Science.gov

Sample records for adult human dental

  1. Adult human dental pulp stem cells promote blood-brain barrier permeability through vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression.

    PubMed

    Winderlich, Joshua N; Kremer, Karlea L; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising new treatment option for stroke. Intravascular administration of stem cells is a valid approach as stem cells have been shown to transmigrate the blood-brain barrier. The mechanism that causes this effect has not yet been elucidated. We hypothesized that stem cells would mediate localized discontinuities in the blood-brain barrier, which would allow passage into the brain parenchyma. Here, we demonstrate that adult human dental pulp stem cells express a soluble factor that increases permeability across an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. This effect was shown to be the result of vascular endothelial growth factor-a. The effect could be amplified by exposing dental pulp stem cell to stromal-derived factor 1, which stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression. These findings support the use of dental pulp stem cell in therapy for stroke. PMID:26661186

  2. Comparison of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, synovial fluid, adult dental pulp, and exfoliated deciduous tooth pulp.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Y; Koyama, N; Nakao, K; Osawa, K; Ikeno, M; Yamanaka, S; Okubo, Y; Fujimura, K; Bessho, K

    2016-01-01

    Populations of pluripotent stem cells were isolated from bone marrow, synovial fluid, adult dental pulp, and exfoliated deciduous teeth and their multipotentiality properties compared. Osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic differentiation potentials were examined. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and synovial fluid-derived cells (SFCs) showed the highest levels of osteogenesis as expressed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (0.54±0.094 U/mg protein and 0.57±0.039 U/mg protein, respectively; P=0.60) and by osteocalcin (BGLAP; determined by real-time RT-PCR). SFCs showed the highest levels of chondrogenesis as expressed by ALP activity (1.75±0.097 U/mg protein) and of COL2A1 and COL10A1 by real-time PCR. In terms of adipogenesis, lipid vesicles were observed in the BMMSCs and SFCs. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) exhibited neurogenesis potential, as shown by increases in expression of class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) on RT-PCR. Variability was found in the differentiation potential corresponding to the tendency of the original tissue to differentiate. It is suggested that the cell type should be selected depending on the regenerative treatment regimen. PMID:26235629

  3. Adult safeguarding; guidance for dental professionals.

    PubMed

    Lewney, J; Boland, B

    2015-09-25

    The legal responsibilities of all those involved in the care of adults at risk of harm were set out in the 'Care Act 2014' which became law in England in April 2015. In the same month, the General Dental Council (GDC) announced that 'safeguarding vulnerable adults' was to become a recommended topic for continuing professional development (CPD), along with 'safeguarding children and young people.' This paper updates on relevant legislation, and outlines the role of dental professionals in adult safeguarding. It then advises on issues surrounding safeguarding concerns, using three scenarios for illustration. Rather than covering the very broad topic of abuse of adults in general, the paper focusses on 'adults at risk' to whom statutory safeguarding law applies. PMID:26404993

  4. Denitrification in human dental plaque

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that can reduce this NO3- to nitrite (NO2-). Results We show that dental plaque mediates denitrification of NO3- to nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N2O), and dinitrogen (N2) using microsensor measurements, 15N isotopic labelling and molecular detection of denitrification genes. In vivo N2O accumulation rates in the mouth depended on the presence of dental plaque and on salivary NO3- concentrations. NO and N2O production by denitrification occurred under aerobic conditions and was regulated by plaque pH. Conclusions Increases of NO concentrations were in the range of effective concentrations for NO signalling to human host cells and, thus, may locally affect blood flow, signalling between nerves and inflammatory processes in the gum. This is specifically significant for the understanding of periodontal diseases, where NO has been shown to play a key role, but where gingival cells are believed to be the only source of NO. More generally, this study establishes denitrification by human-associated microbial communities as a significant metabolic pathway which, due to concurrent NO formation, provides a basis for symbiotic interactions. PMID:20307293

  5. Eliminating Medicaid adult dental coverage in California led to increased dental emergency visits and associated costs.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Astha; Caplan, Daniel J; Jones, Michael P; Momany, Elizabeth T; Kuthy, Raymond A; Buresh, Christopher T; Isman, Robert; Damiano, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Dental coverage for adults is an elective benefit under Medicaid. As a result of budget constraints, California Medicaid eliminated its comprehensive adult dental coverage in July 2009. We examined the impact of this policy change on emergency department (ED) visits by Medicaid-enrolled adults for dental problems in the period 2006-11. We found that the policy change led to a significant and immediate increase in dental ED use, amounting to more than 1,800 additional dental ED visits per year. Young adults, members of racial/ethnic minority groups, and urban residents were disproportionately affected by the policy change. Average yearly costs associated with dental ED visits increased by 68 percent. The California experience provides evidence that eliminating Medicaid adult dental benefits shifts dental care to costly EDs that do not provide definitive dental care. The population affected by the Medicaid adult dental coverage policy is increasing as many states expand their Medicaid programs under the ACA. Hence, such evidence is critical to inform decisions regarding adult dental coverage for existing Medicaid enrollees and expansion populations. PMID:25941275

  6. Dental Hygiene Students’ Perceptions of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R. Constance; Shockey, Alcinda Trickett; Long, D. Leann

    2015-01-01

    Geriatric education is an important component of the dental hygiene curriculum because, in it, students acquire skills and attitudes to help provide quality care to older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine if off-site exposure to nursing home residents with supervised oversight had the potential to improve dental hygiene students’ attitudes toward older adults. Senior dental hygiene students at one school completed a pre-nursing home experience questionnaire. A series of geriatric lectures and discussions, which included discussions about students’ anxieties of working with institutionalized older adults, were held prior to the nursing home experience. The students then participated in two supervised four-hour nursing home experiences, were debriefed after the experiences, and completed a second questionnaire. Of thirty-nine potential participants in the study, thirty-two took part in the pre-nursing home experience questionnaire (82.1 percent). They had a mean split Fabroni score of 34.2 (95 percent confidence interval: 32.2, 36.3). The thirty participants in the post-experience questionnaire (76.9 percent of total) had a mean split score of 32.7 (95 percent confidence interval: 30.1, 35.3). This study failed to reject the null hypothesis of no mean difference between the pre- and post-nursing home experience; however, the post-experience mean score was lower than the pre-nursing home experience mean score, indicating a more positive attitude toward older adults after the experience. PMID:25480277

  7. Age estimation of adults from dental radiographs.

    PubMed

    Kvaal, S I; Kolltveit, K M; Thomsen, I O; Solheim, T

    1995-07-28

    Previous studies have shown that with advancing age the size of the dental pulp cavity is reduced as a result of secondary dentine deposit, so that measurements of this reduction can be used as an indicator of age. The aim of the present study was to find a method which could be used to estimate the chronological age of an adult from measurements of the size of the pulp on full mouth dental radiographs. The material consisted of periapical radiographs from 100 dental patients who had attended the clinics of the Dental Faculty in Oslo. The radiographs of six types of teeth from each jaw were measured: maxillary central and lateral incisors and second premolars, and mandibular lateral incisors, canines and first premolars. To compensate for differences in magnification and angulation on the radiographs, the following ratios were calculated: pulp/root length, pulp/tooth length, tooth/root length and pulp/root width at three different levels. Statistical analyses showed that Pearson's correlation coefficient between age and the different ratios for each type of tooth was significant, except for the ratio between tooth and root length, which was, therefore, excluded from further analysis. Principal component analyses were performed on all ratios, followed by regression analyses with age as dependent variable and the principal components as independent variables. The principal component analyses showed that only the two first of them had significant influence on age, and a good and easily calculated approximation to the first component was found to be the mean of all the ratios. A good approximation to the second principal component was found to be the difference between the mean of two width ratios and the mean of two length ratios, and these approximations of the first and second principal components were chosen as predictors in regression analyses with age as the dependent variable. The coefficient of determination (r2) for the estimation was strongest when the ratios

  8. Dental Care among Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn

    2013-01-01

    Dental care among young adults with intellectual disability (ID) is poorly documented and largely unmet. By using population-based data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Follow-Up Study, we assessed factors associated with at least one or two dental visits per year among young adults with and without ID. Significantly fewer…

  9. The Level of Dental Anxiety and Dental Status in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dobros, Katarzyna; Hajto-Bryk, Justyna; Wnek, Anna; Zarzecka, Joanna; Rzepka, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to assess potential correlation between dental anxiety and overall dental status in adult patients, in consideration of the frequency of dental appointments and individual dental hygiene practices. Materials and Methods: Individual dental anxiety levels were assessed with the aid of the Corah’s dental anxiety scale (DAS). The study embraced 112 patients of the University Dental Clinic, Kraków. Following clinical and X-ray exams, respectively, decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) index and dental treatment index (DTI) were computed for each study subject. Results: Mean DAS among the 112 subjects under study was 9.41 standard deviation (SD = 3.36). Mean DMFT value was 15.86 (SD = 7.00), whereas DTI value was 0.76 (SD = 0.27). The number of decayed teeth and an individual dental anxiety level were found to be correlated (r = 0.26). Higher dental anxiety correlated with lower DTI value (r = −0.22) and lesser frequency of dental appointments (r = 0.22). Conclusions: Individual dental anxiety level appears to impact overall dental status, frequency of dental appointments and everyday oral health practices. Every conceivable effort should therefore be undertaken with a view to effectively diminishing dental anxiety levels in the patients. How to cite the article: Dobros K, Hajto-Bryk J, Wnęk A, Zarzecka J, Rzepka D. The level of dental anxiety and dental status in adult patients. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):11-4. PMID:25083026

  10. Cortical representation area of human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Kubo, K; Shibukawa, Y; Shintani, M; Suzuki, T; Ichinohe, T; Kaneko, Y

    2008-04-01

    To elucidate the dental pulp-representing area in the human primary somatosensory cortex and the presence of A-beta fibers in dental pulp, we recorded somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields from the cortex in seven healthy persons using magnetoencephalography. Following non-painful electrical stimulation of the right maxillary first premolar dental pulp, short latency (27 ms) cortical responses on the magnetic waveforms were observed. However, no response was seen when stimulation was applied to pulpless teeth, such as devitalized teeth. The current source generating the early component of the magnetic fields was located anterior-inferiorly compared with the locations for the hand area in the primary somatosensory cortex. These results demonstrate the dental pulp representation area in the primary somatosensory cortex, and that it receives input from intradental A-beta neurons, providing a detailed organizational map of the orofacial area, by adding dental pulp to the classic "sensory homunculus". PMID:18362319

  11. Dental service trends for older US adults, 1998-2006.

    PubMed

    Skaar, Daniel D; O'Connor, Heidi

    2012-03-01

    This study of the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) updates trends in utilization of dental services between 1998 and 2006 for community-dwelling U.S. adults of age 65 years and older. Bivariate comparisons were made between dependent variables (annual dental visits and types of dental procedures) and independent variables (age, gender, race, income, education, population density, marital status, U.S. Census Bureau regions, and self-reported health). The estimated percentage of community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries with a dental visit for the years studied increased from 45.0% in 1998 to 46.3% in 2006. The age group of respondents who were 85 years and older had the greatest percentage increase in dental visits. Those reporting visits with preventive procedures increased from 87.8% to 91.2% whereas those reporting visits with nonpreventive procedures declined from 63.9% to 58.4%. The prevalence of dental visits continues to trend upward for this population of older adults. Increasing delivery of preventive services will likely impact the future mix of dental services as U.S. adults live longer. PMID:22416985

  12. Adults with Disabilities and Proper Dental Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    Repeated studies of graduating dental students indicate limited preparation to provide services for individuals with special healthcare needs. By the end of the 1990s and into the present decade, more than half of the U.S. dental schools provided less than five hours of class room presentations and about three quarters of the schools provided 0-5…

  13. Shaking Up the Dental Safety-net: Elimination of Optional Adult Dental Medicaid Benefits in California

    PubMed Central

    Wides, Cynthia; Alam, Sonia Rab; Mertz, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In July 2009, California eliminated funding for most adult non-emergency Medicaid dental benefits (Denti-Cal). This paper presents the findings from a qualitative assessment of the impacts of the Denti-Cal cuts on California's oral health safety-net. Interviews were conducted with dental safety-net providers throughout the state, including public health departments, community health centers, dental schools, Native American health clinics, and private providers, and were coded thematically using Atlas.ti. Safety-net providers reported decreased utilization by Denti-Cal-eligible adults, who now primarily seek emergency dental services, and reported shifting to focus on pediatric and privately-insured patients. Significant changes were reported in safety-net clinic finances, operations, and ability to refer. The impact of the Denti-Cal cuts has been distributed unevenly across the safety-net, with private providers and County Health Departments bearing the highest burden. PMID:24583494

  14. Self-Evaluated Dental Appearance Satisfaction among Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Azodo, CC; Ogbomo, AC

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental appearance satisfaction is important among young adults because judgment concerning the personal characteristics of individuals is influenced by their dental appearance in the absence of other information. Aim: The aim of the study was to determine the self-evaluated dental appearance satisfaction among young adults. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional survey of financial industry prone undergraduates of University of Benin was conducted between July and September, 2010. The self-administered questionnaire which assessed information on demographic characteristics, smoking habit, alcohol use, previous dental visit, dental appearance satisfaction, tooth shape, size, arrangement and strength was the tool of data collection. The data was subjected to descriptive, Chi-square and regression statistics using statistical package for the social sciences version 17.0 (Chicago, IL, USA). (P < 0.05) was considered to be significant. Results: A total of 399 undergraduates which are made up of 179 (44.9%) males and 220 (55.1%) females with mean age of 24.66 (4.20) years participated in this study. Self-evaluated dental appearance satisfaction was expressed by 79.4% (317/399) of the participants. The significant predictors of self-evaluated dental appearance satisfaction were skin color (P = 0.03, odds ratio [OR] =2.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.09-6.09) and perceived tooth strength (P = 0.02, OR = 5.83, 95% CI = 1.40-24.28) among males and alcohol consumption (P = 0.04, OR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.21-0.95] and perceived size of tooth (P = 0.02, OR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.15-4.89) among females. The significant predictors of self-evaluated dental appearance satisfaction among the participants were ethnicity (P = 0.04, OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.32-0.96), skin color (P = 0.04, OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.03-2.93), perceived tooth size (P = 0.03, OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.07-3.09) and strength (P = 0.01, OR = 3.42, 95% CI = 1.58-7.41). Conclusion: Ethnicity, tooth arrangement

  15. The use of dental services by adult Singaporeans.

    PubMed

    Lo, G L

    1993-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the rate of dental service utilisation amongst the adult Singaporeans and to examine factors influencing their service utilisation. 1959 subjects aged between 18-75 years participated in a questionnaire survey. Respondents were asked whether they had seen a dentist in the past twelve months. It was found that 57% of the subjects had not seen a dentist in the past year. The reasons given for non-attendance were "felt it was unnecessary" (69.7%), "lack of time" (13.8%), "fear" (5.7%) and "cost" (2.4%). The low level of dental awareness appeared to be the major block to utilisation of dental services in this population. PMID:9582690

  16. [Oral health, dental state and nutrition in older adults].

    PubMed

    Müller, F; Nitschke, I

    2005-10-01

    The loss of natural teeth impairs essentially the chewing function and can only partly be restored by the insertion of dental prostheses. Equally, xerostomia and dysphagia may aggravate the nutritional intake in older adults. Often denture wearers do subjectively not notice the adjustment of their food choice and the employment of special preparation techniques. Finally the dental state influences the nutritional intake. A reduced number of teeth correlates with the intake of less calories, proteins, fat, non-starch polysaccharides and vitamins. Often missing calories are compensated by an increased consumption of sugar and fat. Especially edentulous persons with a low level of education choose a diet which is rich in fat and sugar. Further the daily intake of fruit and vegetables diminishes along with fewer occlusal contacts in posterior teeth. The restoration of the chewing function by dental intervention does not lead to an improvement of the nutritional intake by itself and should therefore always be complemented by nutritional advice. PMID:16244818

  17. Psychometric properties of Spanish-language adult dental fear measures

    PubMed Central

    Coolidge, Trilby; Chambers, Mark A; Garcia, Laura J; Heaton, Lisa J; Coldwell, Susan E

    2008-01-01

    Background It would be useful to have psychometrically-sound measures of dental fear for Hispanics, who comprise the largest ethnic minority in the United States. We report on the psychometric properties of Spanish-language versions of two common adult measures of dental fear (Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, MDAS; Dental Fear Survey, DFS), as well as a measure of fear of dental injections (Needle Survey, NS). Methods Spanish versions of the measures were administered to 213 adults attending Hispanic cultural festivals, 31 students (who took the questionnaire twice, for test-retest reliability), and 100 patients at a dental clinic. We also administered the questionnaire to 136 English-speaking adults at the Hispanic festivals and 58 English-speaking students at the same college where we recruited the Spanish-speaking students, to compare the performance of the English and Spanish measures in the same populations. Results The internal reliabilities of the Spanish MDAS ranged from 0.80 to 0.85. Values for the DFS ranged from 0.92 to 0.96, and values for the NS ranged from 0.92 to 0.94. The test-retest reliabilities (intra-class correlations) for the three measures were 0.69, 0.86, and 0.94 for the MDAS, DFS, and NS, respectively. The three measures showed moderate correlations with one another in all three samples, providing evidence for construct validity. Patients with higher scores on the measures were rated as being more anxious during dental procedures. Similar internal reliabilities and correlations were found in the English-version analyses. The test-retest values were also similar in the English students for the DFS and NS; however, the English test-retest value for the MDAS was better than that found in the Spanish students. Conclusion We found evidence for the internal reliability, construct validity, and criterion validity for the Spanish versions of the three measures, and evidence for the test-retest reliability of the Spanish versions of the DFS and NS

  18. Widespread Legionella pneumophila contamination of dental stations in a dental school without apparent human infection.

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheim, B. A.; Sefton, A. M.; Gill, O. N.; Tyler, J. E.; O'Mahony, M. C.; Richards, J. M.; Dennis, P. J.; Harrison, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    Following isolation of Legionella pneumophila from a special dental station water circuit, used primarily to cool high-speed dental drills which produce fine aerosols, a case finding and environmental survey was undertaken. Widespread colonization of the dental stations was found and the results suggested that amplification of the background levels of L. pneumophila was taking place within the stations. However there was no evidence for transmission causing human infection. PMID:3609170

  19. Numerical analysis of human dental occlusal contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, F. S.; Las Casas, E. B.; Godoy, G. C. D.; Meireles, A. B.

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain real contact areas, forces, and pressures acting on human dental enamel as a function of the nominal pressure during dental occlusal contact. The described development consisted of three steps: characterization of the surface roughness by 3D contact profilometry test, finite element analysis of micro responses for each pair of main asperities in contact, and homogenization of macro responses using an assumed probability density function. The inelastic deformation of enamel was considered, adjusting the stress-strain relationship of sound enamel to that obtained from instrumented indentation tests conducted with spherical tip. A mechanical part of the static friction coefficient was estimated as the ratio between tangential and normal components of the overall resistive force, resulting in μd = 0.057. Less than 1% of contact pairs reached the yield stress of enamel, indicating that the occlusal contact is essentially elastic. The micro-models indicated an average hardness of 6.25GPa, and the homogenized result for macroscopic interface was around 9GPa. Further refinements of the methodology and verification using experimental data can provide a better understanding of processes related to contact, friction and wear of human tooth enamel.

  20. Human metapneumovirus in adults.

    PubMed

    Haas, Lenneke E M; Thijsen, Steven F T; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  1. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  2. Prevalence of Dental Caries in Kosovar Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Begzati, Agim; Kelmendi, Jeta; Ilijazi, Donika; Kqiku, Lumnije

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental caries in the Kosovar adult population. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study in Kosovo was conducted examining 9387 patients, aged 18 upwards, between January 2010 and December 2011. Clinical evaluation was done using WHO criteria for evaluation of dental health status and data collection. Results. The prevalence of caries for the whole study was 72.80%. The mean DMFT index was 9.61 (±5.12) in the 18–34-year age group, 11.6 (±6.42) in the 35–44-year age group, 13.68 (±8.12) among the 45–64-year age group, 17.98 (±9.81) in the 65–74-year age group, and 23.19 (±9.41) in the age group of 75+ years, respectively. A significant difference of mean DMFT and its each component was observed between the ages (P < 0.001). Conclusion. This study comes out with the significant levels of dental caries among young Kosovar population (18–34 years old). PMID:27516774

  3. Do young adults demand more dental services as their income increases?

    PubMed

    Grytten, Jostein; Holst, Dorthe

    2002-12-01

    Several studies from the USA have shown that there is a positive and strong relationship between income and demand for dental care. All these studies have been performed on populations where treatment needs were high. Today, young adults represent one group of the population where treatment needs are low. But young adults will not necessarily demand or utilize more dental services as their income increases. As we do not know the extent to which demand will increase when income increases among young adults, future needs for dental manpower could be less than predicted from previous studies. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between income and demand/utilization for dental services among young adults in Norway. The analyses were performed on two large sets of survey data, collected in 1985 and 1995, which were representative of the Norwegian population aged 20 years and above. The main finding was that the increase in demand with an increase in income was less for young adults than for older adults. In particular, there was a marked fall in the income elasticities among young adults from 1985 to 1995. The fall in the income elasticity corresponds to a marked decrease in the prevalence of dental diseases among young adults during that period. Our results imply that future policies for dental manpower should take into account the lower income elasticity for young adults compared to for older adults, and that future needs for dental personnel should be planned accordingly. PMID:12453118

  4. Humanities in Dental Education: A Focus on Understanding the Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balis, Sophia A.; Rule, James T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a seminar program at the University of Maryland Dental School, which uses books, short stories, and films that integrate human values into dental education, specifically in pediatric dentistry, for residents, clerks, and faculty. Results of initial evaluation and changes in the program over time are detailed. (DB)

  5. A national cross-sectional survey of dental anxiety in the French adult population

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Emmanuel; Collado, Valérie; Faulks, Denise; Bullier, Brigitte; Hennequin, Martine

    2007-01-01

    Background Dental anxiety is a public health problem but no epidemiological study has been undertaken in France to evaluate its prevalence. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence, severity and associations of dental anxiety in a sample of the French adult population. Methods A convenience sample of 2725 adults (mean age = 47 years, SD16, minimum = 16, maximum = 101 years), representative of the French population with regard to age and urban distribution, completed a French version of the Corah Dental Anxiety scale (DAS) and a questionnaire relating to their dental appointments. Results Moderate dental anxiety (14≥DAS≥13) was revealed for 172 persons (6.2%), while 195 (7.3%) had severe dental anxiety (DAS≥15), giving an overall prevalence of dental anxiety of 13.5%. Prevalence was lower proportionally with age (P < 0.001) and was higher in French overseas territories and in the countryside (P < 0.01). Farmers and low skilled workers were significantly more anxious than executives and shopkeepers (P < 0.001). Anxiety was associated with avoidance of care (p < 0.001) and lack of regular dental appointments (p < 0.001). Conclusion Dental anxiety in France appears to concern a similar proportion of the population as in other industrialised European, Australasian or North American countries. Recommendations for prevention and management of dental anxiety are made with reference to dental education and health care services in France. PMID:17927808

  6. Factors that limit access to dental care for adults with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Hon K.; Wolf, Bethany J.; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Magruder, Kathryn M.; Selassie, Anbesaw W.; Salinas, Carlos F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated dental care service utilization among adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) and identified barriers and other factors affecting utilization among this population. Methods Respondents (n = 192) with SCI participated in an oral health survey assessing dental care service utilization and were compared with respondents from the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System (BRFSS). Results There was no significant difference in the proportion of SCI respondents who visited the dentist for any reason in the past year compared to the general population (65.5% vs. 68.8%, P = 0.350). However, SCI respondents were less likely to go to the dentist for a dental cleaning in the past year compared to the general population (54.6% vs. 69.4%, P < 0.001). The three most commonly reported barriers to accessing dental care were cost (40.1 %), physical barriers (22.9%), and dental fear (15.1%). Multivariable modeling showed physical barriers and fear of dental visits were the two significant factors deterring respondents from dental visits in the past year. Conclusions Physical barriers preventing access to dental facilities and dental fear are prevalent and significantly impede the delivery of dental health care to adults with SCI. Dentists should undertake necessary physical remodeling in their facilities to accommodate wheelchair users and implement appropriate strategies for the management of dental fear among patients with SCI. PMID:20618781

  7. More than a Set of Teeth: Assessing and Enhancing Dental Students' Perceptions of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrop, Deborah P.; Fabiano, Jude A.; Nochajski, Thomas H.; Zittel-Palamara, Kimberly; Davis, Elaine L.; Goldberg, Louis J.

    2006-01-01

    Dental professionals play a key role in maintaining the well-being of older adults by identifying problems that disturb systemic health. A 3-part instrument was used to assess dental students' knowledge of aging, comfort with patient diversity and patient care strategies (Years 1-4; N = 321). Collaborative education and services were developed by…

  8. The Relationships between Cognitive Ability and Dental Status in a National Sample of USA Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabbah, Wael; Sheiham, Aubrey

    2010-01-01

    There are very few studies on the relationship between cognitive ability and dental status in middle aged and younger adults. We postulate that lower cognitive ability is directly related to poorer dental status and that this relationship operates through the relationship between cognitive ability and health-related behaviors. The objectives of…

  9. Dental Caries Prevalence and Tooth Loss in Chilean Adult Population: First National Dental Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Urzua, I.; Mendoza, C.; Arteaga, O.; Rodríguez, G.; Cabello, R.; Faleiros, S.; Carvajal, P.; Muñoz, A.; Espinoza, I.; Aranda, W.; Gamonal, J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental caries, tooth loss, and risk factors among adult population of Chile. Furthermore, age, gender, and behavioural specific differences in caries prevalence and tooth loss were examined. A national stratified multistage probabilistic sample design in two-age cohorts was applied to the Chilean population. A sample of 1553 adults, comprising 1088 individuals aged 35–44 and 465 senior individuals aged 65–74, were examined. The DMFT was evaluated following WHO recommendations using diagnostic criteria of caries lesions into dentin. The data were analyzed by univariate and multivariate models using logistic regression analyses. Results showed a mean DMFT of 15.06 in the 35–44-year-old group and of 21.57 in the 65–74 group. Factors related to tooth loss in the 35–44 group through univariate logistic regression were depression (OR 1.9 CI 95% 1.26–2.85), education level <12 years (OR 2.24 CI 95% 1.31–3.73), personal income (OR 1.51 CI 95% 1.04–2.19), and familiar income (OR 2.05 CI 95% 1.34–3.13), and through multivariate logistic regression in the same age group were depression (OR 1.93 CI 95% 1.24–3.0), education level <12 years (OR 1.94 CI 95% 1.2–3.14), and familiar income (OR 1.71 CI 95% 1.09–2.68). Factors related to tooth loss in the 65–74-year-old group through univariate logistic regression were education level <12 years (OR 2.54 CI 95% 1.3–4.96) and personal income (OR 1.66 CI 95% 1.05–2.63), and for multivariate logistic regression in the same age group, it was education level <12 years (OR 2.51 CI 95% 1.21–5.18). In conclusion, adult population in Chile showed a high prevalence of dental caries and tooth loss, as age, education level, personal and familiar incomes, and depression are being the main risk factors. PMID:23316234

  10. Anxiety and depressive disorders and dental fear among adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Pohjola, Vesa; Mattila, Aino K; Joukamaa, Matti; Lahti, Satu

    2011-02-01

    We studied the association between dental fear and anxiety or depressive disorders, as well as the comorbidity of dental fear with anxiety and depressive disorders, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, dental attendance, and dental health. Nationally representative data on Finnish adults, ≥ 30 yr of age (n = 5,953), were gathered through interviews and clinical examination. Dental fear was measured using the question: 'How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?' Anxiety and/or depressive disorders were assessed using a standardized structured psychiatric interview according to criteria presented in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) (DSM-IV).Those with depressive disorders, generalized anxiety disorder or social phobia more commonly reported high dental fear than did those without these disorders. When age, gender, education, dental attendance, and the number of decayed, missing, and restored teeth were considered, those with generalized anxiety disorder were more likely to have high dental fear than were participants with neither anxiety nor depressive disorders. The comorbidity of depressive and anxiety disorders also remained statistically significantly associated with dental fear; those with both depressive and anxiety disorders were more likely to have high dental fear than were those without these disorders. Our findings support the suggestion that some individuals may have a personality that is vulnerable to dental fear. PMID:21244512

  11. Activation of the NLRP3/caspase-1 inflammasome in human dental pulp tissue and human dental pulp fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenkai; Lv, Haipeng; Wang, Haijing; Wang, Diya; Sun, Shukai; Jia, Qian; Wang, Peina; Song, Bing; Ni, Longxing

    2015-08-01

    The NLRP3/caspase-1 inflammasome pathway plays an important role in cellular immune defence against bacterial infection; however, its function in human dental pulp tissue and human dental pulp fibroblasts remains poorly understood. We demonstrate that NLRP3 protein expression occurs to a greater extent in pulp tissue with irreversible pulpitis than in normal pulp tissue and in tissue with reversible pulpitis. Caspase-1 is present in its active (cleaved) form only in pulp tissue with irreversible pulpitis. NLRP3 and caspase-1 are expressed in the odontoblast layers in normal human dental pulp tissue, whereas in inflamed pulp tissue, the odontoblast layers are disrupted and dental pulp cells are positive for NLRP3 and caspase-1. Additionally, we investigate the role of the NLRP3/caspase-1 inflammasome pathway in human dental pulp fibroblasts and show that ATP activates the P2X7 receptor on the cell membrane triggering K(+) efflux and inducing the gradual recruitment of the membrane pore pannexin-1. Extracellular lipopolysaccharide is able to penetrate the cytosol and activate NLRP3. Furthermore, the low intracellular K(+) concentration in the cytosol triggers reactive oxygen species generation, which also induces the NLRP3 inflammasome. Thus, the NLRP3/caspase-1 pathway has a biological role in the innate immune response mounted by human dental pulp fibroblasts. PMID:25684031

  12. Dental Calculus and the Evolution of the Human Oral Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Warinner, Christina

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the evolution of the oral microbiome is a challenging, but increasingly feasible, task. Recently, dental calculus has been shown to preserve ancient biomolecules from the oral microbiota, host tissues and diet for tens of thousands of years. As such, it provides a unique window into the ancestral oral microbiome. This article reviews recent advancements in ancient dental calculus research and emerging insights into the evolution and ecology of the human oral microbiome. PMID:27514153

  13. Costs of providing dental services to adult mentally retarded: a preliminary report.

    PubMed Central

    Gotowka, T D; Johnson, E S; Gotowka, C J

    1982-01-01

    This study reports on the hourly costs of providing comprehensive dental services to mentally retarded adults in a hospital-based group dental practice. The analysis indicated average total hourly costs of $56.11 for dentist-provided services an $22.25 for dental hygienist-provided services. When compared to the revenues available for program maintenance, a net hourly deficit of $18.82 per dentist hour and $9.89 per dental hygienist hour resulted. The implications of this operating loss on the continued care of this patient population are discussed. PMID:6751105

  14. Dental Care in the Frail Older Adult: Special Considerations and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Stein, Pamela; Aalboe, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    Frail older adults disproportionately suffer from untreated dental problems. Age-related biological changes to hard and soft dental tissues, existing medical conditions, polypharmacy, diet and uncontrolled plaque exacerbate the problem. All of these factors increase the complexity of treatment and will differ greatly from standard treatment of younger adults. This article discusses the key considerations and suggestions for risk assessment, disease management, treatment planning and palliative care to maintain the patient's comfort and quality of life. PMID:26819997

  15. Dental Anxiety Among Adults: An Epidemiological Study in South India

    PubMed Central

    Appukuttan, Devapriya; Subramanian, Sangeetha; Tadepalli, Anupama; Damodaran, Lokesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental anxiety is a major barrier for dental care utilization. Hence, identifying anxious individuals and their appropriate management becomes crucial in clinical practice. Aim: The study aims to assess dental anxiety, factors influencing dental anxiety, and anxiety towards tooth extraction procedure among patients attending a dental hospital in India. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 1,148 consecutive patients aged 18-70 years. The assessment tools consisted of a consent form, history form, a questionnaire form containing the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) which was used to assess the level of dental anxiety, and an additional question on anxiety towards dental extraction procedure. Results: Among the study group, 63.7% were men and 36.3% were women. Based on the MDAS score, 45.2% of the participants were identified to be less anxious, 51.8% were moderately or extremely anxious, and 3% were suffering from dental phobia. Mean MDAS total score was 10.4 (standard deviation (SD) = 3.91). Female participants and younger subjects were more anxious (P < 0.001). Subjects who were anxious had postponed their dental visit (P < 0.001). Participants who had negative dental experience were more anxious (P < 0.05). Notably, 82.6% reported anxiety towards extraction procedure. Significant association was seen between anxiety towards extraction procedure and the respondents gender (P < 0.05), age (P < 0.001), education level (P < 0.05), employment status (P < 0.001), income (P < 0.001), self-perceived oral health status (P < 0.05), and their history of visit to dentist (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Significant percentage of population was suffering from dental anxiety in this study population. A plethora of factors like age, gender, education level, occupation, financial stability, and previous bad dental experience influences dental anxiety to various levels. Extraction followed by drilling of tooth and receiving local anesthetic injection

  16. Long-term patterns of dental attendance and caries experience among British adults: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Aldossary, Arwa; Harrison, Victoria E; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    There is inconclusive evidence on the value of regular dental attendance. This study explored the relationship between long-term patterns of dental attendance and caries experience. We used retrospective data from 3,235 adults, ≥ 16 yrs of age, who participated in the Adult Dental Health Survey in the UK. Participants were classified into four groups (always, current, former, and never regular-attenders) based on their responses to three questions on lifetime dental-attendance patterns. The association between dental-attendance patterns and caries experience, as measured using the decayed, missing, or filled teeth (DMFT) index, was tested in negative binomial regression models, adjusting for demographic (sex, age, and country of residence) and socio-economic (educational attainment, household income, and social class) factors. A consistent pattern of association between long-term dental attendance and caries experience was found in adjusted models. Former and never regular-attenders had a significantly higher DMFT score and numbers of decayed and missing teeth, but fewer filled teeth, than always regular-attenders. No differences in DMFT or its components were found between current and always regular-attenders. The findings of this study show that adults with different lifetime trajectories of dental attendance had different dental statuses. PMID:25521216

  17. Human dental pulp stem cells: Applications in future regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, Pravin D; Jethmalani, Yogita D

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are pluripotent cells, having a property of differentiating into various types of cells of human body. Several studies have developed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various human tissues, peripheral blood and body fluids. These cells are then characterized by cellular and molecular markers to understand their specific phenotypes. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are having a MSCs phenotype and they are differentiated into neuron, cardiomyocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, liver cells and β cells of islet of pancreas. Thus, DPSCs have shown great potentiality to use in regenerative medicine for treatment of various human diseases including dental related problems. These cells can also be developed into induced pluripotent stem cells by incorporation of pluripotency markers and use for regenerative therapies of various diseases. The DPSCs are derived from various dental tissues such as human exfoliated deciduous teeth, apical papilla, periodontal ligament and dental follicle tissue. This review will overview the information about isolation, cellular and molecular characterization and differentiation of DPSCs into various types of human cells and thus these cells have important applications in regenerative therapies for various diseases. This review will be most useful for postgraduate dental students as well as scientists working in the field of oral pathology and oral medicine. PMID:26131314

  18. Dental evidence for ontogenetic differences between modern humans and Neanderthals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tanya M; Tafforeau, Paul; Reid, Donald J; Pouech, Joane; Lazzari, Vincent; Zermeno, John P; Guatelli-Steinberg, Debbie; Olejniczak, Anthony J; Hoffman, Almut; Radovcic, Jakov; Makaremi, Masrour; Toussaint, Michel; Stringer, Chris; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2010-12-01

    Humans have an unusual life history, with an early weaning age, long childhood, late first reproduction, short interbirth intervals, and long lifespan. In contrast, great apes wean later, reproduce earlier, and have longer intervals between births. Despite 80 y of speculation, the origins of these developmental patterns in Homo sapiens remain unknown. Because they record daily growth during formation, teeth provide important insights, revealing that australopithecines and early Homo had more rapid ontogenies than recent humans. Dental development in later Homo species has been intensely debated, most notably the issue of whether Neanderthals and H. sapiens differ. Here we apply synchrotron virtual histology to a geographically and temporally diverse sample of Middle Paleolithic juveniles, including Neanderthals, to assess tooth formation and calculate age at death from dental microstructure. We find that most Neanderthal tooth crowns grew more rapidly than modern human teeth, resulting in significantly faster dental maturation. In contrast, Middle Paleolithic H. sapiens juveniles show greater similarity to recent humans. These findings are consistent with recent cranial and molecular evidence for subtle developmental differences between Neanderthals and H. sapiens. When compared with earlier hominin taxa, both Neanderthals and H. sapiens have extended the duration of dental development. This period of dental immaturity is particularly prolonged in modern humans. PMID:21078988

  19. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  20. Genome-wide transcriptomic alterations induced by ethanol treatment in human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs).

    PubMed

    Khalid, Omar; Kim, Jeffrey J; Duan, Lewei; Hoang, Michael; Elashoff, David; Kim, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from adult dental pulp are multipotent mesenchymal stem cells that can be directed to differentiate into osteogenic/odontogenic cells and also trans-differentiate into neuronal cells. The utility of DPSC has been explored in odontogenic differentiation for tooth regeneration. Alcohol abuse appears to lead to periodontal disease, tooth decay and mouth sores that are potentially precancerous. Persons who abuse alcohol are at high risk of having seriously deteriorated teeth, gums and compromised oral health in general. It is currently unknown if alcohol exposure has any impact on adult stem cell maintenance, stem cell fate determination and plasticity, and stem cell niche environment. Here we provide detailed experimental methods, analysis and information associated with our data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under GSE57255. Our data provide transcriptomic changes that are occurring by EtOH treatment of DPSCs at 24-hour and 48-hour time point. PMID:25045622

  1. Axonal Degeneration in Dental Pulp Precedes Human Primary Teeth Exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Lovera, M; Schmachtenberg, O; Couve, E

    2015-10-01

    The dental pulp in human primary teeth is densely innervated by a plethora of nerve endings at the coronal pulp-dentin interface. This study analyzed how the physiological root resorption (PRR) process affects dental pulp innervation before exfoliation of primary teeth. Forty-four primary canine teeth, classified into 3 defined PRR stages (early, middle, and advanced) were fixed and demineralized. Longitudinal cryosections of each tooth were stained for immunohistochemical and quantitative analysis of dental pulp nerve fibers and associated components with confocal and electron microscopy. During PRR, axonal degeneration was prominent and progressive in a Wallerian-like scheme, comprising nerve fiber bundles and nerve endings within the coronal and root pulp. Neurofilament fragmentation increased significantly during PRR progression and was accompanied by myelin degradation and a progressive loss of myelinated axons. Myelin sheath degradation involved activation of autophagic activity by Schwann cells to remove myelin debris. These cells expressed a sequence of responses comprising dedifferentiation, proliferative activity, GAP-43 overexpression, and Büngner band formation. During the advanced PRR stage, increased immune cell recruitment within the dental pulp and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II upregulation by Schwann cells characterized an inflammatory condition associated with the denervation process in preexfoliative primary teeth. The ensuing loss of dental pulp axons is likely to be responsible for the progressive reduction of sensory function of the dental pulp during preexfoliative stages. PMID:26149320

  2. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Stimulated by the Calcium Phosphate Porous Granules

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sunyoung; Won, Jong-Eun; Kim, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Won

    2011-01-01

    Effects of three-dimensional (3D) calcium phosphate (CaP) porous granules on the growth and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were examined for dental tissue engineering. hDPSCs isolated from adult human dental pulps were cultured for 3-4 passages, and populated on porous granules. Cell growth on the culture dish showed an ongoing increase for up to 21 days, whereas the growth on the 3D granules decreased after 14 days. This reduction in proliferative potential on the 3D granules was more conspicuous under the osteogenic medium conditions, indicating that the 3D granules may induce the odontogenic differentiation of hDPSCs. Differentiation behavior on the 3D granules was confirmed by the increased alkaline phosphatase activity, up-regulation of odontoblast-specific genes, including dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and greater level of dentin sialoprotein synthesis by western blot. Moreover, the cellular mineralization, as assessed by Alizarin red S and calcium quantification, was significantly higher in the 3D CaP granules than in the culture dish. Taken all, the 3D CaP porous granules should be useful for dental tissue engineering in combination with hDPSCs by providing favorable 3D substrate conditions for cell growth and odontogenic development. PMID:21772958

  3. Characterization of p75 neurotrophin receptor expression in human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenru; Kremer, Karlea L; Kaidonis, Xenia; Ludlow, Victoria E; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Xie, Jianling; Proud, Christopher G; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-10-01

    Human adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) are a heterogeneous stem cell population, which are able to differentiate down neural, chondrocyte, osteocyte and adipocyte lineages. We studied the expression pattern of p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75NTR), a marker of neural stem cells, within human DPSC populations from eight donors. p75NTR are expressed at low levels (<10%) in DPSC. Importantly, p75(+) DPSC represent higher expression levels of SOX1 (neural precursor cell marker), SOX2 (cell pluripotency marker) and nestin (neural stem cell marker) in comparison to p75(-) DPSC. Our results suggest that p75(+) hDPSC may denote a subpopulation with greater neurogenic potential. PMID:27469433

  4. Dental fear and alexithymia among adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Pohjola, Vesa; Mattila, Aino K; Joukamaa, Matti; Lahti, Satu

    2011-07-01

    population sample, controlling for age, gender, education and marital status as well as depressive and anxiety disorders. An additional aim was to evaluate whether gender modified this association. MATERIAL AND METHODS. The two-stage stratified cluster sample (n = 8028) represented the Finnish population aged 30 years and older. Participants (n = 5241) answered the question 'How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?' They also filled out the 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), which included three sub-scales, i.e. difficulties in identifying feelings (DIF), difficulties in describing feelings (DDF) and externally oriented thinking (EOT). Anxiety and depressive disorders were assessed with a standardized structured psychiatric interview according to DSM-IV criteria. To evaluate the association between dental fear and alexithymia, multiple logistic regression analyses were performed, adjusting simultaneously for the effects of possible confounding variables. RESULTS. Gender modified the association between dental fear and alexithymia. Among women, those reporting higher scores for TAS-20, DIF and EOT sub-scale scores were more likely to have high dental fear than were those reporting lower scores. Among men no such association was observed. Those participants who reported high DDF sub-scale scores were more likely to have high dental fear than were those reporting lower scores. CONCLUSIONS. Alexithymics are more likely to have high dental fear than non-alexithymics are. The findings support the suggestion that some people with dental fear may have internal personality vulnerability to anxiety disorders. PMID:21294672

  5. Differences Among Older Adults in the Types of Dental Services Used in the United States.

    PubMed

    Manski, Richard J; Hyde, Jody Schimmel; Chen, Haiyan; Moeller, John F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore differences in the socioeconomic, demographic characteristics of older adults in the United States with respect to their use of different types of dental care services. The 2008 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) collected information about patterns of dental care use and oral health from individuals aged 55 years and older in the United States. We analyze these data and explore patterns of service use by key characteristics before modeling the relationship between service use type and those characteristics. The most commonly used service category was fillings, inlays, or bonding, reported by 43.6% of those with any utilization. Just over one third of those with any utilization reported a visit for a crown, implant, or prosthesis, and one quarter reported a gum treatment or tooth extraction. The strongest consistent predictors of use type are denture, dentate, and oral health status along with dental insurance coverage and wealth. Our results provide insights into the need for public policies to address inequalities in access to dental services among an older US population. Our findings show that lower income, less wealthy elderly with poor oral health are more likely to not use any dental services rather than using only preventive dental care, and that cost prevents most non-users who say they need dental care from going to the dentist. These results suggest a serious access problem and one that ultimately produces even worse oral health and expensive major procedures for this population in the future. PMID:27284127

  6. More than a set of teeth: assessing and enhancing dental students' perceptions of older adults.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Deborah P; Fabiano, Jude A; Nochajski, Thomas H; Zittel-Palamara, Kimberley M; Davis, Elaine L; Goldberg, Louis J

    2006-01-01

    Dental professionals play a key role in maintaining the well-being of older adults by identifying problems that disturb systemic health. A 3-part instrument was used to assess dental students' knowledge of aging, comfort with patient diversity and patient care strategies (Years 1-4; N = 321). Collaborative education and services were developed by the Schools of Dental Medicine and Social Work. Results indicate that dental students' knowledge of aging was low (Palmore's FAQ 1 Range = 58%-64%), comfort with geriatric issues improved after the first year of intervention, and strategies for patient care changed with experience. Group differences suggest the importance of utilizing educational "turning points" as teachable moments. PMID:16873208

  7. A critical review of approaches to the treatment of dental anxiety in adults.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Dina; Heimberg, Richard G; Tellez, Marisol; Ismail, Amid I

    2013-05-01

    Dental anxiety and specific phobia of dental procedures are prevalent conditions that can result in substantial distress and oral health impairment. This paper critically reviews 22 randomized treatment trials aimed at reducing dental anxiety and avoidance in adults, published in peer-reviewed journals between 1974 and 2012. The following treatment techniques are reviewed: various forms of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), relaxation training, benzodiazepine premedication, music distraction, hypnotherapy, acupuncture, nitrous oxide sedation, and the use of lavender oil scent. CBT delivered in a variety of formats, including one-session treatment, has the most evidence for its efficacy. Cognitive techniques, relaxation, and techniques to increase patients' sense of control over dental care are also efficacious but perform best when combined with repeated, graduated exposure. Other interventions require further study in randomized trials before conclusions about their efficacy are warranted. Limitations of the extant outcome research and implications for future treatment and research are discussed. PMID:23746494

  8. Dental DNA fingerprinting in identification of human remains

    PubMed Central

    Girish, KL; Rahman, Farzan S; Tippu, Shoaib R

    2010-01-01

    The recent advances in molecular biology have revolutionized all aspects of dentistry. DNA, the language of life yields information beyond our imagination, both in health or disease. DNA fingerprinting is a tool used to unravel all the mysteries associated with the oral cavity and its manifestations during diseased conditions. It is being increasingly used in analyzing various scenarios related to forensic science. The technical advances in molecular biology have propelled the analysis of the DNA into routine usage in crime laboratories for rapid and early diagnosis. DNA is an excellent means for identification of unidentified human remains. As dental pulp is surrounded by dentin and enamel, which forms dental armor, it offers the best source of DNA for reliable genetic type in forensic science. This paper summarizes the recent literature on use of this technique in identification of unidentified human remains. PMID:21731342

  9. Application of the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene to the role of the clinician : part II.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M M; Darby, M

    1993-01-01

    In summary, the theories of Maslow and of Yura and Walsh have been highlighted as background for understanding the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene. In addition, 11 human needs have been identified and defined as being especially related to dental hygiene care, and a sample evaluation tool for their clinical assessment and a dental hygiene care plan have been presented. The four concepts of client, environment, health/oral health, and dental hygiene actions explained in terms of human need theory, and the 11 human needs related to dental hygiene care constitute the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene. Within the framework of the human needs conceptual model of dental hygiene, the dental hygiene process is a systematic approach to dental hygiene care that involves assessment of the 11 human needs related to dental hygiene care; analysis of deficits in these needs; determination of the dental hygiene care plan based on identified deficits; implementation of dental hygiene interventions stated in the care plan; and evaluation of the effectiveness of dental hygiene interventions in achieving specific goals, including subsequent reassessment and revision of the dental hygiene care plan. This human needs conceptual model for dental hygiene provides a guide for comprehensive and humanistic client care. This model allows the dental hygienist to view each client (whether an individual or a group) holistically to prevent oral disease and to promote health and wellness. Dental hygiene theorists are encouraged to expand this model or to develop additional conceptual models based on dental hygiene's paradigm. PMID:17233167

  10. Purified Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Promote Osteogenic Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yasui, T; Mabuchi, Y; Toriumi, H; Ebine, T; Niibe, K; Houlihan, D D; Morikawa, S; Onizawa, K; Kawana, H; Akazawa, C; Suzuki, N; Nakagawa, T; Okano, H; Matsuzaki, Y

    2016-02-01

    Human dental pulp stem/progenitor cells (hDPSCs) are attractive candidates for regenerative therapy because they can be easily expanded to generate colony-forming unit-fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) on plastic and the large cell numbers required for transplantation. However, isolation based on adherence to plastic inevitably changes the surface marker expression and biological properties of the cells. Consequently, little is currently known about the original phenotypes of tissue precursor cells that give rise to plastic-adherent CFU-Fs. To better understand the in vivo functions and translational therapeutic potential of hDPSCs and other stem cells, selective cell markers must be identified in the progenitor cells. Here, we identified a dental pulp tissue-specific cell population based on the expression profiles of 2 cell-surface markers LNGFR (CD271) and THY-1 (CD90). Prospectively isolated, dental pulp-derived LNGFR(Low+)THY-1(High+) cells represent a highly enriched population of clonogenic cells--notably, the isolated cells exhibited long-term proliferation and multilineage differentiation potential in vitro. The cells also expressed known mesenchymal cell markers and promoted new bone formation to heal critical-size calvarial defects in vivo. These findings suggest that LNGFR(Low+)THY-1(High+) dental pulp-derived cells provide an excellent source of material for bone regenerative strategies. PMID:26494655

  11. The opinions and attitudes of dental school academic staff towards oral healthcare education for older adults.

    PubMed

    Haresaku, S; Mariño, R; Naito, T; Morgan, M V

    2016-08-01

    The term 'oral health care for older adults' has various interpretations, and its meaning is not clear among dental school academic staff. Additionally, there are no theoretical or practical stand-alone courses on oral health care for older adults in Japanese dental schools. To improve oral health care education, we investigated the opinions and attitudes toward oral health care education for older adults among academic staff in dental schools. Data were collected in seven dental schools from May to September 2013 via an online questionnaire survey. Five-hundred-fifty-eight academics (428 male, 130 female) participated (response rate 57%). The average number of years since they had completed a university degree was 20.2 (SD 10.2) years. The majority (Over 90%) of participants perceived that oral health care should be provided in nursing facilities, hospitals, and at home. Its treatments and instructions should include, not only methods of keeping good oral hygiene, but also improvement of oral function such as swallowing training and salivary glands massage. The majority (84.2%) suggested oral health care education should be combined as a one-credit, stand-alone course. Findings indicate that dental academics have an understanding the need for a course in oral health care for older adults. Participants supported the need for further development of education in oral health care for older adults' in Japan, as a separate course on its own right. However there were some different views about content by teaching field. The need for a national core program for teaching oral health care education was suggested. PMID:26083002

  12. Immunomic Screening of Cell Surface Molecules on Undifferentiated Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyo-In; Lee, Tae-Hyung; Kang, Kyung-Jung; Ryu, Chun-Jeih; Jang, Young-Joo

    2015-08-15

    Human adult dental pulp tissue is a source of adult stem cells that have a potential to differentiate into various tissues, although the primary cell suspensions cultured from pulp tissue are mixtures of both stem cell and nonstem cell populations with heterogeneous phenotypes and various differentiation efficiencies. Therefore, cell surface protein markers on dental pulp stem cells are critical for detection and purification of stem cell populations. Yet, little is known about the cell surface molecules that are specifically associated with the undifferentiated and progenitor state of human adult dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Presently, cell surface proteins expressed on hDPSCs were assessed by screening surface molecules specifically expressed on dentinogenic progenitors. Using a decoy immunization strategy, a set of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was generated against undifferentiated pulp progenitor cells. Forty-five hybridomas produced MAbs that interacted weakly, if at all, to differentiated pulp cells. Of these, 19 MAbs (18 IgG, 1 IgM) recognized surface molecules on undifferentiated hDPSCs. By multicolor flow cytometric analysis, 40%-60% of newly identified MAb-positive cells were demonstrated to be positive for the CD44 and CD90 mesenchymal markers. When MAb-positive cells were sorted from the heterogeneous pulp cell suspension, mineralization efficiency was increased three to five times compared with MAb-negative cells. The results suggest that the decoy immunization is an efficient method for isolation of MAbs against dentinogenic progenitors. These MAbs will be helpful for identification and enrichment of hDPSCs for efficient dentin regeneration. PMID:25919113

  13. Hydroxyapatite Formation on a Novel Dental Cement in Human Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Engstrand, Johanna; Unosson, Erik; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Dental materials have to meet high standards regarding mechanical strength and handling properties. There is however only a limited amount of research that has been devoted to natural formation of hydroxyapatite (HA) in contact with the materials. The objective of the current investigation was to study the surface reactions occurring in human salvia on a novel dental cement. Ceramir Crown & Bridge, a bioceramic luting agent intended for permanent cementation of conventional oral prosthetics, was evaluated by immersing discs made from the cement in human saliva and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for seven days, after which they were dried and analyzed. The analytical methods used in order to verify HA formation on the surface were grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). All results showed that HA was formed on the surfaces of samples stored in saliva as well as on samples stored in PBS. The possibility of a dental luting cement to promote natural formation of HA at the tooth interface increases the stability and durability of the system and could help prevent secondary caries. PMID:23056955

  14. Access to Fluoridated Water and Adult Dental Caries: A Natural Experiment.

    PubMed

    Peres, M A; Peres, K G; Barbato, P R; Höfelmann, D A

    2016-07-01

    Systematic reviews have found no evidence to support a benefit of water fluoridation (WF) to prevent dental caries in adult populations. The aim of this natural experiment was to investigate whether lifetime access to fluoridated water is associated with dental caries experience among adults from Florianópolis, Brazil. The data originated from a population-based cohort study (EpiFloripa Adult) initiated in 2009 (n = 1,720) when participants were aged 20 to 59 years. The second wave was carried out in 2012 (n = 1,140) and included a dental examination and a face-to-face questionnaire. Participants residing at the same address since the age of 7 y or before were included in the primary analyses. Sensitivity analyses were also performed. WF was implemented in the city in 2 different periods of time: 1982 (60% of the population) and 1996. Dental caries was assessed by the decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index. A combination of residential status, participant's age, and year of implementation of WF permitted the creation of participants' lifetime access to fluoridated water: >75%, 50% to 75%, and <50% of a participant's lifetime. Covariates included sex, age, socioeconomic mobility, educational attainment, income, pattern of dental attendance, and smoking. Participants who accessed fluoridate water <50% of their lifetime presented a higher mean rate ratio of DMFT (1.39; 95% CI, 1.05-1.84) compared with those living >75% of their lifetime with residential access to fluoridated water. Participants living between 50% and 75% and <50% of their lives in fluoridated areas presented a decayed and filled teeth mean ratio of 1.34 (95% CI, 1.02-1.75) and 1.47 (95% CI, 1.05-2.04) higher than those with residential access to fluoridated water >75% of their lifetime, respectively. Longer residential lifetime access to fluoridated water was associated with less dental caries even in a context of multiple exposures to fluoride. PMID:27053119

  15. Osteogenic differentiation of human dental papilla mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Etsuko; Hirose, Motohiro . E-mail: motohiro-hirose@aist.go.jp; Kotobuki, Noriko; Shimaoka, Hideki; Tadokoro, Mika; Maeda, Masahiko; Hayashi, Yoshiko; Kirita, Tadaaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2006-04-21

    We isolated dental papilla from impacted human molar and proliferated adherent fibroblastic cells after collagenase treatment of the papilla. The cells were negative for hematopoietic markers but positive for CD29, CD44, CD90, CD105, and CD166. When the cells were further cultured in the presence of {beta}-glycerophosphate, ascorbic acid, and dexamethasone for 14 days, mineralized areas together with osteogenic differentiation evidenced by high alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin contents were observed. The differentiation was confirmed at both protein and gene expression levels. The cells can also be cryopreserved and, after thawing, could show in vivo bone-forming capability. These results indicate that mesenchymal type cells localize in dental papilla and that the cells can be culture expanded/utilized for bone tissue engineering.

  16. The human brain response to dental pain relief.

    PubMed

    Meier, M L; Widmayer, S; Abazi, J; Brügger, M; Lukic, N; Lüchinger, R; Ettlin, D A

    2015-05-01

    Local anesthesia has made dental treatment more comfortable since 1884, but little is known about associated brain mechanisms. Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a modern neuroimaging tool widely used for investigating human brain activity related to sensory perceptions, including pain. Most brain regions that respond to experimental noxious stimuli have recently been found to react not only to nociception alone, but also to visual, auditory, and other stimuli. Thus, presumed functional attributions have come under scrutiny regarding selective pain processing in the brain. Evidently, innovative approaches are warranted to identify cerebral regions that are nociceptive specific. In this study, we aimed at circumventing known methodological confounders by applying a novel paradigm in 14 volunteers: rather than varying the intensity and thus the salience of painful stimuli, we applied repetitive noxious dental stimuli at constant intensity to the left mandibular canine. During the functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm, we suppressed the nociceptive barrage by a mental nerve block. Brain activity before and after injection of 4% articaine was compared intraindividually on a group level. Dental pain extinction was observed to correspond to activity reduction in a discrete region of the left posterior insular cortex. These results confirm previous reports demonstrating that direct electrical stimulation of this brain region-but not of others-evokes bodily pain sensations. Hence, our investigation adds further evidence to the notion that the posterior insula plays a unique role in nociceptive processing. PMID:25691071

  17. Soft matrix supports osteogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra; Voellner, Florian; Moehl, Christoph; Kuepper, Kevin; Brockhoff, Gero; Reichert, Torsten E.; Schmalz, Gottfried; Morsczeck, Christian

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Rigid stiffness supports osteogenic differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). {yields} Our study examined stiffness and differentiation of dental follicle cells (DFCs). {yields} Soft ECMs have a superior capacity to support the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs. {yields} DFCs and MSCs react contrarily to soft and rigid surface stiffness. -- Abstract: The differentiation of stem cells can be directed by the grade of stiffness of the developed tissue cells. For example a rigid extracellular matrix supports the osteogenic differentiation in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, less is known about the relation of extracellular matrix stiffness and cell differentiation of ectomesenchymal dental precursor cells. Our study examined for the first time the influence of the surface stiffness on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells (DFCs). Cell proliferation of DFCs was only slightly decreased on cell culture surfaces with a bone-like stiffness. The osteogenic differentiation in DFCs could only be initiated with a dexamethasone based differentiation medium after using varying stiffness. Here, the softest surface improved the induction of osteogenic differentiation in comparison to that with the highest stiffness. In conclusion, different to bone marrow derived MSCs, soft ECMs have a superior capacity to support the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs.

