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Sample records for adult human articular

  1. Comparative potential of juvenile and adult human articular chondrocytes for cartilage tissue formation in three-dimensional biomimetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Behn, Anthony W; Goodman, Stuart B; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human articular cartilage is inherently limited and extensive efforts have focused on engineering the cartilage tissue. Various cellular sources have been studied for cartilage tissue engineering including adult chondrocytes, and embryonic or adult stem cells. Juvenile chondrocytes (from donors below 13 years of age) have recently been reported to be a promising cell source for cartilage regeneration. Previous studies have compared the potential of adult and juvenile chondrocytes or adult and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. To comprehensively characterize the comparative potential of young, old, and diseased chondrocytes, here we examined cartilage formation by juvenile, adult, and OA chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogels composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate. All three human articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels and cultured for 3 or 6 weeks to allow maturation and extracellular matrix formation. Outcomes were analyzed using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. After 3 and 6 weeks, juvenile chondrocytes showed a greater upregulation of chondrogenic gene expression than adult chondrocytes, while OA chondrocytes showed a downregulation. Aggrecan and type II collagen deposition and glycosaminoglycan accumulation were high for juvenile and adult chondrocytes but not for OA chondrocytes. Similar trend was observed in the compressive moduli of the cartilage constructs generated by the three different chondrocytes. In conclusion, the juvenile, adult and OA chondrocytes showed differential responses in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels. The 3D culture model described here may also provide a useful tool to further study the molecular differences among chondrocytes from different stages, which can help elucidate the mechanisms for age-related decline in the intrinsic capacity for cartilage repair.

  2. Serial variation in histological character of articular soft tissue in young human adult temporomandibular joint condyles.

    PubMed

    Bibb, C A; Pullinger, A G; Baldioceda, F

    1993-04-01

    Histological variation was studied in serial sections, in contrast to previous studies which have generalized from representative sections. The sample consisted of consecutive serial sagittal sections from the central third of nine condyles, plus an accompanying stone cast showing the intact articular surface before sectioning. The thickness of the articular soft tissue and its fibrous connective tissue and cartilage components was measured, and the presence of undifferentiated mesenchymal (UM) cells was assessed by low-power light microscopy. Components of variance analysis showed that section-to-section variation in thickness was of the same order as differences between joints, each explaining approx. 50% of the variance in both connective tissue and cartilage thickness. The fibrous connective tissue contributed as much to the overall variation in soft tissue thickness as did the cartilage component (SD 0.0946 versus 0.0909 mm for the superior sector). Serial UM cell variability was common, and the UM cells were often distributed in islands rather than uniformly across the articular tissue. Condyles with the greatest surface irregularity were characterized by greater serial variability in fibrous connective tissue thickness, more frequent absence of cartilage, and more areas of UM cell depletion. These results suggest that serial variation in histological character may be more important than mean values in the description of surface contours and articular tissue relations in the temporomandibular joint. This should influence the design of future investigations.

  3. PGE2 And Its Cognate EP Receptors Control Human Adult Articular Cartilage Homeostasis and Are Linked to the Pathophysiology of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Ellman, Michael; Muddasani, Prasuna; Wang, James H-C; Cs-Szabo, Gabriella; van Wijnen, Andre J; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2009-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the pathophysiologic links between prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and osteoarthritis by characterizing the catabolic effects of PGE2 and its unique receptors in human adult articular chondrocytes. Methods Human adult articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer or alginate beads with and without PGE2 and/or agonist, antagonist of EP receptors and cytokines. Cell survival, proliferation, and total proteoglycan synthesis and accumulation were measured in alginate beads. Chondrocyte-related gene expression and PI3k/Akt signaling were assessed by real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively, using a monolayer cell culture model. Results Stimulation of human articular chondrocytes with PGE2 through the EP2 receptor (i) suppresses proteoglycan accumulation and synthesis, (ii) suppresses aggrecan gene expression, (iii) does not appreciably affect expression of matrix-degrading enzymes; and (iv) decreases the collagen II:I ratio. EP2 and EP4 receptors are expressed at higher levels in knee compared to ankle cartilage, and in a grade-dependent fashion. PGE2 titration combined with IL-1 synergistically accelerates expression of pain-associated molecules such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and IL-6. Finally, stimulation with exogenous PGE2 or an EP2 agonist inhibits activation of Akt that is induced by insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). Conclusion PGE2 exerts an anti-anabolic effect on human adult articular cartilage in vitro, and EP2/4 receptor antagonists may represent effective therapeutic agents for the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:19180509

  4. Prostaglandin E2 and its cognate EP receptors control human adult articular cartilage homeostasis and are linked to the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Ellman, Michael; Muddasani, Prasuna; Wang, James H-C; Cs-Szabo, Gabriella; van Wijnen, Andre J; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2009-02-01

    To elucidate the pathophysiologic links between prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and osteoarthritis (OA) by characterizing the catabolic effects of PGE(2) and its unique receptors in human adult articular chondrocytes. Human adult articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer or alginate beads with and without PGE(2) and/or agonists of EP receptors, antagonists of EP receptors, and cytokines. Cell survival, proliferation, and total proteoglycan synthesis and accumulation were measured in alginate beads. Chondrocyte-related gene expression and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling were assessed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively, using a monolayer cell culture model. Stimulation of human articular chondrocytes with PGE(2) through the EP2 receptor suppressed proteoglycan accumulation and synthesis, suppressed aggrecan gene expression, did not appreciably affect expression of matrix-degrading enzymes, and decreased the type II collagen:type I collagen ratio. EP2 and EP4 receptors were expressed at higher levels in knee cartilage than in ankle cartilage and in a grade-dependent manner. PGE(2) titration combined with interleukin-1 (IL-1) synergistically accelerated expression of pain-associated molecules such as inducible nitric oxide synthase and IL-6. Finally, stimulation with exogenous PGE(2) or an EP2 receptor-specific agonist inhibited activation of Akt that was induced by insulin-like growth factor 1. PGE(2) exerts an antianabolic effect on human adult articular cartilage in vitro, and EP2 and EP4 receptor antagonists may represent effective therapeutic agents for the treatment of OA.

  5. Phosphorylation of proteoglycans from human articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.S.; Schwartz, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sulfated proteoglycans from human articular and epiphyseal cartilage were phosphorylated. These macromolecules contribute to the stiffness and resiliency of this tissue. We demonstrate here that the phosphate moieties are an integral part of proteoglycan subunits. Specifically, evidence is presented which indicates that proteoglycan monomers contain 3 to 4 phosphate moieties per core protein and that these appear to exist as phosphoserine residues. Furthermore, the data illustrate that human articular cartilage also contains more than 20 different phosphoproteins, some of which are closely associated with proteoglycan aggregates. Proteoglycan subunits were purified from extracts of articular cartilage or from media fractions which had been used to label tissue specimens with 32P-orthophosphate. Chemical and radiographic analyses revealed that the phosphate concentration with respect to sulfate and uronic acid content remained constant when purified proteoglycan monomers were subjected to equilibrium ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography. That the phosphate moieties were bound to proteoglycan monomers via monoester linkages was indicated by the release of 32P-orthophosphate from proteoglycan subunits incubated under mild alkaline conditions or reacted with acid or alkaline phosphatases. Identification of serine residues in the core protein as the sites of phosphorylation was made by autoradiography of thin layer plates on which hydrolyzed samples of purified 32P-proteoglycan subunits had been subjected to 2-dimensional electrophoresis/chromatography. Quantification of 3 to 4 phosphate moieties per core protein of 200,000 daltons was made by chemical analysis of inorganic phosphate released from proteoglycans by acid hydrolysis.

  6. Subtalar Joint Instability and Calcaneal Spurs Associated with the Configuration of the Articular Facets of Adult Human Calcaneum in Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpi; Vasudeva, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Morphological variations of articular facets of calcaneum may predispose people to joint instability, ligamentous laxity and development of arthritic changes in the subtalar joint. Knowledge of such variations is essential for treatment and diagnostic procedures in orthopaedic surgeries. Aim The aim of this study was to determine patterns of articular facets of calcanei and to establish its correlation with calcaneal spurs. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 580 adult calcanei of Indian origin at Maulana Azad Medical College and pattern of articular facets were observed and classified according to five patterns described in literature. A digital vernier calliper was used to measure separation between anterior and middle facet. Degree of intersecting angle between anterior and medial facets was calculated using UTHSCSA Image Tool software. The calcaneal spurs were observed by visual inspection. Results Out of 580 calcanei, 66.55% had fused anterior and middle facets (Pattern I), 27.59% had all three facets separate (Pattern II), 5.52% had absence of anterior facet (Pattern III), 0.17% had all three facets fused (Pattern IV) and 0.17% had fused middle and posterior facets (Pattern V). A significant side variation was present in Pattern III with predominance on left side. Mean angle of intersection was 147.700 in Pattern I and 133.340 in Pattern II calcaneum. Calcaneal spurs were found in 61.38% out of which it was associated with Pattern I in 43.62%, Pattern II in 14.66% and Pattern III in 2.76%. Conclusion Individuals with Pattern I and III calcaneum were found to be at a greater risk of subtalar joint instability than individuals with Pattern II. Angle of intersection was obtuse in Pattern I which resulted in ligament laxity and unstable joint. Pattern I was more common in Indian population and this fact necessitates modifications of the western surgical techniques to suit the Indian scenario. An association between the presence of spur

  7. Basic fibroblast growth factor induces matrix metalloproteinase-13 via ERK MAP kinase-altered phosphorylation and sumoylation of Elk-1 in human adult articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Im, Hee-Jeong; Sharrocks, Andrew D; Lin, Xia; Yan, Dongyao; Kim, Jaesung; van Wijnen, Andre J; Hipskind, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) are principal aspects of the pathology of osteoarthritis (OA). ECM disruption leads to bFGF release, which activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway and its downstream target the Ets-like transcription factor Elk-1. Previously we demonstrated that the bFGF-ERK-Elk-1 signaling axis is responsible for the potent induction of MMP-13 in human primary articular chondrocytes. Here we report that, in addition to phosphorylation of Elk-1, dynamic posttranslational modification of Elk-1 by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) serves as an important mechanism through which MMP-13 gene expression is regulated. We show that bFGF activates Elk-1 mainly through the ERK pathway and that increased phosphorylation of Elk-1 is accompanied by decreased conjugation of SUMO to Elk-1. Reporter gene assays reveal that phosphorylation renders Elk-1 competent for induction of MMP-13 gene transcription, while sumoylation has the opposite effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the SUMO-conjugase Ubc9 acts as a key mediator for Elk-1 sumoylation. Taken together, our results suggest that sumoylation antagonizes the phosphorylation-dependent transactivation capacity of Elk-1. This attenuates transcription of its downstream target gene MMP-13 to maintain the integrity of cartilage ECM homeostasis.

  8. Adult human mesenchymal stem cells delivered via intra-articular injection to the knee following partial medial meniscectomy: a randomized, double-blind, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Vangsness, C Thomas; Farr, Jack; Boyd, Joel; Dellaero, David T; Mills, C Randal; LeRoux-Williams, Michelle

    2014-01-15

    There are limited treatment options for tissue restoration and the prevention of degenerative changes in the knee. Stem cells have been a focus of intense preclinical research into tissue regeneration but limited clinical investigation. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled study, the safety of the intra-articular injection of human mesenchymal stem cells into the knee, the ability of mesenchymal stem cells to promote meniscus regeneration following partial meniscectomy, and the effects of mesenchymal stem cells on osteoarthritic changes in the knee were investigated. A total of fifty-five patients at seven institutions underwent a partial medial meniscectomy. A single superolateral knee injection was given within seven to ten days after the meniscectomy. Patients were randomized to one of three treatment groups: Group A, in which patients received an injection of 50 × 10⁶ allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells; Group B, 150 × 10⁶ allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells; and the control group, a sodium hyaluronate (hyaluronic acid/hyaluronan) vehicle control. Patients were followed to evaluate safety, meniscus regeneration, the overall condition of the knee joint, and clinical outcomes at intervals through two years. Evaluations included sequential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). No ectopic tissue formation or clinically important safety issues were identified. There was significantly increased meniscal volume (defined a priori as a 15% threshold) determined by quantitative MRI in 24% of patients in Group A and 6% in Group B at twelve months post meniscectomy (p = 0.022). No patients in the control group met the 15% threshold for increased meniscal volume. Patients with osteoarthritic changes who received mesenchymal stem cells experienced a significant reduction in pain compared with those who received the control, on the basis of visual analog scale assessments. There was evidence of meniscus regeneration and improvement in knee pain following treatment with

  9. Human patellar articular proportions: recent and Pleistocene patterns

    PubMed Central

    TRINKAUS, ERIK

    2000-01-01

    The degrees of mediolateral asymmetry of the patellar articular facet, as well as the median and lateral articular angles of the facet, were compared across samples of recent humans and of Pleistocene archaic and modern fossil humans. All samples exhibit considerable variability in these patellar proportions. The articular angles are similar across the different samples, but there is a trend towards decreasing lateral angles with decreasing robusticity. The archaic humans exhibit significantly more symmetry of the medial and lateral facets than do any of the recent human samples. However, given the variability in medial versus lateral patellofemoral contact forces documented for extant humans and the roles of the distal oblique portions of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis in patellar stabilisation, it is unclear to what extent this variation in patellar articular proportions may affect knee kinesiology. The contrasts may be related to different levels of patellar stability and/or musculoskeletal hypertrophy, but they appear unlikely to have affected primary knee function. PMID:10853969

  10. Morphological, genetic and phenotypic comparison between human articular chondrocytes and cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mata-Miranda, Mónica Maribel; Martinez-Martinez, Claudia María; Noriega-Gonzalez, Jesús Emmanuel; Paredes-Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Vázquez-Zapién, Gustavo Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue with limited capacity for regeneration. On large articular lesions, it is recommended to use regenerative medicine strategies, like autologous chondrocyte implantation. There is a concern about morphological changes that chondrocytes suffer once they have been isolated and cultured. Due to the fact that there is little evidence that compares articular cartilage chondrocytes with cultured chondrocytes, in this research we proposed to obtain chondrocytes from human articular cartilage, compare them with themselves once they have been cultured and characterize them through genetic, phenotypic and morphological analysis. Knee articular cartilage samples of 10 mm were obtained, and each sample was divided into two fragments; a portion was used to determine gene expression, and from the other portion, chondrocytes were obtained by enzymatic disaggregation, in order to be cultured and expanded in vitro. Subsequently, morphological, genetic and phenotypic characteristics were compared between in situ (articular cartilage) and cultured chondrocytes. Obtained cultured chondrocytes were rounded in shape, possessing a large nucleus with condensed chromatin and a clear cytoplasm; histological appearance was quite similar to typical chondrocyte. The expression levels of COL2A1 and COL10A1 genes were higher in cultured chondrocytes than in situ chondrocytes; moreover, the expression of COL1A1 was almost undetectable on cultured chondrocytes; likewise, COL2 and SOX9 proteins were detected by immunofluorescence. We concluded that chondrocytes derived from adult human cartilage cultured for 21 days do not tend to dedifferentiate, maintaining their capacity to produce matrix and also retaining their synthesis capacity and morphology.

  11. The potential of human allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes for restoration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Adkisson, H Davis; Martin, James A; Amendola, Richard L; Milliman, Curt; Mauch, Kelsey A; Katwal, Arbindra B; Seyedin, Mitchell; Amendola, Annuziato; Streeter, Philip R; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2010-07-01

    Donor-site morbidity, limited numbers of cells, loss of phenotype during ex vivo expansion, and age-related decline in chondrogenic activity present critical obstacles to the use of autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair. Chondrocytes from juvenile cadaveric donors may represent an alternative to autologous cells. Hypothesis/ The authors hypothesized that juvenile chondrocyte would show stronger and more stable chondrogenic activity than adult cells in vitro and that juvenile cells pose little risk of immunologic incompatibility in adult hosts. Controlled laboratory study. Cartilage samples were from juvenile (<13 years old) and adult (>13 years old) donors. The chondrogenic activity of freshly isolated human articular chondrocytes and of expanded cells after monolayer culture was measured by proteoglycan assay, gene expression analysis, and histology. Lymphocyte proliferation assays were used to assess immunogenic activity. Proteoglycan content in neocartilage produced by juvenile chondrocytes was 100-fold higher than in neocartilage produced by adult cells. Collagen type II and type IX mRNA in fresh juvenile chondrocytes were 100- and 700-fold higher, respectively, than in adult chondrocytes. The distributions of collagens II and IX were similar in native juvenile cartilage and in neocartilage made by juvenile cells. Juvenile cells grew significantly faster in monolayer cultures than adult cells (P = .002) and proteoglycan levels produced in agarose culture was significantly higher in juvenile cells than in adult cells after multiple passages (P < .001). Juvenile chondrocytes did not stimulate lymphocyte proliferation. These results document a dramatic age-related decline in human chondrocyte chondrogenic potential and show that allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes do not stimulate an immunologic response in vivo. Juvenile human chondrocytes have greater potential to restore articular cartilage than adult cells, and may be transplanted without the

  12. THE POTENTIAL OF HUMAN ALLOGENEIC JUVENILE CHONDROCYTES FOR RESTORATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Adkisson, H. Davis; Martin, James A.; Amendola, Richard L.; Milliman, Curt; Mauch, Kelsey A.; Katwal, Arbindra B.; Seyedin, Mitchell; Amendola, Annuziato; Streeter, Philip R.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Donor site morbidity, limited numbers of cells, loss of phenotype during ex vivo expansion, and age-related decline in chondrogenic activity present critical obstacles to the use of autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair. Chondrocytes from juvenile cadaveric donors may represent an alternative to autologous cells. Hypothesis/Purpose The authors hypothesized that juvenile chondrocyte would show stronger and more stable chondrogenic activity than adult cells in vitro and that juvenile cells pose little risk of immunologic incompatibility in adult hosts. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Cartilage samples were from juvenile (<13 years old) and adult (> 13 years old) donors. The chondrogenic activity of freshly isolated human articular chondrocytes and of expanded cells after monolayer culture was measured by proteoglycan assay, gene expression analysis, and histology. Lymphocyte proliferation assays were used to assess immunogenic activity. Results Proteoglycan content in neocartilage produced by juvenile chondrocytes was 100-fold higher than in neocartilage produced by adult cells. Collagen type II and type IX mRNAs in fresh juvenile chondrocytes were 100- and 700-fold higher, respectively, than in adult chondrocytes. The distributions of collagens II and IX were similar in native juvenile cartilage and in neocartilage made by juvenile cells. Juvenile cells grew significantly faster in monolayer cultures than adult cells (p = 0.002) and proteoglycan levels produced in agarose culture was significantly higher in juvenile cells than in adult cells after multiple passages (p < 0.001). Juvenile chondrocytes did not stimulate lymphocyte proliferation. Conclusions These results document a dramatic age related decline in human chondrocyte chondrogenic potential and show that allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes do not stimulate an immunologic response in vivo. Clinical Relevance Juvenile human chondrocytes have greater potential to

  13. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes.

  14. The effects of exercise on human articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, F; Hudelmaier, M; Putz, R

    2006-01-01

    The effects of exercise on articular hyaline articular cartilage have traditionally been examined in animal models, but until recently little information has been available on human cartilage. Magnetic resonance imaging now permits cartilage morphology and composition to be analysed quantitatively in vivo. This review briefly describes the methodological background of quantitative cartilage imaging and summarizes work on short-term (deformational behaviour) and long-term (functional adaptation) effects of exercise on human articular cartilage. Current findings suggest that human cartilage deforms very little in vivo during physiological activities and recovers from deformation within 90 min after loading. Whereas cartilage deformation appears to become less with increasing age, sex and physical training status do not seem to affect in vivo deformational behaviour. There is now good evidence that cartilage undergoes some type of atrophy (thinning) under reduced loading conditions, such as with postoperative immobilization and paraplegia. However, increased loading (as encountered by elite athletes) does not appear to be associated with increased average cartilage thickness. Findings in twins, however, suggest a strong genetic contribution to cartilage morphology. Potential reasons for the inability of cartilage to adapt to mechanical stimuli include a lack of evolutionary pressure and a decoupling of mechanical competence and tissue mass. PMID:16637874

  15. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Emi; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  16. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, A.; Barrett-Jolley, R.; Werner, A.; Kelly, R.; Stacey, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca2+ activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  17. Chondrogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Adult Stem Cells by a Porous Scaffold Derived from Native Articular Cartilage Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Nai-Chen; Estes, Bradley T.; Awad, Hani A.

    2009-01-01

    Adipose-derived adult stem cells (ASCs) have the ability to differentiate into a chondrogenic phenotype in response to specific environmental signals such as growth factors or artificial biomaterial scaffolds. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a porous scaffold derived exclusively from articular cartilage can induce chondrogenesis of ASCs. Human ASCs were seeded on porous scaffolds derived from adult porcine articular cartilage and cultured in standard medium without exogenous growth factors. Chondrogenesis of ASCs seeded within the scaffold was evident by quantitative RT-PCR analysis for cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) genes. Histological and immunohistochemical examination showed abundant production of cartilage-specific ECM components—particularly, type II collagen—after 4 or 6 weeks of culture. After 6 weeks of culture, the cellular morphology in the ASC-seeded constructs resembled those in native articular cartilage tissue, with rounded cells residing in the glycosaminoglycan-rich regions of the scaffolds. Biphasic mechanical testing showed that the aggregate modulus of the ASC-seeded constructs increased over time, reaching 150 kPa by day 42, more than threefold higher than that of the unseeded controls. These results suggest that a porous scaffold derived from articular cartilage has the ability to induce chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs without exogenous growth factors, with significant synthesis and accumulation of ECM macromolecules, and the development of mechanical properties approaching those of native cartilage. These findings support the potential for a processed cartilage ECM as a biomaterial scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. Additional in vivo evaluation is necessary to fully recognize the clinical implication of these observations. PMID:18950290

  18. Isolation and characterization of human articular chondrocytes from surgical waste after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)

    PubMed Central

    Gradišnik, Lidija; Gorenjak, Mario; Vogrin, Matjaž

    2017-01-01

    Background Cartilage tissue engineering is a fast-evolving field of biomedical engineering, in which the chondrocytes represent the most commonly used cell type. Since research in tissue engineering always consumes a lot of cells, simple and cheap isolation methods could form a powerful basis to boost such studies and enable their faster progress to the clinics. Isolated chondrocytes can be used for autologous chondrocyte implantation in cartilage repair, and are the base for valuable models to investigate cartilage phenotype preservation, as well as enable studies of molecular features, nature and scales of cellular responses to alterations in the cartilage tissue. Methods Isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes from the surgical waste obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was performed. To evaluate the chondrogenic potential of the isolated cells, gene expression of collagen type 2 (COL2), collagen 1 (COL1) and aggrecan (ACAN) was evaluated. Immunocytochemical staining of all mentioned proteins was performed to evaluate chondrocyte specific production. Results Cartilage specific gene expression of COL2 and ACAN has been shown that the proposed protocol leads to isolation of cells with a high chondrogenic potential, possibly even specific phenotype preservation up to the second passage. COL1 expression has confirmed the tendency of the isolated cells dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like phenotype already in the second passage, which confirms previous findings that higher passages should be used with care in cartilage tissue engineering. To evaluate the effectiveness of our approach, immunocytochemical staining of the evaluated chondrocyte specific products was performed as well. Discussion In this study, we developed a protocol for isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes with the desired phenotype from the surgical waste obtained during TKA. TKA is a common and very

  19. Clinical efflux of cryoprotective agents from vitrified human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hana; Al-Abbasi, Khaled K; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E; Jomha, Nadr M

    2013-04-01

    In previous research, we successfully cryopreserved intact human articular cartilage on its bone base with high chondrocyte viability using a vitrification protocol that entailed sequential exposure to several cryopreserving agents (CPAs) at lowering temperatures resulting in a high final concentration of CPA. The CPA must be removed from the cartilage at warming due to its toxicity to cells in the cryopreserved tissue and the post-transplant adjacent tissues. The current experiment explores the relationship between removal solution volume and time required for complete removal of CPA from bone-cartilage samples. Osteochondral dowels of 10mm diameter from five patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty were vitrified using our protocol resulting in 6.5M CPA within the matrix. In the primary experiment, the warmed dowels were immersed in 10 mL of X-VIVO for 30 min and this was repeated 5 times (the last wash being 5 min only). Removal solution osmolality was recorded at various times and compared to controls of pure X-VIVO. Changes in removal solution osmolality over time were normalized to tissue volume. In a secondary experiment, the procedure was repeated using double the volume of removal solution (20 mL X-VIVO). Results showed a rapid change in the osmolality of the removal solution indicating a rapid efflux of CPA from cartilage. The efflux rate decreased with time and during subsequent immersions until equilibrium was reached during the 4th immersion indicating effectively complete removal of CPA. Doubling the amount of removal solution demonstrated the effective removal of CPAs by the third immersion. The results of this study yield a practical relationship between the amount of removal solution and the time and number of immersions required to remove CPA from the transplantable tissue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Engraft into Rabbit Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; He, Na; Feng, Chenchen; Liu, Victor; Zhang, Luyi; Wang, Fei; He, Jiaping; Zhu, Tengfang; Wang, Shuyang; Qiao, Weiwei; Li, Suke; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Li; Dai, Chengxiang; Cao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to have the potential for articular cartilage regeneration, and are suggested for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Here, we investigated whether intra-articular injection of xenogeneic human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (haMPCs) promoted articular cartilage repair in rabbit OA model and engrafted into rabbit articular cartilage. The haMPCs were cultured in vitro, and phenotypes and differentiation characteristics of cells were evaluated. OA was induced surgically by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) and medical meniscectomy of knee joints. At six weeks following surgery, hyaluronic acid (HA) or haMPCs was injected into the knee joints, the contralateral knee served as normal control. All animals were sacrificed at the 16th week post-surgery. Assessments were carried out by macroscopic examination, hematoxylin/eosin (HE) and Safranin-O/Fast green stainings and immunohistochemistry. The data showed that haMPC treatment promoted cartilage repair. Signals of human mitochondrial can be directly detected in haMPC treated cartilage. The haMPCs expressed human leukocyte antigen I (HLA-I) but not HLA-II-DR in vivo. These results suggest that intra-articular injection of haMPCs promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in rabbit OA model, and support the notion that MPCs are transplantable between HLA-incompatible individuals. PMID:26023716

  1. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells engraft into rabbit articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; He, Na; Feng, Chenchen; Liu, Victor; Zhang, Luyi; Wang, Fei; He, Jiaping; Zhu, Tengfang; Wang, Shuyang; Qiao, Weiwei; Li, Suke; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Li; Dai, Chengxiang; Cao, Wei

    2015-05-27

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to have the potential for articular cartilage regeneration, and are suggested for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Here, we investigated whether intra-articular injection of xenogeneic human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (haMPCs) promoted articular cartilage repair in rabbit OA model and engrafted into rabbit articular cartilage. The haMPCs were cultured in vitro, and phenotypes and differentiation characteristics of cells were evaluated. OA was induced surgically by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) and medical meniscectomy of knee joints. At six weeks following surgery, hyaluronic acid (HA) or haMPCs was injected into the knee joints, the contralateral knee served as normal control. All animals were sacrificed at the 16th week post-surgery. Assessments were carried out by macroscopic examination, hematoxylin/eosin (HE) and Safranin-O/Fast green stainings and immunohistochemistry. The data showed that haMPC treatment promoted cartilage repair. Signals of human mitochondrial can be directly detected in haMPC treated cartilage. The haMPCs expressed human leukocyte antigen I (HLA-I) but not HLA-II-DR in vivo. These results suggest that intra-articular injection of haMPCs promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in rabbit OA model, and support the notion that MPCs are transplantable between HLA-incompatible individuals.

  2. Parathyroid hormone 1-34 reduces dexamethasone-induced terminal differentiation in human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ling-Hua; Wu, Shun-Cheng; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Wang, Gwo-Jaw; Chang, Je-Ken; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2016-08-10

    Intra-articular injection of dexamethasone (Dex) is occasionally used to relieve pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Dex induces terminal differentiation of chondrogenic mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and causes impaired longitudinal skeletal growth in vivo. Parathyroid hormone 1-34 (PTH 1-34) has been shown to reverse terminal differentiation of osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. We hypothesized that Dex induces terminal differentiation of articular chondrocytes and that this effect can be mitigated by PTH 1-34 treatment. We tested the effect of Dex on terminal differentiation in human articular chondrocytes and further tested if PTH 1-34 reverses the effects. We found that Dex treatment downregulated chondrogenic-induced expressions of SOX-9, collagen type IIa1 (Col2a1), and aggrecan and reduced synthesis of cartilaginous matrix (Col2a1 and sulfated glycosaminoglycan) synthesis. Dex treatment upregulated chondrocyte hypertrophic markers of collagen type X and alkaline phosphatase at mRNA and protein levels, and it increased the cell size of articular chondrocytes and induced cell death. These results indicated that Dex induces terminal differentiation of articular chondrocytes. To test whether PTH 1-34 treatment reverses Dex-induced terminal differentiation of articular chondrocytes, PTH 1-34 was co-administered with Dex. Results showed that PTH 1-34 treatment reversed both changes of chondrogenic and hypertrophic markers in chondrocytes induced by Dex. PTH 1-34 also decreased Dex-induced cell death. PTH 1-34 treatment reduces Dex-induced terminal differentiation and apoptosis of articular chondrocytes, and PTH 1-34 treatment may protect articular cartilage from further damage when received Dex administration.

  3. Adenylate cyclase of human articular chondrocytes. Responsiveness to prostaglandins and other hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, J P; McGuire, M K; Meats, J E; Ebsworth, N M; Russell, R G; Crawford, A; Mac Neil, S

    1982-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] was shown to be present in cultured human articular chondrocytes. Optimal conditions of incubation time, protein and substrate concentrations and pH were determined in whole cell lysates. Maximal activity occurred at pH 8.5 with no decrease in activity up to pH 10.0. Adenylate cyclase activity of particulate membrane preparations was enhanced by the addition of crude cytosol preparations. The prostaglandins E1, E2, F1 alpha, F2 alpha, D2, B1, B2, A1 and A2, as well as adrenaline and isoprenaline, stimulated adenylate cyclase derived from either adult or foetal chondrocytes. No significant stimulation was observed in the presence of human calcitonin or glucagon. Bovine parathyroid hormone always significantly stimulated the adenylate cyclase derived from foetal chondrocytes, but not from adult chondrocytes. Preincubation of the chondrocytes in culture with indomethacin and with or without supernatant medium from cultured mononuclear cells increased the responsiveness of the adenylate cyclase to prostaglandin E1. PMID:7159397

  4. Human stem cells and articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Stoltz, J-F; Huselstein, C; Schiavi, J; Li, Y Y; Bensoussan, D; Decot, V; De Isla, N

    2012-12-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage are one of the most challenging issues of musculoskeletal medicine due to the poor intrinsic ability of this tissue for repair. Despite progress in orthopaedic surgery, cell-based surgical therapies such as autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) have been in clinical use for cartilage repair for over a decade but this approach has shown mixed results. Moreover, the lack of efficient modalities of treatment for large chondral defects has prompted research on cartilage tissue engineering combining cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. This paper focuses on the main parameters in tissue engineering and in particular, on the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative to cells derived from patient tissues in autologous transplantation and tissue engineering. We discussed the prospects of using autologous chondrocytes or MSCs in regenerative medicine and summarized the advantages and disadvantages of these cells in articular cartilage engineering.

  5. Physioxia Promotes the Articular Chondrocyte-Like Phenotype in Human Chondroprogenitor-Derived Self-Organized Tissue.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Devon E; Markway, Brandon D; Weekes, Kenneth J; McCarthy, Helen E; Johnstone, Brian

    2017-07-07

    Biomaterial-based tissue engineering has not successfully reproduced the structural architecture or functional mechanical properties of native articular cartilage. In scaffold-free tissue engineering systems, cells secrete and organize the entire extracellular matrix over time in response to environmental signals such as oxygen level. In this study, we investigated the effect of oxygen on the formation of neocartilage from human-derived chondrogenic cells. Articular chondrocytes (ACs) and articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPs) derived from healthy human adults were guided toward cell condensation by centrifugation onto plate inserts that were uncoated or coated with either agarose or fibronectin. Neocartilage discs were cultured at hyperoxic (20%) or physioxic (5%) oxygen levels, and biochemical, biomechanical, and molecular analyses were used to compare the cartilage produced by ACs versus ACPs. Fibronectin-coated inserts proved optimal for growing cartilaginous discs from both cell types. In comparison with culture in hyperoxia, AC neocartilage cultured at physioxia exhibited a significant increase in chondrogenic gene expression, proteoglycan production, and mechanical properties with a concomitant decrease in collagen content. At both oxygen levels, ACP-derived neocartilage produced tissue with significantly enhanced mechanical properties and collagen content relative to AC-derived neocartilage. Both ACs and ACPs produced substantial collagen II and reduced levels of collagens I and X in physioxia relative to hyperoxia. Neocartilage from ACPs exhibited anisotropic organization characteristic of native cartilage with respect to collagen VI of the pericellular matrix when compared with AC-derived neocartilage; however, only ACs produced abundant surface-localized lubricin. Guiding human-derived cells toward condensation and subsequent culture in physioxia promoted the articular cartilage tissue phenotype for ACs and ACPs. Unlike ACs, ACPs are clonable and

  6. Histomorphometric analysis of adult articular calcified cartilage zone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuyou; Ying, Zhang; Duan, Xiaojun; Tan, Hongbo; Yang, Bin; Guo, Lin; Chen, Guangxing; Dai, Gang; Ma, Zhe; Yang, Liu

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a histomorphometric analysis of calcified cartilage zone (CCZ) and its interfaces between hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone. The study used 40 donated normal human femoral condyles, from which paraffin-embedded sections were prepared after fixation and decalcification. The histomorphology of the CCZ were qualitatively and quantitatively observed by staining, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. The hyaline cartilage and CCZ were stained red with Safranin-O, and the subchondral bone was stained blue with Fast green. CCZ was stained black after von Kossa staining. The hyaline cartilage was interlocked tightly in the manner of "ravine-engomphosis" by the CCZ. The surface roughnesses of tidemark and cement line were 1.14+/-0.04 and 1.99+/-0.38. The maximum, minimum and mean thicknesses of CCZ were 277.12+/-8.6, 9.83+/-6.72 and 104.162+/-0.87 microm, respectively. The cell density of CCZ (51.25+/-21.26 cells/mm(2)) was significantly lower than that of the hyaline cartilage (152.54+/-35.77 cells/mm(2)) (P<0.05). The subchondral bone was anchored tightly in the manner of a "comb-anchor" by the CCZ in our 3D reconstruction model. Thus, we discovered two junctional interfaces of CCZ using different histomorphometric methods. The upper interface of CCZ is a "ravine-engomphosis" shape, while its lower interface is a "comb-anchor" shape.

  7. Metric analysis of loading magnitudes at articular and non-articular weight-bearing surfaces in human calcaneus.

    PubMed

    Mahato, Niladri Kumar; Murthy, S Sathiya Narayana

    2013-03-01

    The calcaneus is axially loaded at its articular interface with the talus. A large bulk of this load is transmitted to the ground across the non-articular tubercles at the plantar surface of the bone. A small part of the incumbent load sustained by the calcaneus is directed towards the forefoot at the calcaneo-cuboid junction. This study investigates the proportion of load distributed across the articular and non-articular surfaces of the calcaneus. The present study demonstrates strong and significant correlation between some of the load bearing variables and suggests the need for further investigations to understand the effect of angular aspects of axial loading on the calcaneus. Accounting for the relative distribution of weight across the articular and non-articular areas may enable us to appreciate the internal trabecular structure of the calcaneus in light of its clinical importance.

  8. Traumatic atlantoaxial rotatory fixation associated with C2 articular facet fracture in adult patient: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Bellil, Mehdi; Hadhri, Khaled; Sridi, Maamoun; Kooli, Mondher

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic atlantoaxial rotatory fixation is a very rare injury in adults which is often misdiagnosed initially. Its combination with C2 fractures is predominated by dens lesions. Therapeutic management is challenging because of the difficulty to achieve optimal reduction and permanent stability. We report a rare case of traumatic atlantoaxial rotatory fixation in a 56-year-old women associated with C2 articular facet fracture successfully treated by conservative means after patient-awake manual reduction with optimal functional and radiographic outcome. PMID:25558147

  9. Extraction of high-quality RNA from human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Le Bleu, Heather K; Kamal, Fadia A; Kelly, Meghan; Ketz, John P; Zuscik, Michael J; Elbarbary, Reyad A

    2017-02-01

    Extracting high-quality RNA from articular cartilage is challenging due to low cellularity and high proteoglycan content. This problem hinders efficient application of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis in studying cartilage homeostasis. Here we developed a method that purifies high-quality RNA directly from cartilage. Our method optimized the collection and homogenization steps so as to minimize RNA degradation, and modified the conventional TRIzol protocol to enhance RNA purity. Cartilage RNA purified using our method has appropriate quality for RNA-seq experiments including an RNA integrity number of ∼8. Our method also proved efficient in extracting high-quality RNA from subchondral bone.

  10. Electromechanical probe and automated indentation maps are sensitive techniques in assessing early degenerated human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sotcheadt; Chevrier, Anik; Garon, Martin; Quenneville, Eric; Lavigne, Patrick; Yaroshinsky, Alex; Hoemann, Caroline D; Buschmann, Michael D

    2016-06-09

    Recent advances in the development of new drugs to halt or even reverse the progression of Osteoarthritis at an early-stage requires new tools to detect early degeneration of articular cartilage. We investigated the ability of an electromechanical probe and an automated indentation technique to characterize entire human articular surfaces for rapid non-destructive discrimination between early degenerated and healthy articular cartilage. Human cadaveric asymptomatic articular surfaces (4 pairs of distal femurs and 4 pairs of tibial plateaus) were used. They were assessed ex vivo: macroscopically, electromechanically (maps of the electromechanical quantitative parameter, QP, reflecting streaming potentials), mechanically (maps of the instantaneous modulus, IM) and through cartilage thickness. Osteochondral cores were also harvested from healthy and degenerated regions for histological assessment, biochemical analyses and unconfined compression tests. The macroscopic visual assessment delimited three distinct regions on each articular surface: region I was macroscopically degenerated, region II was macroscopically normal but adjacent to region I and region III was the remaining normal articular surface. Thus, each extracted core was assigned to one of the three regions. A mixed effect model revealed that only the QP (p < 0.0001) and IM (p < 0.0001) were able to statistically discriminate the three regions. Effect size was higher for QP and IM than other assessments, indicating greater sensitivity to distinguish early degeneration of cartilage. When considering the mapping feature of the QP and IM techniques, it also revealed bilateral symmetry in a moderately similar distribution pattern between bilateral joints. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Viscoelastic properties of human and bovine articular cartilage: a comparison of frequency-dependent trends.

    PubMed

    Temple, Duncan K; Cederlund, Anna A; Lawless, Bernard M; Aspden, Richard M; Espino, Daniel M

    2016-10-06

    The purpose of this study was to compare the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of human and bovine cartilage. Full-depth cartilage specimens were extracted from bovine and human femoral heads. Using dynamic mechanical analysis, the viscoelastic properties of eight bovine and six human specimens were measured over the frequency range 1 Hz to 88 Hz. Significant differences between bovine and human cartilage viscoelastic properties were assessed using a Mann-Whitney test (p < 0.05). Throughout the range of frequencies tested and for both species, the storage modulus was greater than the loss modulus and both were frequency-dependent. The storage and loss moduli of all human and bovine cartilage specimens presented a logarithmic relationship with respect to frequency. The mean human storage modulus ranged from 31.9 MPa to 43.3 MPa, while the mean bovine storage modulus ranged from 54.0 MPa to 80.5 MPa; bovine storage moduli were 1.7 to 1.9 times greater than the human modulus. Similarly, the loss modulus of bovine cartilage was 2.0 to 2.1 times greater than human. The mean human loss modulus ranged from 5.3 MPa to 8.5 MPa while bovine moduli ranged from 10.6 MPa to 18.1 MPa. Frequency-dependent viscoelastic trends of bovine articular cartilage were consistent with those of human articular cartilage; this includes a similar frequency dependency and high-frequency plateau. Bovine cartilage was, however, 'stiffer' than human by a factor of approximately 2. With these provisos, bovine articular cartilage may be a suitable dynamic model for human articular cartilage.

  12. Prenatal caffeine exposure induces a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring rats via cholesterol accumulation in cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanwen; Li, Jing; Cao, Hong; Tan, Yang; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that osteoarthritis is associated with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Our previous studies showed that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) induced chondrogenesis retardation in IUGR offspring rats. The current study sought to investigate the effects of PCE on male IUGR offspring rats’ articular cartilage, and the mechanisms associated with abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Based on the results from both male fetal and adult fed a high-fat diet (HFD) studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kg.d), the results showed a poor quality of articular cartilage and cholesterol accumulation in the adult PCE group. Meanwhile, the serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were increased in adult PCE offspring. We also observed lower expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and impaired cholesterol efflux in adult articular cartilage. Furthermore, the expression of cartilage functional genes, components of the IGF1 signaling pathway and cholesterol efflux pathway related genes were decreased in PCE fetal cartilage. In conclusion, PCE induced a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring fed a HFD. This finding was shown to be due to cholesterol accumulation in the cartilage, which may have resulted from intrauterine reduced activity of the IGF1 signaling pathway. PMID:26639318

  13. The role of BKCa channels on hyperpolarization mediated by hyperosmolarity in human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2011-03-01

    Chondrocytes, the only cell in cartilage, are subjected to hyperosmotic challenges continuously since extracellular osmolarity in articular cartilage increases in response to mechanical loads during joint movement. Hyperosmolarity can affect membrane transport, and it is possible that load modulates matrix synthesis through alterations in intracellular composition. In the present study, the effects of hyperosmotic challenges were evaluated using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, whole cell mode on freshly isolated human and bovine articular chondrocytes. In human chondrocytes, hypertonicity induced the activation of outward Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) currents, which were inhibited by iberiotoxin and TEA-Cl. The current induced by hypertonic switching (osmolarity from 300 to 400 mOsm/l) caused cell hyperpolarization (from -39 mV to -70 mV) with a reversal potential of -96 ± 7 mV. These results suggest a role for Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in human articular chondrocytes, leading to hyperpolarization as a consequence of K(+) efflux through these channels. These channels could have a role in the articular chondrocyte's response to a hyperosmotic challenge and matrix metabolism regulation by load.

  14. Differences in articular-eminence inclination between medieval and contemporary human populations.

    PubMed

    Kranjčić, Josip; Vojvodić, Denis; Žabarović, Domagoj; Vodanović, Marin; Komar, Daniel; Mehulić, Ketij

    2012-08-01

    The articular-eminence inclination is an important element in the biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint and the entire masticatory system; however, very little is known about this inclination in archaeological human populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the values of, in addition to the differences between, the articular-eminence inclination in medieval and contemporary human populations. The study was carried out on two dry skull groups. The first group consisted of 14 dry skulls from the medieval culture group Bijelo Brdo (BB) of East Croatia, and the other consisted of 137 recent dry skulls from the osteologic collection of the Institute of Anatomy (IA) in Zagreb. All BB skulls were dentulous, whereas the IA skulls were divided into dentulous and edentulous groups. The articular-eminence inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal plane on digital images of the skull's two lateral views using AutoCAD computer software. The mean value of the articular-eminence inclination in the BB sample group (49.57°) was lower, with a statistical significance (p<0.01), than those of the IA dentulous (61.56°), the IA edentulous (62.54°), and all the combined IA (61.99°) specimens. Because the values of the articular-eminence inclination can vary a lot with reference to the number of specimens and the different methods used for measuring, the obtained values yield only orientational information. Further investigations including a larger number of medieval specimens are needed to confirm the results obtained from this study.

  15. Secretome analysis of human articular chondrocytes unravels catabolic effects of nicotine on the joint.

    PubMed

    Lourido, Lucía; Calamia, Valentina; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Mateos, Jesús; Oreiro, Natividad; Blanco, Francisco J; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint pathology characterized by articular cartilage degradation that lacks from efficient therapy. Since previous epidemiological data show a high controversy regarding the role of smoking in OA, we aimed to evaluate the effects of nicotine (the most physiologically active compound of tobacco) on the joint. Secretome analyses, based on metabolic labeling followed by LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis, were carried out using an in vitro model of articular inflammation (primary human articular chondrocytes treated with interleukin-1β), and also on osteoarthritic cells. ELISA and Western blot assays were performed to verify some of the results. Nineteen proteins were altered by nicotine in the model of articular inflammation, including several cytokines and proteases. We confirmed the increased secretion by nicotine of matrix metalloproteinase 1 and two proposed markers of OA, fibronectin, and chitinase 3-like protein 1. Finally, four components of the extracellular matrix of cartilage were decreased by nicotine in OA chondrocytes. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are modulated by nicotine in cartilage cells, suggesting a negative effect of this drug on the joint. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Arthroscopic Ultrasound Assessment of Articular Cartilage in the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kaleva, Erna; Virén, Tuomas; Saarakkala, Simo; Sahlman, Janne; Sirola, Joonas; Puhakka, Jani; Paatela, Teemu; Kröger, Heikki; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We tested whether an intra-articular ultrasound (IAUS) method could be used to evaluate cartilage status arthroscopically in human knee joints in vivo. Design: Seven patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery of the knee were enrolled in this study. An ultrasonic examination was conducted using the same portals as in the arthroscopic surgery. A high-frequency (40-MHz) ultrasound transducer (diameter = 1 mm) was directed to the desired location on the articular surface under arthroscopic control. In addition to ultrasound data, an IAUS video and optical video through the arthroscope were recorded. Classification of cartilage injuries according to International Cartilage Repair Society, as conducted by the orthopedic surgeon, provided reference data for comparison with the IAUS. Results: The IAUS method was successful in imaging different characteristics of the articular surfaces (e.g., intact surface, surface fibrillation, and lesions of varying depth). In some cases, also the subchondral bone and abnormal internal cartilage structure were visible in the IAUS images. Specifically, using the IAUS, a local cartilage lesion of 1 patient was found to be deeper than estimated arthroscopically. Conclusions: The IAUS method provided a novel arthroscopic method for quantitative imaging of articular cartilage lesions. The IAUS provided quantitative information about the cartilage integrity and thickness, which are not available in conventional arthroscopy. The present equipment is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration for intravascular use and might be transferred to intra-articular use. The invasiveness of the IAUS method might restrict its wider clinical use but combined with arthroscopy, ultrasonic assessment may enlarge the diagnostic potential of arthroscopic surgery. PMID:26069583

  17. Gremlin 1, frizzled-related protein, and Dkk-1 are key regulators of human articular cartilage homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Leijten, J C H; Emons, J; Sticht, C; van Gool, S; Decker, E; Uitterlinden, A; Rappold, G; Hofman, A; Rivadeneira, F; Scherjon, S; Wit, J M; van Meurs, J; van Blitterswijk, C A; Karperien, M

    2012-10-01

    The development of osteoarthritis (OA) may be caused by activation of hypertrophic differentiation of articular chondrocytes. Healthy articular cartilage is highly resistant to hypertrophic differentiation, in contrast to other hyaline cartilage subtypes, such as growth plate cartilage. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism responsible for the difference in the propensity of human articular cartilage and growth plate cartilage to undergo hypertrophic differentiation. Whole-genome gene-expression microarray analysis of healthy human growth plate and articular cartilage derived from the same adolescent donors was performed. Candidate genes, which were enriched in the articular cartilage, were validated at the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels and examined for their potential to inhibit hypertrophic differentiation in two models. In addition, we studied a possible genetic association with OA. Pathway analysis demonstrated decreased Wnt signaling in articular cartilage as compared to growth plate cartilage. This was at least partly due to increased expression of the bone morphogenetic protein and Wnt antagonists Gremlin 1, Frizzled-related protein (FRP), and Dkk-1 at the mRNA and protein levels in articular cartilage. Supplementation of these proteins diminished terminal hypertrophic differentiation without affecting chondrogenesis in long-bone explant cultures and chondrogenically differentiating human mesenchymal stem cells. Additionally, we found that single-nucleotide polymorphism rs12593365, which is located in a genomic control region of GREM1, was significantly associated with a 20% reduced risk of radiographic hip OA in 2 population-based cohorts. Taken together, our study identified Gremlin 1, FRP, and Dkk-1 as natural brakes on hypertrophic differentiation in articular cartilage. As hypertrophic differentiation of articular cartilage may contribute to the development of OA, our findings may open new avenues for therapeutic

  18. In situ measurements of human articular cartilage stiffness by means of a scanning force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imer, Raphaël; Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nico F.; Stolz, Martin; Aebi, Ueli; Kilger, Robert; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Wirz, Dieter; Daniels, A. U.; Staufer, Urs

    2007-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a painful and disabling progressive joint disease, characterized by degradation of articular cartilage. In order to study this disease at early stages, we have miniaturized and integrated a complete scanning force microscope into a standard arthroscopic device fitting through a standard orthopedic canula. This instrument will allow orthopedic surgeons to measure the mechanical properties of articular cartilage at the nanometer and micrometer scale in-vivo during a standard arthroscopy. An orthopedic surgeon assessed the handling of the instrument. First measurements of the elasticity-modulus of human cartilage were recorded in a cadaver knee non minimal invasive. Second, minimally invasive experiments were performed using arthroscopic instruments. Load-displacement curves were successfully recorded.

  19. Decellularization of porcine articular cartilage explants and their subsequent repopulation with human chondroprogenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lu; Eswaramoorthy, Rajalakshmanan; Mulhall, Kevin J; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-03-01

    Engineering tissues with comparable structure, composition and mechanical functionality to native articular cartilage remains a challenge. One possible solution would be to decellularize xenogeneic articular cartilage in such a way that the structure of the tissue is maintained, and to then repopulate this decellularized matrix with human chondroprogenitor cells that will facilitate the reconstitution, maintenance and eventual turnover of the construct following implantation. The overall objective of this study was to develop a protocol to efficiently decellularize porcine articular cartilage grafts and to identify a methodology to subsequently repopulate such explants with human chondroprogenitor cells. To this end, channels were first introduced into cylindrical articular cartilage explants, which were then decellularized with a combination of various chemical reagents including sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and nucleases. The decellularization protocol resulted in a ~90% reduction in porcine DNA content, with little observed effect on the collagen content and the collagen architecture of the tissue, although a near-complete removal of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) and a related reduction in tissue compressive properties was observed. The introduction of channels did not have any detrimental effect on the biochemical or the mechanical properties of the decellularized tissue. Next, decellularized cartilage explants with or without channels were seeded with human infrapatellar fat pad derived stem cells (FPSCs) and cultured chondrogenically under either static or rotational conditions for 10 days. Both channeled and non-channeled explants supported the viability, proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of FPSCs. The addition of channels facilitated cell migration and subsequent deposition of cartilage-specific matrix into more central regions of these explants. The application of rotational culture appeared to promote a less proliferative cellular

  20. Effect of arthroscopic lavage and repeated intra-articular administrations of antibiotic in adult horses and foals with septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cousty, Matthieu; David Stack, John; Tricaud, Cyril; David, Florent

    2017-08-03

    To evaluate the effect of arthroscopic lavage and repeated intra-articular administration of antibiotic in adult horses and foals with septic arthritis. Retrospective clinical study. Adult horses and foals with septic arthritis (n = 62). Age, sex, cause of septic synovitis, joint involved, hospitalization time, and outcome were recorded. Arthroscopic lavage was performed at day 0 (D 0). Synovial fluid was collected every 48 hours prior to intra-articular administration of antibiotic, and until hospital discharge. Synovial nucleated cell count, total protein, and percentage of neutrophils were compared across time and between subjects with a favorable or unfavorable outcome. Synovial nucleated cell counts decreased progressively and were lower at all times compared to D 0. Percentages of neutrophils were lower than baseline at D 8 and 10, only. Total protein contents decreased progressively and were lower than baseline at D 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 14. When adult horses and foals with a favorable outcome were compared to those with an unfavorable outcome, the nucleated cell count was lower at D 10, 12, and 14 and the percentage of neutrophils was lower at D 4 only, but total protein content did not differ between groups at any time. Synovial nucleated cell counts and total protein concentrations decreased after arthroscopic lavage and repeated intra-articular administration of antibiotic in horses and foals with septic arthritis. Synovial nucleated cell count is limited as a monitoring tool during treatment of septic arthritis. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. Establishment of a reliable method for direct proteome characterization of human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Lionneton, Frédéric; Kratassiouk, Gueorgui; Guillemin, François; Netter, Patrick; Mainard, Didier; Magdalou, Jacques

    2006-10-01

    Articular cartilage consists mainly of extracellular matrix, mostly made of collagens and proteoglycans. These macromolecules have so far impaired the detailed two-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomic analysis of articular cartilage. Here we describe a method for selective protein extraction from cartilage, which excludes proteoglycans and collagen species, thus allowing direct profiling of the protein content of cartilage by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Consistent electrophoretic patterns of more than 600 protein states were reproducibly obtained after silver staining from 500 mg of human articular cartilage from joints with diverse pathologies. The extraction yield increased when the method was applied to a chondrosarcoma sample, consistent with selective extraction of cellular components. Nearly 200 of the most intensely stained protein spots were analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry after trypsin digestion. They represented 127 different proteins with diverse functions. Our method provides a rapid, efficient, and pertinent alternative to previously proposed approaches for proteomic characterization of cartilage phenotypes. It will be useful for detecting protein expression patterns that relate pathophysiological processes of cartilaginous tissues such as osteoarthritis and chondrosarcoma.

  2. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA). Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (IHH), Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin like growth factor (IGF) and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC) repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint. PMID:26287176

  3. Iron oxide labelling of human mesenchymal stem cells in collagen hydrogels for articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Heymer, Andrea; Haddad, Daniel; Weber, Meike; Gbureck, Uwe; Jakob, Peter M; Eulert, Jochen; Nöth, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    For the development of new therapeutical cell-based strategies for articular cartilage repair, a reliable cell monitoring technique is required to track the cells in vivo non-invasively and repeatedly. We present a systematic and detailed study on the performance and biological impact of a simple and efficient labelling protocol for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Commercially available very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOPs) were used as magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Iron uptake via endocytosis was confirmed histologically with prussian blue staining and quantified by mass spectrometry. Compared with unlabelled cells, VSOP-labelling did neither influence the viability nor the proliferation potential of hMSCs. Furthermore, iron incorporation did not affect hMSCs in undergoing adipogenic, osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation, as demonstrated histologically and by gene expression analyses. The efficiency of the labelling protocol was assessed with high-resolution MR imaging at 11.7T. VSOP-labelled hMSCs were visualised in a collagen type I hydrogel, which is in clinical use for matrix-based articular cartilage repair. The presence of VSOP-labelled hMSCs was indicated by distinct hypointense spots in the MR images, as a result of iron specific loss of signal intensity. In summary, this labelling technique has great potential to visualise hMSCs and track their migration after transplantation for articular cartilage repair with MR imaging.

  4. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N

    2015-08-14

    Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA). Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (IHH), Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin like growth factor (IGF) and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC) repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint.

  5. Boundary mode lubrication of articular cartilage by recombinant human lubricin.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Jones, Aled R C; Flannery, Carl R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-06-01

    Lubrication of cartilage involves a variety of physical and chemical factors, including lubricin, a synovial glycoprotein that has been shown to be a boundary lubricant. It is unclear how lubricin boundary lubricates a wide range of bearings from tissue to artificial surfaces, and if the mechanism is the same for both soluble and bound lubricin. In the current study, experiments were conducted to investigate the hypothesis that recombinant human lubricin (rh-lubricin) lubricates cartilage in a dose-dependent manner and that soluble and bound fractions of rh-lubricin both contribute to the lubrication process. An rh-lubricin dose response was observed with maximal lubrication achieved at concentrations of rh-lubricin greater than 50 microg/mL. A concentration-response variable-slope model was fit to the data, and indicated that rh-lubricin binding to cartilage was not first order. The pattern of decrease in equilibrium friction coefficient indicated that aggregation of rh-lubricin or steric arrangement may regulate boundary lubrication. rh-lubricin localized at the cartilage surface was found to lubricate a cartilage-glass interface in boundary mode, as did soluble rh-lubricin at high concentrations (150 microg/mL); however, the most effective lubrication occurred when both soluble and bound rh-lubricin were present at the interface. These findings point to two distinct mechanisms by which rh-lubricin lubricates, one mechanism involving lubricin bound to the tissue surface and the other involving lubricin in solution.

  6. Human articular chondrocytes express functional leukotriene B4 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ann Kristin; Indrevik, Jill-Tove; Figenschau, Yngve; Martinez-Zubiaurre, Inigo; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur

    2015-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant associated with the development of osteoarthritis (OA), while its receptors BLT1 and BLT2 have been found in synovium and subchondral bone. In this study, we have investigated whether these receptors are also expressed by human cartilage cells and their potential effects on cartilage cells. The expression of LTB4 receptors in native tissue and cultured cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and electron microscopy. The functional significance of the LTB4 receptor expression was studied by Western blotting, using phospho-specific antibodies in the presence or absence of receptor antagonists. In further studies, the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors and metalloproteinases by LTB4-stimulated chondrocytes was measured by multiplex protein assays. The effects of LTB4 in cartilage signature gene expression in cultured cells were assessed by quantitative PCR, whereas the LTB4-promoted matrix synthesis was determined using 3D pellet cultures. Both receptors were present in cultured chondrocytes, as was confirmed by immunolabelling and PCR. The relative quantification by PCR demonstrated a higher expression of the receptors in cells from healthy joints compared with OA cases. The stimulation of cultured chondrocytes with LTB4 resulted in a phosphorylation of downstream transcription factor Erk 1/2, which was reduced after blocking BLT1 signalling. No alteration in the secretion of cytokine and metalloproteinases was recorded after challenging cultured cells with LTB4; likewise, cartilage matrix gene expression and 3D tissue synthesis were unaffected. Chondrocytes express BLT1 and BLT2 receptors, and LTB4 activates the downstream Erk 1/2 pathway by engaging the high-affinity receptor BLT1. However, any putative role in cartilage biology could not be revealed, and remains to be clarified. PMID:25677035

  7. Surface markers and gene expression to characterize the differentiation of monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Takashi; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Nakashima, Motoshige; Ono, Yohei; Mitsuyama, Hirohito; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a method of cartilage repair. To improve the quality of regenerated tissue by ACI, it is essential to identify surface marker expression correlated with the differentiation status of monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes and to define the index for discriminating dedifferentiated cells from monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes. Normal human articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer until passage 4. At each passage, mRNA expression of collagen type I, II, and X and aggrecan was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR, and the surface marker expression of CD14, CD26, CD44, CD49a, CD49c, CD54, and CD151 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The ratios of mRNA levels of collagen type II to I (Col II/Col I) represented the differentiation status of chondrocytes more appropriately during monolayer culture. The surface marker expression of CD44, CD49c, and CD151 was upregulated according to the dedifferentiation status, whereas that of CD14, CD49a, and CD54 was downregulated. The most appropriate combination of the ratio of Col II/Col I was CD54 and CD44. Cell sorting was performed using a magnetic cell sorting system (MACS) according to CD54 and CD44, and real-time quantitative PCR was performed for the cell subpopulations before and after cell sorting. The expression of collagen type II and aggrecan of the chondrocytes after MACS was higher than that before sorting, but not significantly. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) ratio of CD54 to CD44 could be an adequate candidate as the index of the differentiation status.

  8. Chondroprotective effects of taurine in primary cultures of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lu, Zhenhui; Wu, Huayu; Zheng, Li

    2015-03-01

    Articular cartilage is characterized by the lack of blood vessels and has a poor self-healing potential. Limited cell numbers and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes when expanded in vitro are the major obstacles of autologous chondrocyte implantation. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a cell-based treatment that can be used as a second-line measure to regenerate chondral or osteochondral defects in younger, active patients. There is an urgent need to find an effective chondrogenic protection agent alleviating or inhibiting chondrocyte dedifferentiation. In this study, we explored the effect of taurine (2-aminoethane sulfonic acid) on proliferation and phenotype maintenance of human articular chondrocytes by analyzing the cell proliferation, morphology, viability, and expression of cartilage specific mRNAs and proteins. Primary chondrocytes were isolated from human articular cartilage tissues. Results showed that taurine effectively promoted chondrocyte growth and enhanced accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and collagens in the conditioned media of chondrocytes. Moreover, taurine exposure caused significant increases in the relative expression levels of mRNAs for cartilage specific markers, including aggrecan, collagen type II and SOX9. Aggrecan is a cartilage-specific proteoglycan, and SOX9 is a chondrogenic transcription factor. In contrast, the mRNA expression of collagen type I, a marker for chondrocyte dedifferentiation, was significantly decreased in cells treated with taurine, indicating that taurine inhibits the chondrocyte dedifferentiation. This study reveals that taurine is effective in proliferation promotion and phenotype maintenance of chondrocytes. Thus, taurine may be a useful pro-chondrogenic agent for autologous chondrocyte implantation in the treatment of cartilage repair.

