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Sample records for adult human kidney

  1. Impact of growth hormone hypersecretion on the adult human kidney.

    PubMed

    Grunenwald, Solange; Tack, Ivan; Chauveau, Dominique; Bennet, Antoine; Caron, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Acromegaly is most often secondary to a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with increased Insulin-like Growth Factor type 1 (IGF-1) level. The consequences of GH/IGF-1 hypersecretion reflect the diversity of action of these hormones. The genes of the GH receptor (GHR), IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and IGF-binding proteins (IGF-BP) are physiologically expressed in the adult kidney, suggesting a potential role of the somatotropic axis on renal structure and functions. The expression of these proteins is highly organized and differs according to the anatomical and functional segments of the nephron suggesting different roles of GH and IGF-1 in these segments. In animals, chronic exposure to high doses of GH induces glomerulosclerosis and increases albuminuria. Studies in patients with GH hypersecretion have identified numerous targets of GH/IGF-1 axis on the kidney: 1) an impact on renal filtration with increased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), 2) a structural impact with an increase in kidney weight and glomerular hypertrophy, and 3) a tubular impact leading to hyperphosphatemia, hypercalciuria and antinatriuretic effects. Despite the increased glomerular filtration rate observed in patients with GH hypersecretion, GH is an inefficient treatment for chronic renal failure. GH and IGF-1 seem to be involved in the physiopathology of diabetic nephropathy; this finding offers the possibility of targeting the GH/IGF-1 axis for the prevention and the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  2. [Human physiology: kidney].

    PubMed

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  3. [Membranous kidney diseases in adults].

    PubMed

    Sobarzo Toro, Martín; Vilches, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy is the most common histologic phenotype associated with the primary nephrotic syndrome in adults and the second most common etiological diagnosis in over sixteen hundred renal biopsies on native kidneys processed at our institution over a 30 year period. Renal survival at 10 years is about 70%, but the course of the disease is related to a series of factors which have constituted the basis for mathematical models developed to predict the natural history in a given individual. These factors are gender, age, renal function at the time of diagnosis, presence of the nephrotic syndrome, high blood pressure and the degree of structural damage. Although in low risk patients a period of observation and the use of ACE inhibitors is a reasonable option, most nephrologists would elect to use pharmacological treatment to induce remissions of proteinuria and preserve renal function. The use of steroids and cytotoxic agents in alternating monthly cycles over six months is firmly supported by controlled, randomized clinical trials. If patients are resistant to this regimen or clinical considerations indicate it may be inappropriately toxic, the use of cyclosporin over 6 to 12 months is also a good choice, and it has been shown to be useful even in the context of deteriorating renal function. Mycophenolate mofetil and possibly rituximab may be options of last resort before considering the patient resistant to therapy. At all times, treatment of hypertension, non-specific antiproteinuric measures, and preventing complications of the nephrotic state should be top priorities in the overall therapeutic strategy.

  4. Stroke in adult polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, M.; Gonzalo, A.; Gobernado, J. M.; Orte, L.; Quereda, C.; Ortuño, J.

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the incidence of acute cerebrovascular events, 142 patients with adult polycystic kidney disease were retrospectively reviewed. Fourteen patients (9.8%) had 19 cerebral attacks. Six patients (4.2%) had intracranial haemorrhage attacks (three ruptured intracranial aneurysms and three cerebral haemorrhages). Ischaemic events occurred in nine patients (five cerebral infarctions and four transient ischaemic attacks). Patients with ischaemic attacks had a better outcome than patients with haemorrhagic events even when transient ischaemic attacks were excluded. Patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms were younger. Cerebral complications are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with adult polycystic kidney disease. They can prove disabling prior to or after dialysis and transplantation. PMID:1480536

  5. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Carol F.; Ratliff, Michelle L.; Powell, Rebecca; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  6. The gene encoding the VP16-accessory protein HCF (HCFC1) resides in human Xq28 and is highly expressed in fetal tissues and the adult kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.C.; Herr, W.; Parrish, J.E.; Massa, H.F.

    1995-01-20

    After herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, the viral regulatory protein VP16 activates transcription of the HSV immediate-early promoters by directing complex formation with two cellular proteins, the POU-homeodomain transcription factor Oct-1 and the host cell factor HCF. The function of HCF in uninfected cells is unknown. Here we show by fluorescence in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid analysis that the gene encoding human HCF, HCFC1, maps to the q28 region of the X chromosome. Yeast artificial chromosome and cosmid mapping localizes the HCFC1 gene within 100 kb distal of the renal vasopressin type-2 receptor (V2R) gene and adjacent to the renin-binding protein gene (RENBP). The HCFC1 gene is apparently unique. HCF transcripts and protein are most abundant in fetal and placental tissues and cell lines, suggesting a role in cell proliferation. In adults, HCF protein is abundant in the kidney, but not in the brain, a site of latent HSV infection and where HCF levels may influence progression of HSV infection. 42 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Atlas of Cellular Dynamics during Zebrafish Adult Kidney Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    McCampbell, Kristen K.; Springer, Kristin N.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a useful animal model to study the signaling pathways that orchestrate kidney regeneration, as its renal nephrons are simple, yet they maintain the biological complexity inherent to that of higher vertebrate organisms including mammals. Recent studies have suggested that administration of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin in zebrafish mimics human acute kidney injury (AKI) through the induction of nephron damage, but the timing and details of critical phenotypic events associated with the regeneration process, particularly in existing nephrons, have not been characterized. Here, we mapped the temporal progression of cellular and molecular changes that occur during renal epithelial regeneration of the proximal tubule in the adult zebrafish using a platform of histological and expression analysis techniques. This work establishes the timing of renal cell death after gentamicin injury, identifies proliferative compartments within the kidney, and documents gene expression changes associated with the regenerative response of proliferating cells. These data provide an important descriptive atlas that documents the series of events that ensue after damage in the zebrafish kidney, thus availing a valuable resource for the scientific community that can facilitate the implementation of zebrafish research to delineate the mechanisms that control renal regeneration. PMID:26089919

  8. Exaggerated natriuresis in adult polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, H; Nielsen, A H; Pedersen, E B; Herlevsen, P; Kornerup, H J; Posborg, V

    1986-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AII), aldosterone (Aldo) arginine vasopressin (AVP) in plasma, serum osmolality (Sosm), and renal sodium excretion (UNaV) were studied before and after infusion of hypertonic sodium chloride solution in 20 patients with adult polycystic kidney disease (PKD) with normal or moderately reduced creatinine clearance (Ccr) and in 10 healthy control subjects. UNaV increased after sodium loading in all, significantly more in the PKD patients. AII and Aldo were normal before sodium loading and suppressed after saline in PKD patients and controls. The increase in VNaV correlated with Aldo in patients but not in controls. AVP before loading was increased in hypertensive PKD patients with reduced Ccr, but not in normotensive patients with normal Ccr. After hypertonic saline, Sosm increased to the same degree both in PKD and control subjects, but AVP increased more in those with PKD. The exaggerated natriuresis of PKD is probably not explained by a change in the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The enhanced response of AVP to osmotic stimuli in PKD may be a compensatory reaction to a reduced renal tubular effect of AVP.

  9. Analysis of Nephron Composition and Function in the Adult Zebrafish Kidney

    PubMed Central

    McCampbell, Kristen K.; Springer, Kristin N.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish model has emerged as a relevant system to study kidney development, regeneration and disease. Both the embryonic and adult zebrafish kidneys are composed of functional units known as nephrons, which are highly conserved with other vertebrates, including mammals. Research in zebrafish has recently demonstrated that two distinctive phenomena transpire after adult nephrons incur damage: first, there is robust regeneration within existing nephrons that replaces the destroyed tubule epithelial cells; second, entirely new nephrons are produced from renal progenitors in a process known as neonephrogenesis. In contrast, humans and other mammals seem to have only a limited ability for nephron epithelial regeneration. To date, the mechanisms responsible for these kidney regeneration phenomena remain poorly understood. Since adult zebrafish kidneys undergo both nephron epithelial regeneration and neonephrogenesis, they provide an outstanding experimental paradigm to study these events. Further, there is a wide range of genetic and pharmacological tools available in the zebrafish model that can be used to delineate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate renal regeneration. One essential aspect of such research is the evaluation of nephron structure and function. This protocol describes a set of labeling techniques that can be used to gauge renal composition and test nephron functionality in the adult zebrafish kidney. Thus, these methods are widely applicable to the future phenotypic characterization of adult zebrafish kidney injury paradigms, which include but are not limited to, nephrotoxicant exposure regimes or genetic methods of targeted cell death such as the nitroreductase mediated cell ablation technique. Further, these methods could be used to study genetic perturbations in adult kidney formation and could also be applied to assess renal status during chronic disease modeling. PMID:25145398

  10. Arterial flow regulator enables transplantation and growth of human fetal kidneys in rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, N K; Gu, J; Gu, S; Osorio, R W; Concepcion, W; Gu, E

    2015-06-01

    Here we introduce a novel method of transplanting human fetal kidneys into adult rats. To overcome the technical challenges of fetal-to-adult organ transplantation, we devised an arterial flow regulator (AFR), consisting of a volume adjustable saline-filled cuff, which enables low-pressure human fetal kidneys to be transplanted into high-pressure adult rat hosts. By incrementally withdrawing saline from the AFR over time, blood flow entering the human fetal kidney was gradually increased until full blood flow was restored 30 days after transplantation. Human fetal kidneys were shown to dramatically increase in size and function. Moreover, rats which had all native renal mass removed 30 days after successful transplantation of the human fetal kidney were shown to have a mean survival time of 122 days compared to 3 days for control rats that underwent bilateral nephrectomy without a prior human fetal kidney transplant. These in vivo human fetal kidney models may serve as powerful platforms for drug testing and discovery.

  11. Approach to the Adult Kidney Stone Former

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Naim

    2012-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a prevalent and costly condition with high recurrence rate. A medical evaluation to identify abnormalities responsible for nephrolithiasis and guide subsequent therapy has been advocated to reduce the risk of stone recurrence. The evaluation of kidney stone formers generally comprises an extensive medical history to identify metabolic, environmental, dietary and/or genetic factors contributing to stone formation. Imaging studies are utilized to evaluate and follow stone burden. Laboratory studies including stone composition analysis and serum and urinary chemistries are commonly obtained to further assess for any underlying systemic disorders, to detect environmental and metabolic processes contributing to stone disease, and to guide initial and follow-up dietary and pharmacological therapy. The nature and extent of such an evaluation is discussed in this review article. PMID:22654574

  12. Hypertension after bilateral kidney irradiation in young and adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jongejan, H.T.; van der Kogel, A.J.; Provoost, A.P.; Molenaar, J.C.

    1987-09-01

    The mechanism of a rise in blood pressure after kidney irradiation is unclear but most likely of renal origin. We have investigated the role of the renin-angiotensin system and dietary salt restriction in the development of systolic hypertension after bilateral kidney irradiation in young and adult rats. Three to 12 months after a single X-ray dose of 7.5 or 12.5 Gy to both kidneys of young and adult rats, the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and plasma renin concentration (PRC) were measured regularly. A single X-ray dose of 12.5 Gy caused a moderate rise in SBP and a slight reduction in PRC in both young and adult rats. A dose of 7.5 Gy did not significantly alter the SBP or PRC during the follow-up period of 1 year. In a second experiment, the kidneys of young rats received an X-ray dose of 20 Gy. Subsequently, rats were kept on a standard diet (110 mmol sodium/kg) or a sodium-poor diet (10 mmol sodium/kg). On both diets, SBP started to rise rapidly 3 months after kidney irradiation. Sodium balance studies carried out at that time revealed an increased sodium retention in the irradiated rats compared to controls on the same diet. In rats on a low sodium intake, there was neither a delay nor an alleviation in the development of hypertension. Compared to controls, the PRC tended to be lower in irradiated rats up to 4 months after irradiation. Subsequently, malignant hypertension developed in all 20 Gy rats, resulting in pressure natriuresis, stimulating the renin-angiotensin system. Our findings indicated that hypertension after bilateral kidney irradiation was not primarily the result of an activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Although there were some indications that sodium retention played a role, dietary sodium restriction did not influence the development of hypertension.

  13. Glomerulocystic kidney disease in an adult with enlarged kidneys: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Obata, Y; Furusu, A; Miyazaki, M; Nishino, T; Kawazu, T; Kanamoto, Y; Nishikido, M; Taguchi, T; Kohno, S

    2011-02-01

    We report the case of a 31-year-old male with enlarged kidneys and glomerulocystic kidney disease (GCKD). The patient had no family history of renal disease or other diseases. On initial presentation he complained of poor eyesight, and hypertensive retinopathy and elevated serum creatinine (5.0 mg/dl) were found at that time. Renal biopsy showed cystic dilatation of Bowman's capsule and atrophy of the glomerular tuft. Thus, an adult case of sporadic GCKD was diagnosed. Based on previous reports, kidney size in patients with adult type GCKD varies from small to large. Our patient's kidneys are the largest ever reported (right kidney was 22 cm×10 cm, left kidney was 19 cm×10 cm). A review of the literature dealing with sporadic adult GCKD suggested that it is difficult to diagnose this disease early in its course.

  14. Congenital hepatic fibrosis, liver cell carcinoma and adult polycystic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Manes, J L; Kissane, J M; Valdes, A J

    1977-06-01

    In reviewing the literature, we found no liver cell carcinoma (LCC) or well-documented adult polycystic kidneys (APK) associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). We report a 69-year-old man with CHF, LCC, APK, duplication cyst of distal portion of stomach, two calcified splenic artery aneurysms, myocardial fibrosis and muscular hypertrophy of esophagus. The LCC was grossly predunculated and microscopically showed prominent fibrosis and hyaline intracytoplasmic inclusions in the tumor cells.

  15. Transcriptome Analysis of Human Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Woroniecka, Karolina I.; Park, Ae Seo Deok; Mohtat, Davoud; Thomas, David B.; Pullman, James M.; Susztak, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the single leading cause of kidney failure in the U.S., for which a cure has not yet been found. The aim of our study was to provide an unbiased catalog of gene-expression changes in human diabetic kidney biopsy samples. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Affymetrix expression arrays were used to identify differentially regulated transcripts in 44 microdissected human kidney samples. DKD samples were significant for their racial diversity and decreased glomerular filtration rate (~25–35 mL/min). Stringent statistical analysis, using the Benjamini-Hochberg corrected two-tailed t test, was used to identify differentially expressed transcripts in control and diseased glomeruli and tubuli. Two different web-based algorithms were used to define differentially regulated pathways. RESULTS We identified 1,700 differentially expressed probesets in DKD glomeruli and 1,831 in diabetic tubuli, and 330 probesets were commonly differentially expressed in both compartments. Pathway analysis highlighted the regulation of Ras homolog gene family member A, Cdc42, integrin, integrin-linked kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in DKD glomeruli. The tubulointerstitial compartment showed strong enrichment for inflammation-related pathways. The canonical complement signaling pathway was determined to be statistically differentially regulated in both DKD glomeruli and tubuli and was associated with increased glomerulosclerosis even in a different set of DKD samples. CONCLUSIONS Our studies have cataloged gene-expression regulation and identified multiple novel genes and pathways that may play a role in the pathogenesis of DKD or could serve as biomarkers. PMID:21752957

  16. Definition and Facts for Kidney Stones in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Kidney Stones in Children Definition & Facts for Kidney Stones What are kidney stones? Kidney stones are hard, pebble-like pieces ... stone may get stuck along the way. Do kidney stones have another name? The scientific name for ...

  17. Mechanisms of human kidney stone formation.

    PubMed

    Evan, Andrew P; Worcester, Elaine M; Coe, Fredric L; Williams, James; Lingeman, James E

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms of kidney stone formation and growth are not completely known, even though human stone disease appears to be one of the oldest diseases known to medicine. With the advent of the new digital endoscope and detailed renal physiological studies performed on well phenotyped stone formers, substantial advances have been made in our knowledge of the pathogenesis of the most common type of stone former, the idiopathic calcium oxalate stone former as well as nine other stone forming groups. The observations from our group on human stone formers and those of others on model systems have suggested four entirely different pathways for kidney stone formation. Calcium oxalate stone growth over sites of Randall's plaque appear to be the primary mode of stone formation for those patients with hypercalciuria. Overgrowths off the ends of Bellini duct plugs have been noted in most stone phenotypes, do they result in a clinical stone? Micro-lith formation does occur within the lumens of dilated inner medullary collecting ducts of cystinuric stone formers and appear to be confined to this space. Lastly, cystinuric stone formers also have numerous small, oval, smooth yellow appearing calyceal stones suggestive of formation in free solution. The scientific basis for each of these four modes of stone formation are reviewed and used to explore novel research opportunities.

  18. Human metapneumovirus in adults.

    PubMed

    Haas, Lenneke E M; Thijsen, Steven F T; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A

    2013-01-08

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination.

  19. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  20. Primary primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the kidney in adults.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Singhal, Mitali; Pandey, Rakesh

    2013-03-04

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) is a neural crest tumour derived from neuroectoderm. Renal PNET is a very rare tumour occurring during childhood or adolescence. We report two cases of PNET involving kidney in adults. Presenting signs and symptoms include abdominal/flank pain and/or haematuria. Microscopy reveals the tumour consisted of small round cells with round nuclei and scant cytoplasm. Diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry with diffuse membranous positivity of tumour cells with CD99. As these tumours have an aggressive clinical course with rapid death in many reported cases, it is important to differentiate them from other small round-cell tumours.

  1. Pyrimethamine inhibits adult polycystic kidney disease by modulating STAT signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Takakura, Ayumi; Nelson, Erik A.; Haque, Nadeem; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; Zandi-Nejad, Kambiz; Frank, David A.; Zhou, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a commonly inherited disorder mostly caused by mutations in PKD1, encoding polycystin-1 (PC1). The disease is characterized by development and growth of epithelium-lined cyst in both kidneys, often leading to renal failure. There is no specific treatment for this disease. Here, we report a sustained activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in ischemic injured and uninjured Pkd1 knockout polycystic kidneys and in human ADPKD kidneys. Through a chemical library screen, we identified the anti-parasitic compound pyrimethamine as an inhibitor of STAT3 function. Treatment with pyrimethamine decreases cell proliferation in human ADPKD cells and blocks renal cyst formation in an adult and a neonatal PKD mouse model. Moreover, we demonstrated that a specific STAT3 inhibitor, S3I-201, reduces cyst formation and growth in a neonatal PKD mouse model. Our results suggest that PC1 acts as a negative regulator of STAT3 and that blocking STAT3 signaling with pyrimethamine or similar drugs may be an attractive therapy for human ADPKD. PMID:21821671

  2. Discarded human kidneys as a source of ECM scaffold for kidney regeneration technologies.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Booth, Christopher; Wang, Zhan; Totonelli, Giorgia; Ross, Christina L; Moran, Emma; Salvatori, Marcus; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Turmaine, Mark; Delario, Ginger; Al-Shraideh, Yousef; Farooq, Umar; Farney, Alan C; Rogers, Jeffrey; Iskandar, Samy S; Burns, Alan; Marini, Frank C; De Coppi, Paolo; Stratta, Robert J; Soker, Shay

    2013-08-01

    In the United States, more than 2600 kidneys are discarded annually, from the total number of kidneys procured for transplant. We hypothesized that this organ pool may be used as a platform for renal bioengineering and regeneration research. We previously showed that decellularization of porcine kidneys yields renal extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds that maintain their basic components, support cell growth and welfare in vitro and in vivo, and show an intact vasculature that, when such scaffolds are implanted in vivo, is able to sustain physiological blood pressure. The purpose of the current study was to test if the same strategy can be applied to discarded human kidneys in order to obtain human renal ECM scaffolds. The results show that the sodium dodecylsulfate-based decellularization protocol completely cleared the cellular compartment in these kidneys, while the innate ECM framework retained its architecture and biochemical properties. Samples of human renal ECM scaffolds stimulated angiogenesis in a chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Importantly, the innate vascular network in the human renal ECM scaffolds retained its compliance. Collectively, these results indicate that discarded human kidneys are a suitable source of renal scaffolds and their use for tissue engineering applications may be more clinically applicable than kidneys derived from animals.

  3. Human Kidney-Derived Cells Ameliorate Acute Kidney Injury Without Engrafting into Renal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Santeramo, Ilaria; Herrera Perez, Zeneida; Illera, Ana; Taylor, Arthur; Kenny, Simon; Murray, Patricia; Wilm, Bettina; Gretz, Norbert

    2017-04-04

    Previous studies have suggested that CD133(+) cells isolated from human kidney biopsies have the potential to ameliorate injury following intravenous (IV) administration in rodent models of kidney disease by integrating into damaged renal tissue and generating specialized renal cells. However, whether renal engraftment of CD133(+) cells is a prerequisite for ameliorating injury has not yet been unequivocally resolved. Here, we have established a cisplatin-induced nephropathy model in immunodeficient rats to assess the efficacy of CD133(+) human kidney cells in restoring renal health, and to determine the fate of these cells after systemic administration. Specifically, following IV administration, we evaluated the impact of the CD133(+) cells on renal function by undertaking longitudinal measurements of the glomerular filtration rate using a novel transcutaneous device. Using histological assays, we assessed whether the human kidney cells could promote renal regeneration, and if this was related to their ability to integrate into the damaged kidneys. Our results show that both CD133(+) and CD133(-) cells improve renal function and promote renal regeneration to a similar degree. However, this was not associated with engraftment of the cells into the kidneys. Instead, after IV administration, both cell types were exclusively located in the lungs, and had disappeared by 24 hours. Our data therefore indicate that renal repair is not mediated by CD133(+) cells homing to the kidneys and generating specialized renal cells. Instead, renal repair is likely to be mediated by paracrine or endocrine factors. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  4. Risk factors for fracture in adult kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Kyla L; Zou, Guangyong; Leslie, William D; Hodsman, Anthony B; Lam, Ngan N; McArthur, Eric; Fraser, Lisa-Ann; Knoll, Gregory A; Adachi, Jonathan D; Kim, S Joseph; Garg, Amit X

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the general and transplant-specific risk factors for fractures in kidney transplant recipients. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study of all adults who received a kidney-only transplant (n = 2723) in Ontario, Canada between 2002 and 2009. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to determine general and transplant-specific risk factors for major fractures (proximal humerus, forearm, hip, and clinical vertebral). The final model was established using the backward elimination strategy, selecting risk factors with a P-value ≤ 0.2 and forcing recipient age and sex into the model. We also assessed risk factors for other fracture locations (excluding major fractures, and fractures involving the skull, hands or feet). RESULTS: There were 132 major fractures in the follow-up (8.1 fractures per 1000 person-years). General risk factors associated with a greater risk of major fracture were older recipient age [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) per 5-year increase 1.11, 95%CI: 1.03-1.19] and female sex (aHR = 1.81, 95%CI: 1.28-2.57). Transplant-specific risk factors associated with a greater risk of fracture included older donor age (5-year increase) (aHR = 1.09, 95%CI: 1.02-1.17) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) caused by diabetes (aHR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.09-2.72) or cystic kidney disease (aHR = 1.73, 95%CI: 1.08-2.78) (compared to glomerulonephritis as the reference cause). Risk factors across the two fracture locations were not consistent (major fracture locations vs other). Specifically, general risk factors associated with an increased risk of other fractures were diabetes and a fall with hospitalization prior to transplantation, while length of time on dialysis, and renal vascular disease and other causes of ESRD were the transplant-specific risk factors associated with a greater risk of other fractures. CONCLUSION: Both general and transplant-specific risk factors were associated with a higher risk of fractures in kidney transplant

  5. Adverse prenatal environment and kidney development: implications for programing of adult disease.

    PubMed

    Dorey, Emily S; Pantaleon, Marie; Weir, Kristy A; Moritz, Karen M

    2014-06-01

    The 'developmental origins of health and disease' hypothesis suggests that many adult-onset diseases can be attributed to altered growth and development during early life. Perturbations during gestation can be detrimental and lead to an increased risk of developing renal, cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurocognitive dysfunction in adulthood. The kidney has emerged as being especially vulnerable to insult at almost any stage of development resulting in a reduction in nephron endowment. In both humans and animal models, a reduction in nephron endowment is strongly associated with an increased risk of hypertension. The focus of this review is twofold: i) to determine the importance of specific periods during development on long-term programing and ii) to examine the effects of maternal perturbations on the developing kidney and how this may program adult-onset disease. Recent evidence has suggested that insults occurring around the time of conception also have the capacity to influence long-term health. Although epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in mediating these outcomes, it is unclear as to how these may impact on kidney development. This presents exciting new challenges and areas for research.

  6. Demographics of the older adult and chronic kidney disease: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Rowena W

    2012-01-01

    Older adults (65 years of age and older) comprised 4.1% of the population in 1900 (3.1 million), rose to 13.0% in 2010 (40.3 million), and are projected to reach 16.1% in 2020 (54.8 million). With each decade, there has been a steady increase, including older adults, in the population with chronic kidney disease. This article provides a review of the literature related to the demographics of the older adult population and older adults with chronic kidney disease. It also explores life expectancy, health promotion, and the economic impact of chronic kidney disease and its co-morbidities.

  7. Generation of kidney tubular organoids from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Morizane, Ryuji; Homma, Koichiro; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Sayuri; Fujii, Shizuka; Koda, Muneaki; Hiratsuka, Ken; Yamashita, Maho; Yoshida, Tadashi; Wakino, Shu; Hayashi, Koichi; Sasaki, Junichi; Hori, Shingo; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in stem cell research have resulted in methods to generate kidney organoids from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), which contain cells of multiple lineages including nephron epithelial cells. Methods to purify specific types of cells from differentiated hPSCs, however, have not been established well. For bioengineering, cell transplantation, and disease modeling, it would be useful to establish those methods to obtain pure populations of specific types of kidney cells. Here, we report a simple two-step differentiation protocol to generate kidney tubular organoids from hPSCs with direct purification of KSP (kidney specific protein)-positive cells using anti-KSP antibody. We first differentiated hPSCs into mesoderm cells using a glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor for 3 days, then cultured cells in renal epithelial growth medium to induce KSP+ cells. We purified KSP+ cells using flow cytometry with anti-KSP antibody, which exhibited characteristics of all segments of kidney tubular cells and cultured KSP+ cells in 3D Matrigel, which formed tubular organoids in vitro. The formation of tubular organoids by KSP+ cells induced the acquisition of functional kidney tubules. KSP+ cells also allowed for the generation of chimeric kidney cultures in which human cells self-assembled into 3D tubular structures in combination with mouse embryonic kidney cells. PMID:27982115

  8. Modelling kidney disease with CRISPR-mutant kidney organoids derived from human pluripotent epiblast spheroids.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Benjamin S; Brooks, Craig R; Lam, Albert Q; Fu, Hongxia; Morizane, Ryuji; Agrawal, Vishesh; Saad, Abdelaziz F; Li, Michelle K; Hughes, Michael R; Werff, Ryan Vander; Peters, Derek T; Lu, Junjie; Baccei, Anna; Siedlecki, Andrew M; Valerius, M Todd; Musunuru, Kiran; McNagny, Kelly M; Steinman, Theodore I; Zhou, Jing; Lerou, Paul H; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2015-10-23

    Human-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived kidney cells (hPSC-KCs) have important potential for disease modelling and regeneration. Whether the hPSC-KCs can reconstitute tissue-specific phenotypes is currently unknown. Here we show that hPSC-KCs self-organize into kidney organoids that functionally recapitulate tissue-specific epithelial physiology, including disease phenotypes after genome editing. In three-dimensional cultures, epiblast-stage hPSCs form spheroids surrounding hollow, amniotic-like cavities. GSK3β inhibition differentiates spheroids into segmented, nephron-like kidney organoids containing cell populations with characteristics of proximal tubules, podocytes and endothelium. Tubules accumulate dextran and methotrexate transport cargoes, and express kidney injury molecule-1 after nephrotoxic chemical injury. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of podocalyxin causes junctional organization defects in podocyte-like cells. Knockout of the polycystic kidney disease genes PKD1 or PKD2 induces cyst formation from kidney tubules. All of these functional phenotypes are distinct from effects in epiblast spheroids, indicating that they are tissue specific. Our findings establish a reproducible, versatile three-dimensional framework for human epithelial disease modelling and regenerative medicine applications.

  9. Modelling kidney disease with CRISPR-mutant kidney organoids derived from human pluripotent epiblast spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin S.; Brooks, Craig R.; Lam, Albert Q.; Fu, Hongxia; Morizane, Ryuji; Agrawal, Vishesh; Saad, Abdelaziz F.; Li, Michelle K.; Hughes, Michael R.; Werff, Ryan Vander; Peters, Derek T.; Lu, Junjie; Baccei, Anna; Siedlecki, Andrew M.; Valerius, M. Todd; Musunuru, Kiran; McNagny, Kelly M.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Zhou, Jing; Lerou, Paul H.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Human-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived kidney cells (hPSC-KCs) have important potential for disease modelling and regeneration. Whether the hPSC-KCs can reconstitute tissue-specific phenotypes is currently unknown. Here we show that hPSC-KCs self-organize into kidney organoids that functionally recapitulate tissue-specific epithelial physiology, including disease phenotypes after genome editing. In three-dimensional cultures, epiblast-stage hPSCs form spheroids surrounding hollow, amniotic-like cavities. GSK3β inhibition differentiates spheroids into segmented, nephron-like kidney organoids containing cell populations with characteristics of proximal tubules, podocytes and endothelium. Tubules accumulate dextran and methotrexate transport cargoes, and express kidney injury molecule-1 after nephrotoxic chemical injury. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of podocalyxin causes junctional organization defects in podocyte-like cells. Knockout of the polycystic kidney disease genes PKD1 or PKD2 induces cyst formation from kidney tubules. All of these functional phenotypes are distinct from effects in epiblast spheroids, indicating that they are tissue specific. Our findings establish a reproducible, versatile three-dimensional framework for human epithelial disease modelling and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26493500

  10. Kidney dysfunction and cerebral microbleeds in neurologically healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Shin, Dong Wook; Yun, Jae Moon; Lee, Ji Eun; Lim, Jae-Sung; Cho, Be Long

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral microbleed (CMB) is a potent risk factor for overt cerebrovascular disease. Although some studies indicated the possible role of renal dysfunction as a risk factor of CMB, the findings could not be generalized. This study aimed to investigate the association between renal dysfunction and cerebral microbleed (CMB) in neurologically healthy adults. Materials and methods A total of 2,518 subjects who underwent brain MRI as part of health screening were involved in the study. CMBs were defined as well-demarcated focal areas of low signal intensity with associated blooming on the T2-weighted MRI measuring less than 5mm in diameter. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. Kidney function was classified as normal (≥90), mild (60 to 89.9), moderate (30 to 59.9), and severe (<30 mL/min/1.73 m2) renal dysfunction according to the GFR. Results The mean age of the participants was 57.5 ± 8.3 years (ranged 40 to 79), and 1,367 subjects (54.3%) were male. The mean GFR level was 81.5 ± 15.5, and the prevalence of CMB was 4.1% (n = 103). Subjects with CMB demonstrated a higher proportion of moderate-to-severe renal dysfunction than those without CMB (15.5% vs. 5.0%, p < 0.001). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, moderate-to-severe renal dysfunction showed a significant association with CMB (adjusted odd ratio = 2.63; p = 0.008). Furthermore, a decrease in the GFR level was associated with an increasing trend of the presence of CMB (p for trend = 0.031) and number of CMB lesions (p for trend = 0.003). Conclusions Renal dysfunction was significantly associated with the presence of CMB in neurologically healthy adults. More studies are needed to evaluate if treatment of kidney disease and risk factor modification may prevent further progress of CMB. PMID:28207801

  11. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  12. Urinary acylcarnitines are altered in human kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Sheila; Taylor, Sandra L; Kim, Kyoungmi; Hoppel, Charles L; Guo, Lining; Yang, Joy; Evans, Christopher; Weiss, Robert H

    2012-06-15

    Kidney cancer often diagnosed at late stages when treatment options are severely limited. Thus, greater understanding of tumor metabolism leading ultimately to novel approaches to diagnosis is needed. Our laboratory has been utilizing metabolomics to evaluate compounds appearing in kidney cancer patients' biofluids at concentrations different from control patients. Here, we collected urine samples from kidney cancer patients and analyzed them by chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Once normalized to control for urinary concentration, samples were analyzed by two independent laboratories. After technical validation, we now show differential urinary concentrations of several acylcarnitines as a function of both cancer status and kidney cancer grade, with most acylcarnitines being increased in the urine of cancer patients and in those patients with high cancer grades. This finding was validated in a mouse xenograft model of human kidney cancer. Biological validation shows carbon chain length-dependent effects of the acylcarnitines on cytotoxicity in vitro, and higher chain length acylcarnitines demonstrated inhibitory effects on NF-κB activation, suggesting an immune modulatory effect of these compounds. Thus, acylcarnitines in the kidney cancer urine may reflect alterations in metabolism, cell component synthesis and/or immune surveillance, and may help explain the profound chemotherapy resistance seen with this cancer. This study shows for the first time the value of a novel class of metabolites which may lead to new therapeutic approaches for cancer and may prove useful in cancer biomarker studies. Furthermore, these findings open up a new area of investigation into the metabolic basis of kidney cancer.

  13. Kidney injury biomarkers and urinary creatinine variability in nominally healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Stiegel, M A; Pleil, J D; Sobus, J R; Angrish, M M; Morgan, M K

    2015-01-01

    Environmental exposure diagnostics use creatinine concentrations in urine aliquots as the internal standard for dilution normalization of all other excreted metabolites when urinary excretion rate data are not available. This is a reasonable approach for healthy adults as creatinine is a human metabolite that is continually produced in skeletal muscles and presumably excreted in the urine at a stable rate. However, creatinine also serves as a biomarker for glomerular filtration rate (efficiency) of the kidneys, so undiagnosed kidney function impairment could affect this commonly applied dilution calculation. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has recently conducted a study that collected approximately 2600 urine samples from 50 healthy adults, aged 19-50 years old, in North Carolina in 2009-2011. Urinary ancillary data (creatinine concentration, total void volume, elapsed time between voids), and participant demographic data (race, gender, height, and body weight) were collected. A representative subset of 280 urine samples from 29 participants was assayed using a new kidney injury panel (KIP). In this article, we investigated the relationships of KIP biomarkers within and between subjects and also calculated their interactions with measured creatinine levels. The aims of this work were to document the analytical methods (procedures, sensitivity, stability, etc.), provide summary statistics for the KIP biomarkers in "healthy" adults without diagnosed disease (distribution, fold range, central tendency, variance), and to develop an understanding as to how urinary creatinine level varies with respect to the individual KIP proteins. Results show that new instrumentation and data reduction methods have sufficient sensitivity to measure KIP levels in nominally healthy urine samples, that linear regression between creatinine concentration and urinary excretion explains only about 68% of variability, that KIP markers are poorly correlated with

  14. Density gradient electrophoresis of cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Giranda, V.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Ground based confirmation of the electrophoretic heterogeneity of human embryonic kidney cell cultures, the general characterization of their electrophoretic migration, and observations on the general properties of cultures derived from electrophoretic subpopulations were studied. Cell migration in a density gradient electrophoresis column and cell electrophoretic mobility was determined. The mobility and heterogeneity of cultured human embryonic kidney cells with those of fixed rat erythrocytes as model test particle was compared. Electrophoretically separated cell subpopulations with respect to size, viability, and culture characteristics were examined.

  15. Association Between Kidney Dysfunction and Carotid Atherosclerosis in Community-Based Older Adults in China.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiang; Fang, Xianghua; Hua, Yang; Tang, Zhe; Ji, Xunming; Guan, Shaochen; Wu, Xiaoguang; Liu, Hongjun; Liu, Beibei; Wang, Chunxiu; Zhang, Zhongying

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the association between kidney dysfunction and carotid atherosclerosis in community-based older adults. This study consisted of 1257 participants, aged 55 years and older and free of cardiovascular disease. Kidney dysfunction was classified as mild, moderate, and severe (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 45-59, 30-44, and <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), respectively). We found that the mean common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) progressively increased with decrement in kidney function (P < .001). Even mild kidney dysfunction was significantly associated with CCA-IMT thickening (CCA-IMT ≥1.0 mm; odds ratio [OR] 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-1.99) compared to normal kidney function. A significantly increased presence of heterogeneous plaque was observed in relation to decreased kidney function (P for trend = .011), that is, even a mild kidney dysfunction was a potential independent risk factor for heterogeneous plaque (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.04-1.98). Mild kidney dysfunction may be a predictor of early or accelerated carotid atherosclerosis in older adults.

  16. Epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Kaddourah, Ahmad; Basu, Rajit K; Bagshaw, Sean M; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2017-01-05

    Background The epidemiologic characteristics of children and young adults with acute kidney injury have been described in single-center and retrospective studies. We conducted a multinational, prospective study involving patients admitted to pediatric intensive care units to define the incremental risk of death and complications associated with severe acute kidney injury. Methods We used the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria to define acute kidney injury. Severe acute kidney injury was defined as stage 2 or 3 acute kidney injury (plasma creatinine level ≥2 times the baseline level or urine output <0.5 ml per kilogram of body weight per hour for ≥12 hours) and was assessed for the first 7 days of intensive care. All patients 3 months to 25 years of age who were admitted to 1 of 32 participating units were screened during 3 consecutive months. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality. Results A total of 4683 patients were evaluated; acute kidney injury developed in 1261 patients (26.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 25.6 to 28.2), and severe acute kidney injury developed in 543 patients (11.6%; 95% CI, 10.7 to 12.5). Severe acute kidney injury conferred an increased risk of death by day 28 after adjustment for 16 covariates (adjusted odds ratio, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.17 to 2.68); death occurred in 60 of the 543 patients (11.0%) with severe acute kidney injury versus 105 of the 4140 patients (2.5%) without severe acute kidney injury (P<0.001). Severe acute kidney injury was associated with increased use of mechanical ventilation and renal-replacement therapy. A stepwise increase in 28-day mortality was associated with worsening severity of acute kidney injury (P<0.001 by log-rank test). Assessment of acute kidney injury according to the plasma creatinine level alone failed to identify acute kidney injury in 67.2% of the patients with low urine output. Conclusions Acute kidney injury is common and is associated with poor outcomes, including increased

  17. Immunodepletion experiments suggest that acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) protein plays a major catalytic role in adult human liver, adrenal gland, macrophages, and kidney, but not in intestines.

    PubMed

    Lee, O; Chang, C C; Lee, W; Chang, T Y

    1998-08-01

    The first acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) cDNA cloned and expressed in 1993 is designated as ACAT-1. In various human tissue homogenates, ACAT-1 protein is effectively solubilized with retention of enzymatic activity by the detergent CHAPS along with high salt. After using anti-ACAT-1 antibodies to quantitatively remove ACAT-1 protein from the solubilized enzyme, measuring the residual ACAT activity remaining in the immunodepleted supernatants allows us to assess the functional significance of ACAT-1 protein in various human tissues. The results showed that ACAT activity was immunodepleted 90% in liver (83% in hepatocytes), 98% in adrenal gland, 91% in macrophages, 80% in kidney, and 19% in intestines, suggesting that ACAT-1 protein plays a major catalytic role in all of the human tissue/cell homogenates examined except intestines. Intestinal ACAT activity is largely resistant to immunodepletion and is much more sensitive to inhibition by the ACAT inhibitor Dup 128 than liver ACAT activity.

  18. Awareness level of kidney functions and diseases among adults in a Nigerian population

    PubMed Central

    Okwuonu, C. G.; Chukwuonye, I. I.; Ogah, S. O.; Abali, C.; Adejumo, O. A.; Oviasu, E.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney diseases is on the increase in Nigeria. The cost of its management is far beyond the reach of an average patient. Prevention is thus of paramount importance and awareness of kidney diseases will help in its prevention. The aim of this study is to assess the level of awareness of kidney functions and diseases among adults in a Nigerian population. A semi-structured, researcher – administered questionnaire was the tool for data collection. Four hundred and thirty-five questionnaires were analyzed. There were 160 males (36.8%) and 275 females (63.2%). The mean age was 42.8 ± 14 years with a range of 18–78 years. Among these, 82.1% were aware of the kidneys' involvement in waste removal from the body through urine while 36% and 29% were aware of kidneys' role in blood pressure regulation and blood production, respectively. Only 26.6% correctly identified at least two basic functions of the kidneys. Also, 32.6% of the respondents were aware of at least three common causes of kidney diseases in our environment. Majority of the respondents (70.7%) did not know that kidney diseases could be inherited. Furthermore, belief in alternative therapy for kidney disease was documented in 83.2%, while unawareness of dialysis as a treatment modality was recorded in 68% of the respondents. The awareness of kidney functions and diseases among the population is poor. Measures are needed to improve this to stem the rising prevalence of chronic kidney disease in Nigeria. PMID:26060365

  19. A novel SGLT is expressed in the human kidney.

    PubMed

    Kothinti, Rajendra K; Blodgett, Amy B; North, Paula E; Roman, Richard J; Tabatabai, Niloofar M

    2012-09-05

    Selective inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2)-mediated reabsorption of glucose in the proximal tubule of the kidney are being developed for the treatment of diabetes. SGLT2 shares high degree of homology with SGLT3; however, very little is known about the expression and functional role of SGLT3 in the human kidney. Indeed, the SGLT2 inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials might affect the expression and/or the activity of SGLT3. Therefore, the present study examined the expression of SGLT3 mRNA and protein in human kidney and in a human proximal tubule HK-2 cell line. The results indicated that human SGLT3 (hSGLT3) message and protein are expressed both in vivo and in vitro. We also studied the activity of hSGLT3 protein following its over-expression in mammalian kidney-derived COS-7 cells and in HK-2 cells treated with the imino sugar deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), a potent agonist of hSGLT3. Over-expression of hSGLT3 in COS-7 cells increased intracellular sodium concentration by 3-fold without affecting glucose transport. Activation of hSGLT3 with DNJ (50μM) increased sodium uptake in HK-2 cells by 5.5 fold and this effect could be completely blocked with SGLT inhibitor phlorizin (50μM). These results suggest that SGLT3 is expressed in human proximal tubular cells where it serves as a novel sodium transporter. Up-regulation of the expression of SGLT3 in the proximal tubule in diabetic patients may contribute to the elevated sodium transport in this segment of the nephron that has been postulated to promote hyperfiltration and renal injury.

  20. A novel SGLT is expressed in the human kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kothinti, Rajendra K.; Blodgett, Amy B.; North, Paula E.; Roman, Richard J.; Tabatabai, Niloofar M.

    2013-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2)-mediated reabsorption of glucose in the proximal tubule of the kidney are being developed for the treatment of diabetes. SGLT2 shares high degree of homology with SGLT3; however, very little is known about the expression and functional role of SGLT3 in the human kidney. Indeed, the SGLT2 inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials might affect the expression and/or the activity of SGLT3. Therefore, the present study examined the expression of SGLT3 mRNA and protein in human kidney and in a human proximal tubule HK-2 cell line. The results indicated that human SGLT3 (hSGLT3) message and protein are expressed both in vivo and in vitro. We also studied the activity of hSGLT3 protein following its over-expression in mammalian kidney-derived COS-7 cells and in HK-2 cells treated with the imino sugar deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), a potent agonist of hSGLT3. Over-expression of hSGLT3 in COS-7 cells increased intracellular sodium concentration by 3-fold without affecting glucose transport. Activation of hSGLT3 with DNJ (50 μM) increased sodium uptake in HK-2 cells by 5.5 fold and this effect could be completely blocked with SGLT inhibitor phlorizin (50 μM). These results suggest that SGLT3 is expressed in human proximal tubular cells where it serves as a novel sodium transporter. Up-regulation of the expression of SGLT3 in the proximal tubule in diabetic patients may contribute to the elevated sodium transport in this segment of the nephron that has been postulated to promote hyperfiltration and renal injury. PMID:22766068

  1. THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF BABOON (PAPIO DOGUERA) KIDNEY CELLS TO HUMAN ENTEROVIRUSES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Studies were made to learn if baboon kidney cells are as susceptible as monkey kidney cells to human enteroviruses . Since the baboon (Papio doguera...kidney cells showed high susceptibility to most human enteroviruses . Their usefulness is inhanced in that they indicated the presence of contaminating SV40 virus. (Author)

  2. Identification of human nephron progenitors capable of generation of kidney structures and functional repair of chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Metsuyanim, Sally; Omer, Dorit; Gnatek, Yehudit; Gershon, Rotem; Pri-Chen, Sara; Ozdemir, Derya D; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Noiman, Tzahi; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Vaknin, Zvi; Schneider, David F; Aronow, Bruce J; Goldstein, Ronald S; Hohenstein, Peter; Dekel, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Identification of tissue-specific renal stem/progenitor cells with nephrogenic potential is a critical step in developing cell-based therapies for renal disease. In the human kidney, stem/progenitor cells are induced into the nephrogenic pathway to form nephrons until the 34 week of gestation, and no equivalent cell types can be traced in the adult kidney. Human nephron progenitor cells (hNPCs) have yet to be isolated. Here we show that growth of human foetal kidneys in serum-free defined conditions and prospective isolation of NCAM1+ cells selects for nephron lineage that includes the SIX2-positive cap mesenchyme cells identifying a mitotically active population with in vitro clonogenic and stem/progenitor properties. After transplantation in the chick embryo, these cells—but not differentiated counterparts—efficiently formed various nephron tubule types. hNPCs engrafted and integrated in diseased murine kidneys and treatment of renal failure in the 5/6 nephrectomy kidney injury model had beneficial effects on renal function halting disease progression. These findings constitute the first definition of an intrinsic nephron precursor population, with major potential for cell-based therapeutic strategies and modelling of kidney disease. PMID:23996934

  3. Urine Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Human Kidney Allograft Status.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Schwartz, Joseph E; Sharma, Vijay K; Chen, Qiuying; Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana M; Ding, Ruchuang; Ikle, David N; Bridges, Nancy D; Williams, Nikki M; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Karoly, Edward D; Mohney, Robert P; Abecassis, Michael; Friedewald, John; Knechtle, Stuart J; Becker, Yolanda T; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham; Gross, Steven S; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis and prognostication of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft may help realize the full benefits of kidney transplantation. To investigate whether urine metabolites predict kidney allograft status, we determined levels of 749 metabolites in 1516 urine samples from 241 kidney graft recipients enrolled in the prospective multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-04 study. A metabolite signature of the ratio of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine in biopsy specimen-matched urine supernatants best discriminated acute cellular rejection biopsy specimens from specimens without rejection. For clinical application, we developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based assay that enabled absolute and rapid quantification of the 3-sialyllactose-to-xanthosine ratio in urine samples. A composite signature of ratios of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine and quinolinate to X-16397 and our previously reported urinary cell mRNA signature of 18S ribosomal RNA, CD3ε mRNA, and interferon-inducible protein-10 mRNA outperformed the metabolite signatures and the mRNA signature. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the composite metabolite-mRNA signature was 0.93, and the signature was diagnostic of acute cellular rejection with a specificity of 84% and a sensitivity of 90%. The composite signature, developed using solely biopsy specimen-matched urine samples, predicted future acute cellular rejection when applied to pristine samples taken days to weeks before biopsy. We conclude that metabolite profiling of urine offers a noninvasive means of diagnosing and prognosticating acute cellular rejection in the human kidney allograft, and that the combined metabolite and mRNA signature is diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection with very high accuracy.

  4. Economic impact of kidney stones in white male adults.

    PubMed

    Shuster, J; Scheaffer, R L

    1984-10-01

    A large survey of patients hospitalized for kidney stones in the Carolinas and the Rocky Mountain states yielded information that can be translated into conservative estimates of cost of this disease. Hospital costs were estimated by considering number of surgeries, the approximate cost of various types of surgery, number of days hospitalized, and room rates. Work force costs were estimated from information on work days lost and income categories. Estimated recurrence rates for this disease are used to approximate the total cost, due to stones, for the next year for a current stone case. Each incident of stone disease costs, on the average, approximately $2,000, exclusive of recurrences. Hospital stays average four to five days. The average annual cost of recurrence for a current stone case is conservatively estimated to be in the $300 to $400 range. A conservative projection of these costs to the entire national population of white males in the age range of eighteen to sixty years yields an annual cost due to kidney stones approaching $315,000,000.

  5. Pkd1 transgenic mice: adult model of polycystic kidney disease with extrarenal and renal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kurbegovic, Almira; Côté, Olivier; Couillard, Martin; Ward, Christopher J.; Harris, Peter C.; Trudel, Marie

    2010-01-01

    While high levels of Pkd1 expression are detected in tissues of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), it is unclear whether enhanced expression could be a pathogenetic mechanism for this systemic disorder. Three transgenic mouse lines were generated from a Pkd1-BAC modified by introducing a silent tag via homologous recombination to target a sustained wild-type genomic Pkd1 expression within the native tissue and temporal regulation. These mice specifically overexpressed the Pkd1 transgene in extrarenal and renal tissues from ∼2- to 15-fold over Pkd1 endogenous levels in a copy-dependent manner. All transgenic mice reproducibly developed tubular and glomerular cysts leading to renal insufficiency. Interestingly, Pkd1TAG mice also exhibited renal fibrosis and calcium deposits in papilla reminiscent of nephrolithiasis as frequently observed in ADPKD. Similar to human ADPKD, these mice consistently displayed hepatic fibrosis and ∼15% intrahepatic cysts of the bile ducts affecting females preferentially. Moreover, a significant proportion of mice developed cardiac anomalies with severe left-ventricular hypertrophy, marked aortic arch distention and/or valvular stenosis and calcification that had profound functional impact. Of significance, Pkd1TAG mice displayed occasional cerebral lesions with evidence of ruptured and unruptured cerebral aneurysms. This Pkd1TAG mouse model demonstrates that overexpression of wild-type Pkd1 can trigger the typical adult renal and extrarenal phenotypes resembling human ADPKD. PMID:20053665

  6. Introduction: Kidney Stone Research, Lessons From Human Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Fredric L.

    2007-04-01

    About 5% of American women and 12% of men will develop a kidney stone at some time in their life, the prevalence has been rising in both sexes. Approximately 80% of stones are composed of calcium oxalate, and calcium phosphate; 10% of struvite; 9% of uric acid; and the remaining 1% are composed of cystine or ammonium acid urate or are diagnosed as drug-related stone. Stones ultimately arise because of an unwanted phase change of these substances from liquid to solid state. In this introduction, I have outlined our current thinking of the possible mechanisms involved in stone formation based on our biopsy data collected from a series of human kidney stone formers. In addition, I have presented a set of questions as a means of focusing future research in this field.

  7. Urokinase production by electrophoretically separated cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Giranda, V.; Sedor, K.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Urokinase is a plasminogen activator found in urine. Relatively pure preparations have been tested in Europe, Japan and the United States for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and other dangerous blood clots. Human embryonic kidney cell cultures have been found to produce urokinase at much higher concentrations, but less than 5% of the cells in typical cultures are producers. Since human diploid cells become senescent in culture the selection of clones derived from single cells will not provide enough material to be useful, so a bulk purification method is needed for the isolation of urokinase producing cell populations. Preparative cell electrophoresis was chosen as the method, since evidence exists that human embryonic cell cultures are richly heterogeneous with respect to electrophoretic mobility, and preliminary electrophoretic separations on the Apollo-Soyuz space flight produced cell populations that were rich in urokinase production. Similarly, erythropoietin is useful in the treatment of certain anemias and is a kidney cell duct, and electrophoretically enriched cell populations producing this product have been reported. Thus, there is a clear need for diploid human cells that produce these products, and there is evidence that such cells should be separable by free-flow cell electrophoresis.

  8. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human kidney mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Bi; Niclis, Jonathan C; Alikhan, Maliha A; Sakkal, Samy; Sylvain, Aude; Kerr, Peter G; Laslett, Andrew L; Bernard, Claude A; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2011-07-01

    Glomerular injury and podocyte loss leads to secondary tubulointerstitial damage and the development of fibrosis. The possibility of genetically reprogramming adult cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), may pave the way for patient-specific stem-cell-based therapies. Here, we reprogrammed normal human mesangial cells to pluripotency by retroviral transduction using defined factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-Myc). The kidney iPS (kiPS) cells resembled human embryonic stem-cell-like colonies in morphology and gene expression: They were alkaline phosphatase-positive; expressed OCT3/4, TRA-1 to 60 and TRA-1 to 81 proteins; and showed downregulation of mesangial cell markers. Quantitative (qPCR) showed that kiPS cells expressed genes analogous to embryonic stem cells and exhibited silencing of the retroviral transgenes by the fourth passage of differentiation. Furthermore, kiPS cells formed embryoid bodies and expressed markers of all three germ layers. The injection of undifferentiated kiPS colonies into immunodeficient mice formed teratomas, thereby demonstrating pluripotency. These results suggest that reprogrammed kidney induced pluripotent stem cells may aid the study of genetic kidney diseases and lead to the development of novel therapies.

  9. Update on kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nashar, Khaled; Sureshkumar, Kalathil K

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with chronic kidney disease following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy resulted in the need to revisit the topic of kidney transplantation in these patients. Large cohort studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes and proved that transplantation is a viable therapeutic option. However, HIV-infected recipients had higher rates of rejection. Immunosuppressive therapy did not negatively impact the course of HIV infection. Some of the immunosuppressive drugs used following transplantation exhibit antiretroviral effects. A close collaboration between infectious disease specialists and transplant professionals is mandatory in order to optimize transplantation outcomes in these patients. Transplantation from HIV+ donors to HIV+ recipients has been a subject of intense debate. The HIV Organ Policy Equity act provided a platform to research this area further and to develop guidelines. The first HIV+ to HIV+ kidney transplant in the United States and the first HIV+ to HIV+ liver transplant in the world were recently performed at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. PMID:27458559

  10. Antihypertensive medications and the risk of kidney stones in older adults: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R Todd; McArthur, Eric; Jandoc, Racquel; Welk, Blayne; Hayward, Jade S; Jain, Arsh K; Braam, Branko; Flockerzi, Veit; Garg, Amit X; Quinn, Robert Ross

    2017-03-23

    Antihypertensives are widely prescribed and could influence kidney stone risk by altering urinary calcium excretion. However, the impact of different classes of antihypertensives on kidney stone risk is unknown. To assess this impact, we conducted a retrospective, population-based cohort study using linked health administrative databases. Individuals aged >65 years who initiated one of the four antihypertensive classes (that is, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers or thiazide diuretics) were included. The participants were followed for the occurrence of a kidney stone event while maintaining continuous usage on their drug class. The association between antihypertensive class and outcome was estimated by Cox regression. Of the 542 581 people included, we observed 4533 kidney stone events (0.83%) over a median follow-up of 368 days (365-729). Compared with beta-blockers, thiazides were associated with a lower risk of kidney stones (hazard ratio (HR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68-0.84), ACEis/ARBs with a borderline decreased risk (HR 0.90; 95% CI 0.83-0.98) and calcium channel blockers with a comparable risk (HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.92-1.13). When the risk of requiring an intervention for a kidney stone was examined, the results were consistent with the primary analysis; however, the protective effect of ACEis/ARBs was eliminated (HR 0.96; 95% CI 0.87-1.06). In conclusion, relative to beta-blockers, thiazide diuretics were associated with a decreased risk of kidney stone formation in adults aged >65 years, whereas ACEis/ARBs and calcium channel blockers had a comparable risk of presenting with a kidney stone.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 23 March 2017; doi:10.1038/hr.2017.42.

