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Sample records for adult human hepatocytes

  1. Increased reprogramming of human fetal hepatocytes compared with adult hepatocytes in feeder-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Marc C; Gramignoli, Roberto; Blake, William; Davila, Julio; Skvorak, Kristen; Dorko, Kenneth; Tahan, Veysel; Lee, Brian R; Tafaleng, Edgar; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Fox, Ira J; Strom, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been used to treat liver disease. The availability of cells for these procedures is quite limited. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) may be a useful source of hepatocytes for basic research and transplantation if efficient and effective differentiation protocols were developed and problems with tumorigenicity could be overcome. Recent evidence suggests that the cell of origin may affect hiPSC differentiation. Thus, hiPSCs generated from hepatocytes may differentiate back to hepatocytes more efficiently than hiPSCs from other cell types. We examined the efficiency of reprogramming adult and fetal human hepatocytes. The present studies report the generation of 40 hiPSC lines from primary human hepatocytes under feeder-free conditions. Of these, 37 hiPSC lines were generated from fetal hepatocytes, 2 hiPSC lines from normal hepatocytes, and 1 hiPSC line from hepatocytes of a patient with Crigler-Najjar syndrome, type 1. All lines were confirmed reprogrammed and expressed markers of pluripotency by gene expression, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and teratoma formation. Fetal hepatocytes were reprogrammed at a frequency over 50-fold higher than adult hepatocytes. Adult hepatocytes were only reprogrammed with six factors, while fetal hepatocytes could be reprogrammed with three (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG) or four factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LIN28 or OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, C-MYC). The increased reprogramming efficiency of fetal cells was not due to increased transduction efficiency or vector toxicity. These studies confirm that hiPSCs can be generated from adult and fetal hepatocytes including those with genetic diseases. Fetal hepatocytes reprogram much more efficiently than adult hepatocytes, although both could serve as useful sources of hiPSC-derived hepatocytes for basic research or transplantation. PMID:23394081

  2. Human Embryonic and Rat Adult Stem Cells with Primitive Endoderm-Like Phenotype Can Be Fated to Definitive Endoderm, and Finally Hepatocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Bipasha; Ordovas, Laura; Vanuytsel, Kim; Geraerts, Martine; Firpo, Meri; De Vos, Rita; Fevery, Johan; Nevens, Frederik; Hu, Wei-Shou; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell-derived hepatocytes may be an alternative cell source to treat liver diseases or to be used for pharmacological purposes. We developed a protocol that mimics mammalian liver development, to differentiate cells with pluripotent characteristics to hepatocyte-like cells. The protocol supports the stepwise differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (ESC) to cells with characteristics of primitive streak (PS)/mesendoderm (ME)/definitive endoderm (DE), hepatoblasts, and finally cells with phenotypic and functional characteristics of hepatocytes. Remarkably, the same protocol can also differentiate rat multipotent adult progenitor cells (rMAPCs) to hepatocyte-like cells, even though rMAPC are isolated clonally from cultured rat bone marrow (BM) and have characteristics of primitive endoderm cells. A fraction of rMAPCs can be fated to cells expressing genes consistent with a PS/ME/DE phenotype, preceding the acquisition of phenotypic and functional characteristics of hepatocytes. Although the hepatocyte-like progeny derived from both cell types is mixed, between 10–20% of cells are developmentally consistent with late fetal hepatocytes that have attained synthetic, storage and detoxifying functions near those of adult hepatocytes. This differentiation protocol will be useful for generating hepatocyte-like cells from rodent and human stem cells, and to gain insight into the early stages of liver development. PMID:20711405

  3. Controlled and reversible induction of differentiation and activation of adult human hepatocytes by a biphasic culture technique

    PubMed Central

    Auth, Marcus K.H.; Boost, Kim A.; Leckel, Kerstin; Beecken, Wolf-Dietrich; Engl, Tobias; Jonas, Dietger; Oppermann, Elsie; Hilgard, Philip; Markus, Bernd H.; Bechstein, Wolf-Otto; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Clinical application of human hepatocytes (HC) is hampered by the progressive loss of growth and differentiation in vitro. The object of the study was to evaluate the effect of a biphasic culture technique on expression and activation of growth factor receptors and differentiation of human adult HC. METHODS: Isolated HC were sequentially cultured in a hormone enriched differentiation medium (DM) containing nicotinamide, insulin, transferrin, selenium, and dexame-thasone or activation medium (AM) containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Expression, distribution and activation of the HC receptors (MET and EGFR) and the pattern of characteristic cytokeratin (CK) filaments were measured by fluorometry, confocal microscopy and Western blotting. RESULTS: In the biphasic culture system, HC underwent repeated cycles of activation (characterized by expression and activation of growth factor receptors) and re-differentiation (illustrated by distribution of typical filaments CK-18 but low or absent expression of CK-19). In AM increased expression of MET and EGFR was associated with receptor translocation into the cytoplasm and induction of atypical CK-19. In DM low expression of MET and EGFR was localized on the cell membrane and CK-19 was reduced. Receptor phosphorylation required embedding of HC in collagen type I gel. CONCLUSION: Control and reversible modulation of growth factor receptor activation of mature human HC can be accomplished in vitro, when defined signals from the extracellular matrix and sequential growth stimuli are provided. The biphasic technique helps overcome de-differentiation, which occurs during continuous stimulation by means of growth factors. PMID:15810072

  4. Enzyme induction in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Kafert-Kasting, Sabine; Alexandrova, Krassimira; Barthold, Marc; Laube, Britta; Friedrich, Gerhard; Arseniev, Lubomir; Hengstler, Jan G

    2006-03-15

    Freshly isolated human hepatocytes are considered as the gold standard for in vitro testing of drug candidates. Meanwhile also cryopreserved human hepatocyte suspensions are available. However, a drawback of these cells is the incalculability of attachment to the culture dish. Therefore, we established a technique freezing hepatocytes cultured on a collagen gel. After thawing damaged cells were removed to a certain extent by gentle washing with culture medium prior to adding an upper gel layer. The morphology of the resulting hepatocyte cultures could not be distinguished from that of non-frozen cells. However, basal activities of cytochrome P450 isoforms decreased in cryopreserved compared to non-frozen hepatocytes, as evidenced by analysis of testosterone hydroxylation (OHT) in positions 6beta, 16alpha, 2beta and 6alpha. Nevertheless, enzyme induction factors caused by 24 h incubation with 50 microM rifampicin were similar in cryopreserved and non-frozen hepatocytes. In cryopreserved hepatocytes rifampicin caused an increase in mean values of 6beta-OHT formation from 57.2 to 157.7 pmol/well/min (2.8-fold), compared to an increase from 115.8 to 269.1 pmol/well/min (2.3-fold) in non-frozen cells. Similarly, 16alpha- and 2beta-OHT showed induction factors of 2.4- and 2.3-fold in cryopreserved compared to 1.6- and 2.4-fold in non-frozen hepatocytes, respectively. In conclusion, human hepatocytes cryopreserved on collagen gels show a clear induction of CYP3A4 by rifampicin, although the basal activities are reduced compared to non-frozen cells. PMID:16473453

  5. Suppression of Hepatocyte Proliferation by Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α in Adult Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Bonzo, Jessica A.; Ferry, Christina H.; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) regulates genes involved in lipid and bile acid synthesis, gluconeogenesis, amino acid metabolism, and blood coagulation. In addition to its metabolic role, HNF4α is critical for hepatocyte differentiation, and loss of HNF4α is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. The hepatocyte-specific Hnf4a knock-out mouse develops severe hepatomegaly and steatosis resulting in premature death, thereby limiting studies of the role of this transcription factor in the adult animal. In addition, gene compensation may complicate analysis of the phenotype of these mice. To overcome these issues, an acute Hnf4a knock-out mouse model was generated through use of the tamoxifen-inducible ErT2cre coupled to the serum albumin gene promoter. Microarray expression analysis revealed up-regulation of genes associated with proliferation and cell cycle control only in the acute liver-specific Hnf4α-null mouse. BrdU and ki67 staining confirmed extensive hepatocyte proliferation in this model. Proliferation was associated with induction of the hepatomitogen Bmp7 as well as reduced basal apoptotic activity. The p53/p63 apoptosis effector gene Perp was further identified as a direct HNF4α target gene. These data suggest that HNF4α maintains hepatocyte differentiation in the adult healthy liver, and its loss may directly contribute to hepatocellular carcinoma development, thus indicating this factor as a possible liver tumor suppressor gene. PMID:22241473

  6. Metabolism of lipoproteins by human fetal hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, B.R.

    1987-12-01

    The rate of clearance of lipoproteins from plasma appears to play a role in the development of atherogenesis. The liver may account for as much as two thirds of the removal of low-density lipoprotein and one third of the clearance of high-density lipoprotein in certain animal species and humans, mainly by receptor-mediated pathways. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if human fetal hepatocytes maintained in vitro take up and degrade lipoproteins. We first determined that the maximal binding capacity of iodine 125-iodo-LDL was approximately 300 ng of low-density lipoprotein protein/mg of membrane protein and an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 60 micrograms low-density lipoprotein protein/ml in membranes prepared from human fetal liver. We found that the maximal uptake of (/sup 125/I)iodo-LDL and (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL by fetal hepatocytes occurred after 12 hours of incubation. Low-density lipoprotein uptake preceded the appearance of degradation products by 4 hours, and thereafter the degradation of low-density lipoprotein increased linearly for at least 24 hours. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein was not degraded to any extent by fetal hepatocytes. (/sup 125/I)Iodo-LDL uptake and degradation were inhibited more than 75% by preincubation with low-density lipoprotein but not significantly by high-density lipoprotein, whereas (/sup 125/I)iodo-HDL uptake was inhibited 70% by preincubation with high-density lipoprotein but not by low-density lipoprotein. In summary, human fetal hepatocytes take up and degrade low-density lipoprotein by a receptor-mediated process similar to that described for human extrahepatic tissues.

  7. Generation of functional hepatocytes from human spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Niu, Minghui; Yao, Chencheng; Hou, Jingmei; Wang, Hong; Wen, Liping; Liu, Yun; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2016-01-01

    To generate functional human hepatocytes from stem cells and/or extra-hepatic tissues could provide an important source of cells for treating liver diseases. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have an unlimited plasticity since they can dedifferentiate and transdifferentiate to other cell lineages. However, generation of mature and functional hepatocytes from human SSCs has not yet been achieved. Here we have for the first time reported direct transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature and functional hepatocytes by three-step induction using the defined condition medium. Human SSCs were first transdifferentiated to hepatic stem cells, as evidenced by their morphology and biopotential nature of co-expressing hepatocyte and cholangiocyte markers but not hallmarks for embryonic stem cells. Hepatic stem cells were further induced to differentiate into mature hepatocytes identified by their morphological traits and strong expression of CK8, CK18, ALB, AAT, TF, TAT, and cytochrome enzymes rather than CK7 or CK19. Significantly, mature hepatocytes derived from human SSCs assumed functional attributes of human hepatocytes, because they could produce albumin, remove ammonia, and uptake and release indocyanine green. Moreover, expression of β-CATENIN, HNF4A, FOXA1 and GATA4 was upregulated during the transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature hepatocytes. Collectively, human SSCs could directly transdifferentiate to mature and functional hepatocytes. This study could offer an invaluable source of human hepatocytes for curing liver disorders and drug toxicology screening and provide novel insights into mechanisms underlying human liver regeneration. PMID:26840458

  8. Generation of functional hepatocytes from human spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Niu, Minghui; Yao, Chencheng; Hou, Jingmei; Wang, Hong; Wen, Liping; Liu, Yun; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2016-02-23

    To generate functional human hepatocytes from stem cells and/or extra-hepatic tissues could provide an important source of cells for treating liver diseases. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have an unlimited plasticity since they can dedifferentiate and transdifferentiate to other cell lineages. However, generation of mature and functional hepatocytes from human SSCs has not yet been achieved. Here we have for the first time reported direct transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature and functional hepatocytes by three-step induction using the defined condition medium. Human SSCs were first transdifferentiated to hepatic stem cells, as evidenced by their morphology and biopotential nature of co-expressing hepatocyte and cholangiocyte markers but not hallmarks for embryonic stem cells. Hepatic stem cells were further induced to differentiate into mature hepatocytes identified by their morphological traits and strong expression of CK8, CK18, ALB, AAT, TF, TAT, and cytochrome enzymes rather than CK7 or CK19. Significantly, mature hepatocytes derived from human SSCs assumed functional attributes of human hepatocytes, because they could produce albumin, remove ammonia, and uptake and release indocyanine green. Moreover, expression of β-CATENIN, HNF4A, FOXA1 and GATA4 was upregulated during the transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature hepatocytes. Collectively, human SSCs could directly transdifferentiate to mature and functional hepatocytes. This study could offer an invaluable source of human hepatocytes for curing liver disorders and drug toxicology screening and provide novel insights into mechanisms underlying human liver regeneration. PMID:26840458

  9. ESRP2 controls an adult splicing programme in hepatocytes to support postnatal liver maturation.

    PubMed

    Bhate, Amruta; Parker, Darren J; Bebee, Thomas W; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Arif, Waqar; Rashan, Edrees H; Chorghade, Sandip; Chau, Anthony; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Anakk, Sayeepriyadarshini; Carstens, Russ P; Xiao, Xinshu; Kalsotra, Auinash

    2015-01-01

    Although major genetic networks controlling early liver specification and morphogenesis are known, the mechanisms responsible for postnatal hepatic maturation are poorly understood. Here we employ global analyses of the mouse liver transcriptome to demonstrate that postnatal remodelling of the liver is accompanied by large-scale transcriptional and post-transcriptional transitions that are cell-type-specific and temporally coordinated. Combining detailed expression analyses with gain- and loss-of-function studies, we identify epithelial splicing regulatory protein 2 (ESRP2) as a conserved regulatory factor that controls the neonatal-to-adult switch of ∼20% of splice isoforms in mouse and human hepatocytes. The normal shift in splicing coincides tightly with dramatic postnatal induction of ESRP2 in hepatocytes. We further demonstrate that forced expression of ESRP2 in immature mouse and human hepatocytes is sufficient to drive a reciprocal shift in splicing and causes various physiological abnormalities. These findings define a direct role for ESRP2 in the generation of conserved repertoires of adult splice isoforms that facilitate terminal differentiation and maturation of hepatocytes. PMID:26531099

  10. Thyroid hormone effect in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Miler, Eliana A; Ríos de Molina, María Del Carmen; Domínguez, Gabriela; Guerra, Liliana N

    2008-01-01

    We have already demonstrated that a combined treatment of methimazole and an antioxidant mixture improved the condition of hyperthyroid patients both biochemically and clinically. Elevated thyroid hormone levels might trigger signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism through the increase of free radicals. To study the direct effect of thyroid hormone on cellular markers of oxidative stress, we carried out in vitro assays in which 0.1-20.0 nM T3 (6.5-1300.0 ng/dl) doses were added to culture media of the human hepatocyte cell line Hep G2 for 1-24 h. T3 increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and intracellular oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels; SOD activity was also higher with hormone treatment, whereas catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities showed no variation at different T3 doses and during all experimental times. When ascorbic acid was added to the culture, the MDA level decreased and SOD activity was increased. With higher doses of T3 (e.g. 200 nM), cell death occurred (69% of apoptotic cells). The increase in SOD activity was not enough to overcome the effect of T3 since MDA and GSSG remained high during a 24-h experiment. We showed a beneficial effect of ascorbic acid when cells were exposed to a T3 dose of 20 nM, a higher level of hormone than that achieved in hyperthyroidism. PMID:18647489

  11. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α in adult mice results in increased hepatocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Walesky, Chad; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Terwilliger, Ernest F.; Edwards, Genea; Borude, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF4α) is known as the master regulator of hepatocyte differentiation. Recent studies indicate that HNF4α may inhibit hepatocyte proliferation via mechanisms that have yet to be identified. Using a HNF4α knockdown mouse model based on delivery of inducible Cre recombinase via an adeno-associated virus 8 viral vector, we investigated the role of HNF4α in the regulation of hepatocyte proliferation. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of HNF4α resulted in increased hepatocyte proliferation. Global gene expression analysis showed that a majority of the downregulated genes were previously known HNF4α target genes involved in hepatic differentiation. Interestingly, ≥500 upregulated genes were associated with cell proliferation and cancer. Furthermore, we identified potential negative target genes of HNF4α, many of which are involved in the stimulation of proliferation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we confirmed binding of HNF4α at three of these genes. Furthermore, overexpression of HNF4α in mouse hepatocellular carcinoma cells resulted in a decrease in promitogenic gene expression and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, these data indicate that, apart from its role in hepatocyte differentiation, HNF4α actively inhibits hepatocyte proliferation by repression of specific promitogenic genes. PMID:23104559

  12. Uptake and processing of human platelet factor 4 by hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, B.; Steward, G.J.; de Feo, P.A.; Boden, G.; Niewiarowski, S.

    1987-12-01

    We previously demonstrated rapid clearance of human platelet factor 4 (PF4) from rabbit and rat blood, its accumulation in the liver, and elimination of PF4 degradation products in urine. The purpose of the present experiments was to characterize interaction of PF4 with cultured rat hepatocytes. /sup 125/I-PF4 was taken up by hepatocytes reaching maximum at 180 min. The association of /sup 125/I-PF4 with hepatocytes was two times greater at 37/sup 0/C than at 4/sup 0/C. At 37/sup 0/C degradation of /sup 125/-PF4 by hepatocytes was also observed as indicated by the increase of /sup 125/I-PF4 radioactivity soluble in 6% trichloroacetic acid. By contrast, no uptake of /sup 125/I-..beta..-thromboglobulin antigen was observed. Autoradiography demonstrated that short incubation (5-20 min) of /sup 125/I-PF4 with hepatocytes results in the association of /sup 125/I-radioactivity with cell membranes while after longer incubation (60 min) radioactivity was also localized in the endosomes. Heparin inhibited binding and uptake of /sup 125/I-PF4 radioactivity by hepatocytes. We propose that part of PF4 released in the circulating blood by activated platelets is bound to the surface of hepatocytes and that it is further processed by these cells.

  13. Polygonal networks, "geodomes", of adult rat hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Y; Furukawa, K; Mitaka, T; Yokoi, T; Kodama, T

    1988-01-01

    Polygonal networks, "geodomes", in cultured hepatocytes of adult rats were examined by both light and electron microscopy. On light microscopical examinations of specimens stained with Coomassie blue after the treatment with Triton X-100, the networks were detected 5 days after culture, which consisted of triangles arranged mainly in hexagonal patterns. They surrounded main cell body, looking like a headband, or were occasionally situated over nuclei, looking like a geodesic dome. Scanning electron microscopical observations after Triton treatment revealed that these structures were located underneath surface membrane. Transmission electron microscopical investigations revealed that the connecting fibers of networks consisted of microfilaments which radiated in a compact bundle from electron-dense vertices. PMID:3396075

  14. INTERINDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE METABOLISM OF ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory


    The liver is the major site for the enzymatic methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in humans. Primary cultures of normal human hepatocytes isolated from tissue obtained at surgery or from donor livers have been used to study interindividual variation in the capacity of live...

  15. Characterization of Liver-Specific Functions of Human Fetal Hepatocytes in Culture.

    PubMed

    Chinnici, Cinzia Maria; Timoneri, Francesca; Amico, Giandomenico; Pietrosi, Giada; Vizzini, Giovanni; Spada, Marco; Pagano, Duilio; Gridelli, Bruno; Conaldi, Pier Giulio

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess liver-specific functions of human fetal liver cells proposed as a potential source for hepatocyte transplantation. Fetal liver cells were isolated from livers of different gestational ages (16-22 weeks), and the functions of cell preparations were evaluated by establishing primary cultures. We observed that 20- to 22-week-gestation fetal liver cell cultures contained a predominance of cells with hepatocytic traits that did not divide in vitro but were functionally competent. Fetal hepatocytes performed liver-specific functions at levels comparable to those of their adult counterpart. Moreover, exposure to dexamethasone in combination with oncostatin M promptly induced further maturation of the cells through the acquisition of additional functions (i.e., ability to store glycogen and uptake of indocyanine green). In some cases, particularly in cultures obtained from fetuses of earlier gestational ages (16-18 weeks gestation), cells with mature hepatocytic traits proved to be sporadic, and the primary cultures were mainly populated by clusters of proliferating cells. Consequently, the values of liver-specific functions detected in these cultures were low. We observed that a low cell density culture system rapidly prompted loss of the mature hepatocytic phenotype with downregulations of all the liver-specific functions. We found that human fetal liver cells can be cryopreserved without significant loss of viability and function and evaluated up to 1 year in storage in liquid nitrogen. They might, therefore, be suitable for cell banking and allow for the transplantation of large numbers of cells, thus improving clinical outcomes. Overall, our results indicate that fetal hepatocytes could be used as a cell source for hepatocyte transplantation. Fetal liver cells have been used so far to treat end-stage liver disease. Additional studies are needed to include these cells in cell-based therapies aimed to treat liver failure and inborn

  16. Comparative Metabolism of Furan in Rodent and Human Cryopreserved Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Leah A.; Phillips, Martin B.; Matter, Brock A.

    2014-01-01

    Furan is a liver toxicant and carcinogen in rodents. Although humans are most likely exposed to furan through a variety of sources, the effect of furan exposure on human health is still unknown. In rodents, furan requires metabolism to exert its toxic effects. The initial product of the cytochrome P450 2E1-catalyzed oxidation is a reactive α,β-unsaturated dialdehyde, cis-2-butene-1,4-dial (BDA). BDA is toxic and mutagenic and consequently is considered responsible for the toxic effects of furan. The urinary metabolites of furan in rats are derived from the reaction of BDA with cellular nucleophiles, and precursors to these metabolites are detected in furan-exposed hepatocytes. Many of these precursors are 2-(S-glutathionyl)butanedial-amine cross-links in which the amines are amino acids and polyamines. Because these metabolites are derived from the reaction of BDA with cellular nucleophiles, their levels are a measure of the internal dose of this reactive metabolite. To compare the ability of human hepatocytes to convert furan to the same metabolites as rodent hepatocytes, furan was incubated with cryopreserved human and rodent hepatocytes. A semiquantitative liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry assay was developed for a number of the previously characterized furan metabolites. Qualitative and semiquantitative analysis of the metabolites demonstrated that furan is metabolized in a similar manner in all three species. These results indicate that humans may be susceptible to the toxic effects of furan. PMID:24751574

  17. Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protects human hepatocytes against apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ilowski, Maren; Kleespies, Axel; Toni, Enrico N. de; Donabauer, Barbara; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hengstler, Jan G.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALR decreases cytochrome c release from mitochondria. {yields} ALR protects hepatocytes against apoptosis induction by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. {yields} ALR exerts a liver-specific anti-apoptotic effect. {yields} A possible medical usage of ALR regarding protection of liver cells during apoptosis inducing therapies. -- Abstract: Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is known to support liver regeneration and to stimulate proliferation of hepatocytes. However, it is not known if ALR exerts anti-apoptotic effects in human hepatocytes and whether this protective effect is cell type specific. This is relevant, because compounds that protect the liver against apoptosis without undesired effects, such as protection of metastatic tumour cells, would be appreciated in several clinical settings. Primary human hepatocytes (phH) and organotypic cancer cell lines were exposed to different concentrations of apoptosis inducers (ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta}, actinomycin D) and cultured with or without recombinant human ALR (rhALR). Apoptosis was evaluated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and by FACS with propidium iodide (PI) staining. ALR significantly decreased apoptosis induced by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. Further, the anti-apoptotic effect of ALR was observed in primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells but not in bronchial (BC1), colonic (SW480), gastric (GC1) and pancreatic (L3.6PL) cell lines. Therefore, the hepatotrophic growth factor ALR acts in a liver specific manner with regards to both its mitogenic and its anti-apoptotic effect. Unlike the growth factors HGF and EGF, rhALR acts in a liver specific manner. Therefore, ALR is a promising candidate for further evaluation as a possible hepatoprotective factor in clinical settings.

  18. Serial transplantation reveals the stem-cell-like regenerative potential of adult mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Overturf, K.; al-Dhalimy, M.; Ou, C. N.; Finegold, M.; Grompe, M.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has shown that adult mouse hepatocytes can divide at least 18 times in vivo. To test whether this represents the upper limit of their regenerative capacity, we performed serial transplantation of hepatocytes in the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency murine model of liver repopulation. Hepatocytes from adult donors were serially transplanted in limiting numbers six times and resulted in complete repopulation during each cycle. This corresponds to a minimal number of 69 cell doublings or a 7.3 x 10(20)-fold expansion. No evidence for abnormal liver function or altered hepatic architecture was found in repopulated animals. We conclude that a fraction of adult mouse hepatocytes have growth potential similar to that of hematopoietic stem cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9358753

  19. Human hepatocytes and endothelial cells in organotypic membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Simona; Campana, Carla; Morelli, Sabrina; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2011-12-01

    The realization of organotypic liver model that exhibits stable phenotype is a major challenge in the field of liver tissue engineering. In this study we developed liver organotypic co-culture systems by using synthetic and biodegradable membranes with primary human hepatocytes and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Synthetic membranes prepared by a polymeric blend constituted of modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK-WC) and polyurethane (PU) and biodegradable chitosan membranes were developed by phase inversion technique and used in homotypic and organotypic culture systems. The morphological and functional characteristics of cells in the organotypic co-culture membrane systems were evaluated in comparison with homotypic cultures and traditional systems. Hepatocytes in the organotypic co-culture systems exhibit compact polyhedral cells with round nuclei and well demarcated cell-cell borders like in vivo, as a result of heterotypic interaction with HUVECs. In addition HUVECs formed tube-like structures directly through the interactions with the membranes and hepatocytes and indirectly through the secretion of ECM proteins which secretion improved in the organotypic co-culture membrane systems. The heterotypic cell-cell contacts have beneficial effect on the hepatocyte albumin production, urea synthesis and drug biotransformation. The developed organotypic co-culture membrane systems elicit liver specific functions in vitro and could be applied for the realization of engineered liver tissues to be used in tissue engineering, drug metabolism studies and bioartificial liver devices. PMID:21871658

  20. 3D Cultivation Techniques for Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anastasia; Moll, Matthias; Gottwald, Eric; Nies, Cordula; Zantl, Roman; Wagner, Helga; Burkhardt, Britta; Sánchez, Juan J. Martínez; Ladurner, Ruth; Thasler, Wolfgang; Damm, Georg; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in drug development is the prediction of in vivo toxicity based on in vitro data. The standard cultivation system for primary human hepatocytes is based on monolayer cultures, even if it is known that these conditions result in a loss of hepatocyte morphology and of liver-specific functions, such as drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. As it has been demonstrated that hepatocytes embedded between two sheets of collagen maintain their function, various hydrogels and scaffolds for the 3D cultivation of hepatocytes have been developed. To further improve or maintain hepatic functions, 3D cultivation has been combined with perfusion. In this manuscript, we discuss the benefits and drawbacks of different 3D microfluidic devices. For most systems that are currently available, the main issues are the requirement of large cell numbers, the low throughput, and expensive equipment, which render these devices unattractive for research and the drug-developing industry. A higher acceptance of these devices could be achieved by their simplification and their compatibility with high-throughput, as both aspects are of major importance for a user-friendly device.

  1. Metabolism of Oxycodone in Human Hepatocytes from Different Age Groups and Prediction of Hepatic Plasma Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Korjamo, Timo; Tolonen, Ari; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Turpeinen, Miia; Kokki, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    Oxycodone is commonly used to treat severe pain in adults and children. It is extensively metabolized in the liver in adults, but the maturation of metabolism is not well understood. Our aim was to study the metabolism of oxycodone in cryopreserved human hepatocytes from different age groups (3 days, 2 and 5 months, 4 years, adult pool) and predict hepatic plasma clearance of oxycodone using these data. Oxycodone (0.1, 1, and 10 μM) was incubated with hepatocytes for 4 h, and 1 μM oxycodone also with CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole (1 μM). Oxycodone and noroxycodone concentrations were determined at several time points with liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. In vitro clearance of oxycodone was used to predict hepatic plasma clearance, using the well-stirred model and published physiological parameters. Noroxycodone was the major metabolite in all batches and ketoconazole inhibited the metabolism markedly in most cases. A clear correlation between in vitro oxycodone clearance and CYP3A4 activity was observed. The predicted hepatic plasma clearances were typically much lower than the published median total plasma clearance from pharmacokinetic studies. The data suggests that there are no children-specific metabolites of oxycodone. Moreover, CYP3A activity seems to be the major determinant in metabolic clearance of oxycodone regardless of age group or individual variability in hepatocyte batches. PMID:22291644

  2. Cryopreservation of isolated human hepatocytes for transplantation: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Terry, Claire; Dhawan, Anil; Mitry, Ragai R; Hughes, Robin D

    2006-10-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from unused donor livers are being used for transplantation in patients with acute liver failure and liver-based metabolic defects. As large numbers of hepatocytes can be prepared from a single liver and hepatocytes need to be available for emergency and repeated treatment of patients it is essential to be able to cryopreserve and store cells with good thawed cell function. This review considers the current status of cryopreservation of human hepatocytes discussing the different stages involved in the process. These include pre-treatment of cells, freezing solution, cryoprotectants and freezing and thawing protocols. There are detrimental effects of cryopreservation on hepatocyte structure and metabolic function, including cell attachment, which is important to the engraftment of transplanted cells in the liver. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes have been successfully used in clinical transplantation, with evidence of replacement of missing function. Further optimisation of hepatocyte cryopreservation protocols is important for their use in hepatocyte transplantation. PMID:16793034

  3. Differential expression of TRPM7 in rat hepatoma and embryonic and adult hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lam, D Hung; Grant, Caroline E; Hill, Ceredwyn E

    2012-04-01

    TRPM7 channels are implicated in cellular survival, proliferation, and differentiation. However, a profile of TRPM7 activity in a specific cell type has not been determined from embryonic to terminally differentiated state. Here, we characterized TRPM7 expression in a spectrum of rat liver cells at different developmental stages. Using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, TRPM7-like Na(+) currents were identified in RLC-18 cells, a differentiated, proliferating hepatocellular line derived from day 17 embryonic rat liver. Currents were outwardly rectifying, enhanced in divalent-free solutions, and inhibited by intracellular Mg(2+). Reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that RLC-18 cells express both TRPM6 and TRPM7. However, mean currents were reduced almost 80% by 1 mmol/L 2-aminoethoxyphenylborate (2-APB) and were abolished in RLC-18 cells heterologously expressing a dominant negative TRPM7 construct, suggesting that TRPM7 is the major current carrier in these cells. Functional comparison showed that relative to terminally differentiated adult rat hepatocytes, currents were 1.8 and 3.9 times higher in, respectively, RLC-18 and WIF-B cells, a rat hepatoma - human fibroblast cross. Our results demonstrate that plasma membrane TRPM7 channels are more highly expressed in proliferating cells as compared with terminally differentiated and nondividing rat hepatocytes and suggest that downregulation of this channel is associated with hepatocellular differentiation. PMID:22429021

  4. Hepatocytic Differentiation Potential of Human Fetal Liver Mesenchymal Stem Cells: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hamidouche, Zahia; Sokal, Etienne; Charbord, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In line with the search of effective stem cell population that would progress liver cell therapy and because the rate and differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) decreases with age, the current study investigates the hepatogenic differentiation potential of human fetal liver MSCs (FL-MSCs). After isolation from 11-12 gestational weeks' human fetal livers, FL-MSCs were shown to express characteristic markers such as CD73, CD90, and CD146 and to display adipocytic and osteoblastic differentiation potential. Thereafter, we explored their hepatocytic differentiation potential using the hepatogenic protocol applied for adult human liver mesenchymal cells. FL-MSCs differentiated in this way displayed significant features of hepatocyte-like cells as demonstrated in vitro by the upregulated expression of specific hepatocytic markers and the induction of metabolic functions including CYP3A4 activity, indocyanine green uptake/release, and glucose 6-phosphatase activity. Following transplantation, naive and differentiated FL-MSC were engrafted into the hepatic parenchyma of newborn immunodeficient mice and differentiated in situ. Hence, FL-MSCs appeared to be interesting candidates to investigate the liver development at the mesenchymal compartment level. Standardization of their isolation, expansion, and differentiation may also support their use for liver cell-based therapy development. PMID:27057173

  5. Vasopressin inhibits type-I collagen and albumin gene expression in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chojkier, M.; Brenner, D.A.; Leffert, H.L.

    1989-06-05

    The mechanisms that regulate collagen gene expression in hepatic cells are poorly understood. Accelerated Ca2+ fluxes are associated with inhibiting collagen synthesis selectively in human fibroblasts. In suspension cultures of isolated hepatocytes, the Ca2+ agonist vasopressin increases cytosolic levels of free Ca2+. However, whether vasopressin's interactions with plasma membrane V1 receptors attenuate hepatic collagen production is unknown. We investigated this problem by studying vasopressin's effects on collagen synthesis and Ca2+ efflux in long-term primary cultures of differentiated and proliferation-competent adult rat hepatocytes. Twelve-day-old quiescent cultures were exposed to test substances and labeled with (5-3H)proline. Determinations of radioactivity in collagenase-sensitive and collagenase-resistant proteins were used to calculate the relative levels of collagen production. Synthetic (8-arg)vasopressin stimulated 45Ca2+ efflux within 1 min and inhibited hepatocyte collagen production within 3 h by 50%; overall rates of protein synthesis were not affected significantly. In cultures labeled with (35S)methionine, vasopressin also decreased the levels of newly synthesized and secreted albumin, but not fibrinogen, detected in specific immunoprecipitates analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Northern blot analyses using specific (32P)cDNA probes revealed 70% decreases in hybridizable levels of collagen alpha 1(I) mRNA in hepatocyte cultures treated with either vasopressin or Ca2+ ionophore A23187; hybridizable levels of albumin mRNA also fell approximately 50% following vasopressin treatment.

  6. Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone on rats and human by gel entrapped hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chong; Meng, Qin; Zhang, Guoliang

    2012-01-01

    Troglitazone, despite passing preclinical trials on animals, was shortly withdrawn from market due to its severe hepatotoxicity in clinic. As rat hepatocyte monolayer consistently showed sensitive troglitazone toxicity as human hepatocyte monolayer in contrast to the species-specific toxicity in vivo, this paper utilized both hepatocytes in three-dimensional culture of gel entrapment to reflect the species difference on hepatotoxicity. Rat hepatocytes in gel entrapment did not show obvious cellular damage even under a long-term exposure for 21 days while gel entrapped human hepatocytes significantly displayed oxidative stress, steatosis, mitochondrial damage and cell death at a short exposure for 4 days. As a result, the detected species-specific toxicity of troglitazone between gel entrapped rat and human hepatocytes consisted well with the situation in vivo but was in a sharp contrast to the performance of two hepatocytes by monolayer culture. Such contradictory toxicity of rat hepatocytes between monolayer and gel entrapment culture could be explained by the fact that troglitazone was cleared more rapidly in gel entrapment than in monolayer culture. Similarly, the differential clearance of troglitazone in rat and human might also explain its species-specific toxicity. Therefore, gel entrapment of hepatocytes might serve as a platform for evaluation of drug toxicity at early stage of drug development by reducing costs, increasing the likelihood of clinical success and limiting human exposure to unsafe drugs. -- Highlights: ► Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone reflected by rat/human hepatocytes ► 3D hepatocytes in 21 days’ long-term culture used for drug hepatotoxicity ► Oversensitive toxicity in hepatocyte monolayer by slow troglitazone clearance.

  7. Robust generation of hepatocyte-like cells from human embryonic stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Medine, Claire N; Lucendo-Villarin, Baltasar; Zhou, Wenli; West, Christopher C; Hay, David C

    2011-01-01

    Despite progress in modelling human drug toxicity, many compounds fail during clinical trials due to unpredicted side effects. The cost of clinical studies are substantial, therefore it is essential that more predictive toxicology screens are developed and deployed early on in drug development (Greenhough et al 2010). Human hepatocytes represent the current gold standard model for evaluating drug toxicity, but are a limited resource that exhibit variable function. Therefore, the use of immortalised cell lines and animal tissue models are routinely employed due to their abundance. While both sources are informative, they are limited by poor function, species variability and/or instability in culture (Dalgetty et al 2009). Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are an attractive alternative source of human hepatocyte like cells (HLCs) (Medine et al 2010). PSCs are capable of self renewal and differentiation to all somatic cell types found in the adult and thereby represent a potentially inexhaustible source of differentiated cells. We have developed a procedure that is simple, highly efficient, amenable to automation and yields functional human HLCs (Hay et al 2008 ; Fletcher et al 2008 ; Hannoun et al 2010 ; Payne et al 2011 and Hay et al 2011). We believe our technology will lead to the scalable production of HLCs for drug discovery, disease modeling, the construction of extra-corporeal devices and possibly cell based transplantation therapies. PMID:22064456

  8. Maintenance of Hepatic Functions in Primary Human Hepatocytes Cultured on Xeno-Free and Chemical Defined Human Recombinant Laminins.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaaki; Zemack, Helen; Johansson, Helene; Hagbard, Louise; Jorns, Carl; Li, Meng; Ellis, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Refined methods for maintaining specific functions of isolated hepatocytes under xeno-free and chemical defined conditions is of great importance for the development of hepatocyte research and regenerative therapy. Laminins, a large family of heterotrimeric basement membrane adhesion proteins, are highly cell and tissue type specific components of the extracellular matrix and strongly influence the behavior and function of associated cells and/or tissues. However, detailed biological functions of many laminin isoforms are still to be evaluated. In this study, we determined the distribution of laminin isoforms in human liver tissue and isolated primary human hepatocytes by western blot analysis, and investigated the efficacy of different human recombinant laminin isoforms on hepatic functions during culture. Protein expressions of laminin-chain α2, α3, α4, β1, β3, γ1, and γ2 were detected in both isolated human hepatocytes and liver tissue. No α1 and α5 expression could be detected in liver tissue or hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from five different individual livers, and cultured on human recombinant laminin isoforms -111, -211, -221, -332, -411, -421, -511, and -521 (Biolamina AB), matrigel (extracted from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma), or collagen type IV (Collagen). Hepatocytes cultured on laminin showed characteristic hexagonal shape in a flat cell monolayer. Viability, double stranded DNA concentration, and Ki67 expression for hepatocytes cultured for six days on laminin were comparable to those cultured on EHS and Collagen. Hepatocytes cultured on laminin also displayed production of human albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, bile acids, and gene expression of liver-enriched factors, such as hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, glucose-6-phosphate, cytochrome P450 3A4, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. We conclude that all forms of human recombinant laminin tested maintain cell viability and liver-specific functions of primary human

  9. Helicobacter hepaticus Induces an Inflammatory Response in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kleine, Moritz; Worbs, Tim; Schrem, Harald; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Förster, Reinhold; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Bektas, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus can lead to chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma in certain strains of mice. Until now the pathogenic role of Helicobacter species on human liver tissue is still not clarified though Helicobacter species identification in human liver cancer was successful in case controlled studies. Therefore we established an in vitro model to investigate the interaction of primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with Helicobacter hepaticus. Successful co-culturing of PHH with Helicobacter hepaticus was confirmed by visualization of motile bacteria by two-photon-microscopy. Isolated human monocytes were stimulated with PHH conditioned media. Changes in mRNA expression of acute phase cytokines and proteins in PHH and stimulated monocytes were determined by Real-time PCR. Furthermore, cytokines and proteins were analyzed in PHH culture supernatants by ELISA. Co-cultivation with Helicobacter hepaticus induced mRNA expression of Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, Interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in PHH (p<0.05) resulting in a corresponding increase of IL-8 and MCP-1 concentrations in PHH supernatants (p<0.05). IL-8 and IL-1β mRNA expression was induced in monocytes stimulated with Helicobacter hepaticus infected PHH conditioned media (p<0.05). An increase of Cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression was observed, with a concomitant increase of prostaglandin E2 concentration in PHH supernatants at 24 and 48 h (p<0.05). In contrast, at day 7 of co-culture, no persistent elevation of cytokine mRNA could be detected. High expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on PHH cell membranes after co-culture was shown by two-photon-microscopy and confirmed by flow-cytomety. Finally, expression of Cytochrome P450 3A4 and albumin mRNA were downregulated, indicating an impairment of hepatocyte synthesis function by Helicobacter hepaticus presence. This is the first in vitro model demonstrating a pathogenic effect of a

  10. Immortalization of Human Fetal Hepatocyte by Ectopic Expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Human Papilloma Virus (E7) and Simian Virus 40 Large T (SV40 T) Antigen Towards Bioartificial Liver Support

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Shibashish; Bader, Augustinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Generation of genetically stable and non-tumoric immortalization cell line from primary cells would be enormously useful for research and therapeutic purposes, but progress towards this goal has so far been limited. It is now universal acceptance that immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes based on recent advances of telomerase biology and oncogene, lead to unlimited population doubling could be the possible source for bioartificial liver device. Methods Immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes cell line by ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), human papilloma virus gene (E7) and simian virus 40 large T (SV40 T) antigens is main goal of present study. We used an inducible system containing human telomerase and E7, both of which are cloned into responder constructs controlled by doxycycline transactivator. We characterized the immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells by analysis of green fluorescent cells (GFP) positive cells using flow cytometry (FACs) cell sorting and morphology, proliferative rate and antigen expression by immunohistochemical analysis. In addition to we analysized lactate formation, glucose consumption, albumin secretion and urea production of immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells. Results After 25 attempts for transfection of adult primary hepatocytes by human telomerase and E7 to immortalize them, none of the transfection systems resulted in the production of a stable, proliferating cell line. Although the transfection efficiency was more than 70% on the first day, the vast majority of the transfected hepatocytes lost their signal within the first 5–7 days. The remaining transfected hepatocytes persisted for 2–4 weeks and divided one or two times without forming a clone. After 10 attempts of transfection human fetal hepatocytes using the same transfection system, we obtained one stable human fetal hepatocytes cell line which was able albumin secretion urea production and glucose

  11. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  12. COVALENT BINDING OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE TO PROTEINS IN HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES. (R826409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental contaminant and occupational solvent trichloroethylene is metabolized to a reactive intermediate that covalently binds to specific hepatic proteins in exposed mice and rats. In order to compare covalent binding between humans and rodents, primary hepatocyte c...

  13. Modeling of Hepatocytes Proliferation Isolated from Proximal and Distal Zones from Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Montalbano, Mauro; Curcurù, Giuseppe; Shirafkan, Ali; Vento, Renza; Rastellini, Cristiana; Cicalese, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of hepatocytes from cirrhotic human livers and subsequent primary culture are important new tools for laboratory research and cell-based therapeutics in the study of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using such techniques, we have previously identified different subpopulations of human hepatocytes and among them one is showing a progressive transformation of hepatocytes in HCC-like cells. We have hypothesized that increasing the distance from the neoplastic lesion might affect hepatocyte function and transformation capacity. However, limited information is available in comparing the growth and proliferation of human hepatocytes obtained from different areas of the same cirrhotic liver in relation to their distance from the HCC lesion. In this study, hepatocytes from 10 patients with cirrhosis and HCC undergoing surgical resections from specimens obtained at a proximal (CP) and distal (CD) distance from the HCC lesion were isolated and placed in primary culture. CP hepatocytes (CP-Hep) were isolated between 1 to 3 cm (leaving at least 1cm margin to avoid cancer cells and/or satellite lesions), while CD hepatocytes (CD-Hep) were isolated from more than 5 cm or from the contralateral-lobe. A statistical model was built to analyze the proliferation rates of these cells and we evaluated expression of HCC markers (Glypican-3 (GPC3), αSmooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA) and PCNA). We observed a significant difference in proliferation and in-vitro growth showing that CP-Hep had a proliferation pattern and rate significantly different than CD-Hep. Based on these data, this model can provide information to predict growth of human hepatocytes in primary culture in relation to their pre-cancerous state with significant differences in the HCC markers expression. This model provides an important innovative tool for in-vitro analysis of HCC. PMID:27074018

  14. Polarized location of SLC and ABC drug transporters in monolayer-cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Noel, Gregory; Stieger, Bruno; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    Human hepatocytes cultured in a monolayer configuration represent a well-established in vitro model in liver toxicology, notably used in drug transporter studies. Polarized status of drug transporters, i.e., their coordinated location at sinusoidal or canalicular membranes, remains however incompletely documented in these cultured hepatocytes. The present study was therefore designed to analyze transporter expression and location in such cells. Most of drug transporters were first shown to be present at notable mRNA levels in monolayer-cultured human hepatocytes. Cultured human hepatocytes, which morphologically exhibited bile canaliculi-like structures, were next demonstrated, through immunofluorescence staining, to express the influx transporters organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, OATP2B1 and organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and the efflux transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 3 at their sinusoidal pole. In addition, the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein and MRP2 were detected at the canalicular pole of monolayer-cultured human hepatocytes. Moreover, canalicular secretion of reference substrates for the efflux transporters bile salt export pump, MRP2 and P-glycoprotein as well as sinusoidal drug transporter activities were observed. This polarized and functional expression of drug transporters in monolayer-cultured human hepatocytes highlights the interest of using this human in vitro cell model in xenobiotic transport studies. PMID:25862123

  15. Improved cryopreservation of human hepatocytes using a new xeno free cryoprotectant solution

    PubMed Central

    Saliem, Mohammed; Holm, Frida; Tengzelius, Rosita Bergström; Jorns, Carl; Nilsson, Lisa-Mari; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Ellis, Ewa; Hovatta, Outi

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To optimize a xeno-free cryopreservation protocol for primary human hepatocytes. METHODS: The demand for cryopreserved hepatocytes is increasing for both clinical and research purposes. Despite several hepatocyte cryopreservation protocols being available, improvements are urgently needed. We first compared controlled rate freezing to polystyrene box freezing and did not find any significant change between the groups. Using the polystyrene box freezing, we compared two xeno-free freezing solutions for freezing of primary human hepatocytes: a new medium (STEM-CELLBANKER, CB), which contains dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and anhydrous dextrose, both permeating and non-permeating cryoprotectants, and the frequently used DMSO - University of Wisconsin (DMSO-UW) medium. The viability of the hepatocytes was assessed by the trypan blue exclusion method as well as a calcein-esterase based live-dead assay before and after cryopreservation. The function of the hepatocytes was evaluated before and after cryopreservation by assessing enzymatic activity of 6 major cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYPs): CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP3A4 and CYP3A7. RESULTS: The new cryoprotectant combination preserved hepatocyte viability significantly better than the standard DMSO-UW protocol (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in viability estimation between both the trypan blue (TB) and the Live-Dead Assay methods. There was a correlation between viability of fresh hepatocytes and the difference in cell viability between CB and DMSO protocols (r2 = 0.69) using the TB method. However, due to high within-group variability in the activities of the major CYPs, any statistical between-group differences were precluded. Cryopreservation of human hepatocytes using the cryoprotectant combination was a simple and xeno-free procedure yielding better hepatocyte viability. Thus, it may be a better alternative to the standard DMSO-UW protocol. Estimating CYP activities did not seem to be a

  16. Effect of docosahexaenoic acid and sardine oil diets on the ultrastructure of hepatocytes in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, M; Suzuki, H

    1995-08-01

    The influence of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the ultrastructure of hepatocytes was studied. Adult male mice of Crj:CD-1 (ICR) strain were fed a fat-free purified diet supplemented with 5% (by weight) of purified DHA, refined sardine oil, and palm oil. The mice were fed the DHA diet or the palm oil diet for 7 days, and the sardine oil diet or the palm oil diet for one month. There were significant ultrastructural changes in the hepatocytes between the mice fed palm oil diet and the animals fed DHA and sardine oil diets. Many lipid droplets in the tissues of mice fed the palm oil diet were observed. Few lipid droplets were contained in the hepatocytes from the mice fed DHA and sardine oil diets, but electron-dense bodies were found in their tissues. These electron-dense bodies were mainly found near the region of the nucleus, blood sinusoids and bile canaliculi. These results suggest that the dense bodies found in the DHA and sardine oil diet groups may appear as a result of acceleration of lipid metabolism in the liver of mice. PMID:8676220

  17. Expression of human. alpha. sub 1 -antitrypsin in dogs after autologous transplantation of retroviral transduced hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.A.; Baley, P.; Rothenberg, S.; Leland, F; Fleming, L.; Ponder, K.P.; Liu, Tajen; Finegold, M.; Darlington, G.; Pokorny, W.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1992-01-01

    The liver represents an excellent organ for gene therapy since many genetic disorders result from the deficiency of liver-specific gene products. The authors have previously demonstrated that transgenic mouse hepatocytes can be heterologously transplanted into congenic recipients where they survived indefinitely and continued to function as hepatocytes. Here they demonstrate the autologous transplantation of retrovirally transduced canine hepatocytes. In two animals they have transplanted hepatocytes transduced with a retroviral vector containing the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin cDNA under transcriptional control of the cytomegalovirus promotor. Both animals had significant human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin in the serum for 1 month. The results suggest that gene therapy of hepatic deficiencies may be achieved by hepatocellular transplantation after genetic reconstruction with the use of promoters of cellular genes that are active in the normal liver.

  18. Functional 3D human primary hepatocyte spheroids made by co-culturing hepatocytes from partial hepatectomy specimens and human adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    No, Da Yoon; Lee, Seung-A; Choi, Yoon Young; Park, DoYeun; Jang, Ju Yun; Kim, Dong-Sik; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    We have generated human hepatocyte spheroids with uniform size and shape by co-culturing 1∶1 mixtures of primary human hepatocytes (hHeps) from partial hepatectomy specimens and human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in concave microwells. The hADSCs in spheroids could compensate for the low viability and improve the functional maintenance of hHeps. Co-cultured spheroids aggregated and formed compact spheroidal shapes more rapidly, and with a significantly higher viability than mono-cultured spheroids. The liver-specific functions of co-cultured spheroids were greater, although they contained half the number of hepatocytes as mono-cultured spheroids. Albumin secretion by co-cultured spheroids was 10% higher on day 7, whereas urea secretion was similar, compared with mono-cultured spheroids. A quantitative cytochrome P450 assay showed that the enzymatic activity of co-cultured spheroids cultured for 9 days was 28% higher than that of mono-cultured spheroids. These effects may be due to the transdifferentiation potential and paracrine healing effects of hADSCs on hHeps. These co-cultured spheroids may be useful for creating artificial three-dimensional hepatic tissue constructs and for cell therapy with limited numbers of human hepatocytes. PMID:23236387

  19. In vitro drug metabolism of green tea catechins in human, monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendy W; Qin, Geng-Yao; Zhang, Ting; Feng, Wan-Yong

    2012-06-01

    The metabolic fate of green tea catechins [(-)-epicatechin ((-)-EC), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) (-)- epigallocatechin (EGC) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)] in cryopreserved human, monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes was studied. Methylation, glucuronidation, sulfation and isomerization pathways of (-)-EC in all five species were found. Methylation, glucuronidation, sulfation, hydrolysis, isomerization and glucosidation pathways of ECG were found. Species differences in metabolism of (-)-EC or ECG were observed. Surprisingly, no metabolites of EGC or EGCG were detected, but chemical oxidation and polymerization were observed under these experimental conditions. It appeared that enzymatic reactions and chemical reactions were differentiated by an additional hydroxyl group on the B-ring between (-)-EC/ECG and EGC/EGCG. For (-)-EC, thirty-five metabolites including isomerized (M6. M10 and M25), glucuronidated (M3, M5 and M11), sulfated (M7, M15, M16, M18, M20, M23, M26), methylated (M2, M9, M12, M17, M19, M21, M27, M30, M32), glucuronated/methylated (M4, M8, M13, M14), sulfated/methylated (M22, M24, M28, M29, M31, M33, M34, M35) and diglucuronidate (M1), were detected and characterized. M11, M18, M19 and M23 were major metabolites in human hepatocytes; M11, M26 and M31 were major metabolites in monkey hepatocytes; M10, M20, M22, M26 and M31 were major metabolites in dog hepatocytes; M5, M6 and M10 were major metabolites in rat hepatocytes; and M5, M6 and M13 were major metabolites in mouse hepatocytes. For ECG, twelve metabolites including isomerized (M1), hydrolyzed (M3), glucosidated (M2), glucuronidated (M4 and M6), sulfated (M9, M11 and M12), methylated (M7), sulfated/glucuronidated/methylated (M8 and M10) and diglucuronidated (M5), were detected and characterized. M4, M11 and M12 were major metabolites in human hepatocytes; M11 and M12 were major metabolites in monkey hepatocytes; M3 and M11 were major metabolites in dog hepatocytes; M4, M6 and

  20. Effect of Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Melatonin on the Isolation of Human Primary Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Solanas, Estela; Sostres, Carlos; Serrablo, Alejandro; García-Gil, Agustín; García, Joaquín J; Aranguren, Francisco J; Jiménez, Pilar; Hughes, Robin D; Serrano, María T

    2014-01-01

    The availability of fully functional human hepatocytes is critical for progress in human hepatocyte transplantation and the development of bioartificial livers and in vitro liver systems. However, the cell isolation process impairs the hepatocyte status and determines the number of viable cells that can be obtained. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and melatonin in the human hepatocyte isolation protocol. Human hepatocytes were isolated from liver pieces resected from 10 patients undergoing partial hepatectomy. Each piece was dissected into 2 equally sized pieces and randomized, in 5 of 10 isolations, to perfusion with 1% DMSO-containing perfusion buffer or buffer also containing 5 mM melatonin using the 2-step collagenase perfusion technique (experiment 1), and in the other 5 isolations to standard perfusion or perfusion including 1% DMSO (experiment 2). Tissues perfused with DMSO yielded 70.6% more viable hepatocytes per gram of tissue (p = 0.076), with a 26.1% greater albumin production (p < 0.05) than those perfused with control buffer. Melatonin did not significantly affect (p > 0.05) any of the studied parameters, but cell viability, dehydrogenase activity, albumin production, urea secretion, and 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase activity were slightly higher in cells isolated with melatonin-containing perfusion buffer compared to those isolated with DMSO. In conclusion, addition of 1% DMSO to the hepatocyte isolation protocol could improve the availability and functionality of hepatocytes for transplantation, but further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms involved. PMID:26381499

  1. Highly Efficient Differentiation of Functional Hepatocytes From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaocui; Tschudy-Seney, Benjamin; Roll, Garrett; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ahuja, Tijess P.; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Wang, Charles; McGee, Jeannine; Khoobyari, Shiva; Nolta, Jan A.; Willenbring, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) hold great potential for use in regenerative medicine, novel drug development, and disease progression/developmental studies. Here, we report highly efficient differentiation of hiPSCs toward a relatively homogeneous population of functional hepatocytes. hiPSC-derived hepatocytes (hiHs) not only showed a high expression of hepatocyte-specific proteins and liver-specific functions, but they also developed a functional biotransformation system including phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and phase III transporters. Nuclear receptors, which are critical for regulating the expression of metabolizing enzymes, were also expressed in hiHs. hiHs also responded to different compounds/inducers of cytochrome P450 as mature hepatocytes do. To follow up on this observation, we analyzed the drug metabolizing capacity of hiHs in real time using a novel ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We found that, like freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes, the seven major metabolic pathways of the drug bufuralol were found in hiHs. In addition, transplanted hiHs engrafted, integrated, and proliferated in livers of an immune-deficient mouse model, and secreted human albumin, indicating that hiHs also function in vivo. In conclusion, we have generated a method for the efficient generation of hepatocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells in vitro and in vivo, and it appears that the cells function similarly to primary human hepatocytes, including developing a complete metabolic function. These results represent a significant step toward using patient/disease-specific hepatocytes for cell-based therapeutics as well as for pharmacology and toxicology studies. PMID:23681950

  2. Effects of macroporous hydroxyapatite carriers on the growth and function of human hepatoblasts derived from fetal hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takaaki; Saito, Hiroshi; Komizu, Yuji; Tomoshige, Ryuichi; Matsushita, Taku

    2016-08-01

    Improvement of three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions, including substrates for cell growth, is needed for various cell-based applications. In this study, we developed hydroxyapatite (HAp) macroporous carriers having several pore size distributions and tried to obtain the findings about the effective pore sizes for the growth and function of hepatoblasts derived from human fetal hepatocytes. Cellular CYP3A4 activity was significantly enhanced when 20% HAp macroporous carrier was used, reaching 1.49±0.28 pmol/10(6) cells/min of benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylation activity, which is comparable to that of primary human hepatocytes from livers of adult donors. Analysis of the pore size (the radius of curvature) distribution of each HAp carrier using a 3D-electron beam surface roughness analyzer revealed two peaks of pore size distribution at 30-40 μm and 70-80 μm, respectively. Thirty-five percent of the pores in the 20% carrier had a size distribution within 50-80 μm. Especially, pores of 70-80 μm were more abundant in the 20% HAp carrier than in the 10% and 30% HAp carriers. These results suggested that a HAp carrier with the pore size distribution of 50-80 μm might be effective for cell growth and function in human hepatoblasts derived from fetal hepatocytes. PMID:26968126

  3. Preincubation of rat and human hepatocytes with cytoprotectants prior to cryopreservation can improve viability and function upon thawing.

    PubMed

    Terry, Claire; Dhawan, Anil; Mitry, Ragai R; Lehec, Sharon C; Hughes, Robin D

    2005-12-01

    Cryopreservation of human hepatocytes is important for the treatment of liver disease by hepatocyte transplantation and also for the use of hepatocytes as an in vitro model of the liver. One factor in the success of cryopreservation is the quality of cells before freezing. Preincubation of hepatocytes with cytoprotective compounds to allow recovery from the isolation process prior to cryopreservation, such as those that will boost cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content or antioxidants, may improve the viability and function of cells upon thawing. Rat hepatocytes were used to investigate the effects of preincubation with 10 compounds: precursors (glucose, fructose, glutathione, and S-adenosyl-L-methionine), antioxidants (ascorbic acid and alpha-lipoic acid), and compounds with multiple effects (N-acetylcysteine, pentoxifylline, prostaglandin E(1), and tauroursodeoxycholic acid). Human hepatocytes were then used to investigate 5 of the original 10 compounds (glucose, fructose, alpha-lipoic acid, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and pentoxifylline). Glucose preincubation (100-300 mM) improved the viability and attachment efficiency of rat hepatocytes and improved the viability and reduced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage of human hepatocytes. Fructose preincubation (100-300 mM) improved the viability and attachment efficiency of rat hepatocytes and improved the attachment efficiency of human hepatocytes. alpha-lipoic acid preincubation (0.5-5 mM) improved the viability and attachment efficiency of both rat and human hepatocytes. At a concentration of 2.5 mM alpha-lipoic acid also improved the albumin production of human hepatocytes. In conclusion, preincubation of hepatocytes prior to cryopreservation can improve the viability and function of thawed cells and may provide a method of obtaining better-quality cryopreserved hepatocytes for transplantation. PMID:16315306

  4. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes as alternative in vitro model for cytochrome p450 induction studies.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Martha; Rager, Joseph; Wang, Qing; Strab, Robert; Hidalgo, Ismael J; Owen, Albert; Li, Jibin

    2003-01-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) by drugs is one of major concerns for drug-drug interactions. Thus, the assessment of CYP induction by novel compounds is a vital component in the drug discovery and development processes. Primary human hepatocytes are the preferred in vitro model for predicting CYP induction in vivo. However, their use is hampered by the erratic supply of human tissue and donor-to-donor variability. Although cryopreserved hepatocytes have been recommended for short-term applications in suspension, their use in studies on induction of enzyme activity has been limited because of poor attachment and response to enzyme inducers. In this study, we report culture conditions that allowed the attachment of cryopreserved human hepatocytes and responsiveness to CYP inducers. We evaluated the inducibility of CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A4 enzymes in cryopreserved hepatocytes from three human donors. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes were cultured in serum-free medium for 4 d. They exhibited normal morphology and measurable viability as evaluated by the reduction of tetrazolium salts (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt) by cellular dehydrogenases. Treatment with beta-naphthoflavone (10 microM) for 3 d increased ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (CYP1A1/2) by 6- to 11-fold over untreated cultures and increased CYP1A2 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression by three- to eightfold. Similarly, treatment of cryopreserved human hepatocytes with rifampicin (25 microM) for 3 d increased testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activity (CYP3A4) by five- to eightfold over untreated cultures and increased CYP3A4 mRNA expression by four- to eightfold. The results suggest that cryopreserved human hepatocytes can be a suitable in vitro model for evaluating xenobiotics as inducers of CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A4 enzymes. PMID:14599235

  5. Functional activity of human hepatocytes under traumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtseva, M V; Stein, G I; Shashkov, B V; Kudryavtsev, B N

    1998-03-01

    Absorption and fluorescent cytophotometry techniques were applied to studies of RNA as well as of total glycogen and its fractions as the parameters of functional activity of the hepatocytes in patients with severe mechanical trauma, both with and without autointoxication (AI). Slides were stained with gallocyanine-chromalums to determine the RNA content and were processed by the fluorescent PAS-reaction for the glycogen content. To trace the dynamics of RNA and glycogen contents in the liver punction biopsies were done in the same patients. A quick increase in the RNA content took place in both groups of patients at the first period (within the first 3 days) of traumatic disease. At the second period of disease the hepatocyte RNA content in patients without AI was found to decrease up to the initial level whereas that in patients with AI increased on the average by 36% of the initial values. The total glycogen content in hepatocytes of all the patients changed insignificantly in the course of disease but its labile fraction in patients with AI decreased to 70% of the total. The increase of hepatocyte synthetic activity and the maintenance of the high glycogen level are indicative of the large compensatory potential of the liver that enables it to carry an intensive functional load under AI conditions. PMID:9570502

  6. Cytotoxicity evaluation using cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes in various culture formats.

    PubMed

    Richert, Lysiane; Baze, Audrey; Parmentier, Céline; Gerets, Helga H J; Sison-Young, Rowena; Dorau, Martina; Lovatt, Cerys; Czich, Andreas; Goldring, Christopher; Park, B Kevin; Juhila, Satu; Foster, Alison J; Williams, Dominic P

    2016-09-01

    Sixteen training compounds selected in the IMI MIP-DILI consortium, 12 drug-induced liver injury (DILI) positive compounds and 4 non-DILI compounds, were assessed in cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes. When a ten-fold safety margin threshold was applied, the non-DILI-compounds were correctly identified 2h following a single exposure to pooled human hepatocytes (n=13 donors) in suspension and 14-days following repeat dose exposure (3 treatments) to an established 3D-microtissue co-culture (3D-MT co-culture, n=1 donor) consisting of human hepatocytes co-cultured with non-parenchymal cells (NPC). In contrast, only 5/12 DILI-compounds were correctly identified 2h following a single exposure to pooled human hepatocytes in suspension. Exposure of the 2D-sandwich culture human hepatocyte monocultures (2D-sw) for 3days resulted in the correct identification of 11/12 DILI-positive compounds, whereas exposure of the human 3D-MT co-cultures for 14days resulted in identification of 9/12 DILI-compounds; in addition to ximelagatran (also not identified by 2D-sw monocultures, Sison-Young et al., 2016), the 3D-MT co-cultures failed to detect amiodarone and bosentan. The sensitivity of the 2D human hepatocytes co-cultured with NPC to ximelagatran was increased in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but only at high concentrations, therefore preventing its classification as a DILI positive compound. In conclusion (1) despite suspension human hepatocytes having the greatest metabolic capacity in the short term, they are the least predictive of clinical DILI across the MIP-DILI test compounds, (2) longer exposure periods than 72h of human hepatocytes do not allow to increase DILI-prediction rate, (3) co-cultures of human hepatocytes with NPC, in the presence of LPS during the 72h exposure period allow the assessment of innate immune system involvement of a given drug. PMID:27363785

  7. Genotoxic effects of alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane in primary cultures of rodent and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, F; Robbiano, L; Adamo, D; Federa, R; Martelli, A; Brambilla, G

    1996-01-01

    The genotoxicity of alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH) was evaluated in primary cultures of mouse, rat and human hepatocytes. DNA fragmentation was measured by the alkaline elution technique and DNA repair synthesis by quantitative autoradiography. A 20 h exposure to subtoxic concentrations ranging from 0.056 to 0.32 mM produced a dose-dependent frequency of DNA breaks in rat hepatocytes and in hepatocytes from four of five human donors, but not in mouse hepatocytes, DNA repair induction was absent in hepatocytes from all three species. The reduction in the frequency of DNA breaks observed in rat hepatocytes simultaneously exposed to metyrapone suggests that alpha-HCH is transformed into reactive species by a cytochrome P450-dependent reaction. The detection of DNA fragmentation but not of DNA repair synthesis may be tentatively explained by assuming that alpha-HCH behaves as a chemical eliciting short patch DNA repair, which is more easily revealed as genotoxic by the occurrence of DNA single-strand breaks. PMID:8671720

  8. Hypoxia promotes liver-stage malaria infection in primary human hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shengyong; March, Sandra; Galstian, Ani; Hanson, Kirsten; Carvalho, Tânia; Mota, Maria M; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2014-02-01

    Homeostasis of mammalian cell function strictly depends on balancing oxygen exposure to maintain energy metabolism without producing excessive reactive oxygen species. In vivo, cells in different tissues are exposed to a wide range of oxygen concentrations, and yet in vitro models almost exclusively expose cultured cells to higher, atmospheric oxygen levels. Existing models of liver-stage malaria that utilize primary human hepatocytes typically exhibit low in vitro infection efficiencies, possibly due to missing microenvironmental support signals. One cue that could influence the infection capacity of cultured human hepatocytes is the dissolved oxygen concentration. We developed a microscale human liver platform comprised of precisely patterned primary human hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells to model liver-stage malaria, but the oxygen concentrations are typically higher in the in vitro liver platform than anywhere along the hepatic sinusoid. Indeed, we observed that liver-stage Plasmodium parasite development in vivo correlates with hepatic sinusoidal oxygen gradients. Therefore, we hypothesized that in vitro liver-stage malaria infection efficiencies might improve under hypoxia. Using the infection of micropatterned co-cultures with Plasmodium berghei, Plasmodium yoelii or Plasmodium falciparum as a model, we observed that ambient hypoxia resulted in increased survival of exo-erythrocytic forms (EEFs) in hepatocytes and improved parasite development in a subset of surviving EEFs, based on EEF size. Further, the effective cell surface oxygen tensions (pO2) experienced by the hepatocytes, as predicted by a mathematical model, were systematically perturbed by varying culture parameters such as hepatocyte density and height of the medium, uncovering an optimal cell surface pO2 to maximize the number of mature EEFs. Initial mechanistic experiments revealed that treatment of primary human hepatocytes with the hypoxia mimetic, cobalt(II) chloride, as well as a HIF-1

  9. Human Hepatocytes and Hematolymphoid Dual Reconstitution in Treosulfan-Conditioned uPA-NOG Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gutti, Tanuja L.; Knibbe, Jaclyn S.; Makarov, Edward; Zhang, Jinjin; Yannam, Govardhana R.; Gorantla, Santhi; Sun, Yimin; Mercer, David F.; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Wisecarver, James L.; Osna, Natalia A.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Poluektova, Larisa Y.

