era, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Timothy; Kojic, E. Milu; Overton, Edgar T.; Henry, Keith; Önen, Nur; Rhame, Frank; Conley, Lois; Brooks, John T.; Fry, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The duration of influenza virus shedding in HIV-infected adults is unknown and could affect quarantine and treatment recommendations. Participants were monitored for influenza-like illness (ILI), defined as fever and cough or sore throat, using weekly telephone audio computer-assisted self-interviews. Those with ILI were further evaluated at three HIV specialty clinics. For those with influenza, we collected nasopharyngeal washes every 3 days after the date of confirmed influenza infection for 21–28 days; specimens underwent reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and viral culture. Duration of influenza virus shedding was the interval from the date of onset (day 0) of ILI to the date of last culture-positive specimen. Characteristics were compared between patients with and without influenza using Fisher's exact test. We used the Wilcoxon rank-sum test to examine factors that may have affected influenza virus shedding. From October 2010 to April 2011, we enrolled 961 participants in syndromic surveillance and diagnosed 20 patients with influenza whose characteristics were as follows: median age 48 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 43–53), 60% male, 50% non-Hispanic black, 95% had been prescribed combination highly active antiretroviral therapy (cART), 85% were virologically suppressed (HIV RNA <400 copies/ml), median CD4 cell count 317 cells/mm3 (IQR: 190-544), and median follow-up time 21 days (IQR: 19–22). Compared with persons without influenza, persons with influenza were more likely to be older, use injection drugs, and have a lower median CD4 cell count and were less likely to have had an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months. Median durations of shedding, PCR detection, and ILI symptoms were 3 (IQR: 0–5), 10 (IQR: 6–15), and 14 days (IQR: 12–26), respectively. Median days of shedding were similar among patients with and without any prior influenza vaccination (0 vs. 4, p = .448), HIV viral suppression (2 vs

  12. Short communication: nuclear JAK3 and its involvement in CD4 activation in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Landires, Ivan; Núñez-Samudio, Virginia; Thèze, Jacques

    2013-05-01

    The subcellular localization of JAK3 was examined by quantitative image analysis. For the first time, JAK3 was found to be located in the nuclei of primary CD4 lymphocytes. A comparable quantity of JAK3 was recovered in CD4 lymphocytes from healthy donors and HIV-infected patients. By contrast, far more phosphorylated JAK3 (pJAK3) was found in the nuclei of CD4 lymphocytes from HIV-infected patients than from healthy donors. The correlation detected between the quantity of pJAK3 in the nuclei of CD4 lymphocytes and the increase in HLA-DR at their surface suggests that pJAK3 may play a role in the deleterious immune activation characterizing HIV-infected patients.

  13. Insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus associated with antiretroviral use in HIV-infected patients: pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tebas, Pablo

    2008-09-01

    The contribution of current antiretroviral treatment regimens to the long-term survival of HIV-infected individuals is accompanied by increased risk of glucose metabolism abnormalities in this patient population. The risk of insulin resistance and diabetes in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral treatment stems from 2 sources: exposure to the same environmental factors that have led to an increased incidence of these conditions in the general population and the negative effects on glucose metabolism inherent to components of antiretroviral treatment regimens. This article reviews the pathogenesis and diagnosis of insulin resistance and diabetes and the contribution of components of antiretroviral therapy regimens to increased risk for these conditions. Optimization of antiretroviral treatment regimens for HIV-infected patients with or at increased risk for development of abnormalities in glucose metabolism is discussed.

  14. Behavioral and neuroimaging evidence for impaired executive function in "cognitively normal" older HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiong; Barasky, Rebecca; Olsen, Halli; Riesenhuber, Maximilian; Magnus, Manya

    2016-01-01

    The increased prevalence of HIV among adults >50 years underscores the importance of improving our understanding of mechanisms causing HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Identifying novel and noninvasive diagnostic predictors of HAND prior to clinical manifestation is critical to ultimately identifying means of preventing progression to symptomatic HAND. Here, using a task-switching paradigm, in which subjects were cued (unpredictably) to perform a face-gender or a word-semantic task on superimposed face and word images, we examined the behavioral and neural profile of impaired cognitive control in older HIV + adults (N = 14, 9 HIV+). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and behavioral data were acquired while subjects were performing the face-gender or word-semantic task. We found that, despite comparable performance in standard neuropsychology tests that are designed to probe executive deficits, HIV-infected participants were significantly slower than uninfected controls in adapting to change in task demand, and the behavioral impairments can be quantitatively related to difference in fMRI signal at the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Due to the limited sample size of this hypothesis-generating study, we should take caution with these findings and future studies with a large and better matched sample size are needed. However, these rather novel findings in this study have a few important implications: first, the prevalence of cognitive impairments in HIV+ older adults might be even higher than previously proposed; second, ACC (in particularly its dorsal region) might be one of the key regions underlying cognitive impairments (in particularly executive functions) in HIV; and third, it might be beneficial to adopt paradigms developed and validated in cognitive neuroscience to study HAND, as these techniques might be more sensitive to some aspects of HIV-associated neurocognitive impairments than standard neuropsychology tests.

  15. Influence of the First Consultation on Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV-infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peyre, Marion; Gauchet, Aurélie; Roustit, Matthieu; Leclercq, Pascale; Epaulard, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physician attitude influences the way patients cope with diagnosis and therapy in chronic severe diseases such as cancer. Previous studies showed that such an effect exists in HIV care; it is likely that it begins with the first contact with a physician. Objective: We aimed to explore in HIV-infected persons their perception of the first consultation they had with an HIV specialist (PFC-H), and whether this perception correlates with adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Method: The study was conducted in Grenoble University Hospital, France, a tertiary care center. Every antiretroviral-experienced patient was asked to freely complete a self-reported, anonymous questionnaire concerning retrospective PFC-H, present adherence (Morisky scale), and present perceptions and beliefs about medicine (BMQ scale). Results: One hundred and fifty-one questionnaires were available for evaluation. PFC-H score and adherence were correlated, independently from age, gender, and numbers of pill(s) and of pill intake(s) per day. BMQ score also correlated with adherence; structural equation analysis suggested that the effect of PFC-H on adherence is mediated by positive beliefs. Conclusion: These results suggest that for HIV-infected persons, the perceptions remaining from the first consultation with an HIV specialist physician influence important issues such as adherence and perception about medicine. Physicians must be aware of this potentially long-lasting effect. PMID:27708747

  16. Reactive lymphadenopathy in Ugandan patients and its relationship to EBV and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kalungi, Sam; Wabinga, Henry; Bostad, Leif

    2009-04-01

    In Uganda, a large number of biopsied enlarged lymph nodes is diagnosed as reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH) not indicative of a specific etiologic agent. The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of RLH in lymph node biopsies in Ugandan patients and their possible association with HIV and EBV infection. Ninety biopsies were retrieved and included in the study. The predominant RLH type was follicular, found in 45 (50.0%) of the cases. Positive staining for LMP-1 was found in six cases (6.7%), EBNA-1 in 36 cases (40.0%) and HIV1-p24 in 15 cases (16.7%), respectively. A combination of EBV and HIV positivity was found in 46 (52.2%) of the cases. EBV infection was associated with hyperplastic germinal centers (p<0.01). HIV1-p24 positive staining was associated with follicle fragmentation (p<0.01) but not hyperplastic GC (p=0.08). In conclusion, RLH in Ugandan patients is frequently associated with EBV and HIV infection. The histologic features of the lymph nodes are not specific for any individual infection, but a high number of EBV-positive cases are associated with hyperplastic GC, and follicular fragmentation is characteristic of HIV infection.

  17. [Risk reduction and intravenous drug use abstinence in patients with HIV infection. The SEROCO group].

    PubMed

    Meyer, L; Wade, A; Persoz, A; Boué, F; Dellamonica, P; Caroli-Bosc, C; Carré, N

    1998-02-01

    Few prospective studies have described the stepwise process of giving up intravenous drug (IV) use. In an effort to deepen the understanding of the relationship between risk reduction related to IV drug use and giving up such drug use, the authors studied factors associated with IV drug abstinence among HIV-infected patients using IV drugs at their enrollment in the multicenter French cohort SEROCO between 1988 and 1994. 63 HIV-infected patients injecting IV drugs at enrollment were followed clinically every 6 months and with a questionnaire on their sexual practices and drug use since their most recent consultations. The termination of drug use was defined as not using drugs for a period of at least 6 months. The 30 subjects who gave up IV drug use over the 3-year follow-up were compared to the 33 subjects who continued using IV drugs. Those who gave up IV drugs were more likely to be professionally active at enrollment than those who kept injecting, they more often used during the follow-up period new injection materials for each injection, and more often used condoms with HIV-negative partners and those of unknown serostatus. The abandonment of IV drug use in this study followed a stepwise process in which the reduction of risks preceded the eventual cessation of drug use.

  18. Plasma Selenium Concentrations Are Sufficient and Associated with Protease Inhibitor Use in Treated HIV-Infected Adults123

    PubMed Central

    Hileman, Corrilynn O; Dirajlal-Fargo, Sahera; Lam, Suet Kam; Kumar, Jessica; Lacher, Craig; Combs, Gerald F; McComsey, Grace A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selenium is an essential constituent of selenoproteins, which play a substantial role in antioxidant defense and inflammatory cascades. Selenium deficiency is associated with disease states characterized by inflammation, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although HIV infection has been associated with low selenium, the role of selenium status in HIV-related CVD is unclear. Objectives: We sought to assess associations between plasma selenium and markers of inflammation, immune activation, and subclinical vascular disease in HIV-infected adults on contemporary antiretroviral therapy (ART) and to determine if statin therapy modifies selenium status. Methods: In the Stopping Atherosclerosis and Treating Unhealthy bone with RosuvastatiN trial, HIV-infected adults on stable ART were randomly assigned 1:1 to rosuvastatin or placebo. Plasma selenium concentrations were determined at entry, week 24, and week 48. Spearman correlation and linear regression analyses were used to assess relations between baseline selenium, HIV-related factors and markers of inflammation, immune activation, and subclinical vascular disease. Changes in selenium over 24 and 48 wk were compared between groups. Results: One hundred forty-seven HIV-infected adults were included. All participants were on ART. Median current CD4+ count was 613, and 76% had HIV-1 RNA ≤48 copies/mL (range: <20–600). Median plasma selenium concentration was 122 μg/L (range: 62–200). At baseline, higher selenium was associated with protease inhibitor (PI) use, lower body mass index, and a higher proportion of activated CD8+ T cells (CD8+CD38+human leukocyte antigen-DR+), but not markers of inflammation or subclinical vascular disease. Over 48 wk, selenium concentrations increased in the statin group (P < 0.01 within group), but the change did not differ between groups (+13.1 vs. +5.3 μg/L; P = 0.14 between groups). Conclusions: Plasma selenium concentrations were within the normal range for the

  19. Long-term efavirenz use is associated with worse neurocognitive functioning in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing; Vaida, Florin; Wong, Jenna; Sanders, Chelsea A; Kao, Yu-ting; Croteau, David; Clifford, David B; Collier, Ann C; Gelman, Benjamin B; Marra, Christina M; McArthur, Justin C; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M; Heaton, Robert K; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L

    2016-04-01

    Neurocognitive (NC) complications continue to afflict a substantial proportion of HIV-infected people taking effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). One contributing mechanism for this is antiretroviral neurotoxicity. Efavirenz (EFV) is associated with short-term central nervous system (CNS) toxicity, but less is known about its long-term effects. Our objective was to compare NC functioning with long-term use of EFV to that of a comparator, lopinavir-ritonavir (LPV/r), in a cohort of well-characterized adults. Four hundred forty-five patients were selected from the CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort based on their use of either EFV (n = 272, mean duration 17.9 months) or LPV/r (n = 173, mean duration 16.4 months) and the lack of severe NC comorbidities. All patients had undergone standardized comprehensive NC testing. Univariable and multivariable analyses to predict NC outcomes were performed. Compared with LPV/r users, EFV users were more likely to be taking their first ART regimen (p < 0.001), were less likely to have AIDS (p < 0.001) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection (p < 0.05), had higher CD4+ T cell nadirs (p < 0.001), had lower peak (p < 0.001) and current (p < 0.001) plasma HIV RNA levels, and were less likely to have detectable HIV RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (p < 0.001). Overall, EFV users had worse speed of information processing (p = 0.04), verbal fluency (p = 0.03), and working memory (p = 0.03). An interaction with HCV serostatus was present: Overall among HCV seronegatives (n = 329), EFV users performed poorly, whereas among HCV seropositives (n = 116), LPV/r users had overall worse performance. In the subgroup with undetectable plasma HIV RNA (n = 269), EFV users had worse speed of information processing (p = 0.02) and executive functioning (p = 0.03). Substantial differences exist between EFV and LPV/r users in this observational cohort

  20. Long-term efavirenz use is associated with worse neurocognitive functioning in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Vaida, Florin; Wong, Jenna; Sanders, Chelsea A.; Kao, Yu-ting; Croteau, David; Clifford, David B.; Collier, Ann C.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Marra, Christina M.; McArthur, Justin C.; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M.; Heaton, Robert K.; Grant, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive (NC) complications continue to afflict a substantial proportion of HIV-infected people taking effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). One contributing mechanism for this is antiretroviral neurotoxicity. Efavirenz (EFV) is associated with short-term central nervous system (CNS) toxicity, but less is known about its long-term effects. Our objective was to compare NC functioning with long-term use of EFV to that of a comparator, lopinavir-ritonavir (LPV/r), in a cohort of well-characterized adults. Four hundred forty-five patients were selected from the CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort based on their use of either EFV (n=272, mean duration 17.9 months) or LPV/r (n=173, mean duration 16.4 months) and the lack of severe NC comorbidities. All patients had undergone standardized comprehensive NC testing. Univariable and multivariable analyses to predict NC outcomes were performed. Compared with LPV/r users, EFV users were more likely to be taking their first ART regimen (p<0.001), were less likely to have AIDS (p<0.001) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection (p<0.05), had higher CD4+ T cell nadirs (p<0.001), had lower peak (p<0.001) and current (p<0.001) plasma HIV RNA levels, and were less likely to have detectable HIV RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (p<0.001). Overall, EFV users had worse speed of information processing (p=0.04), verbal fluency (p=0.03), and working memory (p=0.03). An interaction with HCV serostatus was present: Overall among HCV seronegatives (n=329), EFV users performed poorly, whereas among HCV seropositives (n=116), LPV/r users had overall worse performance. In the subgroup with undetectable plasma HIV RNA (n=269), EFV users had worse speed of information processing (p=0.02) and executive functioning (p=0.03). Substantial differences exist between EFV and LPV/r users in this observational cohort, possibly because of channeling by clinicians who may have prescribed LPV/r to more severely ill patients

  1. Paraquat Poisoning in Patients With HIV Infection: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jun-Li; Chen, Cheng-Hsu; Wu, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Shang-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Paraquat poisoning is very severe. Most victims, including those who have ingested a small amount, will die from Paraquat poisoning. The cause of death in the majority of such cases is lung fibrosis. Paraquat poisoning in patients with positive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection status has seldom been reported. Herein, we report a case of an HIV patient with Paraquat poisoning who had an excellent outcome even without standard treatment. Currently, only 3 such cases have been reported in the literature and in each case there was a good outcome, which was not expected according to predictive models. A possible mechanism may involve the relative lack of functional macrophages in HIV patients, which would tend to result in much less severe lung injury. None of the available predictive models of Paraquat poisoning appear to be appropriate for HIV patients.Paraquat poisoning in HIV patients may have better survival due to less lung injury.

  2. Population pharmacokinetics and dose optimisation of ritonavir-boosted atazanavir in Thai HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Punyawudho, Baralee; Thammajaruk, Narukjaporn; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Avihingsanon, Anchalee

    2017-03-01

    There is evidence that Thai patients receiving standard doses of ritonavir (RTV)-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) have high exposure to atazanavir (ATV) leading to a higher risk of toxicity. A lower dose of ATV/r may provide adequate exposure in this population. However, pharmacokinetic data on ATV/r in Thai patients required for dose adjustment are limited. This study aimed to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of ATV/r and to determine the influence of patient characteristics on ATV pharmacokinetics. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate the proportion of patients achieving target ATV trough concentration (Ctrough) with the standard ATV/r dose of 300/100 mg and a low dose of 200/100 mg once daily (OD). A total of 127 Thai HIV-infected patients were included in this study. One random blood sample was collected to determine ATV and RTV concentrations at each clinic visit from 100 patients. Intensive data from 27 patients enrolled in previous studies were also included. Data were analysed using the non-linear mixed-effects modelling approach. A one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination and absorption lag time best described the data. The population mean clearance of ATV/r was 4.93 L/h in female patients and was 28.7% higher in male patients. Simulation results showed a higher proportion of patients achieving ATV Ctrough within the target range with ATV/r 200/100 mg compared with 300/100 mg. The 200/100 mg OD dose of ATV/r provides adequate ATV exposure in Thai HIV-infected patients. Therefore, a lower dose of ATV/r should be considered for Thai and Asian populations.

  3. CD4/CD8 Ratio and KT Ratio Predict Yellow Fever Vaccine Immunogenicity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Peter W.; Huang, Yong; Simoes, Marisol; Lima, Sheila B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Caiaffa-Filho, Helio H.; Hong, Marisa A.; Costa, Dayane Alves; Dias, Juliana Zanatta C.; Cerqueira, Natalia B.; Nishiya, Anna Shoko; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Sartori, Ana M.; Kallas, Esper G.

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-infected individuals have deficient responses to Yellow Fever vaccine (YFV) and may be at higher risk for adverse events (AE). Chronic immune activation–characterized by low CD4/CD8 ratio or high indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO) activity—may influence vaccine response in this population. Methods We prospectively assessed AE, viremia by the YFV virus and YF-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAb) in HIV-infected (CD4>350) and -uninfected adults through 1 year after vaccination. The effect of HIV status on initial antibody response to YFV was measured during the first 3 months following vaccination, while the effect on persistence of antibody response was measured one year following vaccination. We explored CD4/CD8 ratio, IDO activity (plasma kynurenine/tryptophan [KT] ratio) and viremia by Human Pegivirus as potential predictors of NAb response to YFV among HIV-infected participants with linear mixed models. Results 12 HIV-infected and 45-uninfected participants were included in the final analysis. HIV was not significantly associated with AE, YFV viremia or NAb titers through the first 3 months following vaccination. However, HIV–infected participants had 0.32 times the NAb titers observed for HIV-uninfected participants at 1 year following YFV (95% CI 0.13 to 0.83, p = 0.021), independent of sex, age and prior vaccination. In HIV-infected participants, each 10% increase in CD4/CD8 ratio predicted a mean 21% higher post-baseline YFV Nab titer (p = 0.024). Similarly, each 10% increase in KT ratio predicted a mean 21% lower post-baseline YFV Nab titer (p = 0.009). Viremia by Human Pegivirus was not significantly associated with NAb titers. Conclusions HIV infection appears to decrease the durability of NAb responses to YFV, an effect that may be predicted by lower CD4/CD8 ratio or higher KT ratio. PMID:27941965

  4. A characterisation of low-grade inflammation and metabolic complications in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ove

    2016-10-01

    HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome frequently presents as a relative lack of peripheral adipose tissue storage combined with an increase in visceral fat, associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. This thesis discusses explanations for the links between abnormalities in glucose metabolism, the steroid synthesis pathway, the growth hormone-insulin growth factor-1 axis, and chronic changes in adipose tissue distribution. Specifically, the mechanisms by which low-grade inflammation may affect the normal stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose and fat storage are reviewed. We propose that both chronic low-grade inflammation from HIV infection and treatment with HAART trigger cellular homeostatic stress responses with adverse effects on glucose metabolism. The physiological outcome is such that the total energy storage in the adipocytes is decreased, and the remaining adipocytes resist further energy storage. The excess circulating and dietary lipid metabolites, normally metabolised by adipose tissue, are deposited ectopically in the muscle, liver, or visceral adipose tissue, where they impair insulin action. This deposition of lipid metabolites leads to a vicious circle of insulin resistance and lipotoxicity leading to lipoatrophy or a mixed-type with increased visceral adipose tissue and a clinical phenotype of HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome with an elevated waist-to-hip ratio. This HIV-associated inflamm-ageing syndrome can provide a platform for further studies in HIV-infected patients and act as a model for biological accelerated ageing.

  5. [Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Habegger de Sorrentino, A; Motta, P; Iliovich, E; Sorrentino, A P

    1997-01-01

    The cytopathic effect of HIV on CD4 T cells, as well as the active autoimmune mechanism occurring during infection, have been documented. Of the cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of AIDS, the main one produced by the monocyte-macrophage series is tumor necrosis factor alfa (TNF alpha). This cytokine induces antigens such as proteinase 3 (Pr 3) or mieloperoxidase (MPO). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are directed against this type of PMN antigens. In the present paper, the role of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in HIV infected patients as responsible for autoimmune phenomena in relation to opportunistic infections, was studied. A total of 88 serum samples belonging to 49 asymptomatic and 39 symptomatic HIV infected patients were tested for ANCA by an indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test over a neutrophil substrate. ANCA were detected in 53.8% of symptomatic patients as compared to 4.1% in asymptomatic cases (p < 0.0001). A 95.9% correlation was observed between ANCA-positive samples and pulmonary infection (n = 20). In those ANCA (+) samples 95.9% correlation was found with pulmonary infection (n = 20). Pulmonary infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a frequent finding in HIV infected patients from Northeastern Argentina. When the presence of ANCA in TB(+) HIV(+) and TB(+) HIV(-) patients was studied, it was seen that positive-ANCA significantly correlated with the first group (p < 0.001). The presence of ANCA was not related to viral infections, toxoplasmosis, neurological features of AIDS, vasculitis or malignant diseases. ANCA during pulmonary infection, mostly caused by TB, as well as PMN infiltration in pulmonary parenchyma, and the deregulated immune reaction elicited by HIV, may contribute to the onset of autoimmune phenomena. The presence of human T lymphocytes reactive to heat stress proteins (Hsp), an important target of immune response against certain intracellular auto-antigens such as MPO from PMN, added to

  6. Intestinal protozoa in HIV-infected patients in Apulia, South Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Brandonisio, O.; Maggi, P.; Panaro, M. A.; Lisi, S.; Andriola, A.; Acquafredda, A.; Angarano, G.

    1999-01-01

    Protozoa are important enteric pathogens in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In this study the prevalence of intestinal protozoa in 154 HIV-infected patients, with or without diarrhoea, in our region (Apulia, South Italy) was evaluated between December 1993 and February 1998. In the majority of patients CD4+ T cell count was below 200/microl. The overall prevalence of intestinal protozoa was 43/154 (27.92%). Twenty-eight (43.08%) out of 65 patients with diarrhoea and 15 (16-85%) out of 89 non-diarrhoeic patients were parasitized. In particular, in the group of 65 patients with diarrhoea the following protozoa were identified: Cryptosporidium parvum in 14 (21.54%), Blastocystis hominis in 7 (10.77%), microsporidia in 6 (9.23%), Giardia lamblia in 4 (6.15%) and Isospora belli in 1 (1.54%). Three patients were Cryptosporidium parvum-microsporidia co-infected. In patients without intestinal symptoms, prevalence was 3/89 (3.37%) for Cryptosporidium parvum, 9/89 (10.11%) for Blastocystis hominis, 1/89 (1.12%) for microsporidia and 2/89 (2.25%) for Giardia lamblia. A significant (P<0.001) correlation was observed between protozoan infection and the presence of diarrhoea. In particular, Cryptosporidium parvum and microsporidia infections were significantly (P<0.001) and P = 0.046, respectively) associated with diarrhoeal illness. Moreover, the majority of cases of cryptosporidiosis were first diagnosed in the periods of heaviest rainfall. Therefore, drinking water contamination may be a possible source of human infection in our area. PMID:10694157

  7. Tuberculosis and hepatic steatosis are prevalent liver pathology findings among HIV-infected patients in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christopher J; Hoffmann, Jennifer D; Kensler, Caroline; van der Watt, Martin; Omar, Tanvier; Chaisson, Richard E; Martinson, Neil A; Variava, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa has shifted as a result of HIV and the increased use of antiretroviral therapy leading to a need for updated data on common causes of liver disease. We retrospectively reviewed records from all hospitalized patients who had liver biopsy at a single hospital in South Africa from 2001 to 2009 and compared diagnosis by HIV status. During the period of study 262 patients had liver biopsy, 108 (41%) were HIV-infected, 25 (10%) were HIV-sero-negative, and 129 (49%) had unknown or unrecorded HIV status. Overall 81% of biopsies provided additional diagnostic data. Malignancy was the most common finding reported on 56 (21%) biopsies followed by granuloma or TB, hepatic steatosis, and fibrosis or cirrhosis. HIV-infected patients were more likely to have granulomas and steatosis. Half of patients with granulomas were already on TB treatment, suggesting paradoxical reactions or drug induced liver injury may have been important causes of liver inflammation among these patients. We note that TB, paradoxical reactions during TB treatment, possible drug induced liver injury, and hepatic steatosis are important causes of liver pathology among HIV-infected hospitalized patients with unclear etiology of liver disease after initial assessment. Among HIV sero-negative patients, malignancy was the major cause of liver disease. Our findings re-enforce the importance of TB as a diagnosis among HIV-infected individuals.

  8. High perceived social standing is associated with better health in HIV-infected Ugandan adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ezeamama, A E; Guwatudde, D; Wang, M; Bagenda, D; Brown, K; Kyeyune, R; Smith, Emily; Wamani, H; Manabe, Y C; Fawzi, W W

    2016-06-01

    Perceived social standing (PSS) was evaluated as a determinant of differences in health outcomes among Ugandan HIV-infected adults from Kampala using cross-sectional study design. PSS was defined using the MacArthur scale of subjective social status translated and adapted for the study setting. Socio-demographic and psychosocial correlates of PSS ranking at enrollment were determined using linear regression models. High versus low PSS was defined based on the median PSS score and evaluated as a determinant of body mass index, hemoglobin, quality of life (QOL) and frailty-related phenotype via linear regression. A log-binomial regression model estimated the relative-risk of good, very good or excellent versus fair or poor self-rated health (SRH) in relation to PSS. Older age, increasing social support and material wealth were correlated with high PSS ranking, whereas female sex, experience of multiple stigmas and multiple depressive symptoms were correlated with low PSS ranking. High PSS participants were on average 1.1 kg/m(2) heavier, had 4.7 % lower frailty scores and 3.6 % higher QOL scores compared to low PSS patients (all p < 0.05); they were also more likely to self-classify as high SRH (RR 1.4, 95 % confidence interval 1.1, 1.7) but had comparable hemoglobin levels (p = 0.634). Low PSS correlated with poor physical and psychosocial wellbeing in HIV-positive Ugandan adults. The assessment of PSS as part of clinical management, combined with efforts to reduce stigma and improve social support, may identify and possibly reduce PSS-associated health inequality in Ugandan adults with HIV.

  9. Effect of antiretroviral therapy on malaria incidence in HIV-infected Ugandan adults

    PubMed Central

    Kasirye, Ronnie P.; Grosskurth, Heiner; Munderi, Paula; Levin, Jonathan; Anywaine, Zacchaeus; Nunn, Andrew; Kamali, Anatoli; Baisley, Kathy

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Using the data of a trial on cotrimoxazole (CTX) cessation, we investigated the effect of different antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens on the incidence of clinical malaria. Methods: During the cotrimoxazole cessation trial (ISRCTN44723643), HIV-infected Ugandan adults with CD4+ at least 250 cells/μl were randomized to receive either CTX prophylaxis or placebo and were followed for a median of 2.5 years. Blood slides for malaria microscopy were examined at scheduled visits and at unscheduled visits when the participant felt unwell. CD4+ cell counts were done 6-monthly. Malaria was defined as fever with a positive blood slide. ART regimens were categorized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) only, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-containing or protease inhibitor containing. Malaria incidence was calculated using random effects Poisson regression to account for clustering of events. Results: Malaria incidence in the three ART regimen groups was 9.9 (3.6-27.4), 9.3 (8.3-10.4), and 3.5 (1.6-7.6) per 100 person-years, respectively. Incidence on protease inhibitors was lower than that on the other regimens with the results just reaching significance (adjusted rate ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval = 0.2–1.0, comparing with NNRTI regimens). Stratification by CTX/placebo use gave similar results, without evidence of an interaction between the effects of CTX/placebo use and ART regimen. There was no evidence of an interaction between ART regimen and CD4+ cell count. Conclusion: There was some evidence that protease inhibitor-containing ART regimens may be associated with a lower clinical malaria incidence compared with other regimens. This effect was not modified by CTX use or CD4+ cell count. The antimalarial properties of protease inhibitors may have clinical and public health importance. PMID:28121670

  10. The role of depression chronicity and recurrence on neurocognitive dysfunctions in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Cysique, Lucette A; Dermody, Nadene; Carr, Andrew; Brew, Bruce J; Teesson, Maree

    2016-02-01

    Research assessing whether major depressive disorders (MDD) impacts neurocognitive functions in HIV+ persons has yielded inconsistent results. However, none have considered the role of MDD remission, chronicity, and stability on treatment. Ninety-five HIV+ adults clinically stable on combined antiretroviral treatment completed a psychiatric interview, a depression scale, a neuropsychological, daily living, and cognitive complaints assessments at baseline and 18 months. Participants were screened for current (within 12 months of study entry) alcohol and/or substance use disorder. History of alcohol and/or substance abuse disorder prior to the 12 months entry screen and MDD treatments were recorded. Participants were grouped into two psychiatric nomenclatures: (1) lifetime: no MD episode (MDE), single MDE life-event treated and fully remitted, chronic MDD treated and stable, chronic MDD treated and unstable, and baseline untreated MDE; (2) recent: last 2 years MDE (yes or no). We found that lifetime and recent psychiatric history were more strongly associated with decreased in independence in daily living and cognitive complaints than with baseline neuropsychological performance. However, lack of full remission, instability on treatment in chronic MDD, and severity of symptoms in current MDE were factors in whether MDD impacted baseline neuropsychological performance. Depressive symptoms improved at follow-up in those with baseline moderate-severe symptoms, and MDD was not associated with neurocognitive change at 18 months. A history of alcohol and/or substance abuse disorder was significantly more frequent in those with treated and unstable chronic MDD but it was not associated with neuropsychological performance. MDD recurrence, chronicity profiles, and associated comorbidities are keys factors to understand any potential impact on neurocognitive abilities in HIV infection. More comprehensive consideration of these complex effects could serve at constructively

  11. A comparative study of CIDP in a cohort of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Pierre L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate differences in clinical presentation, electrodiagnostic measures, CSF changes, and treatment outcome measures in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Methods: A retrospective analysis of medical records of all patients meeting the European Federation of Neurology diagnostic criteria for idiopathic CIDP was performed in 2 neuromuscular units in Kwa-Zulu Natal between 2003 and 2015. Results: Eighty-four patients were included in the study; 39 were HIV-infected and 45 were HIV-uninfected. Among the HIV-infected patients, the majority were younger, were female, and had a monophasic progressive illness. Eighty-six percent (86%) were corticosteroid-responsive and 76% were in remission within 6–12 months requiring no further treatment. Among the HIV- uninfected patients, the majority were older, were male, and had a relapsing-remitting course. Twenty-seven percent (27%) were corticosteroid-responsive, 95% required combination therapy, and 33% were not in remission by 18 months on therapy. Conclusion: This study shows that HIV-infected patients with CIDP were younger, were more often female, displayed a monophasic progressive course, were highly steroid-responsive, and went into remission within 12 months of corticosteroid initiation. PMID:28054000

  12. Oxidative Stress Predicts All-Cause Mortality in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Masiá, Mar; Padilla, Sergio; Fernández, Marta; Rodríguez, Carmen; Moreno, Ana; Oteo, Jose A.; Antela, Antonio; Moreno, Santiago; del Amo, Julia; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess whether oxidative stress is a predictor of mortality in HIV-infected patients. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study in CoRIS, a contemporary, multicentre cohort of HIV-infected patients, antiretroviral-naïve at entry, launched in 2004. Cases were patients who died with available stored plasma samples collected. Two age and sex-matched controls for each case were selected. We measured F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) and malondialdehyde (MDA) plasma levels in the first blood sample obtained after cohort engagement. Results 54 cases and 93 controls were included. Median F2-IsoPs and MDA levels were significantly higher in cases than in controls. When adjustment was performed for age, HIV-transmission category, CD4 cell count and HIV viral load at cohort entry, and subclinical inflammation measured with highly-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), the association of F2-IsoPs with mortality remained significant (adjusted OR per 1 log10 increase, 2.34 [1.23–4.47], P = 0.009). The association of MDA with mortality was attenuated after adjustment: adjusted OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 2.05 [0.91–4.59], P = 0.080. Median hsCRP was also higher in cases, and it also proved to be an independent predictor of mortality in the adjusted analysis: OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 1.39 (1.01–1.91), P = 0.043; and OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 1.46 (1.07–1.99), P = 0.014, respectively, when adjustment included F2-IsoPs and MDA. Conclusion Oxidative stress is a predictor of all-cause mortality in HIV-infected patients. For plasma F2-IsoPs, this association is independent of HIV-related factors and subclinical inflammation. PMID:27111769

  13. Quality of Life Among HIV-Infected Patients in Brazil after Initiation of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Lorenza Nogueira; César, Cibele Comini; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Despite improvement in clinical treatment for HIV-infected patients, the impact of antiretroviral therapy on the overall quality of life has become a major concern. OBJECTIVE To identify factors associated with increased levels of self-reported quality of life among HIV-infected patients after four months of antiretroviral therapy. METHODS Patients were recruited at two public health referral centers for AIDS, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, for a prospective adherence study. Patients were interviewed before initiating treatment (baseline) and after one and four months. Quality of life was assessed using a psychometric instrument, and factors associated with good/very good quality of life four months after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy were assessed using a cross-sectional approach. Logistic regression was used for analysis. RESULTS Overall quality of life was classified as ‘very good/good’ by 66.4% of the participants four months after initiating treatment, while 33.6% classified it as ‘neither poor nor good/poor/very poor’. Logistic regression indicated that >8 years of education, none/mild symptoms of anxiety and depression, no antiretroviral switch, lower number of adverse reactions and better quality of life at baseline were independently associated with good/very good quality of life over four months of treatment. CONCLUSIONS Our results highlight the importance of modifiable factors such as psychiatric symptoms and treatment-related variables that may contribute to a better quality of life among patients initiating treatment. Considering that poor quality of life is related to non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy, careful clinical monitoring of these factors may contribute to ensuring the long-term effectiveness of antiretroviral regimens. PMID:19759880

  14. Chronic Pain in Patients With HIV Infection: What Clinicians Need To Know.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Jessica S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is common in individuals with HIV infection. The primary goal of treatment of chronic pain is not only to improve pain but also to improve physical and emotional function. Patients with chronic pain should be assessed for concurrent psychiatric and substance use disorders, as these conditions often coexist. Treatment of chronic pain may have limited success in the absence of treatment of psychiatric disorders. Treatments for chronic pain include nonopioid pharmacologic therapies and nonpharmacologic therapies (eg, cognitive and behavioral therapy, physical therapy), and the latter option is often the most effective for improving patient function. Care must be taken when initiating or continuing treatment with opioids, and the risks and benefits of treatment with opioids should be regularly assessed. This article summarizes a presentation by Jessica S. Merlin, MD, MBA, at the IAS-USA continuing education program held in New York, New York, in March 2015.