  18. Direct evidence of milk consumption from ancient human dental calculus.

    PubMed

    Warinner, C; Hendy, J; Speller, C; Cappellini, E; Fischer, R; Trachsel, C; Arneborg, J; Lynnerup, N; Craig, O E; Swallow, D M; Fotakis, A; Christensen, R J; Olsen, J V; Liebert, A; Montalva, N; Fiddyment, S; Charlton, S; Mackie, M; Canci, A; Bouwman, A; Rühli, F; Gilbert, M T P; Collins, M J

    2014-01-01

    Milk is a major food of global economic importance, and its consumption is regarded as a classic example of gene-culture evolution. Humans have exploited animal milk as a food resource for at least 8500 years, but the origins, spread, and scale of dairying remain poorly understood. Indirect lines of evidence, such as lipid isotopic ratios of pottery residues, faunal mortality profiles, and lactase persistence allele frequencies, provide a partial picture of this process; however, in order to understand how, where, and when humans consumed milk products, it is necessary to link evidence of consumption directly to individuals and their dairy livestock. Here we report the first direct evidence of milk consumption, the whey protein β-lactoglobulin (BLG), preserved in human dental calculus from the Bronze Age (ca. 3000 BCE) to the present day. Using protein tandem mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that BLG is a species-specific biomarker of dairy consumption, and we identify individuals consuming cattle, sheep, and goat milk products in the archaeological record. We then apply this method to human dental calculus from Greenland's medieval Norse colonies, and report a decline of this biomarker leading up to the abandonment of the Norse Greenland colonies in the 15(th) century CE. PMID:25429530

  19. Direct evidence of milk consumption from ancient human dental calculus

    PubMed Central

    Warinner, C.; Hendy, J.; Speller, C.; Cappellini, E.; Fischer, R.; Trachsel, C.; Arneborg, J.; Lynnerup, N.; Craig, O. E.; Swallow, D. M.; Fotakis, A.; Christensen, R. J.; Olsen, J. V.; Liebert, A.; Montalva, N.; Fiddyment, S.; Charlton, S.; Mackie, M.; Canci, A.; Bouwman, A.; Rühli, F.; Gilbert, M. T. P.; Collins, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Milk is a major food of global economic importance, and its consumption is regarded as a classic example of gene-culture evolution. Humans have exploited animal milk as a food resource for at least 8500 years, but the origins, spread, and scale of dairying remain poorly understood. Indirect lines of evidence, such as lipid isotopic ratios of pottery residues, faunal mortality profiles, and lactase persistence allele frequencies, provide a partial picture of this process; however, in order to understand how, where, and when humans consumed milk products, it is necessary to link evidence of consumption directly to individuals and their dairy livestock. Here we report the first direct evidence of milk consumption, the whey protein β-lactoglobulin (BLG), preserved in human dental calculus from the Bronze Age (ca. 3000 BCE) to the present day. Using protein tandem mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that BLG is a species-specific biomarker of dairy consumption, and we identify individuals consuming cattle, sheep, and goat milk products in the archaeological record. We then apply this method to human dental calculus from Greenland's medieval Norse colonies, and report a decline of this biomarker leading up to the abandonment of the Norse Greenland colonies in the 15th century CE. PMID:25429530

  20. National Survey of Oral/Dental Conditions Related to Tobacco and Alcohol Use in Mexican Adults

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Pontigo-Loyola, América Patricia; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Hernández-Cruz, Pedro; Ávila-Burgos, Leticia; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Martha; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Oral diseases are a major burden on individuals and health systems. The aim of this study was to determine whether consumption of tobacco and alcohol were associated with the prevalence of oral/dental problems in Mexican adults. Using data from the National Performance Evaluation Survey 2003, a cross-sectional study part of the World Health Survey, dental information from a representative sample of Mexico (n = 22,229, N = 51,155,740) was used to document self-reported oral/dental problems in the 12 months prior to the survey. Questionnaires were used to collect information related to sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and other risk factors. Three models were generated for each age group (18–30, 31–45 and 46–98 years). The prevalence of oral/dental conditions was 25.7%. Adjusting for sex, schooling, socioeconomic position, diabetes, and self-reported health, those who used tobacco (sometimes or daily) (OR = 1.15, p = 0.070; OR = 1.24, p < 0.01; and OR = 1.16, p < 0.05, for each age group respectively) or alcohol (moderate or high) (OR = 1.26, p < 0.001; OR = 1.18, p < 0.01 and OR = 1.30, p < 0.001, for each age group respectively) had a higher risk of reporting oral/dental problems. Because tobacco and alcohol use were associated with self-reported oral/dental problems in one out of four adults, it appears advisable to ascertain how direct is such link; more direct effects would lend greater weight to adopting measures to reduce consumption of tobacco and alcohol for the specific purpose of improving oral health. PMID:24642844

  1. Viability of imaging structures inside human dentin using dental transillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandisoli, C. L.; Alves-de-Souza, F. D.; Costa, M. M.; Castro, L.; Ana, P. A.; Zezell, D. M.; Lins, E. C.

    2014-02-01

    Dental Transillumination (DT) is a technique for imaging internal structures of teeth by detecting infrared radiation transmitted throughout the specimens. It was successfully used to detect caries even considering dental enamel and dentin scatter infrared radiation strongly. Literature reports enamel's scattering coefficient is 10 to 30 times lower than dentin; this explain why DT is useful for imaging pathologies in dental enamel, but does not disable its using for imaging dental structures or pathologies inside the dentin. There was no conclusive data in the literature about the limitations of using DT to access biomedical information of dentin. The goal in this study was to present an application of DT to imaging internal structures of dentin. Slices of tooth were confectioned varying the thickness of groups from 0.5 mm up to 2,5 mm. For imaging a FPA InGaAs camera Xeva 1.7- 320 (900-1700 nm; Xenics, Inc., Belgium) and a 3W lamp-based broadband light source (Ocean Optics, Inc., USA) was used; bandpass optical filters at 1000+/-10 nm, 1100+/-10 nm, 1200+/-10 nm and 1300+/-50 nm spectral region were also applied to spectral selection. Images were captured for different camera exposure times and finally a computational processing was applied. The best results revealed the viability to imaging dent in tissue with thickness up to 2,5 mm without a filter (900-1700nm spectral range). After these results a pilot experiment of using DT to detect the pulp chamber of an incisive human tooth was made. New data showed the viability to imaging the pulp chamber of specimen.

  2. Mercury exposure in the work place and human health: dental amalgam use in dentistry at dental teaching institutions and private dental clinics in selected cities of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Mahmood A; Nawaz, Sadaf; Ali, Saeed Waqar

    2016-03-01

    During the past two decades, mercury has come under increasing scrutiny with regard to its safety both in the general population and in occupationally exposed groups. It's a growing issue of global concern because of its adverse environmental and health impacts. Very few investigations on mercury amalgam use in the dentistry sector have been carried out in South Asia and there is little data reported on mercury contamination of indoor/outdoor air at dental sites. According to an earlier SDPI study, reported in 2013, alarmingly high mercury levels were observed in air (indoor as well as outdoor) at 11 of the 34 visited dental sites (17 dental teaching institutions, 7 general hospitals & 10 dental clinics) in five main cities of Pakistan. 88% of the sites indicated indoor mercury levels in air above the USA EPA reference level of 300 ng/m3. According to our study, carried out at 38 dental teaching institutions in 12 main cities (in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces) of Pakistan, respondents were of the opinion that the currently offered BDS curriculum does not effectively guide outgoing dental professionals and does not provide them adequate knowledge and training about mercury/mercury amalgam and other mercury related human health and mercury waste issues. 90% of respondents supported the review and revision of the present dental curriculum offered at dental teaching institutions in the country, at the earliest. A study has also been conducted to assess the status of mercury amalgam use in private dental clinics in Gilgit, Hunza, Peshawar, Rawalpindi and Islamabad. More than 90 private dental clinics were visited and dental professionals/private clinics in-charge were interviewed during June-July, 2015. The focus areas of the study were Hg amalgam toxicity, its waste management practices and safety measures practiced among the dental practitioners. In the light of the findings described and discussed in this brief report, to safeguard public health and

  3. Barriers and facilitators to dental care among HIV-Infected adults.

    PubMed

    Parish, Carrigan; Siegel, Karolynn; Pereyra, Margaret; Liguori, Terri; Metsch, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Oral health problems can significantly compromise HIV-infected individuals' general health and well-being, yet many of them experience an unmet need for oral care. The barriers and facilitators of obtaining dental care in a sample of HIV-infected adults, all of whom were eligible for Ryan White Part A funding for their treatment, were investigated through qualitative interviews with HIV-positive individuals who had not received dental services in the prior 12 months (n = 44). Identified barriers were as follows: (1) dental anxiety and fear, (2) cumbersome administrative procedures, (3) long waits at the dental office, (4) problem focused care-seeking behavior, (5) transportation difficulties, (6) dentists' reluctance to treat people like them, and (7) psychological issues. Identified facilitating factors were as follows: (1) coverage for dental care, (2) being treated with respect and acceptance, and (3) having an assigned case manager or social worker. Many of the barriers uncovered in this qualitative study can be addressed and overcome by case management services, but other approaches are needed to address the additional psychological and stigma-related factors that are impeding access to oral healthcare in this population. PMID:26336866

  4. Has dental caries prevalence some connection with caries index values in adults?

    PubMed

    Larmas, M

    2010-01-01

    DMF index values have been used for 70 years and were originally meant to describe both dental status and treatment need in elementary school children. Since then its application to caries experience and severity determination has expanded. Today, WHO has standardized its use in oral health surveys in describing past and present caries experience in adults and the elderly as well. This expansion to all age cohorts creates some problems if the index is limited to dental caries, which can be easily avoided when individual values are not combined. This has been performed in some of the 7,187 DMF index publications included in PubMed. The high number of scientific articles using this index underlines its leading role in the present epidemiological caries research. On the other hand, WHO uses different determinations for clinical dental caries and missing teeth in ICD-10, the 10th revision of International Classification of Diseases, which does not include dental restorations. Combining the individual parameters of Oral Health Surveys and diseases of ICD-10, and analyzing the mean value of each parameter separately, will give a precise picture of dental health at different ages. PMID:20130404

  5. A Systematic Review of Socioeconomic Indicators and Dental Caries in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Simone M.; Martins, Carolina C.; Bonfim, Maria de Lourdes C.; Zina, Lívia G.; Paiva, Saul M.; Pordeus, Isabela A.; Abreu, Mauro H. N. G.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that socioeconomic factors may be associated with an increased risk of dental caries. To provide better evidence of the association between dental caries in adults and socioeconomic indicators, we evaluated the relation between these two conditions in a thorough review of the literature. Seven databases were systematically searched: Pubmed, Cochrane, Web of Science, Bireme, Controlled Trials, Clinical Trials and the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. No restrictions were placed on the language or year of publication. The search yielded 41 studies for systematic review. Two independent reviewers screened the studies for inclusion, extracted data and evaluated quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. The following socioeconomic indicators were found: educational level, income, occupation, socio-economic status and the community index. These indicators were significantly associated with a greater occurrence of dental caries: the subject’s education, subject’s income, subject’s occupation and the Gini coefficient. A high degree of heterogeneity was found among the methods. Quality varied across studies. The criteria employed for socioeconomic indicators and dental caries should be standardized in future studies. The scientific evidence reveals that educational level, income, occupation and the Gini coefficient are associated with dental caries. PMID:23202762

  6. Access to dental care for low-income adults: perceptions of affordability, availability and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bruce B; Macentee, Michael I

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to explore access to dental care for low-income communities from the perspectives of low-income people, dentists and related health and social service-providers. The case study included 60 interviews involving, low-income adults (N = 41), dentists (N = 6) and health and social service-providers (N = 13). The analysis explores perceptions of need, evidence of unmet needs, and three dimensions of access--affordability, availability and acceptability. The study describes the sometimes poor fit between private dental practice and the public oral health needs of low-income individuals. Dentists and low-income patients alike explained how the current model of private dental practice and fee-for-service payments do not work well because of patients' concerns about the cost of dentistry, dentists' reluctance to treat this population, and the cultural incompatibility of most private practices to the needs of low-income communities. There is a poor fit between private practice dentistry, public dental benefits and the oral health needs of low-income communities, and other responses are needed to address the multiple dimensions of access to dentistry, including community dental clinics sensitive to the special needs of low-income people. PMID:21590434

  7. Development of dental charts according to tooth development and eruption for Turkish children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Afşin, Hüseyin; Ozaslan, Abdi; Karadayı, Şükriye

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we aimed to develop dental charts for Turkish children and young adults of both genders within the age group of 4.5-22.5 years according to tooth mineralization and eruption in a format similar to that proposed by AlQahtani et al. Materials and Methods In total, 753 digital panoramic radiographs from 350 males and 403 females were assessed. The permanent teeth were evaluated according to the classification system described by Demirjian et al. The eruption stage was assessed with Bengston's system, which was modified by AlQahtani et al at four points. Results Teeth generally developed earlier in females than in males. This was particularly notable in the age group of 5-14 years. However, this difference was usually visible in only one stage, not in all teeth. It has been determined that the mixed dentition period ended with the shedding of the second deciduous molars in both genders. Conclusion The dental charts presented here included information that could be beneficial to dental clinicians in making appropriate diagnosis and planning orthodontic and surgical procedures. These charts also provided datasets for preliminary dental age estimation in Turkish children and young adults. PMID:24944959

  8. Comparison of odontogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells and human dental papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lijuan; Li, Jie; Qiao, Xiangchen; Yu, Mei; Tang, Wei; Wang, Hang; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Classical tooth development theory suggests that dental papilla cells (DPCs) are the precursor cells of odontoblasts, which are responsible for dentin development. However, our previous studies have indicated that dental follicle cells (DFCs) can differentiate into odontoblasts. To further our understanding of tooth development, and the differences in dentinogenesis between DFCs and DPCs, the odontogenic differentiation of DFCs and DPCs was characterized in vitro and in vivo. DFCs and DPCs were individually combined with treated dentin matrix (TDM) before they were subcutaneously implanted into the dorsum of mice for 8 weeks. Results showed that 12 proteins were significantly differential, and phosphoserine aminotransferase 1 (PSAT1), Isoform 2 of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1A) and Isoform 1 of annexin A2 (ANXA2), were the most significantly differential proteins. These proteins are related to regulation of bone balance, angiogenesis and cell survival in an anoxic environment. Both DFCs and DPCs express odontogenic, neurogenic and peridontogenic markers. Histological examination of the harvested grafts showed that both DFCs and DPCs form pulp-dentin/cementum-periodentium-like tissues in vivo. Hence, DFCs and DPCs have similar odontogenic differentiation potential in the presence of TDM. However, differences in glucose and amino acid metabolism signal transduction and protein synthesis were observed for the two cell types. This study expands our understanding on tooth development, and provides direct evidence for the use of alternative cell sources in tooth regeneration. PMID:23620822

  9. Treatment of Orally Handicapped Edentulous Older Adults Using Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Charles

    2016-07-01

    The oral handicap of complete edentulism is the terminal outcome of a multifactorial process involving biological factors and patient-related factors. Fully edentulous orally handicapped older adults have been neglected because removable acrylic dentures have been the classic therapy for complete edentulism but are only rehabilitative, not therapeutic. Not replacing missing teeth with stable dentures could prevent adequate food intake. Osseointegrated endosseous implants used as a therapeutic adjunct can reduce the problem of long-term bone resorption to less than 0.1 mm per year. Implant-borne prostheses substantially increase the overall health and quality of life of orally handicapped fully edentulous older adults. PMID:27264857

  10. General anesthesia for the provision of dental treatment to adults with developmental disability.

    PubMed Central

    Ananthanarayan, C.; Sigal, M.; Godlewski, W.

    1998-01-01

    The management of the behavior of mentally challenged adults when providing required dental care is often a problem, whether in the dental office or in a hospital setting. Our institution has a designated program to provide required dental care to this group of patients. Because of the high incidence of poor cooperation, which may include aggressive antagonistic behavior, many of these patients are scheduled for dental care under general anesthesia with an incomplete preoperative medical assessment. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact and limitations that an incomplete medical assessment may present in the delivery of dental care under general anesthesia to these adults with developmental disability. After approval from the institutional review board, the medical records of 139 patients treated in this program between 1992 and 1994 were reviewed to determine the patient profiles, anesthesia management, and complications. The charts of these patients, who underwent dental and radiographic examination, scaling and prophylaxis, and restoration and extraction of teeth under general anesthesia, were reviewed. There were 149 procedures performed on these patients, some more than once. The mean age was 29.5 yr. Males predominated females by a ratio of 2:1. All had multiple diagnoses, medical problems, and medications. Twenty-three patients had Down's Syndrome, four had schizophrenia disorders, 42 had seizure disorders, 11 had hypothyroidism, seven had heart disease, and 14 had central nervous system and neuromuscular disorders. The remainder had a variety of diagnoses, including rare syndromes. One hundred had intravenous (i.v.), 25 had mask inhalation, and 24 had intramuscular ketamine (Ketalar) induction. Nasotracheal intubation was uneventful in 139 patients, five had difficult visualization of the larynx and intubation. Ten patients experienced intraoperative complications, including nonfatal ventricular arrhythmia, slight fall in blood pressure and

  11. Socio-Economic Determinants of the Need for Dental Care in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Trohel, Gilda; Bertaud-Gounot, Valérie; Soler, Marion; Chauvin, Pierre; Grimaud, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral health has improved in France. However, there are still inequalities related to the socio-economic status. Objectives The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of dental care needs in an adult population and to identify the demographic, socio-economic and behavioral variables that may explain variations in this parameter. Methods A cross-sectional analysis of the French SIRS cohort (n = 2,997 adults from the Paris region; 2010 data) was carried out to determine the prevalence of self-reported dental care needs relative to demographic, socio-economic and behavioral variables. A logistic regression model was used to identify the variables that were most strongly associated with the level of need. Results In 2010, the prevalence of the need for dental care in the SIRS cohort was 35.0% (95% CI [32.3–37.8]). It was lower in people with higher education levels (31.3% [27.9–34.6]), without immigrant background (31.3% [28.0–34.6]) and with comprehensive health insurance (social security + complementary health cover; 32.8% [30.2–35.4]). It decreased as the socio-economic status increased, but without following a strict linear change. It was also lower among individuals who had a dental check-up visit in the previous two years. In multivariate analyses, the socioeconomic variables most strongly associated with the need for dental care were: educational attainment (OR = 1.21 [1.02–1.44]), income level (OR = 1.66 [1.92–2.12]) and national origin (OR = 1.53 [1.26–1.86]). Conclusion These results confirm that the prevalence of dental care needs is higher among adults with low socio-economic status. Education level, income level and also national origin were more strongly associated with the need for dental care than insurance cover level. PMID:27441841

  12. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  13. Association between dental pain and depression in Korean adults using the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Yang, S E; Park, Y G; Han, K; Min, J A; Kim, S Y

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships between the prevalence of depression and dental pain using a well characterised, nationally representative, population-based study. This study analysed data from the 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 4886). Oral health status was assessed using the oral health questionnaire, and oral examination was performed by trained dentists. Depression was defined as the participant having been diagnosed as depression during the previous year. Logistic regression was applied to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), controlling for a range of covariates. Results demonstrated that participants included in 'root canal treatment is necessary' showed higher prevalence of self-reported dental pain; in particular, participants with depression presented more dental pain than those without depression. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, self-reported dental pain increased in participants with depression. The AOR (95% CI) for having self-reported dental pain was 1·58 (1·08-2·33) in dentists' diagnosis of no dental pain/depression group, 1·62 (1·32-1·98) in dentists' diagnosis of dental pain/no depression group and 2·84 (1·10-7·37) in dentists' diagnosis of dental pain/depression group. It was concluded that depression was associated with dental pain after adjustment for potential confounders in Korean adults. Thus, dentists should consider the possible presence of psychopathology when treating patients with dental pain. PMID:26337763

  14. The effect of intrusive orthodontic force on dental pulp of adults versus adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Mostafa; Eslami, Neda; Abadi, Reza Zare Mahmoud; Rezaei, Saber Pooria

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is no conclusive evidence on the effect of orthodontic force application on dental pulp tissue. The aim of this study was to compare early and delayed histological effects of intrusive forces on dental pulp of adolescents and adults. Materials and Methods: Patients referred to the Department of Orthodontics of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences participated in this study. They were assigned to adult (25–32-year-old) and adolescent (13–18-year-old) Groups. A cantilever spring made of 16 × 22 steel wire was used to apply intrusive force to upper first premolars (11 teeth in adolescents and 11 teeth in adults) and the opposing teeth were considered as control group. In each group, 6 pairs of teeth were extracted after one week, and the remaining 5 pairs were extracted after one month of intrusion. Histologic changes were compared between the control and intrusive groups and also between the adults and adolescents after 7 days and 1 month. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney U-tests. P ≤ 0.05 was set as statistically significant. Results: Significant difference was not found in any histological parameters between intrusive and control groups 1 week and 1 month after intrusion in adolescents and adults (P > 0.05). One month after intrusion, inflammatory cell response intensity (P = 0.032) and frequency of chronic inflammation (P = 0.032) were significantly higher in adults compared to adolescents. Conclusion: Mild intrusive force in closed apex teeth causes no significant histologic changes in adolescents and adults. However, it seems that inflammatory-related histologic pulpal changes are more severe in adults after one month of intrusion. PMID:27605996

  15. Longitudinal study of dental caries, tooth mortality and interproximal bone loss in adults with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Gabre, P; Martinsson, T; Gahnberg, L

    2001-02-01

    The investigation focused on longitudinal changes of oral health in a group of adults with intellectual disability. A number of 124 individuals, aged 21-40 yr in 1990, were followed during 8.5 yr. The incidence and prevalence of caries, incidence of tooth mortality, and interproximal bone loss were registered from clinical examinations and bite-wing radiographs. The subjects visited the dental clinic for preventive dental care on average every third month during the period. The caries incidence was low, on average 0.51 new lesions per yr. Persons with mild intellectual disability experienced more caries than other subjects. During the 8.5 yr, the subjects had lost on average 1.82 teeth, with periodontitis dominating as the reason for tooth mortality. Individuals who cooperated poorly with dental treatment had lost the most teeth. The average annual bone loss in all subjects was 0.03 mm. Subjects with Down syndrome had a higher bone loss compared to those with other diagnoses of intellectual disability. Thus, the major part of the persons with intellectual disability showed satisfactory oral health. However, subjects with poor ability to cooperate with dental treatment and subjects with Down syndrome showed an increased risk for impaired oral health. PMID:11330930

  16. Adults with special needs and proper dental care.

    PubMed

    Waldman, H Barry; Perlman, S P; Cinotti, Debra A

    2009-01-01

    The Special Olympics was founded by Eunice Kennedy Shriver in 1968 and has grown into a global movement involving 2.5 million athletes, in addition to millions of volunteers, family members, and friends. The international organization provides year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-style sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities. The year-round programs provide opportunities for participants to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy and participate in the sharing of gifts, skills, and friendship with their families, other Special Olympics athletes, and the community. Most important has been the opportunity to demonstrate what people with intellectual disabilities can do, rather than what they can't do. PMID:19774864

  17. Aspartate aminotransferase activity in human healthy and inflamed dental pulps.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Fioroni, M; Rubini, C; Tripodi, D; Perinetti, G; Piattelli, A

    2001-06-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) seems to be an important mediator of inflammatory processes. Its role in the progression and detection of inflammatory periodontal disease has been increasingly recognized in recent years. In the present study AST activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis, and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic AST activity showed that the control values for the healthy pulps were 4.8 +/- 0.7 units/mg of pulp tissue. In reversible pulpitis specimens the AST activity increased to 7.98 +/- 2.1 units/mg of pulp tissue. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values decreased to 2.28 +/- 1.7 units/mg of pulp tissue. Differences between the groups (control versus reversible pulpitis and reversible pulpitis versus irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant (p = 0.0015). These results could point to a role of AST in the early events that lead to development of pulpal inflammation. PMID:11487132

  18. Angiogenic Properties of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bronckaers, Annelies; Hilkens, Petra; Fanton, Yanick; Struys, Tom; Gervois, Pascal; Politis, Constantinus; Martens, Wendy; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels, is a key process in tissue engineering. If blood supply cannot be established rapidly, there is insufficient oxygen and nutrient transport and necrosis of the implanted tissue will occur. Recent studies indicate that the human dental pulp contains precursor cells, named dental pulp stem cells (hDPSC) that show self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity. Since these cells can be easily isolated, cultured and cryopreserved, they represent an attractive stem cell source for tissue engineering. Until now, only little is known about the angiogenic abilities and mechanisms of the hDPSC. In this study, the angiogenic profile of both cell lysates and conditioned medium of hDPSC was determined by means of an antibody array. Numerous pro-and anti-angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and endostatin were found both at the mRNA and protein level. hDPSC had no influence on the proliferation of the human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), but were able to significantly induce HMEC-1 migration in vitro. Addition of the PI3K-inhibitor LY294002 and the MEK-inhibitor U0126 to the HMEC-1 inhibited this effect, suggesting that both Akt and ERK pathways are involved in hDPSC-mediated HMEC-1 migration. Antibodies against VEGF also abolished the chemotactic actions of hDPSC. Furthermore, in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, hDPSC were able to significantly induce blood vessel formation. In conclusion, hDPSC have the ability to induce angiogenesis, meaning that this stem cell population has a great clinical potential, not only for tissue engineering but also for the treatment of chronic wounds, stroke and myocardial infarctions. PMID:23951091

  19. Angiogenic properties of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bronckaers, Annelies; Hilkens, Petra; Fanton, Yanick; Struys, Tom; Gervois, Pascal; Politis, Constantinus; Martens, Wendy; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels, is a key process in tissue engineering. If blood supply cannot be established rapidly, there is insufficient oxygen and nutrient transport and necrosis of the implanted tissue will occur. Recent studies indicate that the human dental pulp contains precursor cells, named dental pulp stem cells (hDPSC) that show self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity. Since these cells can be easily isolated, cultured and cryopreserved, they represent an attractive stem cell source for tissue engineering. Until now, only little is known about the angiogenic abilities and mechanisms of the hDPSC. In this study, the angiogenic profile of both cell lysates and conditioned medium of hDPSC was determined by means of an antibody array. Numerous pro-and anti-angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and endostatin were found both at the mRNA and protein level. hDPSC had no influence on the proliferation of the human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), but were able to significantly induce HMEC-1 migration in vitro. Addition of the PI3K-inhibitor LY294002 and the MEK-inhibitor U0126 to the HMEC-1 inhibited this effect, suggesting that both Akt and ERK pathways are involved in hDPSC-mediated HMEC-1 migration. Antibodies against VEGF also abolished the chemotactic actions of hDPSC. Furthermore, in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, hDPSC were able to significantly induce blood vessel formation. In conclusion, hDPSC have the ability to induce angiogenesis, meaning that this stem cell population has a great clinical potential, not only for tissue engineering but also for the treatment of chronic wounds, stroke and myocardial infarctions. PMID:23951091

  20. Detection and Proportion of Very Early Dental Caries in Independent Living Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Jennifer S.; Kohanchi, Daniel; Biren-Fetz, John; Fontana, Margherita; Ramchandani, Manisha; Osann, Kathryn; Hallajian, Lucy; Mansour, Stephanie; Nabelsi, Tasneem; Chung, Na Eun; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Dental caries is an important healthcare challenge in adults over 65 years of age. Integration of oral health screening into non-dental primary care practice may improve access to preventive dental care for vulnerable populations such as the elderly. Such integration would require easy, fast, and accurate early caries detection tools. Primary goal of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for detecting very early caries in the elderly living in community-based settings. The International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) served as gold standard. Secondary goal of this study was to provide baseline prevalence data of very early caries lesions in independent living adults aged 65+ years. Materials and Methods Seventy-two subjects were recruited from three sites in Southern California: a retirement community, a senior health fair, and a convalescent hospital. Clinical examination was performed using the ICDAS visual criteria and this was followed by OCT imaging. The two-dimensional OCT images (B-scan) were analyzed with simple software. Locations with a log of back-scattered light intensity (BSLI) below 2.9 were scored as sound, and areas equaling or exceeding 2.9 BSLI were considered carious. Diagnostic performance of OCT imaging was compared with ICDAS score. Results OCT-based diagnosis demonstrated very good sensitivity (95.1%) and good specificity (85.8%). 54.7% of dentate subjects had at least one tooth with very early coronal caries. Conclusions Early coronal decay is prevalent in the unrestored pits and fissures of coronal surfaces of teeth in independent living adults aged 65+ years. Though OCT imaging coupled with a simple diagnostic algorithm can accurately detect areas of very early caries in community-based settings, existing devices are expensive and not well-suited for use by non-dental health care providers. Simple, inexpensive, fast, and accurate tools

  1. Assessing prosthodontic dental treatment needs in older adults in Thailand: normative vs. sociodental approaches.

    PubMed

    Srisilapanan, Patcharawan; Korwanich, Narumanas; Sheiham, Aubrey

    2003-01-01

    The authors compared the estimated prosthodontic treatment needs of edentulous older adults when using normative and sociodental approaches. This cross-sectional study involved a non-random sample of 158 edentulous adults, aged 60 to 74 years, who were living independently in metropolitan Chiang Mai, Thailand. Each subject was given an oral examination and was interviewed. The dental questionnaire and the clinical criteria were adapted from the National Diet and Nutritional Survey for People Aged 65 and Older and included the Oral Impacts on Daily Performances sociodental indicator. Of the 158 subjects, we found using a normative assessment that 79.7% had a treatment need for complete dentures; 60.5% of those adults had impact-related treatment needs. Estimated treatment need dropped by about 40% when subjects were assessed using the sociodental approach. We concluded that large reductions in normative need estimates for complete dentures were apparent using a sociodental approach to assess prosthodontic dental treatment needs of older people. PMID:14765891

  2. Neighborhood Social Capital, Neighborhood Attachment, and Dental Care Use for Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey Adults

    PubMed Central

    Carpiano, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We tested the hypothesis that neighborhood-level social capital and individual-level neighborhood attachment are positively associated with adult dental care use. Methods. We analyzed data from the 2000–2001 Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey that were linked to US Census Bureau data from 2000 (n = 1800 adults aged 18–64 years across 65 neighborhoods). We used 2-level hierarchical logistic regression models to estimate the odds of dental use associated with each of 4 forms of social capital and neighborhood attachment. Results. After adjusting for confounders, the odds of dental use were significantly associated with only 1 form of social capital: social support (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.72, 0.99). Individual-level neighborhood attachment was positively associated with dental care use (AOR = 1.05; 95% CI = 1.01, 1.10). Conclusions. Contrary to our hypothesis, adults in neighborhoods with higher levels of social capital, particularly social support, were significantly less likely to use dental care. Future research should identify the oral health–related attitudes, beliefs, norms, and practices in neighborhoods and other behavioral and cultural factors that moderate and mediate the relationship between social capital and dental care use. PMID:23409881

  3. Microbiological aspects of human mandibular subperiosteal dental implants.

    PubMed

    Rams, Thomas E; Balkin, Burton E; Roberts, Thomas W; Molzan, Arthur K

    2013-12-01

    Clinical, microbiological, and biochemical features of human mandibular subperiosteal dental implants exhibiting peri-implantitis were compared with those experiencing long-term peri-implant health. After evaluation of clinical parameters, submucosal plaque samples were obtained from permucosal implant abutment posts exhibiting probing depths ≥5 mm and bleeding on probing in subjects with peri-implantitis (n = 3) and from posts with peri-implant health in subjects with long-term subperiosteal implant health (n = 8). The microbial specimens were transported in VMGA III and plated onto enriched Brucella blood agar and Hammond's selective medium with anaerobic incubation, and onto selective TSBV with 5% CO2 incubation. Total anaerobic viable counts and selected bacterial species were identified using established phenotypic methods and criteria. In vitro resistance to doxycycline (2 μg/mL), amoxicillin (2 μg/mL), or metronidazole (4 μg/mL) was recorded per subject when bacterial pathogen growth was noted on antibiotic-supplemented isolation plates. Interleukin (IL)-1β levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in peri-implant crevicular fluid samples from 5 study subjects. Significantly higher Plaque Index scores, higher total anaerobic viable counts, more red complex species, and lower proportions of gram-positive facultative viridans streptococci and Actinomyces species were detected on peri-implantitis-affected subperiosteal implants as compared with subperiosteal implants with long-term peri-implant health. No in vitro resistance to the 3 test antibiotic breakpoint concentrations studied was found, except a Fusobacterium nucleatum strain resistant to doxycycline at 2 μg/mL from 1 peri-implantitis subject. Subperiosteal implants with peri-implantitis tended to yield higher peri-implant crevicular fluid IL-1β levels. The level of peri-implant supramucosal plaque control and the composition of the peri-implant submucosal microbiome may be

  4. Oral health and dental care of elderly adults dependent on care.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Willy; Schimmel, Martin; Müller, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy in Switzerland is posing new challenges, as more and more people are becoming dependent on care, both at home and in long-term care facilities. The dental profession must deal with patients retaining their own teeth until later in life with an increased incidence and severity of caries and periodontal diseases. The association between general and oral health is becoming important, particularly in older people with medical conditions. Aspiration pneumonia can develop as a result of pathogenic bacteria descending from the oral cavity to the bronchoalveolar system, which presents a frequent, potentially life-threatening danger. By adapting care and treatment concepts, the masticatory ability can be preserved or restored, which in turn helps preventing malnutrition. Other aims include preventing infections as well as maintaining subjective well-being and an attractive dental appearance. Care standards should be defined for the provision of oral-health related dentistry for the vulnerable population of the care-dependent adults. These should be implemented by an interdisciplinary care team composed of nursing personnel, long-term care facility managers, Spitex staff, physicians, dentists as well as dental assistants and hygienists. PMID:26169068

  5. Nano-crystalline diamond-coated titanium dental implants - a histomorphometric study in adult domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Philipp; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Stadlinger, Bernd; Zemann, Wolfgang; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Rosiwal, Stephan; Rupprecht, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    Promising biomaterial characteristics of diamond-coatings in biomedicine have been described in the literature. However, there is a lack of knowledge about implant osseointegration of this surface modification compared to the currently used sandblasted acid-etched Ti-Al6-V4 implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the osseointegration of microwave plasma-chemical-vapour deposition (MWP-CVD) diamond-coated Ti-Al6-V4 dental implants after healing periods of 2 and 5 months. Twenty-four MWP-CVD diamond-coated and 24 un-coated dental titanium-alloy implants (Ankylos(®)) were placed in the frontal skull of eight adult domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nano-structured surfaces on bone formation, a histomorphometric analysis was performed after 2 and 5 months of implant healing. Histomorphometry analysed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC). No significant difference in BIC for the diamond-coated implants in comparison to reference implants could be observed for both healing periods. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an adequate interface between the bone and the diamond surface. No delamination or particle-dissociation due to shearing forces could be detected. In this study, diamond-coated dental titanium-alloy implants and sandblasted acid-etched implants showed a comparable degree of osseointegration. PMID:23266005

  6. Dental erosive wear and salivary flow rate in physically active young adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little attention has been directed towards identifying the relationship between physical exercise, dental erosive wear and salivary secretion. The study aimed i) to describe the prevalence and severity of dental erosive wear among a group of physically active young adults, ii) to describe the patterns of dietary consumption and lifestyle among these individuals and iii) to study possible effect of exercise on salivary flow rate. Methods Young members (age range 18-32 years) of a fitness-centre were invited to participate in the study. Inclusion criteria were healthy young adults training hard at least twice a week. A non-exercising comparison group was selected from an ongoing study among 18-year-olds. Two hundred and twenty participants accepted an intraoral examination and completed a questionnaire. Seventy of the exercising participants provided saliva samples. The examination was performed at the fitness-centre or at a dental clinic (comparison group), using tested erosive wear system (VEDE). Saliva sampling (unstimulated and stimulated) was performed before and after exercise. Occlusal surfaces of the first molars in both jaws and the labial and palatal surfaces of the upper incisors and canines were selected as index teeth. Results Dental erosive wear was registered in 64% of the exercising participants, more often in the older age group, and in 20% of the comparison group. Enamel lesions were most observed in the upper central incisors (33%); dentine lesions in lower first molar (27%). One fourth of the participants had erosive wear into dentine, significantly more in males than in females (p = 0.047). More participants with erosive wear had decreased salivary flow during exercise compared with the non-erosion group (p < 0.01). The stimulated salivary flow rate was in the lower rage (≤ 1 ml/min) among more than one third of the participants, and more erosive lesions were registered than in subjects with higher flow rates (p < 0.01). Conclusion

  7. Role of the dental surgeon in the early detection of adults with underlying HIV infection / AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Jorge; del Romero, Jorge; Hernando, Victoria; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    A review is made of the late diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a subject of growing interest in public health. It has been estimated that in Europe 30% of all HIV-infected people are unaware of their seropositive condition, and this in turn is associated with a poorer long-term disease prognosis and an increased risk of transmission to other individuals. The role of the dental surgeon in this context could be of great importance, since there are many oral lesions that can suggest the existence of underlying infection. The study also addresses the controversial subject of rapid HIV testing, and whether these tests should be performed on a routine basis in the dental clinic, or whether it is preferable to refer the patient to a specialized center. Key words:HIV in Spain, HIV screening, early diagnosis. PMID:22143719

  8. Optimization of treatment with recombinant FGF-2 for proliferation and differentiation of human dental stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Hyung; Kim, Won-Tae; Ryu, Chun Jeih; Jang, Young-Joo

    2015-08-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2) is widely used to modulate the proliferation and differentiation of certain cell types. An expression and purification system for recombinant human FGF-2 in Escherichia coli was established for the purpose of securing a continuous supply of this protein. The purified recombinant FGF-2 significantly increased the population of human embryonic stem cells. The optimal concentrations of FGF-2 for cell proliferative induction in various adult stem cells including human dental pulp stem cells, full term human periodontal ligament stem cells, human gingival fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells, and osteogenic oseosarcoma were established in a dose-dependent manner. When cells were treated with recombinant FGF-2 for 6 days before osteogenic induction, the mRNA expression of the bone markers was upregulated in cells originated from human dental pulp tissue, indicating that pretreatment with FGF-2 during culture increase stem cell/progenitor population and osteogenic potential. PMID:25789782

  9. Design of the Prevention of Adult Caries Study (PACS): A randomized clinical trial assessing the effect of a chlorhexidine dental coating for the prevention of adult caries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dental caries is one of the primary causes of tooth loss among adults. It is estimated to affect a majority of Americans aged 55 and older, with a disproportionately higher burden in disadvantaged populations. Although a number of treatments are currently in use for caries prevention in adults, evidence for their efficacy and effectiveness is limited. Methods/Design The Prevention of Adult Caries Study (PACS) is a multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized clinical trial of the efficacy of a chlorhexidine (10% w/v) dental coating in preventing adult caries. Participants (n = 983) were recruited from four different dental delivery systems serving four diverse communities, including one American Indian population, and were randomized to receive either chlorhexidine or a placebo treatment. The primary outcome is the net caries increment (including non-cavitated lesions) from baseline to 13 months of follow-up. A cost-effectiveness analysis also will be considered. Discussion This new dental treatment, if efficacious and approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), would become a new in-office, anti-microbial agent for the prevention of adult caries in the United States. Trial Registration Number NCT00357877 PMID:20923557

  10. Fluorescence properties of human teeth and dental calculus for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescent emission of human teeth and dental calculus is important for the esthetic rehabilitation of teeth, diagnosis of dental caries, and detection of dental calculus. The purposes of this review were to summarize the fluorescence and phosphorescence of human teeth by ambient ultraviolet (UV) light, to investigate the clinically relevant fluorescence measurement methods in dentistry, and to review the fluorescence of teeth and dental calculus by specific wavelength light. Dentine was three times more phosphorescent than enamel. When exposed to light sources containing UV components, the fluorescence of human teeth gives them the quality of vitality, and fluorescent emission with a peak of 440 nm is observed. Esthetic restorative materials should have fluorescence properties similar to those of natural teeth. Based on the fluorescence of teeth and restorative materials as determined with a spectrophotometer, a fluorescence parameter was defined. As to the fluorescence spectra by a specific wavelength, varied wavelengths were investigated for clinical applications, and several methods for the diagnosis of dental caries and the detection of dental calculus were developed. Since fluorescent properties of dental hard tissues have been used and would be expanded in diverse fields of clinical practice, these properties should be investigated further, embracing newly developed optical techniques. PMID:25875625

  11. Fluorescence properties of human teeth and dental calculus for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescent emission of human teeth and dental calculus is important for the esthetic rehabilitation of teeth, diagnosis of dental caries, and detection of dental calculus. The purposes of this review were to summarize the fluorescence and phosphorescence of human teeth by ambient ultraviolet (UV) light, to investigate the clinically relevant fluorescence measurement methods in dentistry, and to review the fluorescence of teeth and dental calculus by specific wavelength light. Dentine was three times more phosphorescent than enamel. When exposed to light sources containing UV components, the fluorescence of human teeth gives them the quality of vitality, and fluorescent emission with a peak of 440 nm is observed. Esthetic restorative materials should have fluorescence properties similar to those of natural teeth. Based on the fluorescence of teeth and restorative materials as determined with a spectrophotometer, a fluorescence parameter was defined. As to the fluorescence spectra by a specific wavelength, varied wavelengths were investigated for clinical applications, and several methods for the diagnosis of dental caries and the detection of dental calculus were developed. Since fluorescent properties of dental hard tissues have been used and would be expanded in diverse fields of clinical practice, these properties should be investigated further, embracing newly developed optical techniques.

  12. Association of Streptococcus mutans with Human Dental Decay

    PubMed Central

    Loesche, W. J.; Rowan, J.; Straffon, L. H.; Loos, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The association of Streptococcus mutans with human dental decay was investigated by using several types of samples: (i) paraffin-stimulated saliva samples taken from children with from 0 to 15 decayed teeth; (ii) pooled occlusal and approximal plaque taken from children with no decayed or filled teeth, or from children with rampant caries of 10 or more teeth; (iii) plaque removed from single occlusal fissures that were either carious or noncarious. The results showed a significant association between plaque levels of S. mutans and caries. The strongest association, P < 0.0001, was found when plaque was removed from single occlusal fissures. Seventy-one percent of the carious fissures had S. mutans accounting for more than 10% of the viable flora, whereas 70% of the fissures that were caries free had no detectable S. mutans. Sixty-five percent of the pooled plaque samples from the children with rampant caries had S. mutans accounting for more than 10% of the viable flora, whereas 40% of the pooled samples from children that were caries free had no detectable S. mutans. Saliva samples tended to have low levels of S. mutans and were equivocal in demonstrating a relationship between S. mutans and caries. PMID:1140847

  13. Beeswax as Dental Filling on a Neolithic Human Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Federico; Tuniz, Claudio; Coppa, Alfredo; Mancini, Lucia; Dreossi, Diego; Eichert, Diane; Turco, Gianluca; Biasotto, Matteo; Terrasi, Filippo; De Cesare, Nicola; Hua, Quan; Levchenko, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of prehistoric dentistry has been limited to a few cases, the most ancient dating back to the Neolithic. Here we report a 6500-year-old human mandible from Slovenia whose left canine crown bears the traces of a filling with beeswax. The use of different analytical techniques, including synchrotron radiation computed micro-tomography (micro-CT), Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dating, Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), has shown that the exposed area of dentine resulting from occlusal wear and the upper part of a vertical crack affecting enamel and dentin tissues were filled with beeswax shortly before or after the individual’s death. If the filling was done when the person was still alive, the intervention was likely aimed to relieve tooth sensitivity derived from either exposed dentine and/or the pain resulting from chewing on a cracked tooth: this would provide the earliest known direct evidence of therapeutic-palliative dental filling. PMID:23028670

  14. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Rajreddy; Kumar, B. Mohana; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Jang, Si-Jung; Lee, Yeon-Mi; Park, Bong-Wook; Byun, June-Ho; Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Jae-Won; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression of surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs.

  15. The effectiveness of potent dental adhesives on the viability of LPS challenged human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Garner, Angelia D; Tucci, Michelle A; Benghuzzi, Hamed A

    2014-01-01

    Dental adhesives are necessary for the retention of specific dental restorations utilized to repair the anatomy of the tooth after dental decay is removed. Adhesives come into contact with healthy and diseased periodontal tissues. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a gram negative bacterial pathogen, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-PG) is an endotoxin found in gingival connective tissues of patients who suffer from periodontal disease. The presence of the endotoxin causes inflammation. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of potent dental adhesives when human gingival fibroblasts are challenged with LPS-PG. The fibroblasts were exposed to the dental adhesives polymethly methacrylate (PMMA), OptiBond®, and Prime & Bond® which were purchased from Patterson Dental, a national dental materials supplier. The human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1, ATCC® CRL-2014™) were purchased from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). The porphyromonas gingival lipopolysaccharide (LPS-PG) was purchased from Fisher Scientific (Pittsburg, PA). No significant differences in metabolic behavior was detected among the groups (p<0.132). While the glutathione assay determined that there was not any significant increase in oxidative stress levels; the lactate dehydrogenase assay identified significant cellular damage in the group exposed to combinations of the Prime & Bond® adhesives and LPS-PG at 48 hour intervals (p<0.003). No significant changes were noted in cellular morphology at any phases, and all cells demonstrated typical fibroblast spindle shape. PMID:25405402

  16. Bovine teeth as substitute for human teeth in dental research: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yassen, Ghaeth H; Platt, Jeffrey A; Hara, Anderson T

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to review in vitro and in situ studies that directly compared the use of bovine teeth as a substitute for human teeth in dental experiments. A PubMed search was conducted for papers published from 1953 to December 30, 2010 using the following keywords: "human bovine enamel" or "human bovine dentin" or "human bovine teeth". The abstracts of the studies resulting from the keyword search were read, and all papers that compared human and bovine teeth were fully read. Only original articles written in English and directly comparing human and bovine substrates were included in the review. The search was supplemented by manual searches of the reference lists from each identified paper. Out of 76 studies initially selected, 68 fulfilled the selection criteria for inclusion. The studies covered seven categories: dental morphology, chemical composition, physical properties, dental caries, dental erosion/abrasion, bonding/adhesive strength, and marginal microleakage. Inconsistent data exist regarding whether bovine teeth can be considered an appropriate substitute for human teeth in dental research. Morphological, chemical compostion and physical property differences between the two substrates must be considered when interpreting results obtained from any experiment using bovine tooth substrate. PMID:21959653

  17. Intakes of calcium, vitamin D, and dairy servings and dental plaque in older Danish adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate whether intakes of calcium and dairy-servings within-recommendations were associated with plaque score when allowing for vitamin D intakes. Methods In this cross-sectional study, including 606 older Danish adults, total dietary calcium intake (mg/day) was classified as below vs. within-recommendations and dairy intake as <3 vs. ≥3 servings/ d. Dental plaque, defined as the percentage of tooth surfaces exhibiting plaque, was classified as < median vs. ≥median value (9.5%). Analyses were stratified by lower and higher (≥6.8 μg/d) vitamin D intake. Findings Intakes of calcium (OR = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.31–0.92) and dairy servings (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.33–0.89) within-recommendations were significantly associated with lower plaque score after adjustments for age, gender, education, intakes of alcohol, sucrose and mineral supplements, smoking, diseases, number of teeth, visits to the dentist, use of dental floss/tooth pick and salivary flow, among those with higher, but not lower, vitamin D intake. Conclusion Intakes of calcium dairy-servings within-recommendations were inversely associated with plaque, among those with higher, but not lower, vitamin D intakes. Due to the cross-sectional nature of the study, it is not possible to infer that this association is causal. PMID:23680488

  18. Isolation and Culture of Dental Epithelial Stem Cells from the Adult Mouse Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Miquella G.; Hu, Jimmy; Seidel, Kerstin; Li, Chunying; Jheon, Andrew; Naveau, Adrien; Horst, Orapin; Klein, Ophir D.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie tooth regeneration and renewal has become a topic of great interest1-4, and the mouse incisor provides a model for these processes. This remarkable organ grows continuously throughout the animal's life and generates all the necessary cell types from active pools of adult stem cells housed in the labial (toward the lip) and lingual (toward the tongue) cervical loop (CL) regions. Only the dental stem cells from the labial CL give rise to ameloblasts that generate enamel, the outer covering of teeth, on the labial surface. This asymmetric enamel formation allows abrasion at the incisor tip, and progenitors and stem cells in the proximal incisor ensure that the dental tissues are constantly replenished. The ability to isolate and grow these progenitor or stem cells in vitro allows their expansion and opens doors to numerous experiments not achievable in vivo, such as high throughput testing of potential stem cell regulatory factors. Here, we describe and demonstrate a reliable and consistent method to culture cells from the labial CL of the mouse incisor. PMID:24834972

  19. N-Acetyl Cysteine Depletes Reactive Oxygen Species and Prevents Dental Monomer-Induced Intrinsic Mitochondrial Apoptosis In Vitro in Human Dental Pulp Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Liu, Qian; Liu, Ying; Song, Qian; Yu, Fan; Yu, Haohan; Liu, Huan; Huang, Li; Chen, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the involvement of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis in dental monomer-induced cytotoxicity and the influences of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on this process. Methods Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) were exposed to several dental monomers in the absence or presence of NAC, and cell viability, intracellular redox balance, morphology and function of mitochondria and key indicators of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis were evaluated using various commercial kits. Results Dental monomers exerted dose-dependent cytotoxic effects on hDPCs. Concomitant to the over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of glutathione (GSH), differential changes in activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase were detected. Apoptosis, as indicated by positive Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) staining and activation of caspase-3, was observed after dental monomer treatment. Dental monomers impaired the morphology and function of mitochondria, and induced intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis in hDPCs via up-regulation of p53, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and down-regulation of Bcl-2. NAC restored cell viability, relieved oxidative stress and blocked the apoptotic effects of dental monomers. Conclusions Dental monomers induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial intrinsic apoptosis in hDPCs. NAC could reduce the oxidative stress and thus protect hDPCs against dental monomer-induced apoptosis. PMID:26808507

  20. Self-perceived loss of control and untreated dental decay in African American adults with and without sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Brian; Woods, Dexter; George, David; Onyekwere, Onyinye; Katz, Ralph; Lanzkron, Sophie; Diener-West, Marie; Powe, Neil

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between self-perceived loss of control as measured by dental external locus of control summary scores, with the amount of untreated dental decay in African American adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) and African Americans adults without SCD. The sample included 102 subjects with SCD and 103 subjects without SCD matched on age, sex, and recruitment location (mean age of all subjects 35.4 years, 55.6% female). Subjects with SCD in the highest quartile for dental external locus of control summary scores had 2.58-fold (CI 1.05, 6.34) as much untreated decay as those in the lowest quartile (p<.05) in multivariable analysis using the negative binomial regression model. For subjects without SCD, those in the highest quartile for dental external locus of control summary scores had 3.00-fold (CI 1.38, 6.49) as much untreated decay as those in the lowest quartile (p<.05) using similar analysis. This study showed that higher dental external locus of control is associated with increased untreated tooth decay, both for African Americans with and without SCD and that the magnitude of the association did not differ across groups. PMID:16960327

  1. Reliability and validity of eight dental age estimation methods for adults.

    PubMed

    Soomer, Helena; Ranta, Helena; Lincoln, Michael J; Penttilä, Antti; Leibur, Edvitar

    2003-01-01

    This paper evaluates the reliability and validity of eight published dental age estimation methods for adults that may aid in victim identification. Age was calculated on 20 Caucasian teeth of known age according to the methods of Kvaal (for in situ and extracted teeth), Solheim (for in situ and sectioned teeth), Lamendin (for extracted teeth), Johanson (for sectioned teeth) and Bang (for extracted and sectioned teeth) by one independent observer. For each method, mean age error and standard error were assessed as the measures of accuracy and precision. In addition, method simplicity, requirements for tooth preparation and the equipment necessary were assessed and recommendations given for forensic use in various situations. Methods for sectioned teeth gave more reliable results when compared to methods for intact teeth. PMID:12570217

  2. Income-related inequality in perceived oral health among adult Finns before and after a major dental subsidization reform.