    2015-01-01

    Human-specific HIV-1 and hepatitis co-infections significantly affect patient management and call for new therapeutic options. Small xenotransplantation models with human hepatocytes and hematolymphoid tissue should facilitate antiviral/antiretroviral drug trials. However, experience with mouse strains tested for dual reconstitution is limited, with technical difficulties such as risky manipulations with newborns and high mortality rates due to metabolic abnormalities. The best animal strains for hepatocyte transplantation are not optimal for human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment, and vice versa. We evaluated a new strain of highly immunodeficient nonobese diabetic/Shi-scid (severe combined immunodeficiency)/IL-2Rγcnull (NOG) mice that carry two copies of the mouse albumin promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator transgene for dual reconstitution with human liver and immune cells. Three approaches for dual reconstitution were evaluated: i) freshly isolated fetal hepatoblasts were injected intrasplenically, followed by transplantation of cryopreserved HSCs obtained from the same tissue samples 1 month later after treosulfan conditioning; ii) treosulfan conditioning is followed by intrasplenic simultaneous transplantation of fetal hepatoblasts and HSCs; and iii) transplantation of mature hepatocytes is followed by mismatched HSCs. The long-term dual reconstitution was achieved on urokinase-type plasminogen activator–NOG mice with mature hepatocytes (not fetal hepatoblasts) and HSCs. Even major histocompatibility complex mismatched transplantation was sustained without any evidence of hepatocyte rejection by the human immune system. PMID:24200850

  10. 5α-Reductase Type 2 Regulates Glucocorticoid Action and Metabolic Phenotype in Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Maryam; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Parajes, Silvia; Krone, Nils P; Valsamakis, George; Mastorakos, George; Hughes, Beverly; Taylor, Angela; Bujalska, Iwona J; Gathercole, Laura L; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoids and androgens have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); androgen deficiency in males, androgen excess in females, and glucocorticoid excess in both sexes are associated with NAFLD. Glucocorticoid and androgen action are regulated at a prereceptor level by the enzyme 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2), which inactivates glucocorticoids to their dihydrometabolites and converts T to DHT. We have therefore explored the role of androgens and glucocorticoids and their metabolism by SRD5A2 upon lipid homeostasis in human hepatocytes. In both primary human hepatocytes and human hepatoma cell lines, glucocorticoids decreased de novo lipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas androgen treatment (T and DHT) increased lipogenesis in cell lines and in primary cultures of human hepatocytes from female donors, it was without effect in primary hepatocyte cultures from men. SRD5A2 overexpression reduced the effects of cortisol to suppress lipogenesis and this effect was lost following transfection with an inactive mutant construct. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition using the 5α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride augmented cortisol action. We have demonstrated that manipulation of SRD5A2 activity can regulate lipogenesis in human hepatocytes in vitro. This may have significant clinical implications for those patients prescribed 5α-reductase inhibitors, in particular augmenting the actions of glucocorticoids to modulate hepatic lipid flux. PMID:25974403

  11. 5α-Reductase Type 2 Regulates Glucocorticoid Action and Metabolic Phenotype in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Maryam; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Parajes, Silvia; Krone, Nils P.; Valsamakis, George; Mastorakos, George; Hughes, Beverly; Taylor, Angela; Bujalska, Iwona J.; Gathercole, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids and androgens have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); androgen deficiency in males, androgen excess in females, and glucocorticoid excess in both sexes are associated with NAFLD. Glucocorticoid and androgen action are regulated at a prereceptor level by the enzyme 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2), which inactivates glucocorticoids to their dihydrometabolites and converts T to DHT. We have therefore explored the role of androgens and glucocorticoids and their metabolism by SRD5A2 upon lipid homeostasis in human hepatocytes. In both primary human hepatocytes and human hepatoma cell lines, glucocorticoids decreased de novo lipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas androgen treatment (T and DHT) increased lipogenesis in cell lines and in primary cultures of human hepatocytes from female donors, it was without effect in primary hepatocyte cultures from men. SRD5A2 overexpression reduced the effects of cortisol to suppress lipogenesis and this effect was lost following transfection with an inactive mutant construct. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition using the 5α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride augmented cortisol action. We have demonstrated that manipulation of SRD5A2 activity can regulate lipogenesis in human hepatocytes in vitro. This may have significant clinical implications for those patients prescribed 5α-reductase inhibitors, in particular augmenting the actions of glucocorticoids to modulate hepatic lipid flux. PMID:25974403

  12. Human hepatocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells: a promising cell model for drug hepatotoxicity screening.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lechón, María José; Tolosa, Laia

    2016-09-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a frequent cause of failure in both clinical and post-approval stages of drug development, and poses a key challenge to the pharmaceutical industry. Current animal models offer poor prediction of human DILI. Although several human cell-based models have been proposed for the detection of human DILI, human primary hepatocytes remain the gold standard for preclinical toxicological screening. However, their use is hindered by their limited availability, variability and phenotypic instability. In contrast, pluripotent stem cells, which include embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), proliferate extensively in vitro and can be differentiated into hepatocytes by the addition of soluble factors. This provides a stable source of hepatocytes for multiple applications, including early preclinical hepatotoxicity screening. In addition, iPSCs also have the potential to establish genotype-specific cells from different individuals, which would increase the predictivity of toxicity assays allowing more successful clinical trials. Therefore, the generation of human hepatocyte-like cells derived from pluripotent stem cells seems to be promising for overcoming limitations of hepatocyte preparations, and it is expected to have a substantial repercussion in preclinical hepatotoxicity risk assessment in early drug development stages. PMID:27325232

  13. Micropatterned coculture of primary human hepatocytes and supportive cells for the study of hepatotropic pathogens.

    PubMed

    March, Sandra; Ramanan, Vyas; Trehan, Kartik; Ng, Shengyong; Galstian, Ani; Gural, Nil; Scull, Margaret A; Shlomai, Amir; Mota, Maria M; Fleming, Heather E; Khetani, Salman R; Rice, Charles M; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2015-12-01

    The development of therapies and vaccines for human hepatropic pathogens requires robust model systems that enable the study of host-pathogen interactions. However, in vitro liver models of infection typically use either hepatoma cell lines that exhibit aberrant physiology or primary human hepatocytes in culture conditions in which they rapidly lose their hepatic phenotype. To achieve stable and robust in vitro primary human hepatocyte models, we developed micropatterned cocultures (MPCCs), which consist of primary human hepatocytes organized into 2D islands that are surrounded by supportive fibroblast cells. By using this system, which can be established over a period of days, and maintained over multiple weeks, we demonstrate how to recapitulate in vitro hepatic life cycles for the hepatitis B and C viruses and the Plasmodium pathogens P. falciparum and P. vivax. The MPCC platform can be used to uncover aspects of host-pathogen interactions, and it has the potential to be used for drug and vaccine development. PMID:26584444

  14. IFNL3 genotype is associated with differential induction of IFNL3 in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kurbanov, Fuat; Kim, Yonghak; Latanich, Rachel; Chaudhari, Pooja; El-Diwany, Ramy; Knabel, Matt; Kandathil, Abraham J; Cameron, Andrew; Cox, Andrea; Jang, Yoon-Young; Thomas, David L; Balagopal, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Background Lambda interferons (IFNLs) have potent antiviral activity against HCV, and polymorphisms within the IFNL gene cluster near the IFNL3 gene strongly predict spontaneous- and treatment-related HCV infection outcomes. The mechanism(s) linking IFNL polymorphisms and HCV control is currently elusive. Methods IFNL induction was studied in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from 18 human donors, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 18 human donors, multiple cell lines and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-hepatocytes) from 7 human donors. After stimulation with intracellular RNA and infectious HCV, quantitative PCR (qPCR) primers and probes were designed to distinguish and quantify closely related IFNL messenger (m)RNAs from IFNL1, IFNL2 and IFNL3. Results PHH demonstrated the most potent induction of IFNLs, although had lower pre-stimulation levels compared to PBMCs, monocytes and cell lines. PHH stimulation with cytoplasmic poly I:C induced >1,000-fold expression of IFNL1, IFNL2 and IFNL3. PHH from donors who were homozygous for the favourable IFNL3 allele (IFNL3-CC) had higher IFNL3 induction compared to PHH from IFNL3-TT donors (P=0.03). Baseline IFNL mRNA expression and induction was also tested in iPSC-hepatocytes: iPSC-hepatocytes had significantly higher baseline expression of IFNLs compared to PHH (P<0.0001), and IFNL3 induction was marginally different in iPSC-hepatocytes by IFNL genotype (P=0.07). Conclusions Hepatocytes express IFNLs when stimulated by a synthetic viral RNA that signals the cell through the cytoplasm. IFNL induction may be greater in persons with the favourable IFNL3 allele. These data provide insight into the strong linkage between IFNL3 genetics and control of HCV infection. PMID:26109548

  15. Vascularized subcutaneous human liver tissue from engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yusuke; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Ohashi, Kazuo; Koike, Makiko; Utoh, Rie; Hasegawa, Hideko; Muraoka, Izumi; Suematsu, Takashi; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    Subcutaneous liver tissue engineering is an attractive and minimally invasive approach used to curative treat hepatic failure and inherited liver diseases. However, graft failure occurs frequently due to insufficient infiltration of blood vessels (neoangiogenesis), while the maintenance of hepatocyte phenotype and function requires in vivo development of the complex cellular organization of the hepatic lobule. Here we describe a subcutaneous human liver construction allowing for rapidly vascularized grafts by transplanting engineered cellular sheets consisting of human primary hepatocytes adhered onto a fibroblast layer. The engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets (EHFSs) showed superior expression levels of vascularization-associated growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta 1, and hepatocyte growth factor) in vitro. EHFSs developed into vascularized subcutaneous human liver tissues contained glycogen stores, synthesized coagulation factor IX, and showed significantly higher synthesis rates of liver-specific proteins (albumin and alpha 1 anti-trypsin) in vivo than tissues from hepatocyte-only sheets. The present study describes a new approach for vascularized human liver organogenesis under mouse skin. This approach could prove valuable for establishing novel cell therapies for liver diseases. PMID:26142777

  16. Quantitative expression profile of hepatobiliary transporters in sandwich cultured rat and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Bi, Yi-An; Duignan, David B; Lai, Yurong

    2009-01-01

    As sandwich cultured (SC) hepatocytes can repolarize to form bile canalicular networks, allowing active excretion of compounds in a vectorial manner, the model has been widely used for assessing the transporter related complexity of ADME/tox issues. A lack of quantitative information on transporter expression during cell culture has made in vitro to in vivo extrapolation of hepatobiliary transport difficult. In the present study, using our newly developed LC-MS/MS absolute quantitative methods, we determined the quantitative expression profile of three biliary transporters in SC rat and human hepatocytes. A significant shift of hepatobiliary transporter proteins was observed both in human and rat sandwich cultures. A decrease of BSEP/Bsep protein and an increase of BCRP/Bcrp protein were detected in both rat and human hepatocytes over time in culture. Interestingly, Mrp2 in rat hepatocytes was significantly diminished, while MRP2 constantly increased in human hepatocytes during the cell culture. Consequently, the interspecies difference between rat and human in absolute amount of MRP2/Mrp2 was minimized over time in culture. Following the sandwich culture, the species difference of hepatobiliary transporter protein between human and rat at day 5 post SC was diminished (MRP2/Mrp2), identical (BSEP/Bsep) or reversed (BCRP/Bcrp), compared to the in vivo situation. In addition, the absolute protein amount of BCRP/Bcrp or MRP2/Mrp2 was proportionally correlated with the intrinsic biliary clearance estimated in various lots of SC rat and human hepatocytes. The results revealed that absolute protein amount is a key determinant for hepatobiliary clearance and could provide fundamental support on extrapolation of biliary secretion from in vitro to in vivo. PMID:19545175

  17. SIRT1 Disruption in Human Fetal Hepatocytes Leads to Increased Accumulation of Glucose and Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Tobita, Takamasa; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Takeishi, Kazuki; Nakao, Toshimasa; Wang, Yang; Meng, Fanying; Deng, Chu-Xia; Collin de l’Hortet, Alexandra; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    There are unprecedented epidemics of obesity, such as type II diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) in developed countries. A concerning percentage of American children are being affected by obesity and NAFLD. Studies have suggested that the maternal environment in utero might play a role in the development of these diseases later in life. In this study, we documented that inhibiting SIRT1 signaling in human fetal hepatocytes rapidly led to an increase in intracellular glucose and lipids levels. More importantly, both de novo lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis related genes were upregulated upon SIRT1 inhibition. The AKT/FOXO1 pathway, a major negative regulator of gluconeogenesis, was decreased in the human fetal hepatocytes inhibited for SIRT1, consistent with the higher level of gluconeogenesis. These results indicate that SIRT1 is an important regulator of lipid and carbohydrate metabolisms within human fetal hepatocytes, acting as an adaptive transcriptional response to environmental changes. PMID:26890260

  18. SIRT1 Disruption in Human Fetal Hepatocytes Leads to Increased Accumulation of Glucose and Lipids.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Takamasa; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Takeishi, Kazuki; Nakao, Toshimasa; Wang, Yang; Meng, Fanying; Deng, Chu-Xia; Collin de l'Hortet, Alexandra; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    There are unprecedented epidemics of obesity, such as type II diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) in developed countries. A concerning percentage of American children are being affected by obesity and NAFLD. Studies have suggested that the maternal environment in utero might play a role in the development of these diseases later in life. In this study, we documented that inhibiting SIRT1 signaling in human fetal hepatocytes rapidly led to an increase in intracellular glucose and lipids levels. More importantly, both de novo lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis related genes were upregulated upon SIRT1 inhibition. The AKT/FOXO1 pathway, a major negative regulator of gluconeogenesis, was decreased in the human fetal hepatocytes inhibited for SIRT1, consistent with the higher level of gluconeogenesis. These results indicate that SIRT1 is an important regulator of lipid and carbohydrate metabolisms within human fetal hepatocytes, acting as an adaptive transcriptional response to environmental changes. PMID:26890260

  19. Towards liver-directed gene therapy: retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M; Raper, S E; Wilson, J M

    1991-11-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy is being considered in the treatment of inherited metabolic diseases. One approach we are considering is the transplantation of autologous hepatocytes that have been genetically modified with recombinant retroviruses ex vivo. We describe, in this report, techniques for isolating human hepatocytes and efficiently transducing recombinant genes into primary cultures. Hepatocytes were isolated from tissue of four different donors, plated in primary culture, and exposed to recombinant retroviruses expressing either the LacZ reporter gene or the cDNA for rabbit LDL receptor. The efficiency of gene transfer under optimal conditions, as determined by Southern blot analysis, varied from a maximum of one proviral copy per cell to a minimum of 0.1 proviral copy per cell. Cytochemical assays were used to detect expression of the recombinant derived proteins, E. coli beta-galactosidase and rabbit LDL receptor. Hepatocytes transduced with the LDL receptor gene expressed levels of receptor protein that exceeded the normal endogenous levels. The ability to isolate and genetically modify human hepatocytes, as described in this report, is an important step towards the development of liver-directed gene therapies in humans. PMID:1767337

  20. Application of a Micropatterned Cocultured Hepatocyte System To Predict Preclinical and Human-Specific Drug Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ballard, T Eric; Wang, Shuai; Cox, Loretta M; Moen, Mark A; Krzyzewski, Stacy; Ukairo, Okechukwu; Obach, R Scott

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory animal models are the industry standard for preclinical risk assessment of drug candidates. Thus, it is important that these species possess profiles of drug metabolites that are similar to those anticipated in human, since metabolites also could be responsible for biologic activities or unanticipated toxicity. Under most circumstances, preclinical species reflect human in vivo metabolites well; however, there have been several notable exceptions, and understanding and predicting these exceptions with an in vitro system would be very useful. Human micropatterned cocultured (MPCC) hepatocytes have been shown to recapitulate human in vivo qualitative metabolic profiles, but the same demonstration has not been performed yet for laboratory animal species. In this study, we investigated several compounds that are known to produce human-unique metabolites through CYP2C9, UGT1A4, aldehyde oxidase (AO), or N-acetyltransferase that were poorly covered or not detected at all in the selected preclinical species. To perform our investigation we used 24-well MPCC hepatocyte plates having three individual human donors and a single donor each of monkey, dog, and rat to study drug metabolism at four time points per species. Through the use of the multispecies MPCC hepatocyte system, the metabolite profiles of the selected compounds in human donors effectively captured the qualitative in vivo metabolite profile with respect to the human metabolite of interest. Human-unique metabolites that were not detected in vivo in certain preclinical species (normally dog and rat) were also not generated in the corresponding species in vitro, confirming that the MPCC hepatocytes can provide an assessment of preclinical species metabolism. From these results, we conclude that multispecies MPCC hepatocyte plates could be used as an effective in vitro tool for preclinical understanding of species metabolism relative to humans and aid in the choice of appropriate preclinical models. PMID

  1. Generation of proliferating human hepatocytes using Upcyte® technology: characterisation and applications in induction and cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Alexandra; Dähn, Caroline; Heinz, Stefan; Zutavern, Anne; Sonntag-Buck, Vera; Maltman, Daniel; Przyborski, Stefan; Hewitt, Nicola J; Braspenning, Joris

    2012-10-01

    1. We have developed a novel technique which causes primary human hepatocytes to proliferate by transducing them with genes that upregulate their proliferation. 2. Upcyte(®) hepatocytes did not form colonies in soft agar and are not immortalised anchorage-independent cells. Confluent cultures expressed liver-specific proteins, produced urea and stored glycogen. 3. CYP activities were low but similar to that in 5-day cultures of primary human hepatocytes. CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 were inducible; moreover, upcyte(®) hepatocytes predicted the in vivo induction potencies of known CYP3A4 inducers using the "relative induction score" prediction model. Placing cells into 3D culture increased their basal CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 basal activities and induction responses. 4. Phase 2 activities (UGTs, SULTs and GSTs) were comparable to activities in freshly isolated hepatocytes. 5. Upcyte(®) hepatocytes were markedly more sensitive to the hepatotoxin, α-amanitin, than HepG2 cells, indicating functional OATP1B3 uptake. The cytotoxicity of aflatoxin B(1), was decreased in upcyte(®) hepatocytes by co-incubation with the CYP3A4 inhibitor, ketoconazole. Upcyte(®) hepatocytes also differentiated between ten hepatotoxic and eight non-hepatotoxic compounds. 6. In conclusion, upcyte(®) hepatocyte cultures have a differentiated phenotype and exhibit functional phase 1 and 2 activities. These data support the use of upcyte(®) hepatocytes for CYP induction and cytotoxicity screening. PMID:22524704

  2. Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by Toxcast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary human hepatocyte cultures are useful in vitro model systems of human liver because when cultured under appropriate conditions the hepatocytes retain liver-like functionality such as metabolism, transport, and cell signaling. This model system was used to characterize the ...

  3. Enhancement of hepatocyte differentiation from human embryonic stem cells by Chinese medicine Fuzhenghuayu

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiamei; Gao, Wei; Zhou, Ping; Ma, Xiaocui; Tschudy-Seney, Benjamin; Liu, Chenghai; Zern, Mark A; Liu, Ping; Duan, Yuyou

    2016-01-01

    Chinese medicine, Fuzhenghuayu (FZHY), appears to prevent fibrosis progression and improve liver function in humans. Here we found that FZHY enhanced hepatocyte differentiation from human embryonic stem cells (hESC). After treatment with FZHY, albumin expression was consistently increased during differentiation and maturation process, and expression of metabolizing enzymes and transporter were also increased. Importantly, expression of mesenchymal cell and cholangiocyte marker was significantly reduced by treatment with FZHY, indicating that one possible mechanism of FZHY’s role is to inhibit the formation of mesenchymal cells and cholangiocytes. Edu-labelled flow cytometric analysis showed that the percentage of the Edu positive cells was increased in the treated cells. These results indicate that the enhanced proliferation involved hepatocytes rather than another cell type. Our investigations further revealed that these enhancements by FZHY are mediated through activation of canonical Wnt and ERK pathways and inhibition of Notch pathway. Thus, FZHY not only promoted hepatocyte differentiation and maturation, but also enhanced hepatocyte proliferation. These results demonstrate that FZHY appears to represent an excellent therapeutic agent for the treatment of liver fibrosis, and that FZHY treatment can enhance our efforts to generate mature hepatocytes with proliferative capacity for cell-based therapeutics and for pharmacological and toxicological studies. PMID:26733102

  4. High Content Analysis of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Hepatocytes Reveals Drug Induced Steatosis and Phospholipidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pradip, Arvind; Steel, Daniella; Jacobsson, Susanna; Holmgren, Gustav; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Sartipy, Peter; Björquist, Petter; Johansson, Inger; Edsbagge, Josefina

    2016-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is one of the most cited reasons for withdrawal of approved drugs from the market. The use of nonclinically relevant in vitro and in vivo testing systems contributes to the high attrition rates. Recent advances in differentiating human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into pure cultures of hepatocyte-like cells expressing functional drug metabolizing enzymes open up possibilities for novel, more relevant human cell based toxicity models. The present study aimed to investigate the use of hiPSC derived hepatocytes for conducting mechanistic toxicity testing by image based high content analysis (HCA). The hiPSC derived hepatocytes were exposed to drugs known to cause hepatotoxicity through steatosis and phospholipidosis, measuring several endpoints representing different mechanisms involved in drug induced hepatotoxicity. The hiPSC derived hepatocytes were benchmarked to the HepG2 cell line and generated robust HCA data with low imprecision between plates and batches. The different parameters measured were detected at subcytotoxic concentrations and the order of which the compounds were categorized (as severe, moderate, mild, or nontoxic) based on the degree of injury at isomolar concentration corresponded to previously published data. Taken together, the present study shows how hiPSC derived hepatocytes can be used as a platform for screening drug induced hepatotoxicity by HCA. PMID:26880940

  5. Bile Acid-Induced Necrosis in Primary Human Hepatocytes and in Patients with Obstructive Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. PMID:25636263

  6. Aneuploidy is permissive for hepatocyte-like cell differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) routinely includes analyses of chromosomal integrity. The belief is that pluripotent stem cells best suited to the generation of differentiated derivatives should display a euploid karyotype; although, this does not appear to have been formally tested. While aneuploidy is commonly associated with cell transformation, several types of somatic cells, including hepatocytes, are frequently aneuploid and variation in chromosomal content does not contribute to a transformed phenotype. This insight has led to the proposal that dynamic changes in the chromosomal environment may be important to establish genetic diversity within the hepatocyte population and such diversity may facilitate an adaptive response by the liver to various insults. Such a positive contribution of aneuploidy to liver function raises the possibility that, in contrast to existing dogma, aneuploid iPSCs may be capable of generating hepatocyte-like cells that display hepatic activities. Results We examined whether a human iPSC line that had multiple chromosomal aberrations was competent to differentiate into hepatocytes and found that loss of normal chromosomal content had little impact on the production of hepatocyte-like cells from iPSCs. Conclusions iPSCs that harbor an abnormal chromosomal content retain the capacity to generate hepatocyte–like cells with high efficiency. PMID:25002137

  7. Primary human hepatocytes versus hepatic cell line: assessing their suitability for in vitro nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Gaiser, Birgit K; Ward, Michael B; Stone, Vicki

    2013-11-01

    The use of hepatocyte cell lines as a replacement for animal models have been heavily criticised mainly due to low expression of metabolism enzymes. This study compares primary human hepatocytes with the C3A cell line and with respect to their response to a panel of nanomaterials (NMs; two ZnO, two MWCNTs, one Ag and one positively functionalised TiO₂). The cell line was very comparable with the primary hepatocytes with regards to their cytotoxic response to the NMs (Ag > uncoated ZnO > coated ZnO). The LC₅₀ was not attained in the presence of the MWCNTs and the TiO₂ NMs. All NMs significantly increased IL-8 production, with no change in levels of TNF-α and IL-6. Albumin production was measured as an indicator of hepatic function. The authors found no change in levels of albumin with the exception of the coated ZnO NM at the LC₅₀ concentration. NM uptake was similar for both the primary hepatocytes and C3A cells as investigated by TEM. Meanwhile, the authors confirmed greater levels of CYP450 activity in untreated primary cells. This study demonstrates that the C3A cell line is a good model for investigating NM-induced hepatocyte responses with respect to uptake, cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and albumin production. PMID:23009365

  8. Biotransformation of deramciclane in primary hepatocytes of rat, mouse, rabbit, dog, and human.

    PubMed

    Monostory, Katalin; Kohalmy, Krisztina; Ludányi, Krisztina; Czira, Gábor; Holly, Sándor; Vereczkey, László; Urmös, Iván; Klebovich, Imre; Kóbori, László

    2005-11-01

    The metabolic fate of deramciclane [(1R,2S,4R)-(-)-2-phenyl-2-(2'-dimethylamino-ethoxy)-1,7,7-trimethyl-bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane], a new anxiolytic drug candidate, has been determined in rat, mouse, rabbit, dog, and human hepatocytes. Rat and rabbit cells were the most active, whereas the rate of metabolism was quite slow in human hepatocytes. During biotransformation, deramciclane underwent side chain modification and oxidation at several positions of the molecule. The side chain modification led to the formation of N-desmethyl deramciclane and phenylborneol. The oxidation of deramciclane resulted in several hydroxy-, carboxy-, and N-oxide derivatives. The hydroxylation took place at primary or secondary carbons of the camphor ring as well as at the side chain; furthermore, dihydroxylated derivatives were also found. The side chain-modified metabolites were also oxidized to hydroxy- or carboxy-derivatives. Conjugation of phase I metabolites, as a route of elimination, was also observed in rat, rabbit, and dog hepatocytes. Although there were some species differences in biotransformation of deramciclane, it was concluded that phase I metabolism in human liver cells seemed to be similar to the metabolism in the hepatocytes isolated from rat. With careful approach, the rat model may be considered to be predictive for human metabolism of deramciclane. PMID:16118331

  9. PURIFICATION AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN HEPATOPOETIN A: A POLYPEPTIDE GROWTH FACTOR FOR HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported that the presence of a high molecular weight polypeptide growth factor in the plasma of normal human or rat serum which stimulates DNA synthesis in primary cultures of normal rat hepatocytes. e referred to this activity as Hepatopoietin A (HPTA) (6,7)....

  10. APPARENT SEXUAL DIFFERENCES IN METABOLISM OF INORGANIC ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    APPARENT SEXUAL DIFFERENCES IN METABOLISM OF INORGANIC ARSENIC IN HUMAN HEPATOCYTES. M Styblo1, G A Hamilton1, E L LeCluyse1 and D J Thomas2. 1University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    The liver is considered a m...

  11. Long-term maintenance of taurocholate uptake by adult rat hepatocytes co-cultured with a liver epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Foliot, A; Glaise, D; Erlinger, S; Guguen-Guillouzo, C

    1985-01-01

    Taurocholate (TC) uptake by adult rat hepatocytes co-cultured with other rat liver epithelial cells (RLEC) was studied comparatively to hepatocytes in primary culture. Cells were cultured on Petri dishes for desired times prior to measuring their ability to transport TC. TC uptake was linear for 150 sec in both culture conditions. In hepatocytes cultured alone, the initial rate of TC uptake at an extracellular concentration of 100 microM was 0.19 +/- 0.02 nmole per min per 10(6) cells after 48 hr of culture and decreased by 75% after 4 to 6 days. In hepatocytes co-cultured with RLEC, the rate of uptake at 48 hr (0.31 +/- 0.01 nmole per min per 10(6) cells) was significantly higher than in hepatocytes cultured alone (p less than 0.01); in addition, TC uptake remained stable at an average rate of 0.17 +/- 0.01 nmole per min per 10(6) cells for up to 56 days. No detectable uptake was found in RLEC cultured alone. TC uptake exhibited both saturable (Vmax = 0.30 +/- 0.03 nmole per min per 10(6) cells and Km = 42.6 +/- 4.4 microM) and nonsaturable components. These kinetic parameters were similar to those previously reported in isolated hepatocytes and in short-term cultured hepatocytes. TC uptake exhibited sodium dependence and was significantly reduced when extracellular sodium was replaced by lithium and sucrose, or in the presence of 1 mM ouabain. After 18 days of co-culture, TC uptake had qualitatively the same characteristics as at 48 hr, with a saturable and a nonsaturable component.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3979952

  12. Under the skin: Biotransformation of para-aminophenol and para-phenylenediamine in reconstructed human epidermis and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nohynek, Gerhard J; Duche, Daniel; Garrigues, Alexia; Meunier, Pierre-Alain; Toutain, Herve; Leclaire, Jacques

    2005-09-15

    We investigated the biotransformation of the oxidative arylamine (AA) hair dye ingredients [14C]-para-aminophenol (PAP) and [14C]-para-phenylenediamine (PPD) in reconstructed human epidermis and human hepatocytes. Human epidermis quantitatively transformed PAP to its N-acetylated derivative (APAP), whereas hepatocytes transformed PAP to sulfate or glucuronic acid conjugates of APAP or PAP as well as free APAP. Epidermis and hepatocytes converted PPD to N-mono- (MAPPD) and N,N'-di-acetylated (DAPPD) derivatives. At higher concentrations of PPD (250-1000 microM), epidermis or hepatocytes produced more of the MAPPD, whereas concentrations below 250 microM and lower favoured formation of the DAPPD metabolite. When compared with epidermis, human hepatocytes had a three-fold or eight-fold greater capacity for generation of MAPPD or DAPPD, respectively. No evidence of transformation of PAP or PPD to N-hydroxylated derivatives was found in epidermis or hepatocytes. Our results suggest that (i) after dermal absorption of PAP or PPD, humans are systemically exposed to acetylated derivatives; (ii) current in vitro skin absorption studies may be inadapated for determination of human systemic exposure to AAs due to reduced or absent metabolic capacity of non-viable skin; (iii) due to qualitative differences between dermal and hepatic metabolism, oral toxicity studies may be unsuited for the hazard assessment of dermal exposure to AAs; and (iv) use of induced rodent liver S9 metabolic activation systems for in vitro genotoxicity studies may produce misleading results on the hazard of human dermal exposure to AAs. In conclusion, our data support the growing evidence that AAs are transformed in human skin and suggest that current practices of safety assessment of AAs should take these findings into account. PMID:15890478

  13. Role of Tribbles Pseudokinase 1 (TRIB1) in human hepatocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, Sébastien; Martinuk, Amy; Naing, Thet; Lau, Paulina; McPherson, Ruth

    2016-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies for plasma triglycerides and hepatic steatosis identified a risk locus on chromosome 8q24 close to the TRIB1 gene, encoding Tribbles Pseudokinase 1 (TRIB1). In previous studies conducted in murine models, hepatic over-expression of Trib1 was shown to increase fatty acid oxidation and decrease triglyceride synthesis whereas Trib1 knockdown mice exhibited hypertriglyceridemia. Here we have examined the impact of TRIB1 suppression in human and mouse hepatocytes. Examination of a panel of lipid regulator transcripts revealed species-specific effects, prompting us to focus on human models for the remainder of the study. Acute knockdown of TRIB1 in human primary hepatocytes resulted in decreased expression of MTTP and APOB, required for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly although particle secretion was not significantly affected. A parallel analysis performed in HepG2 revealed reduced MTTP, but not APOB, protein as a result of TRIB1 suppression. Global gene expression changes of human primary hepatocytes upon TRIB1 suppression were analyzed by clustering algorithms and found to be consistent with dysregulation of several pathways fundamental to liver function, including altered CEBPA and B transcript levels and impaired glucose handling. Indeed, TRIB1 expression in HepG2 cells was found to be inversely proportional to glucose concentration. Lastly TRIB1 downregulation in primary hepatocytes was associated with suppression of the HNF4A axis. In HepG2 cells, TRIB1 suppression resulted in reduced HNF4A protein levels while HNF4A suppression increased TRIB1 expression. Taken together these studies reveal an important role for TRIB1 in human hepatocyte biology. PMID:26657055

  14. Gene expression profiling and differentiation assessment in primary human hepatocyte cultures, established hepatoma cell lines, and human liver tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Olsavsky, Katy M.; Page, Jeanine L.; Johnson, Mary C.; Zarbl, Helmut; Strom, Stephen C.; Omiecinski, Curtis J. . E-mail: cjo10@psu.edu

    2007-07-01

    Frequently, primary hepatocytes are used as an in vitro model for the liver in vivo. However, the culture conditions reported vary considerably, with associated variability in performance. In this study, we characterized the differentiation character of primary human hepatocytes cultured using a highly defined, serum-free two-dimensional sandwich system, one that configures hepatocytes with collagen I as the substratum together with a dilute extracellular matrix (Matrigel{sup TM}) overlay combined with a defined serum-free medium containing nanomolar levels of dexamethasone. Gap junctional communication, indicated by immunochemical detection of connexin 32 protein, was markedly enhanced in hepatocytes cultured in the Matrigel sandwich configuration. Whole genome expression profiling enabled direct comparison of liver tissues to hepatocytes and to the hepatoma-derived cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7. PANTHER database analyses were used to identify biological processes that were comparatively over-represented among probe sets expressed in the in vitro systems. The robustness of the primary hepatocyte cultures was reflected by the extent of unchanged expression character when compared directly to liver, with more than 77% of the probe sets unchanged in each of the over-represented categories, representing such genes as C/EBP{alpha}, HNF4{alpha}, CYP2D6, and ABCB1. In contrast, HepG2 and Huh7 cells were unchanged from the liver tissues for fewer than 48% and 55% of these probe sets, respectively. Further, hierarchical clustering of the hepatocytes, but not the cell lines, shifted from donor-specific to treatment-specific when the probe sets were filtered to focus on phenobarbital-inducible genes, indicative of the highly differentiated nature of the hepatocytes when cultured in a highly defined two-dimensional sandwich system.

  15. In Vitro Metabolism of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ramaley, Corinne; Leonard, Susan C.; Miller, Jeffrey D.; Wilson, Denita Takesha-Mashia; Chang, Sai Y.; Chen, Qingyu; Li, Feng; Du, Chengan

    2014-01-01

    Users of the illicit drug, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), show signs of neurotoxicity. However, the precise mechanism of neurotoxicity caused by use of MDMA has not yet been elucidated. Synthetic glutathione (GSH) conjugates of MDMA are transported into the brain by the GSH transporter and subsequently produce neurotoxicity. The objective of this research is to show direct evidence of the formation of GSH adducts of MDMA in human hepatocytes. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was utilized to examine in vitro incubations of MDMA with cryopreserved human hepatocytes. The use of hydrophilic liquid chromatography in combination with linear ion trap mass spectrometry permitted the identification of two possible GSH metabolites. Enhanced product ion scans of m/z = 499 and 487 amu of extracts from hepatocytes treated with 1.0 mM MDMA show a distinct fragmentation pattern (m/z 194.2, 163, 135, 105), suggesting the formation of MDMA–GSH conjugate, MDMA-SG and 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine-SG. The formation of an MDMA–GSH conjugate was further supported by the apparent lack of the same fragmentation pattern from hepatocyte samples without MDMA treatment. The results generated from this study yield valuable qualitative and quantitative information about the neurotoxic thioether metabolites formed from MDMA in humans. PMID:24682111

  16. A Human Hepatocyte-Bearing Mouse: An Animal Model to Predict Drug Metabolism and Effectiveness in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Tateno, Chise

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical studies to predict the efficacy and safety of drugs have conventionally been conducted almost exclusively in mice and rats as rodents, despite the differences in drug metabolism between humans and rodents. Furthermore, human (h) viruses such as hepatitis viruses do not infect the rodent liver. A mouse bearing a liver in which the hepatocytes have been largely repopulated with h-hepatocytes would overcome some of these disadvantages. We have established a practical, efficient, and large-scale production system for such mice. Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that these hepatocyte-humanized mice are a useful and reliable animal model, exhibiting h-type responses in a series of in vivo drug processing (adsorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) experiments and in the infection and propagation of hepatic viruses. In this review, we present the current status of studies on chimeric mice and describe their usefulness in the study of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. PMID:19884982

  17. A novel bile acid-activated vitamin D receptor signaling in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuxin; Li, Tiangang; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen; Chiang, John Y L

    2010-06-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is activated by natural ligands, 1alpha, 25-dihydroxy-vitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)-D(3)] and lithocholic acid (LCA). Our previous study shows that VDR is expressed in human hepatocytes, and VDR ligands inhibit bile acid synthesis and transcription of the gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1). Primary human hepatocytes were used to study LCA and 1alpha,25(OH)(2)-D(3) activation of VDR signaling. Confocal immunofluorescent microscopy imaging and immunoblot analysis showed that LCA and 1alpha, 25(OH)(2)-D(3) induced intracellular translocation of VDR from the cytosol to the nucleus and also plasma membrane where VDR colocalized with caveolin-1. VDR ligands induced tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Src and VDR and their interaction. Inhibition of c-Src abrogated VDR ligand-dependent inhibition of CYP7A1 mRNA expression. Kinase assays showed that VDR ligands specifically activated the c-Raf/MEK1/2/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 pathway, which stimulates serine phosphorylation of VDR and hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha, and their interaction. Mammalian two-hybrid assays showed a VDR ligand-dependent interaction of nuclear receptor corepressor-1 and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid with VDR/retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRalpha). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that an ERK1/2 inhibitor reversed VDR ligand-induced recruitment of VDR, RXRalpha, and corepressors to human CYP7A1 promoter. In conclusion, VDR ligands activate membrane VDR signaling to activate the MEK1/2/ERK1/2 pathway, which stimulates nuclear VDR/RXRalpha recruitment of corepressors to inhibit CYP7A1 gene transcription in human hepatocytes. This membrane VDR-signaling pathway may be activated by bile acids to inhibit bile acid synthesis as a rapid response to protect hepatocytes from cholestatic liver injury. PMID:20371703

  18. Generation of functional hepatocyte-like cells from human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanthan, Punitha; Jayaraman, Pukana; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Lawrence, Anthony; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Musa, Sabri; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu

    2016-08-01

    Human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells have been introduced for as an easily accessible source of stem cells from dental origin. Although recent studies have revealed the ability of these stem cells in multipotential attribute, their efficiency of hepatic lineage differentiation has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study is to investigate hepatic lineage fate competence of periodontal ligament stem cells through direct media induction. Differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells was conducted by the exposure of two phase media induction. First phase was performed in the presence of hepatocyte growth factors to induce a definitive endoderm formation. In the subsequent phase, the cells were treated with oncostatin M and dexamethosone followed by insulin and transferrin to generate hepatocyte-like cells. Hepatic-related characters of the generated hepatocyte-like cells were determined at both mRNA and protein level followed by functional assays. Foremost changes observed in the generation of hepatocyte-like cells were the morphological features in which these cells were transformed from fibroblastic shape to polygonal shape. Temporal expression of hepatic markers ranging from early endodermal up to late markers were detected in the hepatocyte-like cells. Crucial hepatic markers such as glycogen storage, albumin, and urea secretion were also shown. These findings exhibited the ability of periodontal ligament stem cells of dental origin to be directed into hepatic lineage fate. These cells can be regarded as an alternative autologous source in the usage of stem cell-based treatment for liver diseases.

  19. Generation of functional hepatocyte-like cells from human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vasanthan, Punitha; Jayaraman, Pukana; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Lawrence, Anthony; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Musa, Sabri; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu

    2016-08-01

    Human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells have been introduced for as an easily accessible source of stem cells from dental origin. Although recent studies have revealed the ability of these stem cells in multipotential attribute, their efficiency of hepatic lineage differentiation has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study is to investigate hepatic lineage fate competence of periodontal ligament stem cells through direct media induction. Differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells was conducted by the exposure of two phase media induction. First phase was performed in the presence of hepatocyte growth factors to induce a definitive endoderm formation. In the subsequent phase, the cells were treated with oncostatin M and dexamethosone followed by insulin and transferrin to generate hepatocyte-like cells. Hepatic-related characters of the generated hepatocyte-like cells were determined at both mRNA and protein level followed by functional assays. Foremost changes observed in the generation of hepatocyte-like cells were the morphological features in which these cells were transformed from fibroblastic shape to polygonal shape. Temporal expression of hepatic markers ranging from early endodermal up to late markers were detected in the hepatocyte-like cells. Crucial hepatic markers such as glycogen storage, albumin, and urea secretion were also shown. These findings exhibited the ability of periodontal ligament stem cells of dental origin to be directed into hepatic lineage fate. These cells can be regarded as an alternative autologous source in the usage of stem cell-based treatment for liver diseases. PMID:27379400

  20. Human neonatal hepatocyte transplantation induces long-term rescue of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Laia; López, Silvia; Pareja, Eugenia; Donato, María Teresa; Myara, Anne; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Castell, José Vicente; Gómez-Lechón, María José

    2015-06-01

    Crigler-Najjar type 1 disease is a rare inherited metabolic disease characterized by high levels of unconjugated bilirubin due to the complete absence of hepatic uridine diphosphoglucuronate-glucuronosyltransferase activity. Hepatocyte transplantation (HT) has been proposed as an alternative treatment for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, but it is still limited by the quality and the low engraftment and repopulation ability of the cells used. Because of their attachment capability and expression of adhesion molecules as well as the higher proportion of hepatic progenitor cells, neonatal hepatocytes may have an advantage over adult cells. Adult or neonatal hepatocytes were transplanted into Gunn rats, a model for Crigler-Najjar disease. Engraftment and repopulation were studied and compared by immunofluorescence (IF). Additionally, the serum bilirubin levels, the presence of bilirubin conjugates in rat serum, and the expression of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1 family polypeptide A1 (UGT1A1) in rat liver samples were also analyzed. Here we show that neonatal HT results in long-term correction in Gunn rats. In comparison with adult cells, neonatal cells showed better engraftment and repopulation capability 3 days and 6 months after transplantation, respectively. Bilirubinemia decreased in the transplanted animals during the whole experimental follow-up (6 months). Bilirubin conjugates were also present in the serum of the transplanted animals. Western blots and IF confirmed the presence and expression of UGT1A1 in the liver. This work is the first to demonstrate the advantage of using neonatal hepatocytes for the treatment of Crigler-Najjar in vivo. PMID:25821167

  1. Activation-dependent mitochondrial translocation of Foxp3 in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Joselyn; Teran-Angel, Guillermo; Barbosa, Luisa; Peterson, Darrell L; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Salmen, Siham

    2016-05-01

    Foxp3 is considered to be the master regulator for the development and function of regulatory T cells (Treg). Recently Foxp3, has been detected in extra lymphoid tissue, and in hepatocytes and has been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), although its role has not been defined. Since it is expected that there is a relationship between protein localization, activity and cellular function, the aim of this study was to explore the subcellular localization of Foxp3 in resting and stimulated human hepatocytes. Foxp3 expression was measured by flow cytometry, subcellular fractioning, and immunofluorescence, and this data was used to track the shuttling of Foxp3 in different subcellular compartments in hepatocytes (HepG2 cell line), stimulated by using the PKC activators (PMA), core and preS1/2 antigen from hepatitis B virus (HBV). Our data shows that besides the nuclear location, mitochondrial translocation was detected after stimulation with PMA and at to a lesser extent, with preS1/2. In addition, Foxp3 is localizes at outer mitochondrial membrane. These results suggest a non-canonical role of Foxp3 in the mitochondrial compartment in human hepatocytes, and opens a new field about their role in liver damages during HBV infection. PMID:27068374

  2. Tandem overexpression of five human factors renders murine hepatocytes susceptible to hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Lv, L; Kang, Q; Yu, X; Gao, B; Hu, T; Ma, P; Zhang, Y; Yan, F; Xiao, J; Deng, J; Zhou, X; Xu, J

    2015-03-01

    Development of mouse model of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has great significance in drug screening and vaccine research. The barriers of interspecies transmission of HCV are increasingly better understood. Human factors, namely low-density lipoprotein receptor (hLDLR), CD81 (hCD81), scavenger receptor class B type I (hSCARB1), occludin (hOCLN) and claudin 1 (hCLDN1) are all required for rendering mouse hepatocytes permissive to HCV. With the aim to humanize mouse hepatocytes we constructed two recombinant vectors tandemly expressing the first three and the last two HCV entry factors mentioned above, respectively. Cotransfection of mouse hepatocytes with these vectors made them permissive to HCV binding and entry. Tandem overexpression of hLDLR, hSCARB1, hCD81, hCLDN1 and hOCLN is a novel approach to tailoring mouse hepatocytes to HCV binding and entry which can be further used to establish a mouse model of HCV infection as a basis for developing antiviral drugs and vaccines. PMID:25790047

  3. Nuclear lactate dehydrogenase modulates histone modification in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castonguay, Zachary; Auger, Christopher; Thomas, Sean C.; Chahma, M’hamed; Appanna, Vasu D.

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Nuclear LDH is up-regulated under oxidative stress. • SIRT1 is co-immunoprecipitated bound to nuclear LDH. • Nuclear LDH is involved in histone deacetylation and epigenetics. - Abstract: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the nucleus harbors metabolic enzymes that affect genetic transforming events. Here, we describe a nuclear isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (nLDH) and its ability to orchestrate histone deacetylation by controlling the availability of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}), a key ingredient of the sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase system. There was an increase in the expression of nLDH concomitant with the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the culture medium. Under oxidative stress, the NAD{sup +} generated by nLDH resulted in the enhanced deacetylation of histones compared to the control hepatocytes despite no discernable change in the levels of SIRT1. There appeared to be an intimate association between nLDH and SIRT1 as these two enzymes co-immunoprecipitated. The ability of nLDH to regulate epigenetic modifications by manipulating NAD{sup +} reveals an intricate link between metabolism and the processing of genetic information.

  4. Primary Human Hepatocytes Repopulate Livers of Mice After In Vitro Culturing and Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Bierwolf, Jeanette; Volz, Tassilo; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Allweiss, Lena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Warlich, Michael; Fehse, Boris; Kalff, Joerg C; Dandri, Maura; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Cell-based therapies represent a promising alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. However, therapeutic effects are limited by low cell engraftment rates. We recently introduced a technique creating human hepatocyte spheroids for potential therapeutic application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether these spheroids are suitable for engraftment in diseased liver tissues. Intrasplenic spheroid transplantation into immunodeficient uPA/SCID/beige mice was performed. Hepatocyte transduction ability prior to transplantation was tested by lentiviral labeling using red-green-blue (RGB) marking. Eight weeks after transplantation, animals were sacrificed and livers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. To investigate human hepatocyte-specific gene expression profiles in mice, quantitative real-time-PCR was applied. Human albumin and alpha-1-antitrypsin concentrations in mouse serum were quantified to assess the levels of human chimerism. Precultured human hepatocytes reestablished their physiological liver tissue architecture and function upon transplantation in mice. Positive immunohistochemical labeling of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that human hepatocytes retained their in vivo proliferation capacity. Expression profiles of human genes analyzed in chimeric mouse livers resembled levels determined in native human tissue. Extensive vascularization of human cell clusters was detected by demonstration of von Willebrand factor activity. To model gene therapy approaches, lentiviral transduction was performed ex vivo and fluorescent microscopic imaging revealed maintenance of RGB marking in vivo. Altogether, this is the first report demonstrating that cultured and retroviral transduced human hepatocyte spheroids are able to engraft and maintain their regenerative potential in vivo. PMID:27068494

  5. Primary Human Hepatocytes Repopulate Livers of Mice After In Vitro Culturing and Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bierwolf, Jeanette; Volz, Tassilo; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Allweiss, Lena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Warlich, Michael; Fehse, Boris; Kalff, Joerg C.; Dandri, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies represent a promising alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. However, therapeutic effects are limited by low cell engraftment rates. We recently introduced a technique creating human hepatocyte spheroids for potential therapeutic application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether these spheroids are suitable for engraftment in diseased liver tissues. Intrasplenic spheroid transplantation into immunodeficient uPA/SCID/beige mice was performed. Hepatocyte transduction ability prior to transplantation was tested by lentiviral labeling using red-green-blue (RGB) marking. Eight weeks after transplantation, animals were sacrificed and livers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. To investigate human hepatocyte-specific gene expression profiles in mice, quantitative real-time-PCR was applied. Human albumin and alpha-1-antitrypsin concentrations in mouse serum were quantified to assess the levels of human chimerism. Precultured human hepatocytes reestablished their physiological liver tissue architecture and function upon transplantation in mice. Positive immunohistochemical labeling of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that human hepatocytes retained their in vivo proliferation capacity. Expression profiles of human genes analyzed in chimeric mouse livers resembled levels determined in native human tissue. Extensive vascularization of human cell clusters was detected by demonstration of von Willebrand factor activity. To model gene therapy approaches, lentiviral transduction was performed ex vivo and fluorescent microscopic imaging revealed maintenance of RGB marking in vivo. Altogether, this is the first report demonstrating that cultured and retroviral transduced human hepatocyte spheroids are able to engraft and maintain their regenerative potential in vivo. PMID:27068494

  6. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α is required for cell differentiation and homeostasis in the adult mouse gastric epithelium.

    PubMed

    Moore, Benjamin D; Khurana, Shradha S; Huh, Won Jae; Mills, Jason C

    2016-08-01

    We have previously shown that the sequential transcription factors Xbp1→Mist1 (Bhlha15) govern the ultrastructural maturation of the secretory apparatus in enzyme-secreting zymogenic chief cells (ZCs) in the gastric unit. Here we sought to identify transcriptional regulators upstream of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) and MIST1. We used immunohistochemistry to characterize Hnf4α(flox/flox) adult mouse stomachs after tamoxifen-induced deletion of Hnf4α We used qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and chromatin immunoprecipitation to define the molecular interaction between hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and Xbp1 in mouse stomach and human gastric cells. We show that HNF4α protein is expressed in pit (foveolar) cells, mucous neck cells, and zymogenic chief cells (ZCs) of the corpus gastric unit. Loss of HNF4α in adult mouse stomach led to reduced ZC size and ER content, phenocopying previously characterized effects of Xbp1 deletion. However, HNF4α(Δ/Δ) stomachs also exhibited additional phenotypes including increased proliferation in the isthmal stem cell zone and altered mucous neck cell migration, indicating a role of HNF4α in progenitor cells as well as in ZCs. HNF4α directly occupies the Xbp1 promoter locus in mouse stomach, and forced HNF4α expression increased abundance of XBP1 mRNA in human gastric cancer cells. Finally, as expected, loss of HNF4α caused decreased Xbp1 and Mist1 expression in mouse stomachs. We show that HNF4α regulates homeostatic proliferation in the gastric epithelium and is both necessary and sufficient for the upstream regulation of the Xbp1→Mist1 axis in maintenance of ZC secretory architecture. PMID:27340127

  7. Human metapneumovirus in adults.

    PubMed

    Haas, Lenneke E M; Thijsen, Steven F T; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  8. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  9. Changes in gluconeogenesis and intracellular lipid accumulation characterize uremic human hepatocytes ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Ellis, Ewa; Johansson, Helene; Nowak, Greg; Isaksson, Bengt; Gnocchi, Davide; Parini, Paolo; Axelsson, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) leads to an increased risk of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular mortality. The liver is a central organ for metabolism, but its function in the uremic setting is still poorly characterized. We used human primary hepatocytes isolated from livers of nine donors with normal renal function to investigate perturbations in key metabolic pathways following exposure to uremic (n = 8) or healthy (n = 8) sera, and to serum-free control medium. Both uremic and healthy elicited consistent responses from hepatocytes from multiple donors and compared with serum-free control. However, at physiological insulin concentrations, uremic cells accumulated 56% more intracellular lipids. Also, when comparing uremic with healthy medium after culture, it contained more very-low-density lipoprotein-triglyceride and glucose. These changes were accompanied by decreased phosphorylation of AktS473 mRNA levels of key regulators of gluconeogenesis in uremic sera-treated hepatocytes such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 and glucose 6-phosphate were elevated. We also found increased expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase mRNA in uremic cells, along with high phosphorylation of downstream p53 and phospholipase C-γ1Y783 Thus our ex vivo data suggest that the uremic hepatocytes rapidly develop a glycogenic and lipogenic condition accompanied by perturbations in a large number of signaling networks. PMID:27056725

  10. Use of mRNA expression to detect the induction of drug metabolising enzymes in rat and human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Richert, L. Tuschl, G.; Pekthong, D.; Mantion, G.; Weber, J.-C.; Mueller, S.O.

    2009-02-15

    It is important to investigate the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes by drugs. The most relevant end point is enzyme activity; however, this requires many cells and is low throughput. We have compared the CYP1A, CYP2B and CYP3A induction response to eight inducers in rat and human hepatocytes using enzyme activities (CYP1A2 (ethoxyresorufin), 2B (benzoxyresorufin for rat and bupropion for human) and CYP3A (testosterone)) and Taqman{sup TM} Low Density Array (TLDA) analysis. There was a good correlation between the induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 enzyme activities and mRNA expression in human hepatocytes. In contrast, BROD activities and mRNA expression in rat hepatocytes correlated poorly. However, bupropion hydroxylation correlated well with Cyp2b1 expression in rat hepatocytes. TLDA analysis of a panel of mRNAs encoding for CYPs, phase 2 enzymes, nuclear receptors and transporters revealed that the main genes induced by the 8 compounds tested were the CYPs. AhR ligands also induced UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and glutathione S-transferases in rat and human hepatocytes. The transporters, MDR1, MDR3 and OATPA were the only transporter genes significantly up-regulated in human hepatocytes. In rat hepatocytes Bsep, Mdr2, Mrp2, Mrp3 and Oatp2 were up-regulated. We could then show a good in vivo:in vitro correlation in the induction response of isolated rat hepatocytes and ex-vivo hepatic microsomes for the drug development candidate, EMD392949. In conclusion, application of TLDA methodology to investigate the potential of compounds to induce enzymes in rat and human hepatocytes increases the throughput and information gained from one assay, without reducing the predictive capacity.

  11. Evaluation of human hepatocytes cultured by three-dimensional spheroid systems for drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Takako; Ohta, Kunihiro; Nagao, Takuya; Kusumoto, Kumiko; Koeda, Akiko; Ueda, Tadayoshi; Jomura, Tomoko; Ikeya, Takeshi; Ozeki, Emiko; Wada, Kazuki; Naitoh, Kazushi; Inoue, Yukiko; Takahashi, Naoki; Iwai, Hisakazu; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Takuo

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the utility of three-dimensional (3D) spheroid cultures of human hepatocytes in discovering drug metabolites. Metabolites of acetaminophen, diclofenac, lamotrigine, midazolam, propranolol and salbutamol were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to measure enzyme activities in this system cultured for 2 and 7 days. Sequential metabolic reactions by Phase I and then Phase II enzymes were found in diclofenac [CYP2C9 and UDP-glucuronyltransferases (UGTs)], midazolam (CYP3A4 and UGTs) and propranolol (CYP1A2/2D6 and UGTs). Moreover, lamotrigine and salbutamol were metabolized to lamotrigine-N-glucuronide and salbutamol 4-O-sulfate, respectively. These metabolites, which are human specific, could be observed in clinical studies, but not in conventional hepatic culture systems as in previous reports. Acetaminophen was metabolized to glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, and N-acetyl-p-benzo-quinoneimine (NAPQI) and its metabolites were not observed. In addition, mRNA of drug-metabolism enzymes [CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, UGT1A1, UGT2B7, sulfotransferase 1A1 (SULT1A1) and glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1)], which were measured by qRT-PCR, were expressed in the human hepatocyte spheroids. In conclusion, these results suggest that human hepatocyte spheroids are useful in discovering drug metabolites. PMID:24695277

  12. Small-Molecule-Driven Hepatocyte Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Siller, Richard; Greenhough, Sebastian; Naumovska, Elena; Sullivan, Gareth J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to hepatocytes is well established, yet current methods suffer from several drawbacks. These include a lack of definition and reproducibility, which in part stems from continued reliance on recombinant growth factors. This has remained a stumbling block for the translation of the technology into industry and the clinic for reasons associated with cost and quality. We have devised a growth-factor-free protocol that relies on small molecules to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells toward a hepatic phenotype. The procedure can efficiently direct both human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells to hepatocyte-like cells. The final population of cells demonstrates marker expression at the transcriptional and protein levels, as well as key hepatic functions such as serum protein production, glycogen storage, and cytochrome P450 activity. PMID:25937370

  13. Sulfated Oxysterol, 25HC3S, is a Potent Regulator of Lipid Metabolism in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shunlin; Li, Xiaobo; Rodriguez-Agudo, Daniel; Gil, Gregorio; Hylemon, Phillip; Pandak, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a novel oxysterol, 5-cholesten-3β, 25-diol 3-sulfate (25HC3S) was identified in primary rat hepatocytes following overexpression of the cholesterol transport protein, StarD1. This oxysterol was also detected in human liver nuclei. In the present study, 25HC3S was chemically synthesized. Addition of 25HC3S (6 μM) to human hepatocytes markedly inhibited cholesterol biosynthesis. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that 25HC3S strongly decreased HMG-CoA reductase mRNA and protein levels. Coincidently, 25HC3S inhibited the activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), suggesting that inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis occurred via blocking SREBP-1 activation, and subsequently inhibiting the expression of HMG CoA reductase. 25HC3S decreased SREBP-1 mRNA levels and inhibited the expression of target genes encoding acetyl CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC-1) and fatty acid synthase (FAS). In contract, 25-hydroxycholesterol increased SREBP1 and FAS mRNA levels in primary human hepatocytes. The results imply that 25HC3S is a potent regulator of SREBPs mediated lipid metabolism. PMID:17624300

  14. DNA Adduct Formation of 4-Aminobiphenyl and Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nauwelaers, Gwendoline; Bessette, Erin E.; Gu, Dan; Tang, Yijin; Rageul, Julie; Fessard, Valérie; Yuan, Jian-Min; Yu, Mimi C.; Langouët, Sophie; Turesky, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    DNA adduct formation of the aromatic amine, 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP), a known human carcinogen present in tobacco smoke, and the heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs), 2-amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (AαC), 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylmidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), potential human carcinogens, which are also present in tobacco smoke or formed during the high-temperature cooking of meats, was investigated in freshly cultured human hepatocytes. The carcinogens (10 μM) were incubated with hepatocytes derived from eight different donors for time periods up to 24 h. The DNA adducts were quantified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The principal DNA adducts formed for all of the carcinogens were N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl) (dG-C8) adducts. The levels of adducts ranged from 3.4 to 140 adducts per 107 DNA bases. The highest level of adduct formation occurred with AαC, followed by 4-ABP, then by PhIP, MeIQx, and IQ. Human hepatocytes formed dG-C8-HAA-adducts at levels that were up to 100-fold greater than the amounts of adducts produced in rat hepatocytes. In contrast to HAA adducts, the levels of dG-C8-4-ABP adduct formation were similar in human and rat hepatocytes. These DNA binding data demonstrate that the rat, an animal model that is used for carcinogenesis bioassays, significantly underestimates the potential hepatic genotoxicity of HAAs in humans. The high level of DNA adducts formed by AαC, a carcinogen produced in tobacco smoke at levels that are up to 100-fold higher than the amounts of 4-ABP, is noteworthy. The possible causal role of AαC in tobacco-associated cancers warrants investigation. PMID:21456541

  15. Direct Reprogramming of Human Fibroblasts to Hepatocyte-Like Cells by Synthetic Modified mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Simeonov, Kamen P.; Uppal, Hirdesh

    2014-01-01

    Direct reprogramming by overexpression of defined transcription factors is a promising new method of deriving useful but rare cell types from readily available ones. While the method presents numerous advantages over induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell approaches, a focus on murine conversions and a reliance on retroviral vectors limit potential human applications. Here we address these concerns by demonstrating direct conversion of human fibroblasts to hepatocyte-like cells via repeated transfection with synthetic modified mRNAs. Hepatic induction was achieved with as little as three transcription factor mRNAs encoding HNF1A plus any two of the factors, FOXA1, FOXA3, or HNF4A in the presence of an optimized hepatic growth medium. We show that the absolute necessity of exogenous HNF1A mRNA delivery is explained both by the factor's inability to be activated by any other factors screened and its simultaneous ability to strongly induce expression of other master hepatic transcription factors. Further analysis of factor interaction showed that a series of robust cross-activations exist between factors that induce a hepatocyte-like state. Transcriptome and small RNA sequencing during conversion toward hepatocyte-like cells revealed global preferential activation of liver genes and miRNAs over those associated with other endodermal tissues, as well as downregulation of fibroblast-associated genes. Induced hepatocyte-like cells also exhibited hepatic morphology and protein expression. Our data provide insight into the process by which direct hepatic reprogramming occurs in human cells. More importantly, by demonstrating that it is possible to achieve direct reprogramming without the use of retroviral gene delivery, our results supply a crucial step toward realizing the potential of direct reprogramming in regenerative medicine. PMID:24963715

  16. Characterization of lipid metabolism in a novel immortalized human hepatocyte cell line

    PubMed Central

    Green, Charlotte J.; Johnson, Deborah; Amin, Harsh D.; Sivathondan, Pamela; Silva, Michael A.; Wang, Lai Mun; Stevanato, Lara; McNeil, Catriona A.; Miljan, Erik A.; Sinden, John D.; Morten, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of hepatocyte cell models that represent fatty acid partitioning within the human liver would be beneficial for the study of the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We sought to develop and characterize a novel human liver cell line (LIV0APOLY) to establish a model of lipid accumulation using a physiological mixture of fatty acids under low- and high-glucose conditions. LIV0APOLY cells were compared with a well-established cell line (HepG2) and, where possible, primary human hepatocytes. LIV0APOLY cells were found to proliferate and express some mature liver markers and were wild type for the PNPLA3 (rs738409) gene, whereas HepG2 cells carried the Ile148Met variant that is positively associated with liver fat content. Intracellular triglyceride content was higher in HepG2 than in LIV0APOLY cells; exposure to high glucose and/or exogenous fatty acids increased intracellular triglyceride in both cell lines. Triglyceride concentrations in media were higher from LIV0APOLY compared with HepG2 cells. Culturing LIV0APOLY cells in high glucose increased a marker of endoplasmic reticulum stress and attenuated insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation whereas low glucose and exogenous fatty acids increased AMPK phosphorylation. Although LIV0APOLY cells and primary hepatocytes stored similar amounts of exogenous fatty acids as triglyceride, more exogenous fatty acids were partitioned toward oxidation in the LIV0APOLY cells than in primary hepatocytes. LIV0APOLY cells offer the potential to be a renewable cellular model for studying the effects of exogenous metabolic substrates on fatty acid partitioning; however, their usefulness as a model of lipoprotein metabolism needs to be further explored. PMID:26126685

  17. Applicability of second-generation upcyte® human hepatocytes for use in CYP inhibition and induction studies

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sarada D; Vivarès, Aurélie; Klieber, Sylvie; Hewitt, Nicola J; Muenst, Bernhard; Heinz, Stefan; Walles, Heike; Braspenning, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Human upcyte® hepatocytes are proliferating hepatocytes that retain many characteristics of primary human hepatocytes. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the application of second-generation upcyte® hepatocytes from four donors for inhibition and induction assays using a selection of reference inhibitors and inducers. CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, and CYP3A4 were reproducibly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner and the calculated IC50 values for each compound correctly classified them as potent inhibitors. Upcyte® hepatocytes were responsive to prototypical CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, and CYP3A4 inducers, confirming that they have functional AhR-, CAR-, and PXR-mediated CYP regulation. A panel of 11 inducers classified as potent, moderate or noninducers of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 were tested. There was a good fit of data from upcyte® hepatocytes to three different predictive models for CYP3A4 induction, namely the Relative Induction Score (RIS), AUCu/F2, and Cmax,u/Ind50. In addition, PXR (rifampicin) and CAR-selective (carbamazepine and phenytoin) inducers of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 induction, respectively, were demonstrated. In conclusion, these data support the use of second-generation upcyte® hepatocytes for CYP inhibition and induction assays. Under the culture conditions used, these cells expressed CYP activities that were equivalent to or higher than those measured in primary human hepatocyte cultures, which could be inhibited or induced by prototypical CYP inhibitors and inducers, respectively. Moreover, they can be used to predict in vivo CYP3A4 induction potential using three prediction models. Bulk availability of cells from multiple donors makes upcyte® hepatocytes suitable for DDI screening, as well as more in-depth mechanistic investigations. PMID:26516577

  18. Contribution of CNT1 and ENT1 to ribavirin uptake in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min-Koo; Kim, Min-Hye; Maeng, Han-Joo; Song, Im-Sook

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the contributions of a sodium-dependent concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT) 1 and an equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to ribavirin uptake in human hepatocytes. The initial studies in oocytes expressing CNT1 and ENT1 showed increases in ribavirin uptake, indicating that ribavirin was a substrate for both CNT1 and ENT1. The CNT1- and ENT1-mediated ribavirin uptake showed concentration dependency with the following kinetics parameters: Km 26.3 μM and Vmax 426.2 fmol/min/oocyte for CNT1; Km 70.5 μM and Vmax 134.3 fmol/min/oocyte for ENT1. Ribavirin uptake clearance in six human hepatocytes ranged from 21.3 to 300.7 μL/min. Estimation of the contributions of CNT1 and ENT1 to the hepatic uptake of ribavirin by using a relative activity factor method indicated that the relative contribution of ENT1 to the ribavirin uptake was 82.8 ± 3.9%. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of CNT1 and ENT1 expressions in the hepatocytes showed that ENT1 mRNA expression was closely correlated with ribavirin uptake (R = 0.95, P = 0.003) while CNT1 was not. The findings indicated that ENT1 was the major transporter controlling the hepatic uptake of ribavirin. PMID:25011570

  19. Microarray analyses and molecular profiling of steatosis induction in immortalized human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    De Gottardi, Andrea; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Sgroi, Antonino; Moukil, Moulay; Ravier-Dall'Antonia, Florence; Pazienza, Valerio; Pugnale, Paolo; Foti, Michelangelo; Hadengue, Antoine

    2007-08-01

    Hepatic steatosis is an important risk factor for the development of inflammation, fibrosis and impaired liver regeneration. The factors regulating lipid accumulation and driving hepatic steatosis toward inflammation, fibrosis and impaired regeneration are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify major alterations in gene expression occurring in steatotic hepatocytes, and to analyze how these changes impact cellular processes associated with steatosis. Microarray gene chips and RT-PCR were performed to analyze changes in gene expression induced in fatty human immortalized hepatocytes after treatment with 50 muM oleic acid for 7 days. Lipid metabolism and triglyceride accumulation in these cells was examined by Oil-Red-O staining, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and immunofluorescence. Caspase 3 activity, BrdU incorporation and trypan blue exclusion were used to study apoptosis, proliferation and cell viability. Finally, quantitative analysis of signalling induced by insulin was performed by Western blot. Characterization of steatosis in three hepatocyte-derived cell lines indicated that the immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) line was the most appropriate cell line for this study. Gene expression analysis showed significant alterations in the transcription of two major classes of genes involved either in cholesterol and fatty acid biosynthesis, as well as lipid export, or in apoptosis and cell proliferation. Such changes were functionally relevant, since TLC indicated that synthesis and accumulation of triglycerides were increased in steatotic cells, while synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids were decreased. Lipid accumulation in IHH was associated with an increased apoptosis and an inhibition of cell proliferation and viability. No detectable changes in genes associated with insulin resistance were observed in steatotic cells, but signalling induced by insulin was more efficient in steatotic IHH as compared to control cells. We conclude that IHH

  20. Comparison of cryopreserved HepaRG cells with cryopreserved human hepatocytes for prediction of clearance for 26 drugs.

    PubMed

    Zanelli, Ugo; Caradonna, Nicola Pasquale; Hallifax, David; Turlizzi, Elisa; Houston, J Brian

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of clearance in drug discovery currently relies on human primary hepatocytes, which can vary widely in drug-metabolizing enzyme activity. Potential alternative in vitro models include the HepaRG cell (from immortalized hepatoma cells), which in culture can express drug-metabolizing enzymes to an extent comparable to that of primary hepatocytes. Utility of the HepaRG cell will depend on robust performance, relative to that of primary hepatocytes, in routine high-throughput analysis. In this study, we compared intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) in the recently developed cryopreserved HepaRG cell system with CL(int) in human cryopreserved pooled hepatocytes and with CL(int) in vivo for 26 cytochrome P450 substrate drugs. There was quantitative agreement between CL(int) in HepaRG cells and human hepatocytes, which was linear throughout the range of CL(int) (1-2000 ml · min(-1) · kg(-1)) and not dependent on particular cytochrome P450 involvement. Prediction of CL(int) in HepaRG cells was on average within 2-fold of in vivo CL(int) (using the well stirred liver model), but average fold error was clearance-dependent with greater underprediction (up to at least 5-fold) for the more highly cleared drugs. Recent reporting of this phenomenon in human hepatocytes was therefore confirmed with the hepatocytes used in this study, and hence the HepaRG cell system appears to share an apparently general tendency of clearance-limited CL(int) in cell models. This study shows the cryopreserved HepaRG cell system to be quantitatively comparable to human hepatocytes for prediction of clearance of drug cytochrome P450 substrates and to represent a promising alternative in vitro tool. PMID:21998403

  1. The farnesoid X receptor induces fetuin-B gene expression in human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takeshi; Walczak, Robert; Caron, Sandrine; Duhem, Christian; Vidal, Vincent; Darteil, Raphaël; Staels, Bart

    2007-01-01

    FXR (farnesoid X receptor), a nuclear receptor activated by BAs (bile acids), is a key factor in the regulation of BA, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. The recent development of synthetic FXR agonists and knockout mouse models has accelerated the discovery of FXR target genes. In the present study, we identify human fetuin-B as a novel FXR target gene. Treatment with FXR agonists increased fetuin-B expression in human primary hepatocytes and in the human hepatoma HepG2 cell line. In contrast, fetuin-B expression was not responsive to FXR agonist treatment in murine primary hepatocytes. Fetuin-B induction by FXR agonist was abolished upon FXR knockdown by siRNA (small interfering RNA). In addition to the previously described P1 promoter, we show that the human fetuin-B gene is also transcribed from an alternative promoter, termed P2. Transcription via the P2 promoter was induced by FXR agonist treatment, whereas P1 promoter activity was not sensitive to FXR agonist treatment. Two putative FXR-response elements [IR-1 (inverted repeat-1)] were identified in the region –1.6 kb upstream of the predicted P2 transcriptional start site. Both motifs bound FXR–RXR (retinoid X receptor) complexes in vitro and were activated by FXR in transient transfection reporter assays. Mutations in the IR-1 sites abolished FXR–RXR binding and activation. Taken together, these results identify human fetuin-B as a new FXR target gene in human hepatocytes. PMID:17655523

  2. Long-term maintenance of liver-specific functions in three-dimensional culture of adult rat hepatocytes with a porous gelatin sponge support.