  9. Chondrogenic potential of human articular chondrocytes and skeletal stem cells: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwei; Sengers, Bram G; Oreffo, Richard OC

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine strategies have increasingly focused on skeletal stem cells (SSCs), in response to concerns such as donor site morbidity, dedifferentiation and limited lifespan associated with the use of articular chondrocytes for cartilage repair. The suitability of SSCs for cartilage regeneration, however, remains to be fully determined. This study has examined the chondrogenic potential of human STRO-1-immunoselected SSCs (STRO-1+ SSCs), in comparison to human articular chondrocytes (HACs), by utilising two bioengineering strategies, namely “scaffold-free” three-dimensional (3-D) pellet culture and culture using commercially available, highly porous, 3-D scaffolds with interconnected pore networks. STRO-1+ SSCs were isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting from bone marrow samples of haematologically normal osteoarthritic individuals following routine hip replacement procedures. Chondrocytes were isolated by sequential enzymatic digestion of deep zone articular cartilage pieces dissected from femoral heads of the same individuals. After expansion in monolayer cultures, the harvested cell populations were centrifuged to form high-density 3-D pellets and also seeded in the 3-D scaffold membranes, followed by culture in serum-free chondrogenic media under static conditions for 21 and 28 days, respectively. Chondrogenic differentiation was determined by gene expression, histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Robust cartilage formation and expression of hyaline cartilage-specific markers were observed in both day-21 pellets and day-28 explants generated using HACs. In comparison, STRO-1+ SSCs demonstrated significantly lower chondrogenic differentiation potential and a tendency for hypertrophic differentiation in day-21 pellets. Culture of STRO-1+ SSCs in the 3-D scaffolds improved the expression of hyaline cartilage-specific markers in day-28 explants, however, was unable to prevent hypertrophic differentiation of the SSC population. The

  10. Quantitative analysis of gene expression in human articular chondrocytes assigned for autologous implantation.

    PubMed

    Barlic, Ariana; Drobnic, Matej; Malicev, Elvira; Kregar-Velikonja, Nevenka

    2008-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) relies on the implantation of in vitro expanded cells. The aim was to study the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes under different cultivating conditions [days 0-10 in the primary culture (P0); passages in a monolayer from P0 to P3; monolayer vs. alginate and monolayer vs. alginate/agarose hydrogels] using real-time PCR analysis. The relative gene expressions for collagen type I and II, aggrecan and versican were quantified and the corresponding differentiation indexes (Col2/Col1, Agr/Ver) were calculated. The values of both differentiation indexes decreased exponentially with time in the P0 monolayer culture, and continued with a significant decrease over the subsequent monolayer passages. On the contrary, the chondrocytes seeded in either of the hydrogels significantly increased the indexes compared to their parallel monolayer cultures. These results indicate that alginate and alginate/agarose hydrogels offer an appropriate environment for human articular chondrocytes to redifferentiate after being expanded in vitro. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel chondrocyte cultures present not only surgical, but also biological advantage over the classic suspension-periosteum chondrocyte implantation. (c) 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. Opiates do not violate the viability and proliferative activity of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chechik, Ofir; Arbel, Ron; Salai, Moshe; Gigi, Roy; Beilin, Mark; Flaishon, Ron; Sever, Ronen; Khashan, Morsi; Ben-Tov, Tomer; Gal-Levy, Ronit; Yayon, Avner; Blumenstein, Sara

    2014-09-01

    Articular cartilage injuries present a challenge for the clinician. Autologous chondrocyte implantation embedded in scaffolds are used to treat cartilage defects with favorable outcomes. Autologous serum is often used as a medium for chondrocyte cell culture during the proliferation phase of the process of such products. A previous report showed that opiate analgesics (fentanyl, alfentanil and diamorphine) in the sera have a significant inhibitory effect on chondrocyte proliferation. In order to determine if opiates in serum inhibit chondrocyte proliferation, twenty two patients who underwent knee arthroscopy and were anesthetized with either fentanyl or remifentanil were studied. Blood was drawn before and during opiate administration and up to 2 h after its discontinuation. The sera were used as medium for in vitro proliferation of both cryopreserved and freshly isolated chondrocytes, and the number and viability of cells were measured. There was no difference in the yield or cell viability between the serum samples of patients anesthetized with fentanyl when either fresh or cryopreserved human articular chondrocytes (hACs) were used. Some non-significant reduction in the yield of cells was observed in the serum samples of patients anesthetized with remifentanil when fresh hAC were used. We conclude that Fentanyl in human autologous serum does not inhibit in vitro hAC proliferation. Remifentanil may show minimal inhibitory effect on in vitro fresh hAC proliferation.

  12. Machine learning classification of OARSI-scored human articular cartilage using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ashinsky, Beth G.; Coletta, Christopher E.; Bouhrara, Mustapha; Lukas, Vanessa A.; Boyle, Julianne M.; Reiter, David A.; Neu, Corey P.; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Spencer, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of machine learning to discriminate between magnetic resonance images (MRI) of normal and pathological human articular cartilage obtained under standard clinical conditions. Method An approach to MRI classification of cartilage degradation is proposed using pattern recognition and multivariable regression in which image features from MRIs of histologically scored human articular cartilage plugs were computed using weighted neighbor distance using compound hierarchy of algorithms representing morphology (WND-CHRM). The WND-CHRM method was first applied to several clinically available MRI scan types to perform binary classification of normal and osteoarthritic osteochondral plugs based on the OARSI histological system. In addition, the image features computed from WND-CHRM were used to develop a multiple linear least-squares regression model for classification and prediction of an OARSI score for each cartilage plug. Results The binary classification of normal and osteoarthritic plugs yielded results of limited quality with accuracies between 36% and 70%. However, multiple linear least-squares regression successfully predicted OARSI scores and classified plugs with accuracies as high as 86%. The present results improve upon the previously-reported accuracy of classification using average MRI signal intensities and parameter values. Conclusion MRI features detected by WND-CHRM reflect cartilage degradation status as assessed by OARSI histologic grading. WND-CHRM is therefore of potential use in the clinical detection and grading of osteoarthritis. PMID:26067517

  13. Effects of osmotic challenges on membrane potential in human articular chondrocytes from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2010-01-01

    Changes in external osmolarity arise from variations in mechanical loads on joints and may affect the homeostasis of chondrocytes, which are the only cell type responsible for matrix turnover. Accordingly, variations in membrane potential may affect cartilage production. The present study assessed the effects of variations in external osmolarity on membrane potential and the possible mechanisms responsible for this response. Membrane potential was measured by the patch clamp whole-cell technique using human articular chondrocytes freshly isolated from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. The membrane potential was -39±4 mV in articular human chondrocytes from healthy cartilage and -26±4 mV in those from osteoarthritic cartilage. Increasing the osmolarity produced a reversible hyperpolarization mediated by K+ efflux through BKCa channels in both groups of chondrocytes, but the response in osteoarthritic cells was significantly reduced; no other K+ pathways were involved in this effect. Alternatively, decreasing the osmolarity elicited depolarization in healthy chondrocytes but did not produce any response in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage. The depolarization was dependent on Na+ influx through Gd3+-sensitive stretch-activated cation channels and was independent of external Ca2+. The differential responses observed in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage suggest that disregulation on the responses to external osmolarity may be involved in the process that leads to the alterations in the cartilage structure observed in osteoarthritis.

  14. Chronic exposure of bone morphogenetic protein-2 favors chondrogenic expression in human articular chondrocytes amplified in monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Claus, S; Aubert-Foucher, E; Demoor, M; Camuzeaux, B; Paumier, A; Piperno, M; Damour, O; Duterque-Coquillaud, M; Galéra, P; Mallein-Gerin, F

    2010-12-15

    Articular cartilage is a specialized connective tissue containing chondrocytes embedded in a network of extracellular macromolecules such as type II collagen and presents poor capacity to self-repair. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is worldwide used for treatment of focal damage to articular cartilage. However, dedifferentiation of chondrocytes occurs during the long term culture necessary for mass cell production. The aim of this study was to investigate if addition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, a strong inducer of chondrogenic expression, to human chondrocytes immediately after their isolation from cartilage, could help to maintain their chondrogenic phenotype in long-term culture conditions. Human articular chondrocytes were cultured according to the procedure used for ACT. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the cellular phenotype. Exogenous BMP-2 dramatically improves the chondrogenic character of knee articular chondrocytes amplified over two passages, as assessed by the BMP-2 stimulation on type II procollagen expression and synthesis. This study reveals that BMP-2 could potentially serve as a therapeutic agent for supporting the chondrogenic phenotype of human articular chondrocytes expanded in the conditions generally used for ACT. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Mechanical Stimulation Protocols of Human Derived Cells in Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering - A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Khozoee, Baktash; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim S

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation is a key factor in articular cartilage generation and maintenance. Bioreactor systems have been designed and built in order to deliver specific types of mechanical stimulation. The focus has been twofold, applying a type of preconditioning in order to stimulate cell differentiation, and to simulate in vivo conditions in order to gain further insight into how cells respond to different stimulatory patterns. Due to the complex forces at work within joints, it is difficult to simulate mechanical conditions using a bioreactor. The aim of this review is to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of mechanical stimulation protocols by comparing those employed in bioreactors in the context of tissue engineering for articular cartilage, and to consider their effects on cultured cells. Allied and Complementary Medicine 1985 to 2016, Ovid MEDLINE[R] 1946 to 2016, and Embase 1974 to 2016 were searched using key terms. Results were subject to inclusion and exclusion criteria, key findings summarised into a table and subsequently discussed. Based on this review it is overwhelmingly clear that mechanical stimulation leads to increased chondrogenic properties in the context of bioreactor articular cartilage tissue engineering using human cells. However, given the variability and lack of controlled factors between research articles, results are difficult to compare, and a standardised method of evaluating stimulation protocols proved challenging. With improved standardisation in mechanical stimulation protocol reporting, bioreactor design and building processes, along with a better understanding of joint behaviours, we hope to perform a meta-analysis on stimulation protocols and methods. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. The effect of recombinant human fibroblast growth factor-18 on articular cartilage following single impact load.

    PubMed

    Barr, Lynne; Getgood, Alan; Guehring, Hans; Rushton, Neil; Henson, Frances M D

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to ascertain the effect of recombinant human Fibroblast Growth Factor-18 (rhFGF18) on the repair response of mechanically damaged articular cartilage. Articular cartilage discs were harvested from healthy mature horses (n = 4) and subjected to single impact load (SIL). The impacted explants, together with unimpacted controls were cultured in modified DMEM ± 200 ng/ml rhFGF18 for up to 30 days. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release into the media was measured using the dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay. Aggrecan neopepitope CS846, collagen type II synthesis (CPII) and cleavage (C2C) were measured by ELISA. Histological analysis and TUNEL staining were used to assess repair cell number and cell death. Impacted explants treated with rhFGF18 showed significantly more GAG and CS846 release into the media (p < 0.05), there was also a significant decrease in C2C levels at Day 20. Loaded sections treated with rhFGF18 had more repair cells and significantly less cell death (p < 0.001) at Day 30 in culture. In an in vitro damage/repair model, rhFGF18 increases the proteoglycan synthesis, the repair cell number and prevents apoptosis at Day 30. This suggests that rhFGF18 may be a good candidate for enhancement of cartilage repair following mechanical damage. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effect of anti-inflammatory drugs on sulphated glycosaminoglycan synthesis in aged human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, L S; Horsburgh, B A; Ghosh, P; Taylor, T K

    1976-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory drugs, sodium salicylate, indomethacin, hydrocortisone, ibuprofen, and flurbiprofen, were examined for their effects on sulphated glycosaminoglycan synthesis in aged human cartilage in vitro. Cartilage was obtained from femoral heads removed during surgery and drug effects were found to vary significantly from one head to another. Statistical analysis of the results showed that sodium salicylate exhibits concentration-dependent inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis over the concentration range used. Indomethacin, hydrocortisone, and ibuprofen, at concentrations comparable to those attained in man, caused a statistically significant depression of sulphated glycosaminoglycan synthesis in cartilage from some femoral heads but not others, reflecting the variable response of human articular cartilage to anti-inflammatory drugs. Sodium salicylate and indomethacin at higher doses produced significant (Pless than 0-005) inhibition of sulphated glycosaminoglycan synthesis in all femoral heads studied. The results for flurbiprofen were less conclusive; this compound appears not to inhibit glycosaminoglycan synthesis over the concentration range used. PMID:1008617

  18. In Situ Recruitment of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Chemokines for Articular Cartilage Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Sung; Kim, Yun Hee; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Park, Jong Chul; Yoon, Dong Suk; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Jin Woo

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are a good cell source for regeneration of cartilage as they can migrate directly to the site of cartilage injury and differentiate into articular chondrocytes. Articular cartilage defects do not heal completely due to the lack of chondrocytes or BMSCs at the site of injury. In this study, the chemotaxis of BMSCs toward chemokines, which may give rise to a complete regeneration of the articular cartilage, was investigated. CCR2, CCR4, CCR6, CXCR1, and CXCR2 were expressed in normal BMSCs and were increased significantly upon treatment with proinflammatory cytokines. BMSC migration was increased by MIP-3α and IL-8 more than by MCP-1 or SDF-1α. IL-8 and MIP-3α significantly enhanced the chemotaxis of BMSCs compared with MCP-1, SDF-1α, or PBS. Human BMSC recruitment to transplanted scaffolds containing either IL-8 or MIP-3α significantly increased in vivo compared to scaffolds containing PBS. Furthermore, IL-8- and MIP-3α-containing scaffolds enhanced tissue regeneration of an osteochondral defect site in beagle knee articular cartilage. Therefore, this study suggests that IL-8 and MIP-3α are the candidates that induce the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage.

  19. [Effects of meniscectomy and transplantation of human knee on stress of tibiofemoral articular surface].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xishun; Zhang, Yadong; Hou, Shuxun; Wu, Wenwen; Zhang, Hong; Luo, Dianzhong; Gu, Dongqiang; Zhao, Yantao

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of meniscectomy and transplantation repair ot the knee on the stress area and average pressure of the tibiofemoral articular surface so as to provide a reference for the relevant basic and clinical researches. Seven qualified right knee joints from adult men cadavers were selected. Required structure was retained after careful dissection. The pressure-sensitive paper was clipped to the proper size in accordance with the measured size of the tibial platform to reserve. The experiment was divided into 4 groups: normal knee group (group A), knee meniscus injury group (group B), knee meniscectomy group (group C), and knee meniscus transplantation group (group D). A horizontal incision above the meniscus was made in the position of knee joint capsule, and the pressure-sensitive paper was placed into the medial and lateral space of the knee joint, then the proximal tibia and distal femur were fixed stably and finally a universal mechanical machine was used for testing in appropriate environmental conditions (the knee joints were given longitudinal 700 N pressure at 00 extension and 30, 60, 90, and 1200 flexion for continuous 120 seconds) until the full color reaction. The knee models were prepared, and then the universal mechanical machine was used to perform a test according to the method stated above respectively. The pressure-sensitive paper was removed, and the color negative films were separated and marked. Colorful image analysis system was used to calculate and analyze the stress area and average pressure after the scanner being used to collect image information. The stress area was gradually reduced and the average pressure was gradually increased with increasing flexion angle of the knee. There was significant difference in the stress area and the average pressure between various flexion angles in 4 groups (P < 0.05). Group C had significantly lower stress area and significantly higher average pressure than the other 3 groups (P < 0

  20. The effect of oxygen tension on human articular chondrocyte matrix synthesis: Integration of experimental and computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, S; Oreffo, ROC; Sengers, BG; Tare, RS

    2014-01-01

    Significant oxygen gradients occur within tissue engineered cartilaginous constructs. Although oxygen tension is an important limiting parameter in the development of new cartilage matrix, its precise role in matrix formation by chondrocytes remains controversial, primarily due to discrepancies in the experimental setup applied in different studies. In this study, the specific effects of oxygen tension on the synthesis of cartilaginous matrix by human articular chondrocytes were studied using a combined experimental-computational approach in a “scaffold-free” 3D pellet culture model. Key parameters including cellular oxygen uptake rate were determined experimentally and used in conjunction with a mathematical model to estimate oxygen tension profiles in 21-day cartilaginous pellets. A threshold oxygen tension (pO2 ≈ 8% atmospheric pressure) for human articular chondrocytes was estimated from these inferred oxygen profiles and histological analysis of pellet sections. Human articular chondrocytes that experienced oxygen tension below this threshold demonstrated enhanced proteoglycan deposition. Conversely, oxygen tension higher than the threshold favored collagen synthesis. This study has demonstrated a close relationship between oxygen tension and matrix synthesis by human articular chondrocytes in a “scaffold-free” 3D pellet culture model, providing valuable insight into the understanding and optimization of cartilage bioengineering approaches. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 1876–1885. PMID:24668194

  1. Molecular Characterization of Articular Cartilage from Young Adults with Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shingo; Rai, Muhammad Farooq; Gill, Corey S.; Zhang, Zhiqi; Sandell, Linda J.; Clohisy, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement is a frequent cause of hip pain and may lead to secondary osteoarthritis, yet little is known about the molecular events linking mechanical hip impingement and articular cartilage degeneration. The first goal of this study was to quantify the expression of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine, matrix-degrading, and extracellular matrix genes in articular cartilage harvested from control hips and hips with femoroacetabular impingement and end-stage osteoarthritis. The second goal was to analyze the relative expression of these genes in articular cartilage harvested at various stages of osteoarthritis. Methods: Cartilage samples were obtained from thirty-two hips undergoing hip preservation surgery for femoroacetabular impingement or hip arthroplasty. Three control cartilage samples were also analyzed. Specimens were graded intraoperatively with regard to the severity of cartilage damage, the radiographic osteoarthritis grade was recorded, and quantitative RT-PCR (real-time polymerase chain reaction) was performed to determine relative gene expression. Results: Except for interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and CXCL2, the mRNA (messenger RNA) expression of all other chemokine (IL-8, CXCL1, CXCL3, CXCL6, CCL3, and CCL3L1), matrix-degrading (matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-13 and ADAMTS-4), and structural matrix (COL2A1 [collagen, type II, alpha] and ACAN [aggregan]) genes was higher overall in cartilage from hips with femoroacetabular impingement compared with hips with osteoarthritis and normal controls. The differences reached significance (p ≤ 0.05) for seven of these ten quantified genes, with CXCL3, CXCL6, and COL2A1 being elevated in the femoroacetabular impingement group compared with only the control group and IL-8, CCL3L1, ADAMTS-4, and ACAN being elevated compared with both the osteoarthritis and control groups. When samples were grouped according to the stage of the degenerative cascade, mRNA expression was relatively higher in

  2. Biochemical and metabolic abnormalities in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, J.; Treadwell, B.V.; Mankin, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    Incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules was studied with human normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage organ culture. Analysis of the salt extracted matrix components separated by cesium chloride buoyant density gradient centrifugation showed an increase in the specific activities of all gradient fractions prepared from the osteoarthritic cartilage. Further analysis of these fractions showed the osteoarthritic cartilage contained 5 times as much sulfate incorporated into proteoglycans, and an even greater amount of 3H-glucosamine incorporated into material sedimenting to the middle of the gradient. Greater than half of this radioactive middle fraction appears to be hyaluronate, as judged by the position it elutes from a DEAE column and its susceptibility to hyaluronidase digestion. This study supports earlier findings showing increased rates of macromolecular synthesis in osteoarthritis, and in addition, an even greater synthetic rate for hyaluronic acid is demonstrated.

  3. Effect of nitric oxide on mitochondrial respiratory activity of human articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maneiro, E; Lopez-Armada, M; de Andres, M C; Carames, B; Martin, M; Bonilla, A; del Hoyo, P; Galdo, F; Arenas, J; Blanco, F

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial activity and its relation with the apoptosis of human articular chondrocytes. Materials and methods: Mitochondrial function was evaluated by analysing respiratory chain enzyme complexes, citrate synthase (CS) activities, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). The activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes (complex I: NADH CoQ1 reductase, complex II: succinate dehydrogenase, complex III: ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase, complex IV: cytochrome c oxidase) and CS were measured in human articular chondrocytes isolated from normal cartilage. The Δψm was measured by 5,5',6,6'-tetracholoro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazole carbocyanide iodide (JC-1) using flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression of caspases was analysed by ribonuclease protection analysis and the detection of protein synthesis by western blotting. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used as an NO compound donor. Results: SNP at concentrations higher than 0.5 mmol/l for 24 hours induced cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis. SNP elicited mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-7 and down regulated bcl-2 synthesis in a dose and time dependent manner. Furthermore, 0.5 mM SNP induced depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane at 5, 12, and 24 hours. Analysis of the MRC showed that at 5 hours, 0.5 mM SNP reduced the activity of complex IV by 33%. The individual inhibition of mitochondrial complex IV with azide modified the Δψm and induced apoptosis. Conclusions: This study suggests that the effect of NO on chondrocyte survival is mediated by its effect on complex IV of the MRC. PMID:15708893

  4. TGFβ inhibition during expansion phase increases the chondrogenic re-differentiation capacity of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Narcisi, R; Signorile, L; Verhaar, J A N; Giannoni, P; van Osch, G J V M

    2012-10-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a cell-based treatment to repair articular cartilage defects, relying on the availability of expanded (de-differentiated) chondrocytes. Unfortunately, the expansion process causes several phenotypical changes, requiring re-establishment of the native chondrogenic phenotype to sustain proper repair. Among other proteins, transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) is known to influence the chondrogenic re-differentiation of human articular chondrocytes (HACs) and their matrix deposition. Thus we investigated the effects of TGFβ-depletion during the expansion phase. HACs were isolated from articular cartilage and expanded in the canonical serum-supplemented medium [fetal calf serum (FCS)] or in a chemically-defined (CD) medium, with or without anti-TGFβ antibody administration. The re-differentiation potential of the cells was assessed by pellet cultures, gene expression analysis and histology. Cell proliferation proceeded more rapidly in CD-medium than in FCS-medium; it was not affected by the use of anti-TGFβ antibody but was further increased by addition of exogenous TGFβ1, via increased p-Smad1/5/8. Conversely, in FCS-medium, addition of anti-TGFβ antibody decreased both proliferation and p-Smad1/5/8 level. Challenging either FCS- or CD-medium with anti-TGFβ antibody during expansion enhanced chondrogenesis in the subsequent pellet cultures. Moreover, TGFβ-depletion during expansion in CD-medium inhibited mRNA expression of hypertrophic markers, collagen type-X (COL10) and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). Interestingly, the TGFβ1 level detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent sandwich assay (ELISA) during cell expansion was correlated with COL10 mRNA expression after re-differentiation. TGFβ-depletion during expansion improves the re-differentiation capacity of chondrocytes and inhibits hypertrophy. These results indicate the importance of the expansion medium composition to improve chondrogenic re-differentiation and

  5. Stimulation of the Superficial Zone Protein and Lubrication in the Articular Cartilage by Human Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Ryosuke; McNary, Sean M.; Miyatake, Kazumasa; Lee, Cassandra A.; Van den Bogaerde, James M.; Marder, Richard A.; Reddi, A. Hari

    2016-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains high concentrations of autologous growth factors that originate from platelets. Intra-articular injections of PRP have the potential to ameliorate the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the knee. Superficial zone protein (SZP) is a boundary lubricant in articular cartilage and plays an important role in reducing friction and wear and therefore is critical in cartilage homeostasis. Purpose To determine if PRP influences the production of SZP from human joint-derived cells and to evaluate the lubricating properties of PRP on normal bovine articular cartilage. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Cells were isolated from articular cartilage, synovium, and the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) from 12 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. The concentrations of SZP in PRP and culture media were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cellular proliferation was quantified by determination of cell numbers. The lubrication properties of PRP from healthy volunteers on bovine articular cartilage were investigated using a pin-on-disk tribometer. Results In general, PRP stimulated proliferation in cells derived from articular cartilage, synovium, and ACL. It also significantly enhanced SZP secretion from synovium- and cartilage-derived cells. An unexpected finding was the presence of SZP in PRP (2.89 ± 1.23 µg/mL before activation and 3.02 ± 1.32 µg/mL after activation). In addition, under boundary mode conditions consisting of high loads and low sliding speeds, nonactivated and thrombin-activated PRP decreased the friction coefficient (μ = 0.012 and μ = 0.015, respectively) compared with saline (μ = 0.047, P < 0.004) and high molecular weight hyaluronan (μ = 0.080, P < 0.006). The friction coefficient of the cartilage with PRP was on par with that of synovial fluid. Conclusion PRP significantly stimulates cell proliferation and SZP secretion by articular cartilage and synovium of the human knee joint

  6. Targeted In Situ Biosynthetic Transcriptional Activation in Native Surface-Level Human Articular Chondrocytes during Lesion Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Kumkum; McRury, Ian D.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Morgan, Roy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Safe articular cartilage lesion stabilization is an important early surgical intervention advance toward mitigating articular cartilage disease burden. While short-term chondrocyte viability and chondrosupportive matrix modification have been demonstrated within tissue contiguous to targeted removal of damaged articular cartilage, longer term tissue responses require evaluation to further clarify treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study was to examine surface chondrocyte responses within contiguous tissue after lesion stabilization. Methods: Nonablation radiofrequency lesion stabilization of human cartilage explants obtained during knee replacement was performed for surface fibrillation. Time-dependent chondrocyte viability, nuclear morphology and cell distribution, and temporal response kinetics of matrix and chaperone gene transcription indicative of differentiated chondrocyte function were evaluated in samples at intervals to 96 hours after treatment. Results: Subadjacent surface articular cartilage chondrocytes demonstrated continued viability for 96 hours after treatment, a lack of increased nuclear fragmentation or condensation, persistent nucleic acid production during incubation reflecting cellular assembly behavior, and transcriptional up-regulation of matrix and chaperone genes indicative of retained biosynthetic differentiated cell function. Conclusions: The results of this study provide further evidence of treatment efficacy and suggest the possibility to manipulate or induce cellular function, thereby recruiting local chondrocytes to aid lesion recovery. Early surgical intervention may be viewed as a tissue rescue, allowing articular cartilage to continue displaying biological responses appropriate to its function rather than converting to a tissue ultimately governed by the degenerative material property responses of matrix failure. Early intervention may positively impact the late changes and reduce disease burden of damaged articular

  7. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of collagen type IV antibody in the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint of human fetuses.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Luís Otávio Carvalho; Lodi, Fábio Redivo; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Marques, Sergio Ricardo; Fernandes Junior, João Antão; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fijiyama; Alonso, Luís Garcia

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyze the immunohistochemical expression of the marker of type IV collagen in the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of human fetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human fetuses aging from 21 to 24 weeks of intrauterine life were studied. The TMJ were supplied by the Federal University of Uberaba. The ages of the fetuses were determined by measuring the crown-rump length (CRL). Macroscopically, the fetuses were fixed in a formalin solution at 10% and dissected by removing the skin and the subcutaneous tissue, exposing the deep structures. An immunohistochemical marker of type IV collagen was used in order to characterize the presence of blood vessels in the central region of the temporomandibular joint disc. Analysis of the immunohistochemical marker of type IV collagen showed the presence of blood vessels in the central region of the temporomandibular disc in human fetuses.

  9. Dedifferentiated Human Articular Chondrocytes Redifferentiate to a Cartilage-Like Tissue Phenotype in a Poly(ε-Caprolactone)/Self-Assembling Peptide Composite Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Recha-Sancho, Lourdes; Moutos, Franklin T.; Abellà, Jordi; Guilak, Farshid; Semino, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage has a limited capacity for growth and regeneration and, with injury, new cellular or biomaterial-based therapeutic platforms are required to promote repair. Tissue engineering aims to produce cartilage-like tissues that recreate the complex mechanical and biological properties found in vivo. In this study, a unique composite scaffold was developed by infiltrating a three-dimensional (3D) woven microfiber poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold with the RAD16-I self-assembling nanofibers to obtain multi-scale functional and biomimetic tissue-engineered constructs. The scaffold was seeded with expanded dedifferentiated human articular chondrocytes and cultured for four weeks in control and chondrogenic growth conditions. The composite constructs were compared to control constructs obtained by culturing cells with 3D woven PCL scaffolds or RAD16-I independently. High viability and homogeneous cell distribution were observed in all three scaffolds used during the term of the culture. Moreover, gene and protein expression profiles revealed that chondrogenic markers were favored in the presence of RAD16-I peptide (PCL/RAD composite or alone) under chondrogenic induction conditions. Further, constructs displayed positive staining for toluidine blue, indicating the presence of synthesized proteoglycans. Finally, mechanical testing showed that constructs containing the PCL scaffold maintained the initial shape and viscoelastic behavior throughout the culture period, while constructs with RAD16-I scaffold alone contracted during culture time into a stiffer and compacted structure. Altogether, these results suggest that this new composite scaffold provides important mechanical requirements for a cartilage replacement, while providing a biomimetic microenvironment to re-establish the chondrogenic phenotype of human expanded articular chondrocytes. PMID:28773609

  10. A method for estimating macromolecular reflection by human synovium, using measurements of intra-articular half lives

    PubMed Central

    Levick, J

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies show that very large macromolecules in synovial fluid, such as hyaluronan and large proteoglycans, are partially reflected by the synovial lining during fluid drainage, and thus selectively retained within the cavity. Size selective molecular reflection is a fundamental property of membranes, and a method for quantifying the reflective behaviour of human synovium could be of value in several pathophysiological areas. The method proposed here is based on the intra-articular half lives of the macromolecule of interest and of a smaller, easily cleared protein such as albumin. The key relation is derived from the law of conservation of mass, using simple algebra. It is found that, when the intra-articular half lives of albumin and a macromolecular test solute are determined simultaneously, the reflected fraction of the test solute is given by the complement of the half life ratio. Examples are given. Intra-articular half lives can thus be used to consider such questions as whether immune complexes are significantly reflected by the synovial surface, how the reflective property changes in arthritides or with treatment, and how significantly reflection might influence the intra-articular concentration of large "markers" of joint disease activity.

 PMID:9771207

  11. Recapitulation of physiological spatiotemporal signals promotes in vitro formation of phenotypically stable human articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yiyong; Zhou, Bin; Bernhard, Jonathan; Robinson, Samuel; Burapachaisri, Aonnicha; Guo, X. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Standard isotropic culture fails to recapitulate the spatiotemporal gradients present during native development. Cartilage grown from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is poorly organized and unstable in vivo. We report that human cartilage with physiologic organization and in vivo stability can be grown in vitro from self-assembling hMSCs by implementing spatiotemporal regulation during induction. Self-assembling hMSCs formed cartilage discs in Transwell inserts following isotropic chondrogenic induction with transforming growth factor β to set up a dual-compartment culture. Following a switch in the basal compartment to a hypertrophic regimen with thyroxine, the cartilage discs underwent progressive deep-zone hypertrophy and mineralization. Concurrent chondrogenic induction in the apical compartment enabled the maintenance of functional and hyaline cartilage. Cartilage homeostasis, chondrocyte maturation, and terminal differentiation markers were all up-regulated versus isotropic control groups. We assessed the in vivo stability of the cartilage formed under different induction regimens. Cartilage formed under spatiotemporal regulation in vitro resisted endochondral ossification, retained the expression of cartilage markers, and remained organized following s.c. implantation in immunocompromised mice. In contrast, the isotropic control groups underwent endochondral ossification. Cartilage formed from hMSCs remained stable and organized in vivo. Spatiotemporal regulation during induction in vitro recapitulated some aspects of native cartilage development, and potentiated the maturation of self-assembling hMSCs into stable and organized cartilage resembling the native articular cartilage. PMID:28228529

  12. Slope on proximal tibiofibular articular surface with 3-D reconstruction by 64-slice computed tomography on human.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin-wang; Deng, Hong-zhen; Zhu, Hai-bo; Zhu, Yi; Zhu, Jian-ming

    2012-05-01

    Using 64-slice spiral CT to reconstruct virtual knee joints of adults, we measured the gradient of proximal tibia-fibular joint and compared this result with bare joint measurement. We then discuss the accuracy of these measurements using a 64-slice spiral CT. Two hundred healthy adults were selected, including 100 males and 100 females, aged from 18 to 90 years. The gradient of the longitudinal axis of the fibula and the articular surface, and the angle of horizon of the proximal tibia-fibular articular surface and the horizontal line were measured by using a 64-slice spiral CT scan. The angle between the longitudinal axis of the fibula and the articular surface (angle A) was 56.80° ± 6.59°, both the left and the right fibula showed no significant difference (t = 0.308, P = 0.758). The angle between horizontal line and the articular surface (angle B) was 32.80° ± 6.49°. The regression or correlation analysis findings showed that there is a negative relationship (r = -0.952, P = 0.000), and there is significant difference (t = 51.87, P < 0.01) between the angle A and the angle B. The measurement value of using 64-slice spiral CT to reconstruct the slope of proximal tibia-fibular joints has no difference compared to the measurement value of the slope of bare proximal tibia-fibular joints. It is a precise, convenient method and is easy to apply for clinical study. © 2012 Tianjin Hospital and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. The ontogeny of talo-crural appositional articular morphology among catarrhine taxa: adult shape reflects substrate use.

    PubMed

    Turley, Kevin; Frost, Stephen R

    2014-07-01

    The upper ankle joint forms a single articular plane between organism and the foot and substrate. Singular warp analysis shows that its shape reflects substrate use. This study explores whether the differences in shape are genetic with a developmental trajectory evident during ontogeny or epigenetic and the result of substrate use by the individual. A total of 418 matched distal tibial and proximal talar landmarked surfaces from adult and subadult specimens from 12 diverse catarrhine taxa were studied. Specimens were grouped by molar eruption (M1, M2, and M3) for comparative analysis. Generalized Procrustes analysis, multivariate regression, relative warp analysis, singular warp analysis, and permutation tests were used. Singular warp analysis for the entire cohort was highly significant in the first singular warp, with the adult taxa sorting by substrate use. All 173 subadults clustered with an adult "arboreal" shape profile. Among Hominoidea, adults (M3) sorted by substrate use with Pan paniscus and Hylobatidae assuming an "arboreal" shape separate from Pan troglodytes and the remaining taxa with "terrestrial" shape. Cercopithecoid adults sorted by substrate use as well, with the M3 specimens of Papio hamadryas and Macaca thibetana demonstrating a "terrestrial" shape. Differences in mode of locomotion did not affect the findings in the first singular warp. Results confirmed the convergence of talo-crural shape among superfamilies based on substrate use and divergence in shape within Pan and Macaca, based on substrate use. The shape differences among adults (M3) are consistent with a plastic response to the behavioral stimulus of substrate use.

  14. Differential regulation and expression of hyaluronan synthases in human articular chondrocytes, synovial cells and osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Recklies, A D; White, C; Melching, L; Roughley, P J

    2001-01-01

    Recently three isoforms of hyaluronan synthase (HAS), the enzyme responsible for hyaluronate/hyaluronan (HA) biosynthesis, have been cloned, allowing us to study their expression pattern. Our objective was to determine which of the HAS isoenzymes were expressed in human articular chondrocytes, synovial fibroblasts and osteosarcoma cells, whether their expression could be modulated by growth factors (insulin-like growth factor-1, basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1) and cytokines [interleukin 1beta1 (IL-1beta)], and whether changes in the rate of HA synthesis by the cells correlated with changes in mRNA levels for one or more of the HAS isoforms. All three HAS isoforms were found to be expressed in the cultured cells analysed in this study, although the relative proportions varied for each cell type. HAS2 mRNA was usually predominant in chondrocytes, whereas synovial cells contained increased amounts of HAS1. HAS3 was always the least abundant message. The rapidly growing osteosarcoma cells contained almost exclusively HAS2 message. HAS usage in uncultured cartilage and synovial tissues was similar to that in the cultured cells, with HAS2 message being the predominant species in cartilage and HAS1 usually being the predominant species in synovium. HA synthesis was stimulated by the growth factors, but the extent of the response was cell-type specific. Synovial cells responded particularly well to IL-1beta, and showed a unique synergistic response when IL-1beta was used in combination with TGF-beta1. This response was much reduced in articular chondrocytes and absent in the osteosarcoma cells. Analysis of changes in HAS message levels indicated that there was often no correlation with the changes in HA secretion following exposure to growth factors. Although HAS-1 mRNA was increased in synovial cells after exposure to TGF-beta1/IL-1beta, the magnitude of the change was far less than the effect on HA synthesis. Our data thus

  15. 3-D high-frequency ultrasound backscatter analysis of human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Männicke, Nils; Schöne, Martin; Gottwald, Matthias; Göbel, Felix; Oelze, Michael L; Raum, Kay

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound is a promising method for non-invasive characterization of cartilage degeneration. Surface reflection and integrated spectral parameters are often used. In the work described here, human cartilage samples with varying degrees of degeneration were measured using a 40-MHz transducer. Backscatter signals originating from the superficial and transitional zones of cartilage were analyzed using amplitude, spectral and envelope statistical parameters and related to degenerative changes of the matrix given by the Mankin score. The results indicate an increased sensitivity of spectral slope and envelope statistical parameters to early matrix degeneration compared with conventional amplitude parameters. Furthermore, moderate correlations of chondrocyte number with backscatter amplitude and envelope statistics were observed, suggesting that at high frequencies, cells are one important scattering source in cartilage. An application of spectral and envelope statistical parameters to intra-articular ultrasound arthroscopy is conceivable and could improve the diagnostic potential of these examinations. Future studies are necessary to clarify the contributions of chondrocytes, extracellular matrix and collagen content to ultrasound backscatter to further improve the diagnostic potential of ultrasound for cartilage assessment.

  16. Reference genes for normalization of gene expression studies in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Pombo-Suarez, Manuel; Calaza, Manuel; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Background Assessment of gene expression is an important component of osteoarthritis (OA) research, greatly improved by the development of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). This technique requires normalization for precise results, yet no suitable reference genes have been identified in human articular cartilage. We have examined ten well-known reference genes to determine the most adequate for this application. Results Analyses of expression stability in cartilage from 10 patients with hip OA, 8 patients with knee OA and 10 controls without OA were done with classical statistical tests and the software programs geNorm and NormFinder. Results from the three methods of analysis were broadly concordant. Some of the commonly used reference genes, GAPDH, ACTB and 18S RNA, performed poorly in our analysis. In contrast, the rarely used TBP, RPL13A and B2M genes were the best. It was necessary to use together several of these three genes to obtain the best results. The specific combination depended, to some extent, on the type of samples being compared. Conclusion Our results provide a satisfactory set of previously unused reference genes for qPCR in hip and knee OA This confirms the need to evaluate the suitability of reference genes in every tissue and experimental situation before starting the quantitative assessment of gene expression by qPCR. PMID:18226276

  17. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  18. Autophagy Modulates Articular Cartilage Vesicle Formation in Primary Articular Chondrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Ann K.; Gohr, Claudia M.; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Jackson, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. PMID:25869133

  19. Immunophenotypic analysis of human articular chondrocytes: changes in surface markers associated with cell expansion in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Romero, Jose; Gaillard, Jean Philippe; Grogan, Shawn Patrick; Nesic, Dobrila; Trub, Thomas; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre

    2005-03-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering relies on in vitro expansion of primary chondrocytes. Monolayer is the chosen culture model for chondrocyte expansion because in this system the proliferative capacity of chondrocytes is substantially higher compared to non-adherent systems. However, human articular chondrocytes (HACs) cultured as monolayers undergo changes in phenotype and gene expression known as "dedifferentiation." To gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in the dedifferentiation process, our research focused on the characterization of the surface molecule phenotype of HACs in monolayer culture. Adult HACs were isolated by enzymatic digestion of cartilage samples obtained post-mortem. HACs cultured in monolayer for different time periods were analyzed by flow cytometry for the expression of cell surface markers with a panel of 52 antibodies. Our results show that HACs express surface molecules belonging to different categories: integrins and other adhesion molecules (CD49a, CD49b, CD49c, CD49e, CD49f, CD51/61, CD54, CD106, CD166, CD58, CD44), tetraspanins (CD9, CD63, CD81, CD82, CD151), receptors (CD105, CD119, CD130, CD140a, CD221, CD95, CD120a, CD71, CD14), ectoenzymes (CD10, CD26), and other surface molecules (CD90, CD99). Moreover, differential expression of certain markers in monolayer culture was identified. Up-regulation of markers on HACs regarded as distinctive for mesenchymal stem cells (CD10, CD90, CD105, CD166) during monolayer culture suggested that dedifferentiation leads to reversion to a primitive phenotype. This study contributes to the definition of HAC phenotype, and provides new potential markers to characterize chondrocyte differentiation stage in the context of tissue engineering applications. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Electromechanical Assessment of Human Knee Articular Cartilage with Compression-Induced Streaming Potentials.

    PubMed

    Becher, Christoph; Ricklefs, Marcel; Willbold, Elmar; Hurschler, Christof; Abedian, Reza

    2016-01-01

    To assess the electromechanical properties of human knee articular cartilage with compression-induced streaming potentials for reliability among users and correlation with macroscopic and histological evaluation tools and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content. Streaming potentials are induced in cartilage in response to loading when mobile positive ions in the interstitial fluid temporarily move away from negatively charged proteoglycans. Streaming potential integrals (SPIs) were measured with an indentation probe on femoral condyles of 10 human knee specimens according to a standardized location scheme. Interobserver reliability was measured using an interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The learning curves of 3 observers were evaluated by regression analysis. At each SPI measurement location the degradation level of the tissue was determined by means of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) score, Mankin score, and sGAG content. The computed ICC was 0.77 (0.70-0.83) indicating good to excellent linear agreement of SPI values among the 3 users. A significant positive linear correlation of the learning index values was observed for 2 of the 3 users. Statistically significant negative correlations between SPI and both ICRS and Mankin scores were observed (r = 0.502, P < 0.001, and r = 0.255, P = 0.02, respectively). No correlation was observed between SPI and sGAG content (r = 0.004, P = 0.973). SPI values may be used as a quantitative means of cartilage evaluation with sufficient reliability among users. Due to the significant learning curve, adequate training should be absolved before routine use of the technique.

  1. Hyperosmolarity regulates SOX9 mRNA posttranscriptionally in human articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Peffers, Mandy J.; McKay, Tristan R.; Lowe, Emma T.; Khan, Wasim S.; Hardingham, Timothy E.; Clegg, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor SOX9 regulates cartilage extracellular matrix gene expression and is essential for chondrocyte differentiation. We previously showed that activation of p38 MAPK by cycloheximide in human chondrocytes leads to stabilization of SOX9 mRNA (Tew SR and Hardingham TE. J Biol Chem 281: 39471–39479, 2006). In this study we investigated whether regulation of p38 MAPK caused by changes in osmotic pressure could control SOX9 mRNA levels expression by a similar mechanism. Primary human articular chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritic cartilage at passage 2-4 showed significantly raised SOX9 mRNA levels when exposed to hyperosmotic conditions for 5 h. The effect was strongest and most reproducible when actin stress fibers were disrupted by the Rho effector kinase inhibitor Y27632, or by culturing the cells within alginate beads. Freshly isolated chondrocytes, used within 24–48 h of isolation, did not contain actin stress fibers and upregulated SOX9 mRNA in response to hyperosmolarity in the presence and absence of Y27632. In these freshly isolated chondrocytes, hyperosmolarity led to an increase in the half-life of SOX9 mRNA, which was sensitive to the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190. SOX9 protein levels were increased by hyperosmotic culture over 24 h, and, in passaged chondrocytes, the activity of a COL2A1 enhancer driven luciferase assay was upregulated. However, in freshly isolated chondrocytes, COL2A1 mRNA levels were reduced by hyperosmotic conditions and the half-life was decreased. The results showed that the osmotic environment regulated both SOX9 and COL2A1 mRNA posttranscriptionally, but in fresh cells resulted in increased SOX9, but decreased COL2A1. PMID:19657054

  2. Effects of sesamin on the biosynthesis of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in human articular chondrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Najarus, Sumet; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Kongtawelert, Prachya

    2014-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that progressively causes a loss of joint functions and the impaired quality of life. The most significant event in OA is a high degree of degradation of articular cartilage accompanied by the loss of chondroitin sulfate-proteoglycans (CS-PGs). Recently, the chondroprotective effects of sesamin, the naturally occurring substance found in sesame seeds, have been proved in a rat model of papain-induced osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that sesamin may be associated with possible promotion of the biosynthesis of CS-PGs in human articular chondrocytes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of sesamin on the major CS-PG biosynthesis in primary human chondrocyte. The effects of sesamin on the gene expression of the PG core and the CS biosynthetic enzymes as well as on the secretion of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in monolayer and pellet culture systems of articular chondrocytes. Sesamin significantly increased the GAGs content both in culture medium and pellet matrix. Real-time-quantitative PCR showed that sesamin promoted the expression of the genes encoding the core protein (ACAN) of the major CS-PG aggrecan and the biosynthetic enzymes (XYLT1, XYLT2, CHSY1 and CHPF) required for the synthesis of CS-GAG side chains. Safranin-O staining of sesamin treated chondrocyte pellet section confirmed the high degree of GAG accumulation. These results were correlated with an increased level of secreted GAGs in the media of cultured articular chondrocytes in both culture systems. Thus, sesamin would provide a potential therapeutic strategy for treating OA patients.

  3. The Relationship between MR Parameters and Biomechanical Quantities of Loaded Human Articular Cartilage in Osteoarthritis: An In-Vitro Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juráš, V.; Szomolányi, P.; Gäbler, S.; Frollo, I.; Trattnig, S.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in MRI parameters during applied load directly in MR scanner and correlate these changes with biomechanical parameters of human articular cartilage. Cartilage explants from patients who underwent total knee replacement were examined in the micro-imaging system in 3T scanner. Respective MRI parameters (T1 without- and T1 with contrast agent as a marker of proteoglycan content, T2 as a marker of collagen network anisotropy and ADC as a measure of diffusivity) were calculated in pre- and during compression state. Subsequently, these parameters were compared to the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage, instantaneous modulus (I), equilibrium modulus (Eq) and time of tissue relaxation (τ). Significant load-induced changes of T2 and ADC were recorded. High correlation between T1Gd and I (r = 0.6324), and between ADC and Eq (r = -0.4884) was found. Multi-parametric MRI may have great potential in analyzing static and dynamic biomechanical behavior of articular cartilage in early stages of osteoarthritis (OA).

  4. In vivo articular cartilage deformation: noninvasive quantification of intratissue strain during joint contact in the human knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Deva D.; Cai, Luyao; Butz, Kent D.; Trippel, Stephen B.; Nauman, Eric A.; Neu, Corey P.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of articular cartilage deformation is essential to understand how mechanical forces distribute throughout the healthy tissue and change over time in the pathologic joint. Displacements or strain may serve as a functional imaging biomarker for healthy, diseased, and repaired tissues, but unfortunately intratissue cartilage deformation in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we directly quantified for the first time deformation patterns through the thickness of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in healthy human volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions were synchronized with physiologically relevant compressive loading and used to visualize and measure regional displacement and strain of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in a sagittal plane. We found that compression (of 1/2 body weight) applied at the foot produced a sliding, rigid-body displacement at the tibiofemoral cartilage interface, that loading generated subject- and gender-specific and regionally complex patterns of intratissue strains, and that dominant cartilage strains (approaching 12%) were in shear. Maximum principle and shear strain measures in the tibia were correlated with body mass index. Our MRI-based approach may accelerate the development of regenerative therapies for diseased or damaged cartilage, which is currently limited by the lack of reliable in vivo methods for noninvasive assessment of functional changes following treatment.

  5. In vivo articular cartilage deformation: noninvasive quantification of intratissue strain during joint contact in the human knee

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Deva D.; Cai, Luyao; Butz, Kent D.; Trippel, Stephen B.; Nauman, Eric A.; Neu, Corey P.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of articular cartilage deformation is essential to understand how mechanical forces distribute throughout the healthy tissue and change over time in the pathologic joint. Displacements or strain may serve as a functional imaging biomarker for healthy, diseased, and repaired tissues, but unfortunately intratissue cartilage deformation in vivo is largely unknown. Here, we directly quantified for the first time deformation patterns through the thickness of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in healthy human volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions were synchronized with physiologically relevant compressive loading and used to visualize and measure regional displacement and strain of tibiofemoral articular cartilage in a sagittal plane. We found that compression (of 1/2 body weight) applied at the foot produced a sliding, rigid-body displacement at the tibiofemoral cartilage interface, that loading generated subject- and gender-specific and regionally complex patterns of intratissue strains, and that dominant cartilage strains (approaching 12%) were in shear. Maximum principle and shear strain measures in the tibia were correlated with body mass index. Our MRI-based approach may accelerate the development of regenerative therapies for diseased or damaged cartilage, which is currently limited by the lack of reliable in vivo methods for noninvasive assessment of functional changes following treatment. PMID:26752228

  6. In Vivo Articular Cartilage Regeneration Using Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Cultured in an Alginate Scaffold: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Milian, Lara; Oliver, Maria; Zurriaga, Javier; Sancho-Tello, Maria; de Llano, Jose Javier Martin; Carda, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory disease in which all joint-related elements, articular cartilage in particular, are affected. The poor regeneration capacity of this tissue together with the lack of pharmacological treatment has led to the development of regenerative medicine methodologies including microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The effectiveness of ACI has been shown in vitro and in vivo, but the use of other cell types, including bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, is necessary because of the poor proliferation rate of isolated articular chondrocytes. In this investigation, we assessed the chondrogenic ability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to regenerate cartilage in vitro and in vivo. hDPSCs and primary isolated rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in chondrogenic culture medium and found to express collagen II and aggrecan. Both cell types were cultured in 3% alginate hydrogels and implanted in a rabbit model of cartilage damage. Three months after surgery, significant cartilage regeneration was observed, particularly in the animals implanted with hDPSCs. Although the results presented here are preliminary, they suggest that hDPSCs may be useful for regeneration of articular cartilage. PMID:28951745

  7. Revisiting spatial distribution and biochemical composition of calcium-containing crystals in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    -nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, was upregulated in OA chondrocytes isolated from CaC crystal-containing cartilages. Conclusions CaC crystal deposition is a widespread phenomenon in human OA articular cartilage involving the entire knee cartilage including macroscopically normal and less weight-bearing zones. Cartilage calcification is associated with altered expression of genes involved in the mineralisation process. PMID:24004678

  8. Reconstruction of Hyaline Cartilage Deep Layer Properties in 3-Dimensional Cultures of Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Vibudha; Tattikota, Surendra Mohan; T, Avinash Raj; Sriramagiri, Vijaya Rama Rao; Kantipudi, Suma; Pande, Gopal

    2014-06-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) injuries and malformations are commonly noticed because of trauma or age-related degeneration. Many methods have been adopted for replacing or repairing the damaged tissue. Currently available AC repair methods, in several cases, fail to yield good-quality long-lasting results, perhaps because the reconstructed tissue lacks the cellular and matrix properties seen in hyaline cartilage (HC). To reconstruct HC tissue from 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) cultures of AC-derived human chondrocytes that would specifically exhibit the cellular and biochemical properties of the deep layer of HC. Descriptive laboratory study. Two-dimensional cultures of human AC-derived chondrocytes were established in classical medium (CM) and newly defined medium (NDM) and maintained for a period of 6 weeks. These cells were suspended in 2 mm-thick collagen I gels, placed in 24-well culture inserts, and further cultured up to 30 days. Properties of chondrocytes, grown in 2D cultures and the reconstructed 3D cartilage tissue, were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopic techniques, immunohistochemistry, and cartilage-specific gene expression profiling by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and were compared with those of the deep layer of native human AC. Two-dimensional chondrocyte cultures grown in NDM, in comparison with those grown in CM, showed more chondrocyte-specific gene activity and matrix properties. The NDM-grown chondrocytes in 3D cultures also showed better reproduction of deep layer properties of HC, as confirmed by microscopic and gene expression analysis. The method used in this study can yield cartilage tissue up to approximately 1.6 cm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness that satisfies the very low cell density and matrix composition properties present in the deep layer of normal HC. This study presents a novel and reproducible method for long-term culture of AC-derived chondrocytes and reconstruction of cartilage

  9. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage Surface: Morphogens, Cells, and Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Ryosuke; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2015-10-01

    The articular cartilage is a well-organized tissue for smooth and friction-free joint movement for locomotion in animals and humans. Adult articular cartilage has a very low self-regeneration capacity due to its avascular nature. The regeneration of articular cartilage surface is critical to prevent the progression to osteoarthritis (OA). Although various joint resurfacing procedures in experimental articular cartilage defects have been developed, no standardized clinical protocol has yet been established. The three critical ingredients for tissue regeneration are morphogens and growth factors, cells, and scaffolds. The concepts based on the regeneration triad have been extensively investigated in animal models. However, these studies in animal models have demonstrated variable results and outcomes. An optimal animal model must precisely mimic and model the sequence of events in articular cartilage regeneration in human. In this article, the progress and remaining challenges in articular cartilage regeneration in animal models are reviewed. The role of individual morphogens and growth factors in cartilage regeneration has been investigated. In normal articular cartilage homeostasis, morphogens and growth factors function sequentially in tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cell-based repair of articular cartilage defects, performed with or without various growth factors and scaffolds, has been widely attempted in animal models. Stem cells, including embryonic and adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, have also been reported as attractive cell sources for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Several studies with regard to scaffolds have been advanced, including recent investigations based on nanomaterials, functional mechanocompatible scaffolds, multilayered scaffolds, and extracellular matrix scaffolds for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Continuous refinement of animal models in chondral and osteochondral defects provide opportunities

  10. Cellular automata model for human articular chondrocytes migration, proliferation and cell death: An in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Vaca-González, J J; Gutiérrez, M L; Guevara, J M; Garzón-Alvarado, D A

    2016-01-07

    Articular cartilage is characterized by low cell density of only one cell type, chondrocytes, and has limited self-healing properties. When articular cartilage is affected by traumatic injuries, a therapeutic strategy such as autologous chondrocyte implantation is usually proposed for its treatment. This approach requires in vitro chondrocyte expansion to yield high cell number for cell transplantation. To improve the efficiency of this procedure, it is necessary to assess cell dynamics such as migration, proliferation and cell death during culture. Computational models such as cellular automata can be used to simulate cell dynamics in order to enhance the result of cell culture procedures. This methodology has been implemented for several cell types; however, an experimental validation is required for each one. For this reason, in this research a cellular automata model, based on random-walk theory, was devised in order to predict articular chondrocyte behavior in monolayer culture during cell expansion. Results demonstrated that the cellular automata model corresponded to cell dynamics and computed-accurate quantitative results. Moreover, it was possible to observe that cell dynamics depend on weighted probabilities derived from experimental data and cell behavior varies according to the cell culture period. Thus, depending on whether cells were just seeded or proliferated exponentially, culture time probabilities differed in percentages in the CA model. Furthermore, in the experimental assessment a decreased chondrocyte proliferation was observed along with increased passage number. This approach is expected to having other uses as in enhancing articular cartilage therapies based on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  11. Collar-type osteophyte of the femur in young adults: is it a harbinger of intra-articular osteoid osteoma?

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Bozkurt, Yalcin

    2013-09-01

    Variable clinical and radiological findings for intra-articular osteoid osteoma (OO) of the hip joint make its diagnosis difficult. Because radiographs commonly do not identify the nidus, MR imaging becomes the second line of study. However, because the appearance varies, findings on MR images can be confusing. We found "collar type osteophyte" of the femur i.e. an osteophyte rim around the femoral neck, to be a conspicuous finding of intra-articular OO. Here, this feature will be emphasized and intra-articular OOs will be discussed, with a review of the literature.

  12. Three-Dimensional Scaffold-Free Fusion Culture: the Way to Enhanced Chondrogenesis of in vitro Propagated Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, M.; Martin, F.; Mannigel, K.; Kaltschmidt, K.; Sack, U.; Anderer, U.

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage regeneration based on isolated and culture-expanded chondrocytes has been studied in various in vitro models, but the quality varies with respect to the morphology and the physiology of the synthesized tissues. The aim of our study was to promote in vitro chondrogenesis of human articular chondrocytes using a novel three-dimensional (3-D) cultivation system in combination with the chondrogenic differentiation factors transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-β2) and L-ascorbic acid. Articular chondrocytes isolated from six elderly patients were expanded in monolayer culture. A single-cell suspension of the dedifferentiated chondrocytes was then added to agar-coated dishes without using any scaffold material, in the presence, or absence of TGF-β2 and/or L-ascorbic acid. Three-dimensional cartilage-like constructs, called single spheroids, and microtissues consisting of several spheroids fused together, named as fusions, were formed. Generated tissues were mainly characterized using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. The morphology of the in vitro tissues shared some similarities to native hyaline cartilage in regard to differentiated S100-positive chondrocytes within a cartilaginous matrix, with strong collagen type II expression and increased synthesis of proteoglycans. Finally, our innovative scaffold-free fusion culture technique supported enhanced chondrogenesis of human articular chondrocytes in vitro. These 3-D hyaline cartilage-like microtissues will be useful for in vitro studies of cartilage differentiation and regeneration, enabling optimization of functional tissue engineering and possibly contributing to the development of new approaches to treat traumatic cartilage defects or osteoarthritis. PMID:24441184

  13. In vitro determination of biomechanical properties of human articular cartilage in osteoarthritis using multi-parametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juras, Vladimir; Bittsansky, Michal; Majdisova, Zuzana; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Sulzbacher, Irene; Gäbler, Stefan; Stampfl, Jürgen; Schüller, Georg; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlations between MR parameters and the biomechanical properties of naturally degenerated human articular cartilage. Human cartilage explants from the femoral condyles of patients who underwent total knee replacement were evaluated on a micro-imaging system at 3 T. To quantify glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the cartilage (dGEMRIC) was used. T2 maps were created by using multi-echo, multi-slice spin echo sequences with six echoes: 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 ms. Data for apparent diffusion constant (ADC) maps were obtained from pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) sequences with five b-values: 10.472, 220.0, 627.0, 452.8, 724.5, and 957.7. MR parameters were correlated with mechanical parameters (instantaneous ( I) and equilibrium ( Eq) modulus and relaxation time ( τ)), and the OA stage of each cartilage specimen was determined by histological evaluation of hematoxylin-eosin stained slices. For some parameters, a high correlation was found: the correlation of T1Gd vs Eq ( r = 0.8095), T1Gd vs I/ Eq ( r = -0.8441) and T1Gd vs τ ( r = 0.8469). The correlation of T2 and ADC with selected biomechanical parameters was not statistically significant. In conclusion, GAG content measured by dGEMRIC is highly related to the selected biomechanical properties of naturally degenerated articular cartilage. In contrast, T2 and ADC were unable to estimate these properties. The results of the study imply that some MR parameters can non-invasively predict the biomechanical properties of degenerated articular cartilage.

  14. Cartilage graft engineering by co-culturing primary human articular chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Maria Antonietta; Santoro, Rosaria; Gueven, Sinan; Jaquiery, Claude; Wendt, David James; Martin, Ivan; Moretti, Matteo; Barbero, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Co-culture of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) with articular chondrocytes (ACs) has been reported to improve the efficiency of utilization of a small number of ACs for the engineering of implantable cartilaginous tissues. However, the use of cells of animal origin and the generation of small-scale micromass tissues limit the clinical relevance of previous studies. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo chondrogenic capacities of scaffold-based constructs generated by combining primary human ACs with human bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs). The two cell types were cultured in collagen sponges (2 × 6 mm disks) at the BM-MSCs:ACs ratios: 100:0, 95:5, 75:25 and 0:100 for 3 weeks. Scaffolds freshly seeded or further precultured in vitro for 2 weeks were also implanted subcutaneously in nude mice and harvested after 8 or 6 weeks, respectively. Static co-culture of ACs (25%) with BM-MSCs (75%) in scaffolds resulted in up to 1.4-fold higher glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content than what would be expected based on the relative percentages of the different cell types. In vivo GAG induction was drastically enhanced by the in vitro preculture and maximal at the ratio 95:5 (3.8-fold higher). Immunostaining analyses revealed enhanced accumulation of type II collagen and reduced accumulation of type X collagen with increasing ACs percentage. Constructs generated in the perfusion bioreactor system were homogeneously cellularized. In summary, human cartilage grafts were successfully generated, culturing BM-MSCs with a relatively low fraction of non-expanded ACs in porous scaffolds. The proposed co-culture strategy is directly relevant towards a single-stage surgical procedure for cartilage repair. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  16. Human adipose-derived stem cells contribute to chondrogenesis in coculture with human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hildner, Florian; Concaro, Sebastian; Peterbauer, Anja; Wolbank, Susanne; Danzer, Martin; Lindahl, Anders; Gatenholm, Paul; Redl, Heinz; van Griensven, Martijn

    2009-12-01

    Adipose tissue is easily available and contains high numbers of stem cells that are capable for chondrogenic differentiation. We hypothesize that a partial substitution of chondrocytes with autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) might be a possible strategy to reduce the number of chondrocytes needed in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation. To lay the ground, in vitro coculture experiments were performed using human chondrocytes and human ASC. Chondrocytes were obtained from donors undergoing matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation. ASC were isolated from liposuction material. Chondrocytes and ASC were seeded either in fibrin (Tisseel; Baxter, Vienna, Austria) or collagen matrix (Tissue Fleece; Baxter, Unterschleissheim, Germany). RNA for quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction was isolated after 2 weeks of culture in chondrogenic medium, and after 4 weeks samples were processed for histology. Related to the number of chondrocytes used, coculture with ASC led to strong increase in collagen type IX mRNA expression, which is an indicator for long-term stability of cartilage. Moderate upregulation was shown for SOX9, aggrecan, melanoma inhibitory activity, cartilage link protein 1, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein mRNA. However, expression of collagen I and collagen II indicates the synthesis of fibrous tissue, which might be due to the use of dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Tisseel provided slightly better chondrogenic conditions than Tissue Fleece. These data support the possibility to take advantage of ASC in cartilage regeneration in conjunction with autologous chondrocytes.