    PubMed

    Raittio, Eero; Aromaa, Arpo; Kiiskinen, Urpo; Helminen, Sari; Suominen, Anna Liisa

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In Finland, a dental subsidization reform, implemented in 2001-2002, abolished age restrictions on subsidized dental care. The aim of this study was to investigate income-related inequality in the perceived oral health and its determinants among adult Finns before and after the reform. Materials and methods Three identical cross-sectional nationally representative postal surveys, concerning perceived oral health and the use of dental services among people born before 1971, were conducted in 2001 (n = 2157), in 2004 (n = 1814) and in 2007 (n = 1671). Three measures of perceived oral health were used: toothache or oral discomfort during the past 12 months, current need for dental care and self-reported oral health status. Concentration index was used to analyse the income-related inequalities. Its decomposition was used to study factors related to the inequalities. Results The proportion of respondents reporting need for dental care decreased from 2001 to 2007, while no changes were seen in reports of toothache or self-reported oral health status. Income-related inequalities in reports of toothache and perceived need for care widened, while the inequality in self-reported oral health remained stable. Most of the inequalities were related to income itself, perceived general health and the time since the last visit to dental care. Conclusions It seems that the income-related inequalities in perceived oral health remained or even widened after the reform. PMID:26980421

  3. In vitro osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells seeded on carboxymethyl cellulose-hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Teti, Gabriella; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Durante, Sandra; Mazzotti, Antonio; Dicarlo, Manuela; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Orsini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from human dental pulp have been considered as an alternative source of adult stem cells in tissue engineering because of their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. Recently, polysaccharide based hydrogels have become especially attractive as matrices for the repair and regeneration of a wide variety of tissues and organs. The incorporation of inorganic minerals as hydroxyapatite nanoparticles can modulate the performance of the scaffolds with potential applications in tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to verify the osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) cultured on a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Human DPSCs were seeded on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel and on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel for 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21 days. Cell viability assay and ultramorphological analysis were carried out to evaluate biocompatibility and cell adhesion. Real Time PCR was carried out to demonstrate the expression of osteogenic and odontogenic markers. Results showed a good adhesion and viability in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel, while a low adhesion and viability was observed in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel. Real Time PCR data demonstrated a temporal up-regulation of osteogenic and odontogenic markers in dental pulp stem cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. In conclusion, our in vitro data confirms the ability of DPSCs to differentiate toward osteogenic and odontogenic lineages in presence of a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Taken together, our results provide evidence that DPSCs and carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel could be considered promising candidates for dental pulp complex and periodontal tissue engineering. PMID:26578970

  4. [Aplication of demineralized human bone matrix in the surgical dental fusion treatment. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Mora-Rincones, Oscar A; Corona-Rodríguez, Julio C; Díaz-Carvajal, Alvaro L; Franco-Carrero, Isabel C

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a surgical alternative in the treatment of the dental fusions through the placement of demineralized human bone matrix (DHBM) (Grafton Putty)*, immediately after the separation and extraction of the fused tooth to the permanent one. The dental fusion is a dental anomaly of union, that consists in the union of two dental germs during development. It could happen at any of the dental germ evolution stages from the dental sheet or from more advanced processes of differentiation. For the clinical treatment, an allograft of DHBM with osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties was used. This had several factors of bone growth, it allowed the gradual growth of a new bone that helped to correct the bone defects post-extraction and to cover the exposed distal wall of the remaining permanent tooth. The clinic evaluation and the periapical and panoramic radiographies images were used for the clinical control. It can be concluded that the surgical separation and the extraction of the tooth with less anatomical likeness to the contralateral and the placement of the DHBM, represent a surgical treatment alternative of the dental fusion. PMID:18717269

  5. Ecological and evolutionary factors in dental morphological diversification among modern human populations from southern South America.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Valeria; Perez, S Ivan; Gonzalez, Paula N; Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre Felizola

    2010-04-01

    The knowledge of processes involved in morphological variation requires the integrated analysis of evolutionary and ecological factors. Here, we investigate the factors responsible for dental variation among human populations from southern South America. The aim of this work is to test the correspondence of dental size and shape variation with geographical, molecular (i.e. mtDNA) and ecological (i.e. climate, diet and food preparation) variables employing comparative phylogenetic methods, which have not previously been extensively applied at a within-species level. The results of the Procrustes analysis show a significant association of shape variables with molecular distance and geography, whereas dental size is not associated with molecular or geographical distances among groups. Phylogenetic generalized least-squares analysis, which takes into account the evolutionary autocorrelation among populations, shows a significant relationship between dental size variation and diet, while temperature and pottery do not correspond with dental size or shape. Specifically, groups with diets rich in carbohydrates, as well as the maritime hunter-gatherers, have the smallest teeth. In summary, our results support ecological factors as the dominant factor on dental size diversification in this region, while evolutionary relationships account for variation in dental shape. PMID:19955158

  6. A scoping review of the implications of adult obesity in the delivery and acceptance of dental care.

    PubMed

    Marshall, A; Loescher, A; Marshman, Z

    2016-09-01

    Background Due to the increasing prevalence of obesity within the general population it is presumed that the prevalence of overweight and obese adults accessing dental services will also increase. For this reason dentists need to be aware of implications of managing such patients.Methods A scoping review was carried out. Both Medline via OVID and Scopus databases were searched along with grey literature databases and the websites of key organizations. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established. The data were collected on a purpose-made data collection form and analysed descriptively.Results The review identified 28 relevant published articles and two relevant items of grey literature. Following review of this literature three themes relating to adult obesity in the delivery and acceptance of dental care emerged; clinical, service delivery and patient implications. The majority of the papers focused on the clinical implications.Conclusion On the topic of adult obesity and dental care, the majority of published and grey literature focuses on the clinical implications. Further research is needed on both the patients' perspectives of being overweight or obese and the delivery and acceptance of dental care and the service delivery implications. PMID:27608579

  7. The role of lysyl oxidase-like 2 in the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Hyang; Park, Hye-Jeong; Park, Eui-Kyun; Kwon, Tae-Geon; Shin, Hong-In; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2013-06-01

    Adult human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are a unique population of precursor cells those are isolated from postnatal dental pulp and have the ability to differentiate into a variety of cell types utilized for the formation of a reparative dentin-like complex. Using LC-MS/MS proteomics approaches, we identified the proteins secreted from the differentiating hDPSCs in mineralization media. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) was identified as a protein that was down-regulated in the hDPSCs that differentiate into odontoblast-like cells. The role of LOXL2 has not been studied in dental pulp stem cells. LOXL2 mRNA levels were reduced in differentiating hDPSCs, whereas the levels of other LOX family members including LOX, LOXL1, LOXL3, and LOXL4, are increased. The protein expression and secretion levels of LOXL2 were also decreased during odontogenic differentiation. Recombinant LOXL2 protein treatment to hDPSCs resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the early differentiation and the mineralization accompanying with the lower levels of odontogenic markers such as DSPP, DMP-1 and ALP. These results suggest that LOXL2 has a negative effect on the differentiation of hDPSCs and blocking LOXL2 can promote the hDPSC differentiation to odontoblasts. PMID:23677379

  8. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  9. Evaluation of the interaction between calcifying nanoparticles and human dental pulp cells: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Zeng, Jinfeng; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Xi; Ling, Junqi

    2011-01-01

    Calcifying nanoparticles (CNPs, previously called nanobacteria) are self-propagating, cultivable macromolecular complexes. Their extraordinary characteristic is that they can aggregate carbonate apatite on their envelope from soluble calcium and phosphorus at physiologic concentrations and display cytotoxic effects on murine and human fibroblast cell lines. The question arises whether CNPs contribute to the degeneration of pulp tissue and thus result in clinically significant human dental pulp stones as nidies. This study evaluates CNPs' effects upon human dental pulp cells (HDPCs, the host cells in pulp tissue). We observed the ultrastructural variation of HDPCs attacked by CNPs. The spatial relationship of HDPCs and CNPs after coculture was also identified by immunofluorescence staining. Furthermore, it was verified by MTT viability assay that CNPs isolated from dental pulp stones exerted cytotoxic effect on HDPCs. Therefore, it could be concluded that the existence of CNPs might interfere with the normal physiologic function of the cells, and that might lead to dental pulp calcification. Elucidation of the cytotoxic characteristics of CNPs may offer a new perspective for understanding the etiology of human dental pulp stones. PMID:21289977

  10. Ability of healthy and inflamed human dental pulp to reduce hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Paola; Varvara, Giuseppe; Murmura, Giovanna; Terlizzi, Antonio; Caputi, Sergio

    2003-10-01

    This study examined the defensive ability of human dental pulp against H2O2 in healthy and reversible and irreversible pulpitis tissues through determination of catalase activity by spectrophotometric methods. Thirty-five systemically healthy patients were donors of the pulp tissue, and pulp conditions were assessed using clinical and X-ray evaluations. Catalase activity was 1.61 +/- 0.23 U mg(-1) protein in the healthy tissues, 2.99 +/- 0.45 U mg(-1) protein in the reversible pulpitis tissues, and 2.44 +/- 467 mU mg(-1) protein in the irreversible pulpitis tissues. All differences between the groups were statistically significant. These results point to a role for catalase during dental pulp inflammation in humans, and therefore demonstrate an inherent biological defense system against reactive oxidants in human dental pulp. PMID:12974692

  11. Mouthwash Use in General Population: Results from Adult Dental Health Survey in Grampian, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Kawecki, Michal M.; Cunningham, Claudia; Bovaird, Iain; Morgan, Rochelle; Rhodes, Kirstin; Watkins, Ray

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the pattern of mouthwash use and to investigate the associated factors in general population. Material and Methods An Adult Dental Health Survey was conducted on 3,022 residents of Grampian region of Scotland (adjusted participation rate 58.2%). Participants received a questionnaire consisting of questions on oral health and behavioural factors. Results The majority of participants (38.1%) have never used mouthwash, 17.5% used mouthwash less than once a month, 19.4% used mouthwash once every few days and 25.1% used mouthwash daily. Prevalence of use decreased with age (P < 0.001). Woman were more likely to use mouthwash than men (P = 0.004). Mouthwash use decreased with decrease in the level of deprivation (P < 0.001). Never-smokers were less likely to use mouthwash (40.3%) compared to smokers (53.1%) or those who stopped smoking (46.5%) (P < 0.001). Mouthwash was used by smaller proportion of people drinking alcohol on daily basis (36.6%), than by abstainers (42.2%) (P = 0.012). There was a positive relationship between flossing or brushing pattern and mouthwash use (P < 0.001). There was statistically significant relationship between mouthwash use and reasons for the last dental visit (P = 0.009). When compared to healthy individuals, mouthwash was used by higher proportion of people reporting that they had gum disease (P = 0.001), ulcers (P = 0.001), oral infections or swelling (P = 0.002) or other problems (P = 0.025). Conclusions Mouthwash use in general population is associated with socio-demographic, health and behavioural factors. PMID:24421979

  12. Inter-relationship among degree of mental retardation, living arrangements, and dental health in adults with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Gabre, P; Gahnberg, L

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the inter-relationship among the degree of mental retardation, the way of living, and dental health in adults with mental retardation. One hundred and thirty-two adults between the ages of 21 and 40 years who were mentally retarded were examined on two occasions, one year apart. All subjects had had regular dental care for at least 10 years. The clinical examinations included bite-wing radiographs and were made by the same dentist. The degree of mental retardation was assessed by a professional psychologist. The results show that the degree of mental retardation as well as living arrangements are factors influencing the dental health of persons with mental retardation. Subjects who were mildly retarded had higher caries incidence and caries prevalence compared with subjects with moderate or severe mental retardation. From a preventive dental health perspective, special attention should be focused on subjects with mild mental retardation who are not living in institutions. PMID:9582703

  13. The Comparison of the Immunologic Properties of Stem Cells Isolated from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth, Dental Pulp, and Dental Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Selin; Zibandeh, Noushin; Genc, Deniz; Ozcan, Elif Merve; Goker, Kamil; Akkoc, Tunc

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To compare the effects of various mesenchymal stem cells, those isolated from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), and dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs), on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Method. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from three sources in the orofacial region. Characterization and PCR analyses were performed. Lymphocytes were isolated from healthy peripheral venous blood. Lymphocytes were cocultured with stem cells in the presence and absence of IFN-γ and stimulated with anti-CD2, anti-CD3, and anti-CD28 for 3 days. Then, lymphocyte proliferation, the number of CD4+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells, and the levels of Fas/Fas ligand, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ in the culture supernatant were measured. Results. The DFSCs exhibited an enhanced differentiation capacity and an increased number of CD4+FoxP3+ T lymphocytes and suppressed the proliferation and apoptosis of PBMCs compared with SHEDs and DPSCs. The addition of IFN-γ augmented the proliferation of DFSCs. Furthermore, the DFSCs suppressed IL-4 and IFN-γ cytokine levels and enhanced IL-10 levels compared with the other cell sources. Conclusion. These results suggest that IFN-γ stimulates DFSCs by inducing an immunomodulatory effect on the PBMCs of healthy donors while suppressing apoptosis and proliferation and increasing the number of CD4+FoxP3+ cells. PMID:26770205

  14. Dental fear in Japan: Okayama Prefecture school study of adolescents and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, P.; Shimono, T.; Domoto, P.; Wohlers, K.; Matsumura, S.; Ohmura, M.; Uchida, H.; Omachi, K.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 3,041 students and staff in middle school in Okayama Prefecture, Japan, were surveyed regarding dental fear. Over 88% reported fear, with 42.1% classified as having high fear. Almost 70% reported acquiring dental fear prior to junior high school. A majority reported being hurt at the last appointment. Delay of dental work was also reported for over 50% of the sample. Coping, pattern of physiological upset, nondental fears, and sex and age differences were also reported. Results suggest intervention is needed to address the major dental public health problems associated with dental fear. PMID:8250343

  15. Comparative Gene-Expression Analysis of the Dental Follicle and Periodontal Ligament in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Oh; Song, Je-Seon; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lee, Syng-Ill; Jung, Han-Sung; Choi, Byung-Jai

    2013-01-01

    The human dental follicle partially differentiates into the periodontal ligament (PDL), but their biological functions are different. The gene-expression profiles of the dental follicle and PDL were compared using the cDNA microarray technique. Microarray analysis identified 490 genes with a twofold or greater difference in expression, 365 and 125 of which were more abundant in the dental follicle and PDL, respectively. The most strongly expressed genes in the dental follicle were those related to bone development and remodeling (EGFL6, MMP8, FRZB, and NELL1), apoptosis and chemotaxis (Nox4, CXCL13, and CCL2), and tooth and embryo development (WNT2, PAX3, FGF7, AMBN, AMTN, and SLC4A4), while in the PDL it was the tumor-suppressor gene WIF1. Genes related to bone development and remodeling (STMN2, IBSP, BMP8A, BGLAP, ACP5, OPN, BMP3, and TM7SF4) and wound healing (IL1, IL8, MMP3, and MMP9) were also more strongly expressed in the PDL than in the dental follicle. In selected genes, a comparison among cDNA microarray, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemical staining confirmed similar relative gene expressions. The gene-expression profiles presented here identify candidate genes that may enable differentiation between the dental follicle and PDL. PMID:24376796

  16. Dental occlusion modifies gaze and posture stabilization in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Gangloff, P; Louis, J P; Perrin, P P

    2000-11-01

    Repercussion of dental occlusion was tested upon postural and gaze stabilization, the latter with a visuo-motor task evaluated by shooting performances. Eighteen permit holders shooters and 18 controls were enrolled in this study. Postural control was evaluated in both groups according to four mandibular positions imposed by interocclusal splints: (i) intercuspal occlusion (IO), (ii) centric relation (CR), (iii) physiological side lateral occlusion and (iv) controlateral occlusion, in order to appreciate the impact of the splints upon orthostatism. Postural control and gaze stabilization quality decreased, from the best to the worst, with splints in CR, IO and lateral occlusion. In shooters, the improvement in postural control was parallel to superior shooting performance. A repercussion of dental occlusion upon proprioception and visual stabilization is suggested by these data. PMID:11036196

  17. TAILS N-terminomic and proteomic datasets of healthy human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Marino, Giada; Abbey, Simon R; Matthew, Ian; Overall, Christopher M

    2015-12-01

    The Data described here provide the in depth proteomic assessment of the human dental pulp proteome and N-terminome (Eckhard et al., 2015) [1]. A total of 9 human dental pulps were processed and analyzed by the positional proteomics technique TAILS (Terminal Amine Isotopic Labeling of Substrates) N-terminomics. 38 liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) datasets were collected and analyzed using four database search engines in combination with statistical downstream evaluation, to yield the by far largest proteomic and N-terminomic dataset of any dental tissue to date. The raw mass spectrometry data and the corresponding metadata have been deposited in ProteomeXchange with the PXD identifier ; Supplementary Tables described in this article are available via Mendeley Data (10.17632/555j3kk4sw.1). PMID:26587561

  18. TAILS N-terminomic and proteomic datasets of healthy human dental pulp

    PubMed Central

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Marino, Giada; Abbey, Simon R.; Matthew, Ian; Overall, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The Data described here provide the in depth proteomic assessment of the human dental pulp proteome and N-terminome (Eckhard et al., 2015) [1]. A total of 9 human dental pulps were processed and analyzed by the positional proteomics technique TAILS (Terminal Amine Isotopic Labeling of Substrates) N-terminomics. 38 liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) datasets were collected and analyzed using four database search engines in combination with statistical downstream evaluation, to yield the by far largest proteomic and N-terminomic dataset of any dental tissue to date. The raw mass spectrometry data and the corresponding metadata have been deposited in ProteomeXchange with the PXD identifier ; Supplementary Tables described in this article are available via Mendeley Data (10.17632/555j3kk4sw.1). PMID:26587561

  19. Microcephalia with mandibular and dental dysplasia in adult Zmpste24-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    de Carlos, F; Varela, I; Germanà, A; Montalbano, G; Freije, J M P; Vega, J A; López-Otin, C; Cobo, J M

    2008-01-01

    ZMPSTE24 (also called FACE-1) is a zinc-metalloprotease involved in the post-translational processing of prelamin A to mature lamin A, a major component of the nuclear envelope. Mutations in the ZMPSTE24 gene or in that encoding its substrate prelamin A (LMNA) result in a series of human inherited diseases known collectively as laminopathies and showing regional or systemic manifestations (i.e. the Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome). Typically, patients suffering some laminopathies show craniofacial or mandible anomalies, aberrant dentition or facial features characteristic of aged persons. To analyse whether Zmpste24−/– mice reproduce the cranial phenotype observed in humans due to mutations in ZMPSTE24or LMNA, we conducted a craniometric study based on micro-computer tomography (µCT) images. Furthermore, using simple radiology, µCT, µCT-densitometry and scanning electron microscopy, we analysed the mandible and the teeth from Zmpste24−/– mice. Finally, the structure of the lower incisor was investigated using an H&E technique. The results demonstrate that Zmpste24−/– mice are microcephalic and show mandibular and dental dysplasia affecting only the mandible teeth. In all cases, the lower incisor of mice lacking Zmpste24 was smaller than in control animals, showed cylindrical morphology and a transverse fissure at the incisal edge, and the pulpal cavity was severely reduced. Structurally, the dental layers were normally arranged but cellular layers were disorganized. The inferior molars showed a reduced cusp size. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that Zmpste24−/– mice represent a good model to analyse the craniofacial and teeth malformations characteristic of lamin-related pathologies, and might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular events underlying these diseases. PMID:19014358

  20. Immunomodulatory properties and in vivo osteogenesis of human dental stem cells from fresh and cryopreserved dental follicles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Young-Hoon; Lee, Hye-Jin; Jang, Si-Jung; Byun, June-Ho; Lee, Jong-Sil; Lee, Hee-Chun; Park, Won-Uk; Lee, Jin-Ho; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Park, Bong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, dental follicle tissues from extracted wisdom teeth were successfully cryopreserved for use as a source of stem cells. The goals of the present study were to investigate the immunomodulatory properties of stem cells from fresh and cryopreserved dental follicles (fDFCs and cDFCs, respectively) and to analyze in vivo osteogenesis after transplantation of these DFCs into experimental animals. Third passage fDFCs and cDFCs showed similar expression levels of interferon-γ receptor (CD119) and major histocompatibility complex class I and II (MHC I and MHC II, respectively), with high levels of CD119 and MHC I and nearly no expression of MHC II. Both fresh and cryopreserved human DFCs (hDFCs) were in vivo transplanted along with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold into mandibular defects in miniature pigs and subcutaneous tissues of mice. Radiological and histological evaluations of in vivo osteogenesis in hDFC-transplanted sites revealed significantly enhanced new bone formation activities compared with those in scaffold-only implanted control sites. Interestingly, at 8 weeks post-hDFC transplantation, the newly generated bones were overgrown compared to the original size of the mandibular defects, and strong expression of osteocalcin and vascular endothelial growth factor were detected in the hDFCs-transplanted tissues of both animals. Immunohistochemical analysis of CD3, CD4, and CD8 in the ectopic bone formation sites of mice showed significantly decreased CD4 expression in DFCs-implanted tissues compared with those in control sites. These findings indicate that hDFCs possess immunomodulatory properties that involved inhibition of the adaptive immune response mediated by CD4 and MHC II, which highlights the usefulness of hDFCs in tissue engineering. In particular, long-term preserved dental follicles could serve as an excellent autologous or allogenic stem cell source for bone tissue regeneration as well as a valuable therapeutic agent for

  1. Influence of cigarette smoking on the overall perception of dental health among adults aged 20-79 years, United States, 1988-1994.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Nathalie M.; Dye, Bruce A.; Hooper, Tomoko I.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigation into the relationship between lifestyle factors (particularly cigarette smoking) and perceived oral health has been limited. Data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II), 1988-1994, were used to explore this relationship in a large sample of U.S. adults. METHODS: This study used data on 13,357 dentate participants in NHANES III aged 20-79 years. In NHANES III, information on perceived dental health, sociodemographic attributes, smoking status, frequency of dental visits, dental insurance, and general health perception were collected during a home interview, and oral health status was assessed at a mobile examination center. RESULTS: Overall, 34.4% of individuals in the study sample reported having an unfavorable perception of their dental health by qualifying it as "fair" or "poor." Furthermore, 46.6% of smokers had an unfavorable dental health perception, compared to 28.3% of non-smokers. An interaction between smoking and race/ethnicity was found in logistic regression modeling. Stratified results show that cigarette smoking was not a significant predictor for an unfavorable dental health perception among individuals who self-identified as Mexican American, but smoking was a significant predictor for an unfavorable dental health perception among those who identified as non-Hispanic black or non-Hispanic white. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to describe the effects of smoking on dental health perception while controlling for examined oral health status. Because perceived dental health is a potential indicator for dental care utilization, a better knowledge of the factors that influence dental health perception is not only important for dental services planning, but also for understanding oral health-related quality of life issues. Additionally, given that smoking may negatively affect dental health perception, these findings have potential implications for smoking cessation activities conducted by

  2. Characterization of Human Dental Pulp Tissue Under Oscillatory Shear and Compression.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Burak; Bayrak, Ece; Erisken, Cevat

    2016-06-01

    Availability of material as well as biological properties of native tissues is critical for biomaterial design and synthesis for regenerative engineering. Until recently, selection of biomaterials and biomolecule carriers for dental pulp regeneration has been done randomly or based on experience mainly due to the absence of benchmark data for dental pulp tissue. This study, for the first time, characterizes the linear viscoelastic material functions and compressive properties of human dental pulp tissue harvested from wisdom teeth, under oscillatory shear and compression. The results revealed a gel-like behavior of the pulp tissue over the frequency range of 0.1-100 rps. Uniaxial compression tests generated peak normal stress and compressive modulus values of 39.1±20.4 kPa and 5.5±2.8 kPa, respectively. Taken collectively, the linear viscoelastic and uniaxial compressive properties of the human dental pulp tissue reported here should enable the better tailoring of biomaterials or biomolecule carriers to be employed in dental pulp regeneration. PMID:27093446

  3. Cell proliferation-inducing protein 52/mitofilin is a surface antigen on undifferentiated human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyo-In; Lee, Tae-Hyong; Jang, Young-Joo

    2015-06-01

    Dental pulp is a soft tissue located inside the hard part of a tooth and it contains a stem cell population that can regenerate damaged dentin and/or pulp itself. Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells that have the potential to be differentiated into a variety of cell types. Although cells cultured primarily from pulp tissue show heterogeneous phenotypes and variable efficiency in their dentinogenic differentiation, proper selection markers, which are specific to hDPSCs, are essential for the osteo/dentinogenic study of human dental pulp cells. We had previously screened a set of undifferentiation-specific cell surface antibodies of hDPSCs through decoy immunization. In this study, we show that one of these surface monoclonal antibodies, 3C4, is bound to intact pulp cells in a highly undifferentiation-specific manner. The surface antigen protein bound specifically to 3C4 antibody was identified through direct immunoprecipitation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as the cell proliferation-inducing protein 52/Mitofilin, which is a protein of the inner mitochondrial membrane and is a possible antagonist to maintaining mitochondrial activation during differentiation. The expression of mitofilin/3C4 antigen dramatically decreased during differentiation, and the depletion of mitofilin/3C4 antigen induced the expression of osteogenic/dentinogenic markers earlier than during normal differentiation. The 3C4-positive cells isolated by a magnetic-activated cell sorting system were differentiated with a higher efficiency than 3C4-negative cells. These results indicate that finding mitochondria-related stem cell markers is valuable to be able to identify and isolate primitive stem cells. PMID:25590652

  4. Psychological Distress and Emotional Pain Among Adult Attendees of a Dental Clinic: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Erinfolami, Adebayo Rasheed; Olagunju, Andrew Toyin; Oshodi, Yewande Olufunmilayo; Akinbode, Abiola Adelphine; Fadipe, Babatunde; Adeyemo, Wasiu Lanre

    2016-05-18

    We set out to carry out a case-control evaluation of psychological distress and emotional pain among adult attendees of a Nigerian dental clinic. A total of 201 subjects, made up of 101 dental patients (test group) matched with age and sex with 100 normal subjects (controls), was recruited into the study. All participants completed a designed socio-demographic questionnaire. General Health Question naire and Psyche ache Assessment Schedule were also administered to assess psychological distress based on cut-off scores ≥3 and emotional pain based on cut-off scores ≥28 respectively. The mean ages of study and control group were 33 (±12) and 36 (±13) years respectively, and both study and control groups were not significantly different in all the assessed socio-demographic parameters. Overall, 21.8% (n=22) of the subjects had psychological distress, while only 7% of the control group had psychological distress. This difference was statistically significant (P=0.003). Similarly, there was significant difference in the experience of psyche ache (unbearable psychological pain) as over a third of the dental patients (37.6%, n=38) had emotional pain, while only 13% of the controls experienced psych ache (P<0.001). In this study, the burden of psychological distress and emotional pain was many-fold in dental patients when compared with the controls. PMID:27403272

  5. Psychological Distress and Emotional Pain Among Adult Attendees of a Dental Clinic: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Erinfolami, Adebayo Rasheed; Olagunju, Andrew Toyin; Oshodi, Yewande Olufunmilayo; Akinbode, Abiola Adelphine; Fadipe, Babatunde; Adeyemo, Wasiu Lanre

    2016-01-01

    We set out to carry out a case-control evaluation of psychological distress and emotional pain among adult attendees of a Nigerian dental clinic. A total of 201 subjects, made up of 101 dental patients (test group) matched with age and sex with 100 normal subjects (controls), was recruited into the study. All participants completed a designed socio-demographic questionnaire. General Health Question naire and Psyche ache Assessment Schedule were also administered to assess psychological distress based on cut-off scores ≥3 and emotional pain based on cut-off scores ≥28 respectively. The mean ages of study and control group were 33 (±12) and 36 (±13) years respectively, and both study and control groups were not significantly different in all the assessed socio-demographic parameters. Overall, 21.8% (n=22) of the subjects had psychological distress, while only 7% of the control group had psychological distress. This difference was statistically significant (P=0.003). Similarly, there was significant difference in the experience of psyche ache (unbearable psychological pain) as over a third of the dental patients (37.6%, n=38) had emotional pain, while only 13% of the controls experienced psych ache (P<0.001). In this study, the burden of psychological distress and emotional pain was many-fold in dental patients when compared with the controls. PMID:27403272

  6. Preferences for caries prevention agents in adult patients: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Ajmo, Craig T.; Amundson, Craig; Anderson, Gerald A.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To identify factors that are significantly associated with dentists’ use of specific caries preventive agents in adult patients, and whether dentists who use one preventive agent are also more likely to use certain others. Methods Data were collected from 564 practitioners in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network, a multi-region consortium of participating practices and dental organizations. Results In-office topical fluoride was the method most frequently used. Regarding at-home preventive agents, there was little difference in preference between non-prescription fluoride, prescription fluoride, or chlorhexidine rinse. Dentists who most frequently used caries prevention were also those who regularly perform caries risk assessment and individualize caries prevention at the patient level. Higher percentages of patients with dental insurance were significantly associated with more use of in-office prevention modalities. Female dentists and dentists with more-recent training were more likely to recommend preventive agents that are applied by the patient. Dentists who reported more-conservative decisions in clinical treatment scenarios were also more likely to use caries preventive agents. Groups of dentist who shared a common preference for certain preventive agents were identified. One group used preventive agents selectively, whereas the other groups predominately used either in-office or at-home fluorides. Conclusions Caries prevention is commonly used with adult patients. However, these results suggest that only a subset of dentists base preventive treatments on caries risk at the individual patient level. PMID:20560997

  7. Use of caries preventive agents on adult patients compared to pediatric patients by general practitioners: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Williams, O. Dale; Ritchie, Lloyd K.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that caries prevention reduces caries in adults. This study tested the frequency of recommended caries prevention agents for children compared to adult patients. Methods This study surveyed 467 Dental Practice-Based Research Network general dentists who practice within the United States and treat both pediatric and adult patients. Dentists were asked the percentage of their patients who are administered or recommended dental sealants, in-office and at-home fluoride, chlorhexidine rinse, and xylitol gum. Results Adults were less likely to receive in-office caries preventive agents compared to pediatric patients. However, the rate of recommendation for at-home preventive regimens was very similar. Dentists with a conservative approach to caries treatment were the most likely to use caries prevention at similar rates in adults as in children. In addition, practices with a greater number of patients with dental insurance were significantly less likely to provide in-office fluoride or sealants to adult patients than to their pediatric patients. Conclusion In-office caries prevention agents are more commonly used by general dentists for their pediatric patients compared to their adult patients. Practice Implications Some general dentists should consider providing additional in-office prevention agents for their adult patients who are at increased risk for dental caries. PMID:20516100

  8. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure of Supragingival Plaques in Adults with Dental Health or Caries Revealed by 16S Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Cuicui; Ran, Shujun; Huang, Zhengwei; Liang, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries has a polymicrobial etiology within the complex oral microbial ecosystem. However, the overall diversity and structure of supragingival plaque microbiota in adult dental health and caries are not well understood. Here, 160 supragingival plaque samples from patients with dental health and different severities of dental caries were collected for bacterial genomic DNA extraction, pyrosequencing by amplification of the 16S rDNA V1–V3 hypervariable regions, and bioinformatic analysis. High-quality sequences (2,261,700) clustered into 10,365 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; 97% identity), representing 453 independent species belonging to 122 genera, 66 families, 34 orders, 21 classes, and 12 phyla. All groups shared 7522 OTUs, indicating the presence of a core plaque microbiome. α diversity analysis showed that the microbial diversity in healthy plaques exceeded that of dental caries, with the diversity decreasing gradually with the severity of caries. The dominant phyla of plaque microbiota included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, and TM7. The dominant genera included Capnocytophaga, Prevotella, Actinomyces, Corynebacterium, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Rothia, and Leptotrichia. β diversity analysis showed that the plaque microbial community structure was similar in all groups. Using LEfSe analysis, 25 differentially abundant taxa were identified as potential biomarkers. Key genera (27) that potentially contributed to the differential distributions of plaque microbiota between groups were identified by PLS-DA analysis. Finally, co-occurrence network analysis and function predictions were performed. Treatment strategies directed toward modulating microbial interactions and their functional output should be further developed. PMID:27499752

  9. Structure-mechanical function relations at nano-scale in heat-affected human dental tissue.

    PubMed

    Sui, Tan; Sandholzer, Michael A; Le Bourhis, Eric; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2014-04-01

    The knowledge of the mechanical properties of dental materials related to their hierarchical structure is essential for understanding and predicting the effect of microstructural alterations on the performance of dental tissues in the context of forensic and archaeological investigation as well as laser irradiation treatment of caries. So far, few studies have focused on the nano-scale structure-mechanical function relations of human teeth altered by chemical or thermal treatment. The response of dental tissues to thermal treatment is thought to be strongly affected by the mineral crystallite size, their spatial arrangement and preferred orientation. In this study, synchrotron-based small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques were used to investigate the micro-structural alterations (mean crystalline thickness, crystal perfection and degree of alignment) of heat-affected dentine and enamel in human dental teeth. Additionally, nanoindentation mapping was applied to detect the spatial and temperature-dependent nano-mechanical properties variation. The SAXS/WAXS results revealed that the mean crystalline thickness distribution in dentine was more uniform compared with that in enamel. Although in general the mean crystalline thickness increased both in dentine and enamel as the temperature increased, the local structural variations gradually reduced. Meanwhile, the hardness and reduced modulus in enamel decreased as the temperature increased, while for dentine, the tendency reversed at high temperature. The analysis of the correlation between the ultrastructure and mechanical properties coupled with the effect of temperature demonstrates the effect of mean thickness and orientation on the local variation of mechanical property. This structural-mechanical property alteration is likely to be due to changes of HAp crystallites, thus dentine and enamel exhibit different responses at different temperatures. Our results enable an improved understanding of

  10. Effect of uncontrolled freezing on biological characteristics of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli; Rattan, Vidya

    2015-12-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) hold great promise as a source of adult stem cells for utilization in regenerative medicine. Successful storage and post thaw recovery of DPSCs without loss of function is a key issue for future clinical application. Most of the cryopreservation methods use controlled rate freezing and vapor phase nitrogen to store stem cells. But these methods are both expensive and laborious. In this study, we isolated DPSCs from a patient undergoing impacted mandibular third molar extraction. We adopted eight different methods of cryopreservation at -80 °C for long term storage of the DPSC aliquots. Various parameters like proliferation, cell death, cell cycle, retention of stemness markers and differentiation potential were studied post cryopreservation period of 1 year. We observed successful recovery of stem cells in every method and a significant difference in proliferation potential and cell death between samples stored by different methods. However, post thaw, all cells retained their stemness markers. All DPSCs stored by different methods were able to differentiate into osteoblast like cells, adipocytes and neural cells. Based on these parameters we concluded that uncontrolled freezing at a temperature of -80 °C is as effective as controlled freezing using ethanol vessels and other cryopreservation methods. To the best of our knowledge, our study provides the first proof of concept that long term storage in uncontrolled freezing of cells at -80 °C in 10 % DMSO does not affect the revival capacity of hDPSCs. This implies that DPSCs may be used successfully for tissue engineering and cell based therapeutics even after long term, uncontrolled cryopreservation. PMID:25663639

  11. Acidogenicity and acidurance of dental plaque and saliva sediment from adults in relation to caries activity and chlorhexidine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Georgios, Andreadis; Vassiliki, Topitsoglou; Sotirios, Kalfas

    2015-01-01

    Background The ecological plaque hypothesis for the etiopathogenesis of caries implies a microbial shift towards a more aciduric dental plaque microbiota, due to a frequent carbohydrate intake. Acid tolerance has been suggested as an important property of the caries-associated bacteria and several in vitro studies with mixed cultures indicated that a low pH rather than the carbohydrate availability is responsible for microbiota shifts associated with the development of dental caries. Objective To examine 1) the acidogenic potential (amount lactate produced per mg plaque and minute, at pH 7.0 or pH 5.5) and the aciduric potential (acidogenic potential at pH 5.5/acidogenic potential at pH 7.0) of dental plaque and salivary sediment taken from caries-active or caries-free adults, and 2) the effect of a short-term chlorhexidine treatment on these potentials. Design Dental plaque and saliva sediment samples were taken from caries-free and caries-active subjects and suspended in Ringer's solution containing 1% sucrose and buffered with 0.5 M 3-[N-morpholino]propanesulfonic acid (MOPS), pH 7.0, or 3-[N-morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid (MES), pH 5.5. After incubation at 37°C for 10–20 min, the concentration of lactic acid in the suspension was determined by an enzymatic assay. The acid production of dental plaque was also determined after a period of mouth rinsing with 0.2% chlorhexidine. Results Both dental plaque and salivary sediment from caries-free subjects exhibited significantly lower acidogenic potentials at both pHs compared to caries-active volunteers. The opposite was observed with the aciduric potential. Chlorhexidine treatment significantly reduced all three potentials but had no effect on the relative proportion of bacteria grown on acidic agar. Conclusions Caries-active adults have an oral microbiota characterised by an increased catabolic velocity for sugar. The increase is more pronounced at neutral than acidic pH. Exposure to chlorhexidine, through

  12. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  13. Service evaluation of a nurse-led dental anxiety management service for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Porritt, J; Jones, K; Marshman, Z

    2016-05-27

    Objective Evaluate patients' and professionals' experiences of a nurse-led dental anxiety management service (NDAMS).Design Service evaluation.Setting The NDAMS operates as part of the Sheffield Salaried Primary Dental Care Service.Subjects and methods Questionnaire survey of anxious patients and qualitative interviews with patients and professionals.Interventions Dental nurses delivered low-level psychological interventions as part of an integrated care pathway (ICP) for dental anxiety.Main outcome measures Dental anxiety and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) questionnaires were completed by patients before and following NDAM.Results A total of 187 patients were assessed as suitable for NDAM (mean age = 33.7, 77% female) and 33 had completed it at the time of the service evaluation. Of those patients who had completed the intervention, significant improvements in dental anxiety and OHRQoL were reported. Professionals highlighted the importance of integrated working, adequate support and training, and assessing the suitability of patients for NDAM.Conclusion ICPs that combine pharmacological and psychological management approaches can help meet the needs of dentally anxious patients; however, early identification of patients most likely to benefit from psychological intervention should be a priority. PMID:27228931

  14. A Multilevel Approach on Self-Reported Dental Caries in Subjects of Minority Ethnic Groups: A Cross-Sectional Study of 6440 Adults.

    PubMed

    Ardila, Carlos M; Posada-López, Adriana; Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés A

    2016-02-01

    Regional contextual factors and dental caries using multilevel modeling related to adults in minority ethnic groups have been scantily explored. The influence of the socioeconomic context on self-reported dental caries (SRDC) in individuals of minority ethnic groups (IEG) in Colombia was studied. Data from the 2007 National Public Health Survey were collected in 34,843 participants of the population. The influence of different factors on SRDC in IEG was investigated with logistic and multilevel regression analyses. A total of 6440 individuals belonged to an ethnic group. Multilevel analysis showed a significant variance in SRDC that was smaller in IEG level than between states. Multilevel multivariate analysis also associated SRDC with increasing age, lower education level, last dental visit >1 year, unmet dental need and low Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Minority ethnic groups were at risk to report higher dental caries, where low GDP was an important variable to be considered. PMID:25963050

  15. Predominant cultivable microflora of human dental fissure plaque.

    PubMed Central

    Theilade, E; Fejerskov, O; Karring, T; Theilade, J

    1982-01-01

    Plaque developed in 10 occlusal fissures from unerupted third molars during implantation for 200 to 270 days in lower molars of dental students was studied. To characterize the predominant cultivable flora, 592 isolates (51 to 67 from each fissure) were subcultured from anaerobic roll tubes. Twenty-eight of the isolates were lost. Streptococci constituted 8 to 86% (median, 45%) of the isolates, Streptococcus mutans constituted 0 to 86% (median, 25%) and S. sanguis constituted 0 to 15% (median, 1%). A few isolates of "S. mitior" and "S. milleri" were found, but no S. salivarius. Staphylococci made up 0 to 23% (median, 9%). Gram-positive rods constituted 6 to 59% (median, 35%). Of these, 0 to 46% (median, 18%) were Actinomyces naeslundii and A. viscosus, but no anaerobic actinomyces were isolated. Arachnia and propionibacteria made up small proportions, lactobacilli were isolated from two fissures, constituting 10 and 29%, and eubacteria were isolated from one fissure (27%). Gram-negative cocci made up 0 to 46% (media, 4%). Only two isolates of gram-negative rods were found, both facultative anaerobes. Although 8 of the 10 fissures had large proportions of S. mutans, lactobacilli, or both, no caries was found even with microradiography. The large individual variation probably reflects differences in initial colonization from saliva and in growth conditions in each fissure. PMID:7095858

  16. Rethinking Adult Literacy Programs: A Humanities-Based Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anania, Joanne

    The Roosevelt University Humanities Enrichment Program tries to acknowledge the adult part of adult literacy. Its instructional materials are of interest and value to the adult student and, therefore, provide incentives for reading and discussion instead of serving merely as skill-building exercises. The materials are drawn from literature,…

  17. Kallikrein Promotes Inflammation in Human Dental Pulp Cells Via Protease-Activated Receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tomomi; Kamio, Naoto; Okabe, Tatsu; Muromachi, Koichiro; Matsushima, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Plasma kallikrein (KLKB1), a serine protease, cleaves high-molecular weight kininogen to produce bradykinin, a potent vasodilator and pro-inflammatory peptide. In addition, KLKB1 activates plasminogen and other leukocyte and blood coagulation factors and processes pro-enkephalin, prorenin, and C3. KLKB1 has also been shown to cleave protease-activated receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells to regulate the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor. In this study, we investigated KLKB1-dependent inflammation and activation of protease-activated receptor-1 in human dental pulp cells. These cells responded to KLKB1 stimulation by increasing intracellular Ca(2+) , upregulating cyclooxygenase-2, and secreting prostaglandin E2 . Remarkably, SCH79797, an antagonist of protease-activated receptor-1, blocked these effects. Thus, these data indicate that KLKB1 induces inflammatory reactions in human dental tissues via protease-activated receptor 1. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1522-1528, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26566265

  18. Assessment of exposures and potential risks to the US adult population from wear (attrition and abrasion) of gold and ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G Mark; Clemow, Scott R; Peters, Rachel E; James, Kyle J; Siciliano, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Little has been published on the chemical exposures and risks of dental restorative materials other than from dental amalgam and composite resins. Here we provide the first exposure and risk assessment for gold (Au) alloy and ceramic restorative materials. Based on the 2001-2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we assessed the exposure of US adults to the components of Au alloy and ceramic dental restorations owing to dental material wear. Silver (Ag) is the most problematic component of Au alloy restorations, owing to a combination of toxicity and proportional composition. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of four tooth surfaces restored with Au alloy before exceeding, on average, the reference exposure level (REL) for Ag. Lithium (Li) is the most problematic component of dental ceramics. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of 15 tooth surfaces restored with ceramics before exceeding the REL for Li. Relative risks of chemical exposures from dental materials decrease in the following order: Amalgam>Au alloys>ceramics>composite resins. PMID:25805253

  19. Should we brush twice a day? Determinants of dental health among young adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lien; Häkkinen, Unto; Knuuttila, Matti; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta

    2008-02-01

    We explore the determinants of dental ill-health as measured by the occurrence of caries. A recursive bivariate probit model that was derived from health production and demand theory is employed to model caries, while taking account of dental care use. The data are from a follow-up questionnaire used in a longitudinal study of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort, with respondents aged 31 (n = 5020). The factors controlled for relate to family background and health behavior during their youth, current socioecononomic variables and dental health stock. The total effects on the occurrence of caries of the explanatory variables are computed. Among females, factors increasing caries are body mass index and intake of alcohol, sugar and soft drinks, and those reducing caries are birth weight and adolescent school achievement. Among males, caries is positively related to the metropolitan residence and negatively related to education and healthy diet. Smoking increases caries, whereas dental care use, regular dental attendance and brushing teeth at least twice a day decrease caries. To promote oral health, attention should focus on policies to improve dental health education and to reduce the impacts of common risk factors. PMID:17645280

  20. A human-centered design of a dental discharge summary (DDS) for patients.

    PubMed

    Walji, Muhammad; Loeffelholz, John; Valenza, John A

    2007-01-01

    Patients are often provided with sub-optimal information regarding their clinic visits. Patients sometimes forget post-discharge instructions provided verbally, and infrequently follow preventative advice to improve health. In this research we propose to develop and evaluate a dental discharge summary (DDS) for patients through a human-centered design process. Our long term goals are to automatically generate a personalized discharge summary after each clinic encounter to educate and motivate patients to maintain excellent oral health. PMID:18694242

  1. Dental plaque development on a hydroxyapatite disk in young adults observed by using a barcoded pyrosequencing approach

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Toru; Yasui, Masaki; Shibata, Yukie; Furuta, Michiko; Saeki, Yoji; Eshima, Nobuoki; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Dental plaque is a dynamic microbial biofilm ecosystem that comprises hundreds of species including difficult-to-cultivate bacteria. We observed the assembly of a plaque bacterial community through 16S rRNA gene analysis. Plaque samples that accumulated on a hydroxyapatite disk for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 days with saliva on day 0 were collected from 19 young adults using a removable resin splint. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that the total bacterial amount gradually increased and reached a plateau on day 4. Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis revealed that the microbial richness and diversity particularly increased between days 5 and 7. A principal coordinate analysis plot based on unweighted UniFrac showed the community assembly in a time-related manner, which became increasingly similar to the salivary microbiota. Facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Streptococcus, Neisseria, Abiotrophia, Gemella, and Rothia were predominant in the plaque bacterial community in the earlier days, whereas obligate anaerobes, such as Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, and Capnocytophaga showed increased dominance on later days. UniFrac analysis also demonstrated that dental caries experience had a significant effect on the assembly process. Our results reveal the development pattern of the plaque bacterial community as well as the inter-individual differences associated with dental caries experience. PMID:25633431

  2. Dental plaque development on a hydroxyapatite disk in young adults observed by using a barcoded pyrosequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Toru; Yasui, Masaki; Shibata, Yukie; Furuta, Michiko; Saeki, Yoji; Eshima, Nobuoki; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Dental plaque is a dynamic microbial biofilm ecosystem that comprises hundreds of species including difficult-to-cultivate bacteria. We observed the assembly of a plaque bacterial community through 16S rRNA gene analysis. Plaque samples that accumulated on a hydroxyapatite disk for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 days with saliva on day 0 were collected from 19 young adults using a removable resin splint. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that the total bacterial amount gradually increased and reached a plateau on day 4. Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis revealed that the microbial richness and diversity particularly increased between days 5 and 7. A principal coordinate analysis plot based on unweighted UniFrac showed the community assembly in a time-related manner, which became increasingly similar to the salivary microbiota. Facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Streptococcus, Neisseria, Abiotrophia, Gemella, and Rothia were predominant in the plaque bacterial community in the earlier days, whereas obligate anaerobes, such as Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, and Capnocytophaga showed increased dominance on later days. UniFrac analysis also demonstrated that dental caries experience had a significant effect on the assembly process. Our results reveal the development pattern of the plaque bacterial community as well as the inter-individual differences associated with dental caries experience. PMID:25633431

  3. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  4. Single CD271 marker isolates mesenchymal stem cells from human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Ruth; Lee, Hye-Lim; Hong, Christine; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising tool in regenerative medicine due to their capacity to differentiate into multiple lineages. In addition to MSCs isolated from bone marrow (BMSCs), adult MSCs are isolated from craniofacial tissues including dental pulp tissues (DPs) using various stem cell surface markers. However, there has been a lack of consensus on a set of surface makers that are reproducibly effective at isolating putative multipotent dental mesenchymal stem cells (DMSCs). In this study, we used different combinations of surface markers (CD51/CD140α, CD271, and STRO-1/CD146) to isolate homogeneous populations of DMSCs from heterogeneous dental pulp cells (DPCs) obtained from DP and compared their capacity to undergo multilineage differentiation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting revealed that 27.3% of DPCs were CD51(+)/CD140α(+), 10.6% were CD271(+), and 0.3% were STRO-1(+)/CD146(+). Under odontogenic conditions, all three subsets of isolated DMSCs exhibited differentiation capacity into odontogenic lineages. Among these isolated subsets of DMSCs, CD271(+) DMSCs demonstrated the greatest odontogenic potential. While all three combinations of surface markers in this study successfully isolated DMSCs from DPCs, the single CD271 marker presents the most effective stem cell surface marker for identification of DMSCs with high odontogenic potential. Isolated CD271(+) DMSCs could potentially be utilized for future clinical applications in dentistry and regenerative medicine. PMID:26674422

  5. Adult Education and Human Resource Development: A Symbiotic Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, Robert E.; Hemby, K. Virginia; Conerly-Stewart, Donna L.

    1998-01-01

    Top-ranked competencies for graduate education in human resources development (HRD) identified by 55 (of 195) HRD practitioners were adult learning, presentation, facilitation, needs assessment, and human relations. Seven of the top 10 were allied with adult education graduate program content. (SK)

  6. Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Mateevici, Cristina; Lin, Belinda; Chandra, Ronil V.; Chong, Victor H.T.

    2015-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection, PMID:26488420

  7. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  8. The Prevalence of Pulp stones in Adult Patients of Shiraz Dental School, a Radiographic Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Ravanshad, Shohreh; Khayat, Shideh; Freidonpour, Najmeh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Pulp stones are calcifications found in the pulp chamber or pulp canals of the teeth. Its different prevalence in different population is a matter of concern. Purpose This study aimed to assess the prevalence of pulp stones in a sample of Iranian population and to report its occurrence regarding gender, dental arch, tooth type and dental status. Materials and Methods Dental records of patients who attended Shiraz Dental School were selected randomly. Only bitewing and periapical radiographs of maxillary and mandibular permanent posterior teeth were studied. Teeth were classified in the case of presence or absence of pulp stones, and the prevalence was analyzed in different gender, tooth types, dental arch, and dental status (intact, carious, or restored) groups. Statistical analysis was performed using X2 test. Results Of the 652examined subjects, 306 (46.9%) had one or more teeth with pulp stones. Of the 8244 posterior teeth examined, 928 (11.25%) had pulp stones in the pulp chamber. These pulp stones were detected in 76(37.6%) of males and 230 (51%) of females. The frequency of pulp stones among different teeth between maxillary and mandibular arches had almost a similar pattern. Among teeth demonstrating the condition, first molars were the most prevalent, followed by second molars. In maxillary molars the frequency of occurrence (26%) was higher than mandibular molars (18.7%). No Significant difference was found between dental status and pulp stones occurrence. Conclusion The occurrence of pulp stones noted in this study was significantly higher in female, molar teeth than premolar and 1st maxillary molar than mandibular. There was no significant association between pulp stone and condition of the crown. PMID:26636125

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Human Adult Epithelial Stem Cells from the Periodontal Ligament.

    PubMed

    Athanassiou-Papaefthymiou, M; Papagerakis, P; Papagerakis, S

    2015-11-01

    We report a novel method for the isolation of adult human epithelial stem cells (hEpiSCs) from the epithelial component of the periodontal ligament-the human epithelial cell rests of Malassez (hERM). hEpiSC-rich integrin-α6(+ve) hERM cells derived by fluorometry can be clonally expanded, can grow organoids, and express the markers of pluripotency (OCT4, NANOG, SOX2), polycomb protein RING1B, and the hEpiSC supermarker LGR5. They maintain the growth profile of their originating hERM in vitro. Subcutaneous cotransplantation with mesenchymal stem cells from the dental pulp on poly-l-lactic acid scaffolds in nude mice gave rise to perfect heterotopic ossicles in vivo with ultrastructure of dentin, enamel, cementum, and bone. These remarkable fully mineralized ossicles underscore the importance of epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk in tissue regeneration using human progenitor stem cells, which may have already committed to lineage despite maintaining hallmarks of pluripotency. In addition, we report the clonal expansion and isolation of human LGR5(+ve) cells from the hERM in xeno-free culture conditions. The genetic profile of LGR5(+ve) cells includes both markers of pluripotency and genes important for secretory epithelial and dental epithelial cell differentiation, giving us a first insight into periodontal ligament-derived hEpiSCs. PMID:26392003

  10. BMP7 and EREG Contribute to the Inductive Potential of Dental Mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Xuedong; Pi, Caixia; Xu, Ruoshi; Wan, Mian; Yang, Jing; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Chengcheng; Sun, Jianxun; Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenesis is accomplished by reciprocal signaling between the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments. It is generally accepted that the inductive mesenchyme is capable of inducing the odontogenic commitment of both dental and non-dental epithelial cells. However, the duration of this signal in the developing dental mesenchyme and whether adult dental pulp tissue maintains its inductive capability remain unclear. This study investigated the contribution of growth factors to regulating the inductive potential of the dental mesenchyme. Human oral epithelial cells (OEs) were co-cultured with either human dental mesenchymal/papilla cells (FDPCs) or human dental pulp cells (ADPCs) under 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional conditions. Odontogenic-associated genes and proteins were detected by qPCR and immunofluorescence, respectively, and significant differences were observed between the two co-culture systems. The BMP7 and EREG expression levels in FDPCs were significantly higher than in ADPCs, as indicated by human growth factor PCR arrays and immunofluorescence analyses. OEs co-cultured with ADPCs supplemented with BMP7 and EREG expressed ameloblastic differentiation genes. Our study suggests that BMP7 and EREG expression in late bell-stage human dental papilla contributes to the inductive potential of dental mesenchyme. Furthermore, adult dental pulp cells supplemented with these two growth factors re-established the inductive potential of postnatal dental pulp tissue. PMID:25952286

  11. BMP7 and EREG Contribute to the Inductive Potential of Dental Mesenchyme

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bo; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Xuedong; Pi, Caixia; Xu, Ruoshi; Wan, Mian; Yang, Jing; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Chengcheng; Sun, Jianxun; Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenesis is accomplished by reciprocal signaling between the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments. It is generally accepted that the inductive mesenchyme is capable of inducing the odontogenic commitment of both dental and non-dental epithelial cells. However, the duration of this signal in the developing dental mesenchyme and whether adult dental pulp tissue maintains its inductive capability remain unclear. This study investigated the contribution of growth factors to regulating the inductive potential of the dental mesenchyme. Human oral epithelial cells (OEs) were co-cultured with either human dental mesenchymal/papilla cells (FDPCs) or human dental pulp cells (ADPCs) under 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional conditions. Odontogenic-associated genes and proteins were detected by qPCR and immunofluorescence, respectively, and significant differences were observed between the two co-culture systems. The BMP7 and EREG expression levels in FDPCs were significantly higher than in ADPCs, as indicated by human growth factor PCR arrays and immunofluorescence analyses. OEs co-cultured with ADPCs supplemented with BMP7 and EREG expressed ameloblastic differentiation genes. Our study suggests that BMP7 and EREG expression in late bell-stage human dental papilla contributes to the inductive potential of dental mesenchyme. Furthermore, adult dental pulp cells supplemented with these two growth factors re-established the inductive potential of postnatal dental pulp tissue. PMID:25952286

  12. Human dental pulp stem cells cultured in serum-free supplemented medium

    PubMed Central

    Bonnamain, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Sergent-Tanguy, Solène; Huet, Pascal; Bienvenu, Géraldine; Naveilhan, Philippe; Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence show that human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) could provide a source of adult stem cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative pathologies. In this study, DPSCs were expanded and cultured with a protocol generally used for the culture of neural stem/progenitor cells. Methodology: DPSC cultures were established from third molars. The pulp tissue was enzymatically digested and cultured in serum-supplemented basal medium for 12 h. Adherent (ADH) and non-adherent (non-ADH) cell populations were separated according to their differential adhesion to plastic and then cultured in serum-free defined N2 medium with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Both ADH and non-ADH populations were analyzed by FACS and/or PCR. Results: FACS analysis of ADH-DPSCs revealed the expression of the mesenchymal cell marker CD90, the neuronal marker CD56, the transferrin receptor CD71, and the chemokine receptor CXCR3, whereas hematopoietic stem cells markers CD45, CD133, and CD34 were not expressed. ADH-DPSCs expressed transcripts coding for the Nestin gene, whereas expression levels of genes coding for the neuronal markers β-III tubulin and NF-M, and the oligodendrocyte marker PLP-1 were donor dependent. ADH-DPSCs did not express the transcripts for GFAP, an astrocyte marker. Cells of the non-ADH population that grew as spheroids expressed Nestin, β-III tubulin, NF-M and PLP-1 transcripts. DPSCs that migrated out of the spheroids exhibited an odontoblast-like morphology and expressed a higher level of DSPP and osteocalcin transcripts than ADH-DPSCs. Conclusion: Collectively, these data indicate that human DPSCs can be expanded and cultured in serum-free supplemented medium with EGF and bFGF. ADH-DPSCs and non-ADH populations contained neuronal and/or oligodendrocyte progenitors at different stages of commitment and, interestingly, cells from spheroid structures seem to be more engaged into the odontoblastic lineage than the ADH

  13. Sensitivity of human dental pulp cells to eighteen chemical agents used for endodontic treatments in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Morio; Tsutsui, Takeo W; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Ohno, Maki; Higo, Yukari; Inaba, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2013-01-01

    To determine the adverse effects against human dental pulp tissue, the sensitivity of human dental pulp cells (D824 cells) to 18 chemical agents used for endodontic treatments in dentistry was examined. The cytotoxicity, as determined by a decrease in colony-forming ability of cells treated with the chemical agents, increased as the concentration increased. As a quantitative measure of the cytotoxic effect, LC(50), the concentration which induces a 50% lethality, was extrapolated from the concentration-response curves. The rank of the chemical agents according to their cytotoxic effect (LC(50)) was sodium arsenite > formaldehyde > hydrogen peroxide > zinc oxide > thymol ≈ iodoform ≈ eugenol > guaiacol > ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid ≈ iodine > procaine > lidocaine ≈ chloramphenicol ≈ m-cresol > calcium hydroxide ≈ sodium hypochlorite ≈ phenol ≈ p-phenolsulfonic acid. To compare the cytotoxicity and the levels of apoptosis and mRNA expression of five genes related to the function of dental pulp tissue, D824 cells treated with the LC(50) concentrations of chemical agents were assayed by the TUNEL method and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, respectively. The inducibility of apoptotic cells and the level of mRNA expression of the genes varied with the chemical agents, indicating that both effects occurred independent of the rank of cytotoxic effect of the chemical agents. The results not only provide information concerning cytotoxicity of various chemical agents to human dental pulp cells, but also show an insight into the diversity of the pharmacodynamic action of the chemical agents. PMID:22083529

  14. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel.

    PubMed

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg(2+) ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth. PMID:27617291

  15. Atomic-scale compositional mapping reveals Mg-rich amorphous calcium phosphate in human dental enamel

    PubMed Central

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Zavgorodniy, Alexander; Liu, Howgwei; Zheng, Rongkun; Swain, Michael; Cairney, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Human dental enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, plays a vital role in protecting teeth from wear as a result of daily grinding and chewing as well as from chemical attack. It is well established that the mechanical strength and fatigue resistance of dental enamel are derived from its hierarchical structure, which consists of periodically arranged bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires. However, we do not yet have a full understanding of the in vivo HAP crystallization process that leads to this structure. Mg2+ ions, which are present in many biological systems, regulate HAP crystallization by stabilizing its precursor, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), but their atomic-scale distribution within HAP is unknown. We use atom probe tomography to provide the first direct observations of an intergranular Mg-rich ACP phase between the HAP nanowires in mature human dental enamel. We also observe Mg-rich elongated precipitates and pockets of organic material among the HAP nanowires. These observations support the postclassical theory of amelogenesis (that is, enamel formation) and suggest that decay occurs via dissolution of the intergranular phase. This information is also useful for the development of more accurate models to describe the mechanical behavior of teeth. PMID:27617291

  16. Odontoblastic inductive potential of epithelial cells derived from human deciduous dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Park, Ji-Won; Seo, You-Mi; Kim, Ha Hoon; Lee, Gene; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2016-06-01

    For the dentin regeneration, dental epithelial cells are indispensible and must possess odontoblastic induction capability. Epithelial cell-like stem cells were recently identified in human deciduous dental pulp (DPESCs). However, their cellular characteristics remain poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to characterize DPESCs compared to HAT-7 ameloblastic cells. Expression levels of ameloblast-specific markers [odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (Odam), matrix metalloproteinase (Mmp)-20, amelogenin, and ameloblastin] were detected in DPESCs. Co-culturing odontoblastic MDPC-23 cells with DPESCs increased expression of odontoblast differentiation markers (Dmp1 and Dspp) from days 4 to 10, while the expression of bone sialoprotein rapidly decreased. MDPC-23 cells cultured in DPESC-conditioned medium (CM) showed increased Dspp promoter activity compared with control MDPC-23 cultures. Mineralization was first observed in the CM groups from day 4 and proceeded rapidly until day 14, whereas mineralized nodules were found from day 7 in control media-cultured cells. In conclusion, DPESCs in human deciduous pulp possess ameloblast-like characteristics and differentiation properties, and substances derived from DPESCs promote odontoblastic differentiation. Thus, our results indicate that DPESCs can be a realistic epithelial source for use in odontoblastic induction and dentin formation of dental mesenchymal cells. PMID:27098651

  17. Knowledge and opinions about dental human health resources planning in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Maupome, G; Borges, A; Diez-de-Bonilla, J

    1998-02-01

    Dental human health resource planning (DHHRP), or manpower planning in Mexico has been plagued by fundamental contradictions. In spite of having trained a great many dentists in the past two decades, the dental health status of the population has not significantly improved. Concurrently, the relative scarcity of patients in relation to the number of practising dentists seems to be more marked, a critical issue since most dental care is delivered under private schemes. In the present investigation, 196 practising dentists in Mexico City were interviewed to establish their knowledge and opinions about DHHRP, and their views about the introduction of innovative alternatives in transforming, evaluating and planning human health resources. Concerns were: a need to examine and re-define the aims, skill content and marketability of professional training in professional practice; a lack of consensus as to how this is to be achieved; and a degree of awareness that professional practice has a limited scope in meeting the challenge of providing adequate care because of maldistribution of dentists and of limited financial resources of patients. PMID:9779080

  18. Cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase activity role in normal and inflamed human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Ferrante, M; D'Intino, M; Rega, L; Dolci, M; Trentini, P; Ciavarelli, L

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) plays an important role in pulp tissues. High levels of cGMP PDE are found in dental pulp cells. In the present study cGMP PDE activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic cGMP PDE control values for normal healthy pulps were 4.74+/-0.32 nmol/mg of proteins. In reversible pulpitis the cGMP PDE activity increased almost 3 times. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values increased 4.5 times compared with the normal healthy pulps activity. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results point to a role of cGMP PDE in the initial pulp response after injury. PMID:16857102

  19. Cyclic Amp phosphodiesterase activity in normal and inflamed human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Menna, V; Serra, E; Santoleri, F; Perfetti, G; Ciavarelli, L; Trentini, P

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (cAMP PDE) seems to be important in pulp tissues. High levels of cAMP PDE have been demonstrated to be in dental pulp cells. In the present study cAMP PDE activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic cAMP PDE control values for normal healthy pulps were 12.14 +/- 3.74 nmols/mg of proteins. In reversible pulpitis the cAMP PDE activity increased almost 2.5 times. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values increased 4.5 times compared with normal healthy pulps activity. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results could point to a role of cAMP PDE in the initial pulp response after injury. PMID:16857100

  20. Human dental pulp stem cells derived from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease demonstrate hepatic-like differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y K; Huang, Anderson H C; Chan, Anthony W S; Lin, L M

    2016-06-01

    Reviewing the literature, hepatic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease has not been studied. This study is aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that hDPSCs from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease could possess potential hepatic differentiation. Forty vital extracted teeth with disease recruited for hDPSCs isolation, stem cell characterization and hepatic differentiation were randomly and equally divided into group A (liquid nitrogen-stored dental pulp tissues) and group B (freshly derived dental pulp tissues). Samples of hDPSCs isolated from groups A and B but without hepatic growth factors formed negative controls. A well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma cell line was employed as a positive control. All the isolated hDPSCs from groups A and B showed hepatic-like differentiation with morphological change from a spindle-shaped to a polygonal shape and normal karyotype. Differentiated hDPSCs and the positive control expressed hepatic metabolic function genes and liver-specific genes. Glycogen storage of differentiated hDPSCs was noted from day 7 of differentiation-medium culture. Positive immunofluorescence staining of low-density lipoprotein and albumin was observed from day 14 of differentiation-medium culture; urea production in the medium was noted from week 6. No hepatic differentiation was observed for any of the samples of the negative controls. We not only demonstrated the feasibility of hepatic-like differentiation of hDPSCs from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease but also indicated that the differentiated cells possessed normal karyotype and were functionally close to normal hepatic-like cells. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23950016

  1. Comparison of acceptance, preference and efficacy between pressure anesthesia and classical needle infiltration anesthesia for dental restorative procedures in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Makade, Chetana Sachin; Shenoi, Pratima R; Gunwal, Mohit K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intraoral local anesthesia is essential for delivering dental care. Needless devices have been developed to provide anesthesia without injections. Little controlled research is available on its use in dental restorative procedures in adult patients. The aims of this study were to compare adult patients acceptability and preference for needleless jet injection with classical local infiltration as well as to evaluate the efficacy of the needleless anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Twenty non fearful adults with no previous experience of dental anesthesia were studied using split-mouth design. The first procedure was performed with classical needle infiltration anesthesia. The same amount of anesthetic solution was administered using MADA jet needleless device in a second session one week later, during which a second dental restorative procedure was performed. Patients acceptance was assessed using Universal pain assessment tool while effectiveness was recorded using soft tissue anesthesia and pulpal anesthesia. Patients reported their preference for the anesthetic method at the third visit. The data was evaluated using chi square test and student's t-test. Results: Pressure anesthesia was more accepted and preferred by 70% of the patients than traditional needle anesthesia (20%). Both needle and pressure anesthesia was equally effective for carrying out the dental procedures. Conclusion: Patients experienced significantly less pain and fear (p<0.01) during anesthetic procedure with pressure anesthesia. However, for more invasive procedures needle anesthesia will be more effective. PMID:24778516

  2. Adult Human Neurogenesis: From Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases. PMID:21519376

  3. Six1 is required for mouse dental follicle cell and human periodontal ligament-derived cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Tatsuki; Takahashi, Masanori; Yajima, Hiroshi; Mori, Yoshiyuki; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) is a connective tissue that attaches the tooth cementum to the alveolar bone and is derived from dental follicle cells (DFCs). The DFCs form fibroblasts, osteoblasts, cementoblasts, and PDL stem cells (PDLSCs). We previously reported homeobox transcription factor Six1 expression in mouse DFCs. However, the role of Six1 in periodontal tissue development is largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed SIX1 expression in mouse periodontal tissue cells during postnatal development and adulthood. We also addressed the role of SIX1 in mouse periodontium development and in human cultured PDL-derived cells (PDLCs). In mouse development, SIX1 production was abundant in DFCs and PDL cells by 2 weeks, but it was greatly diminished in the PDL at 4 weeks and in adults. Although the SIX1-positive cell distribution was sparse in the adult PDL, SIX1-positive cells were observed with low expression levels. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) for cell labeling to reveal numerous EdU/SIX1-double positive cells at 2 weeks; however, a few EdU-positive cells remained at 4 weeks. The proportion of DFCs that incorporated EdU was significantly lower in Six1-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice at E18.5. In human PDLCs, SIX1 was intensely expressed, and SIX1-knockdown using siRNA reduced proliferating PDLCs. Our results suggest that SIX1 is a key proliferation regulator in mouse DFCs and human PDLCs, which provides novel insight into Six family gene function in mammals. PMID:27241908

  4. Adult Stem Cells Properties in Terms of Commitment, Aging and Biological Safety of Grit-Blasted and Acid-Etched Ti Dental Implants Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Bressan, Eriberto; Calvo - Guirado, José L.; Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used biomaterials for manufacturing dental implants. The implant surface properties strongly influence osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to in vitro investigate the characteristics of Ti dental implants in terms of mutagenicity, hemocompatibility, biocompatibility, osteoinductivity and biological safety. The Ames test was used to test the mutagenicity of the Ti dental implants, and the hemolysis assay for evaluating their hemocompatibility. Human adipose - derived stem cells (ADSCs) were then seeded onto these implants in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Gene expression analyzing with real-time PCR was carried out to investigate the osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. Finally, the genetic stability of the cells cultured onto dental implants was determined by karyotyping. Our results demonstrated that Ti dental implants are not mutagenic, do not cause hemolysis, and are biocompatible. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs, seeded on Ti dental implants, proliferate up to 30 days in culture. Moreover, ADSCs loaded on Ti dental implants show a substantial expression of some osteoblast specific markers, such as COL1A1, OPN, ALPL, and RUNX2, as well as chromosomal stability after 30 days of culture in a medium without osteogenic factors. In conclusion, the grit-blasted and acid-etched treatment seems to favor the adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs and improve the osteoinductivity of Ti dental implant surfaces. PMID:25635249

  5. Dental stem cell patents.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Frerich, Bernhard; Driemel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    A complex human tissue harbors stem cells that are responsible for its maintenance or repair. These stem cells have been isolated also from dental tissues such as the periodontal ligament, dental papilla or dental follicle and they may offer novel applications in dentistry. This following review summarizes patents about dental stem cells for dental tissue engineering and considers their value for regenerative dentistry. PMID:19149737

  6. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed. PMID:27517891

  7. Sensory Neuropeptides and Endogenous Opioids Expression in Human Dental Pulp with Asymptomatic Inflammation: In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Chavarria-Bolaños, Daniel; Flores-Reyes, Hector; Lombana-Sanchez, Nelson; Cerda-Cristerna, Bernardino; Pozos-Guillen, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study quantified the expression of substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), β-endorphins (β-End), and methionine-enkephalin (Met-Enk) in human dental pulp following orthodontic intrusion. Methods. Eight patients were selected according to preestablished inclusion criteria. From each patient, two premolars (indicated for extraction due to orthodontic reasons) were randomly assigned to two different groups: the asymptomatic inflammation group (EXPg), which would undergo controlled intrusive force for seven days, and the control group (CTRg), which was used to determine the basal levels of each substance. Once extracted, dental pulp tissue was prepared to determine the expression levels of both neuropeptides and endogenous opioids by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Results. All samples from the CTRg exhibited basal levels of both neuropeptides and endogenous opioids. By day seven, all patients were asymptomatic, even when all orthodontic-intrusive devices were still active. In the EXPg, the SP and CGRP exhibited statistically significant different levels. Although none of the endogenous opioids showed statistically significant differences, they all expressed increasing trends in the EXPg. Conclusions. SP and CGRP were identified in dental pulp after seven days of controlled orthodontic intrusion movement, even in the absence of pain. PMID:26538838

  8. Translucency of human teeth and dental restorative materials and its clinical relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    The purpose was to review the translucency of human teeth and related dental materials that should be considered for the development of esthetic restorative materials. Translucency is the relative amount of light transmission or diffuse reflection from a substrate surface through a turbid medium. Translucency influences the masking ability, color blending effect, and the degree of light curing through these materials. Regarding the translucency indices, transmission coefficient, translucency parameter, and contrast ratio have been used, and correlations among these indices were confirmed. Translucency of human enamel and dentine increases in direct proportion to the wavelength of incident light in the visible light range. As for the translucency changes by aging, limited differences were reported in human dentine, while those for enamel proved to increase. There have been studies for the adjustment of translucency in dental esthetic restorative materials; the size and amount of filler and the kind of resin matrix were modified in resin composites, and the kind of ingredient and the degree of crystallization were modified in ceramics. Based on the translucency properties of human enamel and dentine, those of replacing restorative materials should be optimized for successful esthetic rehabilitation. Biomimetic simulation of the natural tooth microstructure might be a promising method.