  15. Imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria in HIV-infected patients: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As HIV becomes a chronic infection, an increasing number of HIV-infected patients are travelling to malaria-endemic areas. Association of malaria with HIV/AIDS can be clinically severe. Severe falciparum malaria is a medical emergency that is associated with a high mortality, even when treated in an Intensive Care Unit. This article describes two cases of HIV-positive patients, who returned from malaria-endemic areas and presented a parasitaemia > 5% of erythrocytes and clinical signs of severe falciparum malaria, both with > 350 CD4 cell count/μl, absence of chemoprophylaxis and successful response. Factors like drug interactions and the possible implication of anti-malarial therapy bioavailability are all especially interesting in HIV-malaria co-infections. PMID:22540214

  16. Effectiveness of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) Among HIV-Infected Patients in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Villasís-Keever, Angelina; Galindo-Fraga, Arturo; del Río, Carlos; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The National Government HAART Program (NGP) for the provision of HAART to uninsured HIV-infected persons in Mexico began in 2001. The objective was to describe the virologic outcome of patients enrolled in the NGP in a large HIV treatment center in Mexico City. HIV-infected persons, naive or ≤6 months on HAART, who entered the NGP from 2001 to 2005 were included. Patients with virological suppression were compared to those with virologic failure (VF) during follow-up. Of 377 patients enrolled, 191 where eligible for analysis. The median age was 35.9 (18–75 years) and 85% were male. The median baseline CD4+ T cell count was 183 cells/mm3; 63.9% had <200 cells/mm3 and/or an AIDS-defining event. During follow-up (median: 17.77 months), 55 patients (28.7%) changed their first regimen: 8.3% because of VF and the remaining due to toxicity. The probability of VF at 48 months was 20%. VF was associated with age <30 years (p = 0.003, RR 4.7, IC 95% 1.5–14.4). The use of NNRTI was associated with lower risk of VF (p = 0.042, RR 0.3, IC 95% 0.12–0.99). Nadir CD4+ and AIDS-defining at baseline were not associated with VF. Implementation of NGP for HAART access in a specialized care setting in Mexico resulted in an excellent virologic response. Younger age was a significant risk factor for VF. PMID:20377418

  17. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, Hannah; Kaul, Daniel; Rao, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile infection is a healthcare-associated infection resulting in significant morbidity. Although immunosuppression is associated with Clostridium difficile infection acquisition and adverse outcomes, the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients has been little studied in the era of antiretroviral therapy. This study identifies the risk factors for acquisition of Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients. Methods: A retrospective, propensity score–matched case–control study design was employed, with patients selected from our institution’s outpatient HIV clinic. Clostridium difficile infection cases were defined as having positive stool testing plus an appropriate clinical presentation. The propensity score was generated via multiple logistic regression from year of HIV diagnosis, age at first contact, duration of follow-up, gender, and initial CD4 count. Results: The 46 cases included were matched to a total of 180 controls. Prior antibiotic treatment was a significant predictor of Clostridium difficile infection (odds ratio: 13, 95% confidence interval: 3.49–48.8, p < .001) as was number of hospital admissions in the preceding year (odds ratio: 4.02, confidence interval: 1.81–8.94, p < .001). Having both proton pump inhibitor use and CD4 count <200 cells/µL significantly increased odds of Clostridium difficile infection in the multivariable model (odds ratio: 15.17, confidence interval: 1.31–175.9, p = .021). Conclusion: As in the general population, frequent hospitalizations and exposure to antimicrobials are independent predictors of Clostridium difficile infection acquisition in patients with HIV. Additionally, low CD4 count and proton pump inhibitor use are new potentially modifiable variables that can be targeted for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection in future interventional studies. PMID:28348742

  18. An Assessment of HIV-Infected Patients Dying in Care for Deceased Organ Donation in a United States Urban Center.

    PubMed

    Richterman, A; Sawinski, D; Reese, P P; Lee, D H; Clauss, H; Hasz, R D; Thomasson, A; Goldberg, D S; Abt, P L; Forde, K A; Bloom, R D; Doll, S L; Brady, K A; Blumberg, E A

    2015-08-01

    Organ transplantation is an acceptable option for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with end-stage kidney or liver disease. With worse outcomes on the waitlist, HIV-infected patients may actually be disproportionately affected by the organ shortage in the United States. One potential solution is the use of HIV-infected deceased donors (HIVDD), recently legalized by the HIV Organ Policy Equity (HOPE) Act. This is the first analysis of patient-specific data from potential HIVDD, retrospectively examining charts of HIV-infected patients dying in care at six HIV clinics in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from January 1, 2009 to June 30, 2014. Our data suggest that there are four to five potential HIVDD dying in Philadelphia annually who might yield two to three kidneys and three to five livers for transplant. Extrapolated nationally, this would approximate 356 potential HIVDD yielding 192 kidneys and 247 livers annually. However, several donor risk indices raise concerns about the quality of kidneys that could be recovered from HIVDD as a result of older donor age and comorbidities. On the other hand, livers from these potential HIVDD are of similar quality to HIV-negative donors dying locally, although there is a high prevalence of positive hepatitis C antibody.

  19. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included. Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves’ disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm3 in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm3 in 19% and less than 200/mm3 in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance. ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated. PMID:28121924

  20. Alcohol use and immune reconstitution among HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Cagle, Anthony; McGrath, Christine; Richardson, Barbra A; Donovan, Dennis; Sakr, Sameh; Yatich, Nelly; Ngomoa, Richard; Chepngeno Langat, Agnes; John-Stewart, Grace; Chung, Michael H

    2017-01-29

    Studies on the effects of alcohol use on HIV disease progression have been contradictory, with at least one study finding a positive effect of low alcohol consumption on CD4 count. In addition, most such studies have taken place in the developed West. We investigated the association between alcohol use and immune reconstitution through CD4 count response among HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) at an urban sub-Saharan African clinic. This was a retrospective cohort study of treatment-naïve HIV-infected adults initiating ART in Nairobi, Kenya and followed for 12 months between January 2009 and December 2012. At enrollment, a standardized questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic variables and alcohol consumption. CD4 count was measured every six months. Linear regression models assessed the association between CD4 count and alcohol consumption, categorized as abstinent, moderate, or hazardous. Overall, 854 participants were included, 522 of which were women, with 85 (25.6%) men and 50 (9.6%) women reporting any alcohol use, and 8 (2.4%) men and 7 (1.3%) women reporting hazardous drinking. At baseline, alcohol use was associated with higher education and socioeconomic status. Median CD4 count was higher among alcohol users compared to those who abstained at baseline and at 6 and 12 months post-ART initiation, although this was only significant at 6 months. There were no differences in adherence between abstainers and drinkers. While overall alcohol use was significantly associated with higher CD4 counts, moderate and hazardous use treated separately were not. We conclude that, while alcohol use was associated with higher CD4 counts at 12 months post-ART, the mechanism for this association is unclear but may reflect unmeasured socioeconomic or nutritional differences. Additional research is required on the specific drinking patterns of this population and the types of alcoholic beverages consumed to clarify this relationship.

  1. Glomerular lesions in HIV-infected patients: a Yale University Department of Medicine Residency Peer-Teaching Conference.

    PubMed Central

    Wrone, E. M.; Carey, H.; Reilly, R. F.

    1997-01-01

    HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is a clinicopathologic entity characterized by heavy proteinuria, absence of edema and an irreversible decline in renal function. Findings on renal biopsy include: collapsed glomerular capillaries; visceral glomerular epitheliosis; microcystic tubules; mesangial prominence; and endothelial tubuloreticular inclusions. Early in the AIDS epidemic, HIVAN was the predominant glomerular lesion observed in HIV-infected patients. It is being increasingly recognized, especially in Caucasian populations, that a variety of immune complex-mediated lesions such as membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, proliferative glomerulonephritis and IgA nephropathy are associated with HIV infection. In this review we present two cases: one patient whose first presentation of AIDS was end-stage renal disease, who on biopsy was found to have HIVAN, and the second, who was infected with HIV, and on biopsy was found to have hepatitis C-related hepatitis C related membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. We also review the current literature on HIVAN and HIV-associated immune complex diseases (HIVICDs). Each case illustrates an important clinical point. The first that renal disease can be the first manifestation of HIV infection and the second that HIV-infected patients may develop immune complex related renal diseases, some of which may be potentially treatable. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9493848

  2. Approach to Dyslipidemia, Lipodystrophy, and Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    There is a significant prevalence (20%–80% depending on the population and the study) of lipid disorders and other cardiovascular risk factors in people living with HIV infection. This review focuses on HIV and HIV treatment–associated metabolic and cardiovascular concerns, including dyslipidemias, lipodystrophy syndromes, endothelial dysfunctions, and associated metabolic events such as insulin resistance. Emerging hypotheses of the underlying pathophysiology of these issues, with impact on selection of specific antiretroviral treatment (ART) strategies, therapy, and preventive approaches to decreasing cardiovascular risk and other problems associated with these syndromes are discussed. Screening for cardiovascular risk as part of the decision of starting antiretroviral therapy, and during care of patients with HIV regardless of ART therapy status, is suggested with particular areas of focus. Statins, other hyperlipidemic therapies, treatment for specific problems arising due to lipodystrophy, and implications on ART selection to avoid drug interactions and adverse effects are also discussed. PMID:21181310

  3. Approach to dyslipidemia, lipodystrophy, and cardiovascular risk in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Troll, J Gregory

    2011-02-01

    There is a significant prevalence (20%-80% depending on the population and the study) of lipid disorders and other cardiovascular risk factors in people living with HIV infection. This review focuses on HIV and HIV treatment-associated metabolic and cardiovascular concerns, including dyslipidemias, lipodystrophy syndromes, endothelial dysfunctions, and associated metabolic events such as insulin resistance. Emerging hypotheses of the underlying pathophysiology of these issues, with impact on selection of specific antiretroviral treatment (ART) strategies, therapy, and preventive approaches to decreasing cardiovascular risk and other problems associated with these syndromes are discussed. Screening for cardiovascular risk as part of the decision of starting antiretroviral therapy, and during care of patients with HIV regardless of ART therapy status, is suggested with particular areas of focus. Statins, other hyperlipidemic therapies, treatment for specific problems arising due to lipodystrophy, and implications on ART selection to avoid drug interactions and adverse effects are also discussed.

  4. Conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines do not improve initial response of the polysaccharide vaccine in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Peñaranda, Maria; Payeras, Antoni; Cambra, Ana; Mila, Joan; Riera, Melcior

    2010-05-15

    This is a randomized trial to compare the immunoglobulin G response and the antibody avidity after two pneumococcal vaccinations, conjugated pneumococcal vaccine (CPV) and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV) 4 weeks after vs. PPV alone in 202 HIV-infected adults. There were no differences in the two strategies, either in the percentage of immunoglobulin G two-fold increase for the CPV included serotypes or immunoglobulin G two-fold increase, reaching the level of 1 microg/ml except for serotype 23F (26% responded after conjugated pneumococcal vaccine + PPV vs. 14% after PPV). No avidity increases were seen in any strategy.

  5. Effect of Milk Thistle on the Pharmacokinetics of Darunavir-Ritonavir in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Marta; Miranda, Cristina; Cedeño, Samandhy; Negredo, Eugenia; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this open-label, fixed-sequence study was to investigate the potential of the botanical supplement milk thistle (silymarin) to interact with the boosted protease inhibitor combination darunavir-ritonavir. Fifteen HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy with darunavir-ritonavir (600/100 mg twice daily) for at least 4 weeks were included. Silymarin (150 mg every 8 h) was added to the antiretroviral treatment from days 1 to 14. Darunavir concentrations in plasma were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography immediately before and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 h after a morning dose of darunavir-ritonavir on day 0 and darunavir-ritonavir plus silymarin on day 14. Individual darunavir pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by noncompartmental analysis and compared between days 0 and 14 by means of the geometric mean ratio (GMR) and its 90% confidence interval (CI). The median age was 48 years (interquartile range, 44 to 50 years), and the median body weight was 70 kg (interquartile range, 65 to 84 kg). Silymarin was well tolerated, and all participants completed the study. The GMRs for darunavir coadministered with silymarin relative to darunavir alone were 0.86 (90% CI, 0.70 to 1.05) for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 h, 0.83 (90% CI, 0.80 to 0.98) for the maximum concentration, and 0.94 (90% CI, 0.73 to 1.19) for the concentration at the end of the dosing interval. In summary, coadministration of silymarin with darunavir-ritonavir seems to be safe in HIV-infected patients; no dose adjustment for darunavir-ritonavir seems to be necessary. PMID:22430963

  6. Prevention of AIDS and living together with an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Fahik, F T; Reichert, M C; Gabriel, R; Marin, H F

    1995-01-01

    In Brazil, approximately 45 thousand cases had been reported until the end of 1993, with an estimated 50% underreport. According to the Ministry of Health, until the year 2,000 from 2 to 8 million Brazilians citizens will be infected with HIV. The basic aspect of the educational campaigns regarding AIDS does not refer only to information on forms of transmission and prevention measures, but also attempts to fight against the mystification and the enormous resistance of the public to definitely accept the fact that transmission does not occur by simple means such as having a drink from the same glass, independently of its socioeconomic and cultural level. In addition to the lack of information, prejudice and discrimination appear strongly rooted in the population to the point of a tendency of social and effective rejection of the HIV-infected patient. Fighting against prejudice, against which there is also no vaccine, is a task as gigantic as fighting against the virus. For both, investments in education of and information to the population in general, is very important. Development of a software which would fulfill the function of explaining, and providing the correct information about AIDS, would be extremely valuable for any part of the society and could also be used as a complementary element by health professionals. The objective was to develop an interactive software in order to demonstrate prevention measures and universal precaution in AIDS; to inform about the necessary care to people that are living together an HIV-infected patient. To develop this software with animation and elucidating text regarding AIDS for the general population, we are using the Storyboard live to be run in Windows environment.

  7. Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral and immunosuppressive agents in HIV-infected patients after solid organ transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    van Maarseveen, Erik M; Rogers, Christin C; Trofe-Clark, Jennifer; van Zuilen, Arjan D; Mudrikova, Tania

    2012-10-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) resulting in the prolonged survival of HIV-infected patients, HIV infection is no longer considered to be a contraindication for solid organ transplantation (SOT). The combined management of antiretroviral and immunosuppressive therapy proved to be extremely challenging, as witnessed by high rates of allograft rejection and drug toxicity, but the profound drug-drug interactions between immunosuppressants and cART, especially protease inhibitors (PIs) also play an important role. Caution and frequent drug level monitoring of calcineurin inhibitors, such as tacrolimus are necessary when PIs are (re)introduced or withdrawn in HIV-infected recipients. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of glucocorticoids and mTOR inhibitors are seriously affected by PIs. With the introduction of integrase inhibitors, CCR5-antagonists and fusion inhibitors which cause significantly less pharmacokinetic interactions, have minor overlapping toxicity, and offer the advantage of pharmacodynamic synergy, it is time to revaluate what may be considered the optimal antiretroviral regimen in SOT recipients. In this review we provide a brief overview of the recent success of SOT in the HIV population, and an update on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between currently available cART and immunosuppressants in HIV-infected patients, who underwent SOT.

  8. Molecular Evidence of Interhuman Transmission of Pneumocystis Pneumonia among Renal Transplant Recipients Hospitalized with HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rabodonirina, Meja; Vanhems, Philippe; Couray-Targe, Sandrine; Gillibert, René-Pierre; Ganne, Christell; Nizard, Nathalie; Colin, Cyrille; Fabry, Jacques; Touraine, Jean-Louis; van Melle, Guy; Nahimana, Aimable; Francioli, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Ten Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) cases were diagnosed in renal transplant recipients (RTRs) during a 3-year period. Nosocomial transmission from HIV-positive patients with PCP was suspected because these patients shared the same hospital building, were not isolated, and were receiving suboptimal anti-PCP prophylaxis or none. P. jirovecii organisms were typed with the multitarget polymerase chain reaction–single-strand conformation polymorphism method. Among the 45 patients with PCP hospitalized during the 3-year period, 8 RTRs and 6 HIV-infected patients may have encountered at least 1 patient with active PCP within the 3 months before the diagnosis of their own PCP episode. In six instances (five RTRs, one HIV-infected patient), the patients harbored the same P. jirovecii molecular type as that found in the encountered PCP patients. The data suggest that part of the PCP cases observed in this building, particularly those observed in RTRs, were related to nosocomial interhuman transmission. PMID:15504262

  9. Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Ushijima, Naofumi; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of HIV-infected patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from HIV-infected cells. Therefore, macrophages of HIV-infected patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Since Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the envelope protein gp120, serum Nagalase activity is the sum of enzyme activities carried by both HIV virions and envelope proteins. These Nagalase carriers were already complexed with anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) but retained Nagalase activity that is required for infectivity. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF), which produces no side effects in humans. Macrophages activated by administration of 100 ng GcMAF develop a large amount of Fc-receptors as well as an enormous variation of receptors that recognize IgG-bound and unbound HIV virions. Since latently HIV-infected cells are unstable and constantly release HIV virions, the activated macrophages rapidly intercept the released HIV virions to prevent reinfection resulting in exhaustion of infected cells. After less than 18 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF for nonanemic patients, they exhibited low serum Nagalase activities equivalent to healthy controls, indicating eradication of HIV-infection, which was also confirmed by no infectious center formation by provirus inducing agent-treated patient PBMCs. No recurrence occurred and their healthy CD + cell counts were maintained for 7 years.

  10. Operating characteristics of carbohydrate–deficient transferrin (CDT) for identifying unhealthy alcohol use in adults with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Julia; Cheng, Debbie M.; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Bridden, Carly; Quinn, Emily; Saitz, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Unhealthy alcohol use (the spectrum of risky use through dependence) is common in HIV-infected persons, yet it can interfere with HIV medication adherence, may lower CD4 cell count, and can cause hepatic injury. Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), often measured as %CDT, can detect heavy drinking but whether it does in people with HIV is not well established. We evaluated the operating characteristics of %CDT in HIV-infected adults using cross-sectional data from 300 HIV-infected adults with current or past alcohol problems. Past 30-day alcohol consumption was determined using the Timeline Followback, a validated structured recall questionnaire, as the reference standard. Sensitivity and specificity of %CDT (at manufacturer's cutoff point of 2.6%) for detecting both “at-risk” (≥four drinks per occasion or >seven drinks per week for women, ≥five drinks per occasion or >14 per week for men) and “heavy” drinking (≥ four drinks per day for women, ≥ five drinks per day for men on at least seven days) were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were estimated to summarize the diagnostic ability of %CDT for distinguishing “at risk” and “heavy” levels of drinking. Exploratory analyses that stratified by gender and viral hepatitis infection were performed. Of 300 subjects, 103 reported current consumption at “at-risk” amounts, and 47 reported “heavy” amounts. For “at-risk” drinking, sensitivity of %CDT was 28% (95% confidence interval (CI) 19%, 37%), specificity 90% (95% CI 86%, 94%); area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.59. For “heavy” drinking, sensitivity was 36% (95% CI 22%, 50%), specificity 88% (95% CI 84%, 92%); AUC was 0.60. Sensitivity appeared lower among women and those with viral hepatitis; specificity was similar across subgroups. Among HIV-infected adults, %CDT testing yielded good specificity, but poor sensitivity for detecting “at-risk” and “heavy” alcohol consumption, limiting its

  11. Comparison of the therapeutic dose of warfarin in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients: a study of clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, B S; Mokoena, T

    2017-01-01

    Background People infected with HIV are prone to venous thrombosis. Treatment of thrombosis is primarily with warfarin. No studies have addressed the effects of HIV infection on warfarin dose. The aims of this study were to determine whether the therapeutic dose of warfarin and induction time to therapeutic dose in HIV-infected patients differ from that in HIV-uninfected patients. Methods A prospective and retrospective descriptive study of induction time to therapeutic warfarin dose, as well as of ambulant therapeutic warfarin dose, was performed. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients being treated after deep venous thrombosis with or without pulmonary embolism were compared. Sex and use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) were also compared in the groups. Results 234 patients were entered into the study. Induction time to therapeutic warfarin dose did not differ between the 2 groups. The mean therapeutic dose of warfarin was higher in the HIV-infected than the HIV-uninfected group: 6.06 vs 5.72 mg/day, but this was not statistically significant (p=0.29). There was no difference in therapeutic warfarin dose between ARV-naïve groups—HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected patients not on ARVs. Conclusions There appears to be little effect of HIV infection on warfarin dosing. Warfarin therapy should be administered conventionally in HIV-infected patients. PMID:28179414

  12. Sporotrichosis: an emerging neglected opportunistic infection in HIV-infected patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Dayvison Francis Saraiva; Valle, Antonio Carlos Francesconi do; da Silva, Margarete Bernardo Tavares; Campos, Dayse Pereira; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; de Souza, Rogerio Valls; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Bastos, Francisco Inácio; Galhardo, Maria Clara Gutierrez

    2014-08-01

    Sporotrichosis associated with zoonotic transmission remains a relevant public health problem in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, affecting a large at-risk population, which includes HIV-infected individuals. We assessed patients co-infected by Sporothrix spp. and HIV over time in the context of an unabated sporotrichosis epidemic. A retrospective cohort retrieved information from a National reference institute for infectious diseases regarding 48 patients with sporotrichosis-HIV co-infection (group 1) as well as 3,570 patients with sporotrichosis (group 2), from 1987 through March 2013. Most patients from group 1 were male (68.8%), whereas women were predominant in group 2 (69.1%; p<0.0001). Patients from group 1 were younger than those from group 2 (μ = 38.38±10.17 vs. 46.34±15.85; p<0.001) and differed from group 2 in terms of their race/ethnic background, with 70.8% non-white patients in group 1 vs. 38.6% from group 2 (p<0.0001). Close to half (∼44%) of the patients from group 1 were hospitalized due to sporotrichosis over time, whereas hospitalization was very unlikely in group 2, among whom approximately 1% were hospitalized over time. Dissemination of sporotrichosis was the main cause of hospitalization in both groups, although it was more common among hospitalized patients from group 1 (19/21 [90.5%] vs. 16/37 [43.2%]; p<0.001). Over the period under analysis, eight patients died due to sporotrichosis (3/48 vs. 5/3,570). The diagnosis of sporotrichosis elicited HIV testing and subsequent diagnosis in 19/48 patients, whereas 23/48 patients were simultaneously diagnosed with the two infections. HIV infection aggravates sporotrichosis, with a higher incidence of severe disseminated cases and a higher number of hospitalizations and deaths. Underserved populations, among whom sporotrichosis has been propagated, have been affected by different transmissible (e.g., HIV) and non-transmissible diseases. These populations should be targeted by community development

  13. Sporotrichosis: An Emerging Neglected Opportunistic Infection in HIV-Infected Patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Dayvison Francis Saraiva; do Valle, Antonio Carlos Francesconi; da Silva, Margarete Bernardo Tavares; Campos, Dayse Pereira; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; de Souza, Rogerio Valls; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Bastos, Francisco Inácio; Galhardo, Maria Clara Gutierrez

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis associated with zoonotic transmission remains a relevant public health problem in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, affecting a large at-risk population, which includes HIV-infected individuals. We assessed patients co-infected by Sporothrix spp. and HIV over time in the context of an unabated sporotrichosis epidemic. A retrospective cohort retrieved information from a National reference institute for infectious diseases regarding 48 patients with sporotrichosis-HIV co-infection (group 1) as well as 3,570 patients with sporotrichosis (group 2), from 1987 through March 2013. Most patients from group 1 were male (68.8%), whereas women were predominant in group 2 (69.1%; p<0.0001). Patients from group 1 were younger than those from group 2 (μ = 38.38±10.17 vs. 46.34±15.85; p<0.001) and differed from group 2 in terms of their race/ethnic background, with 70.8% non-white patients in group 1 vs. 38.6% from group 2 (p<0.0001). Close to half (∼44%) of the patients from group 1 were hospitalized due to sporotrichosis over time, whereas hospitalization was very unlikely in group 2, among whom approximately 1% were hospitalized over time. Dissemination of sporotrichosis was the main cause of hospitalization in both groups, although it was more common among hospitalized patients from group 1 (19/21 [90.5%] vs. 16/37 [43.2%]; p<0.001). Over the period under analysis, eight patients died due to sporotrichosis (3/48 vs. 5/3,570). The diagnosis of sporotrichosis elicited HIV testing and subsequent diagnosis in 19/48 patients, whereas 23/48 patients were simultaneously diagnosed with the two infections. HIV infection aggravates sporotrichosis, with a higher incidence of severe disseminated cases and a higher number of hospitalizations and deaths. Underserved populations, among whom sporotrichosis has been propagated, have been affected by different transmissible (e.g., HIV) and non-transmissible diseases. These populations should be targeted by community development

  14. Detection and management of drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients from lower income countries

    PubMed Central

    Ballif, Marie; Nhandu, Venerandah; Wood, Robin; Dusingize, Jean Claude; Carter, E. Jane; Cortes, Claudia P.; McGowan, Catherine C.; Diero, Lameck; Graber, Claire; Renner, Lorna; Hawerlander, Denise; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Du, Quy Tuan; Sterling, Timothy R.; Egger, Matthias; Fenner, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Setting Drug resistance threatens tuberculosis (TB) control, particularly among HIV-infected persons. Objective We surveyed antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs from lower-income countries on prevention and management of drug-resistant TB. Design We used online questionnaires to collect program-level data in 47 ART programs in Southern Africa (14), East Africa (8), West Africa (7), Central Africa (5), Latin America (7) and Asia-Pacific (6 programs) in 2012. Patient-level data were collected on 1,002 adult TB patients seen at 40 of the participating ART programs. Results Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing was available at 36 (77%) ART programs, but only used for 22% of all TB patients. Molecular drug resistance testing was available at 33 (70%) programs and used for 23% of all TB patients. Twenty ART programs (43%) provided directly observed therapy (DOT) during the whole treatment, 16 (34%) during intensive phase only and 11 (23%) did not follow DOT. Fourteen (30%) ART programs reported no access to second-line TB regimens; 18 (38%) reported TB drug shortages. Conclusions Capacity to diagnose and treat drug-resistant TB was limited across ART programs in lower income countries. DOT was not always implemented and drug supply was regularly interrupted, which may contribute to the global emergence of drug resistance. PMID:25299866

  15. Macronutrient Supplementation for Malnourished HIV-infected Adults: A Review of the Evidence in Resource-Adequate and Resource-Constrained Settings

    PubMed Central

    Koethe, John R.; Chi, Benjamin H.; Megazzini, Karen M.; Heimburger, Douglas C.; Stringer, Jeffrey S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV infection has expanded rapidly throughout sub-Saharan Africa, but malnutrition and food insecurity have emerged as major barriers to program success. Protein-calorie malnutrition (a common form in the region) hastens HIV disease progression, and food insecurity is a barrier to medication adherence. Analyses of patient outcomes have identified a low body mass index (BMI) at ART initiation as an independent predictor of early mortality, but the causes of low BMI are multi-factorial may represent normal anthropometric variation, chronic inadequate food intake, or wasting associated with HIV and other infections. While there is much experience population-level humanitarian food assistance, few data exist to measure the effectiveness of macronutrient supplementation or to identify individuals most likely to benefit. In this report, we review the current evidence supporting macronutrient supplementation for HIV-infected adults; clinical trials in resource-adequate and resource-constrained settings; and highlight priority areas for future research. PMID:19624276

  16. Antiretroviral therapy enrollment characteristics and outcomes among HIV-infected adolescents and young adults compared with older adults--seven African countries, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Auld, Andrew F; Agolory, Simon G; Shiraishi, Ray W; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Kwesigabo, Gideon; Mulenga, Modest; Hachizovu, Sebastian; Asadu, Emeka; Tuho, Moise Zanga; Ettiegne-Traore, Virginie; Mbofana, Francisco; Okello, Velephi; Azih, Charles; Denison, Julie A; Tsui, Sharon; Koole, Olivier; Kamiru, Harrison; Nuwagaba-Biribonwoha, Harriet; Alfredo, Charity; Jobarteh, Kebba; Odafe, Solomon; Onotu, Dennis; Ekra, Kunomboa A; Kouakou, Joseph S; Ehrenkranz, Peter; Bicego, George; Torpey, Kwasi; Mukadi, Ya Diul; van Praag, Eric; Menten, Joris; Mastro, Timothy; Dukes Hamilton, Carol; Swaminathan, Mahesh; Dokubo, E Kainne; Baughman, Andrew L; Spira, Thomas; Colebunders, Robert; Bangsberg, David; Marlink, Richard; Zee, Aaron; Kaplan, Jonathan; Ellerbrock, Tedd V

    2014-11-28

    Although scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) since 2005 has contributed to declines of about 30% in the global annual number of human immunodeficiency (HIV)-related deaths and declines in global HIV incidence, estimated annual HIV-related deaths among adolescents have increased by about 50% and estimated adolescent HIV incidence has been relatively stable. In 2012, an estimated 2,500 (40%) of all 6,300 daily new HIV infections occurred among persons aged 15-24 years. Difficulty enrolling adolescents and young adults in ART and high rates of loss to follow-up (LTFU) after ART initiation might be contributing to mortality and HIV incidence in this age group, but data are limited. To evaluate age-related ART retention challenges, data from retrospective cohort studies conducted in seven African countries among 16,421 patients, aged ≥15 years at enrollment, who initiated ART during 2004-2012 were analyzed. ART enrollment and outcome data were compared among three groups defined by age at enrollment: adolescents and young adults (aged 15-24 years), middle-aged adults (aged 25-49 years), and older adults (aged ≥50 years). Enrollees aged 15-24 years were predominantly female (81%-92%), commonly pregnant (3%-32% of females), unmarried (54%-73%), and, in four countries with employment data, unemployed (53%-86%). In comparison, older adults were more likely to be male (p<0.001), employed (p<0.001), and married, (p<0.05 in five countries). Compared with older adults, adolescents and young adults had higher LTFU rates in all seven countries, reaching statistical significance in three countries in crude and multivariable analyses. Evidence-based interventions to reduce LTFU for adolescent and young adult ART enrollees could help reduce mortality and HIV incidence in this age group.

  17. [Salivary pH and culture determinations in HIV infected and non-HIV infected patients with oral candidosis].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vargas, L Octavio; Pérez-Rios, Patricia; Romo-García, Javier; Corona-Izquierdo, F Paola; Hidalgo-Loperena, Hilda; Franco-Martínez, Fernando

    2002-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the salivary pH in HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) positive(+) and negative(-) patients and in a control group, for assessing if variations or changes in pH are related to the development of oral candidosis and the species isolated. The sample comprised 120 patients from the Infectology Unit of the Mexico General Hospital, and from the School of Dentistry, UNAM. Three study groups were performed: with oral candidosis HIV+, with oral candidosis HIV-, and a control group. All patients filled out a clinical data questionnaire and signed an informed consent document. A 2 ml sample of non-stimulated saliva was obtained from each patient. The pH was measured and the sample was cultured on dextrose Sabouraud agar. The Candida species determinations were performed by the API 20 C AUX system and statistically analyzed. In the HIV+ group, the pH mean was 6.17, with most prevalence of Candida albicans type I and pseudomembranous candidosis. In the HIV- group prosthesis users, the pH mean was 6.29, with most prevalence of C. albicans type I, but with erythematous candidosis. The control group showed a mean pH of 6.78. A statistically significant difference among pH values was found (F= 15.45 p<0.01). The present study revealed that in HIV+ patients, the most significant predisposing factors are: immunosuppression, antibiotic therapy, bad hygiene, anemia, leucoplakia, and diabetes. The salivary pH with acidic values (more in HIV+ patients) significantly favors candidosis development, specially for C. albicans and C. glabrata species and primarily the pseudomembranous and erythematous clinic types. The pH is not a determinant for Candida growth, but could affect the adherence and invasiveness of the yeast.

  18. Long-term prescription opioids and/or benzodiazepines and mortality among HIV-infected and uninfected patients

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, DF; Gordon, KS; Barry, DT; Becker, WC; Crystal, S; Edelman, EJ; Gaither, J; Gordon, AJ; Goulet, J; Kerns, RD; Moore, BA; Tate, J; Justice, AC; Fiellin, DA

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased long-term prescribing of opioids and/or benzodiazepines necessitates evaluating risks associated with their receipt. We sought to evaluate the association between long-term opioids and/or benzodiazepines and mortality in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy and uninfected patients. Methods Prospective analysis of all-cause mortality using multivariable methods and propensity score matching among HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy and uninfected patients. Results From 64,602 available patients (16,989 HIV-infected and 47,613 uninfected), 27,128 (long-term opioids and/or benzodiazepines exposed and unexposed) were 1:1 matched by propensity score. The hazard ratio (HR) for death was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-1.61) for long-term opioid receipt, 1.26 (95% CI 1.08-1.48) for long-term benzodiazepine receipt, and 1.56 (95% CI 1.26-1.92) for long-term opioid and benzodiazepine receipt. There was an interaction (p= 0.01) between long-term opioid receipt and HIV status with mortality. For long-term opioid receipt, the HR was 1.46 (95% CI 1.15-1.87) among HIV-infected patients, and 1.25 (95% CI 1.05 – 1.49) among uninfected patients. Mortality risk was increased for patients receiving both long-term opioids and benzodiazepines when opioid doses were ≥20mg morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD) and for patients receiving long-term opioids alone when doses were ≥50mg MEDD. Conclusions Long-term opioid receipt was associated with an increased risk of death; especially with long-term benzodiazepine receipt, higher opioid doses and among HIV-infected patients. Long-term benzodiazepine receipt was associated with an increased risk of death regardless of opioid receipt. Strategies to mitigate risks associated with these medications, and caution when they are co-prescribed, are needed particularly in HIV-infected populations. PMID:26009831

  19. Lower CSF Aβ is Associated with HAND in HIV-Infected Adults with a Family History of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pariya. L.; Moore, David J.; Franklin, Donald R.; Umlauf, Anya; Heaton, Robert K.; Collier, Ann C.; Marra, Christina M.; Clifford, David B.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Sacktor, Ned C.; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M.; McCutchan, John A.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Both family history of dementia (FHD) and lower levels of Aβ-42 are indepentently associated with worse neurocognitive functioning in HIV-infected patients. Objective To examine the relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ-42 and FHD with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Methods One hundred eighty-three HIV+ adults underwent neuropsychological and neuromedical assessments, and determination of CSF Aβ-42 concentration and FHD (defined as a self-reported first or second-degree relative with a dementia diagnosis). Univariate analyses and multivariable logistic regressions were used. Results FHD was not associated with HAND (p = 0.24); however, CSF Aβ-42 levels were lower (p = 0.03) in the HAND group, but were not associated with FHD (p = 0.89). Multivariable models showed a main effect of CSF Aβ-42 (p = 0.03) and a trend-level (p = 0.06) interaction between FHD and CSF Aβ-42, such that lower CSF Aβ-42 was associated with HAND in those with FHD (p < 0.01) compared to those without FHD (p = 0.83). An analysis in those with follow-up data showed that higher baseline CSF Aβ-42 was associated with lower risk of neurocognitive decline (p = 0.02). While we did not find an FHD X CSF Aβ-42 interaction (p = 0.83), when analyses were stratified by FHD, lower CSF Aβ-42 was associated at the trend-level with neurocognitive decline in the FHD group (p = 0.08) compared to the no FHD group (p = 0.15). Conclusions FHD moderates the relationship between of CSF Aβ-42 and HAND. The findings highlight the complexities in interpreting the relationships between biomarkers of age-related neurodegeneration and HAND. PMID:26673902

  20. HTLV-I infection is not associated with a higher risk of death in Peruvian HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jaime A; Hernández, Adrián V; Hidalgo, José A; Salazar, Raúl

    2009-01-01

    Limited and contradictory information exists regarding the prognosis of HIV/HTLV-I co-infection. Our goal was to estimate the effect of HTLV-I infection on mortality in HIV-infected patients at a HIV reference center in Peru. We studied a retrospective cohort of HIV-infected patients, who were exposed or unexposed to HTLV-I. Exposed patients were Western Blot (WB) positive for both retroviruses. Unexposed patients were WB positive for HIV, and had least one negative EIA for HTLV-I. These were selected among patients who entered our Program immediately before and after each exposed patient, between January 1990 and June 2004. Survival time was considered between the diagnosis of exposure to HTLV-I and death or censoring. Confounding variables were age, gender, baseline HIV clinical stage, baseline CD4+ T cell count, and antiretroviral therapy. We studied 50 exposed, and 100 unexposed patients. Exposed patients had a shorter survival compared to unexposed patients [median survival: 47 months (95% CI: 17-77) vs. 85 months (95% CI: 70-100), unadjusted p = 0.06]. Exposed patients had a higher rate of mortality compared to unexposed patients (HIV/HTLV-I (24/50 [48%]) vs. HIV only (37/100 [37%]), univariable p = 0.2]. HTLV-I exposure was not associated to a higher risk of death in the adjusted analysis: HR: 1.2 (0.4-3.5). AIDS clinical stage and lack of antiretroviral therapy were associated to a higher risk of dying. In conclusions, HTLV-I infection was not associated with a higher risk of death in Peruvian HIV-infected patients. Advanced HIV infection and lack of antiretroviral therapy may explain the excess of mortality in this population.