  17. Lipid profile of human synovial fluid following intra-articular ankle fracture.

    PubMed

    Leimer, Elizabeth M; Pappan, Kirk L; Nettles, Dana L; Bell, Richard D; Easley, Mark E; Olson, Steven A; Setton, Lori A; Adams, Samuel B

    2017-03-01

    This study characterizes the metabolic profile of synovial fluid after intra-articular ankle fracture with an emphasis on changes in the lipid profile. Bilateral ankle synovial fluid from 19 patients with unilateral intra-articular ankle fracture was submitted for metabolic profiling. Contralateral ankle synovial fluid from each patient served as a matched control. Seven patients participated in a second bilateral synovial fluid collection after 6 months. Random forest classification, matched pairs t-tests (α < 0.01), repeated measures ANOVA with post-test contrasts (α < 0.01), correlation to cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases, and fracture and injury classification analyses yielded key lipid biomarkers in synovial fluid following intra-articular fracture. Free fatty acids, sphingomyelins, and lysolipids demonstrated significant elevation in fractured ankles at baseline. Fatty acids and sphingomyelins showed a significant decrease 6 months post-surgery. Random forest analysis showed predominantly fatty acids differentiating between groups. Significant correlations included fatty acids, sphingomyelins, and lysolipids with inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases. Fracture classification showed increased fatty acids, lysolipids, and inositol metabolites as fracture severity increased. Fatty acid and sn-1 lysolipid elevation could be detrimental to the joint, as these strongly correlated with matrix metalloproteinases and TNF-α. This elevation also suggests involvement of phospholipase A2 , a potential target for therapeutic intervention. Together with elevated 2-hydroxyl fatty acids, these findings suggest elevated sn-1 lysolipids, sphingomyelins, and subsequent lipid metabolites in synovial fluid as biomarkers of ankle injury. Reversal of this signature after 6 months suggests temporary involvement of these metabolites in disease progression, although they may activate signaling pathways which drive progression to osteoarthritis. © 2016

  18. Intra-articular injection of human meniscus stem/progenitor cells promotes meniscus regeneration and ameliorates osteoarthritis through stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXCR4-mediated homing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiliang; Chen, Jialin; Zhu, Ting; Chen, Longkun; Zhang, Wei; Fang, Zhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Yin, Zi; Chen, Xiao; Ji, Junfeng; Chen, Weishan; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2014-03-01

    Meniscus injury is frequently encountered in clinical practice. Current surgical therapy involving partial or complete meniscectomy relieves pain in the short-term but often leads to osteoarthritis (OA) in the long-term. In this study, we report a new strategy of articular cartilage protection by intra-articular injection of novel human meniscus stem/progenitor cells (hMeSPCs). We found that hMeSPCs displayed both mesenchymal stem cell characteristics and high expression levels of collagen II. In the rat meniscus injury model, hMeSPC transplantation not only led to more neo-tissue formation and better-defined shape but also resulted in more rounded cells and matured extracellular matrix. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) enhanced the migration of hMeSPCs, whereas AMD3100 abolished the chemotactic effects of SDF-1 on hMeSPCs, both in vitro and in vivo. In an experimental OA model, transplantation of hMeSPCs effectively protected articular cartilage, as evidenced by reduced expression of OA markers such as collagen I, collagen X, and hypoxia-inducible factor 2α but increased expression of collagen II. Our study demonstrated for the first time that intra-articular injection of hMeSPCs enhanced meniscus regeneration through the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Our study highlights a new strategy of intra-articular injection of hMeSPCs for meniscus regeneration.

  19. Intra-Articular Injection of Human Meniscus Stem/Progenitor Cells Promotes Meniscus Regeneration and Ameliorates Osteoarthritis Through Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1/CXCR4-Mediated Homing

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Weiliang; Chen, Jialin; Zhu, Ting; Chen, Longkun; Zhang, Wei; Fang, Zhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Yin, Zi; Chen, Xiao; Ji, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Meniscus injury is frequently encountered in clinical practice. Current surgical therapy involving partial or complete meniscectomy relieves pain in the short-term but often leads to osteoarthritis (OA) in the long-term. In this study, we report a new strategy of articular cartilage protection by intra-articular injection of novel human meniscus stem/progenitor cells (hMeSPCs). We found that hMeSPCs displayed both mesenchymal stem cell characteristics and high expression levels of collagen II. In the rat meniscus injury model, hMeSPC transplantation not only led to more neo-tissue formation and better-defined shape but also resulted in more rounded cells and matured extracellular matrix. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) enhanced the migration of hMeSPCs, whereas AMD3100 abolished the chemotactic effects of SDF-1 on hMeSPCs, both in vitro and in vivo. In an experimental OA model, transplantation of hMeSPCs effectively protected articular cartilage, as evidenced by reduced expression of OA markers such as collagen I, collagen X, and hypoxia-inducible factor 2α but increased expression of collagen II. Our study demonstrated for the first time that intra-articular injection of hMeSPCs enhanced meniscus regeneration through the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Our study highlights a new strategy of intra-articular injection of hMeSPCs for meniscus regeneration. PMID:24448516

  20. Effect of Human Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Ovine Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zorzi, Alessandro R.; Amstalden, Eliane M. I.; Plepis, Ana Maria G.; Martins, Virginia C. A.; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane; Duarte, Adriana S. S.; Luzo, Angela C. M.; Miranda, João B.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising approach to improve cartilage healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant and readily accessible cell source. Previous studies have demonstrated good cartilage repair results with adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells in small animal experiments. This study aimed to examine these cells in a large animal model. Thirty knees of adult sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: CELLS (scaffold seeded with human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells), SCAFFOLD (scaffold without cells), or EMPTY (untreated lesions). A partial thickness defect was created in the medial femoral condyle. After six months, the knees were examined according to an adaptation of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS 1) score, in addition to a new Partial Thickness Model scale and the ICRS macroscopic score. All of the animals completed the follow-up period. The CELLS group presented with the highest ICRS 1 score (8.3 ± 3.1), followed by the SCAFFOLD group (5.6 ± 2.2) and the EMPTY group (5.2 ± 2.4) (p = 0.033). Other scores were not significantly different. These results suggest that human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells promoted satisfactory cartilage repair in the ovine model. PMID:26569221

  1. 17β-estradiol reduces expression of MMP-1, -3, and -13 in human primary articular chondrocytes from female patients cultured in a three dimensional alginate system.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Horst; Steffen, Reinhard; Hassenpflug, Joachim; Varoga, Deike; Wruck, Christoph Jan; Brandenburg, Lars Ove; Pufe, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Clinical observations have suggested a relationship between osteoarthritis and a changed sex-hormone metabolism, especially in menopausal women. This study analyzes the effect of 17β-estradiol on expression of matrix metalloproteinases-1, -3, -13 (MMP-1, -3, -13) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases-1, -2 (TIMP-1, -2) in articular chondrocytes. An imbalance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) specialized on degradation of articular cartilage matrix over the respective inhibitors of these enzymes (TIMPs) that leads to matrix destruction was postulated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Primary human articular chondrocytes from patients of both genders were cultured in alginate beads at 5% O(2) to which 10(-11)M-10(-5)M 17β-estradiol had been added and analyzed by means of immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. Since articular chondrocytes in vivo are adapted to a low oxygen tension, culture was performed at 5% O(2). Immunohistochemical staining in articular cartilage tissue from patients and immunocytochemical staining in articular chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads was positive for type II collagen, estrogen receptor α, MMP-1, and -13. It was negative for type I collagen, MMP-3, TIMP-1 and -2. Using real-time RT-PCR, it was demonstrated that physiological and supraphysiological doses of 17β-estradiol suppress mRNA levels of MMP-3 and -13 significantly in articular chondrocytes of female patients. A significant suppressing effect was also seen in MMP-1 mRNA after a high dose of 10(-5)M 17β-estradiol. Furthermore, high doses of this hormone led to tendentially lower TIMP-1 levels whereas the TIMP-2 mRNA level was not influenced. In male patients, only incubations with high doses (10(-5)M) of 17β-estradiol were followed by a tendency to suppressed MMP-1 and TIMP-1 levels while TIMP-2 mRNA level was decreased significantly. There was no effect on MMP-13 expression of cells from male patients. Taken together, application of

  2. Molecular regulation of articular chondrocyte function and its significance in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Schroeppel, J P; Crist, J D; Anderson, H C; Wang, J

    2011-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease. Histopathologically, OA is characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage, osteophyte formation, thickening of subchondral bone, and subchondral cyst formation. All current therapies are aimed at symptomatic control and have limited impacts on impeding or reversing the histopathologic progression to advanced OA. Previous studies have shown that overexpression of matrix-degrading proteinases and proinflammatory cytokines is associated with osteoarthritic cartilage degradation. However, clinical trials applying an inhibitor of proteinases or proinflammatory cytokines have been unsuccessful. A more sophisticated understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that control the function of articular chondrocytes is paramount to developing effective treatments. Since multiple catabolic factors and pathological chondrocyte hypertrophy are involved in the development of OA, it is important to identify which upstream factors regulate the expression of catabolic molecules and/or chondrocyte hypertrophy in articular cartilage. This review summarizes the current studies on the molecular regulation, with a main focus on transcriptional regulation, of the function of adult articular chondrocytes and its significance in the pathogenesis and treatment of OA. Recent studies have discovered that transcription factor Nfat1 may play an important role in maintaining the physiological function of adult articular chondrocytes. Nfat1-deficient mice exhibit normal skeletal development but display most of the features of human OA as adults, including chondrocyte hypertrophy with overexpression of specific matrix-degrading proteinases and proinflammatory cytokines in adult articular cartilage. ß-catenin transcriptional signaling in articular chondrocytes may also be involved in the pathogenesis of OA. Activation of ß-catenin leads to OA-like phenotypes with overexpression of specific matrix-degrading proteinases in

  3. In vivo cultivation of human articular chondrocytes in a nude mouse-based contained defect organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Rath, R; Gavénis, K; Gravius, S; Andereya, S; Mumme, T; Schneider, U

    2007-01-01

    The nude mouse model is an established method to cultivate and investigate tissue engineered cartilage analogues under in vivo conditions. One limitation of this common approach is the lack of appropriate surrounding articular tissues. Thus the bonding capacity of cartilage repair tissue cannot be evaluated. Widely applied surgical techniques in cartilage repair such as conventional and three-dimensional autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) based on a collagen gel matrix cannot be included into nude mouse studies, since their application require a contained defect. The aim of this study is to apply an organ culture defect model for the in vivo cultivation of different cell-matrix-constructs. Cartilage defects were created on osteochondral specimens which had been harvested from 10 human knee joints during total knee replacement. Autologous chondrocytes were isolated from the cartilage samples and cultivated in monolayer until passage 2. On each osteochondral block defects were treated either by conventional ACI or a collagen gel seeded with autologous chondrocytes, including a defect left empty as a control. The samples were implanted into the subcutaneous pouches of nude mice and cultivated for six weeks. After retrieval, the specimens were examined histologically, immunohistochemically and by cell morphology quantification. In both, ACI and collagen gel based defect treatment, a repair tissue was formed, which filled the defect and bonded to the adjacent tissues. The repair tissue was immature with low production of collagen type II. In both groups redifferentiation of chondrocytes remained incomplete. Different appearances of interface zones between the repair tissue and the adjacent cartilage were found. The presented contained defect organ culture model offers the possibility to directly compare different types of clinically applied biologic cartilage repair techniques using human articular tissues in a nude mouse model.

  4. Increased type II collagen cleavage by cathepsin K and collagenase activities with aging and osteoarthritis in human articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The intra-helical cleavage of type II collagen by proteases, including collagenases and cathepsin K, is increased with aging and osteoarthritis (OA) in cartilage as determined by immunochemical assays. The distinct sites of collagen cleavage generated by collagenases and cathepsin K in healthy and OA human femoral condylar cartilages were identified and compared. Methods Fixed frozen cartilage sections were examined immunohistochemically, using antibodies that react with the collagenase-generated cleavage neoepitopes, C2C and C1,2C, and the primary cleavage neoepitope (C2K) generated in type II collagen by the action of cathepsin K and possibly by other proteases, but not by any collagenases studied to date. Results In most cases, the staining patterns for collagen cleavage were similar for all three epitopes: weak to moderate mainly pericellular staining in non-OA cartilage from younger individuals and stronger, more widespread staining in aging and OA cartilages that often extended from the superficial to the mid/deep zone of the tissue. In very degenerate OA specimens, with significant disruption of the articular surface, staining was distributed throughout most of the cartilage matrix. Conclusions Cleavage of collagen by proteases usually arises pericellularly around chondrocytes at and near the articular surface, subsequently becoming more intense and extending progressively deeper into the cartilage with aging and OA. The close correspondence between the distributions of these products suggests that both collagenases and cathepsin K, and other proteases that may generate this distinct cathepsin K cleavage site, are usually active in the same sites in the degradation of type II collagen. PMID:22584047

  5. Expression of extracellular matrix molecules typical of articular cartilage in the human scapholunate interosseous ligament

    PubMed Central

    Milz, S; Aktas, T; Putz, R; Benjamin, M

    2006-01-01

    The scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) connects the scaphoid and lunate bones and plays a crucial role in carpal kinematics. Its rupture leads to carpal instability and impairment of radiocarpal joint function. As the ligament is one of the first structures affected in rheumatoid arthritis, we conducted an immunohistochemical study of cadaveric tissue to determine whether it contains known autoantigens for rheumatoid arthritis. We immunolabelled the ligament from one hand in 12 cadavers with monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules associated with both fibrous and cartilaginous tissues. The labelling profile has also enabled us to comment on how the molecular composition of the ligament relates to its mechanical function. All regions of the ligament labelled for types I, III and VI collagens, chondroitin 4 and 6 sulphates, keratan sulphate, dermatan sulphate, versican, tenascin and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). However, both entheses labelled strongly for type II collagen, aggrecan and link protein and were distinctly fibrocartilaginous. In some regions, the ligament attached to bone via a region of hyaline cartilage that was continuous with articular cartilage. Labelling for cartilage molecules in the midsubstance was most evident dorsally. We conclude that the SLIL has an ECM which is typical of other highly fibrocartilaginous ligaments that experience both tensile load and shear. The presence of aggrecan, link protein, COMP and type II collagen could explain why the ligament may be a target for autoantigenic destruction in some forms of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:16761970

  6. Computational biomechanics of articular cartilage of human knee joint: effect of osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, R; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2009-11-13

    Articular cartilage and its supporting bone functional conditions are tightly coupled as injuries of either adversely affects joint mechanical environment. The objective of this study was set to quantitatively investigate the extent of alterations in the mechanical environment of cartilage and knee joint in presence of commonly observed osteochondral defects. An existing validated finite element model of a knee joint was used to construct a refined model of the tibial lateral compartment including proximal tibial bony structures. The response was computed under compression forces up to 2000 N while simulating localized bone damage, cartilage-bone horizontal split, bone overgrowth and absence of deep vertical collagen fibrils. Localized tibial bone damage increased overall joint compliance and substantially altered pattern and magnitude of contact pressures and cartilage strains in both tibia and femur. These alterations were further exacerbated when bone damage was combined with base cartilage split and absence of deep vertical collagen fibrils. Local bone boss markedly changed contact pressures and strain patterns in neighbouring cartilage. Bone bruise/fracture and overgrowth adversely perturbed the homeostatic balance in the mechanical environment of articulate cartilage surrounding and opposing the lesion as well as the joint compliance. As such, they potentially contribute to the initiation and development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

  7. Expression of extracellular matrix molecules typical of articular cartilage in the human scapholunate interosseous ligament.

    PubMed

    Milz, S; Aktas, T; Putz, R; Benjamin, M

    2006-06-01

    The scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) connects the scaphoid and lunate bones and plays a crucial role in carpal kinematics. Its rupture leads to carpal instability and impairment of radiocarpal joint function. As the ligament is one of the first structures affected in rheumatoid arthritis, we conducted an immunohistochemical study of cadaveric tissue to determine whether it contains known autoantigens for rheumatoid arthritis. We immunolabelled the ligament from one hand in 12 cadavers with monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules associated with both fibrous and cartilaginous tissues. The labelling profile has also enabled us to comment on how the molecular composition of the ligament relates to its mechanical function. All regions of the ligament labelled for types I, III and VI collagens, chondroitin 4 and 6 sulphates, keratan sulphate, dermatan sulphate, versican, tenascin and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). However, both entheses labelled strongly for type II collagen, aggrecan and link protein and were distinctly fibrocartilaginous. In some regions, the ligament attached to bone via a region of hyaline cartilage that was continuous with articular cartilage. Labelling for cartilage molecules in the midsubstance was most evident dorsally. We conclude that the SLIL has an ECM which is typical of other highly fibrocartilaginous ligaments that experience both tensile load and shear. The presence of aggrecan, link protein, COMP and type II collagen could explain why the ligament may be a target for autoantigenic destruction in some forms of rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Enhanced production of prostaglandins and plasminogen activator during activation of human articular chondrocytes by products of mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Meats, J E; McGuire, M K; Ebsworth, N M; Englis, D J; Russell, R G

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the way in which products of cultured human blood mononuclear cells activate human articular chondrocytes. Conditioned medium from mononuclear cells enhanced the production of prostaglandin E by cultured human chondrocytes and also stimulated fibrinolytic activity in these cultures. These two effects may be interrelated, since the increased fibrinolysis in response to products of mononuclear cells was partially inhibited by indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis. The increased fibrinolysis is probably attributable to plasminogen activator, since it was strongly dependent on the presence of plasminogen. Increased amounts of PGE and chondroitin sulphate were also released from intact fragments of cartilage exposed to medium from cultured mononuclear cells. The time course and dose dependence of these effects were studied. The addition of exogenous arachidonic acid markedly enhanced production of PGE2. Ultrogel AcA54 was used to fractionate medium from cultured mononuclear cells and the chondrocyte-stimulating activity eluted with an apparent molecular weight between 12 000 and 25 000 daltons. Adherent and non-adherent mononuclear blood cells were also partially separated and conditioned medium from each was assayed for chondrocyte-stimulating factors. Both populations released factor(s) which increased the production of prostaglandin E by chondrocytes, but more activity came from the adherent mononuclear cells. The possible interrelationship between the chondrocyte activating factor studied here and others described in the literature is discussed.

  9. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes by inhibiting expression of syndecan-1

    PubMed Central

    KONG, YING; WANG, WANCHUN; ZHANG, CHANGJIE; WU, YI; LIU, YANG; ZHOU, XIAORONG

    2016-01-01

    A central feature of osteoarthritis (OA) is the loss of articular cartilage, which is primarily attributed to cartilage breakdown. A group of metalloproteinases termed the A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family are reported to be important in cartilage breakdown. Recent studies have suggested that ADAMTS-4 is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of OA and that syndecan-1 is closely associated with activation of ADAMTS-4 in human chondrocytes. Accumulating evidence also suggests that cannabinoids have chondroprotective effects. The current study explored the effects of synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) on the expression of syndecan-1 and ADAMTS-4, as well as ADAMTS-4 activity, in unstimulated and interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Primary human OA articular chondrocytes were treated with WIN-55 in the presence or absence of IL-1β and cannabinoid receptor antagonists. The results of the present study demonstrated that WIN-55 inhibited ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated primary human OA articular chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) were constitutively expressed in human OA articular chondrocytes. Furthermore, selective CB2 antagonist, JTE907, but not selective CB1 antagonist, MJ15, abolished the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on ADAMTS-4 activity. WIN55 inhibited the expression of syndecan-1 but not ADAMTS-4, and overexpression of syndecan-1 reversed the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on the ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated human OA articular chondrocytes. Despite having no significant effect on syndecan-1 gene promoter activity, WIN-55 markedly decreased the stability of syndecan-1 mRNA via CB2. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first in vitro evidence supporting that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55 inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1

  10. Increased Hydraulic Conductance of Human Articular Cartilage and Subchondral Bone Plate with Progression of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jennifer; Bae, Won C.; Shieu, Wendy; Lewis, Chad W.; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by progressive degeneration of articular cartilage and remodeling of the subchondral bone plate (ScBP), comprised of calcified cartilage (CC) and underlying subchondral bone (ScB). CC remodeling due to upward invasion by vascular canals or to CC erosion may contribute to biomechanical alteration of the osteochondral (OC) tissue and its ScBP component. The study hypothesis was that hydraulic conductance of OC tissue and ScBP increases with structural changes indicative of increasing stages of OA. Methods OC cores were harvested from knees of cadaveric tissue donors and from discarded fragments of OA knee surgery patients. Tissue donor cores were macroscopically normal, and OA cores had partial- or full-thickness erosion to bone. Cores were perfusion-tested to determine the hydraulic conductance, or ease of fluid flow, in their native state and after enzymatic removal of cartilage. Adjacent portions were analyzed by 3-D histology for CC, ScB, and ScBP thickness and vascular canal density. Results The hydraulic conductances of native OC tissue and ScBP were higher (2700- and 3-fold) in fully eroded samples than normal samples. The CC layer was thicker (1.5-fold) in partially eroded samples than normal samples, but thinner and incomplete in fully eroded samples. ScBP vascularity was altered with increasing stages of OA. Conclusion During joint loading, increased hydraulic conductance of the OC tissue and ScBP could have deleterious biomechanical consequences for cartilage. Increased fluid exudation from overlying and opposing cartilage, increased fluid depressurization, and increased cartilage tissue strains could lead to chondrocyte death and cartilage damage. PMID:19035476

  11. Autologous protein solution inhibits MMP-13 production by IL-1β and TNFα-stimulated human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Woodell-May, Jennifer; Matuska, Andrea; Oyster, Megan; Welch, Zachary; O'Shaughnessey, Krista; Hoeppner, Jacy

    2011-09-01

    Catabolic inflammatory cytokines are prevalent in osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate an autologous protein solution (APS) as a potential chondroprotective agent for OA therapy. APS was prepared from platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The APS solution contained both anabolic (bFGF, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, EGF, IGF-1, PDGF-AB, PDGF-BB, and VEGF) and anti-inflammatory (IL-1ra, sTNF-RI, sTNF-RII, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, and IFNγ) cytokines but low concentrations of catabolic cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, and IL-18). Human articular chondrocytes were pre-incubated with the antagonists IL-1ra, sTNF-RI, or APS prior to the addition of recombinant human IL-1β or TNFα. Following exposure to inflammatory cytokines, the levels of MMP-13 in the culture medium were evaluated by ELISA. MMP-13 production stimulated in chondrocytes by IL-1β or TNFα was reduced by rhIL-1ra and sTNF-RI to near basal levels. APS was also capable of inhibiting the production of MMP-13 induced by both IL-1β and TNFα. The combination of anabolic and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the APS created from PRP may render this formulation to be a potential candidate for the treatment of inflammation in patients at early stages of OA. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  12. Safety of intra-articular cell-therapy with culture-expanded stem cells in humans: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Peeters, C M M; Leijs, M J C; Reijman, M; van Osch, G J V M; Bos, P K

    2013-10-01

    An important goal of stem cell research in orthopaedics is to develop clinically relevant techniques that could be applied to heal cartilage or joint pathology. Stem cell treatment in orthopaedics for joint pathology is promising since these cells have the ability to modulate different processes in the various tissues of the joint simultaneously. The non life-threatening nature of musculoskeletal system disorders makes safety of stem cell therapy a necessary prerequisite. To systematically review the literature and provide an overview of reported adverse events (AEs) of intra-articular treatment with culture-expanded stem cells in humans. A systematic literature search was performed in Pubmed, EMBASE, Web of Science and CINAHL in February 2013. AEs were reported into three categories: local/systemic, serious adverse event or AE (SAE/AE), related/unrelated. 3039 Potentially eligible articles were identified of which eventually eight fulfilled our inclusion criteria. In total, 844 procedures with a mean follow-up of 21 months were analysed. Autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) were used for cartilage repair and osteoarthritis treatment in all included studies. Four SAEs were reported by the authors. One infection following bone marrow aspiration (BMA) was reported as probably related and resolved with antibiotics. One pulmonary embolism occurred 2 weeks after BMA and was reported as possibly related. Two tumours, both not at the site of injection, were reported as unrelated. Twenty-two other cases of possible procedure-related and seven of possible stem cell-product related adverse events (AEs) were documented. The main AEs related to the procedure were increased pain/swelling and dehydration after BMA. Increased pain and swelling was the only AE reported as related to the stem cell-product. Based on current literature review we conclude that application of cultured stem cells in joints appears to be safe. We believe that with continuous

  13. Assessment of TGF-β3 on production of aggrecan by human articular chondrocytes in pellet culture system.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Saeed; Hashemibeni, Batool; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Kabiri, Azadeh; Rabbani, Hossein; Abutorabi, Roshanak

    2014-01-01

    The Autologous Chondrocytes Transplantation (ACT) method is being studied for repair of cartilage diseases. As the chondrocytes dedifferentiated during monolayer culture, three-dimensional cultures are suggested to redifferentiate them. The aim of this study was investigation of the effect of TGF-β3 growth factor on chondrocytes in pellet culture system. The chondrocytes were isolated from three human articular cartilages by enzymatic digestion. The cells of the second passage were transferred to pellet culture system. We determined the chondrogenic medium with TGF-β3 as the experimental group and without it as the control group. After 2 weeks, the aggrecan production was investigated using histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) methods. The presence of glycosaminoglycans was proved through Toluiden blue staining. Comparison of IHC results using MATLAB software showed that aggrecan in the experimental group was significantly higher than in the control group (P ≤ 0.05). The presence of TGF-β3 in the chondrogenic medium could lead to the production of more aggrecan in chondrocytes cultivated in pellet culture system.

  14. The synovial microenvironment of osteoarthritic joints alters RNA-seq expression profiles of human primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Eric A; Bonin, Carolina A; Li, Xin; Smith, Jay; Karperien, Marcel; Larson, A Noelle; Lewallen, David G; Cool, Simon M; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Krych, Aaron J; Leontovich, Alexey A; Im, Hee-Jeong; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-10-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disabling degenerative joint disease that prompts pain and has limited treatment options. To permit early diagnosis and treatment of OA, a high resolution mechanistic understanding of human chondrocytes in normal and diseased states is necessary. In this study, we assessed the biological effects of OA-related changes in the synovial microenvironment on chondrocytes embedded within anatomically intact cartilage from joints with different pathological grades by next generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We determined the transcriptome of primary articular chondrocytes derived from anatomically unaffected knees and ankles, as well as from joints affected by OA. The GALAXY bioinformatics platform was used to facilitate biological interpretations. Comparisons of patient samples by k-means, hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses together reveal that primary chondrocytes exhibit OA grade-related differences in gene expression, including genes involved in cell-adhesion, ECM production and immune response. We conclude that diseased synovial microenvironments in joints with different histopathological OA grades directly alter gene expression in chondrocytes. One ramification of this finding is that anatomically intact cartilage from OA joints is not an ideal source of healthy chondrocytes, nor should these specimens be used to generate a normal baseline for the molecular characterization of diseased joints. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Imaging of Osteoarthritic Human Articular Cartilage using Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy Combined with Multivariate and Univariate Analysis.

    PubMed

    Oinas, J; Rieppo, L; Finnilä, M A J; Valkealahti, M; Lehenkari, P; Saarakkala, S

    2016-07-21

    The changes in chemical composition of human articular cartilage (AC) caused by osteoarthritis (OA) were investigated using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR-MS). We demonstrate the sensitivity of FTIR-MS for monitoring compositional changes that occur with OA progression. Twenty-eight AC samples from tibial plateaus were imaged with FTIR-MS. Hyperspectral images of all samples were combined for K-means clustering. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis was used to compare the spectra with the OARSI grade (histopathological grading of OA). Furthermore, the amide I and the carbohydrate regions were used to estimate collagen and proteoglycan contents, respectively. Spectral peak at 1338 cm(-1) was used to estimate the integrity of the collagen network. The layered structure of AC was revealed using the carbohydrate region for clustering. Statistically significant correlation was observed between the OARSI grade and the collagen integrity in the superficial (r = -0.55) and the deep (r = -0.41) zones. Furthermore, PLSR models predicted the OARSI grade from the superficial (r = 0.94) and the deep (r = 0.77) regions of the AC with high accuracy. Obtained results suggest that quantitative and qualitative changes occur in the AC composition during OA progression, and these can be monitored by the use of FTIR-MS.

  16. Influence of dynamic load on friction behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel as artificial cartilage.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Su, Yonglin; Wang, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Wang, Chengtao

    2010-01-01

    Many biomaterials are being developed to be used for cartilage substitution and hemiarthroplasty implants. The lubrication property is a key feature of the artificial cartilage. The frictional behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel were investigated under cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact, cartilage-on-cartilage contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact using pin-on-plate method. Tests under static load, cyclic load and 1 min load change were used to evaluate friction variations in reciprocating motion. The results showed that the lubrication property of cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact were restored in both 1 min load change and cyclic load tests. The friction coefficient of PVA hydrogel decreased from 0.178 to 0.076 in 60 min, which was almost one-third of the value under static load in continuous sliding tests. In each test, the friction coefficient of cartilage-on-cartilage contact maintained far lower value than other contacts. It is indicated that a key feature of artificial cartilage is the biphasic lubrication properties.

  17. Synthesis of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in vitro in human articular cartilage cultures.

    PubMed

    Eviatar, Tamar; Kauffman, Hannah; Maroudas, Alice

    2003-02-01

    To quantify the rate of synthesis of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) by in vitro cultures of normal and osteoarthritic (OA) human articular cartilage. Levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in media from in vitro cultures of human cartilage were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). IGFBPs were characterized by immunoblots and ligand blots. Ultrafiltration and RIA analysis of synovial fluid (SF) samples and washings of cartilage samples ex vivo were used to calculate partition coefficients and to estimate the amount of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in cartilage in vivo. OA cartilage synthesized 150 ng of IGFBP-3 per gm of cartilage per day, compared with 50 ng synthesized by normal cartilage. The surface zone of normal cartilage produced more IGFBP-3 than did the deep zone. Immunoblots and ligand blots confirmed the presence of IGFBP-3. IGFBP-3 synthesis was stimulated by exogenous IGF-1. No freshly synthesized IGF-1 was detected. The quantities of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 present ex vivo were 11.3 and 78.7 ng/gm of cartilage in normal cartilage and 21.6 and 225.4 ng/gm in OA cartilage. The results show that while IGFBP-3 is synthesized in explant cultures, IGF-1 is not. The rate of IGFBP-3 synthesis is 3 times higher in OA than in normal cartilage. Both IGFBP-3 and IGF-1 penetrate into cartilage from SF in vivo. We estimate that the quantities of IGFBP-3 produced in culture by human cartilage are small compared with the amount supplied in the form of "small complexes" from the circulation. The high value of the partition coefficient of IGFBP-3 implies binding to the matrix.

  18. Articular Osteochondrosis: A Comparison of Naturally-Occurring Human and Animal Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Annette M; Toth, Ferenc; Dolvik, Nils I; Ekman, Stina; Ellermann, Jutta; Olstad, Kristin; Ytrehus, Bjornar; Carlson, Cathy S

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteochondrosis (OC) is a common developmental orthopedic disease affecting both humans and animals. Despite increasing recognition of this disease among children and adolescents, its pathogenesis is incompletely understood because clinical signs are often not apparent until lesions have progressed to end-stage, and examination of cadaveric early lesions is not feasible. In contrast, both naturally-occurring and surgically-induced animal models of disease have been extensively studied, most notably in horses and swine, species in which OC is recognized to have profound health and economic implications. The potential for a translational model of human OC has not been recognized in the existing human literature. Objective The purpose of this review is to highlight the similarities in signalment, predilection sites and clinical presentation of naturally-occurring OC in humans and animals and to propose a common pathogenesis for this condition across species. Study Design Review Methods The published human and veterinary literature for the various manifestations of OC was reviewed. Peer-reviewed original scientific articles and species-specific review articles accessible in PubMed (US National Library of Medicine) were eligible for inclusion. Results A broad range of similarities exists between OC affecting humans and animals, including predilection sites, clinical presentation, radiographic/MRI changes, and histological appearance of the end stage lesion, suggesting a shared pathogenesis across species. Conclusion This proposed shared pathogenesis for OC between species implies that naturally-occurring and surgically-induced models of OC in animals may be useful in determining risk factors and for testing new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions that can be used in humans. PMID:23954774

  19. The secretory profiles of cultured human articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells: implications for autologous cell transplantation strategies.

    PubMed

    Polacek, Martin; Bruun, Jack-Ansgar; Elvenes, Jan; Figenschau, Yngve; Martinez, Inigo

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the phenotype of human articular chondrocytes (ACs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after cell expansion by studying the spectrum of proteins secreted by cells into the culture medium. ACs and MSCs were expanded in monolayer cultures for some weeks, as done in standard cell transplantation procedures. Initially, the expression of cartilage signature genes was compared by real-time PCR. Metabolic labeling of proteins (SILAC) in combination with mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) was applied to investigate differences in released proteins. In addition, multiplex assays were carried out to quantify the amounts of several matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their natural inhibitors (TIMPs). Expanded chondrocytes showed a slightly higher expression of cartilage-specific genes than MSCs, whereas the overall spectra of released proteins were very similar for the two cell types. In qualitative terms MSCs seemed to secrete similar number of extracellular matrix proteins (43% vs. 45% of total proteins found) and catabolic agents (9% vs. 10%), and higher number of anabolic agents (12 % vs. 7%) compared to ACs. Some matrix-regulatory agents such as serpins, BMP-1, and galectins were detected only in MSC supernatants. Quantitative analyses of MMPs and TIMPs revealed significantly higher levels of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-7 in the medium of ACs. Our data show that after the expansion phase, both ACs and MSCs express a dedifferentiated phenotype, resembling each other. ACs hold a phenotype closer to native cartilage at the gene expression level, whereas MSCs show a more anabolic profile by looking at the released proteins pattern. Our data together with the inherent capability of MSCs to maintain their differentiation potential for longer cultivation periods would favor the use of these cells for cartilage reconstruction.

  20. Long-term in vitro expansion of osteoarthritic human articular chondrocytes do not alter genetic stability: a microsatellite instability analysis.

    PubMed

    Neri, Simona; Mariani, Erminia; Cattini, Luca; Facchini, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we investigated genetic damage acquisition during in vitro culture of human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes to evaluate their safety for use in regenerative medicine clinical applications. In particular, we have addressed the impact of long-term in vitro culture on simple sequence repeat stability, to evaluate the involvement of the mismatch repair system (MMR) in the accumulation of genetic damage. MMR, the main post-replicative correction pathway, has a fundamental role in maintaining genomic stability and can be monitored by assessing microsatellite instability (MSI). MMR activity has been reported to decrease with age not only in vivo, but also in vitro in relationship to culture passages. OA chondrocytes from seven donors were cultured corresponding to 13-29 population doublings. Aliquots of the cells were collected and analyzed for MSI at five DNA loci (CD4, VWA, FES, TPOX, and P53) and for MMR gene expression at each subculture. Genetic stability was confirmed throughout the culture period. MMR genes demonstrated a strong coordination at the transcriptional level among the different components; expression levels were very low, in accordance with the observed genetic stability. The reduced expression of MMR genes might underline no need for increasing DNA repair control in the culture conditions tested, in which no genetic damage was evidenced. These data argue for the safety of chondrocytes for cellular therapies and are encouraging for the potential use of in vitro expanded OA chondrocytes, supporting the extension of autologous cell therapy procedures to degenerative articular diseases. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Population doublings and percentage of S100-positive cells as predictors of in vitro chondrogenicity of expanded human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Samoa; Diaz-Romero, Jose; Aigner, Thomas; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Nesic, Dobrila

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interconnection between the processes of proliferation, dedifferentiation, and intrinsic redifferentiation (chondrogenic) capacities of human articular chondrocyte (HAC), and to identify markers linking HAC dedifferentiation status with their chondrogenic potential. Cumulative population doublings (PD) of HAC expanded in monolayer culture were determined, and a threshold range of 3.57-4.19 PD was identified as indicative of HAC loss of intrinsic chondrogenic capacity in pellets incubated without added chondrogenic factors. While several specific gene and surface markers defined early HAC dedifferentiation process, no clear correlation with the loss of intrinsic chondrogenic potential could be established. CD90 expression during HAC monolayer culture revealed two subpopulations, with sorted CD90-negative cells showing lower proliferative capacity and higher chondrogenic potential compared to CD90-positive cells. Although these data further validated PD as critical for in vitro chondrogenesis, due to the early shift in expression, CD90 could not be considered for predicting chondrogenic potential of HAC expanded for several weeks. In contrast, an excellent mathematically modeled correlation was established between PD and the decline of HAC expressing the intracellular marker S100, providing a direct link between the number of cell divisions and dedifferentiation/loss of intrinsic chondrogenic capacity. Based on the dynamics of S100-positive HAC during expansion, we propose asymmetric cell division as a potential mechanism of HAC dedifferentiation, and S100 as a marker to assess chondrogenicity of HAC during expansion, of potential value for cell-based cartilage repair treatments. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Direct Assessment of Articular Cartilage and Underlying Subchondral Bone Reveals a Progressive Gene Expression Change in Human Osteoarthritic Knees

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ching-Heng; Lee, Chian-Her; Lu, Liang-Suei; Song, I-Wen; Chuang, Hui-Ping; Kuo, San-Yuan; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Kraus, Virginia Byers; Wu, Chia-Chun; Lee, Ming Ta Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the interaction of articular cartilage (AC) and subchondral bone (SB) through analysis of osteoarthritis (OA)-related genes of site-matched tissue. Design We developed a novel method for isolating site-matched overlying AC and underlying SB from three and four regions of interest respectively from the human knee tibial plateau (n=50). For each site, the severity of cartilage changes of OA were assessed histologically, and the severity of bone abnormalities were assessed by microcomputed tomography. An RNA isolation procedure was optimized that yielded high quality RNA from site-matched AC and SB tibial regions. Q-PCR analysis was performed to evaluate gene expression of 61 OA-associated genes for correlation with cartilage integrity and bone structure parameters. Results A total of 27 (44%) genes were coordinately up or down regulated in both tissues. The expression levels of 19 genes were statistically significantly correlated with the severity of AC degeneration and changes of SB structure; these included: ADAMTS1, ASPN, BMP6, BMPER, CCL2, CCL8, COL5A1, COL6A3, COL7A1, COL16A1, FRZB, GDF10, MMP3, OGN, OMD, POSTN, PTGES, TNFSF11 and WNT1. Conclusions These results provide a strategy for identifying targets whose modification may have the potential to ameliorate pathological alterations and progression of disease in both AC and SB simultaneously. In addition, this is the first study, to our knowledge, to overcome the major difficulties related to isolation of high quality RNA from site-matched joint tissues. We expect this method to facilitate advances in our understanding of the coordinated molecular responses of the whole joint organ. PMID:23220557

  3. Molecular shuttle between extracellular and cytoplasmic space allows for monitoring of GAG biosynthesis in human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hiroko; Shimawaki, Ken; Takegawa, Yasuhiro; Ohyanagi, Tatsuya; Amano, Maho; Hinou, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2012-09-01

    Cell surface proteoglycans play vital functional roles in various biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, inflammation, immune response, sustentation of cartilage tissue and intensity of tissues. We show here that serglycin-like synthetic glycopeptides function efficiently as a molecular shuttle to hijack glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthetic pathway within cells across the plasma membrane. Fluorescence (FITC)-labeled tetrapeptide (H-Ser(1)-Gly(2)-Ser(3)-Gly(4)-OH) carrying Galβ(1➝4)Xylβ1➝ defined as proteoglycan initiator (PGI) monomer and its tandem repeating PGI polymer was employed for direct imaging of cellular uptake and intracellular traffic by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Novel method for enrichment analysis of GAG-primed PGIs by combined use of anti-FITC antibody and LC/mass spectrometry was established. PGI monomer was incorporated promptly into human articular chondrocytes and distributed in whole cytoplasm including ER/Golgi while PGI polymer localized specifically in nucleus. It was demonstrated that PGIs become good substrates for GAG biosynthesis within the cells and high molecular weight GAGs primed by PGIs is chondroitin sulfate involving N-acetyl-d-galactosamine residues substituted by 4-O-sulfate or 6-O-sulfate group as major components. PGIs activated chondrocytes proliferation and induced up-regulation of the expression level of type II collagen, suggesting that PGIs can function as new class cytokine-like molecules to stimulate cell growth. Synthetic serglycin-type PGIs allow for live cell imaging during proteoglycan biosynthesis and structural characterization of GAG-primed PGIs by an antibody-based enrichment protocol. Novel glycomics designated for investigating proteoglycan biosynthesis, namely real-time GAGomics using synthetic glycopeptides as PGIs, should facilitate greatly dynamic profiling of GAGs in the living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Glycoproteomics

  4. Articular cartilage repair with recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold in a preliminary porcine study.

    PubMed

    Muhonen, Virpi; Salonius, Eve; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Paatela, Teemu; Meller, Anna; Hannula, Markus; Björkman, Mimmi; Pyhältö, Tuomo; Ellä, Ville; Vasara, Anna; Töyräs, Juha; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold (rhCo-PLA) in the repair of full-thickness cartilage lesions with autologous chondrocyte implantation technique (ACI). The forming repair tissue was compared to spontaneous healing (spontaneous) and repair with a commercial porcine type I/III collagen membrane (pCo). Domestic pigs (4-month-old, n = 20) were randomized into three study groups and a circular full-thickness chondral lesion with a diameter of 8 mm was created in the right medial femoral condyle. After 3 weeks, the chondral lesions were repaired with either rhCo-PLA or pCo together with autologous chondrocytes, or the lesion was only debrided and left untreated for spontaneous repair. The repair tissue was evaluated 4 months after the second operation. Hyaline cartilage formed most frequently in the rhCo-PLA treatment group. Biomechanically, there was a trend that both treatment groups resulted in better repair tissue than spontaneous healing. Adverse subchondral bone reactions developed less frequently in the spontaneous group (40%) and the rhCo-PLA treated group (50%) than in the pCo control group (100%). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The novel rhCo-PLA biomaterial showed promising results in this proof-of-concept study, but further studies will be needed in order to determine its effectiveness in articular cartilage repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:745-753, 2016.

  5. Aggrecan turnover in human articular cartilage: use of aspartic acid racemization as a marker of molecular age.

    PubMed

    Maroudas, A; Bayliss, M T; Uchitel-Kaushansky, N; Schneiderman, R; Gilav, E

    1998-02-01

    Aggrecan is a key component of the cartilage matrix. During aging, many changes occur in its composition and structure; in particular, there is an increase in the proportion of lower molecular weight monomers and of the "free" binding region. An important question has been whether these changes represent alterations in biosynthesis or whether they are due to the accumulation with age of the partially degraded fragments of the originally synthesized large monomer. In the present work we have used an independent tool, viz., the extent of racemization of aspartic acid to study the molecular "age" of different buoyant density fractions of the aggrecan of human articular cartilage, as well as of isolated free binding region and link protein. By measuring the D/LAsp ratio of the different aggrecan species, we were able to establish directly the relative residence times of these molecules in the cartilage matrix and, in combination with compositional and structural analyses, to define their "history" and calculate some of the kinetics constants characterizing their turnover. The value of the turnover constant for the large monomer in fraction A1D1 is 0.206 per year, which corresponds to a half-life of 3.4 years, while the turnover constant for the free binding region is 0.027 per year, which corresponds to a half-life of 25 years. It is thus clear that the rate of formation and turnover of the large monomer is much more rapid than the final degradation of the free binding region fragments, which explains the accumulation of the latter in cartilage during aging.

  6. The effect of insulin-like growth factor I on proteoglycan metabolism in immature and adult bovine articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Barone-Varelas, J.

    1989-01-01

    Explants of articular cartilage from calf (15 weeks old) and steer (18-24 months old) were cultured for up to 19 days in medium containing either insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) or 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Explants cultured in medium alone were controls. {sup 35}S-proteoglycans (PGs) synthesized on day 7 of culture during a 5-hour pulse with {sup 35}S-sulfate were isolated, quantified and characterized. Lower concentrations of IGF-I were required for maximal stimulation of PG synthesis in calf than in steer (10 vs 20 ng/ml). In calf, IGF-I was as effective as 20% FABS in stimulating PG synthesis. In steer, PG synthesis in the presence of IGF-I reached its maximum at a rate that was half that obtained with 20% FBS. The stimulation by IGF-I or FBS was not accompanied at either age by alterations in the size and composition of the aggregating PGs nor by changes in the relative proportions of the CS-rich and CS-poor PG subpopulations. Importantly, the newly synthesized calf and steer PGs retained marked age-related differences in composition regardless of the culture conditions. The effects of exogenously added IGF-I and FBS on the rate of turnover of cartilage PGs was also studied. In calf, IGF-I and FBS did not significantly alter the rate of turnover of either the {sup 35}S-PGs synthesized in vitro or of the unlabeled PGs representing mostly molecules synthesize and organized into the matrix in vivo. In steer, explants cultured in the absence of IGF-I or FBS exhibited very fast rates of turnover which resulted in severe depletion of matrix PG with time. Importantly, IGF-I and FBS were equally effective in reducing the turnover rate of {sup 35}S-PGs and unlabeled PGs and in preventing PG depletion. These results demonstrate age-related differences in the effect of IGF-I on PG synthesis by articular chondrocytes.

  7. Effect of collagen type I or type II on chondrogenesis by cultured human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rutgers, Marijn; Saris, Daniel B; Vonk, Lucienne A; van Rijen, Mattie H; Akrum, Vanessa; Langeveld, Danielle; van Boxtel, Antonette; Dhert, Wouter J; Creemers, Laura B

    2013-01-01

    Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently, however, fibrillar collagens were shown to promote cartilage degradation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of collagen type I and type II coating on chondrogenic properties of in vitro cultured human chondrocytes, and to investigate if collagen-mediated cartilage degradation occurs. Human chondrocytes of eight healthy cartilage donors were isolated, expanded, and cultured on culture well inserts coated with either collagen type I, type II, or no coating (control). After 28 days of redifferentiation culture, safranin O and immunohistochemical staining for collagen types I, II, X, and Runx2/Cbfa1 were performed and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA content and release were examined. Further, expression of collagen type I, type II, type X, MMP13, Runx2/Cbfa1, DDR2, α2 and β1 integrin were examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The matrix, created by chondrocytes grown on collagen type I- and II-coated membranes, resembled cartilage more than when grown on noncoated membranes as reflected by histological scoring. Immunohistochemical staining did not differ between the conditions. GAG content as well as GAG/DNA were higher for collagen type II-coated cartilage constructs than control. GAG release was also higher on collagen type I- and II-coated constructs. Expression of collagen type X was higher of chondrocytes grown on collagen type II compared to controls, but no collagen X protein could be demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. No effects of collagen coating on DDR2 nor MMP-13 gene expression were found. No differences were observed between collagen types I and II. Chondrocyte culture on collagen type I or II promotes more active matrix production

  8. Human adult deglutition during sleep.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kiminori; Nakashima, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Clearance of the pharynx by deglutition is important in protecting the airway. The pattern of deglutition during sleep was investigated. Deglutition during sleep was examined in 8 normal human adults via time-matched recordings of polysomnography and surface electromyography (EMG) of the thyrohyoid and suprahyoid muscles. During sleep, deglutition was episodic, and was absent for long periods. The mean number of swallows per hour (+/-SD) during the total sleep time was 2.9 +/- 1.3. The mean period of the longest absence of deglutition was 50.6 +/- 10.2 minutes. Most deglutition occurred in association with spontaneous electroencephalographic arousal in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM sleep. Deglutition was related to sleep stage. The mean number of swallows per hour was 7.2 +/- 3.5 during stage 1 sleep and 2.0 +/- 0.7 during stage 2 sleep. There was little deglutition during stages 3 and 4. The deeper the sleep stage became, the lower the mean deglutition frequency became. The mean number of swallows per hour was 2.7 +/- 2.2 during REM sleep. The EMG amplitude dropped to the lowest level of recording and hypotonic EMG activity increased during REM sleep. Deglutition, a vital function, is infrequent during sleep.

  9. Anti-inflammatory activity of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol in human articular cartilage in vitro: activation of an anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathway

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The mono- and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG and DGDG) galactolipids have been purified from the thermophilic blue-green alga Phormidium sp. ETS-05 that colonizes the therapeutic thermal mud of Abano Terme and Montegrotto Terme, Italy. Both compounds present a marked composition in polyunsaturated fatty acids, mainly omega-3. The therapeutic thermal mud is applied mainly to osteoarthritic cartilage patients. In the present study the effect of MGDG treatment on proteins and factors expressed by human articular cartilage cells in culture and on pathways activated in inflammatory conditions was studied. Methods Primary cultures of human articular chondrocytes were used at cell passage number 1 (P1). Cells were treated in serum-free medium with inflammatory cytokines in the presence and in the absence of MGDG. Western blot was performed on collected medium and on cell layers. At least three different experiments were performed on primary cultures. The quantitation of the MGDG effect was performed by densitometric scanning of Western blots. p38 Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (p38) activation, Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-kB) activation and Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) quantitation were performed by commercially available assays. Results are given as the mean values ± SD. All statistical analyses were performed using GraphPad software. The two-tailed Student's t -test was performed. Results We report that MGDG: 1) represses the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) induced by interleukin-1alpha (IL-1α) or IL-1α + tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) interfering with the p38 and NF-kB pathways; 2) is not toxic for the cells and does not affect the cell phenotype; 3) strongly enhances COX-2 expression induced by IL-1α or IL-1α + TNFα; 4) represses mPGES expression induced by IL-1α and the synthesis of PGE2 and induces the synthesis of 15-deoxy-Δ 12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15ΔPGJ2). In addition, the COX-2 product 15ΔPGJ2 added to the cells

  10. Dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult humans

    PubMed Central

    Alkass, Kanar; Bernard, Samuel; Salehpour, Mehran; Huttner, Hagen B.; Boström, Emil; Westerlund, Isabelle; Vial, Celine; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Possnert, Göran; Mash, Deborah C.; Druid, Henrik; Frisén, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Adult-born hippocampal neurons are important for cognitive plasticity in rodents. There is evidence for hippocampal neurogenesis in adult humans, although whether its extent is sufficient to have functional significance has been questioned. We have assessed the generation of hippocampal cells in humans by measuring the concentration of nuclear bomb test-derived 14C in genomic DNA and we present an integrated model of the cell turnover dynamics. We found that a large subpopulation of hippocampal neurons, constituting one third of the neurons, is subject to exchange. In adult humans, 700 new neurons are added per day, corresponding to an annual turnover of 1.75% of the neurons within the renewing fraction, with a modest decline during aging. We conclude that neurons are generated throughout adulthood and that the rates are comparable in middle aged humans and mice, suggesting that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may contribute to human brain function. PMID:23746839

  11. Effect of stratified culture compared to confluent culture in monolayer on proliferation and differentiation of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Jeanine; Riesle, Jens; Vanblitterswijk, Clemens A

    2006-09-01

    With conventional tissue culture of cells, it is generally assumed that when the available 2D substrate is fully occupied, growth ceases or is greatly reduced.However, in nature wound repair mostly involves proliferation of cells that are attracted to the defect site in a 3D environment.Hence, proliferation continues in 3D until the defect site is filled with cells contributing to repair tissue. With this in mind,we examined the growth behavior of human articular chondrocytes during stratified culture as opposed to routine culture to confluency. Additionally, we studied the influence of growth factors on proliferation during stratified culture and differentiation thereafter. Chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer on tissue culture plastic to confluency or stratified for an additional 7 days. Culture medium was based on DMEM with 10% serum and either supplemented with high concentrations of nonessential amino acids (NEAA) and ascorbic acid (AsAP), or instead with basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDBF-BB), and/or transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta). After expansion, cells were harvested, counted, and their differentiation capacity was examined in pellet culture assay. It was shown that chondrocytes, cultured stratified proliferate exponentially for up to an additional 4 days and that cell yield increased 5-fold. Furthermore, during stratified culture the number of cells increased further in the presence of bFGF, PDBF-BB, and TGFbeta1 or high concentrations of NEAA and AsAP. Depending on donor variation and factors supplemented the cell yield ranged from 0.06 up to 1.1 million cells/cm2 at the second passage. During stratified culture in the presence of either bFGF and PDGF or high concentrations of NEAA and AsAP, exponential growth continued for up to 7 days. Finally, cells maintained their differentiation capacity when cultured stratified with or without growth factors (bFGF, TGF-beta, and PDGF), but not when cultured

  12. The acute effect of bipolar radiofrequency energy thermal chondroplasty on intrinsic biomechanical properties and thickness of chondromalacic human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Dutcheshen, Nicholas; Maerz, Tristan; Rabban, Patrick; Haut, Roger C; Button, Keith D; Baker, Kevin C; Guettler, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Radio frequency energy (RFE) thermal chondroplasty has been a widely-utilized method of cartilage debridement in the past. Little is known regarding its effect on tissue mechanics. This study investigated the acute biomechanical effects of bipolar RFE treatment on human chondromalacic cartilage. Articular cartilage specimens were extracted (n = 50) from femoral condyle samples of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Chondromalacia was graded with the Outerbridge classification system. Tissue thicknesses were measured using a needle punch test. Specimens underwent pretreatment load-relaxation testing using a spherical indenter. Bipolar RFE treatment was applied for 45 s and the indentation protocol was repeated. Structural properties were derived from the force-time data. Mechanical properties were derived using a fibril-reinforced biphasic cartilage model. Statistics were performed using repeated measures ANOVA. Cartilage thickness decreased after RFE treatment from a mean of 2.61 mm to 2.20 mm in Grade II, II-III, and III specimens (P < 0.001 each). Peak force increased after RFE treatment from a mean of 3.91 N to 4.91 N in Grade II and III specimens (P = 0.002 and P = 0.003, respectively). Equilibrium force increased after RFE treatment from a mean of 0.236 N to 0.457 N (P < 0.001 each grade). Time constant decreased after RFE treatment from a mean of 0.392 to 0.234 (P < 0.001 for each grade). Matrix modulus increased in all specimens following RFE treatment from a mean 259.12 kPa to 523.36 kPa (P < 0.001 each grade). Collagen fibril modulus decreased in Grade II and II-III specimens from 60.50 MPa to 42.04 MPa (P < 0.001 and P = 0.005, respectively). Tissue permeability decreased in Grade II and III specimens from 2.04 ∗10(-15) m(4)/Ns to 0.91 ∗10(-15) m(4)/Ns (P < 0.001 and P = 0.009, respectively). RFE treatment decreased thickness, time constant, fibril modulus, permeability, but increased peak force

  13. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA.

  14. The adult human pubic symphysis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Ines; Woodley, Stephanie J; Stringer, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    The pubic symphysis is a unique joint consisting of a fibrocartilaginous disc sandwiched between the articular surfaces of the pubic bones. It resists tensile, shearing and compressive forces and is capable of a small amount of movement under physiological conditions in most adults (up to 2 mm shift and 1° rotation). During pregnancy, circulating hormones such as relaxin induce resorption of the symphyseal margins and structural changes in the fibrocartilaginous disc, increasing symphyseal width and mobility. This systematic review of the English, German and French literature focuses on the normal anatomy of the adult human pubic symphysis. Although scientific studies of the joint have yielded useful descriptive data, comparison of results is hampered by imprecise methodology and/or poorly controlled studies. Several aspects of the anatomy of the pubic symphysis remain unknown or unclear: the precise attachments of surrounding ligaments and muscles; the arrangement of connective tissue fibres within the interpubic disc and the origin, structure and function of its associated interpubic cleft; the biomechanical consequences of sexual dimorphism; potential ethnic variations in morphology; and its precise innervation and blood supply. These deficiencies hinder our understanding of the normal form and function of the joint, which is particularly relevant when attempting to understand the mechanisms underlying pregnancy-related pubic symphyseal pain, a neglected and relatively common cause of pubic pain. A better understanding of the normal anatomy of the human pubic symphysis should improve our understanding of such problems and contribute to better treatments for patients suffering from symphyseal pain and dysfunction. PMID:20840351

  15. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase and glucose-regulated protein 78 increase the life span of articular chondrocytes and their repair potential

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Like all mammalian cells, normal adult chondrocytes have a limited replicative life span, which decreases with age. To facilitate the therapeutic use of chondrocytes from older donors, a method is needed to prolong their life span. Methods We transfected chondrocytes with hTERT or GRP78 and cultured them in a 3-dimensional atelocollagen honeycomb-shaped scaffold with a membrane seal. Then, we measured the amount of nuclear DNA and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and the expression level of type II collagen as markers of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix formation, respectively, in these cultures. In addition, we allografted this tissue-engineered cartilage into osteochondral defects in old rabbits to assess their repair activity in vivo. Results Our results showed different degrees of differentiation in terms of GAG content between chondrocytes from old and young rabbits. Chondrocytes that were cotransfected with hTERT and GRP78 showed higher cellular proliferation and expression of type II collagen than those of nontransfected chondrocytes, regardless of the age of the cartilage donor. In addition, the in vitro growth rates of hTERT- or GRP78-transfected chondrocytes were higher than those of nontransfected chondrocytes, regardless of donor age. In vivo, the tissue-engineered cartilage implants exhibited strong repairing activity, maintained a chondrocyte-specific phenotype, and produced extracellular matrix components. Conclusions Focal gene delivery to aged articular chondrocytes exhibited strong repairing activity and may be therapeutically useful for articular cartilage regeneration. PMID:22472071

  16. Elastic energy storage in human articular cartilage: estimation of the elastic modulus for type II collagen and changes associated with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Silver, Frederick H; Bradica, Gino; Tria, Alfred

    2002-03-01

    The viscoelastic mechanical properties of normal and osteoarthritic articular were analyzed based on data reported by Kempson [in: Adult Articular Cartilage (1973)] and Silver et al. (Connect. Tissue Res., 2001b). Results of the analysis of tensile elastic stress-strain curves suggest that the elastic modulus of cartilage from the superficial zone is approximately 7.0 GPa parallel and 2.21 GPa perpendicular to the cleavage line pattern. Collagen fibril lengths in the superficial zone were found to be approximately 1265 microm parallel and 668 microm perpendicular to the cleavage line direction. The values for the elastic modulus and fibril lengths decreased with increased extent of osteoarthritis. The elastic modulus of type II collagen parallel to the cleavage line pattern in the superficial zone approaches that of type I collagen in tendon, suggesting that elastic energy storage occurs in the superficial zone due to the tensile pre-tension that exists in this region. Decreases in the elastic modulus associated with osteoarthritis reflect decreased ability of cartilage to store elastic energy, which leads to cartilage fibrillation and fissure formation. We hypothesize that under normal physiological conditions, collagen fibrils in cartilage function to store elastic energy associated with weight bearing and locomotion. Enzymatic cleavage of cartilage proteoglycans and collagen observed in osteoarthritis may lead to fibrillation and fissure formation as a result of impaired energy storage capability of cartilage.