  9. DIFFERENTIAL PATIENT RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION, COUNSELING, AND DENTAL TREATMENT. PAPER PRESENTED AT A NATIONAL SEMINAR ON ADULT EDUCATION RESEARCH (CHICAGO, FEBRUARY 11-13, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LUPTON, DANIEL E.

    RESEARCH (1) ANALYZED SPECIFIC OUTCOMES OF COUNSELING, INSTRUCTION, AND DENTAL THERAPY, AND (2) DETERMINED THE RELATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF PATIENT EDUCATION FOR RELIEF OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT (TMJ) DYSFUNCTION. SIXTY ADULT PATIENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS TMJ RESEARCH CENTER WERE RANDOMLY ASSIGNED TO ONE OF THREE PROGRAMS--DENTISTRY,…

  10. Developing Resourceful Humans. Adult Education within the Economic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynn Elen, Ed.

    This book, which explores the shifting paradigm from human resource development to developing resourceful humans, establishes the historical position of adult education within the economic context, discusses human capital propositions, and examines the learning dimensions of economic and educational change. The following chapters are included:…

  11. Application of third molar development and eruption models in estimating dental age in Malay sub-adults.

    PubMed

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yusmiaidil Putera; Cauwels, Rita; Deschepper, Ellen; Martens, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The third molar development (TMD) has been widely utilized as one of the radiographic method for dental age estimation. By using the same radiograph of the same individual, third molar eruption (TME) information can be incorporated to the TMD regression model. This study aims to evaluate the performance of dental age estimation in individual method models and the combined model (TMD and TME) based on the classic regressions of multiple linear and principal component analysis. A sample of 705 digital panoramic radiographs of Malay sub-adults aged between 14.1 and 23.8 years was collected. The techniques described by Gleiser and Hunt (modified by Kohler) and Olze were employed to stage the TMD and TME, respectively. The data was divided to develop three respective models based on the two regressions of multiple linear and principal component analysis. The trained models were then validated on the test sample and the accuracy of age prediction was compared between each model. The coefficient of determination (R²) and root mean square error (RMSE) were calculated. In both genders, adjusted R² yielded an increment in the linear regressions of combined model as compared to the individual models. The overall decrease in RMSE was detected in combined model as compared to TMD (0.03-0.06) and TME (0.2-0.8). In principal component regression, low value of adjusted R(2) and high RMSE except in male were exhibited in combined model. Dental age estimation is better predicted using combined model in multiple linear regression models. PMID:26165657

  12. P16/p53 expression and telomerase activity in immortalized human dental pulp cells

    PubMed Central

    Egbuniwe, Obi; Idowu, Bernadine D; Funes, Juan M; Grant, Andrew D; Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Residing within human dental pulp are cells of an ectomesenchymal origin that have the potential to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells. These cells have a limited growth potential owing to the effects of cell senescence. This study examines the effects of immortalizing odontoblast-like cells on cell proliferation and mineralization by comparing transformed dental pulp stem cells (tDPSCs) and non-transformed dental pulp stem cells (nDPSCs). Results With the exogenous expression of hTERT, tDPSCs maintained a continued expression of odontogenic markers for cell proliferation and mineralization (ALP, COL-1, DMP-1, DSPP, OCN and OPN), as did nDPSCs. Oncoprotein expression was seen in both groups except for a noted absence of p16 in the tDPSCs. nDPSCs also showed lower levels of total ALP and DNA activity in comparison to tDPSCs when assayed, as well as low telomerase activity readings. Methods Using a retroviral vector, exogenous human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) was expressed in tDPSCs. Both cell groups were cultured, and their telomerase activities were determined using a telomerase quantification assay. Also examined, were the expression of genes involved in proliferation and mineralization, such as human alkaline phosphatase (ALP), β-actin, collagen I (col-1), core binding factor (cbfa)-1, dentin matrix protein (DMP-1), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), GAPDH, hTERT, osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN) as well as oncoproteins involved in senescence (p16, p21 and p53) using RT-PCR. DNA and alkaline phosphate activity was also assayed in both cell groups. Conclusion These results indicate maintenance of odontoblast-like differentiation characteristics after retroviral transformation with hTERT and suggest a possible link with a reduced p16 expression. PMID:22067611

  13. Exosomes from Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Suppress Carrageenan-Induced Acute Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pivoraitė, Ugnė; Jarmalavičiūtė, Akvilė; Tunaitis, Virginijus; Ramanauskaitė, Giedrė; Vaitkuvienė, Aida; Kašėta, Vytautas; Biziulevičienė, Genė; Venalis, Algirdas; Pivoriūnas, Augustas

    2015-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to examine the effects of human dental pulp stem cell-derived exosomes on the carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in mice. Exosomes were purified by differential ultracentrifugation from the supernatants of stem cells derived from the dental pulp of human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) cultivated in serum-free medium. At 1 h post-carrageenan injection, exosomes derived from supernatants of 2 × 10(6) SHEDs were administered by intraplantar injection to BALB/c mice; 30 mg/kg of prednisolone and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Edema was measured at 6, 24, and 48 h after carrageenan injection. For the in vivo imaging experiments, AngioSPARK750, Cat B 750 FAST, and MMPSense 750 FAST were administered into the mouse tail vein 2 h post-carrageenan injection. Fluorescence images were acquired at 6, 24, and 48 h after edema induction by IVIS Spectrum in vivo imaging system. Exosomes significantly reduced the carrageenan-induced edema at all the time points studied (by 39.5, 41.6, and 25.6% at 6, 24, and 48 h after injection, respectively), to similar levels seen with the positive control (prednisolone). In vivo imaging experiments revealed that, both exosomes and prednisolone suppress activities of cathepsin B and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) at the site of carrageenan-induced acute inflammation, showing more prominent effects of prednisolone at the early stages, while exosomes exerted their suppressive effects gradually and at later time points. Our study demonstrates for the first time that exosomes derived from human dental pulp stem cells suppress carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in mice. PMID:25903966

  14. Why Teach the Humanities to Adult Basic Education Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mocker, Donald W., Ed.; Jones, William C., Ed.

    The publication contains an article on curriculum selection in adult basic education (ABE), three presentations on the humanities and ABE, and a concluding commentary. An introductory article, "Criteria for Selecting Curriculum in Adult Basic Education" by Donald Mocker, emphasizes the need for broader criteria for selection of ABE curriculum.…

  15. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  16. Humanizing Adult Education Research: Five Stories from the 1930's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Ronald

    Taken from the author's doctoral dissertation, this award-winning monograph describes a method for humanizing educational research in adult education and provides five stories of adult education efforts in the 1930's as examples of such research. The method described suggests valuing qualitative data as much as quantitative in the field of…

  17. Technology and the Adult Degree Program: The Human Element

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriquez, Frank G.; Nash, Susan Smith

    2004-01-01

    While technology has for many years been a critical component in programs for adults and calls to mind sophisticated gadgetry with expensive price tags, it is often the nexus where technology and humans intersect that proves most critical to the success and quality of adult degree programs.

  18. Prevalence and risks of habitual snoring and obstructive sleep apnea symptoms in adult dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jewair, Thikriat S.; Nazir, Mohammed A.; Al-Masoud, Naif N.; Alqahtani, Nasser D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of habitual snoring and risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among dental patients and investigate factors associated with high-risk OSA. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed at the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between October and December 2014. A total of 200 consecutive female and male dental patients were included in this study. Subjective and objective assessments were carried out. Habitual snoring and risk of OSA were assessed using the Arabic version of the Berlin questionnaire. Two trained investigators carried out the objective measurements of anthropometric data, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, pulse rate, and clinical examination of upper-airway, and dental occlusion. Results: Habitual snoring was present in 18.2% of the females and 81.8% of the males (p<0.05). Breathing pauses during sleep of more than once a week occurred in 9% (n=17) of the sample. Of the males, 78.3% were at high risk of OSA compared with 21.7% of the females. Multivariate analysis for risk of OSA revealed that obese patients were almost 10 times more likely to report OSA symptoms than their non-obese counterparts (odds ratio: 9.9, 95% confidence intervals: 4.4-22.1). Tongue indentations, tonsil size, and a high Epworth Sleepiness Scale score were also independent risks of OSA. Conclusion: Tongue indentations and tonsil grades III and IV were significantly associated with risk of OSA. This validates the important role of dentists in the recognition of the signs and symptoms of OSA. PMID:26837402

  19. Imatinib-induced dental hyperpigmentation in chronic myeloid leukemia in an adult female

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Prabhat; Singh, Omkar; Nigam, Ashwini Kumar; Upadhyay, Shalini

    2015-01-01

    The course of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has changed since the introduction of imatinb, and its side-effects are still being reported. We are reporting a case of a CML patient who presented to us with discoloration of the upper front teeth following 6 months of therapy with imatinib. On detailed evaluation, the patient was found to have imatinib-induced dental hyperpigmentation. PMID:26729966

  20. Unintentional root fragment retention in proximity to dental implants: a series of six human case reports.

    PubMed

    Langer, Laureen; Langer, Burton; Salem, Daliah

    2015-01-01

    There has been renewed interest in intentionally placing dental implants in proximity to or in contact with tooth root fragments. In clinical practice, human teeth are usually extracted due to nonrestorable caries, vertical or horizontal root fractures, periodontal disease, or endodontic failure, which is commonly accompanied by inflammation and bacterial contamination. The aim of this case series is to present the adverse effects in humans of clinically undetected root-to-implant contact (CURIC), where implants were unintentionally placed in proximity to undetected retained root fragments. The adverse effects of small (3 to 5 mm) root fragments were detectible 6 to 48 months post implant placement. Three out of seven implants in six patients were removed due to severe coronal bone loss. This differs from retrograde peri-implantitis, where only the apical area of the implant is affected and the coronal portion remains integrated. The detrimental effect of root fragment-to-implant contact is described along with its clinical management. Based on the review of currently relevant data, mixed results have been documented regarding the success of dental implants in proximity to tooth-root fragments. Careful evaluation of long-term, postloading results in humans where hopeless teeth have been extracted due to infection and significant bone loss are required before intentional root fragment retention is considered a safe and reliable clinical option for implant placement. PMID:25909518

  1. Geographic variations in dental services provided to older adults in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Locker, D; Clarke, M

    1999-08-01

    In an initial study, Leake et al. (J Public Health Dent 1996; 52: 182-90) found that older Ontarians living in metropolitan communities received almost twice the amount of dental care than older Ontarians living in non-metropolitan communities. Since data were collected for the 2 years prior to the enrollment of subjects in a longitudinal study, factors responsible for this variation could not be explored. This paper extends these findings by examining the volume of dental services received by these subjects in the 3 years between the baseline and follow-up phases of the longitudinal study. During this 3-year period, geographic variations in the volume of services provided were also observed. In a regression analysis, geographic location remained a significant predictor of the number of services received after controlling for six other explanatory variables: insurance coverage, number of teeth, restorative treatment need, self-rated oral health, regular dental visits and use of specialist services. Together, these explained only 24% of the variance in service provision. Since patient-reported outcomes were better in the communities with higher volumes of provision, further research concerning the patient and dentist factors influencing treatment provision is warranted. PMID:10403087

  2. Microtomography evaluation of dental tissue wear surface induced by in vitro simulated chewing cycles on human and composite teeth.

    PubMed

    Bedini, Rossella; Pecci, Raffaella; Notarangelo, Gianluca; Zuppante, Francesca; Persico, Salvatore; Di Carlo, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    In this study a 3D microtomography display of tooth surfaces after in vitro dental wear tests has been obtained. Natural teeth have been compared with prosthetic teeth, manufactured by three different polyceramic composite materials. The prosthetic dental element samples, similar to molars, have been placed in opposition to human teeth extracted by paradontology diseases. After microtomography analysis, samples have been subjected to in vitro fatigue test cycles by servo-hydraulic mechanical testing machine. After the fatigue test, each sample has been subjected again to microtomography analysis to obtain volumetric value changes and dental wear surface images. Wear surface images were obtained by 3D reconstruction software and volumetric value changes were measured by CT analyser software. The aim of this work has been to show the potential of microtomography technique to display very clear and reliable wear surface images. Microtomography analysis methods to evaluate volumetric value changes have been used to quantify dental tissue and composite material wear. PMID:22456018

  3. FHL2 mediates tooth development and human dental pulp cell differentiation into odontoblasts, partially by interacting with Runx2.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianxin; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Pishan; Wang, Xiaoying

    2016-04-01

    The differentiation of mesenchymal cells in tooth germ and dental pulp cells into odontoblasts is crucial for dentin formation, and the transcription factor runt-related transcription factor (Runx2) is necessary for odontoblast differentiation. Our previous study demonstrated that four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) may play an important role in tooth development and human dental pulp cell differentiation. This study aimed to determine whether FHL2 mediated the mesenchymal cells in tooth development and human dental pulp cell differentiation into odontoblasts by interacting with Runx2. The expression patterns of FHL2 and Runx2 were examined at the early stages of mouse molar development using double immunofluorescence staining. Western blot analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) were conducted for the preliminary study of the relationship between FHL2 and Runx2 in human dental pulp cell differentiation into odontoblasts. Results of double immunofluorescence staining showed that FHL2 and Runx2 exhibited similar expression patterns at the early stages of tooth development. Western blot analysis indicated that the expression patterns of FHL2 and Runx2 were synchronized on day 7 of induction, whereas those on day 14 differed. Co-IP analysis revealed positive bands of protein complexes, revealing the interaction of FHL2 and Runx2 on days 0, 7 and 14 of induction. Our data suggested that FHL2 might interact with Runx2 to mediate mesenchymal cell differentiation at the early stages of tooth development and human dental pulp cell differentiation. PMID:26759258

  4. Is dental amalgam safe for humans? The opinion of the scientific committee of the European Commission

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    It was claimed by the Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR)) in a report to the EU-Commission that "....no risks of adverse systemic effects exist and the current use of dental amalgam does not pose a risk of systemic disease..." [1, available from: http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_risk/committees/04_scenihr/docs/scenihr_o_016.pdf]. SCENIHR disregarded the toxicology of mercury and did not include most important scientific studies in their review. But the real scientific data show that: (a) Dental amalgam is by far the main source of human total mercury body burden. This is proven by autopsy studies which found 2-12 times more mercury in body tissues of individuals with dental amalgam. Autopsy studies are the most valuable and most important studies for examining the amalgam-caused mercury body burden. (b) These autopsy studies have shown consistently that many individuals with amalgam have toxic levels of mercury in their brains or kidneys. (c) There is no correlation between mercury levels in blood or urine, and the levels in body tissues or the severity of clinical symptoms. SCENIHR only relied on levels in urine or blood. (d) The half-life of mercury in the brain can last from several years to decades, thus mercury accumulates over time of amalgam exposure in body tissues to toxic levels. However, SCENIHR state that the half-life of mercury in the body is only "20-90 days". (e) Mercury vapor is about ten times more toxic than lead on human neurons and with synergistic toxicity to other metals. (f) Most studies cited by SCENIHR which conclude that amalgam fillings are safe have severe methodical flaws. PMID:21232090

  5. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  6. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults.

    PubMed

    Khonsari, Shadi; Suganthy, Mayuran; Burczynska, Beata; Dang, Vu; Choudhury, Manika; Pachenari, Azra

    2016-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  7. Risk factors and socioeconomic condition effects on periodontal and dental health: A pilot study among adults over fifty years of age

    PubMed Central

    Bertoldi, Carlo; Lalla, Michele; Pradelli, John Mauricio; Cortellini, Pierpaolo; Lucchi, Andrea; Zaffe, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Observational studies on the association among systemic/general and oral cavity indices, tooth loss, periodontal conditions, and socioeconomic inequalities are to be still performed in the population of Southern Europe. This study aims to determine the extent of this relationship among Italian healthy adults 50 years of age and above. Materials and Methods: Socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics, cardiovascular indicators, and systemic indices were examined by contrasting the dental indices among adult people of Northern Italy. Data were processed through correlation analysis, and multivariate analysis was carried out using seemingly unrelated regressions. Results: A total of 118 adults 50 years of age and above, after anamnesis, underwent systemic and dental examination. Their socioeconomic status was found to be inversely associated only with smoking and dental parameters. Unexpected outcomes between lifestyle and risk factors were detected. The statistical analysis showed an uneven correlation among dental indices and between those indices and the socioeconomic status, such as, a periodontal condition, apparently free from influences, unusually became worse as the socioeconomic status enhanced. Conclusions: The study outcomes indicate a relationship between tooth loss and conservative endodontic therapy, but they result in alternative choices. Nevertheless, the socioeconomic status has an inverse relationship with tooth loss and conservative endodontic therapy, but a direct relation with worsening of the periodontal condition. This pilot study highlights a need for the public health administration to adopt a socioeconomic assessment not only based on the household income, but also to accordingly improve its therapeutic course. PMID:24926214

  8. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation improves the odontoblastic differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yihua; Jiang, Hongwei; Gong, Qimei; Li, Xuyan; Ling, Junqi

    2015-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the causative agents of pulpitis and previous studies have demonstrated that the LPS stimulation of human aortic valve interstitial cells induces inflammatory mediators and the gene expression of osteogenic factors. Therefore, in the present study, it was hypothesized that LPS affects the odontoblastic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). In order to investigate this, an in vitro study using hDPCs was performed. Increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was observed in the hDPCs treated with LPS, which was more marked when the cells were costimulated with odontogenic induction medium (OM). LPS also appeared to increase the gene expression levels of dentin sialophosphoprotein and dentin matrix protein‑1 and the protein expression level of dental sialoprotein in the hDPCs, particularly in combination with OM. In addition, the size and the number of nodules formed in the hDPCs exposed to OM and LPS were increased compared to those stimulated by OM alone. To determine the role of nuclear factor κB (NF‑κB) during the LPS‑induced odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs, immunofluorescence was performed. The nuclear translocation of NF‑κB, induced by LPS was confirmed, suggesting its involvement in the LPS‑induced increase in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. In conclusion, there may be an association between LPS stimulation, with or without OM, and odontoblastic differentiation. PMID:25528991

  9. WNT5A inhibits human dental papilla cell proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, L.; Ye, L.; Dong, G.; Ren, L.B.; Wang, C.L.; Xu, P.; Zhou, X.D.

    2009-12-18

    WNT proteins are a large family of cysteine-rich secreted molecules that are linked to both canonical and non-canonical signal pathways, and have been implicated in oncogenesis and tissue development. Canonical WNT proteins have been proven to play critical roles in tooth development, while little is known about the role of non-canonical WNT proteins such as WNT5A. In this study, WNT5A was localized to human dental papilla tissue and human dental papilla cells (HDPCs) cultured in vitro, using immunochemistry and RT-PCR. Recombinant adenovirus encoding full-length Wnt5a cDNA was constructed to investigate the biological role of WNT5A on HDPCs. The BrdU incorporation assay, the MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis showed that over-expression of Wnt5a strongly inhibited the proliferation of HDPCs in vitro. Wound healing and transwell migration assays indicated that over-expression of WNT5A reduced migration of HDPCs. In conclusion, our results showed that WNT5A negatively regulates both proliferation and migration of HDPCs, suggesting its important role in odontogenesis via controlling the HDPCs.

  10. Matrix metalloproteinase levels and gelatinolytic activity in clinically healthy and inflamed human dental pulps.

    PubMed

    Gusman, Heloisa; Santana, Ronaldo B; Zehnder, Matthias

    2002-10-01

    The role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the breakdown of pulp tissue of teeth with severe caries has not yet been directly elucidated. This study was to determine the levels of selected MMPs and the overall gelatinolytic activity in clinically healthy and inflamed human dental pulps of 29 healthy subjects, aged 10-19 yr. Seventeen pulps were collected from subjects diagnosed with symptomatic pulpitis, and 18 control pulps were obtained from 12 subjects following premolar extraction for orthodontic reasons. The levels of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9 were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Densitometric analysis of gelatin zymograms was used to assay gelatinolytic activity in pulp supernatants. The MMP-1 levels were below the detection limit for both groups. Levels of MMP-2 and MMP-3 were significantly lower in symptomatic vs. clinically healthy pulps. In contrast, levels of MMP-9 in inflamed pulps were significantly higher than those recorded in clinically normal pulps. The overall gelatinolytic activity was elevated in inflamed pulps compared with healthy counterparts. Further, the gelatinolytic activity was positively correlated with MMP-9 levels. The data obtained suggest a key role of MMP-9 in the breakdown of inflamed human dental pulp tissue. PMID:12664465

  11. Effects of Dental Methacrylates on Oxygen Consumption and Redox Status of Human Pulp Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nocca, Giuseppina; Callà, Cinzia; Martorana, Giuseppe Ettore; Cicillini, Loredana; Lupi, Alessandro; Cordaro, Massimo; Luisa Gozzo, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have already demonstrated that the incomplete polymerization of resin-based dental materials causes the release of monomers which might affect cell metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, urethane dimethacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate on (1) cellular energy metabolism, evaluating oxygen consumption rate, glucose consumption, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and lactate production, and (2) cellular redox status, through the evaluation of glutathione concentration and of the activities of enzymes regulating glutathione metabolism. Methods. Human pulp cells were used and oxygen consumption was measured by means of a Clark electrode. Moreover, reactive oxygen species production was quantified. Enzymatic activity and glucose and lactate concentrations were determined through a specific kit. Results. Triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate induced a decrease in oxygen consumption rate, an enhancement of glucose consumption, and lactate production, whilst glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activity were not significantly modified. Moreover, the monomers induced an increase of reactive oxygen species production with a consequent increase of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymatic activities. A depletion of both reduced and total glutathione was also observed. Conclusion. The obtained results indicate that dental monomers might alter energy metabolism and glutathione redox balance in human pulp cells. PMID:24693541

  12. Determination of optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue samples using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Oxidative bleaching changes of human teeth induced changes in the optical properties of dental tissue. We introduced 1310 nm wavelengths of optical coherence tomography (OCT) attenuation coefficient method which is a relatively novel and rarely reported methodology to measure the correlation coefficient during the teeth oxidative bleaching procedure. And the quantitative parameters of enamel optical thickness and disruption of the entrance signal (DES) were extracted from the OCT images. The attenuation coefficient of the bleached tissue is 6.2 mm-1 which is significant (p < 0.001) higher than that unbleached sample is 1.4 mm-1. But attenuation coefficient varied significantly (p < 0.001) between 5.9 and 1.5 mm-1 in dentine which is downtrend. Furthermore, the persistence of bleaching oxidation in 35% hydrogen peroxide-induced optical thickness of enamel is similar with unbleached tissue which may indicate the refractive index of enamel is unchanged. Moreover, disruption of the entrance signal (DES) analysis showed that remarkable difference was appeared at enamel surface. The results indicate that optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue can be determined by attenuation coefficient using OCT system.

  13. Surface nanomorphology of human dental enamel irradiated with an Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ţălu, Ş.; Contreras–Bulnes, R.; Morozov, I. A.; Rodríguez-Vilchis, L. E.; Montoya-Ayala, G.

    2016-02-01

    To determine the effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation on the surface nanomorphology of human dental enamel. Materials and methods: five samples of human dental enamel were divided into five groups: (a) I and II were irradiated with Er:YAG & water irrigation (12.7 J cm-2 and 25.5 J cm-2, respectively); (b) III and IV were Er:YAG laser irradiated & no water irrigation (12.7 J cm-2 and 25.5 J cm-2, respectively); (c) V or control (no laser irradiation). Nanomorphological changes were observed on 1 μm  ×  1 μm areas by AFM (contact mode and air). The partition functions and multifractal spectra were calculated. The graphical results showed that the larger the spectrum width Δα (Δα  =  α max  -  α min) of the multifractal spectra f(α) the more non-uniform the surface nanomorphology. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed (P  <  0.05) to distinguish significant differences between the groups. All the investigated surfaces exhibited multifractal behavior. The computational algorithm indicated that the multifractal spectra differ significantly from each other for the different groups. AFM (atomic force microscopy), the statistical surface roughness parameters, and multifractal analysis provided useful information about the surface nanomorphology and optimal surface characteristics. This approach could be extended to other enamel surfaces in order to characterize its structural 3D microrelief.

  14. Proliferation rate of stem cells derived from human dental pulp and identification of differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Muhammad Fawwaz; Abdullah, Siti Fadilah; Omar, Nor Shamsuria; Mahmood, Zuliani; Fazliah Mohd Noor, Siti Noor; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Mokhtar, Khairani Idah

    2014-05-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) obtained from the dental pulp of human extracted tooth were cultured and characterized to confirm that these were mesenchymal stem cells. The proliferation rate was assessed using AlamarBlue® cell assay. The differentially expressed genes in SHED and DPSCs were identified using the GeneFishing™ technique. The proliferation rate of SHED (P < 0.05) was significantly higher than DPSCs while SHED had a lower multiplication rate and shorter population doubling time (0.01429, 60.57 h) than DPSCs (0.00286, 472.43 h). Two bands were highly expressed in SHED and three bands in DPSCs. Sequencing analysis showed these to be TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 1 (TIMP1), and ribosomal protein s8, (RPS8) in SHED and collagen, type I, alpha 1, (COL1A1), follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1), lectin, galactoside-binding, soluble, 1, (LGALS1) in DPSCs. TIMP1 is involved in degradation of the extracellular matrix, cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic function and RPS8 is involved as a rate-limiting factor in translational regulation; COL1A1 is involved in the resistance and elasticity of the tissues; FSTL1 is an autoantigen associated with rheumatoid arthritis; LGALS1 is involved in cell growth, differentiation, adhesion, RNA processing, apoptosis and malignant transformation. This, along with further protein expression analysis, holds promise in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:24375868

  15. Knowledge, attitudes, and performance of dental students in relation to sterilization/disinfection methods of extracted human teeth

    PubMed Central

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Mozafarinia, Romina; Mirzadeh, Azin; Aramon, Moien; Nassab, Sayed Amir Hossein Gandjalikhan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dental students use extracted human teeth to learn practical and technical skills before they enter the clinical environment. In the present research, knowledge, performance, and attitudes toward sterilization/disinfection methods of extracted human teeth were evaluated in a selected group of Iranian dental students. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study the subjects consisted of fourth-, fifth- and sixth-year dental students. Data were collected by questionnaires and analyzed by Fisher's exact test and Chi-squared test using SPSS 11.5. Results: In this study, 100 dental students participated. The average knowledge score was 15.9 ± 4.8. Based on the opinion of 81 students sodium hypochlorite was selected as suitable material for sterilization and 78 students believed that oven sterilization is a good way for the purpose. The average performance score was 4.1 ± 0.8, with 3.9 ± 1.7 and 4.3 ± 1.1 for males and females, respectively, with no significant differences between the two sexes. The maximum and minimum attitude scores were 60 and 25, with an average score of 53.1 ± 5.2. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that knowledge, performance and attitude of dental students in relation to sterilization/disinfection methods of extracted human teeth were good. However, weaknesses were observed in relation to teaching and materials suitable for sterilization. PMID:24130583

  16. Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ralph C.

    1988-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases afflicting mankind. It reached a peak in the 1950s but has been declining drastically in recent years in children and young adults. This article describes the three contributing factors in dental caries: microbial plaque, tooth susceptibility, and diet, and discusses practical preventive measures which help to reduce caries incidence. Some of these, such as vaccines and antimicrobial varnishes, are still in the research stages, while others, such as sucrose substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners, and limitation of frequency of sugar snacks are well established and can be promoted by family physicians. PMID:21253193

  17. Humanities and the Adult Learner in an Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Dale; Kamholtz, Jonathan

    Humanities courses have often been given little attention in continuing education for adults, possibly because they have been viewed as not "practical" or not "job-oriented" enough in our career-oriented, technologically advanced society. However, the humanities should be an integral part of our culture and of the lives of educated persons--a…

  18. Chimpanzees as an outgroup for the examination of human dental evolution.

    PubMed

    Shields, E D

    2000-01-01

    In the assessment of human origins, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, henceforth called Pan) represent the best hominoid outgroup for comparisons. Such an outgroup roots the "anatomically modern" human population cluster, or continuum. This study incorporates chimpanzees into a worldwide modern human database of quantified complete tooth variables (approximately 30 per tooth; e.g., root, pulp, enamel) in an attempt to develop a more accurate phylogeny of the hominoid continuum, with only intervening extinct hominids missing. Canonical discriminate analysis was performed mainly among Liberian common chimpanzees and global samples of humans. The first canonical variable explained 70% of the total variance and showed a tight cluster of humans, with chimpanzees as a distant outgroup. Within the human community, first non-San Bushman, sub-Saharan Africans and Andamanese, and then, close in, Australian aborigines were positioned towards Pan. Their relative orientation suggested an African human origin with the first branch within sub-Saharan Africa: sub-Saharan Africans and San Bushmen. Next, Andamanese Negritos, and then Australian aborigines, formed the early first surviving modern human lineage to leave Africa. Thin enamel and big teeth with relatively large roots characterized Pan nonmolar teeth. Humans showed a generalized sexual dimorphism for all teeth, with males having bigger teeth, bigger relative roots, and thinner enamel than females, while only Pan canines had significant and impressive sexual dimorphism. Interestingly, Pan molars were not larger than human molars. The data suggest that although hominids underwent two dental macroevolutionary events, the lineage leading to modern humans only experienced anterior tooth-size reduction. The suggested evolutionary significance of the observed total tooth variation is discussed. PMID:10879652

  19. Human sciences in the first semester of the dental undergraduate course at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.

    PubMed

    Röding, K

    1999-08-01

    The first 9 weeks of the dental undergraduate education at the Karolinska Institutet comprises a transition course, designed to introduce students to university studies leading to professional qualifications in patient-related health sciences. 1 week has been set aside for the theme Man and Society, highlighting the importance of the human sciences for the development of behavioural skills necessary for achieving professionalism and a holistic patient concept. Some essential ethical questions are addressed: intercultural communication, empathy, professional demeanour and the development of professional competence, and group dynamics. In this context, more specific subjects are considered, such as the emergence of the multicultural society and its implications for health services, interpersonal skills and patient communication in the health and medical fields. There are several reasons for including this theme, which forms the basis for the ethical and communicative strands throughout the entire curriculum. As 30-40% of freshmen dental students are of non-Swedish origin, it is essential to include cultural awareness seminars. Another reason is that within the EU, cultural and communicative skills are recognised proficiencies for health professionals; it is also acknowledged that effective delivery of health care may be impeded by misunderstandings in communication and conflict in ethical beliefs. Group discussions are scheduled during the week in order to allow the students to discuss their own experiences related to the theme. The students are also given a written assignment in relation to one of the seminars; the report is assessed as a part of the examination. The week is concluded by a plenum discussion summarising the group discussions. To date, 4 course evaluations, with a response rate of 92.5%, show that 97.3% of the students were positive to the theme as a whole or to specific seminars held during the week, especially intercultural communication, ethics and

  20. Urethane dimethacrylate induces cytotoxicity and regulates cyclooxygenase-2, hemeoxygenase and carboxylesterase expression in human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Hua; Chang, Mei-Chi; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Huang, Guay-Fen; Lee, Yuan-Ling; Wang, Yin-Lin; Chan, Chiu-Po; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Tseng, Shuei-Kuen; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2014-02-01

    The toxic effect of urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), a major dental resin monomer, on human dental pulp is not fully clear. In this study, we investigated the influence of UDMA on the cytotoxicity, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and related gene expression of dental pulp cells. The role of reactive oxygen species, hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and carboxylesterase (CES) in UDMA cytotoxicity, was evaluated. UDMA induced morphological changes of pulp cells and decreased cell viability by 29-49% at concentrations of 0.1-0.35 mM. UDMA induced G0/G1, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The expression of cdc2, cyclinB1 and cdc25C was inhibited by UDMA. Moreover, UDMA stimulated COX-2, HO-1 and CES2 mRNA expression of pulp cells. The cytotoxicity of UDMA was attenuated by N-acetyl-l-cysteine, catalase and esterase, but was enhanced by Zn-protoporphyrin (HO-1 inhibitor), BNPP (CES inhibitor) and loperamide (CES2 inhibitor). Exposure of UDMA may potentially induce the inflammation and toxicity of dental pulp. These findings are important for understanding the clinical response of human pulp to resin monomers after operative restoration and pulp capping, and also provide clues for improvement of dental materials. PMID:24140606

  1. TET1 knockdown inhibits the odontogenic differentiation potential of human dental pulp cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Li-Jia; Yi, Bai-Cheng; Li, Qi-Meng; Xu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) possess the capacity to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells and generate reparative dentin in response to exogenous stimuli or injury. Ten–eleven translocation 1 (TET1) is a novel DNA methyldioxygenase that plays an important role in the promotion of DNA demethylation and transcriptional regulation in several cell lines. However, the role of TET1 in the biological functions of hDPCs is unknown. To investigate the effect of TET1 on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation potential of hDPCs, a recombinant shRNA lentiviral vector was used to knock down TET1 expression in hDPCs. Following TET1 knockdown, TET1 was significantly downregulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. Proliferation of the hDPCs was suppressed in the TET1 knockdown groups. Alkaline phosphatase activity, the formation of mineralized nodules, and the expression levels of DSPP and DMP1 were all reduced in the TET1-knockdown hDPCs undergoing odontogenic differentiation. Based on these results, we concluded that TET1 knockdown can prevent the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs, which suggests that TET1 may play an important role in dental pulp repair and regeneration. PMID:27357322

  2. TET1 knockdown inhibits the odontogenic differentiation potential of human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Rao, Li-Jia; Yi, Bai-Cheng; Li, Qi-Meng; Xu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) possess the capacity to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells and generate reparative dentin in response to exogenous stimuli or injury. Ten-eleven translocation 1 (TET1) is a novel DNA methyldioxygenase that plays an important role in the promotion of DNA demethylation and transcriptional regulation in several cell lines. However, the role of TET1 in the biological functions of hDPCs is unknown. To investigate the effect of TET1 on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation potential of hDPCs, a recombinant shRNA lentiviral vector was used to knock down TET1 expression in hDPCs. Following TET1 knockdown, TET1 was significantly downregulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. Proliferation of the hDPCs was suppressed in the TET1 knockdown groups. Alkaline phosphatase activity, the formation of mineralized nodules, and the expression levels of DSPP and DMP1 were all reduced in the TET1-knockdown hDPCs undergoing odontogenic differentiation. Based on these results, we concluded that TET1 knockdown can prevent the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs, which suggests that TET1 may play an important role in dental pulp repair and regeneration. PMID:27357322

  3. Glycometabolic reprogramming associated with the initiation of human dental pulp stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linyan; Cheng, Li; Wang, Huning; Pan, Hongying; Yang, Hui; Shao, Meiying; Hu, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Glycometabolism, particularly mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and glycolysis, plays a central role in cell life activities. Glycometabolism can be reprogrammed to maintain the stemness or to induce the differentiation of stem cells, thereby regulating tissue repair and regeneration. However, research on the glycometabolism of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) remains scarce. Here, we investigated the relationship between glycometabolic reprogramming and initiation of hDPSC differentiation. We found the differentiation of hDPSCs commenced on day 3 when cells were cultured in mineralized medium. When cell differentiation commenced, mitochondria became elongated with well-developed cristae, and the oxygen consumption rate of mitochondria was enhanced, manifested as an increase in basal respiration, mitochondrial ATP production, and maximal respiration. Interestingly, glycolytic enzyme activities, glycolysis capacity, and glycolysis reserve were also upregulated at this time to match the powerful bioenergetic demands. More importantly, hDPSCs derived from different donors or cultured in various oxygen environments showed similar glycometabolic changes when they began to differentiate. Thus, glycometabolic reprogramming accompanies initiation of hDPSC differentiation and could potentially play a role in the regulation of dental pulp repair. PMID:26634800

  4. X-ray scattering evaluation of ultrastructural changes in human dental tissues with thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Sandholzer, Michael A; Sui, Tan; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Walmsley, Anthony Damien; Lumley, Philip J; Landini, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    Micro- and ultrastructural analysis of burned skeletal remains is crucial for obtaining a reliable estimation of cremation temperature. Earlier studies mainly focused on heat-induced changes in bone tissue, while this study extends this research to human dental tissues using a novel quantitative analytical approach. Twelve tooth sections were burned at 400-900°C (30-min exposure, increments of 100°C). Subsequent combined small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) experiments were performed at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron facility, where 28 scattering patterns were collected within each tooth section. In comparison with the control sample, an increase in mean crystal thickness was found in burned dentine (2.8-fold) and enamel (1.4-fold), however at a smaller rate than reported earlier for bone tissue (5-10.7-fold). The results provide a structural reference for traditional X-ray scattering methods and emphasize the need to investigate bone and dental tissues separately to obtain a reliable estimation of cremation temperature. PMID:24502378

  5. Impact of dental treatment under general anesthesia on the oral health-related quality of life of adolescents and adults with special needs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Juhea; Patton, Lauren L; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the perception of the family's primary caregiver on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), and the impact on family dynamics, of dental treatment under general anesthesia (GA) in adolescent and adult patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and neurocognitive disorders. Self-administered questionnaires were completed, before dental treatment, by 116 primary family caregivers of patients who received dental treatment under GA, and 102 (88%) of these caregivers completed the same questionnaires within 4 wk after treatment. The Child Oral Health Impact Profile (COHIP) and the Family Impact Scale (FIS) were shortened to a 14-item COHIP (COHIP-14) and a 12-item FIS (FIS-12) based on the limitations of patients' communication. The COHIP-14 and FIS-12 scores and each subscale improved after treatment. The baseline scores varied based on certain characteristics of the patients, such as age, disabilities, medications, caregivers, meal types, cooperation levels, and treatment needs. The postoperative improvement in OHRQoL was significant in the patients who were older than 30 yr of age, originally eating soft meals, displaying no or very low levels of cooperation, or receiving endodontic treatment. Based on the primary caregiver perceptions, the OHRQoL of adolescents and adults with IDD and neurocognitive disorders was improved by dental treatment under GA. PMID:25292335

  6. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  7. IQuaD dental trial; improving the quality of dentistry: a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing oral hygiene advice and periodontal instrumentation for the prevention and management of periodontal disease in dentate adults attending dental primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease affecting adults, and although it is largely preventable it remains the major cause of poor oral health worldwide. Accumulation of microbial dental plaque is the primary aetiological factor for both periodontal disease and caries. Effective self-care (tooth brushing and interdental aids) for plaque control and removal of risk factors such as calculus, which can only be removed by periodontal instrumentation (PI), are considered necessary to prevent and treat periodontal disease thereby maintaining periodontal health. Despite evidence of an association between sustained, good oral hygiene and a low incidence of periodontal disease and caries in adults there is a lack of strong and reliable evidence to inform clinicians of the relative effectiveness (if any) of different types of Oral Hygiene Advice (OHA). The evidence to inform clinicians of the effectiveness and optimal frequency of PI is also mixed. There is therefore an urgent need to assess the relative effectiveness of OHA and PI in a robust, sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) in primary dental care. Methods/Design This is a 5 year multi-centre, randomised, open trial with blinded outcome evaluation based in dental primary care in Scotland and the North East of England. Practitioners will recruit 1860 adult patients, with periodontal health, gingivitis or moderate periodontitis (Basic Periodontal Examination Score 0–3). Dental practices will be cluster randomised to provide routine OHA or Personalised OHA. To test the effects of PI each individual patient participant will be randomised to one of three groups: no PI, 6 monthly PI (current practice), or 12 monthly PI. Baseline measures and outcome data (during a three year follow-up) will be assessed through clinical examination, patient questionnaires and NHS databases. The primary outcome measures at 3 year follow up are gingival inflammation/bleeding on probing at the

  8. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD. PMID:26988110

  9. Near-Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopy of Synthetic Hydroxyapatites and Human Dental Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kolmas, Joanna; Marek, Dariusz; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) was used to analyze synthetic hydroxyapatite calcined at various temperatures, synthetic carbonated hydroxyapatite, and human hard dental tissues (enamel and dentin). The NIR bands of those materials in the combination, first-overtone, and second-overtone spectral regions were assigned and evaluated for structural characterization. They were attributed to adsorbed and structural water, structural hydroxyl (OH) groups and surface P-OH groups. The NIR spectral features were quantitatively discussed in view of proton solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H MAS NMR) results. We conclude that the NIR spectra of apatites are useful in the structural characterization of synthetic and biogenic apatites. PMID:26163232

  10. miR-152 induces human dental pulp stem cell senescence by inhibiting SIRT7 expression.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shensheng; Ran, Shujun; Liu, Bin; Liang, Jingping

    2016-04-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs) have potential applications in regenerative medicine. The molecular mechanisms underlying HDPSC senescence are not completely understood. Here, we investigated the significance of miR-152 in HDPSC senescence. We show that miR-152 is upregulated during HDPSC senescence and its overexpression in early passaged HDPSCs induced senescence. Sirtuin 7 (SIRT7) was identified as a target of miR-152. SIRT7 was downregulated in senescent HDPSCs, whereas miR-152 inhibition upregulated SIRT7 and suppressed the senescent phenotype and SIRT7 overexpression rescued miR-152-induced senescence. Our results demonstrate that the miR-152/SIRT7 axis plays a key role in the regulation of HDPSC senescence and provide a candidate target to improve the functional and therapeutic potential of HDPSCs. PMID:26991832

  11. [Healing Dental and Oral Problems by Remedies of Animal and of Human Origin].

    PubMed

    Kaán, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    Use of matierials of animal or human origin in dentistry (and generally in medicine) these days is regarded as an unusal way of intervention. However in earlier times, different tissues, parts, products and organs of animals were frequently used in healing. Some of these methods were rooted in magical thinking. As analogical treatments--based on similarity or analogy--e.g. powder of horn or teeth of pike was used for the treatment of decayed teeth and different worms, maggots, veenies were applied against "toothworm". By difficult eruption of primary teeth bone marrow or brain mixed with cockridge-blood and goatmilk was a widely used medicine. Butter and honey were able to help the growing of teeth, as well. Parts of frog (fe: flippers) were also components of curing materials. Egg as the symbol of life was often an ingredient of medicaments. For the treatment of inflamed gum different animal materials were used, like chin and teeth of wolf, pike, crayfish, milk, honey, human saliva etc. Animal or human stools, mucks (containing enzymes) did one's bit in healing of oral and dental illnesses and were applied as fomentation or swathing. Placing a leech on the inflamed face was a common procedure in the past even as the use of earwax in lipnook. In our days tissues, parts or products of animals (or human beings) usually never allowed to get into contact with the body of patients. It's a much safer routine, at the same time however a precious traditional knowledge vanishes forever. PMID:26875294

  12. The effect of scaffold architecture on odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Ma, Haiyun; Jin, Xiaobing; Hu, Jiang; Liu, Xiaohua; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the superiority of nanofibrous (NF) poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds in supporting the osteogenic differentiation of a few cell types and bone regeneration. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether NF-PLLA scaffolds are advantageous for the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) over solid-walled (SW) PLLA scaffolds. The vitro studies demonstrated that, compared with SW scaffolds, NF scaffolds enhanced attachment and proliferation as well as odontogenic differentiation of human DPSCs. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expression of odontogenic genes of human DPSCs was increased on NF scaffolds compared with that on SW scaffolds. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on the NF scaffolds as demonstrated by von Kossa staining, calcium content measurement and scanning electron microscopy. Consistent with the in vitro studies, NF scaffolds promoted odontogenic differentiation and hard tissue formation compared with SW scaffolds after 8 weeks of ectopic transplantation in nude mice as confirmed by von Kossa staining, Masson’s trichrome staining and immunohistochemical staining for dentin sialoprotein. In conclusion, NF-PLLA scaffolds enhanced the odontogenic differentiation of human DPSCs and mineralization both in vitro and in vivo, and are promising scaffolds for dentin regeneration. PMID:21663962

  13. [Clinical manifestations and treatment of vertical deformities of the dental arches and bite in adults].

    PubMed

    Kozhokaru, M P; Postolaki, I I; Kiriiak, E L

    1990-01-01

    Clinical manifestations and management of vertical deformation of the dentitions and occlusion were studied in 75 adult patients. Basing on the clinical picture of the condition, 3 forms and 4 degrees are distinguished. The treatment of the condition is multiple-modality with due consideration for the form and severity of the deformation. PMID:2326816

  14. The Effect of Glass Ionomer and Adhesive Cements on Substance P Expression in Human Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Garcia, German; Camelo, Patricia; Mejia, Monica; Ojeda, Karyn; Azuero-Holguin, Maria M.; Abad-Coronel, Dunia; Munoz, Hugo R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of glass ionomer and adhesive cements on SP expression in healthy human dental pulp. Study Design: Forty pulp samples were obtained from healthy premolars where extraction was indicated for orthodontic reasons. In thirty of these premolars a Class V cavity preparation was performed and teeth were equally divided in three groups: Experimental Group I: Glass Ionomer cement was placed in the cavity. Experimental Group II: Adhesive Cement was placed in the cavity. Positive control group: Class V cavities only. The remaining ten healthy premolars where extracted without treatment and served as a negative control group. All pulp samples were processed and SP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Results: Greater SP expression was found in the adhesive cement group, followed by the glass ionomer and the positive control groups. The lower SP values were for the negative control group. ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between groups (p<0.0001). Tukey HSD post hoc tests showed statistically significant differences in SP expression between negative control group and the 3 other groups (p<0.01). Differences between the cavity-only group and the two experimental groups were also statistically significant (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively). There is also a statistically significant difference between the two experimental groups (p<0.01). Conclusions: These findings suggest that adhesive cements provoke a greater SP expression when compared with glass ionomer. Key words:Glass Ionomer, adhesive cement, Substance P, human dental pulp. PMID:23722145

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of human dental pulp stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Struys, T; Ketkar-Atre, A; Gervois, P; Leten, C; Hilkens, P; Martens, W; Bronckaers, A; Dresselaers, T; Politis, C; Lambrichts, I; Himmelreich, U

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in stem cell research have shown the promising nature of mesenchymal stem cells as plausible candidates for cell-based regenerative medicine. Many studies reported the use of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), which possess self-renewal capacity, high proliferation potential, and the ability to undergo multilineage differentiation. Together with this therapeutic approach, development of effective, noninvasive and nontoxic imaging techniques for visualizing and tracking the cells in vivo is crucial for the evaluation and improvement of stem cell therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most powerful diagnostic imaging techniques currently available for in vivo diagnosis and has been proposed as the most attractive modality for monitoring stem cell migration. The aim of this study was to investigate the labeling efficiency of hDPSCs using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles in order to allow visualization using in vitro and in vivo MRI without influencing cellular metabolism. MRI and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed optimal uptake with low SPIO concentrations of 15 µg/ml in combination with 0.75 µg/ml poly-L-lysine (PLL) resulting in more than 13 pg iron/cell and an in vitro detection limit of 50 labeled cells/µl. Very low SPIO concentrations in the culture medium resulted in extremely high labeling efficiency not reported before. For these conditions, tetrazolium salt assays showed no adverse effects on cell viability. Furthermore, in vivo MRI was performed to detect labeled hDPSCs transplanted into the brain of Rag 2-γ C immune-deficient mice. Transplanted cells did not show any signs of tumorgenecity or teratoma formation during the studied time course. We have reported on a labeling and imaging strategy to visualize human dental pulp stem cells in vivo using MRI. These data provide a solid base to allow cell tracking in future regenerative studies in the brain longitudinally. PMID:23050936

  16. The weight of nations: an estimation of adult human biomass

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The energy requirement of species at each trophic level in an ecological pyramid is a function of the number of organisms and their average mass. Regarding human populations, although considerable attention is given to estimating the number of people, much less is given to estimating average mass, despite evidence that average body mass is increasing. We estimate global human biomass, its distribution by region and the proportion of biomass due to overweight and obesity. Methods For each country we used data on body mass index (BMI) and height distribution to estimate average adult body mass. We calculated total biomass as the product of population size and average body mass. We estimated the percentage of the population that is overweight (BMI > 25) and obese (BMI > 30) and the biomass due to overweight and obesity. Results In 2005, global adult human biomass was approximately 287 million tonnes, of which 15 million tonnes were due to overweight (BMI > 25), a mass equivalent to that of 242 million people of average body mass (5% of global human biomass). Biomass due to obesity was 3.5 million tonnes, the mass equivalent of 56 million people of average body mass (1.2% of human biomass). North America has 6% of the world population but 34% of biomass due to obesity. Asia has 61% of the world population but 13% of biomass due to obesity. One tonne of human biomass corresponds to approximately 12 adults in North America and 17 adults in Asia. If all countries had the BMI distribution of the USA, the increase in human biomass of 58 million tonnes would be equivalent in mass to an extra 935 million people of average body mass, and have energy requirements equivalent to that of 473 million adults. Conclusions Increasing population fatness could have the same implications for world food energy demands as an extra half a billion people living on the earth. PMID:22709383

  17. Expression of tmp21 in normal adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Yang, Yuan; Li, Jianbo; Hou, Jing; Xia, Kun; Song, Weihong; Liu, Shengchun

    2014-01-01

    TMP21, known as p23 protein, is one important member of the p24 protein families. The degradation of TMP21 is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as with the other presenilin-associated γ-secretase complex members. NFAT plays a very important role in regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. Compared with the function of TMP21, the studies about the distribution of this protein in human tissues are limited. We collected 19 normal adult human tissues from a healthy adult man died in a traffic accident and did examination of all the tissues collected for ICH, western blot and RT-PCR. It was shown that the expression of TMP21 is at high levels in heart, liver, lung, kidney and adrenal gland; moderate levels in brain, pancreas, prostate gland, testicle, small intestine, colon, stomach, gall bladder, thyroid gland and trachea; low levels in skeletal muscle, skin and lymphonodus. TMP21 is widely existed in normal adult human tissues. The current study provided for the first time a comprehensive expression of TMP21 in normal adult human tissues. It will benefit on helping in the design and interpretation of future studies focused on expounding the function of TMP21. PMID:25356171

  18. Noncontact, nondestructive elasticity evaluation of sound and demineralized human dental enamel using a laser ultrasonic surface wave dispersion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiao-Chuan; Fleming, Simon; Lee, Yung-Chun; Law, Susan; Swain, Michael; Xue, Jing

    2009-09-01

    Laser ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods have been proposed to replace conventional in vivo dental clinical diagnosis tools that are either destructive or incapable of quantifying the elasticity of human dental enamel. In this work, a laser NDE system that can perform remote measurements on samples of small dimensions is presented. A focused laser line source is used to generate broadband surface acoustic wave impulses that are detected with a simplified optical fiber interferometer. The measured surface wave velocity dispersion spectrum is in turn used to characterize the elasticity of the specimen. The NDE system and the analysis technique are validated with measurements of different metal structures and then applied to evaluate human dental enamel. Artificial lesions are prepared on the samples to simulate different states of enamel elasticity. Measurement results for both sound and lesioned regions, as well as lesions of different severity, are clearly distinguishable from each other and fit well with physical expectations and theoretical value. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that a laser-based surface wave velocity dispersion technique is successfully applied on human dental enamel, demonstrating the potential for noncontact, nondestructive in vivo detection of the development of carious lesions.

  19. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  20. Novel surface markers directed against adult human gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Galivo, Feorillo H.; Dorrell, Craig S.; Grompe, Maria; Zhong, Yong-Ping; Streeter, Philip; Grompe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Novel cell surface-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated against extrahepatic biliary cells were developed for the isolation and characterization of different cell subsets from normal adult human gallbladder. Eleven antigenically distinct gallbladder subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. They were classified into epithelial, mesenchymal, and pancreatobiliary (PDX1+SOX9+) subsets based on gene expression profiling. These antigenically distinct human gallbladder cell subsets could potentially also reflect different functional properties in regards to bile physiology, cell renewal and plasticity. Three of the novel monoclonal antibodies differentially labeled archival sections of primary carcinoma of human gallbladder relative to normal tissue. The novel monoclonal antibodies described herein enable the identification and characterization of antigenically diverse cell subsets within adult human gallbladder and are putative tumor biomarkers. PMID:26079872

  1. Age-Related Gene Expression Differences in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Young Adults, and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lissner, Michelle M; Thomas, Brandon J; Wee, Kathleen; Tong, Ann-Jay; Kollmann, Tobias R; Smale, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    A variety of age-related differences in the innate and adaptive immune systems have been proposed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection of human neonates and older adults. The emergence of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides an opportunity to obtain an unbiased, comprehensive, and quantitative view of gene expression differences in defined cell types from different age groups. An examination of ex vivo human monocyte responses to lipopolysaccharide stimulation or Listeria monocytogenes infection by RNA-seq revealed extensive similarities between neonates, young adults, and older adults, with an unexpectedly small number of genes exhibiting statistically significant age-dependent differences. By examining the differentially induced genes in the context of transcription factor binding motifs and RNA-seq data sets from mutant mouse strains, a previously described deficiency in interferon response factor-3 activity could be implicated in most of the differences between newborns and young adults. Contrary to these observations, older adults exhibited elevated expression of inflammatory genes at baseline, yet the responses following stimulation correlated more closely with those observed in younger adults. Notably, major differences in the expression of constitutively expressed genes were not observed, suggesting that the age-related differences are driven by environmental influences rather than cell-autonomous differences in monocyte development. PMID:26147648

  2. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890418

  3. Dendritic cells in humans--from fetus to adult.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Naomi; Chan, Jerry K Y; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-02-01

    The human immune system evolves continuously during development from the embryo into the adult, reflecting the ever-changing environment and demands of our body. This ability of our immune system to sense external cues and adapt as we develop is just as important in the early tolerogenic environment of the fetus, as it is in the constantly pathogen-challenged adult. Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen-sensing and antigen-presenting components of the immune system, play a crucial role in this process where they act as sentinels, both initiating and regulating immune responses. Here, we provide an overview of the human immune system in the developing fetus and the adult, with a focus on DC ontogeny and function during these discrete but intimately linked life stages. PMID:25323843

  4. Dental Status and Associated Factors in a Dentate Adult Population in Bulgaria: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Damyanov, Nikola D.; Witter, Dick J.; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; Creugers, Nico H. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine variations in the dental status of a dentate adult population in terms of “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth in relation to several sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Quota sampling was used to draw 2531 subjects aged 20 years and over. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and an oral examination. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to observe associations between “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth and the factors of interest. The mean numbers of “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth were 2.2, 6.7, and 4.9, respectively. Molar teeth were significantly more often “missing” than premolar and anterior teeth. Age, gender, education, and tooth brushing revealed most noticeable associations. Increasing age was associated with a lower chance of having “decayed” and “filled” teeth, but with a higher chance of having “missing” teeth. Females were more likely to have “missing” and “filled” teeth. Higher education was associated with a lower chance of having “missing” teeth. More frequent tooth brushing was associated with a lower chance of having “decayed” and “missing” teeth, but with a higher chance of having “filled” teeth. These risk indicators should be considered in prevention program planning if reduction of tooth loss is to be achieved. PMID:22654908

  5. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  6. The adult human brain harbors multipotent perivascular mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gesine; Özen, Ilknur; Christophersen, Nicolaj S; Reinbothe, Thomas; Bengzon, Johan; Visse, Edward; Jansson, Katarina; Dannaeus, Karin; Henriques-Oliveira, Catarina; Roybon, Laurent; Anisimov, Sergey V; Renström, Erik; Svensson, Mikael; Haegerstrand, Anders; Brundin, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Blood vessels and adjacent cells form perivascular stem cell niches in adult tissues. In this perivascular niche, a stem cell with mesenchymal characteristics was recently identified in some adult somatic tissues. These cells are pericytes that line the microvasculature, express mesenchymal markers and differentiate into mesodermal lineages but might even have the capacity to generate tissue-specific cell types. Here, we isolated, purified and characterized a previously unrecognized progenitor population from two different regions in the adult human brain, the ventricular wall and the neocortex. We show that these cells co-express markers for mesenchymal stem cells and pericytes in vivo and in vitro, but do not express glial, neuronal progenitor, hematopoietic, endothelial or microglial markers in their native state. Furthermore, we demonstrate at a clonal level that these progenitors have true multilineage potential towards both, the mesodermal and neuroectodermal phenotype. They can be epigenetically induced in vitro into adipocytes, chondroblasts and osteoblasts but also into glial cells and immature neurons. This progenitor population exhibits long-term proliferation, karyotype stability and retention of phenotype and multipotency following extensive propagation. Thus, we provide evidence that the vascular niche in the adult human brain harbors a novel progenitor with multilineage capacity that appears to represent mesenchymal stem cells and is different from any previously described human neural stem cell. Future studies will elucidate whether these cells may play a role for disease or may represent a reservoir that can be exploited in efforts to repair the diseased human brain. PMID:22523602

  7. Human Service Planning as a Collective Adult Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Joan

    Based on a study by the Department of Community Service Education, Cornell University, to evaluate human service planning (HSP) nationwide, this paper discusses the premises that HSP may be defined as community learning and that the community (according to the Robert Boyd and Jerold Apps model for adult education) is both a beneficiary of and…

  8. Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells. A promising epithelial-like cell source.