  11. Generating kidney organoids from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Takasato, Minoru; Er, Pei X; Chiu, Han S; Little, Melissa H

    2016-01-01

    The human kidney develops from four progenitor populations; nephron progenitors, ureteric epithelial progenitors, renal interstitial progenitors and endothelial progenitors; resulting in the formation of maximally 2 million nephrons. Until recently, methods differentiating human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into either nephron progenitor or ureteric epithelial progenitor had been reported, consequently forming only nephrons or collecting ducts, respectively. Here, we detail a protocol that simultaneously induces all four progenitors to generate kidney organoids within which segmented nephrons are connected to collecting ducts and surrounded by renal interstitial cells and an endothelial network. As evidence of functional maturity, proximal tubules within organoids display megalin-mediated and cubilin-mediated endocytosis, and respond to a nephrotoxicant to undergo apoptosis. This protocol consists of 7 days of monolayer culture for intermediate mesoderm induction followed by 18 days of three-dimensional culture to facilitate self-organising renogenic events leading to organoid formation. Personnel experienced in culturing hPSCs are required to conduct this protocol. PMID:27560173

  12. Human polyomavirus 9 infection in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    van der Meijden, Els; Wunderink, Herman F; van der Blij-de Brouwer, Caroline S; Zaaijer, Hans L; Rotmans, Joris I; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Feltkamp, Mariet C W

    2014-06-01

    Several human polyomaviruses of unknown prevalence and pathogenicity have been identified, including human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9). To determine rates of HPyV9 infection among immunosuppressed patients, we screened serum samples from 101 kidney transplant patients in the Netherlands for HPyV9 DNA and seroreactivity. A total of 21 patients had positive results for HPyV9 DNA; positivity rates peaked at 3 months after transplantation, but the highest viral loads were measured just after transplantation. During 18 months of follow-up, HPyV9 seroprevalence increased from 33% to 46% among transplant patients; seroprevalence remained stable at ≈30% in a control group of healthy blood donors in whom no HPyV9 DNA was detected. Further analysis revealed an association between detection of HPyV9 and detection of BK polyomavirus but not of cytomegalovirus. Our data indicate that HPyV9 infection is frequent in kidney transplant patients, but the nature of infection-endogenous or donor-derived-and pathogenic potential of this virus remain unknown.

  13. Medication safety and chronic kidney disease in older adults prescribed metformin: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication safety in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing concern. This is particularly relevant in older adults due to underlying CKD. Metformin use is contraindicated in patients with abnormal kidney function; however, many patients are potentially prescribed metformin inappropriately. We evaluated the prevalence of CKD among older adults prescribed metformin for type 2 diabetes mellitus using available equations to estimate kidney function and examined demographic characteristics of patients who were potentially inappropriately prescribed metformin. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of older adults aged ≥65 years prescribed metformin from March 2008-March 2009 at an urban tertiary-care facility in Seattle, Washington, USA. CKD was defined using National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative criteria. Creatinine clearance was calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault equation; estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated using the abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and CKD-Epidemiology (EPI) Collaboration equations. Regression analyses were used to determine the associations between demographic characteristics and prevalent CKD. Results Among 356 subjects (median age 69 years, 52.5% female, 39.4% non-Hispanic black), prevalence of stage 3 or greater CKD calculated by any of the equations was 31.4%. The Cockcroft-Gault equation identified more subjects as having CKD (23.7%) than the abbreviated MDRD (21.1%) or CKD-EPI (21.7%) equations (P < 0.001). Older age (OR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.08-1.19) and female sex (OR = 2.51, 95% CI 1.44-4.38) were associated with increased odds of potentially inappropriate metformin prescription due to CKD; non-Hispanic black race was associated with decreased odds of potentially inappropriate metformin prescription due to CKD (OR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.23-0.71). Conclusions CKD is common in older adults prescribed metformin for type 2

  14. Immunoreactivity of thymosin beta 4 in human foetal and adult genitourinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Nemolato, S.; Cabras, T.; Fanari, M.U.; Cau, F.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Manconi, B.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2010-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) is a member of the beta-thymosins family, a family of peptides playing essential roles in many cellular functions. Our recent studies suggested Tβ4 plays a key role in the development of human salivary glands and the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to analyse the presence of Tβ4 in the human adult and foetal genitourinary tract. Immunolocalization of Tβ4 was studied in autoptic samples of kidney, bladder, uterus, ovary, testicle and prostate obtained from four human foetuses and four adults. Presence of the peptide was observed in cells of different origin: in surface epithelium, in gland epithelial cells and in the interstitial cells. Tβ4 was mainly found in adult and foetal bladder in the transitional epithelial cells; in the adult endometrium, glands and stromal cells were immunoreactive for the peptide; Tβ4 was mainly localized in the glands of foetal prostate while, in the adults a weak Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to the stroma. In adult and foetal kidney, Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to ducts and tubules with completely spared glomeruli; a weak positivity was observed in adult and foetal oocytes; immunoreactivity was mainly localized in the interstitial cells of foetal and adult testis. In this study, we confirm that Tβ4 could play a relevant role during human development, even in the genitourinary tract, and reveal that immunoreactivity for this peptide may change during postnatal and adult life. PMID:21263742

  15. An observational study of health literacy and medication adherence in adult kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Demian, Maryam N.; Shapiro, R. Jean

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a high prevalence of non-adherence to immunosuppressants in kidney transplant recipients. Although limited health literacy is common in kidney recipients and is linked to adverse outcomes in other medical populations, its effect on medication adherence in kidney transplant recipients remains poorly understood. The objective was to investigate the effect of lower health literacy on immunosuppressant adherence. Methods Kidney recipients who were at least 6 months post-transplant and outpatients of Vancouver General Hospital in B.C., Canada were recruited through invitation letters. A total of 96 recipients completed the Health Literacy Questionnaire, which provides a multifactorial profile of self-reported health literacy and the Transplant Effects Questionnaire-Adherence subscale measuring self-reported immunosuppressant adherence. Hierarchical linear regression was used to analyze the association between health literacy and adherence after controlling for identified risk factors of non-adherence. Results Our sample was on average 53 years old, 56% male and 9 years post-transplant. Kidney recipients reported low levels of health literacy on scales measuring active health management and critical appraisal of information and 75% reported non-perfect adherence. Worse adherence was associated with poorer overall health literacy (ΔR2 = 0.08, P = 0.004) and lower scores on six of nine of the health literacy factors. Conclusions Poorer health literacy is associated with lower immunosuppressant adherence in adult kidney transplant recipients suggesting the importance of considering a recipient's level of health literacy in research and clinical contexts. Medication adherence interventions can target the six factors of health literacy identified as being risk factors for lower medication adherence. PMID:27994867

  16. LMX1B is Essential for the Maintenance of Differentiated Podocytes in Adult Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Tillmann; Kastner, Jürgen; Suleiman, Hani; Rivera-Milla, Eric; Stepanova, Natalya; Lottaz, Claudio; Kubitza, Marion; Böger, Carsten A.; Schmidt, Sarah; Gorski, Mathias; de Vries, Uwe; Schmidt, Helga; Hertting, Irmgard; Kopp, Jeffrey; Rascle, Anne; Moser, Markus; Heid, Iris M.; Warth, Richard; Spang, Rainer; Wegener, Joachim; Mierke, Claudia T.; Englert, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of the LMX1B gene cause nail–patella syndrome, a rare autosomal-dominant disorder affecting the development of the limbs, eyes, brain, and kidneys. The characterization of conventional Lmx1b knockout mice has shown that LMX1B regulates the development of podocyte foot processes and slit diaphragms, but studies using podocyte-specific Lmx1b knockout mice have yielded conflicting results regarding the importance of LMX1B for maintaining podocyte structures. In order to address this question, we generated inducible podocyte-specific Lmx1b knockout mice. One week of Lmx1b inactivation in adult mice resulted in proteinuria with only minimal foot process effacement. Notably, expression levels of slit diaphragm and basement membrane proteins remained stable at this time point, and basement membrane charge properties also did not change, suggesting that alternative mechanisms mediate the development of proteinuria in these mice. Cell biological and biophysical experiments with primary podocytes isolated after 1 week of Lmx1b inactivation indicated dysregulation of actin cytoskeleton organization, and time-resolved DNA microarray analysis identified the genes encoding actin cytoskeleton-associated proteins, including Abra and Arl4c, as putative LMX1B targets. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in conditionally immortalized human podocytes and gel shift assays showed that LMX1B recognizes AT-rich binding sites (FLAT elements) in the promoter regions of ABRA and ARL4C, and knockdown experiments in zebrafish support a model in which LMX1B and ABRA act in a common pathway during pronephros development. Our report establishes the importance of LMX1B in fully differentiated podocytes and argues that LMX1B is essential for the maintenance of an appropriately structured actin cytoskeleton in podocytes. PMID:23990680

  17. Distribution and concentration of cadmium in human kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Svartengren, M.; Elinder, C.G.; Friberg, L.; Lind, B.

    1986-01-01

    The left kidneys from twenty males, aged 30 to 59, were examined. On an average, the cortex, medulla, and the remainder (renal pelvis and adjacent fatty tissue) constituted 65, 27, and 8 percent of the whole kidney weight, respectively. The mean cadmium concentrations were 18.4, 6.9,, and 3.2 ..mu..g Cd/g wet wt, respectively. The mean whole kidney cadmium concentration was 14.4 ..mu..g Cd/g wet wt. The kidney cortex concentration of cadmium can be approximated by multiplying the whole kidney concentration by a factor of 1.25, which is somewhat lower than the factor of 1.5 previously used. It may be necessary to recalculate previously reported estimates of critical concentrations for cadmium in kidney cortex based on neutron activation analyses in vivo of whole kidney.

  18. Histological effects of oral administration of nutmeg on the kidneys of adult Wister rats

    PubMed Central

    Eweka, Andrew Osayame; Eweka, Abieyuwa

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The effects of oral administration of nutmeg commonly used as spice in various dishes, as components of teas and soft drinks or mixed in milk and alcohol on the kidneys of adult Wistar rats were carefully studied. Material and Methods: Rats of both sexes (n = 24), with average weight of 220g were randomly assigned into two treatments (A & B) of (n=16) and Control (c) (n=8) groups. The rats in the treatment groups (A & B) received 0.1g (500mg/kg body weight) and 0.2g (1000mg/kg body weight) of nutmeg thoroughly mixed with the feeds respectively on a daily basis for forty-two days. The control group (c) received equal amount of feeds daily without nutmeg added for forty-two days. The growers’ mash feeds was obtained from Edo Feeds and Flour Mill Limited, Ewu, Edo state, Nigeria and the rats were given water liberally. The rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation on the forty-third day of the experiment. The kidneys were carefully dissected out and quickly fixed in 10% buffered formaldehyde for routine histological study after hematoxylin and eosin method. Result: The histological findings in the treated sections of the kidneys showed distortion of the renal cortical structures, vacuolations appearing in the stroma and some degree of cellular necrosis, with degenerative and atrophic changes when compared to the control group. Conclusion: These findings indicate that oral administration of nutmeg may have some deleterious effects on the kidneys of adult Wistar rats at higher doses and by extension may affect its excretory and other metabolic functions. It is recommended that caution should therefore be advocated in the intake of this product and further studies be carried out to examine these findings. PMID:22624138

  19. Clinical-Grade Isolated Human Kidney Perivascular Stromal Cells as an Organotypic Cell Source for Kidney Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Leuning, Daniëlle G; Reinders, Marlies E J; Li, Joan; Peired, Anna J; Lievers, Ellen; de Boer, Hetty C; Fibbe, Willem E; Romagnani, Paola; van Kooten, Cees; Little, Melissa H; Engelse, Marten A; Rabelink, Ton J

    2017-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are immunomodulatory and tissue homeostatic cells that have shown beneficial effects in kidney diseases and transplantation. Perivascular stromal cells (PSCs) identified within several different organs share characteristics of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). These PSCs may also possess tissue-specific properties and play a role in local tissue homeostasis. We hypothesized that human kidney-derived PSCs (hkPSCs) would elicit improved kidney repair in comparison with BM-MSCs. Here we introduce a novel, clinical-grade isolation method of hkPSCs from cadaveric kidneys by enriching for the perivascular marker, NG2. hkPSCs show strong transcriptional similarities to BM-MSCs but also show organotypic expression signatures, including the HoxD10 and HoxD11 nephrogenic transcription factors. Comparable to BM-MSCs, hkPSCs showed immunosuppressive potential and, when cocultured with endothelial cells, vascular plexus formation was supported, which was specifically in the hkPSCs accompanied by an increased NG2 expression. hkPSCs did not undergo myofibroblast transformation after exposure to transforming growth factor-β, further corroborating their potential regulatory role in tissue homeostasis. This was further supported by the observation that hkPSCs induced accelerated repair in a tubular epithelial wound scratch assay, which was mediated through hepatocyte growth factor release. In vivo, in a neonatal kidney injection model, hkPSCs reintegrated and survived in the interstitial compartment, whereas BM-MSCs did not show this potential. Moreover, hkPSCs gave protection against the development of acute kidney injury in vivo in a model of rhabdomyolysis-mediated nephrotoxicity. Overall, this suggests a superior therapeutic potential for the use of hkPSCs and their secretome in the treatment of kidney diseases. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:405-418.

  20. Abdominal Obesity, Race and Chronic Kidney Disease in Young Adults: Results from NHANES 1999-2010

    PubMed Central

    Sarathy, Harini; Henriquez, Gabriela; Abramowitz, Matthew K.; Kramer, Holly; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Johns, Tanya; Kumar, Juhi; Skversky, Amy; Kaskel, Frederick; Melamed, Michal L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Kidney dysfunction in obesity may be independent of and may precede the development of hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus. We aimed to examine if abdominal obesity is associated with early markers of CKD in a young healthy population and whether these associations differ by race and/or ethnicity. Methods We analyzed data from the NHANES 1999–2010 for 6918 young adults ages 20–40 years. Abdominal obesity was defined by gender criteria of waist circumference. CKD markers included estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria ≥30 mg/g. Race stratified analyses were done overall and in subgroups with normal blood pressures, normoglycemia and normal insulin sensitivity. Awareness of CKD was assessed in participants with albuminuria. Results Abdominal obesity was present in over one-third of all young adults and was more prevalent among non-Hispanic blacks (45.4%) versus Mexican-Americans (40.6%) or non-Hispanic whites (37.4%) (P-value = 0.004). Mexican-American young adults with abdominal obesity had a higher odds of albuminuria even among those with normal blood pressure, normal glucose, and normal insulin sensitivity [adjusted odds ratio 4.5; 95% confidence interval (1.6–12.2), p = 0.004]. Less than 5% of young adults with albuminuria of all races and ethnicities had been told they had kidney disease. Conclusion Abdominal obesity in young adults, especially in Mexican-Americans, is independently associated with albuminuria even with normal blood pressures, normoglycemia and normal insulin levels. Greater awareness of CKD is needed to protect this young population from long-standing exposure to abdominal obesity and early progressive renal disease. PMID:27224643

  1. MRI-based glomerular morphology and pathology in whole human kidneys.

    PubMed

    Beeman, Scott C; Cullen-McEwen, Luise A; Puelles, Victor G; Zhang, Min; Wu, Teresa; Baldelomar, Edwin J; Dowling, John; Charlton, Jennifer R; Forbes, Michael S; Ng, Amanda; Wu, Qi-zhu; Armitage, James A; Egan, Gary F; Bertram, John F; Bennett, Kevin M

    2014-06-01

    Nephron number (N(glom)) and size (V(glom)) are correlated with risk for chronic cardiovascular and kidney disease and may be predictive of renal allograft viability. Unfortunately, there are no techniques to assess N(glom) and V(glom) in intact kidneys. This work demonstrates the use of cationized ferritin (CF) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent to measure N(glom) and V(glom) in viable human kidneys donated to science. The kidneys were obtained from patients with varying levels of cardiovascular and renal disease. CF was intravenously injected into three viable human kidneys. A fourth control kidney was perfused with saline. After fixation, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed binding of CF to the glomerulus. The intact kidneys were imaged with three-dimensional MRI and CF-labeled glomeruli appeared as punctate spots. Custom software identified, counted, and measured the apparent volumes of CF-labeled glomeruli, with an ~6% false positive rate. These measurements were comparable to stereological estimates. The MRI-based technique yielded a novel whole kidney distribution of glomerular volumes. Histopathology demonstrated that the distribution of CF-labeled glomeruli may be predictive of glomerular and vascular disease. Variations in CF distribution were quantified using image texture analyses, which be a useful marker of glomerular sclerosis. This is the first report of direct measurement of glomerular number and volume in intact human kidneys.

  2. Kidney Dysfunction in Adult Offspring Exposed In Utero to Type 1 Diabetes Is Associated with Alterations in Genome-Wide DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Jean-François; Porcher, Raphaël; Abi Khalil, Charbel; Bellili-Munoz, Naima; Fetita, Lila Sabrina; Travert, Florence; Choukem, Simeon-Pierre; Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Hadjadj, Samy; Larger, Etienne; Boudou, Philippe; Blondeau, Bertrand; Roussel, Ronan; Ferré, Pascal; Ravussin, Eric; Rouzet, François; Marre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background Fetal exposure to hyperglycemia impacts negatively kidney development and function. Objective Our objective was to determine whether fetal exposure to moderate hyperglycemia is associated with epigenetic alterations in DNA methylation in peripheral blood cells and whether those alterations are related to impaired kidney function in adult offspring. Design Twenty nine adult, non-diabetic offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes (T1D) (case group) were matched with 28 offspring of T1D fathers (control group) for the study of their leukocyte genome-wide DNA methylation profile (27,578 CpG sites, Human Methylation 27 BeadChip, Illumina Infinium). In a subset of 19 cases and 18 controls, we assessed renal vascular development by measuring Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) and Effective Renal Plasma Flow (ERPF) at baseline and during vasodilatation produced by amino acid infusion. Results Globally, DNA was under-methylated in cases vs. controls. Among the 87 CpG sites differently methylated, 74 sites were less methylated and 13 sites more methylated in cases vs. controls. None of these CpG sites were located on a gene known to be directly involved in kidney development and/or function. However, the gene encoding DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1)—a key enzyme involved in gene expression during early development–was under-methylated in cases. The average methylation of the 74 under-methylated sites differently correlated with GFR in cases and controls. Conclusion Alterations in methylation profile imprinted by the hyperglycemic milieu of T1D mothers during fetal development may impact kidney function in adult offspring. The involved pathways seem to be a nonspecific imprinting process rather than specific to kidney development or function. PMID:26258530

  3. Kidney function and cognitive health in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    PubMed

    Darsie, Brendan; Shlipak, Michael G; Sarnak, Mark J; Katz, Ronit; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Odden, Michelle C

    2014-07-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated the importance of kidney function in healthy aging. We examined the association between kidney function and change in cognitive function in 3,907 participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study who were recruited from 4 US communities and studied from 1992 to 1999. Kidney function was measured by cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcys). Cognitive function was assessed using the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination and the Digit Symbol Substitution Test, which were administered up to 7 times during annual visits. There was an association between eGFRcys and change in cognitive function after adjustment for confounders; persons with an eGFRcys of less than 60 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) had a 0.64 (95% confidence interval: 0.51, 0.77) points/year faster decline in Modified Mini-Mental State Examination score and a 0.42 (95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.56) points/year faster decline in Digit Symbol Substitution Test score compared with persons with an eGFRcys of 90 or more mL/minute/1.73 m(2). Additional adjustment for intermediate cardiovascular events modestly affected these associations. Participants with an eGFRcys of less than 60 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) had fewer cognitive impairment-free life-years on average compared with those with eGFRcys of 90 or more mL/minute/1.73 m(2), independent of confounders and mediating cardiovascular events (mean difference = -0.44, 95% confidence interval: -0.62, -0.26). Older adults with lower kidney function are at higher risk of worsening cognitive function.

  4. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to evaluate the status of human donor kidneys (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Peter M.; Konkel, Brandon; Anderson, Erik; Stein, Matthew; Cooper, Matthew; Verbesey, Jennifer E.; Ghasemian, Seyed; Chen, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The main cause of delayed renal function following the transplant of donor kidneys is ischemic induced acute tubular necrosis (ATN). The ability to determine the degree of ATN suffered by donor kidneys prior to their transplant would enable transplant surgeons to use kidneys that might otherwise be discarded and better predict post-transplant renal function. Currently, there are no reliable tests to determine the extent of ATN of donor kidneys prior to their transplant. In ongoing clinical trials, we have been using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to non-invasively image the superficial proximal tubules of human donor kidneys prior to and following transplant, and correlate these observations with post-transplant renal function. Thus far we have studied over 40 living donor kidneys and 10 cadaver donor kidneys, and demonstrated that this imaging can be performed in a sterile and expeditious fashion in the operating room (OR). Because of many variables associated with a diverse population of donors/recipients and transplant operation parameters, more transplant data must be collected prior to drawing definite conclusions. Nevertheless, our observations have thus far mirrored our previously published laboratory results indicating that damage to the kidney proximal tubules as indicated by tubule swelling is a good measure of post-transplant ATN and delayed graft function. We conclude that OCT is a useful procedure for analyzing human donor kidneys.

  5. Human hepatocyte and kidney cell metabolism of 2-acetylaminofluorene and comparison to the respective rat cells.

    PubMed

    Langenbach, R; Rudo, K

    1988-12-01

    The metabolism and mutagenic activation of 2-acetylaminofluorene by human and rat hepatocytes and kidney cells were measured. High performance liquid chromatography was used to separate the 2-acetylaminofluorene metabolites, and a cell-mediated Salmonella typhimurium mutagenesis assay was used to detect mutagenic intermediates. Rat and human differences were observed with cells from both organs and levels of metabolism and mutagenesis were higher in human cells. Within a species, liver and kidney cell differences were also evident, with levels of hepatocyte-mediated metabolism and mutagenesis being greater than kidney cells. Human inter-individual variation was apparent with cells from both organs, but the variation observed was significantly greater in hepatocytes than kidney cells. A knowledge of such differences, including an understanding that they may vary with the chemical being studied, should be useful in the extrapolation of rodent carcinogenesis data to humans.

  6. Dietary acid load and chronic kidney disease among adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diet can markedly affect acid-base status and it significantly influences chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its progression. The relationship of dietary acid load (DAL) and CKD has not been assessed on a population level. We examined the association of estimated net acid excretion (NAEes) with CKD; and socio-demographic and clinical correlates of NAEes. Methods Among 12,293 U.S. adult participants aged >20 years in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004, we assessed dietary acid by estimating NAEes from nutrient intake and body surface area; kidney damage by albuminuria; and kidney dysfunction by eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2 using the MDRD equation. We tested the association of NAEes with participant characteristics using median regression; while for albuminuria, eGFR, and stages of CKD we used logistic regression. Results Median regression results (β per quintile) indicated that adults aged 40–60 years (β [95% CI] = 3.1 [0.3–5.8]), poverty (β [95% CI] = 7.1 [4.01–10.22]), black race (β [95% CI] = 13.8 [10.8–16.8]), and male sex (β [95% CI] = 3.0 [0.7- 5.2]) were significantly associated with an increasing level of NAEes. Higher levels of NAEes compared with lower levels were associated with greater odds of albuminuria (OR [95% CI] = 1.57 [1.20–2.05]). We observed a trend toward greater NAEes being associated with higher risk of low eGFR, which persisted after adjustment for confounders. Conclusion Higher NAEes is associated with albuminuria and low eGFR, and socio-demographic risk factors for CKD are associated with higher levels of NAEes. DAL may be an important target for future interventions in populations at high risk for CKD. PMID:25151260

  7. Dual Kidney Allocation Score: A Novel Algorithm Utilizing Expanded Donor Criteria for the Allocation of Dual Kidneys in Adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adam P; Price, Thea P; Lieby, Benjamin; Doria, Cataldo

    2016-09-08

    BACKGROUND Dual kidney transplantation (DKT) of expanded-criteria donors is a cost-intensive procedure that aims to increase the pool of available deceased organ donors and has demonstrated equivalent outcomes to expanded-criteria single kidney transplantation (eSKT). The objective of this study was to develop an allocation score based on predicted graft survival from historical dual and single kidney donors. MATERIAL AND METHODS We analyzed United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data for 1547 DKT and 26 381 eSKT performed between January 1994 and September 2013. We utilized multivariable Cox regression to identify variables independently associated with graft survival in dual and single kidney transplantations. We then derived a weighted multivariable product score from calculated hazard ratios to model the benefit of transplantation as dual kidneys. RESULTS Of 36 donor variables known at the time of listing, 13 were significantly associated with graft survival. The derived dual allocation score demonstrated good internal validity with strong correlation to improved survival in dual kidney transplants. Donors with scores less than 2.1 transplanted as dual kidneys had a worsened median survival of 594 days (24%, p-value 0.031) and donors with scores greater than 3.9 had improved median survival of 1107 days (71%, p-value 0.002). There were 17 733 eSKT (67%) and 1051 DKT (67%) with scores in between these values and no differences in survival (p-values 0.676 and 0.185). CONCLUSIONS We have derived a dual kidney allocation score (DKAS) with good internal validity. Future prospective studies will be required to demonstrate external validity, but this score may help to standardize organ allocation for dual kidney transplantation.

  8. Immunosuppressive therapy for kidney transplantation in adults: a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Snowsill, Tristan; Haasova, Marcela; Coelho, Helen; Crathorne, Louise; Cooper, Chris; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Peters, Jaime; Varley-Campbell, Jo; Huxley, Nicola; Moore, Jason; Allwood, Matt; Lowe, Jenny; Hyde, Chris; Hoyle, Martin; Bond, Mary; Anderson, Rob

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND End-stage renal disease is a long-term irreversible decline in kidney function requiring renal replacement therapy: kidney transplantation, haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The preferred option is kidney transplantation, followed by immunosuppressive therapy (induction and maintenance therapy) to reduce the risk of kidney rejection and prolong graft survival. OBJECTIVES To review and update the evidence for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of basiliximab (BAS) (Simulect(®), Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd) and rabbit anti-human thymocyte immunoglobulin (rATG) (Thymoglobulin(®), Sanofi) as induction therapy, and immediate-release tacrolimus (TAC) (Adoport(®), Sandoz; Capexion(®), Mylan; Modigraf(®), Astellas Pharma; Perixis(®), Accord Healthcare; Prograf(®), Astellas Pharma; Tacni(®), Teva; Vivadex(®), Dexcel Pharma), prolonged-release tacrolimus (Advagraf(®) Astellas Pharma), belatacept (BEL) (Nulojix(®), Bristol-Myers Squibb), mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) (Arzip(®), Zentiva; CellCept(®), Roche Products; Myfenax(®), Teva), mycophenolate sodium (MPS) (Myfortic(®), Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd), sirolimus (SRL) (Rapamune(®), Pfizer) and everolimus (EVL) (Certican(®), Novartis) as maintenance therapy in adult renal transplantation. METHODS Clinical effectiveness searches were conducted until 18 November 2014 in MEDLINE (via Ovid), EMBASE (via Ovid), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (via Wiley Online Library) and Web of Science (via ISI), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects and Health Technology Assessment (The Cochrane Library via Wiley Online Library) and Health Management Information Consortium (via Ovid). Cost-effectiveness searches were conducted until 18 November 2014 using a costs or economic literature search filter in MEDLINE (via Ovid), EMBASE (via Ovid), NHS Economic Evaluation Database (via Wiley Online Library), Web of Science (via ISI

  9. Nutritional Status in Adults with Predialysis Chronic Kidney Disease: KNOW-CKD Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Adverse changes in nutrition are prevalent and are strong indicators of adverse outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM) proposed a common nomenclature and diagnostic criteria to identify protein-energy wasting (PEW) in CKD patients. We examined the nutritional status in 1,834 adults with predialysis CKD enrolled in the KoreaN cohort study for Outcome in patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD) study. As there was a need for further understanding of nutritional status and associated factors in CKD, we evaluated the prevalence and associated factors of PEW in adults with predialysis CKD. The prevalence of PEW was about 9.0% according to ISRNM criteria and tended to increase with advanced stage in predialysis CKD. Those who concurrently had PEW, inflammation, and CVD were a small proportion (0.4%). In multivariate logistic regression model, PEW was independently associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (odds ratio [OR], 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96–0.99), total CO2 (OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.87–0.99), physical activity (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.26–0.69), comorbid diabetes (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.09–2.59), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01–1.06). Our study suggests that PEW increases with advanced CKD stage. PEW is independently associated with renal function, low total CO2, low physical activity, comorbid diabetes, and increased hs-CRP in adults with predialysis CKD. PMID:28049236

  10. Expression of Stem Cell Markers in the Human Fetal Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Metsuyanim, Sally; Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Buzhor, Ella; Omer, Dorit; Pode-Shakked, Naomi; Ben-Hur, Herzl; Halperin, Reuvit; Schneider, David; Dekel, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    In the human fetal kidney (HFK) self-renewing stem cells residing in the metanephric mesenchyme (MM)/blastema are induced to form all cell types of the nephron till 34th week of gestation. Definition of useful markers is crucial for the identification of HFK stem cells. Because wilms' tumor, a pediatric renal cancer, initiates from retention of renal stem cells, we hypothesized that surface antigens previously up-regulated in microarrays of both HFK and blastema-enriched stem-like wilms' tumor xenografts (NCAM, ACVRIIB, DLK1/PREF, GPR39, FZD7, FZD2, NTRK2) are likely to be relevant markers. Comprehensive profiling of these putative and of additional stem cell markers (CD34, CD133, c-Kit, CD90, CD105, CD24) in mid-gestation HFK was performed using immunostaining and FACS in conjunction with EpCAM, an epithelial surface marker that is absent from the MM and increases along nephron differentiation and hence can be separated into negative, dim or bright fractions. No marker was specifically localized to the MM. Nevertheless, FZD7 and NTRK2 were preferentially localized to the MM and emerging tubules (<10% of HFK cells) and were mostly present within the EpCAMneg and EpCAMdim fractions, indicating putative stem/progenitor markers. In contrast, single markers such as CD24 and CD133 as well as double-positive CD24+CD133+ cells comprise >50% of HFK cells and predominantly co-express EpCAMbright, indicating they are mostly markers of differentiation. Furthermore, localization of NCAM exclusively in the MM and in its nephron progenitor derivatives but also in stroma and the expression pattern of significantly elevated renal stem/progenitor genes Six2, Wt1, Cited1, and Sall1 in NCAM+EpCAM- and to a lesser extent in NCAM+EpCAM+ fractions confirmed regional identity of cells and assisted us in pinpointing the presence of subpopulations that are putative MM-derived progenitor cells (NCAM+EpCAM+FZD7+), MM stem cells (NCAM+EpCAM-FZD7+) or both (NCAM+FZD7+). These results and

  11. Loss of executive function after dialysis initiation in adults with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Vittinghoff, Eric; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Tam, Karman; Seliger, Stephen L; Sozio, Stephen; Fischer, Michael; Chen, Jing; Lustigova, Eva; Strauss, Louise; Deo, Rajat; Go, Alan S; Yaffe, Kristine

    2017-04-01

    The association of dialysis initiation with changes in cognitive function among patients with advanced chronic kidney disease is poorly described. To better define this, we enrolled participants with advanced chronic kidney disease from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort in a prospective study of cognitive function. Eligible participants had a glomerular filtration rate of 20 ml/min/1.73m(2) or less, or dialysis initiation within the past two years. We evaluated cognitive function by a validated telephone battery at regular intervals over two years and analyzed test scores as z scores. Of 212 participants, 123 did not transition to dialysis during follow-up, 37 transitioned to dialysis after baseline, and 52 transitioned to dialysis prior to baseline. In adjusted analyses, the transition to dialysis was associated with a significant loss of executive function, but no significant changes in global cognition or memory. The estimated net difference in cognitive z scores at two years for participants who transitioned to dialysis during follow-up compared to participants who did not transition to dialysis was -0.01 (95% confidence interval -0.13, 0.11) for global cognition, -0.24 (-0.51, 0.03) for memory, and -0.33 (-0.60, -0.07) for executive function. Thus, among adults with advanced chronic kidney disease, dialysis initiation was associated with loss of executive function with no change in other aspects of cognition. Larger studies are needed to evaluate cognition during dialysis initiation.

  12. Nephrin Preserves Podocyte Viability and Glomerular Structure and Function in Adult Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuezhu; Chuang, Peter Y; D'Agati, Vivette D; Dai, Yan; Yacoub, Rabi; Fu, Jia; Xu, Jin; Taku, Oltjon; Premsrirut, Prem K; Holzman, Lawrence B; He, John Cijiang

    2015-10-01

    Nephrin is required during kidney development for the maturation of podocytes and formation of the slit diaphragm junctional complex. Because nephrin expression is downregulated in acquired glomerular diseases, nephrin deficiency is considered a pathologic feature of glomerular injury. However, whether nephrin deficiency exacerbates glomerular injury in glomerular diseases has not been experimentally confirmed. Here, we generated mice with inducible RNA interference-mediated nephrin knockdown. Short-term nephrin knockdown (6 weeks), starting after the completion of kidney development at 5 weeks of age, did not affect glomerular structure or function. In contrast, mice with long-term nephrin knockdown (20 weeks) developed mild proteinuria, foot process effacement, filtration slit narrowing, mesangial hypercellularity and sclerosis, glomerular basement membrane thickening, subendothelial zone widening, and podocyte apoptosis. When subjected to an acquired glomerular insult induced by unilateral nephrectomy or doxorubicin, mice with short-term nephrin knockdown developed more severe glomerular injury compared with mice without nephrin knockdown. Additionally, nephrin-knockdown mice developed more exaggerated glomerular enlargement when subjected to unilateral nephrectomy and more podocyte apoptosis and depletion after doxorubicin challenge. AKT phosphorylation, which is a slit diaphragm-mediated and nephrin-dependent pathway in the podocyte, was markedly reduced in mice with long-term or short-term nephrin knockdown challenged with uninephrectomy or doxorubicin. Taken together, our data establish that under the basal condition and in acquired glomerular diseases, nephrin is required to maintain slit diaphragm integrity and slit diaphragm-mediated signaling to preserve glomerular function and podocyte viability in adult mice.

  13. Simple renal cysts in the solitary kidney: Are they innocent in adult patients?

    PubMed

    Tatar, Erhan; Ozay, Emine; Atakaya, Mehmet; Yeniay, Pinar Kezban; Aykas, Ahmet; Okut, Gokalp; Yonguc, Tarik; Imamoglu, Cetin; Uslu, Adam

    2017-05-01

    In patients with a solitary kidney; residual renal volume is an important prognostic factor for kidney survival. At present, the impact of renal cysts on solitary kidney survival is not clear. The aim of this study is to examine the association of cysts on progression of renal failure in patients with a solitary kidney.

  14. Automated quantification of microstructural dimensions of the human kidney using optical coherence tomography (OCT).

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Onozato, Maristela L; Andrews, Peter M; Chen, Chao-Wei; Paek, Andrew; Naphas, Renee; Yuan, Shuai; Jiang, James; Cable, Alex; Chen, Yu

    2009-08-31

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality that can non-invasively provide cross-sectional, high-resolution images of tissue morphology in situ and in real-time. We previously demonstrated that OCT is capable of visualizing characteristic kidney anatomic structures, including blood vessels, uriniferous tubules, glomeruli, and renal capsules on a Munich-Wistar rat model. Because the viability of a donor kidney is closely correlated with its tubular morphology, and a large amount of image datasets are expected when using OCT to scan the entire kidney to provide a global assessment of its viability, it is necessary to develop automatic image analysis methods to quantify the spatially-resolved morphometric parameters such as tubular diameter to provide potential diagnostic information. In this study, we imaged the human kidney in vitro and quantified the diameters of hollow structures such as blood vessels and uriniferous tubules automatically. The microstructures were first segmented from cross-sectional OCT images. Then the spatially-isolated region-of-interest (ROI) was automatically selected to quantify its dimension. This method enables the automatic selection and quantification of spatially-resolved morphometric parameters. The quantification accuracy was validated, and measured features are in agreement with known kidney morphology. This work can enable studies to determine the clinical utility of OCT for kidney imaging, as well as studies to evaluate kidney morphology as a biomarker for assessing kidney's viability prior to transplantation.

  15. Relationships among injury, fibrosis, and time in human kidney transplants

    PubMed Central

    Venner, Jeffery M.; Famulski, Konrad S.; Reeve, Jeff; Chang, Jessica; Halloran, Philip F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Kidney transplant biopsies offer an opportunity to understand the pathogenesis of organ fibrosis. We studied the relationships between the time of biopsy after transplant (TxBx), histologic fibrosis, diseases, and transcript expression. METHODS. Expression microarrays from 681 kidney transplant indication biopsies taken either early (n = 282, <1 year) or late (n = 399, >1 year) after transplant were used to analyze the molecular landscape of fibrosis in relationship to histologic fibrosis and diseases. RESULTS. Fibrosis was absent at transplantation but was present in some early biopsies by 4 months after transplant, apparently as a self-limited response to donation implantation injury not associated with progression to failure. The molecular phenotype of early biopsies represented the time sequence of the response to wounding: immediate expression of acute kidney injury transcripts, followed by fibrillar collagen transcripts after several weeks, then by the appearance of immunoglobulin and mast cell transcripts after several months as fibrosis appeared. Fibrosis in late biopsies correlated with injury, fibrillar collagen, immunoglobulin, and mast cell transcripts, but these were independent of time. Pathway analysis revealed epithelial response-to-wounding pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin. CONCLUSION. Fibrosis in late biopsies had different associations because many kidneys had potentially progressive diseases and subsequently failed. Molecular correlations with fibrosis in late biopsies were independent of time, probably because ongoing injury obscured the response-to-wounding time sequence. The results indicate that fibrosis in kidney transplants is driven by nephron injury and that progression to failure reflects continuing injury, not autonomous fibrogenesis. TRIAL REGISTRATION. INTERCOM study (www.clinicalTrials.gov; NCT01299168). FUNDING. Canada Foundation for Innovation and Genome Canada. PMID:27699214

  16. Angiogenic properties of adult human thymus fat.

    PubMed

    Salas, Julián; Montiel, Mercedes; Jiménez, Eugenio; Valenzuela, Miguel; Valderrama, José Francisco; Castillo, Rafael; González, Sergio; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2009-11-01

    The endogenous proangiogenic properties of adipose tissue are well recognized. Although the adult human thymus has long been known to degenerate into fat tissue, it has never been considered as a potential source of angiogenic factors. We have investigated the expression of diverse angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor A and B, angiopoietin 1, and tyrosine-protein kinase receptor-2 (an angiopoietin receptor), and then analyzed their physiological role on endothelial cell migration and proliferation, two relevant events in angiogenesis. The detection of the gene and protein expression of the various proteins has been performed by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We show, for the first time, that adult thymus fat produces a variety of angiogenic factors and induces the proliferation and migration of human umbilical cord endothelial cells. Based on these findings, we suggest that this fat has a potential angiogenic function that might affect thymic function and ongoing adipogenesis within the thymus.

  17. Renal outcome in adults with renal insufficiency and irregular asymmetric kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Neild, Guy H; Thomson, Gill; Nitsch, Dorothea; Woolfson, Robin G; Connolly, John O; Woodhouse, Christopher RJ

    2004-01-01

    Background The commonest cause of end-stage renal failure (ESRF) in children and young adults is congenital malformation of the kidney and urinary tract. In this retrospective review, we examine whether progression to ESRF can be predicted and whether treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) can delay or prevent this. Methods We reviewed 78 patients with asymmetric irregular kidneys as a consequence of either primary vesico-ureteric reflux or renal dysplasia (Group 1, n = 44), or abnormal bladder function (Group 2, n = 34). Patients (median age 24 years) had an estimated GFR (eGFR) < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 with at least 5 years of follow up (median 143 months). 48 patients received ACEI. We explored potential prognostic factors that affect the time to ESRF using Cox-regression analyses. Results At start, mean (SE) creatinine was 189 (8) μmol/l, mean eGFR 41 (1) ml/min 1.73 m2, mean proteinuria 144 (14) mg/mmol creatinine (1.7 g/24 hrs). Of 78 patients, 36 (46%) developed ESRF, but none of 19 with proteinuria less than 50 mg/mmol and only two of 18 patients with eGFR above 50 ml/min did so. Renal outcome between Groups 1 and 2 appeared similar with no evidence for a difference. A benefit in favour of treatment with ACEI was observed above an eGFR of 40 ml/min (p = 0.024). Conclusion The similar outcome of the two groups supports the nephrological nature of progressive renal failure in young men born with abnormal bladders. There is a watershed GFR of 40–50 ml/min at which ACEI treatment can be successful at improving renal outcome. PMID:15462683

  18. Micronutrient Intakes and Incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    PubMed Central

    Farhadnejad, Hossein; Asghari, Golaleh; Mirmiran, Parvin; Yuzbashian, Emad; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between micronutrient intakes and the 3.6-year incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults. This cohort study was conducted, within the framework of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study, on 1692 subjects, aged ≥30 years, without CKD at the baseline. Dietary intakes were collected using a valid and reliable food-frequency questionnaire. Anthropometrics and biochemical measurements were taken. Chronic kidney disease was defined as eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. The mean age of participants was 43.3 ± 11.4 years. In the fully adjusted model, individuals in the top quintile of folate (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24–0.80), cobalamin (OR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.34–0.93), vitamin C (OR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.21–0.69), vitamin E (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22–0.92), vitamin D (OR: 0.39, 95% CI: 0.21–0.70), potassium (OR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.23–0.97) and magnesium (OR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.22–0.76) had decreased risk of CKD, and in the top quintile of sodium (OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.03–2.61), subjects had increased risk of CKD, in comparison to the bottom quintile. No significant associations were found between the intakes of other micronutrients. High intake of several micronutrients including vitamins C, E, D, cobalamin, folate, magnesium, and potassium was associated with a decreased risk, while sodium was associated with an increased risk of incident CKD. PMID:27104561

  19. Radiation injury in the human kidney: A prospective analysis using specific scintigraphic and biochemical endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Dewit, L.; Anninga, J.K.; Hoefnagel, C.A.; Nooijen, W.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Renal function was prospectively analyzed in 26 evaluable patients, irradiated to various doses on their kidneys for neoplastic disease. Glomerular function was assessed by 99mTc-DTPA renography, creatinine clearance, and serum beta 2-microglobulin, whereas tubular function was monitored by 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy, urine beta 2-microglobulin, urine N-acetyl glucosaminidase, and alanine aminopeptidase and a urine concentration test. In the patients given the highest irradiation dose to the entire left kidney, that is, 40 Gy in 5 1/2 weeks, glomerular and tubular functional impairment, as assessed scintigraphically, progressed at a rate of 2.0 +/- 1.0% (+/- 1 SD) and 2.0 +/- 0.5% per month, respectively, down to 30-40% after 3 to 5 years. The overall glomerular function, as assessed by creatinine clearance, decreased by only 20%. In the patients irradiated unilaterally on the upper pole to 40 Gy in 4 weeks, glomerular and tubular function in the left kidney deteriorated at 0.75 +/- 0.33% and 0.75 +/- 0.20% per month in the first 2 years, down to 75-80% at 5 years. This smaller reduction was due to shielding of a part of the left kidney. No changes were observed, thus far, after bilateral whole kidney irradiation to 17-18 Gy in 3 1/2 weeks. The concentration capacity of the kidney after total volume irradiation was not impaired. There was a trend for an increase in diastolic blood pressure in 3 out of 5 patients given the high dose irradiation to the entire left kidney and in 2 out of 7 patients irradiated on the upper pole of the left kidney. The progressive nature of the radiation nephropathy stresses the need for long term follow-up to determine more accurately the tolerance dose of the human kidney for irradiation.

  20. Regenerating the injured kidney with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Robbins, Paul D

    2013-04-25

    Transplantation of adult stem cells is being used to facilitate repair or regeneration of damaged or diseased tissues. However, in many cases, the therapeutic effects of the injected stem cells are mediated by factors secreted by stem cells and not by differentiation of the transplanted stem cells. Recent reports have identified a class of microvesicles, termed exosomes, released by stem cells that are able to confer therapeutic effects on injured renal and cardiac tissue. In this issue of Stem Cell Research & Therapy, Zhou and colleagues demonstrate the ability of exosomes derived from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hucMSCs), but not non-stem cell-derived exosomes, to improve acute kidney injury induced by cisplatin in rats. The authors demonstrate that hucMSC exosomes can reduce cisplatin-mediated renal oxidative stress and apoptosis in vivo and increase renal epithelial cell proliferation in culture. These results suggest that stem cell-derived exosomes, which are easy to isolate and safer to use than the parental stem cells, could have significant clinical utility.

  1. Uniquely hominid features of adult human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oberheim, Nancy Ann; Takano, Takahiro; Han, Xiaoning; He, Wei; Lin, Jane H C; Wang, Fushun; Xu, Qiwu; Wyatt, Jeffrey D; Pilcher, Webster; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Ransom, Bruce R; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2009-03-11

    Defining the microanatomic differences between the human brain and that of other mammals is key to understanding its unique computational power. Although much effort has been devoted to comparative studies of neurons, astrocytes have received far less attention. We report here that protoplasmic astrocytes in human neocortex are 2.6-fold larger in diameter and extend 10-fold more GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein)-positive primary processes than their rodent counterparts. In cortical slices prepared from acutely resected surgical tissue, protoplasmic astrocytes propagate Ca(2+) waves with a speed of 36 microm/s, approximately fourfold faster than rodent. Human astrocytes also transiently increase cystosolic Ca(2+) in response to glutamatergic and purinergic receptor agonists. The human neocortex also harbors several anatomically defined subclasses of astrocytes not represented in rodents. These include a population of astrocytes that reside in layers 5-6 and extend long fibers characterized by regularly spaced varicosities. Another specialized type of astrocyte, the interlaminar astrocyte, abundantly populates the superficial cortical layers and extends long processes without varicosities to cortical layers 3 and 4. Human fibrous astrocytes resemble their rodent counterpart but are larger in diameter. Thus, human cortical astrocytes are both larger, and structurally both more complex and more diverse, than those of rodents. On this basis, we posit that this astrocytic complexity has permitted the increased functional competence of the adult human brain.

  2. Sevelamer carbonate: a review in hyperphosphataemia in adults with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Perry, Caroline M; Plosker, Greg L

    2014-05-01

    Sevelamer carbonate (Renvela(®)), a buffered form of sevelamer hydrochloride (Renagel(®)), is an orally administered non-absorbed phosphate-binding anion exchange resin used in the treatment of hyperphosphataemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the EU, sevelamer carbonate is approved in adult CKD patients who require dialysis and in those who do not require dialysis with serum phosphate levels ≥ 1.78 mmol/L, whereas in the USA sevelamer carbonate is approved in adult CKD patients who require dialysis. Sevelamer carbonate and sevelamer hydrochloride achieved similar reductions in serum phosphate levels in randomized comparative trials in patients with CKD receiving haemodialysis; sevelamer carbonate also reduced serum phosphate levels in noncomparative studies in CKD patients not requiring dialysis. The most common adverse events with sevelamer carbonate are gastrointestinal in nature. Sevelamer has pleiotropic effects, such as improving the serum lipid profile and attenuating endothelial and cardiovascular risk factors in CKD. All formulations of sevelamer have markedly higher acquisition costs than calcium-based phosphate binders. Cost-effectiveness analyses focusing specifically on sevelamer carbonate have not been conducted, and those based on clinical trial data with sevelamer hydrochloride have provided both favourable and unfavourable results compared with calcium-based phosphate binders, reflecting heterogeneity between modelled analyses in terms of data sources, assumptions, comparators, geographical regions, type of costs included and other factors. Although well-designed studies evaluating the impact of phosphate binders on hard clinical endpoints appear to be warranted, sevelamer carbonate may be particularly useful for the treatment of patients at risk of metabolic acidosis (offering advantages over sevelamer hydrochloride in this regard) and for individuals requiring treatment with a phosphate binding agent that does not contain aluminium or

  3. Neointimal hyperplasia and calcification in medium sized arteries in adult patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chitalia, Nihil; Ross, Louise; Krishnamoorthy, Mahesh; Kapustin, Alexander; Shanahan, Catherine M; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Chemla, Eric; Banerjee, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    The nature of arterial changes resulting in cardiovascular events and dialysis vascular access failures in adult predialysis patients is not well known. This study examined intimal changes, calcium deposition, and consequent stiffness in brachial and radial arteries of adult CKD patients. Ten brachial-artery and seven radial-artery specimens were obtained during fistula creation from nine predialysis and eight dialysis-dependent, nondiabetic patients; and age-gender matched controls undergoing coronary bypass grafts (6 radial) or kidney donation (6 renal). Arterial stiffness was measured at baseline. Vessel histology, morphometric analysis of intima-media, and direct quantification of calcium load was performed using standard techniques. Both predialysis and dialysis patients demonstrated significant arterial intimal hyperplasia with intima:media ratio higher than controls (0.13 ± 0.12 vs. 0.02 ± 0.05, p = 0.01). Calcium deposition was demonstrated on histology and the calcium content in patients was higher than controls (34.68 ± 26.86 vs. 10.95 ± 9.18 μg/μg, p = 0.003). The blood vessel calcium content correlated with arterial stiffness (r = 0.64, p = 0.018). This study for the first time describes, and suggests mechanistic linkage between, intimal hyperplasia, pathological calcium deposition, and increased functional arterial stiffness in dialysis and predialysis patients. Our research could serve as a unique window into the in vivo status of the uremic vasculature impacting fistula maturation and cardiovascular disease.

  4. A population-based study measuring the prevalence of chronic kidney disease among adults in West Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hooi, Lai Seong; Ong, Loke Meng; Ahmad, Ghazali; Bavanandan, Sunita; Ahmad, Noor Ani; Naidu, Balkish M; Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon W; Yusoff, Muhammad Fadhli M

    2013-11-01

    In this population-based study, we determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease in West Malaysia in order to have accurate information for health-care planning. A sample of 876 individuals, representative of 15,147 respondents from the National Health and Morbidity Survey 2011, of the noninstitutionalized adult population (over 18 years old) in West Malaysia was studied. We measured the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (CKD-EPI equation); albuminuria and stages of chronic kidney disease were derived from calibrated serum creatinine, age, gender and early morning urine albumin creatinine ratio. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease in this group was 9.07%. An estimated 4.16% had stage 1 chronic kidney disease (eGFR >90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and persistent albuminuria), 2.05% had stage 2 (eGFR 60-89 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and persistent albuminuria), 2.26% had stage 3 (eGFR 30-59 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)), 0.24% had stage 4 (eGFR 15-29 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)), and 0.36% had stage 5 chronic kidney disease (eGFR <15 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)). Only 4% of respondents with chronic kidney disease were aware of their diagnosis. Risk factors included increased age, diabetes, and hypertension. Thus, chronic kidney disease in West Malaysia is common and, therefore, warrants early detection and treatment in order to potentially improve outcome.

  5. Transitional Care and Adherence of Adolescents and Young Adults After Kidney Transplantation in Germany and Austria

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, Martin; Prüfe, Jenny; Oldhafer, Martina; Bethe, Dirk; Dierks, Marie-Luise; Müther, Silvia; Thumfart, Julia; Hoppe, Bernd; Büscher, Anja; Rascher, Wolfgang; Hansen, Matthias; Pohl, Martin; Kemper, Markus J.; Drube, Jens; Rieger, Susanne; John, Ulrike; Taylan, Christina; Dittrich, Katalin; Hollenbach, Sabine; Klaus, Günter; Fehrenbach, Henry; Kranz, Birgitta; Montoya, Carmen; Lange-Sperandio, Bärbel; Ruckenbrodt, Bettina; Billing, Heiko; Staude, Hagen; Heindl-Rusai, Krisztina; Brunkhorst, Reinhard; Pape, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transition from child to adult-oriented care is widely regarded a challenging period for young people with kidney transplants and is associated with a high risk of graft failure. We analyzed the existing transition structures in Germany and Austria using a questionnaire and retrospective data of 119 patients transferred in 2011 to 2012. Most centers (73%) confirmed agreements on the transition procedure. Patients’ age at transfer was subject to regulation in 73% (18 years). Median age at transition was 18.3 years (16.5–36.7). Median serum creatinine increased from 123 to 132 μmol/L over the 12 month observation period before transfer (P = 0.002). A total of 25/119 patients showed increased creatinine ≥20% just before transfer. Biopsy proven rejection was found in 10/119 patients. Three patients lost their graft due to chronic graft nephropathy. Mean coefficient of variation (CoV%) of immunosuppression levels was 0.20 ± 0.1. Increased creatinine levels ≥20% just before transfer were less frequently seen in patients with CoV < 0.20 (P = 0.007). The majority of pediatric nephrology centers have internal agreements on transitional care. More than half of the patients had CoV of immunosuppression trough levels consistent with good adherence. Although, 20% of the patients showed increase in serum creatinine close to transfer. PMID:26632907

  6. Associations between dairy food consumption and chronic kidney disease in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Bamini; Harris, David C.; Flood, Victoria M.; Burlutsky, George; Mitchell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess the association between dairy product consumption and calcium intake with the prevalence and 10-year incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). 1185 participants aged ≥50 years at baseline were examined between 1992–4 and 2002–4. Dietary data were collected using a food frequency questionnaire, and servings of dairy food consumption were calculated. Baseline biochemistry including serum creatinine was measured. CKD was defined as Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL·min−1.1.73 m−2. Cross-sectional analysis showed that older adults in the highest quintile compared to the lowest quintile (reference group) of low/reduced fat dairy food consumption had reduced odds of CKD, multivariable-adjusted odds ratio, OR, 0.64 (95% confidence intervals, CI, 0.43–0.96). Increasing total intake of dietary calcium was associated with reduced odds of CKD (P-trend = 0.02); comparing highest versus lowest quintile: OR 0.62 (95% CI 0.42–0.92). Participants in the second versus first quintile of low/reduced fat dairy food consumption at baseline had 49% reduced risk of CKD 10 years later, OR 0.51 (95% CI 0.29–0.89). Higher consumption of low/reduced fat dairy foods was independently associated with lower risk of CKD. Additional population-based studies are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:27996057

  7. Associations between dairy food consumption and chronic kidney disease in older adults.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Harris, David C; Flood, Victoria M; Burlutsky, George; Mitchell, Paul

    2016-12-20

    We aimed to assess the association between dairy product consumption and calcium intake with the prevalence and 10-year incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). 1185 participants aged ≥50 years at baseline were examined between 1992-4 and 2002-4. Dietary data were collected using a food frequency questionnaire, and servings of dairy food consumption were calculated. Baseline biochemistry including serum creatinine was measured. CKD was defined as Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL·min(-1.)1.73 m(-2). Cross-sectional analysis showed that older adults in the highest quintile compared to the lowest quintile (reference group) of low/reduced fat dairy food consumption had reduced odds of CKD, multivariable-adjusted odds ratio, OR, 0.64 (95% confidence intervals, CI, 0.43-0.96). Increasing total intake of dietary calcium was associated with reduced odds of CKD (P-trend = 0.02); comparing highest versus lowest quintile: OR 0.62 (95% CI 0.42-0.92). Participants in the second versus first quintile of low/reduced fat dairy food consumption at baseline had 49% reduced risk of CKD 10 years later, OR 0.51 (95% CI 0.29-0.89). Higher consumption of low/reduced fat dairy foods was independently associated with lower risk of CKD. Additional population-based studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  8. Histopathological effects of the adult digenetic trematode Proctoeces ichiharai on the kidney of top shell Batillus cornutus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, S.