  1. Rituximab plus liposomal doxorubicin in HIV-infected patients with KSHV-associated multicentric Castleman disease

    PubMed Central

    Polizzotto, Mark N.; Aleman, Karen; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Marshall, Vickie; Whitby, Denise; Wang, Victoria; Pittaluga, Stefania; O’Mahony, Deirdre; Steinberg, Seth M.; Little, Richard F.; Yarchoan, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) herpesvirus–associated multicentric Castleman disease (KSHV-MCD) is a lymphoproliferative disorder, most commonly seen in HIV-infected patients, that has a high mortality if untreated. Concurrent KS is common. Although rituximab has reported activity in KSHV-MCD, its use is often associated with KS progression. Within a natural history study of KSHV-MCD, we prospectively evaluated rituximab 375 mg/m2 combined with liposomal doxorubicin 20 mg/m2 (R-Dox) every 3 weeks in 17 patients. Patients received a median of 4 cycles (range 3-9). All received antiretroviral therapy, 11 received consolidation interferon-α, and 6 received consolidation high-dose zidovudine with valganciclovir. Using NCI KSHV-MCD response criteria, major clinical and biochemical responses were attained in 94% and 88% of patients, respectively. With a median 58 months’ potential follow-up, 3-year event-free survival was 69% and 3-year overall survival was 81%. During R-Dox therapy, cutaneous KS developed in 1 patient, whereas 5 of 6 patients with it had clinical improvement. R-Dox was associated with significant improvement in anemia and hypoalbuminemia. KSHV viral load, KSHV viral interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, human interleukin-6, and serum immunoglobulin free light chains decreased with therapy. R-Dox is effective in symptomatic KSHV-MCD and may be useful in patients with concurrent KS. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00092222. PMID:25331113

  2. Supportive-expressive and coping group teletherapies for HIV-infected older adults: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy G; Heckman, Bernadette D; Anderson, Timothy; Lovejoy, Travis I; Mohr, David; Sutton, Mark; Bianco, Joseph A; Gau, Jen-Tzer

    2013-11-01

    This clinical trial tested whether telephone-administered supportive-expressive group therapy or coping effectiveness training reduce depressive symptoms in HIV-infected older adults. Participants from 24 states (N = 361) completed the Geriatric Depression Scale at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 4- and 8-month follow-up and were randomized to one of three study arms: (1) 12 weekly sessions of telephone-administered, supportive-expressive group therapy (tele-SEGT; n = 122); (2) 12 weekly sessions of telephone-administered, coping effectiveness training (tele-CET; n = 118); or (3) a standard of care (SOC) control group (n = 121). Tele-SEGT participants reported fewer depressive symptoms than SOC controls at post-intervention (MSEGT = 11.9, MSOC = 14.3) and 4- (MSEGT = 12.5, MSOC = 14.4) and 8-month follow-up (MSEGT = 12.7, MSOC = 14.5) and fewer depressive symptoms than tele-CET participants at post-intervention (MSEGT = 12.4, MCET = 13.6) and 8-month follow-up (MSEGT = 12.7, MCET = 14.1). Tele-CET participants reported no statistically significant differences from SOC controls in GDS values at any assessment period. Tele-SEGT constitutes an efficacious treatment to reduce depressive symptoms in HIV-infected older adults.

  3. Relationship between Inflammatory Markers, Endothelial Activation Markers, and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Allison C.; Rizk, Nesrine; O'Riordan, Mary Ann; Dogra, Vikram; El-Bejjani, Dalia; Storer, Norma; Harrill, Danielle; Tungsiripat, Marisa; Adell, Jerome; McComsey, Grace A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, which may be related to chronic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction despite virological control with antiretroviral therapy. The relationship between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), a surrogate marker for cardiovascular disease, proinflammatory cytokines, and endothelial activation markers has not been fully explored in HIV-infected patients who are receiving antiretroviral therapy. Methods We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional, observational study of treated HIV-infected patients and healthy control subjects to evaluate the relationship between carotid IMT, proinflammatory cytokines, endothelial activation biomarkers, and metabolic parameters in treated HIV-infected patients, compared with healthy control subjects. Results We enrolled 73 HIV-infected patients and 21 control subjects. Common carotid artery and internal carotid artery IMT measurements, as well as tumor necrosis factor–α, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, inter-leukin-6, myeloperoxidase, and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels were higher in the HIV-infected group. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was the only biomarker that was positively correlated with carotid IMT in both groups. In the HIV-infected group, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule–1 was positively correlated with all inflammatory cytokine levels. In multiple regression analysis, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule–1, myeloperoxidase, and tumor necrosis factor–α levels were all associated with internal carotid artery IMT in the HIV-infected group, whereas age was associated with both common carotid artery and internal carotid artery IMT. Conclusions Enhanced endothelial activation, inflammation, and increased carotid IMT occur in HIV-infected patients despite antiretroviral therapy. Inflammatory markers are associated with endothelial activation, and both are associated

  4. Cross-Sectional Study of Vitamin D Levels, Immunologic and Virologic Outcomes in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Cybele; Gangnon, Ron; Sosman, James M.; Binkley, Neil; Safdar, Nasia

    2013-01-01

    Context: Vitamin D is increasingly recognized as an important immunomodulator. Lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25[OH]2D) are observed in persons living with HIV. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of 25(OH)D, and 1,25(OH)2D to HIV viral load, and CD4+ T cells in HIV-infected adults. Design: This was a cross-sectional study completed between January 2010 and April 2011. Setting: This study was conducted with volunteers who received HIV care in Wisconsin at either a University-based HIV clinic or an urban community HIV clinic. Patients: One hundred twelve adults with HIV infection participated in this study. Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome for this study was the relationship between 1,25(OH)2D and HIV viral load. Secondary outcomes included relationships between 25(OH)D and HIV viral load, 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D to CD4+ T cells, and predictors of vitamin D deficiency. Results: The 112 volunteers included 24 women and 3 transgender individuals; 68% were from the university clinic, and 32% were from the urban clinic. Mean age was 44.2 years. The mean 25(OH)D level was 22.5 ng/mL; mean 1,25(OH)2D level was 23.5 pg/mL. Twenty-two percent had 25(OH)D ≤10 ng/mL; 53% had values <20 ng/mL, and 73% were ≤30 ng/mL. There was no association between vitamin D and CD4. A nonlinear relationship between viral load and 1,25(OH)2D was found. For 1,25(OH)2D below 32 pg/mL, for each 10 pg/mL decrease in 1,25(OH)2D, (log10) viral load increased by 0.84 (95% CI: 0.16–1.51, P = .015). For 1,25(OH)2D above 32 pg/mL, for each 10 pg/mL increase in 1,25(OH)2D, (log10) viral load increased by 0.36 (95% CI: 0.15–0.57, P = .0009). Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency was common in this HIV population, as seen in other HIV cohorts. A novel, U-shaped relationship between 1,25(OH)2D and viral load, with the lowest and highest 1,25(OH)2D levels seen with high viral loads, was found and deserves further

  5. Ocular Manifestations in Patients with HIV Infection/AIDS who were Referred from the ART Centre, Hassan, Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Pavana Krishnaraj; Venugopal, Kavitha Chikkanayakanahalli; Karimsab, Dada Peer; Balasubramanya, S

    2012-01-01

    Background Ocular involvement in HIV infection/AIDS is very common and it includes various clinical presentations which may be asymptomatic or atypical or they may be the initial manifestations of the underlying disease. The severity of these lesions increases as the immune competency decreases, leading to visual impairment or blindness. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and the types of HIV associated ocular conditions and their effect on the vision in patients with HIV/AIDS. Methods This cross sectional study was based on the patients with HIV infection/AIDS, who were referred to the Ophthalmic OPD, District hospital, Hassan. These patients were referred from the District ART Centre for a complete ophthalmic evaluation, irrespective of their immune status and the presence or absence of symptoms. All the patients underwent a complete ophthalmic examination, which included both anterior and posterior segment evaluation and colour vision assessment. Results Out of the 553 patients, 66% belonged to the age group of 21-40 years. 87% of the patients had a BCVA of >6/18, whereas 4.7% had very poor vision. 37.6% of the patients had ocular manifestations. Anterior segment, posterior segment and neuro-ophthalmic manifestations were seen in 7%, 9.94% and 5.79% of the patients respectively. The most common anterior segment manifestation was recurrent lid infections, while HIV microangiopathy was the most common posterior segment manifestation. The other unusual findings included an abnormal colour vision in 6.3% of the patients and bilateral lid retraction in 8.5% of the patients. Conclusion Since ocular manifestations are very common and as they can occur at any time during the course of HIV infection, an awareness on various patterns of the ocular disease and the screening of all the patients with HIV infection/AIDS is a must. PMID:23373045

  6. Epstein-Barr virus and human immunodeficiency virus serological responses and viral burdens in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Sullivan, Cathal E.; Peng, RongSheng; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Sturgeon, Timothy; Jenson, Hal B.; Ling, Paul D.; Butel, J. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma is recognized as a complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Little is known regarding the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the biology of EBV in this population. To characterize the EBV- and HIV-specific serological responses together with EBV DNA levels in a cohort of HIV-infected adults treated with HAART, a study was conducted to compare EBV and HIV serologies and EBV DNA copy number (DNAemia) over a 12-month period after the commencement of HAART. All patients were seropositive for EBV at baseline. Approximately 50% of patients had detectable EBV DNA at baseline, and 27/30 had detectable EBV DNA at some point over the follow-up period of 1 year. Changes in EBV DNA copy number over time for any individual were unpredictable. Significant increases in the levels of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) and Epstein-Barr early antigen (EA) antibodies were demonstrated in the 17 patients who had a good response to HAART. Of 29 patients with paired samples tested, four-fold or greater increases in titers were detected for EA in 12/29 (41%), for EBNA in 7/29 (24%), for VCA-IgG in 4/29 (14%); four-fold decreases in titers were detected in 2/29 (7%) for EA and 12/29 (41%) for EBNA. A significant decline in the titer of anti-HIV antibodies was also demonstrated. It was concluded that patients with advanced HIV infection who respond to HAART have an increase in their EBV specific antibodies and a decrease in their HIV-specific antibodies. For the cohort overall, there was a transient increase in EBV DNA levels that had declined by 12 months. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Association of Blood Pressure and Hypertension with Alcohol Consumption in HIV-Infected White and Nonwhite Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Maria Leticia R.; Barcellos, Nêmora T.; Alencastro, Paulo R.; Wolff, Fernando H.; Brandão, Ajácio B. M.; Fuchs, Flávio D.; Fuchs, Sandra C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Although alcohol abuse is associated with hypertension in whites and nonwhites, it has been scarcely investigated in HIV-infected patients. Objective. To investigate whether the association of alcohol abuse with hypertension is influenced by skin color in HIV-infected individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional study in HIV-infected individuals aged 18 years or older. Demographic characteristics, lifestyle, and HIV infection were investigated. Alcohol abuse was defined as ≥15 (women) and ≥30 g/alcohol/day (men), and binge drinking by the intake of ≥5 drinks on a single occasion. Hypertension was defined by blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg or use of blood pressure-lowering agents. Results. We studied 1,240 individuals, with 39.1 ± 10 years, 51% males and 57% whites. Age and body mass index were associated with blood pressure, and there was an independent association of alcohol abuse with hypertension in whites (RR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.1–3.3) and nonwhites (RR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.0). Among nonwhite individuals who were alcohol abusers, systolic (9.3 ± 3.2; P = 0.001) and diastolic blood pressures (6.4 ± 2.1; P = 0.008) were higher than in nonabusers. Conclusion. Alcohol abuse is a risk factor for hypertension in white and nonwhite HIV-infected individuals. The association of ethanol consumption with blood pressure is not explained by AIDS-related conditions. PMID:24235878

  8. Oral Mycobiome Analysis of HIV-Infected Patients: Identification of Pichia as an Antagonist of Opportunistic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Brown, Robert E.; Jurevic, Richard; Salata, Robert A.; Lederman, Michael M.; Gillevet, Patrick M.; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2014-01-01

    Oral microbiota contribute to health and disease, and their disruption may influence the course of oral diseases. Here, we used pyrosequencing to characterize the oral bacteriome and mycobiome of 12 HIV-infected patients and matched 12 uninfected controls. The number of bacterial and fungal genera in individuals ranged between 8–14 and 1–9, among uninfected and HIV-infected participants, respectively. The core oral bacteriome (COB) comprised 14 genera, of which 13 were common between the two groups. In contrast, the core oral mycobiome (COM) differed between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals, with Candida being the predominant fungus in both groups. Among Candida species, C. albicans was the most common (58% in uninfected and 83% in HIV-infected participants). Furthermore, 15 and 12 bacteria-fungi pairs were correlated significantly within uninfected and HIV-infected groups, respectively. Increase in Candida colonization was associated with a concomitant decrease in the abundance of Pichia, suggesting antagonism. We found that Pichia spent medium (PSM) inhibited growth of Candida, Aspergillus and Fusarium. Moreover, Pichia cells and PSM inhibited Candida biofilms (P = .002 and .02, respectively, compared to untreated controls). The mechanism by which Pichia inhibited Candida involved nutrient limitation, and modulation of growth and virulence factors. Finally, in an experimental murine model of oral candidiasis, we demonstrated that mice treated with PSM exhibited significantly lower infection score (P = .011) and fungal burden (P = .04) compared to untreated mice. Moreover, tongues of PSM-treated mice had few hyphae and intact epithelium, while vehicle- and nystatin-treated mice exhibited extensive fungal invasion of tissue with epithelial disruption. These results showed that PSM was efficacious against oral candidiasis in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitory activity of PSM was associated with secretory protein/s. Our findings provide the

  9. Assessing the immunological response to hepatitis B vaccination in HIV-infected patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mena, Guillermo; Llupià, Anna; García-Basteiro, Alberto L; Díez, Consolación; León, Agathe; García, Felipe; Bayas, José M

    2012-05-21

    Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended in HIV-infected patients. Achieving seroprotection rates (anti-HBs ≥ 10I U/L) comparable to the general population remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to analyze the proportion of responders among patients infected with HIV receiving primary HBV vaccination and identify factors associated with seroprotection rates. We analyzed the response to vaccination (antiHBs titers) in 474 HIV-infected patients receiving ≥ 1 doses of vaccine between 1994 and 2009. Factors associated with response to vaccination were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Considering the first vaccine courses administered, a response rate of 60.3% (286/474) was obtained. Eighty-seven patients began a second course, responding in 58.6% of cases. Regardless of the number of doses, schedules, and whether or not they completed the course, the response rates were 71.1% (337/474). After adjustment for year of reception of the first dose, responders were less likely to have a higher baseline HIV 1-RNA viral load (OR: 0.78 95% CI: 0.68-0.91) and more likely to have a CD4 count ≥ 350 cells/μL (OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.03-3.62). Patients receiving less than three doses of vaccine (OR: 0.31 95% CI 0.15-0.61) or three doses of the rapidly accelerated schedule (OR: 0.35 95% CI 0.15-0.81) had a lower probability of response in comparison with those receiving three doses of an accelerated schedule. In patients diagnosed with HIV, HBV vaccination before evolution to greater immunosuppression (CD4 < 350 cells/μL) or delaying vaccination until the CD4 count is higher could provide better seroprotection rates. The rapidly accelerated vaccination schedule should be used with caution, due to its lower effectiveness. If seroprotection is not achieved after the first course, revaccination seems to be effective in increasing the proportion of responders.

  10. Long-term immune responses to vaccination in HIV-infected patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kernéis, Solen; Launay, Odile; Turbelin, Clément; Batteux, Frédéric; Hanslik, Thomas; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine-induced antibodies may wane more quickly in persons living with HIV than in healthy individuals. Here, we reviewed the literature on vaccines routinely recommended in HIV-infected patients to estimate how seroprotection decreases over time in those who initially responded to immunization. For each study retrieved from the literature, the decrease of seroprotection was modeled with a log binomial generalized linear model, and data were pooled in a meta-analysis in order to provide estimates of seroprotection two and five years after last vaccine administration. Our analyses confirmed that duration of seroprotection was shorter in HIV-infected patients, and that with current guidelines, a substantial proportion of patients would have lost protective antibodies before being proposed a booster. We therefore discuss the implications on the monitoring of antibody levels and timing of revaccination in these patients. PMID:24415637

  11. Prevalence and predictors of kaposi sarcoma herpes virus seropositivity: a cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected adults initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is the most common AIDS-defining tumour in HIV-infected individuals in Africa. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) infection precedes development of KS. KSHV co-infection may be associated with worse outcomes in HIV disease and elevated KSHV viral load may be an early marker for advanced HIV disease among untreated patients. We examined the prevalence of KSHV among adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) and compared immunological, demographic and clinical factors between patients seropositive and seronegative for KSHV. Results We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from 404 HIV-infected treatment-naïve adults initiating ART at the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa between November 2008 and March 2009. Subjects were screened at ART initiation for antibodies to KSHV lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73 antigens. Seropositivity to KSHV was defined as positive to either lytic KSHV K8.1 or latent KSHV Orf73 antibodies. KSHV viremia was determined by quantitative PCR and CD3, 4 and 8 lymphocyte counts were determined with flow cytometry. Of the 404 participants, 193 (48%) tested positive for KSHV at ART initiation; with 76 (39%) reactive to lytic K8.1, 35 (18%) to latent Orf73 and 82 (42%) to both. One individual presented with clinical KS at ART initiation. The KSHV infected group was similar to those without KSHV in terms of age, race, gender, ethnicity, smoking and alcohol use. KSHV infected individuals presented with slightly higher median CD3 (817 vs. 726 cells/mm3) and CD4 (90 vs. 80 cells/mm3) counts than KSHV negative subjects. We found no associations between KSHV seropositivity and body mass index, tuberculosis status, WHO stage, HIV RNA levels, full blood count or liver function tests at initiation. Those with detectable KSHV viremia (n = 19), however, appeared to present with signs of more advanced HIV disease including anemia and WHO stage 3 or 4 defining conditions compared to those in whom the virus was

  12. Lactic acidosis in HIV infected patients: a systematic review of published cases

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Pinto, A; Grant, A; Edwards, S; Weller, I

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Systematic review of cases reported in the medical literature. Results: 217 published cases were identified, 90 of which fulfilled the study definition and had sufficient individual data on potential risk factors to be included. The 90 patients had a mean age of 40.1 years (range 16–69) and 53% were female. All 90 patients were taking nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) at the time of the episode. Among the 83 patients with details of their antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen 51 patients were taking stavudine, 29 zidovudine, 27 didanosine, and 25 lamivudine. Around 50% of the patients had abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting. Hepatic steatosis was consistently reported (53/90) and in 36 (68%) there was histological evidence. The case fatality rate was 48%. Six cases were rechallenged with NRTI and three developed a further LA episode. Using data on the numbers of HIV infected individuals receiving care in the United States, we estimate that the risk of LA could be 2.5 times higher for women than men. Conclusions: NRTI use and female sex appear to be risk factors for the development of LA. What other factors are involved is still not clear but might include duration of NRTI therapy, specific drug use, and genetic predisposition. A case-control study is needed to better define risk factors for severe LA. PMID:12902594

  13. Decrease in serial prevalence of coinfection with hepatitis C virus among HIV-infected patients in Spain, 1997-2006.

    PubMed

    Pérez Cachafeiro, Santiago; Del Amo, Julia; Iribarren, Jose A; Salavert Lleti, Miguel; Gutiérrez, Félix; Moreno, Ana; Labarga, Pablo; Pineda, Juan A; Vidal, Francesc; Berenguer, Juan; Moreno, Santiago

    2009-05-15

    The prevalence of injection drug use decreased from 67.3% in 1997 to 14.5% in 2006 among Spanish patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A parallel decrease in the prevalence of coinfection with hepatitis C virus was observed, from 73.8% in 1997 to 19.8% in 2006. This steady decrease in the prevalence of coinfection among Spanish patients was caused by a change in transmission routes of HIV infection.

  14. Clinically significant drug interactions among HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    So-Ngern, Apichot; Montakantikul, Preecha; Manosuthi, Weerawat

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a cross sectional study of the outpatient medical records of 1000 HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 2011 to determine the incidence of clinically significant drug interactions (CSDI). The severities of the CSDI were graded following the Micromedex" 2.0 database and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) 2012 HIV treatment guidelines. Three hundred thirty-five patients (34%) had 554 episodes of CSDI. Of which 337 episodes (61%), 163 episodes (29%) and 54 episodes (10%) had grades 2, 3 and 4 severity CSDI, respectively. The CSDI were caused by protease inhibitor (PI)-based drug regimens in 79%, by efavirenz-based regimens in 34% and by nevirapine-based regimens in 10% (p<0.001). The three most common grade 4 CSDI were: a PI with simvastatin (n=24), simvastatin with gemfibrozil (n=24) and didanosine with allopurinol (n=2). The three most common grade 3 CSDI were: a PI with a statin drug except simvastatin (n=56), fenofibrate with a statin drug (n=28) and amlodipine with simvastatin (n=14). On multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with CSDI were: receiving a PI-based regimen (OR 14.44; 95% CI: 9.10-22.88), having dyslipidemia (OR 3.94; 95% CI: 1.89-8.21), having >5 items prescribed at a time (OR 1.80; 95% CI: 1.23-2.63), seeing a doctor >4 times a year (OR 1.72; 95% CI: 1.20-2.46), having hypertension (OR 0.60; 95% CI: 0.37-0.98), having a duration of receiving ART of >5 years (OR 0.46; 95% CI: 0.28-0.77) and having a CD4 count of >200 cells/mm3 (OR 0.46; 95%CI: 0.26-0.84). CSDI were common among HIV-infected patients receiving ARV in our outpatient clinic. Patients having a low CD, count, having dyslipidemia, receiving PI-based ART, having a frequent number of visits per year and having a large number of items prescribed at each visit had a greater chance of a CSDI.

  15. [Efavirenz and nevirapine plasma levels in HIV-infected patients with hemophilia].

    PubMed

    Martorell, Marta; López, Rosa M; Ribera, Esteban; Ruiz, Isabel; Tural, Cristina; Puig, Lluís; Monterde, Josep

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate efavirenz and nevirapine plasma levels in HIV-infected hemophilic patients seen in two hospitals in Barcelona. Plasma levels of these drugs were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at four-month intervals, together with viral load and CD4 cell count. Nineteen patients treated with efavirenz and 8 with nevirapine were included, and 68 efavirenz and 31 nevirapine determinations were performed. Mean study time was 12 months. Median efavirenz plasma concentration was 2.95 .g/ml (interval: 1.54-5.26 .g/ml) in patients with favorable virological response and 1.86 .g/ml (0.82-4.88 .g/ml) in patients with detectable viral load (p = 0.32). Nevirapine plasma concentrations were 4.41 .g/ml (3.50-6.72 .g/ml) and 3.12 .g/ml (2.44-3.80 .g/ml) respectively (p = 0.18).

  16. Genetic and phenotypic analyses of sequential vpu alleles from HIV-infected IFN-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Vanwalscappel, Bénédicte; Rato, Sylvie; Perez-Olmeda, Mayte; Díez Fuertes, Francisco; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Alcami, José; Mammano, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-infected patients with IFN-α results in significant, but clinically insufficient, reductions of viremia. IFN induces the expression of several antiviral proteins including BST-2, which inhibits HIV by multiple mechanisms. The viral protein Vpu counteracts different effects of BST-2. We thus asked if Vpu proteins from IFN-treated patients displayed improved anti-BST-2 activities as compared to Vpu from baseline. Deep-sequencing analyses revealed that in five of seven patients treated by IFN-α for a concomitant HCV infection in the absence of antiretroviral drugs, the dominant Vpu sequences differed before and during treatment. In three patients, vpu alleles that emerged during treatment improved virus replication in the presence of IFN-α, and two of them conferred improved virus budding from cells expressing BST-2. Differences were observed for the ability to down-regulate CD4, while all Vpu variants potently down-modulated BST-2 from the cell surface. This report discloses relevant consequences of IFN-treatment on HIV properties.

  17. Prevalence and genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Cystoisospora belli in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Assis, Dnieber Chagas; Resende, Deisy Vivian; Cabrine-Santos, Marlene; Correia, Dalmo; Oliveira-Silva, Márcia Benedita

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Cystoisospora belli are monoxenic protozoa that have been recognized as the causative agents of chronic diarrhea in immunocompromised individuals, especially HIV-infected subjects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of these intestinal protozoa in HIV-positive patients in the Triângulo Mineiro region of Brazil and to correlate the presence of these infections with clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data of the patients. Oocysts were detected in stool samples of 10 (16.9%) of the 59 patients studied, while Cryptosporidium spp. were present in 10.1% (6/59) and C. belli in 6.7% (4/59). The frequency of these parasites was higher among patients with diarrheic syndrome and CD4+ T lymphocyte counts < 200 cells/mm 3 , demonstrating the opportunistic characteristic of these infections. A significant association was observed between the lack of adherence to antiretroviral therapy and the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and/or C. belli. Parasitism with Cryptosporidium spp. was more frequent in February and April, the months following the period of high rainfall. The same was not observed for C. belli. Genetic characterization of two isolates led to the identification of Cryptosporidium parvum, one of the main species associated with the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis.

  18. Half of 30-Day Hospital Readmissions Among HIV-Infected Patients Are Potentially Preventable

    PubMed Central

    Kitchell, Ellen; Etherton, Sarah Shelby; Duarte, Piper; Halm, Ethan A.; Jain, Mamta K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thirty-day readmission rates, a widely utilized quality metric, are high among HIV-infected individuals. However, it is unknown how many 30-day readmissions are preventable, especially in HIV patients, who have been excluded from prior potentially preventable readmission analyses. We used electronic medical records to identify all readmissions within 30 days of discharge among HIV patients hospitalized at a large urban safety net hospital in 2011. Two independent reviewers assessed whether readmissions were potentially preventable using both published criteria and detailed chart review, how readmissions might have been prevented, and the phase of care deemed suboptimal (inpatient care, discharge planning, post-discharge). Of 1137 index admissions, 213 (19%) resulted in 30-day readmissions. These admissions occurred among 930 unique HIV patients, with 130 individuals (14%) experiencing 30-day readmissions. Of these 130, about half were determined to be potentially preventable using published criteria (53%) or implicit chart review (48%). Not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) greatly increased the odds of a preventable readmission (OR 5.9, CI:2.4–14.8). Most of the preventable causes of readmission were attributed to suboptimal care during the index hospitalization. Half of 30-day readmission in HIV patients are potentially preventable. Increased focus on early ART initiation, adherence counseling, management of chronic conditions, and appropriate timing of discharge may help reduce readmissions in this vulnerable population. PMID:26154066

  19. Predictive factors of herpes zoster HIV-infected patients: another adverse effect of crack cocaine.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Mathieu; Basurko, Celia; Adenis, Antoine; Gaubert-Marechal, Emilie; Mosnier, Emilie; Edouard, Sophie; Vantilcke, Vincent; Sivapregassam, Sindou; Tressières, Benoit; Cabié, André; Couppié, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 1541 HIV-infected patients to determine variables associated with the incidence of herpes zoster. A single failure Cox model showed that herpes zoster incidence increased following the first 6 months of antiretroviral treatment adjusted hazard ratio (AHR)=5 (95%CI=2.6-9.2), P<0.001; in the >60 years age group AHR=2 (95%CI=1-4), P=0.04; in patients in the top CD8 quartile AHR=2.1 (95%CI=1.3-3.6), P<0.001; and in patients previously reported to use crack cocaine AHR=5.9, (95%CI=1.4-25), P=0.02. Herpes zoster incidence increased in patients with CD4 counts<500 per mm(3) and gradually declined since 1992-1996, with AHR=0.3 (95%CI=0.2-0.5), P<0.001 for the 1997-2002 period and AHR=0.24 (95%CI=0.14-0.4), P<0.001 for the 2002-2008 period. Contrary to what has been described elsewhere, there was no specific effect of protease inhibitors on herpes zoster incidence. The present study is the first to suggest that crack cocaine is associated with an increased incidence of herpes zoster. The neurological or immunological effects of crack are discussed.

  20. [Diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of central nervous system involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphoma in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Miralles, Pilar; Berenguer, Juan; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-09-18

    With the widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) the incidence of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has declined. HAART has also modified the clinical manifestations of these tumors, with a lower frequency of involvement of the central nervous system (CNS). Currently, the frequency of meningeal involvement at the time of diagnosis of NHL in HIV-infected patients varies between 3% and 5%. These figures are similar to those observed among immunocompetent hosts. The diagnosis of meningeal lymphoma relies in clinical findings, imaging techniques, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination. Flow cytometry is a diagnostic technique with a higher sensitivity and specificity than conventional cytology for the diagnosis of meningeal lymphoma. However, flow cytometry is not yet considered to be the gold standard for this purpose. Until recently, most experts recommended neuromeningeal prophylaxis for all HIV-infected patients with aggressive NHL. However, at present this prophylaxis is recommended only in patients with higher risk of CNS relapse according to different sites of involvement, stage and histological subtype. There are different regimens of prophylaxis and treatment for meningeal lymphoma. The drugs most commonly used for this purpose are methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside. However, there are other alternatives such as liposomal cytosine arabinoside that requires fewer spinal taps for drug administration and whose results are very promising. In summary, in the context of an effective HAART, HIV infected patients with NHL have a frequency of CNS involvement by lymphoma similar to that found among immunocompetent hosts. Consequently, indications and regimens for CNS prophylaxis in HIV-infected patients with NHL should not be different than those employed in the general population. Universal CNS prophylaxis should be reserved for the few patients unable to receive an

  1. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Groin and Risk for Clinical Infection among HIV-infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, John T.; McAllister, Sigrid K.; Limbago, Brandi; Lowery, H. Ken; Fosheim, Gregory; Guest, Jodie L.; Gorwitz, Rachel J.; Bethea, Monique; Hageman, Jeffrey; Mindley, Rondeen; McDougal, Linda K.; Rimland, David

    2013-01-01

    Data on the interaction between methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization and clinical infection are limited. During 2007–2008, we enrolled HIV-infected adults in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, in a prospective cohort study. Nares and groin swab specimens were cultured for S. aureus at enrollment and after 6 and 12 months. MRSA colonization was detected in 13%–15% of HIV-infected participants (n = 600, 98% male) at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. MRSA colonization was detected in the nares only (41%), groin only (21%), and at both sites (38%). Over a median of 2.1 years of follow-up, 29 MRSA clinical infections occurred in 25 participants. In multivariate analysis, MRSA clinical infection was significantly associated with MRSA colonization of the groin (adjusted risk ratio 4.8) and a history of MRSA infection (adjusted risk ratio 3.1). MRSA prevention strategies that can effectively prevent or eliminate groin colonization are likely necessary to reduce clinical infections in this population. PMID:23631854

  2. Ibrutinib in Treating Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Patients With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; HIV Infection; Intraocular Lymphoma; Multicentric Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Risk factors for disseminated histoplasmosis in a cohort of HIV-infected patients in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Mathieu; Adenis, Antoine; Blanchet, Denis; Vantilcke, Vincent; Demar, Magalie; Basurko, Célia; Gaubert-Maréchal, Emilie; Dufour, Julie; Aznar, Christine; Carme, Bernard; Couppié, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Disseminated histoplasmosis is the first AIDS-defining infection in French Guiana. A retrospective cohort study studied predictive factors of disseminated histoplasmosis in HIV-infected patients between 1996 and 2008. Cox proportional hazards models were used. The variables studied were age, sex, last CD4/CD8 count, CD4 nadir, herpes or pneumocystosis, cotrimoxazole and fluconazole use, antiretroviral treatment and the notion of recent initiation of HAART. A total of 1404 patients were followed for 6833 person-years. The variables independently associated with increased incidence of disseminated histoplasmosis were CD4 count<50 per mm3, CD4 count between 50 and 200 per mm3, a CD4 nadir <50 per mm3, CD8 count in the lowest quartile, herpes infection, and recent antiretroviral treatment initiation (less than 6 months). The variables associated with decreased incidence of histoplasmosis were antiretroviral treatment for more than 6 months, fluconazole treatment, and pneumocystosis. There were 13.5% of deaths at 1 month, 17.5% at 3 months, and 22.5% at 6 months after the date of diagnosis of histoplasmosis. The most important predictive factors for death within 6 months of diagnosis were CD4 counts and antiretroviral treatment. The present study did not study environmental/occupational factors but provides predictive factors for disseminated histoplasmosis and its outcome in HIV patients in an Amazonian environment during the HAART era.

  4. Anti-NMDAR antibodies in new-onset psychosis. Positive results in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Arboleya, Susana; Clemente, Antonio; Deng, Savannah; Bedmar, Marta; Salvador, Isabel; Herbera, Patricia; Cunill, Vanessa; Vives-Bauza, Cristòfol; Haro, Josep Maria; Canellas, Francesca; Julià, Maria Rosa

    2016-08-01

    The role of neuronal surface autoantibodies (NSAs) in non-encephalitic psychosis is of recent and controversial interest. Most of the studies relating NSAs with psychosis are retrospective and only focused on the N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR). Our goal was to evaluate the prevalence of IgG antibodies against the NMDAR NR1 subunit (NMDAR-Abs) along with five additional NSAs in 61 first psychotic episode patients and 47 matched controls. We found two patients positive for NMDAR-Abs (3.3%). One of them was eventually considered to have been misdiagnosed and reclassified as encephalitis. The other met the criteria for bipolar I disorder, presented no neurological symptoms and had a comorbid HIV infection of vertical transmission. This is the first reported case of an HIV-infected patient with psychosis associated with NSAs. This study shows that patients presenting with clinically incomplete forms of anti-NMDAR encephalitis, with predominant or isolated psychiatric symptoms, can remain undetected if no ancillary tests are performed. To improve patient diagnosis and treatment of individuals with a first psychotic episode, more detailed neurological examinations might be needed. Further studies are required to better clarify the role of NSAs in the neuropsychiatric effects of HIV infection.

  5. Early initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy preserves immune function in the gut of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Kök, A; Hocqueloux, L; Hocini, H; Carrière, M; Lefrou, L; Guguin, A; Tisserand, P; Bonnabau, H; Avettand-Fenoel, V; Prazuck, T; Katsahian, S; Gaulard, P; Thiébaut, R; Lévy, Y; Hüe, S

    2015-01-01

    Massive loss of lamina propria CD4(+) T cells, changes in the lymphatic architecture, and altered intestinal epithelial barrier leading to microbial translocation are the common features of HIV-1 infection and are not fully restored under combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). To better understand determinants of gut mucosal restoration, we have performed phenotypic and gene expression analyses of the gut from HIV-infected patients, naive or treated with cART initiated either at the early phase of the primary infection or later during the chronic phase. We found a depletion of T helper type 22 (Th22) and interleukin-17-producing cells in naive patients. These populations, except Th22 cells, were not restored under cART. Regulatory T cells/Th17 ratio was significantly increased in HIV-infected patients and was inversely correlated to the restoration of CD4(+) T cells but not to gut HIV DNA levels. Gene profile analysis of gut mucosal distinguished two groups of patients, which fitted with the timing of cART initiation. In their majority early, but not later treated patients, exhibited conserved intestinal lymphoid structure, epithelial barrier integrity and dendritic cell maturation pathways. Our data demonstrate that early initiation of cART helps to preserve and/or restore lymphoid gut mucosal homeostasis and provide a rationale for initiating cART during the acute phase of HIV infection.

  6. [In vitro antifungal resistance in Candida albicans from HIV-infected patients with and without oral candidosis.].