    PubMed

    Garzón, I; Martin-Piedra, M A; Alaminos, M

    2015-05-01

    Several models of tissue-engineered human skin based on three-dimensional (3D) co-culture techniques have been proposed to the date. However, normal skin biopsies are not always available, especially in patients with a high percentage of skin affected by deep burning, and the generation of large amounts of cultured keratinocytes may take very long time, with an associated risk for the patients' survival. For those reasons, the search of alternative cell sources for tissue reconstruction is a clinical need. In this context, Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells (HDPSC) have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages by the appropriate differentiation conditions, but skin epidermis differentiation has not been demonstrated so far. Here, we hypothesize that HDPSC may have pluripotent differentiation capability, and may be able to differentiate into skin epithelial keratinocytes in culture using organotypic 3D models based on the interaction with the subjacent dermal fibroblasts. By using HDPSC, the problems associated to the donor site availability and the proliferation capability of the epithelial cells could be solved. The rapid accessibility to these cells could be translated to a more immediate generation of a bioengineered human skin substitute for the future clinical treatment. PMID:25764965

  9. Oral Lactobacilli and Dental Caries: A Model for Niche Adaptation in Humans.

    PubMed

    Caufield, P W; Schön, C N; Saraithong, P; Li, Y; Argimón, S

    2015-09-01

    Lactobacilli have been associated with dental caries for over a century. Here, we review the pertinent literature along with findings from our own study to formulate a working hypothesis about the natural history and role of lactobacilli. Unlike most indigenous microbes that stably colonize a host, lactobacilli appear to be planktonic, opportunistic settlers that can gather and multiply only in certain restrictive niches of the host, at least within the oral cavity. We postulate that the following essential requirements are necessary for sustained colonization of lactobacilli in humans: 1) a stagnant, retentive niche that is mostly anaerobic; 2) a low pH milieu; and 3) ready access to carbohydrates. Three sites on the human body meet these specifications: caries lesions, the stomach, and the vagina. Only a handful of Lactobacillus species is found in caries lesions, but they are largely absent in caries-free children. Lactobacilli present in caries lesions represent both a major contributor to caries progression and a major reservoir to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We extend the assertion from other investigators that lactobacilli found in the GI tract originate in the oral cavity by proposing that lactobacilli in the oral cavity arise from caries lesions. This, in turn, leads us to reflect on the health implications of the lactobacilli in the mouth and downstream GI and to ponder whether these or any of the Lactobacillus species are truly indigenous to the human GI tract or the oral cavity. PMID:25758458

  10. Progressive plateau root form dental implant osseointegration: A human retrieval study.

    PubMed

    Gil, Luiz F; Suzuki, Marcelo; Janal, Malvin N; Tovar, Nick; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Jimbo, Ryo; Gil, Jose N; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-08-01

    Although preclinical and sparse human histology retrieval studies have shown that the interface between implant and bone is constantly remodeling, no human retrieval database has been developed to determine the effect of functional loading time and other clinical/implant design variables on osseointegration. The present study tested the hypothesis that bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) increase over functional loading time around dental implants. Due to prosthetic retreatment reasons, 93 human implant retrievals from the same manufacturer (Bicon LLC, Boston, MA, USA) were obtained over a period of approximately 15 years. The retrieved implants were under functional loading from 120 days to ∼18 years and were histomorphologic/metrically evaluated. BIC/BAFO were assessed as a function of multiple independent variables: implant surface type, diameter, length, jaw (maxilla/mandible), region (anterior/posterior), and time of functional loading. The results showed that both BIC and BAFO increased over time independently of implant design/clinical variables, supporting the postulated hypothesis. PMID:25367155

  11. [The existence vomeronasal organ in adult humans].

    PubMed

    Rapiejko, Piotr; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Wojdas, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Jan; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2007-01-01

    The influence of chemical substances (feromones) on human emotional and physical condition has fascinated psychologists, sexuologists and laryngologists since centurie. Literature conveys inconsistent information on vomeronasal organ (VNO) occurrence in humans. This organ is often called Jacobson's, and 2 symmetrical openings leading into it, located on both sides of septum, are called Ruyasch's ducts. The aim of the study was to analyze vomeronasal organ occurrence in humans in relation to age and sex. The study was conducted in a group of 634 patients, aged 18-80 years. All patients underwent routine ENT examination including rhinoscopy, nasal cavity examination with usage of 2.5x magnification lens (surgical glasses) and surgical microscope with 10x magnification. All persons had nasal cavities examined endoscopically. Every time presence of vomeronasal organ openings, along with localization, size and symmetry of these was noted. Subjects, who presented Jacobson's organ, were asked to fill a questionnaire concerning influence of smells on erotic sensations. Vomeronasal organ was fund in 312 persons, that is 49.21%. In 83.65% of cases vomeronasal organ opening size was smaller than 0.2 mm, what restricted its visibility to usage of magnifying lens, microscope, or endoscope. In 16.34% of cases only vomeronasal organ ducts openings were well visible in routine rhinoscopy without magnification. Vomeronasal organ was found more often in men than women. VNO was significantly more rare in patients with nasal septal deviation. In these cases, vomeronasal organ was usually found unilaterally, in all the cases on the concave side of deviated nasal septum. PMID:18260256

  12. Stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 identifies human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Noriaki; Murata, Satoko; Fukushima, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Yoshihito; Yanagita, Takeshi; Yanagita, Emmy; Ono, Mitsuaki; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Tomoo; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2012-03-10

    Embryonic stem cell-associated antigens are expressed in a variety of adult stem cells as well as embryonic stem cells. In the present study, we investigated whether stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 can be used to isolate dental pulp (DP) stem cells. DP cells showed plastic adherence, specific surface antigen expression, and multipotent differentiation potential, similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). SSEA-4+ cells were found in cultured DP cells in vitro as well as in DP tissue in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that 45.5% of the DP cells were SSEA-4+. When the DP cells were cultured in the presence of all-trans-retinoic acid, marked downregulation of SSEA-3 and SSEA-4 and the upregulation of SSEA-1 were observed. SSEA-4+ DP cells showed a greater telomere length and a higher growth rate compared to ungated and SSEA-4- cells. A clonal assay demonstrated that 65.5% of the SSEA-4+ DP cells had osteogenic potential, and the SSEA-4+ clonal DP cells showed multilineage differentiation potential toward osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and neurons in vitro. In addition, the SSEA-4+ DP cells had the capacity to form ectopic bone in vivo. Thus, our results suggest that SSEA-4 is a specific cell surface antigen that can be used to identify DP stem cells. PMID:22266579

  13. Effect of the Acidic Dental Resin Monomer 10-methacryloyloxydecyl Dihydrogen Phosphate on Odontoblastic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Cheol; Park, Haejin; Lee, Sang-Im; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-11-01

    Although 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) is frequently used as an acidic resin monomer in dental adhesives, its effect on dental pulp cells (DPCs) has been rarely reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 10-MDP on the inflammatory response and odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs at minimally toxic concentrations. We found that 10-MDP caused the release of inflammatory cytokines including NO, PGE2, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, 10-MDP reduced alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization nodule formation and mRNA expression of odontoblastic differentiation markers such as dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein-1, osterix and Runx2 in a concentration-dependent manner with low toxicity. In addition, 10-MDP induced activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its target gene, haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). We evaluated whether the effect of 10-MDP was related to the induction of HO-1 and found that treatment with a selective inhibitor of HO-1 reversed the production of 10-MDP-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokines and the inhibition of differentiation markers. Pre-treatment with either a GSH synthesis inhibitor or antioxidants blocked 10-MDP-induced mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Nrf2 and NF-κB pathways. Taken together, the results of this study showed that minimally toxic concentrations of 10-MDP promoted an inflammatory response and suppressed odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs by activating Nrf2-mediated HO-1 induction through MAPK and NF-κB signalling. PMID:25847254

  14. No known hominin species matches the expected dental morphology of the last common ancestor of Neanderthals and modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Arsuaga, Juan-Luis; Carbonell, Eudald; Polly, P. David

    2013-01-01

    A central problem in paleoanthropology is the identity of the last common ancestor of Neanderthals and modern humans ([N-MH]LCA). Recently developed analytical techniques now allow this problem to be addressed using a probabilistic morphological framework. This study provides a quantitative reconstruction of the expected dental morphology of the [N-MH]LCA and an assessment of whether known fossil species are compatible with this ancestral position. We show that no known fossil species is a suitable candidate for being the [N-MH]LCA and that all late Early and Middle Pleistocene taxa from Europe have Neanderthal dental affinities, pointing to the existence of a European clade originated around 1 Ma. These results are incongruent with younger molecular divergence estimates and suggest at least one of the following must be true: (i) European fossils and the [N-MH]LCA selectively retained primitive dental traits; (ii) molecular estimates of the divergence between Neanderthals and modern humans are underestimated; or (iii) phenotypic divergence and speciation between both species were decoupled such that phenotypic differentiation, at least in dental morphology, predated speciation. PMID:24145426

  15. Telocytes of the human adult trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Cretoiu, Dragos; Vrapciu, Alexandra Diana; Hostiuc, Sorin; Dermengiu, Dan; Manoiu, Vasile Sorin; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Mirancea, Nicolae

    2016-06-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are typically defined as cells with telopodes by their ultrastructural features. Their presence was reported in various organs, however little is known about their presence in human trigeminal ganglion. To address this issue, samples of trigeminal ganglia were tested by immunocytochemistry for CD34 and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that TCs are CD34 positive and form networks within the ganglion in close vicinity to microvessels and nerve fibers around the neuronal-glial units (NGUs). TEM examination confirmed the existence of spindle-shaped and bipolar TCs with one or two telopodes measuring between 15 to 53 μm. We propose that TCs are cells with stemness capacity which might contribute in regeneration and repair processes by: modulation of the stem cell activity or by acting as progenitors of other cells present in the normal tissue. In addition, further studies are needed to establish if they might influence the neuronal circuits. PMID:27147447

  16. Human pancreatic polypeptide in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Hanukoglu, A; Chalew, S; Kowarski, A A

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of human pancreatic polypeptide may be useful for assessment of gastrointestinal function, integrity of the parasympathetic nervous system or screening for endocrine neoplasia. In adults hPP levels have been reported to increase with age. However hPP levels throughout childhood have not been well characterized in comparison with the adult range. We studied fasting human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) from 45 pediatric patients, from infancy - 15 years, and 18 older adolescents and adults aged 16-45 years. The mean hPP level of children (233 +/- 147 pg/ml) was significantly higher than that (113 +/- 35 pg/ml) of adults (P less than .0001). There was no difference in mean hPP levels of children with normal growth hormone secretion compared to growth hormone deficient patients. There was no effect of gender or body mass index on hPP levels. We conclude that fasting hPP levels must be interpreted with respect to the age of the subject, children particularly, in that preteens may have higher fasting levels than older teenagers and adults. PMID:2307392

  17. Dental age estimation in a Brazilian adult population using Cameriere's method.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Alana de Cássia Silva; Alves, Nathalia Zanini; Michel-Crosato, Edgard; Rocha, Marcos; Cameriere, Roberto; Biazevic, Maria Gabriela Haye

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a specific formula to estimate age in a Brazilian adult population and to compare the original formula from Cameriere to this Brazilian formula. The sample comprised 1,772 periapical radiographs from 443 subjects (219 men, 224 women) that were organized into 12 groups according to sex (men or women) and age (20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, and 70 years and older). The films were analyzed using the criteria described by Cameriere et al. (2004) and Adobe Photoshop®. We obtained a mean error of 8.56 (SD = 5.80) years for tooth 13, 7.99 (SD = 5.78) years for tooth 23, 8.38 (SD = 6.26) years for tooth 33, and 8.20 (SD = 6.54) years for tooth 43. When teeth were combined in the analysis, we observed lower mean errors. The Brazilian formula developed from this sample group was more accurate than Cameriere's formula. However, other factors must be considered to improve age estimates in adults. PMID:25590504

  18. Human Adult Cortical Reorganization and Consequent Visual Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Dilks, Daniel D.; Serences, John T.; Rosenau, Benjamin J.; Yantis, Steven; McCloskey, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Neural and behavioral evidence for cortical reorganization in the adult somatosensory system after loss of sensory input (e.g., amputation) has been well documented. In contrast, evidence for reorganization in the adult visual system is far less clear: neural evidence is the subject of controversy, behavioral evidence is sparse, and studies combining neural and behavioral evidence have not previously been reported. Here, we report converging behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from a stroke patient (B.L.) in support of cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system. B.L.’s stroke spared the primary visual cortex (V1), but destroyed fibers that normally provide input to V1 from the upper left visual field (LVF). As a consequence, B.L. is blind in the upper LVF, and exhibits distorted perception in the lower LVF: stimuli appear vertically elongated, toward and into the blind upper LVF. For example, a square presented in the lower LVF is perceived as a rectangle extending upward. We hypothesized that the perceptual distortion was a consequence of cortical reorganization in V1. Extensive behavioral testing supported our hypothesis, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) confirmed V1 reorganization. Together, the behavioral and fMRI data show that loss of input to V1 after a stroke leads to cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system, and provide the first evidence that reorganization of the adult visual system affects visual perception. These findings contribute to our understanding of the human adult brain’s capacity to change and has implications for topics ranging from learning to recovery from brain damage. PMID:17804619

  19. Adult human sarcomas. II. Medical oncology.

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2007-02-01

    Human sarcoma cells can be killed by radio- and chemotherapy, but tumor cells acquiring resistance frequently kill the patient. A keen understanding of the intracellular course of oncogenic cascades leads to the discovery of small molecular inhibitors of the involved phosphorylated kinases. Targeted therapy complements chemotherapy. Oncogene silencing is feasible by small interfering RNA. The restoration of some of the mutated or deleted tumor-suppressor genes (p53, Rb, PTEN, hSNF, INK/ARF and WT) by demethylation or reacetylation of their histones has been accomplished. Genetically engineered or naturally oncolytic viruses selectively lyse tumors and leave healthy tissues intact. Adeno- or retroviral vectors deliver genes of immunological costimulators, tumor antigens, chemo- or cytokines and/or tumor-suppressor proteins into tumor (sarcoma) cells. Suicide gene delivery results in apoptosis induction. Genes of enzymes that target prodrugs as their substrates render tumor cells highly susceptible to chemotherapy, with the prodrug to be targeted intracellularly. It will be combinations of sophisticated surgical removal of the nonencapsulated and locally invasive primary sarcomas, advanced forms of radiotherapy to the involved sites and immunotherapy with sarcoma vaccines that will cure primary sarcomas. Adoptive immunotherapy with immune lymphocytes will be operational in metastatic disease only when populations of regulatory T cells are controlled. Targeted therapy with small molecular inhibitors of oncogene cascades, the driving forces of sarcoma cells, alteration of the tumor stroma from a supportive to a tumor-hostile environment, reactivation or replacement of wild-type tumor-suppressor genes, and radio-chemotherapy (with much reduced toxicity) will eventually accomplish the cure of metastatic sarcomas. PMID:17288529

  20. The Dynamic Behavior of the Early Dental Caries Lesion in Caries-active Adults and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J P; Amaechi, B T; Bader, J D; Shugars, D; Vollmer, W M; Chen, C; Gilbert, G H; Esterberg, E J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the full range of behavior of the visible, non-cavitated, early caries lesion in caries-active adults with substantial fluoride exposure, and to consider implications. Methods The data were from the Xylitol for Adult Caries Trial (X-ACT), collected annually for 33 months using condensed ICDAS caries threshold criteria. Individual tooth surfaces having a non-cavitated caries lesion were included and the Patterns of transition to each subsequent annual clinical examination to sound, non-cavitated or cavitated, filled or crowned were determined. The resulting sets of Patterns for an individual tooth surface, looking forward from its first appearance as a non-cavitated lesion, were combined into one of four behavior Profiles classified as Reversing, Stable, Oscillating or continuously Progressing, or were excluded if not part of the caries continuum. The distributions of Profile types were assessed using the Rao-Scott Chi square test, which adjusts for clustering of tooth surfaces within teeth. Results Inter-and intra-examiner Kappa scores demonstrated acceptable calibration at baseline and annually. 8084 tooth surfaces from 543 subjects were included. The distribution of Profile types differed significantly between coronal and root surfaces. Overall two-thirds of all coronal non-cavitated lesions were first seen at baseline, half Reversed, over a fifth were Stable, 15% Oscillated and only 8.3% progressed to cavitation, filled or crowned in 33 months or less. (6.3% consistently Progressed plus 2.0% inconsistently, a subset of Oscillating, which oscillated before progressing to cavitation). Approximal, smooth and occlusal coronal surfaces each were significantly different in their individual distributions of Profile types. Xylitol showed no significant and consistent effect on this distribution by tooth surface type. This was in keeping with the X-ACT Trial’s lack of effect of xylitol at the non-cavitated plus cavitated lesion thresholds combined

  1. Artificial Saliva Formulations versus Human Saliva Pretreatment in Dental Erosion Experiments.

    PubMed

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Sener, Beatrice; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the erosion-preventive effect of different artificial saliva formulations and human saliva in vitro compared to human saliva in situ. In the in vitro experiment, bovine enamel and dentin specimens were stored in artificial saliva (4 different formulations, each n = 20), deionized water (n = 20) or human saliva (n = 6 enamel and dentin specimens/volunteer) for 120 min. In the in situ experiment, each of the 6 enamel and dentin specimens was worn intraorally by 10 volunteers for 120 min. The specimens were then eroded (HCl, pH 2.6, 60 s). Half of the specimens were subjected to microhardness analysis (enamel) and the determination of calcium release into the acid (enamel and dentin), while the other half were again placed in the respective medium or worn intraorally, respectively, for 120 min before a second erosion was performed. Knoop microhardness of enamel and the calcium release of enamel and dentin into the acid were again determined. Statistical analysis was conducted by two-way repeated-measures ANOVA or two-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Enamel microhardness was not significantly different between all test groups after the first and the second erosive challenge, respectively. Enamel calcium loss was significantly lower in situ compared to the in vitro experiment, where there was no significant difference between all test groups. Dentin calcium loss was significantly lower than deionized water only after the first and than all except one artificial saliva after the second erosion. Under the conditions of this experiment, the use of artificial saliva formulations and human saliva in vitro does not reflect the intraoral situation in dental erosion experiments adequately. PMID:26870948

  2. [A survey of dental-periodontal pathology in a sample of blind adult subjects].

    PubMed

    Campisi, G; Cumbo, V

    1994-01-01

    The authors, after a short inquiry into the Italian epidemiological reality of blind subjects, explain the results of a study made on a sample of 105 blind adults (average age: 60.3 years) in order to check their oral health conditions. In particular, they have pointed out the DMFT index, the average number of permanent teeth present, the OHI-S index in its two components ID and IC, the CPITN index. The results of this study point is a high DMFT index, mainly owing to teeth extracted for periodontal disease. A high OHI-S index and the prevalence of the codes 2 e 3 of the CPITN index direct the therapeutical choice towards a professional oral hygiene and oral preventive protocols adequate to their sensorial deficiency. PMID:8170450

  3. Perivascular mesenchymal progenitors in human fetal and adult liver.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Jörg C; Over, Patrick; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Foka, Hubert G; Chen, William C W; Péault, Bruno; Gridelli, Bruno; Schmelzer, Eva

    2012-12-10

    The presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been described in various organs. Pericytes possess a multilineage differentiation potential and have been suggested to be one of the developmental sources for MSCs. In human liver, pericytes have not been defined. Here, we describe the identification, purification, and characterization of pericytes in human adult and fetal liver. Flow cytometry sorting revealed that human adult and fetal liver contains 0.56%±0.81% and 0.45%±0.39% of CD146(+)CD45(-)CD56(-)CD34(-) pericytes, respectively. Of these, 41% (adult) and 30% (fetal) were alkaline phosphatase-positive (ALP(+)). In situ, pericytes were localized around periportal blood vessels and were positive for NG2 and vimentin. Purified pericytes could be cultured extensively and had low population doubling times. Immunofluorescence of cultures demonstrated that cells were positive for pericyte and mesenchymal cell markers CD146, NG2, CD90, CD140b, and vimentin, and negative for endothelial, hematopoietic, stellate, muscle, or liver epithelial cell markers von Willebrand factor, CD31, CD34, CD45, CD144, CD326, CK19, albumin, α-fetoprotein, CYP3A7, glial fibrillary acid protein, MYF5, and Pax7 by gene expression; myogenin and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression were variable. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of cultures confirmed surface expression of CD146, CD73, CD90, CD10, CD13, CD44, CD105, and ALP and absence of human leukocyte antigen-DR. In vitro differentiation assays demonstrated that cells possessed robust osteogenic and myogenic, but low adipogenic and low chondrogenic differentiation potentials. In functional in vitro assays, cells had typical mesenchymal strong migratory and invasive activity. In conclusion, human adult and fetal livers harbor pericytes that are similar to those found in other organs and are distinct from hepatic stellate cells. PMID:22931482

  4. Efficacy of Sex Determination from Human Dental Pulp Tissue and its Reliability as a Tool in Forensic Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Kaveri Surya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sex determination is one of the primary steps in forensics. Barr body can be used as a histological method for identification of sex as it is found to be specific to female somatic cells and rare in male cells. To demarcate human dental pulp as an important identification tool of sex in forensic odontology (FO) and to evaluate the time period till which sex can be determined from pulp tissue using three stains H and E, Feulgen, and acridine - orange under fluorescence so as. Materials and Methods: 90 pulp samples (45 males and 45 females) were subjected to Barr body analysis for determination of sex using light and fluorescent microscopy. Results: Barr body was found to be positive for female samples and negative or rare in the male sample (<3%). Conclusion: Barr body from human dental pulp tissue can be used as a successful determinant of sex identification in FO. PMID:26668474

  5. The induction of heme oxygenase-1 modulates bismuth oxide-induced cytotoxicity in human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung-San; Chang, Hoon-Sang; Bae, Ji-Myung; Park, Sang-Hyuk; Hong, Chan-Ui; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic and nitric oxide (NO)-inducing effects of bismuth oxide (Bi(2)O(3))-containing Portland cement (BPC) on human dental pulp cells. We also assessed whether heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is involved in BPC-induced cytotoxicity in dental pulp cells. Cytotoxicity and NO production induced by BPC were higher than those induced by Portland cement at 12 and 24 hours, and the former gradually decreased to the level observed for PC. HO-1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA expressions in the BPC group showed maximal increase at 24 hours, and it gradually decreased with increasing cultivation time. Hemin treatment reversed the BPC-induced cytotoxicity, whereas zinc protoporphyrin IX treatment increased the cytotoxicity. These results suggested that NO production by BPC correlates with HO-1 expression in dental pulp cells. Moreover, BPC-induced HO-1 expression in dental pulp cells plays a protective role against the cytotoxic effects of BPC. PMID:17963960

  6. Ultrastructural characteristics of human adult and infant cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, W Y; Garey, L J

    1991-01-01

    Biopsy specimens of human cerebral cortex from three adults and two infants were studied by correlating their light microscopic features in semithin sections with their ultrastructural characteristics. There was good tissue preservation, due to a minimum delay between obtaining the specimens and fixation. Pyramidal cells had a prominent apical dendrite, fine heterochromatin clumps in the nucleus and generally small numbers of cytoplasmic organelles, except for numerous free ribosomes in some of the large pyramids of Layers III to VI. Non-pyramidal cells lacked an apical dendrite and were further classified, on size and ultrastructure, into small, medium and large types. Large numbers of asymmetrical and symmetrical synapses were present in the neuropil but very few axosomatic synapses were found in the human cerebral cortex compared with subhuman primates and other mammals. Some symmetrical synapses were characterised by the presence of wide pre- and postsynaptic densities. The same general features of the adult cortex were also encountered in the infant, with certain exceptions. Many of the infant neurons had less densely packed heterochromatin, but greater numbers of free ribosomes, compared with the adult, and lipofuscin was absent. There was a total absence of myelinated fibres from the infant cortex; more large diameter dendrites were present than in the adult and axosomatic synapses were commoner. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:2050578

  7. A comparison of the dental status and treatment needs of older adults with and without chronic mental illness in Sevilla, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Segura-Egea, Juan J.; Córdoba-Arenas, Sara; Jiménez-Guerra, Alvaro; Monsalve-Guil, Loreto; López-López, José

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To study the dental status and treatment needs of institutionalized older adults with chronic mental illness compared to a non-psychiatric control sample. Study Design: The sample size was 100, in which 50 were psychogeriatric patients (study group; SG) classified according to DSM-IV, with a mean age of 69.6 ± 6.7 years, and 50 non-psychiatric patients (control group; CG), with a mean age of 68.3 ± 6.9 years. Clinical oral health examinations were conducted and caries were recorded clinically using the Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth Index (DMFT). Results were analyzed statistically using the Student’s t-test or analysis of variance. Results: Caries prevalence was 58% and 62% in SG and CG, respectively. DMFT index was 28.3 ± 6.6 in SG and 21.4 ± 6.07 in CG (p < 0.01). Mean number of decayed teeth was higher in SG (3.1) compared to CG (1.8) (p=0.047). Mean number of missing teeth were 25.2 and 16.4 in SG and CG respectively (p<0.05). DMFT scores were higher in SG in all the age groups (p < 0.01). Mean number of teeth per person needing treatment was 3.4 in SG and 1.9 in CG (p= 0.037). The need for restorative dental care was significantly lower in the SG (0.8 teeth per person) than in the CG (1.7 teeth per person) (p = 0.043). Conclusions: Institutionalized psychiatric patients have significantly worse dental status and more dental treatment needs than non-psychiatric patients. Key words:Gerodontology, oral health, older adult, psychiatric patients, schizophrenia. PMID:23229258

  8. Nav1.7 expression is increased in painful human dental pulp

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Songjiang; Perry, Griffin M; Levinson, S Rock; Henry, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Background Animal studies and a few human studies have shown a change in sodium channel (NaCh) expression after inflammatory lesions, and this change is implicated in the generation of pain states. We are using the extracted human tooth as a model system to study peripheral pain mechanisms and here examine the expression of the Nav1.7 NaCh isoform in normal and painful samples. Pulpal sections were labeled with antibodies against: 1) Nav1.7, N52 and PGP9.5, and 2) Nav1.7, caspr (a paranodal protein used to identify nodes of Ranvier), and myelin basic protein (MBP), and a z-series of optically-sectioned images were obtained with the confocal microscope. Nav1.7-immunofluorescence was quantified in N52/PGP9.5-identified nerve fibers with NIH ImageJ software, while Nav1.7 expression in myelinated fibers at caspr-identified nodal sites was evaluated and further characterized as either typical or atypical as based on caspr-relationships. Results Results show a significant increase in nerve area with Nav1.7 expression within coronal and radicular fiber bundles and increased expression at typical and atypical caspr-identified nodal sites in painful samples. Painful samples also showed an augmentation of Nav1.7 within localized areas that lacked MBP, including those associated with atypical caspr-identified sites, thus identifying NaCh remodeling within demyelinating axons as the basis for a possible pulpal pain mechanism. Conclusion This study identifies the increased axonal expression and augmentation of Nav1.7 at intact and remodeling/demyelinating nodes within the painful human dental pulp where these changes may contribute to constant, increased evoked and spontaneous pain responses that characterize the pain associated with toothache. PMID:18426592

  9. A study on the promotion and suppression of demineralization of human dental hard tissues and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Odajima, T; Onishi, M

    1998-01-01

    Demineralization of human dental enamel and dentine and their analogue compound, hydroxyapatite, was examined by using pH-metry to measure the time-courses of neutralization of acetate, formate, lactate or propionate buffer solution or of acidification of EDTA solution. The extent of neutralization by enamel, dentine and hydroxyapatite was different for each acid but increased in the same order: propionate, acetate, lactate and formate. This order was consistent with that of the K values of these acids. The pH-metry was used to determine the influences of sodium chloride and sucrose on demineralization of enamel, dentine and hydroxyapatite by acetate, formate, lactate and propionate and by EDTA. The demineralization by these bioorganic acids was suppressed by sucrose but promoted by sodium chloride, except that the demineralization of enamel by acetate and propionate was little affected. The demineralization of enamel, dentine and hydroxyapatite by EDTA was little affected by sucrose but promoted by sodium chloride. The promotive effect of sodium chloride on demineralization may be due to the increasing of solubility product by this salt and the suppressive effect of sucrose may be due to the formation of a calcium saccharate formed from the sucrose reacted with calcium on the surface of apatite crystal and/or the reduction of solubility product by the sucrose. In this study, it was also ascertained that the use of pH-metry made it possible to determine easily the demineralization. PMID:11063021

  10. Effects of GPNMB on proliferation and odontoblastic differentiation of human dental pulp cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Liang; Hu, Ye-Jia; Zhang, Feng-He

    2015-01-01

    Glycoprotein (transmembrane) nonmetastatic melanoma protein b (GPNMB) plays crucial roles in odontogenesis. However, the role of GPNMB in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) is still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the expression and function of the GPNMB in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Cells were cultured in odontoblast differentiation-inducing medium; the expression of the GPNMB was assessed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We performed gene knockdown of GPNMB in hDPCs using lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA)-GPNMB. The proliferation of cells was measured by the MTT assay, and the differentiation of cells was detected with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay, qRT-PCR and Western blot were used to determine the expression levels of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1). The expression level of GPNMB was significantly increased during odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Suppression of GPNMB expression by siRNA-GPNMB obviously promoted the proliferation of hDPCs. Furthermore, siRNA-GPNMB significantly inhibited the activity of ALP and expression levels of DSPP and DMP-1 during odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Our results show that GPNMB plays an important role in regulating the expression of key pluripotency genes in hDPCs and modifying odontogenic differentiation. PMID:26261527

  11. Vitamin D Promotes Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells via ERK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Su-Mi; Lim, Hae-Soon; Jeong, Kyung-Yi; Kim, Seon-Mi; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D such as 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) is a well-known key regulatory factor in bone metabolism. However, little is known about the potential of vitamin D as an odontogenic inducer in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D3 metabolite, 1α,25(OH)2D3, on odontoblastic differentiation in HDPCs. HDPCs extracted from maxillary supernumerary incisors and third molars were directly cultured with 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the absence of differentiation-inducing factors. Treatment of HDPCs with 1α,25(OH)2D3 at a concentration of 10 nM or 100 nM significantly upregulated the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), the odontogenesis-related genes. Also, 1α,25(OH)2D3 enhanced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization in HDPCs. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), whereas the ERK inhibitor U0126 ameliorated the upregulation of DSPP and DMP1 and reduced the mineralization enhanced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. These results demonstrated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 promoted odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs via modulating ERK activation. PMID:26062551

  12. Effects of GPNMB on proliferation and odontoblastic differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Liang; Hu, Ye-Jia; Zhang, Feng-He

    2015-01-01

    Glycoprotein (transmembrane) nonmetastatic melanoma protein b (GPNMB) plays crucial roles in odontogenesis. However, the role of GPNMB in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) is still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the expression and function of the GPNMB in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Cells were cultured in odontoblast differentiation-inducing medium; the expression of the GPNMB was assessed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We performed gene knockdown of GPNMB in hDPCs using lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA)-GPNMB. The proliferation of cells was measured by the MTT assay, and the differentiation of cells was detected with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay, qRT-PCR and Western blot were used to determine the expression levels of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1). The expression level of GPNMB was significantly increased during odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Suppression of GPNMB expression by siRNA-GPNMB obviously promoted the proliferation of hDPCs. Furthermore, siRNA-GPNMB significantly inhibited the activity of ALP and expression levels of DSPP and DMP-1 during odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs. Our results show that GPNMB plays an important role in regulating the expression of key pluripotency genes in hDPCs and modifying odontogenic differentiation. PMID:26261527

  13. Derivation of iPSCs after Culture of Human Dental Pulp Cells under Defined Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Takeda-Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Ken; Chikusa, Shunji; Iida, Kazuki; Aoki, Hitomi; Tamaoki, Naritaka; Hatakeyama, Daijiro; Kunisada, Takahiro; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Fusaki, Noemi; Tezuka, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) are a promising resource for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and can be used for derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, current protocols use reagents of animal origin (mainly fetal bovine serum, FBS) that carry the potential risk of infectious diseases and unwanted immunogenicity. Here, we report a chemically defined protocol to isolate and maintain the growth and differentiation potential of hDPCs. hDPCs cultured under these conditions showed significantly less primary colony formation than those with FBS. Cell culture under stringently defined conditions revealed a donor-dependent growth capacity; however, once established, the differentiation capabilities of the hDPCs were comparable to those observed with FBS. DNA array analyses indicated that the culture conditions robustly altered hDPC gene expression patterns but, more importantly, had little effect on neither pluripotent gene expression nor the efficiency of iPSC induction. The chemically defined culture conditions described herein are not perfect serum replacements, but can be used for the safe establishment of iPSCs and will find utility in applications for cell-based regenerative medicine. PMID:25521610

  14. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction characterization of healthy and fluorotic human dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaço, M. V.; Barroso, R. C.; Porto, I. M.; Gerlach, R. F.; Costa, F. N.; Braz, D.; Droppa, R.; de Sousa, F. B.

    2012-10-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basic physical-chemistry reactions of demineralization and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction. All the scattering profile measurements were carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory—LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. X-ray diffraction experiments were performed both in powder samples and polished surfaces. The powder samples were analyzed to obtain the characterization of a typical healthy enamel pattern. The polished surfaces were analyzed in specific areas that have been identified as fluorotic ones. X-ray diffraction data were obtained for all samples and these data were compared with the control samples and also with the literature data.

  15. Nanofibrous spongy microspheres enhance odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Rong; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Jin, Xiaobing; Hu, Jiang; Gupte, Melanie J; Ni, Longxing; Ma, Peter X

    2015-09-16

    Dentin regeneration is challenging due to its complicated anatomical structure and the shortage of odontoblasts. In this study, a novel injectable cell carrier, nanofibrous spongy microspheres (NF-SMS), is developed for dentin regeneration. Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(l-lactic acid)-block-poly(l-lysine) are synthesized and fabricated into NF-SMS using self-assembly and thermally induced phase separation techniques. It is hypothesized that NF-SMS with interconnected pores and nanofibers can enhance the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), compared to nanofibrous microspheres (NF-MS) without pore structure and conventional solid microspheres (S-MS) with neither nanofibers nor pore structure. During the first 9 d in culture, hDPSCs proliferate significantly faster on NF-SMS than on NF-MS or S-MS (p < 0.05). Following in vitro odontogenic induction, all the examined odontogenic genes (alkaline phosphatase content, osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, collagen 1, dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP)), calcium content, and DSPP protein content are found significantly higher in the NF-SMS group than in the control groups. Furthermore, 6 weeks after subcutaneous injection of hDPSCs and microspheres into nude mice, histological analysis shows that NF-SMS support superior dentin-like tissue formation compared to NF-MS or S-MS. Taken together, NF-SMS have great potential as an injectable cell carrier for dentin regeneration. PMID:26138254

  16. The rate of RNA degradation in human dental pulp reveals post-mortem interval.

    PubMed

    Poór, Viktor S; Lukács, Dénes; Nagy, Tamás; Rácz, Evelin; Sipos, Katalin

    2016-05-01

    Post-mortem interval (PMI) is the amount of time elapsed since the time of death. Over the years, many methods were developed to assess PMI, but their precision and time frame of applicability are often limited. Our present pilot study aimed to prove if RNA degradation of human dental pulp can be used for PMI estimation. RNA was isolated from the pulps of healthy wisdom teeth and premolars. RNA degradation was determined as RNA integrity number (RIN) with Agilent Bioanalyzer and subsequently by amplification of different length products by PCR after reverse transcription. The RNA integrity analysis allowed us to determine the time of post-mortem interval with high confidence level in the first 21 days. With the PCR-based method, we were able to perform a crude estimation of incubation time of teeth between 20 and 42 days post extraction. These results show that this method might be a promising new tool for PMI estimation despite the limitations. PMID:26608472

  17. Genetic Comparison of Stemness of Human Umbilical Cord and Dental Pulp.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chung-Min; Kim, Hyunok; Song, Je Seon; Choi, Byung-Jai; Kim, Seong-Oh; Jung, Han-Sung; Moon, Seok-Jun; Choi, Hyung-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on gene expression patterns and functions in human umbilical cord (UC) and dental pulp (DP) containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). DP tissues were collected from 25 permanent premolars. UC tissue samples were obtained from three newborns. Comparative gene profiles were obtained using cDNA microarray analysis and the expression of tooth development-associated and MSC-related genes was assessed by the quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Genes related to cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and immune responses were expressed at higher levels in UC, whereas genes related to growth factor and receptor activity and signal transduction were more highly expressed in DP. Although UC and DP tissues exhibited similar expression of surface markers for MSCs, UC showed higher expression of CD29, CD34, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and CD166. qRT-PCR analysis showed that CD146, CD166, and MYC were expressed 18.3, 8.24, and 1.63 times more highly in UC, whereas the expression of CD34 was 2.15 times higher in DP. Immunohistochemical staining revealed significant differences in the expression of genes (DSPP, DMP1, and CALB1) related to odontogenesis and angiogenesis in DP. DP and UC tissue showed similar gene expression, with the usual MSC markers, while they clearly diverged in their differentiation capacity. PMID:27087814

  18. Genetic Comparison of Stemness of Human Umbilical Cord and Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chung-Min; Kim, Hyunok; Song, Je Seon; Choi, Byung-Jai; Kim, Seong-Oh; Jung, Han-Sung; Moon, Seok-Jun; Choi, Hyung-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on gene expression patterns and functions in human umbilical cord (UC) and dental pulp (DP) containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). DP tissues were collected from 25 permanent premolars. UC tissue samples were obtained from three newborns. Comparative gene profiles were obtained using cDNA microarray analysis and the expression of tooth development-associated and MSC-related genes was assessed by the quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Genes related to cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and immune responses were expressed at higher levels in UC, whereas genes related to growth factor and receptor activity and signal transduction were more highly expressed in DP. Although UC and DP tissues exhibited similar expression of surface markers for MSCs, UC showed higher expression of CD29, CD34, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and CD166. qRT-PCR analysis showed that CD146, CD166, and MYC were expressed 18.3, 8.24, and 1.63 times more highly in UC, whereas the expression of CD34 was 2.15 times higher in DP. Immunohistochemical staining revealed significant differences in the expression of genes (DSPP, DMP1, and CALB1) related to odontogenesis and angiogenesis in DP. DP and UC tissue showed similar gene expression, with the usual MSC markers, while they clearly diverged in their differentiation capacity. PMID:27087814

  19. Vitamin D Promotes Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells via ERK Activation.

    PubMed

    Woo, Su-Mi; Lim, Hae-Soon; Jeong, Kyung-Yi; Kim, Seon-Mi; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2015-07-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D such as 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) is a well-known key regulatory factor in bone metabolism. However, little is known about the potential of vitamin D as an odontogenic inducer in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D3 metabolite, 1α,25(OH)2D3, on odontoblastic differentiation in HDPCs. HDPCs extracted from maxillary supernumerary incisors and third molars were directly cultured with 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the absence of differentiation-inducing factors. Treatment of HDPCs with 1α,25(OH)2D3 at a concentration of 10 nM or 100 nM significantly upregulated the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), the odontogenesis-related genes. Also, 1α,25(OH)2D3 enhanced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization in HDPCs. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), whereas the ERK inhibitor U0126 ameliorated the upregulation of DSPP and DMP1 and reduced the mineralization enhanced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. These results demonstrated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 promoted odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs via modulating ERK activation. PMID:26062551

  20. Differential expression of basal microRNAs' patterns in human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vasanthan, Punitha; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Musa, Sabri; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2015-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate translation of mRNA into protein and play a crucial role for almost all biological activities. However, the identification of miRNAs from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), especially from dental pulp, is poorly understood. In this study, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were characterized in terms of their proliferation and differentiation capacity. Furthermore, 104 known mature miRNAs were profiled by using real-time PCR. Notably, we observed 19 up-regulated miRNAs and 29 significantly down-regulated miRNAs in DPSCs in comparison with bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs). The 19 up-regulated miRNAs were subjected to ingenuity analysis, which were composed into 25 functional networks. We have chosen top 2 functional networks, which comprised 10 miRNA (hsa-miR-516a-3p, hsa-miR-125b-1-3p, hsa-miR-221-5p, hsa-miR-7, hsa-miR-584-5p, hsa-miR-190a, hsa-miR-106a-5p, hsa-mir-376a-5p, hsa-mir-377-5p and hsa-let-7f-2-3p). Prediction of target mRNAs and associated biological pathways regulated by each of this miRNA was carried out. We paid special attention to hsa-miR-516a-3p and hsa-miR-7-5p as these miRNAs were highly expressed upon validation with qRT-PCR analysis. We further proceeded with loss-of-function analysis with these miRNAs and we observed that hsa-miR-516a-3p knockdown induced a significant increase in the expression of WNT5A. Likewise, the knockdown of hsa-miR-7-5p increased the expression of EGFR. Nevertheless, further validation revealed the role of WNT5A as an indirect target of hsa-miR-516a-3p. These results provide new insights into the dynamic role of miRNA expression in DPSCs. In conclusion, using miRNA signatures in human as a prediction tool will enable us to elucidate the biological processes occurring in DPSCs. PMID:25475098

  1. Differential expression of basal microRNAs’ patterns in human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Vasanthan, Punitha; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Musa, Sabri; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate translation of mRNA into protein and play a crucial role for almost all biological activities. However, the identification of miRNAs from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), especially from dental pulp, is poorly understood. In this study, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were characterized in terms of their proliferation and differentiation capacity. Furthermore, 104 known mature miRNAs were profiled by using real-time PCR. Notably, we observed 19 up-regulated miRNAs and 29 significantly down-regulated miRNAs in DPSCs in comparison with bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs). The 19 up-regulated miRNAs were subjected to ingenuity analysis, which were composed into 25 functional networks. We have chosen top 2 functional networks, which comprised 10 miRNA (hsa-miR-516a-3p, hsa-miR-125b-1-3p, hsa-miR-221-5p, hsa-miR-7, hsa-miR-584-5p, hsa-miR-190a, hsa-miR-106a-5p, hsa-mir-376a-5p, hsa-mir-377-5p and hsa-let-7f-2-3p). Prediction of target mRNAs and associated biological pathways regulated by each of this miRNA was carried out. We paid special attention to hsa-miR-516a-3p and hsa-miR-7-5p as these miRNAs were highly expressed upon validation with qRT-PCR analysis. We further proceeded with loss-of-function analysis with these miRNAs and we observed that hsa-miR-516a-3p knockdown induced a significant increase in the expression of WNT5A. Likewise, the knockdown of hsa-miR-7-5p increased the expression of EGFR. Nevertheless, further validation revealed the role of WNT5A as an indirect target of hsa-miR-516a-3p. These results provide new insights into the dynamic role of miRNA expression in DPSCs. In conclusion, using miRNA signatures in human as a prediction tool will enable us to elucidate the biological processes occurring in DPSCs. PMID:25475098

  2. Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells into Dopaminergic Neuron-like Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chun, So Young; Soker, Shay; Jang, Yu-Jin; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the potential of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons in vitro as an autologous stem cell source for Parkinson's disease treatment. The hDPSCs were expanded in knockout-embryonic stem cell (KO-ES) medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) on gelatin-coated plates for 3-4 days. Then, the medium was replaced with KO-ES medium without LIF to allow the formation of the neurosphere for 4 days. The neurosphere was transferred into ITS medium, containing ITS (human insulin-transferrin-sodium) and fibronectin, to select for Nestin-positive cells for 6-8 days. The cells were then cultured in N-2 medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), FGF-8b, sonic hedgehog-N, and ascorbic acid on poly-l-ornithine/fibronectin-coated plates to expand the Nestin-positive cells for up to 2 weeks. Finally, the cells were transferred into N-2/ascorbic acid medium to allow for their differentiation into dopaminergic neurons for 10-15 days. The differentiation stages were confirmed by morphological, immunocytochemical, flow cytometric, real-time PCR, and ELISA analyses. The expressions of mesenchymal stem cell markers were observed at the early stages. The expressions of early neuronal markers were maintained throughout the differentiation stages. The mature neural markers showed increased expression from stage 3 onwards. The percentage of cells positive for tyrosine hydroxylase was 14.49%, and the amount was 0.526 ± 0.033 ng/mL at the last stage. hDPSCs can differentiate into dopaminergic neural cells under experimental cell differentiation conditions, showing potential as an autologous cell source for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26839468

  3. Early transplantation of human immature dental pulp stem cells from baby teeth to golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs: Local or systemic?

    PubMed Central

    Kerkis, Irina; Ambrosio, Carlos E; Kerkis, Alexandre; Martins, Daniele S; Zucconi, Eder; Fonseca, Simone AS; Cabral, Rosa M; Maranduba, Carlos MC; Gaiad, Thais P; Morini, Adriana C; Vieira, Natassia M; Brolio, Marina P; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo A; Miglino, Maria A; Zatz, Mayana

    2008-01-01

    Background The golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs represent the best available animal model for therapeutic trials aiming at the future treatment of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have obtained a rare litter of six GRMD dogs (3 males and 3 females) born from an affected male and a carrier female which were submitted to a therapeutic trial with adult human stem cells to investigate their capacity to engraft into dogs muscles by local as compared to systemic injection without any immunosuppression. Methods Human Immature Dental Pulp Stem Cells (hIDPSC) were transplanted into 4 littermate dogs aged 28 to 40 days by either arterial or muscular injections. Two non-injected dogs were kept as controls. Clinical translation effects were analyzed since immune reactions by blood exams and physical scores capacity of each dog. Samples from biopsies were checked by immunohistochemistry (dystrophin markers) and FISH for human probes. Results and Discussion We analyzed the cells' ability in respect to migrate, engraftment, and myogenic potential, and the expression of human dystrophin in affected muscles. Additionally, the efficiency of single and consecutive early transplantation was compared. Chimeric muscle fibers were detected by immunofluorescence and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) using human antibodies and X and Y DNA probes. No signs of immune rejection were observed and these results suggested that hIDPSC cell transplantation may be done without immunosuppression. We showed that hIDPSC presented significant engraftment in GRMD dog muscles, although human dystrophin expression was modest and limited to several muscle fibers. Better clinical condition was also observed in the dog, which received monthly arterial injections and is still clinically stable at 25 months of age. Conclusion Our data suggested that systemic multiple deliveries seemed more effective than local injections. These findings open important avenues for further

  4. Indigenous hydroxyapatite coated and bioactive glass coated titanium dental implant system – Fabrication and application in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Surajit; Kundu, Debabrata; Datta, Someswar; Basu, Debabrata; Soundrapandian, Chidambaram

    2011-01-01

    Background: The use of different bioactive materials as coating on dental implant to restore tooth function is a growing trend in modern Dentistry. In the present study, hydroxyapatite and the bioactive glass-coated implants were evaluated for their behavior in osseous tissue following implantation in 14 patients. Materials and Methods: Bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite formulated and prepared for coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Hydroxyapatite coating was applied on the implant surface by air plasma spray technique and bioactive glass coating was applied by vitreous enameling technique. Their outcome was assessed after 6 months in vivo study in human. Results: Hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass coating materials were nontoxic and biocompatible. Uneventful healing was observed with both types of implants. Conclusion: The results showed bioactive glass is a good alternative coating material for dental implant. PMID:22028507

  5. The nutrition intervention improved adult human capital and economic productivity.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Reynaldo; Melgar, Paul; Maluccio, John A; Stein, Aryeh D; Rivera, Juan A

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews key findings about the long-term impact of a nutrition intervention carried out by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama from 1969 to 1977. Results from follow-up studies in 1988-89 and 2002-04 show substantial impact on adult human capital and economic productivity. The 1988-89 study showed that adult body size and work capacity increased for those provided improved nutrition through age 3 y, whereas the 2002-04 follow-up showed that schooling was increased for women and reading comprehension and intelligence increased in both men and women. Participants were 26-42 y of age at the time of the 2002-04 follow-up, facilitating the assessment of economic productivity. Wages of men increased by 46% in those provided with improved nutrition through age 2 y. Findings for cardiovascular disease risk factors were heterogeneous; however, they suggest that improved nutrition in early life is unlikely to increase cardiovascular disease risk later in life and may indeed lower risk. In conclusion, the substantial improvement in adult human capital and economic productivity resulting from the nutrition intervention provides a powerful argument for promoting improvements in nutrition in pregnant women and young children. PMID:20032473

  6. Dental wear patterns in early modern humans from Skhul and Qafzeh: A response to Sarig and Tillier.

    PubMed

    Fiorenza, Luca; Kullmer, Ottmar

    2015-10-01

    The use of teeth as tools for manipulating objects and simple food-processing methods was common among prehistoric and modern hunter-gatherer human populations. Paramasticatory uses of teeth frequently produce enamel chipping and distinctive types of dental wear that can readily be related to specific tool functions. In particular, the presence of unusual occlusal wear areas (named para-facets) on maxillary teeth of prehistoric, historic and modern hunter-gatherers has been associated with cultural habits involving extensive use of teeth (Fiorenza et al., 2011; Fiorenza and Kullmer, 2013). However, Sarig and Tillier (2014) believe that this wear had been caused by pathological occlusal relationships rather than by the use of teeth as tools. In this contribution, we show how occlusal contacts are created and how it is possible to distinguish between masticatory and non-masticatory wear facets by using an innovative digital approach called Occlusal Fingerprint Analysis. Statistical results from the analysis of comparative modern samples clearly demonstrate that described para-facets in Skhul and Qafzeh could not have been produced by dental occlusal anomalies such as malocclusions and crossbites. Moreover, dental pathologies in prehistoric humans were extremely rare. Only with the adoption of the modern lifestyle between 18th and 19th centuries, did the emergence of malocclusions become significantly more common. Because more than 50% of the Skhul and Qafzeh individuals analysed in our study are characterised by this distinctive type of wear, it is highly unlikely that their para-facets occurred as a result of dental pathologies. PMID:26048367

  7. How long have adult humans been consuming milk?

    PubMed

    Gerbault, Pascale; Roffet-Salque, Mélanie; Evershed, Richard P; Thomas, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down the milk sugar lactose, and in most mammals, including most humans, lactase activity is down-regulated after the weaning period is completed. However, in about 35% of adults worldwide, lactase continues to be expressed throughout adulthood, a feature termed lactase persistence (LP). Genetic evidence indicates that LP is a recent human adaptation, and its current geographic distribution correlates with the relative historical importance of dairying in different human populations. Investigating archaeological evidence for fresh milk consumption has proved crucial in building an account of the joint evolution of LP and dairying. A powerful technique for investigating food processing, including milk processing, in ancient populations is lipid residue analysis on archaeological pottery. We review here the archaeological and genetic evidence available that have contributed to a better understanding of the gene-culture co-evolution of LP and dairying. PMID:24339181

  8. Profiling the Secretome of Human Stem Cells from Dental Apical Papilla.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shi; Zhao, Yuming; Ma, Yushi; Ge, Lihong

    2016-03-15

    Recent studies have shown that secretion of bioactive factors from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) plays a primary role in MSC-mediated therapy; especially for bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs). MSCs from dental apical papilla (SCAPs) are involved in root development and may play a critical role in the formation of dentin and pulp. Bioactive factors secreted from SCAPs actively contribute to their environment; however, the SCAPs secretome remains unclear. To address this and gain a deeper understanding of the relevance of SCAPs secretions in a clinical setting, we used isobaric chemical tags and high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry to profile the secretome of human SCAPs and then compared it to that of BMSCs. A total of 2,046 proteins were detected from the conditioned medium of SCAPs, with a false discovery rate of less than 1.0%. Included were chemokines along with angiogenic, immunomodulatory, antiapoptotic, and neuroprotective factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The secreted levels of 151 proteins were found to differ by at least twofold when BMSCs and SCAPs were compared. Relative to BMSCs, SCAPs exhibited increased secretion of proteins that are involved in metabolic processes and transcription and lower levels of those associated with biological adhesion, developmental processes, and immune function. In addition, SCAPs secreted significantly larger amounts of chemokines and neurotrophins than BMSCs, whereas BMSCs secreted more ECM proteins and proangiogenic factors. These results may provide important clues regarding the molecular mechanisms associated with tissue regeneration and how they differ between cell sources. PMID:26742889

  9. Effect of dentin treatment on proliferation and differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minjeong; Pang, Nan-Sim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is an excellent bactericidal agent, but it is detrimental to stem cell survival, whereas intracanal medicaments such as calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2) promote the survival and proliferation of stem cells. This study evaluated the effect of sequential NaOCl and Ca[OH]2 application on the attachment and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Materials and Methods DPSCs were obtained from human third molars. All dentin specimens were treated with 5.25% NaOCl for 30 min. DPSCs were seeded on the dentin specimens and processed with additional 1 mg/mL Ca[OH]2, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment, file instrumentation, or a combination of these methods. After 7 day of culture, we examined DPSC morphology using scanning electron microscopy and determined the cell survival rate with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. We measured cell adhesion gene expression levels after 4 day of culture and odontogenic differentiation gene expression levels after 4 wk using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results DPSCs did not attach to the dentin in the NaOCl-treated group. The gene expression levels of fibronectin-1 and secreted phosphoprotein-1 gene in both the Ca[OH]2- and the EDTA-treated groups were significantly higher than those in the other groups. All Ca[OH]2-treated groups showed higher expression levels of dentin matrix protein-1 than that of the control. The dentin sialophosphoprotein level was significantly higher in the groups treated with both Ca[OH]2 and EDTA. Conclusions The application of Ca[OH]2 and additional treatment such as EDTA or instrumentation promoted the attachment and differentiation of DPSCs after NaOCl treatment. PMID:26587415

  10. Effects of extracts of Salvadora persica on proliferation and viability of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Fahimeh sadat; Moezizadeh, Maryam; Javand, Fateme

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Efficacy of an ideal antimicrobial agent depends on its ability to eliminate microorganisms while causing minimal toxicity to host cells. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of ethanolic and water extracts of Salvadora persica (SP) on proliferation and viability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, the effects of seven concentrations of ethanolic and water extracts of SP (ranging from 5.75 mg/ml to 0.08 mg/ml) on hDPSCs were evaluated using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Water extract of SP only had cytotoxic effect at 5.75 mg/ml concentration; and caused significant cell proliferation at 1.43-0.08 mg/ml concentrations at 24 h (P < 0.05). At 48 h, only 0.17 and 0.08 mg/ml concentrations caused significant cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Ethanolic extract of SP at 5.75-1.43 mg/ml concentrations showed severe cytotoxic effects at 24 and 48 h. Other concentrations had no significant effects on cells (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The highest concentrations of both water and ethanolic extracts of SP had cytotoxic effects on hDPSCs. Water extract of SP has favorable effects on cell proliferation at specific concentrations in a time-dependent manner. PMID:26180418

  11. Biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium silicate-based endodontic sealers in human dental pulp cells

    PubMed Central

    MESTIERI, Leticia Boldrin; GOMES-CORNÉLIO, Ana Lívia; RODRIGUES, Elisandra Márcia; SALLES, Loise Pedrosa; BOSSO-MARTELO, Roberta; GUERREIRO-TANOMARU, Juliane Maria; TANOMARU, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate-based material. New sealers have been developed based on calcium silicate as MTA Fillapex and MTA Plus. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility and bioactivity of these two calcium silicate-based sealers in culture of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Material and Methods The cells were isolated from third molars extracted from a 16-year-old patient. Pulp tissue was sectioned into fragments with approximately 1 mm3 and kept in supplemented medium to obtain hDPCs adherent cultures. Cell characterization assays were performed to prove the osteogenic potential. The evaluated materials were: MTA Plus (MTAP); MTA Fillapex (MTAF) and FillCanal (FC). Biocompatibility was evaluated with MTT and Neutral Red (NR) assays, after hDPCs exposure for 24 h to different dilutions of each sealer extract (1:2, 1:3 and 1:4). Unexposed cells were the positive control (CT). Bioactivity was assessed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzymatic assay in cells exposed for one and three days to sealer extracts (1:4 dilution). All data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post-test (p≤0.05%). Results MTT and NR results showed suitable cell viability rates for MTAP at all dilutions (90-135%). Cells exposed to MTAF and FC (1:2 and 1:4 dilutions) showed significant low viability rate when compared to CT in MTT. The NR results demonstrated cell viability for all materials tested. In MTAP group, the cells ALP activity was similar to CT in one and three days of exposure to the material. MTAF and FC groups demonstrated a decrease in ALP activity when compared to CT at both periods of cell exposure. Conclusions The hDPCs were suitable for the evaluation of new endodontic materials in vitro. MTAP may be considered a promising material for endodontic treatments. PMID:26537716

  12. An Optimized Injectable Hydrogel Scaffold Supports Human Dental Pulp Stem Cell Viability and Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T. D.; Kefi, A.; Sun, S.; Cho, M.; Alapati, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. HyStem-C™ is a commercially available injectable hydrogel composed of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), hyaluronan (HA), and gelatin (Gn). These components can be mechanically tuned to enhance cell viability and spreading. Methods. The concentration of PEGDA with an added disulfide bond (PEGSSDA) was varied from 0.5 to 8.0% (w/v) to determine the optimal concentration for injectable clinical application. We evaluated the cell viability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) embedded in 2% (w/v) PEGSSDA-HA-Gn hydrogels. Volume ratios of HA : Gn from 100 : 0 to 25 : 75 were varied to encourage hDPSC spreading. Fibronectin (Fn) was added to our model to determine the effect of extracellular matrix protein concentration on hDPSC behavior. Results. Our preliminary data suggests that the hydrogel gelation time decreased as the PEGSSDA cross-linker concentration increased. The PEGSSDA-HA-Gn was biocompatible with hDPSCs, and increased ratios of HA : Gn enhanced cell viability for 14 days. Additionally, cell proliferation with added fibronectin increased significantly over time at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 μg/mL in PEGDA-HA-Gn hydrogels, while cell spreading significantly increased at Fn concentrations of 0.1 μg/mL. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that PEG-based injectable hydrogels maintain hDPSC viability and facilitate cell spreading, mainly in the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. PMID:27294191

  13. Effects of epicatechin, a crosslinking agent, on human dental pulp cells cultured in collagen scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun-su; Lim, Myung-Jin; Min, Kyung-San; Kwon, Young-Sun; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Hong, Chan-Ui; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological effects of epicatechin (ECN), a crosslinking agent, on human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured in collagen scaffolds. Material and Method To evaluate the effects of ECN on the proliferation of hDPCs, cell counting was performed using optical and fluorescent microscopy. Measurements of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, alizarin red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to assess odontogenic differentiation. The compressive strength and setting time of collagen scaffolds containing ECN were measured. Differential scanning calorimetry was performed to analyze the thermal behavior of collagen in the presence of ECN. Results Epicatechin increased ALP activity, mineralized nodule formation, and the mRNA expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), a specific odontogenic-related marker. Furthermore, ECN upregulated the expression of DSPP in hDPCs cultured in collagen scaffolds. Epicatechin activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and the treatment with an ERK inhibitor (U0126) blocked the expression of DSPP. The compressive strength was increased and the setting time was shortened in a dose-dependent manner. The number of cells cultured in the ECN-treated collagen scaffolds was significantly increased compared to the cells in the untreated control group. Conclusions Our results revealed that ECN promoted the proliferation and differentiation of hDPCs. Furthermore, the differentiation was regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. Changes in mechanical properties are related to cell fate, including proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, our study suggests the ECN treatment might be desirable for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. PMID:27008260

  14. Matching the optical properties of direct esthetic dental restorative materials to those of human enamel and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragain, James Carlton, Jr.