    1980-03-01

    The histopathological effects of the adult digenetic trematode Proctoeces ichiharai (Fellodistomatidae) on the renal tissue of the marine gastropod Batillus cornutus (Turbinidae) collected from Misaki (Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan) were examined. The infected top shells showed such pathological changes as (1) discoloration of the kidney, (2) metaplasia and hyperplasia in the epithelium and subepithelial tissue of the renal coelom, (3) cyst formation by accumulation of excretory materials in the collecting ducts and renal tubules, and (4) appearance of eosinophilic granular cells.

  9. Human skin carcinoma arising from kidney transplant-derived tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Verneuil, Laurence; Varna, Mariana; Ratajczak, Philippe; Leboeuf, Christophe; Plassa, Louis-François; Elbouchtaoui, Morad; Schneider, Pierre; Sandid, Wissam; Lebbé, Celeste; Peraldi, Marie-Noelle; Sigaux, François; de Thé, Hugues; Janin, Anne

    2013-09-01

    Tumor cells with donor genotype have been identified in human skin cancer after allogeneic transplantation; however, the donor contribution to the malignant epithelium has not been established. Kidney transplant recipients have an increased risk of invasive skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), which is associated with accumulation of the tumor suppressor p53 and TP53 mutations. In 21 skin SCCs from kidney transplant recipients, we systematically assessed p53 expression and donor/recipient origin in laser-microdissected p53+ tumor cells. In one patient, molecular analyses demonstrated that skin tumor cells had the donor genotype and harbored a TP53 mutation in codon 175. In a kidney graft biopsy performed 7 years before the skin SCC diagnosis, we found p53+ cells in the renal tubules. We identified the same TP53 mutation in these p53+ epithelial cells from the kidney transplant. These findings provide evidence for a donor epithelial cell contribution to the malignant skin epithelium in the recipient in the setting of allogeneic kidney transplantation. This finding has theoretical implications for cancer initiation and progression and clinical implications in the context of prolonged immunosuppression and longer survival of kidney transplant patients.

  10. Human skin carcinoma arising from kidney transplant–derived tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Verneuil, Laurence; Varna, Mariana; Ratajczak, Philippe; Leboeuf, Christophe; Plassa, Louis-François; Elbouchtaoui, Morad; Schneider, Pierre; Sandid, Wissam; Lebbé, Celeste; Peraldi, Marie-Noelle; Sigaux, François; de Thé, Hugues; Janin, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells with donor genotype have been identified in human skin cancer after allogeneic transplantation; however, the donor contribution to the malignant epithelium has not been established. Kidney transplant recipients have an increased risk of invasive skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), which is associated with accumulation of the tumor suppressor p53 and TP53 mutations. In 21 skin SCCs from kidney transplant recipients, we systematically assessed p53 expression and donor/recipient origin in laser-microdissected p53+ tumor cells. In one patient, molecular analyses demonstrated that skin tumor cells had the donor genotype and harbored a TP53 mutation in codon 175. In a kidney graft biopsy performed 7 years before the skin SCC diagnosis, we found p53+ cells in the renal tubules. We identified the same TP53 mutation in these p53+ epithelial cells from the kidney transplant. These findings provide evidence for a donor epithelial cell contribution to the malignant skin epithelium in the recipient in the setting of allogeneic kidney transplantation. This finding has theoretical implications for cancer initiation and progression and clinical implications in the context of prolonged immunosuppression and longer survival of kidney transplant patients. PMID:23979160

  11. Soft 3D-Printed Phantom of the Human Kidney with Collecting System.

    PubMed

    Adams, Fabian; Qiu, Tian; Mark, Andrew; Fritz, Benjamin; Kramer, Lena; Schlager, Daniel; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Miernik, Arkadiusz; Fischer, Peer

    2017-04-01

    Organ models are used for planning and simulation of operations, developing new surgical instruments, and training purposes. There is a substantial demand for in vitro organ phantoms, especially in urological surgery. Animal models and existing simulator systems poorly mimic the detailed morphology and the physical properties of human organs. In this paper, we report a novel fabrication process to make a human kidney phantom with realistic anatomical structures and physical properties. The detailed anatomical structure was directly acquired from high resolution CT data sets of human cadaveric kidneys. The soft phantoms were constructed using a novel technique that combines 3D wax printing and polymer molding. Anatomical details and material properties of the phantoms were validated in detail by CT scan, ultrasound, and endoscopy. CT reconstruction, ultrasound examination, and endoscopy showed that the designed phantom mimics a real kidney's detailed anatomy and correctly corresponds to the targeted human cadaver's upper urinary tract. Soft materials with a tensile modulus of 0.8-1.5 MPa as well as biocompatible hydrogels were used to mimic human kidney tissues. We developed a method of constructing 3D organ models from medical imaging data using a 3D wax printing and molding process. This method is cost-effective means for obtaining a reproducible and robust model suitable for surgical simulation and training purposes.

  12. Morphology of human embryonic kidney cells in culture after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.; Kunze, M. E.; Williams, K.; Morrison, D. R.; Lewis, M. L.; Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability of human embyronic kidney cells to differentiate into small epithelioid, large epithelioid, domed, and fenestrated morphological cell types following space flight is examined. Kidney cells exposed to 1 day at 1 g, then 1 day in orbit, and a 12 minute passage through the electrophoretic separator are compared with control cultures. The data reveal that 70 percent of small epithelioid, 16 percent of large epithelioid, 9 percent of dome-forming, and 5 percent of fenestrated cells formed in the space exposed cells; the distributions correlate well with control data. The formation of domed cells from cells cultured from low electrophoretic mobility fractions and small epithelioid cells from high mobility fractions is unaffected by space flight conditions. It is concluded that storage under microgravity conditions does not influence the morphological differentiation of human embryonic kidney cells in low-passage culture.

  13. Ascorbate increases human oxaluria and kidney stone risk.

    PubMed

    Massey, Linda K; Liebman, Michael; Kynast-Gales, Susan A

    2005-07-01

    Currently, the recommended upper limit for ascorbic acid (AA) intake is 2000 mg/d. However, because AA is endogenously converted to oxalate and appears to increase the absorption of dietary oxalate, supplementation may increase the risk of kidney stones. The effect of AA supplementation on urinary oxalate was studied in a randomized, crossover, controlled design in which subjects consumed a controlled diet in a university metabolic unit. Stoneformers (n = 29; SF) and age- and gender-matched non-stoneformers (n = 19; NSF) consumed 1000 mg AA twice each day with each morning and evening meal for 6 d (treatment A), and no AA for 6 d (treatment N) in random order. After 5 d of adaptation to a low-oxalate diet, participants lived for 24 h in a metabolic unit, during which they were given 136 mg oxalate, including 18 mg 13C2 oxalic acid, 2 h before breakfast; they then consumed a controlled very low-oxalate diet for 24 h. Of the 48 participants, 19 (12 stoneformers, 7 non-stoneformers) were identified as responders, defined by an increase in 24-h total oxalate excretion > 10% after treatment A compared with N. Responders had a greater 24-h Tiselius Risk Index (TRI) with AA supplementation (1.10 +/- 0.66 treatment A vs. 0.76 +/- 0.42 treatment N) because of a 31% increase in the percentage of oxalate absorption (10.5 +/- 3.2% treatment A vs. 8.0 +/- 2.4% treatment N) and a 39% increase in endogenous oxalate synthesis with treatment A than during treatment N (544 +/- 131 A vs. 391 +/- 71 micromol/d N). The 1000 mg AA twice each day increased urinary oxalate and TRI for calcium oxalate kidney stones in 40% of participants, both stoneformers and non-stoneformers.

  14. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B)

    SciTech Connect

    Duangtum, Natapol; Junking, Mutita; Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Cheunsuchon, Boonyarit; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} Impaired trafficking of kAE1 causes distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). {yields} The interaction between kAE1 and kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) is reported. {yields} The co-localization between kAE and KIF3B was detected in human kidney tissues. {yields} A marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane was observed when KIF3B was knockdown. {yields} KFI3B plays an important role in trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Impaired trafficking of human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) to the basolateral membrane of {alpha}-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct leads to the defect of the Cl{sup -}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} exchange and the failure of proton (H{sup +}) secretion at the apical membrane of these cells, causing distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). In the sorting process, kAE1 interacts with AP-1 mu1A, a subunit of AP-1A adaptor complex. However, it is not known whether kAE1 interacts with motor proteins in its trafficking process to the plasma membrane or not. We report here that kAE1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) in kidney cells and a dileucine motif at the carboxyl terminus of kAE1 contributes to this interaction. We have also demonstrated that kAE1 co-localizes with KIF3B in human kidney tissues and the suppression of endogenous KIF3B in HEK293T cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases membrane localization of kAE1 but increases its intracellular accumulation. All results suggest that KIF3B is involved in the trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane of human kidney {alpha}-intercalated cells.

  15. Illicit Drug Use, Hypertension, and Chronic Kidney Disease in the U.S. Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Akkina, Sanjeev K.; Ricardo, Ana C.; Patel, Amishi; Das, Arjun; Bazzano, Lydia A.; Brecklin, Carolyn; Fischer, Michael J.; Lash, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Illicit drug use has been associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in select populations but it is unknown if the same association exists in the general population. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2008, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 5,861 adults who were questioned about illicit drug use including cocaine, methamphetamines, or heroin during their lifetime. The primary outcome was CKD as defined by an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≤60mL/min/1.73m2 using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation or by microalbuminuria. We also examined the association between illicit drug use and blood pressure (BP) ≥120/80, ≥130/85, and ≥140/90. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between illicit drug use and CKD and BP. Mean eGFR was similar between illicit drug users and non-users (100.7 vs. 101.4mL/min/1.73m2, p=0.4) as was albuminuria (5.7 vs. 6.0mg/g creatinine, p=0.5). Accordingly, illicit drug use was not significantly associated with CKD in logistic regression models (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, confidence interval [CI] 0.75-1.27) after adjusting for other important factors. However, illicit drug users had higher systolic (120 vs. 118mmHg, p=0.04) and diastolic BP (73 vs. 71mmHg, p=0.0003) compared to non-users. Also, cocaine use was independently associated with BP≥130/85 (OR 1.24, CI 1.00-1.54), especially when used more during a lifetime (6-49 times, OR 1.42, CI 1.06-1.91). In a representative sample of the U.S. population, illicit drug use was not associated with CKD but cocaine users were more likely to have elevated blood pressures. PMID:22735028

  16. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Ectopic Kidney Medullary Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Kidney Dysplasia What is kidney dysplasia? Kidney dysplasia is a condition in which ... Kidney dysplasia in one kidney What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  17. Properties of electrophoretic fractions of human embryonic kidney cells separated on space shuttle flight STS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Lewis, M. L.; Barlow, G. H.; Todd, P. W.; Kunze, M. E.; Sarnoff, B. E.; Li, Z. K.

    1985-01-01

    Suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic kidney cells were subjected to continuous flow electrophoresis on Space Shuttle flight STS-8. The objectives of the experiments were to obtain electrophoretically separated fractions of the original cell populations and to test these fractions for the amount and kind of urokinase (a kidney plasminogen activator that is used medically for digesting blood clots), the morphologies of cells in the individual fractions, and their cellular electrophoretic mobilities after separation and subsequent proliferation. Individual fractions were successfully cultured after return from orbit, and they were found to differ substantially from one another and from the starting sample with respect to all of these properties.

  18. The effects of pomegranate extract on normal adult rat kidney: A stereological study

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Esrafil; Basgen, John; Saremy, Sadegh

    2016-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been used widely in the traditional medicine of various civilizations for more than 5000 years. The pomegranate tree has several parts; each part has useful medicinal effects. Previous studies have demonstrated the antibacterial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties of pomegranate. The aim of the present study was to determine whether administration of pomegranate extract could result in morphometric changes in the kidneys of rats. Eighteen male rats (180-200 g) were divided into three groups that received either: G1, distilled water; G2, 250 mg kg-1 pomegranate extract; and G3, 500 mg kg-1 pomegranate extract via oral gavages daily for eight weeks. At the end of eight weeks, the rats were euthanized and their kidneys were removed and processed for morphometric analyses. In rats received pomegranate extract, the kidney weight, kidney weight/body weight ratio, cortex v/lume and glomerular volume were increased (p < 0.05), while, medulla volume and the number of glomeruli per kidney did not change. No pathological lesions were observed in the kidney. Therefore, pomegranate hydro-alcoholic extract at doses of 250 and 500 (mg kg-1) increased the volume of some parts of the kidney; however, it did not cause any pathological changes in the kidney. PMID:27226880

  19. Correlation of mercury and selenium in the human kidney.

    PubMed

    Drasch, G; Wanghofer, E; Roider, G; Strobach, S

    1996-12-01

    The total mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) concentrations were determined in kidney cortex samples of 195 deceased, non-occupationally burdened individuals. Mercury was determined by means of Cold-vapour Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (CV-AAS) and selenium by Graphite-Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (GF-AAS). The molar Se/Hg ratio is high (up to (a) 300) in cases with relatively low mercury concentrations [Hg]. The ratio decreases with increasing [Hg]. At [Hg] of 700-1000 ng/g it reaches unity, where it remains constant even at larger [Hg]. Since in vitro mercury and selenium form relatively stable adducts, our results suggest the formation of a 1:1 Hg-Se compound that may explain mercury detoxification by selenium. This effect also results in the trapping of available selenium by mercury, too. Decreasing the reserve of free (i.e. not Hg-bound) selenium. The effect of this decrease of free selenium is under further investigation.

  20. Prevalence of obesity and risk of chronic kidney disease among young adults in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, M.; Ismail, M. I.; Gaballah, A.; Reyad, E.; ELdeeb, S.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing body mass index (BMI) has reached epidemic proportions globally and recently emerged as strong, independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted this study to verify the prevalence of obesity and the associated risk of developing CKD among 3000 Egyptian students. The World Health Organization classification of BMI categorized study population into 1–5 groups, 1146 subjects with normal BMI (20–25), 951 subjects with BMI 25–29.9, 540 subjects with BMI 30–34.9, 225 with BMI 35–39.9, and 138 with BMI above 40. The participants were subjected to clinical examination, anthropometric measurements, laboratory investigation, including urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) and estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). The prevalence of overweight, obesity, and metabolic syndrome (MS) was 31.7%, 30.1%, and 16%, respectively. The prevalence of CKD among subjects with BMI >25 was 6.5%, almost all of them had BMI >35. ACR and eGFR rose progressively with increasing BMI. Elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP), high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and MS increased the risk of development of CKD. Moreover, MAP, waist to height ratio, and triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein ratios at levels of >95 mm Hg, >0.6, and >3 had sensitivity 91.7%, 88.4%, and 86.7%; and specificity 92.3%, 96.4%, and 96.5%, respectively to predict CKD. The prevalence of obesity among Egyptian young adults was high (30.1%) and was associated with increased the risk of CKD (6.5%). PMID:27942172

  1. Prospective randomized trial of maintenance immunosuppression with rapid discontinuation of prednisone in adult kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Suszynski, T M; Gillingham, K J; Rizzari, M D; Dunn, T B; Payne, W D; Chinnakotla, S; Finger, E B; Sutherland, D E R; Najarian, J S; Pruett, T L; Matas, A J; Kandaswamy, R

    2013-04-01

    Rapid discontinuation of prednisone (RDP) has minimized steroid-related complications following kidney transplant (KT). This trial compares long-term (10-year) outcomes with three different maintenance immunosuppressive protocols following RDP in adult KT. Recipients (n=440; 73% living donor) from March 2001 to April 2006 were randomized into one of three arms: cyclosporine (CSA) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) (CSA/MMF, n=151); high-level tacrolimus (TAC, 8-12 μg/L) and low-level sirolimus (SIR, 3-7 μg/L) (TACH/SIRL, n=149) or low-level TAC (3-7 μg/L) and high-level SIR (8-12 μg/L) (TACL/SIR(H) , n=140). Median follow-up was ∼7 years. There were no differences between arms in 10-year actuarial patient, graft and death-censored graft survival or in allograft function. There were no differences in the 10-year actuarial rates of biopsy-proven acute rejection (30%, 26% and 20% in CSA/MMF, TACH/SIRL and TACL/SIRH) and chronic rejection (38%, 35% and 31% in CSA/MMF, TACH/SIRL and TACL/SIRH). Rates of new-onset diabetes mellitus were higher with TACH/SIRL (p=0.04), and rates of anemia were higher with TACH/SIRL and TACL/SIRH (p=0.04). No differences were found in the overall rates of 16 other post-KT complications. These data indicate that RDP-based protocol yield acceptable 10-year outcomes, but side effects differ based on the maintenance regimen used and should be considered when optimizing immunosuppression following RDP.

  2. Prospective Randomized Trial of Maintenance Immunosuppression with Rapid Discontinuation of Prednisone in Adult Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Suszynski, Thomas M.; Gillingham, Kristen J.; Rizzari, Michael D.; Dunn, Ty B.; Payne, William D.; Chinnakotla, Srinath; Finger, Erik B.; Sutherland, David E.R.; Najarian, John S.; Pruett, Timothy L.; Matas, Arthur J.; Kandaswamy, Raja

    2013-01-01

    Rapid discontinuation of prednisone (RDP) has minimized steroid-related complications following kidney transplant (KT). This trial compares long-term (10-year) outcomes with 3 different maintenance immunosuppressive protocols following RDP in adult KT. Recipients (n=440; 73% living donor) from 3/2001–4/2006 were randomized into 1 of 3 arms: cyclosporine (CSA) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) (CSA/MMF, n=151); high-level tacrolimus (TAC, 8–12 μg/L) and low-level sirolimus (SIR, 3–7 μg/L) (TACH/SIRL, n=149); or low-level TAC (3–7 μg/L) and high-level SIR (8–12 μg/L) (TACL/SIRH, n=140). Median follow-up was ~7 years. There were no differences between arms in 10-year actuarial patient (~70%), graft (~60%), death-censored graft (~80%) survival, or in allograft function. There were no differences in the 10-year actuarial rates of biopsy-proven acute rejection (30%, 26%, and 20% in CSA/MMF, TACH/SIRL, and TACL/SIRH) and chronic rejection (38%, 35%, and 31% in CSA/MMF, TACH/SIRL, and TACL/SIRH). Rates of new-onset diabetes mellitus were higher with TACH/SIRL (p=0.04), and rates of anemia were higher with TACH/SIRL and TACL/SIRH (p=0.04). No differences were found in the overall rates of 16 other post-KT complications. These data indicate that RDP-based protocol yield acceptable 10-year outcomes, but side effects differ based on the maintenance regimen used and should be considered when optimizing immunosuppression following RDP. PMID:23432755

  3. Characterization of the Mouse and Human Monoacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase 1 (Mogat1) Promoter in Human Kidney Proximal Tubule and Rat Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sankella, Shireesha; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (Mogat1) catalyzes the conversion of monoacylglycerols (MAG) to diacylglycerols (DAG), the precursor of several physiologically important lipids such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and triacylglycerol (TAG). Expression of Mogat1 is tissue restricted and it is highly expressed in the kidney, stomach and adipose tissue but minimally in the normal adult liver. To understand the transcriptional regulation of Mogat1, we characterized the mouse and human Mogat1 promoters in human kidney proximal tubule-2 (HK-2) cells. In-silico analysis revealed several peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) binding sites in the promoters of both human and mouse Mogat1. These sites responded to all three peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms such that their respective agonist or antagonist activated or inhibited the expression of Mogat1. PPRE site mutagenesis revealed that sites located at -592 and -2518 are very effective in decreasing luciferase reporter gene activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using PPARα antibody further confirmed the occupancy of these sites by PPARα. While these assays revealed the core promoter elements necessary for Mogat1 expression, there are additional elements required to regulate its tissue specific expression. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) assay revealed additional cis-elements located ~10–15 kb upstream which interact with the core promoter. These chromosomal regions are responsive to both PPARα agonist and antagonist. PMID:27611931

  4. Effect of passage number on electrophoretic mobility distributions of cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    A systematic investigation was undertaken to characterize population shifts that occur in cultured human embryonic kidney cells as a function of passage number in vitro after original explantation. This approach to cell population shift analysis follows the suggestion of Mehreshi, Klein and Revesz that perturbed cell populations can be characterized by electrophoretic mobility distributions if they contain subpopulations with different electrophoretic mobilities. It was shown that this is the case with early passage cultured human embryo cells.

  5. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from adult human testis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Sabine; Renninger, Markus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Wiesner, Tina; Just, Lothar; Bonin, Michael; Aicher, Wilhelm; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Mattheus, Ulrich; Mack, Andreas; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Minger, Stephen; Matzkies, Matthias; Reppel, Michael; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Stenzl, Arnulf; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-11-20

    Human primordial germ cells and mouse neonatal and adult germline stem cells are pluripotent and show similar properties to embryonic stem cells. Here we report the successful establishment of human adult germline stem cells derived from spermatogonial cells of adult human testis. Cellular and molecular characterization of these cells revealed many similarities to human embryonic stem cells, and the germline stem cells produced teratomas after transplantation into immunodeficient mice. The human adult germline stem cells differentiated into various types of somatic cells of all three germ layers when grown under conditions used to induce the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. We conclude that the generation of human adult germline stem cells from testicular biopsies may provide simple and non-controversial access to individual cell-based therapy without the ethical and immunological problems associated with human embryonic stem cells.

  6. Immunization by blood-type antigen in human immunoglobulin products before ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tokihiko; Ando, Tetsuo; Sato, Sumihiko; Kubota, Keiichi; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Teraoka, Satoshi

    2004-04-01

    A 29-year-old man wanted to receive an ABO-incompatible kidney transplant. His blood type was O, and the donor, his father, was A1. After endoscopic splenectomy performed before kidney transplantation, the recipient developed a high fever and leukocytosis, and he was treated with antibiotics and 5 g of human immunoglobulin products by intravenous infusion for 3 d. Soon after the infusions, his anti-blood type A antibody titer (anti-A titer) rose, and several sessions of plasma-exchange (PEX) and double-filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) failed to lower it. Three courses of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody were administered to suppress the antibody production more specifically, and the rituximab infusions and repeated PEX and DFPP session lowered the anti-A titer and enabled kidney transplantation. Mild humoral rejection was observed 16 d after transplantation, but the recipient's serum creatinine was 1.5 mg/dL when discharged from the hospital. The increased anti-A titer may have been due to immunization by blood-type A antigen, with the human immunoglobulin products given to the patient being the source of the antigen. Administration of human immunoglobulin products to recipients of ABO-incompatible kidney transplants should be avoided, because it may cause an unexpected increase in anti-blood-type antibody titer.

  7. The directed differentiation of human iPS cells into kidney podocytes.

    PubMed

    Song, Bi; Smink, Alexandra M; Jones, Christina V; Callaghan, Judy M; Firth, Stephen D; Bernard, Claude A; Laslett, Andrew L; Kerr, Peter G; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2012-01-01

    The loss of glomerular podocytes is a key event in the progression of chronic kidney disease resulting in proteinuria and declining function. Podocytes are slow cycling cells that are considered terminally differentiated. Here we provide the first report of the directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to generate kidney cells with podocyte features. The iPS-derived podocytes share a morphological phenotype analogous with cultured human podocytes. Following 10 days of directed differentiation, iPS podocytes had an up-regulated expression of mRNA and protein localization for podocyte markers including synaptopodin, nephrin and Wilm's tumour protein (WT1), combined with a down-regulation of the stem cell marker OCT3/4. In contrast to human podocytes that become quiescent in culture, iPS-derived cells maintain a proliferative capacity suggestive of a more immature phenotype. The transduction of iPS podocytes with fluorescent labeled-talin that were immunostained with podocin showed a cytoplasmic contractile response to angiotensin II (AII). A permeability assay provided functional evidence of albumin uptake in the cytoplasm of iPS podocytes comparable to human podocytes. Moreover, labeled iPS-derived podocytes were found to integrate into reaggregated metanephric kidney explants where they incorporated into developing glomeruli and co-expressed WT1. This study establishes the differentiation of iPS cells to kidney podocytes that will be useful for screening new treatments, understanding podocyte pathogenesis, and offering possibilities for regenerative medicine.

  8. Single-gene causes of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) in humans.

    PubMed

    Vivante, Asaf; Kohl, Stefan; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-04-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) cover a wide range of structural malformations that result from defects in the morphogenesis of the kidney and/or urinary tract. These anomalies account for about 40-50 % of children with chronic kidney disease worldwide. Knowledge from genetically modified mouse models suggests that single gene mutations in renal developmental genes may lead to CAKUT in humans. However, until recently, only a handful of CAKUT-causing genes were reported, most of them in familial syndromic cases. Recent findings suggest that CAKUT may arise from mutations in a multitude of different single gene causes. We focus here on single-gene causes of CAKUT and their developmental origin. Currently, more than 20 monogenic CAKUT-causing genes have been identified. High-throughput sequencing techniques make it likely that additional CAKUT-causing genes will be identified in the near future.

  9. Predictors of Relapse and End Stage Kidney Disease in Proliferative Lupus Nephritis: Focus on Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Debbie S.; Massengill, Susan A.; Dooley, Mary Anne; Primack, William A.; Ferris, Maria A.; Hogan, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The prevalence and significance of remission and relapse in children, adolescents, and young adults with lupus nephritis in the United States are poorly understood. Patterns and predictors of disease progression in a southeastern U.S. pediatric cohort with severe lupus nephritis are presented. Design, settings, participants, & measurements: Individuals age 21 or less with kidney biopsy-proven lupus nephritis followed in the Glomerular Disease Collaborative Network were included. Cox regression models were used to evaluate predictors of relapse and end stage kidney disease (ESKD). Results: Seventy-three subjects with a mean age of 15.6 ± 3.4 yr were included. Five-year kidney survival was 77%. Complete and partial remission rates within 1 yr of induction therapy were 25 and 64%, respectively. Relapse and ESKD rates were similar between complete and partial responders. Relapse occurred in 35% of responders (complete or partial) in 45 ± 32 mo. Disease relapse was a predictor of ESKD (HR = 10.12, P < 0.0001). Treatment resistance was documented in African Americans more often than non-African Americans (eight versus 0; P = 0.03). ESKD HR associated with treatment resistance was 6.25, P < 0.002. Conclusions: Remission whether complete or partial is associated with improved kidney survival in children with lupus nephritis. Nephritis relapse is a strong predictor of progression to ESKD. Treatment resistance portends a high risk of ESKD and disproportionately affects African American children with lupus nephritis. PMID:19820130

  10. Ciliogenesis in normal human kidney development and post-natal life.

    PubMed

    Saraga-Babić, Mirna; Vukojević, Katarina; Bočina, Ivana; Drnašin, Kristina; Saraga, Marijan

    2012-01-01

    Ciliogenesis in developing and post-natal human kidneys appears to influence cell proliferation and differentiation, apico-basal cell polarity, and tubular lumen formation. We have analyzed the appearance of primary cilia and differentiation of kidney cells in ten human conceptuses aged 6-22 weeks and in one 5-year-old kidney, using a double immunofluorescence labeling technique for α-tubulin, γ-tubulin, Oct-4, and Ki-67 and by electron microscopy. Immature forms of nephrons and ampullae were characterized by intense cell proliferation, which subsequently decreased during development. Primary cilia appeared on the surfaces of non-proliferating cells in developing nephrons, gradually increasing in length from 0.59 μm in renal vesicles to 0.81 μm in the S-forms of nephrons, ultimately reaching 3.04 μm in length in mature fetal and post-natal nephrons. Ciliary length increased from 0.59 μm in ampullae to 1.28 μm in post-natal collecting tubules. Mesenchymal to epithelial transformation of kidney cells coincided with the appearance of apico-basal polarity, both gap and tight junctions, and lumen formation. Up-regulation of Oct-4 expression correlated with the onset of kidney cell differentiation. Our results demonstrate the importance of proper primary cilia lengthening and Oct-4 expression for the normal development of fetal and post-natal kidneys and of apico-basal polarity for normal tubular lumen formation. Disturbances in these processes are associated with ciliopathies.

  11. Human Urine-Derived Renal Progenitors for Personalized Modeling of Genetic Kidney Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Elena; Ronconi, Elisa; Angelotti, Maria Lucia; Peired, Anna; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Becherucci, Francesca; Conti, Sara; Sansavini, Giulia; Sisti, Alessandro; Ravaglia, Fiammetta; Lombardi, Duccio; Provenzano, Aldesia; Manonelles, Anna; Cruzado, Josep M; Giglio, Sabrina; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Lasagni, Laura; Romagnani, Paola

    2015-08-01

    The critical role of genetic and epigenetic factors in the pathogenesis of kidney disorders is gradually becoming clear, and the need for disease models that recapitulate human kidney disorders in a personalized manner is paramount. In this study, we describe a method to select and amplify renal progenitor cultures from the urine of patients with kidney disorders. Urine-derived human renal progenitors exhibited phenotype and functional properties identical to those purified from kidney tissue, including the capacity to differentiate into tubular cells and podocytes, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis of podocyte-specific proteins, and scanning electron microscopy. Lineage tracing studies performed with conditional transgenic mice, in which podocytes are irreversibly tagged upon tamoxifen treatment (NPHS2.iCreER;mT/mG), that were subjected to doxorubicin nephropathy demonstrated that renal progenitors are the only urinary cell population that can be amplified in long-term culture. To validate the use of these cells for personalized modeling of kidney disorders, renal progenitors were obtained from (1) the urine of children with nephrotic syndrome and carrying potentially pathogenic mutations in genes encoding for podocyte proteins and (2) the urine of children without genetic alterations, as validated by next-generation sequencing. Renal progenitors obtained from patients carrying pathogenic mutations generated podocytes that exhibited an abnormal cytoskeleton structure and functional abnormalities compared with those obtained from patients with proteinuria but without genetic mutations. The results of this study demonstrate that urine-derived patient-specific renal progenitor cultures may be an innovative research tool for modeling of genetic kidney disorders.

  12. Novel biomarkers for early diagnosis of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kališnik, Jurij Matija

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is a common and serious complication and it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of acute kidney injury is based on the serum creatinine levels which rise several hours to days after the initial injury. Thus, novel biomarkers that will enable faster diagnosis are needed in clinical practice. There are numerous urine and serum proteins that indicate kidney injury and are under extensive research. Despite promising basic research results and assembled data, which indicate superiority of some biomarkers to creatinine, we are still awaiting clinical application. PMID:27212976

  13. Latent inhibition in human adults without masking.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Martha; Arcediano, Francisco; Miller, Ralph R

    2003-09-01

    Latent inhibition refers to attenuated responding to Cue X observed when the X-outcome pairings are preceded by X-alone presentations. It has proven difficult to obtain in human adults unless the preexposure (X-alone) presentations are embedded within a masking (i.e., distracting) task. The authors hypothesized that the difficulty in obtaining latent inhibition with unmasked tasks is related to the usual training procedures, in which the preexposure and conditioning experiences are separated by a set of instructions. Experiment 1 reports latent inhibition without masking in a task in which preexposure and conditioning occur without interruption. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrate that this attenuation in responding to target Cue X does not pass a summation test for conditioned inhibition and is context specific, thereby confirming that it is latent inhibition. Experiments 3 and 4 confirm that introducing instructions between preexposure and conditioning disrupts latent inhibition.

  14. Electrophoretic separation of human kidney cells at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.; Lazer, S. L.; Rueter, A.; Allen, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Electrophoretic isolation of cells results in a loss of resolution power caused by the sedimentation of the cells in the media. The results of an experiment to extract urokinase from human embryos during the Apollo Soyuz mission are presented and discussed.

  15. Comprehensive Metabolomic and Lipidomic Profiling of Human Kidney Tissue: A Platform Comparison.

    PubMed

    Leuthold, Patrick; Schaeffeler, Elke; Winter, Stefan; Büttner, Florian; Hofmann, Ute; Mürdter, Thomas E; Rausch, Steffen; Sonntag, Denise; Wahrheit, Judith; Fend, Falko; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Bedke, Jens; Schwab, Matthias; Haag, Mathias

    2017-02-03

    Metabolite profiling of tissue samples is a promising approach for the characterization of cancer pathways and tumor classification based on metabolic features. Here, we present an analytical method for nontargeted metabolomics of kidney tissue. Capitalizing on different chemical properties of metabolites allowed us to extract a broad range of molecules covering small polar molecules and less polar lipid classes that were analyzed by LC-QTOF-MS after HILIC and RP chromatographic separation, respectively. More than 1000 features could be reproducibly extracted and analyzed (CV < 30%) in porcine and human kidney tissue, which were used as surrogate matrices for method development. To further assess assay performance, cross-validation of the nontargeted metabolomics platform to a targeted metabolomics approach was carried out. Strikingly, from 102 metabolites that could be detected on both platforms, the majority (>90%) revealed Spearman's correlation coefficients ≥0.3, indicating that quantitative results from the nontargeted assay are largely comparable to data derived from classical targeted assays. Finally, as proof of concept, the method was applied to human kidney tissue where a clear differentiation between kidney cancer and nontumorous material could be demonstrated on the basis of unsupervised statistical analysis.

  16. Determination of Single-Kidney Glomerular Filtration Rate in Human Subjects by Using CT

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Saad, Ahmed; Herrmann, Sandra M.; Textor, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that computed tomography (CT)–derived measurements of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) obtained in human subjects with 64-section CT agree with those obtained with iothalamate clearance, a rigorous reference standard. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant study, and written informed consent was obtained. Ninety-six patients (age range, 51–73 years; 46 men, 50 women) with essential (n = 56) or renovascular (n = 40) hypertension were prospectively studied in controlled conditions (involving sodium intake and renin-angiotensin blockade). Single-kidney perfusion, volume, and GFR were measured by using multidetector CT time-attenuation curves and were compared with GFR measured by using iothalamate clearance, as assigned to the right and left kidney according to relative volumes. The reproducibility of CT GFR over a 3-month period (n = 21) was assessed in patients with renal artery stenosis who were undergoing stable medical treatment. Statistical analysis included the t test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, linear regression, and Bland-Altman analysis. Results CT GFR values were similar to those of iothalamate clearance (mean ± standard deviation, 38.2 mL/min ± 18 vs 41.6 mL/min ± 17; P = .062). Stenotic kidney CT GFR in patients with renal artery stenosis was lower than contralateral kidney GFR or essential hypertension single-kidney GFR (mean, 23.1 mL/min ± 13 vs 36.9 mL/min ± 17 [P = .0008] and 45.2 mL/min ± 16 [P = .019], respectively), as was iothalamate clearance (mean, 26.9 mL/min ± 14 vs 38.5 mL/min ± 15 [P = .0004] and 49.0 mL/min ± 14 [P = .001], respectively). CT GFR correlated well with iothalamate GFR (linear regression, CT GFR = 0.88*iothalamate GFR, r2 = 0.89, P < .0001), and Bland-Altman analysis was used to confirm the agreement. CT GFR was also moderately reproducible in medically treated patients with renal artery stenosis (concordance coefficient

  17. The human kidney is a progesterone-metabolizing and androgen-producing organ.

    PubMed

    Quinkler, M; Bumke-Vogt, C; Meyer, B; Bähr, V; Oelkers, W; Diederich, S

    2003-06-01

    Progesterone (P) is a potent antagonist of the human mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in vitro. We have previously demonstrated effective downstream metabolism of P in the kidney. This mechanism potentially protects the MR from P action. Here, we have investigated the expression and functional activity of steroidogenic enzymes in human kidney. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of 5 alpha-reductase type 1, 5 beta-reductase, aldo-keto-reductase (AKR) 1C1, AKR1C2, AKR1C3, 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD) type 2, and 17 alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (P450c17). The presence of 3 beta-HSD type 2 and P450c17 indicated that conversion of pregnenolone to dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and to androstenedione may take place effectively in kidney. To investigate this further, we incubated kidney subcellular fractions with radiolabeled pregnenolone. This resulted in efficient formation of DHEA from pregnenolone, indicating both 17 alpha-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities exerted by P450c17. Radiolabeled DHEA was converted via androstenedione, androstenediol, and testosterone, indicating both 3 beta-HSD type 2 activity and 17 beta-HSD activity. In addition, the conversion of testosterone to 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone was detectable, indicating 5 alpha-reductase activity. In conclusion, we verified the expression and functional activity of several enzymes involved in downstream metabolism of P and androgen synthesis in human kidney. These findings may be critical to the understanding of water balance during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy and of sex differences in hypertension.

  18. Comparison of Life Participation Activities Among Adults Treated by Hemodialysis, Peritoneal Dialysis, and Kidney Transplantation: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Purnell, Tanjala S.; Auguste, Priscilla; Crews, Deidra C.; Lamprea-Montealegre, Julio; Olufade, Temitope; Greer, Raquel; Ephraim, Patti; Sheu, Johanna; Kostecki, Daniel; Powe, Neil R.; Rabb, Hamid; Jaar, Bernard; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2013-01-01

    Background A comprehensive assessment of the association of patients’ renal replacement therapy (RRT) modality on their participation in life activities (physical function, travel, recreation, freedom, work) is needed. Study Design Systematic review of peer-reviewed published studies. Setting & Population Adults undergoing RRT (hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or transplantation). Selection Criteria for Studies We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE from January 1980 through April 2012 for English-language articles that compared participation in life activities among patients receiving 1) hemodialysis compared with peritoneal dialysis, 2) hemodialysis compared with kidney transplantation, or 3) peritoneal dialysis compared with kidney transplantation. Predictor RRT modality. Outcomes Reported rates of physical function, travel, recreation, freedom, and work-related activities by RRT modality. Results A total of 46 studies (6 prospective cohort, 38 cross-sectional, and 2 pre-post transplantation) provided relevant comparisons of life participation activities among patients treated with hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Studies were conducted from 1985 to 2011 among diverse patient populations in 16 distinct locations. A majority of studies reported greater life participation rates among patients with kidney transplants compared to patients receiving either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. In contrast, a majority of studies reported no differences in outcomes between patients receiving hemodialysis and patients receiving peritoneal dialysis. These results were consistent throughout the study period, across diverse populations, and among the subset of studies that performed appropriate adjustments for potential confounding factors. Limitations Many studies included in the review had significant design weaknesses. Conclusions Evidence suggests patients with kidney transplants may experience better rates of life

  19. Incidence and mortality of kidney cancers, and human development index in Asia; a matter of concern

    PubMed Central

    Arabsalmani, Masoumeh; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Hadadian, Fatemeh; Towhidi, Farhad; Vafaee, Kamran; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Background The incidence and mortality of kidney cancer have steadily increased by 2%- 3% per decade worldwide, and an increased risk of kidney cancer has been observed in many Asian countries. The information on the incidence and mortality of a disease and its distribution is essential for better planning for prevention and further studies. Objectives This study aimed to assess the incidence and mortality of kidney cancer and their correlation with the human development index (HDI) in Asia. Materials and Methods This ecological study was based on GLOBOCAN data Asia for assessment the correlation between age-specific incidence rate (ASIR) and age-specific mortality rate (ASMR) with HDI and its details that include life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling and gross national income (GNI) per capita. We use of correlation bivariate method for assessment the correlation between ASIR and ASMR with HDI and its components. Results A total of 121 099 kidney cancer cases were recorded in Asian countries in 2012.Overall, 80 080 cases (66.12%) were males. Sex ratio was 1.95. The three countries with the highest number of new patients were china (66 466 cases), Japan (16 830 cases), India(9658 cases), respectively. Positive correlation were seen between HDI and ASIR of kidney cancer 0.655 (P = 0.001), and HDI and ASMR of kidney cancer 0.285 (P = 0.055). Conclusions A positive relationship between ASIR and the HDI was seen. The relationship is due to risk factors in countries with high development such as older age, smoking, hypertension, obesity, and diet. However, ASMR showed no significant relationship with HDI. PMID:28042551

  20. Comparative expression of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in the mouse, rat, and human kidney.

    PubMed

    Graca, J A Z; Schepelmann, M; Brennan, S C; Reens, J; Chang, W; Yan, P; Toka, H; Riccardi, D; Price, S A

    2016-03-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) was cloned over 20 years ago and functionally demonstrated to regulate circulating levels of parathyroid hormone by maintaining physiological serum ionized calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]). The receptor is highly expressed in the kidney; however, intrarenal and intraspecies distribution remains controversial. Recently, additional functions of the CaSR receptor in the kidney have emerged, including parathyroid hormone-independent effects. It is therefore critical to establish unequivocally the localization of the CaSR in the kidney to relate this to its proposed physiological roles. In this study, we determined CaSR expression in mouse, rat, and human kidneys using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry (using 8 different commercially available and custom-made antibodies), and proximity ligation assays. Negative results in mice with kidney-specific CaSR ablation confirmed the specificity of the immunohistochemistry signal. Both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed CaSR expression in the thick ascending limb, distal tubule, and collecting duct of all species, with the thick ascending limb showing the highest levels. Within the collecting ducts, there was significant heterogeneity of expression between cell types. In the proximal tubule, lower levels of immunoreactivity were detected by immunohistochemistry and proximity ligation assays. Proximity ligation assays were the only technique to demonstrate expression within glomeruli. This study demonstrated CaSR expression throughout the kidney with minimal discrepancy between species but with significant variation in the levels of expression between cell and tubule types. These findings clarify the intrarenal distribution of the CaSR and enable elucidation of the full physiological roles of the receptor within this organ.

  1. Astrocitary niches in human adult medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Dermengiu, Dan; Loreto, Carla; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Pop, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Astrocytes are considered as neuromodulators of the CNS. Whereas experimental studies on astrocitary functions are gaining importance, the anatomy of the astrocitary niches in the human CNS has been overlooked. The study was performed on the brainstem of 10 adult cadavers. We aimed to determine astrocitary niches in the human medulla oblongata using immunohistochemical labeling with vimentin and also CD34 immunostaining to accurately diagnose associated microvessels. Niches rich in astrocytes were identified as follows: (a) the superficial layer of astrocytes, ventral and ventrolateral, in the rostral medulla oblongata; (b) the median raphe; (c) medullary nuclei: arcuate nucleus, area postrema, nucleus of the solitary tract; (d) the subependymal zone (SEZ, caudal medulla) and subventricular zone (SVZ, rostral medulla). Astrocytes were scarce in the ventrolateral medulla, and mostly present within the pyramidal tract and the olivary nucleus. Apart from the SEZ and SVZ, the brainstem niches of astrocytes mostly overlap those regions known to perform roles as central respiratory chemoreceptors. The astrocytes of the SEZ and SVZ, which are known as stem cell niches, are related to an increased microvascular density.

  2. PPAR-gamma agonist ameliorates kidney and liver disease in an orthologous rat model of human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Morita, Miwa; Kugita, Masanori; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Aukema, Harold M; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Calvet, James P; Wallace, Darren P; Nagao, Shizuko

    2011-02-01

    In autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), progressive enlargement of fluid-filled cysts is due to aberrant proliferation of tubule epithelial cells and transepithelial fluid secretion leading to extensive nephron loss and interstitial fibrosis. Congenital hepatic fibrosis associated with biliary cysts/dilatations is the most common extrarenal manifestation in ARPKD and can lead to massive liver enlargement. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ), a member of the ligand-dependent nuclear receptor superfamily, is expressed in a variety of tissues, including the kidneys and liver, and plays important roles in cell proliferation, fibrosis, and inflammation. In the current study, we determined that pioglitazone (PIO), a PPAR-γ agonist, decreases polycystic kidney and liver disease progression in the polycystic kidney rat, an orthologous model of human ARPKD. Daily treatment with 10 mg/kg PIO for 16 wk decreased kidney weight (% of body weight), renal cystic area, serum urea nitrogen, and the number of Ki67-, pERK1/2-, and pS6-positive cells in the kidney. There was also a decrease in liver weight (% of body weight), liver cystic area, fibrotic index, and the number of Ki67-, pERK1/2-, pERK5-, and TGF-β-positive cells in the liver. Taken together, these data suggest that PIO inhibits the progression of polycystic kidney and liver disease in a model of human ARPKD by inhibiting cell proliferation and fibrosis. These findings suggest that PPAR-γ agonists may have therapeutic value in the treatment of the renal and hepatic manifestations of ARPKD.

  3. Evaluation of limited sampling methods for estimation of tacrolimus exposure in adult kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Barraclough, Katherine A; Isbel, Nicole M; Kirkpatrick, Carl M; Lee, Katie J; Taylor, Paul J; Johnson, David W; Campbell, Scott B; Leary, Diana R; Staatz, Christine E

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To examine the predictive performance of limited sampling methods for estimation of tacrolimus exposure in adult kidney transplant recipients. METHODS Twenty full tacrolimus area under the concentration–time curve from 0 to 12 h post-dose (AUC0–12) profiles (AUCf) were collected from 20 subjects. Predicted tacrolimus AUC0–12 (AUCp) was calculated using the following: (i) 42 multiple regression-derived limited sampling strategies (LSSs); (ii) five population pharmacokinetic (PK) models in the Bayesian forecasting program TCIWorks; and (iii) a Web-based consultancy service. Correlations (r2) between C0 and AUCf and between AUCp and AUCf were examined. Median percentage prediction error (MPPE) and median absolute percentage prediction error (MAPE) were calculated. RESULTS Correlation between C0 and AUCf was 0.53. Using the 42 LSS equations, correlation between AUCp and AUCf ranged from 0.54 to 0.99. The MPPE and MAPE were <15% for 29 of 42 equations (62%), including five of eight equations based on sampling taken ≤2 h post-dose. Using the PK models in TCIWorks, AUCp derived from only C0 values showed poor correlation with AUCf (r2 = 0.27–0.54) and unacceptable imprecision (MAPE 17.5–31.6%). In most cases, correlation, bias and imprecision estimates progressively improved with inclusion of a greater number of concentration time points. When concentration measurements at 0, 1, 2 and 4 h post-dose were applied, correlation between AUCp and AUCf ranged from 0.75 to 0.93, and MPPE and MAPE were <15% for all models examined. Using the Web-based consultancy service, correlation between AUCp and AUCf was 0.74, and MPPE and MAPE were 6.6 and 9.6%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Limited sampling methods better predict tacrolimus exposure compared with C0 measurement. Several LSSs based on sampling taken 2 h or less post-dose predicted exposure with acceptable bias and imprecision. Generally, Bayesian forecasting methods required inclusion of a concentration

  4. Protein-energy wasting and uremic failure to thrive in children with chronic kidney disease: they are not small adults.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Noureddin; Rhee, Connie M; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2014-12-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), a condition of decreased body protein and fat mass, is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a potent predictor of mortality in this population. In adults with CKD, PEW has typically been defined on the basis of (1) deranged biochemical parameters, (2) reduced body mass, (3) reduced muscle mass, and (4) decreased dietary protein intake. Emerging data suggest that PEW may also commonly afflict children with CKD and have a negative impact on growth and development ("uremic failure to thrive"), yet it remains comparatively understudied and less well characterized in these patients. Given the challenges of applying adult-defined PEW criteria to the pediatric population, the authors of a recent study entitled "Protein energy wasting in children with chronic kidney disease" [Abraham et al. (2014) Pediatr Nephrol 29:1231-1238] have sought to develop a scoring system and three alterative definitions for this condition using a combination of biochemical markers, clinical measurements, and subjective reporting in children in the CKiD cohort: (1) minimal PEW definition (≥2 adult-defined PEW criteria); (2) standard PEW definition (≥3 adult-defined PEW criteria); (3) modified PEW definition (≥3 adult-defined PEW criteria, plus short stature or poor growth). These authors observed that meeting the modified PEW definition was associated with a significantly increased risk of hospitalization in unadjusted analyses, i.e., a 2.2-fold higher risk, and trended towards increased risk in multivariable adjusted analyses, i.e., 2.0-fold higher risk. At the present time, future studies validating these findings and developing further refined definitions and/or scoring systems for the detection and management of PEW in children and uremic failure to thrive are urgently needed.

  5. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  6. [Isotopic kidney investigations in staghorn lithiasis in the adult (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gaussin, G; Oliveux, A; Scheiben, C; Bollack, C

    1980-01-01

    The authors report a study of 37 kidneys in 30 patients with staghorn calculi undergoing isotopic investigation of renal function by sequential scintigraphy and isotopic nephrogram by gamma-camera. 7 of the patients had bilateral staghorn calculi. Tracers used: Hippuran labelled with I131 and DPTA labelled with Technetium 99 m. 62% of kidneys poorly tolerated their staghorn calculus as shown by severe impairment of the isotopic nephrogram involving the uptake phase. Amongst the 20 cases of unilateral lithiasis, a nephrectomy was performed whenever the functional value was less than 20% normal (7 kidneys). Twelve stones were removed with conservation of the kidney. It should be noted that with renal function greater than 70% normal, the thickness of the renal parenchyma as assessed by IVU is never less by more than 1/2 cm that of the contralateral kidney. In the group, 11 patients underwent postoperative urography and scintigraphy with a mean follow up of 4 years. All extractions of calculi by pyelotomy with or without a small nephrotomy benefited initially impaired kidneys. By contrast, in 5 kidneys where a large nephrotomy was made, there was a gain in function in only one. 1 remained stationary and the others lost respectively 20, 30 and 100% of their function. Correlation was good with other methods of split renal function studies (IVU and renal arteriography). Of essential importance is the fact that the irradiation associated with these isotopic investigations is 20 to 50 times less than that of IVU. Isotopic investigation is thus a good method for the assessment of changes in renal function after surgery for staghorn calculus.

  7. Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Mateevici, Cristina; Lin, Belinda; Chandra, Ronil V; Chong, Victor H T

    2015-11-01

    Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection.

  8. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  9. Validation of an LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of mycophenolic acid in human kidney transplant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Md Dom, Zaipul I; Noll, Benjamin D; Coller, Janet K; Somogyi, Andrew A; Russ, Graeme R; Hesselink, Dennis A; van Gelder, Teun; Sallustio, Benedetta C

    2014-01-15

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) has a low therapeutic index and large inter-individual pharmacokinetic variability necessitating therapeutic drug monitoring to individualise dosing after transplantation. There is an ongoing discrepancy as to whether plasma MPA concentrations sufficiently predict kidney rejection or toxicity and whether immunosuppressant concentrations within the graft tissue may better predict transplant outcomes. The aim of the study was to develop an LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of MPA concentrations in human kidney biopsies taken as part of routine clinical procedures. A total of 4 surplus human kidney biopsies obtained from 4 different kidney transplant recipients were available to use for this study. MPA was also quantified in 2 kidney samples from rats administered MPA to assess tissue extraction reproducibility. Human kidney biopsies and rat kidneys were homogenised mechanically and underwent liquid-liquid extraction before analysis by LC-MS/MS. MPA-free human kidney tissue was used in calibrators and quality control samples. Analyte detection was achieved from multiple reaction monitoring of the ammonium adducts of both MPA (m/z 321.1→207.3) and N-phthaloyl-l-phenylalanine (PPA, internal standard, m/z 296.2→250.2) using positive electrospray ionisation. The method was linear (calibration curves R(2)>0.99, n=10), precise, and accurate with coefficients of variation and bias less than 15%. Extraction efficiencies for MPA and PPA were approximately 97% and 86%, respectively, and matrix effects were minimal. In 4 kidney transplant recipients, tissue MPA concentrations ranged from 1.3 to 7.7ng/mg of tissue, however, the correlation between blood (C0) and tissue MPA concentrations could not be established. The method was successfully applied to the quantification of MPA in human kidney biopsies without the need to alter current clinical protocols.

  10. PTH-receptors regulate norepinephrine release in human heart and kidney.

    PubMed

    Potthoff, S A; Janus, A; Hoch, H; Frahnert, M; Tossios, P; Reber, D; Giessing, M; Klein, H M; Schwertfeger, E; Quack, I; Rump, L C; Vonend, O

    2011-11-10

    Recent data suggests that chronic renal failure and hyperparathyroidism are associated with sympathetic overactivity. Since peptide hormones are known to modulate norepinephrine (NE) release by activating prejunctional receptors, this study investigates whether parathyroid hormone fragment (1-34) (hPTH(1-34)) increases neuronal NE release in human heart and kidney. Using specific PTH-receptor agonists and antagonists, this study furthermore highlights functional differences between PTH1 and PTH2 receptors. Human atrial and renal tissues were incubated with [(3)H]-NE and superfused. Three electrical stimulations (5Hz, 1min) induced a stable [(3)H]-NE release which was taken as an index of endogenous NE release. RT-PCR with specific primers for PTH1- and PTH2-receptor was performed in heart and kidney. hPTH(1-34) (0.01-0.1μmol/L) and a stable analog of its second messenger cAMP (8-bromo-cAMP) increased [(3)H]-NE release in human atria. This facilitatory effect of PTH was also observed in human renal cortex. The PTH1-receptor antagonist (D-Trp(12), Tyr(34))-pTH-(7-34) (0.5μmol/L) abolished the effect of hPTH(1-34). This data was verified using isolated perfused mouse kidneys. Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP-39) (0.1nmol/L-0.1μmol/L) decreased [(3)H]-NE release in atria. PTH1- and PTH2-receptor expressions were demonstrated in human heart and kidney. Moreover, a splice variant of the PTH2-receptor was detected in human kidney. In conclusion, PTH is able to facilitate NE release in human atria and renal cortex by activation of PTH1-receptors. The highly increased PTH levels that can be observed in chronic renal failure might be one contributor for the elevated sympathetic nerve activity and the associated cardiovascular mortality in patients with end stage renal disease.

  11. Nutrient requirements and other factors involved in the culture of human kidney cells on microcarrier beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1987-01-01

    The culture of human kidney cells on microcarrier beads in the Bioprocessing Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center is described. These were the first series of studies performed before and during 1983 to determine optimum conditions, including medium type, bead type and density. The composition of several medium types and the molecular weights of some common culture medium supplements and cellular proteins are included. The microgravity cell-to-bead attachment experiment performed on Space Transportation System Flight 8 is described.