    PubMed

    Lin, K H; Maeda, S; Saito, T

    1995-02-01

    The three-dimensional culture of adult rat hepatocytes with a porous gelatin sponge (gelfoam) support was investigated. Hepatocytes were immobilized on the surface as well as within the pores of the support. The morphology of the hepatocytes immobilized on the support was close to that observed in vivo. In some parts of the support the spheroids of hepatocytes could be observed. To examine the liver-specific functions of the hepatocytes in the culture, the levels of serum albumin and bile acids secreted into the medium were assessed. The secretion of albumin and bile acids was stable over the course of 12 days, longer than that in collagen-gel culture. To elucidate further the function of hepatocytes immobilized on gelfoam, the metabolic activities of the hepatocytes, as measured by the competency of removal of NH4+ and the synthesis of urea nitrogen, were determined. The rates of ammonium removal and urea nitrogen synthesis were comparable with those in conventional monolayer culture. Albumin secretion was enhanced by the treatment of gelfoam with either heparin or acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF), the gelfoam having a high affinity for these substances. DNA synthesis was also enhanced by aFGF. These results demonstrate that gelfoam is a suitable support for the in vitro culture of hepatocytes. Combined with its easy manipulation, it is suggested that the culture system described could be used for both basic and applied studies. PMID:7536008

  3. Genes for the dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha] (DCOH) are on human and murine chromsomes 10

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovich, A.; Mendel, D.B.; Crabtree, G.R.; Francke, U. )

    1993-04-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha] (HNF-1[alpha]; gene symbol, TCF1) forms dimers with itself as well as with HNF-1[beta] and regulates the expression of several liver-specific genes. Recently, a dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha], called DCOH, has been identified. Here, the authors report the chromosomal localization of the genes for this cofactor to chromosomes 10 in both humans and mice by Southern blot analyses of somatic cell hybrids. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Novel immortalized human fetal liver cell line, cBAL111, has the potential to differentiate into functional hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Deurholt, Tanja; van Til, Niek P; Chhatta, Aniska A; ten Bloemendaal, Lysbeth; Schwartlander, Ruth; Payne, Catherine; Plevris, John N; Sauer, Igor M; Chamuleau, Robert AFM; Elferink, Ronald PJ Oude; Seppen, Jurgen; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2009-01-01

    Background A clonal cell line that combines both stable hepatic function and proliferation capacity is desirable for in vitro applications that depend on hepatic function, such as pharmacological or toxicological assays and bioartificial liver systems. Here we describe the generation and characterization of a clonal human cell line for in vitro hepatocyte applications. Results Cell clones derived from human fetal liver cells were immortalized by over-expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase. The resulting cell line, cBAL111, displayed hepatic functionality similar to the parental cells prior to immortalization, and did not grow in soft agar. Cell line cBAL111 expressed markers of immature hepatocytes, like glutathione S transferase and cytokeratin 19, as well as progenitor cell marker CD146 and was negative for lidocaine elimination. On the other hand, the cBAL111 cells produced urea, albumin and cytokeratin 18 and eliminated galactose. In contrast to hepatic cell lines NKNT-3 and HepG2, all hepatic functions were expressed in cBAL111, although there was considerable variation in their levels compared with primary mature hepatocytes. When transplanted in the spleen of immunodeficient mice, cBAL111 engrafted into the liver and partly differentiated into hepatocytes showing expression of human albumin and carbamoylphosphate synthetase without signs of cell fusion. Conclusion This novel liver cell line has the potential to differentiate into mature hepatocytes to be used for in vitro hepatocyte applications. PMID:19845959

  5. Regulation of drug transporter expression by oncostatin M in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Lecureur, Valérie; Fardel, Olivier

    2011-08-01

    The cytokine oncostatin M (OSM) is a member of the interleukin (IL)-6 family, known to down-regulate expression of drug metabolizing cytochromes P-450 in human hepatocytes. The present study was designed to determine whether OSM may also impair expression of sinusoidal and canalicular drug transporters, which constitute important determinants of drug hepatic clearance. Exposure of primary human hepatocytes to OSM down-regulated mRNA levels of major sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC) influx transporters, including sodium-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, OATP1B3, OATP2B1, organic cation transporter 1 and organic anion transporter 2. OSM also repressed mRNA expressions of ATP binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 2/ABCC2 and breast cancer resistance protein/ABCG2, without however impairing those of multidrug resistance gene 1/P-glycoprotein/ABCB1, MRP3/ABCC3, MRP4/ABCC4 and bile salt export pump/ABCB11. The cytokine concomitantly reduced NTCP, OATP1B1, OATP2B1 and ABCG2 protein expression and NTCP and OATP transport activities. OSM effects towards transporters were found to be dose-dependent and highly correlated with those of IL-6, but not with those of other inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α or interferon-γ. In addition, OSM-mediated repression of some transporters such as NTCP, OATP1B1 and OATP2B1, was counteracted by knocking-down expression of the type II OSM receptor subunits through siRNA transfection. This OSM-mediated down-regulation of drug SLC transporters and ABCG2 in human hepatocytes may contribute to alterations of pharmacokinetics in patients suffering from diseases associated with increased production of OSM. PMID:21570956

  6. Adult hepatocytes are generated by self-duplication rather than stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yanger, Kilangsungla; Knigin, David; Zong, Yiwei; Maggs, Lara; Gu, Guoqiang; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Pikarsky, Eli; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-09-01

    The liver is thought to utilize facultative stem cells, also known as "oval cells" or "atypical ductal cells" (ADCs), for regeneration following various types of injury. However, this notion has been based largely on in vitro studies and transplantation models; where lineage tracing has been used, results have been conflicting and effect sizes have been small. Here, we used genetic and nucleoside analog-based tools to mark and track the origin and contribution of various cell populations to liver regeneration in vivo following several ADC-inducing insults. We report that, contrary to prevailing stem-cell-based models of regeneration, virtually all new hepatocytes come from preexisting hepatocytes. PMID:25130492

  7. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  8. Hepatocyte transplantation program: Lessons learned and future strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ibars, Eugenia Pareja; Cortes, Miriam; Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, Maria José; López, Slivia; Castell, José Vicente; Mir, José

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to share the lessons we learned over time during the setting of the hepatocyte transplantation (HT) program at the Hepatic Cell Therapy Unit at Hospital La Fe in Valencia. New sources of liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation have been explored. The hepatocyte isolation and cryopreservation procedures have been optimized and quality criteria for assessment of functionality of hepatocyte preparations and suitability for HT have been established. The results indicate that: (1) Only highly viable and functional hepatocytes allow to recover those functions lacking in the native liver; (2) Organs with steatosis (≥ 40%) and from elderly donors are declined since low hepatocyte yields, viability and cell survival after cryopreservation, are obtained; (3) Neonatal hepatocytes are cryopreserved without significant loss of viability or function representing high-quality cells to improve human HT; (4) Cryopreservation has the advantage of providing hepatocytes constantly available and of allowing the quality evaluation and suitability for transplantation; and (5) Our results from 5 adults with acute liver failure and 4 from children with inborn metabolic diseases, indicate that HT could be a very useful and safe cell therapy, as long as viable and metabolically functional human hepatocytes are used. PMID:26811633

  9. Long term cultures of primary human hepatocytes as an alternative to drug testing in animals.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Anett; Stolz, Donna B; Ellis, Ewa C; Strom, Stephen C; Michalopoulos, George K; Hengstler, Jan G; Runge, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Due to species differences, primary human hepatocytes are still the in vitro system of choice to analyse liver specific processes and functions. Human hepatocytes were cultured for several weeks in a serum-free two-dimensional culture system, which was used to study the effects of acetaminophen (APAP) on hepatocellular functions and vitality. Non-invasive determinations of albumin, urea and lactate dehydrogenase concentrations in cell culture supernatants allowed continuous monitoring for at least two weeks. APAP was applied every 4 days for 24 h. Each application reduced urea production by 25% and albumin synthesis by approximately 70% without any effects on cellular viability. After removal of the substance, hepatocellular functions returned to control levels within one (urea) to three (albumin) days. The repetitive analyses of APAP-mediated effects on cellular metabolism led to identical results for up to five cycles. The drug also caused reversible and repetitive ultrastructural modifications, in particular an almost complete replacement of rough endoplasmic reticulum by smooth endoplasmic reticulum and a massive degradation of glycogen stores. The data demonstrate the suitability of the culture system to serve as a model for repetitive testing of drug-mediated changes on hepatocellular functions, thereby reducing animal studies during drug development. PMID:20383475

  10. Genomic responses to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ancey, Pierre-Benoit; Testoni, Barbara; Gruffaz, Marion; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Durand, Geoffroy; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Durantel, David; Herceg, Zdenko; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections are able to modify the host's cellular programs, with DNA methylation being a biological intermediate in this process. The extent to which viral infections deregulate gene expression and DNA methylation is not fully understood. In the case of Hepatitis B virus (HBV), there is evidence for an interaction between viral proteins and the host DNA methylation machinery. We studied the ability of HBV to modify the host transcriptome and methylome, using naturally infected primary human hepatocytes to better mimic the clinical setting. Gene expression was especially sensitive to culture conditions, independently of HBV infection. However, we identified non-random changes in gene expression and DNA methylation occurring specifically upon HBV infection. There was little correlation between expression and methylation changes, with transcriptome being a more sensitive marker of time-dependent changes induced by HBV. In contrast, a set of differentially methylated sites appeared early and were stable across the time course experiment. Finally, HBV-induced DNA methylation changes were defined by a specific chromatin context characterized by CpG-poor regions outside of gene promoters. These data support the ability of HBV to modulate host cell expression and methylation programs. In addition, it may serve as a reference for studies addressing the genome-wide consequences of HBV infection in human hepatocytes. PMID:26565721

  11. Drug metabolism by cultured human hepatocytes: how far are we from the in vivo reality?

    PubMed

    Ponsoda, Xavier; Donato, M Teresa; Perez-Cataldo, Gabriela; Gómez-Lechón, Maria José; Castell, José V

    2004-06-01

    The investigation of metabolism is an important milestone in the course of drug development. Drug metabolism is a determinant of drug pharmacokinetics variability in human beings. Fundamental to this are phenotypic differences, as well as genotypic differences, in the expression of the enzymes involved in drug metabolism. Genotypic variability is easy to identify by means of polymerase chain reaction-based or DNA chip-based methods, whereas phenotypic variability requires direct measurement of enzyme activities in liver, or, indirectly, measurement of the rate of metabolism of a given compound in vivo. There is a great deal of phenotypic variability in human beings, only a minor part being attributable to gene polymorphisms. Thus, enzyme activity measurements in a series of human livers, as well as in vivo studies with human volunteers, show that phenotypic variability is, by far, much greater than genotypic variability. In vitro models are currently used to investigate the hepatic metabolism of new compounds. Cultured human hepatocytes are considered to be the closest model to the human liver. However, the fact that hepatocytes are placed in a microenvironment that differs from that of the cells in the liver raises the question of to what extent drug metabolism variability observed in vitro actually reflects that in the liver in vivo. This issue has been examined by investigating the metabolism of the model compound, aceclofenac (an approved analgesic/anti-inflammatory drug), both in vitro and in vivo. Hepatocytes isolated from programmed liver biopsies were incubated with aceclofenac, and the metabolites formed were investigated by HPLC. The patients were given the drug during the course of clinical recovery, and the metabolites, largely present in urine, were analysed. In vitro and in vivo data from the same individual were compared. There was a good correlation between the in vitro and in vivo relative abundance of oxidised metabolites (4'-OH-aceclofenac + 4

  12. Functionally Enhanced Human Stem Cell Derived Hepatocytes in Galactosylated Cellulosic Sponges for Hepatotoxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Tasnim, Farah; Toh, Yi-Chin; Qu, Yinghua; Li, Huan; Phan, Derek; Narmada, Balakrishnan C; Ananthanarayanan, Abhishek; Mittal, Nikhil; Meng, Ryan Q; Yu, Hanry

    2016-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cell derived hepatocyte-like cells (hPSC-HLCs) are an attractive alternative to primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) used in applications ranging from therapeutics to drug safety testing studies. It would be critical to improve and maintain mature hepatocyte functions of the hPSC-HLCs, especially for long-term studies. If 3D culture systems were to be used for such purposes, it would be important that the system can support formation and maintenance of optimal-sized spheroids for long periods of time, and can also be directly deployed in liver drug testing assays. We report the use of 3-dimensional (3D) cellulosic scaffold system for the culture of hPSC-HLCs. The scaffold has a macroporous network which helps to control the formation and maintenance of the spheroids for weeks. Our results show that culturing hPSC-HLCs in 3D cellulosic scaffolds increases functionality, as demonstrated by improved urea production and hepatic marker expression. In addition, hPSC-HLCs in the scaffolds exhibit a more mature phenotype, as shown by enhanced cytochrome P450 activity and induction. This enables the system to show a higher sensitivity to hepatotoxicants and a higher degree of similarity to PHHs when compared to conventional 2D systems. These results suggest that 3D cellulosic scaffolds are ideal for the long-term cultures needed to mature hPSC-HLCs. The mature hPSC-HLCs with improved cellular function can be continually maintained in the scaffolds and directly used for hepatotoxicity assays, making this system highly attractive for drug testing applications. PMID:27157693

  13. Protectivity of blue honeysuckle extract against oxidative human endothelial cells and rat hepatocyte damage.

    PubMed

    Palíková, Irena; Valentová, Katerina; Oborná, Ivana; Ulrichová, Jitka

    2009-08-12

    The effect of Lonicera caerulea L. (blue honeysuckle) phenolic fraction (18.5% anthocyanins) on cell viability and against oxidative damage in low density lipoproteins (oxLDL), in rat microsomes and in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), was tested. The phenolic fraction was nontoxic to rat hepatocytes and HUVEC at tested concentrations (1-1000 microg/mL) and time intervals up to 24 h inclusive. Phenolic fraction inhibited rat liver microsome peroxidation, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH), with IC(50) values of 160 +/- 20 microg/mL. The fraction at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 microg/mL delayed LDL oxidation, induced by Cu(2+), by 130 +/- 20%, 200 +/- 30%, and 400 +/- 10%, respectively. The treatment of HUVEC with oxidatively modified LDL induced an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, and resulted in lower formazan formation from 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) uptake, most pronounced for 200 microg/mL (24 h oxidation) after 2 h of incubation. The protective effect of the phenolic fraction against cell damage caused by oxLDL was noted at 0.1 microg/mL for HUVEC and against tBH at 1000 microg/mL for both HUVEC and hepatocytes. The observed protective effects were probably due to the antioxidant properties of L. caerulea constituents, mainly anthocyanins. Microsome peroxidation and LDL oxidation inhibition results provide promising perspectives into the prevention of some oxidative stress-associated diseases. Other data are important in in vitro systems but seem to be accidental in vivo. PMID:19572653

  14. Comparison of human hepatoma HepaRG cells with human and rat hepatocytes in uptake transport assays in order to predict a risk of drug induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Monika; Veres, Zsuzsa; Baranyai, Zsolt; Jakab, Ferenc; Jemnitz, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    Human hepatocytes are the gold standard for toxicological studies but they have several drawbacks, like scarce availability, high inter-individual variability, a short lifetime, which limits their applicability. The aim of our investigations was to determine, whether HepaRG cells could replace human hepatocytes in uptake experiments for toxicity studies. HepaRG is a hepatoma cell line with most hepatic functions, including a considerable expression of uptake transporters in contrast to other hepatic immortalized cell lines. We compared the effect of cholestatic drugs (bosentan, cyclosporinA, troglitazone,) and bromosulfophthalein on the uptake of taurocholate and estrone-3-sulfate in human and rat hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. The substrate uptake was significantly slower in HepaRG cells than in human hepatocytes, still, in the presence of drugs we observed a concentration dependent decrease in uptake. In all cell types, the culture time had a significant impact not only on the uptake process but on the inhibitory effect of drugs too. The most significant drug effect was measured at 4 h after seeding. Our report is among the first concerning interactions of the uptake transporters in the HepaRG, at the functional level. Results of the present study clearly show that concerning the inhibition of taurocholate uptake by cholestatic drugs, HepaRG cells are closer to human hepatocytes than rat hepatocytes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that HepaRG cells may provide a suitable tool for hepatic uptake studies. PMID:23516635

  15. Human Hepatocyte-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: MYC Expression, Similarities to Human Germ Cell Tumors, and Safety Issues

    PubMed Central

    Unzu, Carmen; Friedli, Marc; Bosman, Alexis; Jaconi, Marisa E.; Wildhaber, Barbara E.; Rougemont, Anne-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are a most promising approach to the development of a hepatocyte transplantable mass sufficient to induce long-term correction of inherited liver metabolic diseases, thus avoiding liver transplantation. Their intrinsic self-renewal ability and potential to differentiate into any of the three germ layers identify iPSC as the most promising cell-based therapeutics, but also as drivers of tumor development. Teratoma development currently represents the gold standard to assess iPSC pluripotency. We analyzed the tumorigenic potential of iPSC generated from human hepatocytes (HEP-iPSC) and compared their immunohistochemical profiles to that of tumors developed from fibroblast and hematopoietic stem cell-derived iPSC. HEP-iPSC generated tumors significantly presented more malignant morphological features than reprogrammed fibroblasts or CD34+ iPSC. Moreover, the protooncogene myc showed the strongest expression in HEP-iPSC, compared to only faint expression in the other cell subsets. Random integration of transgenes and the use of potent protooncogenes such as myc might be a risk factor for malignant tumor development if hepatocytes are used for reprogramming. Nonviral vector delivery systems or reprogramming of cells obtained from less invasive harvesting methods would represent interesting options for future developments in stem cell-based approaches for liver metabolic diseases. PMID:26880963

  16. Mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced cell death in primary human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most prevalent cause of drug-induced liver injury in western countries. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of injury after APAP overdose in various animal models; however, the importance of these mechanisms for humans remains unclear. Here we investigated APAP hepatotoxicity using freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from either donor livers or liver resections. PHH were exposed to 5 mM, 10 mM or 20 mM APAP over a period of 48 h and multiple parameters were assessed. APAP dose-dependently induced significant hepatocyte necrosis starting from 24 h, which correlated with the clinical onset of human liver injury after APAP overdose. Interestingly, cellular glutathione was depleted rapidly during the first 3 h. APAP also resulted in early formation of APAP-protein adducts (measured in whole cell lysate and in mitochondria) and mitochondrial dysfunction, indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential after 12 h. Furthermore, APAP time-dependently triggered c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol and translocation of phospho-JNK to the mitochondria. Both co-treatment and post-treatment (3 h) with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced JNK activation and significantly attenuated cell death at 24 h and 48 h after APAP. The clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine offered almost complete protection even if administered 6 h after APAP and a partial protection when given at 15 h. Conclusion: These data highlight important mechanistic events in APAP toxicity in PHH and indicate a critical role of JNK in the progression of injury after APAP in humans. The JNK pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the clinic. - Highlights: • APAP reproducibly causes cell death in freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes. • APAP induces adduct formation, JNK activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in PHH. • Mitochondrial adducts and JNK translocation are delayed in PHH compared to

  17. Engraftment of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes in immunocompetent mice via 3D co-aggregation and encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Lu, Yen-Chun; Frankel, Angela S.; An, Duo; Schwartz, Robert E.; Ma, Minglin

    2015-01-01

    Cellular therapies for liver diseases and in vitro models for drug testing both require functional human hepatocytes (Hum-H), which have unfortunately been limited due to the paucity of donor liver tissues. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent a promising and potentially unlimited cell source to derive Hum-H. However, the hepatic functions of these hPSC-derived cells to date are not fully comparable to adult Hum-H and are more similar to fetal ones. In addition, it has been challenging to obtain functional hepatic engraftment of these cells with prior studies having been done in immunocompromised animals. In this report, we demonstrated successful engraftment of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-H) in immunocompetent mice by pre-engineering 3D cell co-aggregates with stromal cells (SCs) followed by encapsulation in recently developed biocompatible hydrogel capsules. Notably, upon transplantation, human albumin and α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) in mouse sera secreted by encapsulated iPS-H/SCs aggregates reached a level comparable to the primary Hum-H/SCs control. Further immunohistochemistry of human albumin in retrieved cell aggregates confirmed the survival and function of iPS-H. This proof-of-concept study provides a simple yet robust approach to improve the engraftment of iPS-H, and may be applicable to many stem cell-based therapies. PMID:26592180

  18. Amelioration of Hyperbilirubinemia in Gunn Rats after Transplantation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Li, Yanfeng; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Wei; Sauer, Vanessa; Chang, Chan-Jung; Han, Bing; Tchaikovskaya, Tatyana; Avsar, Yesim; Tafaleng, Edgar; Madhusudana Girija, Sanal; Tar, Krisztina; Polgar, Zsuzsanna; Strom, Stephen; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Guha, Chandan; Fox, Ira J.; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Roy-Chowdhury, Namita

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocyte transplantation has the potential to cure inherited liver diseases, but its application is impeded by a scarcity of donor livers. Therefore, we explored whether transplantation of hepatocyte-like cells (iHeps) differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) could ameliorate inherited liver diseases. iPSCs reprogrammed from human skin fibroblasts were differentiated to iHeps, which were transplanted into livers of uridinediphosphoglucuronate glucuronosyltransferase-1 (UGT1A1)-deficient Gunn rats, a model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome 1 (CN1), where elevated unconjugated bilirubin causes brain injury and death. To promote iHep proliferation, 30% of the recipient liver was X-irradiated before transplantation, and hepatocyte growth factor was expressed. After transplantation, UGT1A1+ iHep clusters constituted 2.5%–7.5% of the preconditioned liver lobe. A decline of serum bilirubin by 30%–60% and biliary excretion of bilirubin glucuronides indicated that transplanted iHeps expressed UGT1A1 activity, a postnatal function of hepatocytes. Therefore, iHeps warrant further exploration as a renewable source of hepatocytes for treating inherited liver diseases. PMID:26074313

  19. Transcription Factors and Medium Suitable for Initiating the Differentiation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to the Hepatocyte Lineage.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    Transcription factors and culture media were investigated to determine the condition to initiate the differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells most efficiently. The expression of genes in human adult liver was compared with that in 201B7 cells (iPS cells) using cDNA microarray analysis. Episomal plasmids expressing transcription factors were constructed. 201B7 cells were transfected with the episomal plasmids and cultured in ReproFF (feeder-free media maintaining pluripotency), Leibovitz-15 (L15), William's E (WE), or Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium/Nutrient F-12 Ham (DF12) for 7 days. RNA was isolated and subjected to real-time quantitative PCR to analyze the expression of alpha-feto protein (AFP) and albumin. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 16 transcription factors that were upregulated in human adult liver relative to that in 201B7 cells. Episomal plasmids expressing these 16 genes were transfected into 201B7 cells. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPA), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB), forkhead box A1 (FOXA1), and forkhead box A3 (FOXA3) up-regulated AFP and down-regulated Nanog. These four genes were further analyzed. The expression of AFP and albumin was the highest in 201B7 cells transfected with the combination of CEBPA, CEBPB, FOXA1, and FOXA3 and cultured in WE. The combination of CEBPA, CEBPB, FOXA1, and FOXA3 was suitable for 201B7 cells to initiate differentiation to the hepatocyte lineage and WE was the most suitable medium for culture after transfection. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2001-2009, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773721

  20. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  1. Small-Molecule-Directed Hepatocyte-Like Cell Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mathapati, Santosh; Siller, Richard; Impellizzeri, Agata A R; Lycke, Max; Vegheim, Karianne; Almaas, Runar; Sullivan, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) generated in vitro from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide an invaluable resource for basic research, regenerative medicine, drug screening, toxicology, and modeling of liver disease and development. This unit describes a small-molecule-driven protocol for in vitro differentiation of hPSCs into HLCs without the use of growth factors. hPSCs are coaxed through a developmentally relevant route via the primitive streak to definitive endoderm (DE) using the small molecule CHIR99021 (a Wnt agonist), replacing the conventional growth factors Wnt3A and activin A. The small-molecule-derived DE is then differentiated to hepatoblast-like cells in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. The resulting hepatoblasts are then differentiated to HLCs with N-hexanoic-Tyr, Ile-6 aminohexanoic amide (Dihexa, a hepatocyte growth factor agonist) and dexamethasone. The protocol provides an efficient and reproducible procedure for differentiation of hPSCs into HLCs utilizing small molecules. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532814

  2. Differential Transcriptional Responses to Interferon-α and Interferon-γ in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Santosh; Ji, Xuhuai; Calderon-Rodriguez, Gloria M.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Liang, T. Jake

    2010-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) plays a central role in the innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses. While IFN-α is currently approved for treating chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C, in limited studies, IFN-γ has not been shown to be effective for chronic hepatitis B or C. To identify the potential mechanism underlying the differential antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-γ, we used cDNA microarray to profile the global transcriptional response to IFN-α and IFN-γ in primary human hepatocytes, the target cell population of hepatitis viruses. Our results reveal distinct patterns of gene expression induced by these 2 cytokines. Overall, IFN-α induces more genes than IFN-γ at the transcriptional level. Distinct sets of genes were induced by IFN-α and IFN-γ with limited overlaps. IFN-α induces gene transcription at an early time point (6 h) but not at a later time point (18 h), while the effects of IFN-γ are more prominent at 18 h than at 6 h, suggesting a delayed transcriptional response to IFN-γ in the hepatocytes. These findings indicate differential actions of IFN-α and IFN-γ in the context of therapeutic intervention for chronic viral infections in the liver. PMID:20038212

  3. Urokinase and type I plasminogen activator inhibitor production by normal human hepatocytes: modulation by inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Busso, N; Nicodeme, E; Chesne, C; Guillouzo, A; Belin, D; Hyafil, F

    1994-07-01

    We examined the effects of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta) on the plasminogen activator system (urokinase, tissue-type plasminogen activator, type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor) in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. We show that interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha increase urokinase-type plasminogen activator production, reinforcing the concept that increased urokinase production is associated with inflammatory processes. By contrast, the same agents (i.e., interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) do not stimulate plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 production. This latter observation rules out hepatocytes as a major cellular source of plasmatic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 during acute-phase-related responses. Among the inflammatory agents used, transforming growth factor-beta was found to be the most effective modulator of both urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, inducing severalfold increases of activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, antigen and the corresponding mRNA and increasing plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 antigen and mRNA levels. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 modulation by transforming growth factor-beta may play a critical role in hepatic pathophysiology. PMID:8020888

  4. PPAR{alpha} regulates the hepatotoxic biomarker alanine aminotransferase (ALT1) gene expression in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Thulin, Petra; Rafter, Ingalill; Stockling, Kenneth; Tomkiewicz, Celine; Norjavaara, Ensio; Aggerbeck, Martine; Hellmold, Heike; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Andersson, Ulf; Cotgreave, Ian; Glinghammar, Bjoern

    2008-08-15

    In this work, we investigated a potential mechanism behind the observation of increased aminotransferase levels in a phase I clinical trial using a lipid-lowering drug, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, AZD4619. In healthy volunteers treated with AZD4619, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were elevated without an increase in other markers for liver injury. These increases in serum aminotransferases have previously been reported in some patients receiving another PPAR{alpha} agonist, fenofibrate. In subsequent in vitro studies, we observed increased expression of ALT1 protein and mRNA in human hepatocytes after treatment with fenofibric acid. The PPAR effect on ALT1 expression was shown to act through a direct transcriptional mechanism involving at least one PPAR response element (PPRE) in the proximal ALT1 promoter, while no effect of fenofibrate and AZD4619 was observed on the ALT2 promoter. Binding of PPARs to the PPRE located at - 574 bp from the transcriptional start site was confirmed on both synthetic oligonucleotides and DNA in hepatocytes. These data show that intracellular ALT expression is regulated by PPAR agonists and that this mechanism might contribute to increased ALT activity in serum.

  5. Drug-induced cholestasis risk assessment in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Oorts, Marlies; Baze, Audrey; Bachellier, Philippe; Heyd, Bruno; Zacharias, Thomas; Annaert, Pieter; Richert, Lysiane

    2016-08-01

    Drug-induced cholestasis (DIC) is recognized as one of the prime mechanisms for DILI. Hence, earlier detection of drug candidates with cholestatic signature is crucial. Recently, we introduced an in vitro model for DIC and evaluated its performance with several cholestatic drugs. We presently expand on the validation of this model by 14 training compounds (TCs) of the EU-EFPIA IMI project MIP-DILI. Several batches of human hepatocytes in sandwich-culture were qualified for DIC assessment by verifying the bile acid-dependent increase in sensitivity to the toxic effects of cyclosporin A. The cholestatic potential of the TCs was expressed by determining the drug-induced cholestasis index (DICI). A safety margin (SM) was calculated as the ratio of the lowest TC concentration with a DICI≤0.80 to the Cmax,total. Nefazodone, bosentan, perhexiline and troglitazone were flagged for cholestasis (SM<30). The hepatotoxic (but non-cholestatic) compounds, amiodarone, diclofenac, fialuridine and ximelagatran, and all non-hepatotoxic compounds were cleared as "safe" for DIC. Tolcapone and paracetamol yielded DICI-based SM values equal to or higher than those based on cytotoxicity, thus excluding DIC as a DILI mechanism. This hepatocyte-based in vitro assay provides a unique tool for early and reliable identification of drug candidates with cholestasis risk. PMID:27046439

  6. Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Promotes Functional Recovery in Primates after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Kazuya; Fujiyoshi, Kanehiro; Yamane, Jun-ichi; Toyota, Fumika; Hikishima, Keigo; Nomura, Tatsuji; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Aoki, Masashi; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaya

    2011-01-01

    Many therapeutic interventions for spinal cord injury (SCI) using neurotrophic factors have focused on reducing the area damaged by secondary, post-injury degeneration, to promote functional recovery. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is a potent mitogen for mature hepatocytes and a mediator of the inflammatory responses to tissue injury, was recently highlighted as a potent neurotrophic factor in the central nervous system. We previously reported that introducing exogenous HGF into the injured rodent spinal cord using a herpes simplex virus-1 vector significantly reduces the area of damaged tissue and promotes functional recovery. However, that study did not examine the therapeutic effects of administering HGF after injury, which is the most critical issue for clinical application. To translate this strategy to human treatment, we induced a contusive cervical SCI in the common marmoset, a primate, and then administered recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) intrathecally. Motor function was assessed using an original open field scoring system focusing on manual function, including reach-and-grasp performance and hand placement in walking. The intrathecal rhHGF preserved the corticospinal fibers and myelinated areas, thereby promoting functional recovery. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging showed significant preservation of the intact spinal cord parenchyma. rhHGF-treatment did not give rise to an abnormal outgrowth of calcitonin gene related peptide positive fibers compared to the control group, indicating that this treatment did not induce or exacerbate allodynia. This is the first study to report the efficacy of rhHGF for treating SCI in non-human primates. In addition, this is the first presentation of a novel scale for assessing neurological motor performance in non-human primates after contusive cervical SCI. PMID:22140459

  7. Evaluation of Adverse Drug Properties with Cryopreserved Human Hepatocytes and the Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-culture (IdMOCTM) System

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human hepatocytes, with complete hepatic metabolizing enzymes, transporters and cofactors, represent the gold standard for in vitro evaluation of drug metabolism, drug-drug interactions, and hepatotoxicity. Successful cryopreservation of human hepatocytes enables this experimental system to be used routinely. The use of human hepatocytes to evaluate two major adverse drug properties: drug-drug interactions and hepatotoxicity, are summarized in this review. The application of human hepatocytes in metabolism-based drug-drug interaction includes metabolite profiling, pathway identification, P450 inhibition, P450 induction, and uptake and efflux transporter inhibition. The application of human hepatocytes in toxicity evaluation includes in vitro hepatotoxicity and metabolism-based drug toxicity determination. A novel system, the Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-culture (IdMOC) which allows the evaluation of nonhepatic toxicity in the presence of hepatic metabolism, is described. PMID:26191380

  8. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha and bile acids regulate human concentrative nucleoside transporter-1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kerstin; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Wagner, Martin; Trauner, Michael; Eloranta, Jyrki J

    2009-04-01

    The concentrative nucleoside transporter-1 (CNT1) is a member of the solute carrier 28 (SLC28) gene family and is expressed in the liver, intestine, and kidneys. CNT1 mediates the uptake of naturally occurring pyrimidine nucleosides, but also nucleoside analogs used in anticancer and antiviral therapy. Thus expression levels of CNT1 may affect the pharmacokinetics of these drugs and the outcome of drug therapy. Because little is known about the transcriptional regulation of human CNT1 gene expression, we have characterized the CNT1 promoter with respect to DNA response elements and their binding factors. The transcriptional start site of the CNT1 gene was determined by 5'-RACE. In silico analysis revealed the existence of three putative binding sites for the nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha (HNF-4alpha) within the CNT1 promoter. A luciferase reporter gene construct containing the CNT1 promoter region was transactivated by HNF-4alpha in human cell lines derived from the liver, intestine, and kidneys. Consistent with this, we showed in electromobility shift assays that HNF-4alpha specifically binds to two conserved direct repeat-1 motifs within the proximal CNT1 promoter. In cotransfection experiments, the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha further increased, whereas the bile acid-inducible corepressor small heterodimer partner reduced, HNF-4alpha-dependent CNT1 promoter activity. Consistent with the latter phenomenon, CNT1 mRNA expression levels were suppressed in primary human hepatocytes upon bile acid treatment. Supporting the physiological relevance and species conservation of this effect, ileal Cnt1 mRNA expression was decreased upon bile acid feeding and increased upon bile duct ligation in mice. PMID:19228884

  9. Two compartment model of diazepam biotransformation in an organotypical culture of primary human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Acikgoez, Ali; Karim, Najibulla; Giri, Shibashish; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Bader, Augustinus

    2009-01-15

    Drug biotransformation is one of the most important parameters of preclinical screening tests for the registration of new drug candidates. Conventional existing tests rely on nonhuman models which deliver an incomplete metabolic profile of drugs due to the lack of proper CYP450 expression as seen in human liver in vivo. In order to overcome this limitation, we used an organotypical model of human primary hepatocytes for the biotransformation of the drug diazepam with special reference to metabolites in both the cell matrix phase and supernatant and its interaction of three inducers (phenobarbital, dexamethasone, aroclor 1254) in different time responses (1, 2, 4, 8, 24 h). Phenobarbital showed the strongest inducing effect in generating desmethyldiazepam and induced up to a 150 fold increase in oxazepam-content which correlates with the increased availability of the precursor metabolites (temazepam and desmethyldiazepam). Aroclor 1254 and dexamethasone had the strongest inducing effect on temazepam and the second strongest on oxazepam. The strong and overlapping inductive role of phenobarbital strengthens the participation of CYP2B6 and CYP3A in diazepam N-demethylation and CYP3A in temazepam formation. Aroclor 1254 preferentially generated temazepam due to the interaction with CYP3A and potentially CYP2C19. In parallel we represented these data in the form of a mathematical model with two compartments explaining the dynamics of diazepam metabolism with the effect of these other inducers in human primary hepatocytes. The model consists of ten differential equations, with one for each concentration c{sub i,j} (i = diazepam, temazepam, desmethyldiazepam, oxazepam, other metabolites) and one for each compartment (j = cell matrix phase, supernatant), respectively. The parameters p{sub k} (k = 1, 2, 3, 4, 13) are rate constants describing the biotransformation of diazepam and its metabolites and the other parameters (k = 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15) explain the

  10. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  11. Asialoglycoprotein receptor 1 is a specific cell-surface marker for isolating hepatocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Derek T; Henderson, Christopher A; Warren, Curtis R; Friesen, Max; Xia, Fang; Becker, Caroline E; Musunuru, Kiran; Cowan, Chad A

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) are derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in vitro, but differentiation protocols commonly give rise to a heterogeneous mixture of cells. This variability confounds the evaluation of in vitro functional assays performed using HLCs. Increased differentiation efficiency and more accurate approximation of the in vivo hepatocyte gene expression profile would improve the utility of hPSCs. Towards this goal, we demonstrate the purification of a subpopulation of functional HLCs using the hepatocyte surface marker asialoglycoprotein receptor 1 (ASGR1). We analyzed the expression profile of ASGR1-positive cells by microarray, and tested their ability to perform mature hepatocyte functions (albumin and urea secretion, cytochrome activity). By these measures, ASGR1-positive HLCs are enriched for the gene expression profile and functional characteristics of primary hepatocytes compared with unsorted HLCs. We have demonstrated that ASGR1-positive sorting isolates a functional subpopulation of HLCs from among the heterogeneous cellular population produced by directed differentiation. PMID:27143754

  12. Induction of Highly Functional Hepatocytes from Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells by HNF4α Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qingfeng; Xia, Qiang; Bian, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the differentiation potential of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HuMSCs) and the key factors that facilitate hepatic differentiation. Methods HuMSCs were induced to become hepatocyte-like cells according to a previously published protocol. The differentiation status of the hepatocyte-like cells was examined by observing the morphological changes under an inverted microscope and by immunofluorescence analysis. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) overexpression was achieved by plasmid transfection of the hepatocyte-like cells. The expression of proteins and genes of interest was then examined by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or real-time RT-PCR methods. Results Our results demonstrated that HuMSCs can easily be induced into hepatocyte-like cells using a published differentiation protocol. The overexpression of HNF4α in the induced HuMSCs significantly enhanced the expression levels of hepatic-specific proteins and genes. HNF4α overexpression may be associated with liver-enriched transcription factor networks and the Wnt/β-Catenin pathway. Conclusion The overexpression of HNF4α improves the hepatic differentiation of HuMSCs and is a simple way to improve cellular sources for clinical applications. PMID:25137413

  13. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  14. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  15. An Algorithm that Predicts the Viability and the Yield of Human Hepatocytes Isolated from Remnant Liver Pieces Obtained from Liver Resections

    PubMed Central

    Laubender, Rüdiger P.; Fröse, Natalja; Thasler, Reinhard M. K.; Schiergens, Tobias S.; Mansmann, Ulrich; Thasler, Wolfgang E.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated human primary hepatocytes are an essential in vitro model for basic and clinical research. For successful application as a model, isolated hepatocytes need to have a good viability and be available in sufficient yield. Therefore, this study aims to identify donor characteristics, intra-operative factors, tissue processing and cell isolation parameters that affect the viability and yield of human hepatocytes. Remnant liver pieces from tissue designated as surgical waste were collected from 1034 donors with informed consent. Human hepatocytes were isolated by a two-step collagenase perfusion technique with modifications and hepatocyte yield and viability were subsequently determined. The accompanying patient data was collected and entered into a database. Univariate analyses found that the viability and the yield of hepatocytes were affected by many of the variables examined. Multivariate analyses were then carried out to confirm the factors that have a significant relationship with the viability and the yield. It was found that the viability of hepatocytes was significantly decreased by the presence of fibrosis, liver fat and with increasing gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity and bilirubin content. Yield was significantly decreased by the presence of liver fat, septal fibrosis, with increasing aspartate aminotransferase activity, cold ischemia times and weight of perfused liver. However, yield was significantly increased by chemotherapy treatment. In conclusion, this study determined the variables that have a significant effect on the viability and the yield of isolated human hepatocytes. These variables have been used to generate an algorithm that can calculate projected viability and yield of isolated human hepatocytes. In this way, projected viability can be determined even before isolation of hepatocytes, so that donors that result in high viability and yield can be identified. Further, if the viability and yield of the isolated hepatocytes is lower

  16. Total synthesis of biotinylated N domain of human hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Raibaut, Laurent; Vicogne, Jérome; Leclercq, Bérénice; Drobecq, Hervé; Desmet, Rémi; Melnyk, Oleg

    2013-06-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) is the high affinity ligand of MET tyrosine kinase receptor. We report here the total synthesis of a biotinylated analogue of human HGF/SF N domain. Functionally, N domain is part of the HGF/SF high affinity binding site for MET and also the main HGF/SF binding site for heparin. The 97 Aa linear chain featuring a C-terminal biotin group was assembled in high yield using an N-to-C one-pot three segments assembly strategy relying on a sequential Native Chemical Ligation (NCL)/bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amido (SEA) native peptide ligation process. The folded protein displayed the native disulfide bond pattern and showed the ability to bind heparin. PMID:23523386

  17. Xeno-sensing activity of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Min; Kim, Ji-Woo; Choi, Youngjun; Chun, Hang-Suk; Im, Ilkyun; Han, Yong-Mahn; Song, Chang-Woo; Yoon, Seokjoo; Park, Han-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Although hepatocyte-like cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-HLCs) are considered a promising model for predicting hepatotoxicity, their application has been restricted because of the low activity of drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs). Here we found that the low expression of xenobiotic receptors (constitutive androstane receptor, CAR; and pregnane X receptor, PXR) contributes to the low activity of DMEs in hPSC-HLCs. Most CAR- and PXR-regulated DMEs and transporters were transcriptionally down-regulated in hPSC-HLC. Transcriptional expression of CAR and PXR was highly repressed in hPSC-HLCs, whereas mRNA levels of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) were comparable to those of adult liver. Furthermore, ligand-induced transcriptional activation was observed only at AHR in hPSC-HLCs. Bisulfite sequencing analysis demonstrated that promoter hypermethylation of CAR and PXR was associated with diminished transcriptional activity in hPSC-HLCs. Treatment with AHR-selective ligands increased the transcription of AHR-dependent target genes by direct AHR-DNA binding at the xenobiotic response element. In addition, an antagonist of AHR significantly inhibited AHR-dependent target gene expression. Thus, AHR may function intrinsically as a xenosensor as well as a ligand-dependent transcription factor in hPSC-HLCs. Our results indicate that hPSC-HLCs can be used to screen toxic substances related to AHR signaling and to identify potential AHR-targeted therapeutics. PMID:26899675

  18. Expression and hepatobiliary transport characteristics of the concentrative and equilibrative nucleoside transporters in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Rajgopal; Endres, Christopher J.; Whittington, Dale; LeCluyse, Edward; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Tse, Chung-Ming; Unadkat, Jashvant D.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that both the concentrative (hCNT) and equilibrative (hENT) nucleoside transporters are expressed in the human liver (21). Here we report a study that investigated the expression of these transporters (transcripts and proteins) and their role in the hepatobiliary transport of nucleosides/nucleoside drugs using sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes. In the hepatic tissue, the rank order of the mRNA expression of the transporters was hCNT1 ≈ hENT1 > hENT2 ≈ hCNT2 > hCNT3. In sandwich-cultured hepatocytes, the mRNA expression of hCNT2 and hENT2 was comparable to that in hepatic tissue, whereas the expression of corresponding transporters in the two-dimensional hepatocyte cultures was lower. Colocalization studies demonstrated predominant localization of these transporters at the sinusoidal membrane and of hENT1, hCNT1, and hCNT2 at the canalicular membrane. In the sandwich-cultured hepatocytes, ENTs were the major contributors to the transport of thymidine (hENT1, 63%; hENT2, 23%) or guanosine (hENT1, 53%; hENT2, 24%) into the hepatocytes followed by hCNT1 (10%) for thymidine or hCNT2 (23%) for guanosine. Although ribavirin was predominately transported (89%) into the hepatocytes by hENT1, fialuridine (FIAU) was transported by both hENT1 (30%) and hCNTs (61%). The extensively metabolized natural nucleosides were not effluxed into the bile, whereas significant biliary-efflux was observed of FIAU (19%), ribavirin (30%), and formycin B (35%). We conclude that the hepatic activity of hENT1 and hCNT1/2 transporters will determine the in vivo hepatic distribution and therefore the efficacy and/or toxicity of nucleoside drugs used to treat hepatic diseases. PMID:18635603

  19. Markers of electrophilic stress caused by chemically reactive metabolites in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Takakusa, Hideo; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Mitsuru, Ayako; Okazaki, Osamu; Sudo, Kenichi

    2008-05-01

    The metabolic activation of a drug to an electrophilic reactive metabolite and its covalent binding to cellular macromolecules is considered to be involved in the occurrence of idiosyncratic drug toxicity (IDT). As a cellular defense system against oxidative and electrophilic stress, phase II enzymes are known to be induced through a Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1/nuclear factor E2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element system. We presumed that it is important for the risk assessment of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and IDTs to observe the biological responses evoked by exposure to reactive metabolites, and then investigated the mRNA induction profiles of phase II enzymes in human hepatocytes after exposure to problematic drugs associated with IDTs, such as ticlopidine, diclofenac, clozapine, and tienilic acid, as well as safe drugs such as levofloxacin and caffeine. According to the results, the problematic drugs exhibited inductive effects on heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), which contrasted with the safe drugs; therefore, the induction of HO-1 mRNA seems to be correlated with the occurrence of drug toxicity, including IDT caused by electrophilic reactive metabolites. Moreover, glutathione-depletion and cytochrome P450 (P450)-inhibition experiments have shown that the observed HO-1 induction was triggered by the electrophilic reactive metabolites produced from the problematic drugs through P450-mediated metabolic bioactivation. Taken together with our present study, this suggests that HO-1 induction in human hepatocytes would be a good marker of the occurrence of metabolism-based drug-induced hepatotoxicity and IDT caused by the formation of electrophilic reactive metabolites. PMID:18227147

  20. Glucuronidation and Covalent Protein Binding of Benoxaprofen and Flunoxaprofen in Sandwich-Cultured Rat and Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jennifer Q.

    2009-01-01

    Benoxaprofen (BNX), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that was withdrawn because of hepatotoxicity, is more toxic than its structural analog flunoxaprofen (FLX) in humans and rats. Acyl glucuronides have been hypothesized to be reactive metabolites and may be associated with toxicity. Both time- and concentration-dependent glucuronidation and covalent binding of BNX, FLX, and ibuprofen (IBP) were determined by exposing sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes to each NSAID. The levels of glucuronide and covalent protein adduct measured in cells followed the order BNX > FLX > IBP. These results indicate that 1) BNX-glucuronide (G) is more reactive than FLX-G, and 2) IBP-G is the least reactive metabolite, which support previous in vivo studies in rats. The proportional increases of protein adduct formation for BNX, FLX, and IBP as acyl glucuronidation increased also support the hypothesis that part of the covalent binding of all three NSAIDs to hepatic proteins is acyl glucuronide-dependent. Moreover, theses studies confirmed the feasibility of using sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes for studying glucuronidation and covalent binding to hepatocellular proteins. These studies also showed that these in vitro methods can be applied using human tissues for the study of acyl glucuronide reactivity. More BNX-protein adduct was formed in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes than FLX-protein adduct, which not only agreed with its relative toxicity in humans but also was consistent with the in vitro findings using rat hepatocyte cultures. These data support the use of sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes as an in vitro screening model of acyl glucuronide exposure and reactivity. PMID:19773537

  1. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to hepatocyte-like cells on a new developed xeno-free extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Farzaneh, Zahra; Pakzad, Mohammad; Vosough, Massoud; Pournasr, Behshad; Baharvand, Hossein

    2014-08-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) provide a new source for hepatocyte production in translational medicine and cell replacement therapy. The reported hESC-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) were commonly generated on Matrigel, a mouse cell line-derived extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we performed the hepatic lineage differentiation of hESCs following a stepwise application of growth factors on a newly developed serum- and xeno-free, simple and cost-benefit ECM, designated "RoGel," which generated from a modified conditioned medium of human fibroblasts. In comparison with Matrigel, the differentiated HLCs on both ECMs expressed similar levels of hepatocyte-specific genes, secreted α-fetoprotein, and metabolized ammonia, showed glycogen storage activity as well as low-density lipoprotein and indocyanine green uptake. The transplantation of hESC-HLCs into the carbon tetrachloride-injured liver demonstrated incorporation of the cells into the host mouse liver and the expression of albumin. The results suggest that the xeno-free and cost-benefit matrix may be applicable in bioartificial livers and also may facilitating a clinical application of human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes in the future. PMID:24477550

  2. Human monocyte-derived cells with individual hepatocyte characteristics: a novel tool for personalized in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Benesic, Andreas; Rahm, Nora L; Ernst, Samuel; Gerbes, Alexander L

    2012-06-01

    Gender, ethnicity and individual differences in hepatic metabolism have major impact on individual drug response, adverse events and attrition rate during drug development. Therefore, there is an urgent need for reliable test systems based on human cells. Yet, the use of primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) is restricted by limited availability, invasive preparation and short-term stability in culture. All other cellular approaches proposed so far have major disadvantages. We investigated whether peripheral human monocytes after cultivation according to our novel protocol (monocyte-derived hepatocyte-like cells (MH cells)) can serve as an in vitro model for hepatocyte metabolism. Enzyme activities, synthesis parameters (coagulation factor VII and urea) and cytochrome (CY) P450 activities and induction were investigated. Furthermore, MH cells were compared with PHH from the same donor. Using our protocol, we could generate cells that exhibit hepatocyte-like properties: These cells show 71±9% of specific ALT activity, 41±3% of CYP3A4 activity and 65±13% of factor VII secretion when compared with PHHs. Consequently, CYP-mediated acetaminophen toxicity and drug interactions could be shown. Moreover, the investigated parameters were stable in culture over at least 4 weeks. Furthermore, MH cells retain gender-specific and donor-specific CYP activities and toxicity profiles, respectively. MH cells show quantitative and qualitative approximation to human hepatocytes concerning CYP-metabolism and toxicity. Our data support individual prediction of toxicity and CYP metabolism. MH cells are a novel tool to investigate long-term hepatic toxicity, metabolism and drug interactions. PMID:22469698

  3. Lung fibroblasts accelerate wound closure in human alveolar epithelial cells through hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling

    PubMed Central

    Correll, Kelly; Schiel, John A.; Finigan, Jay H.; Prekeris, Rytis; Mason, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    There are 190,600 cases of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) each year in the United States, and the incidence and mortality of ALI/ARDS increase dramatically with age. Patients with ALI/ARDS have alveolar epithelial injury, which may be worsened by high-pressure mechanical ventilation. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells are the progenitor cells for the alveolar epithelium and are required to reestablish the alveolar epithelium during the recovery process from ALI/ARDS. Lung fibroblasts (FBs) migrate and proliferate early after lung injury and likely are an important source of growth factors for epithelial repair. However, how lung FBs affect epithelial wound healing in the human adult lung has not been investigated in detail. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is known to be released mainly from FBs and to stimulate both migration and proliferation of primary rat ATII cells. HGF is also increased in lung tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and serum in patients with ALI/ARDS. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF secreted by FBs would enhance wound closure in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). Wound closure was measured using a scratch wound-healing assay in primary human AEC monolayers and in a coculture system with FBs. We found that wound closure was accelerated by FBs mainly through HGF/c-Met signaling. HGF also restored impaired wound healing in AECs from the elderly subjects and after exposure to cyclic stretch. We conclude that HGF is the critical factor released from FBs to close wounds in human AEC monolayers and suggest that HGF is a potential strategy for hastening alveolar repair in patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:24748602

  4. Human hepatocytes express absent in melanoma 2 and respond to hepatitis B virus with interleukin-18 expression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xingfei; Xu, Haixia; Zheng, Changlong; Li, Mei; Zou, Xiaofang; Cao, Hong; Xu, Qihuan

    2016-08-01

    Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is a recently recognized cytoplasmic receptor which could sense cytoplasmic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). After AIM2 detects the presence of parasitic nucleic acids (dsDNA) derived from invasive bacteria or viral genomes (for example, vaccinia virus and cytomegalovirus) within infected cells, AIM2 inflammasome could be formed. The formed AIM2 inflammasome could induce innate immune response and increase expressions of IL-1β and IL-18. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic, non-cytopathic double-stranded DNA virus. The immune response to viral antigens or virus is thought to be responsible for both liver damage and viral clearance in patients with HBV infection. However, there are no reports about whether AIM2 inflammasome exists in hepatocytes. In the present study, we investigated the presence and activity of AIM2 inflammasome in human hepatocytes. We found that AIM2 was expressed in cytoplasm of hepatocytes, and IL-18 expression was increased after AIM2 sensed HBV in hepatocytes in vitro. These results showed that AIM2 inflammasome was active in hepatocytes. We also found that hepatic AIM2 expression of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients was higher than that of controls. Hepatic AIM2 expression levels were positively correlated to the severity of liver inflammation. IL-18 is already considered to be associated with hepatic injury during HBV infection. In conclusion, we, therefore, believe that AIM2 inflammasome in hepatocytes might play an important role in the development and maintenance of HBV-related hepatitis. PMID:27094165

  5. Metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by cultured human hepatocytes from multiple donors.

    PubMed

    Moore, C J; Gould, M N

    1984-12-01

    Primary hepatocyte cultures from six human donors were established and their abilities to metabolize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) were examined. Cells from each donor were plated at similar densities (1 X 10(7) cells/100 mm dish). All cultures metabolized B[a]P to a significant extent (24-35 nmol in 24 h) and h.p.l.c. profiles of the organic solvent-soluble and glucuronidated B[a]P metabolites were obtained for all donors. The predominant extracellular organic solvent-soluble B[a]P metabolites were the 9,10- and 7,8-dihydrodiols, 9-hydroxy-B[a]P, and a mixture of tetrols, but the general ratios of these metabolites varied widely among the cells from different donors. In contrast, profiles were highly reproducible in cells from the same donor treated with B[a]P at either 8 or 24 h after initial plating. There was less variability in the amounts of specific B[a]P metabolites conjugated to glucuronic acid by cells from various donors. This variability could not be correlated with cell viability or overall levels of B[a]P metabolism. In addition, B[a]P metabolism by fresh and cryopreserved hepatocytes from the same donor was compared. While there was only a small reduction in the level of total B[a]P metabolism after cell freezing, there was a 3- to 5-fold increase in production of B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol, found both in the extracellular medium and as glucuronic acid conjugates, by the cryopreserved cells tested. PMID:6499110

  6. Cytochrome P450 induction response in tethered spheroids as a three-dimensional human hepatocyte in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lei; Hong, Xin; Sakban, Rashidah Binte; Qu, Yinghua; Singh, Nisha Hari; McMillian, Michael; Dallas, Shannon; Silva, Jose; Sensenhauser, Carlo; Zhao, Sylvia; Lim, Heng Keang; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction is a key risk factor of clinical drug-drug interactions that has to be mitigated in the early phases of drug discovery. Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of hepatocytes in vitro have recently emerged as a potentially better platform to recapitulate the in vivo liver structure and to maintain long-term hepatic functions as compared with conventional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. However, the majority of published studies on 3D hepatocyte models use rat hepatocytes and the response to CYP inducers between rodents and humans is distinct. In the present study, we constructed tethered spheroids on RGD/galactose-conjugated membranes as an in vitro 3D model using cryopreserved human hepatocytes. CYP3A4 mRNA expression in the tethered spheroids was induced to a significantly greater extent than those in the collagen sandwich cultures, indicating the transcriptional regulation was more sensitive to the CYP inducers in the 3D model. Induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 activities in the tethered spheroids were comparable to, if not higher than that observed in the collagen sandwich cultures. The membrane-based model is readily integrated into multi-well plates for higher-throughput drug testing applications, which might be an alternative model to screen the CYP induction potential in vitro with more physiological relevance. PMID:26201057

  7. Impact of Environmental Chemicals on the Transcriptome of Primary Human Hepatocytes: Potential for Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert D; Dhammi, Anirudh; Wallace, Andrew; Hodgson, Ernest; Roe, R Michael

    2016-08-01

    New paradigms for human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals emphasize the use of molecular methods and human-derived cell lines. In this study, we examined the effects of the insect repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) and the phenylpyrazole insecticide fipronil (fluocyanobenpyrazole) on transcript levels in primary human hepatocytes. These chemicals were tested individually and as a mixture. RNA-Seq showed that 100 μM DEET significantly increased transcript levels (α = 0.05) for 108 genes and lowered transcript levels for 64 genes and fipronil at 10 μM increased the levels of 2246 transcripts and decreased the levels for 1428 transcripts. Fipronil was 21-times more effective than DEET in eliciting changes, even though the treatment concentration was 10-fold lower for fipronil versus DEET. The mixture of DEET and fipronil produced a more than additive effect (levels increased for 3017 transcripts and decreased for 2087 transcripts). The transcripts affected for all chemical treatments were classified by GO analysis and mapped to chromosomes. The overall treatment responses, specific pathways, and individual transcripts affected were discussed at different levels of fold-change. Changes found in transcript levels in response to treatments will require further research to understand their importance in overall cellular, organ, and organismic function. PMID:27091632

  8. Cost-effective differentiation of hepatocyte-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells using small molecules.

    PubMed

    Tasnim, Farah; Phan, Derek; Toh, Yi-Chin; Yu, Hanry

    2015-11-01

    Significant efforts have been invested into the differentiation of stem cells into functional hepatocyte-like cells that can be used for cell therapy, disease modeling and drug screening. Most of these efforts have been concentrated on the use of growth factors to recapitulate developmental signals under in vitro conditions. Using small molecules instead of growth factors would provide an attractive alternative since small molecules are cell-permeable and cheaper than growth factors. We have developed a protocol for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells using a predominantly small molecule-based approach (SM-Hep). This 3 step differentiation strategy involves the use of optimized concentrations of LY294002 and bromo-indirubin-3'-oxime (BIO) for the generation of definitive endoderm; sodium butyrate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for the generation of hepatoblasts and SB431542 for differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells. Activin A is the only growth factor required in this protocol. Our results showed that SM-Hep were morphologically and functionally similar or better compared to the hepatocytes derived from the growth-factor induced differentiation (GF-Hep) in terms of expression of hepatic markers, urea and albumin production and cytochrome P450 (CYP1A2 and CYP3A4) activities. Cell viability assays following treatment with paradigm hepatotoxicants Acetaminophen, Chlorpromazine, Diclofenac, Digoxin, Quinidine and Troglitazone showed that their sensitivity to these drugs was similar to human primary hepatocytes (PHHs). Using SM-Hep would result in 67% and 81% cost reduction compared to GF-Hep and PHHs respectively. Therefore, SM-Hep can serve as a robust and cost effective replacement for PHHs for drug screening and development. PMID:26310107

  9. Troglitazone, but not rosiglitazone, damages mitochondrial DNA and induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rachek, Lyudmila I.; Yuzefovych, Larysa V.; LeDoux, Susan P.; Julie, Neil L.; Wilson, Glenn L.

    2009-11-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as troglitazone (TRO) and rosiglitazone (ROSI), improve insulin resistance by acting as ligands for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma). TRO was withdrawn from the market because of reports of serious hepatotoxicity. A growing body of evidence suggests that TRO caused mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of apoptosis in human hepatocytes but its mechanisms of action remain unclear. We hypothesized that damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an initiating event involved in TRO-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and hepatotoxicity. Primary human hepatocytes were exposed to TRO and ROSI. The results obtained revealed that TRO, but not ROSI at equimolar concentrations, caused a substantial increase in mtDNA damage and decreased ATP production and cellular viability. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetyl cystein (NAC), significantly diminished the TRO-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting involvement of ROS in TRO-induced hepatocyte cytotoxicity. The PPARgamma antagonist (GW9662) did not block the TRO-induced decrease in cell viability, indicating that the TRO-induced hepatotoxicity is PPARgamma-independent. Furthermore, TRO induced hepatocyte apoptosis, caspase-3 cleavage and cytochrome c release. Targeting of a DNA repair protein to mitochondria by protein transduction using a fusion protein containing the DNA repair enzyme Endonuclease III (EndoIII) from Escherichia coli, a mitochondrial translocation sequence (MTS) and the protein transduction domain (PTD) from HIV-1 TAT protein protected hepatocytes against TRO-induced toxicity. Overall, our results indicate that significant mtDNA damage caused by TRO is a prime initiator of the hepatoxicity caused by this drug.

  10. Biokinetics of chlorpromazine in primary rat and human hepatocytes and human HepaRG cells after repeated exposure.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Jessica J W; Parmentier, Céline; Truisi, Germaine L; Jossé, Rozenn; Alexandre, Eliane; Savary, Camille C; Hewitt, Philip G; Mueller, Stefan O; Guillouzo, André; Richert, Lysiane; van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Hermens, Joop L M; Blaauboer, Bas J

    2015-12-25

    Since drug induced liver injury is difficult to predict in animal models, more representative tests are needed to better evaluate these effects in humans. Existing in vitro systems hold great potential to detect hepatotoxicity of pharmaceuticals. In this study, the in vitro biokinetics of the model hepatotoxicant chlorpromazine (CPZ) were evaluated in three different liver cell systems after repeated exposure in order to incorporate repeated-dose testing into an in vitro assay. Primary rat and human hepatocytes, cultured in sandwich configuration and the human HepaRG cell line were treated daily with CPZ for 14 days. Samples were taken from medium, cells and well plastic at specific time points after the first and last exposure. The samples were analysed by HPLC-UV to determine the amount of CPZ in these samples. Based on cytotoxicity assays, the three models were tested at 1-2 μM CPZ, while the primary rat hepatocytes and the HepaRG cell line were in addition exposed to a higher concentration of 15-20 μM. Overall, the mass balance of CPZ decreased in the course of 24 h, indicating the metabolism of the compound within the cells. The largest decrease in parent compound was seen in the primary cultures; in the HepaRG cell cultures the mass balance only decreased to 50%. CPZ accumulated in the cells during the 14-day repeated exposure. Possible explanations for the accumulation of CPZ are a decrease in metabolism over time, inhibition of efflux transporters or binding to phospholipids. The biokinetics of CPZ differed between the three liver cell models and were influenced by specific cell properties as well as culture conditions. These results support the conclusion that in vitro biokinetics data are necessary to better interpret chemical-induced cytotoxicity data. PMID:25458484

  11. Combined use of N-acetylcysteine and Liberase improves the viability and metabolic function of human hepatocytes isolated from human liver

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, David C.; Hodson, James; Bhogal, Ricky H.; Youster, Janine; Newsome, Phil N.

    2014-01-01

    Background aims Successful hepatocyte isolation is critical for continued development of cellular transplantation. However, most tissue available for research is from diseased liver, and the results of hepatocyte isolation from such tissue are inferior compared with normal tissue. Liberase and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) have been shown separately to improve viability of isolated hepatocytes. This study aims to determine the effect of Liberase and NAC in combination on human hepatocyte isolation from normal and diseased liver tissues. Methods Hepatocytes were isolated from 30 liver specimens through the use of a standard collagenase digestion technique (original protocol) and another 30 with the addition of NAC and standard collagenase substituted by Liberase (new protocol). Viability and success, defined as maintenance of cell adhesion and morphology for 48 hours, were assessed. Metabolic function was assessed by means of albumin and urea synthesis. Results Baseline factors were similar for both groups. The delay to tissue processing was slightly shorter in the new protocol group (median, 2 versus 4 hours; P = 0.007). The success rate improved from 12 of 30 (40.0%) to 21 of 30 (70.0%) with the use of the new protocol (P = 0.037), and median viable cell yield increased from 7.3 × 104 to 28.3 × 104 cells/g tissue (P = 0.003). After adjusting for delay, success rate (P = 0.014) and viable cell yield/g tissue (P = 0.001) remained significantly improved. Albumin and urea synthesis were similar or superior in the new protocol group. Conclusions NAC and Liberase improve the success of hepatocyte isolation, with a significantly higher yield of viable cells. The use of these agents may improve the availability of hepatocytes for transplantation and laboratory research. PMID:24642019

  12. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yijun . E-mail: zhou-yijun@hotmail.com; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-06-02

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-{kappa}B, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-{kappa}B, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease.

  13. Uptake and metabolism of vinca alkaloids by freshly isolated human hepatocytes in suspension.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X J; Placidi, M; Rahmani, R

    1994-01-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate the uptake, release and metabolism of four currently used vinca alkaloids, including vinblastine, vincristine, vindesine and navelbine, using freshly isolated human hepatocytes in suspension. The drugs were rapidly taken up and intensely metabolised by the cells, giving a number of yet unidentified biotransformation products. Navelbine was the most rapidly and intensely accumulated drug followed by vinblastine, vindesine and vincristine. The extent of cell uptake appeared to parallel the lipophilicities of these compounds. Interestingly, we found a significant correlation between the mean uptake rates of the vinca alkaloids into the cells, which were 0.279, 0.343, 0.568 and 0.834 pmol/min/10(6) cells for vincristine, vindesine, vinblastine and navelbine, respectively, and the in vivo plasma clearances of the drugs (r = 0.9995, p < 0.001). This finding is of great importance as regards a better understanding of the structure-activity relationship among this class of antitumour drugs, as well as a reliable extrapolation of in vitro results to the in vivo situation. PMID:8074443

  14. 3D cultured immortalized human hepatocytes useful to develop drugs for blood-borne HCV

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, Hussein Hassan; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Hijikata, Makoto

    2009-02-06

    Due to the high polymorphism of natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) variants, existing recombinant HCV replication models have failed to be effective in developing effective anti-HCV agents. In the current study, we describe an in vitro system that supports the infection and replication of natural HCV from patient blood using an immortalized primary human hepatocyte cell line cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system. Comparison of the gene expression profile of cells cultured in the 3D system to those cultured in the existing 2D system demonstrated an up-regulation of several genes activated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) signaling. Furthermore, using PPAR{alpha} agonists and antagonists, we also analyzed the effect of PPAR{alpha} signaling on the modulation of HCV replication using this system. The 3D in vitro system described in this study provides significant insight into the search for novel anti-HCV strategies that are specific to various strains of HCV.

  15. Featured Article: Isolation, characterization, and cultivation of human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Kegel, Victoria; Zeilinger, Katrin; Hengstler, Jan G; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-05-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are considered to be the gold standard for in vitro testing of xenobiotic metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, PHH cultivation in 2D mono-cultures leads to dedifferentiation and a loss of function. It is well known that hepatic non-parenchymal cells (NPC), such as Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), play a central role in the maintenance of PHH functions. The aims of the present study were to establish a protocol for the simultaneous isolation of human PHH and NPC from the same tissue specimen and to test their suitability for in vitro co-culture. Human PHH and NPC were isolated from tissue obtained by partial liver resection by a two-step EDTA/collagenase perfusion technique. The obtained cell fractions were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. KC, LEC, and HSC contained in the NPC fraction were separated using specific adherence properties and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS®). Identified NPC revealed a yield of 1.9 × 10(6) KC, 2.7 × 10(5) LEC and 4.7 × 10(5) HSC per gram liver tissue, showing viabilities >90%. Characterization of these NPC showed that all populations went through an activation process, which influenced the cell fate. The activation of KC strongly depended on the tissue quality and donor anamnesis. KC became activated in culture in association with a loss of viability within 4-5 days. LEC lost specific features during culture, while HSC went through a transformation process into myofibroblasts. The testing of different culture conditions for HSC demonstrated that they can attenuate, but not prevent dedifferentiation in vitro. In conclusion, the method described allows the isolation and separation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from the same donor. PMID:25394621

  16. Glucocorticoid-dependent induction of interleukin-6 receptor expression in human hepatocytes facilitates interleukin-6 stimulation of amino acid transport.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, C P; Bode, B P; Takahashi, K; Tanabe, K K; Souba, W W

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors studied the effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on glutamine and alanine transport in isolated human hepatocytes. They also evaluated the role of dexamethasone in modulating this response and its effects on the expression of the plasma membrane high-affinity IL-6 receptor. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Animal studies indicate that cytokines are important mediators of the increased hepatic amino acid uptake that occurs during cancer and sepsis, but studies in human tissues are lacking. The control of transport by cytokines and cytokine receptor expression in the liver may provide a mechanism by which hepatocytes can modulate amino acid availability during catabolic disease states. METHODS: Human hepatocytes were isolated from wedge biopsy specimens and plated in 24-well trays. Interleukin-6 and TNF-alpha, in combination with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, were added to hepatocytes in culture, and the transport of radiolabeled glutamine and alanine was measured. Fluorescent-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis was used to study the effects of dexamethasone on IL-6 receptor number in the well-differentiated human hepatoma HepG2. RESULTS: Both IL-6 and TNF-alpha exerted a small stimulatory effect on alanine and glutamine transport. Dexamethasone alone did not alter transport rates, but pretreatment of cells augmented the effects of both cytokines on carrier-mediated amino acid uptake. Dexamethasone pretreatment and a combination of IL-6 and TNF-alpha resulted in a greater than twofold increase in transport activity. Fluorescent-activated cell sorter analysis demonstrated that dexamethasone induced a threefold increase in the expression of high-affinity IL-6 receptors. CONCLUSIONS: Interleukin-6 and TNF-alpha work coordinately with glucocorticoids to stimulate amino acid uptake in human hepatocytes. Dexamethasone exerts a permissive effect on cytokine-mediated increases in transport by increasing IL

  17. Hepatocytes as Immunological Agents.

    PubMed

    Crispe, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes are targeted for infection by a number of major human pathogens, including hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and malaria. However, hepatocytes are also immunological agents in their own right. In systemic immunity, they are central in the acute-phase response, which floods the circulation with defensive proteins during diverse stresses, including ischemia, physical trauma, and sepsis. Hepatocytes express a variety of innate immune receptors and, when challenged with pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns, can deliver cell-autonomous innate immune responses that may result in host defense or in immunopathology. Important human pathogens have evolved mechanisms to subvert these responses. Finally, hepatocytes talk directly to T cells, resulting in a bias toward immune tolerance. PMID:26685314

  18. Studies on the metabolism of metallothionein and alkaline phosphatase of adult rat primary hepatocyte cultures: role of fetal calf serum and agonists of the phosphoinositide cascade.