    One of the goals of the restorative dentist is to restore the appearance of the natural dentition. Clinical matching of teeth and restorative materials are seldom accurate and shade selection techniques are subjective. The first specific aim of this research was to characterize the optical absorption and scattering that occurs within enamel, dentin, and composite resin and compomer restorative materials and to relate those phenomena to translucency and color. The second aim was to evaluate small color differences among composite restorative materials which would be detectable by humans. The last aim was to lay the foundation for developing an improved model of specifying layers of dental restorative materials in order to match the translucency and color to those of human enamel. The Kubelka-Munk theory was validated for enamel, dentin, and the restorative materials. These tissues and materials were then characterized in terms of their color parameters. Tooth cores were also characterized in terms of color space parameters. Human subjects were evaluated for their abilities to discriminate small color differences in the dental composite resin materials. The following conclusions were derived from this study: (1) Kubelka-Munk theory accurately predicts the diffuse reflectance spectra of enamel, dentin, and the direct esthetic dental restorative materials studied. (2) Scattering and absorption coefficients of the dental tissues and esthetic restorative materials can be directly calculated from diffuse reflectance measurements of a uniformly thick slab of tissue/material using black and white backings and the appropriate refractive index. (3) For tooth cores, there is a positive correlation between L* and b* and a negative correlation between L* and a*. (4) The range of translucency parameters for the restorative materials studied does not match those of enamel and dentin. (5) None of the shades of the dental composite resin restorative materials studied fit into the

  15. Novel management of acute or secondary biliary liver conditions using hepatically differentiated human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Ishkitiev, Nikolay; Yaegaki, Ken; Imai, Toshio; Tanaka, Tomoko; Fushimi, Naho; Mitev, Vanyo; Okada, Mio; Tominaga, Noriko; Ono, Sachie; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    The current definitive treatment for acute or chronic liver condition, that is, cirrhosis, is liver transplantation from a limited number of donors, which might cause complications after donation. Hence, bone marrow stem cell transplantation has been developed, but the risk of carcinogenesis remains. We have recently developed a protocol for hepatic differentiation of CD117(+) stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED). In the present study, we examine whether SHED hepatically differentiated (hd) in vitro could be used to treat acute liver injury (ALI) and secondary biliary cirrhosis. The CD117(+) cell fraction was magnetically separated from SHED and then differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. The cells were transplanted into rats with either ALI or induced secondary biliary cirrhosis. Engraftment of human liver cells was determined immunohistochemically and by in situ hybridization. Recovery of liver function was examined by means of histochemical and serological tests. Livers of transplanted animals were strongly positive for human immunohistochemical factors, and in situ hybridization confirmed engraftment of human hepatocytes. The tests for recovery of liver function confirmed the presence of human hepatic markers in the animals' blood serum and lack of fibrosis and functional integration of transplanted human cells into livers. No evidence of malignancy was found. We show that in vitro hdSHED engraft morphologically and functionally into the livers of rats having acute injury or secondary biliary cirrhosis. SHED are readily accessible adult stem cells, capable of proliferating in large numbers before differentiating in vitro. This makes SHED an appropriate and safe stem cell source for regenerative medicine. PMID:25234861

  16. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  17. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase production by human dental pulp stromal cells is enhanced by high density cell culture.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Matthew J; Dennis, Caitriona; Yang, Xuebin B; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    The cell surface hydrolase tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) (also known as MSCA-1) is used to identify a sub-population of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) with high mineralising potential and is found on subsets of cells within the dental pulp. We aim to determine whether TNAP is co-expressed by human dental pulp stromal cells (hDPSCs) alongside a range of BMSC markers, whether this is an active form of the enzyme and the effects of culture duration and cell density on its expression. Cells from primary dental pulp and culture expanded hDPSCs expressed TNAP. Subsequent analyses revealed persistent TNAP expression and co-expression with BMSC markers such as CD73 and CD90. Flow cytometry and biochemical assays showed that increased culture durations and cell densities enhanced TNAP expression by hDPSCs. Arresting the hDPSC cell cycle also increased TNAP expression. These data confirm that TNAP is co-expressed by hDPSCs together with other BMSC markers and show that cell density affects TNAP expression levels. We conclude that TNAP is a potentially useful marker for hDPSC selection especially for uses in mineralised tissue regenerative therapies. PMID:25636587

  18. Intravenous immune globulin use in patients with human immunodeficiency virus-related thrombocytopenia who require dental extraction.

    PubMed Central

    Rarick, M. U.; Burian, P.; de Guzman, N.; Espina, B.; Montgomery, T.; Jamin, D.; Levine, A. M.

    1991-01-01

    Five patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related immune thrombocytopenia who were undergoing dental extraction were treated with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG). All patients received IVIG, 1 gram per kg, the day before the dental extraction and again the day of the dental extraction. Four patients had a previous history of minor clinical bleeding. The median baseline platelet count before extraction was 20 X 10(9) per liter (range 13 to 44). The median peak platelet count was 100 X 10(9) per liter (range 56 to 528) following infusion. This peak response was achieved by day 2 in 3 patients and by days 5 and 7 in 1 patient each. No patients had complications or toxicity from the infusions or perioperative bleeding. No patients required blood product transfusions for the surgical procedure. In conclusion, IVIG infusion should be considered in patients with HIV-related immune thrombocytopenia requiring surgical procedures when a prompt rise in platelet count is desired. PMID:1812630

  19. Retrieving chronological age from dental remains of early fossil hominins to reconstruct human growth in the past

    PubMed Central

    Dean, M. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    A chronology of dental development in Pan troglodytes is arguably the best available model with which to compare and contrast reconstructed dental chronologies of the earliest fossil hominins. Establishing a time scale for growth is a requirement for being able to make further comparative observations about timing and rate during both dento-skeletal growth and brain growth. The absolute timing of anterior tooth crown and root formation appears not to reflect the period of somatic growth. In contrast, the molar dentition best reflects changes to the total growth period. Earlier initiation of molar mineralization, shorter crown formation times, less root length formed at gingival emergence into functional occlusion are cumulatively expressed as earlier ages at molar eruption. Things that are similar in modern humans and Pan, such as the total length of time taken to form individual teeth, raise expectations that these would also have been the same in fossil hominins. The best evidence there is from the youngest fossil hominin specimens suggests a close resemblance to the model for Pan but also hints that Gorilla may be a better developmental model for some. A mosaic of great ape-like features currently best describes the timing of early hominin dental development. PMID:20855313

  20. Manufacturing of dental pulp cell-based products from human third molars: current strategies and future investigations

    PubMed Central

    Ducret, Maxime; Fabre, Hugo; Degoul, Olivier; Atzeni, Gianluigi; McGuckin, Colin; Forraz, Nico; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Farges, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, mesenchymal cell-based products have been developed to improve surgical therapies aimed at repairing human tissues. In this context, the tooth has recently emerged as a valuable source of stem/progenitor cells for regenerating orofacial tissues, with easy access to pulp tissue and high differentiation potential of dental pulp mesenchymal cells. International guidelines now recommend the use of standardized procedures for cell isolation, storage and expansion in culture to ensure optimal reproducibility, efficacy and safety when cells are used for clinical application. However, most dental pulp cell-based medicinal products manufacturing procedures may not be fully satisfactory since they could alter the cells biological properties and the quality of derived products. Cell isolation, enrichment and cryopreservation procedures combined to long-term expansion in culture media containing xeno- and allogeneic components are known to affect cell phenotype, viability, proliferation and differentiation capacities. This article focuses on current manufacturing strategies of dental pulp cell-based medicinal products and proposes a new protocol to improve efficiency, reproducibility and safety of these strategies. PMID:26300779

  1. Manufacturing of dental pulp cell-based products from human third molars: current strategies and future investigations.

    PubMed

    Ducret, Maxime; Fabre, Hugo; Degoul, Olivier; Atzeni, Gianluigi; McGuckin, Colin; Forraz, Nico; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Farges, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, mesenchymal cell-based products have been developed to improve surgical therapies aimed at repairing human tissues. In this context, the tooth has recently emerged as a valuable source of stem/progenitor cells for regenerating orofacial tissues, with easy access to pulp tissue and high differentiation potential of dental pulp mesenchymal cells. International guidelines now recommend the use of standardized procedures for cell isolation, storage and expansion in culture to ensure optimal reproducibility, efficacy and safety when cells are used for clinical application. However, most dental pulp cell-based medicinal products manufacturing procedures may not be fully satisfactory since they could alter the cells biological properties and the quality of derived products. Cell isolation, enrichment and cryopreservation procedures combined to long-term expansion in culture media containing xeno- and allogeneic components are known to affect cell phenotype, viability, proliferation and differentiation capacities. This article focuses on current manufacturing strategies of dental pulp cell-based medicinal products and proposes a new protocol to improve efficiency, reproducibility and safety of these strategies. PMID:26300779

  2. Extreme Dental Compensation in an Adult Skeletal Class III Malocclusion: 3-Year Follow-up of a Successfully Compromised Treatment.

    PubMed

    Estelita, Sérgio; Janson, Guilherme; Chiqueto, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Nonsurgical orthodontic treatment of a patient with severe skeletal Class III malocclusion, negative overjet, increased overbite and maxillary crowding is described Although the treatment options included an orthodontic-surgical approach, high cost of the surgical procedure was the main reason for extreme dental compensation to have been performed. Four-premolar extraction protocol associated with intermaxillary Class III elastics were used to correct the malocclusion at the expense of increasing the initial dental compensation without producing any noticeable skeletal change. Satisfactory and stable occlusion was achieved with dental and smile esthetics improvement, but the amount of facial changes was limited by the nonsurgical protocol. The clinical results and implications of compensatory treatment as well as its relevance within the patient context are discussed based on scientific evidences. PMID:26349294

  3. Dental care - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems such as tooth decay and gum disease (periodontitis) . You should also teach your children how to ... Gingivitis , which are swollen, inflamed, and bleeding gums Periodontitis , is the destruction of the ligaments and bone ...

  4. Dental care - adult

    MedlinePlus

    Tooth decay and gum disease are caused by plaque, a sticky combination of bacteria and food. Plaque begins ... cleaned well each day, plaque will lead to tooth decay. If you do not remove plaque, it turns ...

  5. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness ( r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores ( r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness.

  6. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan.

    PubMed

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness (r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores (r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness. PMID:26715354

  7. Mandibular Jaw Bone Regeneration Using Human Dental Cell-Seeded Tyrosine-Derived Polycarbonate Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weibo; Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Shuang; Macri, Lauren; Kohn, Joachim; Yelick, Pamela C

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a new model for alveolar jaw bone regeneration, which uses human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) combined with tyrosine-derived polycarbonate polymer scaffolds [E1001(1k)] containing beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) [E1001(1k)/β-TCP]. E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds (5 mm diameter × 1 mm thickness) were fabricated to fit a 5 mm rat mandibular ramus critical bone defect. Five experimental groups were examined in this study: (1) E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds seeded with a high density of hDPCs, 5.0 × 10(5) hDPCs/scaffold (CH); (2) E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds seeded with a lower density of hDPCs, 2.5 × 10(5) hDPCs/scaffold (CL); (3) acellular E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds (SA); (4) acellular E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds supplemented with 4 μg recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP); and (5) empty defects (EDs). Replicate hDPC-seeded and acellular E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds were cultured in vitro in osteogenic media for 1 week before implantation for 3 and 6 weeks. Live microcomputed tomography (μCT) imaging at 3 and 6 weeks postimplantation revealed robust bone regeneration in the BMP implant group. CH and CL groups exhibited similar uniformly distributed mineralized tissue coverage throughout the defects, but less than the BMP implants. In contrast, SA-treated defects exhibited sparse areas of mineralized tissue regeneration. The ED group exhibited slightly reduced defect size. Histological analyses revealed no indication of an immune response. In addition, robust expression of dentin and bone differentiation marker expression was observed in hDPC-seeded scaffolds, whereas, in contrast, BMP and SA implants exhibited only bone and not dentin differentiation marker expression. hDPCs were detected in 3-week but not in 6-week hDPC-seeded scaffold groups, indicating their survival for at least 3 weeks. Together, these results show that hDPC-seeded E1001(1k)/β-TCP scaffolds support the rapid regeneration of osteo

  8. New immature hominin fossil from European Lower Pleistocene shows the earliest evidence of a modern human dental development pattern.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Martinón-Torres, María; Prado, Leyre; Gómez-Robles, Aida; Rosell, Jordi; López-Polín, Lucía; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; Carbonell, Eudald

    2010-06-29

    Here we present data concerning the pattern of dental development derived from the microcomputed tomography (microCT) study of a recently discovered immature hominin mandible with a mixed dentition recovered from the TD6 level of the Gran Dolina Lower Pleistocene cave site in Sierra de Atapuerca, northern Spain. These data confirm our previous results that nearly 1 million years ago at least one European hominin species had a fully modern pattern of dental development with a clear slowdown in the development of the molar field regarding the anterior dental field. Furthermore, using available information about enamel formation times and root extension rates in chimpanzees, early hominins, and modern humans, we have estimated that the formation time of the upper and lower first molars of individual 5 (H5) from TD6, which had just erupted at the time of the death of this individual, ranges between 5.3 and 6.6 y. Therefore, the eruption time of the first permanent molars (M1) in the TD6 hominins was within the range of variation of modern human populations. Because the time of M1 eruption in primates is a robust marker of life history, we suggest, as a working hypothesis, that these hominins had a prolonged childhood in the range of the variation of modern humans. If this hypothesis is true, it implies that the appearance in Homo of this important developmental biological feature and an associated increase in brain size preceded the development of the neocortical areas leading to the cognitive capabilities that are thought to be exclusive to Homo sapiens. PMID:20547843

  9. New immature hominin fossil from European Lower Pleistocene shows the earliest evidence of a modern human dental development pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Martinón-Torres, María; Prado, Leyre; Gómez-Robles, Aida; Rosell, Jordi; López-Polín, Lucía; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; Carbonell, Eudald

    2010-01-01

    Here we present data concerning the pattern of dental development derived from the microcomputed tomography (microCT) study of a recently discovered immature hominin mandible with a mixed dentition recovered from the TD6 level of the Gran Dolina Lower Pleistocene cave site in Sierra de Atapuerca, northern Spain. These data confirm our previous results that nearly 1 million years ago at least one European hominin species had a fully modern pattern of dental development with a clear slowdown in the development of the molar field regarding the anterior dental field. Furthermore, using available information about enamel formation times and root extension rates in chimpanzees, early hominins, and modern humans, we have estimated that the formation time of the upper and lower first molars of individual 5 (H5) from TD6, which had just erupted at the time of the death of this individual, ranges between 5.3 and 6.6 y. Therefore, the eruption time of the first permanent molars (M1) in the TD6 hominins was within the range of variation of modern human populations. Because the time of M1 eruption in primates is a robust marker of life history, we suggest, as a working hypothesis, that these hominins had a prolonged childhood in the range of the variation of modern humans. If this hypothesis is true, it implies that the appearance in Homo of this important developmental biological feature and an associated increase in brain size preceded the development of the neocortical areas leading to the cognitive capabilities that are thought to be exclusive to Homo sapiens. PMID:20547843

  10. Cohort Programming and Learning: Improving Educational Experiences for Adult Learners. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltiel, Iris M.; Russo, Charline S.

    This book, which is intended for adult educators and human resource developers, presents guidelines for using the principles of cohort programming and learning to improve adult learners' educational experiences. The following are among the topics covered in the book's eight chapters: (1) cohort programming and learning (cohort programs defined;…

  11. Assessing Adult Learning: A Guide for Practitioners. Revised Edition. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Joseph J.

    This book, which is intended for adult educators and human resource developers, presents guidelines for assessing adult learning. The following are among the topics covered in the book's eight chapters: (1) basic principles of informal assessment (relationship between learning and assessment activities; sequencing learning and assessment…

  12. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing surfaces of children’s back teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants ...

  13. Unique multipotent cells in adult human mesenchymal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Kitada, Masaaki; Wakao, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kouki; Tanimura, Yukihiro; Makinoshima, Hideki; Goda, Makoto; Akashi, Hideo; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Niwa, Akira; Shigemoto, Taeko; Nabeshima, Yoko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Dezawa, Mari

    2010-01-01

    We found adult human stem cells that can generate, from a single cell, cells with the characteristics of the three germ layers. The cells are stress-tolerant and can be isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells, or directly from bone marrow aspirates. These cells can self-renew; form characteristic cell clusters in suspension culture that express a set of genes associated with pluripotency; and can differentiate into endodermal, ectodermal, and mesodermal cells both in vitro and in vivo. When transplanted into immunodeficient mice by local or i.v. injection, the cells integrated into damaged skin, muscle, or liver and differentiated into cytokeratin 14-, dystrophin-, or albumin-positive cells in the respective tissues. Furthermore, they can be efficiently isolated as SSEA-3(+) cells. Unlike authentic ES cells, their proliferation activity is not very high and they do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mouse testes. Thus, nontumorigenic stem cells with the ability to generate the multiple cell types of the three germ layers can be obtained through easily accessible adult human mesenchymal cells without introducing exogenous genes. These unique cells will be beneficial for cell-based therapy and biomedical research. PMID:20421459

  14. Multipotent progenitor cells isolated from adult human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I; Nair, I; Ferreri, K; Rawson, J; Kuroda, A; Pascual, M; Omori, K; Valiente, L; Orr, C; Al-Abdullah, I; Riggs, A; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2005-10-01

    The supply of islet cells is a limiting factor for the widespread application of islet transplantation of type-1 diabetes. Islets constitute 1% to 2% of pancreatic tissue, leaving approximately 98% as discard after islet isolation and purification. In this report we present our data on the isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from discarded adult human pancreatic tissue. The collected cells from discarded nonislet fractions, after enzymatic digestion and gradient purification of islets, were dissociated for suspension culture in a serum-free medium. The cell clusters grown to a size of 100 to 150 mum contained cells staining for stage-specific embryonic antigens, but not insulin or C-peptide. To direct cell differentiation toward islets, clusters were recultured in a pancreatic differentiation medium. Insulin and C-peptide-positive cells by immunocytochemistry appeared within a week, reaching over 10% of the cell population. Glucagon and somatostatin-positive cells were also detected. The cell clusters were found to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Cells from the same clusters also had the capacity for differentiation into neural cells, as documented by staining for neural and glial cell markers when cultured as monolayers in media containing neurotrophic factors. These data suggest that multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells exist within the human pancreatic tissue that is typically discarded during islet isolation procedures. These adult progenitor cells can be successfully differentiated into insulin-producing cells, and thus they have the potential for treatment of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:16298614

  15. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laranjeira, Marta S.; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  16. Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells and Gingival Fibroblasts Seeded into Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Have the Same Ability in Attracting Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Woloszyk, Anna; Buschmann, Johanna; Waschkies, Conny; Stadlinger, Bernd; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.

    2016-01-01

    Neovascularization is one of the most important processes during tissue repair and regeneration. Current healing approaches based on the use of biomaterials combined with stem cells in critical-size bone defects fail due to the insufficient implant vascularization and integration into the host tissues. Therefore, here we studied the attraction, ingrowth, and distribution of blood vessels from the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane into implanted silk fibroin scaffolds seeded with either human dental pulp stem cells or human gingival fibroblasts. Perfusion capacity was evaluated by non-invasive in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging while the number and density of blood vessels were measured by histomorphometry. Our results demonstrate that human dental pulp stem cells and gingival fibroblasts possess equal abilities in attracting vessels within silk fibroin scaffolds. Additionally, the prolonged in vitro pre-incubation period of these two cell populations favors the homogeneous distribution of vessels within silk fibroin scaffolds, which further improves implant survival and guarantees successful healing and regeneration. PMID:27148078

  17. Measurement for natural dental neck data of normal adults and its clinical significance on guiding implant restoration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Junjun; Zhou, Chengyuan; Xia, Junnan; Qin, Hongwei; Yang, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Provide reference basis for the clinical implant restoration to select implant diameter through measuring each data of 7 teeth in the dental neck of bilateral upper and lower jaws of the young volunteers with normal dentition. Methods: Select 30 healthy young volunteers with complete dentition but no malocclusion, take cone beam CT (CBCT), measure the mesiodistal and buccolingual distance of the tooth root at 1.5 mm from 14 teeth (bilateral upper and lower jaws) to alveolar crest, trace out the outline of each tooth neck in this layer, calculate the cross sectional area and roundness of each tooth neck according to pixel value calibration, and then carry out statistical processing. Results: Complete the data collection and processing of mesiodistal length, buccolingual width, cross sectional area, and cross sectional roundness of the dental neck at 1.5 mm from these seven teeth of the bilateral upper and lower jaws to the alveolar crest of 30 volunteers, and calculate the mean value, variance, and reference value range of medical science of each index. Conclusion: CBCT can effectively obtain the image information of the dental neck. Through mimics 10.0 and Photoshop CS3, it is possible to accurately calculate the dental neck length and width, and cross sectional area of each tooth according to CBCT image information. This result can provide reference basis for the implant restoration of the clinical teeth. PMID:26628955

  18. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  19. Depletion of MEIS2 inhibits osteogenic differentiation potential of human dental stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhifang; Wang, Jinsong; Dong, Rui; Wang, Liping; Fan, Zhipeng; Liu, Dayong; Wang, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    Dental mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a reliable and promising cell source for the regeneration of tooth,bone and other tissues . However, the molecular mechanisms underlying their differentiation are still largely unknown, which restricts their further wide application. Here, we investigate regulatory function of homeobox gene MEIS2 in the osteogenic differentiation potential of MSCs using stem cells from apical papilla (SCAPs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) by loss-of-function experiments. Our findings demonstrated that knockdown of MEIS2 in SCAPs and DPSCs decreased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization, and inhibited the mRNA expression of ALP, bone sialoprotein (BSP), and osteocalcin (OCN). Besides, depletion of MEIS2 resulted in reduced expression of the key osteogenesis-related transcription factor, osterix (OSX) but not in the expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Furthermore, MEIS2 expression significantly increased during osteogenic induction and was strongly upregulated by BMP4 stimulation. Taken together, these results indicated that MEIS2 played an essential role in maintaining osteogenic differentiation potential of dental tissue- derived MSCs. These findings will provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying directed differentiation of MSCs, and identify a potential target gene in dental tissues derived MSCs for promoting the tissue regeneration. PMID:26221261

  20. Human amygdala activation by the sound produced during dental treatment: A fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Kun-Che; Hong, Hsiang-Hsi; Kuo, Song-Bor; Wu, Chung-De; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Yi-Fen; Peng, Ying-Chin

    2015-01-01

    During dental treatments, patients may experience negative emotions associated with the procedure. This study was conducted with the aim of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to visualize cerebral cortical stimulation among dental patients in response to auditory stimuli produced by ultrasonic scaling and power suction equipment. Subjects (n = 7) aged 23-35 years were recruited for this study. All were right-handed and underwent clinical pure-tone audiometry testing to reveal a normal hearing threshold below 20 dB hearing level (HL). As part of the study, subjects initially underwent a dental calculus removal treatment. During the treatment, subjects were exposed to ultrasonic auditory stimuli originating from the scaling handpiece and salivary suction instruments. After dental treatment, subjects were imaged with fMRI while being exposed to recordings of the noise from the same dental instrument so that cerebral cortical stimulation in response to aversive auditory stimulation could be observed. The independent sample confirmatory t-test was used. Subjects also showed stimulation in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, indicating that the ultrasonic auditory stimuli elicited an unpleasant response in the subjects. Patients experienced unpleasant sensations caused by contact stimuli in the treatment procedure. In addition, this study has demonstrated that aversive auditory stimuli such as sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece also cause aversive emotions. This study was indicated by observed stimulation of the auditory cortex as well as the amygdala, indicating that noise from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece was perceived as an aversive auditory stimulus by the subjects. Subjects can experience unpleasant sensations caused by the sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece based on their auditory stimuli. PMID:26356376

  1. Human amygdala activation by the sound produced during dental treatment: A fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Kun-Che; Hong, Hsiang-Hsi; Kuo, Song-Bor; Wu, Chung-De; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Yi-Fen; Peng, Ying-Chin

    2015-01-01

    During dental treatments, patients may experience negative emotions associated with the procedure. This study was conducted with the aim of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to visualize cerebral cortical stimulation among dental patients in response to auditory stimuli produced by ultrasonic scaling and power suction equipment. Subjects (n = 7) aged 23-35 years were recruited for this study. All were right-handed and underwent clinical pure-tone audiometry testing to reveal a normal hearing threshold below 20 dB hearing level (HL). As part of the study, subjects initially underwent a dental calculus removal treatment. During the treatment, subjects were exposed to ultrasonic auditory stimuli originating from the scaling handpiece and salivary suction instruments. After dental treatment, subjects were imaged with fMRI while being exposed to recordings of the noise from the same dental instrument so that cerebral cortical stimulation in response to aversive auditory stimulation could be observed. The independent sample confirmatory t-test was used. Subjects also showed stimulation in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, indicating that the ultrasonic auditory stimuli elicited an unpleasant response in the subjects. Patients experienced unpleasant sensations caused by contact stimuli in the treatment procedure. In addition, this study has demonstrated that aversive auditory stimuli such as sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece also cause aversive emotions. This study was indicated by observed stimulation of the auditory cortex as well as the amygdala, indicating that noise from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece was perceived as an aversive auditory stimulus by the subjects. Subjects can experience unpleasant sensations caused by the sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece based on their auditory stimuli. PMID:26356376

  2. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health. PMID:18478885

  3. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is...

  5. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is...

  8. Trends in Dentistry and Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valachovic, Richard W.; Weaver, Richard G.; Sinkford, Jeanne C.; Haden, N. Karl

    2001-01-01

    Compiled from many of the surveys that the American Dental Education Association routinely publishes, along with data from surveys conducted by the American Dental Association and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, presents statistical tables and descriptive text on trends among dental patients, among dental practitioners, and in dental…

  9. Composition of Mineral Produced by Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Volponi, A.A.; Gentleman, E.; Fatscher, R.; Pang, Y.W.Y.; Gentleman, M.M.; Sharpe, P.T.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different dental tissues have been described to have osteogenic/odontogenic-like differentiation capacity, but little attention has been paid to the biochemical composition of the material that each produces. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to analyze the mineralized materials produced in vitro by different dental cell populations, and we compared them with the biochemical composition of native dental tissues. We show that different dental stem cell populations produce materials that differ in their mineral and matrix composition and that these differ from those of native dental tissues. In vitro, BCMP (bone chip mass population), SCAP (stem cells from apical papilla), and SHED (stem cells from human-exfoliated deciduous teeth) cells produce a more highly mineralized matrix when compared with that produced by PDL (periodontal ligament), DPA (dental pulp adult), and GF (gingival fibroblast) cells. Principal component analyses of Raman spectra further demonstrated that the crystallinity and carbonate substitution environments in the material produced by each cell type varied, with DPA cells, for example, producing a more carbonate-substituted mineral and with SCAP, SHED, and GF cells creating a less crystalline material when compared with other dental stem cells and native tissues. These variations in mineral composition reveal intrinsic differences in the various cell populations, which may in turn affect their specific clinical applications. PMID:26253190

  10. The Biomechanics of the Pediatric and Adult Human Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J.; Lau, Sabrina; Riley, Patrick; Lamp, John; Kent, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of literature points out the relevance of the thoracic spine dynamics in understanding the thorax-restraint interaction as well as in determining the kinematics of the head and cervical spine. This study characterizes the dynamic response in bending of eight human spinal specimens (4 pediatric: ages 7 and 15 years, 4 adult: ages 48 and 52 years) from two sections along the thoracic spine (T2–T4 and T7–T9). Each specimen consisted of three vertebral bodies connected by the corresponding intervertebral discs. All ligaments were preserved in the preparation with the exception of the inter-transverse ligament. Specimens were exposed to a series of five dynamic bending ramp-and-hold tests with varying amplitudes at a nominal rate of 2 rad/s. After this battery of tests, failure experiments were conducted. The 7-year-old specimen showed the lowest tolerance to a moment (T2–T4: 12.1 Nm; T7–T9: 11.6 Nm) with no significant reduction of the relative rotation between the vertebrae. The 15-year-old failure tolerance was comparable to that of the adult specimens. Failure of the adult specimens occurred within a wide range at the T2–T4 thoracic section (23.3 Nm- 53.0 Nm) while it was circumscribed to the interval 48.3 Nm-52.5 Nm for the T7–T9 section. The series of dynamic ramp-and-hold were used to assess two different scaling methods (mass scaling and SAE scaling). Neither method was able to capture the stiffness, peak moment and relaxation characteristics exhibited by the pediatric specimens. PMID:22105396

  11. Gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in human adults.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Manasi; Bhatia, Renu; Mathur, Rashmi

    2007-01-01

    Sweet, palatable substances such as sucrose are reported to calm infants undergoing routine investigative procedures. The analgesic effect persists in pre pubertal children and adults with a hint of gender dependent variation in the analgesic response. The present study was therefore designed to explore gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in adult volunteers utilizing the nociceptive flexion reflex, an objective tool for pain assessment. Nociceptive flexion reflex was recorded, both before and after (up to 15 min) ingestion of 100 ml of 25% sucrose solution in 6 male and 6 female volunteers. In the male volunteers the maximum amplitude of the response was 20.8 +/- 7.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 22.6 +/- 9.1 microV, 6.6 +/- 0.7 microV, 6.2 +/- 1.1 microV, 7.5 +/- 0.9 microV at 0, 5, 10 and 15 minutes post sucrose ingestion respectively. In female volunteers, the maximum amplitude of the response was 33.7 +/- 17.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 43.6 +/- 17.2 microV, 7.1 +/- 1.2 microV, 25.9 +/- 16.1 microV, 50.6 +/- 16.3 microV at the same time intervals post sucrose ingestion. The maximum amplitude values were significantly lower in the males at 10 and 15 minutes after sucrose ingestion (P < 0.05). This is the first objective report of gender specificity in sucrose induced analgesia in adult humans. The gender dependent variation in sucrose induced analgesia is prolonged in male (15 min) and short lived in female (5 min) volunteers. This knowledge may have important implications in pain management. PMID:18476396

  12. Overexpression of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Human Dental Pulp Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tancharoen, Salunya; Tengrungsun, Tassanee; Suddhasthira, Theeralaksna; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Vechvongvan, Nuttavun; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nonhistone DNA-binding protein, is released into the extracellular space and promotes inflammation. HMGB1 binds to related cell signaling transduction receptors, including receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which actively participate in vascular and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the pathogenesis of pulpitis and investigate the effect of Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on RAGE and HMGB1 expression in odontoblast-like cells (OLC-1). RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in clinically inflamed dental pulp were higher than those in healthy dental pulp. Upregulated expression of RAGE was observed in odontoblasts, stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells, and endothelial-like cell lining human pulpitis tissue. Strong cytoplasmic HMGB1 immunoreactivity was noted in odontoblasts, whereas nuclear HMGB1 immunoreactivity was seen in stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells in human pulpitis tissue. LPS stimulated OLC-1 cells produced HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner through RAGE. HMGB1 translocation towards the cytoplasm and secretion from OLC-1 in response to LPS was inhibited by TPCA-1, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that RAGE and HMGB1 play an important role in the pulpal immune response to oral bacterial infection. PMID:25114379

  13. In vitro osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and human dental pulp stem cells on poly-L-lysine-treated titanium-6-aluminium-4-vanadium.

    PubMed

    Galli, Daniela; Benedetti, Laura; Bongio, Matilde; Maliardi, Valentina; Silvani, Giulia; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Ronzoni, Flavio; Conte, Silvio; Benazzo, Francesco; Graziano, Antonio; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; De Angelis, Maria Gabriella Cusella

    2011-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) titanium-6-aluminium-4-vanadium (Ti6Al4V) is a widely used biomaterial for orthopedic prosthesis and dental implants; thanks to its very high-mechanical strength and resistance to corrosion. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are responsible for bone regeneration following colonization of prosthesis or dental implants. Both hMSCs and hDPSCs have lower ability to colonize this biomaterial in comparison with tissue culture-treated plastic. Both hMSCs and hDPSCs show lack of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation when grown on Ti6Al4V. This signal is restored in the presence of poly-L-lysine (poly-L-lys). Poly-L-lys has been used as part of organoapatite or together with zinc and calcium ions. Our results suggest that poly-L-lys alone induces FAK activation through β1-INTEGRIN, because the presence of β1-INTEGRIN blocking antibody avoided FAK autophosphorylation. Presence of poly-L-lys also increases expression of osteoblastic differentiation marker genes in hMSCs and hDPSCs grown on Ti6Al4V. PMID:21370441

  14. Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) expressed in human dental pulp mediates IL-1β secretion in response to cytoplasmic DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuheng; Song, Zhi; Jiang, Lan; Chen, Lingling; Wang, Runfu; Qin, Wei; Liu, Pengcheng; Lin, Zhengmei

    2015-04-01

    The inflammasome has been determined to play an important role in inflammatory diseases in recent years. Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2), an inflammasome that recognizes cytoplasmic DNA, has recently been identified as a critical regulator of immune responses. In this study, we explored whether AIM2 was expressed in human dental pulp and defined the role of AIM2 in regulating interleukin (IL)-1β secretion. We demonstrated that AIM2 was only detected in the odontoblast layer of healthy dental pulp, whereas strong expression was observed in inflamed dental pulp. Stimulation with interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and cytoplasmic DNA significantly activated the AIM2 inflammasome and increased IL-1β secretion in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the knockdown of AIM2 downregulated both cleaved-caspase-1 expression and IL-1β release in HDPCs. These results suggest that AIM2 expressed in human dental pulp plays an important role in the immune defense by activating the inflammasome signaling pathway. PMID:24986444

  15. 38 CFR 52.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dental services. 52.170... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.170 Dental services. (a) Program... (2) By arranging for transportation to and from the dental services. (b) Program management...

  16. 38 CFR 52.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dental services. 52.170... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.170 Dental services. (a) Program... (2) By arranging for transportation to and from the dental services. (b) Program management...

  17. 38 CFR 52.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dental services. 52.170... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.170 Dental services. (a) Program... (2) By arranging for transportation to and from the dental services. (b) Program management...

  18. 38 CFR 52.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dental services. 52.170... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.170 Dental services. (a) Program... (2) By arranging for transportation to and from the dental services. (b) Program management...

  19. 38 CFR 52.170 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dental services. 52.170... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.170 Dental services. (a) Program... (2) By arranging for transportation to and from the dental services. (b) Program management...

  20. An in vitro study of the microstructure, composition and nanoindentation mechanical properties of remineralizing human dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsecularatne, J. A.; Hoffman, M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the results of an in vitro investigation on the interrelations among microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of remineralizing human dental enamel. Polished enamel samples have been demineralized for 10 min in an acetic acid solution (at pH 3) followed by remineralization in human saliva for 30 and 120 min. Microstructure variations of sound, demineralized and remineralized enamel samples have been analysed using focused ion beam, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, while their compositions have been analysed using energy dispersive x-ray. Variations in the mechanical properties of enamel samples have been assessed using nanoindentation. The results reveal that, under the selected conditions, only partial remineralization of the softened enamel surface layer occurs where some pores remain unrepaired. As a result, while the nanoindentation elastic modulus shows an improvement following remineralization, hardness does not.

  1. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés; Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Salas-Pérez, José; Gómez-Sánchez, Rafael; Aguilar, Mariano; Aguilar, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA)—assessed implant stability (ISQ values) with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP) (n = 7) or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA) (n = 10). Sixty 4.5 × 13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA) (P < 0.001), but not of the implants (P = 0.455) or of the interaction of the two factors (P = 0.848). Bonferroni post hoc comparisons showed a lower mean ISQ for implants in decalcified (50.33 ± 2.92) heads than in fresh (66.93 ± 1.10) or fixated (70.77 ± 1.32) heads (both P < 0.001). The ISQ score (fresh) was significantly higher for those in OA (73.52 ± 1.92) versus OP (67.13 ± 1.09) heads. However, mixed linear analysis showed no significant association between ISQ scores and morphologic or histomorphometric results (P > 0.5 in all cases), and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P > 0.08). Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA). This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies. PMID:24995307

  2. Induced overexpression of Oct4A in human dental pulp cells enhances pluripotency and multilineage differentiation capability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Wu, Lijing; Wei, Xi; Ling, Junqi

    2015-04-15

    Octamer-binding transcription factor 4A (Oct4A), one of the three spliced variants of the class V of POU transcription factor family, is mainly expressed in the nucleus of undifferentiated cells and serves as the key regulator for the maintenance of pluripotency and self-renewal. However, its specific role in regulating pluripotency and multilineage differentiation potential of dental pulp cells (DPCs) remains unknown. To explore the effect of Oct4A on pluripotency and multilineage differentiation capability of DPCs, expression of Oct4A in human dental pulp tissue and pluripotent markers Oct4A, Sox2, c-Myc, Nanog, and Klf4 in DPCs with prolonged in vitro culture were examined by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescent staining. Oct4A transfection rate in DPCs with lentivirus was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot. Cell proliferation, multilineage differentiation, and the expression of Oct4B1, Sox2, Nanog, Klf4, c-Myc, and Utf1 in DPCs after Oct4A transfection were detected by cell counting kit-8, Alizarin red/Oil red O staining, immunofluorescent staining, alkaline phosphatase analysis, and real-time PCR. We demonstrated that Oct4A was mainly expressed in the nucleus of odontoblasts in dental pulp tissue. Oct4A, Sox2, c-Myc, Nanog, and Klf4 were primarily located in the nucleus of DPCs at early passage (passage 1) and translocated to cytoplasm at late passage (passage 7). In DPCs with Oct4A overexpression, Oct4A, Oct4B1, Sox2, Nanog, Klf4, c-Myc, and Utf1 were significantly upregulated (p<0.05) and the cell proliferation (p<0.05), odontogenic and adipogenic differentiation were significantly enhanced. Taken together, Oct4A plays a critical role in regulation of cell proliferation, pluripotency, and multilineage differentiation potential of DPCs. PMID:25422984

  3. Genomic library screening for viruses from the human dental plaque revealed pathogen-specific lytic phage sequences.

    PubMed

    Al-Jarbou, Ahmed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenesis presents an astounding arsenal of virulence factors that allow them to conquer many different niches throughout the course of infection. Principally fascinating is the fact that some bacterial species are able to induce different diseases by expression of different combinations of virulence factors. Nevertheless, studies aiming at screening for the presence of bacteriophages in humans have been limited. Such screening procedures would eventually lead to identification of phage-encoded properties that impart increased bacterial fitness and/or virulence in a particular niche, and hence, would potentially be used to reverse the course of bacterial infections. As the human oral cavity represents a rich and dynamic ecosystem for several upper respiratory tract pathogens. However, little is known about virus diversity in human dental plaque which is an important reservoir. We applied the culture-independent approach to characterize virus diversity in human dental plaque making a library from a virus DNA fraction amplified using a multiple displacement method and sequenced 80 clones. The resulting sequence showed 44% significant identities to GenBank databases by TBLASTX analysis. TBLAST homology comparisons showed that 66% was viral; 18% eukarya; 10% bacterial; 6% mobile elements. These sequences were sorted into 6 contigs and 45 single sequences in which 4 contigs and a single sequence showed significant identity to a small region of a putative prophage in the Corynebacterium diphtheria genome. These findings interestingly highlight the uniqueness of over half of the sequences, whilst the dominance of a pathogen-specific prophage sequences imply their role in virulence. PMID:21969025

  4. Human herpesvirus 7 is a constitutive inhabitant of adult human saliva.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, L S; Frenkel, N

    1992-01-01

    We report the frequent isolation of human herpesvirus 7 from the saliva of healthy adults. Virus isolates recovered from different individuals exhibited minimal restriction enzyme polymorphism, which was mostly confined to heterogeneous (het) sequences in the genome. DNAs of isolates recovered from the same individual over a period of several months showed the same characteristic het fragments, indicating the stability of the het sequences upon virus replication and shedding in vivo. In contrast to the results of previous reports, human herpesvirus 6, the causative agent of roseola infantum, could not be isolated from the saliva specimens, raising questions regarding oral transmission of human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 to young children. Images PMID:1348548

  5. Exchange delays and impulsive choice in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Hyten, C; Madden, G J; Field, D P

    1994-09-01

    Choice responding by adult humans in a discrete-trial task was examined as a function of conditions that manipulated either the delay to point delivery or the delay between points and their exchange for money. In point-delay conditions, subjects chose between an "impulsive" alternative that provided a small amount of points immediately and a "self-control" alternative that provided a larger amount of points delayed by 15, 30, or 60 s. Points were exchanged for money immediately following the session. Subjects preferred the self-control alternative. In exchange-delay conditions, subjects chose between a small amount of points exchangeable for money immediately following the session and a larger amount of points exchangeable for money after 1 day, 3 weeks, or 6 weeks. A self-control preference observed for all subjects in the 1-day exchange-delay condition reversed to exclusive impulsive preference for 4 of the 6 subjects when choice conditions involved exchange delays of 3 or 6 weeks. These results show that human choice is sensitive to the manipulation of exchange delays and that impulsive preference can be obtained with exchange delays on the order of weeks. PMID:7964366

  6. Simultaneous characterization of progenitor cell compartments in adult human liver.

    PubMed

    Porretti, Laura; Cattaneo, Alessandra; Colombo, Federico; Lopa, Raffaella; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Battiston, Carlo; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Bertolini, Francesco; Rebulla, Paolo; Prati, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The human liver is a complex tissue consisting of epithelial, endothelial, hematopoietic, and mesenchymal elements that probably derive from multiple lineage-committed progenitors, but no comprehensive study aimed at identifying and characterizing intrahepatic precursors has yet been published. Cell suspensions for this study were obtained by enzymatic digestion of liver specimens taken from 20 patients with chronic liver disease and 13 multiorgan donors. Stem and progenitor cells were first isolated, amplified, and characterized ex vivo according to previously validated methods, and then optimized flow cytometry was used to assess their relative frequencies and characterize their immunophenotypes in the clinical specimens. Stem and progenitor cells committed to hematopoietic, endothelial, epithelial, and mesenchymal lineages were clearly identifiable in livers from both healthy and diseased subjects. Within the mononuclear liver cell compartment, epithelial progenitors [epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)(+)/CD49f(+)/CD29(+)/CD45(-)] accounted for 2.7-3.5% whereas hematopoietic (CD34(+)/CD45(+)), endothelial [vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (KDR)(+)/CD146(+)/CD45(-)], and mesenchymal [CD73(+)/CD105(+)/CD90 (Thy-1)(+)/CD45 (-)] stem cells and progenitors accounted for smaller fractions (0.02-0.6%). The patients' livers had higher percentages of hematopoietic and endothelial precursors than those of the donors. In conclusion, we identified and characterized precursors committed to four different lineages in adult human liver. We also optimized a flow cytometry approach that will be useful in exploring the contribution of these cells to the pathogenesis of liver disease. PMID:19960544

  7. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.

  8. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection.more » Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.« less

  9. Ossified Ligamentum Longitudinale Anterius in Adult Human Dry Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Venumadhav, Nelluri; KS, Siddaraju

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ligamentum longitudinale anterius is a broad and strong band of fibrous tissue that runs along the anterior surfaces of the bodies of the vertebrae. Aim: The study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius in adult dry human vertebra. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 95 sets of dry human vertebral columns irrespective of age and sex at Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences- Barabanki,-UP, Melaka Manipal Medical College-Manipal University and Department of Anatomy, KMCT Medical College, Manassery- Calicut, India. All the sets of vertebral columns were macroscopically inspected for the ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius. Results: It was observed that out of 95 sets of vertebral columns, 27 (28.42%) vertebral columns showed ossification. Out of 27 vertebral columns, 17 (17.89%) vertebral columns showed segmental type of ossification, 2 (2.11%) vertebral columns showed continuous type of ossification and 8 (8.42%) vertebral columns showed mixed type of ossification at different vertebral level. Conclusion: Such type of ossification will affect the biomechanics of the spine and may result in stiff neck, low back pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, compression of the brachial plexus, aphonia, immobility or mucosal thickening of larynx. Hence, knowledge of such abnormalities should be kept in mind to minimise serious complications in any surgical intervention or investigative procedures in the region. PMID:25302180

  10. Methacryloxylethyl Cetyl Ammonium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Human Dental Pulp Cells via Generation of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Sun, Jinlong; Chen, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    The polymerizable antibacterial monomer methacryloxylethyl cetyl ammonium chloride (DMAE-CB) has provided an effective strategy to combat dental caries. However, the application of such material raises the question about the biological safety and the question remains open. The mechanism of this toxic action, however, is not yet clearly understood. The present study aims at providing novel insight into the possible causal link between cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as apoptosis in human dental pulp cells exposed to DMAE-CB. The enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of glutathione, as well as differential changes in activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in DMAE-CB-treated cells indicated oxidative stress. By using substances that can alter GSH synthesis, we found that GSH was the key component in the regulation of cell response towards oxidative stress induced by DMAE-CB. The increase in oxidative stress-sensitive 8-Oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content, formation of γ-H2AX and cell cycle G1 phase arrest indicated that DNA damage occurred as a result of the interaction between DNA base and ROS beyond the capacities of antioxidant mechanisms in cells exposed to DMAE-CB. Such oxidative DNA damage thus triggers the activation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signaling, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and destruction of mitochondrial morphology and function. PMID:27143955

  11. Influence of buffered and unbuffered acetylsalicylic acid on dental enamel and dentine in human teeth: an in vitro pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rogalla, K; Finger, W; Hannig, M

    1992-06-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to investigate the erosive effect of buffered and unbuffered acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on dental enamel and dentine in human teeth by scanning electron microscopy. In order to standardize the specimens and to improve comparability the dental enamel and dentine were superficially abraded. The enamel and dentine specimens were therefore particularly sensitive to the influences of acid agents. Concentrated solution of buffered chewable ASA tablets (500 mg ASA and 300 mg calcium carbonate in 5 ml water) showed no changes in the enamel surface structure after exposure times of 1 min, 5 min and 60 min. In contrast, minimal corrosive effects were already seen after exposure of the enamel surface to the unbuffered ASA solutions for 1 min. After exposure times of 5 min and 60 min erosion of the enamel was more pronounced. Immersion in the unbuffered ASA solution led to clearly visible micromorphological changes on the dentine surfaces even after exposure for 1 min. Exposure of the dentine specimens to the buffered ASA solutions led to only very slight changes in the surface morphology. Therefore, the scanning electron micrograph after exposure to buffered ASA is comparable to the picture of untreated dentine. PMID:1513188

  12. Methacryloxylethyl Cetyl Ammonium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Human Dental Pulp Cells via Generation of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Sun, Jinlong; Chen, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    The polymerizable antibacterial monomer methacryloxylethyl cetyl ammonium chloride (DMAE-CB) has provided an effective strategy to combat dental caries. However, the application of such material raises the question about the biological safety and the question remains open. The mechanism of this toxic action, however, is not yet clearly understood. The present study aims at providing novel insight into the possible causal link between cellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as apoptosis in human dental pulp cells exposed to DMAE-CB. The enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of glutathione, as well as differential changes in activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in DMAE-CB-treated cells indicated oxidative stress. By using substances that can alter GSH synthesis, we found that GSH was the key component in the regulation of cell response towards oxidative stress induced by DMAE-CB. The increase in oxidative stress-sensitive 8-Oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content, formation of γ-H2AX and cell cycle G1 phase arrest indicated that DNA damage occurred as a result of the interaction between DNA base and ROS beyond the capacities of antioxidant mechanisms in cells exposed to DMAE-CB. Such oxidative DNA damage thus triggers the activation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signaling, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and destruction of mitochondrial morphology and function. PMID:27143955

  13. The Effect of NRAGE on cell cycle and apoptosis of human dental pulp cells and MDPC-23

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Qi, Shengcai; Ma, Ji; Chen, Fubo; Chen, Jing; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yuanzhi; Pan, Qiuhui; Wang, Raorao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Neurotrophin receptor-mediated melanoma antigen-encoding gene homology (NRAGE) is an important regulator of proliferation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our previous study showed that NRAGE is an important regulator of proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of mouse dental pulp cells. This study aimed to investigate the effects of NRAGE on the cell cycle and apoptosis on human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) and MDPC-23. Materials and methods: Cells were infected by recombinant lentivirus to stably knockdown the expression of NRAGE, then the biological effects of NRAGE on the MDPC-23 was detected. The cell cycle distributions and apoptosis of hDPCs and MCPC-23 were performed by flow cytometric analysis. Simultaneously, the cell cycle and apoptosis were also detected after cells treated with IKK inhibitor. Results: The mRNA and protein levels of NRAGE decreased significantly after infected by recombinant lentivirus. Knockdown of NRAGE inhibited the apoptosis in hDPCs and MCPC-23. Knockdown of NRAGE show significantly G0G1 arrest in hDPCs, while no significantly difference in MDPC-23. Meanwhile, Knockdown of NRAGE activated the NF-κB signaling pathway. After treated with IKK inhibitor, the effect of NRAGE knockdown on apoptosis was reversed in both hDPCs and MDPC-23. Conclusion: NRAGE is a potent regulator for cell cycle and apoptosis of hDPCs. Knockdown of NRAGE inhibited apoptosis of hDPCs and MDPC-23 through the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26379857

  14. Bacteria and archaea paleomicrobiology of the dental calculus: a review.

    PubMed

    Huynh, H T T; Verneau, J; Levasseur, A; Drancourt, M; Aboudharam, G

    2016-06-01

    Dental calculus, a material observed in the majority of adults worldwide, emerged as a source for correlating paleomicrobiology with human health and diet. This mini review of 48 articles on the paleomicrobiology of dental calculus over 7550 years discloses a secular core microbiota comprising nine bacterial phyla - Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, TM7, Synergistetes, Chloroflexi, Fusobacteria, Spirochetes - and one archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota; and some accessory microbiota that appear and disappear according to time frame. The diet residues and oral microbes, including bacteria, archaea, viruses and fungi, consisting of harmless organisms and pathogens associated with local and systemic infections have been found trapped in ancient dental calculus by morphological approaches, immunolabeling techniques, isotope analyses, fluorescent in situ hybridization, DNA-based approaches, and protein-based approaches. These observations led to correlation of paleomicrobiology, particularly Streptococcus mutans and archaea, with past human health and diet. PMID:26194817

  15. Professional Fulfillment and Satisfaction of US and Canadian Adult Education and Human Resource Development Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shari L.; Wiesenberg, Faye

    2004-01-01

    This comparative study explored the professional fulfillment and job satisfaction of US and Canadian college and university faculty in the fields of Adult Education and Human Resource Development. In Autumn 2001, we disseminated electronically "The Adult Education and Human Resource Development Faculty Survey" to a selected sample of Canadian and…

  16. Neural Crest Stem Cells from Dental Tissues: A New Hope for Dental and Neural Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ibarretxe, Gaskon; Crende, Olatz; Aurrekoetxea, Maitane; García-Murga, Victoria; Etxaniz, Javier; Unda, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Several stem cell sources persist in the adult human body, which opens the doors to both allogeneic and autologous cell therapies. Tooth tissues have proven to be a surprisingly rich and accessible source of neural crest-derived ectomesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs), which may be employed to repair disease-affected oral tissues in advanced regenerative dentistry. Additionally, one area of medicine that demands intensive research on new sources of stem cells is nervous system regeneration, since this constitutes a therapeutic hope for patients affected by highly invalidating conditions such as spinal cord injury, stroke, or neurodegenerative diseases. However, endogenous adult sources of neural stem cells present major drawbacks, such as their scarcity and complicated obtention. In this context, EMSCs from dental tissues emerge as good alternative candidates, since they are preserved in adult human individuals, and retain both high proliferation ability and a neural-like phenotype in vitro. In this paper, we discuss some important aspects of tissue regeneration by cell therapy and point out some advantages that EMSCs provide for dental and neural regeneration. We will finally review some of the latest research featuring experimental approaches and benefits of dental stem cell therapy. PMID:23093977

  17. Resuscitation in the dental practice.

    PubMed

    Jevon, P

    2016-03-11

    The Resuscitation Council (UK) published new resuscitation guidelines in October 2015. The aim of this article is to understand these new guidelines and how dental practices should implement them. A 'resuscitation in the dental practice poster' has been designed which incorporates the new Resuscitation Council (UK) adult basic life support algorithm. This poster, endorsed by the British Dental Association, is included with this issue of the British Dental Journal. Further copies can be downloaded from: https://www.walsallhealthcare.nhs.uk/Data/Sites/1/media/documents/health-and-safety/resus.pdf. PMID:26964602

  18. Oral Spirochetes Implicated in Dental Diseases Are Widespread in Normal Human Subjects and Carry Extremely Diverse Integron Gene Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Wei; Rho, Mina; Doak, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    The NIH Human Microbiome Project (HMP) has produced several hundred metagenomic data sets, allowing studies of the many functional elements in human-associated microbial communities. Here, we survey the distribution of oral spirochetes implicated in dental diseases in normal human individuals, using recombination sites associated with the chromosomal integron in Treponema genomes, taking advantage of the multiple copies of the integron recombination sites (repeats) in the genomes, and using a targeted assembly approach that we have developed. We find that integron-containing Treponema species are present in ∼80% of the normal human subjects included in the HMP. Further, we are able to de novo assemble the integron gene cassettes using our constrained assembly approach, which employs a unique application of the de Bruijn graph assembly information; most of these cassette genes were not assembled in whole-metagenome assemblies and could not be identified by mapping sequencing reads onto the known reference Treponema genomes due to the dynamic nature of integron gene cassettes. Our study significantly enriches the gene pool known to be carried by Treponema chromosomal integrons, totaling 826 (598 97% nonredundant) genes. We characterize the functions of these gene cassettes: many of these genes have unknown functions. The integron gene cassette arrays found in the human microbiome are extraordinarily dynamic, with different microbial communities sharing only a small number of common genes. PMID:22635997

  19. The Role of ORAI1 in the Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sohn, S; Park, Y; Srikanth, S; Arai, A; Song, M; Yu, B; Shin, K-H; Kang, M K; Wang, C; Gwack, Y; Park, N-H; Kim, R H

    2015-11-01

    Pulp capping, or placing dental materials directly onto the vital pulp tissues of affected teeth, is a dental procedure that aims to regenerate reparative dentin. Several pulp capping materials are clinically being used, and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) released from these materials is known to mediate reparative dentin formation. ORAI1 is an essential pore subunit of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), which is a major Ca(2+) influx pathway in most nonexcitable cells. Here, we evaluated the role of ORAI1 in mediating the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). During the odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs, the expression of ORAI1 increased in a time-dependent manner. DPSCs knocked down with ORAI1 shRNA (DPSC/ORAI1sh) or overexpressed with dominant negative mutant ORAI1(E106Q) (DPSC/E106Q) exhibited the inhibition of Ca(2+) influx and suppression of odontogenic differentiation and mineralization as demonstrated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity/staining as well as alizarin red S staining when compared with DPSCs of their respective control groups (DPSC/CTLsh and DPSC/CTL). The gene expression for odontogenic differentiation markers such as osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) was also suppressed. When DPSC/CTL or DPSC/E106Q cells were subcutaneously transplanted into nude mice, DPSC/CTL cells induced mineralized tissue formation with significant increases in ALP and DMP1 staining in vivo, whereas DPSC/E106Q cells did not. Collectively, our data showed that ORAI1 plays critical roles in the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization of DPSCs by regulating Ca(2+) influx and that ORAI1 may be a therapeutic target to enhance reparative dentin formation. PMID:26403672

  20. The Adult Learner. The Definitive Classic in Adult Education and Human Resource Development. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Malcolm S.; Holton, Elwood F., III; Swanson, Richard A.