  12. Electrophoretic mobilities of cultured human embryonic kidney cells in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Data on the electrophoretic mobility distributions of cells in the new D-1 buffer and the interlaboratory standardization of urokinase assay methods are presented. A table of cell strains and recent data on cell dispersal methods are also included. It was decided that glycerol in A-1 electrophoretic mobility data on cultured human embryonic kidney cells subjected to electrophoresis in this buffer. The buffer composition is presented.

  13. Summary electrophoretic data base on human embryonic kidney cell strain 8514

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Arquiza, M. V.; Morrison, D. R.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    To properly plan the electrophoresis equipment verification test (EEVT) and continuous flow electrophoresis system (CFES) experiments with human embryonic kidney cells, first a candidate cell lot had to be chosen on the basis of electrophoretic heterogeneity, growth potential, cytogenetics, and urokinase production. Cell lot 8514 from MA Bioproducts, Inc. was chosen for this purpose, and several essential analytical electrophoresis experiments were performed to test its final suitability for these experiments.

  14. Oxidative stress-induced epigenetic changes associated with malignant transformation of human kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mahalingaiah, Prathap Kumar S; Ponnusamy, Logeswari; Singh, Kamaleshwar P

    2016-09-17

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) in humans is positively influenced by oxidative stress status in kidneys. We recently reported that adaptive response to low level of chronic oxidative stress induces malignant transformation of immortalized human renal tubular epithelial cells. Epigenetic alterations in human RCC are well documented, but its role in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of kidney cells is not known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the potential role of epigenetic changes in chronic oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of HK-2, human renal tubular epithelial cells. The results revealed aberrant expression of epigenetic regulatory genes involved in DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3a and MBD4) and histone modifications (HDAC1, HMT1 and HAT1) in HK-2 cells malignantly transformed by chronic oxidative stress. Additionally, both in vitro soft agar assay and in vivo nude mice study showing decreased tumorigenic potential of malignantly transformed HK-2 cells following treatment with DNA de-methylating agent 5-aza 2' dC further confirmed the crucial role of DNA hypermethyaltion in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation. Changes observed in global histone H3 acetylation (H3K9, H3K18, H3K27 and H3K14) and decrease in phospho-H2AX (Ser139) also suggest potential role of histone modifications in increased survival and malignant transformation of HK-2 cells by oxidative stress. In summary, the results of this study suggest that epigenetic reprogramming induced by low levels of oxidative stress act as driver for malignant transformation of kidney epithelial cells. Findings of this study are highly relevant in potential clinical application of epigenetic-based therapeutics for treatments of kidney cancers.

  15. Human Heredity and Health (H3) in Africa Kidney Disease Research Network: A Focus on Methods in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Osafo, Charlotte; Raji, Yemi Raheem; Burke, David; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tiffin, Nicki; Moxey-Mims, Marva M; Rasooly, Rebekah S; Kimmel, Paul L; Ojo, Akinlolu; Adu, Dwomoa; Parekh, Rulan S

    2015-12-07

    CKD affects an estimated 14% of adults in sub-Saharan Africa, but very little research has been done on the cause, progression, and prevention of CKD there. As part of the Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) Consortium, the H3Africa Kidney Disease Research Network was established to study prevalent forms of kidney disease in sub-Saharan Africa and increase the capacity for genetics and genomics research. The study is performing comprehensive phenotypic characterization and analyzing environmental and genetic factors from nine clinical centers in four African countries (Ghana, Nigeria, Ethiopia, and Kenya) over a 5-year period. Approximately 4000 participants with specified kidney disease diagnoses and 4000 control participants will be enrolled in the four African countries. In addition, approximately 50 families with hereditary glomerular disease will be enrolled. The study includes both pediatric and adult participants age <1 to 74 years across a broad spectrum of kidney diseases secondary to hypertension-attributed nephropathy, diabetes, HIV infection, sickle cell disease, biopsy-proven glomerular disease, and CKD of unknown origin. Clinical and demographic data with biospecimens are collected to assess clinical, biochemical, and genetic markers of kidney disease. As of March 2015, a total of 3499 patients and controls have been recruited and 1897 had complete entry data for analysis. Slightly more than half (50.2%) of the cohort is female. Initial quality control of clinical data collection and of biosample and DNA analysis is satisfactory, demonstrating that a clinical research infrastructure can be successfully established in Africa. This study will provide clinical, biochemical, and genotypic data that will greatly increase the understanding of CKD in sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Human Heredity and Health (H3) in Africa Kidney Disease Research Network: A Focus on Methods in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Osafo, Charlotte; Raji, Yemi Raheem; Burke, David; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tiffin, Nicki; Moxey-Mims, Marva M.; Rasooly, Rebekah S.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Parekh, Rulan S.

    2015-01-01

    CKD affects an estimated 14% of adults in sub-Saharan Africa, but very little research has been done on the cause, progression, and prevention of CKD there. As part of the Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) Consortium, the H3Africa Kidney Disease Research Network was established to study prevalent forms of kidney disease in sub-Saharan Africa and increase the capacity for genetics and genomics research. The study is performing comprehensive phenotypic characterization and analyzing environmental and genetic factors from nine clinical centers in four African countries (Ghana, Nigeria, Ethiopia, and Kenya) over a 5-year period. Approximately 4000 participants with specified kidney disease diagnoses and 4000 control participants will be enrolled in the four African countries. In addition, approximately 50 families with hereditary glomerular disease will be enrolled. The study includes both pediatric and adult participants age <1 to 74 years across a broad spectrum of kidney diseases secondary to hypertension-attributed nephropathy, diabetes, HIV infection, sickle cell disease, biopsy-proven glomerular disease, and CKD of unknown origin. Clinical and demographic data with biospecimens are collected to assess clinical, biochemical, and genetic markers of kidney disease. As of March 2015, a total of 3499 patients and controls have been recruited and 1897 had complete entry data for analysis. Slightly more than half (50.2%) of the cohort is female. Initial quality control of clinical data collection and of biosample and DNA analysis is satisfactory, demonstrating that a clinical research infrastructure can be successfully established in Africa. This study will provide clinical, biochemical, and genotypic data that will greatly increase the understanding of CKD in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26138261

  17. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2015-12-25

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy.

  18. Characterization of a thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human kidney and other tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, A.; Seino, S.; Sakurai, A.; Szilak, I.; Bell, G.I.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1988-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a specific form of thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human liver, kidney, placenta, and brain was isolated from a human kidney library. Identical clones were found in human placenta and HepG2 cDNA libraries. The cDNA encodes a 490-amino acid protein. When expressed and translated in vitro, the protein products binds triiodothyronine with K/sub a/ of 2.3 /times/ 10/sup 9/ M/sup /minus/1/. This protein, designated human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 (hTR..cap alpha..2), has the same domain structure as other members of the v-erbA-related superfamily of receptor genes. It is similar to thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha.. described in chicken and rat and less similar to human thyroid hormone receptor type ..beta.. (formerly referred to as c-erbA..beta..) from placenta. However, it is distinguished from these receptors by an extension of the C-terminal hormone binding domain making it 80 amino acids longer than rat thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..1. Different sizes of mRNA found in liver and kidney suggest that there may be tissue-specific processing of the primary transcript of this gene. Identification of human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 indicates that two or more forms of thyroid hormone receptor exist in human tissues and may explain the normal variation in thyroid hormone responsiveness of various organs and the selective tissue abnormalities found in the thyroid hormone resistance syndromes.

  19. Adult human brain cell culture for neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Hannah M; Dragunow, Mike

    2010-06-01

    Studies of the brain have progressed enormously through the use of in vivo and in vitro non-human models. However, it is unlikely such studies alone will unravel the complexities of the human brain and so far no neuroprotective treatment developed in animals has worked in humans. In this review we discuss the use of adult human brain cell culture methods in brain research to unravel the biology of the normal and diseased human brain. The advantages of using adult human brain cells as tools to study human brain function from both historical and future perspectives are discussed. In particular, studies using dissociated cultures of adult human microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons are described and the applications of these types of study are evaluated. Alternative sources of human brain cells such as adult neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and slice cultures of adult human brain tissue are also reviewed. These adult human brain cell culture methods could benefit basic research and more importantly, facilitate the translation of basic neuroscience research to the clinic for the treatment of brain disorders.

  20. Wandering Spleen in an Adult Man Associated With the Horseshoe Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Memari, Mohammadreza; Nikzad, Mohsen; Nikzad, Hossein; Taherian, Aliakbar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A wandering spleen occurs when there is a laxity of the ligaments that fix the spleen in its normal anatomical position. Case Presentation This is a case report of a wandering spleen with horseshoe kidney in a 29-year-old male admitted with acute lower abdominal pain and vomiting to emergency department of Shariati hospital in Isfahan province. Sonographic examination showed a homogeneous 21 × 15 × 8 cm mass in the lower part of the abdomen and pelvis associated with a horseshoe kidney. Laparotomy confirmed the clinical and ultrasound findings. Conclusions The association of horseshoe kidney with a wandering spleen in this case may be due to an embryological anomaly. PMID:24693523

  1. Determination of Chemical Compositions on Adult Kidney Stones—A Spectroscopic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, K.; Rakkappan, C.

    2008-11-01

    The chemical compositions of the kidney stones of both the sexes of patients, aged from 40 to 70, living in and around Chidambaram town are determined by using FT-IR and X-RD technique. The kidney stone samples used in the present study were procured from the Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital, Annamalai University. The FT-IR spectra of different kidney stone samples were recorded in the range of 4000-400 cm-1. By identifying the characteristic frequency, the chemical compositions of the samples are determined. The results analyzed by FTIR technique were confirmed by X-RD method, in which the recorded X-ray diffractogram are compared with JCPDS files using search match method. Further analysis of XRD pattern also reveals the same.

  2. The dynamics of adult neurogenesis in human hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ihunwo, Amadi O.; Tembo, Lackson H.; Dzamalala, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of adult neurogenesis is now an accepted occurrence in mammals and also in humans. At least two discrete places house stem cells for generation of neurons in adult brain. These are olfactory system and the hippocampus. In animals, newly generated neurons have been directly or indirectly demonstrated to generate a significant amount of new neurons to have a functional role. However, the data in humans on the extent of this process is still scanty and such as difficult to comprehend its functional role in humans. This paper explores the available data on as extent of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in humans and makes comparison to animal data. PMID:28197172

  3. Human papilloma virus infection in female kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ghazizadeh, Shirin; Lessan-Pezeshki, Mahboob; Nahayati, Mohamad Ali

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of genital human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and cervical intra-epithelial lesions in transplanted patients. Cervical Papanicolaou (Pap) smear/HPV test and colposcopic examinations were performed in 58 patients who were candidates for renal transplant surgery; these tests were repeated one year later. Their age range was 26-53 years (mean, 37.2 years). Hypertension was the most common cause of renal insufficiency (34.4%), while in 41.4% of the patients, the causative pathology was unknown. In 24.1% of the patients, there was no history of dialysis, i.e. they had pre-emptive transplantation. The mean duration of marriage (years since first intercourse) was 16.2 years (range, 1-35). Coitus interruptus was the most common contraceptive method used (37.9%), followed by tubal ligation and condom (10.3% and 6.9%, respectively). All patients had negative Pap tests and normal gynecologic exam before undergoing transplantation. The Pap test remained normal after transplant surgery, although the HPV test became positive in four patients (6.9%). There were five cases of white epithelium on colposcopy, but biopsy showed normal metaplasia. Two cases of extensive anogenital warts were treated by CO 2 laser, and one patient had recurrent warts, which responded well to second laser surgery. None of the study patients had squamous intra-epithelial lesions (SIL) or vulvar intra-epithelial neoplasia. Our study suggests that screening with HPV and Pap test should be performed before transplant surgery and should be repeated at regular intervals in order to avoid irreversible situations such as high-grade SILs, which are difficult to treat. Avoiding high-risk sexual relations in this group of patients is highly recommended.

  4. Maternal nutrient restriction during early fetal kidney development attenuates the renal innate inflammatory response in obese young adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Don; Gardner, David S; Symonds, Michael E; Budge, Helen

    2009-11-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for developing chronic kidney disease. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), interleukin (IL)-18, and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) are important components of the innate immune system mediating inflammatory renal damage. Early to midgestation maternal nutrient restriction appears to protect the kidney from the deleterious effects of early onset obesity, although the mechanisms remain unclear. We examined the combined effects of gestational maternal nutrient restriction during early fetal kidney development and early onset obesity on the renal innate immune response in offspring. Pregnant sheep were randomly assigned to a normal (control, 100%) or nutrient-restricted (NR, 50%) diet from days 30 to 80 gestation and 100% thereafter. Offspring were killed humanely at 7 days or, following rearing in an obesogenic environment, at 1 yr of age, and renal tissues were collected. IL-18 and TLR4 expression were strongly correlated irrespective of intervention. Seven-day NR offspring had significantly lower relative renal mass and IL-18 mRNA expression. At 1 yr of age, obesity resulted in increased mRNA abundance of TLR4, IL-18, and UCP2, coupled with tubular atrophy and greater immunohistological staining of glomerular IL-6 and medullary tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. NR obese offspring had a marked reduction of TLR4 abundance and renal IL-6 staining. In conclusion, maternal nutrient restriction during early fetal kidney development attenuates the effects of early onset obesity-related nephropathy, in part, through the downregulation of the innate inflammatory response. A better understanding of maternal nutrition and the in utero nutritional environment may offer therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing the burden of later kidney disease.

  5. Expression of human oxoguanine glycosylase 1 or formamidopyrimidine glycosylase in human embryonic kidney 293 cells exacerbates methylmercury toxicity in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ondovcik, Stephanie L.; Preston, Thomas J.; McCallum, Gordon P.; Wells, Peter G.

    2013-08-15

    Exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) acutely at high levels, or via chronic low-level dietary exposure from daily fish consumption, can lead to adverse neurological effects in both the adult and developing conceptus. To determine the impact of variable DNA repair capacity, and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidatively damaged DNA in the mechanism of toxicity, transgenic human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells that stably express either human oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOgg1) or its bacterial homolog, formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg), which primarily repair the oxidative lesion 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), were used to assess the in vitro effects of MeHg. Western blotting confirmed the expression of hOgg1 or Fpg in both the nuclear and mitochondrial compartments of their respective cell lines. Following acute (1–2 h) incubations with 0–10 μM MeHg, concentration-dependent decreases in clonogenic survival and cell growth accompanied concentration-dependent increases in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, ROS formation, 8-oxodG levels and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, consistent with the onset of cytotoxicity. Paradoxically, hOgg1- and Fpg-expressing HEK 293 cells were more sensitive than wild-type cells stably transfected with the empty vector control to MeHg across all cellular and biochemical parameters, exhibiting reduced clonogenic survival and cell growth, and increased LDH release and DNA damage. Accordingly, upregulation of specific components of the base excision repair (BER) pathway may prove deleterious potentially due to the absence of compensatory enhancement of downstream processes to repair toxic intermediary abasic sites. Thus, interindividual variability in DNA repair activity may constitute an important risk factor for environmentally-initiated, oxidatively damaged DNA and its pathological consequences. - Highlights: • hOgg1 and Fpg repair oxidatively damaged DNA. • hOgg1- and Fpg-expressing cells are more

  6. Soluble Fn14 Is Detected and Elevated in Mouse and Human Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Campanholle, Gabriela; Nagiec, Eva E.; Wang, Ju; Syed, Jameel; O’Neil, Shawn P.; Zhan, Yutian; Brenneman, Karrie; Homer, Bruce; Neubert, Hendrik; Karim, Riyez; Pullen, Nick; Evans, Steven M.; Fleming, Margaret; Chockalingam, Priya; Lin, Lih-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine TWEAK and its cognate receptor Fn14 are members of the TNF/TNFR superfamily and are upregulated in tissue injury to mediate local tissue responses including inflammation and tissue remodeling. We found that in various models of kidney disease, Fn14 expression (mRNA and protein) is upregulated in the kidney. These models include: lupus nephritis mouse models (Nephrotoxic serum Transfer Nephritis and MRL.Faslpr/lpr), acute kidney injury models (Ischemia reperfusion injury and Folic acid injury), and a ZSF-1 diabetic nephropathy rat model. Fn14 expression levels correlate with disease severity as measured by disease histology. We have also shown for the first time the detection of soluble Fn14 (sFn14) in the urine and serum of mice. Importantly, we found the sFn14 levels are markedly increased in the diseased mice and are correlated with disease biomarkers including proteinuria and MCP-1. We have also detected sFn14 in human plasma and urine. Moreover, sFn14 levels, in urine are significantly increased in DN patients and correlated with proteinuria and MCP-1 levels. Thus our data not only confirm the up-regulation of Fn14/TWEAK pathway in kidney diseases, but also suggest a novel mechanism for its regulation by the generation of sFn14. The correlation of sFn14 levels and disease severity suggest that sFn14 may serve as a potential biomarker for both acute and chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27171494

  7. Natural Scaffolds for Renal Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Kidney Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Batchelder, Cynthia A; Martinez, Michele L; Tarantal, Alice F

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enthusiasm for bioengineering of functional renal tissues for transplantation, many obstacles remain before the potential of this technology can be realized in a clinical setting. Viable tissue engineering strategies for the kidney require identification of the necessary cell populations, efficient scaffolds, and the 3D culture conditions to develop and support the unique architecture and physiological function of this vital organ. Our studies have previously demonstrated that decellularized sections of rhesus monkey kidneys of all age groups provide a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) with sufficient structural properties with spatial and organizational influences on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) migration and differentiation. To further explore the use of decellularized natural kidney scaffolds for renal tissue engineering, pluripotent hESC were seeded in whole- or on sections of kidney ECM and cell migration and phenotype compared with the established differentiation assays for hESC. Results of qPCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated upregulation of renal lineage markers when hESC were cultured in decellularized scaffolds without cytokine or growth factor stimulation, suggesting a role for the ECM in directing renal lineage differentiation. hESC were also differentiated with growth factors and compared when seeded on renal ECM or a new biologically inert polysaccharide scaffold for further maturation. Renal lineage markers were progressively upregulated over time on both scaffolds and hESC were shown to express signature genes of renal progenitor, proximal tubule, endothelial, and collecting duct populations. These findings suggest that natural scaffolds enhance expression of renal lineage markers particularly when compared to embryoid body culture. The results of these studies show the capabilities of a novel polysaccharide scaffold to aid in defining a protocol for renal progenitor differentiation from hESC, and advance the promise

  8. Nano-silicon dioxide toxicological characterization on two human kidney cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paget, V.; Sergent, J. A.; Chevillard, S.

    2011-07-01

    Silicon dioxide nanoparticles (n-SiO2) have recently encountered a wide variety of applications in medicine or engineering but their toxicological effects are poorly understood. In this study, we have used SiO2-25 nm and SiO2-100 nm mono-dispersed nanoparticles labeled with Rhodamine B and TMPyP respectively. These two fluorophores were incorporated during synthesis in order to track nanoparticles cell incorporation. Up-to-date, no evaluation of the toxicological effects of these nanoparticles upon human kidney has been published. As kidney is one of the major traditional retention organs, the aim of our study is to evaluate the potential toxicity of these nanoparticles on two human cell lines from proximal tubule (Caki-1 and Hek293). Our results report that the two cell lines do not show similar responses after 24 hours of exposure to SiO2-nanoparticles disregarding a similar origin in the kidney. Interestingly, our results indicate that for both tested SiO2-nanoparticles, Caki-1 cells present a higher sensitivity in terms of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than Hek293 cells. Furthermore, our results show that for similar concentration of exposure, SiO2-25 nm seems to be more cytotoxic and genotoxic than SiO2-100nm for both tested cell lines.

  9. Adult Human Neurogenesis: From Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases. PMID:21519376

  10. Adult human neurogenesis: from microscopy to magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases.

  11. FastStats: Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Kidney Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... the U.S. Morbidity Number of adults with diagnosed kidney disease: 4.9 million Percent of adults with diagnosed ...

  12. Expression of MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene and its protein in normal human kidney.

    PubMed

    Ernest, S; Rajaraman, S; Megyesi, J; Bello-Reuss, E N

    1997-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp), the product of the multidrug resistance (MDR) gene overexpressed in cancer cells, is present also in normal tissues. In the kidney, MDR1 Pgp has been found in the proximal tubule and in cultured mesangial cells. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the complete nephronal localization of MDR mRNA and its product, Pgp, in the human kidney. MDR mRNA expression was studied with the use of nonradioactive in situ MDR RNA probes. MDR1 Pgp was immunolocalized using the specific monoclonal antibody MRK16. The presence of MDR mRNA was confirmed in proximal tubules and mesangium, and demonstrated as well in thick limb of Henle's loops and in collecting ducts. MDR1 Pgp colocalized in the same nephronal segments. This suggests that, in addition to secreting xenobiotics, Pgp may play a role in the transport of endogenous substrates or in the regulation of Cl- channels.

  13. Human kidney cell reprogramming: applications for disease modeling and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Adam C; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-09-01

    The ability to reprogram fully differentiated cells into a pluripotent embryonic state, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), has been met with great excitement. iPSC technology has advanced the fundamental study of disease modeling with the potential for cell-replacement therapy, especially in the neuronal and cardiac fields. However, renal medicine as of yet has not benefited from similar advancements. This review summarizes the unique characteristics of iPSCs and their potential applications for modeling kidney disease. Pioneering such endeavors could yield constructs that recapitulate disease phenotypes, open avenues for more targeted drug development, and potentially serve as replenishable sources for replacement of kidney cells in the setting of human disease.

  14. Human apolipoprotein B transgenic SHR/NDmcr-cp rats show exacerbated kidney dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Asahina, Makoto; Shimizu, Fumi; Ohta, Masayuki; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Nephropathy frequently co-occurs with metabolic syndrome in humans. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic diseases including obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, and some previous studies revealed that dyslipidemia contributes to the progression of kidney dysfunction. To establish a new nephropathy model with metabolic syndrome, we produced human apolipoprotein B (apoB) transgenic (Tg.) SHR/NDmcr-cp (SHR-cp/cp) rats, in which dyslipidemia is exacerbated more than in an established metabolic syndrome model, SHR-cp/cp rats. Human apoB Tg. SHR-cp/cp rats showed obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hypertension, and severe hyperlipidemia. They also exhibited exacerbated early-onset proteinuria, accompanied by increased kidney injury and increased oxidative and inflammatory markers. Histological analyses revealed the characteristic features of human apoB Tg. SHR-cp/cp rats including prominent glomerulosclerosis with lipid accumulation. Our newly established human apoB Tg. SHR-cp/cp rat could be a useful model for the nephropathy in metabolic syndrome and for understanding the interaction between dyslipidemia and renal dysfunction in metabolic syndrome.

  15. Surgical illustration of en-bloc (dual) kidney transplant from a 16-month old brain-dead donor to an adult recipient.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vikas; Jain, Saurabh; Singhal, Paras; Nayak, Suman Lata; Mathur, Rajendra P

    2017-01-01

    Transplantable organs from pediatric donors have been contributing significantly to donor pool worldwide. Pediatric donors are excellent resources that should be procured whenever available, and with the recent increase in deceased donations in India, more pediatric donors will be available for organ harvesting. We share a rare instance of multi-organ harvesting from a 16-month old brain dead donor and implanting both kidneys en-bloc in an adult male, while liver went to a 4-year old child. The report provides the surgical illustration of salient steps of transplanting both kidneys from pediatric donor into an adult, in an en-bloc manner.

  16. Surgical illustration of en-bloc (dual) kidney transplant from a 16-month old brain-dead donor to an adult recipient

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vikas; Jain, Saurabh; Singhal, Paras; Nayak, Suman Lata; Mathur, Rajendra P.

    2017-01-01

    Transplantable organs from pediatric donors have been contributing significantly to donor pool worldwide. Pediatric donors are excellent resources that should be procured whenever available, and with the recent increase in deceased donations in India, more pediatric donors will be available for organ harvesting. We share a rare instance of multi-organ harvesting from a 16-month old brain dead donor and implanting both kidneys en-bloc in an adult male, while liver went to a 4-year old child. The report provides the surgical illustration of salient steps of transplanting both kidneys from pediatric donor into an adult, in an en-bloc manner. PMID:28197039

  17. EXPRESSION OF CYP4F2 IN HUMAN LIVER AND KIDNEY: ASSESSMENT USING TARGETED PEPTIDE ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Vandana; Yarovoy, Anton; Kozeska, Anita; Magnusson, Ronald P.; Lasker, Jerome M.

    2008-01-01

    P450 enzymes comprising the human CYP4F gene subfamily are catalysts of eicosanoid (e.g., 20-HETE and leukotriene B4) formation and degradation, although the role that individual CYP4F proteins play in these metabolic processes is not well defined. Thus, we developed antibodies to assess the tissue-specific expression and function of CYP4F2, one of four CYP4F P450s found in human liver and kidney. Peptide antibodies elicited in rabbits to CYP4F2 amino acid residues 61–74 (WGHQGMVNPTEEG) and 65–77 (GMVNPTEEGMRVL) recognized on immunoblots only CYP4F2 and not CYP4F3b, CYP4F11 or CYP4F12. Immunoquantitation with anti-CYP4F2 peptide IgG showed highly-variable CYP4F2 expression in liver (16.4 ± 18.6 pmol/mg microsomal protein; n = 29) and kidney cortex (3.9 ± 3.8 pmol/mg; n = 10), with two subjects lacking the hepatic or renal enzyme entirely. CYP4F2 content in liver microsomes was significantly correlated (r ≥ 0.63; p < 0.05) with leukotriene B4 and arachidonate ω-hydroxylase activities, which are both CYP4F2-catalyzed. Our study provides the first example of a peptide antibody that recognizes a single CYP4F P450 expressed in human liver and kidney, namely CYP4F2. Immunoquantitation and correlation analyses performed with this antibody suggest that CYP4F2 functions as a predominant LTB4 and arachidonate ω-hydroxylase in human liver. PMID:18662666

  18. A beta 1-integrin receptor for fibronectin in human kidney glomeruli.

    PubMed Central

    Kerjaschki, D.; Ojha, P. P.; Susani, M.; Horvat, R.; Binder, S.; Hovorka, A.; Hillemanns, P.; Pytela, R.

    1989-01-01

    The fibronectin receptor (FNR) is a transmembrane heterodimeric glycoprotein which shares a common beta 1-chain with several other members of the integrin family of adhesion receptors. The authors have prepared a membrane fraction of isolated human glomeruli, from which two proteins (apparent molecular weights 120 kd and 140 kd) bound to a fibronectin-column, and were selectively released by the synthetic peptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser. These molecules were labeled in immune overlays by an antibody raised against the FNR from human placenta that recognizes both the FNR-specific a-chain and the group-specific beta 1-integrin chain. In sections of normal human kidneys this antibody labeled predominately the mesangia and the peripheral capillary walls of glomeruli by an immunoperoxidase procedure. Quantitative immunoelectron microscopy, using an indirect immunogold procedure, revealed a preferential localization along the cell membranes of mesangial, epithelial, and endothelial cells that face the mesangial matrix or the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). In kidney biopsies from patients with various glomerular diseases (membranous and other forms of glomerulonephritis, minimal change disease) the distribution was similar to that in normal glomeruli. These findings indicate that a beta 1-integrin-related FNR is present in normal and diseased human glomeruli. Images Figure 1-4 Figure 5 Figure 6-10 Figure 11-16 PMID:2521774

  19. Social support of adults and elderly with chronic kidney disease on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Simone Márcia; Braido, Natalia Fernanda; Ottaviani, Ana Carolina; Gesualdo, Gabriela Dutra; Zazzetta, Marisa Silvana; Orlandi, Fabiana de Souza

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the instrumental and emotional social support of patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis. Method: descriptive cross-sectional study. The sample was sized for convenience and included 103 participants under treatment in a Renal Replacement Therapy Unit. Data were collected through individual interviews, using the Social Support Scale. Results: the mean scores of the emotional and instrumental social support were 3.92 (± 0.78) and 3.81 (± 0.69) respectively, an indication of good support received. The most frequent sources of instrumental and emotional social support mentioned by participants were partners, spouse, companion or boyfriend and friends. Conclusion: patients with chronic kidney disease have high social support, both instrumental and emotional, and the main support comes from the family. PMID:27508920

  20. Developing Resourceful Humans. Adult Education within the Economic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynn Elen, Ed.

    This book, which explores the shifting paradigm from human resource development to developing resourceful humans, establishes the historical position of adult education within the economic context, discusses human capital propositions, and examines the learning dimensions of economic and educational change. The following chapters are included:…

  1. Elemental imaging of kidneys of adult rats exposed to uranium acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma-Takeda, S.; Terada, Y.; Nakata, A.; Sahoo, S. K.; Yoshida, S.; Ueno, S.; Inoue, M.; Iso, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Konishi, T.; Imaseki, H.; Shimada, Y.

    2009-06-01

    Concern about the toxicity of depleted uranium for military use has increased recently. Renal toxicity is the hallmark effect of uranium exposure. However, the dynamics and distribution of uranium in the kidney are not well understood. Here, we determined the precise distribution of uranium and essential elements in the rat kidney using microbeam scanning particle-induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) and synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). Uranium accumulation in the rat kidney reached a maximum at 1 day after the subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of 2 mg U/kg of uranium acetate and then gradually decreased. At 3 h after administration, uranium was distributed mainly in the proximal tubules of the inner zone of the cortex and in the outer stripe of the outer medulla, and absorbed by the proximal tubule epithelium. Iron was localized more in the inside of the outer medulla than uranium, while phosphorus, potassium, sulfur and zinc were equally distributed in the cortex and the outer stripe of the outer medulla. At 3 days after administration, the number of apoptotic cells increased and cells were lost from the proximal tubules. Uranium was detectable mainly in the outer stripe of the outer medulla at 15 days, suggesting that the renal distribution of uranium is site-selective and causes site-specific renal lesions.

  2. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  3. Etoposide induced cytotoxicity mediated by ROS and ERK in human kidney proximal tubule cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeon-Jun; Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2016-01-01

    Etoposide (ETO) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug that inhibits topoisomerase II activity, thereby leading to genotoxicity and cytotoxicity. However, ETO has limited application due to its side effects on normal organs, especially the kidney. Here, we report the mechanism of ETO-induced cytotoxicity progression in human kidney proximal tubule (HK-2) cells. Our results show that ETO perpetuates DNA damage, activates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and triggers morphological changes, such as cell and nuclear swelling. When NAC, a well-known reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, is co-treated with ETO, it inhibits an ETO-induced increase in mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial DNA (ND1 and ND4) copy number, intracellular ATP level, and mitochondrial biogenesis activators (TFAM, PGC-1α and PGC-1β). Moreover, co-treatment with ETO and NAC inhibits ETO-induced necrosis and cell swelling, but not apoptosis. Studies using MAPK inhibitors reveal that inhibition of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) protects ETO-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting DNA damage and caspase 3/7 activity. Eventually, ERK inhibitor treated cells are protected from ETO-induced nuclear envelope (NE) rupture and DNA leakage through inhibition of caspase activity. Taken together, these data suggest that ETO mediates cytotoxicity in HK-2 cells through ROS and ERK pathways, which highlight the preventive avenues in ETO-induced cytotoxicity in kidney. PMID:27666530

  4. Human Polyomavirus Receptor Distribution in Brain Parenchyma Contrasts with Receptor Distribution in Kidney and Choroid Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Sheila A.; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Brittingham, Frances L.P.; Henriksen, Kammi J.; Stopa, Edward G.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    The human polyomavirus, JCPyV, is the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, a rare demyelinating disease that occurs in the setting of prolonged immunosuppression. After initial asymptomatic infection, the virus establishes lifelong persistence in the kidney and possibly other extraneural sites. In rare instances, the virus traffics to the central nervous system, where oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and glial precursors are susceptible to lytic infection, resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The mechanisms by which the virus traffics to the central nervous system from peripheral sites remain unknown. Lactoseries tetrasaccharide c (LSTc), a pentasaccharide containing a terminal α2,6–linked sialic acid, is the major attachment receptor for polyomavirus. In addition to LSTc, type 2 serotonin receptors are required for facilitating virus entry into susceptible cells. We studied the distribution of virus receptors in kidney and brain using lectins, antibodies, and labeled virus. The distribution of LSTc, serotonin receptors, and virus binding sites overlapped in kidney and in the choroid plexus. In brain parenchyma, serotonin receptors were expressed on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, but these cells were negative for LSTc and did not bind virus. LSTc was instead found on microglia and vascular endothelium, to which virus bound abundantly. Receptor distribution was not changed in the brains of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Virus infection of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes during disease progression is LSTc independent. PMID:26056932

  5. Effects of peptides cleaved from human fibrinogen by plasmin on rabbit kidney cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Stachurska, J.; Janik, M.; Kobus, M.; Luczak, M.; Szmigielski, S.; Roszkowski, M.; Gerdin, B.; Saldeen, T.; Kopec, M.

    1983-02-15

    Low molecular weight fibrinogen degradation products (LMW-FDP) containing a mixture of dialysable peptides cleaved from human fibrinogen by plasmin are cytotoxic to an established line of rabbit kidney cells and to primary cultures of rabbit kidney cells. The presence of LMW-FDP in a concentration of 50 micrograms/ml during the cell cultivation caused a considerable release of /sup 51/Cr from prelabelled cells and inhibited /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 86/Rb uptake. Among three isolated peptides of established primary structure only one, 6D: Ser-Gln-Leu-Gln-Lys-Val-Pro-Pro-Glu-Trp-Lys, induced a significant effect, i.e. it enhanced /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. Two others, 6A: Ala-Arg-Pro-Ala-Lys and 6E: Thr-Ser-Glu-Val-Lys, did not influence the examined parameters. Hence other components of LMW-FDP must be assumed to be responsible for the cytotoxic effect on kidney cell cultures.

  6. Human polyomavirus receptor distribution in brain parenchyma contrasts with receptor distribution in kidney and choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Haley, Sheila A; O'Hara, Bethany A; Nelson, Christian D S; Brittingham, Frances L P; Henriksen, Kammi J; Stopa, Edward G; Atwood, Walter J

    2015-08-01

    The human polyomavirus, JCPyV, is the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, a rare demyelinating disease that occurs in the setting of prolonged immunosuppression. After initial asymptomatic infection, the virus establishes lifelong persistence in the kidney and possibly other extraneural sites. In rare instances, the virus traffics to the central nervous system, where oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and glial precursors are susceptible to lytic infection, resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The mechanisms by which the virus traffics to the central nervous system from peripheral sites remain unknown. Lactoseries tetrasaccharide c (LSTc), a pentasaccharide containing a terminal α2,6-linked sialic acid, is the major attachment receptor for polyomavirus. In addition to LSTc, type 2 serotonin receptors are required for facilitating virus entry into susceptible cells. We studied the distribution of virus receptors in kidney and brain using lectins, antibodies, and labeled virus. The distribution of LSTc, serotonin receptors, and virus binding sites overlapped in kidney and in the choroid plexus. In brain parenchyma, serotonin receptors were expressed on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, but these cells were negative for LSTc and did not bind virus. LSTc was instead found on microglia and vascular endothelium, to which virus bound abundantly. Receptor distribution was not changed in the brains of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Virus infection of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes during disease progression is LSTc independent.

  7. Precocious obesity predisposes the development of more severe cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury in young adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Rosemara S.; Passos, Clevia S.; Novaes, Antônio S.; Maquigussa, Edgar; Glória, Maria A.; Visoná, Iria; Ykuta, Olinda; Oyama, Lila M.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and its consequences can damage the kidney over time. However, less is known about the impact of developing overweight/obesity during childhood on the kidney in adulthood and the renal impact of a superimposed acute kidney injury (AKI). This study evaluated the effect of obesity induced by a high-fat diet initiated soon after weaning on the adult life of mice and their response to superimposed nephrotoxic effects of cisplatin. C57BL/6 post-weaning mice (3 weeks old) were divided into a control group (CT, n = 12) and a high-fat diet group (HF, n = 12). After 9 weeks, animals were further divided into the following groups: CT, CT treated with a single dose of cisplatin (CTCis, 20 mg/kg, i.p.), HF and HF treated with cisplatin (HFCis). The HF group exhibited higher body weight gain compatible with a moderate obesity. Obese mice presented increased visceral adiposity, hyperkalemia, sodium retention, glomerular hyperfiltration and proteinuria, without any significant changes in blood pressure and glycemia. AKI induced by cisplatin was exacerbated in obese animals with a 92% reduction in the GFR versus a 31% decrease in the CTCis group; this sharp decline resulted in severely elevated serum creatinine and urea levels. Acute tubular necrosis induced by cisplatin was worsened in obese mice. The HFCis group exhibited robust systemic and intrarenal inflammation that was significantly higher than that in the CTCis group; the HFCis group also showed a higher degree of renal oxidative stress. In conclusion, the moderate degree of obesity induced shortly after weaning resulted in mild early renal alterations, however, obese young animals were prone to develop a much more severe AKI induced by cisplatin. PMID:28358868

  8. Bridging translation for acute kidney injury with better preclinical modeling of human disease.

    PubMed

    Skrypnyk, Nataliya I; Siskind, Leah J; Faubel, Sarah; de Caestecker, Mark P

    2016-05-15

    The current lack of effective therapeutics for patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) represents an important and unmet medical need. Given the importance of the clinical problem, it is time for us to take a few steps back and reexamine current practices. The focus of this review is to explore the extent to which failure of therapeutic translation from animal studies to human studies stems from deficiencies in the preclinical models of AKI. We will evaluate whether the preclinical models of AKI that are commonly used recapitulate the known pathophysiologies of AKI that are being modeled in humans, focusing on four common scenarios that are studied in clinical therapeutic intervention trials: cardiac surgery-induced AKI; contrast-induced AKI; cisplatin-induced AKI; and sepsis associated AKI. Based on our observations, we have identified a number of common limitations in current preclinical modeling of AKI that could be addressed. In the long term, we suggest that progress in developing better preclinical models of AKI will depend on developing a better understanding of human AKI. To this this end, we suggest that there is a need to develop greater in-depth molecular analyses of kidney biopsy tissues coupled with improved clinical and molecular classification of patients with AKI.

  9. PKHD1 Sequence Variations in 78 Children and Adults with Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease and Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gunay-Aygun, Meral; Tuchman, Maya; Font-Montgomery, Esperanza; Lukose, Linda; Edwards, Hailey; Garcia, Angelica; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Ziegler, Shira G.; Piwnica-Worms, Katie; Bryant, Joy; Bernardini, Isa; Fischer, Roxanne; Huizing, Marjan; Guay-Woodford, Lisa; Gahl, William A.

    2009-01-01

    PKHD1, the gene mutated in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD)/Congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF), is an exceptionally large and complicated gene that consists of 86 exons and has a number of alternatively spliced transcripts. Its longest open reading frame contains 67 exons that encode a 4074 amino acid protein called fibrocystin or polyductin. The phenotypes caused by PKHD1 mutations are similarly complicated, ranging from perinatally-fatal PKD to CHF presenting in adulthood with mild kidney disease. To date, more than 300 mutations have been described throughout PKHD1. Most reported cohorts include a large proportion of perinatal-onset ARPKD patients; mutation detection rates vary between 42% and 87%. Here we report PKHD1 sequencing results on 78 ARPKD/CHF patients from 68 families. Differing from previous investigations, our study required survival beyond 6 months and included many adults with a CHF-predominant phenotype. We identified 77 PKHD1 variants (41 novel) including 19 truncating, 55 missense, 2 splice, and 1 small in-frame deletion. Using computer-based prediction tools (GVGD, PolyPhen, SNAP), we achieved a mutation detection rate of 79%, ranging from 63% in the CHF-predominant group to 82% in the remaining families. Prediction of the pathogenicity of missense variants will remain challenging until a functional assay is available. In the meantime, use of PKHD1 sequencing data for clinical decisions requires caution, especially when only novel or rare missense variants are identified. PMID:19914852

  10. Molecular markers of trichloroethylene-induced toxicity in human kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lash, Lawrence H. . E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu; Putt, David A.; Hueni, Sarah E.; Horwitz, Beth P.

    2005-08-07

    Difficulties in evaluation of trichloroethylene (TRI)-induced toxicity in humans and extrapolation of data from laboratory animals to humans are due to the existence of multiple target organs, multiple metabolic pathways, sex-, species-, and strain-dependent differences in both metabolism and susceptibility to toxicity, and the lack or minimal amount of human data for many target organs. The use of human tissue for mechanistic studies is thus distinctly advantageous. The kidneys are one target organ for TRI and metabolism by the glutathione (GSH) conjugation pathway is responsible for nephrotoxicity. The GSH conjugate is processed further to produce the cysteine conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), which is the penultimate nephrotoxic species. Confluent, primary cultures of human proximal tubular (hPT) cells were used as the model system. Although cells in log-phase growth, which are undergoing more rapid DNA synthesis, would give lower LD{sub 50} values, confluent cells more closely mimic the in vivo proximal tubule. DCVC caused cellular necrosis only at relatively high doses (>100 {mu}M) and long incubation times (>24 h). In contrast, both apoptosis and enhanced cellular proliferation occurred at relatively low doses (10-100 {mu}M) and early incubation times (2-8 h). These responses were associated with prominent changes in expression of several proteins that regulate apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, Apaf-1, Caspase-9 cleavage, PARP cleavage) and cellular growth, differentiation and stress response (p53, Hsp27, NF-{kappa}B). Effects on p53 and Hsp27 implicate function of protein kinase C, the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway, and the cytoskeleton. The precise pattern of expression of these and other proteins can thus serve as molecular markers for TRI exposure and effect in human kidney.

  11. Hydrolysis potential of recombinant human skin and kidney prolidase against diisopropylfluorophosphate and sarin by in vitro analysis.

    PubMed

    Costante, Michael; Biggemann, Lionel; Alamneh, Yonas; Soojhawon, Iswarduth; Short, Radley; Nigam, Savita; Garcia, Gregory; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2012-02-01

    Human prolidase (PROL), which has structural homology to bacterial organophosphate acid anhydrolase that hydrolyze organophosphates and nerve agents has been proposed recently as a potential catalytic bioscavenger. To develop PROL as a catalytic bioscavenger, we evaluated the in vitro hydrolysis efficiency of purified recombinant human PROL against organophosphates and nerve agents. Human liver PROL was purified by chromatographic procedures, whereas recombinant human skin and kidney PROL was expressed in Trichoplusia ni larvae, affinity purified and analyzed by gel electrophoresis. The catalytic efficiency of PROL against diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and nerve agents was evaluated by acetylcholinesterase back-titration assay. Partially purified human liver PROL hydrolyzed DFP and various nerve agents, which was abolished by specific PROL inhibitor showing the specificity of hydrolysis. Both the recombinant human skin and kidney PROL expressed in T. ni larvae showed ∼99% purity and efficiently hydrolyzed DFP and sarin. In contrast to human liver PROL, both skin and kidney PROL showed significantly low hydrolyzing potential against nerve agents soman, tabun and VX. In conclusion, compared to human liver PROL, recombinant human skin and kidney PROL hydrolyze only DFP and sarin showing the substrate specificity of PROL from various tissue sources.

  12. HANAC Syndrome Col4a1 Mutation Causes Neonate Glomerular Hyperpermeability and Adult Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyong; Migeon, Tiffany; Verpont, Marie-Christine; Zaidan, Mohamad; Sado, Yoshikazu; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Ronco, Pierre; Plaisier, Emmanuelle

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary angiopathy, nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps (HANAC) syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in COL4A1 that encodes the α1 chain of collagen IV, a major component of basement membranes. Patients present with cerebral small vessel disease, retinal tortuosity, muscle cramps, and kidney disease consisting of multiple renal cysts, chronic kidney failure, and sometimes hematuria. Mutations producing HANAC syndrome localize within the integrin binding site containing CB3[IV] fragment of the COL4A1 protein. To investigate the pathophysiology of HANAC syndrome, we generated mice harboring the Col4a1 p.Gly498Val mutation identified in a family with the syndrome. Col4a1 G498V mutation resulted in delayed glomerulogenesis and podocyte differentiation without reduction of nephron number, causing albuminuria and hematuria in newborns. The glomerular defects resolved within the first month, but glomerular cysts developed in 3-month-old mutant mice. Abnormal structure of Bowman's capsule was associated with metalloproteinase induction and activation of the glomerular parietal epithelial cells that abnormally expressed CD44,α-SMA, ILK, and DDR1. Inflammatory infiltrates were observed around glomeruli and arterioles. Homozygous Col4a1 G498V mutant mice additionally showed dysmorphic papillae and urinary concentration defects. These results reveal a developmental role for the α1α1α2 collagen IV molecule in the embryonic glomerular basement membrane, affecting podocyte differentiation. The observed association between molecular alteration of the collagenous network in Bowman's capsule of the mature kidney and activation of parietal epithelial cells, matrix remodeling, and inflammation may account for glomerular cyst development and CKD in patients with COL4A1-related disorders.

  13. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  14. Kidney injury biomarkers and urinary creatinine variability in nominally healthy adults

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental exposure diagnostics use creatinine concentrations in urine aliquots as the internal standard for dilution normalization of all other excreted metabolites when urinary excretion rate data are not available. This is a reasonable approach for healthy adults as creati...

  15. Comparative Efficacy and Safety of Antihypertensive Agents for Adult Diabetic Patients with Microalbuminuric Kidney Disease: A Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongzhong; Feng, Yuxing; Wang, Ying; Qin, Xiaoxia; Melgiri, Narayan Dhruvaraj; Sun, Yang; Li, Xingsheng

    2017-01-01

    Background Antihypertensive treatment mitigates the progression of chronic kidney disease. Here, we comparatively assessed the effects of antihypertensive agents in normotensive and hypertensive diabetic patients with microalbuminuric kidney disease. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing oral antihypertensive agents in adult diabetic patients with microalbuminuria. The primary efficacy outcome was reduction in albuminuria, and the primary safety outcomes were dry cough, presyncope, and edema. Random-effects pairwise and Bayesian network meta-analyses were performed to produce outcome estimates for all RCTs, only hypertensive RCTs, or only normotensive RCTs. Surface under the cumulative ranking (SUCRA) probability rankings were calculated for all outcomes. Sensitivity analyses on type 2 diabetes status, age, or follow-up duration were also performed. Results A total of 38 RCTs were included in the meta-analyses. The angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-calcium channel blocker (ACEI-CCB) combination therapy of captopril+diltiazem was most efficacious in reducing albuminuria irrespective of blood pressure status. However, the ACEI-angiotensin receptor blocker (ACEI-ARB) combination therapy of trandolapril+candesartan was the most efficacious in reducing albuminuria for normotensive patients, while the ACEI-CCB combination therapy of fosinopril+amlodipine was the most efficacious in reducing albuminuria for hypertensive patients. The foregoing combination therapies displayed inferior safety profiles relative to ACEI monotherapy with respect to dry cough, presyncope, and edema. With respect to type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria, the Chinese herbal medicine Tangshen formula followed by the ACEI ramipril were the most efficacious in reducing albuminuria. Conclusions Trandolapril+candesartan appears to be the most efficacious intervention

  16. Short-term effects of the DASH diet in adults with moderate chronic kidney disease: a pilot feeding study

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Crystal C.; Lin, Pao-Hwa; Corsino, Leonor; Batch, Bryan C.; Allen, Jenifer; Sapp, Shelly; Barnhart, Huiman; Nwankwo, Chinazo; Burroughs, Jasmine; Svetkey, Laura P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet lowers blood pressure (BP) for adults with normal kidney function, evidence is lacking regarding its safety and efficacy in chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to test the effects of the DASH diet on serum electrolytes and BP in adults with moderate CKD. Methods In a prospective before–after feeding study, 11 adults with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 30–59 mL/min/1.73 m2 and medication-treated hypertension were provided a reduced-sodium, run-in diet for 1 week followed by a reduced-sodium, DASH diet for 2 weeks. Changes in serum electrolytes and BP were compared pre–post DASH. Results Eleven participants underwent feeding; 1 completed 1 week and 10 completed 2 weeks of DASH. Compared with baseline, DASH modestly increased serum potassium at 1 week (mean ± standard deviation, +0.28 ± 0.4 mg/dL; P = 0.043) but had no significant effect on potassium at 2 weeks (+0.15 ± 0.28 mg/dL; P = 0.13). Serum bicarbonate was reduced (−2.5 ± 3.0 mg/dL; P = 0.03) at 2 weeks. Neither incident hyperkalemia nor new onset metabolic acidosis was observed. Clinic BP and mean 24-h ambulatory BP was unchanged. DASH significantly reduced mean nighttime BP (−5.3 ± 5.8 mmHg; P = 0.018), and enhanced percent declines in both nocturnal systolic BP (−2.1% to −5.1%; P = 0.004) and diastolic BP (−3.7% to −10.0%; P = 0.008). Conclusions These pilot data suggest that a reduced-sodium DASH dietary pattern does not cause acute metabolic events in adults with moderate CKD and may improve nocturnal BP. Definitive studies are needed to determine long-term effects of DASH in CKD. PMID:27478603

  17. Study of rat kidney transamidinase structure and regulation with monoclonal antibodies and the purification and characterization of human kidney transamidinase

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of monoclonal antibodies to transamidinase made possible the development of an immunosorbent inhibition assay for transamidinase protein using a /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibody. This assay is a more direct measurement of transamidinase protein than the determination of the amount of polyclonal antibody required to precipitate the transamidinase activities. Rats were fed diets supplemented with creatine and/or glycine, and the amounts of transamidinase protein were determined with the assay using the monoclonal antibody. The transamidinase activities of kidneys from the rats fed the various supplemented diets ranged from 10 to 40% of the control values, whereas, the amounts of transamidinase protein were, in all instances no lower than 66% of the control values. Purified homogeneous rat kidney transamidinase and rat kidney supernatants were subjected to isoelectric focussing and four to five fractions of the enzyme were obtained. Polyclonal antibodies, but not the monoclonal antibodies were found by Western blotting experiments to recognize all the forms of the enzyme obtained by the isoelectric focussing. The author concluded that the monoclonal antibodies recognized forms of the enzyme that changed very little in amount, relative to the alterations in enzyme activities, when rats were fed a diet containing creatine.

  18. A novel splice variant of human gene NPL, mainly expressed in human liver, kidney and peripheral blood leukocyte.

    PubMed

    Wu, Maoqing; Gu, Shaohua; Xu, Jian; Zou, Xianqiong; Zheng, Huarui; Jin, Zhe; Xie, Yi; Ji, Chaoneng; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    From the human fetal brain cDNA library constructed by our lab, a novel variant cDNA of a human gene was successfully cloned and identified. Because the gene has been named N-acetylneuraminate pyruvate lyase (NPL), accordingly we term our splice variant NPL_v2. The cDNA of NPL_v2 has a full-length open reading frame (ORF) from the nucleotide position 320 to 1225 that encodes a protein comprising 301 amino acids. SMART analysis showed that our hypothetical protein has one dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) domain. Phosphorylation analysis of the deduced protein show that there are five phosphorylation sites including three "serine" and two "threonine" at the region that are not found in other splice variant. RT-PCR experiment revealed that our splice variant of the gene is mainly expressed in human placenta, liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen, thymus, ovary, small intestine and peripheral blood leukocyte.

  19. Proteomic evaluation of biologic nanoparticles isolated from human kidney stones and calcified arteries

    PubMed Central

    Shiekh, Farooq A.; Charlesworth, Jon E.; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Hunter, Larry W.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Miller, Virginia M.; Lieske, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Calcifying biologic nanoparticles (NPs) develop under cell culture conditions from homogenates of diverse tissue samples displaying extraosseous mineralization, including kidney stones and calcified aneurysms. Probes to definitively identify NPs in biologic systems are lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to begin to establish a proteomic biosignature of NPs in order to facilitate more definitive investigation of their contribution to disease. Biologic NPs derived from human kidney stones and calcified aneurysms were completely decalcified by overnight treatment with EDTA or brief incubation in HCl, as evidenced by lack of a calcium shell and of Alizarin Red S staining, by transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, respectively. Decalcified NPs contained numerous proteins including some from bovine serum and others of prokaryotic origin. Most prominent of the latter group was EF-Tu, which appeared identical to EF-Tu from S. epidermidis. A monoclonal antibody against human EF-Tu recognized a protein in Western blots of total NP lysate, as well as in intact NPs by immunofluorescence and immunogold EM. Approximately 8% of NPs were quantitatively recognized by the antibody by flow cytometry. Therefore, we have defined methods to reproducibly decalcify biologic NPs, and identified key components of their proteome. These elements, including EF-Tu, can be used as biomarkers to further define processes which mediate propagation of biologic NPs and their contribution to disease. PMID:20466084

  20. Proteomic evaluation of biological nanoparticles isolated from human kidney stones and calcified arteries.

    PubMed

    Shiekh, Farooq A; Charlesworth, Jon E; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Hunter, Larry W; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Miller, Virginia M; Lieske, John C

    2010-10-01

    Calcifying biological nanoparticles (NPs) develop under cell culture conditions from homogenates of diverse tissue samples displaying extraosseous mineralization, including kidney stones and calcified aneurysms. Probes to definitively identify NPs in biological systems are lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to begin to establish a proteomic biosignature of NPs in order to facilitate more definitive investigation of their contribution to disease. Biological NPs derived from human kidney stones and calcified aneurysms were completely decalcified by overnight treatment with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or brief incubation in HCl, as evidenced by lack of a calcium shell and of Alizarin Red S staining, by transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, respectively. Decalcified NPs contained numerous proteins, including some from bovine serum and others of prokaryotic origin. Most prominent of the latter group was EF-Tu, which appeared to be identical to EF-Tu from Staphylococcus epidermidis. A monoclonal antibody against human EF-Tu recognized a protein in Western blots of total NP lysate, as well as in intact NPs by immunofluorescence and immunogold EM. Approximately 8% of NPs were quantitatively recognized by the antibody using flow cytometry. Therefore, we have defined methods to reproducibly decalcify biological NPs, and identified key components of their proteome. These elements, including EF-Tu, can be used as biomarkers to further define the processes that mediate propagation of biological NPs and their contribution to disease.

  1. Efficiency of isolation of human rotavirus in primary African green monkey kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Aboudy, Y; Shif, I; Silberstein, I; Gotlieb-Stematsky, T

    1989-09-01

    Out of 212 human rotavirus (HRV) containing fecal specimens, 173 (81.6%) yielded virus on first passage in primary African Green monkey kidney cells (AGMK), while additional 34 specimens, did not yield virus on first passage. However, following blind passages, 18 of the 34 yielded virus in passage levels 2-8, thus raising the overall isolation rate to 90.1%. The isolation rate of HRV strains obtained in embryonic Rhesus monkey kidney cell line (MA-104), was only 41.4%. ELISA tests performed on fluids from infected cell cultures proved to be an efficient tool to measure virus replication. No differences were encountered in the isolation rates between subgroup I and II strains, while viruses lacking the antigenic determinants of both subgroups did not grow at all. However, one of those unusual group A strains was isolated and grew well in AGMK cells. Primary AGMK and MA-104 cells supported the growth of tissue culture adapted virus most efficiently when compared with six human and primate cell types.