    PubMed

    Ceballos Salobreña, A; Gaitán Cepeda, L A; Orihuela Cañada, F; Olea Barrionuevo, D; Ceballos García, L; Quindós, G

    1999-12-01

    The main purpose of this study has been to determine the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates from HIV-infected or AIDS patients, depending on the presence of oral candidosis. The oral cavity of 307 HIV-infected or AIDS patients was examined and an oral swab was cultured on Sabouraud glucose agar and studied by conventional mycological methods. In vitro antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B, nystatin, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was tested by disk diffusion with Neo-Sensitabs tablets (Rosco Diagnostica, Dinamarca). One hundred and thirty five Candida albicans isolates (91 serotype A, 38 serotype B, three C. albicans variety stellatoidea and three untyped isolates), three Candida krusei and two Candida glabrata were obtained. All the isolates were susceptible to nystatin and amphotericin B. However, 7.9% isolates were resistant to fluconazole and 2.9% isolates were resistant to ketoconazole or itraconazole. Nearly all C. krusei and C. glabrata isolates, 31% patients with candidosis and 20% Candida-colonized patients showed decreased susceptibility to azoles. This study shows that polyenes had a great in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates from HIV-infected patients and that in vitro resistance to azoles is not as high as observed in other countries.

  7. Clinical experience with HIV-infected patients at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center: an update.

    PubMed

    Rohlman, V C; Haglund, L A; Swartz, M A; Dahl, E; Greenfield, R A; Slater, L N; Huycke, M M; Muchmore, H G; Fine, D P

    1993-04-01

    We reviewed the course of 545 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients seen between 1983 and March 30, 1991. A majority were Caucasian homosexual or bisexual men, while parenteral drug abusers represented a smaller proportion than seen nationwide. In the 274 patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the distribution of AIDS-defining conditions was generally consistent with those reported in studies from elsewhere in the United States. However, toxoplasmosis remained relatively uncommon. There was a slightly higher incidence of disseminated histoplasmosis compared to other studies. HIV encephalopathy (AIDS dementia) was likely underdiagnosed. Although data suggested prolongation of the asymptomatic phase of HIV infection, median survival after AIDS diagnosis remained approximately 12 months.

  8. Effects of tapering doses of oral prednisone on viral load among HIV-infected patients with unexplained weight loss.

    PubMed

    Kilby, J M; Tabereaux, P B; Mulanovich, V; Shaw, G M; Bucy, R P; Saag, M S

    1997-11-20

    In an exploratory study of virologic and immunomodulatory effects of corticosteroid therapy for wasting syndrome, four HIV-infected adults with recent unexplained weight loss were given tapering doses of prednisone over a 2-month period. Serum neopterin and TNF receptor II levels decreased from baseline after 7 days. An antiretroviral effect was observed initially, peaking on days 14-21 (mean change in HIV-1 branched chain DNA assay on day 21 of -0.52 log10; mean change, from baseline to nadir for each individual, of -0.63 log10); subsequent bDNA levels returned toward baseline as prednisone was tapered. No patient lost weight and there was a mean weight gain of 3.5 kg. Anecdotal reports of corticosteroid benefits in the wasting syndrome may result in part from decreased T cell activation leading to decreased HIV replication, an effect that may be self-limited or that may occur only at higher prednisone doses. Studies involving more targeted immunomodulatory agents for wasting syndrome are warranted.

  9. Accuracy of Lipoarabinomannan and Xpert MTB/RIF Testing in Cerebrospinal Fluid To Diagnose Tuberculous Meningitis in an Autopsy Cohort of HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Cox, Janneke A; Lukande, Robert L; Kalungi, Sam; Van Marck, Eric; Lammens, Martin; Van de Vijver, Koen; Kambugu, Andrew; Nelson, Ann M; Colebunders, Robert; Manabe, Yukari C

    2015-08-01

    Point-of-care tests for tuberculous meningitis (TBM) are needed. We studied the diagnostic accuracy of the lipoarabinomannan (LAM) lateral flow assay (LFA), LAM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and Xpert MTB/RIF in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in an autopsy cohort of Ugandan HIV-infected adults. We obtained written informed consent postmortem from the next of kin. A complete autopsy was done and CSF obtained. We performed LAM LFA (on unprepared and supernatant CSF after heating and spinning), LAM ELISA, and Xpert MTB/RIF on the CSF samples. Accuracy parameters were calculated for histopathological TBM and also for the composite standard, including Xpert MTB/RIF-positive cases. We tested CSF of 91 patients. LAM LFA had a sensitivity of 75% for definite histopathological TBM, ELISA a sensitivity of 43%, and Xpert MTB/RIF a sensitivity of 100% and specificities of 87%, 91%, and 87%, respectively. LAM LFA had a sensitivity of 50% for definite and probable histopathological TBM, ELISA a sensitivity of 38%, and Xpert MTB/RIF a sensitivity of 86% and specificities of 70%, 91%, and 87%, respectively. LAM LFA had a sensitivity of 68% for the composite standard and ELISA a sensitivity of 48% and specificities of 78% and 98%, respectively. The rapid diagnostic tests detected TBM in 22% to 78% of patients not on anti-TB treatment. Point-of-care tests have high accuracy in diagnosis of TBM in deceased HIV-infected adults. LAM LFA in CSF is a useful additional diagnostic tool.

  10. Perception of Antiretroviral Generic Medicines: One-Day Survey of HIV-Infected Patients and Their Physicians in France

    PubMed Central

    Jacomet, Christine; Allavena, Clotilde; Peyrol, Fleur; Pereira, Bruno; Joubert, Laurence Morand; Bagheri, Haleh; Cotte, Laurent; Garaffo, Rodolphe; Gerbaud, Laurent; Dellamonica, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background In the interest of cost effectiveness, switching antiretroviral brand name medications to generics is recommended in France since 2013. The study objective was to evaluate the perception of generics per se and antiretroviral generics in HIV-infected patients and their hospital physicians Methods and Findings 556 out of 703 (79%) adult HIV+ outpatients and 116 physicians in 33 clinics were included in a multicentric cross-sectional survey performed in September 2013. Patients completed a self-questionnaire on their perception and acceptability of generics. Physicians completed a questionnaire on their acceptability of switching antiretroviral to generic. Socio-demographic data, medical history and HIV history were collected. Among the 556 patients with a median HIV duration of 13 years, 77% were France native, 59% in active employment, 100% covered by social insurance, 95% on antiretroviral therapy. Seventy-six percent of the patients accepted generics and 55% trusted them overall. Antiretroviral generics were accepted by 44% of them but only by 17% if the pill burden was going to increase. The factor significantly associated with acceptability of antiretroviral generics was acceptance of generics per se (p<0.001). Among the 116 physicians following a median of 100 HIV-patients/year, 75% would prescribe generics, dropping to 26% if the combo had to be broken. Factors significantly associated with willingness to prescribe antiretroviral generics were the absence of concern regarding the chemical entity (OR = 0.33), being aware that the patient would accept generics for other pathologies (OR = 2.04) and would accept antiretroviral generics (OR = 1.94). No factor related to sociodemographic conditions, HIV status or comorbidities was associated with the acceptability of antiretroviral generics. Conclusions Acceptability of antiretroviral generics in this French population was mostly dictated by the patient’s and physician’s knowledge and use of generics

  11. A Study of Compliance to Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV Infected Patients at a Tertiary Care Hospital in North Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Hasabi, Ishwar Siddappa; Kachapur, Chandrashekar; Kaulgud, Ram Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Compliance to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) is a primary determinant of treatment success of HIV-AIDS. Many studies have shown inadequate compliance to ART in the Indian population. Aim To assess the compliance to ART among HIV infected patients, to explore the factors affecting compliance and impact of compliance on CD4 count. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 200 adult patients attending ART center, KIMS, Hubli. The patients were randomly selected and compliance to ART over preceding 3 months was assessed. Reasons for non- compliance were assessed among those with inadequate compliance. Results Mean age of the study population was 40.07±9.99 years. The sex ratio was 1.02:1 (M:F). Majority of patients were in WHO stage 1 with treatment, with CD4 count above 500/μl. Pulmonary tuberculosis was the most common opportunistic infection. Most of the patients were on long term ART, more than 5 years {81 (40.5%)}. Most of the patients were on ZLN regimen {97 (48.5%)}. Compliance over the preceding 3 months was 94.84± 14.93% for ART and 88.97±23.75% for opportunistic infection prophylaxis. There was no significant difference in compliance in relation to age group, sex, educational status, residence, religion, habits, HIV status of spouse or child, the regimen of ART and frequency of dosing. The compliance was better among those on long term treatment, i.e., those on treatment for more than 5 years compared to those who started ART in last 1 year (p=0.06). The most common reasons given by patients for non-compliance were going away from home, busy with other work and simply forgot. Better compliance was associated with higher CD4 count. Conclusion Compliance to ART was inadequate in the studied population, which is a major obstacle to success of ART. PMID:27437267

  12. Nutritional status, symptoms experienced and general state of health in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, A; Nordström, G

    2001-09-01

    The aim of the study was to describe HIV-infected patients with respect to nutritional status, symptoms experienced, general state of health, and relevant medical and laboratory data. An additional aim was to study the relationships between some of these variables. On admission to an acute care hospital in Sweden, 25 HIV-positive men were consecutively included in the study. Medical data, anthropometric variables such as weight, height, body mass index (BMI) and percentage weight loss were studied. The following instruments were used: the subjective global assessment (SGA) was used to determine nutritional status; the oral assessment guide (OAG) was used for subjective assessment of the oral cavity; and the numeric rating scale (NRS) was used to assess the symptoms experienced. The Health Index (HI) was used to evaluate general state of health. The results showed that more than half of the patients had suspected/severe malnutrition; between 48% and 72% complained of moderate to severe symptoms of various kinds. Two thirds felt their general state of health was rather poor or very poor. Correlations showed that the lower the BMI, the worse the nutritional status (SGA); the greater the weight loss in percent, the worse the nutritional status (SGA); and the worse the general state of health (HI), the worse the nutritional status (SGA). In conclusion, it is important that nurses have good knowledge concerning nutritional problems in order to be able to detect these conditions at an early stage and/or to endeavour to prevent them.

  13. DERMATOLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN A TRIBAL (BASTAR) REGION OF CHHATTISGARH, INDIA

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harminder; Singh, Prabhakar; Tiwari, Pavan; Dey, Vivek; Dulhani, Navin; Singh, Amita

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous disorders during HIV infection are numerous and skin is often the first and only organ affected during most of the course of HIV disease. Some Cutaneous disorders reflect the progression of HIV disease; though the relation is still controversial. Aims: The objective of this study, conducted at a tertiary care centre in Bastar, Jagdalpur, is to estimate the status of cutaneous manifestation in HIV-infected patients and its relationship with CD4 cell counts. Methods: We enrolled 137 HIV positive subjects. Demographic information such as age, gender, weight, height, socioeconomic status, and educational status were recorded. Laboratory parameter (CD4 counts) and treatment regimen were noted. Patients were examined for skin disorders by a dermatologist. Data were analyzed using chi-square test for categorical variables. Results: Majority of the patients were from rural area (65.69%) and belonged to a low socioeconomic and educational status. 30.65% of the patients were housewives, 23.35% drivers, and 16.78% labourers. Predominant mode of transmission was heterosexual contact (94.16%). Most common HIV-related dermatological manifestations were seborrheic dermatitis (74.16%), xerosis (52.5%), generalized skin hyperpigmentation 56 (46.67%), onychomycosis 53 (44.16%), pruritic papular eruption 27 (22.5%), oral candidiasis 21 (17.5%), photo dermatitis 21 (17.5%), and scabies 4 (3.33%). Significant correlation with low CD4+ cell counts was found for oral candidiasis (P < 0.0001) and Kaposi's sarcoma (P = 0.03), while other disorders such as seborrheic dermatitis (P = 0.22), xerosis (P = 0.25), and onychomycosis (P = 0.08) were not statistically significant. Conclusion: This study showed high prevalence of dermatological manifestations in HIV-infected subjects, and they occur more frequently with progression of HIV and decline in immune functions. Therefore, early diagnosis and management of skin disorders can improve the quality of life of HIV-infected

  14. Genomic Load from Sputum Samples and Nasopharyngeal Swabs for Diagnosis of Pneumococcal Pneumonia in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Madhi, Shabir A.; Adrian, Peter V.; Telles, Jean-Noel; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Klugman, Keith P.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative lytA real-time PCR (rtPCR) results from nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs distinguish community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia (CAP) from asymptomatic colonization. The use of an optimized cutoff value improved pneumococcal etiology determination compared to that of traditional diagnostic methods. Here, we compare the utility of lytA rtPCR from induced sputum and from NP swabs. Pneumococcus was considered the cause of CAP in HIV-infected South African adults if blood culture, induced-sputum culture or Gram stain, urine antigen test, or whole-blood lytA rtPCR revealed pneumococcus or if lytA rtPCR from NP swabs gave a result of >8,000 copies/ml. lytA rtPCR was also performed on induced sputum. Pneumococcus was detected by lytA rtPCR from sputum in 149 (67.1%) of 222 patients with available induced sputum, whereas the results of either Gram stain or culture of sputum were positive in 105 of 229 patients (45.9%; P < 0.001). The mean copy numbers from sputum were higher when the sputum cultures were positive than when the sputum cultures were negative (7.9 versus 5.6 log10 copies/ml; P < 0.001). Against the composite diagnostic standard, a cutoff value of 10,000 copies/ml for good-quality sputum lytA rtPCR had a sensitivity of 78.1% and a specificity of 80.0%. This cutoff value performed similarly to the previously identified cutoff value of 8,000 copies/ml for NP swab lytA rtPCR (area under the curve receiver operating characteristic [AUC-ROC], 80.4% for sputum of any quality versus 79.6% for NP swabs). The AUC-ROC for good-quality sputum was 83.2%. Overall, lytA rtPCR performs similarly well on induced sputum as on NP swabs for most patients but performs slightly better if good-quality sputum can be obtained. Due to the ease of specimen collection, NP swabs may be preferable for the diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:25253798

  15. The use of cell phone reminder calls for assisting HIV-infected adolescents and young adults to adhere to highly active antiretroviral therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Puccio, Joseph A; Belzer, Marvin; Olson, Johanna; Martinez, Miguel; Salata, Cathy; Tucker, Diane; Tanaka, Diane

    2006-06-01

    Long-term medication regimen adherence is challenging in all populations, but in the HIV-infected adolescent population the frequency of poverty, homelessness, substance abuse, and mental illness make highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) adherence even more challenging. In 2003, we developed a pilot program for HIV-infected adolescents and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who were either going to begin a HAART regimen for the first time or begin a new HAART regimen. Participants received a free cell phone with a local service plan for approximately 6 months. Participants received phone call reminders for 12 weeks. Call frequency was tapered at 4-week intervals. Patients were assessed at 4-week intervals to determine the perceived intrusiveness or helpfulness of receiving calls, and missed medication doses. Eight consecutive patients were recruited for the study, and five were able to complete it through the 24 weeks. Most participants found the calls to be helpful and the level of intrusion into their daily lives acceptable. Using cell phone reminders to assist patients does not require an extensive amount of daily staff time. Tapering calls rapidly over 3 months, followed by discontinuation of calls provided inadequate support for subjects, especially those with significant psychosocial issues such as substance abuse. Use of cell phone reminders to assist adolescents adhere with HIV medications was practical and acceptable to pilot study participants. Viral suppression waned for all but two patients after termination of cell phone reminders and suggests that a 12-week intervention was not adequate for most subjects. Larger prospective studies of cell phone observation of therapy will be needed to determine if this intervention can improve long-term adherence and health outcomes.

  16. Upregulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by CD4 cross-linking in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed Central

    Than, S; Oyaizu, N; Tetali, S; Romano, J; Kaplan, M; Pahwa, S

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 67 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults. It supports the hypothesis that cross-linking of CD4 molecules by HIV gp120 can result in HIV upregulation and spread of infection. Underlying mechanisms include activation of latent infection by factors in addition to, or other than, tumor necrosis factor alpha. PMID:9223523

  17. Upregulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by CD4 cross-linking in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Than, S; Oyaizu, N; Tetali, S; Romano, J; Kaplan, M; Pahwa, S

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 67 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults. It supports the hypothesis that cross-linking of CD4 molecules by HIV gp120 can result in HIV upregulation and spread of infection. Underlying mechanisms include activation of latent infection by factors in addition to, or other than, tumor necrosis factor alpha.

  18. Differentiation of monocytes into CD1a- dendritic cells correlates with disease progression in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Alessandra; Cappelli, Giulia; Cairo, Cristiana; Martino, Angelo; Sanarico, Nunzia; D'Offizi, Gianpiero; Pupillo, Leopoldo Paolo; Chenal, Henri; De Libero, Gennaro; Colizzi, Vittorio; Vendetti, Silvia

    2007-12-15

    Monocyte differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) depends on microenvironmental conditions. In this study, the capacity of human monocytes to differentiate into mature DCs and their ability to induce an antiviral immune response was investigated in HIV-infected patients. In healthy subjects, monocytes differentiate into CD1a+ DCs in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin (IL)-4 and matured in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Here, we found that in 30% and 45% of HIV-infected white and African subjects, respectively, monocytes gave rise to a homogeneous CD1a* DC population. In the patients who gave rise only to the CD1a* DCs, this population spontaneously produced IL-10 but not IL-12, and induced a T helper 2-like immune response when cultured with human T cells isolated from cord blood mononuclear cells. In patients with monocytes differentiated into CD1a* DCs, a high percentage of HIV-specific CD4 T cells producing IL-4 were seen in the peripheral blood. Furthermore, differentiation of monocytes into DCs with CD1a* phenotype correlated with low CD4 T-cell counts and high viral loads in HIV-infected subjects. These results suggest that the differentiation of monocytes into CD1a* DCs may be a phenotypic marker associated with progression of the disease.

  19. [Guidelines for the management of HCV infection in HIV-infected patients. Istituto Nazionale per le Malattie Infettive Lazzaro Spallanzani].

    PubMed

    Antonucci, G; Antinori, A; Boumis, E; De Longis, P; Gentile, M; Girardi, E; Lauria, F N; Narciso, P; Noto, P; Palmieri, F; Oliva, A; Petrosillo, N; Rosati, S; Urso, R; Tocci, G; Tozzi, V; Visco Comandini, U; Ippolito, G

    2004-03-01

    It is crucial to ensure an optimal clinical management of HCV infection in HIV-co-infected persons. The reasons for the development of guidelines on HCV-infection treatment in HIV-infected persons arise from the need for a standardised management of HIV/HCV coinfection in our Institute. The aim of these guidelines are: to clarify principles of clinical management of HCV infection in HIV-infected patients to care-providers; to improve the awareness of HIV-infected patients cared for our Institute on current management of HCV infection; to improve the quality of care on this topic. These guidelines, based on Evidence based Medicine principles, have been developed by a panel of experts, who conducted a systematic review of the literature, mainly taking into account current international recommendations. In the present document, the most frequent clinical presentation occurring in the management of HIV/HCV co-infected patients at our Institution are discussed. The adherence to present guidelines and their effectiveness at our Institution, outcome indicators will be evaluated. The present guidelines cannot entirely substitute the judgement of an expert clinician. However, adherence to these guidelines will contribute to the improvement of the standard of care of HIV/HCV-co-infected persons.

  20. Normal Myocardial Flow Reserve in HIV-Infected Patients on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Rubidium-82 PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Andreas; Christensen, Thomas E; Ghotbi, Adam Ali; Hasbak, Philip; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Kjær, Andreas; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten

    2015-10-01

    Studies have found HIV-infected patients to be at increased risk of myocardial infarction, which may be caused by coronary microvascular dysfunction. For the first time among HIV-infected patients, we assessed the myocardial flow reserve (MFR) by Rubidium-82 (82Rb) positron emission tomography (PET), which can quantify the coronary microvascular function. MFR has proved highly predictive of future coronary artery disease and cardiovascular events in the general population.In a prospective cross-sectional study, HIV-infected patients all receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) with full viral suppression and HIV-uninfected controls were scanned using 82Rb PET/computed tomography at rest and adenosine-induced stress, thereby obtaining the MFR (stress flow/rest flow), stratified into low ≤1.5, borderline >1.5 to 2.0, or normal >2.0.Fifty-six HIV-infected patients and 25 controls were included. The HIV-infected patients had a mean age of 53 years (range 37-68 years) with 23% active smokers. The controls had a mean age of 52 years (range 36-68 years) and 26% active smokers. In the HIV-infected group 73% had a normal MFR, 17% borderline, and 10% low values of MFR. Among controls these values were 71%, 19%, and 10%, respectively (P = 0.99). However, the HIV-infected group had lower values of stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) (2.63 ± 0.09 mL/g/min vs 2.99 ± 0.14 mL/g/min; P = 0.03). We found no evidence of decreased MFR as assessed by 82Rb PET among HIV-infected patients on stable ART with full viral suppression compared with HIV-uninfected controls. We did notice a decreased MBF during stress.

  1. [Musculoskeletal disorders in HIV-infected patients.National AIDS Plan (PNS) and the AIDS Study Group (GESIDA)].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the most relevant musculoskeletal disorders, their diagnosis and treatment to the scientific community and the professionals in charge of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. These recommendations have been agreed by a panel of experts from the National AIDS Plan (PNS) and the AIDS Study Group (GESIDA). The group have reviewed the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials, cohort studies and pharmacokinetic studies published in biomedical journals (PubMed and Embase), or presented at conferences. Three levels of evidence have been defined according to the sources of data: level A, randomized controlled trials; level B, cohort or case-control; and level C, descriptive studies and expert opinion. Based on this evidence, the authors have decided to recommend, consider or not recommend for each situation. The decrease in bone mineral density is common in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral treatment, especially during the first year (from 2 to 4%), with a subsequent partial recovery. A dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan is recommended in patients over 50 years old with HIV infection, history of bone fractures and/or risk factors. Treatment with bisphosphonates has been shown to be effective. Osteoarticular infections are more frequent than in the non-infected population. The level of immunosuppression, risk practice, and antiretroviral treatment should be considered for a proper diagnosis and therapeutic approach. Laboratory and imaging procedures recommended for the study of musculoskeletal processes in HIV infected subjects are the same as in the general population. Osteonecrosis and decreased bone mineral density are the most frequent alterations in children. An early diagnosis of bone disorders is needed. The influence of modifiable risk factors must be avoided and initiate treatment when necessary. Bisphosphonates have been effective in osteoporosis.

  2. Cancer-Related Causes of Death among HIV-Infected Patients in France in 2010: Evolution since 2000

    PubMed Central

    Vandenhende, Marie-Anne; Roussillon, Caroline; Henard, Sandrine; Morlat, Philippe; Oksenhendler, Eric; Aumaitre, Hugues; Georget, Aurore; May, Thierry; Rosenthal, Eric; Salmon, Dominique; Cacoub, Patrice; Costagliola, Dominique; Chêne, Geneviève; Bonnet, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The current study aimed at describing the distribution and characteristics of malignancy related deaths in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients in 2010 and at comparing them to those obtained in 2000 and 2005. Methods Data were obtained from three national surveys conducted in France in 2010, 2005 and 2000. The underlying cause of death was documented using a standardized questionnaire fulfilled in French hospital wards involved in the management of HIV infection. Results Among the 728 deaths reported in 2010, 262 were cancer-related (36%). After a significant increase from 28% in 2000 to 33% in 2005 and 36% in 2010, cancers represent the leading cause of mortality in HIV infected patients. The proportion of deaths attributed to non-AIDS/non-hepatitis-related cancers significantly increased from 2000 to 2010 (11% of the deaths in 2000, 17% in 2005 and 22% in 2010, p<0.001), while those attributed to AIDS-defining cancers decreased during the same period (16% in 2000, 13% in 2005 and 9% in 2010, p = 0.024). Particularly, the proportion of respiratory cancers significantly increased from 5% in 2000 to 6% in 2005 and 11% in 2010 (p = 0.004). Lung cancer was the most common cancer-related cause of death in 2010 (instead of non-Hodgkin lymphoma so far) and represented the leading cause of death in people living with HIV overall. Conclusions Cancer prevention (especially smoking cessation), screening strategies and therapeutic management need to be optimized in HIV-infected patients in order to reduce mortality, particularly in the field of respiratory cancers. PMID:26083524

  3. [AIDS Study Group/Spanish AIDS Consensus Plan Document on sexually transmitted infections in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    2011-04-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STI) are a major public health problem. Considering their high morbidity and potential short and long term after effects, physicians must have enough knowledge on the management of these infections for a correct prevention, diagnosis and treatment. HIV infection is associated with STI, not only because they share route of transmission, but also because they lead to an increased risk of HIV transmission. In this article, we summarise the updated clinical practice guidelines, for the evaluation, management and prevention of STI in HIV-infected patients, from a panel of experts in HIV, dermatologists, proctologic surgeons, and microbiologists on behalf of the Spanish AIDS Study Group (GESIDA) and the National AIDS Plan (PNS).

  4. Guidelines for management of HIV infection with computer-based patient's record.

    PubMed

    Safran, C; Rind, D M; Davis, R B; Ives, D; Sands, D Z; Currier, J; Slack, W V; Makadon, H J; Cotton, D J

    1995-08-05

    Computers are steadily being incorporated in clinical practice. We conducted a nonrandomised, controlled, prospective trial of electronic messages designed to enhance adherence to clinical practice guidelines. We studied 126 physicians and nurse practitioners who used electronic medical records when caring for 349 patients with HIV infection in a primary care practice. We analysed the response times of clinicians to the situations that triggered alerts and reminders, the number of ambulatory visits, and hospitalisation. The median response times to 303 alerts in the intervention group and 388 alerts in the control group were 11 and 52 days (p < 0.0001), respectively. The median response time to 432 reminders in the intervention group was 114 days and that for 360 reminders in the control group was over 500 days (p < 0.0001). There was no effect on visits to the primary care practice. There was, however, a significant increase in the rate of visits outside the primary care practice (p = 0.02), which is explained by the increased frequency of visits to ophthalmologists. There were no differences in admission rates (p = 0.47), in admissions for pneumocystosis (p = 0.09), in visits to the emergency ward (p = 0.24), or in survival (p = 0.19). We conclude that the electronic medical record was effective in helping clinicians adhere to practice guidelines.

  5. A SOA-Based Solution to Monitor Vaccination Coverage Among HIV-Infected Patients in Liguria.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Barbara; Gazzarata, Roberta; Sticchi, Laura; Giacomini, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination in HIV-infected patients constitutes an essential tool in the prevention of the most common infectious diseases. The Ligurian Vaccination in HIV Program is a proposed vaccination schedule specifically dedicated to this risk group. Selective strategies are proposed within this program, employing ICT (Information and Communication) tools to identify this susceptible target group, to monitor immunization coverage over time and to manage failures and defaulting. The proposal is to connect an immunization registry system to an existing regional platform that allows clinical data re-use among several medical structures, to completely manage the vaccination process. This architecture will adopt a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach and standard HSSP (Health Services Specification Program) interfaces to support interoperability. According to the presented solution, vaccination administration information retrieved from the immunization registry will be structured according to the specifications within the immunization section of the HL7 (Health Level 7) CCD (Continuity of Care Document) document. Immunization coverage will be evaluated through the continuous monitoring of serology and antibody titers gathered from the hospital LIS (Laboratory Information System) structured into a HL7 Version 3 (v3) Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 (CDA R2).

  6. [Prevalence of microsporidia and other intestinal parasites in patients with HIV infection, Bogota, 2001].

    PubMed

    Flórez, Astrid Carolina; García, Dabeiba Adriana; Moncada, Ligia; Beltrán, Mauricio

    2003-09-01

    Opportunistic intestinal parasites are a common cause of diarrhea in HIV-infected patients. To determine the prevalence of microsporidia and other opportunistic parasites infecting HIV patients in Bogotá, Colombia, 115 patients were examined for these infections during the year 2001. The institution and the sample percent from each are as follows: Santa Clara Hospital, 33.0%; San Pedro Claver, 20.0%; Simón Bolívar Hospital, 14.8%; San José Hospital, 13.9%; Central de la Policía Hospital, 6.1%; Compensar, 5.2%; Colombian League against AIDS, 2.6%; San Ignacio Hospital, 2.6%, and the Military Hospital, 1.7%. The average patient age was 36 years, with a range from 18 to 71 years. Patients with complaint of gastrointestinal symptoms were asked to provide two consecutive stool samples. The samples were concentrated in formalin-ether and examined microscopically for intestinal coccidian parasites by direct wet slide mounts. The prevalence of intestinal opportunistic parasites was 10.4% for Cryptosporidium sp. Initially, 29% of the samples were found to be positive for microsporidian spores using a modified Ziehl Neelsen chromotrope stain, but only 3.5% of them were confirmed as positive when a calcofluor/Gram chromotrope stain was used. The general prevalence of intestinal parasites was 59.1%. The most frequently found pathogens were Blastocystis hominis, 25.2%, and Entamoeba histolytica, 13%. In other studies with HIV patients in Colombia, lower prevalences of Cryptosporidium sp. infection were observed.

  7. Successful simplification of HAART in patients with acute primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Sinicco, A; Bonora, S; Arnaudo, I; Zeme, D A; Audagnotto, S; Raiteri, R; Di Perri, G

    2002-01-01

    Aggressive treatment has been advocated for the management of primary HIV infection (PHI), but the composition and the optimal duration of therapy are still to be determined. In addition, time to undetectable viral load (VL), rate and duration of VL suppression as well as subsequent therapeutic choices remain issues widely debated. We evaluated the rate and duration of VL suppression in 12 consecutive patients with PHI given triple-drug treatment with zidovudine, lamivudine and indinavir (highly active antiretroviral therapy, HAART) at onset of the acute illness and subsequently switched to a simplified 2-NRTI-based regimen once VL suppression was maintained for at least 6 months. Throughout the study, no patient discontinued treatment because of symptoms attributed to the study medications. In the study population, undetectable VL was achieved after a median of 84 days (range: 67-135) on HAART and was maintained for a median of 194 days (range: 179-205) before simplification. After switching to simplified maintenace, undetectable VL was maintained in all patients for at least 6 months. Only one patient experienced virological failure, plasma HIV-RNA remaining suppressed for a median foliow-up of 33 months (15-54) and T-CD4+ being steadily higher than 500/mL in the remaining patients. Our results suggest that simplification of HAART in patients promptly treated during PHI and maintaining undetectable VL for at least 6 months before simplification may be a valid option capable of controlling viral replication and maintaining an optimal immunological profile for a prolonged time.

  8. Low bone mineral density and associated risk factors in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiţu-Tișu, Cristina-Emilia; Barbu, Ecaterina-Constanţa; Lazăr, Mihai; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Bădărău, Ioana Anca

    2016-01-01

    Background Aging of persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) resulted in high rates of osteopenia and osteoporosis. Multiple cohort studies have reported an increased prevalence of bone demineralization among HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) and risk factors for osteopenia/osteoporosis among HIV-positive patients attending the National Institute for Infectious Diseases “Prof.Dr. Matei Balș”, Bucharest, Romania. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study that enrolled 60 patients with HIV. The association between BMD and lifestyle habits (smoking), body mass index (BMI), nadir cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count, current CD4 cell count, HIV viral load and history of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) were investigated. The BMD was measured at the lumbar spine, hips and total body using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Results In the present study, DEXA evaluation showed an overall prevalence of osteoporosis of 16.66% (ten patients) and a prevalence of osteopenia of 48.33% (29 patients). In men, low BMI and cigarette smoking showed significant association with the diagnosis of lumbar spine demineralization (p=0.034 and p=0.041, respectively). Duration of exposure to cART classes in relation to BMD was also evaluated. The use of non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was associated with low lumbar spine BMD in all patients (p=0.015). Reduced BMD was significantly associated with protease inhibitors (PIs)-containing treatment (p=0.043) in women. Conclusion At lumbar spine DEXA, male gender was statistically associated with reduced BMD. At the left hip Ward’s area, decreased BMD T scores were significantly associated with aging. The reduced BMD was higher in patients receiving PI- or NNRTI-containing regimens. PMID:27482514

  9. Higher HIV RNA Viral Load in Recent Patients with Symptomatic Acute HIV Infection in Lyon University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Girerd-Genessay, Isabelle; Baratin, Dominique; Ferry, Tristan; Chidiac, Christian; Ronin, Vincent; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virulence at infection has been suggested by a meta-analysis based on viral load and CD4 T lymphocytes (CD4) count during acute infection. This result was obtained after secondary analyses of large databases, facilitating the detection of differences. Similar finding in cohorts of more modest sample size would indicate that the effect could be more substantial. Methods Change from initial CD4 count and HIV viral load after acute HIV infection by calendar year was explored in patients treated at Lyon University hospitals. All patients admitted to our hospitals with acute HIV infection between 1996 and 2013 were included in our study. Initial CD4 count and viral load before the start of anti-retroviral treatment were analyzed. Trends over time were assessed in linear models. Results Initial CD4 count remained similar over time. However, in 2006–2013, initial viral load rose significantly (+1.12 log10/ml/year, p = 0.01). Conclusion Our data, obtained from a single hospital cohort, confirmed findings from a large meta-analysis, showed increased initial viremia at acute HIV infection since 2006 and suggesting potentially higher HIV virulence in recent years. PMID:26799390

  10. Implementation and evaluation of an isoniazid preventive therapy pilot program among HIV-infected patients in Vietnam, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Thuy T.; Han, Dien T.; Bloss, Emily; Le, Thai H.; Vu, Tung T.; Mai, Anh H.; Nguyen, Nhung V.; Nguyen, Long T.; Dinh, Sy N.; Whitehead, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background WHO recommends screening for TB and evaluation for isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) based on evidence that they reduce TB-related morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected persons. In Vietnam, an IPT pilot was implemented in two provinces; TB screening, treatment and outcomes were evaluated to inform the adoption and scale-up of IPT. Methods During April 2008 to March 2010, eligible HIV-infected persons aged >15 years, with no previous or current TB treatment, alcohol abuse or liver disease were screened for TB. If TB disease was ruled out based on symptoms, chest x-rays and sputum smears, isoniazid was administered for 9 months. Results Among 1281 HIV-infected persons who received initial eligibility screening, 520 were referred to and evaluated at district TB clinics for TB disease or IPT eligibility. Active TB was diagnosed in 17 patients and all were started on treatment. Of 520 patients evaluated, 416 (80.0%) initiated IPT: 382 (91.8%) completed IPT, 17 (4.1%) stopped treatment, 8 (1.9%) died, 3 (0.7%) developed TB during IPT and 6 (1.4%) had unknown outcomes. No severe adverse events were reported. Conclusions IPT treatment completion was high; no serious complications occurred. Improving and expanding intensified case-finding and IPT should be considered in Vietnam. PMID:26385936

  11. Clinical and microbiological features of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella associated with HIV-infected patients, Gauteng Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Keddy, Karen H.; Musekiwa, Alfred; Sooka, Arvinda; Karstaedt, Alan; Nana, Trusha; Seetharam, Sharona; Nchabaleng, Maphoshane; Lekalakala, Ruth; Angulo, Frederick J.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to define factors associated with HIV-infected versus uninfected patients with invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) and factors associated with mortality, which are inadequately described in Africa. Laboratory-based surveillance for iNTS was undertaken. At selected sentinel sites, clinical data (age, sex, HIV status, severity of illness, and outcome) were collected. Surveillance was conducted in Gauteng, South Africa, from 2003 to 2013. Clinical and microbiological differences between HIV-infected and uninfected patients were defined and risk factors for mortality established. Of 4886 iNTS infections in Gauteng from 2003 to 2013, 3106 (63.5%) were diagnosed at sentinel sites. Among persons with iNTS infections, more HIV-infected persons were aged ≥5 years (χ2 = 417.6; P < 0.001) and more HIV-infected children were malnourished (χ2 = 5.8; P = 0.02). Although 760 (30.6%) patients died, mortality decreased between 2003 [97/263 (36.9%)] and 2013 [926/120 (21.7%)]. On univariate analysis, mortality was associated with patients aged 25 to 49 years [odds ratio (OR) = 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.7–2.7; P < 0.001 and ≥50 years (OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 2.2–4.1; P < 0.001) compared with children < 5 years, HIV-infected patients (OR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.7–3.4; P < 0.001), and severe illness (OR = 5.4; 95% CI = 3.6–8.1; P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, mortality was associated with patients aged ≥50 years [adjusted OR (AOR) = 3.6, 95% CI = 2.1–6.1, P < 0.001] and severe illness (AOR = 6.3; 95% CI = 3.8–10.5; P < 0.001). Mortality due to iNTS in Gauteng remains high primarily due to disease severity. Interventions must be aimed at predisposing conditions, including HIV, other immune-suppressive conditions, and malignancy. PMID:28353576

  12. No Positive Association between Vitamin D Level and Immune Responses to Hepatitis B and Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccination in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Viard, Jean-Paul; Assuied, Alex; Lévy, Yves; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Carrat, Fabrice; Chêne, Geneviève; Launay, Odile

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels are associated with subsequent better immune responses to hepatitis B and Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccination in HIV-infected patients. Methods 25OHD was measured on stored baseline plasma samples from two randomized vaccine trials in HIV-infected adults: the ANRS HB03 VIHVAC B trial and an immunological sub-study of the ANRS 114-PNEUMOVAC trial. In ANRS HB03 VIHVAC B, participants received three or four doses of recombinant HBV vaccine strategies. Anti-HBs IgG titers were measured four weeks after the last injection. Associations between baseline 25OHD levels and ordered IgG response categories were analyzed in multivariable proportional odds models. In the ANRS 114-PNEUMOVAC sub-study, two strategies of pneumococcal vaccination were tested, cellular immune responses were measured at repeated time points, and IgG responses four weeks after the last vaccine injection. Exploratory statistical analyses were performed on this sub-study data set. Results Three hundred and thirty-nine ANRS HB03 VIHVAC B and 25 ANRS 114-PNEUMOVAC sub-study participants were included in the analyses. Median age in each of the two studies was 43 years, 68% were male, and 77–92% on antiretroviral treatment. Median 25OHD level was 18 ng/mL (IQR: 12–25) and 24 ng/mL (IQR: 13–32) in the two trial populations, respectively. In the multivariable model, there was no significant association between baseline 25OHD level and vaccine responses in ANRS HB03 VIHVAC B (proportional odds ratio 0.83 per 10 ng/mL 25OHD increase; 95% confidence interval 0.65–1.07, p = 0.14). Exploratory analyses of ANRS 114-PNEUMOVAC showed consistent results. Conclusion This study does not support a positive association between 25OHD and immune responses to hepatitis B or pneumococcal vaccination in HIV-infected patients. PMID:27977797

  13. Dental management of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Aldous, J A

    1990-11-01

    In 1981, a group of male homosexuals was found to have an immunological defect resulting in opportunistic infections. The pattern of symptoms became known as acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Much time and expense have been invested to study the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), prevent its spread, and find a cure for HIV infection. Fear of HIV infection has resulted in implementation of stricter infection control practices. Intervention by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has mandated procedures for infection control and waste disposal. Ethical questions and social problems have surfaced concerning the treatment of HIV-infected patients. Despite reports on infection control, literature concerning management of HIV-infected dental patients is limited. Misinformation has prevented the application of reliable information about the care of HIV-infected individuals. An accurate general knowledge of HIV infection is essential for optimal care of these patients.