    PubMed

    Krämer, K; Markwitan, A; Pallauf, J

    1993-09-01

    Adult rat primary hepatocytes maintained in DMEM/F12 (Ham) media were used as a model system for studying the role of fetal calf serum (FCS) and agonists of the phosphoinositide cascade in the metabolism of metallothionein (MT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Experiments were performed both after a 24 h preincubation with FCS and with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Hepatocytes were treated with dexamethasone (DEX), zinc (Zn) and with the agonists of the phosphoinositide cascade A23187, 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (DiC8), 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), angiotensin II (AT), platelet activating factor (PAF), Arg8-vasopressin (VP) and were analyzed for MT and ALP activity in cell homogenates. Cell viability was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) liberation into culture medium, induction of tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) through DEX and by trypan blue exclusion. Overall, cell viability was improved by the FCS pretreatment and by DEX. Exposure of hepatocytes to the established direct inducers Zn and DEX of MT resulted in a manifold increase in MT, independent of whether the cultures were FCS pretreated or not. The FCS preincubation produced a moderate elevation of ALP activity by stimulating cell viability. However, ALP was unaltered in response to Zn and DEX. None of the experiments conducted with agonists of the phosphoinositide cascade led to an elevation of MT and ALP. Only the incubation of hepatocytes with A23187 resulted in a concentration dependent significant decrease of MT and ALP. This observation was due to a cytotoxic effect of A 23187, displayed by LDH leakage and an increase in the number of cells stained with trypan blue. In conclusion, in primary hepatocyte cultures agonists of the phosphoinositide did not have an effect on the metabolism of MT and ALP. Previous in vivo results indicating alterations of Zn metabolism in liver, therefore seem to be caused by indirect systemic responses. PMID:8237077

  19. Ado-Trastuzumab Emtansine Targets Hepatocytes Via Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 to Induce Hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haoheng; Endo, Yukinori; Shen, Yi; Rotstein, David; Dokmanovic, Milos; Mohan, Nishant; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Gao, Bin; Pacher, Pal; Wu, Wen Jin

    2016-03-01

    Ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) approved for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. It consists of trastuzumab, a humanized mAb directed against HER2, and a microtubule inhibitor, DM1, conjugated to trastuzumab via a thioether linker. Hepatotoxicity is one of the serious adverse events associated with T-DM1 therapy. Mechanisms underlying T-DM1-induced hepatotoxicity remain elusive. Here, we use hepatocytes and mouse models to investigate the mechanisms of T-DM1-induced hepatotoxicity. We show that T-DM1 is internalized upon binding to cell surface HER2 and is colocalized with LAMP1, resulting in DM1-associated cytotoxicity, including disorganized microtubules, nuclear fragmentation/multiple nuclei, and cell growth inhibition. We further demonstrate that T-DM1 treatment significantly increases the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase in mice and induces inflammation and necrosis in liver tissues, and that T-DM1-induced hepatotoxicity is dose dependent. Moreover, the gene expression of TNFα in liver tissues is significantly increased in mice treated with T-DM1 as compared with those treated with trastuzumab or vehicle. We propose that T-DM1-induced upregulation of TNFα enhances the liver injury that may be initially caused by DM1-mediated intracellular damage. Our proposal is underscored by the fact that T-DM1 induces the outer mitochondrial membrane rupture, a typical morphologic change in the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis, and mitochondrial membrane potential dysfunction. Our work provides mechanistic insights into T-DM1-induced hepatotoxicity, which may yield novel strategies to manage liver injury induced by T-DM1 or other ADCs. PMID:26712117

  20. Phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) gene expression is induced by estrogen in human and mouse primary hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Resseguie, Mary; Song, Jiannan; Niculescu, Mihai D.; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Randall, Thomas A.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for humans, though some of the requirement can be met by endogenous synthesis catalyzed by phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT). Premenopausal women are relatively resistant to choline deficiency compared with postmenopausal women and men. Studies in animals suggest that estrogen treatment can increase PEMT activity. In this study we investigated whether the PEMT gene is regulated by estrogen. PEMT transcription was increased in a dose-dependent manner when primary mouse and human hepatocytes were treated with 17-β-estradiol for 24 h. This increased message was associated with an increase in protein expression and enzyme activity. In addition, we report a region that contains a perfect estrogen response element (ERE) ∼7.5 kb from the transcription start site corresponding to transcript variants NM_007169 and NM-008819 of the human and murine PEMT genes, respectively, three imperfect EREs in evolutionarily conserved regions and multiple imperfect EREs in nonconserved regions in the putative promoter regions. We predict that both the mouse and human PEMT genes have three unique transcription start sites, which are indicative of either multiple promoters and/or alternative splicing. This study is the first to explore the underlying mechanism of why dietary requirements for choline vary with estrogen status in humans.—Resseguie, M., Song, J., Niculescu, M. D., da Costa, K., Randall, T. A., Zeisel, S. H. Phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) gene expression is induced by estrogen in human and mouse primary hepatocytes. PMID:17456783

  1. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Catherine C; Hendriks, Delilah F G; Moro, Sabrina M L; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C A; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R; Goldring, Christopher E P; Lauschke, Volker M; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  2. Thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP) of Plasmodium falciparum: expression during sporozoite ontogeny and binding to human hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Robson, K J; Frevert, U; Reckmann, I; Cowan, G; Beier, J; Scragg, I G; Takehara, K; Bishop, D H; Pradel, G; Sinden, R

    1995-01-01

    Plasmodium sporozoites collected from oocysts, haemocoel and salivary glands of the mosquito show profound differences in their biological properties such as motility, ability to induce protective immune response and infectivity for vertebrate host cells. Sporozoites from salivary glands are much more infectious than those from oocysts and haemocoel. Differential expression of proteins, such as the circumsporozoite (CS) protein and the thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP), implicated in sporozoite recognition and entry into hepatocytes may account for the development of infectivity during ontogeny. We have carried out a series of experiments to: (i) analyse the expression and localization of TRAP in P.falciparum sporozoites during development in the mosquito; and (ii) elucidate the biochemical and adhesive properties of recombinant TRAP. Our data indicate that TRAP is not expressed in oocysts, whereas variable amounts of CS protein are found in this parasite developmental stage. Hemocoel sporozoites display the distinct phenotypes TRAP- CS protein+ and TRAP+ CS protein+ at a frequency of 98.5 and 1.5% respectively. Salivary gland sporozoites are all TRAP+ CS protein+. We also provide experimental evidence showing that recombinant TRAP binds to the basolateral cell membrane of hepatocytes in the Disse's space and that sulfated glycoconjugates function as TRAP ligands on human hepatocytes. Images PMID:7664729

  3. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Catherine C.; Hendriks, Delilah F. G.; Moro, Sabrina M. L.; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C. A.; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B. Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Goldring, Christopher E. P.; Lauschke, Volker M.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  4. Inhibition of preS1-hepatocyte interaction by an array of recombinant human antibodies from naturally recovered individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sankhyan, Anurag; Sharma, Chandresh; Dutta, Durgashree; Sharma, Tarang; Chosdol, Kunzang; Wakita, Takaji; Watashi, Koichi; Awasthi, Amit; Acharya, Subrat K.; Khanna, Navin; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Sinha, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies are being found to be increasingly useful in viral infections. In hepatitis B infection, antibodies are proven to be useful for passive prophylaxis. The preS1 region (21–47a.a.) of HBV contains the viral hepatocyte-binding domain crucial for its attachment and infection of hepatocytes. Antibodies against this region are neutralizing and are best suited for immune-based neutralization of HBV, especially in view of their not recognizing decoy particles. Anti-preS1 (21–47a.a.) antibodies are present in serum of spontaneously recovered individuals. We generated a phage-displayed scFv library using circulating lymphocytes from these individuals and selected four preS1-peptide specific scFvs with markedly distinct sequences from this library. All the antibodies recognized the blood-derived and recombinant preS1 containing antigens. Each scFv showed a discrete binding signature, interacting with different amino acids within the preS1-peptide region. Ability to prevent binding of the preS1 protein (N-terminus 60a.a.) to HepG2 cells stably expressing hNTCP (HepG2-hNTCP-C4 cells), the HBV receptor on human hepatocytes was taken as a surrogate marker for neutralizing capacity. These antibodies inhibited preS1-hepatocyte interaction individually and even better in combination. Such a combination of potentially neutralizing recombinant antibodies with defined specificities could be used for preventing/managing HBV infections, including those by possible escape mutants. PMID:26888694

  5. Use of Primary Rat and Human Hepatocyte Sandwich Cultures for Activation of Indirect Carcinogens: Monitoring of DNA Strand Breaks and Gene Mutations in Co-cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Fahrig, R; Rupp, M; Steinkamp-Zucht, A; Bader, A

    1998-08-01

    Loss of cytochrome P-450 content is a common feature in conventional culture systems of primary hepatocytes. In contrast to the standard in vitro situation, in vivo each hepatocyte is exposed to an extracellular matrix (space of Disse) at two opposing basolateral surfaces. This in vivo symmetry has been reconstructed in vitro by culturing rat or human hepatocytes within two layers of collagen, thus forming a sandwich configuration. Activation of dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) or benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) was studied in rat and human hepatocytes. Genotoxic effects were studied in a three-dimensional co-culture model between sandwich hepatocytes and mammalian cells using the comet assay for detection of DNA strand breaks, and the HPRT test for detection of gene mutations. Sandwich hepatocytes generated active metabolites. The maintenance of metabolic properties in hepatocytes was dependent on extracellular matrix geometry. The number of DMBA- or BaP-induced genotoxic effects tended to be higher than in standard S-9 mix assays. While the ability to activate indirect carcinogens disappears within hours in primary hepatocytes, hepatocyte sandwich cultures enhance their ability to activate indirect carcinogens within 1 wk and retain this activity for up to 2 wk. This is the main advantage of the sandwich method over the more simple and conventional assays. While freshly isolated hepatocytes, regardless of whether in sandwich culture or in conventional assays, are injured by the isolation procedure and possess a corresponding reduced activation ability, hepatocytes in sandwich cultures recover over the course of a few days, and acquire a much higher ability to activate indirect carcinogens. Consequently, the indirect carcinogens BaP and DMBA, which were ineffective (BaP) or exhibited only weak effects (DMBA) at a concentration of 160nmol/ml in 1-2-day-old hepatocytes, were clearly effective (BaP) or showed about a threefold increase in genotoxicity (DMBA) in 8-day

  6. Hepatitis C Virus Infection Suppresses the Interferon Response in the Liver of the Human Hepatocyte Chimeric Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Tsuge, Masataka; Fujimoto, Yoshifumi; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Zhang, Yizhou; Ohnishi, Mayu; Kohno, Tomohiko; Abe, Hiromi; Miki, Daiki; Imamura, Michio; Takahashi, Shoichi; Ochi, Hidenori; Hayes, C. Nelson; Miya, Fuyuki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Recent studies indicate that hepatitis C virus (HCV) can modulate the expression of various genes including those involved in interferon signaling, and up-regulation of interferon-stimulated genes by HCV was reported to be strongly associated with treatment outcome. To expand our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying treatment resistance, we analyzed the direct effects of interferon and/or HCV infection under immunodeficient conditions using cDNA microarray analysis of human hepatocyte chimeric mice. Methods Human serum containing HCV genotype 1b was injected into human hepatocyte chimeric mice. IFN-α was administered 8 weeks after inoculation, and 6 hours later human hepatocytes in the mouse livers were collected for microarray analysis. Results HCV infection induced a more than 3-fold change in the expression of 181 genes, especially genes related to Organismal Injury and Abnormalities, such as fibrosis or injury of the liver (P = 5.90E-16 ∼ 3.66E-03). IFN administration induced more than 3-fold up-regulation in the expression of 152 genes. Marked induction was observed in the anti-fibrotic chemokines such as CXCL9, suggesting that IFN treatment might lead not only to HCV eradication but also prevention and repair of liver fibrosis. HCV infection appeared to suppress interferon signaling via significant reduction in interferon-induced gene expression in several genes of the IFN signaling pathway, including Mx1, STAT1, and several members of the CXCL and IFI families (P = 6.0E-12). Genes associated with Antimicrobial Response and Inflammatory Response were also significantly repressed (P = 5.22×10−10 ∼ 1.95×10−2). Conclusions These results provide molecular insights into possible mechanisms used by HCV to evade innate immune responses, as well as novel therapeutic targets and a potential new indication for interferon therapy. PMID:21886832

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of CYP2B6 Expression by Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3β in Human Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linhao; Li, Daochuan; Heyward, Scott; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    CYP2B6 plays an increasingly important role in xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR) have been established as predominant regulators for the inductive expression of CYP2B6 gene in human liver. However, there are dramatic interindividual variabilities in CYP2B6 expression that cannot be fully explained by the CAR/PXR-based modulation alone. Here, we show that expression level of CYP2B6 was correlated with that of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3β (HNF3β) in human primary hepatocytes prepared from 35 liver donors. Utilizing recombinant virus-mediated overexpression or knockdown of HNF3β in HepG2 cells, as well as constructs containing serial deletion and site-directed mutation of HNF3β binding motifs in CYP2B6 luciferase reporter assays, we demonstrated that the presence or lack of HNF3β expression markedly correlated with CYP2B6 gene expression and its promoter activity. Novel enhancer modules of HNF3β located upstream of the CYP2B6 gene transcription start site were identified and functionally validated as key elements governing HNF3β-mediated CYP2B6 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in human primary hepatocytes and surface plasmon resonance binding affinity experiments confirmed the essential role of these enhancers in the recruitment of HNF3β to the promoter of CYP2B6 gene. Overall, these findings indicate that HNF3β represents a new liver enriched transcription factor that is involved in the transcription of CYP2B6 gene and contributes to the large interindividual variations of CYP2B6 expression in human population. PMID:26930610

  8. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Atienzar, Franck A.; Novik, Eric I.; Gerets, Helga H.; Parekh, Amit; Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro; MacDonald, James; Yarmush, Martin L.; Dhalluin, Stéphane

    2014-02-15

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes.

  9. Mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling for the prediction of transporter-mediated disposition in humans from sandwich culture human hepatocyte data.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hannah M; Barton, Hugh A; Lai, Yurong; Bi, Yi-An; Kimoto, Emi; Kempshall, Sarah; Tate, Sonya C; El-Kattan, Ayman; Houston, J Brian; Galetin, Aleksandra; Fenner, Katherine S

    2012-05-01

    With efforts to reduce cytochrome P450-mediated clearance (CL) during the early stages of drug discovery, transporter-mediated CL mechanisms are becoming more prevalent. However, the prediction of plasma concentration-time profiles for such compounds using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is far less established in comparison with that for compounds with passively mediated pharmacokinetics (PK). In this study, we have assessed the predictability of human PK for seven organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) substrates (pravastatin, cerivastatin, bosentan, fluvastatin, rosuvastatin, valsartan, and repaglinide) for which clinical intravenous data were available. In vitro data generated from the sandwich culture human hepatocyte system were simultaneously fit to estimate parameters describing both uptake and biliary efflux. Use of scaled active uptake, passive distribution, and biliary efflux parameters as inputs into a PBPK model resulted in the overprediction of exposure for all seven drugs investigated, with the exception of pravastatin. Therefore, fitting of in vivo data for each individual drug in the dataset was performed to establish empirical scaling factors to accurately capture their plasma concentration-time profiles. Overall, active uptake and biliary efflux were under- and overpredicted, leading to average empirical scaling factors of 58 and 0.061, respectively; passive diffusion required no scaling factor. This study illustrates the mechanistic and model-driven application of in vitro uptake and efflux data for human PK prediction for OATP substrates. A particular advantage is the ability to capture the multiphasic plasma concentration-time profiles for such compounds using only preclinical data. A prediction strategy for novel OATP substrates is discussed. PMID:22344703

  10. Comparative Analysis of Temporal and Dose-Dependent TCDD-Elicited Gene Expression in Human, Mouse, and Rat Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)–elicited time- and dose-dependent differential gene expression was compared in human, mouse, and rat primary hepatocytes. Comprehensive time course (10 nM TCDD or dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle control for 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48h) studies identified 495, 2305, and 711 differentially expressed orthologous genes in human, mouse, and rat hepatocytes, respectively. However, only 16 orthologs were differentially expressed across all three species, with the majority of orthologs exhibiting species-specific expression (399 human, 2097 mouse, and 533 rat), consistent with species-specific expression reported in other in vitro and in vivo comparative studies. TCDD also elicited the dose-dependent induction of 397 human, 100 mouse, and 443 rat genes at 12h and 615 human, 426 mouse, and 314 rat genes at 24h. Comparable EC50 values were obtained for AhR battery genes including Cyp1a1 (0.1 nM human, 0.05 nM mouse, 0.08 nM rat at 24h) and Tiparp (0.97 nM human, 0.63 nM mouse, 0.14 nM rat at 12h). Overrepresented functions and pathways included amino acid metabolism in humans, immune response in mice, and energy homeostasis in rats. Differentially expressed genes functionally associated with lipid transport, processing, and metabolism were overrepresented in all three species but exhibited species-specific expression consistent with the induction of hepatic steatosis in mice but not in rats following a single oral gavage of TCDD. Furthermore, human primary hepatocytes showed lipid accumulation following 48h of treatment with TCDD, suggesting that AhR-mediated steatosis in mice more closely resembles human hepatic fat accumulation compared with that in rats. Collectively, these results suggest that species-specific gene expression profiles mediate the species-specific effects of TCDD despite the conservation of the AhR and its signaling mechanism. PMID:23418086

  11. Long-Term Culture of Genome-Stable Bipotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; van Boxtel, Ruben; Hamer, Karien; Blokzijl, Francis; Verstegen, Monique M.A.; Ellis, Ewa; van Wenum, Martien; Fuchs, Sabine A.; de Ligt, Joep; van de Wetering, Marc; Sasaki, Nobuo; Boers, Susanne J.; Kemperman, Hans; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N.M.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje; Strom, Stephen; Vries, Robert R.G.; van der Laan, Luc J.W.; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro and can be differentiated into functional hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. We now describe conditions allowing long-term expansion of adult bile duct-derived bipotent progenitor cells from human liver. The expanded cells are highly stable at the chromosome and structural level, while single base changes occur at very low rates. The cells can readily be converted into functional hepatocytes in vitro and upon transplantation in vivo. Organoids from α1-antitrypsin deficiency and Alagille syndrome patients mirror the in vivo pathology. Clonal long-term expansion of primary adult liver stem cells opens up experimental avenues for disease modeling, toxicology studies, regenerative medicine, and gene therapy. PMID:25533785

  12. Water-Stable Metal-Organic Framework/Polymer Composites Compatible with Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Megan J; Ware, Brenton R; Lutzke, Alec; Khetani, Salman R; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2016-08-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have demonstrated promise in biomedical applications as vehicles for drug delivery, as well as for the ability of copper-based MOFs to generate nitric oxide (NO) from endogenous S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs). Because NO is a participant in biological processes where it exhibits anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antiplatelet activation properties, it has received significant attention for therapeutic purposes. Previous work has shown that the water-stable MOF H3[(Cu4Cl)3-(BTTri)8] (H3BTTri = 1,3,5-tris(1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)benzene), or CuBTTri, produces NO from RSNOs and can be included within a polymeric matrix to form NO-generating materials. While such materials demonstrate potential, the possibility of MOF degradation leading to copper-related toxicity is a concern that must be addressed prior to adapting these materials for biomedical applications. Herein, we present the first cytotoxicity evaluation of an NO-generating CuBTTri/polymer composite material using 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts and primary human hepatocytes (PHHs). CuBTTri/polymer films were prepared from plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and characterized via PXRD, ATR-FTIR, and SEM-EDX. Additionally, the ability of the CuBTTri/polymer films to enhance NO generation from S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) was evaluated. Enhanced NO generation in the presence of the CuBTTri/polymer films was observed, with an average NO flux (0.90 ± 0.13 nmol cm(-2) min(-1)) within the range associated with antithrombogenic surfaces. The CuBTTri/polymer films were analyzed for stability in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and cell culture media under physiological conditions for a 4 week duration. Cumulative copper release in both cell media (0.84 ± 0.21%) and PBS (0.18 ± 0.01%) accounted for less than 1% of theoretical copper present in the films. In vitro cell studies performed with 3T3-J2 fibroblasts and PHHs did not indicate significant toxicity, providing further

  13. Explanted Diseased Livers – A Possible Source of Metabolic Competent Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Krech, Till; DeTemple, Daphne; Jäger, Mark D.; Lehner, Frank; Manns, Michael P.; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Borlak, Jürgen; Bektas, Hueseyin; Vondran, Florian W. R.

    2014-01-01

    Being an integral part of basic, translational and clinical research, the demand for primary human hepatocytes (PHH) is continuously growing while the availability of tissue resection material for the isolation of metabolically competent PHH remains limited. To overcome current shortcomings, this study evaluated the use of explanted diseased organs from liver transplantation patients as a potential source of PHH. Therefore, PHH were isolated from resected surgical specimens (Rx-group; n = 60) and explanted diseased livers obtained from graft recipients with low labMELD-score (Ex-group; n = 5). Using established protocols PHH were subsequently cultured for a period of 7 days. The viability and metabolic competence of cultured PHH was assessed by the following parameters: morphology and cell count (CyQuant assay), albumin synthesis, urea production, AST-leakage, and phase I and II metabolism. Both groups were compared in terms of cell yield and metabolic function, and results were correlated with clinical parameters of tissue donors. Notably, cellular yields and viabilities were comparable between the Rx- and Ex-group and were 5.3±0.5 and 2.9±0.7×106 cells/g liver tissue with 84.3±1.3 and 76.0±8.6% viability, respectively. Moreover, PHH isolated from the Rx- or Ex-group did not differ in regards to loss of cell number in culture, albumin synthesis, urea production, AST-leakage, and phase I and II metabolism (measured by the 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase and uracil-5′-diphosphate-glucuronyltransferase activity). Likewise, basal transcript expressions of the CYP monooxygenases 1A1, 2C8 and 3A4 were comparable as was their induction when treated with a cocktail that consisted of 3-methylcholantren, rifampicin and phenobarbital, with increased expression of CYP 1A1 and 3A4 mRNA while transcript expression of CYP 2C8 was only marginally changed. In conclusion, the use of explanted diseased livers obtained from recipients with low labMELD-score might

  14. Formation of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites in human liver microsomes, S9 fraction, HepaRG-cells, and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Toni; Rousu, Timo; Mattila, Sampo; Chesné, Christophe; Pelkonen, Olavi; Turpeinen, Miia; Tolonen, Ari

    2015-11-10

    The objective was to compare several in vitro human liver-derived subcellular and cellular incubation systems for the formation of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites. Incubations of pooled human liver microsomes, human liver S9 fractions, HepaRG-cells, and human hepatocytes were performed with glutathione as a trapping agent. Experiments with liver S9 were performed under two conditions, using only NADPH and using a full set of cofactors enabling also conjugative metabolism. Ten structurally different compounds were used as a test set, chosen as either "positive" (ciprofloxacin, clozapine, diclofenac, ethinyl estradiol, pulegone, and ticlopidine) or "negative" (caffeine, citalopram, losartan, montelukast) compounds, based on their known adverse reactions on liver or bone marrow. GSH conjugates were observed for seven of the ten compounds; while no conjugates were observed for caffeine, citalopram, or ciprofloxacin. Hepatocyte and HepaRG assays produced a clearly lower number and lower relative abundance of GSH conjugates compared to assays with microsomes and S9 fractions. The major GSH conjugates were different for many compounds in cellular subfractions and cell-based systems. Hepatocytes generally produced a higher number of GSH conjugates than HepaRG cells, although the differences were minor. The results show that the hepatic enzyme system used for screening of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites do have a high impact on the results, and results between different systems are comparable only qualitatively. PMID:26263063

  15. Primary-like human hepatocytes genetically engineered to obtain proliferation competence display hepatic differentiation characteristics in monolayer and organotypical spheroid cultures.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Natalie; Hansen, Max; Miethbauer, Sebastian; Schmidtke, Kai-Uwe; Anderer, Ursula; Lupp, Amelie; Sperling, Sebastian; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg; Scheibner, Katrin; Küpper, Jan-Heiner

    2016-03-01

    Primary human hepatocytes are in great demand during drug development and in hepatology. However, both scarcity of tissue supply and donor variability of primary cells create a need for the development of alternative hepatocyte systems. By using a lentivirus vector system to transfer coding sequences of Upcyte® proliferation genes, we generated non-transformed stable hepatocyte cultures from human liver tissue samples. Here, we show data on newly generated proliferation-competent HepaFH3 cells investigated as conventional two-dimensional monolayer and as organotypical three-dimensional (3D) spheroid culture. In monolayer culture, HepaFH3 cells show typical cobblestone-like hepatocyte morphology and anchorage-dependent growth for at least 20 passages. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that characteristic hepatocyte marker proteins cytokeratin 8, human serum albumin, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 were expressed. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that expression levels of analyzed phase I CYP enzymes were at similar levels compared to those of cultured primary human hepatocytes and considerably higher than in the liver carcinoma cell line HepG2. Additionally, transcripts for phase II liver enzymes and transporter proteins OATP-C, MRP2, Oct1, and BSEP were present in HepaFH3. The cells produced urea and converted model compounds such as testosterone, diclofenac, and 7-OH-coumarin into phases I and II metabolites. Interestingly, phases I and II enzymes were expressed at about the same levels in convenient monolayer cultures and complex 3D spheroids. In conclusion, HepaFH3 cells and related primary-like hepatocyte lines seem to be promising tools for in vitro research of liver functions and as test system in drug development and toxicology analysis. PMID:26715207

  16. Mechanistic Modeling of Pitavastatin Disposition in Sandwich-Cultured Human Hepatocytes: A Proteomics-Informed Bottom-Up Approach.

    PubMed

    Vildhede, Anna; Mateus, André; Khan, Elin K; Lai, Yurong; Karlgren, Maria; Artursson, Per; Kjellsson, Maria C

    2016-04-01

    Isolated human hepatocytes are commonly used to predict transporter-mediated clearance in vivo. Such predictions, however, do not provide estimations of transporter contributions and consequently do not allow predictions of the outcome resulting from a change in the activity of a certain transporter, for example, by inhibition or a genetic variant with reduced function. Pitavastatin is a drug that is heavily dependent on hepatic transporters for its elimination, and it is excreted mainly as unchanged drug in the bile. For this reason, pitavastatin was used as a model drug to demonstrate the applicability of a bottom-up approach to predict transporter-mediated disposition in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHHs), allowing for the estimation of transporter contributions. Transport experiments in transfected human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293 cell lines) and inverted membrane vesicles overexpressing each of the relevant transport proteins were used to generate parameter estimates for the mechanistic model. By adjusting for differences in transporter abundance between the in vitro systems and individual SCHH batches, the model successfully predicted time profiles of medium and intracellular accumulation. Our predictions of pitavastatin bile accumulation could not be confirmed, however, because of a very low biliary excretion of pitavastatin in relation to the hepatic uptake in our SCHHs. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to successfully simulate transporter-mediated processes in a complex system such as SCHHs at the level of individual transport proteins using a bottom-up approach. PMID:26842596

  17. Prediction of interindividual differences in hepatic functions and drug sensitivity by using human iPS-derived hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Kazuo; Morisaki, Yuta; Kuno, Shuichi; Nagamoto, Yasuhito; Harada, Kazuo; Furukawa, Norihisa; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Imagawa, Kazuo; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Sumazaki, Ryo; Noguchi, Emiko; Nakanishi, Mahito; Hirata, Kazumasa; Kawabata, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Interindividual differences in hepatic metabolism, which are mainly due to genetic polymorphism in its gene, have a large influence on individual drug efficacy and adverse reaction. Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have the potential to predict interindividual differences in drug metabolism capacity and drug response. However, it remains uncertain whether human iPSC-derived HLCs can reproduce the interindividual difference in hepatic metabolism and drug response. We found that cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism capacity and drug responsiveness of the primary human hepatocytes (PHH)-iPS-HLCs were highly correlated with those of PHHs, suggesting that the PHH-iPS-HLCs retained donor-specific CYP metabolism capacity and drug responsiveness. We also demonstrated that the interindividual differences, which are due to the diversity of individual SNPs in the CYP gene, could also be reproduced in PHH-iPS-HLCs. We succeeded in establishing, to our knowledge, the first PHH-iPS-HLC panel that reflects the interindividual differences of hepatic drug-metabolizing capacity and drug responsiveness. PMID:25385620

  18. Improved survival of porcine acute liver failure by a bioartificial liver device implanted with induced human functional hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Yimeng; Yan, Yupeng; Ma, Hucheng; Sun, Lulu; Huang, Pengyu; Ni, Xuan; Zhang, Ludi; Zhao, Xin; Ren, Haozhen; Hu, Dan; Zhou, Yan; Tian, Feng; Ji, Yuan; Cheng, Xin; Pan, Guoyu; Ding, Yi-Tao; Hui, Lijian

    2016-02-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a life-threatening illness. The extracorporeal cell-based bioartificial liver (BAL) system could bridge liver transplantation and facilitate liver regeneration for ALF patients by providing metabolic detoxification and synthetic functions. Previous BAL systems, based on hepatoma cells and non-human hepatocytes, achieved limited clinical advances, largely due to poor hepatic functions, cumbersome preparation or safety concerns of these cells. We previously generated human functional hepatocytes by lineage conversion (hiHeps). Here, by improving functional maturity of hiHeps and producing hiHeps at clinical scales (3 billion cells), we developed a hiHep-based BAL system (hiHep-BAL). In a porcine ALF model, hiHep-BAL treatment restored liver functions, corrected blood levels of ammonia and bilirubin, and prolonged survival. Importantly, human albumin and α-1-antitrypsin were detectable in hiHep-BAL-treated ALF pigs. Moreover, hiHep-BAL treatment led to attenuated liver damage, resolved inflammation and enhanced liver regeneration. Our findings indicate a promising clinical application of the hiHep-BAL system. PMID:26768767

  19. Improved survival of porcine acute liver failure by a bioartificial liver device implanted with induced human functional hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Yimeng; Yan, Yupeng; Ma, Hucheng; Sun, Lulu; Huang, Pengyu; Ni, Xuan; Zhang, Ludi; Zhao, Xin; Ren, Haozhen; Hu, Dan; Zhou, Yan; Tian, Feng; Ji, Yuan; Cheng, Xin; Pan, Guoyu; Ding, Yi-Tao; Hui, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a life-threatening illness. The extracorporeal cell-based bioartificial liver (BAL) system could bridge liver transplantation and facilitate liver regeneration for ALF patients by providing metabolic detoxification and synthetic functions. Previous BAL systems, based on hepatoma cells and non-human hepatocytes, achieved limited clinical advances, largely due to poor hepatic functions, cumbersome preparation or safety concerns of these cells. We previously generated human functional hepatocytes by lineage conversion (hiHeps). Here, by improving functional maturity of hiHeps and producing hiHeps at clinical scales (3 billion cells), we developed a hiHep-based BAL system (hiHep-BAL). In a porcine ALF model, hiHep-BAL treatment restored liver functions, corrected blood levels of ammonia and bilirubin, and prolonged survival. Importantly, human albumin and α-1-antitrypsin were detectable in hiHep-BAL-treated ALF pigs. Moreover, hiHep-BAL treatment led to attenuated liver damage, resolved inflammation and enhanced liver regeneration. Our findings indicate a promising clinical application of the hiHep-BAL system. PMID:26768767

  20. Comparative Localization and Functional Activity of the Main Hepatobiliary Transporters in HepaRG Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bachour-El Azzi, Pamela; Sharanek, Ahmad; Burban, Audrey; Li, Ruoya; Guével, Rémy Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Stieger, Bruno; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2015-05-01

    The role of hepatobiliary transporters in drug-induced liver injury remains poorly understood. Various in vivo and in vitro biological approaches are currently used for studying hepatic transporters; however, appropriate localization and functional activity of these transporters are essential for normal biliary flow and drug transport. Human hepatocytes (HHs) are considered as the most suitable in vitro cell model but erratic availability and inter-donor functional variations limit their use. In this work, we aimed to compare localization of influx and efflux transporters and their functional activity in differentiated human HepaRG hepatocytes with fresh HHs in conventional (CCHH) and sandwich (SCHH) cultures. All tested influx and efflux transporters were correctly localized to canalicular [bile salt export pump (BSEP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), and MDR3] or basolateral [Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) and MRP3] membrane domains and were functional in all models. Contrary to other transporters, NTCP and BSEP were less abundant and active in HepaRG cells, cellular uptake of taurocholate was 2.2- and 1.4-fold and bile excretion index 2.8- and 2.6-fold lower, than in SCHHs and CCHHs, respectively. However, when taurocholate canalicular efflux was evaluated in standard and divalent cation-free conditions in buffers or cell lysates, the difference between the three models did not exceed 9.3%. Interestingly, cell imaging showed higher bile canaliculi contraction/relaxation activity in HepaRG hepatocytes and larger bile canaliculi networks in SCHHs. Altogether, our results bring new insights in mechanisms involved in bile acids accumulation and excretion in HHs and suggest that HepaRG cells represent a suitable model for studying hepatobiliary transporters and drug-induced cholestasis. PMID:25690737

  1. Development of an in vitro high content imaging assay for quantitative assessment of CAR-dependent mouse, rat, and human primary hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Soldatow, Valerie; Peffer, Richard C; Trask, O Joseph; Cowie, David E; Andersen, Melvin E; LeCluyse, Edward; Deisenroth, Chad

    2016-10-01

    Rodent liver tumors promoted by constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation are known to be mediated by key events that include CAR-dependent gene expression and hepatocellular proliferation. Here, an in vitro high content imaging based assay was developed for quantitative assessment of nascent DNA synthesis in primary hepatocyte cultures from mouse, rat, and human species. Detection of DNA synthesis was performed using direct DNA labeling with the nucleoside analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The assay was multiplexed to enable direct quantitation of DNA synthesis, cytotoxicity, and cell count endpoints. An optimized defined medium cocktail was developed to sensitize hepatocytes to cell cycle progression. The baseline EdU response to defined medium was greatest for mouse, followed by rat, and then human. Hepatocytes from all three species demonstrated CAR activation in response to the CAR agonists TCPOBOP, CITCO, and phenobarbital based on increased gene expression for Cyp2b isoforms. When evaluated for a proliferation phenotype, TCPOBOP and CITCO exhibited significant dose-dependent increases in frequency of EdU labeling in mouse and rat hepatocytes that was not observed in hepatocytes from three human donors. The observed species differences are consistent with CAR activators inducing a proliferative response in rodents, a key event in the liver tumor mode of action that is not observed in humans. PMID:27530964

  2. Retroviral insertional mutagenesis in telomerase-immortalized hepatocytes identifies RIPK4 as novel tumor suppressor in human hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heim, D; Cornils, K; Schulze, K; Fehse, B; Lohse, A W; Brümmendorf, T H; Wege, H

    2015-01-15

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep process involving alterations in various cellular pathways. The critical genetic events driving the evolution of primary liver cancer, specifically hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), are still poorly understood. However, telomere stabilization is acknowledged as prerequisite for cancer progression in humans. In this project, human fetal hepatocytes were utilized as a cell culture model for untransformed, proliferating human liver cells, with telomerase activation as first oncogenic hit. To elucidate critical downstream genetic events driving further transformation of immortalized liver cells, we used retroviral insertional mutagenesis as an unbiased approach to induce genetic alterations. Following isolation of hyperproliferating, provirus-bearing cell clones, we monitored cancer-associated growth properties and characterized changes toward a malignant phenotype. Three transformed clones with the ability to form colonies in soft agar were expanded. As proof-of-principle for our experimental setup, we identified a transforming insertion on chromosome 8 within the pleiomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1), resulting in a 20-fold increase in PLAG1 expression. Upregulation of PLAG1 has already been described to promote human hepatoblastoma development. In a separate clone, a transforming insertion was detected in close proximity to the receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase 4 (RIPK4) with an approximately eightfold suppression in RIPK4 expression. As validation for this currently unknown driver in hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined RIPK4 expression in human HCC samples and confirmed a significant suppression of RIPK4 in 80% of the samples. Furthermore, overexpression of RIPK4 in transformed human fetal hepatocytes resulted in an almost complete elimination of anchorage-independent growth. On the basis of these data, we propose RIPK4 as a novel putative tumor suppressor in human hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:24413083

  3. Effects of chloro-s-triazine herbicides and metabolites on aromatase activity in various human cell lines and on vitellogenin production in male carp hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, J T; Letcher, R J; Heneweer, M; Giesy, J P; van den Berg, M

    2001-01-01

    We investigated a potential mechanism for the estrogenic properties of three chloro-s-triazine herbicides and six metabolites in vitro in several cell systems. We determined effects on human aromatase (CYP19), the enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens, in H295R (adrenocortical carcinoma), JEG-3 (placental choriocarcinoma), and MCF-7 (breast cancer) cells; we determined effects on estrogen receptor-mediated induction of vitellogenin in primary hepatocyte cultures of adult male carp (Cyprinus carpio). In addition to atrazine, simazine, and propazine, two metabolites--atrazine-desethyl and atrazine-desisopropyl--induced aromatase activity in H295R cells concentration-dependently (0.3-30 microM) and with potencies similar to those of the parent triazines. After a 24-hr exposure to 30 microM of the triazines, an apparent maximum induction of about 2- to 2.5-fold was achieved. The induction responses were confirmed by similar increases in CYP19 mRNA levels, determined by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. In JEG-3 cells, where basal aromatase expression is about 15-fold greater than in H295R cells, the induction responses were similar but less pronounced; aromatase expression in MCF-7 cells was neither detectable nor inducible under our culture conditions. The fully dealkylated metabolite atrazine-desethyl-desisopropyl and the three hydroxylated metabolites (2-OH-atrazine-desethyl, -desisopropyl, and -desethyl-desisopropyl) did not induce aromatase activity. None of the triazine herbicides nor their metabolites induced vitellogenin production in male carp hepatocytes; nor did they antagonize the induction of vitellogenin by 100 nM (EC(50) 17beta-estradiol. These findings together with other reports indicate that the estrogenic effects associated with the triazine herbicides in vivo are not estrogen receptor-mediated, but may be explained partly by their ability to induce aromatase in vitro. PMID:11675267

  4. Similarities and Differences in the Expression of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes between Human Hepatic Cell Lines and Primary Human HepatocytesS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lei; Dial, Stacey; Shi, Leming; Branham, William; Liu, Jie; Fang, Jia-Long; Green, Bridgett; Deng, Helen; Kaput, Jim

    2011-01-01

    In addition to primary human hepatocytes, hepatoma cell lines, and transfected nonhepatoma, hepatic cell lines have been used for pharmacological and toxicological studies. However, a systematic evaluation and a general report of the gene expression spectra of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs) in these in vitro systems are not currently available. To fill this information gap and to provide references for future studies, we systematically characterized the basal gene expression profiles of 251 drug-metabolizing enzymes in untreated primary human hepatocytes from six donors, four commonly used hepatoma cell lines (HepG2, Huh7, SK-Hep-1, and Hep3B), and one transfected human liver epithelial cell line. A large variation in DMET expression spectra was observed between hepatic cell lines and primary hepatocytes, with the complete absence or much lower abundance of certain DMETs in hepatic cell lines. Furthermore, the basal DMET expression spectra of five hepatic cell lines are summarized, providing references for researchers to choose carefully appropriate in vitro models for their studies of drug metabolism and toxicity, especially for studies with drugs in which toxicities are mediated through the formation of reactive metabolites. PMID:21149542

  5. Efavirenz and 8-hydroxyefavirenz induce cell death via a JNK- and BimEL-dependent mechanism in primary human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bumpus, Namandje N.

    2011-12-15

    Chronic use of efavirenz (EFV) has been linked to incidences of hepatotoxicity in patients receiving EFV to treat HIV-1. While recent studies have demonstrated that EFV stimulates hepatic cell death a role for the metabolites of efavirenz in this process has yet to be examined. In the present study, incubation of primary human hepatocytes with synthetic 8-hydroxyEFV (8-OHEFV), which is the primary metabolite of EFV, resulted in cell death, caspase-3 activation and reactive oxygen species formation. The metabolite exerted these effects at earlier time points and using lower concentrations than were required for the parent compound. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of EFV using 1-aminobenzotriazole markedly decreased reactive oxygen species formation and cell death. Treatment of primary human hepatocytes with EFV and 8-OHEFV also stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as well as phosphorylation of the JNK substrate c-Jun. Further, the mRNA and protein expression of an isoform of Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) denoted as BimEL, which is proapoptotic and has been shown to be modulated by JNK, was increased. Inhibition of JNK using SP600125 prevented the EFV- and 8-OHEFV-mediated cell death. Silencing of Bim using siRNA transfected into hepatocytes also prevented cell death resulting from 8-OHEFV-treatment. These data suggest that the oxidative metabolite 8-OHEFV is a more potent inducer of hepatic cell death than the parent compound EFV. Further, activation of the JNK signaling pathway and BimEL mRNA expression appear to be required for EFV- and 8-OHEFV-mediated hepatocyte death. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 8-Hydroxyefavirenz is a more potent stimulator of cell death than efavirenz. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efavirenz and 8-hydroxyefavirenz increase JNK activity and BimEL mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK and Bim are required for efavirenz- and 8

  6. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression in primary cultures of human hepatocytes modulated by ToxCast chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rotroff, Daniel M; Beam, Andrew L; Dix, David J; Farmer, Adam; Freeman, Kimberly M; Houck, Keith A; Judson, Richard S; LeCluyse, Edward L; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Ferguson, Stephen S

    2010-02-01

    Primary human hepatocyte cultures are useful in vitro model systems of human liver because when cultured under appropriate conditions the hepatocytes retain liver-like functionality such as metabolism, transport, and cell signaling. This model system was used to characterize the concentration- and time-response of the 320 ToxCast chemicals for changes in expression of genes regulated by nuclear receptors. Fourteen gene targets were monitored in quantitative nuclease protection assays: six representative cytochromes P-450, four hepatic transporters, three Phase II conjugating enzymes, and one endogenous metabolism gene involved in cholesterol synthesis. These gene targets are sentinels of five major signaling pathways: AhR, CAR, PXR, FXR, and PPARalpha. Besides gene expression, the relative potency and efficacy for these chemicals to modulate cellular health and enzymatic activity were assessed. Results demonstrated that the culture system was an effective model of chemical-induced responses by prototypical inducers such as phenobarbital and rifampicin. Gene expression results identified various ToxCast chemicals that were potent or efficacious inducers of one or more of the 14 genes, and by inference the 5 nuclear receptor signaling pathways. Significant relative risk associations with rodent in vivo chronic toxicity effects are reported for the five major receptor pathways. These gene expression data are being incorporated into the larger ToxCast predictive modeling effort. PMID:20574906

  7. Metabolite profiling of RCS-4, a novel synthetic cannabinoid designer drug, using human hepatocyte metabolism and TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Adarsh S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2009, scheduling legislation of synthetic cannabinoids prompted new compound emergence to circumvent legal restrictions. 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-indol-3-yl)methanone (RCS-4) is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist sold in herbal smoking blends. Absence of parent synthetic cannabinoids in urine suggests the importance of metabolite identification for detecting RCS-4 consumption in clinical and forensic investigations. Materials & methods & Results With 1 h human hepatocyte incubation and TOF high-resolution MS, we identified 18 RCS-4 metabolites, many not yet reported. Most metabolites were hydroxylated with or without demethylation, carboxylation and dealkylation followed by glucuronidation. One additional sulfated metabolite was also observed. O-demethylation was the most common biotransformation and generated the major metabolite. Conclusion For the first time, we present a metabolic scheme of RCS-4 obtained from human hepatocytes, including Phase I and II metabolites. Metabolite structural information and associated high-resolution mass spectra can be employed for developing clinical and forensic laboratory RCS-4 urine screening methods. PMID:25046048

  8. Fluid shear stress modulation of hepatocyte-like cell function.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Hassan; Alhaque, Sharmin; Szkolnicka, Dagmara; Flint, Oliver; Hay, David C

    2016-07-01

    Freshly isolated human adult hepatocytes are considered to be the gold standard tool for in vitro studies. However, primary hepatocyte scarcity, cell cycle arrest and the rapid loss of cell phenotype limit their widespread deployment. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells provide renewable sources of hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Despite the use of various differentiation methodologies, HLCs like primary human hepatocytes exhibit unstable phenotype in culture. It has been shown that the functional capacity can be improved by adding back elements of human physiology, such as cell co-culture or through the use of natural and/or synthetic surfaces. In this study, the effect of fluid shear stress on HLC performance was investigated. We studied two important liver functions, cytochrome P450 drug metabolism and serum protein secretion, in static cultures and those exposed to fluid shear stress. Our study demonstrates that fluid shear stress improved Cyp1A2 activity by approximately fivefold. This was paralleled by an approximate ninefold increase in sensitivity to a drug, primarily metabolised by Cyp2D6. In addition to metabolic capacity, fluid shear stress also improved hepatocyte phenotype with an approximate fourfold reduction in the secretion of a foetal marker, alpha-fetoprotein. We believe these studies highlight the importance of introducing physiologic cues in cell-based models to improve somatic cell phenotype. PMID:26979076

  9. Direct induction of hepatocyte-like cells from immortalized human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by overexpression of HNF4α.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaojun; Xie, Peiyi; Li, Weiqiang; Li, Zhengran; Shan, Hong

    2016-09-16

    Hepatocytes from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) are expected to be a useful source for cell transplantation. However, relatively low efficiency and repeatability of hepatic differentiation of human BM-MSCs remains an obstacle for clinical translation. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α), a critical transcription factor, plays an essential role in the entire process of liver development. In this study, immortalized hBM-MSCs, UE7T-13 cells were transduced with a lentiviral vector containing HNF4α. The typical fibroblast-like morphology of the MSCs changed, and polygonal, epithelioid cells grew out after HNF4α transduction. In hepatocyte culture medium, HNF4α-transduced MSCs (E7-hHNF4α cells) strongly expressed the albumin (ALB), CYP2B6, alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), and FOXA2 mRNA and exhibited morphology markedly similar to that of mature hepatocytes. The E7-hHNF4α cells showed hepatic functions such as Indocyanine green (ICG) uptake and release, glycogen storage, urea production and ALB secretion. Approximately 28% of E7-hHNF4α cells expressed both ALB and AAT. Furthermore, these E7-hHNF4α cells via superior mesenteric vein (SMV) injection expressed human ALB in mouse chronic injured liver. In conclusion, this study represents a novel strategy by directly inducing hepatocyte-like cells from MSCs. PMID:27501760

  10. Protocol for Isolation of Primary Human Hepatocytes and Corresponding Major Populations of Non-parenchymal Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Victoria; Deharde, Daniela; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Zeilinger, Katrin; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Beside parenchymal hepatocytes, the liver consists of non-parenchymal cells (NPC) namely Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC) and hepatic Stellate cells (HSC). Two-dimensional (2D) culture of primary human hepatocyte (PHH) is still considered as the "gold standard" for in vitro testing of drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. It is well-known that the 2D monoculture of PHH suffers from dedifferentiation and loss of function. Recently it was shown that hepatic NPC play a central role in liver (patho-) physiology and the maintenance of PHH functions. Current research focuses on the reconstruction of in vivo tissue architecture by 3D- and co-culture models to overcome the limitations of 2D monocultures. Previously we published a method to isolate human liver cells and investigated the suitability of these cells for their use in cell cultures in Experimental Biology and Medicine(1). Based on the broad interest in this technique the aim of this article was to provide a more detailed protocol for the liver cell isolation process including a video, which will allow an easy reproduction of this technique. Human liver cells were isolated from human liver tissue samples of surgical interventions by a two-step EGTA/collagenase P perfusion technique. PHH were separated from the NPC by an initial centrifugation at 50 x g. Density gradient centrifugation steps were used for removal of dead cells. Individual liver cell populations were isolated from the enriched NPC fraction using specific cell properties and cell sorting procedures. Beside the PHH isolation we were able to separate KC, LEC and HSC for further cultivation. Taken together, the presented protocol allows the isolation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from one donor tissue sample. The access to purified liver cell populations could allow the creation of in vivo like human liver models. PMID:27077489

  11. Expression and characterization of biologically active human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by insect cells infected with HGF-recombinant baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Yee, C J; DeFrances, M C; Bell, A; Bowen, W; Petersen, B; Michalopoulos, G K; Zarnegar, R

    1993-08-10

    A cDNA containing the entire coding sequence of human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) [also known as scatter factor (SF)] was inserted into the genome of Autographa california nuclear polyhedrosis virus (baculovirus) adjacent to the polyhedrin promoter by homologous recombination. Insect cells (Spodoptera frugiperda) infected with the recombinant virus secrete relatively high levels (3-8 mg/L) of biologically active HGF into the culture medium. The recombinant HGF induces pronounced morphological changes and scattering of primary cultures of rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes within 24 h after plating and stimulates DNA synthesis in these cells with the same magnitude as native HGF derived from human placenta or rabbit serum. The human recombinant HGF produced by the insect cells is N-glycosylated, binds to heparin like native HGF, and is recognized by polyclonal antiserums raised against human or rabbit HGF as assessed by immunoblot, ELISA, and immunoneutralization experiments. Metabolic radiolabeling with L-[35S]methionine (pulse-chase experiments) as well as Western blot analysis indicates that the recombinant HGF is synthesized and secreted by the infected insect cells as the unprocessed single-chain form (pro-HGF) when the cells are cultured in serum-free medium. However, when the infected insect cells are cultured in insect culture medium (Grace's medium) containing fetal bovine serum, the secreted HGF is present mainly in the mature heterodimeric form. Addition of serum to the baculovirus-expressed single-chain [125I]HGF in a cell-free system results in conversion to the heterodimeric two-chain form, and the activation is prevented by the serine protease inhibitor PMSF. Incubation of 125I-labeled pro-HGF with rat liver or spleen extracts resulted in conversion of pro-HGF to the heterodimeric two-chain form. A truncated form of HGF containing the N-terminal portion of HGF (kringles 1-3) was also produced in the same expression system. This deleted HGF, by

  12. A novel matrix for the short-term storage of cells: utility in drug metabolism and drug transporter studies with rat, dog and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Palmgren, Anna-Pia; Fihn, Britt-Marie; Bird, James; Courtney, Paul; Grime, Ken

    2013-06-01

    1. The SureTran matrix is a novel method facilitating short-term maintenance of fresh primary hepatocyte cellular function and offers the potential use of primary cells "as fresh" for several days post isolation. In the study presented, the maintenance of several key phase I and II drug metabolizing enzyme and drug transporter activities is demonstrated with rat and dog hepatocytes preserved for up to 7 days after cell isolation. 2. Intrinsic clearance values were determined for 60 new chemical entities using rat hepatocytes freshly isolated at AstraZeneca and rat hepatocytes prepared at the facilities of Abcellute Ltd (SureTran purveyors), stored and incubated 24 hours after isolation. A very good correspondence in the intrinsic clearance values underlines the utility of the cell maintenance matrix. 3. For human hepatocytes many of the enzyme activities assayed were well maintained for 7 days of storage but some declined to below 50% of initial values between day 4 and 7 of storage. Human OATP1B1 activity was only determined with one batch and declined to 51% of the initial test value by day 4 and further down to 35% by day 7. PMID:23137276

  13. Activation of the Nrf2 Pathway by Inorganic Arsenic in Human Hepatocytes and the Role of Transcriptional Repressor Bach1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Duan, Xiaoxu; Dong, Dandan; Bai, Caijun; Li, Xin; Sun, Guifan; Li, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have proved that the environmental toxicant, inorganic arsenic, activates nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in many different cell types. This study tried to explore the hepatic Nrf2 pathway upon arsenic treatment comprehensively, since liver is one of the major target organs of arsenical toxicity. Our results showed that inorganic arsenic significantly induced Nrf2 protein and mRNA expression in Chang human hepatocytes. We also observed a dose-dependent increase of antioxidant response element- (ARE-) luciferase activity. Both the mRNA and protein levels of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were all upregulated dramatically. On the other hand, entry and accumulation of Nrf2 protein in the nucleus, while exportting the transcriptional repressor BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) from nucleus to cytoplasm, were also confirmed by western blot and immunofluorescence assay. Our results therefore confirmed the arsenic-induced Nrf2 pathway activation in hepatocytes and also suggested that the translocation of Bach1 was associated with the regulation of Nrf2 pathway by arsenic. Hepatic Nrf2 pathway plays indispensable roles for cellular defenses against arsenic hepatotoxicity, and the interplay of Bach1 and Nrf2 may be helpful to understand the self-defensive responses and the diverse biological effects of arsenicals. PMID:23738048

  14. Automated detection of hepatotoxic compounds in human hepatocytes using HepaRG cells and image-based analysis of mitochondrial dysfunction with JC-1 dye

    SciTech Connect

    Pernelle, K.; Le Guevel, R.; Glaise, D.; Stasio, C. Gaucher-Di; Le Charpentier, T.; Bouaita, B.; Corlu, A.; Guguen-Guillouzo, C.

    2011-08-01

    In this study, our goal was to develop an efficient in situ test adapted to screen hepatotoxicity of various chemicals, a process which remains challenging during the early phase of drug development. The test was based on functional human hepatocytes using the HepaRG cell line, and automation of quantitative fluorescence microscopy coupled with automated imaging analysis. Differentiated HepaRG cells express most of the specific liver functions at levels close to those found in primary human hepatocytes, including detoxifying enzymes and drug transporters. A triparametric analysis was first used to evaluate hepatocyte purity and differentiation status, mainly detoxication capacity of cells before toxicity testing. We demonstrated that culturing HepaRG cells at high density maintained high hepatocyte purity and differentiation level. Moreover, evidence was found that isolating hepatocytes from 2-week-old confluent cultures limited variations associated with an ageing process occurring over time in confluent cells. Then, we designed a toxicity test based on detection of early mitochondrial depolarisation associated with permeability transition (MPT) pore opening, using JC-1 as a metachromatic fluorescent dye. Maximal dye dimerization that would have been strongly hampered by efficient efflux due to the active, multidrug-resistant (MDR) pump was overcome by coupling JC-1 with the MDR inhibitor verapamil. Specificity of this test was demonstrated and its usefulness appeared directly dependent on conditions supporting hepatic cell competence. This new hepatotoxicity test adapted to automated, image-based detection should be useful to evaluate the early MPT event common to cell apoptosis and necrosis and simultaneously to detect involvement of the multidrug resistant pump with target drugs in a human hepatocyte environment. - Highlights: > We define conditions to preserve differentiation of selective pure HepaRG hepatocyte cultures. > In these conditions, CYPs

  15. Hepatocyte Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, Ragai R; Hughes, Robin D; Dhawan, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation (HTx) has been developed for use in liver-based metabolic disorders and in acute liver failure. Worldwide, there are around 80 patients that have been transplanted with hepatocytes. Almost all reported studies prove feasibility and safety of the procedure with short- to medium-term success. Availability of good quality hepatocytes (HCs) is the main limiting factor, and therefore alternative sources of cells such as stem cells are being investigated. Other limiting factors include cell engraftment, survival, and function of transplanted cells. It remains to be seen if progress in HTx research can overcome these hurdles leading to the wider use of the technique as an alternative to liver transplantation in the future. PMID:25755322

  16. Hepatocyte cell therapy in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, David Christopher; Newsome, Philip N

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Liver transplantation remains the only proven treatment for end-stage liver failure but is limited by the availability of donor organs. Hepatocyte cell therapy, either with bioartificial liver devices or hepatocyte transplantation, may help address this by delaying or preventing liver transplantation. Early clinical studies have shown promising results, however in most cases, the benefit has been short lived and so further research into these therapies is required. Alternative sources of hepatocytes, including stem cell-derived hepatocytes, are being investigated as the isolation of primary human hepatocytes is limited by the same shortage of donor organs. This review summarises the current clinical experience of hepatocyte cell therapy together with an overview of possible alternative sources of hepatocytes. Current and future areas for research that might lead towards the realisation of the full potential of hepatocyte cell therapy are discussed. PMID:26212798

  17. Inhibition of bile salt transport by drugs associated with liver injury in primary hepatocytes from human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; He, Kan; Cai, Lining; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Qin; Woolf, Thomas F; Ge, Weigong; Guo, Lei; Borlak, Jürgen; Tong, Weida

    2016-08-01

    Interference of bile salt transport is one of the underlying mechanisms for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). We developed a novel bile salt transport activity assay involving in situ biosynthesis of bile salts from their precursors in primary human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse hepatocytes in suspension as well as LC-MS/MS determination of extracellular bile salts transported out of hepatocytes. Glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids were rapidly formed in hepatocytes and effectively transported into the extracellular medium. The bile salt formation and transport activities were time‒ and bile-acid-concentration‒dependent in primary human hepatocytes. The transport activity was inhibited by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibitors ketoconazole, saquinavir, cyclosporine, and troglitazone. The assay was used to test 86 drugs for their potential to inhibit bile salt transport activity in human hepatocytes, which included 35 drugs associated with severe DILI (sDILI) and 51 with non-severe DILI (non-sDILI). Approximately 60% of the sDILI drugs showed potent inhibition (with IC50 values <50 μM), but only about 20% of the non-sDILI drugs showed this strength of inhibition in primary human hepatocytes and these drugs are associated only with cholestatic and mixed hepatocellular cholestatic (mixed) injuries. The sDILI drugs, which did not show substantial inhibition of bile salt transport activity, are likely to be associated with immune-mediated liver injury. Twenty-four drugs were also tested in monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes. Species differences in potency were observed with mouse being less sensitive than other species to inhibition of bile salt transport. In summary, a novel assay has been developed using hepatocytes in suspension from human and animal species that can be used to assess the potential for drugs and/or drug-derived metabolites to inhibit bile salt transport and/or formation activity. Drugs causing sDILI, except those by immune

  18. Cellular and molecular analyses of hprt mutation in human hepatocyte L02 cells after exposure to carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; He, Jing; Jin, Xiao-Dong; Gong, Li; Li, Sha

    Mutations play an important role in carcinogenesis. The quantitative evaluation of mutation induction by heavy charged particles helps us to delineate the risks of space radiation on astronauts, as well as the risks of heavy ions on patients during tumor therapy. Hprt mutation assay, which has been used as a biological dosimeter, is an ideal gene mutation test in mammalian cells in vitro. In order to provide basic data and evidence for the risk assessment of heavy ions, the relationships between hprt mutation induction and radiation dose in human hepatocyte L02 cells were investigated for highand low-LET carbon ions and X-rays. Moreover, the carbon ion induced hprt mutation spectrum was analyzed. In our study, human hepatocyte L02 cells were irradiated with carbon ions with LET of 30keV/µm and X-rays (0.2keV/µm), respectively. The survival fraction of L02 cells was measured by means of colony-forming assay. The mutation frequency was detected by measuring 6-thioguanine-resistant clones after 10 days of incubation at the presence of 15mg/L 6-TG. To obtain the mutation spectrum, 9 10 mutant cell clones at each dose were randomly selected from the 6-TG containing medium, and were further cultured and analyzed. The deletion patterns of the 9 exons of hprt gene were analyzed with multiplex polymerase chain reactions (multiplex PCR). Our results show that the number of mutants per 106 surviving cells increased with increasing the radiation dose for both the irradiations, and the mutation frequency increased up to 1Gy while reduced with increasing dose further. Partial deletion was the most dominant deletion pattern in the hprt mutant cells, and with the increase of dose, hprt genes tended to have more total deletions and less point deletions. It can be inferred that human hepatocyte L02 cells are more radiosensitive to high-LET carbon ions than to low-LET X-rays, and carbon ions are more effective in inducing hprt mutation in L02 cells. It has been also found that the

  19. Metabolic Rate Constants for Hydroquinone in F344 Rat and Human Liver Isolated Hepatocytes: Application to a PBPK model.

    SciTech Connect

    Poet, Torka S.; Wu, Hong; English, J C.; Corley, Rick A.

    2004-11-15

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is an important industrial chemical that also occurs naturally in foods and in the leaves and bark of a number of plant species. Exposure of laboratory animals to HQ may result in a species-, sex-, and strain-specific nephrotoxicity. The sensitivity of male F344 vs. female F344 and Sprague-Dawley rats or B6C3F1 mice appears to be related to differences in the rates of formation and further metabolism of key nephrotoxic metabolites. Metabolic rate constants for the conversion of HQ through several metabolic steps to the mono-glutathione conjugate and subsequent detoxification via mercapturic acid were measured in suspension cultures of hepatocytes isolated from male F344 rats and humans. An in vitro mathematic kinetic model was used to analyze each metabolic step by simultaneously fitting the disappearance of each substrate and the appearance of subsequent metabolites. An iterative, nested approach was used whereby downstream metabolites were considered first and the model was constrained by the requirement that rate constants determined during analysis of individual metabolic steps must also satisfy the complete, integrated metabolism scheme, including competitive pathways. The results from this study indicated that the overall capacity for metabolism of HQ and its mono-glutathione conjugate is greater in hepatocytes from humans than those isolated from rats, suggesting a greater capacity for detoxification of the glutathione conjugates. Metabolic rate constants were applied to an existing physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the model was used to predict total glutathione metabolites produced in the liver. The results showed that body burdens of these metabolites will be much higher in rats than humans.

  20. Prediction of Drug-Induced Liver Injury in Micropatterned Co-cultures Containing iPSC-Derived Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ware, Brenton R; Berger, Dustin R; Khetani, Salman R

    2015-06-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) are a limited resource for drug screening, their quality for in vitro use can vary considerably across different lots, and a lack of available donor diversity restricts our understanding of how human genetics affect drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-HHs) could provide a complementary tool to PHHs for high-throughput drug screening, and ultimately enable personalized medicine. Here, we hypothesized that previously developed iPSC-HH-based micropatterned co-cultures (iMPCCs) with murine embryonic fibroblasts could be amenable to long-term drug toxicity assessment. iMPCCs, created in industry-standard 96-well plates, were treated for 6 days with a set of 47 drugs, and multiple functional endpoints (albumin, urea, ATP) were evaluated in dosed cultures against vehicle-only controls to enable binary toxicity decisions. We found that iMPCCs correctly classified 24 of 37 hepatotoxic drugs (65% sensitivity), while all 10 non-toxic drugs tested were classified as such in iMPCCs (100% specificity). On the other hand, conventional confluent cultures of iPSC-HHs failed to detect several liver toxins that were picked up in iMPCCs. Results for DILI detection in iMPCCs were remarkably similar to published data in PHH-MPCCs (65% versus 70% sensitivity) that were dosed with the same drugs. Furthermore, iMPCCs detected the relative hepatotoxicity of structural drug analogs and recapitulated known mechanisms of acetaminophen toxicity in vitro. In conclusion, iMPCCs could provide a robust tool to screen for DILI potential of large compound libraries in early stages of drug development using an abundant supply of commercially available iPSC-HHs. PMID:25716675

  1. Beta-adrenergic control of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by transmethylation in hepatocytes from juvenile, adult and adrenalectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Cao, D; Alvarez Chiva, V; Mato, J M

    1983-01-01

    Changes in isoprenaline-sensitive phospholipid methyltransferase were studied in hepatocytes isolated from juvenile, mature and adrenalectomized rats. Isoprenaline produced greater stimulation of cyclic AMP accumulation in juvenile and mature adrenalectomized rats than in mature animals. Similarly, isoprenaline stimulated phospholipid methyltransferase in juvenile and mature adrenalectomized rats but had no effect in mature animals. Isoprenaline-mediated activation of phospholipid methyltransferase in adrenalectomized rats was time- and dose-dependent. In hepatocytes isolated from adrenalectomized rats incubated with [Me-3H]methionine or [3H]-ethanolamine the addition of isoprenaline increased the amount of radioactivity incorporated into phosphatidylcholine. The activation by isoprenaline of phospholipid methyltransferase was abolished by the beta-blocker propranolol and by insulin. These results indicate that rat liver the occupation of functional beta-receptors causes a stimulation of phospholipid methylation. It is suggested that, as reported previously, cyclic AMP activates phospholipid methyltransferase. PMID:6320796

  2. Improved Survival and Initiation of Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Hepatocyte-Like Cells upon Culture in William’s E Medium followed by Hepatocyte Differentiation Inducer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte differentiation inducer (HDI) lacks both glucose and arginine, but is supplemented with galactose and ornithine, and is added together with other reagents such as apoptosis inhibitor and oncostatin M. Although human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells initiate hepatocyte differentiation, most die within 7 days. In this study, we investigated both HDI and conventional media for their potential to improve cell survival. Materials and Methods 201B7 iPS cells were cultured in conventional media. This consisted of three cycles of 5-day culture in William’s E (WE) medium, followed by a 2-day culture in HDI. Results Expression levels of α-feto protein (AFP) were higher in cells cultured in WE and in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium/Nutrient F-12 Ham (DF12). 201B7 cells expressed the highest AFP and albumin (ALB) when cultured in HDI for 2 days following 7-day culture in WE. After three cycles of 5-day culture in WE followed by 2 days in HDI, 201B7 cells expressed AFP and ALB 54 ± 2.3 (average ± standard deviation) and 73 ± 15.1 times higher, respectively, than those cultured in ReproFF (feeder-free condition). Conclusion 201B7 cells survived culture in WE for 7 days followed HDI for 2 days. After three cycles of culture under these conditions, hepatocyte differentiation was enhanced, as evidenced by increased AFP and ALB expression. PMID:27073925

  3. Mitochondrial Respiratory Defect Causes Dysfunctional Lactate Turnover via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Activation in Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Im, Ilkyun; Jang, Mi-Jin; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Sang-Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook; Kim, Seyun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2015-12-01

    A defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (DMRC) causes various metabolic disorders in humans. However, the pathophysiology of DMRC in the liver remains unclear. To understand DMRC pathophysiology in vitro, DMRC-induced pluripotent stem cells were generated from dermal fibroblasts of a DMRC patient who had a homoplasmic mutation (m.3398T→C) in the mitochondrion-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MTND1) gene and that differentiated into hepatocytes (DMRC hepatocytes) in vitro. DMRC hepatocytes showed abnormalities in mitochondrial characteristics, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, the glycogen storage level, the lactate turnover rate, and AMPK activity. Intriguingly, low glycogen storage and transcription of lactate turnover-related genes in DMRC hepatocytes were recovered by inhibition of AMPK activity. Thus, AMPK activation led to metabolic changes in terms of glycogen storage and lactate turnover in DMRC hepatocytes. These data demonstrate for the first time that energy depletion may lead to lactic acidosis in the DMRC patient by reduction of lactate uptake via AMPK in liver. PMID:26491018

  4. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: Potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.R. Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA ); Darlington, G. ); Armentano, D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. The authors report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently {gamma}-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  5. Quantitative Nuclease Protection Assays (qNPA) as Windows into Chemical-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultures of Primary Human Hepatocytes (Concentration and Time-Response)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cultures of primary human hepatocytes have been shown to be dynamic in vitro model systems that retain liver-like functionality (e.g. metabolism, transport, induction). We have utilized these culture models to interrogate 309 ToxCast chemicals. The study design characterized both...