  2. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease across levels of glycemia among adults in Pudong New Area, Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Few population-based studies have examined the relationship between glycemic status and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in China. We examined the prevalence of CKD across categories of glycemia [diagnosed diabetes, undiagnosed diabetes (fasting plasma glucose [FPG] ≥ 126 mg/dL), prediabetes (FPG 100–126 mg/dL) and normal glycemia (FPG <100 mg/dL)] among Chinese adults and assessed the relative contribution of dysglycemia (prediabetes and/or diabetes) to the burden of CKD. Methods 5,584 Chinese adults aged 20–79 years were selected from the Pudong New Area of Shanghai through a multistage random sampling. Demographic and lifestyle characteristics, anthropometry and blood pressure were measured. Biochemical assays included FPG, serum creatinine and lipids, urinary creatinine and albumin. Prevalence of albuminuria [urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) ≥ 30 mg/g], decreased kidney function and CKD (either decreased kidney function or albuminuria) across levels of glycemia were estimated. Results The prevalence of albuminuria, decreased kidney function and CKD each increased with higher glycemic levels (P < 0.001). Based on the MDRD Study equation, the unadjusted CKD prevalence was 30.9%, 28.5%, 14.1% and 9.2% in those with diagnosed diabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, prediabetes and normoglycemia, respectively. The corresponding age-, gender- and hypertension-adjusted CKD prevalence were 25.8%, 25.0%, 12.3% and 9.1%, respectively. In a multivariable analysis, the factors associated with CKD were hypertension (Odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42-2.03), dysglycemia (OR 1.65, 95% CI: 1.39-1.95), female gender (OR 1.48, 95% CI: 1.25-1.75), higher triglycerides (OR 1.14, 95% CI: 1.08-1.20 per mmol/L), higher body mass index (OR 1.08, 95% CI: 1.05-1.10 per kg/m2), and older age (OR 1.02, 95% CI: 1.01 -1.03 per year). The population attributable risks (PARs) associated with diabetes, prediabetes, dysglycemia (diabetes and

  3. Humanities and the Adult Learner in an Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Dale; Kamholtz, Jonathan

    Humanities courses have often been given little attention in continuing education for adults, possibly because they have been viewed as not "practical" or not "job-oriented" enough in our career-oriented, technologically advanced society. However, the humanities should be an integral part of our culture and of the lives of…

  4. ADAM10 is expressed in human podocytes and found in urinary vesicles of patients with glomerular kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The importance of the Notch signaling in the development of glomerular diseases has been recently described. Therefore we analyzed in podocytes the expression and activity of ADAM10, one important component of the Notch signaling complex. Methods By Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analysis we characterized the expression of ADAM10 in human podocytes, human urine and human renal tissue. Results We present evidence, that differentiated human podocytes possessed increased amounts of mature ADAM10 and released elevated levels of L1 adhesion molecule, one well known substrate of ADAM10. By using specific siRNA and metalloproteinase inhibitors we demonstrate that ADAM10 is involved in the cleavage of L1 in human podocytes. Injury of podocytes enhanced the ADAM10 mediated cleavage of L1. In addition, we detected ADAM10 in urinary podocytes from patients with kidney diseases and in tissue sections of normal human kidney. Finally, we found elevated levels of ADAM10 in urinary vesicles of patients with glomerular kidney diseases. Conclusions The activity of ADAM10 in human podocytes may play an important role in the development of glomerular kidney diseases. PMID:20070888

  5. Predictive value of serum cystatin C for acute kidney injury in adults: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort trials

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Zhenzhu; Pei, Xiaohua; Zhu, Bei; Yuan, Haichuan; Zhao, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    The role of serum cystatin C (Scys) for the detection of acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been fully discussed. This meta-analysis was aimed to investigate the overall diagnostic accuracy of Scys for AKI in adults, and further identify factors affecting its performance. Studies before Sept. 2016 were retrieved from PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library. A total of 30 prospective cohort studies (involving 4247 adults from 15 countries, 982 patients occurring AKI) were included. The revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy (QUADAS-2) tools demonstrated no significant bias had influenced the methodological quality of the included studies. Scys showed a high predictive power for all-cause AKI, that the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.89. The detailed assessment parameters, such as sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio and diagnostic odds ratio for Scys were 0.82, 0.82, 4.6, 0.22 and 21, respectively. Although Scys could be slightly influenced by the following factors: settings, AKI diagnostic criteria, ethnicity, determination method, age and gender, these factors above did not reach statistically significance. In conclusion, Scys could be a vital promising marker to screen out AKI. PMID:28112204

  6. Solitary Kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... How They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Solitary Kidney What is a solitary kidney? When a person has only one kidney or ... ureter are removed (bottom right). What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  7. En Bloc Cadaver Kidney Transplantation From a 9-Month-Old Donor to an Adult Recipient: Maturation of Glomerular Size and Podocyte in the Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Hirukawa, Takashi; Suzuki, Hajime; Niimura, Fumio; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Kakuta, Takatoshi

    2017-01-01

    Background Favorable outcomes of en bloc pediatric donor kidney transplantation to adult recipients are attributed primarily to grafting of twice the nephron mass of a single kidney. Methods The kidneys of a 9-month-old male infant were transplanted en bloc in a 56-year-old man. Biopsies were performed 1 hour postreperfusion, 6 months and 3.5 years posttransplant. Results Warm and cold ischemia times were 21 and 426 minutes, respectively. The recipient was released from hemodialysis 10 days posttransplant and discharged 91 days posttransplant when serum creatinine was 0.9 mg/dL. At 4 years and 9 months posttransplant, serum creatinine was 1.0 mg/dL, and estimated glomerular filtration rate was 58.0 mL/min per 1.73 m2. The grafts increased in size until they reached adult size by 3 months posttransplant. The glomerular area and volume, respectively, increased from 5.9 × 103 μm2 and 0.34 × 106 μm3 at 1 hour postreperfusion to 14.9 × 103 μm2 and 1.27 × 106 μm3 at 3.5 years posttransplant, both of which were less than half of adult size. At 1 hour postreperfusion, podocytes were structurally immature. At 6 months posttransplant, podocyte immaturity was still evident. At 3.5 years posttransplant, podocytes were mature. Conclusions These findings suggest that podocytes and glomerular size of pediatric donor kidneys can continue to mature in adult recipients at rates appropriate for donor age when transplanted en bloc. The maturational levels of podocytes and glomeruli may also be a factor involved in favorable outcomes of en bloc pediatric donor kidney transplantation. PMID:28361114

  8. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage phenotype and promote regeneration via homing to the kidney following ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Wise, Andrea F; Williams, Timothy M; Kiewiet, Mensiena B G; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-05-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate injury and accelerate repair in many organs, including the kidney, although the reparative mechanisms and interaction with macrophages have not been elucidated. This study investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and traced their homing patterns following administration to mice with ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury using whole body bioluminescence imaging. The effect of MSCs on macrophage phenotype following direct and indirect coculture was assessed using qPCR. Human cytokine production was measured using multiplex arrays. After IR, MSCs homed to injured kidneys where they afforded protection indicated by decreased proximal tubule kidney injury molecule-1 expression, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine levels. SDS-PAGE and immunofluorescence labeling revealed MSCs reduced collagen α1(I) and IV by day 7 post-IR. Gelatin zymography confirmed that MSC treatment significantly increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in IR kidneys, which contributed to a reduction in total collagen. Following direct and indirect coculture, macrophages expressed genes indicative of an anti-inflammatory "M2" phenotype. MSC-derived human GM-CSF, EGF, CXCL1, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, PDGF-AA, and CCL5 were identified in culture supernatants. In conclusion, MSCs home to injured kidneys and promote repair, which may be mediated by their ability to promote M2 macrophage polarization.

  9. Assessment of Plasma and NGAL for the Early Prediction of Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery in Adults Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI); Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD); End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD); Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR); Neutrophil Gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL); Serum Creatinine (SCr); Urine Creatinine (UCr); Urine Albumin (UAlb)

  10. Cognitive dysfunction and depression in adult kidney transplant recipients: baseline findings from the FAVORIT Ancillary Cognitive Trial (FACT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperhomocysteinemia and B-vitamin deficiency may be treatable risk factors for cognitive impairment and decline. Hyperhomocysteinemia, cognitive impairment and depression all are common in individuals with kidney disease, including kidney transplant recipient. Accordingly, we assessed the prevalenc...

  11. Human embryonic mesenchymal stem cell-derived conditioned medium rescues kidney function in rats with established chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    van Koppen, Arianne; Joles, Jaap A; van Balkom, Bas W M; Lim, Sai Kiang; de Kleijn, Dominique; Giles, Rachel H; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health care problem, affecting more than 35% of the elderly population worldwide. New interventions to slow or prevent disease progression are urgently needed. Beneficial effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been described, however it is unclear whether the MSCs themselves or their secretome is required. We hypothesized that MSC-derived conditioned medium (CM) reduces progression of CKD and studied functional and structural effects in a rat model of established CKD. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (SNX) combined with L-NNA and 6% NaCl diet in Lewis rats. Six weeks after SNX, CKD rats received either 50 µg CM or 50 µg non-CM (NCM) twice daily intravenously for four consecutive days. Six weeks after treatment CM administration was functionally effective: glomerular filtration rate (inulin clearance) and effective renal plasma flow (PAH clearance) were significantly higher in CM vs. NCM-treatment. Systolic blood pressure was lower in CM compared to NCM. Proteinuria tended to be lower after CM. Tubular and glomerular damage were reduced and more glomerular endothelial cells were found after CM. DNA damage repair was increased after CM. MSC-CM derived exosomes, tested in the same experimental setting, showed no protective effect on the kidney. In a rat model of established CKD, we demonstrated that administration of MSC-CM has a long-lasting therapeutic rescue function shown by decreased progression of CKD and reduced hypertension and glomerular injury.

  12. Flow cytometry of human embryonic kidney cells: A light scattering approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Goolsby, C. L.; Todd, P. W.; Morrison, D. R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The mammalian kidney contains cells that transport water, convert vitamin D to active forms, synthesize hormones such a renin and erythropoietin, and produce enzymes such as urokinase, a plasminogen activator. Several of these functions are maintained by human embryonic kidney cells (HEK) cultivated in vitro. Biochemical study of these functions in their individual cell types in vitro requires purified populations of cells. Light-scattering activated cell sorting (LACS) was explored as a means of achieving such purifications. It was found that HEK cells at the first 1 to 5 passages in culture were heterogeneous with respect to 2-parameter light scattering intensity distribution, in which combined measurements included forward angle scattering (2.5 to 19 deg), 90 deg scattering, and time-of-flight size measurements. Size was measured at a resolution of 0.15 microns/channel in 256 channels using pulse-height independent pulse-width measurements. Two-parameter distributions combining these measurements were obtained for HEK cell subpopulations that had been purified by microgravity electrophoresis and subsequently propagated in culture. These distributions contained at least 3 subpopulations in all purified fractions, and results of experiments with prepurified cultured HEK cells indicated that subpopulations of living cells that were high in plasminogen-activator activity also contained the highest per cent of cells with high 90 deg light scatter intensity.

  13. Rapid 3D human ribcage and kidney modeling for transcostal HIFU surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Rui; Gao, Jing; Melzer, Andreas; Nabi, Ghulam; Huang, Zhihong

    2012-11-01

    A rapid modeling technique for constructing human ribcage and kidney models for high intensity focused ultrasound through the ribcage is proposed and tested. In this study, a 3D model reconstructed from a patient's CT images provides solutions for the conversion of 3D image data into multi-part volumetric models of kidney and ribcage. The model was imported into PZFlex for simulation of acoustic field analysis. Tissue mimicking materials for the phantom were selected based on the acoustic characterisation result. The effect of the ribcage on HIFU sonication and acoustic pressure distribution were measured in the focal plane. Porcine ribcage sample was used in experiments for comparison. Results showed that with the presence of the ribcage phantom, the maximum temperature at the focus was reduced by approximately 60-70% and the maximum pressure at the focal zone was halved. Focus splitting with the ribcage in place was demonstrated both in experiments and simulations. The development of this model provides basis for using patient's data for transcostal HIFU research and maximise the efficiency of the HIFU surgery.

  14. Clinical Application of Human Urinary Extracellular Vesicles in Kidney and Urologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giuseppe; Sallustio, Fabio; Schena, Francesco Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been isolated in different body fluids, including urine. The cargo of urinary EVs is composed of nucleic acids and proteins reflecting the physiological and possibly pathophysiological state of cells lining the nephron and the urinary tract. Urinary EVs have been confirmed to contain low amounts of various types of RNA that play a role in intercellular communication by transferring genetic information. This communication through EV RNAs includes both continuation of normal physiological processes and conditioning in disease mechanisms. Although proteins included in urinary EVs represent only 3% of the whole-urine proteome, urinary EVs can influence cells in the renal epithelia not only by delivering RNA cargo, but also by delivering a wide range of proteins. Since urine is a readily available biofluid, the discovery of EVs has opened a new field of biomarker research. The potential use of urinary EV RNAs and proteins as diagnostic biomarkers for various kidney and urologic diseases is currently being explored. Here, we review recent studies that deal in identifying biomarker candidates for human kidney and urologic diseases using urinary EVs and might help to understand the pathophysiology. PMID:27376269

  15. Carvedilol exacerbate gentamicin-induced kidney mitochondrial alterations in adult rat.

    PubMed

    Félix, Luís; Oliveira, M M; Videira, Romeu; Maciel, Elisabete; Alves, Nuno D; Nunes, Fernando M; Alves, Anabela; Almeida, José M; Domingues, M Rosário M; Peixoto, Francisco P

    2017-02-01

    Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic widely used to treat many types of bacterial infections. Although its properties, his clinical use is limited due to the occurrence of nephrotoxicity, which has been related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Carvedilol, an antihypertensive drug with strong antioxidant properties, has been tested in order to prevent gentamicin nephrotoxicity. This study aimed to test this hypothesis using a rat model of gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Animals were treated subcutaneously with DMSO (control) (0.4%/kg/24h bw) for 11days; with carvedilol (2mg/kg/24h bw) for 11days; with gentamicin (60mg/kg/24h bw) for the last 8days and with carvedilol (2mg/kg/24h bw) for 11days and with gentamicin (60mg/kg/24h bw) for the last 8days. Estimations of urine creatinine, urine carboxylic acids, blood urea, serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate were carried out after the last administered dose of gentamicin. Mitochondria functionality was analyzed by monitoring its bioenergetics function and cardiolipin oxidized products were analyzed by ESI-MS. The kidneys were also examined for morphological changes. Gentamicin caused marked nephrotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction as evidenced by several mitochondrial parameters. Carvedilol did not induce significant changes while the co-treatment exacerbated the negative effect of gentamicin although maintaining ATP levels and membrane potential. Kidneys from gentamicin treated rats, with and without carvedilol, showed necrosis of tubular cells in renal cortex. Higher values on relative abundance of cardiolipin oxidation products identified as [M-2H](2-) ions, at m/z 771 were observed in the groups treated with gentamicin. The observed effects were associated to a possible interaction of carvedilol with F1F0-ATP synthase that merit further investigation. In conclusion, carvedilol may contribute to the exacerbation of renal dysfunction induced by gentamicin, at least in some physiological and

  16. Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal, not adult, β cells.

    PubMed

    Hrvatin, Sinisa; O'Donnell, Charles W; Deng, Francis; Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia Walton; DiIorio, Philip; Rezania, Alireza; Gifford, David K; Melton, Douglas A

    2014-02-25

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to generate any human cell type, and one widely recognized goal is to make pancreatic β cells. To this end, comparisons between differentiated cell types produced in vitro and their in vivo counterparts are essential to validate hPSC-derived cells. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of sorted insulin-expressing (INS(+)) cells derived from three independent hPSC lines, human fetal pancreata, and adult human islets points to two major conclusions: (i) Different hPSC lines produce highly similar INS(+) cells and (ii) hPSC-derived INS(+) (hPSC-INS(+)) cells more closely resemble human fetal β cells than adult β cells. This study provides a direct comparison of transcriptional programs between pure hPSC-INS(+) cells and true β cells and provides a catalog of genes whose manipulation may convert hPSC-INS(+) cells into functional β cells.

  17. Epididymis microlithiasis and semen abnormalities in young adult kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, G; Lunelli, L; Berlingheri, M; Groppali, E; Carmignani, L

    2013-10-01

    Microlithiasis of the epididymis is a rare ultrasound finding in the general population, but the incidence of calcifications in various organs of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is extremely high. The aim of this study was to describe epididymal microlithiasis in 22 previously dialysed patients who received kidney transplantations at a median age of 19 years (range 9-30). The patients underwent scrotum ultrasonography, semen analysis and laboratory tests (renal function, sexual hormones, Ca, P and PTH) and were administered the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire. Seventeen presented calcifications of the epididymis, two of whom had concomitant testicular calcifications; a further three patients had isolated testicular calcifications without epididymis involvement. It was not possible to investigate the fertility of all of the patients but 12 of the 13 whose semen was analysed showed abnormalities: five were azoospermic and seven oligospermic with various degrees of morphological anomalies. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first published data concerning the prevalence of epididymal calcifications in young dialysed patients undergoing renal transplantation. Epididymal microlithiasis and infertility were common findings and so performing a spermiogram and preserving semen before ESRD for future paternity may be good advice in this selected population.

  18. Double-Negative αβ T Cells Are Early Responders to AKI and Are Found in Human Kidney.

    PubMed

    Martina, Maria N; Noel, Sanjeev; Saxena, Ankit; Bandapalle, Samatha; Majithia, Richa; Jie, Chunfa; Arend, Lois J; Allaf, Mohamad E; Rabb, Hamid; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A

    2016-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of AKI, and previous studies established important roles for conventional CD4(+) T cells, natural killer T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in AKI pathogenesis. We recently identified CD4(-)CD8(-) (double-negative; DN) T cells as an important subset of αβ T cell receptor-positive cells residing in mouse kidney. However, little is known about the pathophysiologic functions of kidney DN T cells. In this study, we phenotypically and functionally characterized murine kidney DN T cells in the steady state and in response to IRI. Unlike CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, DN T cells in the steady state expressed high levels of CD69, CD28, and CD40L; differentially expressed IL-27 and IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokines; spontaneously proliferated at a very high rate; and suppressed in vitro proliferation of activated CD4(+) T cells. Within the first 3-24 hours after IRI, kidney DN T cells expanded significantly and upregulated expression of IL-10. In adoptive transfer experiments, DN T cells significantly protected recipients from AKI by an IL-10-dependent mechanism. DN T cells also made up a large fraction of the T cell compartment in human kidneys. Our results indicate that DN T cells are an important subset of the resident αβ(+) T cell population in the mammalian kidney and are early responders to AKI that have anti-inflammatory properties.

  19. Transgene-induced CCWGG methylation does not alter CG methylation patterning in human kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Taras; Kretzner, Leo; Munson, Kristofer; Axume, John; Clark, Jarrod; Dyachenko, Olga V; Caudill, Marie; Buryanov, Yaroslav; Smith, Steven S

    2005-01-01

    Several reports suggest that C(m)CWGG methylation tends not to co-exist with (m)CG methylation in human cells. We have asked whether or not methylation at CCWGG sites can influence CG methylation. DNA from cells expressing an M.EcoRII-GFP fusion was actively methylated at CCWGG sites. CG methylation as measured by R.HpaII/R.MspI ratios was unchanged in cells expressing the transgene. Cloned representatives of C(m)CWGG methylated DNA often contained, or were adjacent to an ALU repeat, suggesting that M.EcoRII-GFP actively methylated gene-rich R-band DNA. The transgenic methyltransferase applied C(m)CWGG methylation to a representative human promoter that was heavily methylated at CG dinucleotides (the SERPINB5 promoter) and to a representative promoter that was essentially unmethylated at CG dinucleotides (the APC promoter). In each case, the CG methylation pattern remained in its original state, unchanged by the presence of neighboring C(m)CWGG sites. Q-PCR measurements showed that RNA expression from the APC gene was not significantly altered by the presence of C(m)CWGG in its promoter. Kinetic studies suggested that an adjacent C(m)CWGG methylation site influences neither the maintenance nor the de novo methylation activities of purified human Dnmt1. We conclude that C(m)CWGG methylation does not exert a significant effect on CG methylation in human kidney cells.

  20. Metals in Human Gall, Bladder, and Kidney Stones Based on an Electron Microprobe Investigation.

    PubMed

    Moser, Reinhard; Zaccarini, Federica; Moser, Waltraud; Schrittwieser, Rudolf; Kerbl, Reinhold

    2015-10-01

    Several particles of copper accompanied by a few particles of nickel, lead, and a compound composed of selenium containing minor Ni, Si, Cu, and Co were found in human gall, kidney, and bladder stones. The investigated particles occur as tiny grains, <10 µm in size, that are irregularly dispersed in the stones. Therefore, they were studied by scanning electron microscopy and qualitatively analyzed by energy dispersive system. One grain of copper contained a small amount of Ni and Zn, and some grains of nickel proved to contain Cr as trace element. Most of the discovered metals formed a single-phase grain. However, a few grains found in two gallstones were associated with inclusions of calcium and apatite. Based on the results presented in this contribution, we argue that most of the studied metals can be classified as endogenous particles, i.e., directly precipitated from the same fluids that formed their host human stones. This observation suggests that the precipitation and accumulation of metals in some human stones can be considered an efficient way to eliminate them from the human body.

  1. Identification and quantitation of morphological cell types in electrophoretically separated human embryonic kidney cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, K. B.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Four major cell types were identified by phase microscopy in early passage human embryonic kidney cell cultures. They are small and large epithelioid, domed, and fenestrated cells. Fibroblasts are also present in some explants. The percent of each cell type changes with passage number as any given culture grows. As a general rule, the fraction of small epithelioid cells increases, while the fraction of fenestrated cells, always small, decreases further. When fibroblasts are present, they always increase in percentage of the total cell population. Electrophoretic separation of early passage cells showed that the domed cells have the highest electrophoretic mobility, fibroblasts have an intermediate high mobility, small epithelioid cells have a low mobility, broadly distributed, and fenestrated cells have the lowest mobility. All cell types were broadly distributed among electrophoretic subfractions, which were never pure but only enriched with respect to a given cell type.

  2. Further analyses of human kidney cell populations separated on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Robin M.; Todd, Paul; Cole, Kenneth D.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    Cultured human embryonic kidney cells were separated into electrophoretic subpopulations in laboratory experiments and in two separation experiments on the STS-8 (Challenger) Space Shuttle flight using the mid-deck Continuous Flow Electrophoretic Separator (CFES). Populations of cells from each fraction were cultured for the lifetime of the cells, and supernatant medium was withdrawn and replaced at 4-day intervals. Withdrawn medium was frozen at -120 C for subsequent analysis. Enzyme assays, antibodies and gel electrophoresis were used as analytical tools for the detection and quantization of plasminogen activators in these samples. These assays of frozen-culture supernatant fluids confirmed the electrophoretic separation of plasminogen-activator-producing cells from nonproducing cells, the isolation of cells capable of sustained production, and the separation of cells that produce different plasminogen activators from one other.

  3. Further analyses of human kidney cell populations separated on the space shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robin M.; Todd, Paul; Cole, Kenneth D.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    Cultured human embryonic kidney cells were separated into electrophoretic subpopulations in laboratory experiments and in two separation experiments on the STS-8 (Challenger) Space Shuttle flight using the mid-deck Continuous Flow Electrophoretic Separator (CFES). Populations of cells from each fraction were cultured for the lifetime of the cells, and supernatant medium was withdrawn and replaced at 4-day intervals. Withdrawn medium was frozen at -120°C for subsequent analysis. Enzyme assays, antibodies and gel electrophoresis were used as analytical tools for the detection and quantitation of plasminogen activators in these samples. These assays of frozen culture supernatant fluids confirmed the electrophoretic separation of plasminogen-activator producing cells from non-producing cells, the isolation of cells capable of sustained production, and the separation of cells that produce different plasminogen activators from one another.

  4. Amiloride-inhibited Na -H exchange in human kidney medulla microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, E.F.

    1986-08-01

    Membrane vesicles from the medulla of the human kidney are capable of amiloride-inhibited sodium-proton exchange. Sodium uptake into the vesicles in stimulated by low intravesicular pH (6.0) and inhibited by both low extravesicular pH (6.0) and amiloride (2 mM). Sodium uptake is a linear function of the vesicular protein concentration and can be reversed by raising the osmotic strength of the solution to shrink the vesicle or by adding the inophore nigericin. Acridine orange was accumulated by the vesicles in response to a pH gradient (pH 6.0, inside, 8.0 outside), and the accumulation of acridine orange could be reduced by increase extravesicular sodium. Thus sodium could stimulate proton movement just as protons could stimulate sodium movement across the vesicular membrane.

  5. Oct4 expression in adult human stem cells: evidence in support of the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tai, Mei-Hui; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Kiupel, Matti; Webster, Joshua D; Olson, L Karl; Trosko, James E

    2005-02-01

    The Oct3/4 gene, a POU family transcription factor, has been noted as being specifically expressed in embryonic stem cells and in tumor cells but not in cells of differentiated tissues. With the ability to isolate adult human stem cells it became possible to test for the expression of Oct3/4 gene in adult stem cells and to test the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis. Using antibodies and PCR primers we tested human breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, mesenchyme and gastric stem cells, the cancer cell lines HeLa and MCF-7 and human, dog and rat tumors for Oct4 expression. The results indicate that adult human stem cells, immortalized non-tumorigenic cells and tumor cells and cell lines, but not differentiated cells, express Oct4. Oct4 is expressed in a few cells found in the basal layer of human skin epidermis. The data demonstrate that adult stem cells maintain expression of Oct4, consistent with the stem cell hypothesis of carcinogenesis.

  6. Occurrence of malignancies after kidney transplantation in adults: Slovak multicenter experience.

    PubMed

    Zilinska, Z; Sersenova, M; Chrastina, M; Sr, J Breza; Bena, L; Baltesova, T; Jurcina, A; Roland, R; Lackova, E; Cellar, M; Laca, L; Dedinska, I

    2017-01-05

    Malignancies are one of the three major causes of renal recipient´s death with a functioning graft after cardiovascular diseases and infections. Among the variety of risk factors, including conventional and specific to transplant recipients, the duration of immunosuppressive therapy, the intensity of therapy, and the type of immunosuppressive agent all have an impact on development of post-transplant malignancy. The aim of our retrospective study was to document the incidence, the type of malignancies, the patient/graft survival in the group of kidney transplant recipients in Slovak Republic, and to identify the factors which influenced the outcome. We analyzed the data of 1421 patients who underwent renal transplantation from deceased or living donors in the period from 2007 to 2015 in the Slovak transplant centers. The incidence of malignant tumors was 6%, the malignancy was diagnosed in 85 patients at the age of 54.1 ± 9.8 years, more frequently in men (68.2 %; P < 0.0001). The mean time of malignancy occurrence was 45 months after transplantation. The most frequent malignancies were skin cancers- basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in 17.6%, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in 8.2%, and malignant melanoma (MM) in 2.4% of patients, followed by non-skin tumors such as renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in 16.5%, cancer of colon in 12.9%, prostatic cancer in 9.4%, breast cancer in 9.4%, cancer of lung in 7.1%, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in 2.4%, cancer of urine bladder in 2.4%, and cancer of sublingual gland in 1.17% of patients. Surgical treatment was used in 40% of patients, chemotherapy in 7.1%, radiotherapy in 2.4%, treatment with biological agents in 15.3%, combined therapy in 29.4% and palliative treatment in 5.9% of patients. 55.3% of patients underwent conversion from other immunosuppressive agents into mTORi at the time of malignancy occurrence. The remission was achieved in 48.2% of patients, 28.2% of patients were in the oncology treatment in the

  7. Effects of SGLT2 inhibition in human kidney proximal tubular cells--renoprotection in diabetic nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Panchapakesan, Usha; Pegg, Kate; Gross, Simon; Komala, Muralikrishna Gangadharan; Mudaliar, Harshini; Forbes, Josephine; Pollock, Carol; Mather, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are oral hypoglycemic agents used to treat patients with diabetes mellitus. SGLT2 inhibitors block reabsorption of filtered glucose by inhibiting SGLT2, the primary glucose transporter in the proximal tubular cell (PTC), leading to glycosuria and lowering of serum glucose. We examined the renoprotective effects of the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin to determine whether blocking glucose entry into the kidney PTCs reduced the inflammatory and fibrotic responses of the cell to high glucose. We used an in vitro model of human PTCs. HK2 cells (human kidney PTC line) were exposed to control 5 mM, high glucose (HG) 30 mM or the profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ1; 0.5 ng/ml) in the presence and absence of empagliflozin for up to 72 h. SGLT1 and 2 expression and various inflammatory/fibrotic markers were assessed. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was used to determine the binding of phosphorylated smad3 to the promoter region of the SGLT2 gene. Our data showed that TGFβ1 but not HG increased SGLT2 expression and this occurred via phosphorylated smad3. HG induced expression of Toll-like receptor-4, increased nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid binding for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein 1, induced collagen IV expression as well as interleukin-6 secretion all of which were attenuated with empagliflozin. Empagliflozin did not reduce high mobility group box protein 1 induced NF-κB suggesting that its effect is specifically related to a reduction in glycotoxicity. SGLT1 and GLUT2 expression was not significantly altered with HG or empagliflozin. In conclusion, empagliflozin reduces HG induced inflammatory and fibrotic markers by blocking glucose transport and did not induce a compensatory increase in SGLT1/GLUT2 expression. Although HG itself does not regulate SGLT2 expression in our model, TGFβ increases SGLT2 expression through phosphorylated smad3.

  8. Association between Noninvasive Fibrosis Markers and Chronic Kidney Disease among Adults with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sesti, Giorgio; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Arturi, Franco; Perticone, Maria; Sciacqua, Angela; Perticone, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are associated with an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study we aimed to evaluate whether the severity of liver fibrosis estimated by NAFLD fibrosis score is associated with higher prevalence of CKD in individuals with NAFLD. To this end NAFLD fibrosis score and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were assessed in 570 White individuals with ultrasonography-diagnosed NAFLD. As compared with subjects at low probability of liver fibrosis, individuals at high and intermediate probability showed an unfavorable cardio-metabolic risk profile having significantly higher values of waist circumference, insulin resistance, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, uric acid and lower insulin-like growth factor-1 levels. Individuals at high and intermediate probability of liver fibrosis have lower eGFR after adjustment for gender, smoking, glucose tolerance status, homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index), diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, statin therapy, anti-diabetes and anti-hypertensive treatments (P = 0.001). Individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 5.1-fold increased risk of having CKD (OR 5.13, 95%CI 1.13–23.28; P = 0.03) as compared with individuals at low probability after adjustment for age, gender, and BMI. After adjustment for glucose tolerance status, statin therapy, and anti-hypertensive treatment in addition to gender, individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 3.9-fold increased risk of CKD (OR 3.94, 95%CI 1.11–14.05; P = 0.03) as compared with individuals at low probability. In conclusion, advanced liver fibrosis, determined by noninvasive fibrosis markers, is associated with CKD independently from other known factors. PMID:24520400

  9. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  10. Directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Lam, Albert Q; Freedman, Benjamin S; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2014-07-01

    Regenerative medicine affords a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease. Nephron progenitor cell populations exist only during embryonic kidney development. Understanding the mechanisms by which these populations arise and differentiate is integral to the challenge of generating new nephrons for therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from adults, have the potential to generate functional kidney cells and tissue. Studies in mouse and human PSCs have identified specific approaches to the addition of growth factors, including Wnt and fibroblast growth factor, that can induce PSC differentiation into cells with phenotypic characteristics of nephron progenitor populations with the capacity to form kidney-like structures. Although significant progress has been made, further studies are necessary to confirm the production of functional kidney cells and to promote their three-dimensional organization into bona fide kidney tissue. Human PSCs have been generated from patients with kidney diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Wilms tumor, and may be used to better understand phenotypic consequences of naturally occurring genetic mutations and to conduct "clinical trials in a dish". The capability to generate human kidney cells from PSCs has significant translational applications, including the bioengineering of functional kidney tissue, use in drug development to test compounds for efficacy and toxicity, and in vitro disease modeling.

  11. Contents of cesium, iodine, strontium, thorium, and uranium in selected human organs of adult asian population.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, G V; Kawamura, H; Dang, H S; Parr, R M; Wang, J W; Cho, S Y; Natera, E S

    2004-08-01

    Contents of cesium, iodine, strontium, thorium, and uranium in some selected human organs were estimated for adult Asian population using data obtained in four Asian countries: China, India, Philippines, and Republic of Korea, as part of a Coordinated Research Program of the International Atomic Energy Agency on "Ingestion and Organ contents of elements of importance in radiation protection." These countries together represent more than 40% of the world population. Highly sensitive analytical techniques were employed to measure cesium in skeletal muscle, iodine in thyroid, strontium in skeleton, thorium and uranium in skeleton, liver, kidneys, and lungs where, in comparison to other organs, these elements are present in higher concentrations. The organ contents for adult Asian population, when compared with the corresponding data proposed for Reference Man by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), showed about 40 times lower kidneys content and about 10 times lower skeleton content of uranium. The content of thorium in skeleton for Asian population was also half of the ICRP Reference Man value. Interestingly, organ contents for the other elements such as iodine in thyroid, cesium in skeletal muscle, and strontium in skeleton were comparable for Asian and the Caucasian population (represented by ICRP Reference Man). Organ contents for these elements were also calculated by applying the new ICRP models of these elements to their daily intakes. The comparison of the calculated and measured organ contents showed that despite uncertainties in the organ content values arising due to the inter-country variations in daily dietary intakes, the contents were within a factor of two to three. This observation is significant since human data both on organ contents and ingestion were obtained at environmental level of intakes. The study suggests that currently available ICRP models for these elements are quite realistic.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: polycystic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Registry: Polycystic kidney disease, adult type Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (3 links) GeneReview: Polycystic Kidney Disease, Autosomal Dominant GeneReview: Polycystic Kidney Disease, Autosomal Recessive ...

  13. ELISA-Based Segregation of Adult Spring Chinook Salmon for Control of Bacterial Kidney Disease: Annual Report 1991.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaattari, Stephen L.

    1993-02-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum (RS), a serious disease of salmonid fish worldwide. The disease has a major impact on spring chinook salmon populations in the Columbia River system. There is strong evidence that RS can be transmitted from parent to progeny, and segregation of progeny based on levels of antigen detected in adult fish may obviate this mode of transmission. Results are presented from the third year of a four year study to investigate segregation of broodstock as a tool for controlling BKD. Segregation of adult fish infected with RS has been achieved using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELlSAs) optimized in the first and second year of this project. Gametes from both 1990 and 1991 broodstock, either injected with erythromycin or receiving no antibiotic injection were successfully segregated into groups having either high or low levels of the RS soluble antigen. Offspring have been monitored every three months from the 1990 broodstock and are being monitored from the 1991 broodstock. Antigen levels in the offspring from the 1990 segregation experiment at Marion Forks Hatchery were low and clinical BKD was not observed in any of the juvenile fish. At Carson National Fish Hatchery, antigen levels were also low in fish which were sampled December 1990 through July 1991. Total mortality was low throughout these sampling periods. An increase in mortality was observed in November-December 1991, and preliminary evidence suggests that motality may have been due BKD. The epizootic appears to have equally effected both offspring from high and low RS antigen level parents. Antigen levels in moribund fish are being examined to confirm the prevalence of RS infection.

  14. Carboxylated nanodiamonds are neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic on liver, kidney, intestine and lung human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Paget, V; Sergent, J A; Grall, R; Altmeyer-Morel, S; Girard, H A; Petit, T; Gesset, C; Mermoux, M; Bergonzo, P; Arnault, J C; Chevillard, S

    2014-08-01

    Although nanodiamonds (NDs) appear as one of the most promising nanocarbon materials available so far for biomedical applications, their risk for human health remains unknown. Our work was aimed at defining the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of two sets of commercial carboxylated NDs with diameters below 20 and 100 nm, on six human cell lines chosen as representative of potential target organs: HepG2 and Hep3B (liver), Caki-1 and Hek-293 (kidney), HT29 (intestine) and A549 (lung). Cytotoxicity of NDs was assessed by measuring cell impedance (xCELLigence® system) and cell survival/death by flow cytometry while genotoxicity was assessed by γ-H2Ax foci detection, which is considered the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double-strand breaks. To validate and check the sensitivity of the techniques, aminated polystyrene nanobeads were used as positive control in all assays. Cell incorporation of NDs was also studied by flow cytometry and luminescent N-V center photoluminescence (confirmed by Raman microscopy), to ensure that nanoparticles entered the cells. Overall, we show that NDs effectively entered the cells but NDs do not induce any significant cytotoxic or genotoxic effects on the six cell lines up to an exposure dose of 250 µg/mL. Taken together these results strongly support the huge potential of NDs for human nanomedicine but also their potential as negative control in nanotoxicology studies.

  15. The performance of primary human renal cells in hollow fiber bioreactors for bioartificial kidneys.

    PubMed

    Oo, Zay Yar; Deng, Rensheng; Hu, Min; Ni, Ming; Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; bin Ibrahim, Mohammed Shahrudin; Ying, Jackie Y; Zink, Daniele

    2011-12-01

    Bioartificial kidneys (BAKs) containing human primary renal proximal tubule cells (HPTCs) have been applied in clinical trials. The results were encouraging, but also showed that more research is required. Animal cells or cell lines are not suitable for clinical applications, but have been mainly used in studies on BAK development as large numbers of such cells could be easily obtained. It is difficult to predict HPTC performance based on data obtained with other cell types. To enable more extensive studies on HPTCs, we have developed a bioreactor containing single hollow fiber membranes that requires relatively small amounts of cells. Special hollow fiber membranes with the skin layer on the outer surface and consisting of polyethersulfone/polyvinylpyrrolidone were developed. The results suggested that such hollow fiber membranes were more suitable for the bioreactor unit of BAKs than membranes with an inner skin layer. An HPTC-compatible double coating was applied to the insides of the hollow fiber membranes, which sustained the formation of functional epithelia under bioreactor conditions. Nevertheless, the state of differentiation of the primary human cells remained a critical issue and should be further addressed. The bioreactor system described here will facilitate further studies on the relevant human cell type.

  16. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of continuous and intermittent renal replacement therapies among adult patients with acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfelder, Tonio; Chen, Xiaoyu; Bleß, Hans-Holger

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI) can be treated using continuous (CRRT) or intermittent renal replacement therapies (IRRT). Although some studies suggest that CRRT may have advantages over IRRT, study findings are inconsistent. This study assessed differences between CRRT and IRRT regarding important clinical outcomes (such as mortality and renal recovery) and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, ethical aspects that are linked to renal replacement therapies in the intensive care setting are considered. Methods: Systematic searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library including RCTs, observational studies, and cost-effectiveness studies were performed. Results were pooled using a random effects-model. Results: Forty-nine studies were included. Findings show a higher rate of renal recovery among survivors who initially received CRRT as compared with IRRT. This advantage applies to the analysis of all studies with different observation periods (Relative Risk (RR) 1.10; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [1.05, 1.16]) and to a selection of studies with observation periods of 90 days (RR 1.07; 95% CI [1.04, 1.09]). Regarding observation periods beyond there are no differences when only two identified studies were analyzed. Patients initially receiving CRRT have higher mortality as compared to IRRT (RR 1.17; 95% CI [1.06, 1.28]). This difference is attributable to observational studies and may have been caused by allocation bias since seriously ill patients more often initially receive CRRT instead of IRRT. CRRT do not significantly differ from IRRT with respect to change of mean arterial pressure, hypotensive episodes, hemodynamic instability, and length of stay. Data on cost-effectiveness is inconsistent. Recent analyzes indicate that initial CRRT is cost-effective compared to initial IRRT due to a reduction of the rate of long-term dialysis dependence. As regards a short time horizon, this cost benefit has not been shown. Conclusion: Findings of

  18. Effects of continuous and intermittent renal replacement therapies among adult patients with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Tonio; Chen, Xiaoyu; Bleß, Hans-Holger

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI) can be treated using continuous (CRRT) or intermittent renal replacement therapies (IRRT). Although some studies suggest that CRRT may have advantages over IRRT, study findings are inconsistent. This study assessed differences between CRRT and IRRT regarding important clinical outcomes (such as mortality and renal recovery) and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, ethical aspects that are linked to renal replacement therapies in the intensive care setting are considered. Methods: Systematic searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library including RCTs, observational studies, and cost-effectiveness studies were performed. Results were pooled using a random effects-model. Results: Forty-nine studies were included. Findings show a higher rate of renal recovery among survivors who initially received CRRT as compared with IRRT. This advantage applies to the analysis of all studies with different observation periods (Relative Risk (RR) 1.10; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [1.05, 1.16]) and to a selection of studies with observation periods of 90 days (RR 1.07; 95% CI [1.04, 1.09]). Regarding observation periods beyond there are no differences when only two identified studies were analyzed. Patients initially receiving CRRT have higher mortality as compared to IRRT (RR 1.17; 95% CI [1.06, 1.28]). This difference is attributable to observational studies and may have been caused by allocation bias since seriously ill patients more often initially receive CRRT instead of IRRT. CRRT do not significantly differ from IRRT with respect to change of mean arterial pressure, hypotensive episodes, hemodynamic instability, and length of stay. Data on cost-effectiveness is inconsistent. Recent analyzes indicate that initial CRRT is cost-effective compared to initial IRRT due to a reduction of the rate of long-term dialysis dependence. As regards a short time horizon, this cost benefit has not been shown. Conclusion: Findings of

  19. Isolation and characterization of a human liver and kidney-specific protein: the hepato-renal (H-R) antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Nerenberg, S T; Prasad, R; Inboriboon, P; Biskup, N; Pedersen, L; Faiferman, I

    1980-01-01

    This paper reports the isolation and characterization of a soluble antigen shared by the liver and kidney of human and some other animal species. Homogenates of human liver in saline were centrifugated at 27,000 g and the supernatants were fractionated by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The gels were divided in sections and each was injected into rabbits; after absorption with polymerized normal human serum, the antiserum obtained by injecting one of the sections reacted only with saline extracts of human liver and kidney when tested against a variety of human tissue extracts. The absorbed antiserum, polymerized and insolubilized with glutaraldehyde, was used to purify the antigen by affinity chromatography. The purified antigen proved to be a glycoprotein containing 19 percent carbohydrate, had a molecular weight of 5.8-6.0 x 10(4) Daltons and a pI of 7.2-7.4. The antigen, relatively thermostable, was precipitated by 35-55 percent ammonium sulphate; its antigenic activity was not affected by extraction with 0.6 N perchloric acid or by incubation with ribonuclease, deoxyribonuclease or neuraminidase but was destroyed by incubation with ttypsin or chymotrypsin. Immunoperoxidase studies showed that the antigen appeared concentrated in the neclei of liver and kidney glomerular epithelial and tubular epithelial cells in humans and rats. The antigen could not be detected in human hepatomas or hypernephromas or in the rat Morris hepatoma 5123. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 7 PMID:6155231

  20. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  1. Maps of the adult human hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Nezzar, Hachemi; Sakka, Laurent; Boirie, Yves; Fontaine, Denys; Coste, Aurélien; Coll, Guillaume; Sontheimer, Anna; Sarret, Catherine; Gabrillargues, Jean; De Salles, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The human hypothalamus is a small deeply located region placed at the crossroad of neurovegetative, neuroendocrine, limbic, and optic systems. Although deep brain stimulation techniques have proven that it could be feasible to modulate these systems, targeting the hypothalamus and in particular specific nuclei and white bundles, is still challenging. Our goal was to make a synthesis of relevant topographical data of the human hypothalamus, under the form of magnetic resonance imaging maps useful for mastering its elaborated structure as well as its neighborhood. As from 1.5 Tesla, Inversion-Recovery sequence allows locating the hypothalamus and most of its components. Spotting hypothalamic compartments is possible according to specific landmarks: the anterior commissure, the mammillary bodies, the preoptic recess, the infundibular recess, the crest between the preoptic and the infundibular recesses, the optical tract, the fornix, and the mammillo-thalamic bundle. The identification of hypothalamus and most of its components could be useful to allow the quantification of local pathological processes and to target specific circuitry to alleviate severe symptoms, using physical or biological agents. PMID:23682342

  2. Ion transport in the zebrafish kidney from a human disease angle: possibilities, considerations, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Simone; Arjona, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Unique experimental advantages, such as its embryonic/larval transparency, high-throughput nature, and ease of genetic modification, underpin the rapid emergence of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a preeminent model in biomedical research. Particularly in the field of nephrology, the zebrafish provides a promising model for studying the physiological implications of human solute transport processes along consecutive nephron segments. However, although the zebrafish might be considered a valuable model for numerous renal ion transport diseases and functional studies of many channels and transporters, not all human renal electrolyte transport mechanisms and human diseases can be modeled in the zebrafish. With this review, we explore the ontogeny of zebrafish renal ion transport, its nephron structure and function, and thereby demonstrate the clinical translational value of this model. By critical assessment of genomic and amino acid conservation of human proteins involved in renal ion handling (channels, transporters, and claudins), kidney and nephron segment conservation, and renal electrolyte transport physiology in the zebrafish, we provide researchers and nephrologists with an indication of the possibilities and considerations of the zebrafish as a model for human renal ion transport. Combined with advanced techniques envisioned for the future, implementation of the zebrafish might expand beyond unraveling pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie distinct genetic or environmentally, i.e., pharmacological and lifestyle, induced renal transport deficits. Specifically, the ease of drug administration and the exploitation of improved genetic approaches might argue for the adoption of the zebrafish as a model for preclinical personalized medicine for distinct renal diseases and renal electrolyte transport proteins.

  3. Biomineralogy of human urinary calculi (kidney stones) from some geographic regions of Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Chandrajith, Rohana; Wijewardana, Geethika; Dissanayake, C B; Abeygunasekara, Anurudha

    2006-08-01

    Kidney stones (urinary calculi) have become a global scourge since it has been recognized as one of the most painful medical problems. Primary causative factors for the formation of these stones are not clearly understood, though they are suspected to have a direct relationship to the composition of urine, which is mainly governed by diet and drinking water. Sixty nine urinary calculi samples which were collected from stone removal surgeries were analyzed chemically for their Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Zn, Pb, Fe and phosphate contents. Structural and mineralogical properties of stones were studied by XRD and FT-IR methods. The mean contents of trace elements were 1348 mg kg(-1) (Na); 294 mg kg(-1) (K); 32% (Ca); 1426 mg kg(-1) (Mg); 8.39 mg kg(-1) (Mn); 258 mg kg(-1) (Fe); 67 mg kg(-1) (Cu); 675 mg kg(-1) (Zn); 69 mg kg(-1) (Pb); and 1.93% (PO (4) (3-) ). The major crystalline constituent in the calculi of Sri Lanka is calcium oxalate monohydrate. Principal component analysis was used to identify the multi element relationships in kidney stones. Three components were extracted and the first component represents positively correlated Na-K-Mg-PO (4) (3-) whereas the second components represent the larger positively weighted Fe-Cu-Pb. Ca-Zn correlated positively in the third component in which Mn-Cu correlated negatively. This study indicates that during the crystallization of human urinary stones, Ca shows more affinity towards oxalates whereas other alkali and alkaline earths precipitate with phosphates.

  4. Acute Kidney Injury, Risk Factors, and Prognosis in Hospitalized HIV-Infected Adults in South Africa, Compared by Tenofovir Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Neil; Motlhaoleng, Katlego; Abraham, Pattamukkil; Mancama, Dalu; Naicker, Saraladevi; Variava, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There are limited data describing acute kidney injury (AKI) in HIV-infected adult patients in resource-limited settings where tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), which is potentially nephrotoxic, is increasingly prescribed. We describe risk factors for and prognosis of AKI in HIV-infected individuals, stratified by those receiving and those naive to TDF. A prospective case cohort study of hospitalized HIV-infected adults with AKI stratified by TDF exposure. Adults (≥18 years) were recruited: clinical and biochemical data were collected at admission; their renal recovery, discharge, or mortality was ascertained as an in-patient and, subsequently, to a scheduled 3-month follow-up. Among this predominantly female (61%), almost exclusively black African cohort of 175 patients with AKI, 93 (53%) were TDF exposed; median age was 41 years (interquartile range 35–50). Median CD4 count and viral load and creatinine at baseline were 116 cells/mm3 and 110,159 copies/ml, respectively. A greater proportion of the TDF group had severe AKI on admission (61% vs. 43%, p = .014); however, both groups had similar rates of newly diagnosed tuberculosis (TB; 52%) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID; 32%) use. Intravenous fluid was the therapeutic mainstay; only seven were dialyzed. Discharge median serum creatinine (SCr) was higher in the TDF group (p = .032) and fewer in the TDF group recovered renal function after 3 months (p = .043). Three-month mortality was 27% in both groups, but 55% of deaths occurred in hospital. Those that died had a higher SCr and more severe AKI than survivors; TB was diagnosed in 33 (70%) of those who died. AKI was more severe and renal recovery slower in the TDF group; comorbidities, risk factors, and prognosis were similar regardless of TDF exposure. Because TB is linked to higher mortality, TB coinfection in HIV-infected patients with AKI warrants more intensive monitoring. In all those with poor renal recovery, our

  5. Renal progenitors derived from human iPSCs engraft and restore function in a mouse model of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Tomasoni, Susanna; Ciampi, Osele; Pezzotta, Anna; Derosas, Manuela; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Rizzo, Paola; Papadimou, Evangelia; Novelli, Rubina; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most relevant health issues, leading to millions of deaths. The magnitude of the phenomenon remarks the urgent need for innovative and effective therapeutic approaches. Cell-based therapy with renal progenitor cells (RPCs) has been proposed as a possible strategy. Studies have shown the feasibility of directing embryonic stem cells or induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) towards nephrogenic intermediate mesoderm and metanephric mesenchyme (MM). However, the functional activity of iPSC-derived RPCs has not been tested in animal models of kidney disease. Here, through an efficient inductive protocol, we directed human iPSCs towards RPCs that robustly engrafted into damaged tubuli and restored renal function and structure in cisplatin-mice with AKI. These results demonstrate that iPSCs are a valuable source of engraftable cells with regenerative activity for kidney disease and create the basis for future applications in stem cell-based therapy. PMID:25744951

  6. Targeting kidney CLC-K channels: pharmacological profile in a human cell line versus Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Imbrici, Paola; Liantonio, Antonella; Gradogna, Antonella; Pusch, Michael; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2014-10-01

    CLC-K chloride channels play a crucial role in kidney physiology and genetic mutations, affecting their function are responsible for severe renal salt loss in humans. Thus, compounds that selectively bind to CLC-Ka and/or CLC-Kb channels and modulate their activity may have a significant therapeutic potential. Here, we compare the biophysical and pharmacological behaviors of human CLC-K channels expressed either in HEK293 cells or in Xenopus oocytes and we show that CLC-K channel properties are greatly influenced by the biochemical environment surrounding the channels. Indeed, in HEK293 cells the potentiating effect of niflumic acid (NFA) on CLC-Ka/barttin and CLC-Kb/barttin channels seems to be absent while the blocking efficacy of niflumic acid and benzofuran derivatives observed in oocytes is preserved. The NFA block does not seem to involve the accessory subunit barttin on CLC-K1 channels. In addition, the sensitivity of CLC-Ks to external Ca(2+) is reduced in HEK293 cells. Based on our findings, we propose that mammalian cell lines are a suitable expression system for the pharmacological profiling of CLC-Ks.

  7. Expression of thirty-six drug transporter genes in human intestine, liver, kidney, and organotypic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hilgendorf, Constanze; Ahlin, Gustav; Seithel, Annick; Artursson, Per; Ungell, Anna-Lena; Karlsson, Johan

    2007-08-01

    This study was designed to quantitatively assess the mRNA expression of 36 important drug transporters in human jejunum, colon, liver, and kidney. Expression of these transporters in human organs was compared with expression in commonly used cell lines (Caco-2, HepG2, and Caki-1) originating from these organs to assess their value as in vitro transporter system models, and was also compared with data obtained from the literature on expression in rat tissues to assess species differences. Transporters that were highly expressed in the intestine included HPT1, PEPT1, BCRP, MRP2, and MDR1, whereas, in the liver, OCT1, MRP2, OATP-C, NTCP and BSEP were the main transporters. In the kidney, OAT1 was expressed at the highest levels, followed by OAT3, OAT4, MCT5, MDR1, MRP2, OCT2, and OCTN2. The best agreement between human tissue and the representative cell line was observed for human jejunum and Caco-2 cells. Expression in liver and kidney ortholog cell lines was not correlated with that in the associated tissue. Comparisons with rat transporter gene expression revealed significant species differences. Our results allowed a comprehensive quantitative comparison of drug transporter expression in human intestine, liver, and kidney. We suggest that it would be beneficial for predictive pharmacokinetic research to focus on the most highly expressed transporters. We hope that our comparison of rat and human tissue will help to explain the observed species differences in in vivo models, increase understanding of the impact of active transport processes on pharmacokinetics and distribution, and improve the quality of predictions from animal studies to humans.

  8. A COMPARISON OF THE GROWTH OF SELECTED MYCOBACTERIA IN HELA, MONKEY KIDNEY, AND HUMAN AMNION CELLS IN TISSUE CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Charles C.