  17. TGF β-1 administration during ex vivo expansion of human articular chondrocytes in a serum-free medium redirects the cell phenotype toward hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Narcisi, R; Quarto, R; Ulivi, V; Muraglia, A; Molfetta, L; Giannoni, P

    2012-09-01

    Cell-based cartilage resurfacing requires ex vivo expansion of autologous articular chondrocytes. Defined culture conditions minimize expansion-dependent phenotypic alterations but maintenance of the cells' differentiation potential must be carefully assessed. Transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF β-1) positively regulates the expression of several cartilage proteins, but its therapeutic application in damaged cartilage is controversial. Thus we evaluated the phenotypic outcomes of cultured human articular chondrocytes exposed to TGF β-1 during monolayer expansion in a serum-free medium. After five doublings cells were transferred to micromass cultures to assess their chondrogenic differentiation, or replated in osteogenic medium. Immunocytostainings of micromasses of TGF-expanded cells showed loss of aggrecan and type II collagen. Positivity was evidenced for RAGE, IHH, type X collagen and for apoptotic cells, paralleling a reduction of BCL-2 levels, suggesting hypertrophic differentiation. TGF β-1-exposed cells also evidenced increased mRNA levels for bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, matrix metalloproteinase-13, TIMP-3, VEGF and SMAD7, enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and pyrophosphate availability. Conversely, SMAD3 mRNA and protein contents were reduced. After osteogenic induction, only TGF-expanded cells strongly mineralized and impaired p38 kinase activity, a contributor of chondrocytes' differentiation. To evaluate possible endochondral ossification progression, we seeded the chondrocytes on hydroxyapatite scaffolds, subsequently implanted in an in vivo ectopic setting, but cells failed to reach overt ossification; nonetheless, constructs seeded with TGF-exposed cells displayed blood vessels of the host vascular supply with enlarged diameters, suggestive of vascular remodeling, as in bone growth. Thus TGF-exposure during articular chondrocytes expansion induces a phenotype switch to hypertrophy, an undesirable effect for cells possibly intended for

  18. Dual effect of platelet lysate on human articular cartilage: a maintenance of chondrogenic potential and a transient proinflammatory activity followed by an inflammation resolution.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rui Cruz; Scaranari, Monica; Benelli, Roberto; Strada, Paolo; Reis, Rui L; Cancedda, Ranieri; Gentili, Chiara

    2013-06-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a cocktail of platelet growth factors and bioactive proteins, has been proposed as a therapeutic agent to restore damaged articular cartilage. We report the biological effect of the platelet lysate (PL), a PRP derivative, on primary human articular chondrocytes cultured under both physiological and inflammatory conditions. When added to the culture medium, PL induced a strong mitogenic response in the chondrocytes. The in vitro expanded cell population maintained a chondrogenic redifferentiation potential as revealed by micromass culture in vitro and ectopic cartilage formation in vivo. Further, in chondrocytes cultured in the presence of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1α (IL-1α), the PL induced a drastic enhancement of the synthesis of the cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 and of neutrophil-gelatinase associated lipocalin, a lipocalin expressed during chondrocyte differentiation and inflammation. These events were mediated by the p38 MAP kinase and NF-κB pathways. We observed that inflammatory stimuli activated phospo-MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2, a direct target of p38. The proinflammatory effect of the PL was a transient phenomenon; after an initial upregulation, we observed significant reduction of the NF-κB activity together with the repression of the inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2. Moreover, the medium of chondrocytes cultured in the simultaneous presence of PL and IL-1α, showed a significant enhancement of the chemoattractant activity versus untreated chondrocytes. Our findings support the concept that the platelet products have a direct beneficial effect on articular chondrocytes and could drive in sequence a transient activation and the resolution of the inflammatory process, thus providing a rational for their use as therapeutic agents in cartilage inflammation and damage.

  19. Effects of tissue-engineered articular disc implants on the biomechanical loading of the human temporomandibular joint in a three-dimensional finite element model.

    PubMed

    Al-Sukhun, Jehad; Ashammakhi, Nureddin; Penttila, Heikki

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate biomechanical loading of the temporomandibular joint when using a biodegradable laminate implant to replace the articular disc and to test the hypothesis that the use of the implant reduces stress distribution in the condyle, implant, and glenoid fossa. A finite element model of a female human mandible, including the temporomandibular joint, which had two standard endosseous implants inserted bilaterally in the premolar region, was constructed from computed tomography scan images using a commercially available finite element software. The disc, condyle, and glenoid fossa were arbitrarily divided into five regions: the anterior, posterior, medial, lateral, and central. The disc was then replaced with a poly-L/DL-lactide biodegradable laminate. The finite element model was then used to predict principal and Von Mises stresses. The use of poly-L/DL-lactide implant resulted in remarkable reduction in Von Mises stresses (approximately threefold) in the anterior, central, and medial regions of the mandibular condyle in comparison with slight to moderate stress reductions in the corresponding regions of the implant and glenoid fossa. The mandibular condyle also demonstrated the largest total displacement in all directions followed by the implant and glenoid fossa. The use of an alloplastic implant such as the bioresorbable, poly-L/DL-lactide laminate to replace the articular disc reduces loading of the mandibular condyle rather than the implant and glenoid fossa. These findings lead to support the hypothesis that the mandibular condyle more likely functions as a shock absorber than the disc. The use of bioresorbable laminate implants might prove an efficient technique to replace the articular disc and promote normal function of the temporomandibular joint.

  20. Nasal chondrocyte-based engineered autologous cartilage tissue for repair of articular cartilage defects: an observational first-in-human trial.

    PubMed

    Mumme, Marcus; Barbero, Andrea; Miot, Sylvie; Wixmerten, Anke; Feliciano, Sandra; Wolf, Francine; Asnaghi, Adelaide M; Baumhoer, Daniel; Bieri, Oliver; Kretzschmar, Martin; Pagenstert, Geert; Haug, Martin; Schaefer, Dirk J; Martin, Ivan; Jakob, Marcel

    2016-10-22

    Articular cartilage injuries have poor repair capacity, leading to progressive joint damage, and cannot be restored predictably by either conventional treatments or advanced therapies based on implantation of articular chondrocytes. Compared with articular chondrocytes, chondrocytes derived from the nasal septum have superior and more reproducible capacity to generate hyaline-like cartilage tissues, with the plasticity to adapt to a joint environment. We aimed to assess whether engineered autologous nasal chondrocyte-based cartilage grafts allow safe and functional restoration of knee cartilage defects. In a first-in-human trial, ten patients with symptomatic, post-traumatic, full-thickness cartilage lesions (2-6 cm(2)) on the femoral condyle or trochlea were treated at University Hospital Basel in Switzerland. Chondrocytes isolated from a 6 mm nasal septum biopsy specimen were expanded and cultured onto collagen membranes to engineer cartilage grafts (30 × 40 × 2 mm). The engineered tissues were implanted into the femoral defects via mini-arthrotomy and assessed up to 24 months after surgery. Primary outcomes were feasibility and safety of the procedure. Secondary outcomes included self-assessed clinical scores and MRI-based estimation of morphological and compositional quality of the repair tissue. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01605201. The study is ongoing, with an approved extension to 25 patients. For every patient, it was feasible to manufacture cartilaginous grafts with nasal chondrocytes embedded in an extracellular matrix rich in glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen. Engineered tissues were stable through handling with forceps and could be secured in the injured joints. No adverse reactions were recorded and self-assessed clinical scores for pain, knee function, and quality of life were improved significantly from before surgery to 24 months after surgery. Radiological assessments indicated variable degrees of

  1. Intra articular synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Radha; Tameem, Afroz; Vidyasagar, J V S

    2010-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue neoplasm with a characteristic biphasic pattern. Incidence in soft tissues is 5-10%. Intra articularly synovial sarcoma is extremely rare. Fewer than 5% of all synovial sarcomas arise within the joint space. We report a case of intra articular synovial sarcoma in a young male who presented as internal derangement of the knee.

  2. Tensorial electrokinetics in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    Electrokinetic phenomena contribute to biomechanical functions of articular cartilage and underlie promising methods for early detection of osteoarthritic lesions. Although some transport properties, such as hydraulic permeability, are known to become anisotropic with compression, the direction-dependence of cartilage electrokinetic properties remains unknown. Electroosmosis experiments were therefore performed on adult bovine articular cartilage samples, whereby fluid flows were driven by electric currents in directions parallel and perpendicular to the articular surface of statically compressed explants. Magnitudes of electrokinetic coefficients decreased slightly with compression (from approximately -7.5 microL/As in the range of 0-20% compression to -6.0 microL/As in the 35-50% range) consistent with predictions of microstructure-based models of cartilage material properties. However, no significant dependence on direction of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was detected, even for conditions where the hydraulic permeability tensor is known to be anisotropic. This contrast may also be interpreted using microstructure-based models, and provides insights into structure-function relationships in cartilage extracellular matrix and physical mediators of cell responses to tissue compression. Findings support the use of relatively simple isotropic modeling approaches for electrokinetic phenomena in cartilage and related materials, and indicate that measurement of electrokinetic properties may provide particularly robust means for clinical evaluation of cartilage matrix integrity.

  3. Expression of α and β subunits of the integrin superfamily in articular cartilage from macroscopically normal and osteoarthritic human femoral heads

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, K.; Salter, D.; Petersen, J.; Bendtzen, K.; Hvolris, J.; Andersen, C.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The objective of this study was to detail the topographical and zonal distribution of α and β subunits of the integrin superfamily in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage.
METHODS—Immunohistochemistry utilising antibodies towards α and β subunits was performed on cryostat sections of human articular cartilage from macroscopically normal (n = 6) and osteoarthritic (n = 6) femoral heads. Samples of articular cartilage were obtained from 12 topographically distinct sites from each femoral head. Each section was divided into zones (superficial, middle, deep) and staining scores were recorded.
RESULTS—Normal cartilage stained for integrin subunits α1, α5, αV, β1, β4, and β5, but not for α2, α3, α4, α6, β2, β3, and β6. Intact and non-intact residual cartilage from osteoarthritic femoral heads stained for α1, α2, α5, αV, β1, β4, and β5. Staining was occasionally seen for α4 and β2, but not for α3, α6, β3, and β6. There was no topographical variation in the staining for any of the subunits in either normal or osteoarthritic cartilage. The only subunit that displayed a zonal variation was αV; staining for this subunit was most pronounced in the superficial zone compared with the middle and deep zones.
CONCLUSION—Chondrocytes in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage express the integrin subunits α1, α5, αV, β1, β4, and β5. Chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage, in addition, express the α2, α4, and β2 subunits. The αv subunit is expressed by more chondrocytes in the superficial zone in comparison with cells in the deeper zones. None of the subunits display topographical variation in expression.

 Keywords: cartilage; integrins; immunohistochemistry; osteoarthritis PMID:9741315

  4. Articular cartilage biochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, K.E.; Schleyerbach, R.; Hascall, V.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six parts, each consisting of several papers. The part titles are: Cartilage Matrix Components; Biosynthesis and Characterization of Cartilage--Specific Matrix Components and Events; Cartilage Metabolism; In Vitro Studies of Articular Cartilage Metabolism; Normal and Pathologic Metabolism of Cartilage; and Destruction of the Articular Cartilage in Rheumatoid Diseases. Some of the paper topics are: magnetic resonance imaging; joint destruction; age-related changes; proteoglycan structure; and biosynthesis of cartilage proteoglycan.

  5. Histological study of the extratympanic portion of the discomallear ligament in adult humans: a functional hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Mérida-Velasco, J R; de la Cuadra-Blanco, C; Pozo Kreilinger, J J; Mérida-Velasco, J A

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out on histological aspects of the extratympanic portion of the discomallear ligament (DL) in adult humans. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was dissected bilaterally in 20 cadavers; in 15 cases the articular disc (AD) and the retroarticular tissue were extirpated. The extratympanic portion of the DL had the shape of a base-down triangle, in relation to the AD, and an upper vertex, in relation to the petrotympanic fissure. In five cases, the base, measured bilaterally, had an average length of 6.4 mm, while the distance from the base to the upper vertex averaged 9.3 mm in length. The extratypanic portion of the DL is an intrinsic ligament of the TMJ, composed of collagen fibres and abundant elastic fibres. We propose that this ligament could act as a tensor of the synovial membrane in movements of the TMJ. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Histological study of the extratympanic portion of the discomallear ligament in adult humans: a functional hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Mérida-Velasco, J R; de la Cuadra-Blanco, C; Pozo Kreilinger, J J; Mérida-Velasco, J A

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out on histological aspects of the extratympanic portion of the discomallear ligament (DL) in adult humans. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was dissected bilaterally in 20 cadavers; in 15 cases the articular disc (AD) and the retroarticular tissue were extirpated. The extratympanic portion of the DL had the shape of a base-down triangle, in relation to the AD, and an upper vertex, in relation to the petrotympanic fissure. In five cases, the base, measured bilaterally, had an average length of 6.4 mm, while the distance from the base to the upper vertex averaged 9.3 mm in length. The extratypanic portion of the DL is an intrinsic ligament of the TMJ, composed of collagen fibres and abundant elastic fibres. We propose that this ligament could act as a tensor of the synovial membrane in movements of the TMJ. PMID:22050648

  7. Angiogenic properties of adult human thymus fat.

    PubMed

    Salas, Julián; Montiel, Mercedes; Jiménez, Eugenio; Valenzuela, Miguel; Valderrama, José Francisco; Castillo, Rafael; González, Sergio; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2009-11-01

    The endogenous proangiogenic properties of adipose tissue are well recognized. Although the adult human thymus has long been known to degenerate into fat tissue, it has never been considered as a potential source of angiogenic factors. We have investigated the expression of diverse angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor A and B, angiopoietin 1, and tyrosine-protein kinase receptor-2 (an angiopoietin receptor), and then analyzed their physiological role on endothelial cell migration and proliferation, two relevant events in angiogenesis. The detection of the gene and protein expression of the various proteins has been performed by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We show, for the first time, that adult thymus fat produces a variety of angiogenic factors and induces the proliferation and migration of human umbilical cord endothelial cells. Based on these findings, we suggest that this fat has a potential angiogenic function that might affect thymic function and ongoing adipogenesis within the thymus.

  8. Uniquely hominid features of adult human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oberheim, Nancy Ann; Takano, Takahiro; Han, Xiaoning; He, Wei; Lin, Jane H C; Wang, Fushun; Xu, Qiwu; Wyatt, Jeffrey D; Pilcher, Webster; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Ransom, Bruce R; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2009-03-11

    Defining the microanatomic differences between the human brain and that of other mammals is key to understanding its unique computational power. Although much effort has been devoted to comparative studies of neurons, astrocytes have received far less attention. We report here that protoplasmic astrocytes in human neocortex are 2.6-fold larger in diameter and extend 10-fold more GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein)-positive primary processes than their rodent counterparts. In cortical slices prepared from acutely resected surgical tissue, protoplasmic astrocytes propagate Ca(2+) waves with a speed of 36 microm/s, approximately fourfold faster than rodent. Human astrocytes also transiently increase cystosolic Ca(2+) in response to glutamatergic and purinergic receptor agonists. The human neocortex also harbors several anatomically defined subclasses of astrocytes not represented in rodents. These include a population of astrocytes that reside in layers 5-6 and extend long fibers characterized by regularly spaced varicosities. Another specialized type of astrocyte, the interlaminar astrocyte, abundantly populates the superficial cortical layers and extends long processes without varicosities to cortical layers 3 and 4. Human fibrous astrocytes resemble their rodent counterpart but are larger in diameter. Thus, human cortical astrocytes are both larger, and structurally both more complex and more diverse, than those of rodents. On this basis, we posit that this astrocytic complexity has permitted the increased functional competence of the adult human brain.

  9. Articular Cartilage of the Human Knee Joint: In Vivo Multicomponent T2 Analysis at 3.0 T

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwang Won; Samsonov, Alexey; Spencer, Richard G.; Wilson, John J.; Block, Walter F.; Kijowski, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare multicomponent T2 parameters of the articular cartilage of the knee joint measured by using multicomponent driven equilibrium single-shot observation of T1 and T2 (mcDESPOT) in asymptomatic volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods This prospective study was performed with institutional review board approval and with written informed consent from all subjects. The mcDESPOT sequence was performed in the knee joint of 13 asymptomatic volunteers and 14 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Single-component T2 (T2Single), T2 of the fast-relaxing water component (T2F) and of the slow-relaxing water component (T2S), and the fraction of the fast-relaxing water component (FF) of cartilage were measured. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and multivariate linear regression models were used to compare mcDESPOT parameters between volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to assess diagnostic performance with mcDESPOT parameters for distinguishing morphologically normal cartilage from morphologically degenerative cartilage identified at magnetic resonance imaging in eight cartilage subsections of the knee joint. Results Higher cartilage T2Single (P < .001), lower cartilage FF (P < .001), and similar cartilage T2F (P = .079) and T2S (P = .124) values were seen in patients with osteoarthritis compared with those in asymptomatic volunteers. Differences in T2Single and FF remained significant (P < .05) after consideration of age differences between groups of subjects. Diagnostic performance was higher with FF than with T2Single for distinguishing between normal and degenerative cartilage (P < .05), with greater areas under the curve at receiver operating characteristic analysis. Conclusion Patients with osteoarthritis of the knee had significantly higher cartilage T2Single and significantly lower cartilage FF than did asymptomatic volunteers, and receiver operating characteristic analysis

  10. The Effect of Intra-articular Corticosteroids on Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wernecke, Chloe; Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intra-articular (IA) corticosteroid therapy has been used for the treatment of inflammation and pain in the knee since the 1950s. Purpose: To review the current literature on the effects of IA corticosteroids on articular cartilage. Study Design: Systematic review. Methods: A MEDLINE and SCOPUS database search was performed, and studies were selected for basic science and clinical trial research on corticosteroids with direct outcome measures of cartilage health. Preliminary searches yielded 1929 articles, and final analysis includes 40 studies. Results: Methylprednisolone, dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, betamethasone, prednisolone, and triamcinolone were reported to display dose-dependent deleterious effects on cartilage morphology, histology, and viability in both in vitro and in vivo models. The beneficial animal in vivo effects of methylprednisolone, hydrocortisone, and triamcinolone occurred at low doses (usually <2-3 mg/dose or 8-12 mg/cumulative total dose in vivo), at which increased cell growth and recovery from damage was observed; the single human clinical trial indicated a beneficial effect of triamcinolone. However, at higher doses (>3 mg/dose or 18-24 mg/cumulative total dose in vivo), corticosteroids were associated with significant gross cartilage damage and chondrocyte toxicity. Dose and time dependency of corticosteroid chondrotoxicity was supported in the in vitro results, however, without clear dose thresholds. Conclusion: Corticosteroids have a time- and dose-dependent effect on articular cartilage, with beneficial effects occurring at low doses and durations and detrimental effects at high doses and durations. Clinically, beneficial effects are supported for IA administration, but the lowest efficacious dose should be used. PMID:26674652

  11. Equine Models of Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Fortier, Lisa A.; Frisbie, David D.; Nixon, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage injuries of the knee and ankle are common, and a number of different methods have been developed in an attempt to improve their repair. Clinically, there are 2 distinct aims of cartilage repair: 1) restoration of joint function and 2) prevention or at least delay of the onset of osteoarthritis. These goals can potentially be achieved through replacement of damaged or lost articular cartilage with tissue capable of functioning under normal physiological environments for an extended period, but limitations of the final repair product have long been recognized and still exist today. Screening of potential procedures for human clinical use is done by preclinical studies using animal models. This article reviews equine chondral defect models that have been recently recognized to have specific advantages for translation into human articular cartilage regeneration. Defect models in the femoropatellar, femorotibial, and tibiotalar joints have been developed. The horse provides the closest approximation to humans in terms of articular cartilage and subchondral bone thickness, and it is possible to selectively leave the entire calcified cartilage layer or completely remove it. The defect on the equine medial femoral condyle emulates medial femoral condylar lesions in humans. Other advantages of the equine model include an ability to use an arthroscope to create lesions and perform second-look arthroscopies, the large lesion size allowing for more tissue for evaluation, and the ability to have controlled exercise and test the ability of the repair to cope with athletic exercise as well as institute rehabilitation regimens. PMID:26069590

  12. Structural characteristics of the collagen network in human normal, degraded and repair articular cartilages observed in polarized light and scanning electron microscopies.

    PubMed

    Changoor, A; Nelea, M; Méthot, S; Tran-Khanh, N; Chevrier, A; Restrepo, A; Shive, M S; Hoemann, C D; Buschmann, M D

    2011-12-01

    This study characterizes collagen organization (CO) in human normal (n = 6), degraded (n = 6) and repair (n = 22) cartilages, using polarized light (PLM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. CO was assessed using a recently developed PLM-CO score (Changoor et al. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2011;19:126-35), and zonal proportions measured. SEM images were captured from locations matched to PLM. Fibre orientations were assessed in SEM and compared to those observed in PLM. CO was also assessed in individual SEM images and combined to generate a SEM-CO score for overall CO analogous to PLM-CO. Fibre diameters were measured in SEM. PLM-CO and SEM-CO scores were correlated, r = 0.786 (P < 0.00001, n = 32), after excluding two outliers. Orientation observed in PLM was validated by SEM since PLM/SEM correspondence occurred in 91.6% of samples. Proportions of the deep (DZ), transitional (TZ) and superficial (SZ) zones averaged 74.0 ± 9.1%, 18.6 ± 7.0%, and 7.3 ± 1.2% in normal, and 45.6 ± 10.7%, 47.2 ± 10.1% and 9.5 ± 3.4% in degraded cartilage, respectively. Fibre diameters in normal cartilage increased with depth from the articular surface [55.8 ± 9.4 nm (SZ), 87.5 ± 1.8 nm (TZ) and 108.2 ± 1.8 nm (DZ)]. Fibre diameters were smaller in repair biopsies [60.4 ± 0.7 nm (SZ), 63.2 ± 0.6 nm (TZ) and 67.2 ± 0.8 nm (DZ)]. Degraded cartilage had wider fibre diameter ranges and bimodal distributions, possibly reflecting new collagen synthesis and remodelling or collagen fibre unravelling. Repair tissues revealed the potential of microfracture-based repair procedures to produce zonal CO resembling native articular cartilage structure. Values are reported as mean ± 95% confidence interval. This detailed assessment of collagen architecture could benefit the development of cartilage repair strategies intended to recreate functional collagen architecture. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International

  13. Biochemical and metabolic abnormalities in articular cartilage from osteoarthritic human hips. III. Distribution and metabolism of amino sugar-containing macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Mankin, H J; Johnson, M E; Lippiello, L

    1981-01-01

    Since 1960, numerous studies have supported the thesis that the synthetic activity of articular chondrocytes is increased in osteoarthritis, but several recent reports have challenged this concept. To clarify this problem fully and also to define further the products of this increased synthesis, three experiments were performed in which the distribution and rates of synthesis of amino sugar-containing macromolecules in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage from the human femoral head were assessed by biochemical analysis and studies of the incorporation of 3H-glucosamine and 35SO4. The biochemical data obtained clearly demonstrated the previously noted significant decrease in hexosamine content in osteoarthritic tissue. This decrease was principally due to a diminution in glucosamine concentration and correlated inversely with the severity of the disease process (as measured by a previously described histological-histochemical grading system). Metabolic studies showed a marked increment in the rates of incorporation of 3H-glucosamine into both the glucosamine and the galactosamine fractions of the cartilage. The increased synthesis correlated directly in a non-linear fashion with the severity of the disease. The ratio of the rate of incorporation of 3H-glucosamine into the glucosamine fraction to the rate of its incorporation into the galactosamine fraction was the same in normal and osteoarthritic samples, suggesting that the decline in glucosamine concentration was not related to a qualitative alteration of synthetic activity.

  14. Human platelet lysate successfully promotes proliferation and subsequent chondrogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells: a comparison with articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hildner, F; Eder, M J; Hofer, K; Aberl, J; Redl, H; van Griensven, M; Gabriel, C; Peterbauer-Scherb, A

    2015-07-01

    Fetal calf serum (FCS) bears a potential risk for carrying diseases and eliciting immune reactions. Nevertheless, it still represents the gold standard as medium supplement in cell culture. In the present study, human platelet lysate (PL) was tested as an alternative to FCS for the expansion and subsequent chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). ASCs were expanded with 10% FCS (group F) or 5% PL (group P). Subsequently, three-dimensional (3D) micromass pellets were created and cultured for 5 weeks in chondrogenic differentiation medium. Additionally, the de- and redifferentiation potential of human articular chondrocytes (HACs) was evaluated and compared to ASCs. Both HACs and ASCs cultured with PL showed strongly enhanced proliferation rates. Redifferentiation of HACs was possible for cells expanded up to 3.3 population doublings (PD). At this stage, PL-expanded HACs demonstrated better redifferentiation potential than FCS-expanded cells. ASCs could also be differentiated following extended passaging. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification and qRT-PCR of 10 cartilage related markers demonstrated a tendency for increased chondrogenic differentiation of PL-expanded ASCs compared to cells expanded with FCS. Histologically, collagen type II but also collagen type X was mainly present in group P. The present study demonstrates that PL strongly induces proliferation of ASCs, while the chondrogenic differentiation potential is retained. HACs also showed enhanced proliferation and even better redifferentiation when previously expanded with PL. This suggests that PL is superior to FCS as a supplement for the expansion of ASCs and HACs, particularly with regard to chondrogenic (re)differentiation.

  15. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from adult human testis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Sabine; Renninger, Markus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Wiesner, Tina; Just, Lothar; Bonin, Michael; Aicher, Wilhelm; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Mattheus, Ulrich; Mack, Andreas; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Minger, Stephen; Matzkies, Matthias; Reppel, Michael; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Stenzl, Arnulf; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-11-20

    Human primordial germ cells and mouse neonatal and adult germline stem cells are pluripotent and show similar properties to embryonic stem cells. Here we report the successful establishment of human adult germline stem cells derived from spermatogonial cells of adult human testis. Cellular and molecular characterization of these cells revealed many similarities to human embryonic stem cells, and the germline stem cells produced teratomas after transplantation into immunodeficient mice. The human adult germline stem cells differentiated into various types of somatic cells of all three germ layers when grown under conditions used to induce the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. We conclude that the generation of human adult germline stem cells from testicular biopsies may provide simple and non-controversial access to individual cell-based therapy without the ethical and immunological problems associated with human embryonic stem cells.

  16. Contour interpolated radial basis functions with spline boundary correction for fast 3D reconstruction of the human articular cartilage from MR images

    SciTech Connect

    Javaid, Zarrar; Unsworth, Charles P.; Boocock, Mark G.; McNair, Peter J.

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to demonstrate a new image processing technique that can provide a “near real-time” 3D reconstruction of the articular cartilage of the human knee from MR images which is user friendly. This would serve as a point-of-care 3D visualization tool which would benefit a consultant radiologist in the visualization of the human articular cartilage. Methods: The authors introduce a novel fusion of an adaptation of the contour method known as “contour interpolation (CI)” with radial basis functions (RBFs) which they describe as “CI-RBFs.” The authors also present a spline boundary correction which further enhances volume estimation of the method. A subject cohort consisting of 17 right nonpathological knees (ten female and seven male) is assessed to validate the quality of the proposed method. The authors demonstrate how the CI-RBF method dramatically reduces the number of data points required for fitting an implicit surface to the entire cartilage, thus, significantly improving the speed of reconstruction over the comparable RBF reconstruction method of Carr. The authors compare the CI-RBF method volume estimation to a typical commercial package (3D DOCTOR), Carr’s RBF method, and a benchmark manual method for the reconstruction of the femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilages. Results: The authors demonstrate how the CI-RBF method significantly reduces the number of data points (p-value < 0.0001) required for fitting an implicit surface to the cartilage, by 48%, 31%, and 44% for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages, respectively. Thus, significantly improving the speed of reconstruction (p-value < 0.0001) by 39%, 40%, and 44% for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages over the comparable RBF model of Carr providing a near real-time reconstruction of 6.49, 8.88, and 9.43 min for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages, respectively. In addition, it is demonstrated how the CI-RBF method matches the volume

  17. Synoviocyte Derived-Extracellular Matrix Enhances Human Articular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Maintains Re-Differentiation Capacity at Both Low and Atmospheric Oxygen Tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kean, Thomas J.; Dennis, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current tissue engineering methods are insufficient for total joint resurfacing, and chondrocytes undergo de-differentiation when expanded on tissue culture plastic. De-differentiated chondrocytes show poor re-differentiation in culture, giving reduced glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen matrix accumulation. To address this, porcine synoviocyte-derived extracellular matrix and low (5%) oxygen tension were assessed for their ability to enhance human articular chondrocyte expansion and maintain re-differentiation potential. Methods Porcine synoviocyte matrices were devitalized using 3 non-detergent methods. These devitalized synoviocyte matrices were compared against tissue culture plastic for their ability to support human chondrocyte expansion. Expansion was further compared at both low (5%), and atmospheric (20%) oxygen tension on all surfaces. Expanded cells then underwent chondrogenic re-differentiation in aggregate culture at both low and atmospheric oxygen tension. Aggregates were assessed for their GAG and collagen content both biochemically and histologically. Results Human chondrocytes expanded twice as fast on devitalized synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic, and cells retained their re-differentiation capacity for twice the number of population doublings. There was no significant difference in growth rate between low and atmospheric oxygen tension. There was significantly less collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan and more MMP13 expression in cells expanded on synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic. There were also significant effects due to oxygen tension on gene expression, wherein there was greater collagen type I, collagen type II, SOX9 and less MMP13 expression on tissue culture plastic compared to synoviocyte matrix. There was a significant increase in GAG, but not collagen, accumulation in chondrocyte aggregates re-differentiated at low oxygen tension over that achieved in atmospheric oxygen conditions. Conclusions

  18. Human Articular Chondrocytes Regulate Immune Response by Affecting Directly T Cell Proliferation and Indirectly Inhibiting Monocyte Differentiation to Professional Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rui C.; Martinelli, Daniela; Cancedda, Ranieri; Gentili, Chiara; Poggi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard cell therapy for cartilage lesions. However, in some instances, the heavily compromised health of the patient can either impair or limit the recovery of the autologous chondrocytes and a satisfactory outcome of the implant. Allogeneic human articular chondrocytes (hAC) could be a good alternative, but the possible immunological incompatibility between recipient and hAC donor should be considered. Herein, we report that allogeneic hAC inhibited T lymphocyte response to antigen-dependent and -independent proliferative stimuli. This effect was maximal when T cells and hAC were in contact and it was not relieved by the addition of exogenous lymphocyte growth factor interleukin (IL)-2. More important, hAC impaired the differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes induced with granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-4 (Mo) to professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Indeed, a marked inhibition of the onset of the CD1a expression and an ineffective downregulation of CD14 antigens was observed in Mo–hAC co-cultures. Furthermore, compared to immature or mature DC, Mo from Mo–hAC co-cultures did not trigger an efficacious allo-response. The prostaglandin (PG) E2 present in the Mo–hAC co-culture conditioned media is a putative candidate of the hAC-mediated inhibition of Mo maturation. Altogether, these findings indicate that allogeneic hAC inhibit, rather than trigger, immune response and strongly suggest that an efficient chondrocyte implantation could be possible also in an allogeneic setting. PMID:27822208

  19. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Alexander J; Gardner, Oliver F W; Williams, Rebecca; Alini, Mauro; Archer, Charles W; Stoddart, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs) represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs) are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase). To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs represent a

  20. Effects of Adipokines and Insulin on Intracellular pH, Calcium Concentration, and Responses to Hypo-Osmolarity in Human Articular Chondrocytes from Healthy and Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    López-Zapata, Diego F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of adipokines and insulin on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and pH (pHi) in human articular chondrocytes from healthy (CHC) and osteoarthritic cartilage (COC). Design: pHi and [Ca2+]i were measured using BCECF and Fura-2 fluorometric probes in CHC and COC under control conditions and following a hypotonic shock. The effects of interleukin-1β (IL1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), insulin, leptin, resistin, and adiponectin were assessed. Results: pHi was lower in COC than in CHC. Only IL1β β decreased pHi in both cell types; all the agents enhanced pHi recovery following an ammonium prepulse in CHC, effect that was attenuated by Na+–H+ exchanger inhibitors, but they had no effect in COC. Hypotonic shock (HTS) caused a pHi increase, which was significantly smaller in COC. All the hormones attenuated this response and the effect of IL1β was greater. The basal [Ca2+]i was similar in COC and CHC; IL1β, TNFα, and insulin increased the [Ca2+]i, but leptin, resistin, and adiponectin did not. These effects were greater in COC. This [Ca2+]i increase was dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and attenuated by Na+–Ca2+ exchanger inhibitors. HTS caused a [Ca2+]i increase, which was inhibited by transient receptor potential vanilloid blockers and attenuated by all the hormones tested with the exception of adiponectin. Conclusions: These findings may help explain the association between obesity and osteoarthritis, in which these hormones are altered. The responses of CHC and COC are different, which suggests that a modification of pH and Ca2+ homeostasis is part of the osteoarthritis pathophysiology. PMID:26069708

  1. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Alexander J.; Gardner, Oliver F. W.; Williams, Rebecca; Alini, Mauro; Archer, Charles W.; Stoddart, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs) represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs) are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase). To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs represent a

  2. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726, increases the production of IL-1 receptor antagonist in human synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Gaby; Burger, Danielle; Mezin, Françoise; Magne, David; Gabay, Cem; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Guerne, Pierre-André

    2004-01-01

    Leflunomide is an immunomodulatory agent used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we investigated the effect of A77 1726 - the active metabolite of leflunomide - on the production of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) by human synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes. Cells were incubated with A77 1726 alone or in combination with proinflammatory cytokines. IL-1Ra production was determined by ELISA. A77 1726 alone had no effect, but in the presence of IL-1beta or tumour necrosis factor-alpha it markedly enhanced the secretion of IL-1Ra in synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. The effect of A77 1726 was greatest at 100 micromol/l. In synovial fibroblasts and de-differentiated chondrocytes, A77 1726 also increased IL-1beta-induced IL-1Ra production in cell lysates. Freshly isolated chondrocytes contained no significant amounts of intracellular IL-1Ra. A77 1726 is a known inhibitor of pyrimidine synthesis and cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 activity. Addition of exogenous uridine did not significantly modify the effect of A77 1726 on IL-1Ra production, suggesting that it was not mediated by inhibition of pyrimidine synthesis. Indomethacin increased IL-1beta-induced IL-1Ra secretion in synovial fibroblasts and de-differentiated chondrocytes, suggesting that inhibition of COX-2 may indeed enhance IL-1beta-induced IL-1Ra production. However, the stimulatory effect of indomethacin was consistently less effective than that of A77 1726. A77 1726 increases IL-1Ra production by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines, and thus it may possess chondroprotective effects. The effect of A77 1726 may be partially mediated by inhibition of COX-2, but other mechanisms likely concur to stimulate IL-1Ra production.

  3. Latent inhibition in human adults without masking.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Martha; Arcediano, Francisco; Miller, Ralph R

    2003-09-01

    Latent inhibition refers to attenuated responding to Cue X observed when the X-outcome pairings are preceded by X-alone presentations. It has proven difficult to obtain in human adults unless the preexposure (X-alone) presentations are embedded within a masking (i.e., distracting) task. The authors hypothesized that the difficulty in obtaining latent inhibition with unmasked tasks is related to the usual training procedures, in which the preexposure and conditioning experiences are separated by a set of instructions. Experiment 1 reports latent inhibition without masking in a task in which preexposure and conditioning occur without interruption. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrate that this attenuation in responding to target Cue X does not pass a summation test for conditioned inhibition and is context specific, thereby confirming that it is latent inhibition. Experiments 3 and 4 confirm that introducing instructions between preexposure and conditioning disrupts latent inhibition.

  4. Tantalum oxide nanoparticles for the imaging of articular cartilage using X-ray computed tomography: visualization of ex vivo/in vivo murine tibia and ex vivo human index finger cartilage.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Jonathan D; Lusic, Hrvoje; Snyder, Brian D; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2014-08-04

    The synthesis and characterization of tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) nanoparticles (NPs) as new X-ray contrast media for microcomputed tomography (μCT) imaging of articular cartilage are reported. NPs, approximately 5-10 nm in size, and possessing distinct surface charges, were synthesized using phosphonate (neutral), ammonium (cationic), and carboxylate (anionic) ligands as end functional groups. Assessment of a cartilage defect in a human cadaver distal metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint with the ammonium nanoparticles showed good visualization of damage and preferential uptake in areas surrounding the defect. Finally, an optimized nontoxic cationic NP contrast agent was evaluated in an in vivo murine model and the cartilage was imaged. These nanoparticles represent a new type of contrast agent for imaging articular cartilage, and the results demonstrate the importance of surface charge in the design of nanoparticulate agents for targeting the surface or interior zones of articular cartilage. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Effect of in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol on lumbar and femoral bone, articular cartilage, and the intervertebral disc in male and female adult mice progeny with and without swimming exercise.

    PubMed

    Rowas, Sora Al; Haddad, Rami; Gawri, Rahul; Al Ma'awi, Abdul Aziz; Chalifour, Lorraine E; Antoniou, John; Mwale, Fackson

    2012-01-23

    Developmental exposure to estrogens has been shown to affect the musculoskeletal system. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that environmental exposure to estrogen-like compounds is much higher than originally anticipated. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a well-known estrogen agonist, on articular cartilage, intervertebral disc (IVD), and bone phenotype. C57Bl/6 pregnant mice were dosed orally with vehicle (peanut oil) or 0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg/day of DES on gestational days 11 to 14. Male and female pups were allowed to mature without further treatment until 3 months of age, when swim and sedentary groups were formed. After euthanasia, bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone area (BA), and trabecular bone area (TBA) of the lumbar vertebrae and femur were measured by using a PIXImus Bone Densitometer System. Intervertebral disc proteoglycan was measured with the DMMB assay. Histologic analysis of proteoglycan for IVD and articular cartilage was performed with safranin O staining, and degeneration parameters were scored. The lumbar BMC was significantly increased in female swimmers at both the highest and lowest dose of DES, whereas the femoral BMC was increased only at the highest. The males, conversely, showed a decreased BMC at the highest dose of DES for both lumbar and femoral bone. The female swim group had an increased BA at the highest dose of DES, whereas the male counterpart showed a decreased BA for femoral bone. The TBA showed a similar pattern. Proteoglycan analysis of lumbar IVDs showed a decrease at the lowest doses but a significant increase at the highest doses for both males and females. Histologic examination showed morphologic changes of the IVD and articular cartilage for all doses of DES. DES significantly affected the musculoskeletal system of adult mice. Results suggest that environmental estrogen contaminants can have a detrimental effect on the developmental lumbar

  6. Articular cartilage: structural and developmental intricacies and questions

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Eiki; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage has obvious and fundamental roles in joint function and body movement. Much is known about its organization, extracellular matrix and phenotypic properties of its cells, but less is known about its developmental biology. Incipient articular cartilage in late embryos and neonates is a thin tissue with scanty matrix and small cells, while adult tissue is thick and zonal and contains large cells and abundant matrix. What remains unclear is not only how incipient articular cartilage forms, but how it then grows and matures into a functional, complex and multifaceted structure. This review focuses on recent and exciting discoveries on the developmental biology and growth of articular cartilage, frames them within the context of classic studies, and points to lingering questions and research goals. Advances in this research area will have significant relevance to basic science, and also considerable translational value to design superior cartilage repair and regeneration strategies. PMID:26408155

  7. Quinolone arthropathy--acute toxicity to immature articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Gough, A W; Kasali, O B; Sigler, R E; Baragi, V

    1992-01-01

    A class effect of quinolone antibacterial agents observed during animal toxicity testing is a specific arthropathy (QAP). Despite the growing list of laboratory animals susceptible to QAP and reports of arthralgia in patients treated with quinolones, the potential for QAP development in humans remains unknown. This review discusses current concepts in the biology of articular cartilage and how these concepts elucidate QAP pathogenesis. Biomechanical forces within synovial joints and toxicokinetic properties of quinolones contribute to QAP induction. Since a limited number of mechanistic pathways exist for acute articular damage, QAP may serve as a research tool to probe the pathobiology of injury to articular cartilage.

  8. A novel rat tail collagen type-I gel for the cultivation of human articular chondrocytes in low cell density.

    PubMed

    Muller-Rath, R; Gavénis, K; Andereya, S; Mumme, T; Schmidt-Rohlfing, B; Schneider, U

    2007-12-01

    Collagen type-I matrix systems have gained growing importance as a cartilage repair device. However, most of the established matrix systems use collagen type-I of bovine origin seeded in high cell densities. Here we present a novel collagen type-I gel system made of rat tail collagen for the cultivation of human chondrocytes in low cell densities. Rat tail collagen type-I gel (CaReS, Arthro Kinetics, Esslingen, Germany) was seeded with human passage 2 chondrocytes in different cell densities to evaluate the optimal cell number. In vitro, the proliferation factor of low density cultures was more than threefold higher compared with high density cultures. After 6 weeks of in vitro cultivation, freshly prepared chondrocytes with an initial cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL showed a proliferation factor of 33. A cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL was chosen for in vitro and in vivo cultivation using the common nude mouse model as an in vivo system. Chondrocytes stayed viable as a Live/Dead fluorescence assay and TUNEL staining revealed. During in vitro cultivation, passage 0 cells partly dedifferentiated morphologically. In vivo, passage 0 cells maintained the chondrocyte phenotype and demonstrated an increased synthesis of collagen type-II protein and gene expression compared to passage 2 cells. Passage 2 cells did not redifferentiate in vivo. Cultivating a cell-seeded collagen gel of bovine origin as a control (AtelocollagenTM, Koken, Tokyo, Japan) did not lead to superior results with regard to cell morphology, col-II protein production and col-II gene expression. With the CaReS collagen gel system the best quality of repair tissue was obtained by seeding freshly isolated chondrocytes.

  9. Intra-articular therapies for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shirley P; Hunter, David J

    2016-10-01

    Conventional medical therapies for osteoarthritis are mainly palliative in nature, aiming to control pain and symptoms. Traditional intra-articular therapies are not recommended in guidelines as first line therapy, but are potential alternatives, when conventional therapies have failed. Current and future intra-articular drug therapies for osteoarthritis are highlighted, including corticosteroids, hyaluronate, and more controversial treatments marketed commercially, namely platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal cell therapy. Intraarticular disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs are the future of osteoarthritis treatments, aiming at structural modification and altering the disease progression. Interleukin-1β inhibitor, bone morphogenic protein-7, fibroblast growth factor 18, bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, human serum albumin, and gene therapy are discussed in this review. The evolution of drug development in osteoarthritis is limited by the ability to demonstrate effect. High quality trials are required to justify the use of existing intra-articular therapies and to advocate for newer, promising therapies. Challenges in osteoarthritis therapy research are fundamentally related to the complexity of the pathological mechanisms of osteoarthritis. Novel drugs offer hope in a disease with limited medical therapy options. Whether these future intra-articular therapies will provide clinically meaningful benefits, remains unknown.

  10. Astrocitary niches in human adult medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Dermengiu, Dan; Loreto, Carla; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Pop, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Astrocytes are considered as neuromodulators of the CNS. Whereas experimental studies on astrocitary functions are gaining importance, the anatomy of the astrocitary niches in the human CNS has been overlooked. The study was performed on the brainstem of 10 adult cadavers. We aimed to determine astrocitary niches in the human medulla oblongata using immunohistochemical labeling with vimentin and also CD34 immunostaining to accurately diagnose associated microvessels. Niches rich in astrocytes were identified as follows: (a) the superficial layer of astrocytes, ventral and ventrolateral, in the rostral medulla oblongata; (b) the median raphe; (c) medullary nuclei: arcuate nucleus, area postrema, nucleus of the solitary tract; (d) the subependymal zone (SEZ, caudal medulla) and subventricular zone (SVZ, rostral medulla). Astrocytes were scarce in the ventrolateral medulla, and mostly present within the pyramidal tract and the olivary nucleus. Apart from the SEZ and SVZ, the brainstem niches of astrocytes mostly overlap those regions known to perform roles as central respiratory chemoreceptors. The astrocytes of the SEZ and SVZ, which are known as stem cell niches, are related to an increased microvascular density.

  11. Effects of tenoxicam and aspirin on the metabolism of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Manicourt, D H; Druetz-Van Egeren, A; Haazen, L; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1994-01-01

    1. As nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may impair the ability of the chondrocyte to repair its damaged extracellular matrix, we explored the changes in the metabolism of newly synthesized proteoglycan (PG) and hyaluronan (HA) molecules produced by tenoxicam and aspirin in human normal cartilage explants and in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage from age-matched donors. 2. Explants were sampled from the medial femoral condyle and were classified by use of Mankin's histological-histochemical grading system. Cartilage specimens were normal in 10 subjects, exhibited moderate OA (MOA) in 10 and had severe OA (SOA) in 10. 3. Cartilage explants were pulsed with [3H]-glucosamine and chased in the absence and in the presence of either aspirin (190 micrograms ml-1) or tenoxicam (4-16 micrograms ml-1). After papain digestion, the labelled chondroitin sulphate ([3H]-PGs) and HA([3H]-HA) molecules present in the tissue and media were purified by anion-exchange chromatography. 4. In normal cartilage as well as in explants with MOA and SOA aspirin reduced more strongly PG and HA synthesis than the loss of [3H]-HA and [3H]-PGs. 5. In normal cartilage, tenoxicam did not affect PG metabolism whereas it reduced HA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner and did not change or even increased the net loss of [3H]-HA. In contrast, in OA cartilage, tenoxicam produced a stronger reduction in the loss of [3H]-PGs than in PG synthesis and this decrease occurred at lower concentrations in cartilage with SOA (4-8 micrograms ml-1) than in cartilage with MOA (8-16 micrograms ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889262

  12. Effect of hydrogen sulfide sources on inflammation and catabolic markers on interleukin 1β-stimulated human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Burguera, E F; Vela-Anero, A; Magalhães, J; Meijide-Faílde, R; Blanco, F J

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter together with NO and CO, is emerging as a regulator of inflammation. To test if it might offer therapeutic value in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) we evaluated the effects of two exogenous sources of H2S, NaSH and GYY4137, on inflammation and catabolic markers that characterize OA. Human chondrocytes (CHs) were isolated from OA tissue. Cells were stimulated with a pro-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-1β, IL1β, 5 ng/ml) and the ability of the two H2S sources to ameliorate its effects on the cells was tested. Nitric oxide (NO) production was quantified through the Griess reaction. Protein levels of inducible NO synthase (NOS2) and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) were visualized through immunocytochemistry (ICC). Relative mRNA expression was quantified with qRT-PCR. Prostaglandin-2 (PGE-2), interleukin 6 (IL6) and MMP13 levels were measured with specific EIAs. NFκB nuclear translocation was visualized with immunofluorescence. Both H2S sources led to significant reductions in NO, PGE-2, IL6 and MMP13 released by the cells and at the protein level. This was achieved by downregulation of relevant genes involved in the synthesis routes of these molecules, namely NOS2, cyclooxigenase-2 (COX2), prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES), IL6 and MMP13. NFκB nuclear translocation was also reduced. NaSH and GYY4137 show anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic properties when added to IL1β activated osteoarthritic CHs. Supplementation with exogenous H2S sources can regulate the expression of relevant genes in OA pathogenesis and progression, counteracting IL1β pro-inflammatory signals that lead to cartilage destruction in part by reducing NFκB activation. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  14. Gene expression profiling of primary human articular chondrocytes in high-density micromasses reveals patterns of recovery, maintenance, re- and dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Dehne, Tilo; Schenk, Rita; Perka, Carsten; Morawietz, Lars; Pruss, Axel; Sittinger, Michael; Kaps, Christian; Ringe, Jochen

    2010-08-15

    The high-density micromass culture has been widely applied to study chondrocyte cell physiology and pathophysiological mechanisms. Since an integrated image has not been established so far, we analyzed the phenotypic alterations of human articular chondrocytes in this model on the broad molecular level. Freshly isolated chondrocytes were assembled as micromasses and maintained up to 6 weeks in medium containing human serum. Formation of cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) was evaluated by histological and immunohistochemical staining. At 0, 3 and 6 weeks, chondrocyte micromasses were subjected to gene expression analysis using oligonucleotide microarrays and real-time RT-PCR. Micromasses developed a cartilaginous ECM rich in proteoglycans and type II collagen. On gene expression level, time-dependent expression patterns was observed. The induction of genes associated with cartilage-specific ECM (COL2A1 and COL11A1) and developmental signaling (GDF5, GDF10, ID1, ID4 and FGFR1-3) indicated redifferentiation within the first 3 weeks. The repression of genes related to stress response (HSPA1A and HSPA4), apoptotic events (HYOU1, NFKBIA and TRAF1), and degradation (MMP1, MMP10 and MMP12) suggested a recovery of chondrocytes. Constant expression of other chondrogenic (ACAN, FN1 and MGP) and hypertrophic markers (COL10A1, ALPL, PTHR1 and PTHR2) indicated a pattern of phenotypic maintenance. Simultaneously, the expression of chondrogenic growth (BMP6, TGFA, FGF1 and FGF2) and transcription factors (SOX9, EGR1, HES1 and TGIF1), and other cartilage ECM-related genes (COMP and PRG4) was consistently repressed and expression of collagens related to dedifferentiation (COL1A1 and COL3A1) was steadily induced indicating a progressing loss of cartilage phenotype. Likewise, a steady increase of genes associated with proliferation (GAS6, SERPINF1, VEGFB and VEGFC) and apoptosis (DRAM, DPAK1, HSPB, GPX1, NGFRAP1 and TIA1) was observed. Sequence and interplay of identified

  15. Stimulation of DNA synthesis by ascorbate in cultures of articular chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Krystal, G.; Morris, G.M.; Sokoloff, L.

    1982-03-01

    The addition of 0.2 mM Na L-ascorbate increased the incorporation of 3H-thymidine by rabbit articular chondrocytes in cell and organ culture. The stimulatory response of explants to ascorbate was potentiated by pretreatment of the cartilage with 0.2% clostridial collagenase (type 1) or trypsin for 15-30 minutes. In explants there was a latent period of 3 to 4 days before increased labeling of the nuclei could be detected. The effect was transient and declined after 8 days of culture. It was more evident in organ cultures of immature (3-month-old) than 2- to 3-year-old rabbits. Age differences were not detected in cell cultures. Explants of adult human articular cartilage were stimulated by ascorbate when the medium was supplemented with 10% fresh human serum but not by fetal bovine serum. The findings indicated that synthesis of DNA by articular chondrocytes in situ is regulated by responsiveness of the cells proper to compounds such as vitamin C, by properties of the extracellular matrix, and by factors in the serum. Ascorbate was cytotoxic at concentrations greater than 0.2 mM in the presence of certain batches of serum.

  16. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  17. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  18. Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Mateevici, Cristina; Lin, Belinda; Chandra, Ronil V.; Chong, Victor H.T.

    2015-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection, PMID:26488420

  19. Adult human brain cell culture for neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Hannah M; Dragunow, Mike

    2010-06-01

    Studies of the brain have progressed enormously through the use of in vivo and in vitro non-human models. However, it is unlikely such studies alone will unravel the complexities of the human brain and so far no neuroprotective treatment developed in animals has worked in humans. In this review we discuss the use of adult human brain cell culture methods in brain research to unravel the biology of the normal and diseased human brain. The advantages of using adult human brain cells as tools to study human brain function from both historical and future perspectives are discussed. In particular, studies using dissociated cultures of adult human microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons are described and the applications of these types of study are evaluated. Alternative sources of human brain cells such as adult neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and slice cultures of adult human brain tissue are also reviewed. These adult human brain cell culture methods could benefit basic research and more importantly, facilitate the translation of basic neuroscience research to the clinic for the treatment of brain disorders.

  20. Attracting Adult Learners to Humanities Courses. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    A round table discussion among community college presidents and humanities faculty on how to encourage adults to enroll in humanities courses resulted in eleven recommendations. These included experimentation in how to access community interests in humanities courses, the integration of humanities with occupational training to help people deal…

  1. The dynamics of adult neurogenesis in human hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ihunwo, Amadi O.; Tembo, Lackson H.; Dzamalala, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of adult neurogenesis is now an accepted occurrence in mammals and also in humans. At least two discrete places house stem cells for generation of neurons in adult brain. These are olfactory system and the hippocampus. In animals, newly generated neurons have been directly or indirectly demonstrated to generate a significant amount of new neurons to have a functional role. However, the data in humans on the extent of this process is still scanty and such as difficult to comprehend its functional role in humans. This paper explores the available data on as extent of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in humans and makes comparison to animal data. PMID:28197172

  2. S100B + A1 CELISA: A Novel Potency Assay and Screening Tool for Redifferentiation Stimuli of Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Romero, Jose; Kürsener, Sibylle; Kohl, Sandro; Nesic, Dobrila

    2017-06-01

    During monolayer expansion, a necessary step in autologous chondrocyte implantation, human articular chondrocytes (HAC) dedifferentiate and lose their capacity to produce stable hyaline cartilage. Determining HAC potency and learning how to trigger their redifferentiation would improve cell-based cartilage regeneration therapies. We previously identified S100B and S100A1 proteins as markers of HAC redifferentiation potential. Here, we aimed to: (i) demonstrate a correlation between S100B + A1-positive HAC in monolayer culture and their neochondrogenesis capacity in pellet culture; (ii) develop an S100B + A1 cell-based ELISA, and (iii) prove that S100B + A1 induction in HAC increases their chondrogenic capacity. Expression patterns of S100A1 and S100B were investigated in HAC during dedifferentiation (monolayer) or redifferentiation (pellet or high-osmolarity/BMP4 treatment in monolayer) using qRT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, or immunohistochemistry. A cell-based ELISA (CELISA) was developed as a 96-well microplate multiplex assay to measure S100B + A1 (chondrogenesis), alkaline phosphatase (hypertrophy), and DNA amount (normalization), and applied to HAC, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and the chondrocytic cell line ATDC5. The direct correlation between the percentage of S100B + A1-positive HAC in monolayer and their neochondrogenesis in pellets validates S100B + A1 as a marker of chondrogenic potency. The S100B + A1-CELISA accurately determines HAC differentiation status, allows identification of chondrogenic stimuli, and permits the simultaneous monitoring of the undesirable hypertrophic phenotype. This novel assay offers a high-throughput, comprehensive and versatile approach for measuring cell chondrogenic potency and for identifying redifferentiation factors/conditions. HAC improved neochondrogenesis in pellets-induced with high-osmolarity and BMP4 treatment in monolayer-suggests that cell instruction prior to implantation

  3. Quantitative analysis of the mRNA expression levels of BCL2 and BAX genes in human osteoarthritis and normal articular cartilage: An investigation into their differential expression.

    PubMed

    Karaliotas, Georgios I; Mavridis, Konstantinos; Scorilas, Andreas; Babis, George C

    2015-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is primarily characterized by articular cartilage degeneration and chondrocyte loss. Although the role of apoptosis in cartilage pathobiology remains to be elucidated, the apoptotic B‑cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) gene family is considered to be involved in OA. The purpose of the present study was to quantitatively analyze the mRNA expression profiles of the BCL2‑associated X protein (BAX) and BCL2 genes in human OA and in normal cartilage. Cartilage tissue samples were obtained from 78 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty for OA (OA group) and orthopedic interventions for causes other than OA (control group). Total RNA was isolated from the cartilage tissue specimens and reverse transcribed into cDNA. A highly sensitive and specific reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for quantification of the mRNA levels of BAX and BCL2, using beta‑2 microglobulin as an endogenous control for normalization purposes. Gene expression analysis was performed using the comparative Ct (2(‑ΔΔCt)) method. The mRNA expression of BAX presented an increasing trend in the OA group compared with the control group, although without statistically significace (P=0.099). By contrast, the expression ratio of BCL2/BAX was found to be significantly decreased (2.76‑fold) in the OA group compared with the normal cartilage control group (P=0.022). A notable 4.6‑fold overexpression of median mRNA levels of BAX was also observed in patients with stage III OA compared with the control (P=0.034), while the BCL2/BAX ratio was markedly (2.5‑fold) decreased (P=0.024). A marked positive correlation was observed between the mRNA levels of BAX and BCL2 in the control group (r(s)=0.728; P<0.001), which was also present in the OA group, although to a lesser degree (r(s)=0.532; P<0.001). These results further implicate apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA, through molecular mechanisms, which include the aberrant expression of the

  4. Articular manifestations of systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bensen, W G

    1983-11-01

    Many systemic diseases present with articular manifestations. An understanding of the clinical, laboratory and radiological features of these diseases can lead to early diagnosis and appropriate therapy. This article describes the articular presentation and management of four generalized disorders: idiopathic hemachromatosis; sarcoidosis; hepatitis-B virus-induced arthritis, and polymyositis-dermatomyositis induced arthritis.

  5. Pendulum mass affects the measurement of articular friction coefficient.

    PubMed

    Akelman, Matthew R; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C

    2013-02-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton's equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton's model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n=4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton's equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent.

  6. Pendulum Mass Affects the Measurement of Articular Friction Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Akelman, Matthew R.; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T.; Crisco, Joseph J.; Jay, Gregory D.; Fleming, Braden C.

    2012-01-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton’s equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton’s model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n = 4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton’s equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent. PMID:23122223

  7. Homology of lubricin and superficial zone protein (SZP): products of megakaryocyte stimulating factor (MSF) gene expression by human synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes localized to chromosome 1q25.

    PubMed

    Jay, G D; Tantravahi, U; Britt, D E; Barrach, H J; Cha, C J

    2001-07-01

    We have previously identified megakaryocyte stimulating factor (MSF) gene expression by synovial fibroblasts as the origin of lubricin in the synovial cavity. Lubricin is a mucinous glycoprotein responsible for the boundary lubrication of articular cartilage. MSF has a significant homology to vitronectin and is composed of 12 exons. RNA was purified from human synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes grown in vitro from tissue explants obtained from subjects without degenerative joint disease. RT-PCR was used with multiple complimentary primer pairs spanning the central mucin expressing exon 6 of the MSF gene and individual exons on both the N- and C-terminal sides of exon 6. Exons 2, 4 and 5 appear to be variably expressed by synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes. Lubricating mucin, in the form of MSF, is expressed by both chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts in vitro. Both lubricin and superficial zone protein (SZP), a related proteoglycan, share a similar primary structure but could differ in post-translational modifications with O-linked oligosaccharides which are predominant in lubricin and with limited amounts chondroitin and keratan sulfate found in SZP. Since most of the MSF exons are involved in the expression of lubricating mucin, a strong homology to vitronectin persists. It is therefore appropriate to consider that both SZP and lubricin occupy a new class of biomolecules termed tribonectins. Screening of a human genome bacterial artificial chromsome (BAC) library with a cDNA primer pair complimentary for exon 6 identified two clones. Both clones were complimentary for chromosome 1q25 by in situ hybridization. This same locus was previously implicated in camptodactyl-arthropathy-pericarditis syndrome (CAP) by genetic mapping. It is hypothesized that CAP, a large joint arthropathy, may be associated with ineffective boundary lubrication provided by synovial fluid.

  8. Adult Human Neurogenesis: From Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases. PMID:21519376

  9. Adult human neurogenesis: from microscopy to magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases.

  10. Anisotropic hydraulic permeability in compressed articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    The extent to which articular cartilage hydraulic permeability is anisotropic is largely unknown, despite its importance for understanding mechanisms of joint lubrication, load bearing, transport phenomena, and mechanotransduction. We developed and applied new techniques for the direct measurement of hydraulic permeability within statically compressed adult bovine cartilage explant disks, dissected such that disk axes were perpendicular to the articular surface. Applied pressure gradients were kept small to minimize flow-induced matrix compaction, and fluid outflows were measured by observation of a meniscus in a glass capillary under a microscope. Explant disk geometry under radially unconfined axial compression was measured by direct microscopic observation. Pressure, flow, and geometry data were input to a finite element model where hydraulic permeabilities in the disk axial and radial directions were determined. At less than 10% static compression, near free-swelling conditions, hydraulic permeability was nearly isotropic, with values corresponding to those of previous studies. With increasing static compression, hydraulic permeability decreased, but the radially directed permeability decreased more dramatically than the axially directed permeability such that strong anisotropy (a 10-fold difference between axial and radial directions) in the hydraulic permeability tensor was evident for static compression of 20-40%. Results correspond well with predictions of a previous microstructurally-based model for effects of tissue mechanical deformations on glycosaminoglycan architecture and cartilage hydraulic permeability. Findings inform understanding of structure-function relationships in cartilage matrix, and suggest several biomechanical roles for compression-induced anisotropic hydraulic permeability in articular cartilage.

  11. The effect of platelet-rich plasma formulations and blood products on human synoviocytes: implications for intra-articular injury and therapy.