  14. Nutritional and metabolic correlates of cardiovascular and bone disease in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Kathleen; Grinspoon, Steven

    2011-12-01

    The treatment of HIV infection has dramatically reduced the incidence of AIDS-related illnesses. At the same time, non-AIDS-related illnesses such as cardiovascular and bone disease are becoming more prevalent in this population. The mechanisms of these illnesses are complex and are related in part to the HIV virus, antiretroviral medications prescribed for HIV infection, traditional risk factors exacerbated by HIV, and lifestyle and nutritional factors. Further prospective research is needed to clarify the mechanisms by which HIV, antiretroviral medications, and nutritional abnormalities contribute to bone and cardiovascular disease in the HIV population. Increasingly, it is being recognized that optimizing the treatment of HIV infection to improve immune function and reduce viral load may also benefit the development of non-AIDS-related illnesses such as cardiovascular and bone disease.

  15. High Prevalence of Severe Food Insecurity and Malnutrition among HIV-Infected Adults in Senegal, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Benzekri, Noelle A.; Sambou, Jacques; Diaw, Binetou; Sall, El Hadji Ibrahima; Sall, Fatima; Niang, Alassane; Ba, Selly; Ngom Guèye, Ndèye Fatou; Diallo, Mouhamadou Baïla; Hawes, Stephen E.; Seydi, Moussa; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Malnutrition and food insecurity are associated with increased mortality and poor clinical outcomes among people living with HIV/AIDS; however, the prevalence of malnutrition and food insecurity among people living with HIV/AIDS in Senegal, West Africa is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and severity of food insecurity and malnutrition among HIV-infected adults in Senegal, and to identify associations between food insecurity, malnutrition, and HIV outcomes. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study at outpatient clinics in Dakar and Ziguinchor, Senegal. Data were collected using participant interviews, anthropometry, the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale, the Individual Dietary Diversity Scale, and chart review. Results One hundred and nine HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 participants were enrolled. The prevalence of food insecurity was 84.6% in Dakar and 89.5% in Ziguinchor. The prevalence of severe food insecurity was 59.6% in Dakar and 75.4% in Ziguinchor. The prevalence of malnutrition (BMI <18.5) was 19.2% in Dakar and 26.3% in Ziguinchor. Severe food insecurity was associated with missing clinic appointments (p = 0.01) and not taking antiretroviral therapy due to hunger (p = 0.02). Malnutrition was associated with lower CD4 cell counts (p = 0.01). Conclusions Severe food insecurity and malnutrition are highly prevalent among HIV-infected adults in both Dakar and Ziguinchor, and are associated with poor HIV outcomes. Our findings warrant further studies to determine the root causes of malnutrition and food insecurity in Senegal, and the short- and long-term impacts of malnutrition and food insecurity on HIV care. Urgent interventions are needed to address the unacceptably high rates of malnutrition and food insecurity in this population. PMID:26529509

  16. Functional analysis of naturally occurring mutations in the open reading frame of CCR5 in HIV-infected Chinese patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiu-Ying; Lee, Shui-Shan; Wong, Ka-Hing; Chan, Kenny C W; Ng, Fai; Chan, Chris C S; Han, Dan; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Ng, Mun-Hon; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2005-04-15

    We studied polymorphism of the HIV coreceptor CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 5 in 1099 Chinese adults residing in Hong Kong, including 785 HIV-negative healthy donors and 314 HIV-positive patients. Ten mutants in the CCR5 open reading frame were identified, 7 of which were nonsynonymous. The frequencies of these alleles did not show a significant difference between HIV patients and healthy controls. G106R, Delta32, R223Q, 299(FS), and S336I were cloned from prevalent mutant genes, and their effects on HIV infection were analyzed by a series of in vitro experiments to determine their transcription levels, expression levels, conformational changes, and HIV coreceptor function. R223Q is the most prevalent CCR5 mutant in ethnic Chinese, with a frequency of 0.046, which does not affect HIV infection in vitro, however. The S336I mutant also does not affect its transcription, expression, or HIV coreceptor function. Similar to 299(FS), the mutant G106R located in the third transmembrane domain results in diminished HIV coreceptor function in vitro through conformation changes in ECL2.

  17. Plasma Concentrations of Efavirenz and Nevirapine among HIV-Infected Patients with Immunological Failure Attending a Tertiary Hospital in North-Western Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kidenya, Benson R.; Kabangila, Rodrick; Mshana, Stephen E.; Kidola, Jeremiah; Kalluvya, Samuel E.; Kongola, Gilbert W.; Klinker, Hartwig

    2013-01-01

    Background Sub-therapeutic and supra-therapeutic plasma concentrations of antriretrovirals are the significant causes of treatment failure and toxicity respectively among HIV-infected patients. We conducted this study to determine the pattern of efavirenz and nevirapine plasma drug concentrations among adult HIV-infected patients with immunological failure attending at a tertiary hospital in North-western Tanzania. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among adult HIV-infected patients with immunological failure who have been on either efavirenz or nevirapine based antiretroviral regimen for more than 6 months. Patients were serially enrolled through routine Care and Treatment Clinic (CTC) activities. Plasma drug concentrations for efavirenz and nevirapine were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Gas Chromatography (GC) respectively. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data such as viral load and CD4 counts were collected. Data analysis was done using STATA 12. Results Of the 152 patients with immunological failure enrolled, the sub-therapeutic, therapeutic and supra-therapeutic plasma antiretroviral drug concentrations were found in 43/152 (28.3%), 76/152 (50.0%) and 33/152 (21.7%) respectively. Half of the patients were outside therapeutic window with either sub-therapeutic or supra-therapeutic plasma ARV drug concentrations. There was a significant difference in distribution of ARV adherence (p-value<0.001), NRTI backbone (p-value = 0.039), HIV stage (p-value = 0.026) and viral load (p-value = 0.007) within sub-therapeutic, therapeutic and supra-therapeutic ARV plasma drug concentrations. Conclusion There is a wide inter-individual variability of plasma ARV concentrations among HIV patients with immunological failure, with a large proportion of patients being outside therapeutic window. This variability is significant based on ARV adherence, NRTI backbone, viral load and HIV stage. Routine

  18. HIV infection and arterial stiffness among older-adults taking antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Siedner, Mark J.; Kim, June-Ho; Nakku, Ruth Sentongo; Hemphill, Linda; Triant, Virginia A.; Haberer, Jessica E.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Boum, Yap; Kwon, Douglas S.; Tsai, Alexander C.; Hunt, Peter W.; Okello, Samson; Bangsberg, David R.

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with arterial stiffness, but no studies have assessed this relationship in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled 205 participants over 40 years old in Uganda: 105 on antiretroviral therapy for a median of 7 years, and a random sample of 100 age and gender-matched HIV-uninfected controls from the clinic catchment area. The prevalence of arterial stiffness (ABI>1.2) was 33%, 18%, 19% and 2% in HIV+ men, HIV- men, HIV+ women, and HIV- women. In multivariable models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, HIV+ individuals had over double the prevalence of arterial stiffness (APR 2.86, 95%CI 1.41–5.79, P=0.003). PMID:26636926

  19. Delayed switch of antiretroviral therapy after virologic failure associated with elevated mortality among HIV-infected adults in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Maya L.; Tran, Linh; Geng, Elvin H.; Reynolds, Steven J.; Kambugu, Andrew; Wood, Robin; Bangsberg, David R.; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Routine monitoring of plasma HIV RNA among HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is unavailable in many resource-limited settings. Alternative monitoring approaches correlate poorly with virologic failure and can substantially delay switch to second-line therapy. We evaluated the impact of delayed switch on mortality among patients with virologic failure in Africa. Design A cohort. Methods We examined patients with confirmed virologic failure on first-line non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens from four cohorts with serial HIV RNA monitoring in Uganda and South Africa. Marginal structural models aimed to estimate the effect of delayed switch on mortality in a hypothetical trial in which switch time was randomly assigned. Inverse probability weights adjusted for measured confounders including time-updated CD4+ T-cell count and HIV RNA. Results Among 823 patients with confirmed virologic failure, the cumulative incidence of switch 180 days after failure was 30% [95% confidence interval (CI) 27–33]. The majority of patients (74%) had not failed immunologically as defined by WHO criteria by the time of virologic failure. Adjusted mortality was higher for individuals who remained on first-line therapy than for those who had switched [odds ratio (OR) 2.1, 95% CI 1.1 –4.2]. Among those without immunologic failure, the relative harm of failure to switch was similar (OR 2.4; 95% CI 0.99–5.8) to that of the entire cohort, although of borderline statistical significance. Conclusion Among HIV-infected patients with confirmed virologic failure on first-line ART, remaining on first-line therapy led to an increase in mortality relative to switching. Our results suggest that detection and response to confirmed virologic failure could decrease mortality. PMID:24977440

  20. HIV infection late detection in AIDS patients of an European city with increased immigration since mid 1990s.

    PubMed

    Carnicer-Pont, Dolors; de Olalla, Patricia G; Caylă, Joan A

    2009-03-01

    The study goal is to identify predictors of HIV infection late detection in an European city with increased immigration, and determine the effects of HAART era in HIV infection detection. We used Barcelona city AIDS registry (1987-2006). Late testers were those diagnosed of AIDS defining illness within less than 3 months from time of testing positive for HIV infection. Independent variables were: date of birth, sex, country of origin, HIV transmission category, prison history, city district of residence, AIDS diagnostic disease and HAART era when diagnosed. The statistical methods were based on logistic regression (Odds Ratio, OR and 95% confidence interval, CI). Among the 6186 AIDS patients, 43.9% (n=2741) were late testers. Being a male (OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.35-1.83), either < 30 years (OR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.06-1.38) or > 40 years (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.03-1.40), with heterosexual (OR: 3.07, 95% CI: 2.59-3.63) routes of transmission or men who have sex with men (OR: 2.20, 95% CI: 1.89-2.57) and with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumoniae (OR: 1.71, 95% CI: 1.47-2.00) or tuberculosis (OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.36-1.82) were all independent risk factors for being a late tester. Conversely, injecting drug use (IDU) was associated with early detection (OR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.33-0.40). Being migrant was associated with late testing only in the univariate analysis. Individuals with the detected factors (male, having any sexual risk behaviour and being > 50 years) should be in the main focus for HIV testing to further ensure continuous decrease in the slope of late detected HIV infections overall.

  1. Application of the WHOQOL-HIV-BREF Questionnaire in HIV-Infected Thai Patients: Reliability and Validity of the Instrument.

    PubMed

    Meemon, Natthani; Paek, Seung Chun; Yenchai, Daraphak; Wan, Thomas T H

    2016-01-01

    Given the prolonged survival of HIV-infected individuals as a result of widespread availability of treatment, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) becomes a relevant endpoint for assessing the impacts of HIV interventions. We examined the reliability and validity of the World Health Organization Quality of Life in HIV-infected Persons instrument (WHOQOL-HIV-BREF) using data from 329 HIV-infected Thai patients who received outpatient care at seven public hospitals. Our findings revealed acceptable reliability, construct validity, and convergent validity of the WHOQOL-HIV-BREF. No significant difference in HRQOL was found between groups with different CD4+ T cell counts. Conversely, the subgroup with a history of opportunistic infection appeared to have a higher HRQOL compared to those in the latency stage. Challenges to the interpretation of the questions related to culture are discussed. In conclusion, the WHOQOL-HIV-BREF can be added to the limited list of instruments for comprehensive outcome evaluation of HIV interventions in Thailand.

  2. High Mortality of Disseminated Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterial Infection in HIV-Infected Patients in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nishijima, Takeshi; Teruya, Katsuji; Aoki, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Little information is available on the mortality and risk factors associated with death in disseminated non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection (dNTM) in HIV-infected patients in the ART-era. Methods In a single-center study, HIV-infected dNTM with positive NTM culture from sterile sites between 2000 and 2013 were analysed. The clinical characteristics at commencement of anti-mycobacterial treatment (baseline) were compared between those who survived and died. Results Twenty-four patients were analyzed. [The median CD4 27/μL (range 2–185)]. Mycobacterium avium and M. intracellulare accounted for 20 (83%) and 3 (13%) of isolated NTM. NTM bacteremia was diagnosed in 15 (63%) patients. Seven (29%) patients died, and NTM bacteremia was significantly associated with mortality (p = 0.022). The baseline CD4 count was significantly lower in the non-survivors than the survivors (median 7/μL versus 49, p = 0.034). Concomitant AIDS-defining diseases or malignancies were not associated with mortality. Immune-reconstitution syndrome (IRS) occurred to 19 (79%) patients (8 paradoxical and 11 unmasking), and prognosis tended to be better in unmasking-IRS than the other patients (n = 13) (p = 0.078). Patients with paradoxical-IRS had marginally lower CD4 count and higher frequency of bacteremia than those with unmasking-IRS (p = 0.051, and 0.059). Treatment with systemic corticosteroids was applied in 63% and 55% of patients with paradoxical and unmasking-IRS, respectively. Conclusion dNTM in HIV-infected patients resulted in high mortality even in the ART-era. NTM bacteremia and low CD4 count were risk factors for death, whereas patients presented with unmasking-IRS had marginally better prognosis. IRS occurred in 79% of the patients, suggesting difficulty in the management of dNTM. PMID:26985832

  3. Frequency and correlates of late presentation for HIV infection in France: older adults are a risk group - results from the ANRS-VESPA2 Study, France.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kayigan d'Almeida; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Aubrière, Cindy; Hamelin, Christine; Spire, Bruno; Lert, France

    2014-01-01

    Correlates of late presentation (LP) for HIV infection in Metropolitan France and French overseas departments (FODs) were assessed among HIV-infected patients recently diagnosed, using data from a large cross-sectional survey, representative of the French HIV-infected population, conducted in 2011. LP was defined as presentation with either clinical AIDS events within the calendar year of diagnosis or CD4 < 350/mm(3) and presentation with advanced disease (PAD) was defined as presentation with either clinical AIDS events or CD4 < 200/mm(3). Correlates of LP/PAD were assessed through logistic modelling, separately in Metropolitan France and FODs. In Metropolitan France, 47.7% of participants were late presenters and 29.3% presented with advanced disease. LP was more frequent among male and female migrants from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA; 58.5% and 56.4%) and non-African heterosexual males (61.8%) than among men who have sex with men (34.8%). In FODs, 53.2% of participants were late presenters and 36.8% presented with an advanced disease. LP was more frequent among men than women (60.6% vs. 45.3%) and among those with a lower level of education (56.6% vs. 47.5%). A consistent positive association was found in adjusted analyses between LP/PAD and increasing age at diagnosis among all subpopulations, in both settings. In Metropolitan France, among men who have sex with men, those self-declaring as bisexual were at higher risk of LP/PAD; among non-African heterosexual males and females, religiosity was associated with increased risk of LP/PAD; and among SSA migrants, those diagnosed within the year following their arrival in France were at higher risk of LP/PAD. Older age at diagnosis is a major risk factor for LP/PAD independently of any other socio-demographic characteristics. Promotion of HIV testing should be renewed to target each subgroup at risk while paying a particular attention to middle-aged or older adults whose attitudes and beliefs towards HIV/AIDS might

  4. Acute hepatitis C in a chronically HIV-infected patient: Evolution of different viral genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Flichman, Diego; Kott, Veronica; Sookoian, Silvia; Campos, Rodolfo

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the molecular evolution of different viral genomic regions of HCV in an acute HCV infected patient chronically infected with HIV through a 42-month follow-up. METHODS: Serum samples of a chronically HIV infected patient that seroconverted to anti HCV antibodies were sequenced, from the event of superinfection through a period of 17 mo and in a late sample (42nd month). Hypervariable genomic regions of HIV (V3 loop of the gp120) and HCV (HVR-1 on the E2 glycoprotein gene) were studied. In order to analyze genomic regions involved in different biological functions and with the cellular immune response, HCV core and NS5A were also chosen to be sequenced. Amplification of the different regions was done by RT-PCR and directly sequenced. Confirmation of sequences was done on reamplified material. Nucleotide sequences of the different time points were aligned with CLUSTAL W 1.5, and the corresponding amino acid ones were deduced. RESULTS: Hypervariable genomic regions of both viruses (HVR1 and gp120 V3 loop) presented several nonsynonymous changes but, while in the gp120 V3 loop mutations were detected in the sample obtained right after HCV superinfection and maintained throughout, they occurred following a sequential and cumulative pattern in the HVR1. In the NS5A region of HCV, two amino acid changes were detected during the follow-up period, whereas the core region presented several amino acid replacements, once the HCV chronic infection had been established. CONCLUSION: During the HIV-HCV superinfection, each genomic region analyzed shows a different evolutionary pattern. Most of the nucleotide substitutions observed are non-synonymous and clustered in previously described epitopes, thus suggesting an immune-driven evolutionary process. PMID:12854149

  5. Public Policy Affirmations Affecting the Planning and Implementation of Developmental Services for Children and Adults with HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, Allen C., Comp.; And Others

    The increasing number of individuals infected with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has created a need to examine public policy issues and to further efforts in planning, implementing, and evaluating services for individuals with HIV infection and their families. A working conference was convened, which identified several…

  6. Effects of Randomized Rosuvastatin Compared to Placebo on Bone and Body Composition among HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, Kristine M.; Jiang, Ying; Debanne, Sara M.; Mccomsey, Grace A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Statins have a beneficial effect on bone mineral density (BMD) and lean mass in some studies of HIV-uninfected adults, however this has never been investigated in the setting of HIV infection. Design HIV-infected subjects on stable antiretroviral therapy with a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of ≤ 130 mg/dL and evidence of heightened immune activation or inflammation were randomized to rosuvastatin 10mg daily or placebo for 96 weeks. Methods This was a prespecified interim analysis at 48 weeks. Between-group and within group differences were compared; multivariable regression models were constructed. Results 72 subjects were randomized to statin therapy and 75 to placebo. Modest 48 week relative increases in trochanter BMD (0.9%; 95% CI: -0.9, 0.6%) and total hip BMD (0.6%; 95% CI: 0.0, 1.1%) in the statin arm were significantly greater than placebo (p<0.05). The relationship between statin use and total hip BMD change was robust to adjustment of age, gender, race, and smoking status (p=0.02) and strengthened by inclusion of baseline (p=0.01) and week 48 change in sTNFR-1 (p=0.009). Relative increases in total body, trunk and limb fat were similar between statin and placebo arms (p ≥0.58). Although a significant gain in leg lean mass was seen in the statin arm, this was not significantly different compared to placebo (p=0.36). Conclusions The improvements seen in total hip BMD after 48 weeks of rosuvastatin therapy support further potential benefits of statin therapy in HIV, beyond a reduction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25396266

  7. Effect of a monthly dose of calcidiol in improving vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bañón, Sara; Rosillo, Marta; Gómez, Ana; Pérez-Elias, María J; Moreno, Santiago; Casado, José Luis

    2015-06-01

    There are no data about the optimal supplementation therapy in HIV-infected patients with vitamin D (25OHD) deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an oral monthly dose of 16,000 IU calcidiol. We performed a longitudinal cohort study of 365 HIV-infected patients (24 % females) was with sequential determinations of 25OHD, serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, and alkaline phosphatase. The efficacy and safety of supplementation in 123 patients were compared against dietary and sun exposure advice. Overall, mean baseline 25OHD levels were 19.1 ng/ml (IQR 12-23.6), 63 % of patients had 25OHD deficiency and 27 % secondary hyperparathyroidism. After a median time of 9.3 months (95.61 patients-year on-treatment), 25OHD levels increased in comparison with non-supplemented patients (+16.4 vs. +3.2 ng/ml; p < 0.01), decreasing the rate of 25OHD deficiency (from 84 to 24 %), and decreasing serum PTH (-4.9 pg/ml) and the rate of secondary hyperparathyroidism (from 43 to 31 %; p < 0.001). This improvement was observed irrespective of HIV/HCV coinfection or the use of efavirenz. In a regression analysis, adjusting by seasonality, a lower baseline 25OHD was associated with persistence of deficiency (relative risk, RR 1.07; 95 % CI 1.03-1.1; p < 0.001), whereas calcidiol supplementation was the only factor associated with significant improvement (RR 0.38; 95 % CI 0.12-0.46; p < 0.001). This monthly dose showed no clinical toxicity, and no patient had 25OHD levels above 100 ng/ml, nor hypercalcemia. The use of monthly calcidiol is safe, easy to take, and largely effective to improve vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism in HIV-infected patients.

  8. Incidence of Non-AIDS-Defining Malignancies in HIV-Infected Vs. Non-Infected Patients in the HAART Era: Impact of Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Bedimo, Roger J.; McGinnis, Kathleen A.; Dunlap, Melinda; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Justice, Amy C.

    2009-01-01

    Background The incidence of non-AIDS-defining malignancies (non-ADM) is reported as unchanged or increasing in the HAART era. Whether incidence of non-ADM is significantly higher in HIV-infected than in HIV-uninfected patients remains unclear. Methods Incidence rates of malignancies were calculated in a cohort of veterans in care for HIV-infected and age, race, and gender-matched uninfected patients from 1997 to 2004. For HIV-infected patients CD4 counts closest to first observation date were compared between those with and without cancer. Results 33,420 HIV-infected and 66,840 HIV-uninfected patients were followed for a median of 5.1 and 6.4 years. The Incidence rate ratio [IRR] of HIV-infected to HIV-uninfected was 1.6 (1260 vs. 841/100,000 person-years; 95% CI: 1.5–1.7). IRR for individual cancers was highest for anal cancer (14.9; CI: 10.1–22.1). Among HIV-infected patients, median CD4 counts were lower for those with non-ADM (249 vs. 270, p=0.02), anal cancer (154 vs. 270; p<0.001), and Hodgkin’s (217 vs. 270; p=0.03). Prostate cancer was associated with a higher CD4 count (310 vs. 270; p<0.001). Conclusions In the HAART era, the incidence of non-ADMs is higher among HIV-infected than HIV-uninfected patients, adjusting for age, race, and gender. Some non-ADMs do not appear to be associated with significantly lower CD4 counts. PMID:19617846

  9. Chronic pain in HIV-infected patients: relationship to depression, substance use, and mental health and pain treatment

    PubMed Central

    Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Weisberg, Risa B.; Herman, Debra S.; Bailey, Genie L.; Pinkston, Megan M.; Stein, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV has become a chronic disease for most individuals in developed countries. Chronic pain is a common occurrence for HIV –infected patients and has an impact on quality of life and antiretroviral adherence. The objective of this study was to examine relationships between chronic pain and depression, substance use, mental health treatment, and pain treatment in HIV-infected patients. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Three primary care sites where HIV+ patients receive treatment. Subjects 238 HIV-infected primary care patients. Methods We collected self-report and chart-review information on demographics, HIV clinical status, chronic pain, depression, substance use, mental health treatment, and pain treatment. We collected data between October 2012 and November 2013. Results Of the patients enrolled in this study, 107 reported no chronic pain, 24 reported mild chronic pain, and 107 reported moderate-severe chronic pain. Participants in the moderate-severe pain group were more likely to have high levels of depressive symptoms than those in the no chronic pain group. Similarly, there was a significant relationship between chronic pain status and interference with life activities due to pain. Participants with moderate-severe chronic pain were more likely to be taking an antidepressant medication than those with mild chronic pain, and more likely to be taking a prescription opioid than the other two groups. We did not find a significant relationship between problematic substance use and chronic pain status. Conclusions Despite pharmacologic treatment, moderate-severe chronic pain and elevated depression symptoms are common among HIV-infected patients and frequently co-occur. PMID:26119642

  10. [Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of renal diseases in HIV infected patients. Recommendations of the Spanish AIDS Study Group/National AIDS Plan].

    PubMed

    2010-10-01

    The incidence of opportunistic infections and tumours in HIV-infected patients has sharply declined in the HAART era. At the same time there has been a growing increase of other diseases not directly linked to immunodeficiency. Renal diseases are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. In the general population, chronic renal failure has considerable multiorgan repercussions that have particular implications in patients with HIV infection. The detection of occult or subclinical chronic kidney disease is crucial since effective measures for delaying progression exist. Furthermore, the deterioration in glomerular filtration should prompt clinicians to adjust doses of some antiretroviral agents and other drugs used for treating associated comorbidities. Suppression of viral replication, strict control of blood pressure, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus, and avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs in certain patients are fundamental components of programs aimed to prevent renal damage and delaying progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with HIV. Renal transplantation and dialysis have also special implications in HIV-infected patients. In this article, we summarise the updated clinical practice guidelines for the evaluation, management and prevention of renal diseases in HIV-infected patients from a panel of experts in HIV and nephrologists on behalf of the Spanish AIDS Study Group (GESIDA) and the National AIDS Plan.

  11. Maraviroc Failed to Control Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy-Associated IRIS in a Patient with Advanced HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mónica; Silva-Sánchez, Fernando Antonio; Luna-Rivero, César; Vega-Barrientos, Ricardo; Alvarado-de la Barrera, Claudia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of therapeutic options for patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-associated IRIS), maraviroc has generated expectations among the medical community. However, we report a patient with advanced HIV infection, who developed PML-associated IRIS and had a fatal outcome despite the addition of maraviroc to suppressive ART. Future studies are required to define the therapeutic role of maraviroc in PML-associated IRIS and differentiate individuals who may benefit from maraviroc from those who may develop neurological deterioration. PMID:25587282

  12. Cardiovascular disease risk prediction by the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease (ASCVD) risk score among HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hemphill, Linda C.; Palai, Tommy; Nkele, Isaac; Bennett, Kara; Lockman, Shahin; Triant, Virginia A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives HIV-infected patients are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, general population CVD risk prediction equations that identify HIV-infected patients at elevated risk have not been widely assessed in sub-Saharan African (SSA). Methods HIV-infected adults from 30–50 years of age with documented viral suppression were enrolled into a cross-sectional study in Gaborone, Botswana. Participants were screened for CVD risk factors. Bilateral carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) was measured and 10-year predicted risk of cardiovascular disease was calculated using the Pooled Cohorts Equation for atherosclerotic CVD (ASCVD) and the 2008 Framingham Risk Score (FRS) (National Cholesterol Education Program III–NCEP III). ASCVD ≥7.5%, FRS ≥10%, and cIMT≥75th percentile were considered elevated risk for CVD. Agreement in classification of participants as high-risk for CVD by cIMT and FRS or ASCVD risk score was assessed using McNemar`s Test. The optimal cIMT cut off-point that matched ASCVD predicted risk of ≥7.5% was assessed using Youden’s J index. Results Among 208 HIV-infected patients (female: 55%, mean age 38 years), 78 (38%) met criteria for ASCVD calculation versus 130 (62%) who did not meet the criteria. ASCVD classified more participants as having elevated CVD risk than FRS (14.1% versus 2.6%, McNemar’s exact test p = 0.01), while also classifying similar proportion of participants as having elevated CVD like cIMT (14.1% versus 19.2%, McNemar’s exact test p = 0.34). Youden’s J calculated the optimal cut point at the 81st percentile for cIMT to correspond to an ASCVD score ≥7.5% (sensitivity = 72.7% and specificity = 88.1% with area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic [AUC] of 0.82, 95% Mann-Whitney CI: 0.66–0.99). Conclusion While the ASCVD risk score classified more patients at elevated CVD risk than FRS, ASCVD score classified similar proportion of patients as high risk when compared with

  13. Administration of a Toll-like receptor 9 agonist decreases the proviral reservoir in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Winckelmann, Anni A; Munk-Petersen, Lærke V; Rasmussen, Thomas A; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Hjelholt, Thomas J; Montefiori, David; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S; Tolstrup, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can reactivate HIV from latently infected cells in vitro. We aimed to investigate the TLR-9 agonist, CPG 7909's in vivo effect on the proviral HIV reservoir and HIV-specific immunity. This was a post-hoc analysis of a double-blind randomized controlled vaccine trial. HIV-infected adults were randomized 1:1 to receive pneumococcal vaccines with or without 1 mg CPG 7909 as adjuvant at 0, 3 and 9 months. In patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy we quantified proviral DNA at 0, 3, 4, 9, and 10 months (31 subjects in the CPG group and 37 in the placebo-adjuvant group). Furthermore, we measured HIV-specific antibodies, characterized T cell phenotypes and HIV-specific T cell immunity. We observed a mean reduction in proviral DNA in the CPG group of 12.6% (95% CI: -23.6-0.0) following each immunization whereas proviral DNA in the placebo-adjuvant group remained largely unchanged (6.7% increase; 95% CI: -4.2-19.0 after each immunization, p = 0.02). Among participants with additional cryo-preserved PBMCs, HIV-specific CD8+ T cell immunity as indicated by increased expression of degranulation marker CD107a and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP1β) tended to be up-regulated following immunization with CPG 7909 compared with placebo as adjuvant. Further, increasing proportion of HIV-specific CD107a and MIP1β-expressing CD8+ T cells were strongly correlated with decreasing proviral load. No changes were observed in T cell phenotype distribution, HIV-specific CD4+ T cell immunity, or HIV-specific antibodies. TLR9-adjuvanted pneumococcal vaccination decreased proviral load. Reductions in proviral load correlated with increasing levels of HIV specific CD8+ T cells. Further investigation into the potential effect of TLR9 agonists on HIV latency is warranted.

  14. Dyslipidaemia in HIV-infected women on antiretroviral therapy. Analysis of 922 patients from the Spanish VACH cohort

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Information concerning lipid disturbances in HIV-infected women on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is scarce. The objective of the study is to describe the lipid profile in a large cohort of HIV-infected women on contemporary ART and analyse differences between regimes and patient's characteristics. Methods Observational, multicentre, cross-sectional study from the Spanish VACH Cohort. 922 women on stable ART without lipid-lowering treatment were included. Results Median age was 42 years, median CD4 lymphocyte count was 544 cells/mm3, and 85.6% presented undetectable HIV-1 viral load. Median total cholesterol (TC) was 189 mg/dL (interquartile range, IQR, 165-221), HDL cholesterol 53 mg/dL (IQR, 44-64), LDL cholesterol 108 mg/dL (IQR, 86-134), and triglycerides 116 mg/dL (IQR, 85-163). Mean accumulated time on ART was 116 months; 47.4% were on NNRTI-based regimes, 44.7% on PI, and 6.7% on only-NRTI therapy. 43.8% were also hepatitis C (HCV) coinfected. Patients on PI treatment presented higher TC/HDL ratio than those on NNRTI (p < 0.001). Significantly higher HDL values were observed in NNRTI-treated patients. HCV-coinfected patients presented lower TC/HDL ratio than the non HCV-coinfected. In multivariate analysis, factors independently associated with TC/HDL ratio were age, triglyceride levels and HCV co-infection. PI treatment presented a non-significant association with higher TC/HDL ratio. Conclusions In HIV-infected women, the NNRTI-based ART is associated with a better lipid profile than the PI-based. Factors unrelated to ART selection may also exert an independent, significant influence on lipids; in particular, age, and triglyceride levels are associated with an increased TC/HDL ratio while HCV co-infection is associated with a reduced TC/HDL ratio. PMID:21816091

  15. Evaluation of improvement of onychomycosis in HIV-infected patients after initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy without antifungal treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-López, Patricia; Moreno-Coutiño, Gabriela; Fernández-Martínez, Ramón; Espinoza-Hernández, Jessica; Rodríguez-Zulueta, Patricia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2015-09-01

    Onychomycosis in HIV-infected patients has a prevalence of 20-44% and is more frequently seen with CD4(+) T cell counts ≤450 cel μl(-1). There are case reports of improvement in onychomycosis after initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), but there are no prospective studies that prove the existence and frequency of this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to evaluate if HIV-infected patients with onychomycosis who begin cART improve and/or cure without antifungal treatment. We included HIV-infected patients with onychomycosis who had not started cART and nor received antifungal therapy during 6 months prior to the study. We evaluated affected the nails with the Onychomycosis Severity Index (OSI); nail scrapings were collected and direct microscopy with potassium hydroxide (KOH) as well as mycological culture were performed. We repeated these procedures at 3 and 6 months to assess changes. CD4 T cell counts and HIV viral load were obtained. A total of 16 patients were included, with male gender predominance (68.7%); distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (DLSO) was the most common form (31.3%). Trichophyton rubrum was the most frequently isolated microorganism. OSI decreased 21.5% at 3 months and 40% at 6 months after initiation of antiretrovirals (P = 0.05). We found a non-significant tendency towards improvement with higher CD4(+) T cell counts and with viral loads <100 000 copies ml(-1). This could be due to the increase in CD4(+) T cells, decreased percentage of Treg (CD4(+)CD25(+)) among CD4(+) Tcells and/or a decreased viral load; further studies are necessary to prove these hypothesis.