    1958-01-01

    HeLa, monkey kidney, and human amnion cells in tissue cultures were compared as sites for the multiplication of strains of tubercle bacilli or original and reduced pathogenicity, and for several other species of mycobacteria capable of causing disease in humans. The arrangement of the pathogenic species inorder of their growth rates in HeLa cells was Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium balnei, and the "yellow bacillus," followed closely by the tubercle bacillus. This order was also correct for these species in monkey kidney and human amnion cells, and is the same as that seen in bacteriological media. The arrangement of the strains of tubercle bacilli in order of their growth rates in all three types of cells was: H37Rv, then R1Rv, and lastly H37Ra, which multiplied about as slowly as BCG. An INH-resistant strain grew about as rapidly as H37Rv. Growth of the pathogenic species occurred at about the same rates in HeLa and monkey kidney cells, but was distinctly slower in human amnion cells, which are less active metabolically. Irradiation of the cells in doses up to 5000 r did not affect the subsequent growth of mycobacteria in them. Preliminary experiments with human leprosy bacilli indicate that they can be introduced into these cells in high numbers and that the bacilli then persist for the life of the cells. PMID:13491759

  9. Quantitative podocyte parameters predict human native kidney and allograft half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Abhijit S.; Afshinnia, Farsad; Cibrik, Diane; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Zhang, Min; Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Samaniego, Milagros; Bitzer, Markus; Wiggins, Jocelyn E.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Li, Yi; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Kidney function decreases with age. A potential mechanistic explanation for kidney and allograft half-life has evolved through the realization that linear reduction in glomerular podocyte density could drive progressive glomerulosclerosis to impact both native kidney and allograft half-lives. METHODS. Predictions from podometrics (quantitation of podocyte parameters) were tested using independent pathologic, functional, and outcome data for native kidneys and allografts derived from published reports and large registries. RESULTS. With age, native kidneys exponentially develop glomerulosclerosis, reduced renal function, and end-stage kidney disease, projecting a finite average kidney life span. The slope of allograft failure rate versus age parallels that of reduction in podocyte density versus age. Quantitative modeling projects allograft half-life at any donor age, and rate of podocyte detachment parallels the observed allograft loss rate. CONCLUSION. Native kidneys are designed to have a limited average life span of about 100–140 years. Allografts undergo an accelerated aging-like process that accounts for their unexpectedly short half-life (about 15 years), the observation that older donor age is associated with shorter allograft half-life, and the fact that long-term allograft survival has not substantially improved. Podometrics provides potential readouts for these processes, thereby offering new approaches for monitoring and intervention. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health. PMID:27280173

  10. Can deceased donor with recurrent primary brain tumor donate kidneys for transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh; Modi, Pranjal R.; Pal, Bipin C.; Modi, Jayesh

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation from deceased donors is in its infancy in India. Cadaver organ donation was accepted legally in 1994 by the “Human Organs Transplantation Act.” Marginal donors are now accepted by many centers for kidney transplantation. We report a case of procurement of both kidneys from a young deceased donor having recurrent primary brain tumor, transplanted into two adult recipients with successful outcome. PMID:26941500

  11. Kidney stem cells in development, regeneration and cancer.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Klaudyna; Pleniceanu, Oren; Dekel, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    The generation of nephrons during development depends on differentiation via a mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) of self-renewing, tissue-specific stem cells confined to a specific anatomic niche of the nephrogenic cortex. These cells may transform to generate oncogenic stem cells and drive pediatric renal cancer. Once nephron epithelia are formed the view of post-MET tissue renal growth and maintenance by adult tissue-specific epithelial stem cells becomes controversial. Recently, genetic lineage tracing that followed clonal evolution of single kidney cells showed that the need for new cells is constantly driven by fate-restricted unipotent clonal expansions in varying kidney segments arguing against a multipotent adult stem cell model. Lineage-restriction was similarly maintained in kidney organoids grown in culture. Importantly, kidney cells in which Wnt was activated were traced to give significant clonal progeny indicating a clonogenic hierarchy. In vivo nephron epithelia may be endowed with the capacity akin to that of unipotent epithelial stem/progenitor such that under specific stimuli can clonally expand/self renew by local proliferation of mature differentiated cells. Finding ways to ex vivo preserve and expand the observed in vivo kidney-forming capacity inherent to both the fetal and adult kidneys is crucial for taking renal regenerative medicine forward. Some of the strategies used to achieve this are sorting human fetal nephron stem/progenitor cells, growing adult nephrospheres or reprogramming differentiated kidney cells toward expandable renal progenitors.

  12. Bacteriology of moderate (chronic) periodontitis in mature adult humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Cato, E P; Smibert, R M; Burmeister, J A; Ranney, R R

    1983-01-01

    A total of 171 taxa was represented among 1,900 bacterial isolates from 60 samples of sites affected with moderate periodontitis in 22 mature adult humans. The composition of the subgingival sulcus flora was statistically significantly different from that of the adjacent supragingival flora and the subgingival flora of 14 people with healthy gingiva, but was not significantly different from that of sulci affected with severe periodontitis in 21 young human adults. The sulcus floras of moderate periodontitis and severe periodontitis shared many of their predominant bacterial species, but there were differences in the relative proportions of some of these species. Similar relationships were found for seven taxa of treponemes that were cultured from the samples. PMID:6642641

  13. Baseline Cardiovascular Characteristics of Adult Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We report the baseline cardiovascular characteristics of 2,238 participants by using the data of the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD) study. The cohort comprises 5 subcohorts according to the cause of CKD: glomerulonephritis (GN), diabetic nephropathy (DN), hypertensive nephropathy (HTN), polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and unclassified. The average estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 50.5 ± 30.3 mL/min−1/1.73 m−2 and lowest in the DN subcohort. The overall prevalence of previous CVD was 14.4% in all patients, and was highest in the DN followed by that in the HTN subcohort. The DN subcohort had more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles (higher systolic blood pressure [SBP], and higher levels of cardiac troponin T, left ventricular mass index [LVMI], coronary calcium score, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV]) than the other subcohorts. The HTN subcohort exhibited less severe cardiovascular risk profiles than the DN subcohort, but had more severe cardiovascular risk features than the GN and PKD subcohorts. All these cardiovascular risk profiles were inversely correlated with eGFR. In conclusion, this study shows that the KNOW-CKD cohort exhibits high cardiovascular burden, as other CKD cohorts in previous studies. Among the subcohorts, the DN subcohort had the highest risk for CVD. The ongoing long-term follow-up study up to 10 years will further delineate cardiovascular characteristics and outcomes of each subcohort exposed to different risk profiles. PMID:28049233

  14. Baseline Cardiovascular Characteristics of Adult Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoungnae; Yoo, Tae Hyun; Choi, Kyu Hun; Oh, Kook Hwan; Lee, Joongyub; Kim, Soo Wan; Kim, Tae Hee; Sung, Suah; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We report the baseline cardiovascular characteristics of 2,238 participants by using the data of the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD) study. The cohort comprises 5 subcohorts according to the cause of CKD: glomerulonephritis (GN), diabetic nephropathy (DN), hypertensive nephropathy (HTN), polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and unclassified. The average estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 50.5 ± 30.3 mL/min⁻¹/1.73 m⁻² and lowest in the DN subcohort. The overall prevalence of previous CVD was 14.4% in all patients, and was highest in the DN followed by that in the HTN subcohort. The DN subcohort had more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles (higher systolic blood pressure [SBP], and higher levels of cardiac troponin T, left ventricular mass index [LVMI], coronary calcium score, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV]) than the other subcohorts. The HTN subcohort exhibited less severe cardiovascular risk profiles than the DN subcohort, but had more severe cardiovascular risk features than the GN and PKD subcohorts. All these cardiovascular risk profiles were inversely correlated with eGFR. In conclusion, this study shows that the KNOW-CKD cohort exhibits high cardiovascular burden, as other CKD cohorts in previous studies. Among the subcohorts, the DN subcohort had the highest risk for CVD. The ongoing long-term follow-up study up to 10 years will further delineate cardiovascular characteristics and outcomes of each subcohort exposed to different risk profiles.

  15. Pathway of 3-MCPD-induced apoptosis in human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Zhu, Pei; Sun, Chao; Sun, Jiadi; An, Lu; Zhang, Yinzhi; Sun, Xiulan

    2017-01-01

    3-Chloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) is a heat-produced contaminant formed during the preparation of soy sauce worldwide. The present investigation was conducted to determine the molecular aspects of 3-MCPD toxicity on human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed in response to exposure to 3-MCPD using the MTT assay and high-content screening (HCS). DNA damage, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis-related proteins were evaluated. Genes related with apoptosis were detected by qPCR-array for further understanding the 3-MCPD induced cell apoptosis signaling pathway. Our results clearly showed that 3-MCPD treatment inhibits cell proliferation and reactive oxygen species generation. qPCR-array indicated that nine apoptotic genes were up-regulated more than 2-fold and six down-regulated more than 2-fold. Genes associated with the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, especially BCL2 family genes, changed significantly, indicating that the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway is activated. Death receptor pathway-related genes, TNFRSF11B and TNFRSF1A, changed significantly, indicating that the death receptor pathway is also activated, resulting in the inhibition of cell growth and proliferation as well as induction of apoptosis. To sum up, the experiment results indicated that 3-MCPD induced HEK293 cell toxicity through the death receptor pathway and mitochondrial pathway.

  16. Ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones: preliminary results of human feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Michael; Cunitz, Bryan; Dunmire, Barbrina; Paun, Marla; Lee, Franklin; Ross, Susan; Lingeman, James; Coburn, Michael; Wessells, Hunter; Sorensen, Mathew; Harper, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    One in 11 Americans has experienced kidney stones, with a 50% average recurrence rate within 5–10 years. Ultrasonic propulsion (UP) offers a potential method to expel small stones or residual fragments before they become a recurrent problem. Reported here are preliminary findings from the first investigational use of UP in humans. The device uses a Verasonics ultrasound engine and Philips HDI C5-2 probe to generate real-time B-mode imaging and targeted “push” pulses on demand. There are three arms of the study: de novo stones, post-lithotripsy fragments, and the preoperative setting. A pain questionnaire is completed prior to and following the study. Movement is classified based on extent. Patients are followed for 90 days. Ten subjects have been treated to date: three de novo, five post-lithotripsy, and two preoperative. None of the subjects reported pain associated with the treatment or a treatment related adverse event, beyond the normal discomfort of passing a stone. At least one stone was moved in all subjects. Three of five post-lithotripsy subjects passed a single or multiple stones within 1–2 weeks following treatment; one subject passed two (1–2 mm) fragments before leaving clinic. In the pre-operative studies we successfully moved 7 – 8 mm stones. In four subjects, UP revealed multiple stone fragments where the clinical image and initial ultrasound examination indicated a single large stone. PMID:26203347

  17. Evaluation of cytotoxicity attributed to thimerosal on murine and human kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Kee; Mak, Sally K; Kültz, Dietmar; Hammock, Bruce D

    2007-12-01

    Renal inner medullary collecting duct cells (mIMCD3) and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) were used for cytoscreening of thimerosal and mercury chloride (HgCl2). Thimerosal and HgCl2 acted in a concentration-dependent manner. In mIMCD3 cells the 24-h LC50 values for thimerosal, thiosalicylic acid, 2,2-dithiosalicylic acid, and 2-sulfobenzoic acid were 2.9, 2200, >1000, and >10,000 microM, respectively. The 24-h LC50 value for HgCl2 in mIMCD3 cells was 40 microM. In HEK293 cells, the 24-h LC50 value for thimerosal was 9.5 microM. These data demonstrate that the higher cytotoxicity produced by thimerosal on renal cells with respect to similar compounds without Hg may be related to this metal content. The present study also establishes mIMCD3 cells as a valuable model for evaluation of cytotoxicity of nephrotoxic compounds.

  18. Electrophysiological characterization of ionic transport by the retinal exchanger expressed in human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed Central

    Navanglone, A; Rispoli, G; Gabellini, N; Carafoli, E

    1997-01-01

    The retinal Na+:Ca2+, K+exchanger cDNA was transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells by transfection with plasmid DNA. The correct targeting of the expressed protein to the plasma membrane was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. The reverse exchange offrent (Ca2+ imported per Na+ extruded) was measured in whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments after intracellular perfusion with Na+ (Na+i, 128 mM) and extracellular perfusion with Ca2+ (Ca2o+, 1 mM) and Ko+ (20 mM). As expected, the exchange current was suppressed by removing Ca2o+. Surprisingly, however, it was also abolished by increasing Na+o to almost abolish the Na+ gradient, and it was almost unaffected by the removal of Ko+. Apparently, then, at variance with the exchanger in the rod outer segment, the retinal exchanger expressed in 293 cells acts essentially as a Na+:Ca2+ exchanger and does not require K+ for its electrogenic activity. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9199770

  19. Lymphatic Stomata in the Adult Human Pulmonary Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Masahiro; Iobe, Hiroaki; Kudo, Tomoo; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Okudela, Koji; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Yoshida, Maki; Nagao, Toshitaka; Nakaya, Takeo; Kurata, Atsushi; Ohtani, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymphatic stomata are small lymphatic openings in the serosal membrane that communicate with the serosal cavity. Although these stomata have primarily been studied in experimental mammals, little is known concerning the presence and properties of lymphatic stomata in the adult human pleura. Thus, adult human pleurae were examined for the presence or absence of lymphatic stomata. Methods and Results: A total of 26 pulmonary ligaments (13 left and 13 right) were obtained from 15 adult human autopsy cases and examined using electron and light microscopy. The microscopic studies revealed the presence of apertures fringed with D2-40-positive, CD31-positive, and cytokeratin-negative endothelial cells directly communicating with submesothelial lymphatics in all of the pulmonary ligaments. The apertures' sizes and densities varied from case to case according to the serial tissue section. The medians of these aperture sizes ranged from 2.25 to 8.75 μm in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2.50 to 12.50 μm in the right pulmonary ligaments. The densities of the apertures ranged from 2 to 9 per mm2 in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2 to 18 per mm2 in the right pulmonary ligaments. However, no significant differences were found regarding the aperture size (p=0.359) and density (p=0.438) between the left and the right pulmonary ligaments. Conclusions: Our study revealed that apertures exhibit structural adequacy as lymphatic stomata on the surface of the pulmonary ligament, thereby providing evidence that lymphatic stomata are present in the adult human pleura. PMID:25526320

  20. Doublecortin expression in the normal and epileptic adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y W J; Curtis, M A; Gibbons, H M; Mee, E W; Bergin, P S; Teoh, H H; Connor, B; Dragunow, M; Faull, R L M

    2008-12-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a neurological disorder associated with spontaneous recurrent complex partial seizures and hippocampal sclerosis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported in animal models of MTLE, increased neurogenesis has not been reported in the hippocampus of adult human MTLE cases. Here we showed that cells expressing doublecortin (Dcx), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in migrating neuroblasts, were present in the hippocampus and temporal cortex of the normal and MTLE adult human brain. In particular, increased numbers of Dcx-positive cells were observed in the epileptic compared with the normal temporal cortex. Importantly, 56% of Dcx-expressing cells in the epileptic temporal cortex coexpressed both the proliferative cell marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and early neuronal marker, TuJ1, suggesting that they may be newly generated neurons. A subpopulation of Dcx-positive cells in the epileptic temporal cortex also coexpressed the mature neuronal marker, NeuN, suggesting that epilepsy may promote the generation of new neurons in the temporal cortex. This study has identified, for the first time, a novel population of Dcx-positive cells in the adult human temporal cortex that can be upregulated by epilepsy and thus, raises the possibility that these cells may have functional significance in the pathophysiology of epilepsy.

  1. Differential proteome analysis of human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293) following mycophenolic acid treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is widely used as a post transplantation medicine to prevent acute organ rejection. In the present study we used proteomics approach to identify proteome alterations in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293) after treatment with therapeutic dose of MPA. Following 72 hours MPA treatment, total protein lysates were prepared, resolved by two dimensional gel electrophoresis and differentially expressed proteins were identified by QTOF-MS/MS analysis. Expressional regulations of selected proteins were further validated by real time PCR and Western blotting. Results The proliferation assay demonstrated that therapeutic MPA concentration causes a dose dependent inhibition of HEK-293 cell proliferation. A significant apoptosis was observed after MPA treatment, as revealed by caspase 3 activity. Proteome analysis showed a total of 12 protein spots exhibiting differential expression after incubation with MPA, of which 7 proteins (complement component 1 Q subcomponent-binding protein, electron transfer flavoprotein subunit beta, cytochrome b-c1 complex subunit, peroxiredoxin 1, thioredoxin domain-containing protein 12, myosin regulatory light chain 2, and profilin 1) showed significant increase in their expression. The expression of 5 proteins (protein SET, stathmin, 40S ribosomal protein S12, histone H2B type 1 A, and histone H2B type 1-C/E/F/G/I) were down-regulated. MPA mainly altered the proteins associated with the cytoskeleton (26%), chromatin structure/dynamics (17%) and energy production/conversion (17%). Both real time PCR and Western blotting confirmed the regulation of myosin regulatory light chain 2 and peroxiredoxin 1 by MPA treatment. Furthermore, HT-29 cells treated with MPA and total kidney cell lysate from MMF treated rats showed similar increased expression of myosin regulatory light chain 2. Conclusion The emerging use of MPA in diverse pathophysiological conditions demands in-depth studies to understand molecular basis of

  2. Telmisartan Ameliorates Fibrocystic Liver Disease in an Orthologous Rat Model of Human Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kugita, Masanori; Sasaki, Mai; Horie, Shigeo; Nakanishi, Koichi; Abe, Takaaki; Aukema, Harold M.; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Nagao, Shizuko

    2013-01-01

    Human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) produces kidneys which are massively enlarged due to multiple cysts, hypertension, and congenital hepatic fibrosis characterized by dilated bile ducts and portal hypertension. The PCK rat is an orthologous model of human ARPKD with numerous fluid-filled cysts caused by stimulated cellular proliferation in the renal tubules and hepatic bile duct epithelia, with interstitial fibrosis developed in the liver. We previously reported that a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ full agonist ameliorated kidney and liver disease in PCK rats. Telmisartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) used widely as an antihypertensive drug and shows partial PPAR-γ agonist activity. It also has nephroprotective activity in diabetes and renal injury and prevents the effects of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and hepatic fibrosis. In the present study, we determined whether telmisartan ameliorates progression of polycystic kidney and fibrocystic liver disease in PCK rats. Five male and 5 female PCK and normal control (+/+) rats were orally administered 3 mg/kg telmisartan or vehicle every day from 4 to 20 weeks of age. Treatment with telmisartan decreased blood pressure in both PCK and +/+ rats. Blood levels of aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase and urea nitrogen were unaffected by telmisartan treatment. There was no effect on kidney disease progression, but liver weight relative to body weight, liver cystic area, hepatic fibrosis index, expression levels of Ki67 and TGF-β, and the number of Ki67- and TGF-β-positive interstitial cells in the liver were significantly decreased in telmisartan-treated PCK rats. Therefore, telmisartan ameliorates congenital hepatic fibrosis in ARPKD, possibly through the inhibition of signaling cascades responsible for cellular proliferation and interstitial fibrosis in PCK rats. The present results support the potential therapeutic use of ARBs for the

  3. Telmisartan ameliorates fibrocystic liver disease in an orthologous rat model of human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kugita, Masanori; Sasaki, Mai; Horie, Shigeo; Nakanishi, Koichi; Abe, Takaaki; Aukema, Harold M; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Nagao, Shizuko

    2013-01-01

    Human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) produces kidneys which are massively enlarged due to multiple cysts, hypertension, and congenital hepatic fibrosis characterized by dilated bile ducts and portal hypertension. The PCK rat is an orthologous model of human ARPKD with numerous fluid-filled cysts caused by stimulated cellular proliferation in the renal tubules and hepatic bile duct epithelia, with interstitial fibrosis developed in the liver. We previously reported that a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ full agonist ameliorated kidney and liver disease in PCK rats. Telmisartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) used widely as an antihypertensive drug and shows partial PPAR-γ agonist activity. It also has nephroprotective activity in diabetes and renal injury and prevents the effects of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and hepatic fibrosis. In the present study, we determined whether telmisartan ameliorates progression of polycystic kidney and fibrocystic liver disease in PCK rats. Five male and 5 female PCK and normal control (+/+) rats were orally administered 3 mg/kg telmisartan or vehicle every day from 4 to 20 weeks of age. Treatment with telmisartan decreased blood pressure in both PCK and +/+ rats. Blood levels of aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase and urea nitrogen were unaffected by telmisartan treatment. There was no effect on kidney disease progression, but liver weight relative to body weight, liver cystic area, hepatic fibrosis index, expression levels of Ki67 and TGF-β, and the number of Ki67- and TGF-β-positive interstitial cells in the liver were significantly decreased in telmisartan-treated PCK rats. Therefore, telmisartan ameliorates congenital hepatic fibrosis in ARPKD, possibly through the inhibition of signaling cascades responsible for cellular proliferation and interstitial fibrosis in PCK rats. The present results support the potential therapeutic use of ARBs for the

  4. Comprehensive microRNA profiling in acetaminophen toxicity identifies novel circulating biomarkers for human liver and kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Vliegenthart, A D B; Shaffer, J M; Clarke, J I; Peeters, L E J; Caporali, A; Bateman, D N; Wood, D M; Dargan, P I; Craig, D G; Moore, J K; Thompson, A I; Henderson, N C; Webb, D J; Sharkey, J; Antoine, D J; Park, B K; Bailey, M A; Lader, E; Simpson, K J; Dear, J W

    2015-10-22

    Our objective was to identify microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers of drug-induced liver and kidney injury by profiling the circulating miRNome in patients with acetaminophen overdose. Plasma miRNAs were quantified in age- and sex-matched overdose patients with (N = 27) and without (N = 27) organ injury (APAP-TOX and APAP-no TOX, respectively). Classifier miRNAs were tested in a separate cohort (N = 81). miRNA specificity was determined in non-acetaminophen liver injury and murine models. Sensitivity was tested by stratification of patients at hospital presentation (N = 67). From 1809 miRNAs, 75 were 3-fold or more increased and 46 were 3-fold or more decreased with APAP-TOX. A 16 miRNA classifier model accurately diagnosed APAP-TOX in the test cohort. In humans, the miRNAs with the largest increase (miR-122-5p, miR-885-5p, miR-151a-3p) and the highest rank in the classifier model (miR-382-5p) accurately reported non-acetaminophen liver injury and were unaffected by kidney injury. miR-122-5p was more sensitive than ALT for reporting liver injury at hospital presentation, especially combined with miR-483-3p. A miRNA panel was associated with human kidney dysfunction. In mice, miR-122-5p, miR-151a-3p and miR-382-5p specifically reported APAP toxicity - being unaffected by drug-induced kidney injury. Profiling of acetaminophen toxicity identified multiple miRNAs that report acute liver injury and potential biomarkers of drug-induced kidney injury.

  5. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by different metallic nanoparticles on human kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some manufactured nanoparticles are metal-based and have a wide variety of applications in electronic, engineering and medicine. Until now, many studies have described the potential toxicity of NPs on pulmonary target, while little attention has been paid to kidney which is considered to be a secondary target organ. The objective of this study, on human renal culture cells, was to assess the toxicity profile of metallic nanoparticles (TiO2, ZnO and CdS) usable in industrial production. Comparative studies were conducted, to identify whether particle properties impact cytotoxicity by altering the intracellular oxidative status. Results Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, surface charge, dispersion and solubility. Cytotoxicity of NPs was then evaluated in IP15 (glomerular mesangial) and HK-2 (epithelial proximal) cell lines. ZnO and CdS NPs significantly increased the cell mortality, in a dose-dependent manner. Cytotoxic effects were correlated with the physicochemical properties of NPs tested and the cell type used. Analysis of reactive oxygen species and intracellular levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione revealed that particles induced stress according to their composition, size and solubility. Protein involved in oxidative stress such as NF-κb was activated with ZnO and CdS nanoparticles. Such effects were not observed with TiO2 nanoparticles. Conclusion On glomerular and tubular human renal cells, ZnO and CdS nanoparticles exerted cytotoxic effects that were correlated with metal composition, particle scale and metal solubility. ROS production and oxidative stress induction clearly indicated their nephrotoxic potential. PMID:21371295

  6. Acepromazine inhibits hERG potassium ion channels expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Young Shin; Lee, Hong Joon; Choi, Jin-Sung

    2017-01-01

    The effects of acepromazine on human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channels were investigated using whole-cell voltage-clamp technique in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells transfected with hERG. The hERG currents were recorded with or without acepromazine, and the steady-state and peak tail currents were analyzed for the evaluating the drug effects. Acepromazine inhibited the hERG currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 1.5 µM and Hill coefficient of 1.1. Acepromazine blocked hERG currents in a voltage-dependent manner between –40 and +10 mV. Before and after application of acepromazine, the half activation potentials of hERG currents changed to hyperpolarizing direction. Acepromazine blocked both the steady-state hERG currents by depolarizing pulse and the peak tail currents by repolarizing pulse; however, the extent of blocking by acepromazine in the repolarizing pulse was more profound than that in the depolarizing pulse, indicating that acepromazine has a high affinity for the open state of the channels, with a relatively lower affinity for the closed state of hERG channels. A fast application of acepromazine during the tail currents inhibited the open state of hERG channels in a concentration-dependent. The steady-state inactivation of hERG currents shifted to the hyperpolarized direction by acepromazine. These results suggest that acepromazine inhibits the hERG channels probably by an open- and inactivated-channel blocking mechanism. Regarding to the fact that the hERG channels are the potential target of drug-induced long QT syndrome, our results suggest that acepromazine can possibly induce a cardiac arrhythmia through the inhibition of hERG channels. PMID:28066143

  7. In vitro evaluation of biomarkers for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity using HK-2 human kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sohn, So-Jung; Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Hyung Sik; Chun, Young-Jin; Han, Soon Young; Kim, Seung Hee; Moon, Aree

    2013-03-13

    The non-animal in vitro test methods, especially for assessment of kidney toxicity, have become invaluable tools due to the target organ-selective nature of many nephrotoxic xenobiotics. In vitro evaluation of biomarkers for nephrotoxicity assessment using human cell lines, which can provide more reliable information for toxicological risk evaluation in humans than animal cells, has not been well established to date. The present study investigated the potential use of biomarkers for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity assessment in vitro using HK-2 cells derived from human kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells. Cisplatin induced apoptosis of HK-2 cells in which down-regulation of Bcl-2 and activation of caspase-3 were possibly involved. We investigated the effect of cisplatin on the protein levels of kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1, clusterin, calbindin, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, cystatin C (CysC), β₂-microglobulin (β₂-M) and neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), which have been recently identified as in vivo biomarkers of nephrotoxicity. The protein levels of KIM-1, calbindin and TIMP-1 were significantly increased in the conditioned media of HK-2 cells treated with cisplatin, while β₂-M, CysC, NGAL and clusterin were not affected by cisplatin treatment. The mRNA levels of KIM-1, calbindin and TIMP-1 were increased by cisplatin, indicating that cisplatin-induced up-regulation involves transcriptional activation. The levels of KIM-1, calbindin and TIMP-1 were significantly increased in urine of cisplatin-treated rats, providing in vivo validation of the in vitro results. Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate that among the known in vivo nephrotoxic biomarkers, KIM-1, calbindin and TIMP-1 can be effectively used as in vitro biomarkers for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity using a HK-2 human kidney cell system.

  8. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infections Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  9. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... upcoming screening events. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. About AKF ... support of AKF. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. Free health ...

  10. Kidney Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney transplant Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A kidney transplant is a surgical procedure to place a healthy kidney ... bloodstream via a machine (dialysis) or a kidney transplant to stay alive. Mayo Clinic's approach . Mayo Clinic ...

  11. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease Print A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  12. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease A A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  13. Your Kidneys

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Kidneys KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Kidneys A A A ... and it will be lighter. What Else Do Kidneys Do? Kidneys are always busy. Besides filtering the ...

  14. Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... common type of PKD end up with kidney failure. PKD also causes cysts in other parts of ... and lifestyle changes, and if there is kidney failure, dialysis or kidney transplants. Acquired cystic kidney disease ( ...

  15. Neprilysin is a Mediator of Alternative Renin-Angiotensin-System Activation in the Murine and Human Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Domenig, Oliver; Manzel, Arndt; Grobe, Nadja; Königshausen, Eva; Kaltenecker, Christopher C.; Kovarik, Johannes J.; Stegbauer, Johannes; Gurley, Susan B.; van Oyen, Dunja; Antlanger, Marlies; Bader, Michael; Motta-Santos, Daisy; Santos, Robson A.; Elased, Khalid M.; Säemann, Marcus D.; Linker, Ralf A.; Poglitsch, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and renal pathologies are frequently associated with an activated renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) and increased levels of its main effector and vasoconstrictor hormone angiotensin II (Ang II). Angiotensin-converting-enzyme-2 (ACE2) has been described as a crucial enzymatic player in shifting the RAS towards its so-called alternative vasodilative and reno-protective axis by enzymatically converting Ang II to angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)). Yet, the relative contribution of ACE2 to Ang-(1-7) formation in vivo has not been elucidated. Mass spectrometry based quantification of angiotensin metabolites in the kidney and plasma of ACE2 KO mice surprisingly revealed an increase in Ang-(1-7), suggesting additional pathways to be responsible for alternative RAS activation in vivo. Following assessment of angiotensin metabolism in kidney homogenates, we identified neprilysin (NEP) to be a major source of renal Ang-(1-7) in mice and humans. These findings were supported by MALDI imaging, showing NEP mediated Ang-(1-7) formation in whole kidney cryo-sections in mice. Finally, pharmacologic inhibition of NEP resulted in strongly decreased Ang-(1-7) levels in murine kidneys. This unexpected new role of NEP may have implications for the combination therapy with NEP-inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor-blockade, which has been shown being a promising therapeutic approach for heart failure therapy. PMID:27649628

  16. Clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of mineral and bone disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD-MBD) in adults.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Ambrosoni, Pablo; Carlini, Raúl G; Carvalho, Aluizio B; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso; Jara, Aquiles; Jorgetti, Vanda; Negri, Armando L; Negri, Armando; Olaizola, Inés; Salusky, Isidro; Slatopolsky, Eduardo; Weisinger, José R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorders (CKD-BMD) in adults, of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension (SLANH) comprise a set of recommendations developed to support the doctor in the management of these abnormalities in adult patients with stages 3-5 kidney disease. This excludes changes associated with renal transplantation. The topics covered in the guidelines are divided into four chapters: 1) Evaluation of biochemical changes, 2) Evaluation of bone changes, 3) Evaluation of vascular calcifications, and 4) Treatment of CKD-MBD. The guidelines are based on the recommendations proposed and published by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) for the prevention, diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of CKD-MBD (KDIGO Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis, evaluation, prevention and treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral and Bone Disorder [CKD-MBD]), adapted to the conditions of patients, institutions and resources available in Latin America, with the support of KDIGO. In some cases, the guidelines correspond to management recommendations directly defined by the working group for their implementation in our region, based on the evidence available in the literature. Each chapter contains guidelines and their rationale, supported by numerous updated references. Unfortunately, there are few controlled studies with statistically sufficient weight in Latin America to support specific recommendations for the region, and as such, most of the references used correspond to studies carried out in other regions. This highlights the need to plan research studies designed to establish the current status of mineral and bone metabolism disorders in Latin America as well as defining the best treatment options for our population.

  17. Retinoid Homeostatic Gene Expression in Liver, Lung and Kidney: Ontogeny and Response to Vitamin A-Retinoic Acid (VARA) Supplementation from Birth to Adult Age

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Sarah A.; Ross, A. Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA, retinol) metabolism is homeostatically controlled, but little is known of its regulation in the postnatal period. Here, we determined the postnatal trajectory of VA storage and metabolism in major compartments of VA metabolism–plasma, liver, lung, and kidney from postnatal (P) day 1 to adulthood. We also investigated the response to supplementation with VARA, a combination of VA and 10% all-trans-retinoic acid that previously was shown to synergistically increase retinol uptake and storage in lung. Nursling pups of dams fed a VA-marginal diet received an oral dose of oil (placebo) or VARA on each of four neonatal days: P1, P4, P7, and P10; and again as adults. Tissues were collected 6 h after the final dosing on P1, P4, P10, and at adult age. Gene transcripts for Lrat and Rbp4 in liver and Raldh-1 and Raldh-3 in lung, did not differ in the neonatal period but were higher, P<0.05, in adults, while Cyp26B1, Stra6, megalin, and Raldh-2 in lung did not differ from perinatal to adult ages. VARA supplementation increased total retinol in plasma, liver and lung, with a dose-by-dose accumulation in neonatal liver and lung, while transcripts for Lrat in liver, megalin in kidney, Cyp26A1/B1 in liver and lung, respectively, and Stra6 in lung, were all increased, suggesting pathways of VA uptake, storage and RA oxidation were each augmented after VARA. VARA decreased hepatic expression of Rbp4, responsible for VA trafficking from liver to plasma, and, in lung, of Raldh-1 and Raldh-2, which function in RA production. Our results define retinoid homeostatic gene expression from neonatal and adult age and show that while supplementation with VARA acutely alters retinol content and retinoid homeostatic gene expression in neonatal and adult lung, liver and kidney, VARA supplementation of neonates increased adult-age VA content only in the liver. PMID:26731668

  18. [Determination of lithium content in human biological objects (liver, kidney) by the method of flame photometry].

    PubMed

    Luzanova, I S; Voznesenskaia, T V; Menitskaia, V I; Pushchinskaia, E V

    2007-01-01

    The authors give a method of determination of the content of lithium in biological objects (liver, kidney) by the method of flame photometry. It is possible to use this method in forensic medicine in cases of acute intoxication.

  19. Covert spatial attention is functionally intact in amblyopic human adults

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mariel; Cymerman, Rachel; Smith, R. Theodore; Kiorpes, Lynne; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Certain abnormalities in behavioral performance and neural signaling have been attributed to a deficit of visual attention in amblyopia, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a diverse array of visual deficits following abnormal binocular childhood experience. Critically, most have inferred attention's role in their task without explicitly manipulating and measuring its effects against a baseline condition. Here, we directly investigate whether human amblyopic adults benefit from covert spatial attention—the selective processing of visual information in the absence of eye movements—to the same degree as neurotypical observers. We manipulated both involuntary (Experiment 1) and voluntary (Experiment 2) attention during an orientation discrimination task for which the effects of covert spatial attention have been well established in neurotypical and special populations. In both experiments, attention significantly improved accuracy and decreased reaction times to a similar extent (a) between the eyes of the amblyopic adults and (b) between the amblyopes and their age- and gender-matched controls. Moreover, deployment of voluntary attention away from the target location significantly impaired task performance (Experiment 2). The magnitudes of the involuntary and voluntary attention benefits did not correlate with amblyopic depth or severity. Both groups of observers showed canonical performance fields (better performance along the horizontal than vertical meridian and at the lower than upper vertical meridian) and similar effects of attention across locations. Despite their characteristic low-level vision impairments, covert spatial attention remains functionally intact in human amblyopic adults. PMID:28033433

  20. The nutrition intervention improved adult human capital and economic productivity.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Reynaldo; Melgar, Paul; Maluccio, John A; Stein, Aryeh D; Rivera, Juan A

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews key findings about the long-term impact of a nutrition intervention carried out by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama from 1969 to 1977. Results from follow-up studies in 1988-89 and 2002-04 show substantial impact on adult human capital and economic productivity. The 1988-89 study showed that adult body size and work capacity increased for those provided improved nutrition through age 3 y, whereas the 2002-04 follow-up showed that schooling was increased for women and reading comprehension and intelligence increased in both men and women. Participants were 26-42 y of age at the time of the 2002-04 follow-up, facilitating the assessment of economic productivity. Wages of men increased by 46% in those provided with improved nutrition through age 2 y. Findings for cardiovascular disease risk factors were heterogeneous; however, they suggest that improved nutrition in early life is unlikely to increase cardiovascular disease risk later in life and may indeed lower risk. In conclusion, the substantial improvement in adult human capital and economic productivity resulting from the nutrition intervention provides a powerful argument for promoting improvements in nutrition in pregnant women and young children.

  1. Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids (SILAC)-Based Proteomics of Primary Human Kidney Cells Reveals a Novel Link between Male Sex Hormones and Impaired Energy Metabolism in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Clotet, Sergi; Soler, Maria Jose; Riera, Marta; Pascual, Julio; Fang, Fei; Zhou, Joyce; Batruch, Ihor; Vasiliou, Stella K; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Barrios, Clara; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Scholey, James W; Konvalinka, Ana

    2017-03-01

    Male sex predisposes to many kidney diseases. Considering that androgens exert deleterious effects in a variety of cell types within the kidney, we hypothesized that dihydrotestosterone (DHT) would alter the biology of the renal tubular cell by inducing changes in the proteome. We employed stable isotope labeling with amino acids (SILAC) in an indirect spike-in fashion to accurately quantify the proteome in DHT- and 17β-estradiol (EST)-treated human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC). Of the 5043 quantified proteins, 76 were differentially regulated. Biological processes related to energy metabolism were significantly enriched among DHT-regulated proteins. SILAC ratios of 3 candidates representing glycolysis, N-acetylglucosamine metabolism and fatty acid β-oxidation, namely glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), glucosamine-6-phosphate-N-acetyltransferase 1 (GNPNAT1), and mitochondrial trifunctional protein subunit alpha (HADHA), were verified in vitro. In vivo, renal GPI and HADHA protein expression was significantly increased in males. Furthermore, male sex was associated with significantly higher GPI, GNPNAT1, and HADHA kidney protein expression in two different murine models of diabetes. Enrichment analysis revealed a link between our DHT-regulated proteins and oxidative stress within the diabetic kidney. This finding was validated in vivo, as we observed increased oxidative stress levels in control and diabetic male kidneys, compared with females. This in depth quantitative proteomics study of human primary PTEC response to sex hormone administration suggests that male sex hormone stimulation results in perturbed energy metabolism in kidney cells, and that this perturbation results in increased oxidative stress in the renal cortex. The proteome-level changes associated with androgens may play a crucial role in the development of structural and functional changes in the diseased kidney. With our findings, we propose a possible link between diabetic and

  2. The Phytoalexin Resveratrol Ameliorates Ochratoxin A Toxicity in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK293) Cells.

    PubMed

    Raghubeer, Shanel; Nagiah, Savania; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Chuturgoon, Anil

    2015-12-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a nephrotoxic mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium fungi. It contaminates human and animal food products, and chronic exposure is associated with renal fibrosis in humans (Balkan endemic nephropathy). Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, possesses anti-cancer and antioxidant properties. We investigated the mechanism of cellular oxidative stress induced by OTA, and the effect of resveratrol in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells over 24 and 48 h. Cells were exposed to OTA [IC50 = 1.5 μM (24 h) and 9.4 μM (48 h) determined using MTT assay] and 25 μM resveratrol. Glutathione was quantified by luminometry and gene expression of Nrf2 and OGG1 was determined by qPCR. Protein expression of Nrf2, LonP1, SIRT3, and pSIRT1 was assessed by Western blot, DNA damage (comet assay), and intracellular reactive oxygen species (flow cytometry). At 24 h, resveratrol increased mRNA expression of the DNA repair enzyme, OGG1 (P < 0.05), whereas OTA and OTA+resveratrol significantly decreased OGG1 expression (P < 0.05). OGG1 expression increased during 48-h exposure to resveratrol and OTA+resveratrol (P < 0.05). Comet tail lengths doubled in 48-h OTA-treated cells, whereas at both time periods, OTA+resveratrol yielded shorter comet tails (P < 0.0001). During 24- and 48-h exposure, OTA, resveratrol, and OTA+resveratrol significantly decreased mRNA expression of Nrf2 (P < 0.05). Luminometry analysis of GSH revealed an increase by OTA+resveratrol for 24 and 48 h (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). Western blot analysis showed decreased Nrf2 protein expression during 24-h exposure, but increased Nrf2 expression during 48 h. LonP1 protein expression increased during 24-h exposure to OTA (P < 0.05) and OTA+resveratrol (P < 0.0011) and during 48-h exposure to resveratrol (P < 0.0005).

  3. Multi wall carbon nanotubes induce oxidative stress and cytotoxicity in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anreddy Rama Narsimha; Reddy, Yellu Narsimha; Krishna, Devarakonda Rama; Himabindu, Vurimindi

    2010-06-04

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the potential toxicity and the general mechanism involved in multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)-induced cytotoxicity using human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293) cells. Two multi wall carbon nanotubes (coded as MWCNT1, size: 90-150nm and MWCNT2, size: 60-80nm) used in this study are MWCNT1 (produced by the electric arc method and size of the nanotubes was 90-150nm) and MWCNT2 (produced by the chemical vapor deposition method with size of 60-80nm). To elucidate the possible mechanisms of MWCNT induced cytotoxicity, cell viability, mitochondrial function (MTT assay), cell membrane damage (LDH assay), reduced glutathione (GSH), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and lipid peroxidation levels were quantitatively assessed under carbon nanotubes exposed (48h) conditions. Exposure of different sizes of two carbon nanotubes at dosage levels between 3 and 300mug/ml decreased cell viability in a concentration dependent manner. The IC(50) values (concentration of nanoparticles to induce 50% cell mortality) of two (MWCNT1, MWCNT2) nanoparticles were found as 42.10 and 36.95mug/ml. Exposure of MWCNT (10-100mug/ml) to HEK cells resulted in concentration dependent cell membrane damage (as indicated by the increased levels of LDH), increased production of IL-8, increased TBARS and decreased intracellular glutathione levels. The cytotoxicity and oxidative stress was significantly more in MWCNT2 exposed cells than MWCNT1. In summary, exposure of carbon nanotubes resulted in a concentration dependent cytotoxicity in cultured HEK293 cells that was associated with increased oxidative stress.

  4. Induction Immunosuppression and Clinical Outcomes in Kidney Transplant Recipients Infected With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Kucirka, L M; Durand, C M; Bae, S; Avery, R K; Locke, J E; Orandi, B J; McAdams-DeMarco, M; Grams, M E; Segev, D L

    2016-08-01

    There is an increased risk of acute rejection (AR) in human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) kidney transplant (KT) recipients. Induction immunosuppression is standard of care for those at high risk of AR; however, use in HIV+ patients is controversial, given fears of increased infection rates. We sought to compare clinical outcomes between HIV+ KT recipients who were treated with (i) anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), (ii) IL-2 receptor blocker, and (iii) no induction. We studied 830 HIV+ KT recipients between 2000 and 2014, as captured in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, and compared rates of delayed graft function (DGF), AR, graft loss and death. Infections and hospitalizations were ascertained by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes in a subset of 308 patients with Medicare. Compared with no induction, neither induction agent was associated with an increased risk of infection (weighted hazard ratio [wHR] 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-1.18). HIV+ recipients who received induction spent fewer days in the hospital (weighted relative risk [wRR] 0.70, 95% CI 0.52-0.95), had lower rates of DGF (wRR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.84), less graft loss (wHR 0.47, 95% CI 0.24-0.89) and a trend toward lower mortality (wHR 0.60, 95% CI 0.24-1.28). Those who received induction with ATG had lower rates of AR (wRR 0.59, 95% CI 0.35-0.99). Induction in HIV+ KT recipients was not associated with increased infections; in fact, those receiving ATG, the most potent agent, had the lowest rates. In light of the high risk of AR in this population, induction therapy should be strongly considered.

  5. Announcement: National Kidney Month - March 2017.

    PubMed

    2017-03-03

    Each year, March is designated National Kidney Month to raise awareness about the prevention and early detection of kidney disease. In the United States, kidney disease is the ninth leading cause of death (1). Approximately one in seven (15%) U.S. adults aged ≥20 years are estimated to have chronic kidney disease, most of whom are unaware of their condition (2). If left untreated, chronic kidney disease can lead to kidney failure, requiring dialysis or transplantation for survival (3).

  6. CCM2 expression during prenatal development and adult human neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tanriover, Gamze; Sozen, Berna; Gunel, Murat; Demir, Necdet

    2011-08-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is one of the most common types of vascular malformations of the central nervous system, affecting nearly one in 200 people. CCM lesions are characterized by grossly dilated vascular channels lined by a single layer of endothelium. Genetic linkage analyses have mapped three CCM loci to CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3. All three causative genes have now been identified allowing new insights into CCM pathophysiology. We focused on the CCM2 protein that might take place in blood vessel formation; we report here the expression patterns of CCM2 in prenatal development and adult human neocortex by means of immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. CCM2 was obviously detected in vascular endothelium and neuroglial precursor cells during development and also observed in arterial endothelium, neurons, some of the glial cells in adult neocortex. The expression patterns suggest that it could be one of the arterial markers whether this is a cause or a consequence of an altered vascular identity. CCM2 might play a role during vasculogenesis and angiogenesis during human brain development. Furthermore, with this study, CCM2 have been described for the first time in developing human neocortex.

  7. In Utero Bisphenol A Concentration, Metabolism, and Global DNA Methylation Across Matched Placenta, Kidney, and Liver in the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Muna S.; Liao, Chunyang; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Harris, Craig; Dolinoy, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    While urine has been an easily accessible and feasible matrix for human biomonitoring, analytical measurements in internal tissues and organs can provide more accurate exposure assessments to understand disease etiology. This is especially important for the endocrine active compound, bisphenol A (BPA), where studies investigating internal doses at sensitive periods of human development are currently lacking. Herein, BPA concentrations, BPA-specific metabolizing enzyme gene expression, and global DNA methylation were characterized across three matched tissues from elective pregnancy terminations of 2nd trimester human fetuses: the placenta, liver, and kidney (N=12 each; N=36 total). Compared to liver (free: 0.54-50.5 ng/g), BPA concentrations were lower in matched placenta (<0.05-25.4 ng/g) and kidney (0.08-11.1 ng/g) specimens. BPA-specific metabolism gene expression of GUSB, UGT2B15, STS, and SULT1A1 differed across each tissue type; however, conjugation and deconjugation expression patterns were similar across the fetus. Average LINE1 and CCGG global methylation were 58.3 and 59.2% in placenta, 79.5 and 66.4% in fetal liver, and 77.9 and 77.0% in fetal kidney, with significant tissue-specific DNA methylation differences in both LINE1 (p-value <0.001) and CCGG content (p-value <0.001). Total BPA concentrations were positively associated with global methylation for the placenta only using the LINE1 assay (p-value: 0.002), suggesting organ-specific biological effects after fetal exposure. Utilizing sensitive human clinical specimens, results are informative for BPA toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics assessment in the developing human fetus. PMID:25434263

  8. Functional characterisation of human SGLT-5 as a novel kidney-specific sodium-dependent sugar transporter.

    PubMed

    Grempler, Rolf; Augustin, Robert; Froehner, Stefanie; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Simon, Eric; Mark, Michael; Eickelmann, Peter

    2012-02-03

    Sodium glucose cotransporters (SGLT) actively catalyse carbohydrate transport across cellular membranes. Six of the 12 known SGLT family members have the capacity to bind and/or transport monosaccharides (SGLT-1 to 6); of these, all but SGLT-5 have been characterised. Here we demonstrate that human SGLT-5 is exclusively expressed in the kidney. Four splice variants were detected and the most abundant SGLT-5-mRNA was functionally characterised. SGLT-5 mediates sodium-dependent [(14)C]-α-methyl-D-glucose (AMG) transport that can be inhibited by mannose, fructose, glucose, and galactose. Uptake studies using demonstrated high capacity transport for mannose and fructose and, to a lesser extent, glucose, AMG, and galactose. SGLT-5 mediated mannose, fructose and AMG transport was weakly (μM potency) inhibited by SGLT-2 inhibitors. In summary, we have characterised SGLT-5 as a kidney mannose transporter. Further studies are warranted to explore the physiological role of SGLT-5.

  9. Effect of noble gases on oxygen and glucose deprived injury in human tubular kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Maleeha; Jawad, Noorulhuda; Li, Yuantao; Vizcaychipi, Marcela P; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2010-07-01

    The noble gas xenon has been shown to be protective in preconditioning settings against renal ischemic injury. The aims of this study were to determine the protective effects of the other noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon, on human tubular kidney HK2 cells in vitro. Cultured human renal tubular cells (HK2) were exposed to noble gas preconditioning (75% noble gas; 20% O(2); 5% CO(2)) for three hours or mock preconditioning. Twenty-four hours after gas exposure, cell injury was provoked with oxygen-glucose deprived (OGD) culture medium for three hours. Cell viability was assessed 24 h post-OGD by a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay. Other cohorts of cultured cells were incubated in the absence of OGD in 75% noble gas, 20% O(2) and 5% CO(2) and cellular signals phospho-Akt (p-Akt), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and Bcl-2 were assessed by Western blotting. OGD caused a reduction in cell viability to 0.382 +/- 0.1 from 1.0 +/- 0.15 at control (P < 0.01). Neon, argon and krypton showed no protection from injury (0.404 +/- 0.03; 0.428 +/- 0.02; 0.452 +/- 0.02; P > 0.05). Helium by comparison significantly enhanced cell injury (0.191 +/- 0.05; P < 0.01). Xenon alone exerted a protective effect (0.678 +/- 0.07; P < 0.001). In the absence of OGD, helium was also detrimental (0.909 +/- 0.07; P < 0.01). Xenon caused an increased expression of p-Akt, HIF-1alpha and Bcl-2, while the other noble gases did not modify protein expression. These results suggest that unlike other noble gases, preconditioning with the anesthetic noble gas xenon may have a role in protection against renal ischemic injury.

  10. Blood cleaner on-chip design for artificial human kidney manipulation.

    PubMed

    Suwanpayak, N; Jalil, M A; Aziz, M S; Ismail, F D; Ali, J; Yupapin, P P

    2011-01-01

    A novel design of a blood cleaner on-chip using an optical waveguide known as a PANDA ring resonator is proposed. By controlling some suitable parameters, the optical vortices (gradient optical fields/wells) can be generated and used to form the trapping tools in the same way as optical tweezers. In operation, the trapping force is formed by the combination between the gradient field and scattering photons by using the intense optical vortices generated within the PANDA ring resonator. This can be used for blood waste trapping and moves dynamically within the blood cleaner on-chip system (artificial kidney), and is performed within the wavelength routers. Finally, the blood quality test is exploited by the external probe before sending to the destination. The advantage of the proposed kidney on-chip system is that the unwanted substances can be trapped and filtered from the artificial kidney, which can be available for blood cleaning applications.

  11. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness ( r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores ( r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness.

  12. Renal denervation and hypertension - The need to investigate unintended effects and neural control of the human kidney.

    PubMed

    Grisk, Olaf

    2017-05-01

    Increased renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) is present in human and experimental forms of arterial hypertension. Experimental denervation studies showed that renal nerves contribute to the development of hypertension. Clinical trials provided equivocal results on the antihypertensive efficacy of renal denervation in patients spurring discussions on technical aspects of renal denervation and further research on the role of renal nerves for the regulation of kidney function as well as the pathophysiology of hypertension. This review summarizes recent findings on adrenoceptor expression and function in the human kidney, adrenoceptor-dependent regulation of sodium chloride transport in the distal nephron, experimental data on chronic RSNA and the development of high arterial pressure and consequences of renal denervation that may limit its antihypertensive efficacy. Future research needs to reduce the gap between our knowledge on neural control of renal function in animals vs. humans to facilitate translation of experimental animal data to humans. More experimental studies on the temporal relationship between RSNA and arterial pressure in the chronic setting are needed to better define the pathogenetic role of heightened RSNA in different forms of arterial hypertension in order to improve the rational basis for renal denervation in antihypertensive therapy. Finally, research on unintended consequences of renal denervation including but not limited to reinnervation and denervation supersensitivity needs to be intensified to further assess the potential of renal denervation to slow the progression of renal disease and hypertension.

  13. Health and Nutrition Literacy and Adherence to Treatment in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Chronic Kidney Disease and Hypertension, North Carolina, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Maria; Rak, Eniko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to treatment and dietary restrictions is important for health outcomes of patients with chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension. The relationship of adherence with nutritional and health literacy in children, adolescents, and young adults is not well understood. The current study examined the relationship of health literacy, nutrition knowledge, nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance, and medication adherence in a sample of children and young people with chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension. Methods We enrolled 74 patients (aged 7–29 y) with a diagnosis of chronic/end-stage kidney disease and hypertension from the University of North Carolina Kidney Center. Participants completed instruments of nutrition literacy (Disease-Specific Nutrition Knowledge Test), health literacy (Newest Vital Sign), nutrition behavior (Nutrition Knowledge–Behavior Concordance Scale), and medication adherence (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale). Linear and binary logistic regressions were used to test the associations. Results In univariate comparisons, nutrition knowledge was significantly higher in people with adequate health literacy. Medication adherence was related to nutrition knowledge and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance. Multivariate regression models demonstrated that knowledge of disease-specific nutrition restrictions did not significantly predict nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance scores. In logistic regression, knowledge of nutrition restrictions did not significantly predict medication adherence. Lastly, health literacy and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance were significant predictors of medication adherence. Conclusion Nutrition knowledge and health literacy skills are positively associated. Nutrition knowledge, health literacy, and nutrition knowledge–behavior concordance are positively related to medication adherence. Future research should focus on additional factors that may predict

  14. Biotransport and intracellular ice formation phenomena in freezing human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293T).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunpeng; Zhao, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Ding, Weiping; Shu, Zhiquan; Gao, Dayong

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the cryobiological characteristics of human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells. The cell membrane hydraulic conductivity (L(pg)) and the activation energy of water transport (E(Lp)) were determined in the absence/presence of cryoprotectant agent (CPA), while the nucleation rate kinetic and thermodynamic parameters (Ωo(SCN) and κo(SCN)) were determined in the absence of CPA. Since dehydration and intracellular ice formation (IIF) are two factors that may cause damage to cells during the freezing process, systematical freezing experiments were carried out at different cooling rates (5, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 60°C/min) under the commercial available cryomicroscopy (FDCS 196, Linkham, Waterfield, UK) to further explore the cryoinjury mechanism for HEK293T cells. By simultaneously fitting the water transport equation to the experimentally measured volumetric shrinkage data at 5, 10, and 15°C/min, the "combined best fit" membrane permeability parameters for HEK293T cells in both phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and CPA media (0.75M Me2SO in PBS) are determined. They are L(pg)=2.85×10(-14)m/s/Pa (0.17μm/min/atm), E(Lp)=142.91kJ/mol (34.13kcal/mol) (R(2)=0.990), and L(pg)[cpa]=2.73±0.44×10(-14)m/s/Pa (0.16±0.03μm/min/atm), E(Lp)[cpa]=152.52±27.69kJ/mol (36.42±6.61kcal/mol) (R(2)=0.993), respectively. An optimal cooling rate B(opt) (the highest cooling rate without IIF) was determined to be 14.24°C/min in the absence of CPA. Additionally, the ice nucleation parameters (Ωo(SCN) and κo(SCN)) were averaged to be 1.31±0.11×10(8)m(-2)s(-1) and 7.67±2.55×10(9)K(5) for the cooling rates 20, 30, and 60°C/min.

  15. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  16. Side effects of high-energy shockwaves in the human kidney: first experience with model comparing two shockwave sources.

    PubMed

    Roessler, W; Wieland, W F; Steinbach, P; Hofstaedter, F; Thüroff, S; Chaussy, C

    1996-12-01

    The side effects of high-energy shockwaves (HESW) from two different sources on kidney parenchyma obtained from 10 patients treated by radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma were examined. Immediately after nephrectomy, the kidneys were perfused with cold HTK solution and kept in hypothermia (8 degrees C) for a maximum of 4 hours. In five cases, the tumor-free parenchyma was treated at the upper or lower renal pole with 2000 shocks, energy output 21 kV, in an experimental electromagnetic shockwave system (Siemens Co., Erlangen). In the other five cases, the upper or lower poles were treated with 2000 shocks, energy output 24 kV, in an electrohydraulic spark gap system (MFL 5000; Dornier Medizintechnik, Germering). The resulting tissue defects were analyzed by histologic examinations. Changes after treatment with the electromagnetic system were found mainly in the tubules and midsized blood vessels in a well-defined focal area. Treatment with the electrohydraulic system was followed by tubular and glomerular lesions combined with vessel defects in a patchy pattern. The model is able to define the side effects of HESW in the human kidney and to test the side effects of different lithotripters.

  17. The Inflammatory Transcription Factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 Drive Age-Associated Transcriptional Changes in the Human Kidney.