  6. Environmental pollutants parathion, paraquat and bisphenol A show distinct effects towards nuclear receptors-mediated induction of xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450 in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vrzal, Radim; Zenata, Ondrej; Doricakova, Aneta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2015-10-01

    Environmental pollutants parathion, bisphenol A and paraquat were not systematically studied towards the effects on the expression of phase I xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450 (CYPs). We monitored their effects on the expression of selected CYPs in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. Moreover, we investigated their effects on the receptors regulating these CYPs, particularly arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by gene reporter assays. We found that parathion and bisphenol A are the activators of AhR. Moreover, they are the inducers of CYP1A1 mRNA in hepatoma cells HepG2 as well as in human hepatocytes by AhR-dependent mechanism via formation of AhR-DNA-binding complex, as revealed by gel shift assay. All three compounds possessed anti-glucocorticoid action as revealed by GR-dependent gene reporter assay and a decline in tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene expression in human hepatocytes. Moreover, parathion and bisphenol A are the activators of PXR and inducers of CYP3A4 mRNA and protein in the primary cultures of human hepatocytes. In conclusion, the studied compounds displayed distinct activities towards nuclear receptors involved in many biological processes and these findings may help us to better understand their adverse actions in pathological states followed after their exposure. PMID:26196221

  7. Transcriptional profiling suggests that Nevirapine and Ritonavir cause drug induced liver injury through distinct mechanisms in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Terelius, Ylva; Figler, Robert A; Marukian, Svetlana; Collado, Maria S; Lawson, Mark J; Mackey, Aaron J; Manka, David; Qualls, Charles W; Blackman, Brett R; Wamhoff, Brian R; Dash, Ajit

    2016-08-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI), a major cause of pre- and post-approval failure, is challenging to predict pre-clinically due to varied underlying direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevirapine, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) and Ritonavir, a protease inhibitor, are antiviral drugs that cause clinical DILI with different phenotypes via different mechanisms. Assessing DILI in vitro in hepatocyte cultures typically requires drug exposures significantly higher than clinical plasma Cmax concentrations, making clinical interpretations of mechanistic pathway changes challenging. We previously described a system that uses liver-derived hemodynamic blood flow and transport parameters to restore primary human hepatocyte biology, and drug responses at concentrations relevant to in vivo or clinical exposure levels. Using this system, primary hepatocytes from 5 human donors were exposed to concentrations approximating clinical therapeutic and supra-therapeutic levels of Nevirapine (11.3 and 175.0 μM) and Ritonavir (3.5 and 62.4 μM) for 48 h. Whole genome transcriptomics was performed by RNAseq along with functional assays for metabolic activity and function. We observed effects at both doses, but a greater number of genes were differentially expressed with higher probability at the toxic concentrations. At the toxic doses, both drugs showed direct cholestatic potential with Nevirapine increasing bile synthesis and Ritonavir inhibiting bile acid transport. Clear differences in antigen presentation were noted, with marked activation of MHC Class I by Nevirapine and suppression by Ritonavir. This suggests CD8+ T cell involvement for Nevirapine and possibly NK Killer cells for Ritonavir. Both compounds induced several drug metabolizing genes (including CYP2B6, CYP3A4 and UGT1A1), mediated by CAR activation in Nevirapine and PXR in Ritonavir. Unlike Ritonavir, Nevirapine did not increase fatty acid synthesis or activate the respiratory electron chain

  8. Nonsterol Isoprenoids Activate Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor in an Isoform-Selective Manner in Primary Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rondini, Elizabeth A; Duniec-Dmuchowski, Zofia; Kocarek, Thomas A

    2016-04-01

    Our laboratory previously reported that accumulation of nonsterol isoprenoids following treatment with the squalene synthase inhibitor, squalestatin 1 (SQ1) markedly induced cytochrome P450 (CYP)2B1 mRNA and reporter activity in primary cultured rat hepatocytes, which was dependent on activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). The objective of the current study was to evaluate whether isoprenoids likewise activate murine CAR (mCAR) or one or more isoforms of human CAR (hCAR) produced by alternative splicing (SPTV, hCAR2; APYLT, hCAR3). We found that SQ1 significantly induced Cyp2b10 mRNA (∼3.5-fold) in primary hepatocytes isolated from both CAR-wild-type and humanized CAR transgenic mice, whereas the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor pravastatin had no effect. In the absence of CAR, basal Cyp2b10 mRNA levels were reduced by 28-fold and the effect of SQ1 on Cyp2b10 induction was attenuated. Cotransfection with an expression plasmid for hCAR1, but not hCAR2 or hCAR3, mediated SQ1-induced CYP2B1 and CYP2B6 reporter activation in hepatocytes isolated from CAR-knockout mice. This effect was also observed following treatment with the isoprenoid trans,trans-farnesol. The direct agonist CITCO increased interaction of hCAR1, hCAR2, and hCAR3 with steroid receptor coactivator-1. However, no significant effect on coactivator recruitment was observed with SQ1, suggesting an indirect activation mechanism. Further results from an in vitro ligand binding assay demonstrated that neither farnesol nor other isoprenoids are direct ligands for hCAR1. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that SQ1 activates CYP2B transcriptional responses through farnesol metabolism in an hCAR1-dependent manner. Further, this effect probably occurs through an indirect mechanism. PMID:26798158

  9. Rifampin Regulation of Drug Transporters Gene Expression and the Association of MicroRNAs in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Eric A.; Eadon, Michael T.; Desta, Zeruesenay; Liu, Yunlong; Lin, Hai; Burgess, Kimberly S.; Segar, Matthew W.; Gaedigk, Andrea; Skaar, Todd C.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane drug transporters contribute to the disposition of many drugs. In human liver, drug transport is controlled by two main superfamilies of transporters, the solute carrier transporters (SLC) and the ATP Binding Cassette transporters (ABC). Altered expression of these transporters due to drug-drug interactions can contribute to differences in drug exposure and possibly effect. In this study, we determined the effect of rifampin on gene expression of hundreds of membrane transporters along with all clinically relevant drug transporters. Methods: In this study, primary human hepatocytes (n = 7 donors) were cultured and treated for 24 h with rifampin and vehicle control. RNA was isolated from the hepatocytes, mRNA expression was measured by RNA-seq, and miRNA expression was analyzed by Taqman OpenArray. The effect of rifampin on the expression of selected transporters was also tested in kidney cell lines. The impact of rifampin on the expression of 410 transporter genes from 19 different transporter gene families was compared with vehicle control. Results: Expression patterns of 12 clinically relevant drug transporter genes were changed by rifampin (FDR < 0.05). For example, the expressions of ABCC2, ABCB1, and ABCC3 were increased 1.9-, 1.7-, and 1.2-fold, respectively. The effects of rifampin on four uptake drug transporters (SLCO1B3, SLC47A1, SLC29A1, SLC22A9) were negatively correlated with the rifampin effects on specific microRNA expression (SLCO1B3/miR-92a, SLC47A1/miR-95, SLC29A1/miR-30d#, and SLC22A9/miR-20; r < −0.79; p < 0.05). Seven hepatic drug transporter genes (SLC22A1, SLC22A5, SLC15A1, SLC29A1, SLCO4C1, ABCC2, and ABCC4), whose expression was altered by rifampin in hepatocytes, were also present in a renal proximal tubular cell line, but in renal cells rifampin did not alter their gene expression. PXR expression was very low in the kidney cells; this may explain why rifampin induces gene expression in a tissue-specific manner. Conclusion

  10. In vitro glucuronidation of 2,2-bis(bromomethyl)-1,3-propanediol by microsomes and hepatocytes from rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Rad, Golriz; Hoehle, Simone I; Kuester, Robert K; Sipes, I Glenn

    2010-06-01

    2,2-Bis(bromomethyl)-1,3-propanediol (BMP) is a brominated flame retardant used in unsaturated polyester resins. In a 2-year bioassay BMP was shown to be a multisite carcinogen in rats and mice. Because glucuronidation is the key metabolic transformation of BMP by rats, in this study the in vitro hepatic glucuronidation of BMP was compared across several species. In addition, the glucuronidation activities of human intestinal microsomes and specific human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes for BMP were determined. To explore other possible routes of metabolism for BMP, studies were conducted with rat and human hepatocytes. Incubation of hepatic microsomes with BMP in the presence of UDP-glucuronic acid resulted in the formation of a BMP monoglucuronide. The order of hepatic microsomal glucuronidation activity of BMP was rats, mice > hamsters > monkeys > humans. The rate of glucuronidation by rat hepatic microsomes was 90-fold greater than that of human hepatic microsomes. Human intestinal microsomes converted BMP to BMP glucuronide at a rate even lower than that of human hepatic microsomes. Among the human UGT enzymes tested, only UGT2B7 had detectable glucuronidation activity for BMP. BMP monoglucuronide was the only metabolite formed when BMP was incubated with suspensions of freshly isolated hepatocytes from male F-344 rats or with cryopreserved human hepatocytes. Glucuronidation of BMP in human hepatocytes was extremely low. Overall, the results support in vivo studies in rats in which BMP glucuronide was the only metabolite found. The poor glucuronidation capacity of humans for BMP suggests that the pharmacokinetic profile of BMP in humans will be dramatically different from that of rodents. PMID:20200232

  11. In Vitro Glucuronidation of 2,2-Bis(bromomethyl)-1,3-propanediol by Microsomes and Hepatocytes from Rats and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Golriz; Hoehle, Simone I.; Kuester, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    2,2-Bis(bromomethyl)-1,3-propanediol (BMP) is a brominated flame retardant used in unsaturated polyester resins. In a 2-year bioassay BMP was shown to be a multisite carcinogen in rats and mice. Because glucuronidation is the key metabolic transformation of BMP by rats, in this study the in vitro hepatic glucuronidation of BMP was compared across several species. In addition, the glucuronidation activities of human intestinal microsomes and specific human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes for BMP were determined. To explore other possible routes of metabolism for BMP, studies were conducted with rat and human hepatocytes. Incubation of hepatic microsomes with BMP in the presence of UDP-glucuronic acid resulted in the formation of a BMP monoglucuronide. The order of hepatic microsomal glucuronidation activity of BMP was rats, mice ≫ hamsters > monkeys ⋙ humans. The rate of glucuronidation by rat hepatic microsomes was 90-fold greater than that of human hepatic microsomes. Human intestinal microsomes converted BMP to BMP glucuronide at a rate even lower than that of human hepatic microsomes. Among the human UGT enzymes tested, only UGT2B7 had detectable glucuronidation activity for BMP. BMP monoglucuronide was the only metabolite formed when BMP was incubated with suspensions of freshly isolated hepatocytes from male F-344 rats or with cryopreserved human hepatocytes. Glucuronidation of BMP in human hepatocytes was extremely low. Overall, the results support in vivo studies in rats in which BMP glucuronide was the only metabolite found. The poor glucuronidation capacity of humans for BMP suggests that the pharmacokinetic profile of BMP in humans will be dramatically different from that of rodents. PMID:20200232

  12. HepatoNet1: a comprehensive metabolic reconstruction of the human hepatocyte for the analysis of liver physiology

    PubMed Central

    Gille, Christoph; Bölling, Christian; Hoppe, Andreas; Bulik, Sascha; Hoffmann, Sabrina; Hübner, Katrin; Karlstädt, Anja; Ganeshan, Ramanan; König, Matthias; Rother, Kristian; Weidlich, Michael; Behre, Jörn; Holzhütter, Herrmann-Georg

    2010-01-01

    We present HepatoNet1, the first reconstruction of a comprehensive metabolic network of the human hepatocyte that is shown to accomplish a large canon of known metabolic liver functions. The network comprises 777 metabolites in six intracellular and two extracellular compartments and 2539 reactions, including 1466 transport reactions. It is based on the manual evaluation of >1500 original scientific research publications to warrant a high-quality evidence-based model. The final network is the result of an iterative process of data compilation and rigorous computational testing of network functionality by means of constraint-based modeling techniques. Taking the hepatic detoxification of ammonia as an example, we show how the availability of nutrients and oxygen may modulate the interplay of various metabolic pathways to allow an efficient response of the liver to perturbations of the homeostasis of blood compounds. PMID:20823849

  13. Differential Response of Human Hepatocyte Chromatin to HDAC Inhibitors as a Function of Microenvironmental Glucose Level.

    PubMed

    Felisbino, Marina Barreto; Alves da Costa, Thiago; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari; Mello, Maria Luiza Silveira

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is a complex multifactorial disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycemia due to impaired insulin secretion. Recent observations suggest that the complexity of the disease cannot be entirely accounted for genetic predisposition and a compelling argument for an epigenetic component is rapidly emerging. The use of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) in clinical setting is an emerging area of investigation. In this study, we have aimed to understand and compare the response of hepatocyte chromatin to valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA) treatments under normoglycemic or hyperglycemic conditions to expand our knowledge about the consequences of HDACi treatment in a diabetes cell model. Under normoglycemic conditions, these treatments promoted chromatin remodeling, as assessed by image analysis and H3K9ac and H3K9me2 abundance. Simultaneously, H3K9ac marks shifted to the nuclear periphery accompanied by HP1 dissociation from the heterochromatin and a G1 cell cycle arrest. More striking changes in the cell cycle progression and mitotic ratios required drastic treatment. Under hyperglycemic conditions, high glucose per se promoted chromatin changes similar to those promoted by VPA and TSA. Nonetheless, these results were not intensified in cells treated with HDACis under hyperglycemic conditions. Despite the absence of morphological changes being promoted, HDACi treatment seems to confer a physiological meaning, ameliorating the cellular hyperglycemic state through reduction of glucose production. These observations allow us to conclude that the glucose level to which the hepatocytes are subjected affects how chromatin responds to HDACi and their action under high-glucose environment might not reflect on chromatin remodeling. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2257-2265, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26888775

  14. Activation of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor Inhibits Gluconeogenesis without Affecting Lipogenesis or Fatty Acid Synthesis in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Caitlin; Pan, Yongmei; Li, Linhao; Heyward, Scott; Moeller, Timothy; Swaan, Peter W.; Wang, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    Objective Accumulating evidence suggests that activation of mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) alleviates type 2 diabetes and obesity by inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis. However, the role of human (h) CAR in energy metabolism is largely unknown. The present study aims to investigate the effects of selective hCAR activators on hepatic energy metabolism in human primary hepatocytes (HPH). Methods Ligand-based structure-activity models were used for virtual screening of the Specs database (www.specs.net) followed by biological validation in cell-based luciferase assays. The effects of two novel hCAR activators (UM104 and UM145) on hepatic energy metabolism were evaluated in HPH. Results Real-time PCR and Western blotting analyses reveal that activation of hCAR by UM104 and UM145 significantly repressed the expression of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, two pivotal gluconeogenic enzymes, while exerting negligible effects on the expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid synthesis. Functional experiments show that UM104 and UM145 markedly inhibit hepatic synthesis of glucose but not triglycerides in HPH. In contrast, activation of mCAR by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, a selective mCAR activator, repressed the expression of genes associated with gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis in mouse primary hepatocytes, which were consistent with previous observations in mouse model in vivo. Conclusion Our findings uncover an important species difference between hCAR and mCAR in hepatic energy metabolism, where hCAR selectively inhibits gluconeogenesis without suppressing fatty acid synthesis. Implications Such species selectivity should be considered when exploring CAR as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. PMID:24878338

  15. An improvement in the attaching capability of cryopreserved human hepatocytes by a proteinaceous high molecule, sericin, in the serum-free solution.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Teramoto, Naozumi; Hayashi, Shuji; Enosawa, Shin

    2010-01-01

    The methodology of cryopreservation of human hepatocytes remains unsatisfactory. Even when the viability of thawed cells is tolerable, the cells often lose the attaching capability to a culture dish, resulting in the cells' inability to survive. Previously, we described the effectiveness of maltose on the attachment of hepatocytes. This article demonstrates that a silk-derived high molecular protein, sericin, improves the cell-attaching capability in the serum-free freezing medium. When human hepatocytes [initial viability: 60.9 ± 3.1% (mean ± SD, n = 3)] were frozen with serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) containing 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the viability was 29.4 ± 3.2% and the cell-attaching capability 20.4 ± 4.1%. On the other hand, DMEM containing 10% DMSO and 1% sericin increased the values to 45.0 ± 0.8% and 26.2 ± 3.2%. Moreover, the addition of 0.1 mol/L maltose to the sericin-containing medium improved to 42.2 ± 3.2% and 51.1 ± 1.0%, as we demonstrated in a previous report. The present results indicated that sericin combined with maltose is a novel additive in the serum-free freezing medium for human hepatocytes. PMID:20525438

  16. Property of hepatitis B virus replication in Tupaia belangeri hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Takahiro; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Murakami, Shuko; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Tateno, Chise; Kohara, Michinori

    2016-01-01

    The northern treeshrew (Tupaia belangeri) has been reported to be an effective candidate for animal infection model with hepatitis B virus (HBV). The objective of our study was to analyze the growth characteristics of HBV in tupaia hepatocytes and the host response to HBV infection. We established primary tupaia hepatocytes (3-6-week old tupaia) and infected them with HBV genotypes A, B and C, and all the genotypes proliferated as well as those in human primary hepatocytes (>10(5) copies/ml in culture supernatant). We next generated a chimeric mouse with tupaia liver by transplantation of tupaia primary hepatocytes to urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA (cDNA-uPA)/severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and the replacement ratio with tupaia hepatocytes was found to be more than 95%. Infection of chimeric mice with HBV (genotypes B, C, and D) resulted in HBV-DNA level of 10(4)-10(6) copies/ml after 8 weeks of infection, which were almost similar to that in humanized chimeric mouse. In contrast, serum HBV level in adult tupaia (1-year-old tupaia) was quite low (<10(3) copies/ml). Understanding the differences in the response to HBV infection in primary tupaia hepatocytes, chimeric mouse, and adult tupaia will contribute to elucidating the mechanism of persistent HBV infection and viral eradication. Thus, T. belangeri was found to be efficient for studying the host response to HBV infection, thereby providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of HBV. PMID:26654952

  17. Metabolic pathways of 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (2C-B): analysis of phase I metabolism with hepatocytes of six species including human.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Helena; Hengstler, Jan G; de Boer, Douwe; Ringel, Michael; Remião, Fernando; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda; dos Reys, Lesseps A; Oesch, Franz; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria

    2005-01-01

    4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (2C-B) is a psychoactive designer drug of abuse that is sold under the street names "Venus", "Bromo", "Erox", "XTC" or "Nexus". Concern has been raised because only little is known about its toxicity and metabolism in humans. In the present study we incubated 2C-B with human, monkey, dog, rabbit, rat and mouse hepatocytes to identify the metabolites formed and to determine possible toxic effects as evidenced by an ATP assay. Our data allow construction of the main metabolic pathways of 2C-B. Oxidative deamination results in the 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-ethanol (BDMPE) and 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenylacetic acid (BDMPAA) metabolites. Additionally, 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid (BDMBA) can be produced also by oxidative deamination. Further metabolism of BDMPE and BDMPAA may occur by demethylation. Alternatively, the later metabolites can be generated by demethylation of 2C-B followed by oxidative deamination. Two remarkable interspecies differences in metabolism of 2C-B were observed (i) a hitherto unknown metabolite, 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxy-phenol (BDMP), was identified after incubation only with mouse hepatocytes; (ii) 2-(4-bromo-2-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)-ethanol (B-2-HMPE) was produced by hepatocytes from human, monkey and rabbit but not by dog, rat and mouse. Comparing the toxic effects of 2C-B between hepatocytes of the six examined species we observed only minor interspecies differences. However, large inter-individual differences in susceptibility of hepatocytes from three human donors were observed. PMID:15590110

  18. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective. PMID:25055961

  19. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  20. Analysis of intracellular reducing levels in human hepatocytes on three-dimensional focusing microchip.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiu; Cai, Longfei

    2014-02-01

    A novel three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic device integrated with high-throughput cell sampling and detection of intracellular contents is presented. It has a pivotal role in maintaining the reducing environment in cells. Intracellular reducing species such as vitamin C and glutathione in normal and tumor cells were labeled by a newly synthesized 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl-based fluorescent probe. Hepatocytes are adherent cells, which are prone to attaching to the channel surface. To avoid the attachment of cells on the channel surface, a single channel microchip with three sheath-flow channels located on both sides of and below the sampling channel was developed. Hydrostatic pressure generated by emptying the sample waste reservoir was used as driving force of fluid on the microchip. Owing to the difference between the liquid levels of the reservoirs, the labeled cells were three-dimensional hydrodynamically focused and transported from the sample reservoir to the sample waste reservoir. Hydrostatic pressure takes advantage of its ease of generation on a microfluidic chip without any external pressure pump, which drives three sheath-flow streams to constrain a sample flow stream into a narrow stream to avoid blockage of the sampling channel by adhered cells. The intracellular reducing levels of HepG2 cells and L02 cells were detected by home-built laser-induced fluorescence detector. The analysis throughput achieved in this microfluidic system was about 59-68 cells/min. PMID:23297173

  1. Data on gene and protein expression changes induced by apabetalone (RVX-208) in ex vivo treated human whole blood and primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wasiak, Sylwia; Gilham, Dean; Tsujikawa, Laura M; Halliday, Christopher; Norek, Karen; Patel, Reena G; McLure, Kevin G; Young, Peter R; Gordon, Allan; Kulikowski, Ewelina; Johansson, Jan; Sweeney, Michael; Wong, Norman C

    2016-09-01

    Apabetalone (RVX-208) inhibits the interaction between epigenetic regulators known as bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins and acetyl-lysine marks on histone tails. Data presented here supports the manuscript published in Atherosclerosis "RVX-208, a BET-inhibitor for Treating Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease, Raises ApoA-I/HDL and Represses Pathways that Contribute to Cardiovascular Disease" (Gilham et al., 2016) [1]. It shows that RVX-208 and a comparator BET inhibitor (BETi) JQ1 increase mRNA expression and production of apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I), the main protein component of high density lipoproteins, in primary human and African green monkey hepatocytes. In addition, reported here are gene expression changes from a microarray-based analysis of human whole blood and of primary human hepatocytes treated with RVX-208. PMID:27570805

  2. Activation of the constitutive androstane receptor inhibits gluconeogenesis without affecting lipogenesis or fatty acid synthesis in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Caitlin; Pan, Yongmei; Li, Linhao; Heyward, Scott; Moeller, Timothy; Swaan, Peter W.; Wang, Hongbing

    2014-08-15

    Objective: Accumulating evidence suggests that activation of mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) alleviates type 2 diabetes and obesity by inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis. However, the role of human (h) CAR in energy metabolism is largely unknown. The present study aims to investigate the effects of selective hCAR activators on hepatic energy metabolism in human primary hepatocytes (HPH). Methods: Ligand-based structure–activity models were used for virtual screening of the Specs database ( (www.specs.net)) followed by biological validation in cell-based luciferase assays. The effects of two novel hCAR activators (UM104 and UM145) on hepatic energy metabolism were evaluated in HPH. Results: Real-time PCR and Western blotting analyses reveal that activation of hCAR by UM104 and UM145 significantly repressed the expression of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, two pivotal gluconeogenic enzymes, while exerting negligible effects on the expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid synthesis. Functional experiments show that UM104 and UM145 markedly inhibit hepatic synthesis of glucose but not triglycerides in HPH. In contrast, activation of mCAR by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, a selective mCAR activator, repressed the expression of genes associated with gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis in mouse primary hepatocytes, which were consistent with previous observations in mouse model in vivo. Conclusion: Our findings uncover an important species difference between hCAR and mCAR in hepatic energy metabolism, where hCAR selectively inhibits gluconeogenesis without suppressing fatty acid synthesis. Implications: Such species selectivity should be considered when exploring CAR as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. - Highlights: • Novel hCAR activators were identified by computational and biological approaches. • The role

  3. Identification of early target genes of aflatoxin B1 in human hepatocytes, inter-individual variability and comparison with other genotoxic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Josse, Rozenn; Dumont, Julie; Fautrel, Alain; Robin, Marie-Anne; Guillouzo, André

    2012-01-15

    Gene expression profiling has recently emerged as a promising approach to identify early target genes and discriminate genotoxic carcinogens from non-genotoxic carcinogens and non-carcinogens. However, early gene changes induced by genotoxic compounds in human liver remain largely unknown. Primary human hepatocytes and differentiated HepaRG cells were exposed to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) that induces DNA damage following enzyme-mediated bioactivation. Gene expression profile changes induced by a 24 h exposure of these hepatocyte models to 0.05 and 0.25 μM AFB1 were analyzed by using oligonucleotide pangenomic microarrays. The main altered signaling pathway was the p53 pathway and related functions such as cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. Direct involvement of the p53 protein in response to AFB1 was verified by using siRNA directed against p53. Among the 83 well-annotated genes commonly modulated in two pools of three human hepatocyte populations and HepaRG cells, several genes were identified as altered by AFB1 for the first time. In addition, a subset of 10 AFB1-altered genes, selected upon basis of their function or tumor suppressor role, was tested in four human hepatocyte populations and in response to other chemicals. Although they exhibited large variable inter-donor fold-changes, several of these genes, particularly FHIT, BCAS3 and SMYD3, were found to be altered by various direct and other indirect genotoxic compounds and unaffected by non-genotoxic compounds. Overall, this comprehensive analysis of early gene expression changes induced by AFB1 in human hepatocytes identified a gene subset that included several genes representing potential biomarkers of genotoxic compounds. -- Highlights: ► Gene expression profile changes induced by aflatoxin B1 in human hepatocytes. ► AFB1 modulates various genes including tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes. ► Important inter-individual variations in the response to AFB1. ► Some genes also altered by other

  4. Involvement of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Khaleque Newaz; Kitajima, Michio; Hiraki, Koichi; Fujishita, Akira; Nakashima, Masahiro; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-02-01

    Adenomyosis is commonly believed to arise from the basalis endometrium. As an estromedin growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exhibits multiple functions in endometriosis, a disease commonly believed to arise from the functionalis endometrium. Here, we investigated the role of HGF in the occurrence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in adenomyosis. Full-thickness-biopsy specimens from endometrium to myometrium were collected after hysterectomy from women with and without adenomyosis. The relationship between HGF and E-cadherin (epithelial cell marker) and N-cadherin (mesenchymal cell markers) was examined at the gene and protein levels using endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) in culture and tissues by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The gene and protein expressions of two transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin, SLUG and SNAIL, were examined using Ishikawa cells and in response to HGF and estrogen (E2). HGF down-regulated E-cadherin and up-regulated N-cadherin mRNA expression in EECs, and an inverse relationship in protein expression between HGF and E-cadherin was observed in basalis endometria derived from women with diffuse and focal adenomyosis. HGF induced morphological changes of EECs from a cobblestone-like appearance to spindle-shaped cells and promoted migration of EECs. Ishikawa cells exhibited up-regulation of SLUG/SNAIL gene expression in response to both HGF and E2 with an additive effect between them. HGF- and E2-promoted SLUG/SNAIL gene expression was significantly abrogated after pretreatment of cells with anti-HGF antibody or ICI 182720, an estrogen receptor antagonist. HGF may be involved in gland invagination deep into the myometrium by inducing EMT at the endo-myometrial junction in women with adenomyosis. PMID:25505196

  5. Insulin inhibits delta-aminolevulinate synthase gene expression in rat hepatocytes and human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Scassa, M E; Varone, C L; Montero, L; Cánepa, E T

    1998-11-01

    Insulin has been known to regulate intracellular metabolism by modifying the activity or location of many enzymes but it is only in the past few years that the regulation of gene expression is recognized to be a major action of this hormone. The present work provides evidences that insulin inhibits delta-aminolevulinate synthase (ALA-S) gene expression, the enzyme which governs the rate-limiting step in heme biosynthesis. The addition of 5 nM insulin to hepatocytes culture led to a significant decrease of both basal and phenobarbital-induced ALA-S mRNA in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by Northern and slot-blot analysis. Several clues as to how insulin regulates ALA-S transcription were determined. The inhibitory effect is achieved at physiological concentrations but much higher proinsulin doses are needed. Insulin's effect is rapid, quite specific, and protein synthesis is not required. Moreover, ALA-S mRNA half-life is not modified by the presence of the peptidic hormone. Our results demonstrate that the insulin effect is dominant; it overrides 8-CPT-cAMP plus phenobarbital-mediated induction. Also, insulin requires the activation of protein kinase C to exert its full effect. On the other hand, a 870-bp fragment of the ALA-S promoter region is able to sustain the inhibition of CAT expression in plasmid-transfected HepG2 cells. Thus, these results indicate that insulin plays an important role in regulating ALA-S expression by inhibiting its transcription. PMID:9806796

  6. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity in human hepatocyte and embryonic kidney cells exposed to ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Rongfa; Kang, Tianshu; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Zhiguo; Shen, Haitao; Liu, Mingqi

    2012-10-01

    Traces of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) used may be found in the liver and kidney. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal viability assay for using with ZnO NPs and to assess their toxicity to human hepatocyte (L02) and human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (MTT assay), and oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were assessed under control and exposed to ZnO NPs conditions for 24 h. The results demonstrated that ZnO NPs lead to cellular morphological modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cause reduction of SOD, depletion of GSH, and oxidative DNA damage. The exact mechanism behind ZnO NPs toxicity suggested that oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation played an important role in ZnO NPs-elicited cell membrane disruption, DNA damage, and subsequent cell death. Our preliminary data suggested that oxidative stress might contribute to ZnO NPs cytotoxicity.

  7. Modulation of aflatoxin B1-mediated genotoxicity in primary cultures of human hepatocytes by diindolylmethane, curcumin, and xanthohumols.

    PubMed

    Gross-Steinmeyer, Kerstin; Stapleton, Patricia L; Tracy, Julia H; Bammler, Theo K; Strom, Stephen C; Buhler, Donald R; Eaton, David L

    2009-12-01

    This study employed cultured human primary hepatocytes to investigate the ability of the putative chemopreventive phytochemicals curcumin (CUR), 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), isoxanthohumol (IXN), or 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) to reduce DNA adduct formation of the hepatocarcinogen aflatoxin B1 (AFB). Following 48 h of pretreatment, DIM and 8PN significantly increased AFB-DNA adduct levels, whereas CUR and IXN had no effect. DIM greatly enhanced the transcriptional expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNA. Glutathione S-transferase mRNAs were not increased by any of the treatments. In vitro enzyme activity assays demonstrated that 8PN and DIM, but not CUR or IXN, inhibited human CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4 activities. To distinguish between treatment effects on transcription versus direct effects on enzyme activity for DIM, we evaluated the effects of pretreatment alone (transcriptional activation) versus cotreatment alone (enzyme inhibition). The results demonstrated that effects on gene expression, but not catalytic activity, are responsible for the observed effects of DIM on AFB-DNA adduct formation. The increase in AFB-DNA damage following DIM treatment may be explained through its substantial induction of CYP1A2 and/or its downregulation of GSTM1, both of which were significant. The increase in DNA damage by DIM raises potential safety risks for dietary supplements of DIM and its precursor indole-3-carbinol. PMID:19770484

  8. The mutated human gene encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β inhibits kidney formation in developing Xenopus embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Wiltrud; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Nastos, Aristotelis; Senkel, Sabine; Lingott-Frieg, Anja; Bulman, Michael; Bingham, Coralie; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ryffel, Gerhart U.

    2000-01-01

    The transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) is a tissue-specific regulator that also plays an essential role in early development of vertebrates. In humans, four heterozygous mutations in the HNF1β gene have been identified that lead to early onset of diabetes and severe primary renal defects. The degree and type of renal defects seem to depend on the specific mutation. We show that the frameshift mutant P328L329fsdelCCTCT associated with nephron agenesis retains its DNA-binding properties and acts as a gain-of-function mutation with increased transactivation potential in transfection experiments. Expression of this mutated factor in the Xenopus embryo leads to defective development and agenesis of the pronephros, the first kidney form of amphibians. Very similar defects are generated by overexpressing in Xenopus the wild-type HNF1β, which is consistent with the gain-of-function property of the mutant. In contrast, introduction of the human HNF1β mutant R137-K161del, which is associated with a reduced number of nephrons with hypertrophy of the remaining ones and which has an impaired DNA binding, shows only a minor effect on pronephros development in Xenopus. Thus, the overexpression of both human mutants has a different effect on renal development in Xenopus, reflecting the variation in renal phenotype seen with these mutations. We conclude that mutations in human HNF1β can be functionally characterized in Xenopus. Our findings imply that HNF1β not only is an early marker of kidney development but also is functionally involved in morphogenetic events, and these processes can be investigated in lower vertebrates. PMID:10758154

  9. Hepatocyte-like cells derived from human amniotic epithelial cells can be encapsulated without loss of viability or function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vaghjiani, Vijesh; Vaithilingam, Vijayaganapathy; Saraswati, Indah; Sali, Adnan; Murthi, Padma; Kalionis, Bill; Tuch, Bernard E; Manuelpillai, Ursula

    2014-04-15

    Placenta derived human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) are an attractive source of stem cells for the generation of hepatocyte-like cells (HLC) for therapeutic applications to treat liver diseases. During hAEC differentiation into HLC, they become increasingly immunogenic, which may result in immune cell-mediated rejection upon transplantation into allogeneic recipients. Placing cells within devices such as alginate microcapsules can prevent immune cell-mediated rejection. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of HLC generated from hAEC and to examine the effects of encapsulation on HLC viability, gene expression, and function. hAEC were differentiated for 4 weeks and evaluated for hepatocyte-specific gene expression and function. Differentiated cells were encapsulated in barium alginate microcapsules and cultured for 7 days and the effect of encapsulation on cell viability, function, and hepatocyte related gene expression was determined. Differentiated cells performed key functions of hepatocytes including urea synthesis, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4 activity, indocyanine green (ICG) uptake, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake, and exhibited glutathione antioxidant capacity. A number of hepatocyte-related genes involved in fat, cholesterol, bile acid synthesis, and xenobiotic metabolism were also expressed showing that the hAEC had differentiated into HLC. Upon encapsulation, the HLC remained viable for at least 7 days in culture, continued to express genes involved in fat, cholesterol, bile acid, and xenobiotic metabolism and had glutathione antioxidant capacity. CYP3A4 activity and urea synthesis by the encapsulated HLC were higher than that of monolayer HLC cultures. Functional HLC can be derived from hAEC, and HLC can be encapsulated within alginate microcapsules without losing viability or function in vitro. PMID:24295364

  10. Hepatocyte-Like Cells Derived from Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells Can Be Encapsulated Without Loss of Viability or Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vaghjiani, Vijesh; Vaithilingam, Vijayaganapathy; Saraswati, Indah; Sali, Adnan; Murthi, Padma; Kalionis, Bill; Tuch, Bernard E.

    2014-01-01

    Placenta derived human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) are an attractive source of stem cells for the generation of hepatocyte-like cells (HLC) for therapeutic applications to treat liver diseases. During hAEC differentiation into HLC, they become increasingly immunogenic, which may result in immune cell-mediated rejection upon transplantation into allogeneic recipients. Placing cells within devices such as alginate microcapsules can prevent immune cell-mediated rejection. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of HLC generated from hAEC and to examine the effects of encapsulation on HLC viability, gene expression, and function. hAEC were differentiated for 4 weeks and evaluated for hepatocyte-specific gene expression and function. Differentiated cells were encapsulated in barium alginate microcapsules and cultured for 7 days and the effect of encapsulation on cell viability, function, and hepatocyte related gene expression was determined. Differentiated cells performed key functions of hepatocytes including urea synthesis, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4 activity, indocyanine green (ICG) uptake, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake, and exhibited glutathione antioxidant capacity. A number of hepatocyte-related genes involved in fat, cholesterol, bile acid synthesis, and xenobiotic metabolism were also expressed showing that the hAEC had differentiated into HLC. Upon encapsulation, the HLC remained viable for at least 7 days in culture, continued to express genes involved in fat, cholesterol, bile acid, and xenobiotic metabolism and had glutathione antioxidant capacity. CYP3A4 activity and urea synthesis by the encapsulated HLC were higher than that of monolayer HLC cultures. Functional HLC can be derived from hAEC, and HLC can be encapsulated within alginate microcapsules without losing viability or function in vitro. PMID:24295364

  11. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  12. Responses of Nontransformed Human Hepatocytes to Conditional Expression of Full-Length Hepatitis C Virus Open Reading Frame

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weiliang; Lázaro, Catherine A.; Campbell, Jean S.; Parks, W. Tony; Katze, Michael G.; Fausto, Nelson

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic hepatitis that can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. To study the effects of HCV protein expression on host cells, we established conditional expression of the full-length open reading frame (ORF) of an infectious cDNA clone of HCV (genotype 1a, H77 strain) in the nontransformed human hepatocyte line cell HH4 using the ecdysone receptor regulatory system. Treatment with the ecdysone analog ponasterone-A induced tightly regulated and dose-dependent full-length HCV ORF expression and properly processed HCV proteins. HCV Core, NS3, and NS5A colocalized in perinuclear regions and associated with the early endosomal protein EEA1. HCV ORF expression caused marked growth inhibition, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, up-regulation of glutamate-l-cysteine ligase activity, increased glutathione level, and activation of nuclear factor κB. Although it was not directly cytotoxic, HCV ORF expression sensitized HH4 cells to Fas at certain concentrations but not to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. HCV ORF expression in HH4 cells up-regulated genes involved in innate immune response/inflammation and oxidative stress responses and down-regulated cell growth-related genes. Expression of HCV ORF in host cells may contribute to HCV pathogenesis by producing oxidative stress and increasing the expression of genes related to the innate immune response and inflammation. PMID:17991716

  13. A Schisandra-Derived Compound Schizandronic Acid Inhibits Entry of Pan-HCV Genotypes into Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi-Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Lian; Zhao, Ping; Jin, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Hai-Sheng; Xu, Qing-Qiang; Ren, Hao; Zhu, Shi-Ying; Tang, Hai-Lin; Zhu, Yong-Zhe; Qi, Zhong-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent progress in the development of hepatitis C virus (HCV) inhibitors, cost-effective antiviral drugs, especially among the patients receiving liver transplantations, are still awaited. Schisandra is a traditional medicinal herb used to treat a range of liver disorders including hepatitis for thousands of years in China. To isolate the bioactive compounds of schisandra for the treatment of HCV infection, we screened a schisandra-extracts library and identified a tetracyclic triterpenoid, schizandronic acid (SZA), as a novel HCV entry inhibitor. Our findings suggested that SZA potently inhibited pan-HCV genotype entry into hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes without interfering virus binding on cell surface or internalization. However, virion-cell fusion process was impaired in the presence of SZA, along with the increased host membrane fluidity. We also found that SZA inhibited the spread of HCV to the neighboring cells, and combinations of SZA with interferon or telaprevir resulted in additive synergistic effect against HCV. Additionally, SZA diminished the establishment of HCV infection in vivo. The SZA target is different from conventional direct-acting antiviral agents, therefore, SZA is a potential therapeutic compound for the development of effective HCV entry inhibitors, especially for patients who need to prevent HCV reinfection during the course of liver transplantations. PMID:27252043

  14. A Schisandra-Derived Compound Schizandronic Acid Inhibits Entry of Pan-HCV Genotypes into Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xi-Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Lian; Zhao, Ping; Jin, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Hai-Sheng; Xu, Qing-Qiang; Ren, Hao; Zhu, Shi-Ying; Tang, Hai-Lin; Zhu, Yong-Zhe; Qi, Zhong-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent progress in the development of hepatitis C virus (HCV) inhibitors, cost-effective antiviral drugs, especially among the patients receiving liver transplantations, are still awaited. Schisandra is a traditional medicinal herb used to treat a range of liver disorders including hepatitis for thousands of years in China. To isolate the bioactive compounds of schisandra for the treatment of HCV infection, we screened a schisandra-extracts library and identified a tetracyclic triterpenoid, schizandronic acid (SZA), as a novel HCV entry inhibitor. Our findings suggested that SZA potently inhibited pan-HCV genotype entry into hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes without interfering virus binding on cell surface or internalization. However, virion-cell fusion process was impaired in the presence of SZA, along with the increased host membrane fluidity. We also found that SZA inhibited the spread of HCV to the neighboring cells, and combinations of SZA with interferon or telaprevir resulted in additive synergistic effect against HCV. Additionally, SZA diminished the establishment of HCV infection in vivo. The SZA target is different from conventional direct-acting antiviral agents, therefore, SZA is a potential therapeutic compound for the development of effective HCV entry inhibitors, especially for patients who need to prevent HCV reinfection during the course of liver transplantations. PMID:27252043

  15. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Matthew D; Ballinger, Kimberly R; Khetani, Salman R

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  16. Contribution of cytochrome P450 and UDT-glucuronosyltransferase to the metabolism of drugs containing carboxylic acid groups: risk assessment of acylglucuronides using human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Norimasa; Tagashira, Mizuka; Tsurui, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Shizuo

    2014-08-01

    1. In order to evaluate the inhibition activity of 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT) and (-)-borneol (borneol) against cytochrome P450 (CYP) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), the substrates of these metabolic enzymes were incubated with ABT and borneol in human hepatocytes. We found that 3 mM ABT and 300 μM borneol were the most suitable experimental levels to specifically inhibit CYP and UGT. 2. Montelukast, mefenamic acid, flufenamic acid, diclofenac, tienilic acid, gemfibrozil, ibufenac and repaglinide were markedly metabolized in human hepatocytes, and the metabolism of gemfibrozil, mefenamic acid and flufenamic acid was inhibited by borneol. With regard to repaglinide, montelukast, diclofenac and tienilic acid, metabolism was inhibited by ABT. Ibufenac was partly inhibited by both inhibitors. Zomepirac, tolmetin, ibuprofen, indomethacin and levofloxacin were moderately metabolized by human hepatocytes, and the metabolism of zomepirac, ibuprofen and indomethacin was equally inhibited by both ABT and borneol. The metabolism of tolmetin was strongly inhibited by ABT, and was also inhibited weakly by borneol. Residual drugs, telmisartan, valsartan, furosemide, naproxen and probenecid were scarcely metabolized. 3. Although we attempted to predict the toxicological risks of drugs containing carboxylic groups from the combination chemical stability and CLint via UGT, the results indicated that this combination was not sufficient and that clinical daily dose is important. PMID:24575896

  17. A study of the mechanism of in vitro cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles using catfish primary hepatocytes and human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonggang; Aker, Winfred G; Hwang, Huey-min; Yedjou, Clement G; Yu, Hongtao; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2011-10-15

    Nanoparticles (NPs), including nanometal oxides, are being used in diverse applications such as medicine, clothing, cosmetics and food. In order to promote the safe development of nanotechnology, it is essential to assess the potential adverse health consequences associated with human exposure. The liver is a target site for NP toxicity, due to NP accumulation within it after ingestion, inhalation or absorption. The toxicity of nano-ZnO, TiO(2), CuO and Co(3)O(4) was investigated using a primary culture of channel catfish hepatocytes and human HepG2 cells as in vitro model systems for assessing the impact of metal oxide NPs on human and environmental health. Some mechanisms of nanotoxicity were determined by using phase contrast inverted microscopy, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays, and flow cytometric assays. Nano-CuO and ZnO showed significant toxicity in both HepG2 cells and catfish primary hepatocytes. The results demonstrate that HepG2 cells are more sensitive than catfish primary hepatocytes to the toxicity of metal oxide NPs. The overall ranking of the toxicity of metal oxides to the test cells is as follows: TiO(2)

  18. Secretory expression and characterization of a recombinant-deleted variant of human hepatocyte growth factor in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhao, Hong-Liang; Xue, Chong; Deng, Bing-Bing; Zhang, Wei; Xiong, Xiang-Hua; Yang, Bing-Fen; Yao, Xue-Qin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the secretory expression of human hepatocyte growth factor (hdHGF) gene in Pichia pastoris. METHODS: The full-length gene of human cDNA encoding the deleted variant of hdHGF was cloned by RT-PCR and overlapping-fragment PCR technique using mRNA of human placenta as a template. The cloned hdHGF cDNA was inserted into the Escherichia coli-yeast shuttle vector of pPIC9. The constructed plasmid, pPIC9-hdHGF, was transformed into the GS115 cells of the methylotrophic yeast, P pastoris, using a chemical method. The Mut+ transformants were screened to obtain high-expression strains by the test and analysis of expressed products of shake-flask culture. A secretory form of rhdHGF was made with the aid of the leader peptide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor. RESULTS: The expressed products, which showed a band of molecular mass of about 80 ku, were observed on 15% SDS-PAGE and identified by Western blotting and N-terminal amino acid sequencing. In the high cell density culture of 5 L fermentor by fed-batch culture protocol, the cell biomass was reached at approximately 135 g (DCW)/L. The productivity of secreted total supernant protein concentration attained a high-level expression of more than 8.0 g/L and the ratio of rhdHGF band area was about 12.3% of the total band area scanned by SDS-PAGE analysis, which estimated that the product of rhdHGF was 500-900 mg/L. CONCLUSION: The P pastoris system represents an attractive tool of generating large quantities of hdHGF for both research and industrial purposes. PMID:16437654

  19. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and induce CYP1A genes expression in human hepatocytes and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Dořičáková, Aneta; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-25

    The effects of four copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui1)(L)]NO3·H2O (1-3) and [Cu(qui2)(phen)]NO3 (4), where qui1=2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, Hqui2=2-(4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-propyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone-7-carboxamide, L=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (2), bathophenanthroline (bphen) (3), on transcriptional activities of steroid receptors, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors have been studied. The complexes (1-4) did not influence basal or ligand-inducible activities of glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, thyroid receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor, as revealed by gene reporter assays. The complexes 1 and 2 dose-dependently induced luciferase activity in stable gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, and this induction was reverted by resveratrol, indicating involvement of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the process. The complexes 1, 2 and 3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA in LS180 cells and CYP1A1/CYP1A2 in human hepatocytes through AhR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay EMSA showed that the complexes 1 and 2 transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form. Collectively, we demonstrate that the complexes 1 and 2 activate AhR and induce AhR-dependent genes in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines. In conclusion, the data presented here might be of toxicological importance, regarding the multiple roles of AhR in human physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:27180721

  20. Three Dimensional Primary Hepatocyte Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoffe, Boris

    1998-01-01

    Our results demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of culturing PHH in microgravity bioreactors that exceeded the longest period obtained using other methods. Within the first week of culture, isolated hepatocytes started to form aggregates, which continuously increased in size (up to 1 cm) and macroscopically appeared as a multidimensional tissue-like assembly. To improve oxygenation and nutrition within the spheroids we performed experiments with the biodegradable nonwoven fiber-based polymers made from PolyGlycolic Acid (PGA). It has been shown that PGA scaffolds stimulate isolated cells to regenerate tissue with defined sizes and shapes and are currently being studied for various tissue-engineering applications. Our data demonstrated that culturing hepatocytes in the presence of PGA scaffolds resulted in more efficient cell assembly and formations of larger cell spheroids (up to 3 cm in length, see figure). The histology of cell aggregates cultured with PGA showed polymer fibers with attached hepatocytes. We initiated experiments to co-culture primary human hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells in the bioreactor. The presence of endothelial cells in co-cultures were established by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD34 monoclonal Ab. Our preliminary data demonstrated that cultures of purified hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells exhibited better growth and expressed higher levels of albumin MRNA for a longer period of time than cultures of ppfified, primary human hepatocytes cultured alone. We also evaluated microsomal deethylation activity of hepatocytes cultured in the presence of endothelial cells.In summary, we have established liver cell culture, which mimicked the structure and function of the parent tissue.

  1. BST-2 expression in human hepatocytes is inducible by all three types of interferons and restricts production of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Amet, T; Byrd, D; Hu, N; Sun, Q; Li, F; Zhao, Y; Hu, S; Grantham, A; Yu, Q

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2, also known as tetherin, CD317, or HM1.24) has recently been identified as a host restriction factor against diverse families of enveloped viruses. However, the effects of BST-2 on the life cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV), an enveloped RNA virus, remain unclear and controversial. Here we demonstrated that human hepatocytes including Huh7.5.1 cells, primary human hepatocytes (PHHs), and HepG2 cells constitutively expressed low to moderate levels of endogenous BST-2 on the cell surface, which could be robustly up-regulated by all three types of interferons (IFNs) such as IFN-α, IFN-γ, and IFN-λ. IFN-α and IFN-γ showed a synergistic effect in induction of BST-2 expression on human hepatocytes. Over-expression of BST-2 by BST-2-expressing vector transfection or up-regulation of BST-2 by IFN stimulation markedly suppressed HCV production, whereas shRNA-mediated depletion of endogenous BST-2 significantly enhanced HCV production in infected Huh7.5.1 cells. IFN-mediated anti-HCV activity was partially but significantly diminished by shRNA-mediated knockdown of BST-2 expression, indicating that BST- 2 upregulation is directly involved in IFN-mediated inhibition of HCV production. We also found that both BST-2 and HCV core co-localized with intracellular lipid droplets (LDs), suggesting that BST-2-HCV interaction may take place around LDs as LDs constitute an important intracellular organelle for HCV assembly and replication. Taken together, our data suggest that BST-2 is a host restriction factor against HCV, and induction of BST-2 in hepatocytes could be one of the mechanisms by which current HCV standard therapy (IFN-α plus ribavirin) achieves a sustained virological response (SVR). PMID:24236455

  2. Differentiation of hepatocytes from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mallanna, Sunil K.

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of human embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into hepatocyte-like cells provides a platform to study the molecular basis of human hepatocyte differentiation, to develop cell culture models of liver disease, and to potentially provide hepatocytes for treatment of end-stage liver disease. Additionally, hepatocyte-like cells generated from human pluripotent stem cells could serve as platforms for drug discovery, determination of pharmaceutical induced hepatotoxicity, and evaluation of idiosyncratic drug-drug interactions. Here, we describe a step-wise protocol previously developed in our laboratory that facilitates the highly efficient and reproducible differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. Our protocol uses defined culture conditions and closely recapitulates key developmental events that are found to occur during hepatogenesis. PMID:24510789

  3. Genomewide comparison of the inducible transcriptomes of nuclear receptors CAR, PXR and PPARα in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Benjamin A; Thomas, Maria; Winter, Stefan; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Burk, Oliver; Schwab, Matthias; Zanger, Ulrich M

    2016-09-01

    The ligand-activated nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) and the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) are two master transcriptional regulators of many important drug metabolizing enzymes and transporter genes (DMET) in response to xenobiotics including many drugs. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα, NR1C1), the target of lipid lowering fibrate drugs, primarily regulates fatty acid catabolism and energy-homeostasis. Recent research has shown that there are substantial overlaps in the regulated genes of these receptors. For example, both CAR and PXR also modulate the transcription of key enzymes involved in lipid and glucose metabolism and PPARα also functions as a direct transcriptional regulator of important DMET genes including cytochrome P450s CYP3A4 and CYP2C8. Despite their important and widespread influence on liver metabolism, comparative data are scarce, particularly at a global level and in humans. The major objective of this study was to directly compare the genome-wide transcriptional changes elucidated by the activation of these three nuclear receptors in primary human hepatocytes. Cultures from six individual donors were treated with the prototypical ligands for CAR (CITCO), PXR (rifampicin) and PPARα (WY14,643) or DMSO as vehicle control. Genomewide mRNA profiles determined with Affymetrix microarrays were analyzed for differentially expressed genes and metabolic functions. The results confirmed known prototype target genes and revealed strongly overlapping sets of coregulated but also distinctly regulated and novel responsive genes and pathways. The results further specify the role of PPARα as a regulator of drug metabolism and the role of the xenosensors PXR and CAR in lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26994748

  4. Cytotoxicity, intracellular localization and exocytosis of citrate capped and PEG functionalized gold nanoparticles in human hepatocyte and kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Tlotleng, Nonhlanhla; Vetten, Melissa A; Keter, Frankline K; Skepu, Amanda; Tshikhudo, Robert; Gulumian, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Surface-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are nanomaterials that hold promise in drug delivery applications. In this study, the cytotoxicity, uptake, intracellular localization, and the exocytosis of citrate-stabilized (Cit-AuNP) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified gold nanoparticles with the carboxyl (COOH) terminal functional group were assessed in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) and the human caucasian hepatocytes carcinoma (Hep G2) cell systems, representing two major accumulation sites for AuNPs. The zeta (ζ)-potential measurements confirmed the negative surface charge of the AuNPs in water and in cell growth medium. The transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size and morphology of the AuNPs. Both types of AuNPs were shown to induce cytotoxic effects in cells. The Hep G2 cells were more sensitive cell type, with the COOH-PEG-AuNPs inducing the highest toxicity at higher concentrations. Dark field microscopy and TEM images revealed that the AuNPs were internalized in cells, mostly as agglomerates. TEM micrographs further revealed that the AuNPs were confined as agglomerates inside vesicle-like compartments, likely to be endosomal and lysosomal structures as well as in the cytosol, mostly as individual particles. The AuNPs were shown to remain in cellular compartments for up to 3 weeks, but thereafter, clearance of the gold nanoparticles from the cells by exocytosis was evident. The results presented in this study may therefore give an indication on the fate of AuNPs on long-term exposure to cells and may also assist in safety evaluation of AuNPs. PMID:27184667

  5. Preferential Glutathione Conjugation of a Reverse Diol Epoxide Compared with a Bay Region Diol Epoxide of Benzo[a]pyrene in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Pramod; Hochalter, J. Bradley; Balbo, Silvia; McIntee, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have examined the relationship between polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase genes and cancer in people exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), but the results to date have been modest. Missing from these studies has been an exploration of the formation of the appropriate glutathione conjugates in humans. We incubated human hepatocytes from 10 donors with racemic anti-BaP-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), believed to be a major ultimate carcinogen of BaP, or with the noncarcinogenic reverse diol epoxide, racemic anti-BaP-9,10-diol-7,8-epoxide (rev-BPDE). Incubations were carried out for 12 or 24 h. We used high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry-selected reaction monitoring at m/z 464 → m/z 317 to analyze the incubation mixtures for the mercapturic acid products that would result from glutathione conjugation. The standard mercapturic acids were synthesized by reaction of BPDE or rev-BPDE with N-acetylcysteine. We obtained convincing evidence in human hepatocytes for mercapturic acid formation from rev-BPDE in all 10 samples, in amounts up to 17 pmol/ml. However, we could detect mercapturic acids from BPDE in only 1 of 10 samples (0.05 pmol/ml). Taken together with our similar previous results of analyses of phenanthrene metabolites in human hepatocytes and human urine, the results of this study indicate that conjugation of BPDE with glutathione is a minor pathway in humans, indicating that glutathione S-transferase genotyping is not an effective method for assessing risk of PAH-induced cancer in humans, at least with respect to the diol epoxide pathway of PAH carcinogenesis. PMID:20547966

  6. Leflunomide or A77 1726 protect from acetaminophen-induced cell injury through inhibition of JNK-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition in immortalized human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Seah, Quee Ming; Tan, Rachel C.H.; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Beerheide, Walter; Boelsterli, Urs A. . E-mail: phcbua@nus.edu.sg

    2006-11-15

    Leflunomide, a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, protects against T-cell-mediated liver injury by poorly understood mechanisms. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726 (teriflunomide) has been shown to inhibit stress-activated protein kinases (JNK pathway), which are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that leflunomide may protect from drugs that induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) by blocking the JNK signaling pathway. To this end, we exposed cultured immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to the standard protoxicant drug acetaminophen (APAP), which induces CsA-sensitive mPT-mediated cell death. We determined the effects of leflunomide on the extent of APAP-induced hepatocyte injury and the upstream JNK-mediated mitochondrial signaling pathways. We found that leflunomide or A77 1726 concentration-dependently protected hepatocytes from APAP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial permeabilization and lethal cell injury. This was not due to proximal inhibition of CYP-catalyzed APAP bioactivation to its thiol-reactive metabolite. Instead, we demonstrate that leflunomide (20 {mu}M) inhibited the APAP-induced early (3 h) activation (phosphorylation) of JNK1/2, thus inhibiting phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and preventing P-Bcl-2-mediated induction of the mPT. This greatly attenuated mitochondrial cytochrome c release, which we used as a marker for mitochondrial permeabilization. The specific JNK2 inhibitor SP600125 similarly protected from APAP-induced cell death. In conclusion, these findings are consistent with our hypothesis that leflunomide protects from protoxicant-induced hepatocyte injury by inhibiting JNK signaling and preventing mPT induction.

  7. Burkholderia pseudomallei rpoS mediates iNOS suppression in human hepatocyte (HC04) cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanongkiet, Sucharat; Ponnikorn, Saranyoo; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a widespread disease in Southeast Asia. Reactive nitrogen, in an intermediate form of nitric oxide (NO), is one of the first lines of defense used by host cells to eliminate intracellular pathogens, through the stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Studies in phagocytotic cells have shown that the iNOS response is muted in B. pseudomallei infection, and implicated the rpoS sigma factor as a key regulatory factor mediating suppression. The liver is a main visceral organ affected by B. pseudomallei, and there is little knowledge about the interaction of liver cells and B. pseudomallei. This study investigated the induction of iNOS, as well as autophagic flux and light-chain 3 (LC3) localization in human liver (HC04) cells in response to infection with B. pseudomallei and its rpoS deficient mutant. Results showed that the rpoS mutant was unable to suppress iNOS induction and that the mutant showed less induction of autophagy and lower co-localization with LC3, and this was coupled with a lower intracellular growth rate. Combining these results suggest that B. pseudomallei rpoS is an important factor in establishing infection in liver cells. PMID:27324398

  8. Burkholderia pseudomallei rpoS mediates iNOS suppression in human hepatocyte (HC04) cells.

    PubMed

    Sanongkiet, Sucharat; Ponnikorn, Saranyoo; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a widespread disease in Southeast Asia. Reactive nitrogen, in an intermediate form of nitric oxide (NO), is one of the first lines of defense used by host cells to eliminate intracellular pathogens, through the stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Studies in phagocytotic cells have shown that the iNOS response is muted in B. pseudomallei infection, and implicated the rpoS sigma factor as a key regulatory factor mediating suppression. The liver is a main visceral organ affected by B. pseudomallei, and there is little knowledge about the interaction of liver cells and B. pseudomallei This study investigated the induction of iNOS, as well as autophagic flux and light-chain 3 (LC3) localization in human liver (HC04) cells in response to infection with B. pseudomallei and its rpoS deficient mutant. Results showed that the rpoS mutant was unable to suppress iNOS induction and that the mutant showed less induction of autophagy and lower co-localization with LC3, and this was coupled with a lower intracellular growth rate. Combining these results suggest that B. pseudomallei rpoS is an important factor in establishing infection in liver cells. PMID:27324398

  9. Human and rat hepatocyte toxicity and protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitory activity of naturally occurring desmethyl-microcystins and nodularins.

    PubMed

    Ufelmann, Helena; Krüger, Thomas; Luckas, Bernd; Schrenk, Dieter

    2012-03-11

    Contamination of water, foods and food supplements by various genera of cyanobacteria is a serious health problem worldwide for humans and animals, largely due to the toxic effects of microcystins (MCs) and nodularin (NOD), a group of hepatotoxic cyclic peptides. The toxins occur in variable structures resulting in more than 90 different MCs and 8 different NODs, many of them not having been investigated for their toxic potency. Potent MCs such as MC-LR have been shown to elicit their hepatotoxic potency via inhibition of hepatic protein phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A leading to over-phosphorylation of vital cellular proteins. This mechanism of action is also thought to be responsible for the long term tumor promoting action of certain MCs and NOD in the liver. Here, we report on the isolation of certain MCs and NOD as well as a number of their desmethylated derivatives from algae bloom. Subsequently, we determined the cytotoxicity of these compounds in isolated primary human and rat hepatocytes in culture. In parallel experiments, we analyzed the inhibitory potency of these congeners on PP1 and 2A using commercially available enzymes. We found in primary rat hepatocytes that MC-LR, -YR and NOD were cytotoxic, namely in the 10 to >50 nM range, while MC-RR was not. The desmethylated congeners of MC-LR, -YR, and NOD were equally or more-toxic as/than their fully methylated counterparts. In primary human hepatocytes we could show that MC-LR, NOD and the desmethylated variants [³Asp]MC-LR, [⁷Dha]MC-LR and [¹Asp]NOD were cytotoxic in the 20 to >600 nM range. Inhibition data with human, bovine and rabbit protein phosphatases 1 and 2A were roughly in accordance with the cytotoxicity findings in human and rat hepatocytes, i.e. desmethylation had no pronounced effects on the inhibitory potencies. Thus, a variety of naturally occurring desmethylated MC and NOD congeners have to be considered as being at least as toxic as the corresponding fully methylated derivatives. PMID

  10. Lack of effect of furfural on unscheduled DNA synthesis in the in vivo rat and mouse hepatocyte DNA repair assays and in precision-cut human liver slices.

    PubMed

    Lake, B G; Edwards, A J; Price, R J; Phillips, B J; Renwick, A B; Beamand, J A; Adams, T B

    2001-10-01

    The ability of furfural to induce unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in hepatocytes of male and female B6C3F(1) mice and male F344 rats after in vivo administration and in vitro in precision-cut human liver slices has been studied. Preliminary toxicity studies established the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of furfural to be 320 and 50 mg/kg in the mouse and rat, respectively. Furfural was dosed by gavage at levels of 0 (control), 50, 175 and 320 mg/kg to male and female mice and 0, 5, 16.7 and 50 mg/kg to male rats. Hepatocytes were isolated by liver perfusion either 2-4 h or 12-16 h after treatment, cultured in medium containing [3H]thymidine for 4 h and assessed for UDS by grain counting of autoradiographs. Furfural treatment did not produce any statistically significant increase or any dose-related effects on UDS in mouse and rat hepatocytes either 2-4 h or 12-16 h after dosing. In contrast, UDS was markedly induced in mice and rats 2-4 h after treatment with 20 mg/kg dimethylnitrosamine and 12-16 h after treatment of mice and rats with 200 mg/kg o-aminoazotoluene and 50 mg/kg 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), respectively. Precision-cut human liver slices from four donors were cultured for 24 h in medium containing [3H]thymidine and 0-10 mM furfural. Small increases in the net grain count (i.e. nuclear grain count less mean cytoplasmic grain count) observed with 2-10 mM furfural were not due to any increase in the nuclear grain count. Rather, it was the result of concentration-dependent decreases in the mean cytoplasmic grain counts and to a lesser extent in nuclear grain counts, due to furfural-induced cytotoxicity. In contrast, marked increases in UDS (both net grain and nuclear grain counts) were observed in human liver slices treated with 0.02 and 0.05 mM 2-AAF, 0.002 and 0.02 mM aflatoxin B(1) and 0.005 and 0.05 mM 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine. This study demonstrates that furfural does not induce UDS in the hepatocytes of male and female B6C3F

  11. Biguanide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction yields increased lactate production and cytotoxicity of aerobically-poised HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Dykens, James A. Jamieson, Joseph; Marroquin, Lisa; Nadanaciva, Sashi; Billis, Puja A.; Will, Yvonne

    2008-12-01

    As a class, the biguanides induce lactic acidosis, a hallmark of mitochondrial impairment. To assess potential mitochondrial impairment, we evaluated the effects of metformin, buformin and phenformin on: 1) viability of HepG2 cells grown in galactose, 2) respiration by isolated mitochondria, 3) metabolic poise of HepG2 and primary human hepatocytes, 4) activities of immunocaptured respiratory complexes, and 5) mitochondrial membrane potential and redox status in primary human hepatocytes. Phenformin was the most cytotoxic of the three with buformin showing moderate toxicity, and metformin toxicity only at mM concentrations. Importantly, HepG2 cells grown in galactose are markedly more susceptible to biguanide toxicity compared to cells grown in glucose, indicating mitochondrial toxicity as a primary mode of action. The same rank order of potency was observed for isolated mitochondrial respiration where preincubation (40 min) exacerbated respiratory impairment, and was required to reveal inhibition by metformin, suggesting intramitochondrial bio-accumulation. Metabolic profiling of intact cells corroborated respiratory inhibition, but also revealed compensatory increases in lactate production from accelerated glycolysis. High (mM) concentrations of the drugs were needed to inhibit immunocaptured respiratory complexes, supporting the contention that bioaccumulation is involved. The same rank order was found when monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS production, and glutathione levels in primary human hepatocytes. In toto, these data indicate that biguanide-induced lactic acidosis can be attributed to acceleration of glycolysis in response to mitochondrial impairment. Indeed, the desired clinical outcome, viz., decreased blood glucose, could be due to increased glucose uptake and glycolytic flux in response to drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  12. GW4064, an agonist of farnesoid X receptor, represses CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes by inducing small heterodimer partner expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Pan, Xian; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-05-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) functions as a regulator of bile acid and lipid homeostasis and is recognized as a promising therapeutic target for metabolic diseases. The biologic function of FXR is mediated in part by a small heterodimer partner (SHP); ligand-activated FXR enhances SHP expression, and SHP in turn represses the activity of multiple transcription factors. This study aimed to investigate the effect of FXR activation on expression of the major drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP3A4. The effects of 3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-4-(3'-carboxy-2-chlorostilben-4-yl)oxymethyl-5-isopropylisoxazole (GW4064), a synthetic agonist of FXR, on the expression and activity of CYP3A4 were examined in primary human hepatocytes by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and S9 phenotyping. In human hepatocytes, treatment of GW4064 (1 μM) for 48 hours resulted in a 75% decrease in CYP3A4 mRNA expression and a 25% decrease in CYP3A4 activity, accompanied by ∼3-fold increase in SHP mRNA expression. In HepG2 cells, SHP repressed transactivation of CYP3A4 promoter by pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and glucocorticoid receptor. Interestingly, GW4064 did not repress expression of CYP2B6, another target gene of PXR and CAR; GW4064 enhanced CYP2B6 promoter activity. In conclusion, GW4064 represses CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes, potentially through upregulation of SHP expression and subsequent repression of CYP3A4 promoter activity. Clinically significant drug-drug interaction involving FXR agonists and CYP3A4 substrates may occur. PMID:25725071

  13. Bridging in vitro and in vivo metabolism and transport of faldaprevir in human using a novel cocultured human hepatocyte system, HepatoPac.

    PubMed

    Ramsden, Diane; Tweedie, Donald J; Chan, Tom S; Taub, Mitchell E; Li, Yongmei

    2014-03-01

    An increased appreciation of the importance of transporter and enzyme interplay in drug clearance and a desire to delineate these mechanisms necessitates the utilization of models that contain a full complement of enzymes and transporters at physiologically relevant activities. Additionally, the development of drugs with longer half-lives requires in vitro systems with extended incubation times that allow characterization of metabolic pathways for low-clearance drugs. A recently developed coculture hepatocyte model, HepatoPac, has been applied to meet these challenges. Faldaprevir is a drug in late-stage development for the treatment of hepatitis C. Faldaprevir is a low-clearance drug with the somewhat unique characteristic of being slowly metabolized, producing two abundant hydroxylated metabolites (M2a and M2b) in feces (∼40% of the dose) without exhibiting significant levels of circulating metabolites in humans. The human HepatoPac model was investigated to characterize the metabolism and transport of faldaprevir. In human HepatoPac cultures, M2a and M2b were the predominant metabolites formed, with extents of formation comparable to in vivo. Direct glucuronidation of faldaprevir was shown to be a minor metabolic pathway. HepatoPac studies also demonstrated that faldaprevir is concentrated in liver with active uptake by multiple transporters (including OATP1B1 and Na(+)-dependent transporters). Overall, human HepatoPac cultures provided valuable insights into the metabolism and disposition of faldaprevir in humans and demonstrated the importance of enzyme and transporter interplay in the clearance of the drug. PMID:24366904

  14. Monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in human hepatocytes and increases lipid accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jung Hwan; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jung; Choi, Hyeonjin; Choi, Yoonjeong; Seok, Jo Woon; Kim, Jae-woo

    2015-05-08

    Monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (MGAT) is an enzyme that is involved in triglyceride synthesis by catalyzing the formation of diacylglycerol from monoacylglycerol and fatty acyl CoAs. Recently, we reported that MGAT1 has a critical role in hepatic TG accumulation and that its suppression ameliorates hepatic steatosis in a mouse model. However, the function of MGAT enzymes in hepatic lipid accumulation has not been investigated in humans. Unlike in rodents, MGAT3 as well as MGAT1 and MGAT2 are present in humans. In this study, we evaluated the differences between MGAT subtypes and their association with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a regulator of mouse MGAT1 expression. In human primary hepatocytes, basal expression of MGAT1 was lower than that of MGAT2 or MGAT3, but was strongly induced by PPARγ overexpression. A luciferase assay as well as an electromobility shift assay revealed that human MGAT1 promoter activity is driven by PPARγ by direct binding to at least two regions of the promoter in 293T and HepG2 cells. Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of MGAT1 expression significantly attenuated lipid accumulation by PPARγ overexpression in HepG2 cells, as evidenced by oil-red-O staining. These results suggest that human MGAT1 has an important role in fatty liver formation as a target gene of PPARγ, and blocking MGAT1 activity could be an efficient therapeutic way to reduce nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases in humans. - Highlights: • PPARγ promotes MGAT1 expression in human primary hepatocytes. • PPARγ directly regulates MGAT1 promoter activity. • Human MGAT1 promoter has at least two PPARγ-binding elements. • Inhibition of MGAT1 expression attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation in humans.

  15. Evaluation of cytochrome P450 inductions by anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine, and carbamazepine using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Ikuo; Murayama, Norie; Kuroki, Ayaka; Kota, Jagannath; Iwano, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Hirota, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine is structurally related to carbamazepine, but has reportedly different metabolic pathway. Auto-induction potentials of oxcarbazepine, its pharmacologically active metabolite 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine were evaluated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 mRNA levels and primary metabolic rates using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. For the CYP1A2 the induction potential determined as the fold change in mRNA levels was 7.2 (range: 2.3-11.5) and 10.0 (6.2-13.7) for oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively, while 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine did not induce. The fold change in mRNA levels for CYP2B6 was 11.5 (3.2-19.3), 7.0 (2.5-10.8) and 14.8 (3.1-29.1) for oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively. The fold change for CYP3A4 induction level by oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine was 3.5 (1.2-7.4), 2.7 (0.8-5.7) and 8.3 (3.5-14.5), respectively. The data suggest lower induction potential of oxcarbazepine and 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine relative to carbamazepine. The results in HepaRG cells showed similar trend as the human hepatocytes. After incubation for 72 h in hepatocytes and HepaRG cells, auto-induction was evident for only carbamazepine metabolism. The 10-keto group instead of double bond at C10 position is evidently a determinant factor for limited auto-induction of P450 enzymes by oxcarbazepine. PMID:26711482

  16. Locally synthesized HSP27 in hepatocytes: Is it possibly a novel strategy against human liver ischemia/reperfusion injury?