  16. Update on current management of chronic kidney disease in patients with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Diana, Nina E; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2016-01-01

    disease upon detection of HIV infection and annually thereafter in high-risk populations is recommended. PMID:27695357

  17. Ratio of Monocytes to Lymphocytes in Peripheral Blood Identifies Adults at Risk of Incident Tuberculosis Among HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Warimwe, George M.; McShane, Helen; Fletcher, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Eight decades ago, the ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes (hereafter, the “ML ratio”) was noted to affect outcomes of mycobacterial infection in rabbits. Recent transcriptomic studies support a role for relative proportions of myeloid and lymphoid transcripts in tuberculosis outcomes. The ML ratio in peripheral blood is known to be governed by hematopoietic stem cells with distinct biases. Methods. The predictive value of the baseline ML ratio was modeled in 2 prospective cohorts of HIV-infected adults starting cART in South Africa (primary cohort, 1862 participants; replication cohort, 345 participants). Incident tuberculosis was diagnosed with clinical, radiographic, and microbiologic methods per contemporary guidelines. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses and Cox proportional hazards modeling were conducted. Results. The incidence rate of tuberculosis differed significantly by baseline ML ratio: 32.61 (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.38–61.54), 16.36 (95% CI, 12.39–21.23), and 51.80 (95% CI, 23.10–101.71) per 1000 patient-years for ML ratios of less than the 5th percentile, between the 5th and 95th percentiles, and greater than the 95th percentile, respectively (P = .007). Neither monocyte counts nor lymphocyte counts alone were associated with tuberculosis. After adjustment for sex, World Health Organization human immunodeficiency virus disease stage, CD4+ T-cell counts, and previous history of tuberculosis, hazards of disease were significantly higher for patients with ML ratios of less than the 5th percentile or greater than the 95th percentile (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.39–4.40; P = .002). Conclusions. The ML ratio may be a useful, readily available tool to stratify the risk of tuberculosis and suggests involvement of hematopoietic stem cell bias in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:24041796

  18. Bone marrow aspiration, biopsy, and culture in the evaluation of HIV-infected patients for invasive mycobacteria and histoplasma infections.

    PubMed

    Akpek, G; Lee, S M; Gagnon, D R; Cooley, T P; Wright, D G

    2001-06-01

    Bone marrow (BM) aspiration and biopsy are used commonly in clinical practice to diagnose invasive tissue infections caused by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare (MAC), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), and Histoplasma capsulatum (HC) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) infection. However, the value of these invasive procedures relative to other diagnostic approaches has not been clearly defined. To determine the value of BM culture and BM histology in the diagnosis of opportunistic MAC/TB and HC infections in immunosuppressed patients with HIV, we retrospectively reviewed the records of 56 adult patients with HIV who underwent a single BM aspiration, biopsy, and culture because of unexplained fever and/or other clinical features suggestive of MAC/TB or HC infection. Thirty-two patients (57%) were ultimately diagnosed with MAC/TB or HC infection by positive cultures of BM, blood, sputum, or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or by the histologic detection of organisms in biopsies of BM or other tissues. The diagnostic sensitivity of BM cultures was equal to that of blood cultures (20/32, or 63%). Granuloma and/or histologically apparent organisms were seen in BM biopsy specimens in 11 of 32 individuals (34%) ultimately diagnosed with MAC/TB or HC infections. Among these 11 cases, both granuloma and acid-fast staining organisms were found in the BM biopsy specimens of 2 individuals for whom both BM and blood cultures were negative. Certain clinical symptoms and signs at the time of BM examination were found by logistic regression analysis to be significantly associated with a subsequent diagnosis of MAC/TB or HC infections; these included high fever, long duration of febrile days prior to BM examination, and elevated direct bilirubin. In conclusion, while the diagnostic sensitivity of BM cultures was found to be no greater than that of blood cultures in detecting MAC/TB or HC infections in immunosuppressed HIV+ patients, histopathologic examination of BM

  19. Incidence of serious morbidity in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy in a West African care centre, 2003-2008

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In resource-limited settings, scaling-up antiretroviral treatment (ART) has required the involvement of decentralized health facilities with limited equipment. We estimated the incidence of serious morbidity among HIV-infected adults receiving ART in one of these HIV routine care center in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We conducted a prospective study at the Centre Medical de Suivi des Donneurs de Sang (CMSDS), which is affiliated with the National Centre for Blood Transfusion in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Adult patients infected with HIV-1 or HIV-1/HIV-2 who initiated ART between January 2003 and December 2008 were eligible for the study. Standardized clinical data were collected at each visit. Serious morbidity was defined as a new episode of malaria, WHO stage 3–4 event, ANRS grade 3–4 adverse event, or any event leading to death or to hospitalization. Results 1008 adults, 67% women, with a median age of 35 years, and a median pre-ART CD4 count of 186/mm3 started ART and were followed for a median of 17.3 months. The overall incidences of loss to follow-up, death, and attrition were 6.2/100 person-years (PY) [95% CI 5.1-7.2], 2.3/100 PY [95% CI 1.6-2.9], and 8.1/100 PY [95% CI 7.0-9.4], respectively. The incidence of first serious event was 11.5/100 PY overall, 15.9/100 PY within the first year and 8.3/100 PY thereafter. The most frequently documented specific diagnoses were malaria, tuberculosis, bacterial septicemia and bacterial pneumonia. Conclusion Among HIV-infected adults followed in routine conditions in a West African primary care clinic, we recorded a high incidence of serious morbidity during the first year on ART. Providing care centers with diagnostic tools and standardizing data collection are necessary steps to improve the quality of care in primary care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24373303

  20. Association between polymorphisms in genes involved in lipid metabolism and immunological status in chronically HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Patricia; Guardiola, Montse; González, Marta; Vallvé, Joan Carles; Bonjoch, Anna; Puig, Jordi; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ribalta, Josep; Negredo, Eugènia

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have reported associations between lipid parameters and clinical progression of HIV infection. We performed a cross-sectional study including 468 antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected patients to investigate the impact of 13 polymorphisms of 9 genes affecting lipid metabolism and CD4 and CD8-T cell levels. Polymorphisms were identified in genes selected for their role in the development of atherogenic dyslipidemia, defined as triglycerides ⩾1.7mmol/L and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) <1.02 in women or 1.28mmol/L in men. Lipid and lipoprotein parameters were determined in all participants, as well as CD4 and CD8 T-cell counts. ANOVA was performed to compare the mean values of lipid and CD4 and CD8 T-cell count data. A Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was applied. 468 patients were included, 148 of them had a diagnosis of atherogenic dyslipidemia. The polymorphism rs3135506 in APOA5 was associated with a 9% increase in triglycerides (p=0.002), 10% and 21% decrease in HDLc (p=0.005), and CD4 T-cell count (p=0.024), respectively. APOA5 rs662799, was associated with a 19% increase in CD8 T-cell count (p=0.002). Carriers of LPL rs328 in the dyslipidemic group presented 11% higher levels of HDLc (p=0.015) and 14% higher levels of CD4 cells (p=0.038). In conclusion, polymorphisms in genes associated to the development of atherogenic dyslipidemia, especially variants in APOA5 gene (rs3135506 and rs662799), can influence the circulating CD4 T-cell levels in chronically HIV-infected patients. These data support previous reports on the effect of lipid metabolism on immunologic parameters in HIV+ individuals on antiretroviral therapy.

  1. From Space to the Patient: A New Cytokine Release Assay to Monitor the Immune Status of HIV Infected Patients and Sepsis Patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, I.; Draenert, R.; Gruber, M.; Feuerecker, M.; Crucian, B. E.; Mehta, S. L.; Roider, J.; Pierson, D. L.; Briegel, J. M.; Schelling, G.; Sams, C. F.; Chouker, A.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of humans either in the healthy men under extreme environmental stress like space flight, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients or in sepsis is of critical importance with regard to the timing of adequate therapeutic (counter-)measures. The in vivo skin delayed-type hypersensitivity test (DTH) served for many years as a tool to evaluate cell mediated immunity. However, this standardised in vivo test was removed from the market in 2002 due to the risk of antigen stabilization. To the best of our knowledge an alternative test as monitoring tool to determine cell mediated immunity is not available so far. For this purpose we tested a new alternative assay using elements of the skin DTH which is based on an ex vivo cytokine release from whole blood and asked if it is suitable and applicable to monitor immune changes in HIV infected patients and in patients with septic shock.

  2. Partner Disclosure and Early CD4 Response among HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment in Nairobi Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, T. Tony; Yatich, Nelly; Ngomoa, Richard; McGrath, Christine J.; Richardson, Barbra A.; Sakr, Samah R.; Langat, Agnes; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Chung, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Disclosure of HIV serostatus can have significant benefits for people living with HIV/AIDS. However, there is limited data on whether partner disclosure influences ART treatment response. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of newly diagnosed, ART-naïve HIV-infected adults (>18 years) who enrolled at the Coptic Hope Center in Nairobi, Kenya between January 1st 2009 and July 1st 2011 and initiated ART within 3 months. Analysis was restricted to adults who reported to have either disclosed or not disclosed their HIV status to their partner. Analysis of CD4 response at 6 and 12 months post-ART was stratified by age group. Results Among 615 adults newly initiating ART with partner disclosure data and 12 month follow-up, mean age was 38 years and 52% were male; 76% reported that they had disclosed their HIV-status to their partner. Those who disclosed were significantly younger and more likely to be married/cohabitating than non-disclosers. At baseline, median CD4 counts were similar between disclosure groups. Among younger adults (< 38 years) those who disclosed had higher CD4 recovery than those who did not at 6 months post- ART (mean difference = 31, 95% CI 3 to 58 p = 0.03) but not at 12 months (mean difference = 17, 95% CI -19 to 52, p = 0.4). Among older adults (≥ 38years) there was no observed difference in CD4 recovery at 6 or 12 months between disclosure groups. Conclusion Among younger adults, disclosure of HIV status to partners may be associated with CD4 recovery following ART. PMID:27711164

  3. Environmental Factors Related to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Patients in the Combined Antiretroviral Therapy (cART) Era

    PubMed Central

    Álvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Díaz, Asuncion; de Miguel Díez, Javier; Resino, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the seasonal variations and whether short-term exposure to environmental risk factors, such as climate and air pollution, is associated with PTB-related hospital admissions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients in Spain during the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). A retrospective study was carried out using data from the Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS) and the State Meteorological Agency (AEMET) of Spain. The primary outcome variable was hospital admissions with PTB diagnosis. The environmental risk factors evaluated were season, temperature, humidity, NO2, SO2, O3, PM10, and CO. Overall, HIV-infected patients had a lower frequency of PTB-related hospital admissions in summer (22.8%) and autumn (22.4%), but higher values in winter (26.6%) and spring (28.2%). Using a Bayesian temporal model, PTB-related hospital admissions were less frequent in summer-autumn and more abundant in winter-spring during the first years of follow-up. During the later years of follow-up, the seasonal trends continued resulting in the lowest values in autumn and the highest in spring. When considering short-term exposure to environmental risk factors, lower temperatures at 1 week (odds ratio (OR) = 1.03; p = 0.008), 1.5 weeks (OR = 1.03; p<0.001), 2 weeks (OR = 1.04; p<0.001), and 3 weeks (OR = 1.03; p<0.001) prior to PTB admission. In addition, higher concentration of NO2 at the time of admission were significantly associated with higher likelihoods of PTB-related hospital admission in HIV-infected patients when 1.5 weeks (OR = 1.1; p = 0.044) and 2 weeks (OR = 1.21; p<0.001) were used as controls. Finally, higher concentration of SO2 at 1.5 weeks prior to PTB admission was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of PTB-related hospital admissions (OR = 0.92; p = 0.029). In conclusion, our data suggest an apparent seasonal variation in hospital admissions of HIV-infected patients with a PTB diagnosis (summer

  4. Genetic polymorphisms in the CD14 gene are associated with monocyte activation and carotid intima-media thickness in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yean K.; Shankar, Esaki M.; Westhorpe, Clare L.V.; Maisa, Anna; Spelman, Tim; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Given the relationship between innate immune activation and CVD, we investigated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and CD14 and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), a surrogate measurement for CVD, in HIV-infected individuals on ART and HIV-uninfected controls as a cross-sectional, case-control study. We quantified the frequency of monocyte subsets (CD14, CD16), markers of monocyte activation (CD38, HLA-DR), and endothelial adhesion (CCR2, CX3CR1, CD11b) by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD163, sCD14, sCX3CL1, and sCCL2, were measured by ELISA. Genotyping of TLR4 and CD14 SNPs was also performed. The TT genotype for CD14/−260SNP but not the CC/CT genotype was associated with elevated plasma sCD14, and increased frequency of CD11b+CD14+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals. The TT genotype was associated with lower cIMT in HIV-infected patients (n = 47) but not in HIV-uninfected controls (n = 37). The AG genotype for TLR4/+896 was associated with increased CX3CR1 expression on total monocytes among HIV-infected individuals and increased sCCL2 and fibrinogen levels in HIV-uninfected controls. SNPs in CD14/−260 and TLR4/+896 were significantly associated with different markers of systemic and monocyte activation and cIMT that differed between HIV-infected participants on ART and HIV-uninfected controls. Further investigation on the relationship of these SNPs with a clinical endpoint of CVD is warranted in HIV-infected patients on ART. PMID:27495090

  5. Genetic polymorphisms in the CD14 gene are associated with monocyte activation and carotid intima-media thickness in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yean K; Shankar, Esaki M; Westhorpe, Clare L V; Maisa, Anna; Spelman, Tim; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Crowe, Suzanne M; Lewin, Sharon R

    2016-08-01

    HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Given the relationship between innate immune activation and CVD, we investigated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and CD14 and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), a surrogate measurement for CVD, in HIV-infected individuals on ART and HIV-uninfected controls as a cross-sectional, case-control study. We quantified the frequency of monocyte subsets (CD14, CD16), markers of monocyte activation (CD38, HLA-DR), and endothelial adhesion (CCR2, CX3CR1, CD11b) by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD163, sCD14, sCX3CL1, and sCCL2, were measured by ELISA. Genotyping of TLR4 and CD14 SNPs was also performed. The TT genotype for CD14/-260SNP but not the CC/CT genotype was associated with elevated plasma sCD14, and increased frequency of CD11b+CD14+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals. The TT genotype was associated with lower cIMT in HIV-infected patients (n = 47) but not in HIV-uninfected controls (n = 37). The AG genotype for TLR4/+896 was associated with increased CX3CR1 expression on total monocytes among HIV-infected individuals and increased sCCL2 and fibrinogen levels in HIV-uninfected controls. SNPs in CD14/-260 and TLR4/+896 were significantly associated with different markers of systemic and monocyte activation and cIMT that differed between HIV-infected participants on ART and HIV-uninfected controls. Further investigation on the relationship of these SNPs with a clinical endpoint of CVD is warranted in HIV-infected patients on ART.

  6. Drug fever induced by piperacillin/tazobactam in an elderly patient with underlying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

    PubMed

    Swe, Thein; Ali, Mir; Naing, Akari Thein

    2016-07-20

    Our search of the literature revealed no detailed case reports about drug fever induced by piperacillin/tazobactam in a patient with HIV infection although there were a few case reports about drug fever due to piperacillin/tazobactam with other comorbidities. A 63-year-old male patient with HIV positive was admitted for acute cholecystitis. He was started on piperacillin/tazobactam. For the next 8 days, he had intermittent fever up to 103°F (39.4°C) with relative bradycardia although he showed clinical improvement. There was no laboratory or imaging findings suggestive of another infectious source and drug fever was suspected. The antibiotics were stopped and after 48 hours no fever was observed until the day of discharge. Piperacillin/tazobactam can induce fever in patients with cystic fibrosis and in patients with other conditions. Drug fever may be more prevalent in patients with HIV infection. It has no characteristic pattern and may not be associated with eosinophilia.

  7. Prevalence and predictors of anaemia in patients with HIV infection at the initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Mijiti, Peierdun; Yuexin, Zhang; Min, Liu; Wubuli, Maimaitili; Kejun, Pan; Upur, Halmurat

    2015-03-01

    We retrospectively analysed routinely collected baseline data of 2252 patients with HIV infection registered in the National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program in Xinjiang province, China, from 2006 to 2011 to estimate the prevalence and predictors of anaemia at the initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy. Anaemia was diagnosed using the criteria set forth by the World Health Organisation, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine its predictors. The prevalences of mild, moderate, and severe anaemia at the initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy were 19.2%, 17.1%, and 2.6%, respectively. Overall, 38.9% of the patients were anaemic at the initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy. The multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that Uyghur ethnicity, female gender, lower CD4 count, lower body mass index value, self-reported tuberculosis infection, and oral candidiasis were associated with a higher prevalence of anaemia, whereas higher serum alanine aminotransferase level was associated with a lower prevalence of anaemia. The results suggest that the overall prevalence of anaemia at the initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy in patients with HIV infection is high in Xinjiang, China, but severe anaemia is uncommon. Patients in China should be routinely checked for anaemia prior to combined antiretroviral therapy initiation, and healthcare providers should carefully select the appropriate first-line combined antiretroviral therapy regimens for anaemic patients.

  8. CYP2B6 haplotype and biological factors responsible for hepatotoxicity in HIV-infected patients receiving efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Manosuthi, Weerawat; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Lueangniyomkul, Aroon; Mankatitham, Wiroj; Thongyen, Supeda; Nilkamhang, Samruay; Manosuthi, Sukanya; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2014-03-01

    Data on the pharmacogenetic markers of CYP2B6 and biological factors associated with hepatotoxicity in HIV-infected patients receiving an efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen are very limited. A total of 134 HIV-infected Thai adults were prospectively enrolled to receive a once-daily regimen of efavirenz 600 mg/tenofovir/lamivudine. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within CYP2B6 were genotyped using real-time PCR. At 12 weeks after ART, plasma efavirenz concentrations at 12h after dosing were measured. The mean ± standard deviation patient age was 37 ± 8 years, and 77.6% were male. The median (IQR) CD4 count was 43 cells/mm(3) (17-105 cells/mm(3)). Eighteen patients (13.4%) had positive anti-HCV and 5 patients (3.7%) had positive HBsAg. The frequencies of heterozygous/homozygous mutants of each SNP were 64C>T (11%), 499C>G (0%), 516G>T (55%), 785A>G (63%), 1375A>G (0%), 1459C>T (3%) and 21563C>T (62%). The three most frequent haplotypes identified included *1/*6 (40.3%), *1/*1 (34.3%) and *6/*6 (8.2%). The median (IQR) plasma efavirenz concentration was 2.3mg/L (1.4-3.7 mg/L). At 24 weeks, median (IQR) serum ALP was 98 mg/dL (73-133 mg/dL) and direct bilirubin was 0.11 mg/dL (0.10-0.19 mg/dL). The proportion of grade 1 and grade 2 elevated serum ALP was 12.7% and 1.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis, factors associated with high ALP, total bilirubin and direct bilirubin included CYP2B6 haplotype *6/*6, high serum ALP at Week 0 and positive anti-HCV (all P<0.05). In summary, HIV-infected patients with the pharmacogenetic marker 'CYP2B6 haplotype *6/*6' may have increased susceptibility to hepatotoxicity with efavirenz-based ART.

  9. Correlation analysis on total lymphocyte count and CD4 count in HIV-infected patients: a retrospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuming; Liang, Shuying; Yu, Erman; Guo, Jinling; Li, Zizhao; Wang, Zhe; Du, Yukai

    2011-10-01

    CD4 count is the standard method for determining eligibility for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and monitoring HIV/AIDS disease progression, but it is not widely available in resource-limited settings. This study examined the correlation between total lymphocyte count (TLC) and CD4 count of HIV-infected patients before and after HAART, and assessed the thresholds of TLC for making decisions about the initiation and for monitoring HAART. A retrospective study was performed, and 665 HIV-infected patients with TLC and CD4 count from four counties (Shangcai, Queshan, Shenqiu and Weishi) were included in the study. Pearson correlation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) were used. TLC and CD4 count after HAART was significantly increased as compared with pre-HAART (P<0.01). An overall positive correlation was noted between TLC and CD4 count (pre-HAART, r=0.73, P=0.0001; follow-up HAART, r=0.56, P=0.0001). The ROC curve between TLC and CD4 count showed that TLC ≤ 1200 cells/mm(3) could predict CD4 < 200 cells/mm(3) with a sensitivity of 71.12%, specificity of 66.35% at pre-HAART. After 12-month HAART, the optimum prediction for CD4 count < 200 cells/mm3 was a TLC ≤ 1300 cells/mm(3), with a sensitivity of 63.27%, and a specificity of 74.84%. Further finding indicated that TLC change was positively correlated to CD4 change (r=0.77, P=0.0001) at the time point of 12-month treatment, and the best prediction point of TLC change for CD4 increasing was 135 cells/mm(3). TLC and its change can be used as a surrogate marker for CD4 count and its change of HIV-infected individuals for making decisions about the initiation and for monitoring HAART in resource-limited settings.

  10. Plasma selenium concentrations are sufficient and associated with protease inhibitor use in treated HIV-infected adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Selenium (Se) is an essential constituent of selenoproteins which play significant roles in antioxidant defense and inflammatory cascades. Selenium deficiency is associated with disease states characterized by inflammation including cardiovascular disease (CVD). While HIV infection has b...

  11. Acceptability of Couples’ Voluntary HIV Testing Among HIV-infected Patients in Care and Their HIV-negative Partners in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Kristin M.; Canary, Lauren; Workowski, Kimberly; Lockard, Annie; Jones, Jeb; Sullivan, Patrick; Hills, Katherine; Fofana, Kadija; Stephenson, Rob; Allen, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Couples’ voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CHTC) is an HIV risk reduction strategy not widely available in the US. Methods: We assessed willingness to participate in CHTC among US HIV-infected clinic patients via tablet-based survey and among HIV-negative persons with HIV-infected partners in care via mixed-method phone interviews. Results: Most of the N=64 HIV-infected partners surveyed were men (89%), on antiretroviral treatment (ART) (92%), and many self-identified homosexual (62%). We observed high levels of willingness to participate in CHTC (64%) among HIV-infected partners. Reasons for not wanting to participate included perceived lack of need (26%), desire to self-disclose their status (26%), and fear of being asked sensitive questions with their partner present (17%). HIV-infected partners were interested in discussing ART (48%), other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (44%), and relationship agreements like monogamy (31%) during CHTC sessions. All N=15 HIV-negative partners interviewed were men, most identified as homosexual (73%), and about half (54%) reported consistent condom use with HIV-infected partners. We observed high levels of willingness to participate in CHTC (87%) among HIV-negative partners, who were also interested in discussing ART (47%), other STIs (47%), mental health services (40%), and relationship agreements (33%). Most negative partners (93%) indicated that they believed their HIV-infected partner was virally suppressed, but in the event that they were not, many (73%) were willing to take pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Conclusion: These results indicate that CHTC for serodiscordant couples is acceptable and should emphasize aspects most pertinent to these couples, such as discussion of ART/PrEP, STIs, and relationship agreements. PMID:27014393

  12. Bone disease and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Amorosa, Valerianna; Tebas, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of bone demineralization among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients in the current therapeutic era has been described in multiple studies, sounding the alarm that we may expect an epidemic of fragility fractures in the future. However, despite noting high overall prevalences of osteopenia and osteoporosis, recent longitudinal studies that we review here have generally not observed accelerated bone loss during antiretroviral therapy beyond the initial period after treatment initiation. We discuss the continued progress toward understanding the mechanisms of HIV-associated bone loss, particularly the effects of HIV infection, antiretroviral therapy, and host immune factors on bone turnover. We summarize results of clinical trials published in the past year that studied the safety and efficacy of treatment of bone loss in HIV-infected patients and provide provisional opinions about who should be considered for bone disease screening and treatment.

  13. Prevalence and Predictors of Thyroid Dysfunction in Patients with HIV Infection and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An Indian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neera; Sharma, Lokesh Kumar; Dutta, Deep; Gadpayle, Adesh Kisanji; Anand, Atul; Gaurav, Kumar; Mukherjee, Sabyasachi; Bansal, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Background. Predictors of thyroid dysfunction in HIV are not well determined. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of thyroid dysfunction in HIV infected Indians. Methods. Consecutive HIV patients, 18-70 years of age, without any severe comorbid state, having at least 1-year follow-up at the antiretroviral therapy clinic, underwent clinical assessment and hormone assays. Results. From initially screened 527 patients, 359 patients (61.44 ± 39.42 months' disease duration), having good immune function [CD4 count >200 cell/mm(3): 90.25%; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART): 88.58%], were analyzed. Subclinical hypothyroidism (ScH) was the commonest thyroid dysfunction (14.76%) followed by sick euthyroid syndrome (SES) (5.29%) and isolated low TSH (3.1%). Anti-TPO antibody (TPOAb) was positive in 3.90%. Baseline CD4 count had inverse correlation with TPOAb after adjusting for age and body mass index. Stepwise linear regression revealed baseline CD4 count, TPOAb, and tuberculosis to be best predictors of ScH after adjusting for age, weight, duration of HIV, and history of opportunistic fungal and viral infections. Conclusion. Burden of thyroid dysfunction in chronic HIV infection with stable immune function is lower compared to pre-HAART era. Thyroid dysfunction is primarily of nonautoimmune origin, predominantly ScH. Severe immunodeficiency at disease onset, TPOAb positivity, and tuberculosis were best predictors of ScH.

  14. Plasma cholesterol efflux capacity from human THP-1 macrophages is reduced in HIV-infected patients: impact of HAART[S

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Petra; Ghislain, Mathilde; Villard, Elise F.; Le Goff, Wilfried; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Yeni, Patrick; Meyer, Laurence; Vigouroux, Corinne; Goujard, Cécile; Guerin, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of HDL to remove cholesterol from macrophages is inversely associated with the severity of angiographic coronary artery disease. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or its treatment on the ability of HDL particles to stimulate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages has never been studied. We evaluated the capacity of whole plasma and isolated HDL particles from HIV-infected subjects (n = 231) and uninfected controls (n = 200), as well as in a subset of 41 HIV subjects receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to mediate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages. Plasma cholesterol efflux capacity was reduced (−12%; P = 0.001) in HIV patients as compared with controls. HIV infection reduced by 27% (P < 0.05) the capacity of HDL subfractions to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages. We observed a reduced ABCA1-dependent efflux capacity of plasma (−27%; P < 0.0001) from HIV-infected subjects as a result of a reduction in the efflux capacity of HDL3 particles. HAART administration restored the capacity of plasma from HIV patients to stimulate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages (9.4%; P = 0.04). During HIV infection, the capacity of whole plasma to remove cholesterol from macrophages is reduced, thus potentially contributing to the increased coronary heart disease in the HIV population. HAART administration restored the removal of cholesterol from macrophages by increasing HDL functionality. PMID:25573889

  15. Molecular Epidemiology of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpes Virus, and Risk Factors in HIV-infected Patients in Tehran, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Hesamizadeh, Khashayar; Keyvani, Hossein; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Esghaei, Maryam; Jahanbakhsh Sefidi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) remains the most common malignancy among HIV-infected patients. Human herpesvirus type-8 (HHV-8) is regarded as the infectious etiological agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KSHV). Diagnostic procedures associated with KSHV are not routinely performed in HIV-infected subjects. Objectives The main objective of this study is to obtain information on KSHV epidemiology in Iranian HIV-infected individuals. Patients and Methods In the present cross-sectional study, 109 patients with established HIV infection, who visited a governmental and referral center for HIV screening in Tehran (Tehran west health center (TWHC)) between May 2014 and July 2015 were enrolled according to the convenience sample strategy. After peripheral blood collection, isolation of plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) compartments, DNA extraction was performed. KSHV DNA was analyzed by nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) using primers from ORF-26 (virus minor capsid). Results Among all 109 HIV-infected patients, 67 (61.5%) were male, with an age range of 2 - 64 years (mean ± standard deviation 35.8 ± 13.3). KSHV DNA was found in PBMC and plasma samples of six (5.5%) and four (3.6%) patients, respectively. Conclusions This study revealed a considerable prevalence of KSHV DNA, during latent and lytic phases, among HIV-infected patients. Risk factors for KSHV infection acquisition and concurrent. 0+infection with HIV were also evaluated. Diagnosis of KSHV in the group could be helpful for prognosis of Kaposi’s sarcoma and clinical management. PMID:28191343

  16. Experience of dolutegravir in HIV-infected treatment-naive patients from a tertiary care University Hospital in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Waqas, Sarmad; O’Connor, Mairead; Levey, Ciara; Mallon, Paddy; Sheehan, Gerard; Patel, Anjali; Avramovic, Gordana; Lambert, John S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dolutegravir, an HIV integrase inhibitor, is a relatively new treatment option. To assess the tolerability, side effects, and time to viral decline to non-detectable in patients newly started on dolutegravir. Methods: Retrospective health care record of 61 consecutive HIV treatment-naive patients started on dolutegravir was reviewed and analysed on SPSS. Results: The mean initial viral load was 160826.05 copies/mL (range, 79–1,126,617 copies/mL). HIV viral load became non-detectable in 63.9% of patients on dolutegravir within 3 months. In all, 60.7% of patients reported no side effects on dolutegravir; 98.4% of the patients claimed full compliance to their antiretrovirals. Conclusion: Dolutegravir was found to be efficacious and well tolerated in HIV-infected treatment-naive patients. PMID:27826447

  17. Measuring Health Literacy Among Adults with HIV Infection in Mozambique: Development and Validation of the HIV Literacy Test.

    PubMed

    Tique, José A; Howard, Leigh M; Gaveta, Sandra; Sidat, Mohsin; Rothman, Russell L; Vermund, Sten H; Ciampa, Philip J

    2017-03-01

    The role of health literacy on HIV outcomes has not been evaluated widely in Africa, in part because few appropriate literacy measures exist. We developed a 16-item scale, the HIV Literacy Test (HIV-LT) to assess literacy-related tasks needed to participate in HIV care. Items were scored as correct or incorrect; higher scores indicated higher literacy skill (range 0-100 %). We tested internal reliability (Kuder-Richardson coefficient) of the HIV-LT in a convenience sample of 319 Portuguese-speaking, HIV infected adults on antiretroviral treatment in Maputo, Mozambique. Construct validity was assessed by a hypothetical model developed a priori. The HIV-LT was reliable and valid to measure participants' literacy skills. The mean HIV-LT score was 42 %; literacy skills applicable to HIV care were challenging for many participants. The HIV-LT could be used to assess the relationship of literacy and HIV-related outcomes in diverse settings, and evaluate interventions to improve health communication for those in HIV care.

  18. [Microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    López-Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Rafael; García, Federico; Eiros, José M; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl

    2007-12-01

    Currently, there are around 150,000 HIV-infected patients in Spain. This number, together with the fact that this disease is now a chronic condition since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, has generated an increasing demand on the clinical microbiology laboratories in our hospitals. This increase has occurred not only in the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic diseases, but also in tests related to the diagnosis and therapeutic management of HIV infection. To meet this demand, the Sociedad de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clinica (Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) has updated its standard Procedure for the microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection. The main advances related to serological diagnosis, plasma viral load, and detection of resistance to antiretroviral drugs are reviewed in this version of the Procedure.

  19. Geographic Variations in Retention in Care among HIV-Infected Adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiro, Peter F.; Gange, Stephen J.; Horberg, Michael A.; Abraham, Alison G.; Napravnik, Sonia; Samji, Hasina; Yehia, Baligh R.; Althoff, Keri N.; Moore, Richard D.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Curriero, Frank C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To understand geographic variations in clinical retention, a central component of the HIV care continuum and key to improving individual- and population-level HIV outcomes. Design We evaluated retention by US region in a retrospective observational study. Methods Adults receiving care from 2000–2010 in 12 clinical cohorts of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) contributed data. Individuals were assigned to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-defined regions by residential data (10 cohorts) and clinic location as proxy (2 cohorts). Retention was ≥2 primary HIV outpatient visits within a calendar year, >90 days apart. Trends and regional differences were analyzed using modified Poisson regression with clustering, adjusting for time in care, age, sex, race/ethnicity, and HIV risk, and stratified by baseline CD4+ count. Results Among 78,993 adults with 444,212 person-years of follow-up, median time in care was 7 years (Interquartile Range: 4–9). Retention increased from 2000 to 2010: from 73% (5,000/6,875) to 85% (7,189/8,462) in the Northeast, 75% (1,778/2,356) to 87% (1,630/1,880) in the Midwest, 68% (8,451/12,417) to 80% (9,892/12,304) in the South, and 68% (5,147/7,520) to 72% (6,401/8,895) in the West. In adjusted analyses, retention improved over time in all regions (p<0.01, trend), although the average percent retained lagged in the West and South vs. the Northeast (p<0.01). Conclusions In our population, retention improved, though regional differences persisted even after adjusting for demographic and HIV risk factors. These data demonstrate regional differences in the US which may affect patient care, despite national care recommendations. PMID:26752637

  20. Empiric Tuberculosis Therapy versus Isoniazid in Advanced HIV-infected Adult Outpatients Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy: a Multi-Country Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Bisson, Gregory P.; Miyahara, Sachiko; Sun, Xin; Moses, Agnes; Riviere, Cynthia; Kirui, F.K.; Badal-Faesen, Sharla; Lagat, David; Nyirenda, Mulinda; Naidoo, K; Hakim, James; Mugyenyi, Peter; Henostroza, German; Leger, P.D; Lama, Javier.R; Mohapi, Lerato; Alave, Jorge; Mave, V; Veloso, Valdilea.G; Pillay, Sandy; Kumarasamy, N.; Bao, Jing; Hogg, Evelyn; Jones, Lynne; Zolopa, Andrew; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Gupta, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Mortality within the first 6 months after initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) is common in resource-limited settings and is often due to tuberculosis (TB) among patients with advanced HIV disease. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is recommended in HIV-infected adults, but sub-clinical TB can be difficult to diagnose. We hypothesized that empiric TB treatment would reduce early mortality compared to IPT in high-burden settings. Methods We conducted a multi-country randomized clinical trial comparing empiric TB therapy (Empiric) vs. isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) in HIV-infected outpatients initiating ART with CD4 counts <50 cells/mm3. Individuals were screened for TB using a symptom screen, locally available diagnostics, and the GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay when available. The primary endpoint was survival (death or unknown status) at 24 weeks post randomization. Kaplan Meier estimates of the endpoint rates across arms were compared by the z-test. Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01380080). Findings From October 31, 2011 until June 9, 2014, we randomized 850 participants (424 in Empiric arm and 426 in IPT arm); the median CD4 count at baseline was 18 cells/mm3 (IQR: 9, 32). At week 24, each arm had 22 primary endpoints, for rates of 5.2% in each arm (95% CI: 3.5% to 7.8% for Empiric and 3.4% to 7.8% for IPT; absolute risk difference of -0.06% (95% CI: −3.05% to 2.94%). Grade 3 or 4 signs or symptoms occurred in 50 (12%) in the Empiric arm and 46 (11%) in the IPT arm. Grade 3 or 4 laboratory abnormalities occurred in 99 (23%) in the Empiric arm and 97 (23%) in the IPT arm. Incident TB was more common in the Empiric arm (31 vs. 18 events, p=0.01). Interpretation Empiric TB therapy did not reduce mortality at 24 weeks in outpatient adults initiating ART with advanced HIV disease. The low mortality rate of the trial supports implementation of systematic TB screening and IPT in outpatients with advanced HIV disease. PMID:27025337

  1. Water filter provision and home-based filter reinforcement reduce diarrhea in Kenyan HIV-infected adults and their household members.

    PubMed

    Pavlinac, Patricia B; Naulikha, Jaqueline M; Chaba, Linda; Kimani, Naomi; Sangaré, Laura R; Yuhas, Krista; Singa, Benson O; John-Stewart, Grace; Walson, Judd L

    2014-08-01

    Among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults and children in Africa, diarrheal disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the effectiveness of provision and home-based reinforcement of a point-of-use water filtration device to reduce diarrhea among 361 HIV-infected adults in western Kenya by comparing prevalence of self-reported diarrhea before and after these interventions. After provision of the filter, 8.7% of participants reported diarrhea compared with 17.2% in the 3 months before filter provision (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.23-0.66, P < 0.001). The association was similar among 231 participants who were already taking daily cotrimoxazole prophylaxis before being given a filter (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.25-0.88, P = 0.019). Educational reinforcement was also associated with a modest reduction in self-reported diarrhea (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.20-0.99, P = 0.047). Provision and reinforcement of water filters may confer significant benefit in reducing diarrhea among HIV-infected persons, even when cotrimoxazole prophylaxis is already being used.