    PubMed

    O'Brown, Zach K; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Higgins, John P; Kim, Stuart K

    2015-12-01

    Human kidney function declines with age, accompanied by stereotyped changes in gene expression and histopathology, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are largely unknown. To identify potential regulators of kidney aging, we compared age-associated transcriptional changes in the human kidney with genome-wide maps of transcription factor occupancy from ChIP-seq datasets in human cells. The strongest candidates were the inflammation-associated transcription factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3, the activities of which increase with age in epithelial compartments of the renal cortex. Stimulation of renal tubular epithelial cells with the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (a STAT3 activator), IFNγ (a STAT1 activator), or TNFα (an NFκB activator) recapitulated age-associated gene expression changes. We show that common DNA variants in RELA and NFKB1, the two genes encoding subunits of the NFκB transcription factor, associate with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in gene association studies, providing the first evidence that genetic variation in NFκB contributes to renal aging phenotypes. Our results suggest that NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 underlie transcriptional changes and chronic inflammation in the aging human kidney.

  18. The protolobar structure of the human kidney: Its biologic and clinical significance

    SciTech Connect

    Inke, G.

    1988-01-01

    This book depicts the uniqueness of each kidney as a result of the interaction of the process of nephronogenesis with the random variability of vascular channels within the bounds of a limited space. The fields of anatomy, developmental biology, comparative morphology, embryology, nephrology, pathology, physiology, radiology, and urologic surgery are treated.

  19. Renal cortical necrosis and acute kidney injury associated with Plasmodium vivax: a neglected human malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Vanikar, Aruna V; Ghuge, Pramod P; Goswami, Jitendra G; Patel, Mohan P; Patel, Himanshu V; Gumber, Manoj R; Shah, Pankaj R; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2012-11-01

    Plasmodium vivax is causing increasingly more cases of severe malaria worldwide. There is an urgent need to reexamine the clinical spectrum and burden of P. vivax so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this emerging but neglected disease. Herein, we report a case of renal acute cortical necrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI) associated with P. vivax monoinfection. Her initial serum creatinine was 7.3 mg/dL on admission. Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study glomerular filtration rate (GFR) value was 7 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (normal kidney function-GFR above 90 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and no proteinuria). On follow-up, 5 months later, her SCr. was 2.43 mg/dl with no proteinuria. MDRD GFR value was 24 mL/min/1.73 m(2) suggesting severe chronic kidney disease (CKD; GFR less than 60 or kidney damage for at least 3 months), stage 4. Our case report highlights the fact that P. vivax malaria is benign by name but not always by nature. AKI associated with P. vivax malaria can lead to CKD. Further studies are needed to determine why P. vivax infections are becoming more severe.

  20. Gross morphological study of the renal pelvicalyceal patterns in human cadaveric kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Anjana, T. S. R.; Muthian, Elangovan; Thiagarajan, Sivakami; Shanmugam, Sumathi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The knowledge of detailed calyceal anatomy is essential for performing urologic procedures such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy, percutaneous nephrostomy, flexible ureterorenoscopy, endopyelotomy, and retrograde renal surgery. This study was performed to analyze the various patterns of pelvicalyceal system in the South Indian population, and compare these with previously published studies in different populations. Methods: The study was conducted in 100 kidney specimens. Morphologically undamaged kidneys belonging to both sexes were removed en bloc from cadavers and autopsy cases of the Departments of Anatomy and Forensic Medicine, respectively. The specimens were carefully dissected, and the percentage of various patterns was compared with previous studies. Results: The renal pelvis was found to be intrarenal in 79% of the specimens. The most common type of anatomy was a bicalyceal system with two major calyces, one each from the upper and lower poles, with the middle zone drainage dependent on any one or both of them. An interesting and rare variation of extrarenal calyces with the absence of renal pelvis was observed in 1% of the specimens. In addition, the presence of minor calyces opening directly into the renal pelvis was seen in 8% of the specimens. Conclusion: A biclayceal system of drainage with intrarenal pelvis is the most common calyceal pattern in the kidneys. The patterns must be borne in mind while examining a radiological report involving the kidneys. PMID:28197028

  1. Distribution of Tight Junction Proteins in Adult Human Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Ola M.; Kim, Jung-Wan Martin; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A.; Baum, Bruce J.; Tran, Simon D.

    2008-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are an essential structure of fluid-secreting cells, such as those in salivary glands. Three major families of integral membrane proteins have been identified as components of the TJ: claudins, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs), plus the cytosolic protein zonula occludens (ZO). We have been working to develop an orally implantable artificial salivary gland that would be suitable for treating patients lacking salivary parenchymal tissue. To date, little is known about the distribution of TJ proteins in adult human salivary cells and thus what key molecular components might be desirable for the cellular component of an artificial salivary gland device. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of TJ proteins in human salivary glands. Salivary gland samples were obtained from 10 patients. Frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained using IHC methods. Claudin-1 was expressed in ductal, endothelial, and ∼25% of serous cells. Claudins-2, -3, and -4 and JAM-A were expressed in both ductal and acinar cells, whereas claudin-5 was expressed only in endothelial cells. Occludin and ZO-1 were expressed in acinar, ductal, and endothelial cells. These results provide new information on TJ proteins in two major human salivary glands and should serve as a reference for future studies to assess the presence of appropriate TJ proteins in a tissue-engineered human salivary gland. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:1093–1098, 2008) PMID:18765838

  2. Amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of human factor VII sub a from plasma and transfected baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thim, L.; Bjoern, S.; Christensen, M.; Nicolaisen, E.M.; Lund-Hansen, T.; Pedersen, A.H.; Hedner, U. )

    1988-10-04

    Blood coagulation factor VII is a vitamin K dependent glycoprotein which in its activated form, factor VII{sub a}, participates in the coagulation process by activating factor X and/or factor IX in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and tissue factor. Three types of potential posttranslational modifications exist in the human factor VII{sub a} molecule, namely, 10 {gamma}-carboxylated, N-terminally located glutamic acid residues, 1 {beta}-hydroxylated aspartic acid residue, and 2 N-glycosylated asparagine residues. In the present study, the amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of recombinant factor VII{sub a} as purified from the culture medium of a transfected baby hamster kidney cell line have been compared to human plasma factor VII{sub a}. By use of HPLC, amino acid analysis, peptide mapping, and automated Edman degradation, the protein backbone of recombinant factor VII{sub a} was found to be identical with human factor VII{sub a}. Asparagine residues 145 and 322 were found to be fully N-glycosylated in human plasma factor VII{sub a}. In the recombinant factor VII{sub a}, asparagine residue 322 was fully glycosylated whereas asparagine residue 145 was only partially (approximately 66%) glycosylated. Besides minor differences in the sialic acid and fucose contents, the overall carbohydrate compositions were nearly identical in recombinant factor VII{sub a} and human plasma factor VII{sub a}. These results show that factor VII{sub a} as produced in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells is very similar to human plasma factor VII{sub a} and that this cell line thus might represent an alternative source for human factor VII{sub a}.

  3. Site-specific distribution of copper, selenium, and zinc in human kidney by synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Shino; Nakai, Izumi; Misawa, Syogo; Shimojo, Nobuhiro

    1995-10-01

    Distribution of trace elements such as Cu, Se, and Zn in human kidney was examined by use of nondestructive synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) imaging technique. All elements measured were more accumulated in the renal cortex than in the medulla. The renal Cu and Zn distributions obtained by SR-XRF imaging were consistent with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Furthermore, correlation analysis based on the X-ray intensity data of each analytical point showed a positive correlation of the distribution of these elements.

  4. Kidney Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney tests check to see how well your kidneys are working. They include blood, urine, and imaging tests. Early kidney disease usually does not have signs ...

  5. Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cancers in the United States. Cancer Home Kidney Cancer Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... work with the chemical trichloroethylene. What Are the Kidneys? The body has two kidneys, one on each ...

  6. Kidney Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Kidney Problems Basic Facts & Information The kidneys are two ... the production of red blood cells. What are Kidney Diseases? For about one-third of older people, ...

  7. Kidney School

    MedlinePlus

    ... copies? Read our licensing agreement Living Successfully with Kidney Disease People with kidney disease can live long ... Listen Printing multiple copies? Read our licensing agreement Kidneys: How They Work, How They Fail, What You ...

  8. Kidney Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray called a voiding cystourethrogram. Antibiotics for kidney infections Antibiotics are the first line of treatment ... the infection is completely eliminated. Hospitalization for severe kidney infections For a severe kidney infection, your doctor ...

  9. Neuropeptide Y in the adult and fetal human pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Badiu, Corin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we show by use of immunohistochemistry that neuropeptide Y is present in nerve fibers of the adult human pineal gland. The fibers are classical neuropeptidergic fibers endowed with large boutons en passage and primarily located in a perifollicular position with some fibers entering the pineal parenchyma inside the follicle. The distance from the immunoreactive terminals to the pinealocytes indicates a modulatory function of neuropeptide Y for pineal physiology. Some of the immunoreactive fibers might originate from neurons located in the brain and be a part of the central innervation of the pineal gland. In a series of human fetuses, neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers was present and could be detected as early as in the pineal of four- to five-month-old fetuses. This early innervation of the human pineal is different from most rodents, where the innervation starts postnatally.

  10. A Review of the Diagnosis and Treatment of Ochratoxin A Inhalational Exposure Associated with Human Illness and Kidney Disease including Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Janette H.; Hope, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) exposure via ingestion and inhalation has been described in the literature to cause kidney disease in both animals and humans. This paper reviews Ochratoxin A and its relationship to human health and kidney disease with a focus on a possible association with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) in humans. Prevention and treatment strategies for OTA-induced illness are also discussed, including cholestyramine, a bile-acid-binding resin used as a sequestrant to reduce the enterohepatic recirculation of OTA. PMID:22253638

  11. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Maria R.; Rocca, Bruno J.; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T.; Tripodi, Sergio A.; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  12. Cell Therapy Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Renal Progenitors Ameliorates Acute Kidney Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toyohara, Takafumi; Mae, Shin-Ichi; Sueta, Shin-Ichi; Inoue, Tatsuyuki; Yamagishi, Yukiko; Kawamoto, Tatsuya; Kasahara, Tomoko; Hoshina, Azusa; Toyoda, Taro; Tanaka, Hiromi; Araoka, Toshikazu; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Sato, Yasunori; Yamaji, Noboru; Ogawa, Seishi; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is defined as a rapid loss of renal function resulting from various etiologies, with a mortality rate exceeding 60% among intensive care patients. Because conventional treatments have failed to alleviate this condition, the development of regenerative therapies using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) presents a promising new therapeutic option for AKI. We describe our methodology for generating renal progenitors from hiPSCs that show potential in ameliorating AKI. We established a multistep differentiation protocol for inducing hiPSCs into OSR1+SIX2+ renal progenitors capable of reconstituting three-dimensional proximal renal tubule-like structures in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that renal subcapsular transplantation of hiPSC-derived renal progenitors ameliorated the AKI in mice induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury, significantly suppressing the elevation of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels and attenuating histopathological changes, such as tubular necrosis, tubule dilatation with casts, and interstitial fibrosis. To our knowledge, few reports demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapy with renal lineage cells generated from hiPSCs have been published. Our results suggest that regenerative medicine strategies for kidney diseases could be developed using hiPSC-derived renal cells. Significance This report is the first to demonstrate that the transplantation of renal progenitor cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has therapeutic effectiveness in mouse models of acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury. In addition, this report clearly demonstrates that the therapeutic benefits come from trophic effects by the renal progenitor cells, and it identifies the renoprotective factors secreted by the progenitors. The results of this study indicate the feasibility of developing regenerative medicine strategy using iPS cells against renal diseases

  13. Vitrification of kidney precursors as a new source for organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marco-Jiménez, Francisco; Garcia-Dominguez, Ximo; Jimenez-Trigos, Estrella; Vera-Donoso, Cesar D; Vicente, Jose S

    2015-06-01

    Kidney transplantation from deceased or living human donors has been limited by donor availability as opposed to the increasing demand, and by the risk of allograft loss rejection and immunosuppressive therapy toxicity. In recent years, xenotransplantation of developed kidney precursor cells has offered a novel solution for the unlimited supply of human donor organs. Specifically, transplantation of kidney precursors in adult hosts showed that intact embryonic kidneys underwent maturation, exhibiting functional properties, and averted humoural rejection post-transplantation from non-immunosuppressed hosts. Even if supply and demand could be balanced using xenotransplants or lab-grown organs from regenerative medicine, the future of these treatments would still be compromised by the ability to physically distribute the organs to patients in need and to produce these products in a way that allows adequate inventory control and quality assurance. Kidney precursors originating from fifteen-day old rabbit embryos were vitrified using Cryotop® as a device and VM3 as vitrification solution. After 3 months of storage in liquid nitrogen, 18 kidney precursors were transplanted into non-immunosuppressed adult hosts by laparoscopy surgery. Twenty-one days after allotransplantation, 9 new kidneys were recovered. All the new kidneys recovered exhibited significant growth and mature glomeruli. Having achieved these encouraging results, we report, for the first time, that it is possible to create a long-term biobank of kidney precursors as an unlimited source of organs for transplantation, facilitating the inventory control and distribution of organs.

  14. Vanillin mitigates potassium bromate-induced molecular, biochemical and histopathological changes in the kidney of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ben Saad, Hajer; Driss, Dorra; Ellouz Chaabouni, Samia; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Khaled Mounir; Hakim, Ahmed; Ben Amara, Ibtissem

    2016-05-25

    The present study aimed to explore the ability of vanillin to ameliorate the adverse effects induced by potassium bromate (KBrO3) in the renal tissue. Our results showed a significant increase in hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, malondialdehyde, advanced oxidation protein product and protein carbonyl levels in the kidney of KBrO3 treated mice, compared with the control group. Nephrotoxicity was evidenced by a decrease in plasma uric acid and kidney glutathione levels, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, lactate dehydrogenase and catalase activities. Additionally, creatinine and urea levels significantly increased in the plasma and declined in the urine. Also, Kidney glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, metallothionein (MT1 and MT2) mRNA expression remarkably increased. These modifications in biochemical and molecular values were substantiated by histopathological data. Co-treatment with vanillin restored these parameters to near control values. Interestingly, vanillin proved to possess, in vitro, a stronger scavenging radical activity than vitamin C and Trolox. Thus, vanillin inhibited KBrO3-induced damage via its antioxidant and antiradical activities as well as its capacity to protect genes expression and histopathological changes.

  15. Quality of life/spirituality, religion and personal beliefs of adult and elderly chronic kidney patients under hemodialysis 1

    PubMed Central

    Rusa, Suzana Gabriela; Peripato, Gabriele Ibanhes; Pavarini, Sofia Cristina Iost; Inouye, Keika; Zazzetta, Marisa Silvana; Orlandi, Fabiana de Souza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess the quality of life of chronic kidney patients undergoing hemodialysis, using the WHOQOL-bref and WHOQOL-SRPB. METHOD: a descriptive and cross-sectional study was undertaken at a kidney replacement therapy service in the interior of the state of SP. The 110subjects who complied with the inclusion criteria answered the Subject Characterization Instrument, the WHOQOL-bref and WHOQOL-SRPB. RESULTS: most of the respondents were male (67.27%), with a mean age of 55.65 years, Catholic (55.45%), with unfinished primary education (33.64%) and without formal occupation (79.08%). The WHOQOL-bref domains with the highest and lowest mean score were, respectively, "psychological" (µ=74.20) and "physical" (µ=61.14). The WHOQOL-SRPB domains with the highest and lowest mean score were, respectively, "completeness and integration" (µ=4.00) and "faith" (µ=4.40). CONCLUSIONS: the respondents showed high quality of life scores, specifically in the dimensions related to spirituality, religion and personal beliefs. Losses were evidenced in the physical domain of quality of life, possibly due to the changes resulting from the chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis treatment. PMID:25591085

  16. Intermediate-Term Outcomes of Dual Adult versus Single-Kidney Transplantation: Evolution of a Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Ana K.; Mayer, Wesley A.; Hollander, Adam B.; Patel, Samir; Teeter, Larry D.; Graviss, Edward A.; Saharia, Ashish; Podder, Hemangshu; Asham, Emad H.; Gaber, A. Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acceptance of dual kidney transplantation (DKT) has proven difficult, due to surgical complexity and concerns regarding long-term outcomes. We herein present a standard technique for ipsilateral DKT and compare outcomes to single-kidney transplant (SKT) recipients. Methods. A retrospective single-center comparison of DKT and SKT performed between February 2007 and July 2013. Results. Of 516 deceased donor kidney transplants, 29 were DKT and 487 were SKT. Mean follow-up was 43 ± 67 months. DKT recipients were older and more likely than SKT recipients to receive an extended criteria graft (p < 0.001). For DKT versus SKT, the rates of delayed graft function (10.3 versus 9.2%) and acute rejection (20.7 versus 22.4%) were equivalent (p = ns). A higher than expected urologic complication rate in the DKT cohort (14 versus 2%, p < 0.01) was reduced through modification of the ureteral anastomosis. Graft survival was equivalent between DKT and SKT groups (p = ns) with actuarial 3-year DKT patient and graft survivals of 100% and 93%. At 3 years, the groups had similar renal function (p = ns). Conclusions. By utilizing extended criteria donor organs as DKT, the donor pool was enlarged while providing excellent patient and graft survival. The DKT urologic complication rate was reduced by modification of the ureteral anastomosis. PMID:27478630

  17. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells repair cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury through antiapoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weiqi; Hu, Qinyong; Ma, Yuhong; Xiong, Wenping; Wu, Tingting; Cao, Jun; Wu, Dongcheng

    2015-08-01

    Cisplatin has been hypothesized to induce nephrotoxicity through triggering the apoptosis of tubular cells; however, the drug remains widely administered for the treatment of tumors. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to protect the kidney from the adverse effects induced by cisplatin. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of human adipose-derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) on kidney function and tubular cells. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups, which included the healthy controls, those subjected to cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) for 24 h without subsequent treatment and those subjected to cisplatin-induced AKI for 24 h, followed by AD-MSC engraftment. The rats were sacrificed at day 5 and the effects were analyzed using various methods, including biochemical analysis, structural examination and cell tracking experiments. In addition, an in vitro experiment with NRK-52E cells was performed. The cells were divided into three groups, including the healthy control, cisplatin induction and cisplatin induction with co-culture of AD-MSCs, and were subsequently assessed with a Transwell assay. After culture for four days, the cells were lysed and the total protein extract was subjected to western blot analysis. Cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction and tissue damage was shown to recover following AD-MSC infusion, although there were few AD-MSCs observed around the injured kidney tubules in the kidney. When the cisplatin-treated NRK-52E cells were co-cultured with AD-MSCs, the activation of p38 and BAX were inhibited, while the expression of Bcl-2 was upregulated, as compared with the cisplatin-treated NRK-52E cells that were not co-cultured. Therefore, AD-MSCs were shown to markedly improve cisplatin-induced renal failure and tubular cells necrosis through the secretion of certain factors, which subsequently inhibited the apoptosis pathway in vitro. It was hypothesized

  18. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano; Alves da Silva, Ricardo Henrique

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects.

  19. The adult human pubic symphysis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Ines; Woodley, Stephanie J; Stringer, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    The pubic symphysis is a unique joint consisting of a fibrocartilaginous disc sandwiched between the articular surfaces of the pubic bones. It resists tensile, shearing and compressive forces and is capable of a small amount of movement under physiological conditions in most adults (up to 2 mm shift and 1° rotation). During pregnancy, circulating hormones such as relaxin induce resorption of the symphyseal margins and structural changes in the fibrocartilaginous disc, increasing symphyseal width and mobility. This systematic review of the English, German and French literature focuses on the normal anatomy of the adult human pubic symphysis. Although scientific studies of the joint have yielded useful descriptive data, comparison of results is hampered by imprecise methodology and/or poorly controlled studies. Several aspects of the anatomy of the pubic symphysis remain unknown or unclear: the precise attachments of surrounding ligaments and muscles; the arrangement of connective tissue fibres within the interpubic disc and the origin, structure and function of its associated interpubic cleft; the biomechanical consequences of sexual dimorphism; potential ethnic variations in morphology; and its precise innervation and blood supply. These deficiencies hinder our understanding of the normal form and function of the joint, which is particularly relevant when attempting to understand the mechanisms underlying pregnancy-related pubic symphyseal pain, a neglected and relatively common cause of pubic pain. A better understanding of the normal anatomy of the human pubic symphysis should improve our understanding of such problems and contribute to better treatments for patients suffering from symphyseal pain and dysfunction. PMID:20840351

  20. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano

    2016-01-01

    Absract The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects. PMID:27847394

  1. Quantifying creatinine and urea in human urine through Raman spectroscopy aiming at diagnosis of kidney disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saatkamp, Cassiano Junior; de Almeida, Maurício Liberal; Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martins; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2016-03-01

    Due to their importance in the regulation of metabolites, the kidneys need continuous monitoring to check for correct functioning, mainly by urea and creatinine urinalysis. This study aimed to develop a model to estimate the concentrations of urea and creatinine in urine by means of Raman spectroscopy (RS) that could be used to diagnose kidney disease. Midstream urine samples were obtained from 54 volunteers with no kidney complaints. Samples were subjected to a standard colorimetric assay of urea and creatinine and submitted to spectroscopic analysis by means of a dispersive Raman spectrometer (830 nm, 350 mW, 30 s). The Raman spectra of urine showed peaks related mainly to urea and creatinine. Partial least squares models were developed using selected Raman bands related to urea and creatinine and the biochemical concentrations in urine measured by the colorimetric method, resulting in r=0.90 and 0.91 for urea and creatinine, respectively, with root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSEcv) of 312 and 25.2 mg/dL, respectively. RS may become a technique for rapid urinalysis, with concentration errors suitable for population screening aimed at the prevention of renal diseases.

  2. Quantifying creatinine and urea in human urine through Raman spectroscopy aiming at diagnosis of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Saatkamp, Cassiano Junior; de Almeida, Maurício Liberal; Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martins; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Silveira, Landulfo

    2016-03-01

    Due to their importance in the regulation of metabolites, the kidneys need continuous monitoring to check for correct functioning, mainly by urea and creatinine urinalysis. This study aimed to develop a model to estimate the concentrations of urea and creatinine in urine by means of Raman spectroscopy (RS) that could be used to diagnose kidney disease. Midstream urine samples were obtained from 54 volunteers with no kidney complaints. Samples were subjected to a standard colorimetric assay of urea and creatinine and submitted to spectroscopic analysis by means of a dispersive Raman spectrometer (830 nm, 350 mW, 30 s). The Raman spectra of urine showed peaks related mainly to urea and creatinine. Partial least squares models were developed using selected Raman bands related to urea and creatinine and the biochemical concentrations in urine measured by the colorimetric method, resulting in r = 0.90 and 0.91 for urea and creatinine, respectively, with root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSEcv) of 312 and 25.2 mg/dL, respectively. RS may become a technique for rapid urinalysis, with concentration errors suitable for population screening aimed at the prevention of renal diseases.

  3. Microsomal and cytosolic scaling factors in dog and human kidney cortex and application for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of renal metabolic clearance.

    PubMed

    Scotcher, Daniel; Billington, Sarah; Brown, Jay; Jones, Christopher; Brown, Colin D A; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2017-03-07

    In vitro-in vivo extrapolation of drug metabolism data obtained in enriched preparations of sub-cellular fractions rely upon robust estimates of physiologically relevant scaling factors for prediction of clearance in vivo. The purpose of the current study was to measure the microsomal and cytosolic protein per gram of kidney (MPPGK and CPPGK) in dog and human kidney cortex using appropriate protein recovery markers, and evaluate functional activity of human cortex microsomes. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) content and glucose-6-phosphatase activity were used as microsomal protein markers, whereas glutathione-S-transferase activity was a cytosolic marker. Functional activity of human microsomal samples was assessed by measuring mycophenolic acid glucuronidation. MPPGK was 33.9 and 44.0 mg/g dog kidney cortex, and 41.1 and 63.6 mg/g dog liver (n=17), using CYP content and glucose-6-phosphatase activity, respectively. There were no trends between kidney, liver and intestinal scalars from the same animals. Species differences were evident, as human MPPGK and CPPGK were 26.2 and 53.3 mg/g kidney cortex (n=38), respectively. MPPGK was 2-fold higher than the commonly used in vitro-in vivo extrapolation scalar; difference was mainly attributed to tissue source (mixed kidney regions vs cortex). Robust human MPPGK and CPPGK scalars were measured for the first time. The work emphasized the importance of regional differences (cortex vs. whole kidney specific MPPGK, tissue weight and blood flow) and a need to account for these to improve assessment of renal metabolic clearance and its extrapolation to in vivo.

  4. COGNITIVE-HD study: protocol of an observational study of neurocognitive functioning and association with clinical outcomes in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Suetonia C; Ruospo, Marinella; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Iurillo, Annalisa; Saglimbene, Valeria; Natale, Patrizia; Gargano, Letizia; Murgo, Angelo M; Loy, Clement; van Zwieten, Anita; Wong, Germaine; Tortelli, Rosanna; Craig, Jonathan C; Johnson, David W; Tonelli, Marcello; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Wollheim, Charlotta; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Strippoli, G F M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of cognitive impairment may be increased in adults with end-stage kidney disease compared with the general population. However, the specific patterns of cognitive impairment and association of cognitive dysfunction with activities of daily living and clinical outcomes (including withdrawal from treatment) among haemodialysis patients remain incompletely understood. The COGNITIVE impairment in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with HemoDialysis (COGNITIVE-HD) study aims to characterise the age-adjusted and education-adjusted patterns of cognitive impairment (using comprehensive testing for executive function, perceptual-motor function, language, learning and memory, and complex attention) in patients on haemodialysis and association with clinical outcomes. Methods and analysis A prospective, longitudinal, cohort study of 750 adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with long-term haemodialysis has been recruited within haemodialysis centres in Italy (July 2013 to April 2014). Testing for neurocognitive function was carried out by a trained psychologist at baseline to assess cognitive functioning. The primary study factor is cognitive impairment and secondary study factors will be specific domains of cognitive function. The primary outcome will be total mortality. Secondary outcomes will be cause-specific mortality, major cardiovascular events, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke, institutionalisation, and withdrawal from treatment at 12 months. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved before study conduct by the following responsible ethics committees: Catania (approval reference 186/BE; 26/09/2013), Agrigento (protocol numbers 61–62; 28/6/2013), USL Roma C (CE 39217; 24/6/2013), USL Roma F (protocol number 0041708; 23/7/2013), USL Latina (protocol number 20090/A001/2011; 12/7/2013), Trapani (protocol number 3413; 16/7/2013) and Brindisi (protocol number 40259; 6/6/2013). All participants

  5. [Topography and mechanisms of adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria in the human kidney and renal pelvis].

    PubMed

    Vierbuchen, M; Peters, G; Ortmann, M; Pulverer, G; Fischer, R

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence and significance of bacterial carbohydrate recognition proteins (bacterial lectins) and endogenous carbohydrate binding proteins (endogenous lectins) of human urothelium as well as kidney tubulus epithelium was analyzed with respect to the adhesion of urotoxogenic Escherichia coli bacteria. Using biotinylated neoglycoproteins, we demonstrated a wide spectrum of endogenous lectins with Galactose-, Mannose-, Fucose-, N-Acetylgalactosamine-, and N-Acetylglucosamine binding activities in the urothelium. In the kidney the distal nephron and especially the medullar collecting ducts exhibited a similar spectrum of endogenous carbohydrate binding activities as detected for the urothelium. Adhesion- as well as inhibition-experiments with selective blocking of either bacterial lectins or endogenous lectins of the target cells by different carbohydrates both reduced the bacterial adhesion. However, maximal inhibition of bacterial adhesion was achieved by simultanous blocking of microbial and target cell lectins with mannose or mannan. From these results it is reasonable to conclude that specific adhesion which may result in an organotropism (urotropism) of E. coli infection is due to a dual recognition mechanism which is accomplished by the combined interaction of the bachterial and host cell lectins with the corresponding carbohydrates of E. coli and that of the target cells respectively. Further studies showed that normal human serum possesses natural antiadhesins which are represented by the glycan parts of the serum-glycoproteins.

  6. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity in human hepatocyte and embryonic kidney cells exposed to ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Rongfa; Kang, Tianshu; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Zhiguo; Shen, Haitao; Liu, Mingqi

    2012-10-01

    Traces of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) used may be found in the liver and kidney. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal viability assay for using with ZnO NPs and to assess their toxicity to human hepatocyte (L02) and human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (MTT assay), and oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were assessed under control and exposed to ZnO NPs conditions for 24 h. The results demonstrated that ZnO NPs lead to cellular morphological modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cause reduction of SOD, depletion of GSH, and oxidative DNA damage. The exact mechanism behind ZnO NPs toxicity suggested that oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation played an important role in ZnO NPs-elicited cell membrane disruption, DNA damage, and subsequent cell death. Our preliminary data suggested that oxidative stress might contribute to ZnO NPs cytotoxicity.

  7. Role of angiotensin in the congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract in the mouse and the human.

    PubMed

    Yerkes, E; Nishimura, H; Miyazaki, Y; Tsuchida, S; Brock, J W; Ichikawa, I

    1998-09-01

    The role of angiotensin in fluid and electrolyte and blood pressure homeostasis is well known. Recent developments indicate that angiotensin has a profound role not only in the developing urinary tract but also in the response of the urinary tract to specific noxious stimuli. Furthermore, the role of angiotensin II and its receptor has been understood quite poorly with respect to the developing renal unit. Knockout mice for the ATR2 gene show a significant incidence of congenital urinary tract anomalies. The congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) seen in these mice are very similar to the anomalies observed in humans. This has been supported further by the finding of an abnormality in the genetic sequence in patients with CAKUT. This article reviews experimental laboratory data as well as the potential implications for humans.

  8. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2: differential expression and secretion in human kidney tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Emlet, David R; Pastor-Soler, Nuria; Marciszyn, Allison; Wen, Xiaoyan; Gomez, Hernando; Humphries, William H; Morrisroe, Seth; Volpe, Jacob K; Kellum, John A

    2017-02-01

    We have characterized the expression and secretion of the acute kidney injury (AKI) biomarkers insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) in human kidney epithelial cells in primary cell culture and tissue. We established cell culture model systems of primary kidney cells of proximal and distal tubule origin and observed that both proteins are indeed expressed and secreted in both tubule cell types in vitro. However, TIMP-2 is both expressed and secreted preferentially by cells of distal tubule origin, while IGFBP7 is equally expressed across tubule cell types yet preferentially secreted by cells of proximal tubule origin. In human kidney tissue, strong staining of IGFBP7 was seen in the luminal brush-border region of a subset of proximal tubule cells, and TIMP-2 stained intracellularly in distal tubules. Additionally, while some tubular colocalization of both biomarkers was identified with the injury markers kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, both biomarkers could also be seen alone, suggesting the possibility for differential mechanistic and/or temporal profiles of regulation of these early AKI biomarkers from known markers of injury. Last, an in vitro model of ischemia-reperfusion demonstrated enhancement of secretion of both markers early after reperfusion. This work provides a rationale for further investigation of these markers for their potential role in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury.

  9. The Effect of Body Mass on Outdoor Adult Human Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Spencer, Jessica R; Dabbs, Gretchen R

    2017-02-23

    Forensic taphonomy explores factors impacting human decomposition. This study investigated the effect of body mass on the rate and pattern of adult human decomposition. Nine males and three females aged 49-95 years ranging in mass from 73 to 159 kg who were donated to the Complex for Forensic Anthropology Research between December 2012 and September 2015 were included in this study. Kelvin accumulated degree days (KADD) were used to assess the thermal energy required for subjects to reach several total body score (TBS) thresholds: early decomposition (TBS ≥6.0), TBS ≥12.5, advanced decomposition (TBS ≥19.0), TBS ≥23.0, and skeletonization (TBS ≥27.0). Results indicate no significant correlation between body mass and KADD at any TBS threshold. Body mass accounted for up to 24.0% of variation in decomposition rate depending on stage, and minor differences in decomposition pattern were observed. Body mass likely has a minimal impact on postmortem interval estimation.

  10. Adult human liver mesenchymal progenitor cells express phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Baruteau, Julien; Nyabi, Omar; Najimi, Mustapha; Fauvart, Maarten; Sokal, Etienne

    2014-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases and is accountable for a severe encephalopathy by progressive intoxication of the brain by phenylalanine. This results from an ineffective L-phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme (PAH) due to a mutated phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Neonatal screening programs allow an early dietetic treatment with restrictive phenylalanine intake. This diet prevents most of the neuropsychological disabilities but remains challenging for lifelong compliance. Adult-derived human liver progenitor cells (ADHLPC) are a pool of precursors that can differentiate into hepatocytes. We aim to study PAH expression and PAH activity in a differenciated ADHLPC. ADHLPC were isolated from human hepatocyte primary culture of two different donors and differenciated under specific culture conditions. We demonstrated the high expression of PAH and a large increase of PAH activity in differenciated LPC. The age of the donor, the cellular viability after liver digestion and cryopreservation affects PAH activity. ADHLPC might therefore be considered as a suitable source for cell therapy in PKU.

  11. Ossified Ligamentum Longitudinale Anterius in Adult Human Dry Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Venumadhav, Nelluri; KS, Siddaraju

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ligamentum longitudinale anterius is a broad and strong band of fibrous tissue that runs along the anterior surfaces of the bodies of the vertebrae. Aim: The study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius in adult dry human vertebra. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 95 sets of dry human vertebral columns irrespective of age and sex at Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences- Barabanki,-UP, Melaka Manipal Medical College-Manipal University and Department of Anatomy, KMCT Medical College, Manassery- Calicut, India. All the sets of vertebral columns were macroscopically inspected for the ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius. Results: It was observed that out of 95 sets of vertebral columns, 27 (28.42%) vertebral columns showed ossification. Out of 27 vertebral columns, 17 (17.89%) vertebral columns showed segmental type of ossification, 2 (2.11%) vertebral columns showed continuous type of ossification and 8 (8.42%) vertebral columns showed mixed type of ossification at different vertebral level. Conclusion: Such type of ossification will affect the biomechanics of the spine and may result in stiff neck, low back pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, compression of the brachial plexus, aphonia, immobility or mucosal thickening of larynx. Hence, knowledge of such abnormalities should be kept in mind to minimise serious complications in any surgical intervention or investigative procedures in the region. PMID:25302180

  12. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.

  13. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    DOE PAGES

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection.more » Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.« less

  14. Comprehensive cellular‐resolution atlas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Royall, Joshua J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A.C.; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet‐Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A.; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A.; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L.; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A.; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W.; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H. Ronald; Hohmann, John G.; Jones, Allan R.; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole‐brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high‐resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion‐weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large‐format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto‐ and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127–3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27418273

  15. Enhanced propagation of adult human renal epithelial progenitor cells to improve cell sourcing for tissue-engineered therapeutic devices for renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Westover, Angela J; Buffington, Deborah A; Humes, H D

    2012-08-01

    Renal cell therapy employing cells derived from adult renal epithelial cell (REC) progenitors promises to reduce the morbidity of patients with renal insufficiency due to acute renal failure and end stage renal disease. To this end, tissue engineered devices addressing the neglected biologic component of renal replacement therapy are being developed. Because human donor tissue is limited, novel enhanced progenitor cell propagation (EP) techniques have been developed and applied to adult human kidney transplant discards from six donors. Changes include more efficient digestion and the amplification of progenitors prior to terminal epithelial differentiation promoted by contact inhibition and the addition of retinoic acid. Differentiated morphology in EP populations was demonstrated by the ability to form polarized epithelium with tight junctions, apical central cilia and expression of brush border membrane enzymes. Evaluation of lipopolysaccharide stimulated interleukin-8 secretion and γ-glutamyl transpeptisade activity in EP derived cells was used to confirm therapeutic equivalence to REC obtained using published techniques, which have previously shown efficacy in large animal models and clinical trials. Yield exceeded 10(16) cells/gram cortex from the only kidney obtained due to an anatomical defect, while the average yield from diseased kidneys ranged from 1.1 × 10(9) to 8.8 × 10(11) cells/gram cortex, representing an increase of more than 10 doublings over standard methods. Application of the EP protocol to REC expansion has solved the problem of cell sourcing as the limiting factor to the manufacture of cell based therapies targeting renal diseases and may provide a method for autologous device fabrication from core kidney biopsies.

  16. Methanol exposure does not produce oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, liver or kidney of adult mice, rabbits or primates

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, Gordon P.; Siu, Michelle; Sweeting, J. Nicole; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-01-15

    In vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests indicate methanol (MeOH) is not mutagenic, but carcinogenic potential has been claimed in one controversial long-term rodent cancer bioassay that has not been replicated. To determine whether MeOH could indirectly damage DNA via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanisms, we treated male CD-1 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) and 6 h later assessed oxidative damage to DNA, measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) by HPLC with electrochemical detection. We found no MeOH-dependent increases in 8-oxodG in lung, liver or kidney of any species. Chronic treatment of CD-1 mice with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) daily for 15 days also did not increase 8-oxodG levels in these organs. These results were corroborated in DNA repair-deficient oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) knockout (KO) mice, which accumulated 8-oxodG in lung, kidney and liver with age, but exhibited no increase following MeOH, despite a 2-fold increase in renal 8-oxodG in Ogg1 KO mice following treatment with a ROS-initiating positive control, the renal carcinogen potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}; 100 mg/kg ip). These observations suggest that MeOH exposure does not promote the accumulation of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, kidney or liver, and that environmental exposure to MeOH is unlikely to initiate carcinogenesis in these organs by DNA oxidation.

  17. Human herpesvirus-8 infection and Kaposi's sarcoma after liver and kidney transplantation in different geographical areas of Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Astudillo, Luis Alfonso; Leyva-Cobián, Francisco

    2006-12-01

    Since data on human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) infection in Spain is not available, our purpose was to determine the prevalence of HHV-8 infection and the risk of developing Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) among organ transplant recipients in different geographical areas of Spain. The study population consisted of 1019 liver and kidney transplant recipients recruited in four transplant units in Spain. Only post-transplant serum samples were available for all participants. IgG anti-HHV-8 latent and lytic antigens were detected by using an indirect immunofluorescence assay as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays. In available samples, HHV-8 DNA genome was detected by using a nested polymerase chain reaction in sera, blood mononuclear cells and KS tissues. The prevalence of HHV-8 infection after transplantation was calculated. To determine risk factors for infection, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were also calculated. Of the 788 kidney transplants, 5 (0.6%) were HHV-8-positive shortly after transplantation. Of the 231 liver transplant individuals, 8 (3.4%) developed IgG anti-HHV-8 antibodies after transplantation. Thus, incidence of HHV-8 infection is significantly higher among liver transplant recipients in comparison with that in the control population (OR=6, 95% CI=1.2-28.5, p<0.05). In this series, HHV-8 prevalence in liver transplant recipients was higher in the northern (6.6-6.9%) than in the central (2.9%) or the southeastern (1.4%) areas of Spain. Four renal transplant recipients (0.5%) and five of the liver transplant recipients (2.16%) developed KS after transplantation. Time of KS diagnosis after transplant is significantly higher in kidney transplant patients (33.7 months) than in liver transplant recipients (10.4 months), indicating that the latter have a higher risk of developing KS.

  18. Liver, spleen, pancreas and kidney involvement by human fascioliasis: imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Zali, Mohammad Reza; Ghaziani, Tahereh; Shahraz, Saeed; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Radmehr, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Background Fasciola hepatica primarily involves the liver, however in some exceptional situations other organs have been reported to be involved. The ectopic involvement is either a result of Parasite migration or perhaps eosinophilic reaction. Case presentation Here we report a known case of multiple myeloma who was under treatment with prednisolone and melphalan. He was infected by Fasciola hepatica, which involved many organs and the lesions were mistaken with metastatic ones. Discussion Presented here is a very unusual case of the disease, likely the first case involving the pancreas, spleen, and kidney, as well as the liver. PMID:15294025

  19. Outcomes of Adults with Ewing’s Sarcoma Family of Tumors (ESFT) of the Kidney: A Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Teegavarapu, Purnima Sravanti; Rao, Priya; Matrana, Marc R.; Cauley, Diana H.; Wood, Christopher; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ewing’s sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) of the kidney are exceedingly rare. Given the rarity of this neoplasm and the complexity associated with its management, information regarding treatment and outcome is warranted. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of patients with ESFT of the kidney who were treated at MDACC between 1/1/2001 and 1/1/2011. Descriptive statistics were used. Results Thirteen patients were identified. (Median age 33 years; male:female 11:2). Common presenting symptoms were back pain, flank pain and hematuria. Six patients had metastatic disease at presentation. Initial diagnostic biopsy was performed in six patients. Immunohistochemistry showed strong positivity for CD99 (mic2) and cytogenetic analysis demonstrated evidence of EWSR1 fusion gene in eight cases. Nine patients underwent nephrectomy. Frequently used chemotherapy regimens consisted of vincristine, doxorubicin, and ifosfamide. Median overall survival (OS) was 17.2 months. Three patients were alive at the time of analysis, at 2 years, 7 years and 11 years from diagnosis (the latter without evidence of disease). Conclusion Renal ESFT carry a guarded prognosis with limited response to therapy and short median OS. For patients with metastatic disease, diagnostic biopsy and sarcoma-based chemotherapy regimens are recommended as upfront therapeutic strategy. The role of nephrectomy in the metastatic setting is unclear. Future studies with novel therapies are needed. PMID:25222071

  20. Antihypertensive treatments in adult autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: network meta-analysis of the randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bing; Yu, Shengqiang; Xu, Chenggang; Mao, Zhiguo; Ye, Chaoyang; Chen, Dongping; Zhao, Xuezhi; Wu, Jun; Chen, Wansheng; Mei, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) control is one of the most important treatments of Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The comparative efficacy of antihypertensive treatments in ADPKD patients is inconclusive. Methods Network meta-analysis was used to evaluate randomized controlled trials (RCT) which investigated antihypertensive treatments in ADPKD. PubMed, Embase, Ovid, and Cochrane Collaboration were searched. The primary outcome was estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Secondary outcomes were serum creatinine (Scr), urinary albumin excretion (UAE), systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean artery pressure (MAP) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Results We included 10 RCTs with 1386 patients and six interventions: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI), Angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), combination of ACEI and ARB, calcium channel blockers (CCB), β-blockers and dilazep. There was no difference of eGFR in all the treatments in both network and direct comparisons. No significant differences of Scr, SBP, DBP, MAP, and LVMI were found in network comparisons. However, ACEI significantly reduced SBP, DBP, MAP and LVMI when compared to CCB. Significantly increased UAE was observed in CCB compared with ACEI or ARB. Bayesian probability analysis found ARB ranked first in the surrogate measures of eGFR, UAE and SBP. Conclusions There is little evidence to detect differences of antihypertensive treatments on kidney disease progression in ADPKD patients. More RCTs will be needed in the future. Use of ARB may be an optimal choice in clinical practice. PMID:26636542

  1. Kidney transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100087.htm Kidney transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  2. Prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) inhibition protects human renal epithelial cells and mice kidney from hypoxia injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yihong; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) is a key oxygen sensor, setting low steady-state level of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α). Here, we showed that treatment of cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a hypoxia mimic, in HK-2 tubular epithelial cells induced PHD2 and HIF-1/2α expression as well as cell apoptosis and autophagy activation. Three methyladenine (3-MA), the autophagy inhibitor, blocked autophagy and protected HK-2 cells from CoCl2. Significantly, siRNA knockdown of PHD2 also protected HK-2 cells from CoCl2, possibly via increasing HIF-1α expression. Reversely, HIF-1α siRNA knockdown almost abolished cytoprotection by PHD2 siRNA in CoCl2-treated HK-2 cells. In vivo, pretreatment with a PHD inhibitor L-mimosine remarkably attenuated mice renal ischemia-reperfusion injuries. Molecularly, L-mimosine inhibited apoptosis and inflammatory responses in injured mice kidneys. Together, our results suggest that PHD2 silence or inhibition protects human renal epithelial cells and mice kidney from hypoxia injuries. PMID:27527871

  3. Icariin combined with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells significantly improve the impaired kidney function in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Wang, Li; Chu, Xiaoqian; Cui, Huantian; Bian, Yuhong

    2017-04-01

    At present, the main therapy for chronic renal failure (CRF) is dialysis and renal transplantation, but neither obtains satisfactory results. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (huMSCs) are isolated from the fetal umbilical cord which has a high self-renewal and multi-directional differentiation potential. Icariin (ICA), a kidney-tonifying Chinese Medicine can enhance the multipotency of huMSCs. Therefore, this work seeks to employ the use of ICA-treated huMSCs for the treatment of chronic renal failure. Blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (Cr) analyses showed amelioration of functional parameters in ICA-treated huMSCs for the treatment of CRF rats at 3, 7, and 14 days after transplantation. ICA-treated huMSCs can obviously increase the number of cells in injured renal tissues at 3, 7, and 14 days after transplantation by optical molecular imaging system. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that ICA-treated huMSCs reduced the levels of fibrosis in CRF rats at 14 days after transplantation. Superoxide dismutase and Malondialdehyde analyses showed that ICA-treated huMSCs reduced the oxidative damage in CRF rats. Moreover, transplantation with ICA-treated huMSCs decreased inflammatory responses, promoted the expression of growth factors, and protected injured renal tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that ICA-treated huMSCs could improve the kidney function in CRF rats.

  4. Human kidney damage in fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever results of glomeruli injury mainly induced by IL17.

    PubMed

    Pagliari, Carla; Simões Quaresma, Juarez Antônio; Kanashiro-Galo, Luciane; de Carvalho, Leda Viegas; Vitoria, Webster Oliveira; da Silva, Wellington Luiz Ferreira; Penny, Ricardo; Vasconcelos, Barbara Cristina Baldez; da Costa Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas

    2016-02-01

    Acute kidney injury is an unusual complication during dengue infection. The objective of this study was to better identify the characteristics of glomerular changes focusing on in situ immune cells and cytokines. An immunohistochemical assay was performed on 20 kidney specimens from fatal human cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). It was observed a lymphomononuclear infiltrate, neutrophils and nuclear fragmentation in the glomeruli, hydropic degeneration, nuclear retraction, eosinophilic tubules and intense acute congestion. Sickle erythrocytes were frequent in glomeruli and inflammatory infiltrate. The glomeruli presented endothelial swelling and mesangial proliferation. Lymphocytes CD4+ predominated over CD8+ T cells, B cells and natural killer cells. There were also an expressive number of macrophagic CD68+ cells. S100, Foxp3 and CD123 cells were not identified. Cells expressing IL17 and IL18+ cytokines predominated in the renal tissues, while IL4, IL6, IL10, IL13, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma were rarely visualized. The high number of cells expressing IL17 and IL18+ could reflect the acute inflammatory response and possibly contribute to the local lesion. CD8+ T cells could play a role in the cytotoxic response. DHF is a multifactorial disease of capillary leakage associated with a "Tsunami of cytokines expression". The large numbers of cells expressing IL17 seems to play a role favoring the increased permeability.

  5. A retinoid responsive cytokine gene, MK, is preferentially expressed in the proximal tubules of the kidney and human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, M.; Shirasawa, T.; Mitarai, T.; Muramatsu, T.; Maruyama, N.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the expression of an embryonic cytokine gene, MK, in the normal organs and neoplastic tissues of adults. Northern analysis showed that MK mRNA was exclusively expressed in the kidney among murine organs including thymus, lung, heart, spleen, liver, and kidney. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that MK expression was localized in the proximal tubules and metaplastic Bowman's epithelium, but not in other nephron segments such as glomeruli, loop of Henle, distal tubules, and collecting ducts. To investigate whether MK expression is a marker of tubular cell lineage, several cell lines originating from renal tubules were tested. No expression of MK was detected in PtK1 and LLC-PK1 cells derived from marsupial and porcine proximal tubules or in MDBK and MDCK cells from bovine and canine distal/collecting tubules. Unexpectedly, the MK gene was expressed in a human renal cell carcinoma line, VMRC-RCW, and the expression was up-regulated in the presence of retinoic acid. To elucidate the involvement of MK in the development of tumors, we further examined its expression in a variety of human neoplastic cell lines: YMB-1-C (breast cancer), EBC-1 (lung squamous cell carcinoma), RERF-LC-OK (lung adenocarcinoma), SBC-3 (lung small cell carcinoma), HSC-2 (mouth squamous cell carcinoma), NUGC-2 (gastric cancer), COLO201 (colon cancer), HepG2 (hepatoma), MIA PaCa-2 (pancreatic cancer), MCAS (ovarian cancer), HeLa (cervical cancer), BeWo (chorionic carcinoma), ITO-II (testicular tumor), T24 (urinary bladder tumor), and G-401 (Wilms' tumor). Strong signals were detected in COLO201, HepG2, ITO-II, T24, G-401, and weaker but distinct signals were detected in YMB-1-C, HSC-2, and MCAS cells. The MK gene was, therefore, widely expressed in neoplastic cells originating from genital organs, intestinal tract, liver, mammary gland, and urinary tract, and the expression was not restricted to adenocarcinomas, but was also observed in other types of

  6. Expression of lumbosacral HOX genes, crucial in kidney organogenesis, is systematically deregulated in clear cell kidney cancers.

    PubMed

    Cantile, Monica; Schiavo, Giulia; Franco, Renato; Cindolo, Luca; Procino, Alfredo; D'Armiento, Maria; Facchini, Gaetano; Terracciano, Luigi; Botti, Gerardo; Cillo, Clemente

    2011-06-01

    Homeobox-containing genes are involved in different stages of kidney organogenesis, from the early events in intermediate mesoderm to terminal differentiation of glomerular and tubular epithelia. The HOX genes show a unique genomic network organization and regulate normal development. The targeted disruption of paralogous group 11 HOX genes (HOX A11, HOX C11 and HOX D11) results in a complete loss of metanephric kidney induction. Despite a large amount of data are related to the early events in the kidney development, not much is known about HOX genes in advanced kidney organogenesis and carcinogenesis. Here, we compare the expression of the whole HOX gene network in late-stage human foetal kidney development with the same patterns detected in 25 pairs of normal clear cell renal carcinomas (RCCs) and 15 isolated RCC biopsy samples. In the majority of RCCs tested, HOX C11 is upregulated, whereas HOX D11, after an early involvement becomes active again at the 23rd week of the foetal kidney development, is always expressed in normal adult kidneys and is deregulated, together with HOX A11 and lumbosacral locus D HOX genes. Thus, through its function of regulating phenotype cell identity, the HOX network plays an important role in kidney carcinogenesis. Lumbosacral HOX genes are involved in the molecular alterations associated with clear cell kidney cancers and represent, through their deregulation, a molecular mark of tubular epithelial dedifferentiation occurring along tumour evolution, with the restoration of genetic programs associated with kidney organogenesis. The deregulation of lumbosacral HOX genes in RCCs supports (i) the consideration of the HOX gene transcriptome as the potential prognostic tool in kidney carcinogenesis and (ii) the possibility to foresee clinical trials with the purpose of targeting these genes to achieve a therapeutic effect in RCC patients.

  7. Features of hand-foot crawling behavior in human adults.

    PubMed

    Maclellan, M J; Ivanenko, Y P; Cappellini, G; Sylos Labini, F; Lacquaniti, F

    2012-01-01

    Interlimb coordination of crawling kinematics in humans shares features with other primates and nonprimate quadrupeds, and it has been suggested that this is due to a similar organization of the locomotor pattern generators (CPGs). To extend the previous findings and to further explore the neural control of bipedal vs. quadrupedal locomotion, we used a crawling paradigm in which healthy adults crawled on their hands and feet at different speeds and at different surface inclinations (13°, 27°, and 35°). Ground reaction forces, limb kinematics, and electromyographic (EMG) activity from 26 upper and lower limb muscles on the right side of the body were collected. The EMG activity was mapped onto the spinal cord in approximate rostrocaudal locations of the motoneuron pools to characterize the general features of cervical and lumbosacral spinal cord activation. The spatiotemporal pattern of spinal cord activity significantly differed between quadrupedal and bipedal gaits. In addition, participants exhibited a large range of kinematic coordination styles (diagonal vs. lateral patterns), which is in contrast to the stereotypical kinematics of upright bipedal walking, suggesting flexible coupling of cervical and lumbosacral pattern generators. Results showed strikingly dissimilar directional horizontal forces for the arms and legs, considerably retracted average leg orientation, and substantially smaller sacral vs. lumbar motoneuron activity compared with quadrupedal gait in animals. A gradual transition to a more vertical body orientation (increasing the inclination of the treadmill) led to the appearance of more prominent sacral activity (related to activation of ankle plantar flexors), typical of bipedal walking. The findings highlight the reorganization and adaptation of CPG networks involved in the control of quadrupedal human locomotion and a high specialization of the musculoskeletal apparatus to specific gaits.

  8. Functional Coupling of Human Microphysiology Systems: Intestine, Liver, Kidney Proximal Tubule, Blood-Brain Barrier and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vernetti, Lawrence; Gough, Albert; Baetz, Nicholas; Blutt, Sarah; Broughman, James R.; Brown, Jacquelyn A.; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Hasan, Nesrin; In, Julie; Kelly, Edward; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Repper, Jonathan; Senutovitch, Nina; Stabb, Janet; Yeung, Catherine; Zachos, Nick C.; Donowitz, Mark; Estes, Mary; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Truskey, George; Wikswo, John P.; Taylor, D. Lansing

    2017-01-01

    Organ interactions resulting from drug, metabolite or xenobiotic transport between organs are key components of human metabolism that impact therapeutic action and toxic side effects. Preclinical animal testing often fails to predict adverse outcomes arising from sequential, multi-organ metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics. Human microphysiological systems (MPS) can model these interactions and are predicted to dramatically improve the efficiency of the drug development process. In this study, five human MPS models were evaluated for functional coupling, defined as the determination of organ interactions via an in vivo-like sequential, organ-to-organ transfer of media. MPS models representing the major absorption, metabolism and clearance organs (the jejunum, liver and kidney) were evaluated, along with skeletal muscle and neurovascular models. Three compounds were evaluated for organ-specific processing: terfenadine for pharmacokinetics (PK) and toxicity; trimethylamine (TMA) as a potentially toxic microbiome metabolite; and vitamin D3. We show that the organ-specific processing of these compounds was consistent with clinical data, and discovered that trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) crosses the blood-brain barrier. These studies demonstrate the potential of human MPS for multi-organ toxicity and absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME), provide guidance for physically coupling MPS, and offer an approach to coupling MPS with distinct media and perfusion requirements. PMID:28176881

  9. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  10. Kidney: polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Paul, Binu M; Vanden Heuvel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a life-threatening genetic disorder characterized by the presence of fluid-filled cysts primarily in the kidneys. PKD can be inherited as autosomal recessive (ARPKD) or autosomal dominant (ADPKD) traits. Mutations in either the PKD1 or PKD2 genes, which encode polycystin 1 and polycystin 2, are the underlying cause of ADPKD. Progressive cyst formation and renal enlargement lead to renal insufficiency in these patients, which need to be managed by lifelong dialysis or renal transplantation. While characteristic features of PKD are abnormalities in epithelial cell proliferation, fluid secretion, extracellular matrix and differentiation, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not understood. Here we review the progress that has been made in defining the function of the polycystins, and how disruption of these functions may be involved in cystogenesis.