    PubMed

    Ye, Sun-yi; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Shu-sen

    2011-02-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common complication after liver surgery. Approximately 10% of grafts lose function in the early stage after liver transplantation. However, there is no effective way against IRI yet. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a member of the heat shock protein families, is recognized as a protective factor against liver IRI recently. Studies showed that HSP27 can lessen the induction of proinflammatory messenger, reduce neutrophil infiltration, decrease apoptosis (caspase 3 fragmentation and DNA laddering), and reduce disruption of filamentous actin. In addition, Kupffer cells inhibitor- gadolinium chloride can reduce lipid peroxidation and promote hepatocytes regeneration. Herein, we hypothesize that transfecting liver with HSP27 gene accompanied by gadolinium chloride might be a potentially novel treatment against IRI. Compared to passive defense, we firstly suggest positive protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury by hepatocytes automatically. PMID:21067867

  17. Metabolism-mediated drug interaction potential of HS-23, a new herbal drug for the treatment of sepsis in human hepatocytes and liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Lee, Ji Young; Kwon, Soon-Sang; Kim, Ju Hyun; Kim, Young-Mok; Hong, Sung-Woon; Yeon, Sung Hum; Lee, Sun-Mee; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Lee, Hye Suk

    2015-02-01

    HS-23, an extract of the dried flower buds of Lonicera japonica, is a new botanical drug currently being evaluated in a phase I clinical study in Korea for the treatment of sepsis. The in vitro induction and inhibition potentials of HS-23 on the drug-metabolizing enzymes using human hepatocytes and liver microsomes were assessed to evaluate herb-drug interaction according to botanical drug guideline and drug interaction guidance of FDA. HS-23 slightly inhibited CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 enzyme activities in human liver microsomes with IC50 values of 80.6, 160.7, 169.5, 85.4, and 76.6 μg/mL, respectively. HS-23 showed negligible inhibition of CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2D6, UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 activities in human liver microsomes. Based on these results, HS-23 may not inhibit the metabolism of CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4-catalyzed drugs in humans. HS-23 did not affect the mRNA expression of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 after 48 h treatment at three concentrations (0.5, 5, and 50 μg/mL) in three independent human hepatocytes, indicating that HS-23 has no effect on herb-drug interactions that up- or down-regulate CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4. These results indicate that the administration of HS-23 in human may not cause clinically relevant inhibition and induction of these cytochrome P450 (CYP) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes and HS-23 may be promising therapeutic agent for treatment of sepsis. PMID:25052959

  18. Rethinking Adult Literacy Programs: A Humanities-Based Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anania, Joanne

    The Roosevelt University Humanities Enrichment Program tries to acknowledge the adult part of adult literacy. Its instructional materials are of interest and value to the adult student and, therefore, provide incentives for reading and discussion instead of serving merely as skill-building exercises. The materials are drawn from literature,…

  19. Advantages of human hepatocyte-derived transformants expressing a series of human cytochrome p450 isoforms for genotoxicity examination.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Tsuneo; Yoshitomi, Sumie; Asahi, Satoru; Uematsu, Rieko; Matsumura, Shigeo; Chatani, Fumio; Oda, Hiroaki

    2010-08-01

    Metabolites of chemicals can often be ultimate genotoxic species; thus, in vitro routine testing requires the use of rat liver S9. However, there is a question as to whether this represents an appropriate surrogate for human metabolism. We have previously demonstrated the usefulness of HepG2 transformants expressing major human cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms to assess the genotoxicity of metabolites. We further assessed the advantages of these transformants from the following three aspects. First, the sensitivity of these transformants was confirmed with micronucleus (MN) induction by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene or ifosfamide in transformants expressing the corresponding CYP1A1 or CYP2B6 and CYP2C9, respectively. Second, by using these transformants, beta-endosulfan, a chemical for which the CYP isoforms contributing to its genotoxicity are unknown, was found to induce MN through the CYP3A4-mediated pathway. This result was confirmed by the facts that the decreased CYP3A4 activity using a inhibitor or short interfering RNA (siRNA) repressed MN induction by beta-endosulfan and that endosulfan sulfate, one of the metabolites produced by CYP3A4, induced MN in the transformants harboring an empty vector. Third, the interaction between phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes was demonstrated by MN induction with inhibitors of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferases in tamoxifen-treated transformants harboring the corresponding CYP3A4 or with inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase in safrole-treated transformants harboring the corresponding CYP2D6, whereas neither tamoxifen nor safrole alone induced MN in any transformant. These advantages provide the benefits of newly established transformants for in vitro genotoxicity testing that reflects comprehensive metabolic pathways including not only human CYP isoforms but also the phase II enzymes. PMID:20507880

  20. Culture and establishment of self-renewing human and mouse adult liver and pancreas 3D organoids and their genetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Broutier, Laura; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Hindley, Christopher J; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-09-01

    Adult somatic tissues have proven difficult to expand in vitro, largely because of the complexity of recreating appropriate environmental signals in culture. We have overcome this problem recently and developed culture conditions for adult stem cells that allow the long-term expansion of adult primary tissues from small intestine, stomach, liver and pancreas into self-assembling 3D structures that we have termed 'organoids'. We provide a detailed protocol that describes how to grow adult mouse and human liver and pancreas organoids, from cell isolation and long-term expansion to genetic manipulation in vitro. Liver and pancreas cells grow in a gel-based extracellular matrix (ECM) and a defined medium. The cells can self-organize into organoids that self-renew in vitro while retaining their tissue-of-origin commitment, genetic stability and potential to differentiate into functional cells in vitro (hepatocytes) and in vivo (hepatocytes and endocrine cells). Genetic modification of these organoids opens up avenues for the manipulation of adult stem cells in vitro, which could facilitate the study of human biology and allow gene correction for regenerative medicine purposes. The complete protocol takes 1-4 weeks to generate self-renewing 3D organoids and to perform genetic manipulation experiments. Personnel with basic scientific training can conduct this protocol. PMID:27560176

  1. Enhanced expression of hepatocyte-specific microRNAs in valproic acid mediated hepatic trans-differentiation of human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Raut, Akshata; Khanna, Aparna

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the control of cell fate determination during differentiation. In this study, we analyzed the expression pattern of microRNAs (miRNAs) during hepatic trans-differentiation. The protocol employed the use of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), valproic acid (VPA) to induce hepatic trans-differentiation of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs). The differentiated hepatocyte like cells (HLCs) from hUC-MSCs shared typical characteristics with mature hepatocytes, including morphology, expression of hepatocyte -specific genes at the molecular and cellular level. Moreover, the functionality of HLCs was confirmed through various liver function tests such as periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain for glycogen accumulation, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for synthesis of albumin and release of urea. The aim of the present work was to examine the effect of VPA treatment on miRNA expression during hepatic trans-differentiation. The analysis at miRNA level showed that there was a significant increase in expression of miRNAs involved in hepatic differentiation, due to VPA pre-treatment during differentiation. The study, thus demonstrated that improved expression of hepatocyte-specific miRNAs, miR-23b cluster (miR-27b-3p, miR-24-1-5p and miR-23b-3p), miR-30a-5p, miR-26a-5p, miR-148a-3p, miR-192-5p, miR-122-5p due to VPA pre-treatment contributed to a more efficient hepatic trans-differentiation from hUC-MSCs. The putative targets of these upregulated miRNAs were predicted using Bioinformatics analysis. Finally, miR-122-5p, highly upregulated miRNA during hepatic differentiation, was selected for target verification studies. Thus, this study also provides the basis for the function of miR-122-5p during hepatic differentiation of hUC-MSCs. PMID:27001466

  2. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  3. Adult Education and Human Resource Development: A Symbiotic Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, Robert E.; Hemby, K. Virginia; Conerly-Stewart, Donna L.

    1998-01-01

    Top-ranked competencies for graduate education in human resources development (HRD) identified by 55 (of 195) HRD practitioners were adult learning, presentation, facilitation, needs assessment, and human relations. Seven of the top 10 were allied with adult education graduate program content. (SK)

  4. Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Mateevici, Cristina; Lin, Belinda; Chandra, Ronil V.; Chong, Victor H.T.

    2015-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection, PMID:26488420

  5. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  6. Anti-apoptotic effects of novel phenolic antioxidant isolated from the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) on cultured human hepatocytes under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fuda, Hirotoshi; Watanabe, Mitsugu; Hui, Shu-Ping; Joko, Sae; Okabe, Hiroaki; Jin, Shigeki; Takeda, Seiji; Miki, Emiko; Watanabe, Takayuki; Chiba, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    The antioxidant, and hepatoprotective properties of 3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzyl alcohol (DHMBA), a natural phenolic antioxidant isolated from the Pacific oyster, were defined using cultured human hepatocyte-derived cells (C3A). DHMBA showed no cytotoxicity at 62.5-500μM, as well as chlorogenic acid (CGA), vitamin C, and vitamin E. However, butylated hydroxytoluene, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and catechin reduced cell viability. In the presence of the prooxidant 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), DHMBA at 125-500μM improved cell viability, whereas CGA had no effect. DNA ladder formation and flow-cytometric studies indicated that DHMBA inhibited AAPH-induced apoptosis and necrosis. CGA was ineffective. Thus, DHMBA is a novel, potent antioxidant, effectively protecting cultured hepatocytes from apoptosis and necrosis caused by oxidative stress. Additionally, the concentration of DHMBA was determined by mass spectrometry to be 24.4μmol/kg wet oyster meat, and three polyphenols (gentisic acid, daidzein, and matairesinol) were newly identified in the oyster extracts. PMID:25624228

  7. Overexpression of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α in human mesenchymal stem cells suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma development through Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway downregulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ning; Zhang, Yu-Ling; Wang, Hai-Tian; Li, Da-Wei; Dai, Hui-Juan; Zhang, Qi-Qi; Zhang, Jiang; Ma, Yong; Xia, Qiang; Bian, Jian-Min; Hang, Hua-Lian

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold promise as cellular vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic gene products because they can be isolated, expanded, and genetically modified in vitro and possess tumor-oriented homing capacity in vivo. (1) Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a dominant transcriptional regulator of hepatocyte differentiation and hepatocellular carcinogenesis (HCC). (2,3) We have previously demonstrated that overexpression of HNF4α activates various hepatic-specific genes and enhances MSC differentiation. (4) However, the extent that overexpression of HNF4α in MSCs influences HCC progression has yet to be examined. Here we sought to investigate what effect MSCs overexpressing HNF4α (MSC-HNF4α) have on human hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned medium collected from in vitro MSC-HNF4α cultures significantly inhibited hepatoma cell growth and metastasis compared with controls. Additionally, nude mice administered MSC-HNF4α exhibited significantly smaller tumors compared with controls in vivo. Immunoblot analysis of HCC cells treated with MSC-HNF4α displayed downregulated β-catenin, cyclinD1, c-Myc, MMP2 and MMP9. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MSC-HNF4α inhibits HCC progression by reducing hepatoma cell growth and metastasis through downregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:27124543

  8. LIVER REGENERATION STUDIES WITH RAT HEPATOCYTES IN PRIMARY CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult rat parenchymal hepatocytes in primary culture can be induced to enter into DNA synthesis and mitosis. The optimal conditions for hepatocyte replication are low plating density (less than 10,000 cells/sq cm) and 50% serum from two-thirds partially hepatectomized rats (48 hr...

  9. IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) does not inhibit the production of C-reactive protein or serum amyloid A protein by human primary hepatocytes. Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, C; Genin, B; Mentha, G; Iynedjian, P B; Roux-Lombard, P; Guerne, P A

    1995-01-01

    The synthesis of some class 1 acute-phase proteins (APP), including C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) protein is completely blocked by the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), whereas the production of fibrinogen, a class 2 APP, is increased by IL-1Ra in hepatoma cells, but this has never been tested in human hepatocytes in primary culture. Since previous studies on the contributions of cytokine inhibitors in connective tissues diseases suggested that IL-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) might play an important role in the regulation of CRP, we decided to examine in more detail the respective roles of IL-1 beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha and their inhibitors in the production of APP by human primary hepatocytes versus the hepatoma cell line PLC/PRF/5. In the hepatoma cell line, IL-1 beta and/or TNF-alpha had synergistic effects with IL-6 on the production of CRP and SAA. In contrast, these cytokines were devoid of effect in normal hepatocytes. The production of fibrinogen was increased by IL-6 and decreased by IL-1 (and TNF-alpha) in both cell types. The secretion of CRP and SAA by primary hepatocytes incubated with a cytokine-rich mononuclear cell-conditioned medium was totally unaffected by IL-1Ra or anti-TNF-alpha antibodies. In contrast, the addition of IL-1Ra increased the production of fibrinogen by both hepatoma cells and primary hepatocytes incubated with the mononuclear cell-conditioned medium. We therefore conclude that IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha do not exert any significant effect on the synthesis of CRP and SAA by human primary hepatocytes. Images Fig. 6 PMID:7743670

  10. Bioprinting of human pluripotent stem cells and their directed differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells for the generation of mini-livers in 3D.

    PubMed

    Faulkner-Jones, Alan; Fyfe, Catherine; Cornelissen, Dirk-Jan; Gardner, John; King, Jason; Courtney, Aidan; Shu, Wenmiao

    2015-01-01

    We report the first investigation into the bioprinting of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), their response to a valve-based printing process as well as their post-printing differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). HLCs differentiated from both hiPSCs and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) sources were bioprinted and examined for the presence of hepatic markers to further validate the compatibility of the valve-based bioprinting process with fragile cell transfer. Examined cells were positive for nuclear factor 4 alpha and were demonstrated to secrete albumin and have morphology that was also found to be similar to that of hepatocytes. Both hESC and hiPSC lines were tested for post-printing viability and pluripotency and were found to have negligible difference in terms of viability and pluripotency between the printed and non-printed cells. hESC-derived HLCs were 3D printed using alginate hydrogel matrix and tested for viability and albumin secretion during the remaining differentiation and were found to be hepatic in nature. 3D printed with 40-layer of HLC-containing alginate structures reached peak albumin secretion at day 21 of the differentiation protocol. This work demonstrates that the valve-based printing process is gentle enough to print human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) (both hESCs and hiPSCs) while either maintaining their pluripotency or directing their differentiation into specific lineages. The ability to bioprint hPSCs will pave the way for producing organs or tissues on demand from patient specific cells which could be used for animal-free drug development and personalized medicine. PMID:26486521

  11. Cellular impact of combinations of endosulfan, atrazine, and chlorpyrifos on human primary hepatocytes and HepaRG cells after short and chronic exposures.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad; Razpotnik, Andrej; Rouimi, Patrick; de Sousa, Georges; Cravedi, Jean Pierre; Rahmani, Roger

    2014-02-01

    Chronic exposure to low doses of pesticides present in the environment is increasingly suspected to cause major health issues to humans. Toxicological evaluations become more complex when the exposure concerns chemical combinations. Atrazine, chlorpyrifos, and endosulfan are pesticides used worldwide in agriculture and are therefore currently found at residual levels in food and the environment, even in countries in which they are now banned. Our study aimed to use Real-Time Cell Impedance Analyzer to investigate changes in phenotypical status of primary human hepatocytes and differentiated HepaRG cells induced by short and chronic exposures to these three chemicals. In contrast to the traditionally used endpoint cytotoxicity test, this technology allows kinetic measurements in real-time throughout the entire experiment. Our data show significantly higher cytotoxic effects of mixtures as compared to individual pesticides and a greater susceptibility of human hepatocytes as compared to HepaRG to short-term exposure (24 h). Repeated exposure over 2 weeks to endosulfan and endosulfan-containing mixture induced HepaRG cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Of the typical genes involved in metabolism and cell-response to xenobiotics, we found an exposure time- and condition-dependent deregulation of the expression of CYP3A4 and UGT1A in HepaRG cells exposed to low doses of pesticides and mixtures. Our data demonstrate the usefulness of real-time cell monitoring in long-term toxicological evaluations of co-exposure to xenobiotics. In addition, they support but at the same time highlight certain limitations in the use of HepaRG cells as the gold standard liver cell model in toxicity studies. PMID:24343343

  12. The role of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs/SLCOs) in the toxicity of different microcystin congeners in vitro: A comparison of primary human hepatocytes and OATP-transfected HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A.; Hoeger, S.J.; Stemmer, K.; Feurstein, D.J.; Knobeloch, D.; Nussler, A.; Dietrich, D.R.

    2010-05-15

    Cellular uptake of microcystins (MCs), a family of cyclic cyanobacterial heptapeptide toxins, occurs via specific organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs), where MCs inhibit serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase (PP). Despite comparable PP-inhibitory capacity, MCs differ greatly in their acute toxicity, thus raising the question whether this discrepancy results from MC-specific toxikokinetic rather than toxicodynamic differences. OATP-mediated uptake of MC congeners MCLR, -RR, -LW and -LF was compared in primary human hepatocytes and HEK293 cells stably expressing recombinant human OATP1B1/SLCO1B1 and OATP1B3/SLCO1B3 in the presence/absence of OATP substrates taurocholate (TC) and bromosulfophthalein (BSP) and measuring PP-inhibition and cytotoxicity. Control vector expressing HEK293 were resistant to MC cytotoxicity, while TC and BSP competition experiments reduced MC cytotoxicity in HEK293-OATP transfectants, thus confirming the requirement of OATPs for trans-membrane transport. Despite comparable PP-inhibiting capabilities, MCLW and -LF elicited cytotoxic effects at lower equimolar concentrations than MCLR and MCRR, hence suggesting congener selective transport into HEK293-OATP transfectants and primary human hepatocytes. Primary human hepatocytes appeared one order of magnitude more sensitive to MC congeners than the corresponding HEK293 -OATP transfectants. Although the latter maybe due to a much lower level of PPs in primary human hepatocytes, the presence of OATPs other than 1B1 or 1B3 may have added to an increased uptake of MCs. In view of the high sensitivity of human hepatocytes and currently MCLR-only based risk calculations, the actual risk of human MC-intoxication and ensuing liver damage could be underestimated in freshwater cyanobacterial blooms where MCLW and-LF predominate.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL HEPATOCYTE XENOTRANSPLANTATION – A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huidong; Liu, Hong; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Schmelzer, Eva; Wang, Yi; Gerlach, Jörg; Gridelli, Bruno; Cooper, David K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte transplantation is a potential therapy for certain diseases of the liver, including hepatic failure. However, there is a limited supply of human livers as a source of cells and, after isolation, human hepatocytes can be difficult to expand in culture, limiting the number available for transplantation. Hepatocytes from other species, e.g., the pig, have therefore emerged as a potential alternative source. We searched the literature through the end of 2014 to assess the current status of experimental research into hepatocyte xenotransplantation. Literature search and results The literature search identified 51 reports of in vivo cross-species transplantation of hepatocytes in a variety of experimental models. Most studies investigated the transplantation of human (n=23) or pig (n=19) hepatocytes. No studies explored hepatocytes from genetically-engineered pigs. The spleen was the most common site of transplantation (n=23), followed by the liver (through the portal vein [n=6]) and peritoneal cavity (n=19). In 47 studies (92%), there was evidence of hepatocyte engraftment and function across a species barrier. Conclusions The data provided by this literature search strengthen the hypothesis that xenotransplantation of hepatocytes is feasible and potentially successful as a clinical therapy for certain liver diseases, including hepatic failure. By excluding vascular structures, hepatocytes isolated from genetically-engineered pig livers may address some of the immunological problems of xenotransplantation. PMID:25950141

  14. Adult Human Neurogenesis: From Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases. PMID:21519376

  15. Zinc inhibits aflatoxin B1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human hepatocytes (HepG2 cells).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Lv, Yangjun; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) has strong carcinogenicity. Consumption of AFB1-contaminated agricultural products and the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma have received widespread attention. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplementation could inhibit AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of this inhibition. Our data suggest that zinc sources can relieve a certain degree of AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity by protecting against apoptotic body formation and DNA strand breaks, affecting S phase cell cycle arrest, reducing 8-OHdG formation, inhibiting global DNA hypomethylation and regulating gene expression in antioxidation, zinc-association and apoptosis processes. Consequently, zinc stabilizes the integrity of DNA and improves cell survival. These data provides new insights into the protective role of zinc in alleviating AFB1-induced cytotoxicity and mediating epigenetic changes in hepatocytes, demonstrating that zinc sources have detoxification properties in mycotoxin-induced toxicity. PMID:27017951

  16. Establishment of In Silico Prediction Models for CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 Induction in Human Hepatocytes by Multiple Regression Analysis Using Azole Compounds.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Mika; Konno, Yoshihiro; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shinji; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2016-08-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) via cytochrome P450 (P450) induction are one clinical problem leading to increased risk of adverse effects and the need for dosage adjustments and additional therapeutic monitoring. In silico models for predicting P450 induction are useful for avoiding DDI risk. In this study, we have established regression models for CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 induction in human hepatocytes using several physicochemical parameters for a set of azole compounds with different P450 induction as characteristics as model compounds. To obtain a well-correlated regression model, the compounds for CYP3A4 or CYP2B6 induction were independently selected from the tested azole compounds using principal component analysis with fold-induction data. Both of the multiple linear regression models obtained for CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 induction are represented by different sets of physicochemical parameters. The adjusted coefficients of determination for these models were of 0.8 and 0.9, respectively. The fold-induction of the validation compounds, another set of 12 azole-containing compounds, were predicted within twofold limits for both CYP3A4 and CYP2B6. The concordance for the prediction of CYP3A4 induction was 87% with another validation set, 23 marketed drugs. However, the prediction of CYP2B6 induction tended to be overestimated for these marketed drugs. The regression models show that lipophilicity mostly contributes to CYP3A4 induction, whereas not only the lipophilicity but also the molecular polarity is important for CYP2B6 induction. Our regression models, especially that for CYP3A4 induction, might provide useful methods to avoid potent CYP3A4 or CYP2B6 inducers during the lead optimization stage without performing induction assays in human hepatocytes. PMID:27208383

  17. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed. PMID:27517891

  18. Assessing the therapeutic potential of lab-made hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Milad; Grimm, Andrew A; Willenbring, Holger

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has potential as a bridge or even alternative to whole-organ liver transplantation. Because donor livers are scarce, realizing this potential requires the development of alternative cell sources. To be therapeutically effective, surrogate hepatocytes must replicate the complex function and ability to proliferate of primary human hepatocytes. Ideally, they are also autologous to eliminate the need for immune suppression, which can have severe side effects and may not be sufficient to prevent rejection long term. In the past decade, several methods have been developed to generate hepatocytes from other readily and safely accessible somatic cells. These lab-made hepatocytes show promise in animal models of liver diseases, supporting the feasibility of autologous liver cell therapies. Here, we review recent preclinical studies exemplifying different types of lab-made hepatocytes that can potentially be used in autologous liver cell therapies. To define the therapeutic efficacy of current lab-made hepatocytes, we compare them to primary human hepatocytes, focusing on engraftment efficiency and posttransplant proliferation and function. In addition to summarizing published results, we discuss animal models and assays effective in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This analysis underscores the therapeutic potential of current lab-made hepatocytes, but also highlights deficiencies and uncertainties that need to be addressed in future studies aimed at developing liver cell therapies with lab-made hepatocytes. (Hepatology 2016;64:287-294). PMID:27014802

  19. Assessment of Protein Binding of 5-Hydroxythalidomide Bioactivated in Humanized Mice with Human P450 3A-Chromosome or Hepatocytes by Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis/Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oofusa, Ken; Kuribayashi, Shunji; Shimizu, Makiko; Ninomiya, Shinichi; Horie, Toru; Shibata, Norio; Guengerich, F Peter

    2016-08-15

    Bioactivation of 5-hydroxy-[carbonyl-(14)C]thalidomide, a known metabolite of thalidomide, by human artificial or native cytochrome P450 3A enzymes, and nonspecific binding in livers of mice was assessed using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with accelerator mass spectrometry. The apparent major target proteins were liver microsomal cytochrome c oxidase subunit 6B1 and ATP synthase subunit α in mice containing humanized P450 3A genes or transplanted humanized liver. Liver cytosolic retinal dehydrogenase 1 and glutathione transferase A1 were targets in humanized mice with P450 3A and hepatocytes, respectively. 5-Hydroxythalidomide is bioactivated by human P450 3A enzymes and trapped with proteins nonspecifically in humanized mice. PMID:27464947

  20. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Aravinthan, Aloysious; Challis, Benjamin; Shannon, Nicholas; Hoare, Matthew; Heaney, Judith; Alexander, Graeme J.M.

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance.

  1. Developing Resourceful Humans. Adult Education within the Economic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynn Elen, Ed.

    This book, which explores the shifting paradigm from human resource development to developing resourceful humans, establishes the historical position of adult education within the economic context, discusses human capital propositions, and examines the learning dimensions of economic and educational change. The following chapters are included:…

  2. Why Teach the Humanities to Adult Basic Education Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mocker, Donald W., Ed.; Jones, William C., Ed.

    The publication contains an article on curriculum selection in adult basic education (ABE), three presentations on the humanities and ABE, and a concluding commentary. An introductory article, "Criteria for Selecting Curriculum in Adult Basic Education" by Donald Mocker, emphasizes the need for broader criteria for selection of ABE curriculum.…

  3. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  4. Humanizing Adult Education Research: Five Stories from the 1930's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Ronald

    Taken from the author's doctoral dissertation, this award-winning monograph describes a method for humanizing educational research in adult education and provides five stories of adult education efforts in the 1930's as examples of such research. The method described suggests valuing qualitative data as much as quantitative in the field of…

  5. Technology and the Adult Degree Program: The Human Element

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriquez, Frank G.; Nash, Susan Smith

    2004-01-01

    While technology has for many years been a critical component in programs for adults and calls to mind sophisticated gadgetry with expensive price tags, it is often the nexus where technology and humans intersect that proves most critical to the success and quality of adult degree programs.

  6. Critical role of free cytosolic calcium, but not uncoupling, in mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death induced by diclofenac oxidative metabolites in immortalized human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, M.S.; Lim, Priscilla L.K.; Gupta, Rashi; Boelsterli, Urs A. . E-mail: phcbua@nus.edu.sg

    2006-12-15

    Diclofenac is a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been associated with rare but serious hepatotoxicity. Experimental evidence indicates that diclofenac targets mitochondria and induces the permeability transition (mPT) which leads to apoptotic cell death in hepatocytes. While the downstream effector mechanisms have been well characterized, the more proximal pathways leading to the mPT are not known. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of free cytosolic calcium (Ca{sup 2+} {sub c}) in diclofenac-induced cell injury in immortalized human hepatocytes. We show that exposure to diclofenac caused time- and concentration-dependent cell injury, which was prevented by the specific mPT inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA, 5 {mu}M). At 8 h, diclofenac caused increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} (Fluo-4 fluorescence), which was unaffected by CsA. Combined exposure to diclofenac/BAPTA (Ca{sup 2+} chelator) inhibited cell injury, indicating that Ca{sup 2+} plays a critical role in precipitating mPT. Diclofenac decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, {delta}{psi}{sub m} (JC-1 fluorescence), even in the presence of CsA or BAPTA, indicating that mitochondrial depolarization was not a consequence of the mPT or elevated [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. The CYP2C9 inhibitor sulphaphenazole (10 {mu}M) protected from diclofenac-induced cell injury and prevented increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, while it had no effect on the dissipation of the {delta}{psi}{sub m}. Finally, diclofenac exposure greatly increased the mitochondria-selective superoxide levels secondary to the increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that diclofenac has direct depolarizing effects on mitochondria which does not lead to cell injury, while CYP2C9-mediated bioactivation causes increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, triggering the mPT and precipitating cell death.

  7. Analysis of DNA strand breaks induced in rodent liver in vivo, hepatocytes in primary culture, and a human cell line by chlorinated acetic acids and chlorinated acetaldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.W.; Daniel, F.B. ); DeAngelo, A.B. )

    1992-01-01

    An alkaline unwinding assay was used to quantitate the induction of DNA strand breaks (DNA SB) in the livers of rats and mice treated in vivo, in rodent hepatocytes in primary culture, and in CCRF-CEM cells, a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, following treatment with tri-(TCA), di-(CA), and mono-(MCA) chloroacetic acid and their corresponding aldehydes, tri-(chloralhydrate, CH), di(DCAA) and mono-(CAA) chloroacetaldehyde. None of the chloracetic acids induced DNA SB in the livers of rats at 4 hr following a single administration of 1-10 mmole/kg. TCA (10 mmole/kg) and DCA (5 and 10 mmole/kg) did produce a small amount of strand breakage in mice (7% at 4hr) but not at 1 hr. N-nitrosodiethylamine (DENA), an established alkylating agent and a rodent hepatocarcinogen, produced DNA SB in the livers of both species. TCA, DCA, and MCA also failed to induce DNA strand breaks in splenocytes and epithelial cells derived from the stomach and duodenum of mice treated in vivo. None of the three chloroacetaldehydes induced DNA SB in either mouse or rat liver. These studies provide further evidence that the chloroacetic acids lack genotoxic activity not only in rodent liver, a tissue in that they induce tumors, but in a variety of other rodent tissues and cultured cell types. Two of the chloroacetaldehydes, DCAA and CAA, are direct acting DNA damaging agents in CCRF-CEM cells, but not in liver or splenocytes in vivo or in cultured hepatocytes. CH showed no activity in any system investigated. 58 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Enhanced Metabolizing Activity of Human ES Cell-Derived Hepatocytes Using a 3D Culture System with Repeated Exposures to Xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Jang, Yu Jin; An, Su Yeon; Son, Jeongsang; Lee, Jaehun; Lee, Gyunggyu; Park, Ji Young; Park, Han-Jin; Hwang, Dong-Youn; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Han, Jiyou

    2015-09-01

    Highly homogeneous and functional stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) are considered a promising option in the cell-based therapy of liver disease and the development of effective in vitro toxicity screening tools. However, the purity of cells and expression and/or activity of drug metabolizing enzymes in stem cell-derived HLCs are usually too low to be useful for clinical or in vitro applications. Here, we describe a highly optimized hepatic differentiation protocol, which produces >90% (BGO1 and CHA15) albumin-positive HLCs with no purification process from human embryonic stem cell lines. In addition, we show that hepatic enzyme gene expressions and activities were significantly improved by generating 3D spheroidal aggregate of HLCs, compared with 2D HLCs. The 3D differentiation method increased expression of nuclear receptors (NRs) that regulate the proper expression of key hepatic enzymes. Furthermore, significantly increased hepatic functions such as albumin and urea secretion were observed in 3D hepatic spheroids, compared with 2D HLCs. HLCs in the spheroid exhibited morphological and ultrastructural features of normal hepatocytes. Importantly, we show that repeated exposures to xenobiotics facilitated further functional maturation of HLC, as confirmed by increased expression of genes for drug metabolizing enzymes and transcription factors. In conclusion, the 3D culture system with repeated exposures to xenobiotics may be a new strategy for enhancing hepatic metabolizing ability of stem cell-derived HLCs as a cell source for in vitro high-throughput hepatotoxicity models. PMID:26089346

  9. Prediction of the metabolic clearance of benzophenone-2, and its interaction with isoeugenol and coumarin using cryopreserved human hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Georges; Teng, Sophie; Salle-Siri, Romain; Pery, Alexandre; Rahmani, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Benzophenone-2 (BP2) is widely used as a UV screen in both industrial products and cosmetic formulations, where it is frequently found associated with fragrance compounds, such as isoeugenol and coumarin. BP2 is now recognized as an endocrine disruptor, but to date, no information has been reported on its fate in humans. The intrinsic clearance (Clint) and metabolic interactions of BP2 were explored using cryopreserved human hepatocytes in primary cultures. In vitro kinetic experiments were performed to estimate the Michaelis-Menten parameters. The substrate depletion method demonstrated that isoeugenol was cleared more rapidly than BP2 or coumarin (Clint = 259, 94.7 and 0.40 μl/min/10(6) cells respectively). This vitro model was also used to study the metabolic interactions between BP2 and isoeugenol and coumarin. Coumarin exerted no effects on either isoeugenol or BP2 metabolism, because of its independent metabolic pathway (CYP2A6). Isoeugenol appeared to be a potent competitive substrate inhibitor of BP2 metabolism, equivalent to the specific UGT1A1 substrate: estradiol. Despite the fact that inhibition of UGT by xenobiotics is not usually considered to be a major concern, the involvement of UGT1A1 in BP2 metabolism may have pharmacokinetic and pharmacological consequences, due to the its polymorphisms in humans and its pure estrogenic effect. PMID:26829614

  10. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  11. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults.

    PubMed

    Khonsari, Shadi; Suganthy, Mayuran; Burczynska, Beata; Dang, Vu; Choudhury, Manika; Pachenari, Azra

    2016-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  12. In vitro evaluation of hepatotoxic drugs in human hepatocytes from multiple donors: Identification of P450 activity as a potential risk factor for drug-induced liver injuries.

    PubMed

    Utkarsh, Doshi; Loretz, Carol; Li, Albert P

    2016-08-01

    A possible risk factor for drug-induced hepatotoxicity is drug metabolizing enzyme activity, which is known to vary among individuals due to genetic (genetic polymorphism) and environmental factors (environmental pollutants, foods, and medications that are inhibitors or inducers of drug metabolizing enzymes). We hypothesize that hepatic cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase (CYP) activity is one of the key risk factors for drug induced liver injuries (DILI) in the human population, especially for drugs that are metabolically activated to cytotoxic/reactive metabolites. Human hepatocytes from 19 donors were evaluated for the activities of 8 major P450 isoforms: CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1 and CYP3A4. Extensive individual variations were observed, consistent with what is known to be in the human population. As CYP3A4 is known to be one of the most important P450 isoforms for drug metabolism, studies were performed to evaluate the relationship between the in vitro cytotoxicity of hepatotoxic drugs and CYP3A4 activity. In a proof of concept study, hepatocytes from six donors (lots) representing the observed range of CYP3A4 activities were chosen for the evaluation of in vitro hepatotoxicity of four drugs known to be associated with acute liver failure: acetaminophen, cyclophosphamide, ketoconazole, and tamoxifen. The hepatocytes were cultured in collagen-coated plates and treated with the hepatotoxicants for approximately 24 h, followed by viability determination based on cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) contents. HH1023, the lot of hepatocytes with the highest CYP3A4 activity, was found to be the most sensitive to the cytotoxicity of all 4 hepatotoxic drugs, thereby suggesting that high CYP3A4 activity may be a risk factor. To further validate the relationship, a second study was performed with hepatocytes from 16 donors. In this study, the hepatocytes were quantified for CYP3A4 activity at the time of treatment. Results of the

  13. Cloning and characterization of a novel human hepatocyte transcription factor, hB1F, which binds and activates enhancer II of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Xie, Y H; Kong, Y Y; Wu, X; Zhu, L; Wang, Y

    1998-10-30

    Enhancer II (ENII) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the essential cis-elements for the transcriptional regulation of HBV gene expression. Its function is highly liver-specific, suggesting that liver-enriched transcriptional factors play critical roles in regulating the activity of ENII. In this report, a novel hepatocyte transcription factor, which binds specifically to the B1 region (AACGACCGACCTTGAG) within the major functional unit (B unit) of ENII, has been cloned from a human liver cDNA library by yeast one-hybrid screening, and demonstrated to trans-activate ENII via the B1 region. We named this factor hB1F, for human B1-binding factor. Amino acid analysis revealed this factor structurally belongs to nuclear receptor superfamily. Based on the sequence similarities, hB1F is characterized to be a novel human homolog of the orphan receptor fushi tarazu factor I (FTZ-F1). Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, a splicing isoform of hB1F (hB1F-2) was identified, which has an extra 46 amino acid residues in the A/B region. Examination of the tissue distribution has revealed an abundant 5.2-kilobase transcript of hB1F is present specifically in human pancreas and liver. Interestingly, an additional transcript of 3.8 kilobases was found to be present in hepatoma cells HepG2. Fluorescent in situ hybridization has mapped the gene locus of hB1F to the region q31-32.1 of human chromosome 1. Altogether, this study provides the first report that a novel human homolog of FTZ-F1 binds and regulates ENII of HBV. The potential roles of this FTZ-F1 homolog in tissue-specific gene regulation, in embryonic development, as well as in liver carcinogenesis are discussed. PMID:9786908

  14. Suppression of furin by interferon-γ and the impact on hepatitis B virus antigen biosynthesis in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Feng; Hsu, Hong-Yuan; Ni, Yen-Hsuan; Chen, Huey-Ling; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2012-07-01

    The roles of furin and intrahepatic cytokines in chronic heptatitis B virus (HBV) infection remain largely unknown. Here, we examined the relations between furin, IL-10, IL-12β, interferon (IFN)-γ, programed death (PD)-1, programed death ligand (PD-L)1, and the suppression of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and surface antigen (HBsAg) biosynthesis. Liver biopsies were performed on 20 chronically HBV-infected (15 HBeAg-positive and 5 HBeAg-negative) patients to assess liver inflammation/fibrosis, and mRNA levels of furin, IL-10, IL-12β, IFN-γ, PD-1, and PD-L1 were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. IFN-γ mRNA abundance was associated with lower furin mRNA levels and higher PD-1 and PD-L1 mRNA levels in liver tissue from HBeAg-positive patients. IL-10 and IL-12β mRNA levels positively correlated with IFN-γ expression levels (P < 0.05). PD-L1 and furin mRNA levels were further assessed in IFN-γ-stimulated hepatoma cell lines with (HepG2.2.15 cells) and without (HepG2 and Huh7 cells) HBV replication. IFN-γ enhanced PD-L1 expression in hepatoma cells. In HepG2.2.15 cells, IFN-γ further suppressed furin and HBeAg expression. Furin inhibition and knockdown in HepG2.2.15 cells also down-regulated HBeAg and HBsAg biosynthesis. These data suggest that IFN-γ modulates the inflammatory response to avoid excessive hepatocyte damage through the enhancement of PD-1/PD-L1 expression, whereas furin suppression may contribute to a reduction in HBeAg/HBsAg biosynthesis. PMID:22634051

  15. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Modification Enhances the Anti-Arrhythmic Properties of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Yu, Yi-Chao; Ju, Wei-Zhu; Man, Yi-Long; Li, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Yan; Wang, Zi-Dun; Gu, Wei-Juan; Zhang, Feng-Xiang; Wang, Hua; Wu, Chu-Tse; Cao, Ke-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic myocardial infarction (MI) results in the formation of arrhythmogenic substrates, causing lethal ventricular arrhythmia (VA). We aimed to determine whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) carrying a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene modification (HGF-MSCs) decrease the levels of arrhythmogenic substrates and reduce the susceptibility to developing VA compared with unmodified MSCs and PBS in a swine infarction model. Methods The left descending anterior artery was balloon-occluded to establish an MI model. Four weeks later, the randomly grouped pigs were administered MSCs, PBS or HGF-MSCs via thoracotomy. After an additional four weeks, dynamic electrocardiography was performed to assess heart rate variability, and programmed electrical stimulation was conducted to evaluate the risk for VA. Then, the pigs were euthanized for morphometric, immunofluorescence and western blot analyses. Results: The HGF-MSC group displayed the highest vessel density and Cx43 expression levels, and the lowest levels of apoptosis, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) expression. Moreover, the HGF-MSC group exhibited a decrease in the number of sympathetic nerve fibers, substantial decreases in the low frequency and the low-/high- frequency ratio and increases in the root mean square of successive differences (rMSSD) and the percentage of successive normal sinus R-R intervals longer than 50 ms (pNN50), compared with the other two groups. Finally, the HGF-MSC group displayed the lowest susceptibility to developing VA. Conclusion HGF-MSCs displayed potent antiarrhythmic effects, reducing the risk for VA. PMID:25360679

  16. Humanities and the Adult Learner in an Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Dale; Kamholtz, Jonathan

    Humanities courses have often been given little attention in continuing education for adults, possibly because they have been viewed as not "practical" or not "job-oriented" enough in our career-oriented, technologically advanced society. However, the humanities should be an integral part of our culture and of the lives of educated persons--a…

  17. Effect of sex hormones on n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in HepG2 cells and in human primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sibbons, Charlene M; Brenna, J Thomas; Lawrence, Peter; Hoile, Samuel P; Clarke-Harris, Rebecca; Lillycrop, Karen A; Burdge, Graham C

    2014-01-01

    Female humans and rodents have been shown to have higher 22:6n-3 status and synthesis than males. It is unclear which sex hormone is involved. We investigated the specificity of the effects of physiological concentrations of sex hormones in vitro on the mRNA expression of genes involved in polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis and on the conversion of [d5]-18:3n-3 to longer chain fatty acids. Progesterone, but not 17α-ethynylestradiol or testosterone, increased FADS2, FADS1, ELOVl 5 and ELOVl 2 mRNA expression in HepG2 cells, but only FADS2 in primary human hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, these changes were accompanied by hypomethylation of specific CpG loci in the FADS2 promoter. Progesterone, not 17α-ethynylestradiol or testosterone, increased conversion of [d5]-18:3n-3 to 20:5n-3, 22:5n-3 and 22:6n-3. These findings show that progesterone increases n-3 PUFA biosynthesis by up-regulating the mRNA expression of genes involved in this pathway, possibly via changes in the epigenetic regulation of FADS2. PMID:24411721

  18. In vitro human metabolism of permethrin isomers alone or as a mixture and the formation of the major metabolites in cryopreserved primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Willemin, M-E; Kadar, A; de Sousa, G; Leclerc, E; Rahmani, R; Brochot, C

    2015-06-01

    In vitro metabolism of permethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, was assessed in primary human hepatocytes. In vitro kinetic experiments were performed to estimate the Michaelis-Menten parameters and the clearances or formation rates of the permethrin isomers (cis- and trans-) and three metabolites, cis- and trans-3-(2,2 dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethyl-(1-cyclopropane) carboxylic acid (cis- and trans-DCCA) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA). Non-specific binding and the activity of the enzymes involved in permethrin's metabolism (cytochromes P450 and carboxylesterases) were quantified. Trans-permethrin was cleared more rapidly than cis-permethrin with a 2.6-factor (25.7±0.6 and 10.1±0.3 μL/min/10(6) cells respectively). A 3-factor was observed between the formation rates of DCCA and 3-PBA obtained from trans- and cis-permethrin. For both isomers, the rate of formation of DCCA was higher than the one of 3-PBA. The metabolism of the isomers in mixture was also quantified. The co-incubation of isomers at different ratios showed the low inhibitory potential of cis- and trans-permethrin on each other. The estimates of the clearances and the formation rates in the co-incubation condition did not differ from the estimates obtained with a separate incubation. These metabolic parameters may be integrated in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to predict the fate of permethrin and metabolites in the human body. PMID:25765475

  19. Alirocumab, a Therapeutic Human Antibody to PCSK9, Does Not Affect CD81 Levels or Hepatitis C Virus Entry and Replication into Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Aarti; Gusarova, Viktoria; Stahl, Neil; Gurnett-Bander, Anne; Kyratsous, Christos A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PSCK9) is secreted mainly from the liver and binds to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), reducing LDLR availability and thus resulting in an increase in LDL-cholesterol. While the LDLR has been implicated in the cell entry process of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), overexpression of an artificial non-secreted, cell membrane-bound form of PCSK9 has also been shown to reduce surface expression of CD81, a major component of the HCV entry complex, leading to concerns that pharmacological inhibition of PCSK9 may increase susceptibility to HCV infection by increasing either CD81 or LDLR availability. Here, we evaluated effects of PCSK9 and PCSK9 blockade on CD81 levels and HCV entry with a physiologically relevant model using native secreted PCSK9 and a monoclonal antibody to PCSK9, alirocumab. Methods and Results Flow cytometry and Western blotting of human hepatocyte Huh-7 cells showed that, although LDLR levels were reduced when cells were exposed to increasing PCSK9 concentrations, there was no correlation between total or surface CD81 levels and the presence and amount of soluble PCSK9. Moreover, inhibiting PCSK9 with the monoclonal antibody alirocumab did not affect expression levels of CD81. In an in vitro model of HCV entry, addition of soluble PCSK9 or treatment with alirocumab had no effect on the ability of either lentiviral particles bearing the HCV glycoproteins or JFH-1 based cell culture virus to enter hepatocytes. Consistent with these in vitro findings, no differences were observed in hepatic CD81 levels using in vivo mouse models, including Pcsk9-/- mice compared with wild-type controls and hyperlipidemic mice homozygous for human Pcsk9 and heterozygous for Ldlr deletion, treated with either alirocumab or isotype control antibody. Conclusion These results suggest that inhibition of PCSK9 with alirocumab has no effect on CD81 and does not result in increased susceptibility to HCV entry

  20. The potential of induced pluripotent stem cell derived hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hannoun, Zara; Steichen, Clara; Dianat, Noushin; Weber, Anne; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2016-07-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation remains the only curative treatment for liver disease. However, the number of patients who die while on the waiting list (15%) has increased in recent years as a result of severe organ shortages; furthermore the incidence of liver disease is increasing worldwide. Clinical trials involving hepatocyte transplantation have provided encouraging results. However, transplanted cell function appears to often decline after several months, necessitating liver transplantation. The precise aetiology of the loss of cell function is not clear, but poor engraftment and immune-mediated loss appear to be important factors. Also, primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are not readily available, de-differentiate, and die rapidly in culture. Hepatocytes are available from other sources, such as tumour-derived human hepatocyte cell lines and immortalised human hepatocyte cell lines or porcine hepatocytes. However, all these cells suffer from various limitations such as reduced or differences in functions or risk of zoonotic infections. Due to their significant potential, one possible inexhaustible source of hepatocytes is through the directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This review will discuss the potential applications and existing limitations of hiPSC-derived hepatocytes in regenerative medicine, drug screening, in vitro disease modelling and bioartificial livers. PMID:26916529

  1. Scalable Differentiation of Human iPSCs in a Multicellular Spheroid-based 3D Culture into Hepatocyte-like Cells through Direct Wnt/β-catenin Pathway Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Pettinato, Giuseppe; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Fisher, Robert A; Mangino, Martin J; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute liver failure by cell transplantation is hindered by a shortage of human hepatocytes. Current protocols for hepatic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) result in low yields, cellular heterogeneity, and limited scalability. In the present study, we have developed a novel multicellular spheroid-based hepatic differentiation protocol starting from embryoid bodies of hiPSCs (hiPSC-EBs) for robust mass production of human hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) using two novel inhibitors of the Wnt pathway. The resultant hiPSC-EB-HLCs expressed liver-specific genes, secreted hepatic proteins such as Albumin, Alpha Fetoprotein, and Fibrinogen, metabolized ammonia, and displayed cytochrome P450 activities and functional activities typical of mature primary hepatocytes, such as LDL storage and uptake, ICG uptake and release, and glycogen storage. Cell transplantation of hiPSC-EB-HLC in a rat model of acute liver failure significantly prolonged the mean survival time and resolved the liver injury when compared to the no-transplantation control animals. The transplanted hiPSC-EB-HLCs secreted human albumin into the host plasma throughout the examination period (2 weeks). Transplantation successfully bridged the animals through the critical period for survival after acute liver failure, providing promising clues of integration and full in vivo functionality of these cells after treatment with WIF-1 and DKK-1. PMID:27616299

  2. Inhibition of hepatic organic anion-transporting polypeptide by RNA interference in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes: an in vitro model to assess transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Mingxiang; Raczynski, Arek R; Chen, Michael; Chuang, Bei-Ching; Zhu, Qing; Shipman, Rob; Morrison, Jodi; Lee, David; Lee, Frank W; Balani, Suresh K; Xia, Cindy Q

    2010-09-01

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), members of the SLCO/SLC21 family, mediate the transport of various endo- and xenobiotics. In human liver, OATP1B1, 1B3, and 2B1 are located at the basolateral membrane of hepatocytes and are involved in hepatic drug uptake and biliary elimination. Clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) mediated by hepatic OATPs have drawn great attention from clinical practitioners and researchers. However, there are considerable challenges to prospectively understanding the extent of OATP-mediated DDIs because of the lack of specific OATP inhibitors or substrates and the limitations of in vitro tools. In the present study, a novel RNA interference knockdown sandwich-cultured human hepatocyte model was developed and validated. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction, microarray and immunoblotting analyses, along with uptake assays, illustrated that the expression and transport activity of hepatic OATPs were reduced by small interfering (siRNA) efficiently and specifically in this model. Although OATP siRNA decreased only 20 to 30% of the total uptake of cerivastatin into human hepatocytes, it caused a 50% reduction in cerivastatin metabolism, which was observed by monitoring the formation of the two major metabolites of cerivastatin. The results suggest that coadministration of a drug that is a hepatic OATP inhibitor could significantly alter the pharmacokinetic profile of cerivastatin in clinical studies. Further studies with this novel model demonstrated that OATP and cytochrome P450 have a synergistic effect on cerivastatin-gemfibrozil interactions. The siRNA knockdown sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes may provide a new powerful model for evaluating DDIs. PMID:20516252

  3. Identification of major proteins in the lipid droplet-enriched fraction isolated from the human hepatocyte cell line HuH7.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Jun; Makita, Minoru; Noda, Junich; Mori, Masahiro; Higashi, Yusuke; Kojima, Shinichi; Takano, Tatsuya

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies have revealed the presence of intracellular lipid droplets in wide variety of species. In mammalian cells, there exist proteins specifically localize in lipid droplets. However, the protein profile in the droplet remains yet to be clarified. In this study, a fraction enriched with lipid droplets was isolated from a human hepatocyte cell line HuH7 using sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and 17 major proteins in the fraction were identified using nano LC-MS/MS techniques. Adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) was the most abundant protein in the fraction. The secondary abundant proteins were identified to be acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACS3) and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 11 (17betaHSD11). Included in the identified proteins were five lipid-metabolizing enzymes as well as two lipid droplet-specific proteins. When HuH7 cell lysate was fractionated by a density gradient, most of 17betaHSD11 was found in the droplet-enriched fraction. In immunocytochemical analysis, 17betaHSD11 showed ring-shaped images which overlapped with those for ADRP. These results suggest that a specific set of proteins is enriched in the lipid droplet-enriched fraction and that 17betaHSD11 localizes specifically in the fraction. PMID:14741744

  4. Curcumin attenuates quinocetone induced apoptosis and inflammation via the opposite modulation of Nrf2/HO-1 and NF-kB pathway in human hepatocyte L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Li, Bin; Zhou, Yan; Li, Daowen; Zhang, Shen; Li, Hui; Xiao, Xilong; Tang, Shusheng

    2016-09-01

    The potential toxicity of quinocetone (QCT) has raised widely concern, but its mechanism is still unclear. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of curcumin on QCT induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanism in human hepatocyte L02 cells. The results showed that QCT treatment significantly decreased the cell viability of L02 cell and increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which was attenuated by curcumin pre-treatment at 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μM. Compared to the QCT alone group, curcumin pre-treatment significantly attenuated QCT induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. In addition, curcumin pretreatment markedly attenuated QCT-induced increase of iNOS activity and NO production in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, curcumin pretreatment markedly down-regulated the expression of nuclear factor -kB (NF-kB) and iNOS mRNAs, but up-regulated the expressions of Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNAs, compared to the QCT alone group. Zinc protoporphyrin IX, a HO-1 inhibitor, markedly partly abolished the cytoprotective effect of curcumin against QCT-induced caspase activation, NF-kB mRNA expression. These results indicate that curcumin could effectively inhibit QCT induced apoptosis and inflammatory response in L02 cells, which may involve the activation of Nrf2/HO-1 and inhibition of NF-kB pathway. PMID:27375190

  5. Curcumin Ameliorates Furazolidone-Induced DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Human Hepatocyte L02 Cells by Inhibiting ROS Production and Mitochondrial Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Li, Daowen; Gong, Lijing; Xiao, Xilong; Tang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Furazolidone (FZD), a synthetic nitrofuran derivative, has been widely used as an antibacterial and antiprotozoal agent. Recently, the potential toxicity of FZD has raised concerns, but its mechanism is still unclear. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of curcumin on FZD-induced cytotoxicity and the underlying mechanism in human hepatocyte L02 cells. The results showed that curcumin pre-treatment significantly ameliorated FZD-induced oxidative stress, characterized by decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde formation, and increased superoxide dismutase, catalase activities and glutathione contents. In addition, curcumin pre-treatment significantly ameliorated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the activations of caspase-9 and -3, and apoptosis caused by FZD. Alkaline comet assay showed that curcumin markedly reduced FZD-induced DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Curcumin pre-treatment consistently and markedly down-regulated the mRNA expression levels of p53, Bax, caspase-9 and -3 and up-regulated the mRNA expression level of Bcl-2. Taken together, these results reveal that curcumin protects against FZD-induced DNA damage and apoptosis by inhibiting oxidative stress and mitochondrial pathway. Our study indicated that curcumin may be a promising combiner with FZD to reduce FZD-related toxicity in clinical applications. PMID:27556439

  6. The Roles of Endoplasmic Reticulum Overload Response Induced by HCV and NS4B Protein in Human Hepatocyte Viability and Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingjie; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Qinghua; Ye, Li; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Xiangdong; Sun, Ruina; Guo, Yunli

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and its infection triggers ER stress. In response to ER stress, ER overload response (EOR) can be activated, which involves the release of Ca2+ from ER, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). We have previously reported that HCV NS4B expression activates NF-κB via EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway. Here, we showed that NS4B expression and HCV infection activated cancer-related NF-κB signaling pathway and induced the expression of cancer-related NF-κB target genes via EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway. Moreover, we found that HCV-activated EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway had profound effects on host cell viability and HCV replication. HCV infection induced human hepatocyte death by EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway, whereas activation of EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway increased the cell viability. Meanwhile, EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway inhibited acute HCV replication, which could alleviate the detrimental effect of HCV on cell viability and enhance chronic HCV infection. Together, our findings provide new insights into the functions of EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway in natural HCV replication and pathogenesis. PMID:25875501

  7. Microvesicles Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Facilitate Tubular Epithelial Cell Dedifferentiation and Growth via Hepatocyte Growth Factor Induction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuai; Zou, Xiang-yu; Zhang, Guang-yuan; Gu, Di; Miao, Shuai; Zhu, Ying-jian; Sun, Jie; Du, Tao

    2015-01-01

    During acute kidney injury (AKI), tubular cell dedifferentiation initiates cell regeneration; hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is involved in modulating cell dedifferentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-derived microvesicles (MVs) deliver RNA into injured tubular cells and alter their gene expression, thus regenerating these cells. We boldly speculated that MVs might induce HGF synthesis via RNA transfer, thereby facilitating tubular cell dedifferentiation and regeneration. In a rat model of unilateral AKI, the administration of MVs promoted kidney recovery. One of the mechanisms of action is the acceleration of tubular cell dedifferentiation and growth. Both in vivo and in vitro, rat HGF expression in damaged rat tubular cells was greatly enhanced by MV treatment. In addition, human HGF mRNA present in MVs was delivered into rat tubular cells and translated into the HGF protein as another mechanism of HGF induction. RNase treatment abrogated all MV effects. In the in vitro experimental setting, the conditioned medium of MV-treated injured tubular cells, which contains a higher concentration of HGF, strongly stimulated cell dedifferentiation and growth, as well as Erk1/2 signaling activation. Intriguingly, these effects were completely abrogated by either c-Met inhibitor or MEK inhibitor, suggesting that HGF induction is a crucial contributor to the acceleration of cell dedifferentiation and growth. All these findings indicate that MV-induced HGF synthesis in damaged tubular cells via RNA transfer facilitates cell dedifferentiation and growth, which are important regenerative mechanisms. PMID:25793303

  8. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Effects on Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Arteries: A Novel Strategy to Accelerate Vascular Ulcer Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Sabrina; Pasanisi, Emanuela; Ricci, Francesca; Stella, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Vascular ulcers are a serious complication of peripheral vascular disease, especially in diabetics. Several approaches to treat the wounds are proposed but they show poor outcomes and require long healing times. Hepatocyte Growth Factor/Scatter Factor (HGF/SF) is a pleiotropic cytokine exerting many biological activities through the c-Met receptor. This study was aimed at verifying whether HGF/SF influences proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis on mesenchymal stem cells isolated from human arteries (hVW-MSCs). hVW-MSCs were exposed to NIBSC HGF/SF (2.5, 5, 10, and 70 ng/mL) from 6 hrs to 7 days. HGF and c-MET mRNA and protein expression, cell proliferation (Alamar Blue and Ki–67 assay), migration (scratch and transwell assays), and angiogenesis (Matrigel) were investigated. hVW-MSCs displayed stemness features and expressed HGF and c-MET. HGF/SF did not increase hVW-MSC proliferation, whereas it enhanced the cell migration, the formation of capillary-like structures, and the expression of angiogenic markers (vWF, CD31, and KDR). The HGF/SF effects on hVW-MSC migration and angiogenic potential are of great interest to accelerate wound healing process. Local delivery of HGF/SF could therefore improve the healing of unresponsive vascular ulcers. PMID:26788066

  9. Inter-donor variability of phase I/phase II metabolism of three reference drugs in cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes in suspension and monolayer.

    PubMed

    den Braver-Sewradj, Shalenie P; den Braver, Michiel W; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M; Richert, Lysiane; Vos, J Chris

    2016-06-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs), UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) and sulfotransferases (SULTs) are the most important enzymes for metabolic clearance. Characterization of phase I and phase II metabolism of a given drug in cellular models is therefore important for an adequate interpretation of the role of drug metabolism in toxicity. We investigated phase I (CYP) and phase II (UGT and SULT) metabolism of three drugs related to drug-induced liver injury (DILI), namely acetaminophen (APAP), diclofenac (DF) and tolcapone (TC), in cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes from 5 donors in suspension and monolayer. The general phase II substrate 7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC) was included for comparison. Our results show that the decrease in CYP, UGT and SULT activity after plating is substrate dependent. As a consequence the phase I/phase II metabolism ratio is significantly affected, with a shift in monolayer towards phase I metabolism for TC and towards phase II metabolism for APAP and DF. Inter-donor variability in drug metabolism is significant, especially in sulfation of 7-HC or APAP. As CYP, UGT and SULT metabolism may lead to bioactivation and/or detoxification of drugs, a changed ratio in phase I/phase II metabolism may have important consequences for metabolism-related toxicity. PMID:26921663

  10. DNA Adducts of the Tobacco Carcinogens 2-Amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole and 4-Aminobiphenyl are Formed at Environmental Exposure levels and Persist in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nauwelaërs, Gwendoline; Bellamri, Medjda; Fessard, Valérie; Turesky, Robert J.; Langouët, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic amines and structurally related heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are produced during the combustion of tobacco or during the high-temperature cooking of meat. Exposure to some of these chemicals may contribute to the etiology of several common types of human cancers. 2-Amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (AαC) is the most abundant HAA formed in mainstream tobacco smoke: it arises in amounts that are 25–100 times greater than the levels of the arylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP), a human carcinogen. 2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) is a prevalent HAA formed in cooked meats. AαC and MeIQx are rodent carcinogens; however, their carcinogenic potency in humans is unknown. A preliminary assessment of the carcinogenic potential of these HAAs in humans was conducted by examining the capacity of primary human hepatocytes to form DNA adducts of AαC and MeIQx, in comparison to 4-ABP, followed by the kinetics of DNA adduct removal by cellular enzyme repair systems. The principal DNA adducts formed were N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl) (dG-C8) adducts. Comparable levels of DNA adducts were formed with AαC and 4-ABP, whereas adduct formation was ~5-fold lower for MeIQx. dG-C8-AαC and dG-C8-4-ABP were formed at comparable levels in a concentration-dependent manner in human hepatocytes treated with procarcinogens over a ten thousand-fold concentration range (1 nM – 10 µM). Pretreatment of hepatocytes with furafylline, a selective inhibitor of cytochrome P450 1A2, resulted in a strong diminution of DNA adducts signifying that P450 1A2 is a major P450 isoform involved in bioactivation of these procarcinogens. The kinetics of adduct removal varied for each hepatocyte donor. Approximately half of the DNA adducts were removed within 24 h of treatment; however, the remaining lesions persisted over 5 days. The high levels of AαC present in tobacco smoke and its propensity to form persistent DNA adducts in human hepatocytes, suggests that AαC can contribute to

  11. Species Differences in Hepatobiliary Disposition of Taurocholic Acid in Human and Rat Sandwich-Cultured Hepatocytes: Implications for Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kyunghee; Pfeifer, Nathan D.; Köck, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP) plays an important role in bile acid excretion. Impaired BSEP function may result in liver injury. Bile acids also undergo basolateral efflux, but the relative contributions of biliary (CLBile) versus basolateral efflux (CLBL) clearance to hepatocellular bile acid excretion have not been determined. In the present study, taurocholic acid (TCA; a model bile acid) disposition was characterized in human and rat sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) combined with pharmacokinetic modeling. In human SCH, biliary excretion of TCA predominated (CLBile = 0.14 ± 0.04 ml/min per g liver; CLBL = 0.042 ± 0.019 ml/min per g liver), whereas CLBile and CLBL contributed approximately equally to TCA hepatocellular excretion in rat SCH (CLBile = 0.34 ± 0.07 ml/min per g liver; CLBL = 0.26 ± 0.07 ml/min per g liver). Troglitazone decreased TCA uptake, CLBile, and CLBL; membrane vesicle assays revealed for the first time that the major metabolite, troglitazone sulfate, was a noncompetitive inhibitor of multidrug resistance–associated protein 4, a basolateral bile acid efflux transporter. Simulations revealed that decreased CLBile led to a greater increase in hepatic TCA exposure in human than in rat SCH. A decrease in both excretory pathways (CLBile and CLBL) exponentially increased hepatic TCA in both species, suggesting that 1) drugs that inhibit both pathways may have a greater risk for hepatotoxicity, and 2) impaired function of an alternate excretory pathway may predispose patients to hepatotoxicity when drugs that inhibit one pathway are administered. Simulations confirmed the protective role of uptake inhibition, suggesting that a drug’s inhibitory effects on bile acid uptake also should be considered when evaluating hepatotoxic potential. Overall, the current study precisely characterized basolateral efflux of TCA, revealed species differences in hepatocellular TCA efflux pathways, and provided insights about altered hepatic bile acid

  12. Species differences in hepatobiliary disposition of taurocholic acid in human and rat sandwich-cultured hepatocytes: implications for drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyunghee; Pfeifer, Nathan D; Köck, Kathleen; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2015-05-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP) plays an important role in bile acid excretion. Impaired BSEP function may result in liver injury. Bile acids also undergo basolateral efflux, but the relative contributions of biliary (CLBile) versus basolateral efflux (CLBL) clearance to hepatocellular bile acid excretion have not been determined. In the present study, taurocholic acid (TCA; a model bile acid) disposition was characterized in human and rat sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) combined with pharmacokinetic modeling. In human SCH, biliary excretion of TCA predominated (CLBile = 0.14 ± 0.04 ml/min per g liver; CLBL = 0.042 ± 0.019 ml/min per g liver), whereas CLBile and CLBL contributed approximately equally to TCA hepatocellular excretion in rat SCH (CLBile = 0.34 ± 0.07 ml/min per g liver; CLBL = 0.26 ± 0.07 ml/min per g liver). Troglitazone decreased TCA uptake, CLBile, and CLBL; membrane vesicle assays revealed for the first time that the major metabolite, troglitazone sulfate, was a noncompetitive inhibitor of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4, a basolateral bile acid efflux transporter. Simulations revealed that decreased CLBile led to a greater increase in hepatic TCA exposure in human than in rat SCH. A decrease in both excretory pathways (CLBile and CLBL) exponentially increased hepatic TCA in both species, suggesting that 1) drugs that inhibit both pathways may have a greater risk for hepatotoxicity, and 2) impaired function of an alternate excretory pathway may predispose patients to hepatotoxicity when drugs that inhibit one pathway are administered. Simulations confirmed the protective role of uptake inhibition, suggesting that a drug's inhibitory effects on bile acid uptake also should be considered when evaluating hepatotoxic potential. Overall, the current study precisely characterized basolateral efflux of TCA, revealed species differences in hepatocellular TCA efflux pathways, and provided insights about altered hepatic bile acid exposure

  13. First metabolic profile of PV8, a novel synthetic cathinone, in human hepatocytes and urine by high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Swortwood, Madeleine J; Ellefsen, Kayla N; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Diao, Xingxing; Concheiro-Guisan, Marta; Kronstrand, Robert; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-07-01

    Novel psychoactive substances (NPS) are ever changing on the drug market, making it difficult for toxicology laboratory methods to stay current with so many new drugs. Recently, PV8, a synthetic pyrrolidinophenone, was detected in seized products in Japan (2013), The Netherlands (2014), and Germany (2014). There are no controlled PV8 administration studies, and no pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic data. The objective was to determine PV8's metabolic stability in human liver microsome (HLM) incubation and its metabolism following human hepatocyte incubation and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) with a Thermo Scientific Q-Exactive. Data were acquired with a full-scan data-dependent mass spectrometry method. Scans were thoroughly data mined with different data processing algorithms and analyzed in WebMetaBase. PV8 exhibited a relatively short 28.8 min half-life, with an intrinsic 24.2 μL/min/mg microsomal clearance. This compound is predicted to be an intermediate clearance drug with an estimated human 22.7 mL/min/kg hepatic clearance. Metabolic pathways identified in vitro included: hydroxylation, ketone reduction, carboxylation, N-dealkylation, iminium formation, dehydrogenation, N-oxidation, and carbonylation. The top three in vitro metabolic pathways were di-hydroxylation > ketone reduction > γ-lactam formation. Authentic urine specimen analyses revealed the top three metabolic pathways were aliphatic hydroxylation > ketone reduction + aliphatic hydroxylation > aliphatic carboxylation, although the most prominent peak was parent PV8. These data provide useful urinary metabolite targets (aliphatic hydroxylation, aliphatic hydroxylation + ketone reduction, aliphatic carboxylation, and di-hydroxylation) for forensic and clinical testing, and focus reference standard companies' synthetic efforts to provide commercially available standards needed for PV8 biological specimen testing. Graphical Abstract Top four PV8 metabolites identified in vitro

  14. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD. PMID:26988110

  15. Diffuse Glomerular Nodular Lesions in Diabetic Pigs Carrying a Dominant-Negative Mutant Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-Alpha, an Inheritant Diabetic Gene in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Satoshi; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Yokoo, Takashi; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Nagata, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular nodular lesions, known as Kimmelstiel-Wilson nodules, are a pathological hallmark of progressive human diabetic nephropathy. We have induced severe diabetes in pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF1α) P291fsinsC, a maturity-onset diabetes of the young type-3 (MODY3) gene in humans. In this model, glomerular pathology revealed that formation of diffuse glomerular nodules commenced as young as 1 month of age and increased in size and incidence until the age of 10 months, the end of the study period. Immunohistochemistry showed that the nodules consisted of various collagen types (I, III, IV, V and VI) with advanced glycation end-product (AGE) and Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) deposition, similar to those in human diabetic nodules, except for collagen type I. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) was also expressed exclusively in the nodules. The ultrastructure of the nodules comprised predominant interstitial-type collagen deposition arising from the mesangial matrices. Curiously, these nodules were found predominantly in the deep cortex. However, diabetic pigs failed to show any of the features characteristic of human diabetic nephropathy; e.g., proteinuria, glomerular basement membrane thickening, exudative lesions, mesangiolysis, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and vascular hyalinosis. The pigs showed only Armanni-Ebstein lesions, a characteristic tubular manifestation in human diabetes. RT-PCR analysis showed that glomeruli in wild-type pigs did not express endogenous HNF1α and HNF1β, indicating that mutant HNF1α did not directly contribute to glomerular nodular formation in diabetic pigs. In conclusion, pigs harboring the dominant-negative mutant human MODY3 gene showed reproducible and distinct glomerular nodules, possibly due to AGE- and CML-based collagen accumulation. Although the pathology differed in several respects from that of human glomerular nodular lesions, the somewhat acute and

  16. The weight of nations: an estimation of adult human biomass

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The energy requirement of species at each trophic level in an ecological pyramid is a function of the number of organisms and their average mass. Regarding human populations, although considerable attention is given to estimating the number of people, much less is given to estimating average mass, despite evidence that average body mass is increasing. We estimate global human biomass, its distribution by region and the proportion of biomass due to overweight and obesity. Methods For each country we used data on body mass index (BMI) and height distribution to estimate average adult body mass. We calculated total biomass as the product of population size and average body mass. We estimated the percentage of the population that is overweight (BMI > 25) and obese (BMI > 30) and the biomass due to overweight and obesity. Results In 2005, global adult human biomass was approximately 287 million tonnes, of which 15 million tonnes were due to overweight (BMI > 25), a mass equivalent to that of 242 million people of average body mass (5% of global human biomass). Biomass due to obesity was 3.5 million tonnes, the mass equivalent of 56 million people of average body mass (1.2% of human biomass). North America has 6% of the world population but 34% of biomass due to obesity. Asia has 61% of the world population but 13% of biomass due to obesity. One tonne of human biomass corresponds to approximately 12 adults in North America and 17 adults in Asia. If all countries had the BMI distribution of the USA, the increase in human biomass of 58 million tonnes would be equivalent in mass to an extra 935 million people of average body mass, and have energy requirements equivalent to that of 473 million adults. Conclusions Increasing population fatness could have the same implications for world food energy demands as an extra half a billion people living on the earth. PMID:22709383

  17. Expression of tmp21 in normal adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Yang, Yuan; Li, Jianbo; Hou, Jing; Xia, Kun; Song, Weihong; Liu, Shengchun

    2014-01-01

    TMP21, known as p23 protein, is one important member of the p24 protein families. The degradation of TMP21 is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as with the other presenilin-associated γ-secretase complex members. NFAT plays a very important role in regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. Compared with the function of TMP21, the studies about the distribution of this protein in human tissues are limited. We collected 19 normal adult human tissues from a healthy adult man died in a traffic accident and did examination of all the tissues collected for ICH, western blot and RT-PCR. It was shown that the expression of TMP21 is at high levels in heart, liver, lung, kidney and adrenal gland; moderate levels in brain, pancreas, prostate gland, testicle, small intestine, colon, stomach, gall bladder, thyroid gland and trachea; low levels in skeletal muscle, skin and lymphonodus. TMP21 is widely existed in normal adult human tissues. The current study provided for the first time a comprehensive expression of TMP21 in normal adult human tissues. It will benefit on helping in the design and interpretation of future studies focused on expounding the function of TMP21. PMID:25356171

  18. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  19. Exploring the cell signalling in hepatocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, Rebecca; Alvarenga, Érika C; Parreira, Ricardo C; Lima, Swiany S; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2016-11-01

    The liver is the second largest organ in the human body and is responsible for several functions that directly contribute to homeostasis. Hepatocytes are the main parenchymal liver cells that regulate multiple biochemical and metabolic functions and the synthesis of substances important to the body. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a group of stem cells derived from the mesoderm, which can be obtained from various tissues. Under certain conditions, MSCs can differentiate into several cell types, including hepatocytes. Post-transcriptional regulations of liver development signalling and hepatocyte differentiation have been demonstrated. At the post-transcriptional level, microRNAs have emerged as precursors for determining cell fate during differentiation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. They can determine the stem cell fate by repressing the translation of target mRNAs. In this review, we outline signalling pathways involved in stem cell differentiation to hepatocytes and its interplay with liver development. Hepatic differentiation models in two-dimensional and three-dimensional cultures used to analyse signalling mechanisms will be described. We also highlight the possible miRNAs involved in this process and the transdifferentiation signalling mechanisms present in hepatocytes. PMID:27555287