    PubMed

    Braun, Hillary J; Kim, Hyeon Joo; Chu, Constance R; Dragoo, Jason L

    2014-05-01

    The effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on chondrocytes has been studied in cell and tissue culture, but considerably less attention has been given to the effect of PRP on synoviocytes. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) compose 80% of the normal human synovium and produce cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases that can mediate cartilage catabolism. To compare the effects of leukocyte-rich PRP (LR-PRP), leukocyte-poor PRP (LP-PRP), red blood cell (RBC) concentrate, and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) on human FLS to determine whether leukocyte and erythrocyte concentrations of PRP formulations differentially affect the production of inflammatory mediators. Controlled laboratory study. Peripheral blood was obtained from 4 donors and processed to create LR-PRP, LP-PRP, RBCs, and PPP. Human synoviocytes were cultured for 96 hours with the respective experimental conditions using standard laboratory conditions. Cell viability and inflammatory mediator production were then evaluated. Treatment with LR-PRP resulted in significantly greater synoviocyte death (4.9% ± 3.1%) compared with LP-PRP (0.72% ± 0.70%; P = .035), phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (0.39% ± 0.27%; P = .018), and PPP (0.26% ± 0.30%; P = .013). Synoviocytes treated with RBC concentrate demonstrated significantly greater cell death (12.5% ± 6.9%) compared with PBS (P < .001), PPP (P < .001), LP-PRP (P < .001), and LR-PRP (4.9% ± 3.1%; P < .001). Interleukin (IL)-1β content was significantly higher in cultures treated with LR-PRP (1.53 ± 0.86 pg/mL) compared with those treated with PBS (0.22 ± 0.295 pg/mL; P < .001), PPP (0.11 ± 0.179 pg/mL; P < .001), and RBCs (0.64 ± 0.58 pg/mL; P = .001). IL-6 content was also higher with LR-PRP (32,097.82 ± 22,844.300 pg/mL) treatment in all other groups (P < .001). Tumor necrosis factor-α levels were greatest in LP-PRP (9.97 ± 3.110 pg/mL), and this was significantly greater compared with all other culture conditions (P < .001). Interferon-γ levels were

  12. Developing Resourceful Humans. Adult Education within the Economic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynn Elen, Ed.

    This book, which explores the shifting paradigm from human resource development to developing resourceful humans, establishes the historical position of adult education within the economic context, discusses human capital propositions, and examines the learning dimensions of economic and educational change. The following chapters are included:…

  13. Extra-Articular Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Doral, Mahmut N; Huri, Gazi; Bohacek, Ivan; Turhan, Egemen; Bojanic, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    With the advent of endoscopy in the last 2 decades, a number of procedures, and modifications to them, have been developed and have advanced exponentially. The list of indications was extended over time because of several reasons: better understanding of the pathophysiology, better diagnostics, and advances in endoscopic technology. In this review article, we summarize the most frequently performed extra-articular endoscopic procedures on the extremities. As there are several methods, some have been described briefly, whereas others have been described in greater detail, such as suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome and Achilles tendon disorders, as they present our area of interest and subspecialty domain. Recent advances in the treatment of versatile pathologic entities have been described, together with new methods, which currently lack sufficient clinical data but still represent promising techniques for the future.

  14. Towards Regeneration of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Yoichi; Larmour, Colleen; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage is classified into permanent hyaline cartilage and has significant differences in structure, extracelluar matrix components, gene expression profile, and mechanical property from transient hyaline cartilage found in growth plate. In the process of synovial joint development, articular cartilage is originated from the interzone, developing at the edge of the cartilaginous anlagen, it establishes zonal structure over time and supports smooth movement of the synovial joint through life. The cascade actions of key regulators such as Wnts, GDF5, Erg, and PTHLH coordinate sequential steps of articular cartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes are restrictedly controlled not to differentiate into a hypertrophic stage by autocrine and paracrine factors and extracerllular matrix microenvironment, but retain potential to undergo hypertrophy. The basal calcified zone of articular cartilage is connected with subchondral bone, but not invaded by blood vessels nor replaced by bone, which is highly contrasted with the growth plate. Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capacity, but likely possesses and potentially uses intrinsic stem cell source in the superficial layer, Ranvier’s groove, the intra-articular tissues such as synovium and fat pad, and marrow below the subchondral bone. Considering the biological views on articular cartilage, several important points are raised for regeneration of articular cartilage. We should evaluate the nature of regenerated cartilage as permanent hyaline cartilage and not just hyaline cartilage. We should study how a hypertrophic phenotype of transplanted cells can be lastingly suppressed in regenerating tissue. Further, we should develop the methods and reagents to activate recruitment of intrinsic stem/progenitor cells into the damaged site. PMID:24078496

  15. Humanizing Adult Education Research: Five Stories from the 1930's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Ronald

    Taken from the author's doctoral dissertation, this award-winning monograph describes a method for humanizing educational research in adult education and provides five stories of adult education efforts in the 1930's as examples of such research. The method described suggests valuing qualitative data as much as quantitative in the field of…

  16. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  17. RANKL synthesized by articular chondrocytes contributes to juxta-articular bone loss in chronic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The receptor activator nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) diffuses from articular cartilage to subchondral bone. However, the role of chondrocyte-synthesized RANKL in rheumatoid arthritis-associated juxta-articular bone loss has not yet been explored. This study aimed to determine whether RANKL produced by chondrocytes induces osteoclastogenesis and juxta-articular bone loss associated with chronic arthritis. Methods Chronic antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was induced in New Zealand (NZ) rabbits. Osteoarthritis (OA) and control groups were simultaneously studied. Dual X-ray absorptiometry of subchondral knee bone was performed before sacrifice. Histological analysis and protein expression of RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were evaluated in joint tissues. Co-cultures of human OA articular chondrocytes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors were stimulated with macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), then further stained with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. Results Subchondral bone loss was confirmed in AIA rabbits when compared with controls. The expression of RANKL, OPG and RANKL/OPG ratio in cartilage were increased in AIA compared to control animals, although this pattern was not seen in synovium. Furthermore, RANKL expression and RANKL/OPG ratio were inversely related to subchondral bone mineral density. RANKL expression was observed throughout all cartilage zones of rabbits and was specially increased in the calcified cartilage of AIA animals. Co-cultures demonstrated that PGE2-stimulated human chondrocytes, which produce RANKL, also induce osteoclasts differentiation from PBMCs. Conclusions Chondrocyte-synthesized RANKL may contribute to the development of juxta-articular osteoporosis associated with chronic arthritis, by enhancing osteoclastogenesis. These results point out a new mechanism of bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22709525

  18. Contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography of articular cartilage: association with tissue composition and properties.

    PubMed

    Silvast, T S; Jurvelin, J S; Aula, A S; Lammi, M J; Töyräs, J

    2009-01-01

    Contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography may enable the noninvasive quantification of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of articular cartilage. It has been reported that penetration of the negatively charged contrast agent ioxaglate (Hexabrix) increases significantly after enzymatic degradation of GAGs. However, it is not known whether spontaneous degradation of articular cartilage can be quantitatively detected with this technique. To investigate the diagnostic potential of contrast agent-enhanced cartilage tomography (CECT) in quantification of GAG concentration in normal and spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage by means of clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). In this in vitro study, normal and spontaneously degenerated adult bovine cartilage (n=32) was used. Bovine patellar cartilage samples were immersed in 21 mM contrast agent (Hexabrix) solution for 24 hours at room temperature. After immersion, the samples were scanned with a clinical pQCT instrument. From pQCT images, the contrast agent concentration in superficial as well as in full-thickness cartilage was calculated. Histological and functional integrity of the samples was quantified with histochemical and mechanical reference measurements extracted from our earlier study. Full diffusion of contrast agent into the deep cartilage was found to take over 8 hours. As compared to normal cartilage, a significant increase (11%, P<0.05) in contrast agent concentration was seen in the superficial layer of spontaneously degenerated samples. Significant negative correlations were revealed between the contrast agent concentration and the superficial or full-thickness GAG content of tissue (|R| > 0.5, P<0.01). Further, pQCT could be used to measure the thickness of patellar cartilage. The present results suggest that CECT can be used to diagnose proteoglycan depletion in spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage with a clinical pQCT scanner. Possibly, the in vivo use of clinical p

  19. Regulation of Articular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Differentiation by Indian Hedgehog and Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuesong; Macica, Carolyn; Nasiri, Ali; Broadus, Arthur E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The chondrocytes of the epiphyseal growth zone are regulated by the Indian hedgehog (Ihh)-parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) axis. In weight-bearing joints, this growth zone comes to be subdivided by the secondary ossification center into distinct articular and growth cartilage structures. Here, we explored the cells of origin, localization, regulation of expression, and putative functions of Ihh and PTHrP in articular cartilage in the mouse. Methods We assessed Ihh and PTHrP expression in an allelic PTHrP-lacZ knockin mouse and several versions of PTHrP-null mice. Selected joints were unloaded surgically to examine load-induction of PTHrP and Ihh. Results The embryonic growth zone appears to serve as the source of PTHrP-expressing proliferative chondrocytes that populate both the forming articular cartilage and growth plate structures. In articular cartilage, these cells take the form of articular chondrocytes in the mid-zone. In PTHrP-knockout mice, mineralizing chondrocytes encroach upon developing articular cartilage but appear to be prevented from mineralizing the joint space by Ihh-driven surface chondrocyte proliferation. In growing and adult mice, PTHrP expression in articular chondrocytes is load-induced, and unloading is associated with rapid changes in PTHrP expression and articular chondrocyte differentiation. Conclusion We conclude that the PTHrP-Ihh axis participates in the maintenance of articular cartilage. Dysregulation of this system might contribute to the pathogenesis of arthritis. PMID:19035497

  20. Articular manifestations of familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mathon, G; Gagné, C; Brun, D; Lupien, P J; Moorjani, S

    1985-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia is characterised by a decreased removal of low density lipoproteins and premature coronary artery disease. Tendinous xanthomata are a hallmark of the disease. The affected joints may also be the sites of inflammation and pain. Arthropathy has been associated mainly with the homozygous form of familial hypercholesterolaemia, but it is also known to occur in the heterozygous form. We report on the articular manifestations in 73 patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia. About 40% of these patients had at least one episode of articular symptoms. The observed articular manifestations may be classified into four types: Achilles pain (18%), Achilles tendinitis (11%), oligoarticular arthritis (7%), polyarticular or rheumatic fever-like arthritis (4%). It is concluded that in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia articular manifestations are frequent, diverse, and may be the first symptom of this metabolic disorder. Images PMID:4037885

  1. Genetic Modification of Human Peripheral Blood Aspirates Using Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors for Articular Cartilage Repair with a Focus on Chondrogenic Transforming Growth Factor-β Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Janina; Orth, Patrick; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh Kumar; Rey-Rico, Ana; Schmitt, Gertrud; Kohn, Dieter; Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2017-01-01

    Transplantation of genetically modified peripheral blood aspirates that carry chondrogenically competent progenitor cells may offer new, convenient tools to treat articular cartilage lesions compared with the more complex and invasive application of bone marrow concentrates or of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we show that recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors are powerful gene vehicles capable of successfully targeting primary human peripheral blood aspirates in a stable and safe manner, allowing for an efficient and long-term transgene expression in such samples (up to 63 days with use of a lacZ reporter gene and for at least 21 days with application of the pleiotropic, chondrogenic factor transforming growth factor-β [TGF-β]). rAAV-mediated overexpression of TGF-β enhanced both the proliferative and metabolic properties of the peripheral blood aspirates, also increasing the chondrogenic differentiation processes in these samples. Hypertrophy and osteogenic differentiation events were also activated by production of TGF-β via rAAV, suggesting that translation of the current approach in vivo will probably require close regulation of expression of this candidate gene. However, these results support the concept of directly modifying peripheral blood as a novel approach to conveniently treat articular cartilage lesions in patients. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:249-260. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  2. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  3. Postnatal development of collagen structure in ovine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage (AC) is the layer of tissue that covers the articulating ends of the bones in diarthrodial joints. Across species, adult AC shows an arcade-like structure with collagen predominantly perpendicular to the subchondral bone near the bone, and collagen predominantly parallel to the articular surface near the articular surface. Recent studies into collagen fibre orientation in stillborn and juvenile animals showed that this structure is absent at birth. Since the collagen structure is an important factor for AC mechanics, the absence of the adult Benninghoff structure has implications for perinatal AC mechanobiology. The current objective is to quantify the dynamics of collagen network development in a model animal from birth to maturity. We further aim to show the presence or absence of zonal differentiation at birth, and to assess differences in collagen network development between different anatomical sites of a single joint surface. We use quantitative polarised light microscopy to investigate properties of the collagen network and we use the sheep (Ovis aries) as our model animal. Results Predominant collagen orientation is parallel to the articular surface throughout the tissue depth for perinatal cartilage. This remodels to the Benninghoff structure before the sheep reach sexual maturity. Remodelling of predominant collagen orientation starts at a depth just below the future transitional zone. Tissue retardance shows a minimum near the articular surface at all ages, which indicates the presence of zonal differentiation at all ages. The absolute position of this minimum does change between birth and maturity. Between different anatomical sites, we find differences in the dynamics of collagen remodelling, but no differences in adult collagen structure. Conclusions The collagen network in articular cartilage remodels between birth and sexual maturity from a network with predominant orientation parallel to the articular surface to a

  4. Extra-articular hip endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Verhelst, L.; Guevara, V.; De Schepper, J.; Van Melkebeek, J.; Pattyn, C.; Audenaert, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the current available literature evidencing on peri-articular hip endoscopy (the third compartment). A comprehensive approach has been set on reports dealing with endoscopic surgery for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis, snapping hip (or coxa-saltans; external and internal), gluteus medius and minimus tears and endoscopy (or arthroscopy) after total hip arthroplasty. This information can be used to trigger further research, innovation and education in extra-articular hip endoscopy. PMID:23610664

  5. Articular Manifestations of Systemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bensen, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    Many systemic diseases present with articular manifestations. An understanding of the clinical, laboratory and radiological features of these diseases can lead to early diagnosis and appropriate therapy. This article describes the articular presentation and management of four generalized disorders: idiopathic hemachromatosis; sarcoidosis; hepatitis-B virus-induced arthritis, and polymyositis-dermatomyositis induced arthritis. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:21283470

  6. Human retrovirus in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sugamura, K; Hinuma, Y

    1985-03-01

    In this review Kazuo Sugamura and Yorio Hinuma summarize developments in studies on the human retrovirus associated with a unique human T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia; they also discuss the possible mechanisms of retrovirus-induced leukemogenesis. Copyright © 1985. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Humanities and the Adult Learner in an Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Dale; Kamholtz, Jonathan

    Humanities courses have often been given little attention in continuing education for adults, possibly because they have been viewed as not "practical" or not "job-oriented" enough in our career-oriented, technologically advanced society. However, the humanities should be an integral part of our culture and of the lives of…

  8. Humanities and the Adult Learner in an Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Dale; Kamholtz, Jonathan

    Humanities courses have often been given little attention in continuing education for adults, possibly because they have been viewed as not "practical" or not "job-oriented" enough in our career-oriented, technologically advanced society. However, the humanities should be an integral part of our culture and of the lives of…

  9. Endogenous versus Exogenous Growth Factor Regulation of Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G.; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J.; Trippel, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), or with the genes encoding these growth factors for endogenous production. Treatment effects were measured as change in chondrocyte DNA content, glycosaminoglycan production, and aggrecan gene expression. We found that IGF-I stimulated chondrocyte biosynthesis similarly when delivered by either exogenous or endogenous means. In contrast, exogenous TGF-ß1 stimulated these reparative functions, while endogenous TGF-ß1 had little effect. Endogenous TGF-ß1 became more bioactive following activation of the transgene protein product. These data indicate that effective mechanisms of growth factor delivery for articular cartilage repair may differ for different growth factors. In the case of IGF-I, gene therapy or protein therapy appear to be viable options. In contrast, TGF-ß1 gene therapy may be constrained by a limited ability of chondrocytes to convert latent complexes to an active form. PMID:24105960

  10. A Clinically Realistic Large Animal Model of Intra-Articular Fracture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    effect of a therapeutic treatment will be pursued. 15. SUBJECT TERMS post-traumatic osteoarthritis , joint injuries, intra-articular fracture...technique to create experimental articular fractures in large animal joints . Osteoarthritis Cartilage (in print). 4 1. INTRODUCTION The...consistent with our empirical knowledge in human clinical settings. Figure 7. Representative case of joint surface incongruity analysis in a 2 mm step

  11. Resveratrol inhibits the IL-1β-induced expression of MMP-13 and IL-6 in human articular chondrocytes via TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hailun; Jiao, Yongliang; Yu, Xiaolu; Li, Xingyao; Wang, Wei; Ding, Lifeng; Liu, Li

    2017-03-01

    The natural polyphenolic compound, resveratrol, has been shown to exhibit anti-osteoarthritic activity. Therefore it is hypothesized that resveratrol may serve as a nutritional supplement to counteract osteoarthritis (OA). However, the mechanisms responsible for these anti-osteoarthritic effects have not yet been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether the biological effects of resveratrol against interleukin (IL)-1β‑induced inflammation in human articular chondrocytes involved both Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent and -independent signaling pathways. Human articular chondrocytes derived from patients with OA were stimulated with IL-1β, and then co-treated with resveratrol. Cell viability was subsequently evaluated by MTS assays, and the concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and the pro-inflammatory factor, IL-6, were detected in culture supernatants using ELISA. The mRNA and protein levels of downstream mediators of TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways were also assayed by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Our results revealed that resveratrol prevented the IL-1β-induced reduction in cell viability. Furthermore, stimulation of the chondrocytes with IL-1β resulted in a significant upregulation of TLR4 and downstream targets of both TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways that are associated with the synthesis of MMP-13 and IL-6. Correspondingly, IL-1β-induced catabolic and inflammatory responses were effectively reversed by resveratrol. Taken together, these data suggest that resveratrol exerted protective effects against matrix degradation and inflammation in OA-affected chondrocytes by inhibiting both TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways. Thus, resveratrol represents a potential treatment for OA and warrants further investigation.

  12. Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal, not adult, β cells.

    PubMed

    Hrvatin, Sinisa; O'Donnell, Charles W; Deng, Francis; Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia Walton; DiIorio, Philip; Rezania, Alireza; Gifford, David K; Melton, Douglas A

    2014-02-25

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to generate any human cell type, and one widely recognized goal is to make pancreatic β cells. To this end, comparisons between differentiated cell types produced in vitro and their in vivo counterparts are essential to validate hPSC-derived cells. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of sorted insulin-expressing (INS(+)) cells derived from three independent hPSC lines, human fetal pancreata, and adult human islets points to two major conclusions: (i) Different hPSC lines produce highly similar INS(+) cells and (ii) hPSC-derived INS(+) (hPSC-INS(+)) cells more closely resemble human fetal β cells than adult β cells. This study provides a direct comparison of transcriptional programs between pure hPSC-INS(+) cells and true β cells and provides a catalog of genes whose manipulation may convert hPSC-INS(+) cells into functional β cells.

  13. PGA-associated heterotopic chondrocyte cocultures: implications of nasoseptal and auricular chondrocytes in articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, K; Marzahn, U; John, T; Hoyer, M; Zreiqat, H; Witthuhn, A; Kohl, B; Haisch, A; Schulze-Tanzil, G

    2013-01-01

    The availability of autologous articular chondrocytes remains a limiting issue in matrix assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Non-articular heterotopic chondrocytes could be an alternative autologous cell source. The aims of this study were to establish heterotopic chondrocyte cocultures to analyze cell-cell compatibilities and to characterize the chondrogenic potential of nasoseptal chondrocytes compared to articular chondrocytes. Primary porcine and human nasoseptal and articular chondrocytes were investigated for extracellular cartilage matrix (ECM) expression in a monolayer culture. 3D polyglycolic acid- (PGA) associated porcine heterotopic mono- and cocultures were assessed for cell vitality, types II, I, and total collagen-, and proteoglycan content. The type II collagen, lubricin, and Sox9 gene expressions were significantly higher in articular compared with nasoseptal monolayer chondrocytes, while type IX collagen expression was lower in articular chondrocytes. Only β1-integrin gene expression was significantly inferior in humans but not in porcine nasoseptal compared with articular chondrocytes, indicating species-dependent differences. Heterotopic chondrocytes in PGA cultures revealed high vitality with proteoglycan-rich hyaline-like ECM production. Similar amounts of type II collagen deposition and type II/I collagen ratios were found in heterotopic chondrocytes cultured on PGA compared to articular chondrocytes. Quantitative analyses revealed a time-dependent increase in total collagen and proteoglycan content, whereby the differences between heterotopic and articular chondrocyte cultures were not significant. Nasoseptal and auricular chondrocytes monocultured in PGA or cocultured with articular chondrocytes revealed a comparable high chondrogenic potential in a tissue engineering setting, which created the opportunity to test them in vivo for articular cartilage repair. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Brother of CDO (BOC) expression in equine articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Vanderman, K S; Tremblay, M; Zhu, W; Shimojo, M; Mienaltowski, M J; Coleman, S J; MacLeod, J N

    2011-04-01

    Brother of CDO (BOC) is a cell surface receptor that derives its name from the structurally related protein, cell adhesion molecule-related/down-regulated by oncogenes (CDO, sometimes CDON). High levels of BOC mRNA and protein expression have been described in embryonic tissues with active cell proliferation and ongoing cellular differentiation(1,2). A microarray-based screen of RNA isolated from 11 different adult equine tissues unexpectedly identified BOC as having an expression pattern restricted to articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to further investigate BOC expression in adult articular cartilage relative to other tissues. Both RT-qPCR and mRNA sequencing confirmed the microarray data. Steady state BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage were substantially higher than in the other adult tissues tested, neonatal tendon, placenta, and whole embryo. The expression of BOC displayed a pattern of tissue specificity comparable to well established cartilage matrix protein biomarkers. BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage increased with age, but were rapidly down-regulated when chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the cartilage matrix and expanded in monolayer culture. Relative expression patterns of CDO were broadly similar, but displayed lower fold change differences. A functional role in articular cartilage that involves Hedgehog signaling is suggested by the known binding affinity of BOC for all three Hedgehog ligands. These data also extend BOC and CDO biology to a post-mitotic and highly differentiated cell type within a mature tissue. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Articular Cartilage Injury in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Timothy R.; Mithoefer, Kai; Scopp, Jason M.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the athletic population are observed with increasing frequency and, due to limited intrinsic healing capacity, can lead to progressive pain and functional limitation over time. If left untreated, isolated cartilage lesions can lead to progressive chondropenia or global cartilage loss over time. A chondropenia curve is described to help predict the outcome of cartilage injury based on different lesion and patient characteristics. Nutriceuticals and chondroprotective agents are being investigated as tools to slow the development of chondropenia. Several operative techniques have been described for articular cartilage repair or replacement and, more recently, cartilage regeneration. Rehabilitation guidelines are being developed to meet the needs of these new techniques. Next-generation techniques are currently evaluated to optimize articular cartilage repair biology and to provide a repair cartilage tissue that can withstand the high mechanical loads experienced by the athlete with consistent long-term durability. PMID:26069548

  16. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment.

    PubMed

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-25

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20-40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans.

  17. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  18. Development of artificial articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Oka, M; Ushio, K; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Hyon, S H; Nakamura, T; Fujita, H

    2000-01-01

    Attempts have been made to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which the lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H), 'a rubber-like gel', was investigated as an artificial articular cartilage and the mechanical properties of this gel were improved through a new synthetic process. In this article the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new improved PVA-H is reported from the perspective of its usefulness as an artificial articular cartilage. As regards lubrication, the changes in thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading were measured and it was found that PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressures than polyethylene (PE) did. The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times that of PE. Histological studies of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammation nor degenerative changes. The artificial articular cartilage made from PVA-H could be attached to the underlying bone using a composite osteochondral device made from titanium fibre mesh. In the second phase of this work, the damage to the tibial articular surface after replacement of the femoral surface in dogs was studied. Pairs of implants made of alumina, titanium or PVA-H on titanium fibre mesh were inserted into the femoral condyles. The two hard materials caused marked pathological changes in the articular cartilage and menisci, but the hydrogel composite replacement caused minimal damage. The composite osteochondral device became rapidly attached to host bone by ingrowth into the supporting mesh. The clinical implications of

  19. Minimally invasive osteosynthesis technique for articular fractures.

    PubMed

    Beale, Brian S; Cole, Grayson

    2012-09-01

    Articular fractures require accurate reduction and rigid stabilization to decrease the chance of osteoarthritis and joint dysfunction. Articular fractures have been traditionally repaired by arthrotomy and internal fixation. Recently, minimally invasive techniques have been introduced to treat articular fractures, reducing patient morbidity and improving the accuracy of reduction. A variety of techniques, including distraction, radiographic imaging, and arthroscopy, are used with the minimally invasive osteosynthesis technique of articular fractures to achieve a successful repair and outcome.

  20. The development and evaluation of individualized templates to assist transoral C2 articular mass or transpedicular screw placement in TARP-IV procedures: adult cadaver specimen study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Shi; Wu, Zeng-Hui; Xia, Hong; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Ai, Fu-Zhi; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Jian-Hua; Mai, Xiao-Hong; Yin, Qing-Shui

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate system treats irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation from transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-I to transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-III. However, this system has demonstrated problems associated with screw loosening, atlantoaxial fixation and concealed or manifest neurovascular injuries. This study sought to design a set of individualized templates to improve the accuracy of anterior C2 screw placement in the transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-IV procedure. METHODS: A set of individualized templates was designed according to thin-slice computed tomography data obtained from 10 human cadavers. The templates contained cubic modules and drill guides to facilitate transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate positioning and anterior C2 screw placement. We performed 2 stages of cadaveric experiments with 2 cadavers in stage one and 8 in stage two. Finally, guided C2 screw placement was evaluated by reading postoperative computed tomography images and comparing the planned and inserted screw trajectories. RESULTS: There were two cortical breaching screws in stage one and three in stage two, but only the cortical breaching screws in stage one were ranked critical. In stage two, the planned entry points and the transverse angles of the anterior C2 screws could be simulated, whereas the declination angles could not be simulated due to intraoperative blockage of the drill bit and screwdriver by the upper teeth. CONCLUSIONS: It was feasible to use individualized templates to guide transoral C2 screw placement. Thus, these drill templates combined with transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-IV, may improve the accuracy of transoral C2 screw placement and reduce related neurovascular complications. PMID:25518033

  1. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Maps of the adult human hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Nezzar, Hachemi; Sakka, Laurent; Boirie, Yves; Fontaine, Denys; Coste, Aurélien; Coll, Guillaume; Sontheimer, Anna; Sarret, Catherine; Gabrillargues, Jean; De Salles, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The human hypothalamus is a small deeply located region placed at the crossroad of neurovegetative, neuroendocrine, limbic, and optic systems. Although deep brain stimulation techniques have proven that it could be feasible to modulate these systems, targeting the hypothalamus and in particular specific nuclei and white bundles, is still challenging. Our goal was to make a synthesis of relevant topographical data of the human hypothalamus, under the form of magnetic resonance imaging maps useful for mastering its elaborated structure as well as its neighborhood. As from 1.5 Tesla, Inversion-Recovery sequence allows locating the hypothalamus and most of its components. Spotting hypothalamic compartments is possible according to specific landmarks: the anterior commissure, the mammillary bodies, the preoptic recess, the infundibular recess, the crest between the preoptic and the infundibular recesses, the optical tract, the fornix, and the mammillo-thalamic bundle. The identification of hypothalamus and most of its components could be useful to allow the quantification of local pathological processes and to target specific circuitry to alleviate severe symptoms, using physical or biological agents. PMID:23682342

  3. Human Service Planning as a Collective Adult Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Joan

    Based on a study by the Department of Community Service Education, Cornell University, to evaluate human service planning (HSP) nationwide, this paper discusses the premises that HSP may be defined as community learning and that the community (according to the Robert Boyd and Jerold Apps model for adult education) is both a beneficiary of and…

  4. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  5. Adult Education, Basic Human Needs, and Integrated Development Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Reginald Herbold

    1976-01-01

    This paper argues for an integrated approach to adult education which would require an examination of basic human needs and national development planning each in its own terms. The paper's argument is centered on liberation and participation as ends, not means: Education, development, and planning must be seen and acted on as an integrated whole.…

  6. Distinct functional programming of human fetal and adult monocytes.

    PubMed

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Kim, Charles C; Burt, Trevor D; McCune, Joseph M

    2014-03-20

    Preterm birth affects 1 out of 9 infants in the United States and is the leading cause of long-term neurologic handicap and infant mortality, accounting for 35% of all infant deaths in 2008. Although cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-6, and IL-1 are produced in response to in utero infection and are strongly associated with preterm labor, little is known about how human fetal immune cells respond to these cytokines. We demonstrate that fetal and adult CD14(+)CD16(-) classical monocytes are distinct in terms of basal transcriptional profiles and in phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) in response to cytokines. Fetal monocytes phosphorylate canonical and noncanonical STATs and respond more strongly to IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-4 than adult monocytes. We demonstrate a higher ratio of SOCS3 to IL-6 receptor in adult monocytes than in fetal monocytes, potentially explaining differences in STAT phosphorylation. Additionally, IFN-γ signaling results in upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory machinery in adult, but not fetal, monocytes. These findings represent the first evidence that primary human fetal and adult monocytes are functionally distinct, potentially explaining how these cells respond differentially to cytokines implicated in development, in utero infections, and the pathogenesis of preterm labor.

  7. Combination of intra-articular autologous activated peripheral blood stem cells with growth factor addition/ preservation and hyaluronic acid in conjunction with arthroscopic microdrilling mesenchymal cell stimulation Improves quality of life and regenerates articular cartilage in early osteoarthritic knee disease.

    PubMed

    Turajane, Thana; Chaweewannakorn, Ukrit; Larbpaiboonpong, Viroj; Aojanepong, Jongjate; Thitiset, Thakoon; Honsawek, Sittisak; Fongsarun, Juthatip; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos I

    2013-05-01

    Trauma or osteoarthritis (OA) create articular cartilage defects that cannot efficiently heal, thus leading to significant long-term disability. Failed conservative treatment in cartilage diseases is a known condition that necessitates repair attempts but current methods are inadequate. Recent studies in OA animal models and humans, showed articular cartilage regeneration following combinations of drilling, adult stem cells, and intra-articular hyaluronic acid. In the present series, the authors evaluated the combination of repeated intra-articular (IA) autologous activated peripheral blood stem cells (AAPBSC) with growth factor addition/preservation (GFAP) along with hyaluronic acid (HA) in conjunction with arthroscopic microdrilling mesenchymal cell stimulation (MCS) in early osteoarthritic knee disease that failed conservative treatment. Four women and one man (median age 56, range 52-59 years) that failed conservative treatment were enrolled. Arthroscopic MCS was performed once in all patients with subsequent IA injection of AAPBSC with GFAP along with IA-HA intra-operatively, repeated at days 7 and 14. The patients were evaluated by WOMAC and KOO scores at baseline, one, and six months. Cancellous bone biopsies were performed to investigate cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation by electron microscopy and histological staining. All patients improved significantly in WOMAC and KOO scores at one and six months compared to baseline. No adverse effects were seen during the AAPBSC harvesting, arthroscopy and/or IA injections. One month post-surgery, all pain medications could be withdrawn. Electron microscopy scanning revealed cell attachment and proliferation while histological analysis demonstrated that the cell layer on the cancellous scaffold showed increased proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan content indicating hyaline cartilage presence. The combination of intra-articular (IA) autologous activated peripheral blood stem cells (AAPBSC) with growth

  8. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  9. Engineering lubrication in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    McNary, Sean M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-04-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  10. Importance of material properties and porosity of bone on mechanical response of articular cartilage in human knee joint--a two-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Mikko S; Mononen, Mika E; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha; Virén, Tuomas; Korhonen, Rami K

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical behavior of bone is determined by the structure and intrinsic, local material properties of the tissue. However, previously presented knee joint models for evaluation of stresses and strains in joints generally consider bones as rigid bodies or linearly elastic solid materials. The aim of this study was to estimate how different structural and mechanical properties of bone affect the mechanical response of articular cartilage within a knee joint. Based on a cadaver knee joint, a two-dimensional (2D) finite element (FE) model of a knee joint including bone, cartilage, and meniscus geometries was constructed. Six different computational models with varying properties for cortical, trabecular, and subchondral bone were created, while the biphasic fibril-reinforced properties of cartilage and menisci were kept unaltered. The simplest model included rigid bones, while the most complex model included specific mechanical properties for different bone structures and anatomically accurate trabecular structure. Models with different porosities of trabecular bone were also constructed. All models were exposed to axial loading of 1.9 times body weight within 0.2 s (mimicking typical maximum knee joint forces during gait) while free varus-valgus rotation was allowed and all other rotations and translations were fixed. As compared to results obtained with the rigid bone model, stresses, strains, and pore pressures observed in cartilage decreased depending on the implemented properties of trabecular bone. Greatest changes in these parameters (up to -51% in maximum principal stresses) were observed when the lowest modulus for trabecular bone (measured at the structural level) was used. By increasing the trabecular bone porosity, stresses and strains were reduced substantially in the lateral tibial cartilage, while they remained relatively constant in the medial tibial plateau. The present results highlight the importance of long bones, in particular, their mechanical

  11. Effect of jaw opening on the stress pattern in a normal human articular disc: finite element analysis based on MRI images.

    PubMed

    Li, Qihong; Ren, Shuang; Ge, Cheng; Sun, Haiyan; Lu, Hong; Duan, Yinzhong; Rong, Qiguo

    2014-06-19

    Excessive compressive and shear stresses are likely related to condylar resorption and disc perforation. Few studies have reported the disc displacement and deformation during jaw opening. The aim of this study was to analyze stress distribution in a normal articular disc during the jaw opening movement. Bilateral MRI images were obtained from the temporomandibular joint of a healthy subject for the jaw opening displacement from 6 to 24 mm with 1 mm increments. The disc contour for the jaw opening at 6 mm was defined as the reference state, and was used to establish a two dimensional finite element model of the disc. The contours of the disc at other degrees of jaw opening were used as the displacement loading. Hyperelastic material models were applied to the anterior, intermediate and posterior parts of the disc. Stress and strain trajectories were calculated to characterize the stress/strain patterns in the disc. Both the maximum and minimum principal stresses were negative in the intermediate zone, therefore, the intermediate zone withstood mainly compressive stress. On the contrary, the maximum and minimum principal stresses were most positive in the anterior and posterior zones, which meant that the anterior and posterior bands suffered higher tensile stresses. The different patterns of stress trajectories between the intermediate zone and the anterior and posterior bands might be attributed to the effect of fiber orientation. The compression of the intermediate zone and stretching of the anterior and posterior bands caused high shear deformation in the transition region, especially at the disc surfaces. The stress and strain remained at a reasonable level during jaw opening, indicating that the disc experiences no injury during functional opening movements in a healthy temporomandibular joint.

  12. Does Acute Normobaric Hypoxia Induce Anapyrexia in Adult Humans?

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongsuk; Gerhart, Hayden D; Vaughan, Jeremiah; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Glickman, Ellen L

    2017-06-01

    Seo, Yongsuk, Hayden D. Gerhart, Jeremiah Vaughan, Jung-Hyun Kim, and Ellen L. Glickman. Does acute normobaric hypoxia induce anapyrexia in adult humans? High Alt Med Biol. 18:185-190, 2017.-Exposure to hypoxia is known to induce a reduction in core body temperature as a protective mechanism, which has been shown in both animals and humans. The purpose of this study was to test if acute exposure to normobaric hypoxia (NH) induces anapyrexia in adult humans in association with decreased peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2). Ten healthy male subjects were seated in atmospheres of normobaric normoxia 21% (NN21), NH 17% (NH17), and 13% (NH13) O2 for 60 minutes in a counterbalanced manner. Rectal temperature (Tre) was continuously monitored together with the quantification of metabolic heat production (MHP) and body heat storage (S). Baseline physiological measurements showed no differences between the three conditions. SpO2 was significantly decreased in NH17 and NH13 compared with NN21 (p ≤ 0.001). Tre decreased following 60 minutes of resting in all conditions, but, independent of the conditions, showed no association between Tre and levels of hypoxic SpO2. There was also no significant difference in either MHP or S between conditions. The present results showed no evidence of hypoxia-induced anapyrexia in adult humans during 1 hour of resting after exposure to NH either at 13% or 17% O2.

  13. [The effects of exercise on articular cartilage].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Cenk; Sarpel, Yaman; Biçer, O Sunkar

    2007-01-01

    The effect of exercise on articular cartilage has been assessed on animal models and on humans using various imaging techniques. Joint cartilage, whose water content decreases itself thanks to its unique permeable medium, maintains load distribution and joint function together with the synovial fluid under physiologic conditions and sports activities. The adaptive capacity of joint cartilage is limited under various conditions such as excessive load bearing or prolonged immobilization; however, when these factors are reversed deformed cartilage returns to its former state under normal conditions. Due to its adverse effect on joint cartilage, immobilization period following cartilage damage or operation should be as short as possible for wound healing. It is reported that exercise contributes to cartilage healing and reduces risk for injury, and that moderate exercise can even decrease the number of cases requiring arthroplasty. Conversely, excessive (harsh) exercise may be associated with increased cartilage damage or degenerative changes. Despite the presence of osteophytic changes in joint cartilage of athletes performing mild sports activities, these may not result in osteoarthritis due to the adaptive feature of joint cartilage. In contrast, the risk for osteoarthritis is increased in professional sportsmen exposed to acute repetitive impact and torsional loading. This article reviews the influence of controlled, passive-active exercise on healing, and on the development of osteoarthritis and the short- and long-term changes in articular cartilage associated with exercise and participation in sports of different duration and intensity.

  14. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo; Michielon, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory. PMID:26075244

  15. Perivascular mesenchymal progenitors in human fetal and adult liver.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Jörg C; Over, Patrick; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Foka, Hubert G; Chen, William C W; Péault, Bruno; Gridelli, Bruno; Schmelzer, Eva

    2012-12-10

    The presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been described in various organs. Pericytes possess a multilineage differentiation potential and have been suggested to be one of the developmental sources for MSCs. In human liver, pericytes have not been defined. Here, we describe the identification, purification, and characterization of pericytes in human adult and fetal liver. Flow cytometry sorting revealed that human adult and fetal liver contains 0.56%±0.81% and 0.45%±0.39% of CD146(+)CD45(-)CD56(-)CD34(-) pericytes, respectively. Of these, 41% (adult) and 30% (fetal) were alkaline phosphatase-positive (ALP(+)). In situ, pericytes were localized around periportal blood vessels and were positive for NG2 and vimentin. Purified pericytes could be cultured extensively and had low population doubling times. Immunofluorescence of cultures demonstrated that cells were positive for pericyte and mesenchymal cell markers CD146, NG2, CD90, CD140b, and vimentin, and negative for endothelial, hematopoietic, stellate, muscle, or liver epithelial cell markers von Willebrand factor, CD31, CD34, CD45, CD144, CD326, CK19, albumin, α-fetoprotein, CYP3A7, glial fibrillary acid protein, MYF5, and Pax7 by gene expression; myogenin and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression were variable. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of cultures confirmed surface expression of CD146, CD73, CD90, CD10, CD13, CD44, CD105, and ALP and absence of human leukocyte antigen-DR. In vitro differentiation assays demonstrated that cells possessed robust osteogenic and myogenic, but low adipogenic and low chondrogenic differentiation potentials. In functional in vitro assays, cells had typical mesenchymal strong migratory and invasive activity. In conclusion, human adult and fetal livers harbor pericytes that are similar to those found in other organs and are distinct from hepatic stellate cells.

  16. Subchondral route for nutrition to articular cartilage in the rabbit. Measurement of diffusion with hydrogen gas in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ogata, K; Whiteside, L A; Lesker, P A

    1978-10-01

    The route of nutrients going to articular cartilage was studied by determining the diffusion of hydrogen molecules from the subchondral circulation to the articular cartilage in rabbits. In all immature animals there was diffusion of hydrogen from subchondral bone into articular cartilage, while in the older immature animals the results were variable. None of the mature animals showed any diffusion of hydrogen into articular cartilage. The rate of diffusion of hydrogen was significantly lower in the articular cartilage than in the subchondral bone in the immature animals while the concentrations of hydrogen in the articular cartilage were only fractions of those in the subchondral bone at the same instant. Histologically, the deep layers of immature cartilage are penetrated extensively by vascular buds from the ossified portion of the epiphysis, while in adults the articular cartilage is separated from subchondral vascular spaces by an end-plate of bone. Blood vessels penetrating into the basilar layer of articular cartilage in immature animals appear to play an important role in the nutrition of articular cartilage coming from the subchondral region.

  17. Classification of primary articular chondrocalcinosis.

    PubMed

    Zitnan, D; Sitaj, S

    1979-01-01

    Based on long-term observations the authors submit a categorization of primary (hereditary and solitary) articular chondrocalcinosis into three different sub-populations. Attention is drawn to the fact that the extent of the qualitative disorder of the articular cartilage, obviously conditioned genetically, is linked with the age factor and determines the quantitative differences of pyrophosphate arthropathy in primary chondrocalcinosis. In young age, as a rule in the third decade, severe polyarticular condrocalcinosis (first sub-population) develops which causes relatively soon invalidity, in middle age (5th and 6th decade) milder condrocalcinosis develops (second sub-population) which combines with extraarticular, tendinous and tissue calcifacations, and finally in advanced age oligoarticular chondrocalcinosis develops (third sub-population) which is usually associated with ankylosing hyperostosis of the spine. Articular chondrocalcinosis (CCA) which we described by this term as a special metabolic arthropathy which occurs in families and solitary and which we defined as a special nosological unit (35, 36,) has become generally known and firmly established in rheumatology. As ensues from numerous publications, primary (idiopathic) CCA which comprises the hereditary and solitary (sporadic) form is characterized by pyrophosphate arthropathy which develops on articular cartilages not damaged by another process (13, 25, 26, 37); on the other hand as secondary CCA we consider pyrophosphate arthropathies which are associated with metabolic, endocrine or other diseases (9, 30). The common sign of both basic forms of CCA is the presence of microcrystals of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CaPD) in articular cartilages, synovial fluid, or other articular structures (capsules, tendons, ligaments), characterized originally by McCarty et al. (11, 18) and later by other authors (2, 23, 27, 32). In addition to semantic (terminological) problems there were also questions of the

  18. Characterization of auricular chondrocytes and auricular/articular chondrocyte co-cultures in terms of an application in articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Kuhne, Maren; John, Thilo; El-Sayed, Karym; Marzahn, Ulrike; Aue, Annekatrin; Kohl, Benjamin; Stoelzel, Katharina; Ertel, Wolfgang; Blottner, Dieter; Haisch, Andreas; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2010-05-01

    Cartilage injury remains a challenge in orthopedic surgery as articular cartilage only has a limited capacity for intrinsic healing. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a suitable technique for cartilage repair, but requires articular cartilage biopsies for autologous chondrocyte expansion. The use of heterotopic chondrocytes derived from non-articular cartilage sources such as auricular chondrocytes may be a novel approach for ACT. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether co-cultured articular/auricular chondrocytes exhibit characteristics comparable to articular chondrocytes. Analysis of the proliferation rate, extracellular cartilage matrix (ECM) gene and protein expression (type II and I collagen, elastin, lubricin), beta1-integrins and the chondrogenic transcription factor sox9 in articular/auricular chondrocytes was performed using RTD-PCR, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis. Additionally, three-dimensional (3D) chondrocyte mono- and co-cultures were established. The proliferative activity and elastin gene expression were lower and that of type II collagen and lubricin was higher in articular compared with auricular chondrocytes. The species generally did not influence the chondrocyte characteristics, with the exception of type I collagen and sox9 expression, which was higher in porcine but not in human articular chondrocytes compared with both types of auricular chondrocytes. beta1-integrin gene expression did not differ significantly between the chondrocyte types. The type II collagen gene and protein expression was higher in articular chondrocyte monocultures and was slightly higher in co-cultures compared with monocultured auricular chondrocytes. Both chondrocyte types survived in co-culture. Despite their differing expression profiles, co-cultures revealed some adjustment in the ECM expression of both chondrocyte types.

  19. [Generation of new nerve cells in the adult human brain].

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Meyer, Morten; Rasmussen, Jens Zimmer

    2003-03-31

    Generation of new nerve cells (neurogenesis) is normally considered to be limited to the fetal and early postnatal period. Thus, damaged nerve cells are not expected to be replaced by generation of new cells. The brain is, however, more plastic than previously assumed. This also includes neurogenesis in the adult human brain. In particular two brain regions show continuous division of neural stem and progenitor cells generating neurons and glial cells, namely the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zones of the lateral ventricles. From the latter region newly generated neuroblasts (immature nerve cells) migrate toward the olfactory bulb where they differentiate into neurons. In the dentate gyrus the newly generated neurons become functionally integrated in the granule cell layer, where they are believed to be of importance to learning and memory. It is at present not known whether neurogenesis in the adult human brain can be manipulated for specific repair after brain damage.

  20. Somatosensory cortical plasticity in adult humans revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, A; Grossman, J A; Ribary, U; Joliot, M; Volkmann, J; Rapaport, D; Beasley, R W; Llinás, R R

    1993-01-01

    Microelectrode recordings in adult mammals have clearly demonstrated that somatosensory cortical maps reorganize following peripheral nerve injuries and functional modifications; however, such reorganization has never been directly demonstrated in humans. Using magnetoencephalography, we have been able to demonstrate the somatotopic organization of the hand area in normal humans with high spatial precision. Somatosensory cortical plasticity was detected in two adults who were studied before and after surgical separation of webbed fingers (syndactyly). The presurgical maps displayed shrunken and nonsomatotopic hand representations. Within weeks following surgery, cortical reorganization occurring over distances of 3-9 mm was evident, correlating with the new functional status of their separated digits. In contrast, no modification of the somatosensory map was observed months following transfer of a neurovascular skin island flap for sensory reconstruction of the thumb in two subjects in whom sensory transfer failed to occur. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8386377

  1. Bacteriology of moderate (chronic) periodontitis in mature adult humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Cato, E P; Smibert, R M; Burmeister, J A; Ranney, R R

    1983-01-01

    A total of 171 taxa was represented among 1,900 bacterial isolates from 60 samples of sites affected with moderate periodontitis in 22 mature adult humans. The composition of the subgingival sulcus flora was statistically significantly different from that of the adjacent supragingival flora and the subgingival flora of 14 people with healthy gingiva, but was not significantly different from that of sulci affected with severe periodontitis in 21 young human adults. The sulcus floras of moderate periodontitis and severe periodontitis shared many of their predominant bacterial species, but there were differences in the relative proportions of some of these species. Similar relationships were found for seven taxa of treponemes that were cultured from the samples. PMID:6642641

  2. Lymphatic Stomata in the Adult Human Pulmonary Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Masahiro; Iobe, Hiroaki; Kudo, Tomoo; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Okudela, Koji; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Yoshida, Maki; Nagao, Toshitaka; Nakaya, Takeo; Kurata, Atsushi; Ohtani, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymphatic stomata are small lymphatic openings in the serosal membrane that communicate with the serosal cavity. Although these stomata have primarily been studied in experimental mammals, little is known concerning the presence and properties of lymphatic stomata in the adult human pleura. Thus, adult human pleurae were examined for the presence or absence of lymphatic stomata. Methods and Results: A total of 26 pulmonary ligaments (13 left and 13 right) were obtained from 15 adult human autopsy cases and examined using electron and light microscopy. The microscopic studies revealed the presence of apertures fringed with D2-40-positive, CD31-positive, and cytokeratin-negative endothelial cells directly communicating with submesothelial lymphatics in all of the pulmonary ligaments. The apertures' sizes and densities varied from case to case according to the serial tissue section. The medians of these aperture sizes ranged from 2.25 to 8.75 μm in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2.50 to 12.50 μm in the right pulmonary ligaments. The densities of the apertures ranged from 2 to 9 per mm2 in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2 to 18 per mm2 in the right pulmonary ligaments. However, no significant differences were found regarding the aperture size (p=0.359) and density (p=0.438) between the left and the right pulmonary ligaments. Conclusions: Our study revealed that apertures exhibit structural adequacy as lymphatic stomata on the surface of the pulmonary ligament, thereby providing evidence that lymphatic stomata are present in the adult human pleura. PMID:25526320

  3. Doublecortin expression in the normal and epileptic adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y W J; Curtis, M A; Gibbons, H M; Mee, E W; Bergin, P S; Teoh, H H; Connor, B; Dragunow, M; Faull, R L M

    2008-12-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a neurological disorder associated with spontaneous recurrent complex partial seizures and hippocampal sclerosis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported in animal models of MTLE, increased neurogenesis has not been reported in the hippocampus of adult human MTLE cases. Here we showed that cells expressing doublecortin (Dcx), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in migrating neuroblasts, were present in the hippocampus and temporal cortex of the normal and MTLE adult human brain. In particular, increased numbers of Dcx-positive cells were observed in the epileptic compared with the normal temporal cortex. Importantly, 56% of Dcx-expressing cells in the epileptic temporal cortex coexpressed both the proliferative cell marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and early neuronal marker, TuJ1, suggesting that they may be newly generated neurons. A subpopulation of Dcx-positive cells in the epileptic temporal cortex also coexpressed the mature neuronal marker, NeuN, suggesting that epilepsy may promote the generation of new neurons in the temporal cortex. This study has identified, for the first time, a novel population of Dcx-positive cells in the adult human temporal cortex that can be upregulated by epilepsy and thus, raises the possibility that these cells may have functional significance in the pathophysiology of epilepsy.

  4. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  5. Mouse xenograft modeling of human adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia provides mechanistic insights into adult LIC biology

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Aditi; Castleton, Anna Z.; Schwab, Claire; Samuel, Edward; Sivakumaran, Janani; Beaton, Brendan; Zareian, Nahid; Zhang, Christie Yu; Rai, Lena; Enver, Tariq; Moorman, Anthony V.; Fielding, Adele K.

    2014-01-01

    The distinct nature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults, evidenced by inferior treatment outcome and different genetic landscape, mandates specific studies of disease-initiating mechanisms. In this study, we used NOD/LtSz-scid IL2Rγ nullc (NSG) mouse xenotransplantation approaches to elucidate leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) biology in primary adult precursor B (pre-B) ALL to optimize disease modeling. In contrast with xenografting studies of pediatric ALL, we found that modification of the NSG host environment using preconditioning total body irradiation (TBI) was indispensable for efficient engraftment of adult non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL, whereas t(4;11) pre-B ALL was successfully reconstituted without this adaptation. Furthermore, TBI-based xenotransplantation of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL enabled detection of a high frequency of LICs (<1:6900) and permitted frank leukemic engraftment from a remission sample containing drug-resistant minimal residual disease. Investigation of TBI-sensitive stromal-derived factor-1/chemokine receptor type 4 signaling revealed greater functional dependence of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL on this niche-based interaction, providing a possible basis for the differential engraftment behavior. Thus, our studies establish the optimal conditions for experimental modeling of human adult pre-B ALL and demonstrate the critical protumorogenic role of microenvironment-derived SDF-1 in regulating adult pre-B LIC activity that may present a therapeutic opportunity. PMID:24825861

  6. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Intra-articular injection of collagenase in the knee of rats as an alternative model to study nociception associated with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Animal models currently used in osteoarthritis-associated pain research inadequately reproduce the initiating events and structural pathology of human osteoarthritis. Conversely, intra-articular injection of collagenase is a structurally relevant model, as it induces articular degeneration both by digesting collagen from cartilage and by causing articular instability, thereby reproducing some of the main events associated with osteoarthritis onset and development. Here, we evaluated if the intra-articular injection of collagenase can be an alternative model to study nociception associated with osteoarthritis. Methods Osteoarthritis was induced by two intra-articular injections of either 250 U or 500 U of collagenase into the left knee joint of adult male Wistar rats. A six weeks time-course assessment of movement- and loading-induced nociception was performed by the Knee-Bend and CatWalk tests. The effect of morphine, lidocaine and diclofenac on nociceptive behaviour was evaluated in animals injected with 500 U of collagenase. Joint histopathology was scored for both doses throughout time. The expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was evaluated. Results An increase in nociceptive behaviour associated with movement and loading of affected joints was observed after intra-articular collagenase injection. With the 500 U dose of collagenase, there was a significant correlation between the behavioural and the histopathological osteoarthritis-like structural changes developed after six weeks. One week after injection of 500 U collagenase, swelling of the injected knee and inflammation of the synovial membrane were also observed, indicating the occurrence of an early inflammatory reaction. Behavioural changes induced by the 500 U dose of collagenase were overall effectively reversed by morphine and lidocaine. Diclofenac was effective one week after injection. TRPV1 expression increased six weeks

  8. Intra-articular injection of collagenase in the knee of rats as an alternative model to study nociception associated with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Adães, Sara; Mendonça, Marcelo; Santos, Telmo N; Castro-Lopes, José M; Ferreira-Gomes, Joana; Neto, Fani L

    2014-01-15

    Animal models currently used in osteoarthritis-associated pain research inadequately reproduce the initiating events and structural pathology of human osteoarthritis. Conversely, intra-articular injection of collagenase is a structurally relevant model, as it induces articular degeneration both by digesting collagen from cartilage and by causing articular instability, thereby reproducing some of the main events associated with osteoarthritis onset and development. Here, we evaluated if the intra-articular injection of collagenase can be an alternative model to study nociception associated with osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis was induced by two intra-articular injections of either 250 U or 500 U of collagenase into the left knee joint of adult male Wistar rats. A six weeks time-course assessment of movement- and loading-induced nociception was performed by the Knee-Bend and CatWalk tests. The effect of morphine, lidocaine and diclofenac on nociceptive behaviour was evaluated in animals injected with 500 U of collagenase. Joint histopathology was scored for both doses throughout time. The expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was evaluated. An increase in nociceptive behaviour associated with movement and loading of affected joints was observed after intra-articular collagenase injection. With the 500 U dose of collagenase, there was a significant correlation between the behavioural and the histopathological osteoarthritis-like structural changes developed after six weeks. One week after injection of 500 U collagenase, swelling of the injected knee and inflammation of the synovial membrane were also observed, indicating the occurrence of an early inflammatory reaction. Behavioural changes induced by the 500 U dose of collagenase were overall effectively reversed by morphine and lidocaine. Diclofenac was effective one week after injection. TRPV1 expression increased six weeks after 500 U collagenase

  9. Expansion of human articular chondrocytes and formation of tissue-engineered cartilage: a step towards exploring a potential use of matrix-induced cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Munirah, S; Samsudin, O C; Aminuddin, B S; Ruszymah, B H I

    2010-10-01

    Monolayer culture expansion remains as a fundamental step to acquire sufficient number of cells for 3D constructs formation. It has been well-documented that cell expansion is however accompanied by cellular dedifferentiation. In order to promote cell growth and circumvent cellular dedifferentiation, we evaluated the effects of Transforming Growth Factor Beta-2 (TGF-β2), Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) combination on articular chondrocytes culture and 'chondrocytes-fibrin' construct formation. Chondrocytes were serially cultured in: (1) F12:DMEM+10% Foetal Bovine Serum (FBS) with growth factors (FD10GFs), (2) F12:DMEM+2%FBS with the growth factors (FD2GFs) and, (3) F12:DMEM+10%FBS without growth factors (FD) as control. Cultured chondrocytes were evaluated by means of growth kinetics parameters, cell cycle analysis, quantitative phenotypic expression of collagen type II, aggrecan core protein sox-9 and collagen type I and, immunochemistry technique. Harvested chondrocytes were incorporated with plasma-derived fibrin and were polymerized to form the 3D constructs and implanted subcutaneously at the dorsum of athymic nude mice for eight (8) weeks. Resulted constructs were assigned for gross inspections and microscopic evaluation using standard histochemicals staining, immunochemistry technique and, quantitative phenotypic expression of cartilage markers to reassure cartilaginous tissue formation. Growth kinetics performance of chondrocytes cultured in three (3) types of culture media from the most to least was in the following order: FD10GFs>FD2GFs>FD. Following growth kinetics analysis, we decided to use FD10GFs and FD (control) for further evaluation and 'chondrocytes-fibrin' constructs formation. Chondrocytes cultured in FD10GFs preserved the normal diploid state (2c) with no evidence of aneuploidy, haploidy or tetraploidy. Expression of cartilage-specific markers namely collagen type II, aggrecan core protein and

  10. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  11. Calicivirus infection in human immunodeficiency virus seropositive children and adults.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Guillén, L; Vizzi, E; Alcalá, A C; Pujol, F H; Liprandi, F; Ludert, J E

    2005-06-01

    The importance of enteric viral infections in HIV-related diarrhea is uncertain. Human caliciviruses have emerged as a leading cause of acute diarrhea worldwide. To evaluate the importance of calicivirus infections in HIV-related diarrhea. Study design 151 fecal samples collected from children and adults infected with HIV, with and without diarrhea, were examined. In addition, 89 fecal samples from non HIV-infected children and adults were also tested. Samples were analyzed by RT-PCR using primer sets specific to Norovirus genogroup I or genogroup II as well as primers designed to react with both Noroviruses and Sapovirus genus. Viruses were detected with equal frequencies in stools from HIV infected and non-infected adults (12%). However, specimens from HIV infected children were more likely than those of HIV-negative children to have caliciviruses (51% versus 24%, P<0.05). Viral infections were not significantly associated with diarrhea neither in children nor in adults, regardless of HIV status. Viruses genetically related to the common Lordsdale virus (Norovirus genogroup II) and London/92 virus (Sapovirus) clusters were detected circulating among children. These results suggest that caliciviruses may be an important opportunistic pathogen in children infected with HIV.

  12. Covert spatial attention is functionally intact in amblyopic human adults

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mariel; Cymerman, Rachel; Smith, R. Theodore; Kiorpes, Lynne; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Certain abnormalities in behavioral performance and neural signaling have been attributed to a deficit of visual attention in amblyopia, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a diverse array of visual deficits following abnormal binocular childhood experience. Critically, most have inferred attention's role in their task without explicitly manipulating and measuring its effects against a baseline condition. Here, we directly investigate whether human amblyopic adults benefit from covert spatial attention—the selective processing of visual information in the absence of eye movements—to the same degree as neurotypical observers. We manipulated both involuntary (Experiment 1) and voluntary (Experiment 2) attention during an orientation discrimination task for which the effects of covert spatial attention have been well established in neurotypical and special populations. In both experiments, attention significantly improved accuracy and decreased reaction times to a similar extent (a) between the eyes of the amblyopic adults and (b) between the amblyopes and their age- and gender-matched controls. Moreover, deployment of voluntary attention away from the target location significantly impaired task performance (Experiment 2). The magnitudes of the involuntary and voluntary attention benefits did not correlate with amblyopic depth or severity. Both groups of observers showed canonical performance fields (better performance along the horizontal than vertical meridian and at the lower than upper vertical meridian) and similar effects of attention across locations. Despite their characteristic low-level vision impairments, covert spatial attention remains functionally intact in human amblyopic adults. PMID:28033433

  13. Covert spatial attention is functionally intact in amblyopic human adults.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Mariel; Cymerman, Rachel; Smith, R Theodore; Kiorpes, Lynne; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-12-01

    Certain abnormalities in behavioral performance and neural signaling have been attributed to a deficit of visual attention in amblyopia, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a diverse array of visual deficits following abnormal binocular childhood experience. Critically, most have inferred attention's role in their task without explicitly manipulating and measuring its effects against a baseline condition. Here, we directly investigate whether human amblyopic adults benefit from covert spatial attention-the selective processing of visual information in the absence of eye movements-to the same degree as neurotypical observers. We manipulated both involuntary (Experiment 1) and voluntary (Experiment 2) attention during an orientation discrimination task for which the effects of covert spatial attention have been well established in neurotypical and special populations. In both experiments, attention significantly improved accuracy and decreased reaction times to a similar extent (a) between the eyes of the amblyopic adults and (b) between the amblyopes and their age- and gender-matched controls. Moreover, deployment of voluntary attention away from the target location significantly impaired task performance (Experiment 2). The magnitudes of the involuntary and voluntary attention benefits did not correlate with amblyopic depth or severity. Both groups of observers showed canonical performance fields (better performance along the horizontal than vertical meridian and at the lower than upper vertical meridian) and similar effects of attention across locations. Despite their characteristic low-level vision impairments, covert spatial attention remains functionally intact in human amblyopic adults.

  14. The nutrition intervention improved adult human capital and economic productivity.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Reynaldo; Melgar, Paul; Maluccio, John A; Stein, Aryeh D; Rivera, Juan A

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews key findings about the long-term impact of a nutrition intervention carried out by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama from 1969 to 1977. Results from follow-up studies in 1988-89 and 2002-04 show substantial impact on adult human capital and economic productivity. The 1988-89 study showed that adult body size and work capacity increased for those provided improved nutrition through age 3 y, whereas the 2002-04 follow-up showed that schooling was increased for women and reading comprehension and intelligence increased in both men and women. Participants were 26-42 y of age at the time of the 2002-04 follow-up, facilitating the assessment of economic productivity. Wages of men increased by 46% in those provided with improved nutrition through age 2 y. Findings for cardiovascular disease risk factors were heterogeneous; however, they suggest that improved nutrition in early life is unlikely to increase cardiovascular disease risk later in life and may indeed lower risk. In conclusion, the substantial improvement in adult human capital and economic productivity resulting from the nutrition intervention provides a powerful argument for promoting improvements in nutrition in pregnant women and young children.