  2. What do we know about children living with HIV-infected or AIDS-ill adults in Sub-Saharan Africa? A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Rachel E.; Short, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Millions of children in Sub-Saharan Africa live with adults, often parents, who are HIV-infected or ill due to AIDS. These children experience social, emotional, and health vulnerabilities that overlap with, but are not necessarily the same as, those of orphans or other vulnerable children. Despite their distinctive vulnerabilities, research aimed at understanding the situation of these children has been limited until very recently. This review summarizes the state of knowledge based on a systematic search of PubMed and Web of Science that identified 47 empirical research articles that examined either the population prevalence of children living with HIV-infected or AIDS-sick adults, or the consequences of adult HIV infection or AIDS illness for child well-being. This review confirms that this population of children is substantial in size, and that the vulnerabilities they experience are multi-faceted, spanning physical and emotional health and schooling. Mechanisms were examined empirically in only a small number of studies, but encompass poverty, transmission of opportunistic infections, care for unwell adults, adult distress, AIDS stigma, lack of social support, maternal breastfeeding issues, and vertical HIV transmission. Some evidence is provided that infants, adolescents, children with infected or ill mothers, and children living with severely ill adults are particularly vulnerable. Future research would benefit from more attention to causal inference and further characterization of processes and circumstances related to vulnerability and resilience. It would also benefit from further study of variation in observed associations between adult HIV/AIDS and child well-being based on characteristics such as age, sex, kinship, severity of illness, TB co-infection, disclosure, and serostatus awareness. Almost one-quarter of the studies reviewed did not investigate variation based on any of these factors. More nuanced understanding of the short- and long

  3. Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head in three West African HIV-infected adults with heterozygous sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Eholié, Serge P; Ouiminga, Mariama; Ehui, Eboi; Nzunetu, Gustave; Ouattara, Songda I; Konan, Alexis V; Anglaret, Xavier; Bissagnéné, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Three men (aged 33, 44 and 45 years, CD4(+) T-cell nadir 86 cells/mm(3), 99 cells/mm(3) and 12 cells/mm(3), respectively) were admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases (Treichville Hospital, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire) for hip pain and impaired mobility. Their last available CD4(+) T-cell counts were 243 cells/mm(3), 245 cells/mm(3) and 8 cells/mm(3), respectively. They had all received antiretroviral therapy for >4 years, including lopinavir/ritonavir for >8 months. The other risk factors were hypertriglyceridaemia (n=3), smoking addiction (n=2), alcohol consumption (n=2) and lipodystrophy (n=1). All three patients had heterozygous haemoglobin AS sickle cell disease (percentage of haemoglobin S 41%, 45% and 50%, respectively). The diagnosis of avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head (unilateral n=2 and bilateral n=1) was documented by CT scan. Only one patient underwent surgical arthroplasty. In resource-limited settings, avascular osteonecrosis is uneasy to diagnose and unlikely to be appropriately treated. Physicians should be aware of its symptoms and risk factors, including HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy. Future studies should explore whether these risk factors might include haemoglobin AS sickle cell disease, a common trait in the West African general population.

  4. Mediating effects of social support on depression and quality of life among patients with HIV infection in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wen-Li; Chen, Chia-En; Liu, Hsiao-Ying; Lai, Yi-Yin; Lee, Hsin-Chun; Lee, Nan-Yao; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Po-Lin; Ko, Wen-Chien; Shu, Bih-Ching; Ko, Nai-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Few empirical studies have evaluated the mediating effects of quality of life (QoL) among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The purposes of this study were to identify the predictors of QoL and to test the mediating effects of social support on depression and QoL among patients enrolled in an HIV case-management program in Taiwan. A cross-sectional, descriptive correlation design collected data from 108 HIV-infected individuals. Individuals were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory II, the short version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment (WHOQOL-BREF), and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support between September 2007 and April 2010. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics (including age, gender, and mode of transmission) and clinical information (including CD4 count and time since diagnosis with HIV), the study findings showed that QoL was significantly and positively correlated with both social support and the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and was negatively correlated with depression and time since diagnosis with HIV. The strongest predictors for QoL were depression followed by the initiation of HAART and social support, with an R(2) of 0.40. Social support partially mediated the relationship between depression and QoL. Health professionals should enhance HIV-infected individuals' social support to alleviate the level of depression and further increase the QoL among PLWHA.

  5. Patient Navigation Facilitates Medical and Social Services Engagement Among HIV-Infected Individuals Leaving Jail and Returning to the Community

    PubMed Central

    Morewitz, Mark; Pearson, Charles; Weeks, John; Packard, Rebecca; Estes, Milton; Tulsky, Jacqueline; Kang-Dufour, Mi_Suk; Myers, Janet J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract HIV-infected individuals leaving jails, facilities typically used to confine accused persons awaiting trial or to incarcerate persons for minor offenses, often face barriers to engagement with medical and social-support services. Patient navigation is a model that may ease these barriers by supporting individuals in negotiating fragmented and highly bureaucratic systems for services and care. While there is evidence linking navigation to a reduction in health disparities, little is known about the mechanisms by which the model works. We present findings of an ethnographic study of interactions between navigators and their clients: HIV-infected men and women recently released from jails in San Francisco, California. We conducted 29 field observations of navigators as they accompanied their clients to appointments, and 40 in-depth interviews with clients and navigators. Navigators worked on strengthening clients' abilities to engage with social-services and care systems. Building this strength required navigators to gain clients' trust by leveraging their own similar life experiences or expressing social concordance. After establishing meaningful connections, navigators spent time with clients in their day-to-day environments serving as mentors while escorting clients to and through their appointments. Intensive time spent together, in combination with a shared background of incarceration, HIV, and drug use, was a critical mechanism of this model. This study illustrates that socially concordant navigators are well positioned to facilitate successful transition to care and social-services engagement among a vulnerable population. PMID:24517539

  6. Patient navigation facilitates medical and social services engagement among HIV-infected individuals leaving jail and returning to the community.

    PubMed

    Koester, Kimberly A; Morewitz, Mark; Pearson, Charles; Weeks, John; Packard, Rebecca; Estes, Milton; Tulsky, Jacqueline; Kang-Dufour, Mi Suk; Myers, Janet J

    2014-02-01

    HIV-infected individuals leaving jails, facilities typically used to confine accused persons awaiting trial or to incarcerate persons for minor offenses, often face barriers to engagement with medical and social-support services. Patient navigation is a model that may ease these barriers by supporting individuals in negotiating fragmented and highly bureaucratic systems for services and care. While there is evidence linking navigation to a reduction in health disparities, little is known about the mechanisms by which the model works. We present findings of an ethnographic study of interactions between navigators and their clients: HIV-infected men and women recently released from jails in San Francisco, California. We conducted 29 field observations of navigators as they accompanied their clients to appointments, and 40 in-depth interviews with clients and navigators. Navigators worked on strengthening clients' abilities to engage with social-services and care systems. Building this strength required navigators to gain clients' trust by leveraging their own similar life experiences or expressing social concordance. After establishing meaningful connections, navigators spent time with clients in their day-to-day environments serving as mentors while escorting clients to and through their appointments. Intensive time spent together, in combination with a shared background of incarceration, HIV, and drug use, was a critical mechanism of this model. This study illustrates that socially concordant navigators are well positioned to facilitate successful transition to care and social-services engagement among a vulnerable population.

  7. Ocular complications and loss of vision due to herpes zoster ophthalmicus in patients with HIV infection and a comparison with HIV-negative patients.

    PubMed

    Nithyanandam, S; Joseph, M; Stephen, J

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the work is to describe the occurrence of ocular complications and loss of vision due to herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) in HIV-positive patients who received early antiviral therapy for HZO.This is a post hoc analysis of prospectively collected data.Twenty-four HIV-positive patients with HZO were included in this report; male to female ratio was 3.8:1; mean age was 33.5 (±14.9) years. The visual outcome was good, with 14/24 patients having 6/6 vision; severe vision loss (≤6/60) occurred in only 2/24. There was no statistical difference in the visual outcome between the HIV-positive and -negative patients (P = 0.69), although severe vision loss was more likely in HIV-infected patients. The ocular complications of HZO in HIV-infected patients were: reduced corneal sensation (17/24), corneal epithelial lesions (14/24), uveitis (12/24), elevated intraocular pressure (10/24) and extra-ocular muscle palsy (3/24). The severity of rash was similar in the two groups but multidermatomal rash occurred only in HIV-infected patients (4/24). There was no difference in the occurrence of ocular complications of HZO between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. HZO associated ocular complications and visual loss is low in HIV-infected patients if treated with HZO antiviral therapy and was comparable with HIV-negative patients. Early institution of HZO antiviral therapy is recommended to reduce ocular complication and vision loss.

  8. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  9. Clinic-based intervention reduces unprotected sexual behavior among HIV-infected patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: Results of a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cornman, Deborah H.; Kiene, Susan M.; Christie, Sarah; Fisher, William A.; Shuper, Paul A.; Pillay, Sandy; Friedland, Gerald H.; Thomas, Cyril Monty; Lodge, Linda; Fisher, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the feasibility, fidelity, and effectiveness of an HIV prevention intervention delivered to HIV-infected patients by counselors during routine clinical care in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods Total of 152 HIV-infected patients, aged 18 years and older, receiving clinical care at an urban hospital in South Africa, were randomly assigned to intervention or standard-of-care control counselors. Intervention counselors implemented a brief risk reduction intervention at each clinical encounter to help patients reduce their unprotected sexual behavior. Self-report questionnaires were administered at baseline and 6 months to assess number of unprotected sex events in previous 3 months. Results Intervention was delivered in 99% of routine patient visits, and included a modal 8 of 8 intervention steps. Although HIV-infected patients in both conditions reported more vaginal and anal sex events at 6-month follow-up than at baseline, patients who received the counselor-delivered intervention reported a significant decrease over time in number of unprotected sexual events. There was a marginally significant increase in these events among patients in the standard-of-care control condition. Conclusions A counselor-delivered HIV prevention intervention targeting HIV-infected patients appears to be feasible to implement with fidelity in the South African clinical care setting and effective at reducing unprotected sexual behavior. PMID:18645518

  10. Assessment of the effect of antiretroviral therapy on renal and liver functions among HIV-infected patients: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wondifraw Baynes, Habtamu; Tegene, Birhanemeskel; Gebremichael, Mikiyas; Birhane, Gebrehawaria; Kedir, Wabe; Biadgo, Belete

    2017-01-01

    Background The emergence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has dramatically improved quality of life in prolonging survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on treatment in developed as well as developing countries. However, the main shortcoming of HAART in long-term use is its potential to cause liver and kidney derangements that may be life threatening. The drugs are actively accumulated in the proximal renal tubule resulting in functional disturbance with mitochondrial injury being one of the most important targets recognized. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the adverse effects of HAART on kidney and liver functions among HIV-infected patients presenting to the University of Gondar Hospital, Ethiopia. Materials and methods An institution-based retrospective study was conducted from 2010 to 2015 on a subset of HIV-infected patients. Data were collected from the registration book of the University of Gondar Hospital antiretroviral clinic laboratory after checking the completeness of age, gender, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and alanine aminotransferase level. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, one-way analysis of variance, and logistic regression were done to determine associations. A P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 275 study subjects were included in the study. Of these, 62.2% were females, and the overall prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) before and after treatment was 3.6% and 11.7%, respectively. A majority of the CKD patients were in stage 3 for patients after treatment. The overall prevalence of hepatotoxicity was 6.5% and 16.7% before and after treatment, respectively. A majority of the patients developed Grade 2 hepatotoxicity 66.7% and 65.2% before and after treatment, respectively. Binary and multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the female gender was a risk factor for CKD

  11. The spectrum of HIV infection in patients seen at a private hospital in Mexico City: 115 patients seen from 1984 to 1990.

    PubMed

    del Río-Chiriboga, C; Tellez-Gómez, I; Orzechowski-Rallo, A; Alanis-Ortega, A

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology and clinical presentation of HIV infection among upper middle class patients in Mexico City. A retrospective review of outpatient and hospital records of all HIV-infected patients was accomplished by one of the authors between 1984 and 1990. A total of 115 patients were seen during the study period, 109 men and 6 women. One hundred and seven patients acquired HIV infection through sexual contact, six patients had HIV infection associated with blood transfusion and two were homosexual men who also had a history of intravenous drug use. The mean age of the patients was 36.2 years (range 13 - 65 years). CDC classification at presentation was predominantly stage IV (65%) with the most common AIDS associated diseases at presentation being wasting syndrome in 30 (42.2%), P. carinii pneumonia in 22 (30.9%), cytomegalovirus infection in 11 (15.5%), Cryptosporidium parvum diarrhea in 7 (9.8%), and Kaposi's sarcoma in 6 (8.4%). CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell counts at the time of HIV diagnosis were available in 87 patients (median = 150 cells/microliters; mean = 224 cells/microliters, SD +/- 219). Zidovudine was used in 37 patients after 1988 when it first became available in Mexico, in six patients the drug had to be discontinued because of serious hematologic toxicity. The average follow-up on zidovudine was 8.5 months. Similar age, gender, age distribution, risk categories and CDC classification at presentation was seen compared to other series reported from Mexico. However, the spectrum of opportunistic infections found were similar to that seen in the United States.

  12. Diabetes Mellitus is Associated with Increased Death Rates Among HIV-Infected Patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Rodrigo C; Pacheco, Antonio G; Paula, Adelzon; Cardoso, Sandra W; Moreira, Ronaldo I; Ribeiro, Sayonara R; Nunes, Estevão P; Guimarães, Maria R; Mello, Fernanda C; Veloso, Valdilea G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major cause of morbidity worldwide and a known factor leading to increased risk of death, especially in conjunction with other risk factors. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of DM among HIV-infected patients and its association with overall mortality. All HIV-infected patients 18 years or older who were followed in the Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas (INI) cohort from January 1991 to December 2011 were included. Time-updated covariables included DM status, calendar year, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and CD4 cell counts. Fixed demographic covariables included gender and age at entry. Poisson models were used to calculate mortality rate ratios (RR) with robust variances. Among the 4,871 patients included, 1,192 (24.4%) died (mortality rate = 4.72/100 person-years [PY]; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.46-5.00). Death rates were significantly higher among those presenting with DM compared with those who did not (6.16/100 vs. 4.61/100 PY, respectively. p = 0.001). In the final model, DM was significantly associated with mortality (RR = 1.74; 95% CI = 1.57-1.94; p < 0.001). When the analysis was restricted to those on cART or the period post-1996, the association between DM and mortality was even stronger (RR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.91-2.46; p < 0.001 and RR = 1.95; 95% CI = 1.75-2.18; p < 0.001, respectively). Among the major groups of cause of deaths (CODs), the proportion of AIDS-related conditions in patients with DM was lower (74.27% vs. 58.93%, respectively; p < 0.001); whereas in non-AIDS-related conditions, nonimmunodeficiency-related causes (22.44% vs. 34.82%, respectively; p = 0.004) were more common in patients with DM. In conclusion, DM was associated with increased mortality rates even after controlling for HIV-related variables associated to this outcome. Differences in the underlying CODs were identified, reinforcing the necessity to

  13. Sources of Emotional Distress Associated with Diarrhea Among Late Middle-Age and Older HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Karolynn; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Brown-Bradley, Courtney J.; Lekas, Helen-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Although the experience of physical symptoms can adversely influence emotional well-being, the specific emotional reactions experienced in response to specific symptoms are not well understood. The current report examines the emotional impact of diarrhea among HIV-positive late middle-age and older adults (i.e., age 50 and over). In-depth interviews were conducted with 100 participants, of whom 29 had experienced diarrhea and spoke about the emotional impact it had had on them. Three principal themes emerged: (1) I don’t control the diarrhea, the diarrhea controls me; (2) I feel ashamed, dirty and tainted; (3) I fear what the diarrhea is doing to me and what it means. Their inability to control when and where their diarrhea would occur was a great source of emotional distress for participants. Almost all feared the possibility of fecal incontinence while out in public and the humiliation it would bring. To avoid this, many greatly restricted their time outside the home or where they would go to ensure access to a restroom. Others felt shame and perpetually “dirty” even when not dealing with a bout of diarrhea. Many also worried about the effect the diarrhea would have on their health and whether it signaled progression to end-stage disease. The data strongly support the need to aggressively manage diarrhea in HIV-infected adults as the social and emotional consequences can be profound. When it cannot be effectively controlled physicians and social service agencies should address the isolation by providing home-based opportunities for social support and interaction. PMID:20579836

  14. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and response to antiretroviral therapy: A prospective study of HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Maskew, Mhairi; MacPhail, A Patrick; Whitby, Denise; Egger, Matthias; Fox, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The possible impact of co-infection with Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpes virus on the response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is unknown. Prospective studies are rare, particularly in Africa. Methods We enrolled a prospective cohort of HIV-infected adults initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa. Subjects were defined as seropositive to KSHV if reactive to either KSHV lytic K8.1 or latent Orf73 antigen or both. Subjects were followed from ART initiation until 18-months on treatment. HIV viral load and CD4 counts were tested 6 monthly. Linear generalized estimating and log-binomial regression models were used to estimate the effect of KSHV infection on immunologic recovery and response as well as HIV viral load suppression within 18-months after ART initiation. Results 385 subjects initiating ART from November 2008-March 2009 were eligible including 184 (48%) KSHV+. The KSHV+ group was similar to the KSHV− in terms of age, gender, initiating CD4 count, body mass index, tuberculosis and haemoglobin levels. The KSHV+ group gained a similar number of cells at 6- (difference of 10 cells/mm3, 95% CI: −11–31), 12- (3 cells/mm3, 95% CI: −19–25) and 18-months (24 cells/mm3, 95% CI: −13–61) compared to the KSHV− group. Adjusted relative risk of failure to suppress viral load to <400 copies/mL (1.03; 95% CI: 0.90–1.17) were similar for KSHV+ and KSHV− by 6-months on treatment. Conclusions In a population with a high KSHV prevalence, HIV-positive adults co-infected with KSHV achieved similar immunologic and virologic responses to ART early after treatment initiation compared to those KSHV−. PMID:23614996

  15. High-dose amoxicillin should be included in the empirical treatment of suspected meningitis in patients at risk of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Ben Edward Michael; Webster, Daniel; Fisher, Martin; Alexander, Eliza

    2011-01-01

    The authors report on a case of Listeria rhomboencepahlitis in a previously undiagnosed HIV positive man. This case is of interest as the incidence of Listeria has increased dramatically in recent years and so may increase in the HIV-infected population. The organism is inherently resistant to cephalosporin antibiotics, empirically employed in the treatment of central nervous system infections and thus highlights the need to include amoxicillin in meningitis treatment regimes in patients at risk of HIV infection as well as the older and those known to be immuno-compromised. PMID:22696737

  16. Early diagnosis and retention in care of HIV-infected patients through rapid salivary testing: a test-and-treat fast track pilot study.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Maria Rita; Soldini, Laura; Negri, Silvia; Vidoni, Gian Marino; Gianotti, Nicola; Nozza, Silvia; Schlusnus, Karin; Dorigatti, Fernanda; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and the retention-in-care of individuals diagnosed during six years of salivary HIV testing (EASY-test project). Among those linked-to-care at the Infectious Diseases Department of San Raffaele Hospital (Milan, Italy), the proportion of patients engaged, retained in care and virologically suppressed after the antiretroviral treatment was 96%, 100% and 95.2%, respectively. Results from our study suggest that salivary HIV testing may help bring to light cases of HIV infection otherwise undiagnosed, and thus favour a more rapid and wider reduction of the HIV infection burden at the population level.

  17. Tricuspid Valve Replacement in an HIV-Infected Patient with Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation Secondary to Remote Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Merle; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Poltavskiy, Eduard; Fefer, Jose; Bang, Heejung

    2016-12-01

    Surgical intervention for severe tricuspid regurgitation secondary to remote infective endocarditis has been infrequent, especially in patients also infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We describe the case of a 62-year-old HIV-positive man, with a 24-year history of endocarditis caused by intravenous heroin use, who presented with severe tricuspid regurgitation. The patient was initially asymptomatic, was taking antiretroviral medications, and had a satisfactory CD4 count and an undetectable viral load, so we decided to manage the regurgitation conservatively. Two years later, he presented with biventricular heart failure and dyspnea. After surgical tricuspid valve replacement, his condition improved substantially. This case illustrates that HIV-infected patients with complex medical conditions can successfully undergo cardiac surgery.

  18. A Case of Rectal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Metachronous Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma in an HIV-Infected Patient.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heun; Lee, Hye Won; Ann, Hea Won; Kim, Jae Kyung; Kang, Hua Pyong; Kim, Sun Wook; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, June Myung; Choi, Jun Yong

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is one of the most common acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining malignancies among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and rectal cancer has recently emerged as a prevalent non-AIDS-defining malignancy. We report a case of rectal squamous cell carcinoma that was metachronous with DLBCL in an HIV-infected patient who was receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. The patient was diagnosed with DLBCL and showed complete remission after chemotherapy. Follow-up imaging showed increased uptake at the rectum, previously treated as lymphoma. Repeated biopsy was performed and squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum was reported. After concurrent chemoradiation therapy, curative resection was performed.

  19. Tricuspid Valve Replacement in an HIV-Infected Patient with Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation Secondary to Remote Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Ehrin J.; Poltavskiy, Eduard; Fefer, Jose; Bang, Heejung

    2016-01-01

    Surgical intervention for severe tricuspid regurgitation secondary to remote infective endocarditis has been infrequent, especially in patients also infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We describe the case of a 62-year-old HIV-positive man, with a 24-year history of endocarditis caused by intravenous heroin use, who presented with severe tricuspid regurgitation. The patient was initially asymptomatic, was taking antiretroviral medications, and had a satisfactory CD4 count and an undetectable viral load, so we decided to manage the regurgitation conservatively. Two years later, he presented with biventricular heart failure and dyspnea. After surgical tricuspid valve replacement, his condition improved substantially. This case illustrates that HIV-infected patients with complex medical conditions can successfully undergo cardiac surgery. PMID:28100971

  20. CD3zeta down-modulation may explain Vgamma9Vdelta2 T lymphocyte anergy in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Alessandra; Tempestilli, Massimo; Turchi, Federica; Agrati, Chiara; Casetti, Rita; Cimini, Eleonora; Gioia, Cristiana; Martini, Federico

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to explain the observed anergy of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. CD3zeta expression and interferon (IFN)-gamma production by Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells from HIV-positive and HIV-negative subjects were analyzed. We demonstrated that Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells from HIV-infected patients expressed a lower level of CD3zeta than did Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells from healthy donors. A direct correlation was found between CD3zeta expression and IFN-gamma production capability by Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells. However, activation of protein kinase C by phorbol myristate acetate is able to restore CD3zeta expression and IFN-gamma production. Our findings may contribute to clarification of the molecular mechanisms of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell anergy found in HIV-positive patients.

  1. Effect of medroxyprogesterone acetate on the efficiency of an oral protein-rich nutritional support in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Cécile; Prod'homme, Magali; Laurichesse, Henri; Tauveron, Igor; Balage, Michèle; Gourdon, Florence; Baud, Olivier; Jacomet, Christine; Jouvency, Sylvie; Bayle, Gérard; Champredon, Claude; Thieblot, Philippe; Beytout, Jean; Grizard, Jean

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the effect of a medroxyprogesterone therapy in HIV-infected patients under appropriate nutrition for anabolism. The experiments were performed on 12 men (mean age 40 y), HIV seropositive but free of any clinically active opportunistic infection for at least one month. The patients underwent a 2-week baseline diet period (1.2 g protein x kg(-1) body weight (BW) x d(-1)) and then a 5-week experimental period with again the baseline diet in conjunction with supplements including Tonexis HP (0.7 g protein x kg(-1) BW) x d(-1)), L-threonine (0.018 g x kg(-1) BW x d(-1)) and L-methionine (0.013 g x kg(-1) BW x d(-1)). Indeed HIV-infected patients showed deficiencies in these amino acids. They were randomly divided into groups I and II under double-blinded condition. Group II was given medroxyprogesterone acetate (0.4 g x d(-1)) during the last 3 weeks whereas group I received a placebo. All the patients significantly increased their body weight (P < 0.05) during the experimental periods. Those under medroxyprogesterone tended to show a higher but not significant weight gain (+3.1 +/- 1.0 kg in group II and +1.9 +/- 0.3 kg in group I). Blood free amino acids were used as rough indicators of amino acid utilization and were analyzed prior and during acute 150 min intravenous infusion of a complete glucose-amino acid mixture. This test was done before and at the end of the experimental periods. Basal essential blood free amino acids were similar in the two groups and did not change during the experimental period. Most essential amino acids increased following glucose-amino acid infusions. The incremental increase was of less magnitude after the experimental period than before when medroxyprogesterone was present (P < 0.05 for valine, leucine, lysine, threonine and methionine). This was not the case in the absence of the hormone. We concluded that medroxyprogesterone might improve the efficacy of an oral protein-rich nutritional support in HIV-infected

  2. Pharmacotherapy of pediatric and adolescent HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Schuval, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection over the past two decades. Improved therapy has prolonged survival and improved clinical outcome for HIV-infected children and adults. Sixteen antiretroviral (ART) medications have been approved for use in pediatric HIV infection. The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued “Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection”, which provide detailed information on currently recommended antiretroviral therapies (ART). However, consultation with an HIV specialist is recommended as the current therapy of pediatric HIV therapy is complex and rapidly evolving. PMID:19707256

  3. Health-related quality of life of HIV-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Mekuria, Legese A; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Prins, Jan M; Yalew, Alemayehu W; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome measure among HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but has not been studied extensively in resource-limited settings. Insight in the predictors or correlates of poor HRQoL may be helpful to identify patients most in need of additional support and to design appropriate interventions. A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2012 and April 2013 in 10 healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Patients who were at least 6 months on cART were randomly selected and individual patient data were retrieved from medical records. HRQoL was measured by the WHOQoL-HIVBREF, depressive-symptoms by the Kessler-6 scale, and stigma by the Kalichman internalized AIDS-related stigma scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was carried-out to examine associations between HRQoL and the other variables. A total of 664 patients (response-rate 95%) participated in the study. A higher level of depressive-symptoms was most strongly and consistently associated with a lower HRQoL, both in terms of the magnitude of the relationship and in the number of HRQoL domains associated with it. Also, a higher level of HIV-stigma was associated with a lower HRQoL except for the physical domain, while obtaining sufficient nutritious food and job opportunity were associated with a better HRQoL except for the spiritual and social domains, respectively. Demographics, clinical, and treatment characteristics yielded few significant associations with HRQoL. Our study findings suggest that interventions to improve HRQoL should focus on reducing depressive-symptoms and HIV-stigma, and on enhancing food security and job opportunity.

  4. Administration of a Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist Decreases the Proviral Reservoir in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Winckelmann, Anni A.; Munk-Petersen, Lærke V.; Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Hjelholt, Thomas J.; Montefiori, David; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S.; Tolstrup, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can reactivate HIV from latently infected cells in vitro. We aimed to investigate the TLR-9 agonist, CPG 7909's in vivo effect on the proviral HIV reservoir and HIV-specific immunity. This was a post-hoc analysis of a double-blind randomized controlled vaccine trial. HIV-infected adults were randomized 1∶1 to receive pneumococcal vaccines with or without 1 mg CPG 7909 as adjuvant at 0, 3 and 9 months. In patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy we quantified proviral DNA at 0, 3, 4, 9, and 10 months (31 subjects in the CPG group and 37 in the placebo-adjuvant group). Furthermore, we measured HIV-specific antibodies, characterized T cell phenotypes and HIV-specific T cell immunity. We observed a mean reduction in proviral DNA in the CPG group of 12.6% (95% CI: −23.6–0.0) following each immunization whereas proviral DNA in the placebo-adjuvant group remained largely unchanged (6.7% increase; 95% CI: −4.2–19.0 after each immunization, p = 0.02). Among participants with additional cryo-preserved PBMCs, HIV-specific CD8+ T cell immunity as indicated by increased expression of degranulation marker CD107a and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP1β) tended to be up-regulated following immunization with CPG 7909 compared with placebo as adjuvant. Further, increasing proportion of HIV-specific CD107a and MIP1β-expressing CD8+ T cells were strongly correlated with decreasing proviral load. No changes were observed in T cell phenotype distribution, HIV-specific CD4+ T cell immunity, or HIV-specific antibodies. TLR9-adjuvanted pneumococcal vaccination decreased proviral load. Reductions in proviral load correlated with increasing levels of HIV specific CD8+ T cells. Further investigation into the potential effect of TLR9 agonists on HIV latency is warranted. PMID:23637967

  5. Pill Burden Influences the Association Between Time-Based Prospective Memory and Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Younger But Not Older HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, David P; Weber, Erica; Casaletto, Kaitlin B; Avci, Gunes; Woods, Steven Paul

    2016-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) is associated with antiretroviral (ARV) adherence in HIV, but little is known about how pill burden and age might affect this association. One hundred seventeen older (≥50 years) and 82 younger (<50 years) HIV-infected adults were administered a measure of PM in the laboratory and subsequently were monitored for ARV adherence for 30 days using the Medication Event Monitoring System. In the older group, better time-based PM performance was associated with higher likelihood of adherence, irrespective of pill burden. Within the younger sample, time-based PM was positively related to adherence only in participants with lower pill burdens. Younger HIV-infected individuals with higher pill burdens may overcome the normal effects of time-based PM on adherence through compensatory medication-taking strategies, whereas suboptimal use of these strategies by younger HIV-infected individuals with lower pill burdens may heighten their risk of ARV nonadherence secondary to deficits in time-based PM.

  6. Raltegravir and Abacavir/Lamivudine in Japanese Treatment-Naïve and Treatment-Experienced Patients with HIV Infection: a 48-Week Retrospective Pilot Analysis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akihito; Uehara, Yuki; Saita, Mizue; Inui, Akihiro; Isonuma, Hiroshi; Naito, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) is a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used for treating human immunodeficiency viral (HIV) infections. Hypersensitivity reactions such as skin eruptions caused by ABC are well-known, but rarely occur in Asians. Raltegravir (RAL) is an integrase strand transfer inhibitor, that is now increasingly, used for treating HIV infections because it has few adverse effects. This retrospective analysis assessed the efficacy and safety of combined ABC/3TC and RAL in both treatment-naïve and -experienced Japanese patients with HIV infections. In all 11 treatment-naïve patients (100%), virological suppression to undetectable level was achieved. Liver transaminases, renal function, and serum lipid profiles showed no exacerbations up to 48 weeks of treatment. In 12 patients who were switched from previous regimens to ABC/3TC and RAL, HIV viral load was undetectable in 11 patients (91.6%), but remained detectable in 1 patient with poor adherence. Major reasons for switching regimens to ABC/3TC and RAL were hyperlipidemia and nausea. After switching, these adverse effects improved, and no new adverse effects were observed. Despite the small number of participants in this study, the results support the combination of ABC/3TC and RAL as a possible treatment choice in Japanese individuals with HIV-infection.

  7. Cryptoccocal meningitis in Yaoundé (Cameroon) HIV infected patients: Diagnosis, frequency and Cryptococcus neoformans isolates susceptibility study to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Kammalac Ngouana, T; Dongtsa, J; Kouanfack, C; Tonfack, C; Fomena, S; Mallié, M; Delaporte, E; Boyom, F-Fekam; Bertout, S

    2015-03-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a mycosis encountered especially in patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and is fatal in the absence of treatment. Information on epidemiology, diagnosis and susceptibility profile to antifungal drugs, are scarce in Cameroon. Authors evaluated the diagnosis possibilities of the cryptococcal meningitis in Cameroon, and studied the antifungal susceptibility of isolated strains to fluconazole, used as first line treatment of the disease in Cameroon. Between December 2009 and July 2011, 146 cerebrospinal fluids obtained from HIV patients with suspicion of meningitis were analysed. The diagnosis procedure involved macroscopic and cyto-chemical analysis, India ink test, culture on Sabouraud chloramphenicol medium and antigen latex agglutination test. Antifungal susceptibility testing of isolated strains to fluconazole was done by the E-test(®) method. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis gave 28.08% positive cases. Among these patients, 80% were at stages III and IV and 20% at stage I of the HIV infection, according to the WHO previous classification. Cyto-chemical analysis showed current findings in the case of cryptococcal meningitis. India ink test and latex agglutination test exhibited very high sensitivity and specificity (>94%). Fluconazole antifungal susceptibility testing gave MICs lower than 32μg/mL to 92.7% of isolated strains and MICs greater than this value to 7.3% of isolates. These results showed that cryptococcal meningitis remains a real problem among HIV infected patients in Yaoundé. The emergence of fluconazole reduced susceptibility strains is worrying. Nevertheless, efficacy of rapid detection tests is interesting because this will help in rapid diagnosis and treatment of patients.