    This book examines the core principles of adult learning and the roots of andragogy, advances in adult learning, and practice in adult learning. The following are among the topics discussed in the book's 17 chapters: importance of learning theory; theories of learning (concept of part and whole models of development, theories based on elemental…

  1. Dental therapists in general dental practices: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beazoglou, Tryfon J; Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Heffley, Dennis R; Bailit, Howard L

    2012-08-01

    Dental access disparities are well documented and have been recognized as a national problem. Their major cause is the lack of reasonable Medicaid reimbursement rates for the underserved. Specifically, Medicaid reimbursement rates for children average 40 percent below market rates. In addition, most state Medicaid programs do not cover adults. To address these issues, advocates of better oral health for the underserved are considering support for a new allied provider--a dental therapist--capable of providing services at a lower cost per service and in low-income and rural areas. Using a standard economic analysis, this study estimated the potential cost, price, utilization, and dentist's income effects of dental therapists employed in general dental practices. The analysis is based on national general dental practice data and the broadest scope of responsibility for dental therapists that their advocates have advanced, including the ability to provide restorations and extractions to adults and children, training for three years, and minimum supervision. Assuming dental therapists provide restorative, extraction, and pulpal services to patients of all ages and dental hygienists continue to deliver all hygiene services, the mean reduction in a general practice costs ranges between 1.57 and 2.36 percent. For dental therapists treating children only, the range is 0.31 to 0.47 percent. The effects on price and utilization are even smaller. In addition, the effects on most dentists' gross income, hours of work, and net income are negative. The estimated economic impact of dental therapists in the United States on private dental practice is very limited; therefore, the demand for dental therapists by private practices also would probably be very limited. PMID:22855595

  2. Adult somatic stem cells in the human parasite, Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J.; Wang, Bo; Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Tharp, Marla; Iyer, Harini; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Schistosomiasis is among the most prevalent human parasitic diseases, affecting more than 200 million people worldwide1. The etiological agents of this disease are trematode flatworms (Schistosoma) that live and lay eggs within the vasculature of the host. These eggs lodge in host tissues, causing inflammatory responses that are the primary cause of morbidity. Because these parasites can live and reproduce within human hosts for decades2, elucidating the mechanisms that promote their longevity is of fundamental importance. Although adult pluripotent stem cells, called neoblasts, drive long-term homeostatic tissue maintenance in long-lived free-living flatworms3,4 (e.g., planarians), and neoblast-like cells have been described in some parasitic tapeworms5, little is known about whether similar cell types exist in any trematode species. Here, we describe a population of neoblast-like cells in the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. These cells resemble planarian neoblasts morphologically and share their ability to proliferate and differentiate into derivatives of multiple germ layers. Capitalizing on available genomic resources6,7 and RNAseq-based gene expression profiling, we find that these schistosome neoblast-like cells express a fibroblast growth factor receptor ortholog. Using RNA interference we demonstrate that this gene is required for the maintenance of these neoblast-like cells. Our observations suggest that adaptation of developmental strategies shared by free-living ancestors to modern-day schistosomes likely contributed to the success of these animals as long-lived obligate parasites. We expect that future studies deciphering the function of these neoblast-like cells will have important implications for understanding the biology of these devastating parasites. PMID:23426263

  3. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  4. Human dental age estimation by calculation of pulp-tooth volume ratios yielded on clinically acquired cone beam computed tomography images of monoradicular teeth.

    PubMed

    Star, Hazha; Thevissen, Patrick; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Fieuws, Steffen; Solheim, Tore; Willems, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Secondary dentine is responsible for a decrease in the volume of the dental pulp cavity with aging. The aim of this study is to evaluate a human dental age estimation method based on the ratio between the volume of the pulp and the volume of its corresponding tooth, calculated on clinically taken cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images from monoradicular teeth. On the 3D images of 111 clinically obtained CBCT images (Scanora(®) 3D dental cone beam unit) of 57 female and 54 male patients ranging in age between 10 and 65 years, the pulp-tooth volume ratio of 64 incisors, 32 canines, and 15 premolars was calculated with Simplant(®) Pro software. A linear regression model was fit with age as dependent variable and ratio as predictor, allowing for interactions of specific gender or tooth type. The obtained pulp-tooth volume ratios were the strongest related to age on incisors. PMID:21182523

  5. Dental Hygienists

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy, patient management, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease. High school students interested in becoming dental hygienists should take courses in biology, chemistry, and math. Most dental hygiene programs also require applicants to have completed at ...

  6. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants Are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  7. Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session. Nutrition Education--1973. Part 6--Phosphate Research and Dental Decay. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., April 16, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    These hearings before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate include testimony on the subject of research into the use of phosphates to prevent dental decay. The purpose of the hearing was to explore certain dental health questions raised during the committee's recent hearings on the Television Advertising of…

  8. Dynamic hydrostatic pressure promotes differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, V; Damek-Poprawa, M; Nicoll, S B; Akintoye, S O

    2009-09-01

    The masticatory apparatus absorbs high occlusal forces, but uncontrolled parafunctional or orthodontic forces damage periodontal ligament (PDL), cause pulpal calcification, pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Morphology and functional differentiation of connective tissue cells can be controlled by mechanical stimuli but effects of uncontrolled forces on intra-pulpal homeostasis and ability of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to withstand direct external forces are unclear. Using dynamic hydrostatic pressure (HSP), we tested the hypothesis that direct HSP disrupts DPSC survival and odontogenic differentiation. DPSCs from four teenage patients were subjected to HSP followed by assessment of cell adhesion, survival and recovery capacity based on odontogenic differentiation, mineralization and responsiveness to bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). HSP down-regulated DPSC adhesion and survival but promoted differentiation by increasing mineralization, in vivo hard tissue regeneration and BMP-2 responsiveness despite reduced cell numbers. HSP-treated DPSCs displayed enhanced odontogenic differentiation, an indication of favorable recovery from HSP-induced cellular stress. PMID:19555657

  9. Dynamic Hydrostatic Pressure Promotes Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, V; Damek-Poprawa, M.; Nicoll, S. B.; Akintoye, S.O.

    2009-01-01

    The masticatory apparatus absorbs high occlusal forces, but uncontrolled parafunctional or orthodontic forces damage periodontal ligament (PDL), cause pulpal calcification, pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Morphology and functional differentiation of connective tissue cells can be controlled by mechanical stimuli but effects of uncontrolled forces on intra-pulpal homeostasis and ability of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to withstand direct external forces are unclear. Using dynamic hydrostatic pressure (HSP), we tested the hypothesis that direct HSP disrupts DPSC survival and odontogenic differentiation. DPSCs from four teenage patients were subjected to HSP followed by assessment of cell adhesion, survival and recovery capacity based on odontogenic differentiation, mineralization and responsiveness to bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). HSP down-regulated DPSC adhesion and survival but promoted differentiation by increasing mineralization, in vivo hard tissue regeneration and BMP-2 responsiveness despite reduced cell numbers. HSP-treated DPSCs displayed enhanced odontogenic differentiation, an indication of favorable recovery from HSP-induced cellular stress. PMID:19555657

  10. Reconstructions of human history by mapping dental markers in living Eurasian populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashibadze, Vera F.; Nasonova, Olga G.; Nasonov, Dmitry S.

    2013-01-01

    Using advances in gene geography and anthropophenetics, the phenogeographical method for anthropological research was initiated and developed using dental data. Statistical and cartographical analyses are provided for 498 living Eurasian populations. Mapping principal components supplied evidence for the phene pool structure in Eurasian populations, and for reconstructions of Homo sapiens history on the continent. Longitudinal variability seems to be the most important regularity revealed by principal components analysis (PCA) and mapping, indicating the division of the whole area into western and eastern main provinces. So, the most ancient scenario in the history of Eurasian populations developed from two perspective different groups: a western group related to ancient populations of West Asia and an eastern one rooted in ancestry in South and/or East Asia. In spite of the enormous territory and the revealed divergence, the populations of the continent have undergone wide scale and intensive timeespace interaction. Many details in the revealed landscapes are background to different historical events. Migrations and assimilation are two essential phenomena in Eurasian history: the widespread of the western combination through the whole continent to the Pacific coastline and the movement of the paradoxical combinations of eastern and western markers from South or Central Asia to the east and west. Taking into account that no additional eastern combinations in the total variation in Asian groups have been found, but that mixed or western markers' sets and that eastern dental characteristics are traced in Asia since Homo erectus, the assumption is made in favour of the hetero-level assimilation in the eastern province and of net-like evolution of H. sapiens.

  11. In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells in injectable thermo-sensitive chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yantian; Zhang, Fengli; Fu, Qiang; Liu, Yong; Wang, Zejian; Qi, Nianmin

    2016-09-01

    Injectable thermo-sensitive hydrogels have a potential application in bone tissue engineering for their sensitivities and minimal invasive properties. Human dental pulp stem cells have been considered a promising tool for tissue reconstruction. The objective of this study was to investigate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells in injectable thermo-sensitive chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel in vitro. The chitosan /β-glycerophosphate hydrogel and chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel were prepared using the sol-gel method. The injectability of chitosan /β-glycerophosphate hydrogel and chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel was measured using a commercial disposable syringe. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the inner structure of hydrogels. Then dental pulp stem cells were seeded in chitosan /β-glycerophosphate hydrogel and chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel, respectively. The growth of dental pulp stem cells was periodically observed under an inverted microscope. The proliferation of dental pulp stem cells was detected by using an Alamar Blue kit, while cell apoptosis was determined by using a Live/Dead Viability/Cytotoxicity kit. The osteogenic differentiations of dental pulp stem cells in chitosan /β-glycerophosphate hydrogel and chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel were evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity assay and mRNA expression of osteogenesis gene for 21 days in osteogenic medium. The results indicated that there was no significant difference between chitosan /β-glycerophosphate hydrogel and chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel in injectability. Cells within the chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/hydroxyapatite hydrogel displayed a typical adherent cell morphology and rapid proliferation with high cellular viability after 14 days of culture. Dental pulp stem cells seeded in chitosan

  12. A modern human pattern of dental development in Lower Pleistocene hominids from Atapuerca-TD6 (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez de Castro, J. M.; Rosas, A.; Carbonell, E.; Nicolás, M. E.; Rodríguez, J.; Arsuaga, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    The study of life history evolution in hominids is crucial for the discernment of when and why humans have acquired our unique maturational pattern. Because the development of dentition is critically integrated into the life cycle in mammals, the determination of the time and pattern of dental development represents an appropriate method to infer changes in life history variables that occurred during hominid evolution. Here we present evidence derived from Lower Pleistocene human fossil remains recovered from the TD6 level (Aurora stratum) of the Gran Dolina site in the Sierra de Atapuerca, northern Spain. These hominids present a pattern of development similar to that of Homo sapiens, although some aspects (e.g., delayed M3 calcification) are not as derived as that of European populations and people of European origin. This evidence, taken together with the present knowledge of cranial capacity of these and other late Early Pleistocene hominids, supports the view that as early as 0.8 Ma at least one Homo species shared with modern humans a prolonged pattern of maturation. PMID:10097189

  13. THE DENTAL RESEARCH CLINIC IN FLORIDA (AS AN EDUCATIONAL AND SERVICE AGENCY).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Technical and Health Occupations Education Section.

    GUIDELINES FOR ORGANIZING AND OPERATING A DENTAL RESEARCH CLINIC WERE DEVELOPED BY THE DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL, AND ADULT EDUCATION, THE FLORIDA DENTAL SOCIETY'S SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION OF THE DENTAL ASSISTANT, AND OTHER DENTISTS WORKING CLOSELY WITH DENTAL ASSISTANT PROGRAMS. THE PURPOSES OF THE DENTAL RESEARCH CLINICS ARE TO…

  14. Electrochemically Preadsorbed Collagen Promotes Adult Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Benavidez, Tomás E; Wechsler, Marissa E; Farrer, Madeleine M; Bizios, Rena; Garcia, Carlos D

    2016-01-01

    The present article reports on the effect of electric potential on the adsorption of collagen type I (the most abundant component of the organic phase of bone) onto optically transparent carbon electrodes (OTCE) and its mediation on subsequent adhesion of adult, human, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). For this purpose, adsorption of collagen type I was investigated as a function of the protein concentration (0.01, 0.1, and 0.25 mg/mL) and applied potential (open circuit potential [OCP; control], +400, +800, and +1500 mV). The resulting substrate surfaces were characterized using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Adsorption of collagen type I onto OTCE was affected by the potential applied to the sorbent surface and the concentration of protein. The higher the applied potential and protein concentration, the higher the adsorbed amount (Γcollagen). It was also observed that the application of potential values higher than +800 mV resulted in the oxidation of the adsorbed protein. Subsequent adhesion of hMSCs on the OTCEs (precoated with the collagen type I films) under standard cell culture conditions for 2 h was affected by the extent of collagen preadsorbed onto the OTCE substrates. Specifically, enhanced hMSCs adhesion was observed when the Γcollagen was the highest. When the collagen type I was oxidized (under applied potential equal to +1500 mV), however, hMSCs adhesion was decreased. These results provide the first correlation between the effects of electric potential on protein adsorption and subsequent modulation of anchorage-dependent cell adhesion. PMID:26549607

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor enhances in vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    D' Alimonte, I; Nargi, E; Mastrangelo, F; Falco, G; Lanuti, P; Marchisio, M; Miscia, S; Robuffo, I; Capogreco, M; Buccella, S; Caputi, S; Caciagli, F; Tetè, S; Ciccarelli, R

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), isolated from dental tissues, are largely studied for future application in regenerative dentistry. In this study, we used MSC obtained from human dental pulp (DPSC) of normal impacted third molars that, when cultured in lineage-specific inducing media, differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes (evaluated by Alizarin Red S and Red Oil O stainings, respectively), thus showing a multipotency. We confirmed that DPSC, grown under undifferentiating conditions, are negative for hematopoietic (CD45, CD31, CD34, CD144) and positive for mesenchymal (CD29, CD90, CD105, CD166, CD146, STRO-1) markers, that underwent down-regulation when cells were grown in osteogenic medium for 3 weeks. In this condition, they also exhibit an increase in the expression of osteogenic markers (RUNX-2, alkaline phosphatase) and extracellular calcium deposition, whereas the expression of receptors (VEGFR-1 and -2) for vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) and related VEGF binding proteins was similar to that found in undifferentiated DPSC. Exposure of DPSC growing under undifferentiating or osteogenic conditions to VEGF-A165 peptide (10-40 ng/ml) for 8 days dose- and time-dependently increased the number of proliferating cells without inducing differentiation towards endothelial lineage, as evaluated by the lack of expression of specific markers (CD31, CD34, CD144). Additionally, exposure of DPSC cultured in osteogenic medium to VEGF-A165 for a similar period enhanced cell differentiation towards osteoblasts as evaluated after 14 and 21 days by Alizarin Red S staining and alkaline phosphatase activity quantification. These findings may have clinical implications possibly facilitating tissue repair and remodeling. PMID:21382274

  16. A comparison of erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase activity from human foetuses and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Strange, R C; Johnston, J D; Coghill, D R; Hume, R

    1980-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity was measured in partially purified haemolysates of erythrocytes from human foetuses and adults. Enzyme activity was present in erythrocytes obtained between 12 and 40 weeks of gestation. The catalytic properties of the enzyme from foetal cells were similar to those of the enzyme from adult erythrocytes, indicating that probably only one form of the erythrocytes enzyme exists throughout foetal and adult life. PMID:7396875

  17. Improved single- and multi-contact life-time testing of dental restorative materials using key characteristics of the human masticatory system and a force/position-controlled robotic dental wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Raabe, D; Harrison, A; Ireland, A; Alemzadeh, K; Sandy, J; Dogramadzi, S; Melhuish, C; Burgess, S

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a new in vitro wear simulator based on spatial parallel kinematics and a biologically inspired implicit force/position hybrid controller to replicate chewing movements and dental wear formations on dental components, such as crowns, bridges or a full set of teeth. The human mandible, guided by passive structures such as posterior teeth and the two temporomandibular joints, moves with up to 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) in Cartesian space. The currently available wear simulators lack the ability to perform these chewing movements. In many cases, their lack of sufficient DOF enables them only to replicate the sliding motion of a single occlusal contact point by neglecting rotational movements and the motion along one Cartesian axis. The motion and forces of more than one occlusal contact points cannot accurately be replicated by these instruments. Furthermore, the majority of wear simulators are unable to control simultaneously the main wear-affecting parameters, considering abrasive mechanical wear, which are the occlusal sliding motion and bite forces in the constraint contact phase of the human chewing cycle. It has been shown that such discrepancies between the true in vivo and the simulated in vitro condition influence the outcome and the quality of wear studies. This can be improved by implementing biological features of the human masticatory system such as tooth compliance realized through the passive action of the periodontal ligament and active bite force control realized though the central nervous system using feedback from periodontal preceptors. The simulator described in this paper can be used for single- and multi-occlusal contact testing due to its kinematics and ability to exactly replicate human translational and rotational mandibular movements with up to 6 DOF without neglecting movements along or around the three Cartesian axes. Recorded human mandibular motion and occlusal force data are the reference inputs of the simulator

  18. Human paraoxonase polymorphism: Hungarian population studies in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Szabó, I; Róna, K; Czinner, A; Gachályi, B

    1991-06-01

    The paraoxonase phenotype distribution pattern was studied in a Hungarian population of 102 children and 100 adults. All the subjects were of Caucasian origin and are not related. The adult population showed the trimodality in phenotype distribution similar to other European population data. The gene frequencies obtained were statistically not significantly different either. There was no correlation between the activity of serum paraoxonase and activity of cholinesterase, sex, age and body weight. The phenotype distribution was trimodal in the children's population too. There was a significant difference in gene frequency, however, compared to data from adult population. PMID:1651288

  19. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  20. Reaching beyond the United States: Adventures in International Adult Education and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henschke, John A.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his experience of how travel and adult education merged, for him, into a major emphasis in international adult education (AE) and human resource development (HRD). International ventures have been some of the most exciting and learning-filled aspects of the author's career in AE and HRD. His involvement in…

  1. Adult Continuing Education and Human Resource Development: Present Competitors, Potential Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    Adult Continuing Education (ACE) and Human Resource Development (HRD) have grown tremendously in the last quarter century. ACE experienced tremendous growth in the 60s and 70s, with over 17 million attending colleges and universities, and local school and community adult education programs by the end of the 1970s. More ACE programs were started…

  2. XPC Promotes Pluripotency of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Regulation of Oct-4/Sox2/c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Peng, Zhengjun; Xu, Zhezhen; Wei, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC), essential component of multisubunit stem cell coactivator complex (SCC), functions as the critical factor modulating pluripotency and genome integrity through interaction with Oct-4/Sox2. However, its specific role in regulating pluripotency and multilineage differentiation of human dental pulp cells (DPCs) remains unknown. Methods. To elucidate the functional role XPC played in pluripotency and multilineage differentiation of DPCs, expressions of XPC in DPCs with long-term culture were examined by real-time PCR and western blot. DPCs were transfected with lentiviral-mediated human XPC gene; then transfection rate was investigated by real-time PCR and western blot. Cell cycle, apoptosis, proliferation, senescence, multilineage differentiation, and expression of Oct-4/Sox2/c-Myc in transfected DPCs were examined. Results. XPC, Oct-4, Sox2, and c-Myc were downregulated at P7 compared with P3 in DPCs with long-term culture. XPC genes were upregulated in DPCs at P2 after transfection and maintained high expression level at P3 and P7. Cell proliferation, PI value, and telomerase activity were enhanced, whereas apoptosis was suppressed in transfected DPCs. Oct-4/Sox2/c-Myc were significantly upregulated, and multilineage differentiation in DPCs with XPC overexpression was enhanced after transfection. Conclusions. XPC plays an essential role in the modulation of pluripotency and multilineage differentiation of DPCs through regulation of Oct-4/Sox2/c-Myc. PMID:27127517

  3. XPC Promotes Pluripotency of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Regulation of Oct-4/Sox2/c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Peng, Zhengjun; Xu, Zhezhen; Wei, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC), essential component of multisubunit stem cell coactivator complex (SCC), functions as the critical factor modulating pluripotency and genome integrity through interaction with Oct-4/Sox2. However, its specific role in regulating pluripotency and multilineage differentiation of human dental pulp cells (DPCs) remains unknown. Methods. To elucidate the functional role XPC played in pluripotency and multilineage differentiation of DPCs, expressions of XPC in DPCs with long-term culture were examined by real-time PCR and western blot. DPCs were transfected with lentiviral-mediated human XPC gene; then transfection rate was investigated by real-time PCR and western blot. Cell cycle, apoptosis, proliferation, senescence, multilineage differentiation, and expression of Oct-4/Sox2/c-Myc in transfected DPCs were examined. Results. XPC, Oct-4, Sox2, and c-Myc were downregulated at P7 compared with P3 in DPCs with long-term culture. XPC genes were upregulated in DPCs at P2 after transfection and maintained high expression level at P3 and P7. Cell proliferation, PI value, and telomerase activity were enhanced, whereas apoptosis was suppressed in transfected DPCs. Oct-4/Sox2/c-Myc were significantly upregulated, and multilineage differentiation in DPCs with XPC overexpression was enhanced after transfection. Conclusions. XPC plays an essential role in the modulation of pluripotency and multilineage differentiation of DPCs through regulation of Oct-4/Sox2/c-Myc. PMID:27127517

  4. Computerized Dental Injection Fear Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, L.J.; Leroux, B.G.; Ruff, P.A.; Coldwell, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    One in four adults reports a clinically significant fear of dental injections, leading many to avoid dental care. While systematic desensitization is the most common therapeutic method for treating specific phobias such as fear of dental injections, lack of access to trained therapists, as well as dentists’ lack of training and time in providing such a therapy, means that most fearful individuals are not able to receive the therapy needed to be able to receive necessary dental treatment. Computer Assisted Relaxation Learning (CARL) is a self-paced computerized treatment based on systematic desensitization for dental injection fear. This multicenter, block-randomized, dentist-blind, parallel-group study conducted in 8 sites in the United States compared CARL with an informational pamphlet in reducing fear of dental injections. Participants completing CARL reported significantly greater reduction in self-reported general and injection-specific dental anxiety measures compared with control individuals (p < .001). Twice as many CARL participants (35.3%) as controls (17.6%) opted to receive a dental injection after the intervention, although this was not statistically significant. CARL, therefore, led to significant changes in self-reported fear in study participants, but no significant differences in the proportion of participants having a dental injection (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00609648). PMID:23690352

  5. Allogenic banking of dental pulp stem cells for innovative therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Chaubron, Franck; De Vos, John; Cuisinier, Frédéric J

    2015-01-01

    Medical research in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapy has brought encouraging perspectives for the use of stem cells in clinical trials. Multiple types of stem cells, from progenitors to pluripotent stem cells, have been investigated. Among these, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are mesenchymal multipotent cells coming from the dental pulp, which is the soft tissue within teeth. They represent an interesting adult stem cell source because they are recovered in large amount in dental pulps with non-invasive techniques compared to other adult stem cell sources. DPSCs can be obtained from discarded teeth, especially wisdom teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons. To shift from promising preclinical results to therapeutic applications to human, DPSCs must be prepared in clinical grade lots and transformed into advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP). As the production of patient-specific stem cells is costly and time-consuming, allogenic biobanking of clinical grade human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed DPSC lines provides efficient innovative therapeutic products. DPSC biobanks represent industrial and therapeutic innovations by using discarded biological tissues (dental pulps) as a source of mesenchymal stem cells to produce and store, in good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, DPSC therapeutic batches. In this review, we discuss about the challenges to transfer biological samples from a donor to HLA-typed DPSC therapeutic lots, following regulations, GMP guidelines and ethical principles. We also present some clinical applications, for which there is no efficient therapeutics so far, but that DPSCs-based ATMP could potentially treat. PMID:26328017

  6. The impact of Medicaid insurance coverage on dental service use.

    PubMed

    Choi, Moonkyung Kate

    2011-09-01

    The new comprehensive health reform, beginning in 2014, will require Medicaid to expand all elements of coverage to individuals with incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty line. With millions more individuals gaining eligibility for adult Medicaid dental benefits, generating an unbiased estimate of the elasticity of demand for dental services is critical. The causal relationship between access to adult Medicaid dental benefits and usage of dental services for low-income adults is estimated, using difference-in-differences estimation procedures to exploit the state-level variation in adult Medicaid dental benefits. Results suggest that adult Medicaid dental benefits increase the probability of a dental visit within 12 months by 16.4-22 percent. A variety of robustness checks are invoked to confirm the finding. PMID:21885138

  7. Screening of Probiotic Candidates in Human Oral Bacteria for the Prevention of Dental Disease

    PubMed Central

    Terai, Tomohiko; Okumura, Takekazu; Imai, Susumu; Nakao, Masumi; Yamaji, Kazuaki; Ito, Masahiko; Nagata, Tsuyoshi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Miyazaki, Kouji; Okada, Ayako; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity in healthy subjects has a well-balanced microbiota that consists of more than 700 species. However, a disturbance of this balance, with an increase of harmful microbes and a decrease of beneficial microbes, causes oral disorders such as periodontal disease or dental caries. Nowadays, probiotics are expected to confer oral health benefits by modulating the oral microbiota. This study screened new probiotic candidates with potential oral health benefits and no harmful effects on the oral cavity. We screened 14 lactobacillus strains and 36 streptococcus strains out of 896 oral isolates derived from healthy subjects. These bacteria did not produce volatile sulfur compounds or water-insoluble glucan, had higher antibacterial activity against periodontal bacteria, and had higher adherence activity to oral epithelial cells or salivary-coated hydroxyapatite in vitro. We then evaluated the risk of primary cariogenicity and infective endocarditis of the selected oral isolates. As a result, Lactobacillus crispatus YIT 12319, Lactobacillus fermentum YIT 12320, Lactobacillus gasseri YIT 12321, and Streptococcus mitis YIT 12322 were selected because they showed no cariogenic potential in an artificial mouth system and a lower risk of experimental infective endocarditis in a rat model. These candidates are expected as new probiotics with potential oral health benefits and no adverse effects on general health. PMID:26053410

  8. Screening of Probiotic Candidates in Human Oral Bacteria for the Prevention of Dental Disease.

    PubMed

    Terai, Tomohiko; Okumura, Takekazu; Imai, Susumu; Nakao, Masumi; Yamaji, Kazuaki; Ito, Masahiko; Nagata, Tsuyoshi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Miyazaki, Kouji; Okada, Ayako; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity in healthy subjects has a well-balanced microbiota that consists of more than 700 species. However, a disturbance of this balance, with an increase of harmful microbes and a decrease of beneficial microbes, causes oral disorders such as periodontal disease or dental caries. Nowadays, probiotics are expected to confer oral health benefits by modulating the oral microbiota. This study screened new probiotic candidates with potential oral health benefits and no harmful effects on the oral cavity. We screened 14 lactobacillus strains and 36 streptococcus strains out of 896 oral isolates derived from healthy subjects. These bacteria did not produce volatile sulfur compounds or water-insoluble glucan, had higher antibacterial activity against periodontal bacteria, and had higher adherence activity to oral epithelial cells or salivary-coated hydroxyapatite in vitro. We then evaluated the risk of primary cariogenicity and infective endocarditis of the selected oral isolates. As a result, Lactobacillus crispatus YIT 12319, Lactobacillus fermentum YIT 12320, Lactobacillus gasseri YIT 12321, and Streptococcus mitis YIT 12322 were selected because they showed no cariogenic potential in an artificial mouth system and a lower risk of experimental infective endocarditis in a rat model. These candidates are expected as new probiotics with potential oral health benefits and no adverse effects on general health. PMID:26053410

  9. Combined effects of mineral trioxide aggregate and human placental extract on rat pulp tissue and growth, differentiation and angiogenesis in human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seok-Woo; Kim, Ji-Youn; Kim, Mi-Joo; Kim, Ga-Hyun; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Deok-Won; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-05-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and human placental extract (HPE) on cell growth, differentiation and in vitro angiogenesis of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) and to identify underlying signal transduction mechanisms. In vivo dental pulp responses in rats for a pulp-capping agent were examined. Materials and methods MTS assay. ALP activity test, alizarin red S staining and RT-PCR for marker genes were carried out to evaluate cell growth and differentiation. HUVEC migration, mRNA expression and capillary tube formation were measured to evaluate angiogenesis. Signal transduction was analysed using Western blotting and confocal microscopy. The pulps of rat maxillary first molars were exposed and capped with either MTA or MTA plus HPE. Histologic observation and scoring were performed. Results Compared to treatment of HDPCs with either HPE or MTA alone, the combination of HPE and MTA increased cell growth, ALP activity, mineralized nodules and expression of marker mRNAs. Combination HPE and MTA increased migration, capillary tube formation and angiogenic gene expression compared with MTA alone. Activation of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p38, JNK and ERK MAPK, Akt, and NF-κB were significantly increased by combining HPE and MTA compared with MTA alone. Pulp capping with MTA plus HPE in rats showed superior dentin bridge formation, odontoblastic layers and dentinal tubules and lower inflammatory cell response, compared to the MTA alone group. Conclusions This study demonstrates for the first time that the use of MTA with HPE promotes cell growth, differentiation and angiogenesis in HDPCs, which were associated with mTOR, MAPK and NF-κB pathways. Direct pulp capping with HPE plus MTA showed superior results when compared with MTA alone. Thus, the combination of MTA and HPE may be useful for regenerative endodontics. PMID:26807656

  10. Technical note: The two step procedure (TSP) for the determination of age at death of adult human remains in forensic cases.

    PubMed

    Baccino, Eric; Sinfield, Laura; Colomb, Sophie; Baum, Thierry Pascal; Martrille, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the principles and results of TSP (the two step procedure), a comprehensive (combined) method of age estimation in mature human skeletal remains. The first step consists of the examination of the pubic symphysis using the Suchey-Brooks system for a "pre-choice". Then for SBS phases I, II, III, (young adults up to about 40) the age estimate is given using the chronological interval corresponding to each phase. For SBS phase is IV, V or VI (mature adults, about 40 to 60), then (second step) the dental method of Lamendin (using single rooted tooth) will be applied alone. Both methods are fast, easy to learn and to use (requiring no preparation except cleaning soft tissues from the pubic bone) and are not expensive, making TSP usable by all pathologists or anthropologists in any Forensic unit. It is also of great practical use in mass disaster and mass grave situation. After 15 years of use, a literature review and four evaluation studies we confirm that TSP is more accurate than any single method for aging adults and at least as good as more complicated combined methods. Despite its advantages TSP is, like all other aging methods, not efficient in adults over 65 years of age. PMID:25282468

  11. Assessment of exposures and potential risks to the US adult population from the leaching of elements from gold and ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G Mark; James, Kyle Jordan; Peters, Rachel Elizabeth; Clemow, Scott Richard; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2016-05-01

    Using data from the 2001 to 2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) on the number and placement of tooth restorations in adults, we quantified daily doses due to leaching of elements from gold (Au) alloy and ceramic restorative materials. The elements with the greatest leaching rates from these materials are often the elements of lowest proportional composition. As a result, exposure due to wear will predominate for those elements of relatively high proportional composition, while exposure due leaching may predominate for elements of relatively low proportional composition. The exposure due to leaching of silver (Ag) and palladium (Pd) from Au alloys exceeded published reference exposure levels (RELs) for these elements when multiple full surface crowns were present. Six or more molar crowns would result in exceeding the REL for Ag, whereas three or more crowns would be necessary to exceed the REL for Pd. For platinum (Pt), the majority of tooth surfaces, beyond just molar crowns, would be necessary to exceed the REL for Pd. Exposures due to leaching of elements from ceramic dental materials were less than published RELs for all components examined here, including having all restorations composed of ceramic. PMID:26374655

  12. Evaluation of periodontal risk assessment model among adults aged 30-60 years attending KLE Dental College, Belgaum: A hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Eshwar, Shruthi; Ankola, Anil V.; Kumar, Ashok; Hebbal, Mamata

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the periodontal risk of individuals using the modified periodontal risk assessment model. Materials and Methods: Adult subjects aged 30-60 years attending the out patient department of Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum in a week’s period were screened and 30 among those who met the criteria were included in the study. Complete history and examination of the oral cavity was done using mouth mirror and community periodontal index probes. Periodontal status was recorded using community periodontal index. Systemic conditions like hypertension and diabetes was assessed by suitable investigations. All the risk factors were plotted on a model using Microsoft excel and periodontal risk was assessed based on the findings and categorized as low, moderate and high risk. Results: Among 30 patients 13 were in low risk group, 10 in moderate risk group, and 7 in high risk group identified by proposed model given by Vishwa Chandra whereas 20 patients were in low risk group, 5 in moderate risk group and 5 in high risk group when identified Lang and Tonetti model (2003). Conclusion: In conclusion the use of risk assessment tool would result in reduction of complex therapies and would prevent the future effects of periodontal disease such as bone and tooth loss. PMID:21760671

  13. Newborn human skin fibroblasts senesce in vitro without acquiring adult growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of human fibroblasts were prepared from chest skin obtained either from newborns (less than 3 months old) or adults (more than 35 years old) and maintained in vitro until they senesced. Adult cells grew logarithmically in medium supplemented with whole blood serum but not with platelet-poor plasma. Early passage cells obtained from newborns grew equally well in either plasma- or serum-supplemented medium. The difference in growth factor requirements between adult and newborn cells persisted through the lifespan of the cells; i.e., newborn cells did not develop adult hormonal requirements when maintained in culture. Thus, in vitro cellular aging can be distinguished from some types of differentiation.

  14. Effect of an oxygenating agent on oral bacteria in vitro and on dental plaque composition in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez y Mostajo, Mercedes; van der Reijden, Wil A.; Buijs, Mark J.; Beertsen, Wouter; van der Weijden, Fridus; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2014-01-01

    Oral bacteria live in symbiosis with the host. Therefore, when mouthwashes are indicated, selective inhibition of taxa contributing to disease is preferred instead of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The potential selectivity of an oxygenating mouthwash, Ardox-X® (AX), has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial potential of AX and the effects of a twice-daily oral rinse on dental plaque composition. Material and methods: In vitro, 16 oral bacterial strains were tested using agar diffusion susceptibility, minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentration tests. A pilot clinical study was performed with 25 healthy volunteers. Clinical assessments and microbiological sampling of supragingival plaque were performed at 1 month before the experiment (Pre-exp), at the start of the experiment (Baseline) and after the one-week experimental period (Post-exp). During the experiment individuals used AX mouthwash twice daily in absence of other oral hygiene measures. The microbiological composition of plaque was assessed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Results: AX showed high inter-species variation in microbial growth inhibition. The tested Prevotella strains and Fusobacterium nucleatum showed the highest sensitivity, while streptococci and Lactobacillus acidophilus were most resistant to AX. Plaque scores at Pre-exp and Baseline visits did not differ significantly (p = 0.193), nor did the microbial composition of plaque. During a period of 7-days non-brushing but twice daily rinsing plaque scores increased from 2.21 (0.31) at Baseline to 2.43 (0.39) Post-exp. A significant microbial shift in composition was observed: genus Streptococcus and Veillonella increased while Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Leptotrichia, Cardiobacterium and Capnocytophaga decreased (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: AX has the potential for selective inhibition of oral bacteria. The shift in oral microbiome after 1 week of rinsing deserves further research

  15. Brain, Craniofacial, and Dental Lesions of a Free-ranging Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Implicated in a Human Attack in Minnesota, USA.

    PubMed

    Schwabenlander, Marc; Stepaniuk, Kevin; Carstensen, Michelle; Armién, Aníbal G

    2016-01-01

    We describe significant brain, craniofacial, and dental lesions in a free-ranging wolf (Canis lupus) involved in a human attack. On postmortem examination, the wolf presented asymmetric atrophy and bone remodeling affecting the mandible, incisive, maxilla, lacrimal, palatine, frontal, and ethmoid bones. There was an asymmetrical skeletal malocclusion and dental abnormalities including rotated, malpositioned, partially erupted teeth, and an odontogenic cyst associated with an unerupted canine tooth. Brain changes were bilateral loss and atrophy of extensive cortex regions including olfactory bulb, peduncles, and tract, and the frontal lobe. We highlight the relevance of a thorough postmortem examination of wildlife to elucidate disease-based abnormal behavior as the reason for human-animal conflict. PMID:26540333

  16. Influence of different types of pulp treatment during isolation in the obtention of human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Viña-Almunia, Jose; Borras, Consuelo; Gambini, Juan; El Alamy, Marya; Viña, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Different methods have been used in order to isolate dental pulp stem cells. The aim of this study was to study the effect of different types of pulp treatment during isolation, under 3% O2 conditions, in the time needed and the efficacy for obtaining dental pulp stem cells. Material and Methods One hundred and twenty dental pulps were used to isolate dental pulp stem cells treating the pulp tissue during isolation using 9 different methods, using digestive, disgregation, or mechanical agents, or combining them. The cells were positive for CD133, Oct4, Nestin, Stro-1, CD34 markers, and negative for the hematopoietic cell marker CD-45, thus confirming the presence of mesenchymal stem cells. The efficacy of dental pulp stem cells obtention and the minimum time needed to obtain such cells comparing the 9 different methods was analyzed. Results Dental pulp stem cells were obtained from 97 of the 120 pulps used in the study, i.e. 80.8% of the cases. They were obtained with all the methods used except with mechanical fragmentation of the pulp, where no enzymatic digestion was performed. The minimum time needed to isolate dental pulp stem cells was 8 hours, digesting with 2mg/ml EDTA for 10 minutes, 4mg/ml of type I collagenase, 4mg/ml of type II dispase for 40 minutes, 13ng/ml of thermolysine for 40 minutes and sonicating the culture for one minute. Conclusions Dental pulp stem cells were obtained in 97 cases from a series of 120 pulps. The time for obtaining dental pulp stem cells was reduced maximally, without compromising the obtention of the cells, by combining digestive, disgregation, and mechanical agents. Key words:Dental pulp stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, isolation method. PMID:26946201

  17. Repeated lipopolysaccharide stimulation promotes cellular senescence in human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs).

    PubMed

    Feng, Xingmei; Feng, Guijuan; Xing, Jing; Shen, Biyu; Tan, Wei; Huang, Dan; Lu, Xiaohui; Tao, Tao; Zhang, Jinlong; Li, Liren; Gu, Zhifeng

    2014-05-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are a type of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characterized by multi-lineage differentiation making it an attractive choice for tissue regeneration. However, before DPSCs can be used for cell-based therapy, we have to understand their biological properties in response to intrinsic and extrinsic stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). DPSCs were therefore stimulated with LPS and senescence was evaluated by senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining, with cell number and cell-cycle arrest being examined by BrdU assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The morphology of DPSCs was characterized by their flat shape, increased size and increased SA-β-gal activity after repeated stimulation (3 or 6 times) with LPS. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) staining showed that the number of ROS-stained cells and the DCFH fluorescent level were higher in the LPS-treated DPSCs compared with those in the untreated DPSCs. Protein and mRNA expression levels of γ-H2A.X and p16(INK4A) were also increased in DPSCs with repeated LPS stimulation. We found that the LPS bound with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and that TLR4 signaling accounted for p16(INK4A) expression. Further results indicated that the senescence of DPSCs stimulated repeatedly with LPS was reversed by p16(INK4A) short interfering RNA. The DNA damage response and p16(INK4A) pathways might be the main mediators of DPSC senescence induced by repeated LPS stimulation. Thus, DPSCs tend to undergo senescence after repeated activation, implying that DPSC senescence starts after many inflammatory challenges. Ultimately, these findings should lead to a better understanding of DPSC-based clinical therapy. PMID:24676500

  18. Functional differences in mesenchymal stromal cells from human dental pulp and periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Vasandan, Anoop Babu; Shankar, Shilpa Rani; Prasad, Priya; Sowmya Jahnavi, Vulugundam; Bhonde, Ramesh Ramachandra; Jyothi Prasanna, Susarla

    2014-02-01

    Clinically reported reparative benefits of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are majorly attributed to strong immune-modulatory abilities not exactly shared by fibroblasts. However, MSCs remain heterogeneous populations, with unique tissue-specific subsets, and lack of clear-cut assays defining therapeutic stromal subsets adds further ambiguity to the field. In this context, in-depth evaluation of cellular characteristics of MSCs from proximal oro-facial tissues: dental pulp (DPSCs) and periodontal ligament (PDLSCs) from identical donors provides an opportunity to evaluate exclusive niche-specific influences on multipotency and immune-modulation. Exhaustive cell surface profiling of DPSCs and PDLSCs indicated key differences in expression of mesenchymal (CD105) and pluripotent/multipotent stem cell-associated cell surface antigens: SSEA4, CD117, CD123 and CD29. DPSCs and PDLSCs exhibited strong chondrogenic potential, but only DPSCs exhibited adipogenic and osteogenic propensities. PDLSCs expressed immuno-stimulatory/immune-adhesive ligands like HLA-DR and CD50, upon priming with IFNγ, unlike DPSCs, indicating differential response patterns to pro-inflammatory cytokines. Both DPSCs and PDLSCs were hypo-immunogenic and did not elicit robust allogeneic responses despite exposure to IFNγ or TNFα. Interestingly, only DPSCs attenuated mitogen-induced lympho-proliferative responses and priming with either IFNγ or TNFα enhanced immuno-modulation capacity. In contrast, primed or unprimed PDLSCs lacked the ability to suppress polyclonal T cell blast responses. This study indicates that stromal cells from even topographically related tissues do not necessarily share identical MSC properties and emphasizes the need for a thorough functional testing of MSCs from diverse sources with respect to multipotency, immune parameters and response to pro-inflammatory cytokines before translational usage. PMID:24393246

  19. Changes in tooth mortality between 1990 and 2002 among adults in Västerbotten County, Sweden: influence of socioeconomic factors, general health, smoking, and dental care habits on tooth mortality.

    PubMed

    Pihlgren, Karin; Forsberg, Hans; Sjödin, Lars; Lundgren, Per; Wänman, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to analyse changes in tooth mortality among adults in Västerbotten County, Sweden, between 1990 and 2002 and determine whether socioeconomic factors, general health, smoking, and dental care habits influenced tooth mortality. The study was based on samples drawn from the adult population in Västerbotten County in 1990 and 2002. The studied age groups were 35-, 50-, and 65-year-olds. In 2002 75-year-olds were included. The surveys comprised a clinical examination and a questionnaire.The latter focused on oro-facial symptoms, socioeconomic factors, general health, smoking, and dental care habits. Complete data were obtained from 715 individuals in 1990 and from 768 individuals in 2002.Variables used to depict tooth mortality were edentulousness, occlusal supporting zones (Eichner index), and number of teeth. The prevalence of edentulousness in Västerbotten County decreased from 12.7% in 1990 to 3.7% in 2002 (P < 0.001). The mean number of teeth increased in all age groups between 1990 and 2002, and so did the number of individuals with tooth contact in all occlusal supporting zones and no gaps between teeth. Low educational level, weak economic status, smoking, and irregular visits to the dental clinic were all significantly related to increased tooth mortality. Between 1990 and 2002 tooth mortality decreased significantly in the adult population of Västerbotten County, Sweden. Cross-sectional analysis identified socioeconomic factors, smoking, and irregular use of dental care services as being related to tooth mortality in both 1990 and 2002. PMID:21827017

  20. Interferon-gamma improves impaired dentinogenic and immunosuppressive functions of irreversible pulpitis-derived human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Soichiro; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Ma, Lan; Tanaka, Yosuke; Tomoda, Erika; Aijima, Reona; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Kukita, Toshio; Shi, Songtao; Nishimura, Fusanori; Yamaza, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Clinically, irreversible pulpitis is treated by the complete removal of pulp tissue followed by replacement with artificial materials. There is considered to be a high potential for autologous transplantation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in endodontic treatment. The usefulness of DPSCs isolated from healthy teeth is limited. However, DPSCs isolated from diseased teeth with irreversible pulpitis (IP-DPSCs) are considered to be suitable for dentin/pulp regeneration. In this study, we examined the stem cell potency of IP-DPSCs. In comparison with healthy DPSCs, IP-DPSCs expressed lower colony-forming capacity, population-doubling rate, cell proliferation, multipotency, in vivo dentin regeneration, and immunosuppressive activity, suggesting that intact IP-DPSCs may be inadequate for dentin/pulp regeneration. Therefore, we attempted to improve the impaired in vivo dentin regeneration and in vitro immunosuppressive functions of IP-DPSCs to enable dentin/pulp regeneration. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) treatment enhanced in vivo dentin regeneration and in vitro T cell suppression of IP-DPSCs, whereas treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha did not. Therefore, these findings suggest that IFN-γ may be a feasible modulator to improve the functions of impaired IP-DPSCs, suggesting that autologous transplantation of IFN-γ-accelerated IP-DPSCs might be a promising new therapeutic strategy for dentin/pulp tissue engineering in future endodontic treatment. PMID:26775677

  1. In Vivo Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Embedded in an Injectable In Vivo-Forming Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja Yong; Park, Seung Hun; Park, Ji Hoon; Lee, Bo Keun; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Bong; Kim, Jae Ho; Min, Byoung Hyun; Kim, Moon Suk

    2016-08-01

    In this study, human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are examined as a cellular source for bone tissue engineering using an in vivo-forming hydrogel. The hDPSCs are easily harvested in large quantities from extracted teeth. The stemness of harvested hDPSCs indicates their relative tolerance to ex vivo manipulation in culture. The in vitro osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs is characterized using Alizarin Red S (ARS), von Kossa (VK), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. The solution of hDPSCs and a methoxy polyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone block copolymer (PC) is easily prepared by simple mixing at room temperature and in no more than 10 s it forms in vivo hydrogels after subcutaneous injection into rats. In vivo osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs in the in vivo-forming hydrogel is confirmed by micro-computed tomography (CT), histological staining, and gene expression. Micro-CT analysis shows evidence of significant tissue-engineered bone formation in hDPSCs-loaded hydrogel in the presence of osteogenic factors. Differentiated osteoblasts in in vivo-forming hydrogel are identified by ARS and VK staining and are found to exhibit characteristic expression of genes like osteonectin, osteopontin, and osteocalcin. In conclusion, hDPSCs embedded in an in vivo-forming hydrogel may provide benefits as a noninvasive formulation for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:27074749

  2. Optothermophysical properties of demineralized human dental enamel determined using photothermally generated diffuse photon density and thermal-wave fields.

    PubMed

    Hellen, Adam; Matvienko, Anna; Mandelis, Andreas; Finer, Yoav; Amaechi, Bennett T

    2010-12-20

    Noninvasive dental diagnostics is a growing discipline since it has been established that early detection and quantification of tooth mineral loss can reverse caries lesions in their incipient state. A theoretical coupled diffuse photon density and thermal-wave model was developed and applied to photothermal radiometric frequency responses, fitted to experimental data using a multiparameter simplex downhill minimization algorithm for the extraction of optothermophysical properties from artificially demineralized human enamel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and robustness of the advanced fitting algorithm. The results showed a select group of optical and thermal transport parameters and thicknesses were reliably extracted from the computational fitting algorithm. Theoretically derived thicknesses were accurately predicted, within about 20% error, while the estimated error in the optical and thermal property evaluation was within the values determined from early studies using destructive analyses. The high fidelity of the theoretical model illustrates its efficacy, reliability, and applicability toward the nondestructive characterization of depthwise inhomogeneous sound enamel and complex enamel caries lesions. PMID:21173829

  3. A therapeutic strategy for spinal cord defect: human dental follicle cells combined with aligned PCL/PLGA electrospun material.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinghan; Yang, Chao; Li, Lei; Xiong, Jie; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Yu, Mei; Feng, Lian; Jiang, Zongting; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell implantation has been utilized for the repair of spinal cord injury; however, it shows unsatisfactory performance in repairing large scale lesion of an organ. We hypothesized that dental follicle cells (DFCs), which possess multipotential capability, could reconstruct spinal cord defect (SCD) in combination with biomaterials. In the present study, mesenchymal and neurogenic lineage characteristics of human DFCs (hDFCs) were identified. Aligned electrospun PCL/PLGA material (AEM) was fabricated and it would not lead to cytotoxic reaction; furthermore, hDFCs could stretch along the oriented fibers and proliferate efficiently on AEM. Subsequently, hDFCs seeded AEM was transplanted to restore the defect in rat spinal cord. Functional observation was performed but results showed no statistical significance. The following histologic analyses proved that AEM allowed nerve fibers to pass through, and implanted hDFCs could express oligodendrogenic lineage maker Olig2 in vivo which was able to contribute to remyelination. Therefore, we concluded that hDFCs can be a candidate resource in neural regeneration. Aligned electrospun fibers can support spinal cord structure and induce cell/tissue polarity. This strategy can be considered as alternative proposals for the SCD regeneration studies. PMID:25695050

  4. A computer-designed scaffold for bone regeneration within cranial defect using human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yeon Kwon, Doo; Seon Kwon, Jin; Hun Park, Seung; Hun Park, Ji; Hee Jang, So; Yun Yin, Xiang; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Ho Kim, Jae; Hyun Min, Byoung; Hee Lee, Jun; Kim, Wan-Doo; Suk Kim, Moon

    2015-01-01

    A computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold offer several potential advantages such as ease of customized manufacture and in vivo safety. In this work, we firstly used a computer-designed, solvent-free scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to regenerate neo-bone within cranial bone defects. The hDPSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers and served as an abundant source of stem cells with a high proliferation rate. In addition, hDPSCs showed a phenotype of differentiated osteoblasts in the presence of osteogenic factors (OF). We used solid freeform fabrication (SFF) with biodegradable polyesters (MPEG-(PLLA-co-PGA-co-PCL) (PLGC)) to fabricate a computer-designed scaffold. The SFF technology gave quick and reproducible results. To assess bone tissue engineering in vivo, the computer-designed, circular PLGC scaffold was implanted into a full-thickness cranial bone defect and monitored by micro-computed tomography (CT) and histology of the in vivo tissue-engineered bone. Neo-bone formation of more than 50% in both micro-CT and histology tests was observed at only PLGC scaffold with hDPSCs/OF. Furthermore, the PLGC scaffold gradually degraded, as evidenced by the fluorescent-labeled PLGC scaffold, which provides information to tract biodegradation of implanted PLGC scaffold. In conclusion, we confirmed neo-bone formation within a cranial bone defect using hDPSCs and a computer-designed PLGC scaffold. PMID:26234712

  5. Multiwall carbon nanotubes/polycaprolactone scaffolds seeded with human dental pulp stem cells for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Flores-Cedillo, M L; Alvarado-Estrada, K N; Pozos-Guillén, A J; Murguía-Ibarra, J S; Vidal, M A; Cervantes-Uc, J M; Rosales-Ibáñez, R; Cauich-Rodríguez, J V

    2016-02-01

    Conventional approaches to bone regeneration rarely use multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) but instead use polymeric matrices filled with hydroxyapatite, calcium phosphates and bioactive glasses. In this study, we prepared composites of MWCNTs/polycaprolactone (PCL) for bone regeneration as follows: (a) MWCNTs randomly dispersed on PCL, (b) MWCNTs aligned with an electrical field to determine if the orientation favors the growing of human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs), and (c) MWCNTs modified with β-glycerol phosphate (BGP) to analyze its osteogenic potential. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of MWCNTs and BGP on PCL, whereas the increase in crystallinity by the addition of MWCNTs to PCL was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. A higher elastic modulus (608 ± 4.3 MPa), maximum stress (42 ± 6.1 MPa) and electrical conductivity (1.67 × 10(-7) S/m) were observed in non-aligned MWCNTs compared with the pristine PCL. Cell viability at 14 days was similar in all samples according to the live/dead assay, but the 21 day cell proliferation, measured by MTT was higher in MWCNTs aligned with BGP. Von Kossa and Alizarin red showed larger amounts of mineral deposits on MWCNTs aligned with BGP, indicating that at 21 days, this scaffold promotes osteogenic differentiation of HDPSCs. PMID:26704552

  6. Hg, Bi, Cu and Zn distribution in human teeth treated by dental amalgam measured by synchrotron microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Marques, J. P.; Brito, J.; Casaca, C.; Cunha, A. S.

    2002-11-01

    Human teeth restored with dental amalgam were analysed by a synchrotron microprobe to evaluate the diffusion of its major constituents, Cu, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. We measured the elemental distribution inside the tooth from the root to the enamel, specially the region around the amalgam, after its total removal. Hg is present only in restored teeth and concentration profiles show strongly increased levels of this element close to the amalgam region, reaching 500 μg g -1 in one or two cases, decreasing strongly to the inner part of the tooth. Pb concentration profiles do not seem to be affected by metallic amalgam. Very high concentrations of Bi were found in one of the restored teeth, reaching more than 2000 μg g -1, decreasing sharply to the outer regions. The distribution of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn was also determined in order to evaluate elemental influences by amalgam components. No significant changes in elemental concentrations were detected for Mn and Fe between healthy and restored teeth. However, the levels of Zn and Cu are increased in restored teeth. An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, 100 μm of spatial resolution and an energy of 18 keV, installed at LURE synchrotron (France) was used.

  7. Interferon-gamma improves impaired dentinogenic and immunosuppressive functions of irreversible pulpitis-derived human dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Soichiro; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Ma, Lan; Tanaka, Yosuke; Tomoda, Erika; Aijima, Reona; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Kukita, Toshio; Shi, Songtao; Nishimura, Fusanori; Yamaza, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Clinically, irreversible pulpitis is treated by the complete removal of pulp tissue followed by replacement with artificial materials. There is considered to be a high potential for autologous transplantation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in endodontic treatment. The usefulness of DPSCs isolated from healthy teeth is limited. However, DPSCs isolated from diseased teeth with irreversible pulpitis (IP-DPSCs) are considered to be suitable for dentin/pulp regeneration. In this study, we examined the stem cell potency of IP-DPSCs. In comparison with healthy DPSCs, IP-DPSCs expressed lower colony-forming capacity, population-doubling rate, cell proliferation, multipotency, in vivo dentin regeneration, and immunosuppressive activity, suggesting that intact IP-DPSCs may be inadequate for dentin/pulp regeneration. Therefore, we attempted to improve the impaired in vivo dentin regeneration and in vitro immunosuppressive functions of IP-DPSCs to enable dentin/pulp regeneration. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) treatment enhanced in vivo dentin regeneration and in vitro T cell suppression of IP-DPSCs, whereas treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha did not. Therefore, these findings suggest that IFN-γ may be a feasible modulator to improve the functions of impaired IP-DPSCs, suggesting that autologous transplantation of IFN-γ-accelerated IP-DPSCs might be a promising new therapeutic strategy for dentin/pulp tissue engineering in future endodontic treatment. PMID:26775677

  8. A Therapeutic Strategy for Spinal Cord Defect: Human Dental Follicle Cells Combined with Aligned PCL/PLGA Electrospun Material

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Li, Lei; Xiong, Jie; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Yu, Mei; Feng, Lian; Jiang, Zongting; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell implantation has been utilized for the repair of spinal cord injury; however, it shows unsatisfactory performance in repairing large scale lesion of an organ. We hypothesized that dental follicle cells (DFCs), which possess multipotential capability, could reconstruct spinal cord defect (SCD) in combination with biomaterials. In the present study, mesenchymal and neurogenic lineage characteristics of human DFCs (hDFCs) were identified. Aligned electrospun PCL/PLGA material (AEM) was fabricated and it would not lead to cytotoxic reaction; furthermore, hDFCs could stretch along the oriented fibers and proliferate efficiently on AEM. Subsequently, hDFCs seeded AEM was transplanted to restore the defect in rat spinal cord. Functional observation was performed but results showed no statistical significance. The following histologic analyses proved that AEM allowed nerve fibers to pass through, and implanted hDFCs could express oligodendrogenic lineage maker Olig2 in vivo which was able to contribute to remyelination. Therefore, we concluded that hDFCs can be a candidate resource in neural regeneration. Aligned electrospun fibers can support spinal cord structure and induce cell/tissue polarity. This strategy can be considered as alternative proposals for the SCD regeneration studies. PMID:25695050

  9. Corporate Human Resources Adult Training and Employment Program Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aetna Life and Casualty, Hartford, CT.