  15. [Intra-articular injection of cortisone].

    PubMed

    Hammer, M; Schwarz, T; Ganser, G

    2015-11-01

    Intra-articular injections with glucocorticoids are standard procedures according to therapy guidelines in many rheumatic conditions. There is increasing evidence from clinical trials on the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis that more patients will attain the target of remission using a combination of systemic medication and intra-articular injections with glucocorticoids compared to systemic medication alone. Intra-articular injections with glucocorticoids play an important role in the therapeutic management of pediatric rheumatic diseases. In many countries competency in performing intra-articular injections is among the important skills necessary for certification as a specialist in rheumatology.

  16. Maturational differences in superficial and deep zone articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Chisa; Cheng, Christina; Alexandre, Deborah; Bhargava, Madhu; Torzilli, Peter A

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether differences in chondrocytes from skeletally immature versus adult individuals are important in cartilage healing, repair, or tissue engineering, superficial zone chondrocytes (SZC, from within 100 microm of the articular surface) and deep zone chondrocytes (DZC, from 30%-45% of the deepest un-mineralized part of articular cartilage) were harvested from immature (1-4 months) and young adult (18-36 months) steers and compared. Cell size, matrix gene expression and protein levels, integrin levels, and chemotactic ability were measured in cells maintained in micromass culture for up to 7 days. Regardless of age, SZC were smaller, had a lower type II to type I collagen gene expression ratio, and higher gene expression of SZ proteins than their DZC counterparts. Regardless of zone, chondrocytes from immature steers had higher levels of Sox 9 and type II collagen gene expression. Over 7 days in culture, the SZC of immature steers had the highest rate of proliferation. Phenotypically, the SZC of immature and adult steers were more stable than their respective DZC. Cell surface alpha5 and alpha2 integrin subunit levels were higher in the SZC of immature than of adult steers, whereas beta1 integrin subunit levels were similar. Both immature and adult SZC were capable of chemotaxis in response to fetal bovine serum or basic fibroblast growth factor. Our data indicate that articular chondrocytes vary in the different zones of cartilage and with the age of the donor. These differences may be important for cartilage growth, tissue engineering, and/or repair.

  17. Human-Animal Interaction and Older Adults: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Gee, Nancy R; Mueller, Megan K; Curl, Angela L

    2017-01-01

    Both pet ownership and animal-assisted therapy are becoming increasingly popular in the United States, and the science of human-animal interaction (HAI) seeks to explore how these relationships with animals can impact health and well-being. In particular, one burgeoning area of research is the role of HAI in healthy aging, given the potential for HAI as an important feature of health and well-being in older adults. The purpose of this review is to summarize and evaluate existing research in this innovative area of scholarship, identifying the potential benefits and risks of both pet ownership and animals in therapeutic settings for older adults. We will also identify recommendations for future research and applications in this developing area of scholarship.

  18. Inter- and intra-specific scaling of articular surface areas in the hominoid talus

    PubMed Central

    Parr, William C H; Chatterjee, Helen J; Soligo, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The morphology of postcranial articular surfaces is expected to reflect their weight-bearing properties, as well as the stability and mobility of the articulations to which they contribute. Previous studies have mainly confirmed earlier predictions of isometric scaling between articular surface areas and body mass; the exception to this is ‘male-type’, convex articular surface areas, which may scale allometrically due to differences in locomotor strategies within the analysed samples. In the present study, we used new surface scanning technology to quantify more accurately articular surface areas and to test those predictions within the talus of hominoid primates, including modern humans. Our results, contrary to predictions, suggest that there are no generalised rules of articular scaling within the talus of hominoids. Instead, we suggest that articular scaling patterns are highly context-specific, depending on the role of each articulation during locomotion, as well as taxon- and sex-specific differences in locomotion and ontogenetic growth trajectories within any given sample. While this may prove problematic for inferring body mass based on articular surface area, it also offers new opportunities of gaining substantial insights into the locomotor patterns of extinct species. PMID:21323919

  19. CCM2 expression during prenatal development and adult human neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tanriover, Gamze; Sozen, Berna; Gunel, Murat; Demir, Necdet

    2011-08-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is one of the most common types of vascular malformations of the central nervous system, affecting nearly one in 200 people. CCM lesions are characterized by grossly dilated vascular channels lined by a single layer of endothelium. Genetic linkage analyses have mapped three CCM loci to CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3. All three causative genes have now been identified allowing new insights into CCM pathophysiology. We focused on the CCM2 protein that might take place in blood vessel formation; we report here the expression patterns of CCM2 in prenatal development and adult human neocortex by means of immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. CCM2 was obviously detected in vascular endothelium and neuroglial precursor cells during development and also observed in arterial endothelium, neurons, some of the glial cells in adult neocortex. The expression patterns suggest that it could be one of the arterial markers whether this is a cause or a consequence of an altered vascular identity. CCM2 might play a role during vasculogenesis and angiogenesis during human brain development. Furthermore, with this study, CCM2 have been described for the first time in developing human neocortex.

  20. Molecular basis of lactase levels in adult humans.

    PubMed Central

    Escher, J C; de Koning, N D; van Engen, C G; Arora, S; Büller, H A; Montgomery, R K; Grand, R J

    1992-01-01

    The molecular basis of adult human "lactase deficiency" has long been a subject of controversy. To address this issue, small intestinal biopsies from orienta, black, and white patients were analyzed. Adjacent samples were assayed for lactase and sucrase specific activities and the sucrase/lactase ratio (high ratio signifies lactase deficiency), and the results were compared to lactase steady-state mRNA levels detected in Northern blots probed with a human lactase mDNA. All oriental patients had high ratios and no detectable lactase mRNA. Four black patients had a similar pattern; two with low ratios had detectable mRNA. The group of white patients displayed a range of findings, from high ratio/no mRNA to low ratio/considerable mRNA. Elevated levels of lactase mRNA always correlated with the presence of elevated levels of lactase enzyme activity, suggesting that the difference in levels of adult human intestinal lactase activity among racial groups may be regulated at the level of gene transcription. Images PMID:1737837

  1. The relationship between the temporomandibular joint capsule, articular disc and jaw muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Schmolke, C

    1994-01-01

    The anatomy of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its possible relationships to other structures near the joint are not fully understood. A 3-dimensional analysis based on sagittal, frontal and horizontal serial sections through the human temporomandibular joint region was therefore undertaken. Capsular elements which directly connect the temporal bone with the mandible were seen only on the lateral side of the joint. In the posterior, anterior and medial regions of the joint the upper and lower laminae of the articular disc are attached separately either to the temporal bone or to the mandibular condyle. The shaping of the articular cavities and the texture of the joint capsule permit movements of the articular disc predominantly in the anteromedial direction. On the entire medial side of the joint the articular disc and its capsular attachments are in close contact with the fascia of the lateral pterygoid muscle whereby a small portion of the upper head of this muscle inserts directly into the anteromedial part of the articular disc. Thus both the upper and the lower heads of the lateral pterygoid muscle are likely to influence the position of the articular disc directly during temporomandibular joint movements. Laterally, the articular disc is attached to the fascia of the masseter muscle, and part of the lateral ligament inserts into the temporalis fascia. Since these attachments are relatively weak, neither the temporalis nor the masseter muscles are considered to act directly on the articular disc; instead, via afferents from muscle spindles, they may take part in signalling the position of the temporomandibular joint components, including that of the articular disc. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8014124

  2. Eye contact elicits bodily self-awareness in human adults.

    PubMed

    Baltazar, Matias; Hazem, Nesrine; Vilarem, Emma; Beaucousin, Virginie; Picq, Jean-Luc; Conty, Laurence

    2014-10-01

    Eye contact is a typical human behaviour known to impact concurrent or subsequent cognitive processing. In particular, it has been suggested that eye contact induces self-awareness, though this has never been formally proven. Here, we show that the perception of a face with a direct gaze (that establishes eye contact), as compared to either a face with averted gaze or a mere fixation cross, led adult participants to rate more accurately the intensity of their physiological reactions induced by emotional pictures. Our data support the view that bodily self-awareness becomes more acute when one is subjected to another's gaze. Importantly, this effect was not related to a particular arousal state induced by eye contact perception. Rejecting the arousal hypothesis, we suggest that eye contact elicits a self-awareness process by enhancing self-focused attention in humans. We further discuss the implications of this proposal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness ( r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores ( r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness.

  4. Human Handling Promotes Compliant Behavior in Adult Laboratory Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Swennes, Alton G; Alworth, Leanne C; Harvey, Stephen B; Jones, Carolyn A; King, Christopher S; Crowell-Davis, Sharon L

    2011-01-01

    Routine laboratory procedures can be stressful for laboratory animals. We wanted to determine whether human handling of adult rabbits could induce a degree of habituation, reducing stress and facilitating research-related manipulation. To this end, adult New Zealand white rabbits were handled either frequently or minimally. After being handled over 3 wk, these rabbits were evaluated by novel personnel and compared with minimally handled controls. Evaluators subjectively scored the rabbits for their relative compliance or resistance to being scruffed and removed from their cages, being transported to a treatment room, and their behavior at all stages of the exercise. Upon evaluation, handled rabbits scored significantly more compliant than nontreated controls. During evaluation, behaviors that the rabbits displayed when they were approached in their cages and while being handled outside their cages were recorded and compared between study groups. Handled rabbits displayed behavior consistent with a reduction in human-directed fear. This study illustrates the potential for handling to improve compliance in laboratory procedures and reduce fear-related behavior in laboratory rabbits. Such handling could be used to improve rabbit welfare through the reduction of stress and exposure to novel stimuli. PMID:21333162

  5. Human handling promotes compliant behavior in adult laboratory rabbits.

    PubMed

    Swennes, Alton G; Alworth, Leanne C; Harvey, Stephen B; Jones, Carolyn A; King, Christopher S; Crowell-Davis, Sharon L

    2011-01-01

    Routine laboratory procedures can be stressful for laboratory animals. We wanted to determine whether human handling of adult rabbits could induce a degree of habituation, reducing stress and facilitating research-related manipulation. To this end, adult New Zealand white rabbits were handled either frequently or minimally. After being handled over 3 wk, these rabbits were evaluated by novel personnel and compared with minimally handled controls. Evaluators subjectively scored the rabbits for their relative compliance or resistance to being scruffed and removed from their cages, being transported to a treatment room, and their behavior at all stages of the exercise. Upon evaluation, handled rabbits scored significantly more compliant than nontreated controls. During evaluation, behaviors that the rabbits displayed when they were approached in their cages and while being handled outside their cages were recorded and compared between study groups. Handled rabbits displayed behavior consistent with a reduction in human-directed fear. This study illustrates the potential for handling to improve compliance in laboratory procedures and reduce fear-related behavior in laboratory rabbits. Such handling could be used to improve rabbit welfare through the reduction of stress and exposure to novel stimuli.

  6. Laminin chains in developing and adult human myotendinous junctions.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa-Domellöf, F; Tiger, C F; Virtanen, I; Thornell, L E; Gullberg, D

    2000-02-01

    In addition to being the specialized site for transmission of force from the muscle to the tendon, the myotendinous junction (MTJ) also plays an important role in muscle splitting during morphogenesis. An early event in the formation of the MTJ is a regional deposition of basement membranes. We used immunocytochemistry to investigate the distribution of laminin chains during the development of MTJs in human limb muscle at 8-22 weeks of gestation (wg) and in adult MTJs. We used polyclonal antibodies and a new monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the human laminin alpha1 G4/G5 domains. At 8-10 wg, laminin alpha1 and laminin alpha5 chains were specifically localized to the MTJ. Laminin alpha1 chain remained restricted to the MTJ at 22 wg as the laminin beta2 chain had appeared, whereas the laminin alpha5 chain became deposited along the entire length of the myotubes from 12 wg. In the adult MTJ, only vestigial amounts of laminin alpha1 and laminin alpha5 chains could be detected. On the basis of co-distribution data, we speculate that laminin alpha1 chain in the forming MTJ undergoes an isoform switch from laminin 1 to laminin 3. Our data indicate a potentially important role for laminin alpha1 chain in skeletal muscle formation. (J Histochem Cytochem 48:201-209, 2000)

  7. Doublecortin is expressed in articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Ryan, James A; Di Cesare, Paul E; Liu, Judy; Walsh, Christopher A; You, Zongbing

    2007-11-23

    Articular cartilage and cartilage in the embryonic cartilaginous anlagen and growth plates are both hyaline cartilages. In this study, we found that doublecortin (DCX) was expressed in articular chondrocytes but not in chondrocytes from the cartilaginous anlagen or growth plates. DCX was expressed by the cells in the chondrogenous layers but not intermediate layer of joint interzone. Furthermore, the synovium and cruciate ligaments were DCX-negative. DCX-positive chondrocytes were very rare in tissue engineered cartilage derived from in vitro pellet culture of rat chondrosarcoma, ATDC5, and C3H10T1/2 cells. However, the new hyaline cartilage formed in rabbit knee defect contained mostly DCX-positive chondrocytes. Our results demonstrate that DCX can be used as a marker to distinguish articular chondrocytes from other chondrocytes and to evaluate the quality of tissue engineered or regenerated cartilage in terms of their "articular" or "non-articular" nature.

  8. Comprehensive comparison of neonate and adult human platelet transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Caparrós-Pérez, Eva; López-Andreo, Mª José; Llanos, Mª Carmen; Rivera, José; Palma-Barqueros, Verónica; Blanco, Jose E.; Vicente, Vicente; Martínez, Constantino; Ferrer-Marín, Francisca

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of the well-substantiated platelet hyporeactivity in neonates is of interest given their implications for the clinical management of newborns, a population at higher bleeding risk than adults (especially sick and preterm infants), as well as for gaining insight into the regulatory mechanisms of platelet biology. Transcriptome analysis is useful in identifying mRNA signatures affecting platelet function. However, human fetal/neonatal platelet transcriptome analysis has never before been reported. We have used mRNA expression array for the first time to compare platelet transcriptome changes during development. Microarray analysis was performed in pure platelet RNA obtained from adult and cord blood, using the same platform in two independent laboratories. A high correlation was obtained between array results for both adult and neonate platelet samples. There was also good agreement between results in our adult samples and outcomes previously reported in three different studies. Gene enrichment analysis showed that immunity- and platelet function-related genes are highly expressed at both developmental stages. Remarkably, 201 genes were found to be differentially expressed throughout development. In particular, neonatal platelets contain higher levels of mRNA that are associated with protein synthesis and processing, while carrying significantly lower levels of genes involved in calcium transport/metabolism and cell signaling (including GNAZ). Overall, our results point to variations in platelet transcriptome as possibly underlining the hypo-functional phenotype of neonatal platelets and provide further support for the role of platelets in cellular immune response. Better characterization of the platelet transcriptome throughout development can contribute to elucidate how transcriptome changes impact different pathological conditions. PMID:28813466

  9. Functional anatomy of the equine temporomandibular joint: Collagen fiber texture of the articular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Adams, K; Schulz-Kornas, E; Arzi, B; Failing, K; Vogelsberg, J; Staszyk, C

    2016-11-01

    In the last decade, the equine masticatory apparatus has received much attention. Numerous studies have emphasized the importance of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the functional process of mastication. However, ultrastructural and histological data providing a basis for biomechanical and histopathological considerations are not available. The aim of the present study was to analyze the architecture of the collagen fiber apparatus in the articular surfaces of the equine TMJ to reveal typical morphological features indicating biomechanical adaptions. Therefore, the collagen fiber alignment was visualized using the split-line technique in 16 adult warmblood horses without any history of TMJ disorders. Within the central two-thirds of the articular surfaces of the articular tubercle, the articular disc and the mandibular head, split-lines ran in a correspondent rostrocaudal direction. In the lateral and medial aspects of these articular surfaces, the split-line pattern varied, displaying curved arrangements in the articular disc and punctual split-lines in the bony components. Mediolateral orientated split-lines were found in the rostral and caudal border of the articular disc and in the mandibular fossa. The complex movements during the equine chewing cycle are likely assigned to different areas of the TMJ. The split-line pattern of the equine TMJ is indicative of a relative movement of the joint components in a preferential rostrocaudal direction which is consigned to the central aspects of the TMJ. The lateral and medial aspects of the articular surfaces provide split-line patterns that indicate movements particularly around a dorsoventral axis.

  10. Distribution of Tight Junction Proteins in Adult Human Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Ola M.; Kim, Jung-Wan Martin; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A.; Baum, Bruce J.; Tran, Simon D.

    2008-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are an essential structure of fluid-secreting cells, such as those in salivary glands. Three major families of integral membrane proteins have been identified as components of the TJ: claudins, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs), plus the cytosolic protein zonula occludens (ZO). We have been working to develop an orally implantable artificial salivary gland that would be suitable for treating patients lacking salivary parenchymal tissue. To date, little is known about the distribution of TJ proteins in adult human salivary cells and thus what key molecular components might be desirable for the cellular component of an artificial salivary gland device. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of TJ proteins in human salivary glands. Salivary gland samples were obtained from 10 patients. Frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained using IHC methods. Claudin-1 was expressed in ductal, endothelial, and ∼25% of serous cells. Claudins-2, -3, and -4 and JAM-A were expressed in both ductal and acinar cells, whereas claudin-5 was expressed only in endothelial cells. Occludin and ZO-1 were expressed in acinar, ductal, and endothelial cells. These results provide new information on TJ proteins in two major human salivary glands and should serve as a reference for future studies to assess the presence of appropriate TJ proteins in a tissue-engineered human salivary gland. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:1093–1098, 2008) PMID:18765838

  11. The effect of joint position on juxta-articular bone marrow pressure. Relation to intra-articular pressure and joint effusion--an experimental study on horses.

    PubMed

    Arnoldi, C C; Reimann, I; Mortensen, S; Christensen, S B; Kristoffersen, J; Sønnichsen, H V; Smith, M

    1980-12-01

    Six metacarpo-phalangeal joints of adult horses were studied. Pressure measurements were made in the joint and the metacarpal bone with simultaneous measurement of the systemic arterial blood pressure. Investigations performed to study the effect of joint position on juxta-articular bone marrow pressure showed that an increase in joint flexion was always followed by a rise in intraosseous pressure with a significant increase at flexion above 60 degrees. Increase in intra-articular pressure which was achieved by injection of saline was always followed by a slower rise in intraosseous pressure. Furthermore, it was shown that even a few millilitres of saline in the joint caused a rise in intra-articular pressure. The findings indicate that changes in joint position as well as effusion may block the drainage vessels from the bone marrow as they pass through the joint.

  12. Transplantation of free tibial periosteal grafts for the repair of articular cartilage defect: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravijot; Chauhan, Vijendra; Chauhan, Neena; Sharma, Sansar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Articular chondrocytes have got a long lifespan but rarely divides after maturity. Thus, an articular cartilage has a limited capacity for repair. Periosteal grafts have chondrogenic potential and have been used to repair defects in the articular cartilage. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the differentiation of free periosteal grafts in the patellofemoral joint where the cambium layer faces the subchondral bone and to investigate the applicability of periosteal grafts in the reconstruction of articular surfaces. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out over a period of 1 year on 25 adult, male Indian rabbits after obtaining permission from the institutional animal ethical committee. A full-thickness osteochondral defect was created by shaving off the whole articular cartilage of the patella of the left knee. The defect thus created was grafted with free periosteal graft. The patella of the right knee was taken as a control where no grafting was done after shaving off the articular cartilage. The first animal was used to study the normal histology of the patellar articular cartilage and periosteum obtained from the medial surface of tibial condyle. Rest 24 animals were subjected to patellectomy, 4 each at serial intervals of 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 48 weeks and the patellar articular surfaces were examined macroscopically and histologically. Results: The grafts got adherent to the underlying patellar articular surface at the end of 4 weeks. Microscopically, graft incorporation could be appreciated at 4 weeks. Mesenchymal cells of the cambium layer were seen differentiating into chondrocytes by the end of 4 weeks in four grafts (100%) and they were arranged in a haphazard manner. Till the end of 8 weeks, the cellular arrangement was mostly wooly. At 16 weeks, one graft (25%) had wooly arrangement of chondrocytes and three grafts (75%) had columnar formation of cells. Same percentage was maintained at 32 weeks. Four grafts (100%) at

  13. PGE2 signal through EP2 promotes the growth of articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Tomoki; Liang, Bojian; Okamoto, Takeshi; Matsusaki, Takashi; Nishijo, Koichi; Ishibe, Tatsuya; Yasura, Ko; Nagayama, Satoshi; Nakayama, Tomitaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Toguchida, Junya

    2005-03-01

    EP2 was identified as the major PGE2 receptor expressed in articular cartilage. An EP2 agonist increased intracellular cAMP in articular chondrocytes, stimulating DNA synthesis in both monolayer and 3D cultures. Hence, the EP2 agonist may be a potent therapeutic agent for degenerative cartilage diseases. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) exhibits pleiotropic effects in various types of tissue through four types of receptors, EP1-4. We examined the expression of EPs and effects of agonists for each EP on articular chondrocytes. The expression of each EP in articular chondrocytes was examined by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. A chondrocyte cell line, MMA2, was established from articular cartilage of p53(-/-) mice and used to analyze the effects of agonists for each EP. A search for molecules downstream of the PGE2 signal through the EP2 agonist was made by cDNA microarray analysis. The growth-promoting effect of the EP2 agonist on chondrocytes surrounded by cartilage matrix was examined in an organ culture of rat femora. EP2 was identified as the major EP expressed in articular cartilage. Treatment of MMA2 cells with specific agonists for each EP showed that only the EP2 agonist significantly increased intracellular cAMP levels in a dose-dependent manner. Gene expression profiling of MMA2 revealed a set of genes upregulated by the EP2 agonist, including several growth-promoting and apoptosis-protecting genes such as the cyclin D1, fibronectin, integrin alpha5, AP2alpha, and 14-3-3gamma genes. The upregulation of these genes by the EP2 agonist was confirmed in human articular chondrocytes by quantitative mRNA analysis. On treatment with the EP2 agonist, human articular chondrocytes showed an increase in the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuracil (BrdU), and the organ culture of rat femora showed an increase of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining in articular chondrocytes surrounded by cartilage matrix, suggesting growth-promoting effects of the PGE2 signal

  14. Neuropeptide Y in the adult and fetal human pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Badiu, Corin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we show by use of immunohistochemistry that neuropeptide Y is present in nerve fibers of the adult human pineal gland. The fibers are classical neuropeptidergic fibers endowed with large boutons en passage and primarily located in a perifollicular position with some fibers entering the pineal parenchyma inside the follicle. The distance from the immunoreactive terminals to the pinealocytes indicates a modulatory function of neuropeptide Y for pineal physiology. Some of the immunoreactive fibers might originate from neurons located in the brain and be a part of the central innervation of the pineal gland. In a series of human fetuses, neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers was present and could be detected as early as in the pineal of four- to five-month-old fetuses. This early innervation of the human pineal is different from most rodents, where the innervation starts postnatally.

  15. Extra-articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Tanasescu, R

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main characteristic is persistent joint inflammation that results in joint damage and loss of function. Although RA is more common in females, extra-articular manifestations of the disease are more common in males. The extra-articular manifestations of RA can occur at any age after onset. It is characterised by destructive polyarthritis and extra-articular organ involvement, including the skin, eye, heart, lung, renal, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. The frequence of extra-articular manifestations in RA differs from one country to another. Extra-articular organ involvement in RA is more frequently seen in patients with severe, active disease and is associated with increased mortality. Incidence and frequence figures for extra-articular RA vary according to study design. Extra-articular involvement is more likely in those who have RF and/or are HLA-DR4 positive. Occasionally, there are also systemic manifestations such as vasculitis, visceral nodules, Sjögren's syndrome, or pulmonary fibrosis present. Nodules are the most common extra-articular feature, and are present in up to 30%; many of the other classic features occur in 1% or less in normal clinic settings. Sjögren's syndrome, anaemia of chronic disease and pulmonary manifestations are relatively common – in 6-10%, are frequently present in early disease and are all related to worse outcomes measures of rheumatoid disease in particular functional impairment and mortality. The occurrence of these systemic manifestations is a major predictor of mortality in patients with RA. This paper focuses on extra-articular manifestations, defined as diseases and symptoms not directly related to the locomotor system. PMID:21977172

  16. Synthesis of Tantalum Oxide Nanoparticles for Imaging Articular Cartilage Using X-Ray Computed Tomography: Visualization of Ex vivo/In vivo Murine Tibia and Ex vivo Human Index Finger Cartilage**

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Jonathan D.; Lusic, Hrvoje; Snyder, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) nanoparticles are used as X-ray contrast media for micro computed tomography (μCT) imaging of articular cartilage. The cationic nanoparticles are attracted to the anionic glycosaminoglycans in the cartilage tissue. PMID:24981730

  17. Investigation of regional influence of magic-angle effect on t2 in human articular cartilage with osteoarthritis at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ligong; Regatte, Ravinder R

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research study were to determine the magic-angle effect on different subregions of in vivo human femoral cartilage through the quantitative assessment of the effect of static magnetic field orientation (B0) on transverse (T2) relaxation time at 3.0 T. Healthy volunteers (n = 5; mean age, 36.4 years) and clinical patients (n = 5; mean age, 64 years) with early osteoarthritis (OA) were scanned at 3.0-T magnetic resonance using an 8-channel phased-array knee coil (transmit-receive). The T2 maps revealed significantly greater values in anterior than in posterior regions. When the cartilage regions were oriented at 55° to B0 (magic angle), the longest T2 values were detected in comparison with the neighboring regions oriented 90° and 180° (0°) to B0. The subregions oriented 180° (0°) to B0 showed the lowest T2 values. The differences in T2 values of different subregions suggest that magic-angle effect needs to be considered when interpreting cartilage abnormalities in OA patients. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of Regional Influence of Magic-Angle Effect on T2 in Human Articular Cartilage with Osteoarthritis at 3 T

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ligong; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives The objectives of this research study were to determine the magic-angle effect on different subregions of in vivo human femoral cartilage through the quantitative assessment of the effect of static magnetic field orientation (B0) on transverse (T2) relaxation time at 3.0 T. Materials and Methods Healthy volunteers (n = 5l; mean age, 36.4 years) and clinical patients (n = 5; mean age, 64 years) with early osteoarthritis (OA) were scanned at 3.0-T magnetic resonance using an 8-channel phased-array knee coil (transmit-receive). Results The T2 maps revealed significantly greater values in ventral than in dorsal regions. When the cartilage regions were oriented at 55° to B0 (magic angle), the longest T2 values were detected in comparison with the neighboring regions oriented 90° and 180° (0°) to B0. The subregions oriented 180° (0°) to B0 showed the lowest T2 values. Conclusions The differences in T2 values of different subregions suggest that magic-angle effect needs to be considered when interpreting cartilage abnormalities in OA patients. PMID:25481517

  19. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano

    2016-01-01

    Absract The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects. PMID:27847394

  20. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano; Alves da Silva, Ricardo Henrique

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects.

  1. Safety reporting on implantation of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells with platelet-rich plasma into human articular joints

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), a type of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have great potential as therapeutic agents in regenerative medicine. Numerous animal studies have documented the multipotency of ADSCs, showing their capabilities to differentiate into tissues such as muscle, bone, cartilage, and tendon. However, the safety of autologous ADSC injections into human joints is only beginning to be understood and the data are lacking. Methods Between 2009 and 2010, 91 patients were treated with autologous ADSCs with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for various orthopedic conditions. Stem cells in the form of stromal vascular fraction (SVF) were injected with PRP into various joints (n = 100). All patients were followed for symptom improvement with visual analog score (VAS) at one month and three months. Approximately one third of the patients were followed up with third month magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the injected sites. All patients were followed up by telephone questionnaires every six months for up to 30 months. Results The mean follow-up time for all patients was 26.62 ± 0.32 months. The follow-up time for patients who were treated in 2009 and early 2010 was close to three years. The relative mean VAS of patients at the end of one month follow-up was 6.55 ± 0.32, and at the end of three months follow-up was 4.43 ± 0.41. Post-procedure MRIs performed on one third of the patients at three months failed to demonstrate any tumor formation at the implant sites. Further, no tumor formation was reported in telephone long-term follow-ups. However, swelling of injected joints was common and was thought to be associated with death of stem cells. Also, tenosinovitis and tendonitis in elderly patients, all of which were either self-limited or were remedied with simple therapeutic measures, were common as well. Conclusions Using both MRI tracking and telephone follow ups in 100 joints in 91 patients treated, no neoplastic complications were

  2. Combined intra-articular and extra-articular reconstructions for anterior tibial subluxation.

    PubMed

    Zarins, B

    1985-04-01

    This article describes several procedures that combine intra-articular techniques with extra-articular techniques to stabilize the knee with anterior tibial subluxation. The procedures detailed are reconstruction using the semitendinosus tendon and the iliotibial tract; tenodesis using a strip of iliotibial tract combined with intra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with the central third of the patellar tendon; "mini-reconstruction"; and a procedure utilizing a vascularized patellar tendon graft plus "dynamic" augmentation.

  3. Ossified Ligamentum Longitudinale Anterius in Adult Human Dry Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Venumadhav, Nelluri; KS, Siddaraju

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ligamentum longitudinale anterius is a broad and strong band of fibrous tissue that runs along the anterior surfaces of the bodies of the vertebrae. Aim: The study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius in adult dry human vertebra. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 95 sets of dry human vertebral columns irrespective of age and sex at Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences- Barabanki,-UP, Melaka Manipal Medical College-Manipal University and Department of Anatomy, KMCT Medical College, Manassery- Calicut, India. All the sets of vertebral columns were macroscopically inspected for the ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius. Results: It was observed that out of 95 sets of vertebral columns, 27 (28.42%) vertebral columns showed ossification. Out of 27 vertebral columns, 17 (17.89%) vertebral columns showed segmental type of ossification, 2 (2.11%) vertebral columns showed continuous type of ossification and 8 (8.42%) vertebral columns showed mixed type of ossification at different vertebral level. Conclusion: Such type of ossification will affect the biomechanics of the spine and may result in stiff neck, low back pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, compression of the brachial plexus, aphonia, immobility or mucosal thickening of larynx. Hence, knowledge of such abnormalities should be kept in mind to minimise serious complications in any surgical intervention or investigative procedures in the region. PMID:25302180

  4. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    DOE PAGES

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection.more » Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.« less

  5. Comprehensive cellular-resolution atlas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Song-Lin; Royall, Joshua J; Sunkin, Susan M; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A C; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H Ronald; Hohmann, John G; Jones, Allan R; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Hof, Patrick R; Fischl, Bruce; Lein, Ed S

    2016-11-01

    Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole-brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high-resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large-format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto- and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127-3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.

  7. An anatomically comprehensive atlas of the adult human brain transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L.; Shen, Elaine H.; Ng, Lydia; Miller, Jeremy A.; van de Lagemaat, Louie N.; Smith, Kimberly A.; Ebbert, Amanda; Riley, Zackery L.; Abajian, Chris; Beckmann, Christian F.; Bernard, Amy; Bertagnolli, Darren; Boe, Andrew F.; Cartagena, Preston M.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chapin, Mike; Chong, Jimmy; Dalley, Rachel A.; David Daly, Barry; Dang, Chinh; Datta, Suvro; Dee, Nick; Dolbeare, Tim A.; Faber, Vance; Feng, David; Fowler, David R.; Goldy, Jeff; Gregor, Benjamin W.; Haradon, Zeb; Haynor, David R.; Hohmann, John G.; Horvath, Steve; Howard, Robert E.; Jeromin, Andreas; Jochim, Jayson M.; Kinnunen, Marty; Lau, Christopher; Lazarz, Evan T.; Lee, Changkyu; Lemon, Tracy A.; Li, Ling; Li, Yang; Morris, John A.; Overly, Caroline C.; Parker, Patrick D.; Parry, Sheana E.; Reding, Melissa; Royall, Joshua J.; Schulkin, Jay; Sequeira, Pedro Adolfo; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R.; Smith, Simon C.; Sodt, Andy J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Swanson, Beryl E.; Vawter, Marquis P.; Williams, Derric; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H. Ronald; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Hof, Patrick R.; Smith, Stephen M.; Koch, Christof; Grant, Seth G. N.; Jones, Allan R.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroanatomically precise, genome-wide maps of transcript distributions are critical resources to complement genomic sequence data and to correlate functional and genetic brain architecture. Here we describe the generation and analysis of a transcriptional atlas of the adult human brain, comprising extensive histological analysis and comprehensive microarray profiling of ~900 neuroanatomically precise subdivisions in two individuals. Transcriptional regulation varies enormously by anatomical location, with different regions and their constituent cell types displaying robust molecular signatures that are highly conserved between individuals. Analysis of differential gene expression and gene co-expression relationships demonstrates that brain-wide variation strongly reflects the distributions of major cell classes such as neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia. Local neighbourhood relationships between fine anatomical subdivisions are associated with discrete neuronal subtypes and genes involved with synaptic transmission. The neocortex displays a relatively homogeneous transcriptional pattern, but with distinct features associated selectively with primary sensorimotor cortices and with enriched frontal lobe expression. Notably, the spatial topography of the neocortex is strongly reflected in its molecular topography— the closer two cortical regions, the more similar their transcriptomes. This freely accessible online data resource forms a high-resolution transcriptional baseline for neurogenetic studies of normal and abnormal human brain function. PMID:22996553

  8. Age-associated changes in microvasculature of human adult testis.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, T; Hatakeyama, S

    1978-07-01

    Age-associated architectural changes of the human testicular microvasculature from 70 autopsy cases were stereoscopically examined with a silicone-rubber injection technique. In the testis of a young subject, the interlobular main arteries run straight. The coiling phenomena of the interlobular centripetal or centrifugal arteries, which are commonly seen in adult testis, have been so far considered as physiological transformation of the vasculature. It was confirmed that the coiling changes in the interlobular main arteries of the human testis appear as an age-dependent alteration of the vasculature closely related to the volume of the gland. The practical importance of the spirallin or coiling of arteries is that it results in a considerable reduction of blood flow. The age-related coiling of the interlobular arteries is virtually accompanied by varying degrees of collapse of the peritubular capillary networks. The reduction of blood supply to the seminiferous tubules plays an active role in promoting aging of the testis. These stereoscopical observations of age-related transfiguration of testicular microvasculature were ascertained also by histometrical examinations.

  9. Comprehensive cellular‐resolution atlas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Royall, Joshua J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A.C.; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet‐Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A.; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A.; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L.; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A.; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W.; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H. Ronald; Hohmann, John G.; Jones, Allan R.; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole‐brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high‐resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion‐weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large‐format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto‐ and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127–3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27418273

  10. Ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius in adult human dry vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Kosuri, Kalyan Chakravarthi; Venumadhav, Nelluri; Ks, Siddaraju

    2014-08-01

    The ligamentum longitudinale anterius is a broad and strong band of fibrous tissue that runs along the anterior surfaces of the bodies of the vertebrae. The study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius in adult dry human vertebra. This study was carried out on 95 sets of dry human vertebral columns irrespective of age and sex at Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences- Barabanki,-UP, Melaka Manipal Medical College-Manipal University and Department of Anatomy, KMCT Medical College, Manassery- Calicut, India. All the sets of vertebral columns were macroscopically inspected for the ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius. It was observed that out of 95 sets of vertebral columns, 27 (28.42%) vertebral columns showed ossification. Out of 27 vertebral columns, 17 (17.89%) vertebral columns showed segmental type of ossification, 2 (2.11%) vertebral columns showed continuous type of ossification and 8 (8.42%) vertebral columns showed mixed type of ossification at different vertebral level. Such type of ossification will affect the biomechanics of the spine and may result in stiff neck, low back pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, compression of the brachial plexus, aphonia, immobility or mucosal thickening of larynx. Hence, knowledge of such abnormalities should be kept in mind to minimise serious complications in any surgical intervention or investigative procedures in the region.

  11. The Effect of Body Mass on Outdoor Adult Human Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Spencer, Jessica R; Dabbs, Gretchen R

    2017-02-23

    Forensic taphonomy explores factors impacting human decomposition. This study investigated the effect of body mass on the rate and pattern of adult human decomposition. Nine males and three females aged 49-95 years ranging in mass from 73 to 159 kg who were donated to the Complex for Forensic Anthropology Research between December 2012 and September 2015 were included in this study. Kelvin accumulated degree days (KADD) were used to assess the thermal energy required for subjects to reach several total body score (TBS) thresholds: early decomposition (TBS ≥6.0), TBS ≥12.5, advanced decomposition (TBS ≥19.0), TBS ≥23.0, and skeletonization (TBS ≥27.0). Results indicate no significant correlation between body mass and KADD at any TBS threshold. Body mass accounted for up to 24.0% of variation in decomposition rate depending on stage, and minor differences in decomposition pattern were observed. Body mass likely has a minimal impact on postmortem interval estimation.

  12. Adult human liver mesenchymal progenitor cells express phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Baruteau, Julien; Nyabi, Omar; Najimi, Mustapha; Fauvart, Maarten; Sokal, Etienne

    2014-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases and is accountable for a severe encephalopathy by progressive intoxication of the brain by phenylalanine. This results from an ineffective L-phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme (PAH) due to a mutated phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Neonatal screening programs allow an early dietetic treatment with restrictive phenylalanine intake. This diet prevents most of the neuropsychological disabilities but remains challenging for lifelong compliance. Adult-derived human liver progenitor cells (ADHLPC) are a pool of precursors that can differentiate into hepatocytes. We aim to study PAH expression and PAH activity in a differenciated ADHLPC. ADHLPC were isolated from human hepatocyte primary culture of two different donors and differenciated under specific culture conditions. We demonstrated the high expression of PAH and a large increase of PAH activity in differenciated LPC. The age of the donor, the cellular viability after liver digestion and cryopreservation affects PAH activity. ADHLPC might therefore be considered as a suitable source for cell therapy in PKU.

  13. Photogrammetric analysis of the articular surface of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Ege, A; Seker, D Z; Tuncay, I; Duran, Z

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional measurements made using photogrammetry have recently gained popularity with the development of real-time detection facilities and up-to-date equipment. The modelling of human bones presents a particular challenge as the measurements required are difficult to obtain, especially from uneven surfaces. In this study, the articular surfaces of 12 radius bones were evaluated using photogrammetry to obtain three-dimensional coordinates of certain points. Morphometric characteristics of the digital topography of the articular surface were analysed using three-dimensional data from more than 200 points for each specimen. The coronal plane curve, from the tip of the styloid process to the centre of the distal radioulnar articular notch, was found to be similar to the fourth degree polynomial function. A mathematical expression representing the sagittal curve passing through scapholunate border could not be found. Close-range photogrammetry is a safe and precise technique that can provide reliable, reproducible and accurate data for evaluating complex morphological surfaces.

  14. Supporting Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Drescher, Wolf; Rath, Björn; Tingart, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and researchers worldwide are continuously faced with the challenge of regenerating articular cartilage defects. However, until now, it has not been possible to completely mimic the biological and biochemical properties of articular cartilage using current research and development approaches. In this review, biomaterials previously used for articular cartilage repair research are addressed. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the state of the art of current cell printing procedures mimicking native cartilage is offered in light of their use as future alternatives for cartilage tissue engineering. Inkjet cell printing, controlled deposition cell printing tools, and laser cell printing are cutting-edge techniques in this context. The development of mimetic hydrogels with specific biological properties relevant to articular cartilage native tissue will support the development of improved, functional, and novel engineered tissue for clinical application. PMID:26069634

  15. Articular manifestations in patients with Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-López, María Esther; Díez-Morrondo, Carolina; Sánchez-Andrade, Amalia; Pego-Reigosa, Robustiano; Díaz, Pablo; Castro-Gago, Manuel

    To determine the percentage of Lyme patients with articular manifestations in NW Spain and to know their evolution and response to treatment. A retrospective study (2006-2013) was performed using medical histories of confirmed cases of Lyme disease showing articular manifestations. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, together with the treatment and evolution of the patients, were analysed. Seventeen out of 108 LD confirmed patients (15.7%) showed articular manifestations. Regarding those 17 patients, 64.7%, 29.4% and 5.9% presented arthritis, arthralgia and bursitis, respectively. The knee was the most affected joint. Articular manifestations were often associated to neurological, dermatological and cardiac pathologies. Otherwise, most patients were in Stage III. The 11.8% of the cases progressed to a recurrent chronic arthritis despite the administration of an appropriate treatment. Lyme disease patients showing articular manifestations should be included in the diagnosis of articular affections in areas of high risk of hard tick bite, in order to establish a suitable and early treatment and to avoid sequels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  16. Professional Fulfillment and Satisfaction of US and Canadian Adult Education and Human Resource Development Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shari L.; Wiesenberg, Faye

    2004-01-01

    This comparative study explored the professional fulfillment and job satisfaction of US and Canadian college and university faculty in the fields of Adult Education and Human Resource Development. In Autumn 2001, we disseminated electronically "The Adult Education and Human Resource Development Faculty Survey" to a selected sample of Canadian and…

  17. Topography and interactions of the arytenoid and cricoid articular facets: implications for vocal process positional shifts.

    PubMed

    Probst, Kenneth X; Schön Ybarra, Miguel A; Kashima, Haskin; Crosby, Ranice W

    2004-04-01

    Using new computer applications and digital technologies, we provide a rigorous description and realistic illustrations of the arytenoid-on-the cricoid rotations. We also provide the articular facet topography and interactions that underlay those rotations and the concomitant vocal process positional shifts. The thyroid cartilage and all soft tissues were removed from three excised, preserved, normal, adult human larynges without disturbing the crico-arytenoid (CA) articular capsule. Three CA assemblies were thus prepared and used to digitize arytenoid rotations and vocal process positional shifts, and, after disarticulation, also the surface contour of the arytenoid and cricoid facets, and the cricoid lumen margin. The digitized data served to computer generate 2D and 3D graphic visualizations of the vocal process positional shifts, of the topography of the facets, and of the facet motion sequences that show that the anteroposteriorly concave arytenoid facet slides and conjunctly rotates on the anteroposteriorly convex cricoid facet. Visual details of all graphic representations and facet motion sequences were essentially identical across the three assemblies. Then, based on the computer generated data obtained from the largest of the CA assemblies, 3D, realistic, and hand-drawn images were made that illustrate the directions in which the arytenoids can rotate and the vocal processes concomitantly shift positions. Results indicate that when the arytenoids rotate by sliding from anterior to posterior on the cricoid facets about a primary axis of motion aligned from medial, posterior, and superior, to lateral, anterior, and inferior, their vocal processes shift positions along a plane obliquely oriented from anterior and medial, to posterior and lateral, and from inferior and medial, to superior and lateral. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Acute Joint Pathology and Synovial Inflammation is Associated with Increased Intra-Articular Fracture Severity in the Mouse Knee

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John S.; Hembree, W. Chad; Furman, Bridgette D.; Tippets, Lauren; Cattel, Dennis; Huebner, Janet L.; Little, Dianne; DeFrate, Louis E.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Guilak, Farshid; Olson, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Post-traumatic arthritis is a frequent cause of disability and occurs most commonly and predictably after articular fracture. The objective of this investigation was to examine the effect of fracture severity on acute joint pathology in a novel murine model of intra-articular fracture. DESIGN Low and high energy articular fractures (n=25 per group) of the tibial plateau were created in adult male C57BL/6 mice. The acute effect of articular fracture severity on synovial inflammation, bone morphology, liberated fracture area, cartilage pathology, chondrocyte viability, and systemic cytokines and biomarkers levels was assessed at 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days post-fracture. RESULTS Increasing intra-articular fracture severity was associated with greater acute pathology in the synovium and bone compared to control limbs, including increased global synovitis and reduced periarticular bone density and thickness. Applied fracture energy was significantly correlated with degree of liberated cortical bone surface area, indicating greater comminution. Serum concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA) were significantly increased one day post-fracture. While articular fracture significantly reduced chondrocyte viability, there was no relationship between fracture severity and chondrocyte viability, cartilage degeneration, or systemic levels of cytokines and biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that articular fracture is associated with a loss of chondrocyte viability and increased levels of systemic biomarkers, and that increased intra-articular fracture severity is associated with increased acute joint pathology in a variety of joint tissues, including synovial inflammation, cortical comminution, and bone morphology. Further characterization of the early events following articular fracture could aid in the treatment of post-traumatic arthritis. PMID:21619936

  19. Features of hand-foot crawling behavior in human adults.

    PubMed

    Maclellan, M J; Ivanenko, Y P; Cappellini, G; Sylos Labini, F; Lacquaniti, F

    2012-01-01

    Interlimb coordination of crawling kinematics in humans shares features with other primates and nonprimate quadrupeds, and it has been suggested that this is due to a similar organization of the locomotor pattern generators (CPGs). To extend the previous findings and to further explore the neural control of bipedal vs. quadrupedal locomotion, we used a crawling paradigm in which healthy adults crawled on their hands and feet at different speeds and at different surface inclinations (13°, 27°, and 35°). Ground reaction forces, limb kinematics, and electromyographic (EMG) activity from 26 upper and lower limb muscles on the right side of the body were collected. The EMG activity was mapped onto the spinal cord in approximate rostrocaudal locations of the motoneuron pools to characterize the general features of cervical and lumbosacral spinal cord activation. The spatiotemporal pattern of spinal cord activity significantly differed between quadrupedal and bipedal gaits. In addition, participants exhibited a large range of kinematic coordination styles (diagonal vs. lateral patterns), which is in contrast to the stereotypical kinematics of upright bipedal walking, suggesting flexible coupling of cervical and lumbosacral pattern generators. Results showed strikingly dissimilar directional horizontal forces for the arms and legs, considerably retracted average leg orientation, and substantially smaller sacral vs. lumbar motoneuron activity compared with quadrupedal gait in animals. A gradual transition to a more vertical body orientation (increasing the inclination of the treadmill) led to the appearance of more prominent sacral activity (related to activation of ankle plantar flexors), typical of bipedal walking. The findings highlight the reorganization and adaptation of CPG networks involved in the control of quadrupedal human locomotion and a high specialization of the musculoskeletal apparatus to specific gaits.

  20. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  1. Spirituality of Adult Education and Training. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Leona M.; Fenwick, Tara J.; Parsons, Jim

    This book explores how spirituality intersects with the lives of adult educators and trainers. The following are among the topics discussed: (1) spirituality's role within the context of adult education and training and defining spirituality (the original spiritual purpose of adult education, as illustrated in the history of the Chautauqua,…

  2. Investigation of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography towards the study of microstructure of articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaragod, Deepa; Lu, Zenghai; Le Maitre, Christine; Wilkinson, J. Mark; Matcher, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    This paper highlights the extended Jones matrix calculus based multi-angle study carried out to understand the depth dependent structural orientation of the collagen fibers in articular cartilage using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). A 3D lamellar model for the collagen fiber orientation, with a quadratic profile for the arching of the collagen fibers in transitional zone which points towards an ordered arrangement of fibers in that zone is the basis of the organization architecture of collagen fibers in articular cartilage. Experimental data for both ex-vivo bovine fetlock and human patellar cartilage samples are compared with theoretical predictions, with a good quantitative agreement for bovine and a reasonable qualitative agreement for human articular cartilage samples being obtained

  3. [Osteo-articular manifestations of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Alaoui, Fatima-Zohra; Talaoui, Maha; Benamour, Saida

    2005-01-15

    Osteo-articular sarcoidosis may be evoked in the presence of peripheral articular manifestations or bone lesions that are sometimes asymptomatic. The aim of this work is to describe clinical and progressive features of sarcoidosis with osteo-articular involvement. Our retrospective study concerned 18 patients presenting with osteo-articular sarcoidosis from 1985 to 1999. We included patients with clinical diagnosis suggestive of sarcoidosis and with at least one positive biopsy. Among 35 cases of sarcoidosis, 18 patients had an osteo-articular manifestation (51.42%), which revealed the disease in 2 patients. The female sex was predominant (sex ratio M/F of 0.12), the mean age was 47 years and the time before diagnosis was 3.6 years. Articular involvement was the most frequent. Inflammatory joint pains were present in 11 cases, a Lofgren syndrome in 2 cases, a chronic arthritis in 4 cases and acute monoarthritis of the elbow in 1 case. A female patient exhibited a probable association with a spondylarthropathy. The bone involvement, revealing the disease in 1 case, was also noted in 5 cases, located exclusively on hands; this sarcoidosal dactyly was represented in 2 cases in the form of phalangeal geodes, in wired form (2 cases) and in large bulla form (1 case). The bone biopsy when it was performed was positive in all 3 cases. The patients responded well to corticosteroids. The osteo-articular involvement of sarcoidosis is polymorphic and can reveal the disease or may appear during the course of its progression.

  4. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate increases maximal oxygen uptake in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jennifer C; Lonac, Mark C; Johnson, Tyler K; Schweder, Melani M; Bell, Christopher

    2010-04-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a component of green tea, increases endurance performance in animals and promotes fat oxidation during cycle ergometer exercise in adult humans. We have investigated the hypothesis that short-term consumption of EGCG delays the onset of the ventilatory threshold (VT) and increases maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). In this randomized, repeated-measures, double-blind study, 19 healthy adults (11 males and 8 females, age = 26 ± 2 yr (mean ± SE)) received seven placebo or seven EGCG (135-mg) pills. Forty-eight hours before data collection, participants began consuming three pills per day; the last pill was taken 2 h before exercise testing. VT and VO2max were determined from breath-by-breath indirect calorimetry data collected during continuous incremental stationary cycle ergometer exercise (20-35 W·min(-1)), from rest until volitional fatigue. Each condition/exercise test was separated by a minimum of 14 d. Compared with placebo, short-term EGCG consumption increased VO2max (3.123 ± 0.187 vs 3.259 ± 0.196 L·min(-1), P = 0.04). Maximal work rate (301 ± 15 vs 301 ± 16 W, P = 0.98), maximal RER (1.21 ± 0.01 vs 1.22 ± 0.02, P = 0.27), and maximal HR were unaffected (180 ± 3 vs 180 ± 3 beats·min(-1), P = 0.87). In a subset of subjects (n = 11), maximal cardiac output (determined via open-circuit acetylene breathing) was also unaffected by EGCG (29.6 ± 2.2 vs 30.2 ± 1.4 L·min(-1), P = 0.70). Contrary to our hypothesis, EGCG decreased VO2 at VT (1.57 ± 0.11 vs 1.48 ± 0.10 L·min(-1)), but this change was not significant (P = 0.06). Short-term consumption of EGCG increased VO2max without affecting maximal cardiac output, suggesting that EGCG may increase arterial-venous oxygen difference.

  5. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  6. Internal plate fixation versus plaster in displaced complete articular distal radius fractures, a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mulders, Marjolein A M; Walenkamp, Monique M J; Goslings, J Carel; Schep, Niels W L

    2016-02-09

    Of all distal radius fractures, 25 % are complete articular fractures (AO/OTA type C fractures). Two thirds of those fractures are displaced and require reduction. According to several International Guidelines, adequately reduced intra-articular distal radius fractures are best treated non-operatively with plaster immobilisation, while surgical fixation is suggested only when the articular step exceeds 2 mm after reduction. However, these recommendations are based on studies that did not differentiate between intra- and extra-articular distal radius fractures. Thus, no clear consensus about the best treatment for patients with displaced intra-articular distal radius fractures can be reached. Despite the lack of evidence, an increase in internal fixation of intra-articular distal radius fractures has been observed over the last decade. The aim of this study is to determine the difference in functional outcome following open reduction and plate fixation compared with non-operative treatment with closed reduction and plaster immobilisation in patients with a displaced intra articular distal radius fracture. This multicentre randomised controlled trial will randomise between open reduction and internal plate fixation (intervention group) and closed reduction and plaster immobilisation (control group). All consecutive adult patients from 18 to 65 years with a displaced intra-articular distal radius fracture (AO/OTA type C), which has been adequately reduced at the Emergency Department according to the Dutch National Guidelines, are eligible for inclusion in this study. The primary outcome is function and pain of the wrist assessed with the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation score (PRWE). Secondary outcomes are the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score (DASH), pain, quality of life (SF-36), range of motion, grip strength, radiological parameters, complications, crossovers and cost-effectiveness of both treatments. A total of 90 patients will be included in this

  7. Treating knee osteoarthritis with intra-articular hyaluronans.

    PubMed

    Brzusek, Daniel; Petron, David

    2008-12-01

    Intra-articular hyaluronan (HA) or hylan is approved for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) knee pain. The authors review here published evidence of efficacy and safety of intra-articular HA for the treatment of knee pain. Since the systemic safety of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclo-oxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors for OA knee treatment are a current concern, the authors also offer recommendations for repositioning HA in the OA treatment paradigm. Relevant HA literature was identified by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE from their inception to April 2008 using the search words hyaluronan, hyaluronic acid, sodium hyaluronate, and hylan G-F 20, with knee and OA. Data from randomized, placebo-controlled trials were reviewed and summarized in this article. While not a systematic review, this article reviews the best available evidence for the use of HA to treat knee OA. For the most part, patients in the reviewed studies were adults over the age of 40 with mild to severe symptomatic OA of the knee. Reviewed studies demonstrated significant improvements in pain and physical function with HA or sodium hyaluronate and hylan G-F 20. HA or hylan products were most effective between 5 and 13 weeks after injection with improvements also observed at 14-26 weeks or sometimes longer, and were well tolerated with a low incidence of adverse events. HA also provides beneficial treatment effects when administered in conjunction with other therapies. Intra-articular HA or hylan has proven to be an effective, safe, and tolerable treatment for symptomatic knee OA. In an effort to limit cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and renal safety concerns with COX-2 selective and nonselective NSAIDs and maximize HA efficacy, the authors proposed using HA earlier in the treatment paradigm for knee OA and also as part of a comprehensive treatment strategy.

  8. Progress in intra-articular therapy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Setton, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Diarthrodial joints are well suited to intra-articular injection, and the local delivery of therapeutics in this fashion brings several potential advantages to the treatment of a wide range of arthropathies. Possible benefits include increased bioavailability, reduced systemic exposure, fewer adverse events, and lower total drug costs. Nevertheless, intra-articular therapy is challenging because of the rapid egress of injected materials from the joint space; this elimination is true of both small molecules, which exit via synovial capillaries, and of macromolecules, which are cleared by the lymphatic system. In general, soluble materials have an intra-articular dwell time measured only in hours. Corticosteroids and hyaluronate preparations constitute the mainstay of FDA-approved intra-articular therapeutics. Recombinant proteins, autologous blood products and analgesics have also found clinical use via intra-articular delivery. Several alternative approaches, such as local delivery of cell and gene therapy, as well as the use of microparticles, liposomes, and modified drugs, are in various stages of preclinical development. PMID:24189839

  9. Transcriptional profiling of adult neural stem-like cells from the human brain.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Behnan, Jinan; Helseth, Eirik; Langmoen, Iver A

    2014-01-01

    There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33-60). Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate). We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6), foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1) and human brain tissues (n = 12). The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular fate.

  10. Hyperoxia Induces Inflammation and Cytotoxicity in Human Adult Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Christina; Wu, Jing; Tiboldi, Akos; Hess, Moritz; Mitulovic, Goran; Kaun, Christoph; Krychtiuk, Konstantin Alexander; Wojta, Johann; Ullrich, Roman; Tretter, Eva Verena; Markstaller, Klaus; Klein, Klaus Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Supplemental oxygen (O2) is used as adjunct therapy in anesthesia, emergency, and intensive care medicine. We hypothesized that excessive O2 levels (hyperoxia) can directly injure human adult cardiac myocytes (HACMs). HACMs obtained from the explanted hearts of transplantation patients were exposed to constant hyperoxia (95% O2), intermittent hyperoxia (alternating 10 min exposures to 5% and 95% O2), constant normoxia (21% O2), or constant mild hypoxia (5% O2) using a bioreactor. Changes in cell morphology, viability as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and trypan blue (TB) staining, and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and various pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin, IL; chemokine C-X-C motif ligand, CXC; granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, G-CSF; intercellular adhesion molecule, ICAM; chemokine C-C motif ligand, CCL) were compared among treatment groups at baseline (0 h) and after 8, 24, and 72 h of treatment. Changes in HACM protein expression were determined by quantitative proteomic analysis after 48 h of exposure. Compared with constant normoxia and mild hypoxia, constant hyperoxia resulted in a higher TB-positive cell count, greater release of LDH, and elevated secretion of VEGF, MIF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL-1, CXCL-10, G-CSF, ICAM-1, CCL-3, and CCL-5. Cellular inflammation and cytotoxicity gradually increased and was highest after 72 h of constant and intermittent hyperoxia. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed that hypoxic and hyperoxic O2 exposure differently altered the expression levels of proteins involved in cell-cycle regulation, energy metabolism, and cell signaling. In conclusion, constant and intermittent hyperoxia induced inflammation and cytotoxicity in HACMs. Cell injury occurred earliest and was greatest after constant hyperoxia, but even relatively brief repeating hyperoxic episodes induced a substantial inflammatory response.

  11. Adult Education and the Human Environment: Transactions of a Celebration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones-Quartey, K. A. B., Ed.; And Others

    The document comprises a collection of speeches and seminar reports arising from the 25th anniversary celebration of the Institute of Adult Education at the University of Ghana. The theme of the celebration, introduced in the first chapter, was Adult Education and Man's Environment--the Next Quarter-Century. The second chapter comprises the…

  12. Label-free characterization of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis model mice by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Akehi, Mayu; Kiyomatsu, Hiroshi; Miura, Hiromasa

    2017-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is very common joint disease in the aging population. Main symptom of OA is accompanied by degenerative changes of articular cartilage. Cartilage contains mostly type II collagen and proteoglycans, so it is difficult to access the quality and morphology of cartilage tissue in situ by conventional diagnostic tools (X-ray, MRI and echography) directly or indirectly. Raman spectroscopy is a label-free technique which enables to analyze molecular composition in degenerative cartilage. In this study, we generated an animal OA model surgically induced by knee joint instability, and the femurs were harvested at two weeks after the surgery. We performed Raman spectroscopic analysis for the articular cartilage of distal femurs in OA side and unaffected side in each mouse. In the result, there is no gross findings in the surface of the articular cartilage in OA. On the other hand, Raman spectral data of the articular cartilage showed drastic changes in comparison between OA and control side. The major finding of this study is that the relative intensity of phosphate band (960 cm-1) increases in the degenerative cartilage. This may be the result of exposure of subchondral bone due to thinning of the cartilage layer. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopic technique is sufficient to characterize articular cartilage in OA as a pilot study for Raman application in cartilage degeneration and regeneration using animal models and human subjects.

  13. Actions of Two Bi-Articular Muscles of the Lower Extremity: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Landin, Dennis; Thompson, Melissa; Reid, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    The extremities of the human body contain several bi-articular muscles. The actions produced by muscles at the joints they cross are greatly influenced by joint moment arms and muscle length. These factors are dynamic and subject to change as joint angles are altered. Therefore, to more completely understand the actions of such muscles, the angles of both joints must be manipulated. This report reviews investigations, which have explored the actions of two bi-articular muscles of the lower extremities (gastrocnemius and rectus femoris) as the joints they cross are moved into various combinations of angles. The findings have both clinical and physical performance ramifications. PMID:27298656

  14. The biomechanical ambiguity of the articular surface.

    PubMed Central

    Kamalanathan, S; Broom, N D

    1993-01-01

    A series of micromechanical tests carried out on the articular surface of cartilage have provided an accurate description of the mechanical properties of any one site with respect to the orientation framework obtained from its characteristic split-line direction. Ultrastructural studies revealed little evidence that the split-line direction correlated strongly with any preferred alignment of fibrils. This paper therefore offers a new interpretation of the biomechanical significance of the widely used split-line test for the articular surface of cartilage. Images Fig. 9 Fig. 2 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 PMID:8300433

  15. [Conservative management of articular metacarpophalangeal joint fractures].

    PubMed

    Ebinger, T; Kinzl, L; Mentzel, M

    2000-10-01

    We present a splint system for a protected mobilization program after closed reduction of articular proximal phalangeal base fractures. This therapy consists of the periarticular soft tissue and functional anatomy. The soft-tissue around the base of the proximal phalanx leads to a circular stabilization effect. This so called Zancolli Complex (Metacarpophalangeal Retention Apparatus) can be used with the effect of a brace treatment. Treating 31 patients with articular fractures of the proximal phalanx way we found good functional results within a mean follow up period of 2 years after the accident.

  16. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-07-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net /sup 35/SO/sub 4/-labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage.

  17. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  18. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  19. Adult Continuing Education and Human Resource Development: Present Competitors, Potential Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    Adult Continuing Education (ACE) and Human Resource Development (HRD) have grown tremendously in the last quarter century. ACE experienced tremendous growth in the 60s and 70s, with over 17 million attending colleges and universities, and local school and community adult education programs by the end of the 1970s. More ACE programs were started…

  20. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies.