  8. Clinical Correlates and Drug Resistance in HIV-Infected and -Uninfected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in South India

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Chandy; Elsa, Heylen; Baijayanti, Mishra; Lennartsdotter, Ekstrand Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine demographics, clinical correlates, sputum AFB (acid fast bacilli) smear grading DOTS (Directly Observed Therapy Short Course) uptake, and drug resistance in a cohort of newly-diagnosed, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients with respect to HIV status at baseline, and compare smear conversion rates, side effects and mortality after two months. Design A prospective study among 54 HIV positive and 41 HIV negative pulmonary TB patients. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews, review of medical records, and lab tests. Results HIVTB co-infected patients, though more symptomatic at baseline, showed more improvement in their symptoms compared to HIV-uninfected TB patients at follow-up. The HIV co-infected group had more prevalent perceived side effects, and sputum smear positivity was marginally higher compared to the HIV negative group at follow-up. Mortality was higher among the HIV-infected group. Both groups had high rates of resistance to first-line anti-tubercular drugs, particularly isoniazid. There was no significant difference in the drug resistance patterns between the groups. Conclusions Prompt initiation and provision of daily regimens of ATT (Anti-Tubercular treatment) along with ART (Anti-Retroviral treatment) via ART centers is urgently needed in India. As resistance to ART and/or ATT is directly linked to medication non-adherence, the use of counseling, regular reinforcement, early detection and appropriate intervention strategies to tackle this complex issue could help prevent premature mortality and development of resistance in HIV-TB co-infected patients. The high rate of isoniazid resistance might preclude its use in India as prophylaxis for latent TB in HIV infected persons as per the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline. PMID:27708985

  9. Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Patients Differ Strongly in Frequencies and Spectra between Patients with Low CD4+ Cell Counts Examined Postmortem and Compensated Patients Examined Antemortem Irrespective of the HAART Era

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Marta K.; Benková, Kamila; Selinger, Pavel; Dogoši, Marek; Kinkorová Luňáčková, Iva; Koutníková, Hana; Laštíková, Jarmila; Roubíčková, Alena; Špůrková, Zuzana; Laclová, Lucie; Eis, Václav; Šach, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Objective AIDS-related mortality has changed dramatically with the onset of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), which has even allowed compensated HIV-infected patients to withdraw from secondary therapy directed against opportunistic pathogens. However, in recently autopsied HIV-infected patients, we observed that associations with a broad spectrum of pathogens remain, although detailed analyses are lacking. Therefore, we focused on the possible frequency and spectrum shifts in pathogens associated with autopsied HIV-infected patients. Design We hypothesized that the pathogens frequency and spectrum changes found in HIV-infected patients examined postmortem did not recapitulate the changes found previously in HIV-infected patients examined antemortem in both the pre- and post-HAART eras. Because this is the first comprehensive study originating from Central and Eastern Europe, we also compared our data with those obtained in the West and Southwest Europe, USA and Latin America. Methods We performed autopsies on 124 HIV-infected patients who died from AIDS or other co-morbidities in the Czech Republic between 1985 and 2014. The pathological findings were retrieved from the full postmortem examinations and autopsy records. Results We collected a total of 502 host-pathogen records covering 82 pathogen species, a spectrum that did not change according to patients’ therapy or since the onset of the epidemics, which can probably be explained by the fact that even recently deceased patients were usually decompensated (in 95% of the cases, the last available CD4+ cell count was falling below 200 cells*μl-1) regardless of the treatment they received. The newly identified pathogen taxa in HIV-infected patients included Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Aerococcus viridans and Escherichia hermannii. We observed a very limited overlap in both the spectra and frequencies of the pathogen species found postmortem in HIV-infected patients in Europe, the USA and Latin

  10. Coinfection with Human Herpesvirus 8 Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation and Immune Activation in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Masiá, Mar; Robledano, Catalina; Ortiz de la Tabla, Victoria; Antequera, Pedro; Lumbreras, Blanca; Hernández, Ildefonso; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Infection with co-pathogens is one of the postulated factors contributing to persistent inflammation and non-AIDS events in virologically-suppressed HIV-infected patients. We aimed to investigate the relationship of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8), a vasculotropic virus implicated in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, with inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis in HIV-infected patients. Methods Prospective study including virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients. Several blood biomarkers (highly-sensitive C-reactive protein [hsCRP], tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, malondialdehyde, plasminogen activator inhibitor [PAI-1], D-dimer, sCD14, sCD163, CD4/CD38/HLA-DR, and CD8/CD38/HLA-DR), serological tests for HHV-8 and the majority of herpesviruses, carotid intima-media thickness, and endothelial function through flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery were measured. Results A total of 136 patients were included, 34.6% of them infected with HHV-8. HHV-8-infected patients were more frequently co-infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) (P<0.001), and less frequently with hepatitis C virus (HCV) (P = 0.045), and tended to be older (P = 0.086). HHV-8-infected patients had higher levels of hsCRP (median [interquartile range], 3.63 [1.32–7.54] vs 2.08 [0.89–4.11] mg/L, P = 0.009), CD4/CD38/HLA-DR (7.67% [4.10–11.86]% vs 3.86% [2.51–7.42]%, P = 0.035) and CD8/CD38/HLA-DR (8.02% [4.98–14.09]% vs 5.02% [3.66–6.96]%, P = 0.018). After adjustment for the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, HCV and HSV-2 infection, the associations remained significant: adjusted difference between HHV-8 positive and negative patients (95% confidence interval) for hsCRP, 74.19% (16.65–160.13)%; for CD4/CD38/HLA-DR, 89.65% (14.34–214.87)%; and for CD8/CD38/HLA-DR, 58.41% (12.30–123.22)%. Flow

  11. Early sex work initiation independently elevates odds of HIV infection and police arrest among adult sex workers in a Canadian setting

    PubMed Central

    GOLDENBERG, Shira M.; CHETTIAR, Jill; SIMO, Annick; SILVERMAN, Jay G.; STRATHDEE, Steffanie A.; MONTANER, Julio; SHANNON, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore factors associated with early sex work initiation, and model the independent effect of early initiation on HIV infection and prostitution arrests among adult sex workers (SWs). Design Baseline data (2010–2011) were drawn from a cohort of SWs who exchanged sex for money within the last month and were recruited through time-location sampling in Vancouver, Canada. Analyses were restricted to adults ≥18 years old. Methods SWs completed a questionnaire and HIV/STI testing. Using multivariate logistic regression, we identified associations with early sex work initiation (<18 years old) and constructed confounder models examining the independent effect of early initiation on HIV and prostitution arrests among adult SWs. Results Of 508 SWs, 193 (38.0%) reported early sex work initiation, with 78.53% primarily street-involved SWs and 21.46% off-street SWs. HIV prevalence was 11.22%, which was 19.69% among early initiates. Early initiates were more likely to be Canadian-born (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 6.8, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.42–19.02), inject drugs (AOR: 1.6, 95%CI: 1.0–2.5), and to have worked for a manager (AOR: 2.22, 95%CI: 1.3–3.6) or been coerced into sex work (AOR: 2.3, 95%CI: 1.14–4.44). Early initiation retained an independent effect on increased risk of HIV infection (AOR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.3–3.2) and prostitution arrests (AOR: 2.0, 95%CI: 1.3–3.2). Conclusions Adolescent sex work initiation is concentrated among marginalized, drug and street-involved SWs. Early initiation holds an independent increased effect on HIV infection and criminalization of adult SWs. Findings suggest the need for evidence-based approaches to reduce harm among adult and youth SWs. PMID:23982660

  12. Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, Matthew Carl

    Mathematical models of the dynamics of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have contributed to tremendous advances over the past 20 years. This thesis extends this previous work by exploring the importance of spatial heterogeneity in HIV infection both in vitro and in vivo in patients treated with highly-active antiretroviral therapy. Viral infections propagate locally in space, yet HIV infection has been widely regarded as equilibrated over the entire body of an infected patient. This dissertation constructs and explores a cellular automata model of viral spread at the cellular level. Coupling the automata to a blood compartment represented by a differential equation leads to a whole-body model of HIV infection that explicitly includes spatial effects at both the cellular and tissue levels. These models are tested by comparison with experimental data. A central prediction of the spatial model is that, due to competition between Brownian motion and viral lability, HIV infectivity increases with target cell density. This production is verified in a series of in vitro experiments in cell culture. The predicted independence of inhibitory concentrations of antiretoviral agents is verified for nevirapine, but azidothymidine inhibits HIV replication less efficiently in more dense cultures. These in vitro results suggest that systems allowing cell concentrations closer to tissue densities would better reflect virus replication kinetics, although standard measures of relative drug susceptibility may accurately reflect in vivo conditions. The coupled spatial model of in vivo dynamics is compared with novel mathematical analysis of experiments in HIV-infected patients. These analyses indicate that HIV DNA provides a useful marker of the size of long-lived cellular reservoirs of HIV. Levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood are predictive of the average rate of residual virus production after years of treatment, regardless of whether patients initiate therapy

  13. Clinical Predictors and Accuracy of Empiric Tuberculosis Treatment among Sputum Smear-Negative HIV-Infected Adult TB Suspects in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nakiyingi, Lydia; Bwanika, John Mark; Kirenga, Bruce; Nakanjako, Damalie; Katabira, Catherine; Lubega, Gloria; Sempa, Joseph; Nyesiga, Barnabas; Albert, Heidi; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The existing diagnostic algorithms for sputum smear-negative tuberculosis (TB) are complicated, time-consuming, and often difficult to implement. The decision to initiate TB treatment in resource-limited countries is often largely based on clinical predictors. We sought to determine the clinical predictors and accuracy of empiric TB treatment initiation in HIV-infected sputum smear-negative TB suspects using sputum culture as a reference standard. Setting Out-patient HIV-TB integrated urban clinic in Kampala, Uganda. Methods HIV-infected TB suspects were screened using sputum smear microscopy, and mycobacterial sputum liquid and solid cultures were performed. Smear results were made available to the clinician who made a clinical decision on empiric TB treatment initiation for sputum smear-negative patients. Clinic records were reviewed for patients whose sputum smears were negative to collect data on socio-demographics, TB symptomatology, chest X-ray findings, CD4 cell counts and TB treatment initiation. Results Of 253 smear-negative TB suspects, 56% (142/253) were females, median age 38 IQR (31–44) years, with a median CD4 cell count of 291 IQR (150–482) cells/mm3. Of the 85 (33.6%) smear-negative patients empirically initiated on TB treatment, 35.3% (n = 30) were sputum culture positive compared to only 18 (10.7%) of the 168 untreated patients (p<0.001). Abnormal chest X-ray [aOR 10.18, 95% CI (3.14–33.00), p<0.001] and advanced HIV clinical stage [aOR 3.92, 95% CI (1.20–12.85), p = 0.024] were significantly associated with empiric TB treatment initiation. The sensitivity and specificity of empiric TB treatment initiation in the diagnosis of TB in HIV-infected patients after negative smear microscopy was 62.5% and 73.7% respectively. Conclusion In resource-limited settings, clinically advanced HIV and abnormal chest X-ray significantly predict a clinical decision to empirically initiate TB treatment in smear-negative HIV-infected

  14. Tobacco use and its determinants in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy in West African countries

    PubMed Central

    Jaquet, Antoine; Ekouevi, Didier-Koumavi; Aboubakrine, Maiga; Bashi, Jules; Messou, Eugène; Maiga, Moussa; Traore, Hamar-Alassane; Zannou, Marcel; Guehi, Calixte; Ba-Gomis, Franck-Olivier; Minga, Albert; Allou, Gérard; Eholie, Serge-Paul; Dabis, Francois; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Sasco, Annie-Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Tobacco smoking is common in HIV-infected patients from industrialized countries. In West Africa, few data exist concerning tobacco consumption. METHODS A cross-sectional survey was conducted within the International epidemiological Database to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) network in West Africa. Health workers administered to patients receiving antiretroviral treatment a questionnaire assessing tobacco and cannabis consumption. Regular smokers were defined as present smokers who smoked >1 cigarette per day for ≥1 year. RESULTS Overall, 2920 patients were enrolled in three countries. The prevalence of ever smokers and present smokers were 46.2% (95% CI 42.8–49.5) and 15.6% (95% CI 13.2–18.0) in men and 3.7% (95% CI 2.9–4.5) and 0.6% (95% CI 0.3–0.9) in women, respectively. Regular smoking was associated being from Côte d’Ivoire or Mali compared to Benin (OR 4.6; 95% CI 2.9–7.3 and 7.7; 95% CI 4.4–13.6), a severely impaired immunological status at HAART initiation (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.1–2.2) and a history of tuberculosis (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1–3.0). CONCLUSION Marked differences of smoking prevalence exist between these West African countries. This survey approach also provides evidences concerning the association between cigarette smoking and tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients, a major public health issue in this part of the world. PMID:19861019

  15. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Latin American Variant in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis and HIV Infected in a Hospital in Bogotá, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Carvajal, Lina P.; Rincón, Sandra; Faccini-Martínez, Álvaro A.; Tres Palacios, Alba A.; Mercado, Marcela; Palomá, Sandra L.; Rayo, Leidy X.; Acevedo, Jessica A.; Reyes, Jinnethe; Panesso, Diana; García-Padilla, Paola; Alvarez, Carlos; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of MRSA colonization and examine the molecular characteristics of colonizing isolates in patients receiving hemodialysis and HIV-infected in a Colombian hospital. Patients on hemodialysis and HIV-infected were prospectively followed between July 2011 and June 2012 in Bogota, Colombia. Nasal and axillary swabs were obtained and cultured. Colonizing S. aureus isolates were identified by standard and molecular techniques. Molecular typing was performed by using pulse-field gel electrophoresis and evaluating the presence of lukF-PV/lukS-PV by PCR. A total of 29% (n = 82) of HIV-infected and 45.5% (n = 15) of patients on hemodialysis exhibited S. aureus colonization. MSSA/MRSA colonization was observed in 28% and 3.6% of the HIV patients, respectively and in 42.4% and 13.3% of the hemodialysis patients, respectively. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing showed that four MRSA isolates harbored the type IV cassette, and one type I. In the hemodialysis group, two MRSA isolates were classified as belonging to the USA300-LV genetic lineage. Conversely, in the HIV infected group, no colonizing isolates belonging to the USA300-Latin American Variant (UDA300-LV) lineage were identified. Colonizing isolates recovered from the HIV-infected group belonged to the prevalent hospital-associated clones circulating in Latin America (Chilean [n = 1] and Pediatric [n = 2]). The prevalence of MRSA colonization in the study groups was 3.6% (HIV) and 13.3% (hemodialysis). Surveillance programs should be implemented in this group of patients in order to understand the dynamics of colonization and infection in high-risk patients. PMID:26474075

  16. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Latin American Variant in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis and HIV Infected in a Hospital in Bogotá, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Carvajal, Lina P; Rincón, Sandra; Faccini-Martínez, Álvaro A; Tres Palacios, Alba A; Mercado, Marcela; Palomá, Sandra L; Rayo, Leidy X; Acevedo, Jessica A; Reyes, Jinnethe; Panesso, Diana; García-Padilla, Paola; Alvarez, Carlos; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of MRSA colonization and examine the molecular characteristics of colonizing isolates in patients receiving hemodialysis and HIV-infected in a Colombian hospital. Patients on hemodialysis and HIV-infected were prospectively followed between July 2011 and June 2012 in Bogota, Colombia. Nasal and axillary swabs were obtained and cultured. Colonizing S. aureus isolates were identified by standard and molecular techniques. Molecular typing was performed by using pulse-field gel electrophoresis and evaluating the presence of lukF-PV/lukS-PV by PCR. A total of 29% (n = 82) of HIV-infected and 45.5% (n = 15) of patients on hemodialysis exhibited S. aureus colonization. MSSA/MRSA colonization was observed in 28% and 3.6% of the HIV patients, respectively and in 42.4% and 13.3% of the hemodialysis patients, respectively. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing showed that four MRSA isolates harbored the type IV cassette, and one type I. In the hemodialysis group, two MRSA isolates were classified as belonging to the USA300-LV genetic lineage. Conversely, in the HIV infected group, no colonizing isolates belonging to the USA300-Latin American Variant (UDA300-LV) lineage were identified. Colonizing isolates recovered from the HIV-infected group belonged to the prevalent hospital-associated clones circulating in Latin America (Chilean [n = 1] and Pediatric [n = 2]). The prevalence of MRSA colonization in the study groups was 3.6% (HIV) and 13.3% (hemodialysis). Surveillance programs should be implemented in this group of patients in order to understand the dynamics of colonization and infection in high-risk patients.

  17. A Rare Case of Primary Supraclavicular Lymphadenitis due to Cryptococcus Neoformans in an HIV Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Anuradha; Chandel, Lata R; Chauhan, Smriti; Thakur, Kamlesh; Jaryal, S.C

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis caused by encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans most commonly presents as disease of the central nervous system. Cryptococcus is a non–mycelial budding yeast found in soil, pigeon droppings and their nesting places. The three ‘classic’ virulence factors of cryptococci are: polysaccharide capsule, melanin production and growth at 37°C. Here, we present a rare case of cryptococcosis affecting left supraclavicular lymph node in a Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individual. Culture of fine needle aspirate of the lymph node yielded Cryptococcus neoformans which was identified by standard microbiological techniques. Meyer’s mucicarmine stain imparted a typical rose burgundy colour to the capsule. Unusual characteristics of the isolate included poorly developed capsule and the presence of yeast in chains resembling pseudo-hyphae. This case highlights the importance of microbiological techniques for diagnosis and prompt treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:24701506

  18. The Effect of Spirulina platensis versus Soybean on Insulin Resistance in HIV-Infected Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Marcel, Azabji-Kenfack; Ekali, Loni G.; Eugene, Sobngwi; Arnold, Onana E.; Sandrine, Edie D.; von der Weid, Denis; Gbaguidi, Emmanuel; Ngogang, Jeanne; Mbanya, Jean C.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-infected patients develop abnormalities of glucose metabolism due to the virus and antiretroviral drugs. Spirulina and soybean are nutritional supplements that are cheap, accessible in our community and affect glucose metabolism. We carried out a randomized study to assess the effect of Spirulina platensis versus soybean as a food supplement on HIV/HAART-associated insulin resistance (IR) in 33 insulin-resistant HIV-infected patients. The study lasted for two months at the National Obesity Centre of Cameroon. Insulin resistance was measured using the short insulin tolerance test. Physical activity and diet did not change over the study duration. On-treatment analysis was used to analyze data. The Mann-Whitney U test, the Students T test and the Chi square test were used as appropriate. Curve gradients were analyzed using ANCOVA. Seventeen subjects were randomized to spirulina and 16 to soybean. Each received 19 g of supplement daily. The follow up rate was 65% vs. 100% for spirulina and soybean groups, respectively, and both groups were comparable at baseline. After eight weeks, insulin sensitivity (IS) increased by 224.7% vs. 60% in the spirulina and soybean groups respectively (p < 0.001). One hundred per cent vs. 69% of subjects on spirulina versus soybean, respectively, improved their IS (p = 0.049) with a 1.45 (1.05–2.02) chance of improving insulin sensitivity on spirulina. This pilot study suggests that insulin sensitivity in HIV patients improves more when spirulina rather than soybean is used as a nutritional supplement. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01141777. PMID:22254118

  19. Prevalence of Anemia and Immunological Markers in HIV-Infected Patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Northeastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Denue, Ballah Akawu; Kida, Ibrahim Musa; Hammagabdo, Ahmed; Dayar, Ayuba; Sahabi, Mohammed Abubakar

    2013-01-01

    associated with disease progression, and death in HIV-infected patients. Total lymphocyte count fails to predict CD4 count < 200 cells/μL in our cohort; thus, its use in the management and monitoring of HIV-infected patients in our settings is not reliable. PMID:24847174

  20. Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection: When to Initiate Therapy, Which Regimen to Use, and How to Monitor Patients on Therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven C

    Antiretroviral therapy is recommended for all patients with HIV infection. The benefit of immediate antiretroviral therapy was confirmed by results from the START (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment) trial, which showed a 57% reduction in risk for the composite end point of AIDS-related events, serious non-AIDS-related events, or death from any cause with immediate treatment in antiretroviral therapy-naive participants with CD4+ cell counts above 500/µL. Other changes in HIV care include the widespread adoption of integrase strand transfer inhibitor-based regimens. Considerations regarding when to initiate antiretroviral therapy, which initial regimens to use, and appropriate monitoring of individuals taking antiretroviral therapy are discussed. This article summarizes an IAS-USA continuing education webinar presented by Steven C. Johnson, MD, in July 2015.

  1. Relapse of visceral leishmaniasis in an HIV-infected patient successfully treated with a combination of miltefosine and amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Shauna; Kasper, Ken; Moffatt, Dana C; Marko, Daniel; Keynan, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The present report documents a 49-year-old HIV-infected man receiving antiretroviral therapy with a suboptimal immune response and a CD4 count of 95 cells/mm(3), despite virological suppression. Investigation of bone marrow was conducted and yielded a diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. The clinical course was complicated by gastrointestinal involvment and relapse occurred after amphotericin B therapy. With the addition of miltefosine, the patient no longer presented with bone marrow amastigotes, and displayed an increased CD4 count and negative Leishmania polymerase chain reaction results. The present case highlights atypical presentation of visceral leishmaniasis, including poor immune reconstitution and gastrointestinal involvement. The high likelihood of relapse and response to combination therapy are illustrated.

  2. Relapse of visceral leishmaniasis in an HIV-infected patient successfully treated with a combination of miltefosine and amphotericin B

    PubMed Central

    McQuarrie, Shauna; Kasper, Ken; Moffatt, Dana C; Marko, Daniel; Keynan, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The present report documents a 49-year-old HIV-infected man receiving antiretroviral therapy with a suboptimal immune response and a CD4 count of 95 cells/mm3, despite virological suppression. Investigation of bone marrow was conducted and yielded a diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. The clinical course was complicated by gastrointestinal involvment and relapse occurred after amphotericin B therapy. With the addition of miltefosine, the patient no longer presented with bone marrow amastigotes, and displayed an increased CD4 count and negative Leishmania polymerase chain reaction results. The present case highlights atypical presentation of visceral leishmaniasis, including poor immune reconstitution and gastrointestinal involvement. The high likelihood of relapse and response to combination therapy are illustrated. PMID:26744591

  3. [Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutics' data of HIV-infected patients placed on ART in the Segou hospital in Mali (2004-2011)].

    PubMed

    Koné, M C; Cissoko, Y; Diallo, M S; Traoré, B A; Mallé, K K

    2013-08-01

    This is a retrospective study on a cohort of 811 adult patients placed on ART between January 2004 and December 2011 at the hospital Nianankoro Fomba Segou in Mali, to describe their epidemiological, clinical and developmental profile for 48 months. The average age of patients was 35.2±9.4 years. The sex-ratio was 0.6. Approximately 58.3% of the patients were from rural areas. HIV1 represented 95.8%. Prolonged fever, weight loss and chronic diarrhea were the main reasons for testing. The majority of patients (64.5%) had stage III WHO. The mean CD4 cell count was 144±135.8/mm³ at screening. The evolution was favorable under immunological antiretroviral therapy. The survival rate at 48 months follow-up was 78% [64.1%-81.3%]. Patients followed in the structure are predominantly rural, female and young aged. They are diagnosed with advanced HIV infection. Antiretroviral therapy has led to the strengthening of the immune system and improved the clinical outcomes with a survival rate of 78%.

  4. Decreased Chronic Morbidity but Elevated HIV Associated Cytokine Levels in HIV-Infected Older Adults Receiving HIV Treatment: Benefit of Enhanced Access to Care?

    PubMed Central

    Mutevedzi, Portia C.; Rodger, Alison J.; Kowal, Paul; Nyirenda, Makandwe; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of HIV with chronic morbidity and inflammatory markers (cytokines) in older adults (50+years) is potentially relevant for clinical care, but data from African populations is scarce. Objective To examine levels of chronic morbidity by HIV and ART status in older adults (50+years) and subsequent associations with selected pro-inflammatory cytokines and body mass index. Methods Ordinary, ordered and generalized ordered logistic regression techniques were employed to compare chronic morbidity (heart disease (angina), arthritis, stroke, hypertension, asthma and diabetes) and cytokines (Interleukins-1 and -6, C-Reactive Protein and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha) by HIV and ART status on a cross-sectional random sample of 422 older adults nested within a defined rural South African population based demographic surveillance. Results Using a composite measure of all morbidities, controlling for age, gender, BMI, smoking and wealth quintile, HIV-infected individuals on ART had 51% decreased odds (95% CI:0.26-0.92) of current morbidity compared to HIV-uninfected. In adjusted regression, compared to HIV-uninfected, the proportional odds (aPOR) of having elevated inflammation markers of IL6 (>1.56pg/mL) was nearly doubled in HIV-infected individuals on (aPOR 1.84; 95%CI: 1.05-3.21) and not on (aPOR 1.94; 95%CI: 1.11-3.41) ART. Compared to HIV-uninfected, HIV-infected individuals on ART had >twice partial proportional odds (apPOR=2.30;p=0.004) of having non-clinically significant raised hsCRP levels(>1ug/mL); ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals had >double apPOR of having hsCRP levels indicative of increased heart disease risk(>3.9ug/mL;p=0.008). Conclusions Although HIV status was associated with increased inflammatory markers, our results highlight reduced morbidity in those receiving ART and underscore the need of pro-actively extending these services to HIV-uninfected older adults, beyond mere provision at fixed clinics. Providing health services

  5. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which there are no symptoms of HIV ...

  6. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Charlotte A; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods.  This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results.  Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7-27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4(+) cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions.  The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections.

  7. Asymptomatic oral carriage of Candida species in HIV-infected patients in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Cohen, Ana Joaquina; Fernandes, Orionalda Fátima Lisboa; Miranda, Karla Carvalho; Passos, Xisto Sena; Souza, Lúcia Kioko Hasimoto; do Rosário Rodrigues Silva, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common opportunistic fungal infection in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus. CD4+ lymphocytes count and the quantification of viral RNA in blood plasma have been found to be the main markers of HIV disease progression. The present study was conducted to evaluate Candida sp. diversity in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients and to determine whether there was association of CD4+ cell count and viral load with asymptomatic oral Candida carriage. Out of 99 HIV-positive patients studied, 62 (62.6%) had positive culture for Candida (oral carriage) and 37 patients (37.4%) had Candida negative culture (no oral carriage). The etiologic agents most common were C. albicans and C. tropicalis. The range of CD4+ was 6-2305 cells/mm3 in colonized patients and 3-839 cells/mm3 for non-colonized patients, while the viral load was 60-90016 copies/mL for colonized patients and 75-110488 copies/mL for non colonized patients. The viral load was undetectable in 15 colonized patients and in 12 non colonized patients. Our results showed that there was no significant difference of the variables CD4+ cell count and viral load between oral candida carriage and no oral candida carriage patients.

  8. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension among HIV-Infected Children: Results of a National Survey and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    L'Huillier, Arnaud Grégoire; Posfay-Barbe, Klara Maria; Pictet, Hiba; Beghetti, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, HIV-related mortality has decreased dramatically. As a consequence, patients are living longer, and HIV infection is becoming a chronic disease. Patients and caretakers have to deal with chronic complications of infection and treatment, such as cardiovascular diseases, which now represent an important health issue, even in the pediatric population. Prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the adult HIV population is around 0.4-0.6%, which is around 1000- to 2500-fold more prevalent than in the general population. In recent adult PAH registries, HIV has been identified as the fourth cause of PAH, accounting for approximately 6-7% of cases. Therefore, regular screening is recommended in HIV-infected adults by many experts. If HIV-associated PAH is mainly reported in HIV-infected adults, pediatric cases have also been, albeit rarely, described. This scarcity may be due to a very low PAH prevalence, or due to the lack of systematic cardiovascular screening in pediatric patients. As PAH may manifest only years or decades after infection, a systematic screening should perhaps also be recommended to HIV-infected children. In this context, we retrospectively looked for PAH screening in children included in our national Swiss Mother and Child HIV cohort study. A questionnaire was sent to all pediatric infectious disease specialists taking care of HIV-infected children in the cohort. The questions tried to identify symptoms suggestive of cardiovascular risk factors and asked which screening test was performed. In the 71 HIV-infected children for which we obtained an answer, no child was known for PAH. However, only two had been screened for PAH, and the diagnosis was not confirmed. In conclusion, PAH in HIV-infected children is possibly underestimated due to lack of screening. Systematic echocardiographic evaluation should be performed in HIV-infected children.

  9. [HIV infection and immigration].

    PubMed

    Monge, Susana; Pérez-Molina, José A

    2016-01-01

    Migrants represent around one third of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Spain and they constitute a population with higher vulnerability to its negative consequences due to the socio-cultural, economical, working, administrative and legal contexts. Migrants are diagnosed later, which worsens their individual prognosis and facilitates the maintenance of the HIV epidemic. In spite of the different barriers they experience to access healthcare in general, and HIV-related services in particular, access to antiretroviral treatment has been similar to that of the autochthonous population. However, benefits of treatment have been not, with women in general and men from Sub-Saharan Africa exhibiting the worse response to treatment. We need to proactively promote earlier diagnosis of HIV infection, the adoption of preventive measures to avoid new infections, and to deliver accessible, adapted and high-quality health-care.

  10. Sporotrichosis in HIV-infected patients: report of 21 cases of endemic sporotrichosis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Dayvison Francis Saraiva; de Siqueira Hoagland, Brenda; do Valle, Antonio Carlos Francesconi; Fraga, Beatriz Barros; de Barros, Mônica Bastos; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; de Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Cuzzi, Tullia; Rosalino, Cláudia Maria Valete; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara

    2012-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is endemic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and cases have been reported to be associated with HIV. This article describes the clinical manifestations and evolution of sporotrichosis in HIV-positive patients and constitutes the largest case series reported to date. There were 21 HIV-positive patients with sporotrichosis diagnosed by the recovery of the etiologic agent from 1999-2009. Sixteen patients (76.2%) were men and five (23.8%) were women, with a mean age of 41.2 years. Seven of these individuals were previously unaware of their HIV infection. Mean CD4 count was 346.4 cells/μl. The most frequent clinical presentations of sporotrichosis in these patients were the lymphocutaneous and disseminated form (seven patients each, 33.3%), followed by the widespread cutaneous form in five (23.8%), and fixed form in the remaining two (9.5%). In patients with the disseminated forms, clinical manifestations involved the skin in six, mucosa (nasal, oral, or conjunctival) in four, bone in two, and meninges in two. Eleven (52.4%) patients received itraconazole and eight (38.1%) amphotericin B contributing to an overall cure rate of 81%. Spontaneous cure was observed in one patient. The clinical forms of sporotrichosis varied according to the patients' immune status. The results demonstrate the importance of sporotrichosis as an opportunistic infection associated with AIDS in countries where the mycosis occurs.

  11. Periradicular lesions in HIV-infected patients attending the faculty of dentistry: clinical findings, socio-demographics status, habits and laboratory data - seeking an association

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Tatiana Vasconcellos; Ferreira, Sonia Maria Soares; Silva-Júnior, Arley; dos Santos Marotta, Patrícia; Noce, Cesar Werneck; de Carvalho Ferreira, Dennis; Gonçalves, Lucio Souza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of periradicular lesions in HIV-infected Brazilian patients and to assess the correlation of several factors with the periradicular status. METHOD: One hundred full-mouth periapical radiographs were evaluated. A total of 2,214 teeth were evaluated for the presence of periradicular lesions, caries lesions, coronal restorations, pulp cavity exposure and endodontic treatment. RESULTS: The prevalence of periradicular lesions was 46%. There were no significant differences between individuals with or without periradicular lesions with respect to their socio-demographic status, habits, laboratory data and route of HIV infection. However, the presence of a periradicular lesion was statistically correlated with the number of teeth with endodontic treatment (p = 0.018), inadequate endodontic treatment (p = 0.025), images suggesting pulp cavity exposure (p = 0.002) and caries lesions (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of periradicular lesions in HIV-infected individuals was 46% and was not related to HIV infection. PMID:25318095

  12. Long-term follow-up of HIV-infected patients once diagnosed with acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Seang, Sophie; Boutolleau, David; Burrel, Sonia; Regnier, Stephanie; Epelboin, Loic; Voujon, Delphine; Valantin, Marc-Antoine; Katlama, Christine; Agut, Henri; Caumes, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is common in immunocompromised patients, but the course of such infection is little known. We describe the long-term follow-up of HIV-infected patients diagnosed once with acyclovir-resistant HSV infections. We retrospectively studied all HIV-infected patients between 2000 and 2010 diagnosed with virologically confirmed acyclovir-resistant HSV infection. Patients' socio-demographic and immunovirological characteristics were described. Response to foscarnet or cidofovir and recurrences were reported. Among 5295 HIV-infected patients, 13 (0.2%) were once diagnosed with an acyclovir-resistant HSV infection. Twelve patients were men, nine patients were of African origin. All patients reported previous acyclovir exposure and median CD4 count was 183 cells/mm(3) Ten patients presented exclusively with cutaneous lesions. Initially, 11 patients were treated with foscarnet and two with cidofovir. The median follow-up was 67 months (6-145). All patients recurred, 10 presenting at least one acyclovir-resistant HSV recurrence. The median number of acyclovir-resistant HSV recurrences per patient was 2 (0 - 5). Regarding the first and second recurrences, 7/13 (54%) and 5/11 (45%) HSV clinical isolates exhibited resistance to acyclovir, respectively. Acyclovir-resistant HSV infection prevalence was low in our cohort. The rate of acyclovir-resistant HSV episodes averaged 50% during the two first recurrences.

  13. Impact of HIV Infection on Diastolic Function and Left Ventricular Mass

    PubMed Central

    Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Hunt, Peter W.; Ho, Jennifer E.; Farah, Husam H.; Schnell, Amanda; Hoh, Rebecca; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Bolger, Ann F.

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV patients have increased risk for cardiovascular disease, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of echocardiographic abnormalities among asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals compared to HIV-uninfected individuals. Methods/Results We performed echocardiography in 196 HIV-infected adults and 52 controls. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular mass indexed to the body surface area (LVMI), and diastolic function were assessed according to American Society of Echocardiography standards. LVMI was higher in HIV-infected patients (77.2g/m2 in HIV patients vs. 66.5g/m2 in controls, p<0.0001). LVEF was similar in both groups. Eight(4%) of the HIV patients had evidence of LV systolic dysfunction (defined as an EF<50%) versus none of the controls; 97(50%) had mild diastolic dysfunction compared to 29% of the HIV-uninfected subjects (p=0.008). After adjustment for hypertension and race, HIV-infected participants had a mean 8g/m2 larger LVMI compared to controls (p=0.001). Higher LVMI was independently associated with lower nadir CD4 T cell count, suggesting that immunodeficiency may play a role in this process. After adjustment for age and traditional risk factors, HIV patients had a 2.4 greater odds of having diastolic dysfunction as compared to controls (p=0.019). Conclusions HIV-infected patients had a higher prevalence of diastolic dysfunction and higher LVMI compared to controls. These differences were not readily explained by differences in traditional risk factors and were independently associated with HIV infection. These results suggest that contemporary asymptomatic HIV patients manifest mild functional and morphological cardiac abnormalities which are independently associated with HIV infection. PMID:19933410

  14. Medication and finance management among HIV-infected adults: the impact of age and cognition.

    PubMed

    Thames, April D; Kim, Michelle S; Becker, Brian W; Foley, Jessica M; Hines, Lindsay J; Singer, Elyse J; Heaton, Robert K; Castellon, Steven A; Hinkin, Charles H

    2011-02-01

    This study examined the effects of aging and cognitive impairment on medication and finance management in an HIV sample. We observed main effects of age (older < younger) and neuropsychological impairment on functional task performance. Interactions between age and cognition demonstrated that older impaired individuals performed significantly more poorly than all other comparison groups. There were no relationships between laboratory performance and self-reported medication and finance management. The interaction of advancing age and cognitive impairment may confer significant functional limitations for HIV individuals that may be better detected by performance-based measures of functional abilities rather than patient self-report.

  15. The Rates of Serious Infections in HIV-infected Patients Who Received Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α Inhibitor Therapy for Concomitant Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wangsiricharoen, Sintawat; Ligon, Colin; Gedmintas, Lydia; Dehrab, Admad; Tungsiripat, Marisa; Bingham, Clifton; Lozada, Carlos; Calabrese, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the incidence of serious infections in patients with HIV infection and autoimmune disease who were treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α inhibitor therapy, and to compare these rates among stratified viral load levels. Methods Using a unified search strategy, four centers identified HIV-infected patients exposed to TNF-α inhibitors. Patient characteristics and infection data were assessed via chart review in all patients who were ≥18 years old and received TNF-α inhibitor therapy after HIV diagnosis between January 1999 and March 2015. Results Twenty-three patients with 26 uses of TNF-α inhibitor therapy provided 86.7 person-years of follow-up. Two (8.7%) experienced at least 1 serious infection episode, an overall incidence rate of 2.55 per 100 patient-years (95% CI 0.28–9.23). The incidence rate per 100 patient-years was 3.28 (95% CI 0.04–18.26) among patients with viral load > 500 copies/mL at therapy initiation and 2.09 (0.03–11.65) among patients with viral load ≤ 500 copies/mL. Conclusion This study suggests that TNF-α inhibitors may have a comparable rate of serious infections to the range of those observed in registry databases when used in patients with HIV infection under active care. PMID:27332039

  16. Prevalence of Hypertension and Its Associated Risk Factors among 34,111 HAART Naïve HIV-Infected Adults in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Aveika, Akum; Spiegelman, Donna; Hawkins, Claudia; Armstrong, Catharina; Liu, Enju; Okuma, James; Chalamila, Guerino; Kaaya, Sylvia; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elevated blood pressure has been reported among treatment naïve HIV-infected patients. We investigated prevalence of hypertension and its associated risk factors in a HAART naïve HIV-infected population in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted among HAART naïve HIV-infected patients. Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90 mmHg. Overweight and obesity were defined as body mass index (BMI) between 25.0–29.9 kg/m2 and ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. We used relative risks to examine factors associated with hypertension. Results. Prevalence of hypertension was found to be 12.5%. After adjusting for possible confounders, risk of hypertension was 10% more in male than female patients. Patients aged ≥50 years had more than 2-fold increased risk for hypertension compared to 30–39-years-old patients. Overweight and obesity were associated with 51% and 94% increased risk for hypertension compared to normal weight patients. Low CD4+ T-cell count, advanced WHO clinical disease stage, and history of TB were associated with 10%, 42%, and 14% decreased risk for hypertension. Conclusions. Older age, male gender, and overweight/obesity were associated with hypertension. Immune suppression and history of TB were associated with lower risk for hypertension. HIV treatment programs should screen and manage hypertension even in HAART naïve individuals. PMID:27872756

  17. Cold urticaria and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y; Schwartz, R A

    1993-10-01

    Three patients, all seropositive for HIV antibody, complained of swelling and pruritus on the head and limbs when exposed to the cold. All three had received zidovudine for significant CD4 cell depletion, but had no AIDS-defining illnesses. An ice-cube test was positive on each individual. There was no evidence of cold agglutinins, cryoglobulins, syphilis, or other concurrent diseases in any of the patients. This association may represent yet another allergic manifestation in HIV infection.