  20. Novel surface markers directed against adult human gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Galivo, Feorillo H.; Dorrell, Craig S.; Grompe, Maria; Zhong, Yong-Ping; Streeter, Philip; Grompe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Novel cell surface-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated against extrahepatic biliary cells were developed for the isolation and characterization of different cell subsets from normal adult human gallbladder. Eleven antigenically distinct gallbladder subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. They were classified into epithelial, mesenchymal, and pancreatobiliary (PDX1+SOX9+) subsets based on gene expression profiling. These antigenically distinct human gallbladder cell subsets could potentially also reflect different functional properties in regards to bile physiology, cell renewal and plasticity. Three of the novel monoclonal antibodies differentially labeled archival sections of primary carcinoma of human gallbladder relative to normal tissue. The novel monoclonal antibodies described herein enable the identification and characterization of antigenically diverse cell subsets within adult human gallbladder and are putative tumor biomarkers. PMID:26079872

  1. Age-Related Gene Expression Differences in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Young Adults, and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lissner, Michelle M; Thomas, Brandon J; Wee, Kathleen; Tong, Ann-Jay; Kollmann, Tobias R; Smale, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    A variety of age-related differences in the innate and adaptive immune systems have been proposed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection of human neonates and older adults. The emergence of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides an opportunity to obtain an unbiased, comprehensive, and quantitative view of gene expression differences in defined cell types from different age groups. An examination of ex vivo human monocyte responses to lipopolysaccharide stimulation or Listeria monocytogenes infection by RNA-seq revealed extensive similarities between neonates, young adults, and older adults, with an unexpectedly small number of genes exhibiting statistically significant age-dependent differences. By examining the differentially induced genes in the context of transcription factor binding motifs and RNA-seq data sets from mutant mouse strains, a previously described deficiency in interferon response factor-3 activity could be implicated in most of the differences between newborns and young adults. Contrary to these observations, older adults exhibited elevated expression of inflammatory genes at baseline, yet the responses following stimulation correlated more closely with those observed in younger adults. Notably, major differences in the expression of constitutively expressed genes were not observed, suggesting that the age-related differences are driven by environmental influences rather than cell-autonomous differences in monocyte development. PMID:26147648

  2. MicroRNA hsa-miR-25-3p suppresses the expression and drug induction of CYP2B6 in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yaqiong; Yu, Dianke; Tolleson, William H; Knox, Bridgett; Wang, Yong; Chen, Si; Ren, Zhen; Deng, Helen; Guo, Yongli; Ning, Baitang

    2016-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6), mainly expressed in the liver and brain, is important for processing a number of widely used drugs. Variations in CYP2B6 expression are associated with decreased drug efficacy or adverse effects in some patients. Although CYP2B6 genetic variants are associated with its differential expression, epigenetic mechanisms affecting CYP2B6 gene regulation have not been established. Sequence analysis identified 29 domains in the CYP2B6 mRNA transcript that could be subject to regulation by microRNAs. Inverse correlations were found in human hepatocytes for the levels of the microRNAs hsa-miR-504-5p and hsa-miR-25-3p compared with CYP2B6 mRNA. Reporter gene assays showed that hsa-miR-25-3p suppresses CYP2B6 expression by targeting a specific sequence in the 3'-untranslated region of the mRNA transcript. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that hsa-miR-25-3p forms stable complexes with its cognate mRNA sequence and that it recruits cellular factors, including Ago-4. Transfection of HepaRG cells with hsa-miR-25-3p mimics inhibited expression of the endogenous CYP2B6 gene and it also decreased rifampicin-dependent induction of CYP2B6 at the mRNA and protein levels. In summary, in silico and in vitro analyses show that hsa-miR-25-3p suppresses CYP2B6 expression in human liver cells via an epigenetic mechanism. PMID:27311985

  3. Evaluation of the endothelin receptor antagonists ambrisentan, darusentan, bosentan, and sitaxsentan as substrates and inhibitors of hepatobiliary transporters in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hartman, J Craig; Brouwer, Kenneth; Mandagere, Arun; Melvin, Lawrence; Gorczynski, Richard

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate potential mechanisms of clinical hepatotoxicity, 4 endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) were examined for substrate activity and inhibition of hepatic uptake and efflux transporters in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes. The 4 transporters studied were sodium-dependent taurocholate cotransporter (NTCP), organic anion transporter (OATP), bile salt export pump (BSEP), and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2). ERA transporter inhibition was examined using the substrates taurocholate (for NTCP and BSEP), [(3)H]estradiol-17beta-D-glucuronide (for OATP), and [2-D-penicillamine, 5-D-penicillamine]enkephalin (for MRP2). ERA substrate activity was evaluated using probe inhibitors ritonavir (OATP and BSEP), bromosulfalein (OATP), erythromycin (P-glycoprotein), probenecid (MRP2 and OATP), and cyclosporin (NTCP). ERAs were tested at 2, 20, and 100 micromol*L-1 for inhibition and at 2 micromol*L-1 as substrates. OATP, NTCP, or BSEP transport activity was not reduced by ambrisentan or darusentan. Bosentan and sitaxsentan attenuated NTCP transport at higher concentrations. Only sitaxsentan decreased OATP transport (52%), and only bosentan reduced BSEP transport (78%). MRP2 transport activity was unaltered. OATP inhibitors decreased influx of all ERAs. Darusentan influx was least affected (84%-100% of control), whereas bosentan was most affected (32%-58% of control). NTCP did not contribute to influx of ERAs. Only bosentan and darusentan were shown as substrates for both BSEP and P-glycoprotein efflux. All ERAs tested were substrates for at least one hepatic transporter. Bosentan and sitaxsentan, but not ambrisentan and darusentan, inhibited human hepatic transporters, which provides a potential mechanism for the increased hepatotoxicity observed for these agents in the clinical setting. PMID:20628435

  4. Hepatocyte growth factor increases the invasive potential of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells via an ERK/MAPK and Zeb-1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    HAN, YILI; LUO, YONG; WANG, YONGXING; CHEN, YATONG; LI, MINGCHUAN; JIANG, YONGGUANG

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been implicated in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in numerous types of cancer. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no previous evidence that HGF has a role in prostate cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of HGF on EMT and invasive potential, as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms, in a human prostate cancer cell line. Therefore, PC-3 cells were treated with various concentrations of HGF for varying durations. EMT-associated proteins, including E-cadherin and vimentin, were examined by western blot analysis. The effects of HGF on cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tumorigenicity were assessed using MTT, wound-healing, Transwell and soft-agar assays. Subsequently, the role of c-Met in the mediation of EMT-like changes was investigated using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and gene knockdown by small interfering RNA. Finally, western blot analysis was used to quantify the expression of a downstream transcription factor and extracellular signal-related kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) signaling pathway proteins. The results indicated that treatment with HGF induced EMT-like changes and enhanced the invasive potential of PC-3 cells. There was an increase in the expression of ERK, phosphorylated-ERK and zinc finger E-box binding homeobox-1 (Zeb-1), suggesting that EMT-like changes may be mediated through the ERK/MAPK and Zeb-1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, HGF-mediated EMT-like changes were associated with c-Met activation, and these changes were able to be blocked by c-Met knockdown. The present study demonstrated that HGF-induced EMT increased the invasive potential of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells through activating the ERK/MAPK and Zeb-1 signaling pathway. PMID:26870279

  5. In vitro oxidative metabolism of cajaninstilbene Acid by human liver microsomes and hepatocytes: involvement of cytochrome p450 reaction phenotyping, inhibition, and induction studies.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xin; Peng, Xiao; Tan, Shengnan; Li, Chunying; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yujie; Zu, Yuangang; Smyth, Hugh

    2014-10-29

    Cajaninstilbene acid (CSA, 3-hydroxy-4-prenyl-5-methoxystilbene-2-carboxylic acid), an active constituent of pigeonpea leaves, an important tropical crop, is known for its clinical effects in the treatment of diabetes, hepatitis, and measles and its potential antitumor effect. In this study, the effect of the cytochrome P450 isozymes on the activity of CSA was investigated. Two hydroxylation metabolites were identified in the study. The reaction phenotype study showed that CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and CYP1A2 were the major cytochrome P450 isozymes in the metabolism of CSA. The metabolic food-drug interaction potential was also evaluated in vitro. The effect of CSA inhibition/induction of enzymatic activities of seven drug-metabolizing CYP450 isozymes in vitro was estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analytical techniques. CSA showed different inhibitory effects on different isozymes. CSA reversibly inhibited CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 activities in human liver microsomes with IC50 values of 28.3 and 31.3 μM, respectively, but exhibited no inhibition activities to CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP2E1. CSA showed a weak effect on CYP450 enzymes in a time-dependent manner. CSA did not substantially induce CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2E1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, or CYP3A4 at concentrations up to 30 μM in primary human hepatocytes. The results of our experiments may be helpful to predict clinically significant food-drug interactions when other drugs are administered in combination with CSA. PMID:25272989

  6. Skatole (3-Methylindole) Is a Partial Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist and Induces CYP1A1/2 and CYP1B1 Expression in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer, Patrick; Ekstrand, Bo; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Skatole (3-methylindole) is a product of bacterial fermentation of tryptophan in the intestine. A significant amount of skatole can also be inhaled during cigarette smoking. Skatole is a pulmonary toxin that induces the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulated genes, such as cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), in human bronchial cells. The liver has a high metabolic capacity for skatole and is the first organ encountered by the absorbed skatole; however, the effect of skatole in the liver is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the impact of skatole on hepatic AhR activity and AhR-regulated gene expression. Using reporter gene assays, we showed that skatole activates AhR and that this is accompanied by an increase of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 expression in HepG2-C3 and primary human hepatocytes. Specific AhR antagonists and siRNA-mediated AhR silencing demonstrated that skatole-induced CYP1A1 expression is dependent on AhR activation. The effect of skatole was reduced by blocking intrinsic cytochrome P450 activity and indole-3-carbinole, a known skatole metabolite, was a more potent inducer than skatole. Finally, skatole could reduce TCDD-induced CYP1A1 expression, suggesting that skatole is a partial AhR agonist. In conclusion, our findings suggest that skatole and its metabolites affect liver homeostasis by modulating the AhR pathway. PMID:27138278

  7. A food contaminant ochratoxin A suppresses pregnane X receptor (PXR)-mediated CYP3A4 induction in primary cultures of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Doricakova, Aneta; Vrzal, Radim

    2015-11-01

    Ochratoxin A (OCHA) is a mycotoxin, which can be found in food such as coffee, wine, cereals, meat, nuts. Since it is absorbed via gastrointestinal tract, it is reasonable to anticipate that the liver will be the first organ to which OCHA comes into the contact before systemic circulation. Many xenobiotics are metabolically modified after the passage of the liver to biologically more active substances, sometimes with more harmful activity. Promoting own metabolism is often achieved via transcriptional regulation of biotransformation enzymes through ligand-activated transcription factors. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) belongs to such a group of regulators and it was demonstrated to be activated by many compounds of synthetic as well as natural origin. Our intention was to investigate if OCHA is capable of activating the PXR with consequent induction of PXR-regulated CYP3A4 gene. We found that OCHA does not activate PXR but displays antagonist-like behavior when combined with rifampicin (RIF) in gene reporter assay in human embryonal kidney cells (Hek293T). It was very weak inducer of CYP3A4 mRNA in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and it antagonized RIF-mediated CYP3A4 induction of mRNA as well as protein. In addition, it caused the decline of PXR protein as well as mRNA which was faster than that with actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor. Since we found that OCHA induced the expression of miR-148a, which was described to regulate PXR expression, we conclude that antagonist-like behavior of OCHA is not due to the antagonism itself but due to the downregulation of PXR gene expression. Herein we provide important findings which bring a piece of puzzle into the understanding of mechanism of toxic action of ochratoxin A. PMID:26341324

  8. Cholangiocarcinomas can originate from hepatocytes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Biao; Malato, Yann; Calvisi, Diego F.; Naqvi, Syed; Razumilava, Nataliya; Ribback, Silvia; Gores, Gregory J.; Dombrowski, Frank; Evert, Matthias; Chen, Xin; Willenbring, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICCs) are primary liver tumors with a poor prognosis. The development of effective therapies has been hampered by a limited understanding of the biology of ICCs. Although ICCs exhibit heterogeneity in location, histology, and marker expression, they are currently thought to derive invariably from the cells lining the bile ducts, biliary epithelial cells (BECs), or liver progenitor cells (LPCs). Despite lack of experimental evidence establishing BECs or LPCs as the origin of ICCs, other liver cell types have not been considered. Here we show that ICCs can originate from fully differentiated hepatocytes. Using a mouse model of hepatocyte fate tracing, we found that activated NOTCH and AKT signaling cooperate to convert normal hepatocytes into biliary cells that act as precursors of rapidly progressing, lethal ICCs. Our findings suggest a previously overlooked mechanism of human ICC formation that may be targetable for anti-ICC therapy. PMID:22797301

  9. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890418

  10. Dendritic cells in humans--from fetus to adult.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Naomi; Chan, Jerry K Y; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-02-01

    The human immune system evolves continuously during development from the embryo into the adult, reflecting the ever-changing environment and demands of our body. This ability of our immune system to sense external cues and adapt as we develop is just as important in the early tolerogenic environment of the fetus, as it is in the constantly pathogen-challenged adult. Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen-sensing and antigen-presenting components of the immune system, play a crucial role in this process where they act as sentinels, both initiating and regulating immune responses. Here, we provide an overview of the human immune system in the developing fetus and the adult, with a focus on DC ontogeny and function during these discrete but intimately linked life stages. PMID:25323843

  11. Assessment of competitive and mechanism-based inhibition by clarithromycin: use of domperidone as a CYP3A probe-drug substrate and various enzymatic sources including a new cell-based assay with freshly isolated human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Veronique; Turgeon, Jacques

    2010-04-01

    Clarithromycin is involved in a large number of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. Discrepancies are observed between the magnitude of drug interactions predicted from in vitro competitive inhibition studies and changes observed clinically in the plasma levels of affected CYP3A substrates. The formation of metabolic-intermediate complexes has been proposed to explain these differences. The objectives of our study were: 1) to determine the competitive inhibition potency of clarithromycin on the metabolism of domperidone as a CYP3A probe drug using human recombinant CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 isoenzymes, human liver microsomes and cultured human hepatocytes; 2) to establish the modulatory role of cytochrome b5 on the competitive inhibition potency of clarithromycin; 3) to demonstrate the clarithromycin-induced formation of CYP450 metabolic-intermediate complexes in human liver microsomes; and 4) to determine the extent of CYP3A inhibition due to metabolic-intermediate complex formation using human liver microsomes and cultured human hepatocytes. At high concentrations (100 µM), clarithromycin had weak competitive inhibition potency towards CYP3A4 and CYP3A5. Inhibition potency was further decreased by the addition of cytochrome b5 (9-19%). Clarithromycin-induced metabolic-intermediate complexes were revealed by spectrophotometry analysis using human liver microsomes while time- and concentration-dependent mechanism-based inhibitions were quantified using isolated hepatocytes. These results indicate that mechanism-based but not competitive inhibition of CYP3As is the major underlying mechanism of drug-drug interactions observed clinically with clarithromycin. Drug interactions between clarithromycin and several CYP3A substrates are predicted to be insidious; the risk of severe adverse events should increase over time and persist for a few days after cessation of the drug. PMID:20446912

  12. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  13. The adult human brain harbors multipotent perivascular mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gesine; Özen, Ilknur; Christophersen, Nicolaj S; Reinbothe, Thomas; Bengzon, Johan; Visse, Edward; Jansson, Katarina; Dannaeus, Karin; Henriques-Oliveira, Catarina; Roybon, Laurent; Anisimov, Sergey V; Renström, Erik; Svensson, Mikael; Haegerstrand, Anders; Brundin, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Blood vessels and adjacent cells form perivascular stem cell niches in adult tissues. In this perivascular niche, a stem cell with mesenchymal characteristics was recently identified in some adult somatic tissues. These cells are pericytes that line the microvasculature, express mesenchymal markers and differentiate into mesodermal lineages but might even have the capacity to generate tissue-specific cell types. Here, we isolated, purified and characterized a previously unrecognized progenitor population from two different regions in the adult human brain, the ventricular wall and the neocortex. We show that these cells co-express markers for mesenchymal stem cells and pericytes in vivo and in vitro, but do not express glial, neuronal progenitor, hematopoietic, endothelial or microglial markers in their native state. Furthermore, we demonstrate at a clonal level that these progenitors have true multilineage potential towards both, the mesodermal and neuroectodermal phenotype. They can be epigenetically induced in vitro into adipocytes, chondroblasts and osteoblasts but also into glial cells and immature neurons. This progenitor population exhibits long-term proliferation, karyotype stability and retention of phenotype and multipotency following extensive propagation. Thus, we provide evidence that the vascular niche in the adult human brain harbors a novel progenitor with multilineage capacity that appears to represent mesenchymal stem cells and is different from any previously described human neural stem cell. Future studies will elucidate whether these cells may play a role for disease or may represent a reservoir that can be exploited in efforts to repair the diseased human brain. PMID:22523602

  14. Human Service Planning as a Collective Adult Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Joan

    Based on a study by the Department of Community Service Education, Cornell University, to evaluate human service planning (HSP) nationwide, this paper discusses the premises that HSP may be defined as community learning and that the community (according to the Robert Boyd and Jerold Apps model for adult education) is both a beneficiary of and…

  15. [The existence vomeronasal organ in adult humans].

    PubMed

    Rapiejko, Piotr; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Wojdas, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Jan; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2007-01-01

    The influence of chemical substances (feromones) on human emotional and physical condition has fascinated psychologists, sexuologists and laryngologists since centurie. Literature conveys inconsistent information on vomeronasal organ (VNO) occurrence in humans. This organ is often called Jacobson's, and 2 symmetrical openings leading into it, located on both sides of septum, are called Ruyasch's ducts. The aim of the study was to analyze vomeronasal organ occurrence in humans in relation to age and sex. The study was conducted in a group of 634 patients, aged 18-80 years. All patients underwent routine ENT examination including rhinoscopy, nasal cavity examination with usage of 2.5x magnification lens (surgical glasses) and surgical microscope with 10x magnification. All persons had nasal cavities examined endoscopically. Every time presence of vomeronasal organ openings, along with localization, size and symmetry of these was noted. Subjects, who presented Jacobson's organ, were asked to fill a questionnaire concerning influence of smells on erotic sensations. Vomeronasal organ was fund in 312 persons, that is 49.21%. In 83.65% of cases vomeronasal organ opening size was smaller than 0.2 mm, what restricted its visibility to usage of magnifying lens, microscope, or endoscope. In 16.34% of cases only vomeronasal organ ducts openings were well visible in routine rhinoscopy without magnification. Vomeronasal organ was found more often in men than women. VNO was significantly more rare in patients with nasal septal deviation. In these cases, vomeronasal organ was usually found unilaterally, in all the cases on the concave side of deviated nasal septum. PMID:18260256

  16. Profiling primaquine metabolites in primary human hepatocytes by UPLC-QTOF-MS with 13c stable isotope labeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Primaquine (PQ) is an important antimalarial agent because of its activity against exoerythrocytic forms of Plasmodium spp. However, hemolytic anemia is a dose-limiting side effect of primaquine therapy that limits its widespread use. The major plasma metabolite identified in humans and animals, car...

  17. Interaction of ApoA-IV with NR4A1 and NR1D1 Represses G6Pase and PEPCK Transcription: Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Downregulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in Mice and a Human Hepatocyte Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Wang, Fei; Ji, Yong; DavidsoN, W. Sean; Li, Zongfang; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the nuclear receptor, NR1D1, is a cofactor in ApoA-IV-mediated downregulation of gluconeogenesis. Nuclear receptor, NR4A1, is involved in the transcriptional regulation of various genes involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism. We investigated whether NR4A1 influences the effect of ApoA-IV on hepatic glucose metabolism. Our in situ proximity ligation assays and coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that ApoA-IV colocalized with NR4A1 in human liver (HepG2) and kidney (HEK-293) cell lines. The chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and luciferase reporter assays indicated that the ApoA-IV and NR4A1 colocalized at the RORα response element of the human G6Pase promoter, reducing its transcriptional activity. Our RNA interference experiments showed that knocking down the expression of NR4A1 in primary mouse hepatocytes treated with ApoA-IV increased the expression of NR1D1, G6Pase, and PEPCK, and that knocking down NR1D1 expression increased the level of NR4A1. We also found that ApoA-IV induced the expression of endogenous NR4A1 in both cultured primary mouse hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and decreased glucose production in primary mouse hepatocytes. Our findings showed that ApoA-IV colocalizes with NR4A1, which suppresses G6Pase and PEPCK gene expression at the transcriptional level, reducing hepatic glucose output and lowering blood glucose. The ApoA-IV-induced increase in NR4A1 expression in hepatocytes mediates further repression of gluconeogenesis. Our findings suggest that NR1D1 and NR4A1 serve similar or complementary functions in the ApoA-IV-mediated regulation of gluconeogenesis. PMID:26556724

  18. Taraxacum mongolicum extract exhibits a protective effect on hepatocytes and an antiviral effect against hepatitis B virus in animal and human cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Guan, Rong-Fa; Wu, Yi-Hang; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Wen-Yan; Zhang, Yong-Yong; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Jun; Shi, Shu-Yun; Zhao, Yu

    2014-04-01

    In order to validate the antiviral effect against hepatitis B virus (HBV) of Taraxacum mongolicum (T. mongolicum), the protective effect on hepatocytes, and antiviral properties against duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) and HBV of T. mongolicum extract (TME) were evaluated in chemically-injured neonatal rat hepatocytes, DHBV-infected duck fetal hepatocytes and HBV-transfected HepG2.2.15 cells, respectively. The results demonstrated that TME at 50-100 µg/ml improved D-galactosamine (D-GalN), thioacetamide (TAA) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-injured rat hepatocytes, and produced protection rates of 42.2, 34.6 and 43.8% at 100 µg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, TME at 1-100 µg/ml markedly inhibited DHBV DNA replication. Additionally, TME at 25-100 µg/ml reduced HBsAg and HBeAg levels and produced inhibition rates of 91.39 and 91.72% at 100 µg/ml, respectively. TME markedly inhibited HBV DNA replication at 25-100 µg/ml. The results demonstrate the potent antiviral effect of T. mongolicum against HBV effect. The protective of TME effect on hepatocytes may be achieved by its ability to ameliorate oxidative stress. The antiviral properties of TME may contribute to blocking protein synthesis steps and DNA replication. Furthermore, major components of TME were quantificationally analyzed. These data provide scientific evidence supporting the traditional use of TME in the treatment of hepatitis. PMID:24481875

  19. Telocytes of the human adult trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Cretoiu, Dragos; Vrapciu, Alexandra Diana; Hostiuc, Sorin; Dermengiu, Dan; Manoiu, Vasile Sorin; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Mirancea, Nicolae

    2016-06-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are typically defined as cells with telopodes by their ultrastructural features. Their presence was reported in various organs, however little is known about their presence in human trigeminal ganglion. To address this issue, samples of trigeminal ganglia were tested by immunocytochemistry for CD34 and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that TCs are CD34 positive and form networks within the ganglion in close vicinity to microvessels and nerve fibers around the neuronal-glial units (NGUs). TEM examination confirmed the existence of spindle-shaped and bipolar TCs with one or two telopodes measuring between 15 to 53 μm. We propose that TCs are cells with stemness capacity which might contribute in regeneration and repair processes by: modulation of the stem cell activity or by acting as progenitors of other cells present in the normal tissue. In addition, further studies are needed to establish if they might influence the neuronal circuits. PMID:27147447

  20. Human pancreatic polypeptide in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Hanukoglu, A; Chalew, S; Kowarski, A A

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of human pancreatic polypeptide may be useful for assessment of gastrointestinal function, integrity of the parasympathetic nervous system or screening for endocrine neoplasia. In adults hPP levels have been reported to increase with age. However hPP levels throughout childhood have not been well characterized in comparison with the adult range. We studied fasting human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) from 45 pediatric patients, from infancy - 15 years, and 18 older adolescents and adults aged 16-45 years. The mean hPP level of children (233 +/- 147 pg/ml) was significantly higher than that (113 +/- 35 pg/ml) of adults (P less than .0001). There was no difference in mean hPP levels of children with normal growth hormone secretion compared to growth hormone deficient patients. There was no effect of gender or body mass index on hPP levels. We conclude that fasting hPP levels must be interpreted with respect to the age of the subject, children particularly, in that preteens may have higher fasting levels than older teenagers and adults. PMID:2307392

  1. [The RNA content of hepatocytes of different ploidies].

    PubMed

    Ni, V V; Shteĭn, G I; Maĭtesian, E S; Kudriavtsev, B N

    1988-03-01

    The RNA contents in rat and human liver cells was measured using the scanning absorbtion photometric method after gallocyanin-chromalum staining. The RNA content was shown to increase proportionally with the increase of genome numbers in hepatocytes. PMID:2457966

  2. Human Adult Cortical Reorganization and Consequent Visual Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Dilks, Daniel D.; Serences, John T.; Rosenau, Benjamin J.; Yantis, Steven; McCloskey, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Neural and behavioral evidence for cortical reorganization in the adult somatosensory system after loss of sensory input (e.g., amputation) has been well documented. In contrast, evidence for reorganization in the adult visual system is far less clear: neural evidence is the subject of controversy, behavioral evidence is sparse, and studies combining neural and behavioral evidence have not previously been reported. Here, we report converging behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from a stroke patient (B.L.) in support of cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system. B.L.’s stroke spared the primary visual cortex (V1), but destroyed fibers that normally provide input to V1 from the upper left visual field (LVF). As a consequence, B.L. is blind in the upper LVF, and exhibits distorted perception in the lower LVF: stimuli appear vertically elongated, toward and into the blind upper LVF. For example, a square presented in the lower LVF is perceived as a rectangle extending upward. We hypothesized that the perceptual distortion was a consequence of cortical reorganization in V1. Extensive behavioral testing supported our hypothesis, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) confirmed V1 reorganization. Together, the behavioral and fMRI data show that loss of input to V1 after a stroke leads to cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system, and provide the first evidence that reorganization of the adult visual system affects visual perception. These findings contribute to our understanding of the human adult brain’s capacity to change and has implications for topics ranging from learning to recovery from brain damage. PMID:17804619

  3. l-carnitine protects human hepatocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinlian; Zhang, Yanli; Luan, Haiyun; Chen, Xuehong; Han, Yantao; Wang, Chunbo

    2016-05-01

    In our previous study, l-carnitine was shown to have cytoprotective effect against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in human normal HL7702 hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the protective effect of l-carnitine was associated with the nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NFE2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Our results showed that pretreatment with l-carnitine augmented Nrf2 nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in H2O2-treated HL7702 cells, although l-carnitine treatment alone had no effect on them. Analysis using Nrf2 siRNA demonstrated that Nrf2 activation was involved in l-carnitine-induced HO-1 expression. In addition, l-carnitine-mediated protection against H2O2 toxicity was abrogated by Nrf2 siRNA, indicating the important role of Nrf2 in l-carnitine-induced cytoprotection. Further experiments revealed that l-carnitine pretreatment enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt in H2O2-treated cells. Blocking Akt pathway with inhibitor partly abrogated the protective effect of l-carnitine. Moreover, our finding demonstrated that the induction of Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression by l-carnitine directly correlated with the Akt pathway because Akt inhibitor showed inhibitory effects on the Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that l-carnitine protects HL7702 cells against H2O2-induced cell damage through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:26889770

  4. Differential Effects of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α Isoforms on Tumor Growth and T-Cell Factor 4/AP-1 Interactions in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Linh M.; Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Dhahbi, Joseph M.; Deans, Jonathan R.; Fang, Bin; Bolotin, Eugene; Titova, Nina V.; Hoverter, Nate P.; Spindler, Stephen R.; Waterman, Marian L.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is tumor suppressive in the liver but amplified in colon cancer, suggesting that it also might be oncogenic. To investigate whether this discrepancy is due to different HNF4α isoforms derived from its two promoters (P1 and P2), we generated Tet-On-inducible human colon cancer (HCT116) cell lines that express either the P1-driven (HNF4α2) or P2-driven (HNF4α8) isoform and analyzed them for tumor growth and global changes in gene expression (transcriptome sequencing [RNA-seq] and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing [ChIP-seq]). The results show that while HNF4α2 acts as a tumor suppressor in the HCT116 tumor xenograft model, HNF4α8 does not. Each isoform regulates the expression of distinct sets of genes and recruits, colocalizes, and competes in a distinct fashion with the Wnt/β-catenin mediator T-cell factor 4 (TCF4) at CTTTG motifs as well as at AP-1 motifs (TGAXTCA). Protein binding microarrays (PBMs) show that HNF4α and TCF4 share some but not all binding motifs and that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in sites bound by both HNF4α and TCF4 can alter binding affinity in vitro, suggesting that they could play a role in cancer susceptibility in vivo. Thus, the HNF4α isoforms play distinct roles in colon cancer, which could be due to differential interactions with the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF4 and AP-1 pathways. PMID:26240283

  5. Hepatocyte membrane injury and bleb formation following low dose comfrey toxicity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yeong, M. L.; Wakefield, S. J.; Ford, H. C.

    1993-01-01

    Comfrey, a popular herbal remedy, contains hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids and has been implicated in recent human toxicity. Although alkaloids from other plant sources have been extensively researched, studies on the hepatotoxic effects of comfrey alkaloids are scant. The effects of high dose comfrey toxicity have been studied and the present investigation was undertaken to identify changes associated with relatively low dose toxicity. Eight young adult rats were dosed weekly for six weeks with 50 mg/kg of comfrey derived alkaloids. The animals were dissected one week after the last dose and the livers examined by light and electron microscopy. Changes at the light microscopic level showed vascular congestion, mild zone 3 necrosis and loss of definition of hepatocyte cellular membranes. Extensive ultrastructural abnormalities were identified in the form of endothelial sloughing and the loss of hepatocyte microvilli. A striking finding was florid bleb formation on the sinusoidal borders of hepatocytes. Many blebs were shed into the space of Disse and extruded to fill, and sometimes occlude, sinusoidal lumina. Platelets were frequently found in areas of bleb formation. There was evidence of late damage in collagenization of Disse's space. Hepatocyte bleb formation is known to occur under a variety of pathological conditions but there is little to no information in the literature on the effects, if any, of bleb formation on fibrogenesis and the microcirculation and its role in the pathogenesis of liver disease. The pyrrolizidine alkaloids of comfrey may serve as an experimental tool to study the process of bleb formation and the intimate relationship between hepatocyte and sinusoidal injury in the liver. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8499322

  6. Follow-up to the pre-validation of a harmonised protocol for assessment of CYP induction responses in freshly isolated and cryopreserved human hepatocytes with respect to culture format, treatment, positive reference inducers and incubation conditions.

    PubMed

    Abadie-Viollon, Catherine; Martin, Hélène; Blanchard, Nadège; Pekthong, Dumrongsak; Bachellier, Philippe; Mantion, Georges; Heyd, Bruno; Schuler, Frantz; Coassolo, Philippe; Alexandre, Eliane; Richert, Lysiane

    2010-02-01

    We have compared induction responses of human hepatocytes to known inducers of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C and CYP3A4/5 to determine whether the culture format, treatment regimen and/or substrate incubation conditions affected the outcome. CYP induction responses to prototypical inducers were equivalent regardless of pre-culture time (24h or 48h), plate format (60mm or 24-well plates) used or whether CYP activities were measured in microsomes or whole cell monolayers. Fold-induction of CYP3A4/5 by 1000muM PB and 10microM RIF were equivalent. In contrast, the fold-induction of CYP2B6 by PB was 3-fold higher that by 10microM RIF. In addition to inducing CYP1A2, 50microM OME also induced CYP3A4/5 in 50% of the donors tested. CYP2B6 was induced in 14 out of 21 donors by BNF; however CYP3A4/5 was unaffected by BNF in these donors. In order to confirm that donor-to-donor variation was not due to inter-laboratory differences, the induction responses of 5 different batches of cryopreserved human hepatocytes were compared in two different laboratories. The induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 measured in our laboratory were equivalent to those obtained by the commercial companies, proving good between-laboratory reproducibility. In conclusion, there is some flexibility in the treatment and incubation protocols for classical CYP induction assays on human hepatocytes. Both RIF and PB are suitable positive control inducers of CYP3A4/5 but PB may be more appropriate for CYP2B6 induction. BNF may be more appropriate for CYP1A2 induction than OME since, in contrast to the latter, it does not induce CYP3A4. Induction responses using hepatocytes from the same donor but in different labs can be expected to be similar. The good reproducibility of induction responses between laboratories using cryopreserved hepatocytes underlines the usefulness of these cells for these types of studies. PMID:19497360

  7. In Vitro Model for Hepatotoxicity Studies Based on Primary Human Hepatocyte Cultivation in a Perfused 3D Bioreactor System

    PubMed Central

    Knöspel, Fanny; Jacobs, Frank; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; De Bondt, An; van den Wyngaert, Ilse; Snoeys, Jan; Monshouwer, Mario; Richter, Marco; Strahl, Nadja; Seehofer, Daniel; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the potential hepatotoxic nature of new pharmaceuticals remains highly challenging. Therefore, novel in vitro models with improved external validity are needed to investigate hepatic metabolism and timely identify any toxicity of drugs in humans. In this study, we examined the effects of diclofenac, as a model substance with a known risk of hepatotoxicity in vivo, in a dynamic multi-compartment bioreactor using primary human liver cells. Biotransformation pathways of the drug and possible effects on metabolic activities, morphology and cell transcriptome were evaluated. Formation rates of diclofenac metabolites were relatively stable over the application period of seven days in bioreactors exposed to 300 µM diclofenac (300 µM bioreactors (300 µM BR)), while in bioreactors exposed to 1000 µM diclofenac (1000 µM BR) metabolite concentrations declined drastically. The biochemical data showed a significant decrease in lactate production and for the higher dose a significant increase in ammonia secretion, indicating a dose-dependent effect of diclofenac application. The microarray analyses performed revealed a stable hepatic phenotype of the cells over time and the observed transcriptional changes were in line with functional readouts of the system. In conclusion, the data highlight the suitability of the bioreactor technology for studying the hepatotoxicity of drugs in vitro. PMID:27092500

  8. Adult human sarcomas. II. Medical oncology.

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2007-02-01

    Human sarcoma cells can be killed by radio- and chemotherapy, but tumor cells acquiring resistance frequently kill the patient. A keen understanding of the intracellular course of oncogenic cascades leads to the discovery of small molecular inhibitors of the involved phosphorylated kinases. Targeted therapy complements chemotherapy. Oncogene silencing is feasible by small interfering RNA. The restoration of some of the mutated or deleted tumor-suppressor genes (p53, Rb, PTEN, hSNF, INK/ARF and WT) by demethylation or reacetylation of their histones has been accomplished. Genetically engineered or naturally oncolytic viruses selectively lyse tumors and leave healthy tissues intact. Adeno- or retroviral vectors deliver genes of immunological costimulators, tumor antigens, chemo- or cytokines and/or tumor-suppressor proteins into tumor (sarcoma) cells. Suicide gene delivery results in apoptosis induction. Genes of enzymes that target prodrugs as their substrates render tumor cells highly susceptible to chemotherapy, with the prodrug to be targeted intracellularly. It will be combinations of sophisticated surgical removal of the nonencapsulated and locally invasive primary sarcomas, advanced forms of radiotherapy to the involved sites and immunotherapy with sarcoma vaccines that will cure primary sarcomas. Adoptive immunotherapy with immune lymphocytes will be operational in metastatic disease only when populations of regulatory T cells are controlled. Targeted therapy with small molecular inhibitors of oncogene cascades, the driving forces of sarcoma cells, alteration of the tumor stroma from a supportive to a tumor-hostile environment, reactivation or replacement of wild-type tumor-suppressor genes, and radio-chemotherapy (with much reduced toxicity) will eventually accomplish the cure of metastatic sarcomas. PMID:17288529

  9. Highly efficient expression of functional recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor 1 and its protective effects on hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ping; Zhu, Xiaojing; Shi, Junqing; Fu, Hongqi; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Min; Jiang, Chao; Li, Xiaokun

    2014-05-01

    Three forms of recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor 1 (rhKGF1) with or without the native signal peptide or a 23-amino acid truncation were expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf9) cells by designing with insect codon usage. Immunoblotting demonstrated that these rhKGF1 proteins were recognized by a human anti-KGF1 antibody. The multiplicity of infection and timing of harvest had a significant effect on protein yield, protein quality, and cytotoxicity. Our results indicated that the native signal peptide directed KGF1 secretion from insect cells, reaching a maximum at 60 h postinfection. Although secretion of rhKGF1194 was less efficient than that of rhKGF1163 and rhKGF1140, protein secretion is an attractive pathway for simple purification of biologically active rhKGF1 at a high yield. Moreover, the sizes of rhKGF1194 and rhKGF1163 were similar (20 kDa), suggesting that the signal peptide may be recognized and removed in Sf9 cells. A 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to analyze the biological function of rhKGF1, indicating that the three forms of rhKGF1 had a similar mitogenic function in BaF3 cells. Furthermore, to elucidate the effect of rhKGF1 on cytoprotection of liver cells, we used KGF1 pretreatment of an acute liver injury model. The results indicated that rhKGF1 prevented necrosis and apoptosis of CCl4-treated HL7702 cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that KGF1 may be a candidate therapeutic drug for acute liver injury. PMID:24463717

  10. Mechanisms of lysophosphatidylcholine-induced hepatocyte lipoapoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kakisaka, Keisuke; Cazanave, Sophie C.; Fingas, Christian D.; Guicciardi, Maria E.; Bronk, Steven F.; Werneburg, Nathan W.; Mott, Justin L.

    2012-01-01

    Isolated hepatocytes undergo lipoapoptosis, a feature of hepatic lipotoxicity, on treatment with saturated free fatty acids (FFA) such as palmitate (PA). However, it is unknown if palmitate is directly toxic to hepatocytes or if its toxicity is indirect via the generation of lipid metabolites such as lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). PA-mediated hepatocyte lipoapoptosis is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, and a JNK-dependent upregulation of the potent proapoptotic BH3-only protein PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis). Our aim was to determine which of these mechanisms of lipotoxicity are activated by PA-derived LPC. We employed Huh-7 cells and isolated murine and human primary hepatocytes. Intracellular LPC concentrations increase linearly as a function of the exogenous, extracellular PA, stearate, or LPC concentration. Incubation of Huh-7 cells or primary hepatocytes with LPC induced cell death by apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Substituting LPC for PA resulted in caspase-dependent cell death that was accompanied by activating phosphorylation of JNK with c-Jun phosphorylation and an increase in PUMA expression. LPC also induced ER stress as manifest by eIF2α phosphorylation and CAAT/enhancer binding homologous protein (CHOP) induction. LPC cytotoxicity was attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of JNK or glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). Similarly, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-targeted knockdown of CHOP protected Huh-7 cells against LPC-induced toxicity. The LPC-induced PUMA upregulation was prevented by JNK inhibition or shRNA-targeted knockdown of CHOP. Finally, genetic deficiency of PUMA rendered murine hepatocytes resistant to LPC-induced apoptosis. We concluded that LPC-induced lipoapoptosis is dependent on mechanisms largely indistinguishable from PA. These data suggest that FFA-mediated cytotoxicity is indirect via the generation of the toxic metabolite, LPC. PMID:21995961

  11. Perivascular mesenchymal progenitors in human fetal and adult liver.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Jörg C; Over, Patrick; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Foka, Hubert G; Chen, William C W; Péault, Bruno; Gridelli, Bruno; Schmelzer, Eva

    2012-12-10

    The presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been described in various organs. Pericytes possess a multilineage differentiation potential and have been suggested to be one of the developmental sources for MSCs. In human liver, pericytes have not been defined. Here, we describe the identification, purification, and characterization of pericytes in human adult and fetal liver. Flow cytometry sorting revealed that human adult and fetal liver contains 0.56%±0.81% and 0.45%±0.39% of CD146(+)CD45(-)CD56(-)CD34(-) pericytes, respectively. Of these, 41% (adult) and 30% (fetal) were alkaline phosphatase-positive (ALP(+)). In situ, pericytes were localized around periportal blood vessels and were positive for NG2 and vimentin. Purified pericytes could be cultured extensively and had low population doubling times. Immunofluorescence of cultures demonstrated that cells were positive for pericyte and mesenchymal cell markers CD146, NG2, CD90, CD140b, and vimentin, and negative for endothelial, hematopoietic, stellate, muscle, or liver epithelial cell markers von Willebrand factor, CD31, CD34, CD45, CD144, CD326, CK19, albumin, α-fetoprotein, CYP3A7, glial fibrillary acid protein, MYF5, and Pax7 by gene expression; myogenin and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression were variable. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of cultures confirmed surface expression of CD146, CD73, CD90, CD10, CD13, CD44, CD105, and ALP and absence of human leukocyte antigen-DR. In vitro differentiation assays demonstrated that cells possessed robust osteogenic and myogenic, but low adipogenic and low chondrogenic differentiation potentials. In functional in vitro assays, cells had typical mesenchymal strong migratory and invasive activity. In conclusion, human adult and fetal livers harbor pericytes that are similar to those found in other organs and are distinct from hepatic stellate cells. PMID:22931482

  12. Innate immune responses in human hepatocyte-derived cell lines alter genotype 1 hepatitis E virus replication efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Devhare, Pradip B.; Desai, Swapnil; Lole, Kavita S.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a significant health problem in developing countries causing sporadic and epidemic forms of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis E is a self-limiting disease; however, chronic HEV infections are being reported in immunocompromised individuals. The disease severity is more during pregnancy with high mortality (20–25%), especially in third trimester. Early cellular responses after HEV infection are not completely understood. We analyzed innate immune responses associated with genotype-I HEV replication in human hepatoma cell lines (Huh7, Huh7.5 and HepG2/C3A) using HEV replicon system. These cells supported HEV replication with different efficiencies due to the cell type specific innate immune responses. HepG2/C3A cells were less supportive to HEV replication as compared to Huh7.5 and S10-3 cells. Reconstitution of the defective RIG-I and TLR3 signaling in Huh7.5 cells enabled them to induce higher level antiviral responses and restrict HEV replication, suggesting the involvement of both RIG-I and TLR3 in sensing HEV RNA and downstream activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) to generate antiviral responses. Inhibition of IRF3 mediated downstream responses in HepG2/C3A cells by pharmacological inhibitor BX795 significantly improved HEV replication efficiency implying the importance of this study in establishing a better cell culture system for future HEV studies. PMID:27230536

  13. Humanized anti-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) antibody suppresses innate irinotecan (CPT-11) resistance induced by fibroblast-derived HGF

    PubMed Central

    Kim, BoRa; Park, Byung Hee; Shin, Kum-Joo; Song, Seong-Won; Kim, Jung Ju; Kim, Hwan-Mook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The growth factors derived from the microenvironment create an environment conducive to tumor growth and survival. HGF deprivation using neutralizing antibody enhanced chemosensitivity in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). We determined secreted HGF in fibroblast conditioned medium (CM). Combination treatment of anti-HGF antibody and irinotecan (CPT-11) directly enhanced CPT-11 sensitivity in CRC. We generated xenograft in NOD/SCID mice inoculating HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously with or without fibroblast. We found that the combination of CPT-11 and anti-HGF antibody induced marked suppression of tumor development. These results suggest that HGF produced by fibroblast induce CPT-11 resistance, and that anti-HGF antibody abrogate such resistance in vivo. fibroblast-derived HGF is important determinant of chemoresistance. Anti-HGF monoclonal antibody treatment confirmed the importance of this growth factor for chemoresistance in CRC. These results present new options toward the early diagnosis of chemoresistance and suggest novel combinations of chemotherapy and anti-HGF agents to prevent or significantly delay the onset of therapy resistance. PMID:26090722

  14. Pleiotropic effects of gold(I) mixed-ligand complexes of 9-deazahypoxanthine on transcriptional activity of receptors for steroid hormones, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors in human hepatocytes and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-10-01

    Development of metal-based compounds is an important research avenue in anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drug discovery. Here we examined the effects of three gold (I) mixed-ligand complexes with the general formula [Au(Ln)(PPh3)] (1, 2, 3) involving triphenylphosphine (PPh3) and a deprotonated form of O-substituted derivatives of 9-deazahypoxanthine (Ln) on the transcriptional activity of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thyroid receptor (TR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and vitamin D receptor (VDR), employing gene reporter assays. In addition, we measured mRNA (RT-PCR) and protein (western blot) expression of target genes for those receptors, including drug-metabolizing P450s, in primary human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines LS180 and HepG2. The tested compounds displayed anti-glucocorticoid effects, as revealed by inhibition of dexamethasone-inducible transcriptional activity of GR and down-regulation of tyrosine aminotransferase. All the compounds slightly and dose-dependently activated PXR and AhR, and moderately induced CYP3A4 and CYP1A1/2 genes in human hepatocytes and LS180 cells. The complexes antagonized basal and ligand-activated AR and VDR, indicating inverse agonist behaviour. Both basal and thyroid hormone-inducible transcriptional activity of TR was dose-dependently increased by all tested compounds. In contrast, the expression of SPOT14 mRNA was decreased by tested compounds in human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. In conclusion, if intended for human pharmacotherapy, the potential of the complexes 1-3 to influence studied receptors should be taken in account. PMID:27318977

  15. Streptococcal serum opacity factor increases the rate of hepatocyte uptake of human plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Baiba K; Rosales, Corina; Pillai, Biju K; Lin, Hu Yu; Courtney, Harry S; Pownall, Henry J

    2010-11-16

    Serum opacity factor (SOF), a virulence determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes, converts plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to three distinct species: lipid-free apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, neo HDL, a small discoidal HDL-like particle, and a large cholesteryl ester-rich microemulsion (CERM) that contains the cholesterol esters (CE) of up to ∼400000 HDL particles and apo E as its major protein. Similar SOF reaction products are obtained with HDL, total plasma lipoproteins, and whole plasma. We hypothesized that hepatic uptake of CERM-CE via multiple apo E-dependent receptors would be faster than that of HDL-CE. We tested our hypothesis using human hepatoma cells and lipoprotein receptor-specific Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The uptake of [(3)H]CE by HepG2 and Huh7 cells from HDL after SOF treatment, which transfers >90% of HDL-CE to CERM, was 2.4 and 4.5 times faster, respectively, than from control HDL. CERM-[(3)H]CE uptake was inhibited by LDL and HDL, suggestive of uptake by both the LDL receptor (LDL-R) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Studies in CHO cells specifically expressing LDL-R and SR-BI confirmed CERM-[(3)H]CE uptake by both receptors. RAP and heparin inhibit CERM-[(3)H]CE but not HDL-[(3)H]CE uptake, thereby implicating LRP-1 and cell surface proteoglycans in this process. These data demonstrate that SOF treatment of HDL increases the rate of CE uptake via multiple hepatic apo E receptors. In so doing, SOF might increase the level of hepatic disposal of plasma cholesterol in a way that is therapeutically useful. PMID:20879789

  16. Characterization of a hepatitis C virus-like particle vaccine produced in a human hepatocyte-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Earnest-Silveira, L; Chua, B; Chin, R; Christiansen, D; Johnson, D; Herrmann, S; Ralph, S A; Vercauteren, K; Mesalam, A; Meuleman, P; Das, S; Boo, I; Drummer, H; Bock, C-T; Gowans, E J; Jackson, D C; Torresi, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    An effective immune response against hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires the early development of multi-specific class 1 CD8+ and class II CD4+ T-cells together with broad neutralizing antibody responses. We have produced mammalian-cell-derived HCV virus-like particles (VLPs) incorporating core, E1 and E2 of HCV genotype 1a to produce such immune responses. Here we describe the biochemical and morphological characterization of the HCV VLPs and study HCV core-specific T-cell responses to the particles. The E1 and E2 glycoproteins in HCV VLPs formed non-covalent heterodimers and together with core protein assembled into VLPs with a buoyant density of 1.22 to 1.28 g cm-3. The HCV VLPs could be immunoprecipited with anti-ApoE and anti-ApoC. On electron microscopy, the VLPs had a heterogeneous morphology and ranged in size from 40 to 80 nm. The HCV VLPs demonstrated dose-dependent binding to murine-derived dendritic cells and the entry of HCV VLPs into Huh7 cells was blocked by anti-CD81 antibody. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with HCV VLPs purified from iodixanol gradients resulted in the production of neutralizing antibody responses while vaccination of humanized MHC class I transgenic mice resulted in the prodution of HCV core-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. Furthermore, IgG purified from the sera of patients chronically infected with HCV genotypes 1a and 3a blocked the binding and entry of the HCV VLPs into Huh7 cells. These results show that our mammalian-cell-derived HCV VLPs induce humoral and HCV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses and will have important implications for the development of a preventative vaccine for HCV. PMID:27147296

  17. Ultrastructural characteristics of human adult and infant cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, W Y; Garey, L J

    1991-01-01

    Biopsy specimens of human cerebral cortex from three adults and two infants were studied by correlating their light microscopic features in semithin sections with their ultrastructural characteristics. There was good tissue preservation, due to a minimum delay between obtaining the specimens and fixation. Pyramidal cells had a prominent apical dendrite, fine heterochromatin clumps in the nucleus and generally small numbers of cytoplasmic organelles, except for numerous free ribosomes in some of the large pyramids of Layers III to VI. Non-pyramidal cells lacked an apical dendrite and were further classified, on size and ultrastructure, into small, medium and large types. Large numbers of asymmetrical and symmetrical synapses were present in the neuropil but very few axosomatic synapses were found in the human cerebral cortex compared with subhuman primates and other mammals. Some symmetrical synapses were characterised by the presence of wide pre- and postsynaptic densities. The same general features of the adult cortex were also encountered in the infant, with certain exceptions. Many of the infant neurons had less densely packed heterochromatin, but greater numbers of free ribosomes, compared with the adult, and lipofuscin was absent. There was a total absence of myelinated fibres from the infant cortex; more large diameter dendrites were present than in the adult and axosomatic synapses were commoner. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:2050578

  18. ANALYSIS OF DNA STRAND BREAKS INDUCED IN RODENT LIVER IN VIVO, HEPATOCYTES IN VITRO, AND A HUMAN CELL LINE BY CHLORINATED ACETIC ACIDS AND ALDEHYDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An alkaline unwinding assay was used to quantitate DNA strand breaks (DNA SB) in the livers of rats and mice, in rodent hepatocytes, and in CCRF-CEM cells following treatment with tri- (TCA), di- (DCA) and mono-(MCA) chloroacetic acid and tri-(CH), di)(DCAA) and mono- (CAA) chlor...

  19. Development and characterization of a new human hepatic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ramboer, Eva; De Craene, Bram; De Kock, Joey; Berx, Geert; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand and hampered use of primary human hepatocytes for research purposes have urged scientists to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. The aim of this study was to develop a human hepatic cell line using the combined overexpression of TERT and the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and mutant isoform CDK4R24C. Following transduction of adult human primary hepatocytes with the selected immortalization genes, cell growth was triggered and a cell line was established. When cultured under appropriate conditions, the cell line expressed several hepatocytic markers and liver-enriched transcription factors at the transcriptional and/or translational level, secreted liver-specific proteins and showed glycogen deposition. These results suggest that the immortalization strategy applied to primary human hepatocytes could generate a novel hepatic cell line that seems to retain some key hepatic characteristics. PMID:26869867

  20. Development and characterization of a new human hepatic cell line

    PubMed Central

    Ramboer, Eva; De Craene, Bram; De Kock, Joey; Berx, Geert; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand and hampered use of primary human hepatocytes for research purposes have urged scientists to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. The aim of this study was to develop a human hepatic cell line using the combined overexpression of TERT and the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and mutant isoform CDK4R24C. Following transduction of adult human primary hepatocytes with the selected immortalization genes, cell growth was triggered and a cell line was established. When cultured under appropriate conditions, the cell line expressed several hepatocytic markers and liver-enriched transcription factors at the transcriptional and/or translational level, secreted liver-specific proteins and showed glycogen deposition. These results suggest that the immortalization strategy applied to primary human hepatocytes could generate a novel hepatic cell line that seems to retain some key hepatic characteristics. PMID:26869867

  1. Human adult stem cells from diverse origins: an overview from multiparametric immunophenotyping to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Bruna R; Parreira, Ricardo C; Fonseca, Emerson A; Amaya, Maria J; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Lacerda, Samyra M S N; Lalwani, Pritesh; Santos, Anderson K; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Kihara, Alexandre H; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are known for their capacity to self-renew and differentiate into at least one specialized cell type. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated initially from bone marrow but are now known to exist in all vascularized organ or tissue in adults. MSCs are particularly relevant for therapy due to their simplicity of isolation and cultivation. The International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) has proposed a set of standards to define hMSCs for laboratory investigations and preclinical studies: adherence to plastic in standard culture conditions; in vitro differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondroblasts; specific surface antigen expression in which ≥95% of the cells express the antigens recognized by CD105, CD73, and CD90, with the same cells lacking (≤2% positive) the antigens CD45, CD34, CD14 or CD11b, CD79a or CD19, and HLA-DR. In this review we will take an historical overview of how umbilical cord blood, bone marrow, adipose-derived, placental and amniotic fluid, and menstrual blood stem cells, the major sources of human MSC, can be obtained, identified and how they are being used in clinical trials to cure and treat a very broad range of conditions, including heart, hepatic, and neurodegenerative diseases. An overview of protocols for differentiation into hepatocytes, cardiomyocytes, neuronal, adipose, chondrocytes, and osteoblast cells are highlighted. We also discuss a new source of stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) and some pathways, which are common to MSCs in maintaining their pluripotent state. PMID:24700575

  2. Co-staining for Keratins 8/18 plus Ubiquitin Improves Detection of Hepatocyte Injury in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Cynthia D; Suzuki, Ayako; Burchette, James L; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Abdelmalek, Manal F; Cardona, Diana; McCall, Shannon J; Ünalp, Aynur; Belt, Patricia; Ferrell, Linda D; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a global health dilemma. The gold standard for diagnosis is liver biopsy. Ballooned hepatocytes (BH) are histologic manifestations of hepatocellular injury and are characteristic features of steatohepatitis (SH), the more severe form of NAFLD. Definitive histologic identification of BH on routine stains, however, can be difficult. Immunohistochemical (IHC) evidence for loss of the normal hepatocytic keratins 8/18 (K8/18) can serve as an objective marker of BH. We sought to explore the utility of a K8/18 plus ubiquitin (Ub) double IHC stain for the histologic evaluation of adult NAFLD. Double IHC staining for K8/18 and Ub was analyzed using 40 adult human NAFLD core liver biopsies. Ballooned hepatocytes lack K8/18 staining (KBH) as previously shown by others, but normal size hepatocytes with keratin loss (KH) are approximately five times greater in number than KBH. KBH, KH, and Ub deposits show a zonal distribution, are positively associated with each other, and are frequently found adjacent to or intermixed with fibrous matrix. All three lesions correlate with fibrosis stage and the H&E diagnosis of SH (all p values < 0.05). Compared to H&E staining, IHC staining improves the receiver operating characteristics curve for advanced fibrosis (0.77 vs. 0.83, 0.89, and 0.89 for KBH, KH, and Ub, respectively) because IHC is more sensitive and specific for fibrogenic hepatocellular injury than H&E staining. K8/18+Ub double IHC stain improves detection of hepatocyte injury in NAFLD. Thus, it may help differentiate NASH from NAFL. PMID:22036053

  3. TOXIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CARBON TETRACHLORIDE AND CHLOROFORM IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes were incubated (1.5-16 hr) with various concentrations of CC14 (<0.5 mM) and/or CHCl3 (<2.5 mM). gent dependent alterations in hepatocyte functions were assessed by measuring (1) [3H]choline incorporation into phosphatidylcholine (endopla...

  4. NOREPINEPHRINE AND EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR: DYNAMICS OF THEIR INTERACTION IN THE STIMULATION OF HEPATOCYTE DNA SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes are stimulated to enter DNA synthesis by norepinephrine (NE). This stimulation is maximal if the hepatocytes are incubated with NE for more than 12 hr, beginning no later than 2-4 hr after the cells are first plated. After 24 hr in cultur...

  5. MR Assessment of Myocardial Perfusion, Viability, and Function after Intramyocardial Transfer of VM202, a New Plasmid Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor in Ischemic Swine Myocardium1

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Maythem; Martin, Alastair; Ursell, Phillip; Do, Loi; Bucknor, Matt; Higgins, Charles B.; Saloner, David

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: VM202, a newly constructed plasmid human hepatocyte growth factor, was transferred intramyocardially after infarction for the purpose of evaluating this strategy as a therapeutic approach for protection from left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Materials and Methods: The institutional animal care and use committee approved this study. Pigs underwent coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion and served as either control (n = 8) or VM202-treated (n = 8) animals. VM202 was transferred intramyocardially into four infarcted and four periinfarcted sites. Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (cine, perfusion, delayed enhancement) was performed in acute (3 days) and chronic (50 days ± 3 [standard error of the mean]) infarction. Histopathologic findings were used to characterize and quantify neovascularization. The t test was utilized to compare treated and control groups and to assess changes over time. Results: In acute infarction, MR imaging estimates of function, perfusion, and viability showed no difference between the groups. In chronic infarction, however, VM202 increased maximum signal intensity and upslope at first-pass perfusion imaging and reduced infarct size at perfusion and delayed-enhancement imaging. These changes were associated with a decrease in end-diastolic (2.15 mL/kg ± 0.12 to 1.73 mL/kg ± 0.10, P < .01) and end-systolic (1.33 mL/kg ± 0.07 to 0.92 mL/kg ± 0.08, P < .001) volumes and an increase in ejection fraction (38.2% ± 1.3 to 47.0% ± 1.8, P < .001). In contrast, LV function deteriorated further in control animals. Compared with control animals, VM202-treated animals revealed peninsulas and/or islands of viable myocardium in infarcted and periinfarcted regions and greater number of capillaries (218 per square millimeter ± 19 vs 119 per square millimeter ± 17, P < .05) and arterioles (21 per square millimeter ± 4 vs 3 per square millimeter ± 1, P < .001). Conclusion: Intramyocardial transfer of VM202 improved myocardial

  6. Ephedrae herba stimulates hepatocyte growth factor-induced MET endocytosis and downregulation via early/late endocytic pathways in gefitinib-resistant human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yukio; Hyuga, Sumiko; Takiguchi, Soichi; Hyuga, Masashi; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Hanawa, Toshihiko

    2016-05-01

    The MET tyrosine kinase receptor and its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), are known to be overexpressed in a variety of malignant tumor cells, and are implicated in the development of gefitinib-resistance in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Ephedrae herba was previously reported to prevent HGF-induced cancer cell motility by directly suppressing HGF/MET signaling through the inhibition of MET tyrosine kinase, and treatment with its extract also considerably reduced MET protein levels. To further investigate the mechanism underlying the Ephedrae herba-induced inhibition of MET phosphorylation as well as its degradation and subsequent disappearance, we examined the effect of Ephedrae herba on HGF-stimulated MET endocytosis and downregulation via early/late endocytic pathways in an NSCLC cell line. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that pretreatment of cells with Ephedrae herba extract dramatically changed the intracellular distribution of plasma membrane-associated MET, and that the resultant MET staining was distributed throughout the cytoplasm. Pretreatment of the cells with Ephedrae herba extract also led to the rapid loss of MET and phosphorylated (p)-MET in HGF-stimulated cells. In contrast, inefficient endocytic delivery of MET and p-MET from early to late endosomes was observed in the absence of Ephedrae herba extract, since considerable amounts of the internalized MET accumulated in the early endosomes and were not delivered to lysosomes up to 1 h after HGF-stimulation. Furthermore, large amounts of MET and p-MET that had accumulated in late endosomes of Ephedrae herba-pretreated cells after HGF stimulation were observed along with bafilomycin A1. Therefore, we inferred that degradation of MET occurred in the late endosome/lysosome pathway. Moreover, western blot analysis revealed the accelerated degradation of MET and p-MET proceeds in cells pretreated with Ephedrae herba extract. Collectively, our results suggest that

  7. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Human Serum Albumin Adducts Formed with N-Oxidized Metabolites of 2-Amino-1-methyl-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine in Human Plasma and Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Peng, Lijuan; Bellamri, Medjda; Langoueët, Sophie; Turesky, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), a carcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amine formed in cooked meats, is metabolically activated to electrophilic intermediates that form covalent adducts with DNA and protein. We previously identified an adduct of PhIP formed at the Cys34 residue of human serum albumin following reaction of albumin with the genotoxic metabolite 2-hydroxyamino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (HONH-PhIP). The major adducted peptide recovered from a tryptic/chymotryptic digest was identified as the missed-cleavage peptide LQQC*[SO2PhIP]PFEDHVK, a [Cysteine-S-yl-PhIP]-S-dioxide linked adduct. In this investigation, we have characterized the albumin adduction products of N-sulfooxy-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (N-sulfooxy-PhIP), which is thought to be a major genotoxic metabolite of PhIP formed in vivo. Targeted and data-dependent scanning methods showed that N-sulfooxy-PhIP adducted to the Cys34 of albumin in human plasma to form LQQC*[SO2PhIP]PFEDHVK at levels that were 8 to 10-fold greater than the adduct levels formed with N-(acetyloxy)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (N-acetoxy-PhIP) or HONH-PhIP. We also discovered that N-sulfooxy-PhIP forms an adduct at the sole tryptophan (Trp214) residue of albumin in the sequence AW*[PhIP]AVAR. However, stable adducts of PhIP with albumin were not detected in human hepatocytes. Instead, PhIP and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-(5-hydroxy)-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (5-HO-PhIP), a solvolysis product of the proposed nitrenium ion of PhIP, were recovered during the proteolysis, suggesting a labile sulfenamide linkage had formed between an N-oxidized intermediate of PhIP and Cys34 of albumin. A stable adduct was formed at the Tyr411 residue of albumin in hepatocytes, and identified as a deaminated product of PhIP, Y*[desaminoPhIP]TK, where the 4-HO-tyrosine group bound to the C-2 imidazole atom of PhIP. PMID:25815793

  8. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Human Serum Albumin Adducts Formed with N-Oxidized Metabolites of 2-Amino-1-methylphenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine in Human Plasma and Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Peng, Lijuan; Bellamri, Medjda; Langouët, Sophie; Turesky, Robert J

    2015-05-18

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), a carcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amine formed in cooked meats, is metabolically activated to electrophilic intermediates that form covalent adducts with DNA and protein. We previously identified an adduct of PhIP formed at the Cys(34) residue of human serum albumin following reaction of albumin with the genotoxic metabolite 2-hydroxyamino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (HONH-PhIP). The major adducted peptide recovered from a tryptic/chymotryptic digest was identified as the missed-cleavage peptide LQQC*([SO2PhIP])PFEDHVK, a [cysteine-S-yl-PhIP]-S-dioxide linked adduct. In this investigation, we have characterized the albumin adduction products of N-sulfooxy-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (N-sulfooxy-PhIP), which is thought to be a major genotoxic metabolite of PhIP formed in vivo. Targeted and data-dependent scanning methods showed that N-sulfooxy-PhIP adducted to the Cys(34) of albumin in human plasma to form LQQC*([SO2PhIP])PFEDHVK at levels that were 8-10-fold greater than the adduct levels formed with N-(acetyloxy)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (N-acetoxy-PhIP) or HONH-PhIP. We also discovered that N-sulfooxy-PhIP forms an adduct at the sole tryptophan (Trp(214)) residue of albumin in the sequence AW*([PhIP])AVAR. However, stable adducts of PhIP with albumin were not detected in human hepatocytes. Instead, PhIP and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-(5-hydroxy)phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (5-HO-PhIP), a solvolysis product of the proposed nitrenium ion of PhIP, were recovered during the proteolysis, suggesting a labile sulfenamide linkage had formed between an N-oxidized intermediate of PhIP and Cys(34) of albumin. A stable adduct was formed at the Tyr(411) residue of albumin in hepatocytes and identified as a deaminated product of PhIP, Y(*[desaminoPhIP])TK, where the 4-HO-tyrosine group bound to the C-2 imidazole atom of PhIP. PMID:25815793

  9. The nutrition intervention improved adult human capital and economic productivity.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Reynaldo; Melgar, Paul; Maluccio, John A; Stein, Aryeh D; Rivera, Juan A

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews key findings about the long-term impact of a nutrition intervention carried out by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama from 1969 to 1977. Results from follow-up studies in 1988-89 and 2002-04 show substantial impact on adult human capital and economic productivity. The 1988-89 study showed that adult body size and work capacity increased for those provided improved nutrition through age 3 y, whereas the 2002-04 follow-up showed that schooling was increased for women and reading comprehension and intelligence increased in both men and women. Participants were 26-42 y of age at the time of the 2002-04 follow-up, facilitating the assessment of economic productivity. Wages of men increased by 46% in those provided with improved nutrition through age 2 y. Findings for cardiovascular disease risk factors were heterogeneous; however, they suggest that improved nutrition in early life is unlikely to increase cardiovascular disease risk later in life and may indeed lower risk. In conclusion, the substantial improvement in adult human capital and economic productivity resulting from the nutrition intervention provides a powerful argument for promoting improvements in nutrition in pregnant women and young children. PMID:20032473

  10. How long have adult humans been consuming milk?

    PubMed

    Gerbault, Pascale; Roffet-Salque, Mélanie; Evershed, Richard P; Thomas, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down the milk sugar lactose, and in most mammals, including most humans, lactase activity is down-regulated after the weaning period is completed. However, in about 35% of adults worldwide, lactase continues to be expressed throughout adulthood, a feature termed lactase persistence (LP). Genetic evidence indicates that LP is a recent human adaptation, and its current geographic distribution correlates with the relative historical importance of dairying in different human populations. Investigating archaeological evidence for fresh milk consumption has proved crucial in building an account of the joint evolution of LP and dairying. A powerful technique for investigating food processing, including milk processing, in ancient populations is lipid residue analysis on archaeological pottery. We review here the archaeological and genetic evidence available that have contributed to a better understanding of the gene-culture co-evolution of LP and dairying. PMID:24339181

  11. [A cytophotometric study of the RNA and glycogen content of human hepatocytes at different stages in the development of traumatic disease].