  1. Behavioral and magnetoencephalographic correlates of plasticity in the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, V. S.

    1993-01-01

    Recent behavioral and physiological evidence suggests that even brief sensory deprivation can lead to the rapid emergence of new and functionally effective neural connections in the adult human brain. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8248123

  2. In vitro generation of mechanically functional cartilage grafts based on adult human stem cells and 3D-woven poly(epsilon-caprolactone) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Valonen, Piia K; Moutos, Franklin T; Kusanagi, Akihiko; Moretti, Matteo G; Diekman, Brian O; Welter, Jean F; Caplan, Arnold I; Guilak, Farshid; Freed, Lisa E

    2010-03-01

    Three-dimensionally woven poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds were combined with adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) to engineer mechanically functional cartilage constructs in vitro. The specific objectives were to: (i) produce PCL scaffolds with cartilage-like mechanical properties, (ii) demonstrate that hMSCs formed cartilage after 21 days of culture on PCL scaffolds, and (iii) study effects of scaffold structure (loosely vs. tightly woven), culture vessel (static dish vs. oscillating bioreactor), and medium composition (chondrogenic additives with or without serum). Aggregate moduli of 21-day constructs approached normal articular cartilage for tightly woven PCL cultured in bioreactors, were lower for tightly woven PCL cultured statically, and lowest for loosely woven PCL cultured statically (p<0.05). Construct DNA, total collagen, and glycosaminoglycans (GAG) increased in a manner dependent on time, culture vessel, and medium composition. Chondrogenesis was verified histologically by rounded cells within a hyaline-like matrix that immunostained for collagen type II but not type I. Bioreactors yielded constructs with higher collagen content (p<0.05) and more homogenous matrix than static controls. Chondrogenic additives yielded constructs with higher GAG (p<0.05) and earlier expression of collagen II mRNA if serum was not present in medium. These results show feasibility of functional cartilage tissue engineering from hMSC and 3D-woven PCL scaffolds.

  3. In vitro generation of mechanically functional cartilage grafts based on adult human stem cells and 3D-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Valonen, P.K.; Moutos, F.T.; Kusanagi, A.; Moretti, M.; Diekman, B.O.; Welter, J.F.; Caplan, A.I.; Guilak, F.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensionally woven poly(ε-caprolactone)(PCL) scaffolds were combined with adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) to engineer mechanically functional cartilage constructs in vitro. The specific objectives were to: (i) produce PCL scaffolds with cartilage-like mechanical properties, (ii) demonstrate that hMSCs formed cartilage after 21-days of culture on PCL scaffolds, and (iii) study effects of scaffold structure (loosely vs. tightly woven), culture vessel (static dish vs. oscillating bioreactor), and medium composition (chondrogenic additives with or without serum). Aggregate moduli of 21-day constructs approached normal articular cartilage for tightly woven PCL cultured in bioreactors, were lower for tightly woven PCL cultured statically, and lowest for loosely woven PCL cultured statically (p<0.05). Construct DNA, total collagen, and glyocosaminoglycans (GAG) increased in a manner dependent on time, culture vessel, and medium composition. Chondrogenesis was verified histologically by rounded cells within a hyaline-like matrix that immunostained for collagen type II but not type I. Bioreactors yielded constructs with higher collagen content (p<0.05) and more homogenous matrix than static controls. Chondrogenic additives yielded constructs with higher GAG (p<0.05) and earlier expression of collagen II mRNA if serum was not present in medium. These results show feasibility of functional cartilage tissue engineering from hMSC and 3D woven PCL scaffolds. PMID:20034665

  4. Intra-articular Implantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Kraeutler, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Justin J.; Chahla, Jorge; McCarty, Eric C.; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) after partial or total meniscectomy is a prevalent issue that patients must face. Various methods of replacing meniscal tissue have been studied to avoid this progression, including meniscal allograft transplantation, meniscal scaffolds, and synthetic meniscus replacement. Studies have shown that meniscal scaffolds may improve symptoms but have not been shown to prevent progression of OA. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed as a possible biological therapy for meniscal regeneration. Several animal studies and 1 human study have evaluated the effect of transplanting MSCs into the knee joint after partial meniscectomy. The purpose of this review was to assess the outcomes of intra-articular transplantation of MSCs on meniscal regeneration in animals and humans after partial meniscectomy. Limited results from animal studies suggest that there is some potential for intra-articular injection of MSCs for the regeneration of meniscal tissue. However, further studies are necessary to determine the quality of regenerated meniscal tissue through histological and biomechanical testing. PMID:28203596

  5. [Biogenic stimulants of metabolism in articular cartilage].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V E; Novikova, A V

    2011-01-01

    The review considers issues of pharmacodynamics and clinical applications of drugs with the metabolic type of action, which stimulate regeneration and provide the protective action on articular cartilage in cases of osteoarthritis. Published data of the experimental and clinical trials of the main chondroprotective agents are analyzed.

  6. Intra-articular risks of suprapatellar nailing.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Michael J; Collinge, Cory A; Patzkowski, Jeanne C; Masini, Brendan D; Blease, Robert E; Hsu, Joseph R

    2012-12-01

    To determine the risks to local anatomy near the starting point for tibial nailing during suprapatellar nailing, 15 fresh-frozen hemipelvis specimens were nailed using a suprapatellar technique. After nail passage, the menisci and articular surfaces, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertion, intermeniscal ligament, and fat pad were assessed for injury. The distance from the entry portal to the menisci, articular surfaces, and ACL insertion was determined. Medial meniscus injury occurred in 1 (6.7%) specimen and medial articular injury in 2 (13%). Nails passed through the fat pad in all specimens; intermeniscal ligament injury occurred in 3 (20%) specimens. The ACL insertion and lateral structures were not injured in any specimen. The distance from the entry portal margin to the lateral and medial menisci was 6.46±2.47 mm and 4.74±3.17 mm, respectively. The distances to the lateral and medial articular margins measured 10.33±3.62 mm and 6.54±3.57 mm, respectively. The distance to the ACL insertion averaged 5.80±3.94 mm. Suprapatellar nailing is associated with a risk of injury to anterior knee structures comparable to other nailing techniques. Additional clinical studies are warranted to further define the role of this technique in the management of tibial fractures.

  7. Cryoprotectant agent toxicity in porcine articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jomha, Nadr M; Weiss, Andrew D H; Fraser Forbes, J; Law, Garson K; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2010-12-01

    Large articular cartilage defects have proven difficult to treat and often result in osteoarthritis of the affected joint. Cryopreservation of articular cartilage can provide an increased supply of tissues for osteochondral allograft but cryoprotective agents are required; however, few studies have been performed on the toxicity of these agents. This study was designed to determine the order of toxicity of five commonly used cryoprotectant agents as well as interactions that occur between them. Isolated porcine articular chondrocytes were exposed to individual cryoprotectant agents and combinations of these agents at 1M and 3M concentrations for 5 min and 120 min. Cell viability was determined using membrane integrity dyes and a metabolic activity assay. Subsequently, a regression analysis based study was undertaken to extract the maximum amount of information from this data. Results of this study demonstrated that all 1M solutions were minimally toxic. The 3M solutions demonstrated varying toxicity after 120 min. Ethylene glycol and glycerol were less toxic than propylene glycol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and formamide. Combinations of cryoprotectant agents were less toxic than single cryoprotectant agents at the same concentration. This is the most comprehensive study investigating cryoprotectant agent toxicity in articular chondrocytes and has resulted in important information regarding the order of toxicity and interactions that occur between these agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Newborn human skin fibroblasts senesce in vitro without acquiring adult growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of human fibroblasts were prepared from chest skin obtained either from newborns (less than 3 months old) or adults (more than 35 years old) and maintained in vitro until they senesced. Adult cells grew logarithmically in medium supplemented with whole blood serum but not with platelet-poor plasma. Early passage cells obtained from newborns grew equally well in either plasma- or serum-supplemented medium. The difference in growth factor requirements between adult and newborn cells persisted through the lifespan of the cells; i.e., newborn cells did not develop adult hormonal requirements when maintained in culture. Thus, in vitro cellular aging can be distinguished from some types of differentiation.

  9. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage.

  10. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage. PMID:26340619

  11. Body Weight Independently Affects Articular Cartilage Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Denning, W. Matt; Winward, Jason G.; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J. Ty; Seeley, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key points Walking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration. Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  12. Emerging intra-articular causes of groin pain in athletes.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, Prajyot; Shetty, Gautam; Mane, Prashant; Shetty, Vijay

    2014-12-01

    Groin pain remains one of the most poorly understood conditions in clinical sports medicine. It may be caused by either extra-articular or intra-articular conditions. While extra-articular causes have been extensively studied and reasonably understood, a number of elusive intra-articular causes are emerging, many of which were previously unknown and therefore undiagnosed, leading to premature ending of many competitive careers. This article makes an attempt to look at various, elusive intra-articular causes of groin pain in athletes. This article also analyses the currently available evidence on trends in diagnosis and treatment for these conditions.

  13. Development of an artificial articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Oka, M; Noguchi, T; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Yamamuro, T; Hyon, S H; Ikada, Y

    1990-01-01

    We have attempted to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. We investigated poly(vinyl alcohol)-hydrogel (PVA-H) which has been recognized as a rubber-like gel and have improved the mechanical properties of this gel through a new synthetic process. In this article we report the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new, improved PVA-H from the aspect of its usefulness as artificial articular cartilage. As regards the lubrication, we measured the change of thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading and found that the PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressure than polyethylene (PE). The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times as large as that of PE. Histological findings of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around the PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammatory nor degenerative changes. The PVA-H artificial articular cartilage could be attached to the underlying bone using an osteochondral composite material. Although there remain still some problems to solve, PVA-H seems to be a very interesting and promising material which meets the requirements of artificial articular cartilage.

  14. Hyaluronic acid versus saline intra-articular injections for amelioration of chronic knee osteoarthritis: A canine model.

    PubMed

    Pashuck, Troy D; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Stoker, Aaron M; Cook, James L

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) versus saline for symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty-five adult purpose-bred dogs underwent meniscal release of one knee. Clinical, arthroscopic, and radiographic signs of OA were confirmed in all dogs prior to treatment. Dogs were randomized into five groups: HA-1 (n = 5), HA-3 (n = 5), HA-5 (n = 5), Saline-1 (n = 5), and Saline-3 (n = 5). Each dog received intra-articular injections of the respective substance into the affected knee at the pre-determined time points. Dogs were assessed for heat, swelling, and erythema after each injection and for lameness, pain, effusion, range of motion, kinetics, radiographic OA scoring, and arthroscopic scoring prior to treatment and for 6 months after injection. Dogs were then humanely euthanatized and the knees assessed grossly and histologically. Only mild heat, swelling, and/or erythema were noted in some dogs following injection and resolved within 1 week. Dogs treated with HA-1, HA-3, and HA-5 were significantly (p < 0.05) better than dogs treated with Saline-1 and Saline-3 at the 4, 8, and 12 week time points based on at least one outcome measure. OA severity was not significantly different among groups at any time point, but increased in severity over time in all groups. Gross and histologic OA scores were not significantly different among groups. These data suggest the three HA injection protocols were safe, superior to saline for short-term amelioration of symptoms associated with chronic OA, and can be translated to human OA treatment. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1772-1779, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Investigation of genes important in neurodevelopment disorders in adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Maussion, Gilles; Diallo, Alpha B; Gigek, Carolina O; Chen, Elizabeth S; Crapper, Liam; Théroux, Jean-Francois; Chen, Gary G; Vasuta, Cristina; Ernst, Carl

    2015-10-01

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are caused by mutations in genes expressed in fetal brain, but little is known about these same genes in adult human brain. Here, we test the hypothesis that genes associated with NDDs continue to have a role in adult human brain to explore the idea that NDD symptoms may be partially a result of their adult function rather than just their neurodevelopmental function. To demonstrate adult brain function, we performed expression analyses and ChIPseq in human neural stem cell(NSC) lines at different developmental stages and adult human brain, targeting two genes associated with NDDs, SATB2 and EHMT1, and the WNT signaling gene TCF7L2, which has not been associated with NDDs. Analysis of DNA interaction sites in neural stem cells reveals high (40-50 %) overlap between proliferating and differentiating cells for each gene in temporal space. Studies in adult brain demonstrate that consensus sites are similar to NSCs but occur at different genomic locations. We also performed expression analyses using BrainSpan data for NDD-associated genes SATB2, EHMT1, FMR1, MECP2, MBD5, CTNND2, RAI1, CHD8, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, TCF4, SCN2A, and DYRK1A and find high expression of these genes in adult brain, at least comparable to developing human brain, confirming that genes associated with NDDs likely have a role in adult tissue. Adult function of genes associated with NDDs might be important in clinical disease presentation and may be suitable targets for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Human Capital Development: Reforms for Adult and Community Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Sarojni; Haukka, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The adult and community education (ACE) sector is consistently responsive to changing community needs and government priorities. It is this particular function that has drawn ACE into the lifelong learning debate as one model for sustaining communities. The responsiveness of ACE means that the sector and its programs continue to make valuable…

  17. Adult Literacy Programs in Uganda. Africa Region Human Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okech, Anthony; Carr-Hill, Roy A.; Katahoire, Anne R.; Kakooza, Teresa; Ndidde, Alice N.; Oxenham, John

    This report evaluates the outcomes and cost effectiveness of adult literacy programs in Ugandan villages and compares government programs with those provided by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Part 1 describes evaluation objectives, government and NGO literacy programs and the rural socioeconomic context, and evaluation design. About 100…

  18. The Human Function Compunction: Teleological Explanation in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelemen, Deborah; Rosset, Evelyn

    2009-01-01

    Research has found that children possess a broad bias in favor of teleological--or purpose-based--explanations of natural phenomena. The current two experiments explored whether adults implicitly possess a similar bias. In Study 1, undergraduates judged a series of statements as "good" (i.e., correct) or "bad" (i.e., incorrect) explanations for…

  19. "Adult Education Is about Human Being in All Its Aspects"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Derek Legge, who celebrated his 95th birthday at the end of last month, is one of the most dedicated and influential of the largely unsung heroes of the adult education movement in Britain. As modesty is one of the many qualities with which his friends and colleagues credit him, he is certain to shrink from the description, but there is little…

  20. An Inventory of Skills and Attitudes Necessary for a Career in Human Services/Adult Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, William

    This document is an inventory of skills identified as necessary by professionals in the human services field specializing in adult care. It is intended as a mechanism whereby educators can compare that which they teach against what the human services industry feels is relevant. Introductory material discusses the process of the occupational…

  1. An Inventory of Skills and Attitudes Necessary for a Career in Human Services/Adult Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, William

    This document is an inventory of skills identified as necessary by professionals in the human services field specializing in adult care. It is intended as a mechanism whereby educators can compare that which they teach against what the human services industry feels is relevant. Introductory material discusses the process of the occupational…

  2. [Prostaglandin E₂: innovative approaches for tissue engineering of articular cartilage].

    PubMed

    Brochhausen-Delius, C

    2014-11-01

    Chronic diseases, traumatic tissue defects and tumor resections lead to irreversible loss of tissue which are usually treated by reconstructive techniques or prostheses. Tissue engineering represents a change of paradigm from the structural replacement of damaged tissue to genuine regeneration of organ-specific tissue with reconstruction of function. Therefore, autologous cells, biomaterials and growth factors are used to achieve this goal. Tissue engineering of articular cartilage is used in this article as an example of the successful identification of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a growth factor during endochondral ossification. In addition PGE2 could be shown to be beneficial for a rapid phenotypical redifferentiation and synthesis of collagen II in human articular chondrocytes. Based on these findings the development of a combined construct of an oriented scaffold and release system is demonstrated. The innovative characterization of these cell-seeded constructs by the use of synchrotron microcomputed tomography (μCT) permits non-destructive analysis even down to the cellular level. Our results indicate new requirements for the pathological anatomical diagnosis with a view to long-term effects of tissue engineering constructs, the biocompatibility of biodegradable biomaterials and even more important the regenerative potential of different lesions, with prediction of the outcome of tissue engineering-based strategies for individual patients.

  3. Segmenting articular cartilage automatically using a voxel classification approach.

    PubMed

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik B; Olsen, Ole F; Pettersen, Paola C; Christiansen, Claus

    2007-01-01

    We present a fully automatic method for articular cartilage segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which we use as the foundation of a quantitative cartilage assessment. We evaluate our method by comparisons to manual segmentations by a radiologist and by examining the interscan reproducibility of the volume and area estimates. Training and evaluation of the method is performed on a data set consisting of 139 scans of knees with a status ranging from healthy to severely osteoarthritic. This is, to our knowledge, the only fully automatic cartilage segmentation method that has good agreement with manual segmentations, an interscan reproducibility as good as that of a human expert, and enables the separation between healthy and osteoarthritic populations. While high-field scanners offer high-quality imaging from which the articular cartilage have been evaluated extensively using manual and automated image analysis techniques, low-field scanners on the other hand produce lower quality images but to a fraction of the cost of their high-field counterpart. For low-field MRI, there is no well-established accuracy validation for quantitative cartilage estimates, but we show that differences between healthy and osteoarthritic populations are statistically significant using our cartilage volume and surface area estimates, which suggests that low-field MRI analysis can become a useful, affordable tool in clinical studies.

  4. Changes in articular cartilage in experimentally induced patellar subluxation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, J.; Saito, S.; Yamamoto, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Patellar subluxation was experimentally induced in young rabbits and the resulting cartilaginous changes were observed over a prolonged period of time to determine histological changes in the subluxated patellar cartilage.
METHODS—The tibial tuberosity in 12 week old rabbits was laterally displaced and fixed to the tibia with wire to induce lateral patellar subluxation. Pathological changes in patellar cartilage were examined for 120 weeks after surgery using computed tomography and stereoscopic microscopy.
RESULTS—Eight weeks after surgery, changes in articular cartilage consisting of horizontal splitting of the matrix were observed in the intermediate zone and were presumed to have been caused by shearing stress applied to the patellar cartilage. The cartilaginous changes caused by patellar subluxation progressed very little over the 120 weeks. Very few rabbits presented with osteoarthritic changes in the patellofemoral joint, most probably because the stress resulting from the malalignment of the patellofemoral joint was mild enough to permit recovery.
CONCLUSION—The mild, non-progressive pathological changes, in particular, basal degeneration, induced in this experiment in patellar cartilage were quite similar to the changes in articular cartilage seen in human chondromalacia patellae.

 PMID:9462171

  5. Progressive cell-mediated changes in articular cartilage and bone in mice are initiated by a single session of controlled cyclic compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Ko, Frank C; Dragomir, Cecilia L; Plumb, Darren A; Hsia, Allison W; Adebayo, Olufunmilayo O; Goldring, Steven R; Wright, Timothy M; Goldring, Mary B; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2016-11-01

    We previously showed that repetitive cyclic loading of the mouse knee joint causes changes that recapitulate the features of osteoarthritis (OA) in humans. By applying a single loading session, we characterized the temporal progression of the structural and compositional changes in subchondral bone and articular cartilage. We applied loading during a single 5-minute session to the left tibia of adult (26-week-old) C57Bl/6 male mice at a peak load of 9.0N for 1,200 cycles. Knee joints were collected at times 0, 1, and 2 weeks after loading. The changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry (caspase-3 and cathepsin K), and microcomputed tomography. At time 0, no change was evident in chondrocyte viability or cartilage or subchondral bone integrity. However, cartilage pathology demonstrated by localized thinning and proteoglycan loss occurred at 1 and 2 weeks after the single session of loading. Transient cancellous bone loss was evident at 1 week, associated with increased osteoclast number. Bone loss was reversed to control levels at 2 weeks. We observed formation of fibrous and cartilaginous tissues at the joint margins at 1 and 2 weeks. Our findings demonstrate that a single session of noninvasive loading leads to the development of OA-like morphological and cellular alterations in articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The loss in subchondral trabecular bone mass and thickness returns to control levels at 2 weeks, whereas the cartilage thinning and proteoglycan loss persist. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1941-1949, 2016.

  6. Alternative Sources of Adult Stem Cells: Human Amniotic Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbank, Susanne; van Griensven, Martijn; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Peterbauer-Scherb, Anja

    Human amniotic membrane is a highly promising cell source for tissue engineering. The cells thereof, human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) and human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSC), may be immunoprivileged, they represent an early developmental status, and their application is ethically uncontroversial. Cell banking strategies may use freshly isolated cells or involve in vitro expansion to increase cell numbers. Therefore, we have thoroughly characterized the effect of in vitro cultivation on both phenotype and differentiation potential of hAEC. Moreover, we present different strategies to improve expansion including replacement of animal-derived supplements by human platelet products or the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase to extend the in vitro lifespan of amniotic cells. Characterization of the resulting cultures includes phenotype, growth characteristics, and differentiation potential, as well as immunogenic and immunomodulatory properties.

  7. Postnatal and adult neurogenesis in the development of human disease.

    PubMed

    Danzer, Steve C

    2008-10-01

    The mammalian brain contains a population of neurons that are continuously generated from late embryogenesis through adulthood-after the generation of almost all other neuronal types. This brain region-the hippocampal dentate gyrus-is in a sense, therefore, persistently immature. Postnatal and adult neurogenesis is likely an essential feature of the dentate, which is critical for learning and memory. Protracted neurogenesis after birth would allow the new cells to develop in conjunction with external events-but it may come with a price: while neurogenesis in utero occurs in a protected environment, children and adults are exposed to any number of hazards, such as toxins and infectious agents. Mature neurons might be resistant to such exposures, but new neurons may be vulnerable. Consistent with this prediction, in adult rodents seizures disrupt the integration of newly generated granule cells, whereas mature granule cells are comparatively unaffected. Significantly, abnormally interconnected cells may contribute to epileptogenesis and/or associated cognitive and memory deficits. Finally, studies increasingly indicate that new granule cells are extremely sensitive to a host of endogenous and exogenous factors, raising the possibility that disrupted granule cell integration may be a common feature of many neurological diseases.

  8. [Dietary phytoestrogen and its potential benefits in adult human health].

    PubMed

    Garrido, Argelia; de la Maza, María Pía; Valladares, Luis

    2003-11-01

    Human diet contains a series of bioactive vegetal compounds that can improve human health. Among these, there has been a special interest for phytoestrogens. This article reviews the evidence about the potential benefits of phytoestrogens for human health. Forty eight manuscripts were selected for their study design and relevance to human health. The cell growth inhibitory effects of phytoestrogens and their implication in breast cancer are reviewed. Also the effects of these compounds on serum lipid levels and the effectiveness of a phytoestrogen derivate, ipriflavone, on the prevention of osteoporosis are analyzed. Although these compounds have a great potential for improving health, there is still not enough evidence to recommend the routine use of phytoestrogens.

  9. Applied biomechanics in articular injuries: perspectives in the basic investigation of articular injuries and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Olson, Steven A; Brown, Thomas D; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Natoli, Roman M; Dirschl, Douglas R

    2011-01-01

    Joint injury is an important cause of arthritis. Although the treatment of injury, in general, has been widely studied, the contribution of injury to the development of posttraumatic arthritis is still a relatively understudied area. One of the most perplexing aspects of investigating articular injuries is the complex nature of the injury itself and the multiple facets of the injury mechanism that can potentially lead to the development of arthritis. A symposium by the Orthopaedic Research Society and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons was designed to examine the spectrum of basic science to clinical investigation in the role of biomechanics in the study of joint injury and subsequent posttraumatic arthritis. Four perspectives in the clinical aspects of managing articular injuries were investigated, including the clinical applications of basic science findings, the challenges and advancements in measuring and modeling articular fractures, the relationship of articular cartilage mechanical injuries and osteoarthritis, and the controlled creation of an intra-articular fracture to permit observations of the natural history of posttraumatic arthritis.

  10. Recent Advances in MRI of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Garry E.; Chen, Christina A.; Koo, Seungbum; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Bangerter, Neal K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE MRI is the most accurate noninvasive method available to diagnose disorders of articular cartilage. Conventional 2D and 3D approaches show changes in cartilage morphology. Faster 3D imaging methods with isotropic resolution can be reformatted into arbitrary planes for improved detection and visualization of pathology. Unique contrast mechanisms allow us to probe cartilage physiology and detect changes in cartilage macromolecules. CONCLUSION MRI has great promise as a noninvasive comprehensive tool for cartilage evaluation. PMID:19696274

  11. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Harimurti, Kuntjoro; Saldi, Siti R F; Dewiasty, Esthika; Khoeri, Miftahuddin M; Yunihastuti, Evi; Putri, Tiara; Tafroji, Wisnu; Safari, Dodi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the distribution of serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae carried by adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Jakarta, Indonesia. Specimens of nasopharyngeal swab were collected from 200 HIV infected adults aged 21 to 63 years. Identification of S. pneumoniae was done by optochin susceptibility test and PCR for the presence of psaA and lytA genes. Serotyping was performed with sequential multiplex PCR and antibiotic susceptibility with the disk diffusion method. S. pneumoniae strains were carried by 10% adults with serotype 6A/B 20% was common serotype among cultured strains in 20 adults. Most of isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol (80%) followed by clindamycin (75%), erythromycin (75%), penicillin (55%), and tetracycline (50%). This study found resistance to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was most common with only 15% of strains being susceptible. High non-susceptibility to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was observed in S. pneumoniae strains carried by HIV infected adults in Jakarta, Indonesia.

  12. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Song, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and brain tumors. PMID:27375363

  13. Hepatobiliary disposition of 17-OHPC and taurocholate in fetal human hepatocytes: a comparison with adult human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shringi; Ellis, Ewa C S; Gramignoli, Roberto; Dorko, Kenneth; Tahan, Veysel; Hansel, Marc; Mattison, Donald R; Caritis, Steve N; Hines, Ronald N; Venkataramanan, Raman; Strom, Stephen C

    2013-02-01

    Little information is available in the literature regarding the expression and activity of transporters in fetal human liver or cultured cells. A synthetic progesterone structural analog, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC), is used in the prevention of spontaneous abortion in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage (habitual abortion). 17-OHPC has been reported to traverse the placental barrier and gain access to fetal circulation. In this study, the role of transporters in the disposition of 17-OHPC in fetal and adult human hepatocytes was examined. Progesterone metabolites have been reported to induce trans-inhibition of bile acid transporter, ABCB11. Thus, we investigated the effect of 17-OHPC or its metabolites on [(3)H]taurocholic acid transport in sandwich-cultured human fetal and adult hepatocytes. 17-OHPC was taken up rapidly into the cells and transported out partially by an active efflux process that was significantly inhibited by cold temperature, cyclosporine, verapamil, and rifampin. The active efflux mechanism was observed in both adult and fetal hepatocyte cultures. 17-OHPC produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of taurocholate efflux into canaliculi in sandwich-cultured adult and fetal human hepatocytes. However, given the high concentrations required to cause inhibition of these transport processes, no adverse effects would be anticipated from therapeutic levels of 17-OHPC. We also evaluated the expression of various hepatic transporters (ABCB1, ABCB4, SLCO1B1, SLCO1B3, SLCO2B1, ABCB11, SLC10A1, ABCC2, ABCC3, ABCC4, and ABCG2) in fetal and adult hepatocytes. With the exception of ABCB4, all transporters examined were expressed, albeit at lower mRNA levels in fetal hepatocytes compared with adults.

  14. Hepatobiliary Disposition of 17-OHPC and Taurocholate in Fetal Human Hepatocytes: A Comparison with Adult Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shringi; Ellis, Ewa C. S.; Gramignoli, Roberto; Dorko, Kenneth; Tahan, Veysel; Hansel, Marc; Mattison, Donald R.; Caritis, Steve N.; Hines, Ronald N.; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2013-01-01

    Little information is available in the literature regarding the expression and activity of transporters in fetal human liver or cultured cells. A synthetic progesterone structural analog, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC), is used in the prevention of spontaneous abortion in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage (habitual abortion). 17-OHPC has been reported to traverse the placental barrier and gain access to fetal circulation. In this study, the role of transporters in the disposition of 17-OHPC in fetal and adult human hepatocytes was examined. Progesterone metabolites have been reported to induce trans-inhibition of bile acid transporter, ABCB11. Thus, we investigated the effect of 17-OHPC or its metabolites on [3H]taurocholic acid transport in sandwich-cultured human fetal and adult hepatocytes. 17-OHPC was taken up rapidly into the cells and transported out partially by an active efflux process that was significantly inhibited by cold temperature, cyclosporine, verapamil, and rifampin. The active efflux mechanism was observed in both adult and fetal hepatocyte cultures. 17-OHPC produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of taurocholate efflux into canaliculi in sandwich-cultured adult and fetal human hepatocytes. However, given the high concentrations required to cause inhibition of these transport processes, no adverse effects would be anticipated from therapeutic levels of 17-OHPC. We also evaluated the expression of various hepatic transporters (ABCB1, ABCB4, SLCO1B1, SLCO1B3, SLCO2B1, ABCB11, SLC10A1, ABCC2, ABCC3, ABCC4, and ABCG2) in fetal and adult hepatocytes. With the exception of ABCB4, all transporters examined were expressed, albeit at lower mRNA levels in fetal hepatocytes compared with adults. PMID:23129211

  15. Mechanobiological implications of articular cartilage crystals.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Alyssa K; McCutchen, Carley N; June, Ronald K

    2017-03-01

    Calcium crystals exist in both pathological and normal articular cartilage. The prevalence of these crystals dramatically increases with age, and crystals are typically found in osteoarthritic cartilage and synovial fluid. Relatively few studies have examined the effects of crystals on cartilage biomechanics or chondrocyte mechanotransduction. The purpose of this review is to describe how crystals could influence cartilage biomechanics and mechanotransduction in osteoarthritis. Crystals are found in both loaded and unloaded regions of articular cartilage. Exogenous crystals, in combination with joint motion, result in substantial joint inflammation. Articular cartilage vesicles promote crystal formation, and these vesicles are found near the periphery of chondrocytes. Crystallographic studies report monoclinic symmetry for synthetic crystals, suggesting that crystals will have a large stiffness compared with the cartilage extracellular matrix, the pericellular matrix, or the chondrocyte. This stiffness imbalance may cause crystal-induced dysregulation of chondrocyte mechanotransduction promoting both aging and osteoarthritis chondrocyte phenotypes. Because of their high stiffness compared with cartilage matrix, crystals likely alter chondrocyte mechanotransduction, and high concentrations of crystals within cartilage may alter macroscale biomechanics. Future studies should focus on understanding the mechanical properties of joint crystals and developing methods to understand how crystals affect chondrocyte mechanotransduction.

  16. Androgen responsive adult human prostatic epithelial cell lines immortalized by human papillomavirus 18.

    PubMed

    Bello, D; Webber, M M; Kleinman, H K; Wartinger, D D; Rhim, J S

    1997-06-01

    Prostate cancer and benign tumors of the prostate are the two most common neoplastic diseases in men in the United States, however, research on their causes and treatment has been slow because of the difficulty in obtaining fresh samples of human tissue and a lack of well characterized cell lines which exhibit growth and differentiation characteristics of normal prostatic epithelium. Non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial cells from a white male donor were immortalized with human papillomavirus 18 which resulted in the establishment of the RWPE-1 cell line. Cells from the RWPE-1 cell line were further transformed by v-Ki-ras to establish the RWPE-2 cell line. The objectives of this study were to: (1) establish the prostatic epithelial origin and androgen responsiveness of RWPE-1 and RWPE-2 cell lines; (2) examine their response to growth factors; and (3) establish the malignant characteristics of the RWPE-2 cell line. Immunoperoxidase staining showed that both RWPE-1 and RWPE-2 cells express cytokeratins 8 and 18, which are characteristic of luminal prostatic epithelial cells, but they also coexpress basal cell cytokeratins. These cell lines show growth stimulation and prostate specific antigen (PSA) and androgen receptor (AR) expression in response to the synthetic androgen mibolerone, which establishes their prostatic epithelial origin. Both cell lines also show a dose-dependent growth stimulation by EGF and bFGF and growth inhibition when exposed to TGF-beta, however, the transformed RWPE-2 cells are less responsive. RWPE-1 cells neither grow in agar nor form tumors when injected into nude mice with or without Matrigel. However, RWPE-2 cells form colonies in agar and tumors in nude mice. In the in vitro invasion assay, RWPE-1 cells are not invasive whereas RWPE-2 cells are invasive. Nuclear expression of p53 and Rb proteins was heterogeneous but detectable by immunostaining in both cell lines. The RWPE-1 cells, which show many normal cell

  17. Hesperetin induces melanin production in adult human epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Usach, Iris; Taléns-Visconti, Raquel; Magraner-Pardo, Lorena; Peris, José-Esteban

    2015-06-01

    One of the major sources of flavonoids for humans are citrus fruits, hesperidin being the predominant flavonoid. Hesperetin (HSP), the aglycon of hesperidin, has been reported to provide health benefits such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. However, the effect of HSP on skin pigmentation is not clear. Some authors have found that HSP induces melanogenesis in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells, which, if extrapolated to in vivo conditions, might protect skin against photodamage. Since the effect of HSP on normal melanocytes could be different to that observed on melanoma cells, the described effect of HSP on murine melanoma cells has been compared to the effect obtained using normal human melanocytes. HSP concentrations of 25 and 50 µM induced melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in human melanocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to control melanocytes, 25 µM HSP increased melanin production and tyrosinase activity 1.4-fold (p < 0.01) and 1.1-fold (p < 0.01), respectively, and the corresponding increases in the case of 50 µM HSP were 1.9-fold (p < 0.001) and 1.3-fold (p < 0.001). Therefore, HSP could be considered a valuable photoprotective substance if its capacity to increase melanin production in human melanocyte cultures could be reproduced on human skin.

  18. A century of trends in adult human height.

    PubMed

    2016-07-26

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5-22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3-19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8-144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries.

  19. A century of trends in adult human height

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13410.001 PMID:27458798

  20. Pharmacokinetics of triamcinolone acetonide following intramuscular and intra-articular administration to exercised Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Knych, H K; Vidal, M A; Casbeer, H C; McKemie, D S

    2013-11-01

    The use of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) in performance horses necessitates establishing appropriate withdrawal times prior to performance. To describe the plasma pharmacokinetics of TA and time-related urine and synovial fluid concentrations following i.m. and intra-articular administration to exercised Thoroughbred horses. Block design. Twelve racing fit adult Thoroughbred horses received a single i.m. administration of TA (0.1 mg/kg bwt). After an appropriate washout period, the same horses then received a single intra-articular TA administration (9 mg) into the right antebrachiocarpal joint. Blood, urine and synovial fluid samples were collected prior to, and at various times, up to 60 days post drug administration and analysed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Plasma data were analysed using noncompartmental analysis. Maximum measured plasma TA concentrations were 0.996 ± 0.391 at 13.2 h and 1.27 ± 0.278 ng/ml at 6.5 h for i.m. and intra-articular administration, respectively. The plasma terminal elimination half-life was 11.4 ± 6.53 and 0.78 ± 1.00 days for i.m. and intra-articular administration, respectively. Following i.m. administration, TA was below the limit of detection (LOD) by Days 52 and 60 in plasma and urine, respectively. Following intra-articular administration TA was undetectable by Day 7 in plasma and Day 8 in urine. Triamcinolone acetonide was also undetectable in any of the joints sampled following i.m. administration and remained above the limit of quantitation (LOQ) for 21 days following intra-articular administration. This study extends previous studies describing the pharmacokinetics of TA following i.m. and intra-articular administration to the horse and suggests that plasma and urine concentrations are not a good indicator of synovial fluid concentrations. Furthermore, results of this study supports an extended withdrawal time for TA given i.m. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  1. Hyaluronan thiomer gel/matrix mediated healing of articular cartilage defects in New Zealand White rabbits-a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christoph; Jeyakumar, Vivek; Niculescu-Morzsa, Eugenia; Kern, Daniela; Nehrer, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    Articular cartilage defects are limited to their regenerative potential in human adults. Our current study evaluates tissue regeneration in a surgically induced empty defect site with hyaluronan thiomer as a provisional scaffold in a gel/matrix combination without cells on rabbit models to restore tissue formation. An osteochondral defect of 4 mm in diameter and 5 mm in depth was induced by mechanical drilling in the femoral center of the trochlea in 18 New Zealand White rabbits. Previously evaluated from an in vitro study hyaluronan thiomer matrix, and a hyaluronan thiomer gel was used to treat the defect. As a control, the defect was left untreated. During the whole study, rabbits were clinically examined and after 4 (n = 3) or 12 (n = 3) weeks, the rabbits were sacrificed. Joints were evaluated macroscopically (Brittberg score) and by histology (O'Driscoll score). Synovial cells from the synovial fluid smear were histopathologically evaluated. The healing of the defects varied intra-group wise at the first observation period. After 12 weeks the results concerning the cartilage repair score were inhomogeneous within each group, while the macroscopic analysis was more homogenous. In the synovial fluid smear, the mean score of infiltrated synovial and non-synovial cells was slightly increased after 4 weeks and slightly decreased after 12 weeks in both the treatment groups in comparison to the untreated control. Taken together with results from the in vivo study indicated that implantation of hyaluronan thiomer as a combination of gel and matrix might enhance articular cartilage regeneration in an empty defect. Despite their benefits, the intrinsic healing capacity of New Zealand rabbits is a limitation for comparative test subject in pre-clinical models of cartilage defects.

  2. Development of a Spring-Loaded Impact Device to Deliver Injurious Mechanical Impacts to the Articular Cartilage Surface

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Peter G.; Song, Yingjie; Taboas, Juan M.; Chen, Faye H.; Melvin, Gary M.; Manner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Traumatic impacts on the articular joint surface in vitro are known to lead to degeneration of the cartilage. The main objective of this study was to develop a spring-loaded impact device that can be used to deliver traumatic impacts of consistent magnitude and rate and to find whether impacts cause catabolic activities in articular cartilage consistent with other previously reported impact models and correlated with the development of osteoarthritic lesions. In developing the spring-loaded impactor, the operating hypothesis is that a single supraphysiologic impact to articular cartilage in vitro can affect cartilage integrity, cell viability, sulfated glycosaminoglycan and inflammatory mediator release in a dose-dependent manner. Design: Impacts of increasing force are delivered to adult bovine articular cartilage explants in confined compression. Impact parameters are correlated with tissue damage, cell viability, matrix and inflammatory mediator release, and gene expression 24 hours postimpact. Results: Nitric oxide release is first detected after 7.7 MPa impacts, whereas cell death, glycosaminoglycan release, and prostaglandin E2 release are first detected at 17 MPa. Catabolic markers increase linearly to maximal levels after ≥36 MPa impacts. Conclusions: A single supraphysiologic impact negatively affects cartilage integrity, cell viability, and GAG release in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings showed that 7 to 17 MPa impacts can induce cell death and catabolism without compromising the articular surface, whereas a 17 MPa impact is sufficient to induce increases in most common catabolic markers of osteoarthritic degeneration. PMID:26069650

  3. A noncontacting method for material property determination for articular cartilage from osmotic loading.

    PubMed Central

    Narmoneva, D A; Wang, J Y; Setton, L A

    2001-01-01

    Articular cartilage is one of several biological tissues in which swelling effects are important in tissue mechanics and function, and may serve as an indicator of degenerative joint disease. This work presents a new approach to quantify swelling effects in articular cartilage, as well as to determine the material properties of cartilage from a simple free-swelling test. Samples of nondegenerate and degenerate human patellar cartilage were subjected to osmotic loading by equilibrating the tissue in solutions of varying osmolarity. The resulting swelling-induced strains were measured using a noncontacting optical method. A theoretical formulation of articular cartilage in a free-swelling configuration was developed based on an inhomogeneous, triphasic mechano-chemical model. Optimization of the model predictions to the experimental data was performed to determine two parameters descriptive of material stiffness at the surface and deeper cartilage layers, and a third parameter descriptive of thickness of the cartilage surface layer. These parameters were used to determine the thickness-averaged uniaxial modulus of cartilage, H(A). The obtained values for H(A) were similar to those for the tensile modulus of human cartilage reported in the literature. Degeneration resulted in an increase in thickness of the region of "apparent cartilage softening," and a decrease in the value for uniaxial modulus at this layer. These findings provide important evidence that collagen matrix disruption starts at the articular surface and progresses into the deeper layers with continued degeneration. These results suggest that the method provides a means to quantify the severity and depth of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. This method may also be used to determine material properties of cartilage in small joints in which conventional testing methods are difficult to apply. PMID:11720975

  4. Immune physiology and oogenesis in fetal and adult humans, ovarian infertility, and totipotency of adult ovarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Caudle, Michael R; Virant-Klun, Irma; Gupta, Satish K; Dominguez, Roberto; Svetlikova, Marta; Xu, Fei

    2009-03-01

    It is still widely believed that while oocytes in invertebrates and lower vertebrates are periodically renewed throughout life, oocytes in humans and higher vertebrates are formed only during the fetal/perinatal period. However, this dogma is questioned, and clashes with Darwinian evolutionary theory. Studies of oogenesis and follicular renewal from ovarian stem cells (OSCs) in adult human ovaries, and of the role of third-party bone marrow-derived cells (monocyte-derived tissue macrophages and T lymphocytes) could help provide a better understanding of the causes of ovarian infertility, its prevention, and potential treatment. We have reported differentiation of distinct cell types from OSC and the production of new eggs in cultures derived from premenopausal and postmenopausal human ovaries. OSCs are also capable of producing neural/neuronal cells in vitro after sequential stimulation with sex steroid combinations. Hence, OSC represent a unique type of totipotent adult stem cells, which could be utilized for autologous treatment of premature ovarian failure and also for autologous stem cell therapy of neurodegenerative diseases without use of allogeneic embryonic stem cells or somatic cell nuclear transfer. The in vivo application of sex steroid combinations may augment the proliferation of existing neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neuronal cells (systemic regenerative therapy). Such treatment may also stimulate the transdifferentiation of autologous neural stem cell precursors into neural stem cells useful for topical or systemic regenerative treatment.

  5. Adult humans' understanding of support relations: an up-linkage replication.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francisco J; Ten Hope, Merritt I; Tucker, Ali L

    2014-12-01

    In an up-linkage replication, three experiments examined adult humans' folk physics, i.e., their naturally occurring and spontaneous understanding of the physical world, using a violation of expectation (VOE) task and stimuli similar to those used to study chimpanzees', monkeys', and rooks' folk physics. Unlike what has been reported with nonhuman primates, adult humans did not look longer at physically impossible than possible events, though they did rate the physically impossible events as more interesting and novel than the possible events. These results underscore that behavior during a VOE experiment has many possible causes, only one of which may be a subject's folk physics.

  6. Role of platelet-rich plasma in articular cartilage injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; Saltzman, Bryan M; Fortier, Lisa A; Cole, Brian J

    2015-02-01

    Clinical and laboratory research aimed at biological approaches to cartilage repair are currently in high demand due to the poor regenerative capacity of articular cartilage in the setting of a diseased articular environment. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) takes advantage of supraphysiological concentrations of platelets and their growth factors harbored in α-granules, which together attempt to return the diseased articular cartilage to a preinjury state. The local use of PRP directly at the site of cartilage injury is thought to stimulate a natural healing cascade and accelerate the formation of cartilage repair tissue. This article provides an overview of the basic science behind the use of PRP in the treatment of cartilage injury and disease. Both initial and current examples of the use of intra-articular PRP in clinical human studies are provided. These include the use of PRP either alone or as an augmentation device with various other procedures, including arthroscopic microfracture and cell-free resorbable polyglycolic acid-hyaluronan implantation. Finally, the authors describe some of the potential future roles of PRP in clinical settings based on recent literature. These include Achilles tendon rupture, chronic tendinosis, chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy or tearing, muscle injury, and meniscal repair. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Comparison of proliferating cells between human adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Hong; Fu, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Gang

    2008-04-01

    Studies of sweat glands had demonstrated that there were degenerating cells and proliferating cells in the eccrine sweat glands. To compare the differences in the proliferating cells between human adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands, immunostaining of proliferating-associated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki67 nuclear antigen (Ki67) was performed, and the location and the percentage of the positive staining cells were analyzed. The results showed that a few cells of the secretory and ductal portion in both the adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands stained positive with Ki67 and PCNA. The labeling index of PCNA in adult eccrine sweat glands was 34.71 +/- 8.37%, while that in the fetal was 62.72 +/- 6.54%. The labeling index of PCNA in fetal eccrine sweat glands was higher than that in adult. Myoepithelial cells were negative staining with anti-PCNA antibody in adult eccrine sweat glands, while in the fetal a few myoepithelial cells were positive staining. Labeling index of Ki67 in adult eccrine sweat glands was similar to that in the fetal, ranging from 0.5 to 4.3%. Myoepithelial cells of the adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands both were negative staining with anti-Ki67 antibody. We concluded that the myoepithelial cells had proliferating ability only in fetal eccrine sweat glands, and that the proliferating ability of fetal eccrine sweat glands was stronger than that of the adult.

  8. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues.

    PubMed

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K; Rivas, Manuel A; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S; Kukurba, Kim R; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Burchard, Esteban G; Seibold, Max A; MacArthur, Daniel G; Montgomery, Stephen B; Zaitlen, Noah A; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-07-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. © 2015 Baran et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Seibold, Max A.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  10. Quasi-linear viscoelastic properties of normal articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Woo, S L; Simon, B R; Kuei, S C; Akeson, W H

    1980-05-01

    A combined experimental and analytical approach was used to determine the history-dependent viscoelastic properties of normal articular cartilage in tension. Specimens along the surface split line direction, taken from the middle zone of articular cartilage were subjected to relaxation and cyclic tests. A quasi-linear viscoelastic theory proposed by Fung was used in combination with the experimental results to determine the nonlinear viscoelastic properties and the elastic stress-strain relationship of normal articular cartilage.

  11. Paracetamol, aspirin and indomethacin display endocrine disrupting properties in the adult human testis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Albert, O; Desdoits-Lethimonier, C; Lesné, L; Legrand, A; Guillé, F; Bensalah, K; Dejucq-Rainsford, N; Jégou, B

    2013-07-01

    Do mild analgesics affect the endocrine system of the human adult testis? Mild analgesics induce multiple endocrine disturbances in the human adult testis in vitro. Mild analgesics have recently been incriminated as potential endocrine disruptors. Studies of the effects of these widely used molecules on the androgenic status of men are limited and somewhat contradictory. This prompted us to investigate whether these compounds could alter the adult human testicular function. We therefore assessed in parallel the effects of paracetamol, aspirin and indomethacin on organo-cultured adult human testis and on the NCI-H295R steroid-producing human cell line. Adult human testis explants or NCI-H295R adrenocortical human cells were cultured with 10(-4) or 10(-5) M paracetamol, aspirin or indomethacin for 24-48 h. The effect of 10(-5) M ketoconazole, used as an anti-androgenic reference molecule, was also assessed. Testes were obtained from prostate cancer patients, who had not received any hormone therapy. The protocol was approved by the local ethics committee of Rennes, France and informed consent was given by the donors. Only testes displaying spermatogenesis, as assessed by transillumination, were used in this study. Hormone levels in the culture media were determined by radioimmunoassay (testosterone, insulin-like factor 3), Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (inhibin B) or Enzyme Immunosorbent Assay [prostaglandin (PG) D2, and PGE2]. Tissues were observed and cells counted using classical immunohistochemical methods. The three mild analgesics caused multiple endocrine disturbances in the adult human testis. This was particularly apparent in the interstitial compartment. Effective doses were in the same range as those measured in blood plasma following standard analgesic treatment. The production of testosterone and insulin-like factor 3 by Leydig cells was altered by exposure to all these drugs. Inhibin B production by Sertoli cells was marginally affected by aspirin

  12. Repair of articular cartilage and meniscal tears by photoactive dyes: in-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Millard M.; Jackson, Robert W.; Nosir, Hany R.; Matthews, James Lester; Lewis, David E.; Utecht, Ronald E.; Yuan, Dongwu

    1996-12-01

    We describe healing results of our 6 month study of a repair procedure which evokes the healing response in meniscal tears and partial thickness defects in articular cartilage by a non-thermal tissue sparing photochemical weld using 1,8-naphthalimide dyes. Welds of incisional flaps in adult sheep meniscus and femoral articular cartilage were made using the dye MBM Gold 012011012 at 12 mM in PBS, 457.9nm Argon ion laser radiation at 800 mW/cm2, 7.5 minutes with approximately 1 kg/cm2 externally applied pressure. Gross appearance of tissues in all welded knees appeared normal. Hematoxylin and eosin stained sections disclosed close bonding of welded areas and continuing healing response as cellular recruitment.

  13. Direct Generation of Human Neuronal Cells from Adult Astrocytes by Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Longfei; Guan, Wuqiang; Wang, Min; Wang, Huihan; Yu, Jiali; Liu, Qing; Qiu, Binlong; Yu, Yongchun; Ping, Yifang; Bian, Xiuwu; Shen, Li; Pei, Gang

    2017-03-14

    Astrocytes, due to the proximity to neuronal lineage and capability to proliferate, are ideal starting cells to regenerate neurons. Human fetal astrocytes have been successfully converted into neuronal cells by small molecules, which offered a broader range of further applications than transcription factor-mediated neuronal reprogramming. Here we report that human adult astrocytes could also be converted into neuronal cells by a different set of small molecules. These induced cells exhibited typical neuronal morphologies, expressed neuronal markers, and displayed neuronal electrophysiological properties. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing analysis showed that the global gene expression profile of induced neuronal cells resembled that of human embryonic stem cell-differentiated neurons. When transplanted into post-natal mouse brains, these induced neuronal cells could survive and become electrophysiologically mature. Altogether, our study provides a strategy to directly generate transgene-free neuronal cells from human adult astrocytes by small molecules. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of growth hormone hypersecretion on the adult human kidney.

    PubMed

    Grunenwald, Solange; Tack, Ivan; Chauveau, Dominique; Bennet, Antoine; Caron, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Acromegaly is most often secondary to a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with increased Insulin-like Growth Factor type 1 (IGF-1) level. The consequences of GH/IGF-1 hypersecretion reflect the diversity of action of these hormones. The genes of the GH receptor (GHR), IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and IGF-binding proteins (IGF-BP) are physiologically expressed in the adult kidney, suggesting a potential role of the somatotropic axis on renal structure and functions. The expression of these proteins is highly organized and differs according to the anatomical and functional segments of the nephron suggesting different roles of GH and IGF-1 in these segments. In animals, chronic exposure to high doses of GH induces glomerulosclerosis and increases albuminuria. Studies in patients with GH hypersecretion have identified numerous targets of GH/IGF-1 axis on the kidney: 1) an impact on renal filtration with increased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), 2) a structural impact with an increase in kidney weight and glomerular hypertrophy, and 3) a tubular impact leading to hyperphosphatemia, hypercalciuria and antinatriuretic effects. Despite the increased glomerular filtration rate observed in patients with GH hypersecretion, GH is an inefficient treatment for chronic renal failure. GH and IGF-1 seem to be involved in the physiopathology of diabetic nephropathy; this finding offers the possibility of targeting the GH/IGF-1 axis for the prevention and the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2016-05-01

    Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high-dose hormone application in adult female-to-male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel-based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting-state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone-dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language-specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738-1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high‐dose hormone application in adult female‐to‐male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel‐based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting‐state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone‐dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language‐specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738–1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  17. Bacteriology of severe periodontitis in young adult humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Smibert, R M; Hash, D E; Burmeister, J A; Ranney, R R

    1982-01-01

    A total of 78 bacteriological samples were taken from the supragingival tooth surface after superficial cleaning with toothpicks or from the periodontal sulci of 42 affected sites in 21 adolescents or young adults with severe generalized periodontitis. Of 190 bacterial species, subspecies, or serotypes detected among 2,723 isolates, 11 species exceeded 1% of the subgingival flora and were most closely associated with the diseased sulci. Eleven others were also sufficiently frequent to be suspect agents of tissue destruction. Many of these species are known pathogens of other body sites. In addition, 10 species of Treponema were isolated. One of these and the "large treponeme" were also more closely associated with severe periodontitis than they were with healthy sites or gingivitis. There were highly significant differences between the composition of the flora of the affected sulci and the flora of (i) the adjacent supragingival tooth surface, (ii) the gingival crevice of periodontally healthy people, and (iii) sites with a gingival index score of 0 or 2 in experimental gingivitis studies. The floras of different individuals were also significantly different. There was no statistically detectable effect of sampling per se upon the composition of the flora of subsequent samples from the same sites. The composition of the supragingival flora of the patients with severe generalized periodontitis that had serum antibody to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was significantly different from the supragingival flora of patients without this serum antibody. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the composition of their subgingival floras. PMID:7152665

  18. Perinatal inflammation and adult psychopathology: From preclinical models to humans.

    PubMed

    Depino, Amaicha Mara

    2017-09-07

    Perinatal environment plays a crucial role in brain development and determines its function through life. Epidemiological studies and clinical reports link perinatal exposure to infection and/or immune activation to various psychiatric disorders. In addition, accumulating evidence from animal models shows that perinatal inflammation can affect various behaviors relevant to psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autism, anxiety and depression. Remarkably, the effects on behavior and brain function do not always depend on the type of inflammatory stimulus or the perinatal age targeted, so diverse inflammatory events can have similar consequences on the brain. Moreover, other perinatal environmental factors that affect behavior (e.g. diet and stress) also elicit inflammatory responses. Understanding the interplay between perinatal environment and inflammation on brain development is required to identify the mechanisms through which perinatal inflammation affect brain function in the adult animal. Evidence for the role of the peripheral immune system and glia on perinatal programming of behavior is discussed in this review, along with recent evidence for the role of epigenetic mechanisms affecting gene expression in the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fascicles of the adult human Achilles tendon - an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Szaro, Paweł; Witkowski, Grzegorz; Smigielski, Robert; Krajewski, Paweł; Ciszek, Bogdan

    2009-12-01

    The Achilles or calcaneal tendon is the structural base for the biomechanical work of the ankle joint. The purpose of this study is to describe the internal structure of the human Achilles tendon. The anatomy of the Achilles tendon has been described in lower mammals in which it has three parts which can be dissected from its beginning to the insertion onto the calcaneus. The partial ruptures of each part suggest that the human Achilles tendon may also be composed of parts. The Achilles tendon is one of the most commonly torn tendons in the human body. Each segment of the Achilles tendon described by us can be ruptured separately, which can cause a partial dysfunction in flexion of the ankle joint as observed in clinical practice. We dissected 20 Achilles tendons previously fixed in 10% formaldehyde and 20 fresh-frozen Achilles tendons, paying particular attention to the relationship between the lateral and medial heads of the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscles. The layer-by-layer method and a microscope were used in our study. We found that the medial group of fibers from the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle constitutes the posterior layer of the tendon. The lateral border of the tendon is composed of the fibers from the lateral part of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle. The fibers from the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle constitute the anterior layer of the Achilles tendon. The fibers from the soleus muscle are located in the anteromedial part of the Achilles tendon. Our findings are supported by clinical descriptions and observations of the partial rupture of the Achilles tendon. 2009 Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Refraction-Contrast Articular Cartilage Image: Comparison of Depiction Abilities between In-Line Holographic Method and a Laue Type Analyzer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimao, Daisuke; Mori, Koichi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Two kinds of refraction-contrast image, one obtained using the in-line holographic method and the other obtained using an analyzer crystal in the Laue geometry, from a specimen of a human articular cartilage were investigated using synchrotron X-rays at 30 keV. The former image was superior in spatial resolution and the latter image was superior in contrast regarding the delineation of the articular cartilage, which is invisible by the absorption contrast.

  1. Contact and perspective taking improve humanness standards and perceptions of humanness of older adults and people with dementia: a cross-sectional survey study.

    PubMed

    Miron, Anca M; McFadden, Susan H; Hermus, Nathan J; Buelow, Jennifer; Nazario, Amanda S; Seelman, Katarena

    2017-10-01

    No empirical work has systematically explored perceptions of humanness of people with dementia and of older adults and the variables that could improve these perceptions. We thus investigated the role of contact and perspective taking in improving perceptions of humanness of these social groups. To do so, we developed a new concept, humanness standards, defined as the amount of evidence of ability impairment needed to conclude that elderly people and those with dementia have lost personhood. We used a cross-sectional survey design (n = 619) to assess participants' humanness standards and perceptions of uniquely human characteristics and human nature characteristics of two social groups (people with dementia and older adults). Half the participants (n = 311) completed a survey about people with dementia and half (n = 308) assessed older adults. People with dementia were perceived as possessing humanness characteristics to a lesser extent than were older adults. For both groups, contact predicted enhanced perceptions of humanness characteristics. Participants' degree of contact with individuals with dementia also predicted humanness standards, but only under low perspective-taking conditions. As predicted, for older adults, participants set the highest humanness impairment thresholds in the high contact/high perspective-taking condition. We conclude that while social programs that bring persons with dementia and other individuals in contact could change humanness standards and perceptions of humanness characteristics of people with dementia, in the case of elderly adults, the contact must be supplemented by variables that facilitate taking the perspective of the person.

  2. Does the adult human ciliary body epithelium contain "true" retinal stem cells?

    PubMed

    Frøen, Rebecca; Johnsen, Erik O; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Facskó, Andrea; Petrovski, Goran; Moe, Morten C

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports of retinal stem cells being present in several locations of the adult eye have sparked great hopes that they may be used to treat the millions of people worldwide who suffer from blindness as a result of retinal disease or injury. A population of proliferative cells derived from the ciliary body epithelium (CE) has been considered one of the prime stem cell candidates, and as such they have received much attention in recent years. However, the true nature of these cells in the adult human eye has still not been fully elucidated, and the stem cell claim has become increasingly controversial in light of new and conflicting reports. In this paper, we will try to answer the question of whether the available evidence is strong enough for the research community to conclude that the adult human CE indeed harbors stem cells.

  3. Genetic and functional characterization of clonally derived adult human brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Kosaku; Luijten, Ineke H N; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Hong, Haemin; Sonne, Si B; Kim, Miae; Xue, Ruidan; Chondronikola, Maria; Cypess, Aaron M; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Nedergaard, Jan; Sidossis, Labros S; Kajimura, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) acts in mammals as a natural defense system against hypothermia, and its activation to a state of increased energy expenditure is believed to protect against the development of obesity. Even though the existence of BAT in adult humans has been widely appreciated1–8, its cellular origin and molecular identity remain elusive largely because of high cellular heterogeneity within various adipose tissue depots. To understand the nature of adult human brown adipocytes at single cell resolution, we isolated clonally derived adipocytes from stromal vascular fractions of adult human BAT from two individuals and globally analyzed their molecular signatures. We used RNA sequencing followed by unbiased genome-wide expression analyses and found that a population of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)-positive human adipocytes possessed molecular signatures resembling those of a recruitable form of thermogenic adipocytes (that is, beige adipocytes). In addition, we identified molecular markers that were highly enriched in UCP1-positive human adipocytes, a set that included potassium channel K3 (KCNK3) and mitochondrial tumor suppressor 1 (MTUS1). Further, we functionally characterized these two markers using a loss-of-function approach and found that KCNK3 and MTUS1 were required for beige adipocyte differentiation and thermogenic function. The results of this study present new opportunities for human BAT research, such as facilitating cell-based disease modeling and unbiased screens for thermogenic regulators. PMID:25774848

  4. Canonical Genetic Signatures of the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hawrylycz, Michael; Miller, Jeremy A.; Menon, Vilas; Feng, David; Dolbeare, Tim; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L.; Jegga, Anil G.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Bernard, Amy; Glasser, Matthew F.; Dierker, Donna L.; Menche, Jörge; Szafer, Aaron; Collman, Forrest; Grange, Pascal; Berman, Kenneth A.; Mihalas, Stefan; Yao, Zizhen; Stewart, Lance; Barabási, Albert-László; Schulkin, Jay; Phillips, John; Ng, Lydia; Dang, Chinh; Haynor, David R.; Jones, Allan; Van Essen, David C.; Koch, Christof; Lein, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The structure and function of the human brain are highly stereotyped, implying a conserved molecular program responsible for its development, cellular structure, and function. We applied a correlation-based metric of “differential stability” (DS) to assess reproducibility of gene expression patterning across 132 structures in six individual brains, revealing meso-scale genetic organization. The highest DS genes are highly biologically relevant, with enrichment for brain-related biological annotations, disease associations, drug targets, and literature citations. Using high DS genes we identified 32 anatomically diverse and reproducible gene expression signatures, which represent distinct cell types, intracellular components, and/or associations with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Genes in neuron-associated compared to non-neuronal networks showed higher preservation between human and mouse; however, many diversely-patterned genes displayed dramatic shifts in regulation between species. Finally, highly consistent transcriptional architecture in neocortex is correlated with resting state functional connectivity, suggesting a link between conserved gene expression and functionally relevant circuitry. PMID:26571460

  5. NIRS Measurement of Venous Oxygen Saturation in the Adult Human Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Derek W.; Haensse, Daniel; Bauschatz, Andrea; Wolf, Martin

    Provided that both the breathing frequency remains constant and that the temporal resolution of the instrument is sufficiently high, NIRS spiroximetry enables measurement of cerebral SvO2 in healthy human adults. Furthermore, simultaneous measurements of StO2, SaO2, and SvO2 enable calculation of both OEF and the compartmental distribution of cerebral blood volume.