    In response to increasing difficulty in finding qualified candidates for entry-level positions, the Aetna company has developed an Adult Training and Employment program. This program (1) trains, hires, and retains nontraditional candidates from the area's public and private agencies; (2) focuses on issues that affect this population's ability to…

  10. The Human Function Compunction: Teleological Explanation in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelemen, Deborah; Rosset, Evelyn

    2009-01-01

    Research has found that children possess a broad bias in favor of teleological--or purpose-based--explanations of natural phenomena. The current two experiments explored whether adults implicitly possess a similar bias. In Study 1, undergraduates judged a series of statements as "good" (i.e., correct) or "bad" (i.e., incorrect) explanations for…

  11. "Adult Education Is about Human Being in All Its Aspects"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Derek Legge, who celebrated his 95th birthday at the end of last month, is one of the most dedicated and influential of the largely unsung heroes of the adult education movement in Britain. As modesty is one of the many qualities with which his friends and colleagues credit him, he is certain to shrink from the description, but there is little…

  12. Adult Literacy Programs in Uganda. Africa Region Human Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okech, Anthony; Carr-Hill, Roy A.; Katahoire, Anne R.; Kakooza, Teresa; Ndidde, Alice N.; Oxenham, John

    This report evaluates the outcomes and cost effectiveness of adult literacy programs in Ugandan villages and compares government programs with those provided by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Part 1 describes evaluation objectives, government and NGO literacy programs and the rural socioeconomic context, and evaluation design. About 100…

  13. Human Capital Development: Reforms for Adult and Community Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Sarojni; Haukka, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The adult and community education (ACE) sector is consistently responsive to changing community needs and government priorities. It is this particular function that has drawn ACE into the lifelong learning debate as one model for sustaining communities. The responsiveness of ACE means that the sector and its programs continue to make valuable…

  14. Searching for the vomeronasal organ of adult humans: preliminary findings on location, structure, and size.

    PubMed

    Smith, T D; Siegel, M I; Burrows, A M; Mooney, M P; Burdi, A R; Fabrizio, P A; Clemente, F R

    1998-06-15

    The adult human vomeronasal organ (VNO) has been the focus of numerous recent investigations, yet its developmental continuity from the human fetal VNO is poorly understood. The present study compared new data on the adult human "VNO" with previous findings on the fetal human VNO. Nasal septa were removed from twelve adult human cadavers and each specimen was histologically sectioned. Coronal sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and periodic acid-Schiff-hematoxylin. The sections were examined by light microscopy for the presence of VNOs and the anterior paraseptal cartilages (PC). VNOs were quantified using a computer reconstruction technique to obtain VNO length, volume, and vomeronasal epithelium (VNE) volume. Histologically, VNOs and PCs were identified in eleven specimens. VNOs had ciliated, pseudostratified columnar epithelium with goblet cells. Variations (e.g., multiple communications to the nasal cavity) were observed in several specimens. Quantification was possible for 16 right or left VNOs. Right or left VNOs ranged from 3.5 to 11.8 mm in length, from 1.8 to 33.8 x 10(-4)cc in volume, and from 2.7 to 18.1 x 10(-4)cc in VNE volume. Results indicated that the adult human VNO was similar in VNE morphology, lumen shape, and spatial relationships when compared to human fetal VNOs. By comparison with previous fetal VNO measures, mean VNO length, volume, and VNE volume were larger in adult humans. These results support previous suggestions that postnatal VNO growth occurs. Findings on location and spatial relationships of the adult VNO were similar to those seen in human fetuses, but critical questions remain regarding the ontogeny of the vomeronasal nerves and VNE. PMID:9712196

  15. Teaching Adults with Learning Disabilities. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Dale R.

    This book is designed to show teachers how to reach out to adults and adolescents with learning disabilities and employ specific strategies for helping them to compensate for the disabilities and acquire literacy skills. The ways in which specific differences in brain structure inhibit the mastery of reading, spelling, handwriting, phonics, and…

  16. Arts and Humanities in Adult and Continuing Education. Trends and Issues Alerts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Trends and issues related to arts and humanities in adult and continuing education can be categorized in three ways: ways of knowing, informal sites of learning, and cultural pluralism. The arts and humanities are vehicles for critical reflection, and they present paths to the individual construction of knowledge that are intuitive, relational,…

  17. Reforming the mission of public dental services.

    PubMed

    Wright, F A C; List, P F

    2012-10-01

    Australia has a complex history of providing public dental services to its communities. From the early days of Colonial settlement, the provision of dental care to the Australian public has largely been driven and influenced by organized groups and associations of dentists. The Constitution of Australia, under Section 51 xxiii A, allows for the Commonwealth to provide for medical and dental services. Unlike the United Kingdom, however, dental services have not been embedded into a universal national health service agenda. In 1974, that the Australian Government through the Australian School Dental Program provided the first funding and national direction for public dental services - and that, limited to children. The Commonwealth Dental Health Program 1993-1997 was the second national endeavor to provide public dental services, this time to financially disadvantaged adults. Since that time, public dental service responsibility has been shuttled between States/Territories and the Commonwealth. A new paradigm for public dental services in Australia requires strong Commonwealth leadership, as well as the commitment of State and Territories and the organized dental profession. The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission provided the most recent scenario for a radical change in mission. This paper canvases the competing roles of strategic, functional, and structural issues in relationship to social network and policy issues, which must be recognized if Australians truly seek to reform public dental services. PMID:22998313

  18. Importance of Dental Records in Forensic Dental Identification

    PubMed Central

    Waleed, Petro; Baba, Feras; Alsulami, Salem; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The patient’s record maintains all the diagnostic information with regards to patients and contains valuable information that can be beneficial to the dentist as well as legal authorities during forensic human identification. Aim: Objective of the study was to compare dental records with an ideal dental record form, as well as to compare between dental records of private clinics and academic hospitals and to assess the awareness and the knowledge of the dentists regarding the maintenance of their dental records accurate for medico-legal purposes. Material and Methods: A comparative cross-sectional study between records kept in private clinics and academic teaching hospitals in Khartoum locality. Results: Our results showed that Students are more likely to encounter accurate dental records more than dentists in private clinics. In conclusion Students are more aware regarding medicolegal purposes of maintenance of dental records. Accurate maintenance of dental records is more among dental students. Therefore, private clinics encounter dental records as financial documents. PMID:25870492

  19. A Reproducible Oral Microcosm Biofilm Model for Testing Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Rudney, J.D.; Chen, R.; Lenton, P.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Jones, R.S.; Reilly, C.; Fok, A.S.; Aparicio, C.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Most studies of biofilm effects on dental materials use single-species biofilms, or consortia. Microcosm biofilms grown directly from saliva or plaque are much more diverse, but difficult to characterize. We used the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray (HOMIM) to validate a reproducible oral microcosm model. Methods and Results Saliva and dental plaque were collected from adults and children. Hydroxyapatite and dental composite disks were inoculated with either saliva or plaque, and microcosm biofilms were grown in a CDC biofilm reactor. In later experiments, the reactor was pulsed with sucrose. DNA from inoculums and microcosms were analyzed by HOMIM for 272 species. Microcosms included about 60% of species from the original inoculum. Biofilms grown on hydroxyapatite and composites were extremely similar. Sucrose-pulsing decreased diversity and pH, but increased the abundance of Streptococcus and Veilonella. Biofilms from the same donor, grown at different times, clustered together. Conclusions This model produced reproducible microcosm biofilms that were representative of the oral microbiota. Sucrose induced changes associated with dental caries. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first use of HOMIM to validate an oral microcosm model that can be used to study the effects of complex biofilms on dental materials. PMID:22925110

  20. Photodynamic Inactivation of Root Canal Bacteria by Light Activation through Human Dental Hard and Simulated Surrounding Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cieplik, Fabian; Pummer, Andreas; Leibl, Christoph; Regensburger, Johannes; Schmalz, Gottfried; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Maisch, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic inactivation of bacteria (PIB) may be a supportive antimicrobial approach for use in endodontics, but sufficient activation of photosensitizers (PS) in root canals is a critical point. Therefore, aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of PS absorbing blue (TMPyP) or red light (Methylene Blue; MB) for light activation through human dental hard and simulated surrounding tissue to inactivate root canal bacteria. Methods: A tooth model was fabricated with a human premolar and two molars in an acrylic resin bloc simulating the optical properties of a porcine jaw. The distal root canal of the first molar was enlarged to insert a glass tube (external diameter 2 mm) containing PS and stationary-phase Enterococcus faecalis. Both PS (10 μM) were irradiated for 120 s with BlueV (20 mW/cm2; λem = 400–460 nm) or PDT 1200L (37.8 mW/cm2; λem = 570–680 nm; both: Waldmann Medizintechnik), respectively. Irradiation parameters ensured identical numbers of photons absorbed by each PS. Three setups were chosen: irradiating the glass pipette only (G), the glass pipette inside the single tooth without (GT) and with (GTM) simulated surrounding tissues. Colony forming units (CFU) were evaluated. Transmission measurements of the buccal halves of hemisected mandibular first molars were performed by means of a photospectrometer. Results: PIB with both PS led to reduction by ≥ 5 log10 of E. faecalis CFU for each setup. From transmission measurements, a threshold wavelength λth for allowing an amount of light transmission for sufficient activation of PS was determined to be 430 nm. Conclusion: This study can be seen as proof of principle that light activation of given intra-canal PS from outside a tooth may be possible at wavelengths ≥ 430 nm, facilitating clinical application of PIB in endodontics. PMID:27379059

  1. The effect of UV-Vis to near-infrared light on the biological response of human dental pulp cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadis, Mohammed A.; Cooper, Paul R.; Milward, Michael R.; Gorecki, Patricia; Tarte, Edward; Churm, James; Palin, William M.

    2015-03-01

    Human dental pulp cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured in phenol-red-free α-MEM/10%-FCS at 37ºC in 5% CO2. DPCs at passages 2-4 were seeded (150μL; 25,000 cell/ml) in black 96-microwell plates with transparent bases. 24h post-seeding, cultures were irradiated using a bespoke LED array consisting of 60 LEDs (3.5mW/cm2) of wavelengths from 400-900nm (10 wavelengths, n=6) for time intervals of up to 120s. Metabolic and mitochondrial activity was assessed via a modified MTT assay. Statistical differences were identified using multi-factorial analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey tests (P=0.05). The biological responses were significantly dependent upon post-irradiation incubation period, wavelength and exposure time (P<0.05). At shorter wavelength irradiances (400nm), a reduction in mitochondrial activity was detected although not significant, whereas longer wavelength irradiances (at 633, 656, 781 and 799nm) significantly increased mitochondrial activity (P<0.05) in DPCs. At these wavelengths, mitochondrial activity was generally increased for exposures less than 90s with 30s exposures being most effective with 24h incubation. Increasing the post-irradiation incubation period increased the measured response and identified further significance (P<0.05). The biological responses of human DPCs were wavelength, exposure-time and incubation period dependent. The optimisation of irradiation parameters will be key to the successful application of LLLT in dentistry.

  2. Ethical and Legal Considerations in Dental Caries Research Using Human Subjects: Conference Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Joanna

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research are discussed. It is concluded that dentistry must not uncritically accept guidelines meant for a broader class of research, that guidelines can be misapplied, and that researchers must educate themselves on the Commission…

  3. The human function compunction: teleological explanation in adults.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Deborah; Rosset, Evelyn

    2009-04-01

    Research has found that children possess a broad bias in favor of teleological--or purpose-based--explanations of natural phenomena. The current two experiments explored whether adults implicitly possess a similar bias. In Study 1, undergraduates judged a series of statements as "good" (i.e., correct) or "bad" (i.e., incorrect) explanations for why different phenomena occur. Judgments occurred in one of three conditions: fast speeded, moderately speeded, or unspeeded. Participants in speeded conditions judged significantly more scientifically unwarranted teleological explanations as correct (e.g., "the sun radiates heat because warmth nurtures life"), but were not more error-prone on control items (e.g., unwarranted physical explanations such as "hills form because floodwater freezes"). Study 2 extended these findings by examining the relationship between different aspects of adults' "promiscuous teleology" and other variables such as scientific knowledge, religious beliefs, and inhibitory control. Implications of these findings for scientific literacy are discussed. PMID:19200537

  4. Effects of microenvironment on growth and differentiation of human dental pulp cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datko, Laura Christine

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have recently been described as a potential stem cell source for various regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. They appear to be multipotent, however more characterization is necessary to determine the true potential of these cells. An important aspect of using DPSCs, or any stem cell type, tissue engineering application is the microenvironment within the construct. The microenvironment could include construct mechanical properties, construct composition, and 3D dynamic conditions in vivo. This work aims to study those specific microenvironment effects on DPSCs. To determine the effects of mechanical properties of the substrate on DPSCs, they were seeded on polyacrylamide (PA) gels of different elastic moduli. These gels ranged from 3 kPa to 75 kPa and a glass coverslip was used as a control. They were also exposed to either standard stem cell media or an osteogenic differentiation media, to determine the potential of the DPSCs for osteogenic/odontogenic differentiation. The cultures were analyzed for morphological changes, osteopontin production, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) production, and mineralization. The results showed that the DPSCs adhered well to the PA gels for the first few days in culture, but by day 7, they were starting to detach from the PA gels and only remain viable in gel defects or along the edges. This selective growth was also reflected in the mineralization, which only occurred in areas of confluence for the cells on the PA gels. Interestingly, all cultures produced osteopontin and ALP, however by the end of the experiment, the cells cultured on glass had the highest ALP production. It appeared that without the addition of growth factors to induce other cell lineages, DPSCs defaulted to an osteogenic/odontogenic lineage. To determine the effect of mineral composition, preliminary studies were done on bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and 7F2 osteoblasts. These two cell types were exposed to

  5. Postnatal and adult neurogenesis in the development of human disease.

    PubMed

    Danzer, Steve C

    2008-10-01

    The mammalian brain contains a population of neurons that are continuously generated from late embryogenesis through adulthood-after the generation of almost all other neuronal types. This brain region-the hippocampal dentate gyrus-is in a sense, therefore, persistently immature. Postnatal and adult neurogenesis is likely an essential feature of the dentate, which is critical for learning and memory. Protracted neurogenesis after birth would allow the new cells to develop in conjunction with external events-but it may come with a price: while neurogenesis in utero occurs in a protected environment, children and adults are exposed to any number of hazards, such as toxins and infectious agents. Mature neurons might be resistant to such exposures, but new neurons may be vulnerable. Consistent with this prediction, in adult rodents seizures disrupt the integration of newly generated granule cells, whereas mature granule cells are comparatively unaffected. Significantly, abnormally interconnected cells may contribute to epileptogenesis and/or associated cognitive and memory deficits. Finally, studies increasingly indicate that new granule cells are extremely sensitive to a host of endogenous and exogenous factors, raising the possibility that disrupted granule cell integration may be a common feature of many neurological diseases. PMID:18997123

  6. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed. PMID:19410234

  7. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  8. The Adult Learning Disabled Employee: The Organization's Hidden Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macomber, Janet A.

    This paper describes an experiment with background material designed to promote problem (learning disabled) employees as human resources rather than rejects. The material is presented in the form of the transcript of a fictional advisory committee meeting attended by the human resources manager, assistant corporate counsel, training director, line…

  9. The expression of c-kit protein in human adult and fetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Horie, K; Fujita, J; Takakura, K; Kanzaki, H; Suginami, H; Iwai, M; Nakayama, H; Mori, T

    1993-11-01

    The c-kit proto-oncogene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor and is allelic with the dominant white-spotting (W) locus of the mouse. In this study we investigated the expression of human c-kit protein in various adult and fetal human tissues immunohistochemically using anti-human c-kit monoclonal antibody. To discriminate c-kit+ cells from mast cells expressing c-kit, mast cells were identified by staining with Toluidine blue. In oogonia, spermatogonia and skin melanocytes of the fetus and in oocytes of adult ovary, c-kit expression was detected. In adult uterus, c-kit+ cells were widely distributed in the basal layer of the endometrium, myometrium and cervix, the number and distribution being almost identical to those of mast cells. In fetal uterus, c-kit+ non-mast cells clustered beneath the epithelium and a few mast cells were observed in the myometrium and subserosal layer. In both adult and fetus, c-kit+ non-mast cells were detected within smooth muscle layers of the intestine, colon and oesophagus, while mast cells were observed in the mucosal and submucosal layers of these organs. In contrast to mice, no expression of c-kit protein was detected in the human placenta and decidua. Thus, the distribution of c-kit+ cells in various tissues is similar but not identical between adult and fetus and between human and mouse. PMID:7507133

  10. Alternative Sources of Adult Stem Cells: Human Amniotic Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbank, Susanne; van Griensven, Martijn; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Peterbauer-Scherb, Anja

    Human amniotic membrane is a highly promising cell source for tissue engineering. The cells thereof, human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) and human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSC), may be immunoprivileged, they represent an early developmental status, and their application is ethically uncontroversial. Cell banking strategies may use freshly isolated cells or involve in vitro expansion to increase cell numbers. Therefore, we have thoroughly characterized the effect of in vitro cultivation on both phenotype and differentiation potential of hAEC. Moreover, we present different strategies to improve expansion including replacement of animal-derived supplements by human platelet products or the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase to extend the in vitro lifespan of amniotic cells. Characterization of the resulting cultures includes phenotype, growth characteristics, and differentiation potential, as well as immunogenic and immunomodulatory properties.

  11. Vinegar as a disinfectant of extracted human teeth for dental educational use

    PubMed Central

    Tijare, Manisha; Smitha, D; Kasetty, Sowmya; Kallianpur, Shreenivas; Gupta, Sandeep; Amith, HV

    2014-01-01

    Context: Extracted human teeth are routinely used in dentistry to learn technical and preclinical skills. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has adopted guidelines for infection control of extracted teeth used for research and teaching, requiring that teeth be sterilized before use. Many of the proposed disinfection methods starting from use of formalin, sodium hypochlorite and to autoclaving have their own drawbacks and may not be practical. Aim: To assess the effectiveness of vinegar for disinfection/sterilization of extracted human teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 extracted non-carious human teeth were kept in seven disinfectant media—10% formalin, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 70% alcohol, vinegar, neem extract and normal saline. Ten samples were placed in each disinfectant individually for a period of 7 days, at room temperature. In all, 10 teeth were treated with microwave irradiation at 650 W for 3 min. Later, teeth from each group were placed individually in separate test tubes containing 10 ml of tryptic soy broth at 37°C for 48 h to observe the evidence of growth of microorganisms. Semiquantitative analysis of all the samples was done in Clade agar at 37°C for 48 h. Statistical Analysis Used: The number of teeth disinfected in each group was compared using Chi square test. Results: 10% formalin, 3% hydrogen peroxide and vinegar were totally effective. The result was statistically significant with a Chi square value of 61.414 and P < 0.001. Conclusions: Vinegar can be used as an effective disinfectant medium for extracted human teeth. PMID:24959031

  12. A new era in palaeomicrobiology: prospects for ancient dental calculus as a long-term record of the human oral microbiome.

    PubMed

    Warinner, Christina; Speller, Camilla; Collins, Matthew J

    2015-01-19

    The field of palaeomicrobiology is dramatically expanding thanks to recent advances in high-throughput biomolecular sequencing, which allows unprecedented access to the evolutionary history and ecology of human-associated and environmental microbes. Recently, human dental calculus has been shown to be an abundant, nearly ubiquitous, and long-term reservoir of the ancient oral microbiome, preserving not only microbial and host biomolecules but also dietary and environmental debris. Modern investigations of native human microbiota have demonstrated that the human microbiome plays a central role in health and chronic disease, raising questions about changes in microbial ecology, diversity and function through time. This paper explores the current state of ancient oral microbiome research and discusses successful applications, methodological challenges and future possibilities in elucidating the intimate evolutionary relationship between humans and their microbes. PMID:25487328

  13. A new era in palaeomicrobiology: prospects for ancient dental calculus as a long-term record of the human oral microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Warinner, Christina; Speller, Camilla; Collins, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The field of palaeomicrobiology is dramatically expanding thanks to recent advances in high-throughput biomolecular sequencing, which allows unprecedented access to the evolutionary history and ecology of human-associated and environmental microbes. Recently, human dental calculus has been shown to be an abundant, nearly ubiquitous, and long-term reservoir of the ancient oral microbiome, preserving not only microbial and host biomolecules but also dietary and environmental debris. Modern investigations of native human microbiota have demonstrated that the human microbiome plays a central role in health and chronic disease, raising questions about changes in microbial ecology, diversity and function through time. This paper explores the current state of ancient oral microbiome research and discusses successful applications, methodological challenges and future possibilities in elucidating the intimate evolutionary relationship between humans and their microbes. PMID:25487328

  14. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Song, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and brain tumors. PMID:27375363

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Song, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and brain tumors. PMID:27375363

  16. [Dietary phytoestrogen and its potential benefits in adult human health].

    PubMed

    Garrido, Argelia; de la Maza, María Pía; Valladares, Luis

    2003-11-01

    Human diet contains a series of bioactive vegetal compounds that can improve human health. Among these, there has been a special interest for phytoestrogens. This article reviews the evidence about the potential benefits of phytoestrogens for human health. Forty eight manuscripts were selected for their study design and relevance to human health. The cell growth inhibitory effects of phytoestrogens and their implication in breast cancer are reviewed. Also the effects of these compounds on serum lipid levels and the effectiveness of a phytoestrogen derivate, ipriflavone, on the prevention of osteoporosis are analyzed. Although these compounds have a great potential for improving health, there is still not enough evidence to recommend the routine use of phytoestrogens. PMID:14743696

  17. Division of labor by sex and age in Neandertals: an approach through the study of activity-related dental wear.

    PubMed

    Estalrrich, Almudena; Rosas, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of activity-related dental wear patterns in prehistoric anatomically modern humans and modern hunter-gatherers has shown sex differences attributable to a gendered division of labor. Neandertals are known to have extensive anterior dental wear related to the use of their front teeth as a tool. In this study we analyze the i) cultural striations (scratches on the labial surface of the anterior teeth with a cut-mark morphology), and ii) dental chipping (ante-mortem microfracture involving enamel or both enamel and dentine) in 19 Neandertal individuals from the l'Hortus (France), Spy (Belgium), and El Sidrón (Spain) sites, and compare the characteristics of those traits with the age and sex estimation for the individuals and among samples. The study reveals that all individuals have cultural striations, but those detected on the adult females are longer than the striations found in adult males. Regarding the distribution of dental chipping, the prevalence of this trait is higher in the maxillary dentition of males whereas females have the majority of dental chipping on their mandibular teeth. The differences detected on the overall activity-related dental wear pattern denote a difference or a division of labor by age and sex in Neandertals while using the mouth as a third hand, i.e., in activities other than the provisioning of food, and provide new evidence for the lifestyle of this Pleistocene fossil human species. PMID:25681013

  18. [Effect of irradiation with dental polymerized lamps on human Langerhans cells: a study made on human skin transplanted to nude mice].

    PubMed

    Bonding, N

    1992-04-01

    Light polymerized composite resin materials are now widely used in dentistry. Most resins are polymerized by light sources which have a powerful emission of visible light and a small emission in the ultraviolet light A spectrum (UV-A 320-400 mm). Possible eye damage, induced by such light, has been investigated, but the effects on the oral mucosa, which is directly exposed to the light, have been examined in only one animal study. Langerhans cells (LC) are dendritic non-epithelial cells which form a network within stratified epithelia. LC have features of macrophages, functions as antigen-presenting cells, and play an important role in the immune system associated with skin and oral mucosa. Pilot studies on human skin transplanted to nude mice showed that radiation with small therapeutic doses from a dental light curing unit (DLU) having only a small fraction of UV-light can reduce or deplete the OKT6 surface marker of LC in human epithelium. Further investigation of the photobiologic mechanisms involved spectral analyses of the emmission from the lamps and construction of a suitable light source for establishing an action spectrum for LC in the UV-A range. The action spectrum for LC in the UV-A range was obtained by exposing human skin, grafted to nude mice, to monochromatic light with a band pass of 5-10 nm. Criterion for threshold doses was total depletion of LC, visualized by staining with known LC-markers, monoclonal antibodies OKT6, DAKO-Vimentin, DAKO-HLA-DR and DAKO-S-100. The action spectrum for LC consisted of a biphasic curve, with a non-linear, strong wave-length dependency.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1412043

  19. A century of trends in adult human height.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5-22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3-19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8-144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. PMID:27458798

  20. A century of trends in adult human height

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13410.001 PMID:27458798

  1. Resident aerobic microbiota of the adult human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, T T; Kirkeby, L P; Poulsen, K; Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M

    2000-10-01

    Recent evidence strongly suggests that the microbiota of the nasal cavity plays a crucial role in determining the reaction patterns of the mucosal and systemic immune system. However, little is known about the normal microbiota of the nasal cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine the microbiota in different parts of the nasal cavity and to develop and evaluate methods for this purpose. Samples were collected from 10 healthy adults by nasal washes and by swabbing of the mucosa through a sterile introduction device. Both methods gave results that were quantitatively and qualitatively reproducible, and revealed significant differences in the density of the nasal microbiota between individuals. The study revealed absence of gram-negative bacteria that are regular members of the commensal microbiota of the pharynx. Likewise, viridans type streptococci were sparsely represented. The nasal microbiota was dominated by species of the genera Corynebacterium, Aureobacterium, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus, including S. epidermis, S. capitis, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis and S. warneri. These studies show that the microbiota of the nasal cavity of adults is strikingly different from that of the pharynx, and that the nasal cavity is a primary habitat for several species of diphtheroids recognized as opportunistic pathogens. Under special circumstances, single species, including IgA1 protease-producing bacteria, may become predominant in a restricted area of the nasal mucosa. PMID:11200821

  2. Hypoxia promotes CEMP1 expression and induces cementoblastic differentiation of human dental stem cells in an HIF-1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwajung; Jin, Hexiu; Kim, Jin-Young; Lim, Ki-Taek; Choung, Han-Wool; Park, Joo-Young; Chung, Jong Hoon; Choung, Pill-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Cementum covering the tooth root provides attachment for the tooth proper to the surrounding alveolar bone via non-mineralized periodontal ligament (PDL). Cementum protein 1 (CEMP1) has been shown to induce a cementoblastic phenotype in cementoblast precursors cells of PDL. Oxygen availability is a critical signal for correct development of many tissues; however, its role in tooth root and periodontium development remains poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that reduced oxygen tension increased CEMP1 expression, mineral deposition, and alkaline phosphatase activity in human dental stem cells such as PDL stem cells and periapical follicular stem cells. Since an oxemic state is transduced by the transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), we performed experiments to determine whether this protein was responsible for the observed changes. We noted that when HIF-1 was activated by gene introduction or chemically, CEMP1 expression and mineralization increased. In contrast, when HIF-1α was silenced, CEMP1 expression and mineralization did not increase in vitro. Furthermore, we showed for the first time that mouse tooth root and periodontium development occurs partly under hypoxic conditions, particularly at the apical part and latently at the PDL space in vivo. Desferrioxamine, an HIF-1 stimulator, enhances CEMP1 expression in the mouse PDL space, suggesting that hypoxia affects cementogenesis of PDL cells lining the surface of the developing tooth root in an HIF-1-dependent manner. These results suggest that HIF-1 activators may have the ability to stimulate regeneration of the tooth root and cementum formation. PMID:24117017

  3. Nitric Oxide-Induced Apoptosis of Human Dental Pulp Cells Is Mediated by the Mitochondria-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Young; Jeong, Yeon Jin; Kang, Gi Chang; Kim, Mi-Hwa; Kim, Sun Hun; Chung, Hyun-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is recognized as a mediator and regulator of inflammatory responses. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and NOS is abundantly expressed in the human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). NO produced by NOS can be cytotoxic at higher concentrations to HDPCs. However, the mechanism by which this cytotoxic pathway is activated in cells exposed to NO is not known. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the NO-induced cytotoxic mechanism in HDPCs. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor, reduced the viability of HDPCs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We investigated the in vitro effects of nitric oxide on apoptosis of cultured HDPCs. Cells showed typical apoptotic morphology after exposure to SNP. Besides, the number of Annexin V positive cells was increased among the SNP-treated HDPCs. SNP enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) ameliorated the decrement of cell viability induced by SNP. However, a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) did not inhibited the decrement of cell viability induced by SNP. SNP increased cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 expression levels. Moreover, SNP-treated HDPCs elevated activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9. While pretreatment with inhibitors of caspase (z-VAD-fmk, z-DEVD-fmk) reversed the NO-induced apoptosis of HDPCs. From these results, it can be suggested that NO induces apoptosis of HDPCs through the mitochondria-dependent pathway mediated by ROS and Bcl-2 family, but not by the cyclic GMP pathway. PMID:24634593

  4. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Lee, Eui-Suk; Kim, Mi-joo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-cheol

    2015-01-01

    Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and polycaprolactone (PCL), and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were investigated. Furthermore, the associated signaling pathways were examined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the cellular events. The magnetic scaffolds incorporated with MNPs at varying concentrations (up to 10%wt) supported cellular adhesion and multiplication over 2 weeks, showing good viability. The cellular constructs in the nanocomposite scaffolds played significant roles in the stimulation of adhesion, migration and odontogenesis of HDPCs. Cells were shown to adhere to substantially higher number when affected by the magnetic scaffolds. Cell migration tested by in vitro wound closure model was significantly enhanced by the magnetic scaffolds. Furthermore, odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs, as assessed by the alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expressions of odontogenic markers (DMP-1, DSPP,osteocalcin, and ostepontin), and alizarin red staining, was significantly stimulated by the magnetic scaffolds. Signal transduction was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The magnetic scaffolds upregulated the integrin subunits (α1, α2, β1 and β3) and activated downstream pathways, such as FAK, paxillin, p38, ERK MAPK, and NF-κB. The current study reports for the first time the significant impact of magnetic scaffolds in stimulating HDPC behaviors, including cell migration and odontogenesis, implying the potential usefulness of the magnetic scaffolds for dentin-pulp tissue engineering. PMID:26382272

  5. Neurogenic maturation of human dental pulp stem cells following neurosphere generation induces morphological and electrophysiological characteristics of functional neurons.

    PubMed

    Gervois, Pascal; Struys, Tom; Hilkens, Petra; Bronckaers, Annelies; Ratajczak, Jessica; Politis, Constantinus; Brône, Bert; Lambrichts, Ivo; Martens, Wendy

    2015-02-01

    Cell-based therapies are emerging as an alternative treatment option to promote functional recovery in patients suffering from neurological disorders, which are the major cause of death and permanent disability. The present study aimed to differentiate human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) toward functionally active neuronal cells in vitro. hDPSCs were subjected to a two-step protocol. First, neuronal induction was acquired through the formation of neurospheres, followed by neuronal maturation, based on cAMP and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) signaling. At the ultrastructural level, it was shown that the intra-spheral microenvironment promoted intercellular communication. hDPSCs grew out of the neurospheres in vitro and established a neurogenic differentiated hDPSC culture (d-hDPSCs) upon cAMP and NT-3 signaling. d-hDPSCs were characterized by the increased expression of neuronal markers such as neuronal nuclei, microtubule-associated protein 2, neural cell adhesion molecule, growth-associated protein 43, synapsin I, and synaptophysin compared with nondifferentiated hDPSCs. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that the secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and nerve growth factor differed between d-hDPSCs and hDPSCs. d-hDPSCs acquired neuronal features, including multiple intercommunicating cytoplasmic extensions and increased vesicular transport, as shown by the electron microscopic observation. Patch clamp analysis demonstrated the functional activity of d-hDPSCs by the presence of tetrodotoxin- and tetraethyl ammonium-sensitive voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels, respectively. A subset of d-hDPSCs was able to fire a single action potential. The results reported in this study demonstrate that hDPSCs are capable of neuronal commitment following neurosphere formation, characterized by distinct morphological and electrophysiological properties of functional neuronal cells. PMID:25203005

  6. Effect of low-level laser irradiation on proliferation and viability of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, Ivana Maria; Ginani, Fernanda; Mota-Filho, Haroldo Gurgel; Henriques, Águida Cristina Gomes; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão

    2015-12-01

    A positive effect of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the proliferation of some cell types has been observed, but little is known about its effect on dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). The aim of this study was to identify the lowest energy density able to promote the proliferation of DPSCs and to maintain cell viability. Human DPSCs were isolated from two healthy third molars. In the third passage, the cells were irradiated or not (control) with an InGaAlP diode laser at 0 and 48 h using two different energy densities (0.5 and 1.0 J/cm²). Cell proliferation and viability and mitochondrial activity were evaluated at intervals of 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after the first laser application. Apoptosis- and cell cycle-related events were analyzed by flow cytometry. The group irradiated with an energy density of 1.0 J/cm² exhibited an increase of cell proliferation, with a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) compared to the control group at 72 and 96 h. No significant changes in cell viability were observed throughout the experiment. The distribution of cells in the cell cycle phases was consistent with proliferating cells in all three groups. We concluded that LLLI, particularly a dose of 1.0 J/cm², contributed to the growth of DPSCs and maintenance of its viability. This fact indicates this therapy to be an important future tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine involving stem cells. PMID:26341379

  7. The histone acetyltransferase p300 regulates the expression of pluripotency factors and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Liu, Huijuan; Ning, Yanyang; Xu, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    p300 is a well-known histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and coactivator that plays vital roles in many physiological processes. Despite extensive research on the involvement of p300 in the regulation of transcription in numerous cell lines, the roles of this protein in regulating pluripotency genes and odontogenic differentiation in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) are poorly understood. To address this issue, we investigated the expression of OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 and the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation capacity of HDPCs following p300 overexpression. We found that p300 overexpression did not overtly affect the ability of HDPCs to proliferate. The overexpression of p300 upregulated the promoter activity and the mRNA and protein expression of NANOG and SOX2. The HAT activity of p300 appeared to partially mediate the regulation of these factors; indeed, when a mutant form of p300 lacking the HAT domain was overexpressed, the promoter activity and expression of NANOG and SOX2 decreased relative to p300 overexpression but was greater than in the control. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mRNA levels of the odontogenic marker genes dentine matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OCN) were significantly decreased in HDPCs overexpressing p300 cultured under normal culture conditions and increased in HDPCs inducted to undergo odontogenic differentiation. This finding was further confirmed by measuring levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and assessing the formation of mineralized nodules. The HAT activity of p300 had no significant effect on odontogenic differentiation. p300 was recruited to the promoter regions of OCN and DSPP and might be acting as a coactivator to increase the acetylation of lysine 9 of histone H3 of OCN and DSPP. Collectively, our results show that p300 plays an important role in regulating the expression of key pluripotency genes in HDPCs and

  8. TrAmplification of Human Dental Follicle Cells by piggyBac Transposon - Mediated Reversible Immortalization System.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Feng, Ge; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Yong; Huang, Lan; Zheng, Leilei; Deng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Dental follicle cells (DFCs) are the precursor cells of periodontium. Under certain differentiation conditions, DFCs can be induced to differentiate into chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic cells. However, DFCs has limited lifespan in vitro, so it's difficult to harvest enough cells for basic research and translational application. pMPH86 is a piggyBac transposon-mediated vector which contains SV40 T-Ag cassette that can be removed by flippase recognition target (FRT) recombinase. Here we demonstrated the pMPH86 can effectively amplify human DFCs through reversible immortalization. The immortalized DFCs (iDFCs) exhibit higher proliferate activity, which can be reversed to its original level before immortalization when deimmortalized by FLP recombinase. The iDFCs and deimmortalized DFCs (dDFCs) express most DFC markers and maintain multiple differentiation potential in vitro as they can be induced by BMP9 to differentiate into chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic cells evidenced by gene expression and protein marker. We also proved telomerase activity of iDFCs are significantly increased and maintained at a high level, while the telomerase activity of primary DFCs was relatively low and decreased with every passage. After SV40 T-Ag was removed to deimmortalize the cells, telomerase activity was reduced to its original level before immortalization and decreased with passages just the same as primary DFCs. These results suggest that piggyBac immortalization system could be a potential strategy to amplify primary cells, which is critical for regenerative research and further clinical application. PMID:26172849

  9. Aseptic Raman spectroscopy can detect changes associated with the culture of human dental pulp stromal cells in osteoinductive culture

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Adam; Ashton, Lorna; Yang, Xuebin B.; Goodacre, Royston; Tomlinson, Matthew J.; Smith, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet need for the non-invasive characterisation of stem cells to facilitate the translation of cell-based therapies. Raman spectroscopy has proven utility in stem cell characterisation but as yet no method has been reported capable of taking repeated Raman measurements of living cells aseptically over time. The aim of this study was to determine if Raman spectroscopy could be used to monitor changes in a well characterised cell population (human dental pulp stromal cells (DPSCs)) by taking repeated Raman measurements from the same cell populations in osteoinductive culture over time and under aseptic conditions. DPSCs were isolated from extracted premolar teeth from 3 consenting donors. Following in vitro expansion, DPSCs were maintained for 28 days in osteo-inductive medium. Raman spectra were acquired from the cells at days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14 and 28. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out to assess if there was any temporal spectral variation. At day 28, osteoinduction was confirmed using alizarin red staining and qRT-PCR for alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Alizarin red staining was positive in all samples at day 28 and significant increases in alkaline phosphatase (p < 0.001) and osteocalcin (p < 0.05) gene expression were also observed compared with day 0. PCA of the Raman data demonstrated trends in PC1 from days 0–10, influenced by protein associated features and PC2 from days 10–28, influenced by DNA/RNA associated features. We conclude that spectroscopy can be used to monitor changes in Raman signature with time associated with the osteoinduction of DPSCs using repeated measurements via an aseptic methodology. PMID:26374253

  10. Magnetic Nanocomposite Scaffold-Induced Stimulation of Migration and Odontogenesis of Human Dental Pulp Cells through Integrin Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-joo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-cheol

    2015-01-01

    Magnetism is an intriguing physical cue that can alter the behaviors of a broad range of cells. Nanocomposite scaffolds that exhibit magnetic properties are thus considered useful 3D matrix for culture of cells and their fate control in repair and regeneration processes. Here we produced magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds made of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and polycaprolactone (PCL), and the effects of the scaffolds on the adhesion, growth, migration and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were investigated. Furthermore, the associated signaling pathways were examined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms in the cellular events. The magnetic scaffolds incorporated with MNPs at varying concentrations (up to 10%wt) supported cellular adhesion and multiplication over 2 weeks, showing good viability. The cellular constructs in the nanocomposite scaffolds played significant roles in the stimulation of adhesion, migration and odontogenesis of HDPCs. Cells were shown to adhere to substantially higher number when affected by the magnetic scaffolds. Cell migration tested by in vitro wound closure model was significantly enhanced by the magnetic scaffolds. Furthermore, odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs, as assessed by the alkaline phosphatase activity, mRNA expressions of odontogenic markers (DMP-1, DSPP,osteocalcin, and ostepontin), and alizarin red staining, was significantly stimulated by the magnetic scaffolds. Signal transduction was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy. The magnetic scaffolds upregulated the integrin subunits (α1, α2, β1 and β3) and activated downstream pathways, such as FAK, paxillin, p38, ERK MAPK, and NF-κB. The current study reports for the first time the significant impact of magnetic scaffolds in stimulating HDPC behaviors, including cell migration and odontogenesis, implying the potential usefulness of the magnetic scaffolds for dentin-pulp tissue engineering. PMID:26382272

  11. Stem cells: Sources, and regenerative therapies in dental research and practice

    PubMed Central

    Aly, Lobna Abdel Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are considered to be among the principle scientific breakthroughs of the twentieth century for the future of medicine, and considered to be an important weapon to fight against diseases, particularly those that have resisted the efforts of science for a long time. Human dental tissues have limited potentials to regenerate but the discovery of dental stem cells have developed new and surprising scenario in regenerative dentistry. Stem cell treatments are one example of the possibility using adult cells sourced from patients’ own bodies’ means that it can be expected that in the near future such treatments may become routine at dental practices. The hope is that it will become possible to regenerate bone and dental tissues including the periodontal ligament, dental pulp and enamel, and that the creation of new teeth may also become feasible. In view of this possibility of achieving restoration with regenerative medicine, it can be considered that a new era of dentistry is beginning. Thus the aim of this review is to give dental professionals a brief overview of different stem cells sources and the latest findings and their implications for improving oral health and treating certain conditions of the human mouth and face. PMID:26328020

  12. Hesperetin induces melanin production in adult human epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Usach, Iris; Taléns-Visconti, Raquel; Magraner-Pardo, Lorena; Peris, José-Esteban

    2015-06-01

    One of the major sources of flavonoids for humans are citrus fruits, hesperidin being the predominant flavonoid. Hesperetin (HSP), the aglycon of hesperidin, has been reported to provide health benefits such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. However, the effect of HSP on skin pigmentation is not clear. Some authors have found that HSP induces melanogenesis in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells, which, if extrapolated to in vivo conditions, might protect skin against photodamage. Since the effect of HSP on normal melanocytes could be different to that observed on melanoma cells, the described effect of HSP on murine melanoma cells has been compared to the effect obtained using normal human melanocytes. HSP concentrations of 25 and 50 µM induced melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in human melanocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to control melanocytes, 25 µM HSP increased melanin production and tyrosinase activity 1.4-fold (p < 0.01) and 1.1-fold (p < 0.01), respectively, and the corresponding increases in the case of 50 µM HSP were 1.9-fold (p < 0.001) and 1.3-fold (p < 0.001). Therefore, HSP could be considered a valuable photoprotective substance if its capacity to increase melanin production in human melanocyte cultures could be reproduced on human skin. PMID:25765751

  13. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  14. Environmental effects on skeletal versus dental development II: further testing of a basic assumption in human osteological research.

    PubMed

    Conceição, E L N; Cardoso, H F V

    2011-03-01

    This study further tests the general assumption that skeletal development is more sensitive to socioeconomic factors than dental development in a sample of modern immature Portuguese skeletons (N = 41) of known sex, age, and socioeconomic background. Skeletal development was assessed from skeletal maturation of the knee and dental development was assessed from schedules of tooth formation. Discrepancies between physiological age (skeletal and dental age) and chronological age were used as a measure of developmental status. A positive score indicates that physiological age is in advance of chronological age, whereas a negative score indicates the reverse. Two socioeconomic groups, one of low and the other of high socioeconomic status, were created based on the occupation of the father and on the place of residence, and developmental status was compared between the two socioeconomic groups. Results confirm previous studies by showing that dental development is less affected by environmental insults than skeletal maturation. While socioeconomic differences in skeletal maturation range from 1.20 to 1.22 years (15-18% of chronological age), socioeconomic differences in dental maturation range from 0.51 to 0.53 years (4-9% of chronological age). Compared to a previous study, results also suggest that skeletal maturation is more affected than skeletal growth. Additionally, an adaptation of the radiographic atlas of skeletal development of the knee is proposed for use with dry skeletal material. PMID:21302272

  15. 75 FR 2150 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Review Branch, National Inst. of Dental & Craniofacial Research, NIH 6701 Democracy Blvd., Room 672,...

  16. 77 FR 71605 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Rm. 676, Bethesda, MD...

  17. 77 FR 8268 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research,...

  18. 77 FR 74676 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, One Democracy Plaza, Room 670,...

  19. 78 FR 56902 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, One Democracy Plaza,...

  20. 75 FR 13562 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below... National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research, including consideration of personnel...

  1. 77 FR 14816 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below... National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research, including consideration of personnel...

  2. 77 FR 10539 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial, Research, 6701 Democracy Blvd.,...

  3. 76 FR 1444 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Insitutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd, Room 664,...

  4. 75 FR 39547 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, One Democracy Plaza, Room...

  5. 78 FR 36556 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Chief, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Rm. 662, National Institute of Dental &, Craniofacial Research,...

  6. 78 FR 28234 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Room...

  7. 75 FR 993 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Review Branch, National Inst of Dental & Craniofacial Research, NIH 6701 Democracy Blvd., Room 672,...

  8. 75 FR 4833 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Inst of Dental & Craniofacial Research, NIH 6701 Democracy Blvd, room 672, MSC 4878, Bethesda, md...

  9. 76 FR 80953 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research Council....

  10. 78 FR 24762 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below... NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DENTAL & CRANIOFACIAL RESEARCH, including consideration of personnel...

  11. 77 FR 59202 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Branch, National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center...

  12. 76 FR 57061 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Kelly, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Inst of Dental &...

  13. 78 FR 39740 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 6701 Democracy Blvd.,...

  14. 77 FR 40369 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Rm. 676,...

  15. 77 FR 6812 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research,...

  16. 76 FR 66077 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below... NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DENTAL & CRANIOFACIAL RESEARCH, including consideration of personnel...

  17. 76 FR 20693 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, One Democracy Plaza, Room 670, Bethesda, MD...

  18. 75 FR 26762 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. ] Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., National Inst of Dental & Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy, Rm...

  19. 75 FR 58409 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research,...

  20. 76 FR 5184 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 6701 Democracy Blvd.,...

  1. 75 FR 2146 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research/NIH, 6701 Democracy...

  2. 75 FR 62553 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... of Dental and Craniofacial Research, One Democracy Plaza, Room 670, Bethesda, MD 20892-4878,...

  3. 75 FR 58409 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, ] National Inst of Dental & Craniofacial Research, NIH...

  4. 77 FR 10539 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Natl Inst of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National...

  5. 78 FR 24761 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; Design and Development of Novel Dental Composite Restorative Systems Review Panel....

  6. 75 FR 52537 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Inst of Dental & Craniofacial Research, NIH...

  7. 76 FR 28996 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Branch, National Inst of Dental & Craniofacial Research, NIH, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Room 672, MSC...

  8. 76 FR 28793 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Review Branch, National Inst of Dental & Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center...: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; Agenda: Review...

  9. 76 FR 22111 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below... National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research, including consideration of personnel...

  10. 77 FR 68136 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below... National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research, including consideration of personnel...

  11. 76 FR 79202 - National Institute Of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute Of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Inst of Dental & Craniofacial...

  12. 77 FR 59199 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial, Research, One...

  13. 78 FR 75929 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; Review of R01 &...

  14. 75 FR 7485 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., National Inst of Dental & Craniofacial Research, NIH 6701 Democracy Blvd., Room 672, MSC 4878, Bethesda,...

  15. 75 FR 7486 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental...

  16. 78 FR 67178 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial...

  17. 77 FR 35990 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial...

  18. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues.

    PubMed

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K; Rivas, Manuel A; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S; Kukurba, Kim R; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Burchard, Esteban G; Seibold, Max A; MacArthur, Daniel G; Montgomery, Stephen B; Zaitlen, Noah A; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-07-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  19. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Seibold, Max A.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  20. An in vitro method for making repeated pH measurements on human dental plaque.

    PubMed

    Bibby, B G; Krobicka, A

    1984-06-01

    A combination pH micro-electrode inserted into human plaque centrifuged to the base of a closely-fitting fine-mesh wire "basket" has been used to make continuous recordings of the pH responses produced by exposure to various carbohydrate substrates. The pH depressions given by continued immersion in sugar and starch solutions resemble, both in depth and duration, those obtained by telemetric pH measurements of approximal plaque samples. In contrast, brief exposure to sugar solutions will produce a Stephan type of pH curve. Measurements of pH can be made using a succession of different substrates if, after each substrate is tested, the electrode-plaque assembly is washed with water and its acidity neutralized in circulating saliva. It is suggested that this in vitro pH method could be used instead of the telemetric measurements of approximal plaque for comparing acid production from foods or for other purposes. PMID:6588077

  1. Deposition of corrosion products from dowels on human dental root surfaces measured with proton microprobe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, D.; Brunell, G.; Lindh, U.

    1982-06-01

    Distribution of copper, mercury and zinc on human teeth root surfaces adjacent to dowels of gold alloy or brass as well as dowels of brass in conjunction with an amalgam crown has been measured with a proton microprobe using PIXE techniques. Upper limits of the contents of gold and silver on the root surfaces were established. Pronounced concentration profiles of copper and zinc were observed on the root surfaces of teeth prepared with dowels of brass. The dowel of gold alloy revealed only zinc deposition. The major part of copper on the root surfaces is assumed to arise from corrosion of the dowels, and has been transported to the surface by diffusion through the dential tubuli. Zinc in the volume analysed is a constituent of dentin tissue as well as a corrosion product of the brass dowel. Part of the zinc level could also be ascribed to erosion of the zinc phosphate cement matrix. The volumes analysed were (25×25×25)μm 3. The levels of copper, mercury and zinc on the tooth root surfaces attained values up to about 200, 20 and 600 ppm, respectively.

  2. Multiple cellular and molecular mechanisms are involved in human Aβ clearance by transplanted adult astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pihlaja, Rea; Koistinaho, Jari; Kauppinen, Riitta; Sandholm, Jouko; Tanila, Heikki; Koistinaho, Milla

    2011-11-01

    Astrocytes and microglia are able to degrade potentially neurotoxic β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits typical for Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Contrary to microglia, astrocytes degrade human Aβ from tissue sections in vitro without any additional stimulation, but it has remained unclear whether transplanted astrocytes are able to clear deposited human Aβ in vivo. We transplanted adult mouse astrocytes into the hippocampi of transgenic mice mimicking AD and observed their fate, effects on microglial responses, and Aβ clearance. After 2-months follow-up time, we discovered a significant reduction in Aβ burden compared with AD mice infused with PBS only. The remaining Aβ deposits were fragmented and most of the Aβ immunoreactivity was seen within the transplanted astrocytes. Concomitant to Aβ reduction, both CD68 and CD45 immunoreactivities were significantly upregulated but phagocytic microglia were often surrounding and engulfing Aβ burdened, TUNEL-positive astrocytes rather than co-localizing with Aβ alone. Astrocytes are known to degrade Aβ also by secreting proteases involved in Aβ catabolism. To study the contribution of neprilysin (NEP), angiotensin-converting enzyme-1 (ACE-1), and endothelin-converting enzyme-2 (ECE-2) in human Aβ clearance, we utilized an ex vivo assay to demonstrate that adult astrocytes respond to human Aβ by upregulating NEP expression. Further, incubation of adult astrocytes with known inhibitors of NEP, ACE-1, or ECE-2 significantly inhibited the removal of human Aβ from the tissue suggesting an important role for these proteases in Aβ clearance by adult astrocytes ex vivo. PMID:21826742

  3. Prospective heterotopic ossification progenitors in adult human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Downey, Jennifer; Lauzier, Dominique; Kloen, Peter; Klarskov, Klaus; Richter, Martin; Hamdy, Reggie; Faucheux, Nathalie; Scimè, Anthony; Balg, Frédéric; Grenier, Guillaume

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscle has strong regenerative capabilities. However, failed regeneration can lead to complications where aberrant tissue forms as is the case with heterotopic ossification (HO), in which chondrocytes, osteoblasts and white and brown adipocytes can arise following severe trauma. In humans, the various HO cell types likely originate from multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in skeletal muscle, which have not been identified in humans until now. In the present study, adherent cells from freshly digested skeletal muscle tissue were expanded in defined culture medium and were FACS-enriched for the CD73(+)CD105(+)CD90(-) population, which displayed robust multilineage potential. Clonal differentiation assays confirmed that all three lineages originated from a single multipotent progenitor. In addition to differentiating into typical HO lineages, human muscle resident MSCs (hmrMSCs) also differentiated into brown adipocytes expressing uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). Characterizing this novel multipotent hmrMSC population with a brown adipocyte differentiation capacity has enhanced our understanding of the contribution of non-myogenic progenitor cells to regeneration and aberrant tissue formation in human skeletal muscle. PMID:25445454

  4. Fluorine uptake into human enamel around a fluoride-containing dental material during cariogenic pH cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, H.; Yamamoto, H.; Nomachi, M.; Yasuda, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Murata, Y.; Kijimura, T.; Sano, H.; Sakai, T.; Kamiya, T.

    2007-07-01

    Using PIGE (TIARA, JAPAN) technique, we measured fluorine (F) uptake into the tooth enamel around a fluoride-containing material during caries progression using pH cycling. Class I cavities in the buccal surfaces of 6 extracted human teeth were drilled and filled with fluoride-containing material; a glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX(GC)). Three 300 μm sections through the material were obtained from each tooth. Two of these specimens were utilized to measure the F distribution in enamel adjacent to the material. A 1.7 MeV proton beam accelerated by the TIARA single-ended accelerator was delivered to a micro-beam apparatus. The beam spot size was about 1 μm with a beam current of about 100 pA. A nuclear reaction, 19F(p, αγ) 160, was used to measure the F concentration and the gamma-rays from this reaction were detected with a 4" NaI detector. X-rays induced by proton were detected with a Si(Li) detector to measure calcium concentration and the beam intensity was monitored with the X-ray yield from a copper foil for quantitative analysis. After measurement of F uptake, all specimens were polished to a thickness of 120 μm. In order to simulate daily acid challenges occurring in the oral cavity, the pH cycling (pH6.8-pH4.5) was carried out for 1, 3 and 5 weeks, separately. The duration that the solution remained below pH 5.5 was 37 min per cycle. The cycles were repeated 6 times per day with 2 h interval between cycles, and the specimens were kept in remineralizing solution for the rest of pH cycle. After pH cycling, F and calcium distribution of each specimen was evaluated using PIGE technique. The F distribution of the specimens before pH cycling clearly showed the F uptake from fluoride-containing material into enamel adjacent to the material. After pH cycling, the caries progression in all specimens was observed by the image of transverse microradiography (TMR). The depth of caries and mineral loss progressed with increasing the duration of pH cycling, although

  5. Dental Fluorosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when children regularly consume fluoride during the teeth-forming years, age 8 and younger. Most dental fluorosis ... over a long period when the teeth are forming under the gums. Only children aged 8 years ...

  6. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  7. Malocclusion in Early Anatomically Modern Human: A Reflection on the Etiology of Modern Dental Misalignment

    PubMed Central

    Sarig, Rachel; Slon, Viviane; Abbas, Janan; May, Hila; Shpack, Nir; Vardimon, Alexander Dan; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Malocclusions are common in modern populations. Yet, as the study of occlusion requires an almost intact dentition in both the maxilla and mandible, searching for the ultimate cause of malocclusion is a challenge: relatively little ancient material is available for research on occlusal states. The Qafzeh 9 skull is unique, as its preserved dentition allowed us to investigate the presence and manifestations of malocclusion. The aim of this study was thus to examine the occlusal condition in the Qafzeh 9 specimen in light of modern knowledge regarding the etiology of malocclusion. We revealed a pathologic occlusion in the Qafzeh 9 skull that probably originated in the early developmental stage of the dentition, and was aggravated by forces applied by mastication. When arch continuity is interrupted due to misalignment of teeth as in this case, force transmission is not equal on both sides, causing intra-arch outcomes such as mesialization of the teeth, midline deviation, rotations and the aggravation of crowding. All are evident in the Qafzeh 9 skull: the midline deviates to the left; the incisors rotate mesio-buccally; the left segment is constricted; the left first molar is buccally positioned and the left premolars palatally tilted. The inter-arch evaluation revealed anterior cross bite with functional shift that might affect force transmission and bite force. In conclusion, the findings of the current study suggest that malocclusion of developmental origin was already present in early anatomically modern humans (AMH) (the present case being the oldest known case, dated to ca. 100,000 years); that there is no basis to the notion that early AMH had a better adjustment between teeth and jaw size; and that jaw-teeth size discrepancy could be found in prehistoric populations and is not a recent phenomenon. PMID:24278319

  8. Elevated extracellular calcium increases expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene via a calcium channel and ERK pathway in human dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Eiji; Kanaya, Sousuke; Hamaji, Nozomu; Sato, Hisae; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi

    2010-04-16

    Dental pulp cells, which have been shown to share phenotypical features with osteoblasts, are capable of differentiating into odontoblast-like cells and generating a dentin-like mineral structure. Elevated extracellular Ca{sup 2+}Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} has been implicated in osteogenesis by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts; however, the role of Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} signaling in odontogenesis remains unclear. We found that elevated Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} increases bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 gene expression in human dental pulp cells. The increase was modulated not only at a transcriptional level but also at a post-transcriptional level, because treatment with Ca{sup 2+} increased the stability of BMP-2 mRNA in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. A similar increase in BMP-2 mRNA level was observed in other human mesenchymal cells from oral tissue; periodontal ligament cells and gingival fibroblasts. However, the latter cells exhibited considerably lower expression of BMP-2 mRNA compared with dental pulp cells and periodontal ligament cells. The BMP-2 increase was markedly inhibited by pretreatment with an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, PD98059, and partially inhibited by the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels inhibitor, nifedipine. However, pretreatment with nifedipine had no effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation triggered by Ca{sup 2+}, suggesting that the Ca{sup 2+} influx from Ca{sup 2+} channels may operate independently of ERK signaling. Dental pulp cells do not express the transcript of Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptors (CaSR) and only respond slightly to other cations such as Sr{sup 2+} and spermine, suggesting that dental pulp cells respond to Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} to increase BMP-2 mRNA expression in a manner different from CaSR and rather specific for Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} among cations.

  9. Apple Tree Dental: An Innovative Oral Health Solution.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Deborah; Helgeson, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    The Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health called attention to the "silent epidemic" of dental disease. Older adults and other vulnerable people continue to suffer disproportionately from dental disease and inadequate access to care. As a society and as dental professionals, we face multiple challenges to care for our aging patients, parents and grandparents. Apple Tree Dental's community collaborative practice model illustrates a sustainable, patient-centered approach to overcoming barriers to care across the lifespan. PMID:26357816

  10. Nano-Structured Gelatin/Bioactive Glass Hybrid Scaffolds for the Enhancement of Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Tiejun; Liu, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    Tooth decay is one of the most common chronic disorders throughout the world. Regenerating decayed dentin/pulp structure requires the design of novel scaffolding materials that mimic the architecture of natural dental extracellular matrix (ECM) and provide suitable environments for the attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and biomineralization of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). In this work, we developed an approach to prepare three-dimensional (3D) nano-fibrous gelatin/silica bioactive glass (NF-gelatin/SBG) hybrid scaffolds that mimic the nano-structured architecture and chemical composition of natural dental ECM. This approach involved the combination of a thermally induced phase separation, sol-gel, and porogen leaching process, and synthesized hybrid scaffolds possessing natural ECM-like architecture, high porosity, well-defined pore size and interconnectivity, and improved mechanical strength. An in vitro cell culture study showed that human DPSCs had a significantly higher proliferation rate on NF-gelatin/SBG scaffolds compared to NF-gelatin scaffolds under the same conditions. Furthermore, the integration of SBG into the hybrid scaffold significantly promoted the differentiation and biomineralization of the human DPSCs. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expressions of marker genes for odontogenic differentiation (Col I, ALP, OCN, DSPP and DMP-1) were all significantly higher in the NF-gelatin/SBG than in the NF-gelatin group. Those results were further confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and von Kossa staining, as evidenced by greater ECM secretion and mineral deposition in the hybrid scaffold. In summary, the biomimetic NF-gelatin/SBG hybrid scaffolds provide an excellent environment for the growth and differentiation of human DPSCs and are promising candidates for dentin/pulp tissue regeneration. PMID:24098854

  11. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  12. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high‐dose hormone application in adult female‐to‐male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel‐based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting‐state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone‐dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language‐specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738–1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  13. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2016-05-01

    Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high-dose hormone application in adult female-to-male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel-based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting-state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone-dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language-specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738-1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  14. Bacteriology of severe periodontitis in young adult humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Smibert, R M; Hash, D E; Burmeister, J A; Ranney, R R

    1982-01-01

    A total of 78 bacteriological samples were taken from the supragingival tooth surface after superficial cleaning with toothpicks or from the periodontal sulci of 42 affected sites in 21 adolescents or young adults with severe generalized periodontitis. Of 190 bacterial species, subspecies, or serotypes detected among 2,723 isolates, 11 species exceeded 1% of the subgingival flora and were most closely associated with the diseased sulci. Eleven others were also sufficiently frequent to be suspect agents of tissue destruction. Many of these species are known pathogens of other body sites. In addition, 10 species of Treponema were isolated. One of these and the "large treponeme" were also more closely associated with severe periodontitis than they were with healthy sites or gingivitis. There were highly significant differences between the composition of the flora of the affected sulci and the flora of (i) the adjacent supragingival tooth surface, (ii) the gingival crevice of periodontally healthy people, and (iii) sites with a gingival index score of 0 or 2 in experimental gingivitis studies. The floras of different individuals were also significantly different. There was no statistically detectable effect of sampling per se upon the composition of the flora of subsequent samples from the same sites. The composition of the supragingival flora of the patients with severe generalized periodontitis that had serum antibody to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was significantly different from the supragingival flora of patients without this serum antibody. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the composition of their subgingival floras. PMID:7152665

  15. [Adult].

    PubMed

    Milke-García, María Del Pilar

    2016-09-01

    Adulthood starts after youth and is characterized by the completion of growth and the achievement of organic and psychological maturity. Obesity and other preventable diseases related to lifestyle are common at this age. A complete, balanced and sufficient diet, together with exercise are important in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Several studies have brought about the mechanisms by which the incorporation of milk and dairy products to diet is beneficial in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Milk also contributes to the improvement of dental, bone and intestinal health, theoretically helps in body weight control, has a definite role on the muscular and bone mass maintenance and is an option for hydration during exercise, this being as important as diet for overweight, obesity, diabetes, dislipidemias and hypertension control. PMID:27603885

  16. Phenotypic and Proteomic Characteristics of Human Dental Pulp Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells from a Natal, an Exfoliated Deciduous, and an Impacted Third Molar Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Gurler; Aksoy, Ayca; Duruksu, Gokhan; Gacar, Gulcin; Karaoz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    The level of heterogeneity among the isolated stem cells makes them less valuable for clinical use. The purpose of this study was to understand the level of heterogeneity among human dental pulp derived mesenchymal stem cells by using basic cell biology and proteomic approaches. The cells were isolated from a natal (NDPSCs), an exfoliated deciduous (stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous (SHED)), and an impacted third molar (DPSCs) tooth of three different donors. All three stem cells displayed similar features related to morphology, proliferation rates, expression of various cell surface markers, and differentiation potentials into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. Furthermore, using 2DE approach coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF, we have generated a common 2DE profile for all three stem cells. We found that 62.3 ± 7% of the protein spots were conserved among the three mesenchymal stem cell lines. Sixty-one of these conserved spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis. Classification of the identified proteins based on biological function revealed that structurally important proteins and proteins that are involved in protein folding machinery are predominantly expressed by all three stem cell lines. Some of these proteins may hold importance in understanding specific properties of human dental pulp derived mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:25379041

  17. Profile of the Adult Education and Human Resource Development Professoriate: Characteristics and Professional Fulfillment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shari L.; Provo, Joanne

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 113 members of the Commission of Professors of Adult Education and 50 of the Academy of Human Resource Development found few differences except in age, rank, and salary. The two faculties are compatible and could be integrated. Overall job satisfaction is high. Professors tended to come from other fields and to remain. (SK)

  18. Equality and Human Capital: Conflicting Concepts within State-Funded Adult Education in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a critique of the concept of equality as it informs the White Paper on Adult Education: Learning for Life (2000). It also outlines the extent to which human capital theory can be seen to have effectively colonised lifelong learning from the outset of its adoption by the European Union with highly constraining implications for…

  19. An Instrument Development Model for Online Surveys in Human Resource Development and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strachota, Elaine M.; Conceicao, Simone C. O.; Schmidt, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the use of a schematic model for developing and distributing online surveys. Two empirical studies that developed and implemented online surveys to collect data to measure satisfaction in various aspects of human resource development and adult education exemplify the use of the model to conduct online survey research. The…

  20. An Assessemnt of Graduate Adult Education and Human Resource Development Programs: A U.S. Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akdere, Mesut; Conceicao, Simone C. O.

    2009-01-01

    Due to recent changes in the workplace, the workforce and higher education have driven academic programs of adult education (AE) and human resource development (HRD) in the U.S. to become more integrated as part of the mission of institutions of higher education. In this exploratory study, existing graduate programs in AE and HRD in the U.S. were…