    PubMed

    Kudriavtseva, M V; Shteĭn, G I; Shashkov, B V; Kudriavtsev, B N

    1992-01-01

    Absorption and fluorescent cytophotometry techniques were applied to studies of RNA, glycogen and its fractions in hepatocytes of patients with hard mechanic trauma, both with and without endointoxication. For measuring RNA and glycogen contents, slides were stained by gallocyanin-chromalum or underwent fluorescent PAS-reaction, respectively. The repeated aspiration biopsy material was used for investigation of RNA and glycogen contents in dynamics. A quick increase in RNA content took place at the first stage (within the first 3 days) of traumatic illness of both the groups of patients. At the second stage of illness the hepatocyte RNA content in patients without endointoxication was seen to decrease to the initial level, whereas that in patients with endointoxication increased from the initial level by 36%. At different stages of illness the total glycogen content is changed insignificantly in the course of illness, but its labile fraction decreases to 70% of the total glycogen in patients with endointoxication. The increase of hepatocyte synthetic activity and the maintenance of the normal glycogen level may suggest a sufficient compensatory possibility of the liver, in spite of a high functional load under endointoxication. PMID:1284098

  12. Mutant IDH inhibits HNF4α to block hepatocyte differentiation and promote biliary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Supriya K.; Parachoniak, Christine A.; Ghanta, Krishna S.; Fitamant, Julien; Ross, Kenneth N.; Najem, Mortada S.; Gurumurthy, Sushma; Akbay, Esra A.; Sia, Daniela; Cornella, Helena; Miltiadous, Oriana; Walesky, Chad; Deshpande, Vikram; Zhu, Andrew X.; Hezel, Aram F.; Yen, Katharine; Straley, Kim; Travins, Jeremy; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Gliser, Camelia; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Apte, Udayan; Llovet, Josep M.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are among the most common genetic alterations in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC), a deadly liver cancer1–5. Mutant IDH proteins in IHCC and other malignancies acquire an abnormal enzymatic activity allowing them to convert alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), which inhibits the activity of multiple αKG-dependent dioxygenases, and results in alterations in cell differentiation, survival, and extracellular matrix maturation6–10. However, the molecular pathways by which IDH mutations lead to tumour formation remain unclear. Here we show that mutant IDH blocks liver progenitor cells from undergoing hepatocyte differentiation through the production of 2HG and suppression of HNF4α, a master regulator of hepatocyte identity and quiescence. Correspondingly, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) expressing mutant IDH in the adult liver show aberrant response to hepatic injury, characterized by HNF4α silencing, impaired hepatocyte differentiation and markedly elevated levels of cell proliferation. Moreover, mutant IDH and activated Kras, genetic alterations that co-exist in a subset of human IHCCs4,5, cooperate to drive the expansion of liver progenitor cells, development of premalignant biliary lesions, and progression to metastatic IHCC. These studies provide a functional link between IDH mutations, hepatic cell fate, and IHCC pathogenesis, and present a novel GEMM of IDH-driven malignancy. PMID:25043045

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cells as a source of hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Vanessa; Roy-Chowdhury, Namita; Guha, Chandan; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    During the past decade, a series of discoveries has established the potential of the so called terminally differentiated cells to transition to more primitive progenitor cells. The dramatic demonstration of the ability to reprogram differentiated somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) that can then give rise to cells of all three germ layers has opened the possibility of generating virtually any cell type in culture, from any given individual. Taking advantage of these concepts, researchers have generated iPSCs by reprogramming a wide variety of somatic cells. In addition to their practical implications, these studies have provided crucial insights into the mechanism of cell plasticity that underlies the transition from one cell type to another. Using concepts derived from research on embryological development, investigators have differentiated iPSCs to cells resembling hepatocytes in many ways. Such hepatocyte-like cells could be of enormous value in disease modeling, drug discovery and regenerative medicine. However, the currently available methods do not yield cells that fully reproduce the characteristics of adult primary hepatocytes. Thus generating hepatocytes from iPSCs is very much a work in progress. In addition to chronicling these exciting developments, this review will discuss the emergent new approaches to generating iPSCs, improving their differentiation to hepatocyte-like cells and maintaining the hepatocyte-like cells in culture for longer survival and better function. PMID:25650171

  14. Evaluation of multiple mechanism-based toxicity endpoints in primary cultured human hepatocytes for the identification of drugs with clinical hepatotoxicity: Results from 152 marketed drugs with known liver injury profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Doshi, Utkarsh; Suzuki, Ayako; Chang, Ching-Wei; Borlak, Jürgen; Li, Albert P; Tong, Weida

    2016-08-01

    We report here the results of a collaborative research program to develop a robust and reliable in vitro system to allow an accurate definition of the drug-induced liver injury (DILI) potential of new drug entities during drug development. The in vitro hepatotoxic potential of 152 drugs with known DILI profiles were evaluated in primary cultured human hepatocytes with four mechanistically-relevant endpoints: cellular ATP depletion, reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) depletion, and caspase activation for apoptosis. The drugs, 80 in the testing set and 72 in the validation set, were classified based on serious clinical/regulatory outcomes as defined by reported acute liver failure, black-box warning, and/or withdrawal. The drugs were further sub-categorized for dominant types of liver injury. Logistic regression models were performed to calculate the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) and to evaluate the prediction potential of the selected endpoints for serious clinical/regulatory outcomes. The ROS/ATP ratio was found to yield an excellent AUROC in both the testing (0.8989, P < 0.0001) and validation set (0.8545, P < 0.0001), and was found to distinguish drugs associated with severe from non-severe DILI cases (p < 0.0001). The results suggest that evaluation of drugs in primary human hepatocytes using the ROS/ATP ratio endpoint may aid the definition of their potential to cause severe DILI. PMID:26581450

  15. Effect of solid freeform fabrication-based polycaprolactone/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/collagen scaffolds on cellular activities of human adipose-derived stem cells and rat primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Arthur Joon; Park, Ju Young; Yi, Namwoo; Kang, Inhye; Park, Jaesung; Rhie, Jong-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2013-04-01

    Highly biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/collagen scaffolds in which the PCL/PLGA collagen solution was selectively dispensed into every other space between the struts were fabricated using solid freeform fabrication (SFF) technology, as we described previously. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the PCL/PLGA/collagen scaffolds (group 3) with PCL/PLGA-only scaffolds (group 1) and PCL/PLGA scaffolds with collagen by the dip-coating method (group 2) using human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and rat primary hepatocytes. The selectively dispensed collagen formed a three-dimensional (3D) network of nanofibers in group 3, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The compressive strength and modulus of group 3 were approximately 140 and 510 times higher, respectively, than those of a sponge-type collagen scaffold whose weak mechanical properties were regarded as a critical drawback. Proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hASCs were promoted significantly in group 3 compared to groups 1 and 2. In addition, we found that the viability and albumin secretion ability of rat primary hepatocytes were highly retained for 10 days in group 3 but not group 1. Interestingly, hepatocyte aggregation, which enhances hepatic function through cell-cell interactions, was observed particularly in group 3. In conclusion, group 3, in which the collagen was selectively dispensed in the 3D space of the porous PCL/PLGA framework, will be a promising 3D scaffold for culturing various cell types. PMID:23430333

  16. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness ( r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores ( r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness.

  17. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan.

    PubMed

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness (r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores (r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness. PMID:26715354

  18. Human and rat primary hepatocyte CYP1A1 and 1A2 induction with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran, and 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran.

    PubMed

    Budinsky, Robert A; LeCluyse, Edward L; Ferguson, Stephen S; Rowlands, J Craig; Simon, Ted

    2010-11-01

    The concentration dose response for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-mediated CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 messenger RNA (mRNA) induction and enzyme activity was determined in primary cultures of rat and human hepatocytes for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran. Eleven different congener concentrations from 0.00001 to 100 nM were used, thus spanning seven orders of magnitude. The Hill model was used to obtain values of EC(x) and maximal response from the individual data sets. No-observed effect concentration values were derived using several statistical methods including Dunnett's test, the Welch-Aspin test, and step-down bilinear regression. Thresholds were estimated using baseline projection methods and a "hockey stick" fitting method. Human hepatocytes were less responsive and less sensitive with respect to CYP1A1 activity and mRNA induction than rats. On the other hand, the human CYP1A2 response was more robust than the response in rats but generally less sensitive. These data allow an evaluation of relative species sensitivities for developing interspecies toxicodynamic adjustment factors, for assessing AHR activation thresholds, and for evaluating relative congener potencies. Overall, these data support the position that humans are less sensitive than rats to these AHR-dependent end points and support the use of a data-derived adjustment factor of 1.0 or less for extrapolating between rats and humans. PMID:20705892

  19. Cohort Programming and Learning: Improving Educational Experiences for Adult Learners. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltiel, Iris M.; Russo, Charline S.

    This book, which is intended for adult educators and human resource developers, presents guidelines for using the principles of cohort programming and learning to improve adult learners' educational experiences. The following are among the topics covered in the book's eight chapters: (1) cohort programming and learning (cohort programs defined;…

  20. Assessing Adult Learning: A Guide for Practitioners. Revised Edition. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Joseph J.

    This book, which is intended for adult educators and human resource developers, presents guidelines for assessing adult learning. The following are among the topics covered in the book's eight chapters: (1) basic principles of informal assessment (relationship between learning and assessment activities; sequencing learning and assessment…

  1. Unique multipotent cells in adult human mesenchymal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Kitada, Masaaki; Wakao, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kouki; Tanimura, Yukihiro; Makinoshima, Hideki; Goda, Makoto; Akashi, Hideo; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Niwa, Akira; Shigemoto, Taeko; Nabeshima, Yoko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Dezawa, Mari

    2010-01-01

    We found adult human stem cells that can generate, from a single cell, cells with the characteristics of the three germ layers. The cells are stress-tolerant and can be isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells, or directly from bone marrow aspirates. These cells can self-renew; form characteristic cell clusters in suspension culture that express a set of genes associated with pluripotency; and can differentiate into endodermal, ectodermal, and mesodermal cells both in vitro and in vivo. When transplanted into immunodeficient mice by local or i.v. injection, the cells integrated into damaged skin, muscle, or liver and differentiated into cytokeratin 14-, dystrophin-, or albumin-positive cells in the respective tissues. Furthermore, they can be efficiently isolated as SSEA-3(+) cells. Unlike authentic ES cells, their proliferation activity is not very high and they do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mouse testes. Thus, nontumorigenic stem cells with the ability to generate the multiple cell types of the three germ layers can be obtained through easily accessible adult human mesenchymal cells without introducing exogenous genes. These unique cells will be beneficial for cell-based therapy and biomedical research. PMID:20421459

  2. Multipotent progenitor cells isolated from adult human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I; Nair, I; Ferreri, K; Rawson, J; Kuroda, A; Pascual, M; Omori, K; Valiente, L; Orr, C; Al-Abdullah, I; Riggs, A; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2005-10-01

    The supply of islet cells is a limiting factor for the widespread application of islet transplantation of type-1 diabetes. Islets constitute 1% to 2% of pancreatic tissue, leaving approximately 98% as discard after islet isolation and purification. In this report we present our data on the isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from discarded adult human pancreatic tissue. The collected cells from discarded nonislet fractions, after enzymatic digestion and gradient purification of islets, were dissociated for suspension culture in a serum-free medium. The cell clusters grown to a size of 100 to 150 mum contained cells staining for stage-specific embryonic antigens, but not insulin or C-peptide. To direct cell differentiation toward islets, clusters were recultured in a pancreatic differentiation medium. Insulin and C-peptide-positive cells by immunocytochemistry appeared within a week, reaching over 10% of the cell population. Glucagon and somatostatin-positive cells were also detected. The cell clusters were found to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Cells from the same clusters also had the capacity for differentiation into neural cells, as documented by staining for neural and glial cell markers when cultured as monolayers in media containing neurotrophic factors. These data suggest that multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells exist within the human pancreatic tissue that is typically discarded during islet isolation procedures. These adult progenitor cells can be successfully differentiated into insulin-producing cells, and thus they have the potential for treatment of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:16298614

  3. Metabolic fate of desomorphine elucidated using rat urine, pooled human liver preparations, and human hepatocyte cultures as well as its detectability using standard urine screening approaches.

    PubMed

    Richter, Lilian H J; Kaminski, Yeda Rumi; Noor, Fozia; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2016-09-01

    Desomorphine is an opioid misused as "crocodile", a cheaper alternative to heroin. It is a crude synthesis product homemade from codeine with toxic byproducts. The aim of the present work was to investigate the metabolic fate of desomorphine in vivo using rat urine and in vitro using pooled human liver microsomes and cytosol as well as human liver cell lines (HepG2 and HepaRG) by Orbitrap-based liquid chromatography-high resolution-tandem mass spectrometry or hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. According to the identified metabolites, the following metabolic steps could be proposed: N-demethylation, hydroxylation at various positions, N-oxidation, glucuronidation, and sulfation. The cytochrome P450 (CYP) initial activity screening revealed CYP3A4 to be the only CYP involved in all phase I steps. UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) initial activity screening showed that UGT1A1, UGT1A8, UGT1A9, UGT1A10, UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17 formed desomorphine glucuronide. Among the tested in vitro models, HepaRG cells were identified to be the most suitable tool for prediction of human hepatic phase I and II metabolism of drugs of abuse. Finally, desomorphine (crocodile) consumption should be detectable by all standard urine screening approaches mainly via the parent compound and/or its glucuronide assuming similar kinetics in rats and humans. PMID:27372715

  4. Interaction of hepatocyte nuclear factors in transcriptional regulation of tissue specific hormonal expression of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (abcc2)

    SciTech Connect

    Qadri, Ishtiaq Hu, L.-J.; Iwahashi, Mieko; Al-Zuabi, Subhi; Quattrochi, Linda C.; Simon, Francis R.

    2009-02-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) (ABCC2) is an ATP-binding cassette membrane protein located primarily on apical surface of hepatocytes that mediates transport of conjugated xenobiotics and endogenous compounds into bile. MRP2 is highly expressed in hepatocytes, and at lower levels in small intestines, stomach and kidney. Previous reports have characterized mammalian MRP2 promoters, but none have established the molecular mechanism(s) involved in liver enriched expression. This study aims to investigate the mechanism of hepatic MRP2 regulation. A 2130 bp of MRP2 promoter was cloned from PAC-1 clone P108G1-7, to identify putative liver specific/hormone responsive functional DNA binding sites. Using deletion analysis, site specific mutagenesis and co-transfection studies, liver specific expression was determined. MRP2 promoter-LUC constructs were highly expressed in liver cell lines compared to non-liver cells. The region extending from - 3 to+ 458 bp of MRP2 promoter starting from AUG contained the potential binding sites for CAAATT box enhancer binding protein (C/EBP), hepatocytes nuclear factor 1, 3 and 4 (HNF1, HNF3, and HNF4. Only HNF1 and HNF4 co-transfection with MRP2 luciferase increased expression. Site specific mutational analysis of HNF1 binding site indicated an important role for HNF1{alpha}. HNF4{alpha} induction of MRP2 was independent of HNF1 binding site. C/EBP, HNF3, and HNF6 inhibited HNF1{alpha} while HNF4{alpha} induced MRP2 luciferase expression and glucocorticoids stimulated MRP2 expression. This study emphasizes the complex regulation of MRP2 with HNF1{alpha} and HNF4{alpha} playing a central role. The coordinated regulation of xenobiotic transporters and oxidative conjugation may determine the adaptive responses to cellular detoxification processes.

  5. Modeling Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease with Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Immature Hepatocyte-Like Cells Reveals Activation of PLIN2 and Confirms Regulatory Functions of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Graffmann, Nina; Ring, Sarah; Kawala, Marie-Ann; Wruck, Wasco; Ncube, Audrey; Trompeter, Hans-Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD/steatosis) is a metabolic disease characterized by the incorporation of fat into hepatocytes. In this study, we developed an in vitro model for NAFLD based on hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells. We induced fat storage in these HLCs and detected major expression changes of metabolism-associated genes, as well as an overall reduction of liver-related microRNAs. We observed an upregulation of the lipid droplet coating protein Perilipin 2 (PLIN2), as well as of numerous genes of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pathway, which constitutes a regulatory hub for metabolic processes. Interference with PLIN2 and PPARα resulted in major alterations in gene expression, especially affecting lipid, glucose, and purine metabolism. Our model recapitulates many metabolic changes that are characteristic for NAFLD. It permits the dissection of disease-promoting molecular pathways and allows us to investigate the influences of distinct genetic backgrounds on disease progression. PMID:27308945

  6. Modeling Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease with Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Immature Hepatocyte-Like Cells Reveals Activation of PLIN2 and Confirms Regulatory Functions of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha.

    PubMed

    Graffmann, Nina; Ring, Sarah; Kawala, Marie-Ann; Wruck, Wasco; Ncube, Audrey; Trompeter, Hans-Ingo; Adjaye, James

    2016-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD/steatosis) is a metabolic disease characterized by the incorporation of fat into hepatocytes. In this study, we developed an in vitro model for NAFLD based on hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells. We induced fat storage in these HLCs and detected major expression changes of metabolism-associated genes, as well as an overall reduction of liver-related microRNAs. We observed an upregulation of the lipid droplet coating protein Perilipin 2 (PLIN2), as well as of numerous genes of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pathway, which constitutes a regulatory hub for metabolic processes. Interference with PLIN2 and PPARα resulted in major alterations in gene expression, especially affecting lipid, glucose, and purine metabolism. Our model recapitulates many metabolic changes that are characteristic for NAFLD. It permits the dissection of disease-promoting molecular pathways and allows us to investigate the influences of distinct genetic backgrounds on disease progression. PMID:27308945

  7. Potential interactions between HIV drugs, ritonavir and efavirenz and anticancer drug, nilotinib--a study in primary cultures of human hepatocytes that is applicable to HIV patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Venkateswaran C; Parise, Robert A; Christner, Susan M; Rudek, Michelle A; Beumer, Jan H; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2014-11-01

    Nilotinib is used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and is metabolized by CYP3A. With a black-box warning for QT prolongation, which is exposure dependent, controlling for drug interactions is clinically relevant. Treatments of HIV patients with CML are with HAART drugs, ritonavir and efavirenz, may cause complex drug interactions through CYP3A inhibition or induction. We evaluated the interactions of ritonavir or efavirenz on nilotinib using human hepatocytes and compared these interactions with those of ketoconazole or rifampin, classical CYP3A inhibitor and inducer, respectively. Hepatocytes were treated with vehicle, ritonavir (10 μM), ketoconazole (10 μM), efavirenz (10 μM), or rifampin (10 μM) for 5 days. On day 5, nilotinib (3 μM) was coincubated for an additional 24-48 hours. The concentrations of nilotinib were quantitated in collected samples (combined lysate and medium) by LC-MS. Apparent intrinsic clearance (CL(int,app)) of nilotinib was lowered 5.8- and 3.1-fold, respectively, by ritonavir and ketoconazole. Efavirenz and rifampin increased the CL(int,app) of nilotinib by 2.1- and 4.1-fold, respectively. The clinically recommended dose (300 mg twice daily) of nilotinib may have to be reduced substantially (150 mg once daily) or increased (400 mg thrice daily), respectively, to achieve desired drug exposure, when ritonavir or efavirenz is co-administered. PMID:24846165

  8. Nonylphenol-mediated CYP induction is PXR-dependent: The use of humanized mice and human hepatocytes suggests that hPXR is less sensitive than mouse PXR to nonylphenol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, Linda C.; Barfield, Christina; Hernandez, Juan P.; Baldwin, William S.

    2011-05-01

    Nonylphenol (NP), a by-product of alkylphenol ethoxylates, is a pervasive surfactant that activates the xenosensing nuclear receptor, the pregnane X-receptor (PXR) in transactivation assays in vitro. We are interested in determining if NP activates PXR in vivo, determining if hPXR and mPXR act similarly, and investigating the role of PXR in protecting individuals from NP. Wild-type (WT), PXR-null, and humanized PXR (hPXR) mice were treated with NP at 0, 50 or 75 mg/kg/day for one week, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction, liver histopathology, and serum NP concentrations were examined. WT mice treated with NP showed induction of Cyp2b, and male-specific induction of Cyp2c and Cyp3a. CYPs were not induced in PXR-null mice, demonstrating that PXR is necessary for NP-mediated CYP induction. CAR-mediated CYP induction was not observed in the PXR-null mice despite previous data demonstrating that NP is also a CAR activator. hPXR mice only showed moderate Cyp induction, suggesting that hPXR is not as sensitive to NP as mPXR in vivo. NP-mediated Cyp3a induction from three human hepatocyte donors was not significant, confirming that hPXR is not very sensitive to NP-mediated CYP induction. Lastly, mice with PXR (mPXR and hPXR) showed lower NP serum concentrations than PXR-null mice treated with NP suggesting that PXR plays a role in decreasing liver toxicity by basally regulating phase I-III detoxification enzymes that promote the metabolism and elimination of NP. In summary, PXR is required for NP-mediated CYP-induction, mPXR mediates greater CYP induction than hPXR in vivo, and the presence of PXR, especially mPXR, is associated with altered histopathology and increased clearance of NP.

  9. Nonylphenol-mediated CYP induction is PXR-dependent: The use of humanized mice and human hepatocytes suggests that hPXR is less sensitive than mouse PXR to nonylphenol treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Linda C; Barfield, Christina; Hernandez, Juan P; Baldwin, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Nonylphenol (NP), a by-product of alkylphenol ethoxylates, is a pervasive surfactant that activates the xenosensing nuclear receptor, the pregnane X-receptor (PXR) in transactivation assays in vitro. We are interested in determining if NP activates PXR in vivo, determining if hPXR and mPXR act similarly, and investigating the role of PXR in protecting individuals from NP. Wild-type (WT), PXR-null, and humanized PXR (hPXR) mice were treated with NP at 0, 50 or 75 mg/kg/day for one week, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction, liver histopathology, and serum NP concentrations were examined. WT mice treated with NP showed induction of Cyp2b, and male-specific induction of Cyp2c and Cyp3a. CYPs were not induced in PXR-null mice, demonstrating that PXR is necessary for NP-mediated CYP induction. CAR-mediated CYP induction was not observed in the PXR-null mice despite previous data demonstrating NP is also a CAR activator. hPXR mice only showed moderate Cyp induction, suggesting that hPXR is not as sensitive to NP as mPXR in vivo. NP-mediated Cyp3a induction from three human hepatocyte donors was not significant, confirming that hPXR is not very sensitive to NP-mediated CYP induction. Lastly, mice with PXR (mPXR and hPXR) showed lower NP serum concentrations than PXR-null mice treated with NP suggesting that PXR plays a role in decreasing liver toxicity by basally regulating Phase I-III detoxification enzymes that promote the metabolism and elimination of NP. In summary, PXR is required for NP-mediated CYP-induction, and mPXR mediates greater CYP induction than hPXR in vivo, and the presence of PXR, especially mPXR, is associated with altered histopathology and increased clearance of NP. PMID:21376070

  10. Novel Mechanism of Impaired Function of Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptide 1B3 in Human Hepatocytes: Post-Translational Regulation of OATP1B3 by Protein Kinase C Activation

    PubMed Central

    Powell, John; Farasyn, Taleah; Köck, Kathleen; Meng, Xiaojie; Pahwa, Sonia; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2014-01-01

    The organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B3 is a membrane transport protein that mediates hepatic uptake of many drugs and endogenous compounds. Currently, determination of OATP-mediated drug-drug interactions in vitro is focused primarily on direct substrate inhibition. Indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity is under-appreciated. OATP1B3 has putative protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation sites. Studies were designed to determine the effect of PKC activation on OATP1B3-mediated transport in human hepatocytes using cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8), a specific OATP1B3 substrate, as the probe. A PKC activator, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), did not directly inhibit [3H]CCK-8 accumulation in human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). However, pretreatment with PMA for as little as 10 minutes rapidly decreased [3H]CCK-8 accumulation. Treatment with a PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM) I prior to PMA treatment blocked the inhibitory effect of PMA, indicating PKC activation is essential for downregulating OATP1B3 activity. PMA pretreatment did not affect OATP1B3 mRNA or total protein levels. To determine the mechanism(s) underlying the indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity upon PKC activation, adenoviral vectors expressing FLAG-Myc-tagged OATP1B3 (Ad-OATP1B3) were transduced into human hepatocytes; surface expression and phosphorylation of OATP1B3 were determined by biotinylation and by an anti–phosphor-Ser/Thr/Tyr antibody, respectively. PMA pretreatment markedly increased OATP1B3 phosphorylation without affecting surface or total OATP1B3 protein levels. In conclusion, PKC activation rapidly decreases OATP1B3 transport activity by post-translational regulation of OATP1B3. These studies elucidate a novel indirect inhibitory mechanism affecting hepatic uptake mediated by OATP1B3, and provide new insights into predicting OATP-mediated drug interactions between OATP substrates and kinase modulator drugs/endogenous compounds. PMID:25200870

  11. A Hedgehog Survival Pathway in ‘Undead’ Lipotoxic Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kakisaka, Keisuke; Cazanave, Sophie C.; Werneburg, Nathan W.; Razumilava, Nataliya; Mertens, Joachim C.; Bronk, Steve F.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Ballooned hepatocytes in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) generate sonic hedgehog (SHH). This observation is consistent with a cellular phenotype in which the cell death program has been initiated but cannot be executed. Our aim was to determine if ballooned hepatocytes have potentially disabled the cell death execution machinery, and if so, can their functional biology be modeled in vitro. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on human NASH specimens. In vitro studies were performed using Huh-7 cells with shRNA targeted knockdown of caspase 9 (shC9 cells) or primary hepatocytes from caspase 3−/− mice. Results Ballooned hepatocytes in NASH display diminished expression of the caspase 9. This phenotype was modeled using shC9 cells; these cells were resistant to lipoapoptosis by palmitate (PA) or lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) despite lipid droplet formation. During lipid loading by either PA or LPC, shC9 cells activate JNK which via AP-1 induces SHH expression. An autocrine hedgehog survival signaling pathway was further delineated in both shC9 and caspase 3−/− cells during lipotoxic stress. Conclusion Ballooned hepatocytes in NASH downregulate caspase 9, a pivotal caspase executing the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Hepatocytes engineered to reduce caspase 9 expression are resistant to lipoapoptosis, in part, due to a hedgehog autocrine survival signaling pathway. PMID:22641094

  12. The Biomechanics of the Pediatric and Adult Human Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J.; Lau, Sabrina; Riley, Patrick; Lamp, John; Kent, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of literature points out the relevance of the thoracic spine dynamics in understanding the thorax-restraint interaction as well as in determining the kinematics of the head and cervical spine. This study characterizes the dynamic response in bending of eight human spinal specimens (4 pediatric: ages 7 and 15 years, 4 adult: ages 48 and 52 years) from two sections along the thoracic spine (T2–T4 and T7–T9). Each specimen consisted of three vertebral bodies connected by the corresponding intervertebral discs. All ligaments were preserved in the preparation with the exception of the inter-transverse ligament. Specimens were exposed to a series of five dynamic bending ramp-and-hold tests with varying amplitudes at a nominal rate of 2 rad/s. After this battery of tests, failure experiments were conducted. The 7-year-old specimen showed the lowest tolerance to a moment (T2–T4: 12.1 Nm; T7–T9: 11.6 Nm) with no significant reduction of the relative rotation between the vertebrae. The 15-year-old failure tolerance was comparable to that of the adult specimens. Failure of the adult specimens occurred within a wide range at the T2–T4 thoracic section (23.3 Nm- 53.0 Nm) while it was circumscribed to the interval 48.3 Nm-52.5 Nm for the T7–T9 section. The series of dynamic ramp-and-hold were used to assess two different scaling methods (mass scaling and SAE scaling). Neither method was able to capture the stiffness, peak moment and relaxation characteristics exhibited by the pediatric specimens. PMID:22105396

  13. Gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in human adults.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Manasi; Bhatia, Renu; Mathur, Rashmi

    2007-01-01

    Sweet, palatable substances such as sucrose are reported to calm infants undergoing routine investigative procedures. The analgesic effect persists in pre pubertal children and adults with a hint of gender dependent variation in the analgesic response. The present study was therefore designed to explore gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in adult volunteers utilizing the nociceptive flexion reflex, an objective tool for pain assessment. Nociceptive flexion reflex was recorded, both before and after (up to 15 min) ingestion of 100 ml of 25% sucrose solution in 6 male and 6 female volunteers. In the male volunteers the maximum amplitude of the response was 20.8 +/- 7.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 22.6 +/- 9.1 microV, 6.6 +/- 0.7 microV, 6.2 +/- 1.1 microV, 7.5 +/- 0.9 microV at 0, 5, 10 and 15 minutes post sucrose ingestion respectively. In female volunteers, the maximum amplitude of the response was 33.7 +/- 17.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 43.6 +/- 17.2 microV, 7.1 +/- 1.2 microV, 25.9 +/- 16.1 microV, 50.6 +/- 16.3 microV at the same time intervals post sucrose ingestion. The maximum amplitude values were significantly lower in the males at 10 and 15 minutes after sucrose ingestion (P < 0.05). This is the first objective report of gender specificity in sucrose induced analgesia in adult humans. The gender dependent variation in sucrose induced analgesia is prolonged in male (15 min) and short lived in female (5 min) volunteers. This knowledge may have important implications in pain management. PMID:18476396

  14. Hepatobiliary disposition in primary cultures of dog and monkey hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kelly A; Kostrubsky, Vsevolod; Sahi, Jasminder

    2006-01-01

    Hepatobiliary transporters are a major route for elimination of xenobiotics and endogenous products. In vitro hepatobiliary models have been reported for human and rat, but not for the other preclinical species used in safety evaluation. We have established methodologies for culturing dog and monkey hepatocytes with optimal bile canalicular formation and function, using a sandwich culture comprising rigid collagen substratum and gelled collagen overlay. Hepatic uptake utilizing sinusoidal transporters and biliary excretion through canalicular transporters were assessed using the bile salt taurocholate, salicylate (negative control), and the Bsep inhibitors cyclosporin A (CsA) and glyburide. There was significant taurocholate and salicylate canalicular efflux in dog and monkey hepatocytes, although the amount of salicylate transported was one thousandth that of taurocholate. Species differences were observed, as glyburide significantly inhibited taurocholate uptake in monkey (64% at 10 microM) but not dog hepatocytes, and inhibited taurocholate efflux in dog (100% at 10 microM) but not monkey hepatocytes. CsA did not inhibit bile salt uptake and significantly inhibited canalicular efflux in dog (at 0.1 microM) and monkey (at 1 and 10 microM) hepatocyte cultures. These results suggest that glyburide is a bile salt uptake inhibitor in monkey but not in dog hepatocytes and that CsA inhibits bile salt canalicular efflux but not basolateral uptake in these species. We have established dog and monkey hepatocytes in sandwich culture with intact bile canalicular formation and function. The differences observed in taurocholate transport between dog and monkey hepatocytes may be indicative of in vivo species differences. PMID:16749858

  15. MicroRNA-194 Regulates Hepatocytic Differentiation of Progenitor Cells by Targeting YAP1

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwang Hwa; McCarthy, Ryan L.; Zhou, Chong; Uprety, Nadima; Barton, Michelle Craig; Beretta, Laura

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA expression profiling in human liver progenitor cells following hepatocytic differentiation identified miR-122 and miR-194 as the microRNAs most strongly upregulated during hepatocytic differentiation of progenitor cells. MiR-194 was also highly upregulated following hepatocytic differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Overexpression of miR-194 in progenitor cells accelerated their differentiation into hepatocytes, as measured by morphological features such as canaliculi and expression of hepatocytic markers. Overexpression of miR-194 in hESCs induced their spontaneous differentiation, a phenotype accompanied with accelerated loss of the pluripotent factors OCT4 and NANOG and decrease in mesoderm marker HAND1 expression. We then identified YAP1 as a direct target of miR-194. Inhibition of YAP1 strongly induced hepatocytic differentiation of progenitor cells and YAP1 over expression reversed the miR-194-induced hepatocytic differentiation of progenitor cells. In conclusion, we identified miR-194 as a potent inducer of hepatocytic differentiation of progenitor cells and further identified YAP1 as a mediator of miR-194's effects on hepatocytic differentiation and liver progenitor cell fate. PMID:26731713

  16. Hepatocyte cryopreservation: Is it time to change the strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Stéphenne, Xavier; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne M

    2010-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation presents clinical benefit in patients with inborn errors of metabolism as an alternative, or at least as a bridge, to orthotopic liver transplantation. The success of such a therapeutic approach remains limited by the quality of the transplanted cells. Cryopreservation remains the best option for long-term storage of hepatocytes, providing a permanent and sufficient cell supply. However, isolated adult hepatocytes are poorly resistant to such a process, with a significant alteration both at the morphological and functional levels. Hence, the aim of the current review is to discuss the state of the art regarding widely-used hepatocyte cryopreservation protocols, as well as the assays performed to analyse the post-thawing cell quality both in vitro and in vivo. The majority of studies agree upon the poor quality and efficiency of cryopreserved/thawed hepatocytes as compared to freshly isolated hepatocytes. Intracellular ice formation or exposure to hyperosmotic solutions remains the main phenomenon of cryopreservation process, and its effects on cell quality and cell death induction will be discussed. The increased knowledge and understanding of the cryopreservation process will lead to research strategies to improve the viability and the quality of the cell suspensions after thawing. Such strategies, such as vitrification, will be discussed with respect to their potential to significantly improve the quality of cell suspensions dedicated to liver cell-based therapies. PMID:20039443

  17. Human hepatocyte growth factor in alcoholic liver disease: a comparison with change in alpha-fetoprotein. Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study Group 275.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, C L; Roos, F; Moritz, T E; Roselle, G A; Chedid, A; Grossman, C J; Rouster, S D; Bennett, G L; Lake, J R

    1996-12-01

    To evaluate the hepatic regenerative response in patients with alcoholic liver disease, sera from 263 patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis and/or cirrhosis were analyzed for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). HGF concentration was elevated above healthy controls in 95% of the patients (median level = 2.4 ng/ml), whereas AFP tended to be depressed below controls (median level = 4.1 ng/ml). Correlations with parameters of liver injury (i.e., ascites, encephalopathy, AST bilirubin, and protime) all showed a more significant correlation with HGF concentrations than those of AFP. Patients with HGF levels below the mean (4 ng/ml) exhibited significantly better survival (median survival = 35 months vs. 8.5 months for those with HGF > or = 4 ng/ml; p = 0.007). Serum HGF levels were associated with various specific histologic features of alcoholic hepatitis that included, but were not exclusively related to, necrosis. PMID:8986214

  18. Human herpesvirus 7 is a constitutive inhabitant of adult human saliva.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, L S; Frenkel, N

    1992-01-01

    We report the frequent isolation of human herpesvirus 7 from the saliva of healthy adults. Virus isolates recovered from different individuals exhibited minimal restriction enzyme polymorphism, which was mostly confined to heterogeneous (het) sequences in the genome. DNAs of isolates recovered from the same individual over a period of several months showed the same characteristic het fragments, indicating the stability of the het sequences upon virus replication and shedding in vivo. In contrast to the results of previous reports, human herpesvirus 6, the causative agent of roseola infantum, could not be isolated from the saliva specimens, raising questions regarding oral transmission of human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 to young children. Images PMID:1348548

  19. Exchange delays and impulsive choice in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Hyten, C; Madden, G J; Field, D P

    1994-09-01

    Choice responding by adult humans in a discrete-trial task was examined as a function of conditions that manipulated either the delay to point delivery or the delay between points and their exchange for money. In point-delay conditions, subjects chose between an "impulsive" alternative that provided a small amount of points immediately and a "self-control" alternative that provided a larger amount of points delayed by 15, 30, or 60 s. Points were exchanged for money immediately following the session. Subjects preferred the self-control alternative. In exchange-delay conditions, subjects chose between a small amount of points exchangeable for money immediately following the session and a larger amount of points exchangeable for money after 1 day, 3 weeks, or 6 weeks. A self-control preference observed for all subjects in the 1-day exchange-delay condition reversed to exclusive impulsive preference for 4 of the 6 subjects when choice conditions involved exchange delays of 3 or 6 weeks. These results show that human choice is sensitive to the manipulation of exchange delays and that impulsive preference can be obtained with exchange delays on the order of weeks. PMID:7964366

  20. Simultaneous characterization of progenitor cell compartments in adult human liver.

    PubMed

    Porretti, Laura; Cattaneo, Alessandra; Colombo, Federico; Lopa, Raffaella; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Battiston, Carlo; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Bertolini, Francesco; Rebulla, Paolo; Prati, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The human liver is a complex tissue consisting of epithelial, endothelial, hematopoietic, and mesenchymal elements that probably derive from multiple lineage-committed progenitors, but no comprehensive study aimed at identifying and characterizing intrahepatic precursors has yet been published. Cell suspensions for this study were obtained by enzymatic digestion of liver specimens taken from 20 patients with chronic liver disease and 13 multiorgan donors. Stem and progenitor cells were first isolated, amplified, and characterized ex vivo according to previously validated methods, and then optimized flow cytometry was used to assess their relative frequencies and characterize their immunophenotypes in the clinical specimens. Stem and progenitor cells committed to hematopoietic, endothelial, epithelial, and mesenchymal lineages were clearly identifiable in livers from both healthy and diseased subjects. Within the mononuclear liver cell compartment, epithelial progenitors [epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)(+)/CD49f(+)/CD29(+)/CD45(-)] accounted for 2.7-3.5% whereas hematopoietic (CD34(+)/CD45(+)), endothelial [vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (KDR)(+)/CD146(+)/CD45(-)], and mesenchymal [CD73(+)/CD105(+)/CD90 (Thy-1)(+)/CD45 (-)] stem cells and progenitors accounted for smaller fractions (0.02-0.6%). The patients' livers had higher percentages of hematopoietic and endothelial precursors than those of the donors. In conclusion, we identified and characterized precursors committed to four different lineages in adult human liver. We also optimized a flow cytometry approach that will be useful in exploring the contribution of these cells to the pathogenesis of liver disease. PMID:19960544

  1. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.

  2. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection.more » Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.« less

  3. Ossified Ligamentum Longitudinale Anterius in Adult Human Dry Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Venumadhav, Nelluri; KS, Siddaraju

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ligamentum longitudinale anterius is a broad and strong band of fibrous tissue that runs along the anterior surfaces of the bodies of the vertebrae. Aim: The study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius in adult dry human vertebra. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 95 sets of dry human vertebral columns irrespective of age and sex at Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences- Barabanki,-UP, Melaka Manipal Medical College-Manipal University and Department of Anatomy, KMCT Medical College, Manassery- Calicut, India. All the sets of vertebral columns were macroscopically inspected for the ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius. Results: It was observed that out of 95 sets of vertebral columns, 27 (28.42%) vertebral columns showed ossification. Out of 27 vertebral columns, 17 (17.89%) vertebral columns showed segmental type of ossification, 2 (2.11%) vertebral columns showed continuous type of ossification and 8 (8.42%) vertebral columns showed mixed type of ossification at different vertebral level. Conclusion: Such type of ossification will affect the biomechanics of the spine and may result in stiff neck, low back pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, compression of the brachial plexus, aphonia, immobility or mucosal thickening of larynx. Hence, knowledge of such abnormalities should be kept in mind to minimise serious complications in any surgical intervention or investigative procedures in the region. PMID:25302180

  4. Development of an intact hepatocyte activation system for routine use with the mouse lymphoma assay

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, K.H.; Moore, M.M.; Oglesby, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have developed a method for cocultivating primary rat hepatocytes with L5178Y/TK/sup +/-/-3.7.2C mouse lymphoma cells. This method should provide a means of simulating more closely in-vivo metabolism compared to metabolism by liver homogenates, while still being useful for routine screening. Hepatocytes were isolated from 200-250 gm adult male Sprague-Dawley rats; 1 x 10/sup 6/ viable hepatocytes were seeded per flask. Rapid attachment of the hepatocytes (2 hr) was obtained by using fibronectin-coated 25-cm/sup 2/ tissue culture flasks. Cocultivated cultures were incubated at 37/sup 0/C on a platform rocker at 32 oscillations per minute. A 16-hr cocultivated period was selected. With this hepatocyte activation methodology, CP, DMN, DMBA, and B(a)P, genotoxins that require metabolic activation, could be detected as mutagens in L5178Y/TK/sup +/-/ cells.

  5. Professional Fulfillment and Satisfaction of US and Canadian Adult Education and Human Resource Development Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shari L.; Wiesenberg, Faye

    2004-01-01

    This comparative study explored the professional fulfillment and job satisfaction of US and Canadian college and university faculty in the fields of Adult Education and Human Resource Development. In Autumn 2001, we disseminated electronically "The Adult Education and Human Resource Development Faculty Survey" to a selected sample of Canadian and…

  6. The Adult Learner. The Definitive Classic in Adult Education and Human Resource Development. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Malcolm S.; Holton, Elwood F., III; Swanson, Richard A.

    This book examines the core principles of adult learning and the roots of andragogy, advances in adult learning, and practice in adult learning. The following are among the topics discussed in the book's 17 chapters: importance of learning theory; theories of learning (concept of part and whole models of development, theories based on elemental…

  7. Adult somatic stem cells in the human parasite, Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J.; Wang, Bo; Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Tharp, Marla; Iyer, Harini; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Schistosomiasis is among the most prevalent human parasitic diseases, affecting more than 200 million people worldwide1. The etiological agents of this disease are trematode flatworms (Schistosoma) that live and lay eggs within the vasculature of the host. These eggs lodge in host tissues, causing inflammatory responses that are the primary cause of morbidity. Because these parasites can live and reproduce within human hosts for decades2, elucidating the mechanisms that promote their longevity is of fundamental importance. Although adult pluripotent stem cells, called neoblasts, drive long-term homeostatic tissue maintenance in long-lived free-living flatworms3,4 (e.g., planarians), and neoblast-like cells have been described in some parasitic tapeworms5, little is known about whether similar cell types exist in any trematode species. Here, we describe a population of neoblast-like cells in the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. These cells resemble planarian neoblasts morphologically and share their ability to proliferate and differentiate into derivatives of multiple germ layers. Capitalizing on available genomic resources6,7 and RNAseq-based gene expression profiling, we find that these schistosome neoblast-like cells express a fibroblast growth factor receptor ortholog. Using RNA interference we demonstrate that this gene is required for the maintenance of these neoblast-like cells. Our observations suggest that adaptation of developmental strategies shared by free-living ancestors to modern-day schistosomes likely contributed to the success of these animals as long-lived obligate parasites. We expect that future studies deciphering the function of these neoblast-like cells will have important implications for understanding the biology of these devastating parasites. PMID:23426263

  8. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  9. Death Receptor 5 Signaling Promotes Hepatocyte Lipoapoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Cazanave, Sophie C.; Mott, Justin L.; Bronk, Steven F.; Werneburg, Nathan W.; Fingas, Christian D.; Meng, X. Wei; Finnberg, Niklas; El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is characterized by hepatic steatosis, elevated levels of circulating free fatty acids (FFA), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and hepatocyte lipoapoptosis. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor 5 (DR5) is significantly elevated in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and steatotic hepatocytes demonstrate increased sensitivity to TRAIL-mediated cell death. Nonetheless, a role for TRAIL and/or DR5 in mediating lipoapoptotic pathways is unexplored. Here, we examined the contribution of DR5 death signaling to lipoapoptosis by free fatty acids. The toxic saturated free fatty acid palmitate induces an increase in DR5 mRNA and protein expression in Huh-7 human hepatoma cells leading to DR5 localization into lipid rafts, cell surface receptor clustering with subsequent recruitment of the initiator caspase-8, and ultimately cellular demise. Lipoapoptosis by palmitate was not inhibited by a soluble human recombinant DR5-Fc chimera protein suggesting that DR5 cytotoxic signaling is ligand-independent. Hepatocytes from murine TRAIL receptor knock-out mice (DR−/−) displayed reduced palmitate-mediated lipotoxicity. Likewise, knockdown of DR5 or caspase-8 expression by shRNA technology attenuated palmitate-induced Bax activation and apoptosis in Huh-7 cells, without altering induction of ER stress markers. Similar observations were verified in other cell models. Finally, knockdown of CHOP, an ER stress-mediated transcription factor, reduced DR5 up-regulation and DR5-mediated caspase-8 activation upon palmitate treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that ER stress-induced CHOP activation by palmitate transcriptionally up-regulates DR5, likely resulting in ligand-independent cytotoxic signaling by this death receptor. PMID:21941003

  10. Interspecies differences in metabolism of arsenic by cultured primary hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Drobna, Zuzana; Walton, Felecia S.; Harmon, Anne W.; Thomas, David J.; Styblo, Miroslav

    2010-05-15

    Biomethylation is the major pathway for the metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in many mammalian species, including the human. However, significant interspecies differences have been reported in the rate of in vivo metabolism of iAs and in yields of iAs metabolites found in urine. Liver is considered the primary site for the methylation of iAs and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) is the key enzyme in this pathway. Thus, the As3mt-catalyzed methylation of iAs in the liver determines in part the rate and the pattern of iAs metabolism in various species. We examined kinetics and concentration-response patterns for iAs methylation by cultured primary hepatocytes derived from human, rat, mice, dog, rabbit, and rhesus monkey. Hepatocytes were exposed to [{sup 73}As]arsenite (iAs{sup III}; 0.3, 0.9, 3.0, 9.0 or 30 nmol As/mg protein) for 24 h and radiolabeled metabolites were analyzed in cells and culture media. Hepatocytes from all six species methylated iAs{sup III} to methylarsenic (MAs) and dimethylarsenic (DMAs). Notably, dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes were considerably more efficient methylators of iAs{sup III} than mouse, rabbit or human hepatocytes. The low efficiency of mouse, rabbit and human hepatocytes to methylate iAs{sup III} was associated with inhibition of DMAs production by moderate concentrations of iAs{sup III} and with retention of iAs and MAs in cells. No significant correlations were found between the rate of iAs methylation and the thioredoxin reductase activity or glutathione concentration, two factors that modulate the activity of recombinant As3mt. No associations between the rates of iAs methylation and As3mt protein structures were found for the six species examined. Immunoblot analyses indicate that the superior arsenic methylation capacities of dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes examined in this study may be associated with a higher As3mt expression. However, factors other than As3mt expression may also contribute to

  11. Lipopolysaccharide Is Cleared from the Circulation by Hepatocytes via the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Elena; Cirstea, Mihai; Kong, HyeJin Julia; Boyd, John H.; Wang, Yingjin; Russell, James A.; Walley, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. While decreased Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) function improves clinical outcomes in murine and human sepsis, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major Gram-negative bacteria endotoxin, is cleared from the circulation by hepatocyte Low Density Lipoprotein Receptors (LDLR)—receptors downregulated by PCSK9. We directly visualized LPS uptake and found that LPS is rapidly taken up by hepatocytes into the cell periphery. Over the course of 4 hours LPS is transported towards the cell center. We next found that clearance of injected LPS from the blood was reduced substantially in Ldlr knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice compared to wild type controls and, simultaneously, hepatic uptake of LPS was also reduced in Ldlr-/- mice. Specifically examining the role of hepatocytes, we further found that primary hepatocytes isolated from Ldlr-/- mice had greatly decreased LPS uptake. In the HepG2 immortalized human hepatocyte cell line, LDLR silencing similarly resulted in decreased LPS uptake. PCSK9 treatment reduces LDLR density on hepatocytes and, therefore, was another independent strategy to test our hypothesis. Incubation with PCSK9 reduced LPS uptake by hepatocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that hepatocytes clear LPS from the circulation via the LDLR and PCSK9 regulates LPS clearance from the circulation during sepsis by downregulation of hepatic LDLR. PMID:27171436

  12. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist, AZD4619, induces alanine aminotransferase-1 gene and protein expression in human, but not in rat hepatocytes: Correlation with serum ALT levels.

    PubMed

    Thulin, Petra; Bamberg, Krister; Buler, Marcin; Dahl, Björn; Glinghammar, Björn

    2016-09-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in serum is the standard biomarker for liver injury. We have previously described a clinical trial with a novel selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist (AZD4619), which unexpectedly caused increased serum levels of ALT in treated individuals without any other evidence of liver injury. We pinpointed a plausible mechanism through which AZD4619 could increase serum ALT levels; namely through the PPARα-specific activation of the human ALT1 gene at the transcriptional level. In the present study, we present data from the preceding rat toxicity study, demonstrating that AZD4619 had no effect on rat serum ALT activity levels, and further experiments were performed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for this species-related difference. Our results revealed that AZD4619 increased ALT1 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner in human, but not in rat primary hepatocytes. Cloning of the human and rat ALT1 promoters into luciferase vectors confirmed that AZD4619 induced only the human, but not the rat ALT1 gene promoter in a dose-dependent manner. In PPARα-GAL4 reporter gene assays, AZD4619 was >100-fold more potent on the human vs. rat PPARα levels, explaining the differences in induction of the ALT1 gene between the species at the concentration range tested. These data demonstrate the usefulness of the human and rat ALT1 reporter gene assays for testing future drug candidates at the preclinical stage. In drug discovery projects, these assays elucidate whether elevations in ALT levels observed in vivo or in the clinic are due to metabolic effects rather than a toxic event in the liver. PMID:27430334

  13. Electrochemically Preadsorbed Collagen Promotes Adult Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Benavidez, Tomás E; Wechsler, Marissa E; Farrer, Madeleine M; Bizios, Rena; Garcia, Carlos D

    2016-01-01

    The present article reports on the effect of electric potential on the adsorption of collagen type I (the most abundant component of the organic phase of bone) onto optically transparent carbon electrodes (OTCE) and its mediation on subsequent adhesion of adult, human, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). For this purpose, adsorption of collagen type I was investigated as a function of the protein concentration (0.01, 0.1, and 0.25 mg/mL) and applied potential (open circuit potential [OCP; control], +400, +800, and +1500 mV). The resulting substrate surfaces were characterized using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Adsorption of collagen type I onto OTCE was affected by the potential applied to the sorbent surface and the concentration of protein. The higher the applied potential and protein concentration, the higher the adsorbed amount (Γcollagen). It was also observed that the application of potential values higher than +800 mV resulted in the oxidation of the adsorbed protein. Subsequent adhesion of hMSCs on the OTCEs (precoated with the collagen type I films) under standard cell culture conditions for 2 h was affected by the extent of collagen preadsorbed onto the OTCE substrates. Specifically, enhanced hMSCs adhesion was observed when the Γcollagen was the highest. When the collagen type I was oxidized (under applied potential equal to +1500 mV), however, hMSCs adhesion was decreased. These results provide the first correlation between the effects of electric potential on protein adsorption and subsequent modulation of anchorage-dependent cell adhesion. PMID:26549607

  14. Expression of HNFs and C/EBP alpha is correlated with immunocytochemical differentiation of cell lines derived from human hepatocellular carcinomas, hepatoblastomas and immortalized hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Tadashi; Kano, Junko; Minami, Yuko; Iijima, Tatsuo; Morishita, Yukio; Noguchi, Masayuki

    2003-09-01

    Objective assessment of the differentiation grade of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) is important for evaluation of the pathological diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic treatment. Differentiation of hepatocytes is reflected by their expression of hepatic functional proteins in the mouse embryo, and liver-enriched transcription factors (LETFs) have been shown to regulate hepatic functional genes strictly. Previous reports demonstrated that the level of LETF expression is altered in HCC or preneoplastic nodules compared with noncancerous tissues. Therefore, LETF expression levels might be useful as a measure of HCC maturation. In this study, to clarify the correlation between the expression of LETFs and the differentiation grade of HCCs, we performed a quantitative analysis of the mRNA expressions of HNFs and C/EBP alpha using real-time reverse-transcription PCR and immunocytochemical analysis for hepatic functional proteins in twelve cell lines. Furthermore, we examined orthotopic transplantations of the HCC cell lines in C.B-17/Icrj-scid/scid mice and characterized the histologic and cytologic differentiation of the tumors that developed. Our results showed that comprehensive expressions of HNF-3beta, HNF-4 alpha, HNF-1 alpha, and C/EBP alpha were specific to HCCs with well-differentiated function and morphology. Furthermore, among these four transcription factors, HNF-4 alpha and HNF-1 alpha expressions showed synchronism and had a close relation with HCC differentiation. These in vitro results were confirmed in tumors developed in SCID mice in vivo. These findings suggested that HNF-4 alpha and HNF-1 alpha are useful markers to assess the degree of HCC differentiation, which we suggest could be evaluated objectively by the quantitative analysis of HNFs and C/EBP alpha in HCCs. PMID:12967472

  15. Co-operation of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to transcriptional activation of the human haem oxygenase-1 gene promoter in a hepatoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Matsuura, Naomi; Kurokawa, Takako; Takahashi, Yuji; Miura, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    We reported previously that the 5'-flanking region (nucleotides -1976 to -1655) of the human haem oxygenase-1 ( hHO-1 ) gene enhances hHO-1 promoter activity in human hepatoma HepG2 cells, but not in HeLa cells [Takahashi, Takahashi, Ito, Nagano, Shibahara and Miura (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1447, 231-235]. To define more precisely the regulatory elements involved, in the present study we have functionally dissected this region and localized the enhancer to a 50 bp fragment (-1793 to -1744). Site-direct mutagenesis analysis revealed that two regions were responsible for this enhancer activity, i.e. a hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) homologous region and a GC box motif homologous region. Mutation in either region alone moderately decreased enhancer activity. However, mutations in both regions reduced promoter activity to the basal level. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated that the P5-2 fragment (-1793 to -1744) interacted with at least two nuclear factors, i.e. HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3. Co-transfection experiments using Drosophila SL2 cells revealed that HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3 synergistically stimulated the enhancer activity of the P5-2 fragment. These results indicate that co-operation of HNF-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to the activation of hHO-1 gene expression in hepatoma cells. PMID:12133007

  16. Co-operation of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to transcriptional activation of the human haem oxygenase-1 gene promoter in a hepatoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Matsuura, Naomi; Kurokawa, Takako; Takahashi, Yuji; Miura, Takashi

    2002-11-01

    We reported previously that the 5'-flanking region (nucleotides -1976 to -1655) of the human haem oxygenase-1 ( hHO-1 ) gene enhances hHO-1 promoter activity in human hepatoma HepG2 cells, but not in HeLa cells [Takahashi, Takahashi, Ito, Nagano, Shibahara and Miura (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1447, 231-235]. To define more precisely the regulatory elements involved, in the present study we have functionally dissected this region and localized the enhancer to a 50 bp fragment (-1793 to -1744). Site-direct mutagenesis analysis revealed that two regions were responsible for this enhancer activity, i.e. a hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) homologous region and a GC box motif homologous region. Mutation in either region alone moderately decreased enhancer activity. However, mutations in both regions reduced promoter activity to the basal level. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated that the P5-2 fragment (-1793 to -1744) interacted with at least two nuclear factors, i.e. HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3. Co-transfection experiments using Drosophila SL2 cells revealed that HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3 synergistically stimulated the enhancer activity of the P5-2 fragment. These results indicate that co-operation of HNF-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to the activation of hHO-1 gene expression in hepatoma cells. PMID:12133007

  17. A comparison of erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase activity from human foetuses and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Strange, R C; Johnston, J D; Coghill, D R; Hume, R

    1980-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity was measured in partially purified haemolysates of erythrocytes from human foetuses and adults. Enzyme activity was present in erythrocytes obtained between 12 and 40 weeks of gestation. The catalytic properties of the enzyme from foetal cells were similar to those of the enzyme from adult erythrocytes, indicating that probably only one form of the erythrocytes enzyme exists throughout foetal and adult life. PMID:7396875

  18. Human paraoxonase polymorphism: Hungarian population studies in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Szabó, I; Róna, K; Czinner, A; Gachályi, B

    1991-06-01

    The paraoxonase phenotype distribution pattern was studied in a Hungarian population of 102 children and 100 adults. All the subjects were of Caucasian origin and are not related. The adult population showed the trimodality in phenotype distribution similar to other European population data. The gene frequencies obtained were statistically not significantly different either. There was no correlation between the activity of serum paraoxonase and activity of cholinesterase, sex, age and body weight. The phenotype distribution was trimodal in the children's population too. There was a significant difference in gene frequency, however, compared to data from adult population. PMID:1651288

  19. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  20. Reaching beyond the United States: Adventures in International Adult Education and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henschke, John A.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his experience of how travel and adult education merged, for him, into a major emphasis in international adult education (AE) and human resource development (HRD). International ventures have been some of the most exciting and learning-filled aspects of the author's career in AE and HRD. His involvement in…

  1. Adult Continuing Education and Human Resource Development: Present Competitors, Potential Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    Adult Continuing Education (ACE) and Human Resource Development (HRD) have grown tremendously in the last quarter century. ACE experienced tremendous growth in the 60s and 70s, with over 17 million attending colleges and universities, and local school and community adult education programs by the end of the 1970s. More ACE programs were started…

  2. [Hepatocyte growth factor therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masashi

    2012-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the death of upper and lower motor neurons. Approximately 20% of familial ALS cases are caused by mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. We generated rats that express a human SOD1 transgene with two different ALS-associated mutations and found that these rats develop remarkable motor neuron degeneration and paralysis. This rat model, because of the larger size of the animals as compared to ALS-affected mice, will facilitate studies involving manipulation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (e.g., implantation of intrathecal catheters for chronic therapeutic studies; CSF sampling) or spinal cord (e.g., direct administration of viral- and cell-mediated therapies). The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is one of the most potent survival-promoting factors for motor neurons. To examine its protective effect on motor neurons and its therapeutic potential, we administered human recombinant HGF (hrHGF) to the transgenic rats, by continuous intrathecal delivery, for 4 weeks from the onset of paralysis. Intrathecal administration of hrHGF attenuated motor neuron degeneration and prolonged the duration of the disease 62.7% compared with the contrast group. Our results indicated the therapeutic efficacy of continuous intrathecal administration of hrHGF in ALS rats. To explore the potential use of this treatment strategy in humans, we induced a contusive cervical spinal cord injury in the common marmoset, a primate, and then administered hrHGF intrathecally. The intrathecal administration of hrHGF promoted functional recovery. These projects have been supported by the "Super Special Consortium for Supporting the Development of Cutting-edge Medical Care" (tokku), a special program organized by the Cabinet Office of the Japanese government (research representative: Hideyuki Okano, M.D., Ph.D., Professor at Keio University). PMID:22402718

  3. Newborn human skin fibroblasts senesce in vitro without acquiring adult growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of human fibroblasts were prepared from chest skin obtained either from newborns (less than 3 months old) or adults (more than 35 years old) and maintained in vitro until they senesced. Adult cells grew logarithmically in medium supplemented with whole blood serum but not with platelet-poor plasma. Early passage cells obtained from newborns grew equally well in either plasma- or serum-supplemented medium. The difference in growth factor requirements between adult and newborn cells persisted through the lifespan of the cells; i.e., newborn cells did not develop adult hormonal requirements when maintained in culture. Thus, in vitro cellular aging can be distinguished from some types of differentiation.

  4. MicroRNA-561 promotes acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes through downregulation of the nuclear receptor corepressor dosage-sensitive sex-reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1 (DAX-1).

    PubMed

    Li, Minghua; Yang, Yinxue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Tianxin; Guo, Peixuan; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    One of the major mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity is hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α)-mediated activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). In the present study, we investigated the role of miR-561 and its target gene DAX-1 encoding a corepressor of HNF4α in the process of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We used both human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cells and primary human hepatocytes in this study and monitored the levels of reactive oxygen species, lactate dehydrogenase, and glutathione. Our bioinformatics study suggests an association between miR-561 and DAX-1, but not HNF4α. Treatment of HepG2 cells with APAP significantly reduced the expression of DAX-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. miR-561 was induced by APAP treatment in HepG2 cells. Transfection of HepG2 cells with an miR-561 mimic exacerbated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. HNF4α is physically associated with DAX-1 in HepG2 cells. A decreased protein level of DAX-1 by APAP treatment was also enhanced by miR-561 mimic transfection in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. The basal and APAP-induced expression of PXR and CAR was enhanced by miR-561 mimic transfection; however, transfection of HepG2 cells or primary human hepatocytes with a miR-561 inhibitor or DAX-1 small interfering RNA reversed these effects. Additionally, the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that recruitment of DAX-1 onto the PXR promoter was inversely correlated with the recruitment of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α coactivator-1α and HNF4α on APAP treatment. These results indicate that miR-561 worsens APAP-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibition of DAX-1 and consequent transactivation of nuclear receptors. PMID:24104199

  5. No evidence for protective erythropoietin alpha signalling in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha (rHu-EPO) has been reported to protect the liver of rats and mice from ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, direct protective effects of rHu-EPO on hepatocytes and the responsible signalling pathways have not yet been described. The aim of the present work was to study the protective effect of rHu-EPO on warm hypoxia-reoxygenation and cold-induced injury to hepatocytes and the rHu-EPO-dependent signalling involved. Methods Loss of viability of isolated rat hepatocytes subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation or incubated at 4°C followed by rewarming was determined from released lactate dehydrogenase activity in the absence and presence of rHu-EPO (0.2–100 U/ml). Apoptotic nuclear morphology was assessed by fluorescence microscopy using the nuclear fluorophores H33342 and propidium iodide. Erythropoietin receptor (EPOR), EPO and Bcl-2 mRNAs were quantified by real time PCR. Activation of JAK-2, STAT-3 and STAT-5 in hepatocytes and rat livers perfused in situ was assessed by Western blotting. Results In contrast to previous in vivo studies on ischemia-reperfusion injury to the liver, rHu-EPO was without any protective effect on hypoxic injury, hypoxia-reoxygenation injury and cold-induced apoptosis to isolated cultured rat hepatocytes. EPOR mRNA was identified in these cells but specific detection of the EPO receptor protein was not possible due to the lack of antibody specificity. Both, in the cultured rat hepatocytes (10 U/ml for 15 minutes) and in the rat liver perfused in situ with rHu-EPO (8.9 U/ml for 15 minutes) no evidence for EPO-dependent signalling was found as indicated by missing effects of rHu-EPO on phosphorylation of JAK-2, STAT-3 and STAT-5 and on the induction of Bcl-2 mRNA. Conclusion Together, these results indicate the absence of any protective EPO signalling in rat hepatocytes. This implies that the protection provided by rHu-EPO in vivo against ischemia-reperfusion and other causes of liver injury

  6. Effects on 2,2’,4,4’-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 47) on Thyroxine Metabolism and Transport in Primary Rat and Human Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a major class of brominated flame retardants, are used in consumer products including furniture, electronics, textiles, and plastics. PBDEs bioaccumulate in wildlife and humans; BDE 47 is the predominant PBDE congener detected and typicall...

  7. Corporate Human Resources Adult Training and Employment Program Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aetna Life and Casualty, Hartford, CT.

    In response to increasing difficulty in finding qualified candidates for entry-level positions, the Aetna company has developed an Adult Training and Employment program. This program (1) trains, hires, and retains nontraditional candidates from the area's public and private agencies; (2) focuses on issues that affect this population's ability to…

  8. The Human Function Compunction: Teleological Explanation in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelemen, Deborah; Rosset, Evelyn

    2009-01-01

    Research has found that children possess a broad bias in favor of teleological--or purpose-based--explanations of natural phenomena. The current two experiments explored whether adults implicitly possess a similar bias. In Study 1, undergraduates judged a series of statements as "good" (i.e., correct) or "bad" (i.e., incorrect) explanations for…

  9. "Adult Education Is about Human Being in All Its Aspects"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Derek Legge, who celebrated his 95th birthday at the end of last month, is one of the most dedicated and influential of the largely unsung heroes of the adult education movement in Britain. As modesty is one of the many qualities with which his friends and colleagues credit him, he is certain to shrink from the description, but there is little…

  10. Adult Literacy Programs in Uganda. Africa Region Human Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okech, Anthony; Carr-Hill, Roy A.; Katahoire, Anne R.; Kakooza, Teresa; Ndidde, Alice N.; Oxenham, John

    This report evaluates the outcomes and cost effectiveness of adult literacy programs in Ugandan villages and compares government programs with those provided by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Part 1 describes evaluation objectives, government and NGO literacy programs and the rural socioeconomic context, and evaluation design. About 100…

  11. Human Capital Development: Reforms for Adult and Community Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Sarojni; Haukka, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The adult and community education (ACE) sector is consistently responsive to changing community needs and government priorities. It is this particular function that has drawn ACE into the lifelong learning debate as one model for sustaining communities. The responsiveness of ACE means that the sector and its programs continue to make valuable…

  12. Searching for the vomeronasal organ of adult humans: preliminary findings on location, structure, and size.

    PubMed

    Smith, T D; Siegel, M I; Burrows, A M; Mooney, M P; Burdi, A R; Fabrizio, P A; Clemente, F R

    1998-06-15

    The adult human vomeronasal organ (VNO) has been the focus of numerous recent investigations, yet its developmental continuity from the human fetal VNO is poorly understood. The present study compared new data on the adult human "VNO" with previous findings on the fetal human VNO. Nasal septa were removed from twelve adult human cadavers and each specimen was histologically sectioned. Coronal sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and periodic acid-Schiff-hematoxylin. The sections were examined by light microscopy for the presence of VNOs and the anterior paraseptal cartilages (PC). VNOs were quantified using a computer reconstruction technique to obtain VNO length, volume, and vomeronasal epithelium (VNE) volume. Histologically, VNOs and PCs were identified in eleven specimens. VNOs had ciliated, pseudostratified columnar epithelium with goblet cells. Variations (e.g., multiple communications to the nasal cavity) were observed in several specimens. Quantification was possible for 16 right or left VNOs. Right or left VNOs ranged from 3.5 to 11.8 mm in length, from 1.8 to 33.8 x 10(-4)cc in volume, and from 2.7 to 18.1 x 10(-4)cc in VNE volume. Results indicated that the adult human VNO was similar in VNE morphology, lumen shape, and spatial relationships when compared to human fetal VNOs. By comparison with previous fetal VNO measures, mean VNO length, volume, and VNE volume were larger in adult humans. These results support previous suggestions that postnatal VNO growth occurs. Findings on location and spatial relationships of the adult VNO were similar to those seen in human fetuses, but critical questions remain regarding the ontogeny of the vomeronasal nerves and VNE. PMID:9712196

  13. Teaching Adults with Learning Disabilities. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Dale R.

    This book is designed to show teachers how to reach out to adults and adolescents with learning disabilities and employ specific strategies for helping them to compensate for the disabilities and acquire literacy skills. The ways in which specific differences in brain structure inhibit the mastery of reading, spelling, handwriting, phonics, and…

  14. Arts and Humanities in Adult and Continuing Education. Trends and Issues Alerts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Trends and issues related to arts and humanities in adult and continuing education can be categorized in three ways: ways of knowing, informal sites of learning, and cultural pluralism. The arts and humanities are vehicles for critical reflection, and they present paths to the individual construction of knowledge that are intuitive, relational,…

  15. The xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and orphan nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha in the regulation of human steroid-/bile acid-sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Song, Chung S; Oh, Taesung; Ahmed, Mohamed; De La Cruz, Isidro John; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2007-09-01

    The nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are the primary transcription factors coordinating induced expression of the enzymes and proteins directing oxidative, conjugative, and transport phases of endobiotic and xenobiotic metabolism, whereas hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha), a regulator of hepatic lipid homeostasis, can modify the PXR/CAR response. Steroid- and bile acid-sulfotransferase (SULT2A1) promotes phase II metabolism through its sulfonating action on certain endobiotics, including steroids and bile acids, and on diverse xenobiotics, including therapeutic drugs. This study describes characterization of a PXR- and CAR-inducible composite element in the human SULT2A1 promoter and its synergistic interaction with HNF4alpha. Inverted and direct repeats of AG(G/T)TCA (IR2 and DR4), both binding to PXR and CAR, define the composite element. Differential recognition of the composite element by PXR and CAR is evident because single-site mutation at either IR2 or DR4 in the natural gene abolished the PXR response, whereas mutations at both repeats were necessary to abrogate completely the CAR response. The composite element conferred xenobiotic response to a heterologous promoter, and the cognate ligands induced PXR and CAR recruitment to the chromatin-associated response region. An HNF4alpha element adjacent to the -30 position enhanced basal promoter activity. Although functioning as a synergizer, the HNF4alpha element was not essential for the PXR/CAR response. An emerging role of SULT2A1 in lipid and caloric homeostasis suggests that illumination on the regulatory interactions driving human SULT2A1 expression may reveal new avenues to control certain metabolic disorders. PMID:17595319

  16. RNAi Screening in Primary Human Hepatocytes of Genes Implicated in Genome-Wide Association Studies for Roles in Type 2 Diabetes Identifies Roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among Others, in Hepatic Glucose Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Steven; Zhao, Juan; Tiwari, Shiwani; Eng, Kurt; Guey, Lin T.; Tien, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response) and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway. PMID:23840313

  17. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  18. The human function compunction: teleological explanation in adults.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Deborah; Rosset, Evelyn

    2009-04-01

    Research has found that children possess a broad bias in favor of teleological--or purpose-based--explanations of natural phenomena. The current two experiments explored whether adults implicitly possess a similar bias. In Study 1, undergraduates judged a series of statements as "good" (i.e., correct) or "bad" (i.e., incorrect) explanations for why different phenomena occur. Judgments occurred in one of three conditions: fast speeded, moderately speeded, or unspeeded. Participants in speeded conditions judged significantly more scientifically unwarranted teleological explanations as correct (e.g., "the sun radiates heat because warmth nurtures life"), but were not more error-prone on control items (e.g., unwarranted physical explanations such as "hills form because floodwater freezes"). Study 2 extended these findings by examining the relationship between different aspects of adults' "promiscuous teleology" and other variables such as scientific knowledge, religious beliefs, and inhibitory control. Implications of these findings for scientific literacy are discussed. PMID:19200537

  19. Postnatal and adult neurogenesis in the development of human disease.

    PubMed

    Danzer, Steve C

    2008-10-01

    The mammalian brain contains a population of neurons that are continuously generated from late embryogenesis through adulthood-after the generation of almost all other neuronal types. This brain region-the hippocampal dentate gyrus-is in a sense, therefore, persistently immature. Postnatal and adult neurogenesis is likely an essential feature of the dentate, which is critical for learning and memory. Protracted neurogenesis after birth would allow the new cells to develop in conjunction with external events-but it may come with a price: while neurogenesis in utero occurs in a protected environment, children and adults are exposed to any number of hazards, such as toxins and infectious agents. Mature neurons might be resistant to such exposures, but new neurons may be vulnerable. Consistent with this prediction, in adult rodents seizures disrupt the integration of newly generated granule cells, whereas mature granule cells are comparatively unaffected. Significantly, abnormally interconnected cells may contribute to epileptogenesis and/or associated cognitive and memory deficits. Finally, studies increasingly indicate that new granule cells are extremely sensitive to a host of endogenous and exogenous factors, raising the possibility that disrupted granule cell integration may be a common feature of many neurological diseases. PMID:18997123

  20. The immobilization of hepatocytes on 24 nm-sized gold colloid for enhanced hepatocytes proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hai-Ying; Chen, Zhong; Sa, Rong-Xiao; Yuan, Su-Su; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Ding, Yi-Tao; Yu, Ai-Min

    2004-08-01

    Bioartificial liver and hepatocyte transplantation is anticipated to supply a temporary metabolic support for candidates of liver transplantation or for patients with fulminant liver failure. An essential restriction of this form is the inability to acquire an enough amount of hepatocytes. Enhancement of the proliferation and differentiated function of hepatocytes is becoming a pursued target. Here, porcine hepatocytes were successfully immobilized on nano-sized gold colloid particles to construct a "hepatocyte/gold colloid" interface at which hepatocytes can be quickly proliferated. The properties of this resulting interface were characterized and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The proliferative mechanism of hepatocytes was also discussed. The proliferated hepatocytes could be applied to the clinic based on their excellent functions for the synthesis of protein, glucose and urea as well as lower lactate dehydrogenase release. PMID:15020118