  6. Equality and Human Capital: Conflicting Concepts within State-Funded Adult Education in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a critique of the concept of equality as it informs the White Paper on Adult Education: Learning for Life (2000). It also outlines the extent to which human capital theory can be seen to have effectively colonised lifelong learning from the outset of its adoption by the European Union with highly constraining implications for…

  7. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part Two, the Critical Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2006-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995). The…

  8. An Assessemnt of Graduate Adult Education and Human Resource Development Programs: A U.S. Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akdere, Mesut; Conceicao, Simone C. O.

    2009-01-01

    Due to recent changes in the workplace, the workforce and higher education have driven academic programs of adult education (AE) and human resource development (HRD) in the U.S. to become more integrated as part of the mission of institutions of higher education. In this exploratory study, existing graduate programs in AE and HRD in the U.S. were…

  9. Equality and Human Capital: Conflicting Concepts within State-Funded Adult Education in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a critique of the concept of equality as it informs the White Paper on Adult Education: Learning for Life (2000). It also outlines the extent to which human capital theory can be seen to have effectively colonised lifelong learning from the outset of its adoption by the European Union with highly constraining implications for…

  10. Treatment of Human-Caused Trauma: Attrition in the Adult Outcomes Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthieu, Monica; Ivanoff, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Attrition or dropout is the failure of a participant to complete, comply, or the prematurely discontinuation or discharge from treatment, resulting in lost data and affecting outcomes. This review of 10 years of adult posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment outcome literature specific to Criterion A events of human origin examines how…

  11. Perspectives on Adult Education, Human Resource Development, and the Emergence of Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a perspective on the relationship between adult education and human resource development of the past two decades and the subsequent emergence of workforce development. The lesson taken from the article should be more than simply a recounting of events related to these fields of study. Instead, the more general lesson may be…

  12. Concept Maps: Practice Applications in Adult Education and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Concept maps can be used as both a cognitive and constructivist learning strategy in teaching and learning in adult education and human resource development. The maps can be used to understand course readings, analyze case studies, develop reflective thinking and enhance research skills. The creation of concept maps can also be supported by the…

  13. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part One, Assumptions, Definitions, and Critiques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2006-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995).…

  14. Perspectives on Adult Education, Human Resource Development, and the Emergence of Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a perspective on the relationship between adult education and human resource development of the past two decades and the subsequent emergence of workforce development. The lesson taken from the article should be more than simply a recounting of events related to these fields of study. Instead, the more general lesson may be…

  15. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part Two, the Critical Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2014-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995). The…

  16. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part One, Assumptions, Definitions, and Critiques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2013-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995).…

  17. Emotions and Human Concern: Adult Education and the Philosophical Thought of Martha Nussbaum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Donovan

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that philosopher Martha Nussbaum's reflections on the role of the emotions in human flourishing can contribute in important ways to our understanding of the emotions in adult education contexts. The article summarises Nussbaum's exploration of the contributions of classical philosophers like Socrates, Aristotle, and…

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Adenovirus 7 Associated with Fatal Adult Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshina, Svetlana B; Ageeva, Margarita R; Deviatkin, Andrey A; Pimkina, Ekaterina V; Markelov, Mikhail L; Dedkov, Vladimir G; Safonova, Marina V; Shumilina, Elena Y; Lukashev, Alexander N; Shipulin, German A

    2016-10-27

    Human adenovirus 7 (hAdv7) 19BOVLB/Volgograd/Rus/2014 was isolated from the autopsy material from an adult with fatal pneumonia in Volgograd, Russia, in March 2014. Whole-genome sequencing of the virus isolate was performed.

  19. Emotions and Human Concern: Adult Education and the Philosophical Thought of Martha Nussbaum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Donovan

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that philosopher Martha Nussbaum's reflections on the role of the emotions in human flourishing can contribute in important ways to our understanding of the emotions in adult education contexts. The article summarises Nussbaum's exploration of the contributions of classical philosophers like Socrates, Aristotle, and…

  20. Isolation of alveolar epithelial type II progenitor cells from adult human lungs

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Naoya; Kubo, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Takaya; Ota, Chiharu; Hegab, Ahmed E; He, Mei; Suzuki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Takashi; Kato, Hidemasa; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2011-01-01

    Resident stem/progenitor cells in the lung are important for tissue homeostasis and repair. However, a progenitor population for alveolar type II (ATII) cells in adult human lungs has not been identified. The aim of this study is to isolate progenitor cells from adult human lungs with the ability to differentiate into ATII cells. We isolated colony-forming cells that had the capability for self-renewal and the potential to generate ATII cells in vitro. These undifferentiated progenitor cells expressed surface markers of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and surfactant proteins associated with ATII cells, such as CD90 and pro-surfactant protein-C (pro-SP-C), respectively. Microarray analyses indicated that transcripts associated with lung development were enriched in the pro-SP-C+/CD90+ cells compared with bone marrow-MSCs. Furthermore, pathological evaluation indicated that pro-SP-C and CD90 double-positive cells were present within alveolar walls in normal lungs, and significantly increased in ATII cell hyperplasias contributing to alveolar epithelial repair in damaged lungs. Our findings demonstrated that adult human lungs contain a progenitor population for ATII cells. This study is a first step toward better understanding of stem cell biology in adult human lung alveoli. PMID:21079581

  1. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part One, Assumptions, Definitions, and Critiques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2013-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995).…

  2. Perspectives on Adult Education, Human Resource Development, and the Emergence of Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a perspective on the relationship between adult education and human resource development of the past two decades and the subsequent emergence of workforce development. The lesson taken from the article should be more than simply a recounting of events related to these fields of study. Instead, the more general lesson may be…

  3. Adult attachment style is associated with cerebral μ-opioid receptor availability in humans.

    PubMed

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Manninen, Sandra; Tuominen, Lauri; Hirvonen, Jussi; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Nuutila, Pirjo; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Hari, Riitta; Dunbar, Robin I M; Sams, Mikko

    2015-09-01

    Human attachment behavior mediates establishment and maintenance of social relationships. Adult attachment characteristically varies on anxiety and avoidance dimensions, reflecting the tendencies to worry about the partner breaking the social bond (anxiety) and feeling uncomfortable about depending on others (avoidance). In primates and other mammals, the endogenous μ-opioid system is linked to long-term social bonding, but evidence of its role in human adult attachment remains more limited. We used in vivo positron emission tomography to reveal how variability in μ-opioid receptor (MOR) availability is associated with adult attachment in humans. We scanned 49 healthy subjects using a MOR-specific ligand [(11) C]carfentanil and measured their attachment avoidance and anxiety with the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised scale. The avoidance dimension of attachment correlated negatively with MOR availability in the thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex, as well as the frontal cortex, amygdala, and insula. No associations were observed between MOR availability and the anxiety dimension of attachment. Our results suggest that the endogenous opioid system may underlie interindividual differences in avoidant attachment style in human adults, and that differences in MOR availability are associated with the individuals' social relationships and psychosocial well-being. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part Two, the Critical Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2014-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995). The…

  5. Rehabilitation in adults with human immunodeficiency virus-related diseases.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, M W; Dillon, M E

    1992-06-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is a fatal disorder of cell-mediated immunity caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). As many as one million Americans infected with HIV can expect improved survival with more advanced treatment approaches. Complications of HIV infection occur in the brain, spinal cord, muscle, nerve, joints and other organ systems, which lead to extensive impairments. As survival increases, rehabilitation professionals can anticipate a greater number of referrals for the assessment and management of physical disability in persons with HIV infection. This article reviews HIV-related disease, impairment, disability and handicap pertinent to rehabilitation medicine. An agenda for future research is also proposed. Current knowledge and models or rehabilitation care can be applied to HIV-related physical disability in an effort to improve overall quality of life.

  6. Characterization of human foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatase. Comparison with the isoenzymes from the adult intestine and human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, C M; Enns, C A; Sussman, H H

    1983-01-01

    The molecular structure of human foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatase was defined by high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and amino acid inhibition studies. Comparison was made with the adult form of intestinal alkaline phosphatase, as well as with alkaline phosphatases isolated from cultured foetal amnion cells (FL) and a human tumour cell line (KB). Two non-identical subunits were isolated from the foetal intestinal isoenzyme, one having same molecular weight and isoelectric point as placental alkaline phosphatase, and the other corresponding to a glycosylated subunit of the adult intestinal enzyme. The FL-cell and KB-cell alkaline phosphatases were also found to contain two subunits similar to those of the foetal intestinal isoenzyme. Characterization of neuraminidase digests of the non-placental subunit showed it to be indistinguishable from the subunits of the adult intestinal isoenzyme. This implies that no new phosphatase structural gene is involved in the transition from the expression of foetal to adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase, but that the molecular changes involve suppression of the placental subunit and loss of neuraminic acid from the non-placental subunit. Enzyme-inhibition studies demonstrated an intermediate response to the inhibitors tested for the foetal intestinal, FL-cell and KB-cell isoenzymes when compared with the placental, adult intestinal and liver forms. This result is consistent with the mixed-subunit structure observed for the former set of isoenzymes. In summary, this study has defined the molecular subunit structure of the foetal intestinal form of alkaline phosphatase and has demonstrated its expression in a human tumour cell line. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6882358

  7. Expression of neurotrimin in the normal and injured adult human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Grijalva, I; Li, X; Marcillo, A; Salzer, J L; Levi, A D

    2006-05-01

    Neurotrimin (Ntm) is a member of the family of neural cell adhesion molecules. Its expression pattern suggests that Ntm promotes axonal fasciculation, guides nerve fibers to specific targets and stabilizes synapses as it accumulates coincident with synaptogenesis. Strong labeling of Ntm was observed in motor and sensory areas of the postnatal rat cortex. It is not known whether Ntm is present in adult human spinal cord (SC). In the present study, a monoclonal antibody specific for Ntm (1B1), is applied to the first study of the expression of Ntm in normal and injured adult human SC. (1) To investigate the expression pattern of Ntm in adult normal human SC, and (2) to observe the changes of Ntm expression after SC injury and compare the differences between normal and injured adult human SC. Human SC tissue was obtained from necropsies of patients with (n=5) and without (n=4) SC injury. The 1B1 Ntm monoclonal antibody was used for immunohistochemical staining on paraffin embedded sections with an ABC kit. (1) In total, 12 slides were analyzed for each group from both cervical and thoracic levels. Motor neurons and Clarke's neurons and glial-like cells were mild to moderately positive in all uninjured SC specimens. (2) In injured SC, no staining was observed in the injury epicenter between two and three levels proximally and distally, but was detected five levels away. (3) In patients older than 67 years of age, Ntm-positive inclusions were present in the white matter of the SC with or without injury. (4) Some meningeal cells were strongly Ntm-positive, especially in the uninjured human SC. Ntm is expressed by motor and Clarke's neurons and glial cells in uninjured human SC. The downregulation of Ntm in the injured SC suggests that its expression is regulated by afferent input. Spinal Cord (2006) 44, 275-279. doi:10.1038/sj.sc.3101840; published online 20 September 2005.

  8. 40 CFR 26.1704 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted before April 7, 2006. 26.1704 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted before...

  9. 40 CFR 26.1704 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted before April 7, 2006. 26.1704 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted before...

  10. 40 CFR 26.1705 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted after April 7, 2006. 26.1705 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted after...

  11. 40 CFR 26.1705 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults initiated after April 7, 2006. 26.1705 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults initiated after...

  12. 40 CFR 26.1705 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted after April 7, 2006. 26.1705 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted after...

  13. 40 CFR 26.1704 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted before April 7, 2006. 26.1704 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted before...

  14. 40 CFR 26.1705 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted after April 7, 2006. 26.1705 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted after...

  15. 40 CFR 26.1705 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults initiated after April 7, 2006. 26.1705 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults initiated after...

  16. Self-Control and Impulsiveness in Nondieting Adult Human Females: Effects of Visual Food Cues and Food Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forzano, Lori-Ann B.; Chelonis, John J.; Casey, Caitlin; Forward, Marion; Stachowiak, Jacqueline A.; Wood, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Self-control can be defined as the choice of a larger, more delayed reinforcer over a smaller, less delayed reinforcer, and impulsiveness as the opposite. Previous research suggests that exposure to visual food cues affects adult humans' self-control. Previous research also suggests that food deprivation decreases adult humans' self-control. The…

  17. Self-Control and Impulsiveness in Nondieting Adult Human Females: Effects of Visual Food Cues and Food Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forzano, Lori-Ann B.; Chelonis, John J.; Casey, Caitlin; Forward, Marion; Stachowiak, Jacqueline A.; Wood, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Self-control can be defined as the choice of a larger, more delayed reinforcer over a smaller, less delayed reinforcer, and impulsiveness as the opposite. Previous research suggests that exposure to visual food cues affects adult humans' self-control. Previous research also suggests that food deprivation decreases adult humans' self-control. The…

  18. Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome after intra-articular triamcinolone in a patient receiving ritonavir-boosted darunavir.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jill J; Hughes, Christine A; Foisy, Michelle M; Houston, Stan; Shafran, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    Drug interactions involving human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors are common due to their inhibition of the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme. We describe the case of an HIV-infected patient treated with ritonavir-boosted darunavir who developed cushingoid features following an intra-articular injection of triamcinolone acetate. We review the probable mechanism for this interaction and describe similar cases of Cushing syndrome in patients receiving concomitant ritonavir and triamcinolone.

  19. Deficiency of Thrombospondin-4 in Mice Does Not Affect Skeletal Growth or Bone Mass Acquisition, but Causes a Transient Reduction of Articular Cartilage Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Maciej; Peters, Stephanie; Baum, Wolfgang; Schett, Georg; Ruether, Wolfgang; Niemeier, Andreas; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Although articular cartilage degeneration represents a major public health problem, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We have previously utilized genome-wide expression analysis to identify specific markers of porcine articular cartilage, one of them being Thrombospondin-4 (Thbs4). In the present study we analyzed Thbs4 expression in mice, thereby confirming its predominant expression in articular cartilage, but also identifying expression in other tissues, including bone. To study the role of Thbs4 in skeletal development and integrity we took advantage of a Thbs4-deficient mouse model that was analyzed by undecalcified bone histology. We found that Thbs4-deficient mice do not display phenotypic differences towards wildtype littermates in terms of skeletal growth or bone mass acquisition. Since Thbs4 has previously been found over-expressed in bones of Phex-deficient Hyp mice, we additionally generated Thbs4-deficient Hyp mice, but failed to detect phenotypic differences towards Hyp littermates. With respect to articular cartilage we found that Thbs4-deficient mice display transient thinning of articular cartilage, suggesting a protective role of Thbs4 for joint integrity. Gene expression analysis using porcine primary cells revealed that Thbs4 is not expressed by synovial fibroblasts and that it represents the only member of the Thbs gene family with specific expression in articular, but not in growth plate chondrocytes. In an attempt to identify specific molecular effects of Thbs4 we treated porcine articular chondrocytes with human THBS4 in the absence or presence of conditioned medium from porcine synovial fibroblasts. Here we did not observe a significant influence of THBS4 on proliferation, metabolic activity, apoptosis or gene expression, suggesting that it does not act as a signaling molecule. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Thbs4 is highly expressed in articular chondrocytes, where its presence in the

  20. Deficiency of Thrombospondin-4 in Mice Does Not Affect Skeletal Growth or Bone Mass Acquisition, but Causes a Transient Reduction of Articular Cartilage Thickness.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, Anke; Bonitz, Martin; Simon, Maciej; Peters, Stephanie; Baum, Wolfgang; Schett, Georg; Ruether, Wolfgang; Niemeier, Andreas; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Although articular cartilage degeneration represents a major public health problem, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We have previously utilized genome-wide expression analysis to identify specific markers of porcine articular cartilage, one of them being Thrombospondin-4 (Thbs4). In the present study we analyzed Thbs4 expression in mice, thereby confirming its predominant expression in articular cartilage, but also identifying expression in other tissues, including bone. To study the role of Thbs4 in skeletal development and integrity we took advantage of a Thbs4-deficient mouse model that was analyzed by undecalcified bone histology. We found that Thbs4-deficient mice do not display phenotypic differences towards wildtype littermates in terms of skeletal growth or bone mass acquisition. Since Thbs4 has previously been found over-expressed in bones of Phex-deficient Hyp mice, we additionally generated Thbs4-deficient Hyp mice, but failed to detect phenotypic differences towards Hyp littermates. With respect to articular cartilage we found that Thbs4-deficient mice display transient thinning of articular cartilage, suggesting a protective role of Thbs4 for joint integrity. Gene expression analysis using porcine primary cells revealed that Thbs4 is not expressed by synovial fibroblasts and that it represents the only member of the Thbs gene family with specific expression in articular, but not in growth plate chondrocytes. In an attempt to identify specific molecular effects of Thbs4 we treated porcine articular chondrocytes with human THBS4 in the absence or presence of conditioned medium from porcine synovial fibroblasts. Here we did not observe a significant influence of THBS4 on proliferation, metabolic activity, apoptosis or gene expression, suggesting that it does not act as a signaling molecule. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Thbs4 is highly expressed in articular chondrocytes, where its presence in the

  1. Purinergic responses of calcium-dependent signaling pathways in cultured adult human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hashioka, Sadayuki; Wang, Yun Fan; Little, Jonathan P; Choi, Hyun B; Klegeris, Andis; McGeer, Patrick L; McLarnon, James G

    2014-01-22

    The properties of Ca2+ signaling mediated by purinergic receptors are intrinsically linked with functional activity of astrocytes. At present little is known concerning Ca2+-dependent purinergic responses in adult human astrocytes. This work has examined effects of purinergic stimulation to alter levels of intracellular Ca2+ in adult human astrocytes. Ca2+-sensitive spectrofluorometry was carried out to determine mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ following adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or 3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl-ATP (Bz-ATP) stimulation of adult human astrocytes. In some experiments pharmacological modulation of Ca2+ pathways was applied to help elucidate mechanisms of Ca2+ signaling. RT-PCR was also performed to confirm human astrocyte expression of specific purinoceptors which were indicated from imaging studies. The endogenous P2 receptor agonist ATP (at 100 μM or 1 mM) applied in physiological saline solution (PSS) evoked a rapid increase of [Ca2+]i to a peak amplitude with the decay phase of response exhibiting two components. The two phases of decay consisted of an initial rapid component which was followed by a secondary slower component. In the presence of Ca2+-free solution, the secondary phase of decay was absent indicating this prolonged component was due to influx of Ca2+. This prolonged phase of decay was also attenuated with the store-operated channel (SOC) inhibitor gadolinium (at 2 μM) added to standard PSS, suggesting this component was mediated by SOC activation. These results are consistent with ATP activation of P2Y receptor (P2YR) in adult human astrocytes leading to respective rapid [Ca2+]i mobilization from intracellular stores followed by Ca2+ entry through SOC. An agonist for P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), BzATP induced a very different response compared with ATP whereby BzATP (at 300 μM) elicited a slowly rising increase in [Ca2+]i to a plateau level which was sustained in duration. The BzATP-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was not enhanced with

  2. Purinergic responses of calcium-dependent signaling pathways in cultured adult human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The properties of Ca2+ signaling mediated by purinergic receptors are intrinsically linked with functional activity of astrocytes. At present little is known concerning Ca2+-dependent purinergic responses in adult human astrocytes. This work has examined effects of purinergic stimulation to alter levels of intracellular Ca2+ in adult human astrocytes. Ca2+-sensitive spectrofluorometry was carried out to determine mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ following adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or 3′-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl-ATP (Bz-ATP) stimulation of adult human astrocytes. In some experiments pharmacological modulation of Ca2+ pathways was applied to help elucidate mechanisms of Ca2+ signaling. RT-PCR was also performed to confirm human astrocyte expression of specific purinoceptors which were indicated from imaging studies. Results The endogenous P2 receptor agonist ATP (at 100 μM or 1 mM) applied in physiological saline solution (PSS) evoked a rapid increase of [Ca2+]i to a peak amplitude with the decay phase of response exhibiting two components. The two phases of decay consisted of an initial rapid component which was followed by a secondary slower component. In the presence of Ca2+-free solution, the secondary phase of decay was absent indicating this prolonged component was due to influx of Ca2+. This prolonged phase of decay was also attenuated with the store-operated channel (SOC) inhibitor gadolinium (at 2 μM) added to standard PSS, suggesting this component was mediated by SOC activation. These results are consistent with ATP activation of P2Y receptor (P2YR) in adult human astrocytes leading to respective rapid [Ca2+]i mobilization from intracellular stores followed by Ca2+ entry through SOC. An agonist for P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), BzATP induced a very different response compared with ATP whereby BzATP (at 300 μM) elicited a slowly rising increase in [Ca2+]i to a plateau level which was sustained in duration. The BzATP-induced increase in [Ca2+]i

  3. Induction of CD44 Cleavage in Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nobunori; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Thankamony, Sai; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Mellor, Liliana; Im, Hee-Jeong; Knudson, Warren

    2010-01-01

    Objective The hyaluronan receptor CD44 provides chondrocytes with a mechanism for sensing and responding to changes in the extracellular matrix. The purpose of this study was to document the fragmentation and loss of CD44 and to determine the likely mechanisms involved. Methods A polyclonal anti-CD44 cytotail antibody was generated to detect CD44 fragmentation by Western blot analysis. Chondrocytes were isolated from human or bovine articular cartilage. Primary articular chondrocytes were treated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β), hyaluronan oligosaccharides, or phorbol myristate acetate or were passaged and subcultured in monolayer to induce dedifferentiation. Conditions that altered the capacity of CD44 to transit into lipid rafts, or pharmacologic inhibitors of metalloproteinase or γ-secretase activity were used to define the mechanism of fragmentation of CD44. Results Chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage exhibited CD44 fragmentation as low molecular mass bands, corresponding to the CD44-EXT and CD44-ICD bands. Following dedifferentiation of chondrocytes or treatment of primary chondrocytes with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, IL-1β, or phorbol myristate acetate, CD44 fragmentation was enhanced. Subsequent culture of the dedifferentiated chondrocytes in 3-dimensional alginate beads rescued the chondrocyte phenotype and diminished the fragmentation of CD44. Fragmentation of CD44 in chondrocytes was blocked in the presence of the metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001 and the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT. Conclusion CD44 fragmentation, consistent with a signature pattern reported for sequential metalloproteinase/γ-secretase cleavage of CD44, is a common metabolic feature of chondrocytes that have undergone dedifferentiation in vitro and osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Transit of CD44 into lipid rafts may be required for its fragmentation. PMID:20178130

  4. A humanized version of Foxp2 does not affect ultrasonic vocalization in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, K; Schreiweis, C; Minge, C; Pääbo, S; Fischer, J; Enard, W

    2015-11-01

    The transcription factor FOXP2 has been linked to severe speech and language impairments in humans. An analysis of the evolution of the FOXP2 gene has identified two amino acid substitutions that became fixed after the split of the human and chimpanzee lineages. Studying the functional consequences of these two substitutions in the endogenous Foxp2 gene of mice showed alterations in dopamine levels, striatal synaptic plasticity, neuronal morphology and cortico-striatal-dependent learning. In addition, ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) of pups had a significantly lower average pitch than control littermates. To which degree adult USVs would be affected in mice carrying the 'humanized' Foxp2 variant remained unclear. In this study, we analyzed USVs of 68 adult male mice uttered during repeated courtship encounters with different females. Mice carrying the Foxp2(hum/hum) allele did not differ significantly in the number of call elements, their element structure or in their element composition from control littermates. We conclude that neither the structure nor the usage of USVs in adult mice is affected by the two amino acid substitutions that occurred in FOXP2 during human evolution. The reported effect for pup vocalization thus appears to be transient. These results are in line with accumulating evidence that mouse USVs are hardly influenced by vocal learning. Hence, the function and evolution of genes that are necessary, but not sufficient for vocal learning in humans, must be either studied at a different phenotypic level in mice or in other organisms.

  5. The mechanical properties of human ribs in young adult.

    PubMed

    Pezowicz, Celina; Głowacki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    A good understanding of thoracic biomechanics is important for complete examination and control of chest behaviour under conditions of physiological and pathological work, and under the impact of external forces leading to traumatic loading of the chest. The purpose of the study was to analyse the mechanical properties of human ribs obtained from individuals under the age of 25 with scoliosis deformation and to correlate them with geometric properties of ribs. Thirty three fragments of ribs (9th to 12th) were tested in three-point bending. Rib fragments were collected intraoperatively from female patients treated for scoliosis in the thoracic, thoracolumbar, and lumbar spine. The results were used to determine the maximum failure force, stiffness, and Young's modulus. A significant relationship was found between the age and elastic modulus of the ribs. The analysis was carried out for two age groups, i.e., between the ages of 10 and 15 and between the ages of 16 and 22, and statistically significant differences were obtained for Young's modulus (p = 0.0001) amounting to, respectively, 2.79 ± 1.34 GPa for the first group and 7.44 ± 2.85 GPa for the second group. The results show a significant impact of age on the mechanical properties of ribs.

  6. Neural-competent cells of adult human dermis belong to the Schwann lineage.

    PubMed

    Etxaniz, Usue; Pérez-San Vicente, Adrián; Gago-López, Nuria; García-Dominguez, Mario; Iribar, Haizea; Aduriz, Ariane; Pérez-López, Virginia; Burgoa, Izaskun; Irizar, Haritz; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Leis, Olatz; Matheu, Ander; Martín, Angel G; Otaegui, David; López-Mato, María Paz; Gutiérrez-Rivera, Araika; MacLellan, Robb; Izeta, Ander

    2014-11-11

    Resident neural precursor cells (NPCs) have been reported for a number of adult tissues. Understanding their physiological function or, alternatively, their activation after tissue damage or in vitro manipulation remains an unsolved issue. Here, we investigated the source of human dermal NPCs in adult tissue. By following an unbiased, comprehensive approach employing cell-surface marker screening, cell separation, transcriptomic characterization, and in vivo fate analyses, we found that p75NTR(+) precursors of human foreskin can be ascribed to the Schwann (CD56(+)) and perivascular (CD56(-)) cell lineages. Moreover, neural differentiation potential was restricted to the p75NTR(+)CD56(+) Schwann cells and mediated by SOX2 expression levels. Double-positive NPCs were similarly obtained from human cardiospheres, indicating that this phenomenon might be widespread.

  7. Neural-Competent Cells of Adult Human Dermis Belong to the Schwann Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Etxaniz, Usue; Pérez-San Vicente, Adrián; Gago-López, Nuria; García-Dominguez, Mario; Iribar, Haizea; Aduriz, Ariane; Pérez-López, Virginia; Burgoa, Izaskun; Irizar, Haritz; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Leis, Olatz; Matheu, Ander; Martín, Angel G.; Otaegui, David; López-Mato, María Paz; Gutiérrez-Rivera, Araika; MacLellan, Robb; Izeta, Ander

    2014-01-01

    Summary Resident neural precursor cells (NPCs) have been reported for a number of adult tissues. Understanding their physiological function or, alternatively, their activation after tissue damage or in vitro manipulation remains an unsolved issue. Here, we investigated the source of human dermal NPCs in adult tissue. By following an unbiased, comprehensive approach employing cell-surface marker screening, cell separation, transcriptomic characterization, and in vivo fate analyses, we found that p75NTR+ precursors of human foreskin can be ascribed to the Schwann (CD56+) and perivascular (CD56−) cell lineages. Moreover, neural differentiation potential was restricted to the p75NTR+CD56+ Schwann cells and mediated by SOX2 expression levels. Double-positive NPCs were similarly obtained from human cardiospheres, indicating that this phenomenon might be widespread. PMID:25418723

  8. Protective Mechanism of Articular Cartilage to Severe Loading: Roles of Lubricants, Cartilage Surface Layer, Extracellular Matrix and Chondrocyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Teruo; Sawae, Yoshinori; Ihara, Maki

    The natural synovial joints have excellent tribological performance known as very low friction and very low wear for various daily activities in human life. These functions are likely to be supported by the adaptive multimode lubrication mechanism, in which the various lubrication modes such as elastohydrodynamic lubrication, weeping, boundary and gel film lubrication appear to operate to protect articular cartilage, depending on the severity of the rubbing conditions. In this paper, various protective roles of synovial fluid, cartilage surface layer, extracellular matrix and chondrocyte to severe loading are described. In the first part, the protective mechanism by adsorbed films and underlying gel films was described on the basis of the frictional behaviors of articular cartilage against articular cartilage or glass. It was discussed that the replenishment of gel film removed during severe rubbing is likely to be controlled by supply of proteoglycan from the extracellular matrix, where the chondrocyte plays the main role in the metabolism. In the second part, the time-dependent local deformation of biphasic articular cartilage under constant total compressive strain condition was evaluated in the finite element analyses. The importance of clarification of actual stress-strain in chondrocyte was indicated in relation to the tribological property of articular cartilage.

  9. Towards Scarless Wound Healing: A Comparison of Protein Expression between Human, Adult and Foetal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Sonia; Marçal, Helder; Foster, Leslie John Ray

    2014-01-01

    Proteins from human adult and foetal fibroblast cell lines were compared, focusing on those involved in wound healing. Proteins were separated through two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Differences in protein spot intensity between the lineages were quantified through 3D gel scanning densitometry. Selected protein spots were excised, subjected to tryptic digests, prior to separation using HPLC with a linear ion trap mass spectrometer, and identified. Protein maps representing the proteomes from adult and foetal fibroblasts showed similar distributions but revealed differences in expression levels. Heat shock cognate 71 kDA protein, Tubulin alpha-1A chain, actin cytoplasmic-1, and neuron cytoplasmic protein were all expressed in significantly higher concentrations by foetal fibroblasts, nearly double those observed for their adult counterparts. Fructose bisphosphate aldolase A, Cofilin-1, Peroxiredoxin-1, Lactotransferrin Galectin-1, Profilin-1, and Calreticulin were expressed at comparatively higher concentrations by the adult fibroblasts. Significant differences in the expression levels of some proteins in human adult and foetal fibroblasts correlated with known differences in wound healing behaviour. This data may assist in the development of technologies to promote scarless wound healing and better functional tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:24605334

  10. Towards scarless wound healing: a comparison of protein expression between human, adult and foetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sonia; Marçal, Helder; Foster, Leslie John Ray

    2014-01-01

    Proteins from human adult and foetal fibroblast cell lines were compared, focusing on those involved in wound healing. Proteins were separated through two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Differences in protein spot intensity between the lineages were quantified through 3D gel scanning densitometry. Selected protein spots were excised, subjected to tryptic digests, prior to separation using HPLC with a linear ion trap mass spectrometer, and identified. Protein maps representing the proteomes from adult and foetal fibroblasts showed similar distributions but revealed differences in expression levels. Heat shock cognate 71 kDA protein, Tubulin alpha-1A chain, actin cytoplasmic-1, and neuron cytoplasmic protein were all expressed in significantly higher concentrations by foetal fibroblasts, nearly double those observed for their adult counterparts. Fructose bisphosphate aldolase A, Cofilin-1, Peroxiredoxin-1, Lactotransferrin Galectin-1, Profilin-1, and Calreticulin were expressed at comparatively higher concentrations by the adult fibroblasts. Significant differences in the expression levels of some proteins in human adult and foetal fibroblasts correlated with known differences in wound healing behaviour. This data may assist in the development of technologies to promote scarless wound healing and better functional tissue repair and regeneration.

  11. Larval food quantity affects the capacity of adult mosquitoes to transmit human malaria

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Lillian L. M.; Murdock, Courtney C.; Jacobs, Gregory R.; Thomas, Rachel J.; Thomas, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Adult traits of holometabolous insects are shaped by conditions experienced during larval development, which might impact interactions between adult insect hosts and parasites. However, the ecology of larval insects that vector disease remains poorly understood. Here, we used Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes and the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, to investigate whether larval conditions affect the capacity of adult mosquitoes to transmit malaria. We reared larvae in two groups; one group received a standard laboratory rearing diet, whereas the other received a reduced diet. Emerging adult females were then provided an infectious blood meal. We assessed mosquito longevity, parasite development rate and prevalence of infectious mosquitoes over time. Reduced larval food led to increased adult mortality and caused a delay in parasite development and a slowing in the rate at which parasites invaded the mosquito salivary glands, extending the time it took for mosquitoes to become infectious. Together, these effects increased transmission potential of mosquitoes in the high food regime by 260–330%. Such effects have not, to our knowledge, been shown previously for human malaria and highlight the importance of improving knowledge of larval ecology to better understand vector-borne disease transmission dynamics. PMID:27412284

  12. Biological differences between neonatal and adult human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Mayani, Hector

    2010-03-01

    From the first studies performed by Broxmeyer and his group, in the late 1980s, evidence was presented indicating that hematopoietic progenitor cells from human umbilical cord blood (UCB) possessed certain in vitro biological features that differed from those observed in their adult counterparts. Throughout the past 20 years, these observations have been confirmed and expanded by several groups, using both in vitro and in vivo models. Today, it is widely recognized that stem and progenitor cells present in UCB are biologically different from those present in adult marrow or peripheral blood. As compared to cells from adult subjects, UCB-derived hematopoietic cells possess higher proliferation and expansion potentials, and their capacity to self-renew is also superior to that of adult cells. Although the mechanisms responsible for such biological differences are still not fully understood, telomere dynamics, cell cycle progression, certain transcription factor pathways, differential gene expression, and the autocrine production of particular cytokines are some of the mechanisms that have been implicated. Understanding, at the cellular and molecular levels, the biological differences between neonatal and adult hematopoietic cells has a 2-fold relevance. On the one hand, it will help to understand and characterize basic principles and mechanisms involved in human developmental biology; on the other hand, it will help to gain a deeper knowledge on the biology of hematopoietic cell transplants and to improve and optimize such a clinical procedure.

  13. Neuroscience of human social interactions and adult attachment style.

    PubMed

    Vrtička, Pascal; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    attachment insecurity and particularly anxiety. Emotion regulation strategies such as reappraisal or suppression of social emotions are also differentially modulated by attachment style. This research does not only help better understand the neural underpinnings of human social behavior, but also provides important insights on psychopathological conditions where attachment dysregulation is likely to play an important (causal) role.

  14. Neuroscience of human social interactions and adult attachment style

    PubMed Central

    Vrtička, Pascal; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    attachment insecurity and particularly anxiety. Emotion regulation strategies such as reappraisal or suppression of social emotions are also differentially modulated by attachment style. This research does not only help better understand the neural underpinnings of human social behavior, but also provides important insights on psychopathological conditions where attachment dysregulation is likely to play an important (causal) role. PMID:22822396

  15. Poroviscoelastic finite element model including continuous fiber distribution for the simulation of nanoindentation tests on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Taffetani, M; Griebel, M; Gastaldi, D; Klisch, S M; Vena, P

    2014-04-01

    Articular cartilage is a soft hydrated tissue that facilitates proper load transfer in diarthroidal joints. The mechanical properties of articular cartilage derive from its structural and hierarchical organization that, at the micrometric length scale, encompasses three main components: a network of insoluble collagen fibrils, negatively charged macromolecules and a porous extracellular matrix. In this work, a constituent-based constitutive model for the simulation of nanoindentation tests on articular cartilage is presented: it accounts for the multi-constituent, non-linear, porous, and viscous aspects of articular cartilage mechanics. In order to reproduce the articular cartilage response under different loading conditions, the model considers a continuous distribution of collagen fibril orientation, swelling, and depth-dependent mechanical properties. The model's parameters are obtained by fitting published experimental data for the time-dependent response in a stress relaxation unconfined compression test on adult bovine articular cartilage. Then, model validation is obtained by simulating three independent experimental tests: (i) the time-dependent response in a stress relaxation confined compression test, (ii) the drained response of a flat punch indentation test and (iii) the depth-dependence of effective Poisson's ratio in a unconfined compression test. Finally, the validated constitutive model has been used to simulate multiload spherical nanoindentation creep tests. Upon accounting for strain-dependent tissue permeability and intrinsic viscoelastic properties of the collagen network, the model accurately fits the drained and undrained curves and time-dependent creep response. The results show that depth-dependent tissue properties and glycosaminoglycan-induced tissue swelling should be accounted for when simulating indentation experiments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The response of the anterior striatum during adult human vocal learning.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Anna J; Leech, Robert; Iverson, Paul; Wise, Richard J S

    2014-08-15

    Research on mammals predicts that the anterior striatum is a central component of human motor learning. However, because vocalizations in most mammals are innate, much of the neurobiology of human vocal learning has been inferred from studies on songbirds. Essential for song learning is a pathway, the homolog of mammalian cortical-basal ganglia "loops," which includes the avian striatum. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated adult human vocal learning, a skill that persists throughout life, albeit imperfectly given that late-acquired languages are spoken with an accent. Monolingual adult participants were scanned while repeating novel non-native words. After training on the pronunciation of half the words for 1 wk, participants underwent a second scan. During scanning there was no external feedback on performance. Activity declined sharply in left and right anterior striatum, both within and between scanning sessions, and this change was independent of training and performance. This indicates that adult speakers rapidly adapt to the novel articulatory movements, possibly by using motor sequences from their native speech to approximate those required for the novel speech sounds. Improved accuracy correlated only with activity in motor-sensory perisylvian cortex. We propose that future studies on vocal learning, using different behavioral and pharmacological manipulations, will provide insights into adult striatal plasticity and its potential for modification in both educational and clinical contexts.

  17. The response of the anterior striatum during adult human vocal learning

    PubMed Central

    Leech, Robert; Iverson, Paul; Wise, Richard J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Research on mammals predicts that the anterior striatum is a central component of human motor learning. However, because vocalizations in most mammals are innate, much of the neurobiology of human vocal learning has been inferred from studies on songbirds. Essential for song learning is a pathway, the homolog of mammalian cortical-basal ganglia “loops,” which includes the avian striatum. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated adult human vocal learning, a skill that persists throughout life, albeit imperfectly given that late-acquired languages are spoken with an accent. Monolingual adult participants were scanned while repeating novel non-native words. After training on the pronunciation of half the words for 1 wk, participants underwent a second scan. During scanning there was no external feedback on performance. Activity declined sharply in left and right anterior striatum, both within and between scanning sessions, and this change was independent of training and performance. This indicates that adult speakers rapidly adapt to the novel articulatory movements, possibly by using motor sequences from their native speech to approximate those required for the novel speech sounds. Improved accuracy correlated only with activity in motor-sensory perisylvian cortex. We propose that future studies on vocal learning, using different behavioral and pharmacological manipulations, will provide insights into adult striatal plasticity and its potential for modification in both educational and clinical contexts. PMID:24805076

  18. Predictions of ozone absorption in human lungs from newborn to adult

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H.; Graham, R.C. )

    1989-01-01

    Although children are an important human population, dosimetry models for gases have been used to predict absorption mainly in laboratory animals and adult humans. To correct this omission, we have used several sources of data on age-dependent lower respiratory tract (LRT) volumes, age-dependent airway dimensions, a model of the adult tracheobronchial region, and a model of the adult acinus to construct theoretical LRT lung models for humans from birth to adulthood. An ozone (O3) dosimetry model was then used to estimate the regional and local uptake of O3 in the (theoretical) LRT of children and adults. For sedentary or quiet breathing, the LRT distribution of absorbed O3, the percent uptake (84 to 88%) and the centriacinar O3 tissue dose are not very sensitive to age. For maximal work during exercise, predicted LRT uptakes range from 87 to 93%, and the regional percent uptakes are more dependent on age than during quiet breathing. In general, the total quantity of O3 absorbed per minute increases with age. Regardless of age and state of breathing, the largest tissue dose of O3 is predicted to occur in the centriacinar region, where many animal studies show the maximal morphological damage from O3.

  19. HMGA2 Moderately Increases Fetal Hemoglobin Expression in Human Adult Erythroblasts

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcellos, Jaira F.; Lee, Y. Terry; Byrnes, Colleen; Tumburu, Laxminath; Rabel, Antoinette; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2016-01-01

    Induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) has therapeutic importance for patients with beta-hemoglobin disorders. Previous studies showed that let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) are highly regulated in erythroid cells during the fetal-to-adult developmental transition, and that targeting let-7 mediated the up-regulation of HbF to greater than 30% of the total globin levels in human adult cultured erythroblasts. HMGA2 is a member of the high-mobility group A family of proteins and a validated target of the let-7 family of miRNAs. Here we investigate whether expression of HMGA2 directly regulates fetal hemoglobin in adult erythroblasts. Let-7 resistant HMGA2 expression was studied after lentiviral transduction of CD34(+) cells. The transgene was regulated by the erythroid-specific gene promoter region of the human SPTA1 gene (HMGA2-OE). HMGA2-OE caused significant increases in gamma-globin mRNA expression and HbF to around 16% of the total hemoglobin levels compared to matched control transductions. Interestingly, no significant changes in KLF1, SOX6, GATA1, ZBTB7A and BCL11A mRNA levels were observed. Overall, our data suggest that expression of HMGA2, a downstream target of let-7 miRNAs, causes moderately increased gamma-globin gene and protein expression in adult human erythroblasts. PMID:27861570

  20. Quantitative MRI Evaluation of Articular Cartilage Using T2 Mapping Following Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Wagner, Naomi; Fields, Kara G.; Wentzel, Catherine; Burge, Alissa; Potter, Hollis G.; Lyman, Stephen; Kelly, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes a shearing and delamination injury to the acetabular articular cartilage due to a mismatch between the size of the femoral head and the acetabulum. This mechanism is thought to lead to early osteoarthritis in this population. Cam decompression has been advocated to eliminate impingement, with the ultimate goal of halting the progression of articular cartilage delamination. Although outcomes following this procedure in the young adult population have been favorable at short and medium term follow up, it is not known whether the articular cartilage itself is protected from further injury by changing the biomechanics of the joint with decompression of the cam morphology. The purpose of this study is to compare the pre- and post-operative integrity of the acetabular articular cartilage using T2 mapping to determine if hip arthroscopy is protective of the articular cartilage at short- to medium term follow up. Methods: Males between 18 and 35 years of age who had pre-operative T2 mapping MRIs, underwent hip arthroscopy for cam or mixed-type FAI with an alpha angle greater than 50°, and had at least 2 year follow-up were identified. Post-operative MRIs were performed and T2 relaxation times in the transition zone and weight bearing articular cartilage in the anterosuperior acetabulum at deep and superficial chondral layers were recorded at nine points on three sagittal sequences on pre and post-operative MRIs. A paired t-test was used to compare T2 relaxation values between pre-operative and post-operative scans. Results: Eleven hips were evaluated. Mean age was 26.3 years (range 21 - 35). Mean follow up time to post-operative T2 mapping MRI was 2.6 years (range 2.4 - 2.7). The change in T2 relaxation time was not significantly different between pre- and post-operative MRI scans for any of the nine regions in the deep zone of the acetabular cartilage (p=0.065 - 0.969) or the superficial zone of the

  1. [Extra-articular manifestations of seronegative spondylarthritis].

    PubMed

    Cammelli, Daniele

    2006-05-01

    Seronegative spondylarthritis are frequently characterised by extra-articular manifestations. They are frequently in recurrent uveitis. Between the cutaneous manifestations should be mentioned erythema nodosum, typical of inflammatory bowel diseases, and keratoderma blenorrhagicum, in the Reiter's syndrome. Cardiac complications in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) include aortic valvular regurgitation and arrhythmia and, more rarely, mitral valvulopathy, cardiomyopathy and pericarditis. Pulmonary involvement in AS includes ventilatory restrictive syndrome and fibro-bullous disease of the apex. Vertebral osteoporosis is a very important extra-articular manifestation because of the possibility of spontaneous fractures of the vertebrae. Central neurological manifestations include medullary compression from cervical sub-luxation while the most important peripheral involvements are lumbar stenosis and the cauda equina syndrome. Type AA amyloidosis is a rare late complication of the AS, possible cause of death especially in patients with aggressive disease. Kidney complications can be observed as consequences of prolonged anti-inflammatory therapy, but the most frequent renal complications are amyloidosis and mesangial IgA segmental and focal glomerulonephritis.

  2. Locating articular cartilage in MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik; Pettersen, Paola; Olsen, Ole F.; Nielsen, Mads; Christiansen, Claus

    2005-04-01

    Accurate computation of the thickness of the articular cartilage is of great importance when diagnosing and monitoring the progress of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. A fully automated cartilage assessment method is preferable compared to methods using manual interaction in order to avoid inter- and intra-observer variability. As a first step in the cartilage assessment, we present an automatic method for locating articular cartilage in knee MRI using supervised learning. The next step will be to fit a variable shape model to the cartilage, initiated at the location found using the method presented in this paper. From the model, disease markers will be extracted for the quantitative evaluation of the cartilage. The cartilage is located using an ANN-classifier, where every voxel is classified as cartilage or non-cartilage based on prior knowledge of the cartilage structure. The classifier is tested using leave-one-out-evaluation, and we found the average sensitivity and specificity to be 91.0% and 99.4%, respectively. The center of mass calculated from voxels classified as cartilage are similar to the corresponding values calculated from manual segmentations, which confirms that this method can find a good initial position for a shape model.

  3. Toward patient-specific articular contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Henak, Corinne R.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanics of contacting cartilage layers is fundamentally important to understanding the development, homeostasis and pathology of diarthrodial joints. Because of the highly nonlinear nature of both the materials and the contact problem itself, numerical methods such as the finite element method are typically incorporated to obtain solutions. Over the course of five decades, we have moved from an initial qualitative understanding of articular cartilage material behavior to the ability to perform complex, three-dimensional contact analysis, including multiphasic material representations. This history includes the development of analytical and computational contact analysis methods that now provide the ability to perform highly nonlinear analyses. Numerical implementations of contact analysis based on the finite element method are rapidly advancing and will soon enable patient-specific analysis of joint contact mechanics using models based on medical image data. In addition to contact stress on the articular surfaces, these techniques can predict variations in strain and strain through the cartilage layers, providing the basis to predict damage and failure. This opens up exciting areas for future research and application to patient-specific diagnosis and treatment planning applied to a variety of pathologies that affect joint function and cartilage homeostasis. PMID:25698236

  4. Effects of moving training on histology and biomarkers levels of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chang; Changlin, Huang

    2006-10-01

    To study the adaptation process and extent of articular cartilage in the canine knee joint to different modes of movements and to investigate if levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1), matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in serum and synovial fluid can be used to predict effectively early sports injury and remolding degree of articular cartilage in the canine knee. Twenty adult dogs divided randomly into three groups (eight in the common training group, Training Group; eight in the intensified training group, Intensified Group; and four in the Control Group) were trained daily at different intensities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were performed regularly (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 weeks) to investigate changes of articular cartilage in the canine knee, while concentrations of COMP, MMP-1, MMP-3, and TIMP-1 in serum and synovial fluid were measured by ELISA assays. All of the dogs were euthanized after training for 10 weeks, and all of the knee joints were taken out to be examined histologically. We could find imaging changes of early sport injury of articular cartilage in the Training Group and Intensified Group by MRI examination after 2 weeks of training; the damage images were most severe in 4-6 weeks, and then lightened gradually. We could not find the difference of cartilage injury and repair degree in MRI images between these two groups at different time points. Elevations of levels of COMP, MMP-1, MMP-3, TIMP-1, and MMP-3/TIMP-1 in serum and synovial fluid were seen during the training period, and their levels changed remarkably at different times. Levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-3/TIMP-1 in the Intensified Group were lower than that in the Training Group in general, and levels of COMP were higher, which hinted that the injury trend of articular cartilage in the Intensified Group was lower than that in the Training group, and the repair

  5. Human Centred Design Considerations for Connected Health Devices for the Older Adult

    PubMed Central

    Harte, Richard P.; Glynn, Liam G.; Broderick, Barry J.; Rodriguez-Molinero, Alejandro; Baker, Paul M. A.; McGuiness, Bernadette; O’Sullivan, Leonard; Diaz, Marta; Quinlan, Leo R.; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2014-01-01

    Connected health devices are generally designed for unsupervised use, by non-healthcare professionals, facilitating independent control of the individuals own healthcare. Older adults are major users of such devices and are a population significantly increasing in size. This group presents challenges due to the wide spectrum of capabilities and attitudes towards technology. The fit between capabilities of the user and demands of the device can be optimised in a process called Human Centred Design. Here we review examples of some connected health devices chosen by random selection, assess older adult known capabilities and attitudes and finally make analytical recommendations for design approaches and design specifications. PMID:25563225

  6. Ultrastructural evidence of exosome secretion by progenitor cells in adult mouse myocardium and adult human cardiospheres.

    PubMed

    Barile, Lucio; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Moccetti, Tiziano; Vassalli, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The demonstration of beneficial effects of cell therapy despite the persistence of only few transplanted cells in vivo suggests secreted factors may be the active component of this treatment. This so-called paracrine hypothesis is supported by observations that culture media conditioned by progenitor cells contain growth factors that mediate proangiogenic and cytoprotective effects. Cardiac progenitor cells in semi-suspension culture form spherical clusters (cardiospheres) that deliver paracrine signals to neighboring cells. A key component of paracrine secretion is exosomes, membrane vesicles that are stored intracellularly in endosomal compartments and are secreted when these structures fuse with the cell plasma membrane. Exosomes have been identified as the active component of proangiogenic effects of bone marrow CD34⁺ stem cells in mice and the regenerative effects of embryonic mesenchymal stem cells in infarcted hearts in pigs and mice. Here, we provide electron microscopic evidence of exosome secretion by progenitor cells in mouse myocardium and human cardiospheres. Exosomes are emerging as an attractive vector of paracrine signals delivered by progenitor cells. They can be stored as an "off-the-shelf" product. As such, exosomes have the potential for circumventing many of the limitations of viable cells for therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine.

  7. Noninvasive assessment of articular cartilage surface damage using reflected polarized light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Ruby N; Nehmetallah, George; Raub, Christopher B

    2017-06-01

    Articular surface damage occurs to cartilage during normal aging, osteoarthritis, and in trauma. A noninvasive assessment of cartilage microstructural alterations is useful for studies involving cartilage explants. This study evaluates polarized reflectance microscopy as a tool to assess surface damage to cartilage explants caused by mechanical scraping and enzymatic degradation. Adult bovine articular cartilage explants were scraped, incubated in collagenase, or underwent scrape and collagenase treatments. In an additional experiment, cartilage explants were subject to scrapes at graduated levels of severity. Polarized reflectance parameters were compared with India ink surface staining, features of histological sections, changes in explant wet weight and thickness, and chondrocyte viability. The polarized reflectance signal was sensitive to surface scrape damage and revealed individual scrape features consistent with India ink marks. Following surface treatments, the reflectance contrast parameter was elevated and correlated with image area fraction of India ink. After extensive scraping, polarized reflectance contrast and chondrocyte viability were lower than that from untreated explants. As part of this work, a mathematical model was developed and confirmed the trend in the reflectance signal due to changes in surface scattering and subsurface birefringence. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of polarized reflectance microscopy to sensitively assess surface microstructural alterations in articular cartilage explants.

  8. Functional Properties of Chondrocytes and Articular Cartilage using Optical Imaging to Scanning Probe Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Darling, Eric M; Herzog, Walter

    2017-10-03

    Mature chondrocytes in adult articular cartilage vary in number, size, and shape, depending on their depth in the tissue, location in the joint, and source species. Chondrocytes are the primary structural, functional, and metabolic unit in articular cartilage, the loss of which will induce fatigue to the extracellular matrix (ECM), eventually leading to failure of the cartilage and impairment of the joint as a whole. This brief review focuses on the functional and biomechanical studies of chondrocytes and articular cartilage, using microscopic imaging from optical microscopies to scanning probe microscopy. Three topics are covered in this review, including the functional studies of chondrons by optical imaging (unpolarized and polarized light and infrared light, two-photon excitation microscopy), the probing of chondrocytes and cartilage directly using microscale measurement techniques, and different imaging approaches that can measure chondrocyte mechanics and chondrocyte biological signaling under in situ and in vivo environments. Technical advancement in chondrocyte research during recent years has enabled new ways to study the biomechanical and functional properties of these cells and cartilage. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Noninvasive assessment of articular cartilage surface damage using reflected polarized light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Ruby N.; Nehmetallah, George; Raub, Christopher B.

    2017-06-01

    Articular surface damage occurs to cartilage during normal aging, osteoarthritis, and in trauma. A noninvasive assessment of cartilage microstructural alterations is useful for studies involving cartilage explants. This study evaluates polarized reflectance microscopy as a tool to assess surface damage to cartilage explants caused by mechanical scraping and enzymatic degradation. Adult bovine articular cartilage explants were scraped, incubated in collagenase, or underwent scrape and collagenase treatments. In an additional experiment, cartilage explants were subject to scrapes at graduated levels of severity. Polarized reflectance parameters were compared with India ink surface staining, features of histological sections, changes in explant wet weight and thickness, and chondrocyte viability. The polarized reflectance signal was sensitive to surface scrape damage and revealed individual scrape features consistent with India ink marks. Following surface treatments, the reflectance contrast parameter was elevated and correlated with image area fraction of India ink. After extensive scraping, polarized reflectance contrast and chondrocyte viability were lower than that from untreated explants. As part of this work, a mathematical model was developed and confirmed the trend in the reflectance signal due to changes in surface scattering and subsurface birefringence. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of polarized reflectance microscopy to sensitively assess surface microstructural alterations in articular cartilage explants.

  10. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on matrix synthesis in articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, A.C.; Urban, J.P.; Gehl, K.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The direct effects of hydrostatic pressure on matrix synthesis in articular cartilage can be studied independently of the other factors that change during loading. We have found that the influence of hydrostatic pressure on incorporation rates of {sup 35}SO{sub 4} and ({sup 3}H)proline into adult bovine articular cartilage slices in vitro depends on the pressure level and on the time at pressure. Pressures in the physiological range (5-15 MPa) applied for 20 s or for 5 min could stimulate tracer incorporation (30-130%) during the following 2 h, but higher pressures (20-50 MPa) had no effect on incorporation rates. The degree of stimulation in cartilage obtained from different animals was found to vary; in some animals none was seen. Stimulation also varied with position along the joint. Physiological pressures (5-10 MPa) applied continuously for the 2-h incubation period also stimulated incorporation rates, but pressures greater than 20 MPa always produced a decrease that was related to the applied pressure and that was reversible. These results suggests that the hydrostatic pressure that occurs during loading is a signal that can stimulate matrix synthesis rates in articular cartilage.

  11. Binding of furosemide to albumin isolated from human fetal and adult serum.

    PubMed

    Viani, A; Cappiello, M; Silvestri, D; Pacifici, G M

    1991-01-01

    Albumin was isolated from pooled fetal serum from 58 placentas obtained at normal delivery at term and from pooled adult plasma from 8 individuals. Albumin isolation was carried out by means of PEG precipitation followed by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A 50 and then on SP-Sephadex C 50. The electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels showed only one spot that comigrated with commercial human albumin. Binding to albumin was measured by equilibrium dialysis of an aliquot of albumin solution (0.7 ml) against the same volume of 0.13 M sodium orthophosphate buffer (pH 7.4). At a total concentration of 2 micrograms/ml (therapeutic range), the unbound fraction of furosemide was 2.71% (fetal albumin) and 2.51% (adult albumin). Two classes of binding sites for furosemide were observed in fetal and adult albumin. The number of binding sites (moles of furosemide per mole of albumin) was 1.22 (fetal albumin) and 1.58 (adult albumin) for the high-affinity site and 2.97 (fetal albumin) and 3.25 (adult albumin) for the low-affinity site. The association constants (M-1) were 3.1 X 10(4) (fetal albumin) and 2.6 X 10(4) (adult albumin) for the high-affinity set of sites and 0.83 X 10(4) (fetal albumin) and 1.0 X 10(4) (adult albumin) low-affinity site. The displacement of furosemide from albumin was studied with therapeutic concentrations of several drugs. Valproic acid, salicylic acid, azapropazone and tolbutamide had the highest displacing effects which were significantly higher with fetal than with adult albumin.

  12. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-12-04

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1(HIGH) cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1(HIGH) cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions.

  13. In vivo perfusion of human skin substitutes with microvessels formed by adult circulating endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kung, Elaine F; Wang, Feiya; Schechner, Jeffrey S

    2008-02-01

    At present, tissue-engineered human skin substitutes (HSSs) mainly function as temporary bioactive dressings due to inadequate perfusion. Failure to form functional vascular networks within the initial posttransplantation period compromises cell survival of the graft and its long-term viability in the wound bed. Our goal was to demonstrate that adult circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) seeded onto HSS can form functional microvessels capable of graft neovascularization and perfusion. Adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) underwent CD34 selection and endothelial cell (EC) culture conditions. After in vitro expansion, flow cytometry verified EC phenotype before their incorporation into HSS. After 2 weeks in vivo, immunohistochemical analysis, immunofluorescent microscopy, and microfil polymer perfusion were performed. CD34+ PBMCs differentiated into EPC demonstrating characteristic EC morphology and expression of CD31, Tie-2, and E-selectin after TNFalpha-induction. Numerous human CD31 and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) microvessels within the engineered grafts (HSS/EPCs) inosculated with recipient murine circulation. Limitation of murine CD31 immunoreactivity to HSS margins showed angiogenesis was attributable to human EPC at 2 weeks posttransplantation. Delivery of intravenous rhodamine-conjugated UEA-1 and microfil polymer to HSS/EPCs demonstrated enhanced perfusion by functional microvessels compared to HSS control without EPCs. We successfully engineered functional microvessels in HSS by incorporating adult circulating EPCs. This autologous EC source can form vascular conduits enabling perfusion and survival of human bioengineered tissues.

  14. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1HIGH cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1HIGH cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions. PMID:26634814

  15. Human and monkey striatal interneurons are derived from the medial ganglionic eminence but not from the adult subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congmin; You, Yan; Qi, Dashi; Zhou, Xing; Wang, Lei; Wei, Song; Zhang, Zhuangzhi; Huang, Weixi; Liu, Zhidong; Liu, Fang; Ma, Lan; Yang, Zhengang

    2014-08-13

    In adult rodent and monkey brains, newly born neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) in the wall of the lateral ventricle migrate into the olfactory bulb (OB) via the rostral migratory stream (RMS). A recent study reported that interneurons are constantly generating in the adult human striatum from the SVZ. In contrast, by taking advantage of the continuous expression of Sp8 from the neuroblast stage through differentiation into mature interneurons, we found that the adult human SVZ does not generate new interneurons for the striatum. In the adult human SVZ and RMS, very few neuroblasts were observed, and most of them expressed the transcription factor Sp8. Neuroblasts in the adult rhesus monkey SVZ-RMS-OB pathway also expressed Sp8. In addition, we observed that Sp8 was expressed by most adult human and monkey OB interneurons. However, very few Sp8+ cells were in the adult human striatum. This suggests that neuroblasts in the adult human SVZ and RMS are likely destined for the OB, but not for the striatum. BrdU-labeling results also revealed few if any newly born neurons in the adult rhesus monkey striatum. Finally, on the basis of transcription factor expression, we provide strong evidence that the vast majority of interneurons in the human and monkey striatum are generated from the medial ganglionic eminence during embryonic developmental stages, as they are in rodents. We conclude that, although a small number of neuroblasts exist in the adult human SVZ, they do not migrate into the striatum and become mature striatal interneurons.

  16. Identification and characterization of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone and rostral migratory stream of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congmin; Liu, Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Cai-Hong; You, Yan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jingxiao; Wei, Bin; Ma, Tong; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Rui; Song, Hongjun; Yang, Zhengang

    2011-01-01

    It is of great interest to identify new neurons in the adult human brain, but the persistence of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the existence of the rostral migratory stream (RMS)-like pathway in the adult human forebrain remain highly controversial. In the present study, we have described the general configuration of the RMS in adult monkey, fetal human and adult human brains. We provide evidence that neuroblasts exist continuously in the anterior ventral SVZ and RMS of the adult human brain. The neuroblasts appear singly or in pairs without forming chains; they exhibit migratory morphologies and co-express the immature neuronal markers doublecortin, polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule and βIII-tubulin. Few of these neuroblasts appear to be actively proliferating in the anterior ventral SVZ but none in the RMS, indicating that neuroblasts distributed along the RMS are most likely derived from the ventral SVZ. Interestingly, no neuroblasts are found in the adult human olfactory bulb. Taken together, our data suggest that the SVZ maintains the ability to produce neuroblasts in the adult human brain. PMID:21577236

  17. Fibrin sealants from fresh or fresh/frozen plasma as scaffolds for in vitro articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dare, Emma V; Griffith,