  11. Photoaffinity labeling of human platelet and rabbit kidney. cap alpha. -adrenoceptors with (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Raymond, J.R.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; DeMarinis, R.M.

    1986-06-13

    A newly developed ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic photoaffinity ligand, 3-methyl-6-chloro-9-azido-1H-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-benzazepine (SKF 102229), has been radiolabeled with tritium to a specific activity of approx. 80 Ci/mmol. Using membranes prepared from human platelets and from rabbit kidney, ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors have been covalently labeled following photolysis in the presence of (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229. As determined by SDS-PAGE, the apparent molecular weight of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors from both of these tissues was 64,000. The yield of covalent insertion of (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229 into the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor was very good. Thus, following photolysis up to 90% of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors could be irreversibly labeled with (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229.

  12. Injury - kidney and ureter

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney damage; Toxic injury of the kidney; Kidney injury; Traumatic injury of the kidney; Fractured kidney; Inflammatory injury of the kidney; Bruised kidney; Ureteral injury; Pre-renal failure - injury, ...

  13. Increased tubulointerstitial recruitment of human CD141(hi) CLEC9A(+) and CD1c(+) myeloid dendritic cell subsets in renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kassianos, Andrew J; Wang, Xiangju; Sampangi, Sandeep; Muczynski, Kimberly; Healy, Helen; Wilkinson, Ray

    2013-11-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play critical roles in immune-mediated kidney diseases. Little is known, however, about DC subsets in human chronic kidney disease, with previous studies restricted to a limited set of pathologies and to using immunohistochemical methods. In this study, we developed novel protocols for extracting renal DC subsets from diseased human kidneys and identified, enumerated, and phenotyped them by multicolor flow cytometry. We detected significantly greater numbers of total DCs as well as CD141(hi) and CD1c(+) myeloid DC (mDCs) subsets in diseased biopsies with interstitial fibrosis than diseased biopsies without fibrosis or healthy kidney tissue. In contrast, plasmacytoid DC numbers were significantly higher in the fibrotic group compared with healthy tissue only. Numbers of all DC subsets correlated with loss of kidney function, recorded as estimated glomerular filtration rate. CD141(hi) DCs expressed C-type lectin domain family 9 member A (CLEC9A), whereas the majority of CD1c(+) DCs lacked the expression of CD1a and DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), suggesting these mDC subsets may be circulating CD141(hi) and CD1c(+) blood DCs infiltrating kidney tissue. Our analysis revealed CLEC9A(+) and CD1c(+) cells were restricted to the tubulointerstitium. Notably, DC expression of the costimulatory and maturation molecule CD86 was significantly increased in both diseased cohorts compared with healthy tissue. Transforming growth factor-β levels in dissociated tissue supernatants were significantly elevated in diseased biopsies with fibrosis compared with nonfibrotic biopsies, with mDCs identified as a major source of this profibrotic cytokine. Collectively, our data indicate that activated mDC subsets, likely recruited into the tubulointerstitium, are positioned to play a role in the development of fibrosis and, thus, progression to chronic kidney disease.

  14. Evaluation of the estimated continuous cardiac output monitoring system in adults and children undergoing kidney transplant surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takashi; Maemura, Yumi; Yoshida, Akiko; Muto, Rika; Ochiai, Ryoichi

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of the estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO) allows non-invasive and continuous assessment of cardiac output. However, the applicability of this approach in children has not been assessed thus far. We compared the correlation coefficient, bias, standard deviation (SD), and the lower and upper 95 % limits of agreement for esCCO and dye densitography-cardiac output (DDG-CO) measurements by pulse dye densitometry (PDD) in adults and children. On the basis of these assessments, we aimed to examine whether esCCO can be used in pediatric patients. DDG-CO was measured by pulse dye densitometry (PDD) using indocyanine green. Modified-pulse wave transit time, obtained using pulse oximetry and electrocardiography, was used to measure esCCO. Correlations between DDG-CO and esCCO in adults and children were analyzed using regression analysis with the least squares method. Differences between the two correlation coefficients were statistically analyzed using a correlation coefficient test. Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate bias and SD for DDG-CO and esCCO in both adults and children, and 95 % limits of agreement (bias ± 1.96 SD) and percentage error (1.96 SD/mean DDG-CO) were calculated and compared. The average age of the adult patients (n = 10) was 39.3 ± 12.1 years, while the average age of the pediatric patients (n = 7) was 9.4 ± 3.1 years (p < 0.001). For adults, the correlation coefficient was 0.756; bias, -0.258 L/min; SD, 1.583 L/min; lower and upper 95 % limits of agreement for DDG-CO and esCCO, -3.360 and 2.844 L/min, respectively; and percentage error, 42.7 %. For children, the corresponding values were 0.904; -0.270; 0.908; -2.051 and 1.510 L/min, respectively; and 35.7 %. Due to the high percentage error values, we could not establish a correlation between esCCO and DDG-CO. However, the 95 % limits of agreement and percentage error were better in children than in adults. Due to the high percentage error, we could not confirm a correlation

  15. Synergetic effects of silver and gold nanoparticles in the presence of radiofrequency radiation on human kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi-asl, Jafar; Karbalaee, Mojtaba; Sanatizadeh, Masoud; Amini, Payam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of radiofrequency radiation (RF) in synergism with gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) on the survival fraction of human normal kidney (HNK) and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Materials and Methods: HNK and HEK cells were divided into three groups as control, 1 and 2 h/day-irradiated groups for 8 days. To compare the effects of RF in the presence of Au-NPs and Ag-NPs, the cells were incubated with NPs during the irradiation. In other words, six other groups were designed for the cell incubated with Au-NPs and Ag-NPs including control, 1 and 2 h/day-irradiated groups for 8 days. Generalized estimating equation model was applied to consider the natural correlation of repeated measurements over the time. Results: The mean survival fractions of HNK + Ag-NPs and HEK + Au-NPs were 0.098 less, 0.184 and 0.055 more than HEK cells, respectively. Along with the time, the mean fraction in HEK + Ag-NPs and HEK + Au-NPs groups in comparison with the HEK increased by the rate of 0.005 and decreased by the rates of 0.01 and 0.005, respectively. The mean survival fractions in HEK + Ag-NPs and HEK + Au-NPs were significantly less than that of HEK cells (P < 0.05). Conclusions: RF radiation can affect both HNK and HEK cells when irradiated for 2 h/day for 8 days. The results showed that the Ag-NPs do not increase the synergistic effects of RF compared to the Au-NPs. RF radiation at the presence of Au-NPs can be used as an efficient treatment for melanoma. PMID:28123993

  16. A loss-of-function model for cystogenesis in human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Torra, R; Badenas, C; San Millán, J L; Pérez-Oller, L; Estivill, X; Darnell, A

    1999-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is genetically heterogeneous, with at least three chromosomal loci (PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3) that account for the disease. Mutations in the PKD2 gene, on the long arm of chromosome 4, are expected to be responsible for approximately 15% of cases of ADPKD. Although ADPKD is a systemic disease, it shows a focal expression, because <1% of nephrons become cystic. A feasible explanation for the focal nature of events in PKD1, proposed on the basis of the two-hit theory, suggests that cystogenesis results from the inactivation of the normal copy of the PKD1 gene by a second somatic mutation. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that somatic mutations are present in renal cysts from a PKD2 kidney. We have studied 30 renal cysts from a patient with PKD2 in which the germline mutation was shown to be a deletion that encompassed most of the disease gene. Loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) studies showed loss of the wild-type allele in 10% of cysts. Screening of six exons of the gene by SSCP detected eight different somatic mutations, all of them expected to produce truncated proteins. Overall, >/=37% of the cysts studied presented somatic mutations. No LOH for the PKD1 gene or locus D3S1478 were observed in those cysts, which demonstrates that somatic alterations are specific. We have identified second-hit mutations in human PKD2 cysts, which suggests that this mechanism could be a crucial event in the development of cystogenesis in human ADPKD-type 2. PMID:10417277

  17. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with available imaging techniques (ultrasound and computerized tomography). Diagnosis of earlier stages of disease in children and young adults was much more difficult. Few treatments were available for chronic kidney disease in general, and there was no specific therapy ...

  18. Smoking status and urine cadmium above levels associated with subclinical renal effects in U.S. adults without chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Mary Ellen; Wong, Lee-Yang; Osterloh, John D

    2011-07-01

    Tobacco smoke is a major source of adult exposure to cadmium (Cd). Urine Cd levels (CdU) above 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 μgCd/g creatinine have been associated with increased rates of microproteinuria and reduction in glomerular filtration rate. The two study objectives were to determine the prevalence and relative risk (RR) by smoking status for CdU above 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 μgCd/g creatinine in U.S. adults; and to describe geometric mean CdU by smoking status, age, and sex. NHANES 1999-2006 data for adults without chronic kidney disease were used to compute prevalence rates above the three CdU in current and former cigarette smokers, and non-smokers. RRs for smokers adjusted for age and sex were computed by logistic regression. Analysis of covariance was used to calculate geometric means of CdU adjusted for age, sex, smoking status, log urine creatinine, and interaction terms: age-smoking status and sex-smoking status. At selected ages, adjusted RR for exceeding each risk-associated CdU was highest for current smokers (3-13 times), followed by former smokers (2-3 times), compared to non-smokers. Adjusted RR for smokers increased with age and was higher in females than males. Adjusted geometric means of CdUs increased with age, were higher in females than in males regardless of smoking status, and were higher in current smokers than former smokers, who had higher levels than non-smokers at any age. Cigarette smoking greatly increases RR of exceeding renal risk-associated CdU. Former smokers retain significant risk of exceeding these levels compared to non-smokers. CdU increased with age, particularly in current smokers.

  19. Kidney transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Renal transplant; Transplant - kidney ... Barry JM, Conlin MJ. In: Renal transplantation. Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 44. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes ( ...

  20. Kidney Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the right diagnosis. What should a person do days before a kidney biopsy? Days before the procedure, ... procedure. What can a person expect on the day of the kidney biopsy? A person should arrive ...

  1. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy kidneys clean your blood by removing excess fluid, minerals, and wastes. They also make hormones that keep your ... strong and your blood healthy. But if the kidneys are damaged, they don't work properly. Harmful ...

  2. Localizations of Na(+)-D-glucose cotransporters SGLT1 and SGLT2 in human kidney and of SGLT1 in human small intestine, liver, lung, and heart.

    PubMed

    Vrhovac, Ivana; Balen Eror, Daniela; Klessen, Dirk; Burger, Christa; Breljak, Davorka; Kraus, Ognjen; Radović, Nikola; Jadrijević, Stipe; Aleksic, Ivan; Walles, Thorsten; Sauvant, Christoph; Sabolić, Ivan; Koepsell, Hermann

    2015-09-01

    Novel affinity-purified antibodies against human SGLT1 (hSGLT1) and SGLT2 (hSGLT2) were used to localize hSGLT2 in human kidney and hSGLT1 in human kidney, small intestine, liver, lung, and heart. The renal locations of both transporters largely resembled those in rats and mice; hSGLT2 and SGLT1 were localized to the brush border membrane (BBM) of proximal tubule S1/S2 and S3 segments, respectively. Different to rodents, the renal expression of hSGLT1 was absent in thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH) and macula densa, and the expression of both hSGLTs was sex-independent. In small intestinal enterocytes, hSGLT1 was localized to the BBM and subapical vesicles. Performing double labeling with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) or glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), hSGLT1 was localized to GLP-1-secreting L cells and GIP-secreting K cells as has been shown in mice. In liver, hSGLT1 was localized to biliary duct cells as has been shown in rats. In lung, hSGLT1 was localized to alveolar epithelial type 2 cells and to bronchiolar Clara cells. Expression of hSGLT1 in Clara cells was verified by double labeling with the Clara cell secretory protein CC10. Double labeling of human heart with aquaporin 1 immunolocalized the hSGLT1 protein in heart capillaries rather than in previously assumed myocyte sarcolemma. The newly identified locations of hSGLT1 implicate several extra renal functions of this transporter, such as fluid absorption in the lung, energy supply to Clara cells, regulation of enteroendocrine cells secretion, and release of glucose from heart capillaries. These functions may be blocked by reversible SGLT1 inhibitors which are under development.

  3. Propagation of human hepatitis A virus in African green monkey kidney cell culture: primary isolation and serial passage.

    PubMed Central

    Daemer, R J; Feinstone, S M; Gust, I D; Purcell, R H

    1981-01-01

    Human hepatitis A virus (HAV) was propagated in primary African Green Monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) kidney (AGMK) cell cultures. Three strains of HAV were used: MS-1, SD-11, and HM-175. Cells were inoculated with marmoset-passaged material or human clinical specimens and were stained by direct immunofluorescence to establish the identity of the virus. Both clinical samples and marmoset-passaged material produced immunofluorescence. HAV antigen was found scattered throughout the cytoplasm of inoculated cultures. The HM-175 strain produced the most intense immunofluorescence. This strain of HAV had been serially passaged in cell culture seven times. Blocking experiments with paired human sera from naturally acquired HAV infections and hyperimmune chimpanzee serum from an experimentally infected animal established that the immunofluorescence was specific. The viral antigen was found to be exclusively intracellular. The interval to maximum HAV antigen expression was decreased by serial passage. The HAV strain described herein, which was recovered directly from the stool specimen of a patient with HAV in primary AGMK cell culture, may prove useful as a source of antigen for serological tests and as a candidate vaccine strain. Images PMID:6260685

  4. Propagation of human hepatitis A virus in African green monkey kidney cell culture: primary isolation and serial passage.

    PubMed

    Daemer, R J; Feinstone, S M; Gust, I D; Purcell, R H

    1981-04-01

    Human hepatitis A virus (HAV) was propagated in primary African Green Monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) kidney (AGMK) cell cultures. Three strains of HAV were used: MS-1, SD-11, and HM-175. Cells were inoculated with marmoset-passaged material or human clinical specimens and were stained by direct immunofluorescence to establish the identity of the virus. Both clinical samples and marmoset-passaged material produced immunofluorescence. HAV antigen was found scattered throughout the cytoplasm of inoculated cultures. The HM-175 strain produced the most intense immunofluorescence. This strain of HAV had been serially passaged in cell culture seven times. Blocking experiments with paired human sera from naturally acquired HAV infections and hyperimmune chimpanzee serum from an experimentally infected animal established that the immunofluorescence was specific. The viral antigen was found to be exclusively intracellular. The interval to maximum HAV antigen expression was decreased by serial passage. The HAV strain described herein, which was recovered directly from the stool specimen of a patient with HAV in primary AGMK cell culture, may prove useful as a source of antigen for serological tests and as a candidate vaccine strain.

  5. Aromatase activity modulation by lindane and bisphenol-A in human placental JEG-3 and transfected kidney E293 cells.

    PubMed

    Nativelle-Serpentini, C; Richard, S; Séralini, G-E; Sourdaine, P

    2003-08-01

    Aromatase is the cytochrome P-450 involved in converting androgens to estrogens. The cytochrome P-450 family plays a central role in the oxidative metabolism of compounds including environmental pollutants. Since lindane and bisphenol-A (BPA) are two well-characterized endocrine disruptors that have been detected in animals and humans, it was important to learn whether they could affect aromatase activity and consequently estrogen biosynthesis. The present study investigates the effects of BPA and lindane on cytotoxicity, aromatase activity and mRNA levels in human placental JEG-3 cells and transfected human embryonal kidney 293 cells. Both cell lines were exposed to increasing concentrations of lindane (25, 50 and 75 microM) and bisphenol-A (25, 50 and 100 microM) over different time periods (10 min-18 h). As a result, none of these concentrations showed cytotoxicity. After short pre-incubation times (10 min-6 h), aromatase activity was enhanced by both compounds. Longer time incubation (18 h), however, produced dose-related inhibition. Lindane and BPA had no significant effects on CYP19 mRNA levels. Therefore, lindane and BPA modulate aromatase activity suggesting an interaction with the cytochrome P-450 aromatase. This study highlights the endocrine-modulating properties of lindane and bisphenol-A.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of adult neural stem-like cells from the human brain.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Behnan, Jinan; Helseth, Eirik; Langmoen, Iver A

    2014-01-01

    There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33-60). Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate). We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6), foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1) and human brain tissues (n = 12). The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular fate.

  7. Hyperoxia Induces Inflammation and Cytotoxicity in Human Adult Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Christina; Wu, Jing; Tiboldi, Akos; Hess, Moritz; Mitulovic, Goran; Kaun, Christoph; Krychtiuk, Konstantin Alexander; Wojta, Johann; Ullrich, Roman; Tretter, Eva Verena; Markstaller, Klaus; Klein, Klaus Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Supplemental oxygen (O2) is used as adjunct therapy in anesthesia, emergency, and intensive care medicine. We hypothesized that excessive O2 levels (hyperoxia) can directly injure human adult cardiac myocytes (HACMs). HACMs obtained from the explanted hearts of transplantation patients were exposed to constant hyperoxia (95% O2), intermittent hyperoxia (alternating 10 min exposures to 5% and 95% O2), constant normoxia (21% O2), or constant mild hypoxia (5% O2) using a bioreactor. Changes in cell morphology, viability as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and trypan blue (TB) staining, and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and various pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin, IL; chemokine C-X-C motif ligand, CXC; granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, G-CSF; intercellular adhesion molecule, ICAM; chemokine C-C motif ligand, CCL) were compared among treatment groups at baseline (0 h) and after 8, 24, and 72 h of treatment. Changes in HACM protein expression were determined by quantitative proteomic analysis after 48 h of exposure. Compared with constant normoxia and mild hypoxia, constant hyperoxia resulted in a higher TB-positive cell count, greater release of LDH, and elevated secretion of VEGF, MIF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL-1, CXCL-10, G-CSF, ICAM-1, CCL-3, and CCL-5. Cellular inflammation and cytotoxicity gradually increased and was highest after 72 h of constant and intermittent hyperoxia. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed that hypoxic and hyperoxic O2 exposure differently altered the expression levels of proteins involved in cell-cycle regulation, energy metabolism, and cell signaling. In conclusion, constant and intermittent hyperoxia induced inflammation and cytotoxicity in HACMs. Cell injury occurred earliest and was greatest after constant hyperoxia, but even relatively brief repeating hyperoxic episodes induced a substantial inflammatory response.

  8. Extension of a PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid to include the competitive formation and clearance of metabolites associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, R.A.; Saghir, S.A.; Bartels, M.J.; Hansen, S.C.; Creim, J.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2011-02-01

    A previously developed PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid was extended to include glyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, and the precipitation of calcium oxalate that is associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans. The development and evaluation of the PBPK model was based upon previously published pharmacokinetic studies coupled with measured blood and tissue partition coefficients and rates of in vitro metabolism of glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid, glycine and other metabolites using primary hepatocytes isolated from male Wistar rats and humans. Precipitation of oxalic acid with calcium in the kidneys was assumed to occur only at concentrations exceeding the thermodynamic solubility product for calcium oxalate. This solubility product can be affected by local concentrations of calcium and other ions that are expressed in the model using an ion activity product estimated from toxicity studies such that calcium oxalate precipitation would be minimal at dietary exposures below the NOAEL for kidney toxicity in the sensitive male Wistar rat. The resulting integrated PBPK predicts that bolus oral or dietary exposures to ethylene glycol would result in typically 1.4-1.6-fold higher peak oxalate levels and 1.6-2-fold higher AUC's for calcium oxalate in kidneys of humans as compared with comparably exposed male Wistar rats over a dose range of 1-1000 mg/kg. The converse (male Wistar rats predicted to have greater oxalate levels in the kidneys than humans) was found for inhalation exposures although no accumulation of calcium oxalate is predicted to occur until exposures are well in excess of the theoretical saturated vapor concentration of 200 mg/m{sup 3}. While the current model is capable of such cross-species, dose, and route-of-exposure comparisons, it also highlights several areas of potential research that will improve confidence in such predictions, especially at low doses relevant for most human exposures.

  9. Leiomyosarcoma of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Aiken, W; Gibson, T; Williams, S; Gaskin, D

    2009-03-01

    The case of a 42-year-old woman with leiomyosarcoma of the kidney, a very rare renal lesion, is presented. Leiomyosarcomas are the most common of the primary renal sarcomas which account for less than 1% of renal tumours in adults.

  10. A role for the membrane proteome in human chronic kidney disease erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Zubiri, Irene; Maroto, Aroa S; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Posada-Ayala, María; Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Barderas, María G; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Ramos, Ana; Ortiz, Alberto; Vivanco, Fernando

    2012-11-01

    The molecular basis of the reduced half-life of chronic kidney disease (CKD) erythrocytes is unclear. The erythrocyte membrane plays a key role in the erythrocyte mechanical properties and survival. The aim of the present work is to uncover erythrocyte membrane proteins whose expression could be altered in CKD. The erythrocyte membrane subproteome was analyzed by a non-biased approach where the whole set of proteins was simultaneously investigated by 2D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis without preselection of potential targets. Proteins significantly altered in CKD were identified by mass spectrometry (MS) and results validation was performed by Western blot and confocal microscopy. Nine differentially expressed spots among healthy individuals, non-dialyzed CKD and erythropoietin/dialysis-treated CKD patients were identified by MS/MS corresponding to 5 proteins (beta-adducin, HSP71/72, tropomodulin-1, ezrin, and radixin). Ezrin and radixin were higher in dialyzed CKD patients than in the other 2 groups. Beta-adducin was increased in CKD patients (dialyzed or not). Three spots were normalized in patients on the dialysis/erythropoietin combination compared with non-dialyzed CKD. Among these, a spot corresponding to tropomodulin 1, was found to be of higher abundance in non-dialyzed CKD patients compared with controls or dialyzed CKD. In conclusion, this study identifies changes in erythrocyte membrane proteins in CKD, which may be relevant for the pathogenesis of red cell abnormalities in uremia.

  11. Metabolomic signatures of chronic kidney disease of diverse etiologies in the rats and humans

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Zhi -Hao; Chen, Hua; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; ...

    2016-09-16

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide. It frequently progresses to end-stage renal disease, which is related to very high cost and mortality. Novel biomarkers can provide insight into the novel mechanism, facilitate early detection, and monitor progression of CKD and its response to therapeutic interventions. To identify potential biomarkers, we applied an UPLC-HDMS together with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses using plasma samples from patients with CKD of diverse etiologies (100 sera in discovery set and 120 sera in validation set) and two different rat models of CKD. Using comprehensive screening and validationmore » workflow, we identified a panel of seven metabolites that were shared by all patients and animals regardless of the underlying cause of CKD. These included ricinoleic acid, stearic acid, cytosine, LPA(16:0), LPA(18:2), 3-methylhistidine, and argininic acid. The combination of these seven biomarkers enabled the discrimination of patients with CKD from healthy subjects with a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 96.7%. In addition, these biomarkers accurately reflected improvements in renal function in response to the therapeutic interventions. Lastly, our results indicated that the identified biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of CKD and provide a novel tool for monitoring of the progression of disease and response to treatment in CKD patients.« less

  12. Metabolomic signatures of chronic kidney disease of diverse etiologies in the rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhi -Hao; Chen, Hua; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Mao, Jia -Rong; Zhang, Li; Bai, Xu; Zhao, Ying -Yong

    2016-09-16

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide. It frequently progresses to end-stage renal disease, which is related to very high cost and mortality. Novel biomarkers can provide insight into the novel mechanism, facilitate early detection, and monitor progression of CKD and its response to therapeutic interventions. To identify potential biomarkers, we applied an UPLC-HDMS together with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses using plasma samples from patients with CKD of diverse etiologies (100 sera in discovery set and 120 sera in validation set) and two different rat models of CKD. Using comprehensive screening and validation workflow, we identified a panel of seven metabolites that were shared by all patients and animals regardless of the underlying cause of CKD. These included ricinoleic acid, stearic acid, cytosine, LPA(16:0), LPA(18:2), 3-methylhistidine, and argininic acid. The combination of these seven biomarkers enabled the discrimination of patients with CKD from healthy subjects with a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 96.7%. In addition, these biomarkers accurately reflected improvements in renal function in response to the therapeutic interventions. Lastly, our results indicated that the identified biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of CKD and provide a novel tool for monitoring of the progression of disease and response to treatment in CKD patients.

  13. Molecular diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in human kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; Reeve, J; Loupy, A; Mengel, M; Sis, B; Skene, A; de Freitas, D G; Kreepala, C; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K S; Halloran, P F

    2013-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the major cause of kidney transplant failure, but the histology-based diagnostic system misses most cases due to its requirement for C4d positivity. We hypothesized that gene expression data could be used to test biopsies for the presence of antibody-mediated rejection. To develop a molecular test, we prospectively assigned diagnoses, including C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection, to 403 indication biopsies from 315 patients, based on histology (microcirculation lesions) and donor-specific HLA antibody. We then used microarray data to develop classifiers that assigned antibody-mediated rejection scores to each biopsy. The transcripts distinguishing antibody-mediated rejection from other conditions were mostly expressed in endothelial cells or NK cells, or were IFNG-inducible. The scores correlated with the presence of microcirculation lesions and donor-specific antibody. Of 45 biopsies with scores>0.5, 39 had been diagnosed as antibody-mediated rejection on the basis of histology and donor-specific antibody. High scores were also associated with unanimity among pathologists that antibody-mediated rejection was present. The molecular score also strongly predicted future graft loss in Cox regression analysis. We conclude that microarray assessment of gene expression can assign a probability of ABMR to transplant biopsies without knowledge of HLA antibody status, histology, or C4d staining, and predicts future failure.

  14. Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus cervical infection in female kidney graft recipients: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Immunosuppressive therapy protects the transplanted organ but predisposes the recipient to chronic infections and malignancies. Transplant patients are at risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer resulting from an impaired immune response in the case of primary infection or of reactivation of a latent infection with human papillomavirus of high oncogenic potential (HR-HPV). Methods The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of HR-HPV cervical infections and CIN in 60 female kidney graft recipients of reproductive age in comparison to that in healthy controls. Cervical swabs were analyzed for the presence of HR-HPV DNA. HR-HPV-positive women remained under strict observation and were re-examined after 24 months for the presence of transforming HR-HPV infection by testing for HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA. All the HR-HPV-positive patients were scheduled for further diagnostic tests including exfoliative cytology, colposcopy and cervical biopsy. Results The prevalence of HR-HPV did not differ significantly between the study group and the healthy controls (18% vs 25%, p = 0.37). There was no correlation between HR-HPV presence and the immunosuppresive regimen, underlying disease, graft function or time interval from transplantation. A higher prevalence of HR-HPV was observed in females who had had ≥2 sexual partners in the past. Among HR-HPV-positive patients, two cases of CIN2+ were diagnosed in each group. In the course of follow-up, transforming HR-HPV infections were detected in two kidney recipients and in one healthy female. Histologic examination confirmed another two cases of CIN2+ developing in the cervical canal. Conclusions Female kidney graft recipients of reproductive age are as exposed to HR-HPV infection as are healthy individuals. Tests detecting the presence of HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA offer a novel diagnostic opportunity in those patients, especially in those cases where lesions have developed in the cervical canal

  15. Lack of Benefit of Early Intervention with Dietary Flax and Fish Oil and Soy Protein in Orthologous Rodent Models of Human Hereditary Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tamio; Devassy, Jessay G; Monirujjaman, Md; Gabbs, Melissa; Aukema, Harold M

    2016-01-01

    Rationale for dietary advice in polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is based in part on animal studies that have examined non-orthologous models with progressive development of cystic disease. Since no model completely mimics human PKD, the purpose of the current studies was to examine the effects of dietary soy protein (compared to casein) or oils enriched in omega-3 fatty acids (fish or flax oil compared to soy oil) on early disease progression in two orthologous models of PKD. The models studied were Pkd2WS25/- mice as a model of autosomal dominant PKD, and PCK rats as a model of autosomal recessive PKD. After 13 weeks of feeding, dietary fish (but not flax) oil resulted in larger kidneys and greater kidney water content in female Pkd2WS25/- compared to control mice. After 12 weeks of feeding male PCK compared to control rats, both fish and flax compared to soy oil resulted in enlarged kidneys and livers, greater kidney water content and higher kidney cyst area in diseased rats. Dietary soy protein compared to casein had no effects in Pkd2WS25/- compared to control mice. In PCK rats, kidney and liver histology were not improved, but lower proteinuria and higher urine pH suggest that soy protein could be beneficial in the long term. Therefore, in contrast to studies in non-orthologous models during the progressive development phase, these studies in orthologous PKD models do not support dietary advice to increase soy protein or oils enriched in omega-3 oils in early PKD.

  16. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  17. Glycosphingolipids as Putative Receptor for Staphylococcal Enterotoxin-B in Cultured Human Kidney Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    SMase cleaves sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphocholine. Ceramide in turn, induces apoptosis. In this regard, our preliminary results indicate that SEB...sensitivity of the assay for SEB in human urine is higher than in human serum. A possible reason may be that serum has a number of lipid binding proteins...hemagglutination or latexagglutination assay, radioimrnunoassay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and skin test assay. However, such studies have not

  18. Molecular cloning of cDNAs encoding human GLEPP1, a membrane protein tyrosine phosphatase: characterization of the GLEPP1 protein distribution in human kidney and assignment of the GLEPP1 gene to human chromosome 12p12-p13.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, R C; Wiggins, J E; Goyal, M; Wharram, B L; Thomas, P E

    1995-05-01

    Human glomerular epithelial protein 1 (GLEPP1), a receptor-like membrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), was cloned and sequenced from a human renal cortical cDNA library. The human nucleotide and derived amino acid sequences were, respectively, 90 and 97% identical to those of rabbit. Human GLEPP1 is predicted to contain 1188 amino acids. The predicted mature protein is 1159 amino acids long and contains a large extracellular domain, a single transmembrane domain, and a single intracellular PTPase domain. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies raised against a human GLEPP1 fusion protein recognized a protein with distribution restricted to the glomerulus in human kidney and with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 200 kDa. The GLEPP1 gene was assigned to human chromosome 12p12-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  19. Expression of podocyte-associated molecules in acquired human kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Koop, Klaas; Eikmans, Michael; Baelde, Hans J; Kawachi, Hiroshi; De Heer, Emile; Paul, Leendert C; Bruijn, Jan A

    2003-08-01

    Proteinuria is a poorly understood feature of many acquired renal diseases. Recent studies concerning congenital nephrotic syndromes and findings in genetically modified mice have demonstrated that podocyte molecules make a pivotal contribution to the maintenance of the selective filtration barrier of the normal glomerulus. However, it is unclear what role podocyte molecules play in proteinuria of acquired renal diseases. This study investigated the mRNA and protein expression of several podocyte-associated molecules in acquired renal diseases. Forty-eight patients with various renal diseases were studied, including minimal change nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, and diabetic nephropathy, together with 13 kidneys with normal glomerular function. Protein levels of nephrin, podocin, CD2-associated protein, and podocalyxin were investigated using quantitative immunohistochemical assays. Real-time PCR was used to determine the mRNA levels of nephrin, podocin, and podoplanin in microdissected glomeruli. The obtained molecular data were related to electron microscopic ultrastructural changes, in particular foot process width, and to clinical parameters. In most acquired renal diseases, except in IgA nephropathy, a marked reduction was observed at the protein levels of nephrin, podocin, and podocalyxin, whereas an increase of the glomerular mRNA levels of nephrin, podocin, and podoplanin was found, compared with controls. The mean width of the podocyte foot processes was inversely correlated with the protein levels of nephrin (r = -0.443, P < 0.05), whereas it was positively correlated with podoplanin mRNA levels (r = 0.468, P < 0.05) and proteinuria (r = 0.585, P = 0.001). In the diseases studied, the decrease of slit diaphragm proteins was related to the effacement of foot processes and coincided with a rise of the levels of the corresponding mRNA transcripts. This suggests that the alterations in the expression of

  20. Clinical correlations of human cytomegalovirus strains and viral load in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eliana; Ozaki, Kikumi Suzete; Tomiyama, Helena; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Granato, Celso Francisco Hernandes

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about clinical differences associated with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection by distinct strains in renal transplant patients. Different clinical pictures may be associated with specific viral genotypes, viral load, as well as host factors. The objective of this study was to identify CMV strains to determine viral load (antigenemia), and their correlation with clinical data in renal transplant recipients. Seventy-one patients were enrolled, comprising 91 samples. After selection, polymorphonuclear cells were used to amplify and sequence the gB region of CMV DNA. The sequences were analyzed to ascertain the frequency of different genotypes. Additionally, the results of this study showed that the gB coding gene presents a great variability, revealing a variety of patterns: classical gB1 (1.4%), gB1V (46.4%), classical gB2 (35.2%), gB2V (2.8%), gB3 (1.4%), classical gB4 (4.9%) and gB4V (4.9%). The mean viral load in kidney transplant patient was 75.1 positive cells (1-1000). A higher viral load was observed in patients with genotype 4 infection. Statistically significant differences were detected between gB1 and gB4 (p=0.010), and between gB2 and gB4 (p=0.021). The average numbers of positive cells in relation to clinical presentation were: 34.5 in asymptomatic, 49.5 in CMV associated syndrome and 120.7 in patients with invasive disease (p=0.048). As a group, gB1 was the most frequent strain and revealed a potential risk for developing invasive disease. Viral load also seemed to be important as a marker associated with clinical presentation of the disease.

  1. Adult Continuing Education and Human Resource Development: Present Competitors, Potential Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    Adult Continuing Education (ACE) and Human Resource Development (HRD) have grown tremendously in the last quarter century. ACE experienced tremendous growth in the 60s and 70s, with over 17 million attending colleges and universities, and local school and community adult education programs by the end of the 1970s. More ACE programs were started…

  2. Kidney function changes with aging in adults: comparison between cross-sectional and longitudinal data analyses in renal function assessment.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sang M; Lee, David J; Hand, Austin; Young, Philip; Vaidyanathan, Jayabharathi; Sahajwalla, Chandrahas

    2015-12-01

    The study evaluated whether the renal function decline rate per year with age in adults varies based on two primary statistical analyses: cross-section (CS), using one observation per subject, and longitudinal (LT), using multiple observations per subject over time. A total of 16628 records (3946 subjects; age range 30-92 years) of creatinine clearance and relevant demographic data were used. On average, four samples per subject were collected for up to 2364 days (mean: 793 days). A simple linear regression and random coefficient models were selected for CS and LT analyses, respectively. The renal function decline rates per year were 1.33 and 0.95 ml/min/year for CS and LT analyses, respectively, and were slower when the repeated individual measurements were considered. The study confirms that rates are different based on statistical analyses, and that a statistically robust longitudinal model with a proper sampling design provides reliable individual as well as population estimates of the renal function decline rates per year with age in adults. In conclusion, our findings indicated that one should be cautious in interpreting the renal function decline rate with aging information because its estimation was highly dependent on the statistical analyses. From our analyses, a population longitudinal analysis (e.g. random coefficient model) is recommended if individualization is critical, such as a dose adjustment based on renal function during a chronic therapy.

  3. First D1-like receptor PET imaging of the rat and primate kidney: implications for human disease monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Granda, Michael L.; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Borra, Ronald H. J.; Schauer, Nathan; Aisaborhale, Ehimen; Guimaraes, Alexander R.

    2014-01-01

    The intrarenal dopamine system is important for signaling and natriuresis, and significant dysfunction is associated with hypertension and kidney disease in ex vivo studies. Dopamine receptors also modulate and are modulated by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Here, we show the first in vivo measurement of D1-like receptors in the renal cortex of Sprague-Dawley rat and Papio anubis baboon using [11C]NNC 112, a positron emission tomography radioligand for D1-like receptors. In addition, we show a D1-like binding potential response to angiotensin II blockade in rats using losartan. Demonstration of self-saturable binding in the rat as well as specific and saturable binding in Papio anubis validate the use of [11C]NNC 112 in the first in vivo measurement of renal dopamine D1-like receptors. Furthermore, [11C]NNC 112 is a radioligand tool already validated for use in probing human central nervous system (CNS) D1-like receptors. Our work demonstrates specific and saturable non-CNS binding in higher animals and the ability to quantify physiological response to drug treatment and provides a clear path to extend use of [11C]NNC 112 to study renal dopamine in humans. PMID:24808534

  4. First D1-like receptor PET imaging of the rat and primate kidney: implications for human disease monitoring.

    PubMed

    Granda, Michael L; Schroeder, Frederick A; Borra, Ronald H J; Schauer, Nathan; Aisaborhale, Ehimen; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Hooker, Jacob M

    2014-07-01

    The intrarenal dopamine system is important for signaling and natriuresis, and significant dysfunction is associated with hypertension and kidney disease in ex vivo studies. Dopamine receptors also modulate and are modulated by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Here, we show the first in vivo measurement of D1-like receptors in the renal cortex of Sprague-Dawley rat and Papio anubis baboon using [(11)C]NNC 112, a positron emission tomography radioligand for D1-like receptors. In addition, we show a D1-like binding potential response to angiotensin II blockade in rats using losartan. Demonstration of self-saturable binding in the rat as well as specific and saturable binding in Papio anubis validate the use of [(11)C]NNC 112 in the first in vivo measurement of renal dopamine D1-like receptors. Furthermore, [(11)C]NNC 112 is a radioligand tool already validated for use in probing human central nervous system (CNS) D1-like receptors. Our work demonstrates specific and saturable non-CNS binding in higher animals and the ability to quantify physiological response to drug treatment and provides a clear path to extend use of [(11)C]NNC 112 to study renal dopamine in humans.

  5. Effect of recombinant human erythropoietin on mitomycin C-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rat kidney and heart tissues.

    PubMed

    Rjiba-Touati, K; Ayed-Boussema, I; Guedri, Y; Achour, A; Bacha, H; Abid-Essefi, S

    2016-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is an antineoplastic agent used for the treatment of several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the prolonged use of the drug may result in a serious heart and kidney injuries. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has recently been shown to exert an important cytoprotective effect in experimental brain injury and ischemic acute renal failure. The aim of the present work is to investigate the cardioprotective and renoprotective effects of rhEPO against MMC-induced oxidative damage and genotoxicity. Our results showed that MMC induced oxidative stress and DNA damage. rhEPO administration in any treatment conditions decreased oxidative damage induced by MMC. It reduced malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels. rhEPO ameliorated reduced glutathione plus oxidized glutathione modulation and the increased catalase activity after MMC treatment. Furthermore, rhEPO restored DNA damage caused by MMC. We concluded that rhEPO administration especially in pretreatment condition protected rats against MMC-induced heart and renal oxidative stress and genotoxicity.

  6. Dissecting Stages of Human Kidney Development and Tumorigenesis with Surface Markers Affords Simple Prospective Purification of Nephron Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pode-Shakked, Naomi; Pleniceanu, Oren; Gershon, Rotem; Shukrun, Rachel; Kanter, Itamar; Bucris, Efrat; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Tam, Gal; Tam, Hadar; Caspi, Revital; Pri-Chen, Sara; Vax, Einav; Katz, Guy; Omer, Dorit; Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    When assembling a nephron during development a multipotent stem cell pool becomes restricted as differentiation ensues. A faulty differentiation arrest in this process leads to transformation and initiation of a Wilms’ tumor. Mapping these transitions with respective surface markers affords accessibility to specific cell subpopulations. NCAM1 and CD133 have been previously suggested to mark human renal progenitor populations. Herein, using cell sorting, RNA sequencing, in vitro studies with serum-free media and in vivo xenotransplantation we demonstrate a sequential map that links human kidney development and tumorigenesis; In nephrogenesis, NCAM1+CD133− marks SIX2+ multipotent renal stem cells transiting to NCAM1+CD133+ differentiating segment-specific SIX2− epithelial progenitors and NCAM1−CD133+ differentiated nephron cells. In tumorigenesis, NCAM1+CD133− marks SIX2+ blastema that includes the ALDH1+ WT cancer stem/initiating cells, while NCAM1+CD133+ and NCAM1−CD133+ specifying early and late epithelial differentiation, are severely restricted in tumor initiation capacity and tumor self-renewal. Thus, negative selection for CD133 is required for defining NCAM1+ nephron stem cells in normal and malignant nephrogenesis. PMID:27020553

  7. Multielement analysis of human hair and kidney stones by instrumental neutron activation analysis with the k0-standardization method.

    PubMed

    Abugassa, I; Sarmani, S B; Samat, S B

    1999-06-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of the k0 method of instrumental neutron activation analysis in biological materials. The method has been applied in multielement analysis of human hair standard reference materials from IAEA, No. 085, No. 086 and from NIES (National Institute for Environmental Sciences) No. 5. Hair samples from people resident in different parts of Malaysia, in addition to a sample from Japan, were analyzed. In addition, human kidney stones from members of the Malaysian population have been analyzed for minor and trace elements. More than 25 elements have been determined. The samples were irradiated in the rotary rack (Lazy Susan) at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology and Research (MINT). The accuracy of the method was ascertained by analysis of other reference materials, including 1573 tomato leaves and 1572 citrus leaves. In this method the deviation of the 1/E1+ alpha epithermal neutron flux distribution from the 1/E law (P/T ratio) for true coincidence effects of the gamma-ray cascade and the HPGe detector efficiency were determined and corrected for.

  8. Localisation of embryonic prealbumin in formalin-fixed human fetal and adult tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Gallon, M E; Reid, W A; McHardie, G A; Hardman, R; Smith, G D; Horne, C H; Kalashnikov, V V; Tatarinov, Y S

    1981-01-01

    The presence of embryonic prealbumin (EPA) has been confirmed in fetal fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and distal tubular epithelial cells by an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. EPA has often been found also in the stromal cells of benign and malignant mesodermal tumours, but not in the epithelial cells of benign and malignant epithelial tumours. That EPA is not an exclusive product of neoplastic mesodermal cells is demonstrated by our finding of EPA in fibroblasts of granulation tissue, irradiated fibroblasts, and in distal tubular epithelial cells of miscellaneous adult kidneys. Images PMID:7021602

  9. Behavioral and magnetoencephalographic correlates of plasticity in the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, V. S.

    1993-01-01

    Recent behavioral and physiological evidence suggests that even brief sensory deprivation can lead to the rapid emergence of new and functionally effective neural connections in the adult human brain. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8248123

  10. Measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) used in adult patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Aiyegbusi, Olalekan Lee; Kyte, Derek; Cockwell, Paul; Marshall, Tom; Keeley, Thomas; Gheorghe, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with symptoms that can significantly reduce the quality of life (QoL) of patients. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) may facilitate the assessment of the impact of disease and treatment on the QoL, from a patient perspective. PROMs can be used in research and routine clinical practice. Methods and analysis A systematic review of studies evaluating the measurement properties of PROMs in adults with CKD will be conducted. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL Plus will be systematically searched from inception. Hand searching of reference lists and citations of included studies will be carried out. 2 reviewers will independently screen the titles and abstracts of all the studies retrieved during the systematic search to determine their eligibility. The COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) checklist will be used to appraise the methodological quality of the selected studies following the full-text review. Data on the study population, questionnaire characteristics and measurement properties will be extracted from the selected papers. Finally, a narrative synthesis of extracted data will be undertaken. Ethics and dissemination Ethical permissions are not required for this study as data from published research articles will be used. Findings will be disseminated through publication in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at conferences. This systematic review will provide a comprehensive assessment of the measurement properties of PROMs currently available for use in adult patients with CKD and present evidence which may inform the selection of measures for use in research and clinical practice. Trial registration number CRD42016035554. PMID:27733411

  11. ELISA-Based Segregation of Adult Spring Chinook Salmon for Control of Bacterial Kidney Disease, Annual Report FY 1989.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaattari, Stephen L.; Winton, James R.

    1989-12-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a serious disease of salmonid fish worldwide. The disease has a major impact on spring chinook salmon populations in the Columbia River system. There is strong evidence that R. safmoninarum can be transmitted from parent to progeny, and therefore culling of gametes from infected parents should obviate this mode of transmission. This report presents the results from the first year of our four year study to investigate segregation of broodstock as a tool for controlling BKD. The segregations will use Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs) as detection systems to identify, in tissues of infected fish, proteins produced by R. salmoninarum. A first step in the development of the described detection systems was the optimization of the production of important antigenic proteins from R. salmoninarum. Different culture media were qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated for their ability to support production of cellular and soluble proteins. The major factor affecting antigen quality was the presence and absence of calf serum. Media components and R. salmoninarum growth products could not be separated during harvest of proteins from the cultures containing serum. This caused problems with the quantitation of actual bacterial proteins in the preparation. Thus media without serum is currently employed. Two independent ELISA techniques for the identification of infected parents were examined. One technique is based on polyclonal antisera produced in rabbits and the second is based on mouse monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). To develop the latter system, several Mabs against a major R. salmoninarum antigenic protein were produced. These Mabs were used for the detection of R. salmoninarum antigens in infected fish and also to characterize proteins produced by the bacterium. Both ELISAs were deemed suitable for the segregation of parents into the high and low BKD groups required for this study. An

  12. Evaluation of limited sampling strategies for mycophenolic acid after mycophenolate mofetil intake in adult kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, Katherine A; Isbel, Nicole M; Franklin, Michael E; Lee, Katie J; Taylor, Paul J; Campbell, Scott B; Petchey, William G; Staatz, Christine E

    2010-12-01

    Multiple limited sampling strategies (LSSs) have been proposed for estimation of mycophenolic acid (MPA) area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 hours postdose (AUC 0-12) after mycophenolate mofetil intake. The aim of this study was to provide summary information on all published LSSs for MPA and to evaluate their predictive performance in an independent population of kidney transplant recipients. Seventy-eight LSSs for MPA were identified. Sixty-nine full AUC profiles were collected from 45 subjects (25 cotreated with cyclosporine and 20 with tacrolimus). Predicted MPA AUC 0-12, calculated by applying the relevant concentration measurements within the LSS equations, was compared with full AUC calculated by using all concentration measurements in the linear trapezoidal rule. Four error indices (median prediction error, median percentage prediction error [MPPE], root median squared prediction error, and median absolute percentage prediction error [MAPE]) were used to evaluate bias and imprecision. Twelve of the 25 LSSs for cyclosporine-cotreated recipients and one of the 53 LSSs for tacrolimus-cotreated recipients displayed acceptable (less than 15%) bias and imprecision. In the cyclosporine group, two equations demonstrated the highest predictive power, one that used four time points in the first 6 hours postdose (r2 = 0.84, MPPE 1.6%, MAPE 7.8%) and one that used four time points in the first 4 hours postdose (r2 = 0.76, MPPE -0.8%, MAPE 10.2%). In the tacrolimus group, an equation that used two time points in the first 4 hours postdose was superior (r2 = 0.80, MPPE -3.0%, MAPE 13.6%). Application of the LSSs most appropriate for cyclosporine-cotreated patients to the tacrolimus-cotreated group resulted in clinically unacceptable bias and imprecision and vice versa. High variability in performance of LSSs highlights the importance of validating any LSS before applying it to an alternative population. Attention to comedication use is of particular

  13. Transitional Care and Adherence of Adolescents and Young Adults After Kidney Transplantation in Germany and Austria: A Binational Observatory Census Within the TRANSNephro Trial.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Martin; Prüfe, Jenny; Oldhafer, Martina; Bethe, Dirk; Dierks, Marie-Luise; Müther, Silvia; Thumfart, Julia; Hoppe, Bernd; Büscher, Anja; Rascher, Wolfgang; Hansen, Matthias; Pohl, Martin; Kemper, Markus J; Drube, Jens; Rieger, Susanne; John, Ulrike; Taylan, Christina; Dittrich, Katalin; Hollenbach, Sabine; Klaus, Günter; Fehrenbach, Henry; Kranz, Birgitta; Montoya, Carmen; Lange-Sperandio, Bärbel; Ruckenbrodt, Bettina; Billing, Heiko; Staude, Hagen; Heindl-Rusai, Krisztina; Brunkhorst, Reinhard; Pape, Lars

    2015-12-01

    Transition from child to adult-oriented care is widely regarded a challenging period for young people with kidney transplants and is associated with a high risk of graft failure. We analyzed the existing transition structures in Germany and Austria using a questionnaire and retrospective data of 119 patients transferred in 2011 to 2012. Most centers (73%) confirmed agreements on the transition procedure. Patients' age at transfer was subject to regulation in 73% (18 years). Median age at transition was 18.3 years (16.5-36.7). Median serum creatinine increased from 123 to 132 μmol/L over the 12 month observation period before transfer (P = 0.002). A total of 25/119 patients showed increased creatinine ≥ 20% just before transfer. Biopsy proven rejection was found in 10/119 patients. Three patients lost their graft due to chronic graft nephropathy.Mean coefficient of variation (CoV%) of immunosuppression levels was 0.20 ± 0.1. Increased creatinine levels ≥ 20% just before transfer were less frequently seen in patients with CoV < 0.20 (P = 0.007). The majority of pediatric nephrology centers have internal agreements on transitional care. More than half of the patients had CoV of immunosuppression trough levels consistent with good adherence. Although, 20% of the patients showed increase in serum creatinine close to transfer.

  14. Newborn human skin fibroblasts senesce in vitro without acquiring adult growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of human fibroblasts were prepared from chest skin obtained either from newborns (less than 3 months old) or adults (more than 35 years old) and maintained in vitro until they senesced. Adult cells grew logarithmically in medium supplemented with whole blood serum but not with platelet-poor plasma. Early passage cells obtained from newborns grew equally well in either plasma- or serum-supplemented medium. The difference in growth factor requirements between adult and newborn cells persisted through the lifespan of the cells; i.e., newborn cells did not develop adult hormonal requirements when maintained in culture. Thus, in vitro cellular aging can be distinguished from some types of differentiation.

  15. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the human HSD11K gene encoding the kidney (type 2) isozyme of 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Rogerson, F.M.; Mune, T.; White, P.C.

    1995-09-01

    11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11{beta}HSD) converts glucocorticoids to inactive products and is thus thought to confer specificity for aldosterone on the type I mineralocorticoid receptor in the kidney. Recent studies indicate the presence of at least two isozymes of 11{beta}HSD. In vitro, the NAD{sup +}-dependent kidney (type 2) isozyme catalyzes 11{beta}-dehydrogenase but not reductase reactions, whereas the NADP{sup +}-dependent liver (type 1) isozyme catalyzes both reactions. We have now characterized the human gene encoding kidney 11{beta}HSD (HSD11K). A bacteriophage P1 clone was isolated after screening a human genomic library by hybridization with sheep HSD11K cDNA. The gene consists of 5 exons spread over 6 kb. The nucleotide binding domain lies in the first exon are GC-rich (80%), suggesting that the gene may be transcriptionally regulated by factors that recognize GC-rich sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes with a positive P1 clone localized the gene to chromosome 16q22. In contrast, the HSD11L (liver isozyme) gene is located on chromosome 1 and contains 6 exons; the coding sequences of these genes are only 21% identical. HSD11K is expressed at high levels in the placenta and kidney of midgestation human fetuses and at lower levels in lung and testes. Different transcriptional start sites are utilized in kidney and placenta. These data should be applicable to genetic analysis of the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess, which may represent a deficiency of 11{beta}HSD. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Kidney Failure: What to Expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidneys & How They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Kidney Failure What is kidney failure and how is it treated? Kidney failure ... Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis . Peritoneal dialysis Kidney Transplant A kidney transplant places a healthy kidney ...

  17. HUMAN KIDNEY AND SKELETON URANIUM BURDEN, RADIATION DOSE AND HEALTH RISKS FROM HIGH URANIUM CONTENTS IN DRINKING WATER OF BATHINDA DISTRICT (MALWA REGION) OF PUNJAB STATE, INDIA.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nisha; Singh, Jaspal

    2017-01-23

    Uranium concentration has been measured in drinking water samples from the Bathinda district. It ranges from 2.4 to 529 µg/l with a mean value of 120 µg/l. The mean uranium kidney burden for children and adults is 0.0838 and 0.059 µg U/g, respectively, which crosses the safe limit of 0.02 µg U/g. The mean values for skeleton burden are 1925.7 µg for children and 4108.2 µg for an adult. These values are 32 and 69 times higher than the skeleton burden of 59.4 µg for a normal adult. Radiological and chemical risk is also found to be higher than the recommended values. The mean effective ingestion dose for different age groups and genders is 188.2 µSv/y, while the safety limit is 100 µSv/y. The dose to the kidney, bone surface and bone marrow has also been evaluated. The observed values of the studied parameters show that people of this area may be at higher health risks corresponding to the intake of water; children may be the most affected.

  18. Investigation of genes important in neurodevelopment disorders in adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Maussion, Gilles; Diallo, Alpha B; Gigek, Carolina O; Chen, Elizabeth S; Crapper, Liam; Théroux, Jean-Francois; Chen, Gary G; Vasuta, Cristina; Ernst, Carl

    2015-10-01

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are caused by mutations in genes expressed in fetal brain, but little is known about these same genes in adult human brain. Here, we test the hypothesis that genes associated with NDDs continue to have a role in adult human brain to explore the idea that NDD symptoms may be partially a result of their adult function rather than just their neurodevelopmental function. To demonstrate adult brain function, we performed expression analyses and ChIPseq in human neural stem cell(NSC) lines at different developmental stages and adult human brain, targeting two genes associated with NDDs, SATB2 and EHMT1, and the WNT signaling gene TCF7L2, which has not been associated with NDDs. Analysis of DNA interaction sites in neural stem cells reveals high (40-50 %) overlap between proliferating and differentiating cells for each gene in temporal space. Studies in adult brain demonstrate that consensus sites are similar to NSCs but occur at different genomic locations. We also performed expression analyses using BrainSpan data for NDD-associated genes SATB2, EHMT1, FMR1, MECP2, MBD5, CTNND2, RAI1, CHD8, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, TCF4, SCN2A, and DYRK1A and find high expression of these genes in adult brain, at least comparable to developing human brain, confirming that genes associated with NDDs likely have a role in adult tissue. Adult function of genes associated with NDDs might be important in clinical disease presentation and may be suitable targets for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Regenerative medicine for the kidney: renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Akito; Nakasatomi, Masao; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    The kidney has the capacity for regeneration and repair after a variety of insults. Over the past few decades, factors that promote repair of the injured kidney have been extensively investigated. By using kidney injury animal models, the role of intrinsic and extrinsic growth factors, transcription factors, and extracellular matrix in this process has been examined. The identification of renal stem cells in the adult kidney as well as in the embryonic kidney is an active area of research. Cell populations expressing putative stem cell markers or possessing stem cell properties have been found in the tubules, interstitium, and glomeruli of the normal kidney. Cell therapies with bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have been highly effective for the treatment of acute or chronic renal failure in animals. Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are also utilized for the construction of artificial kidneys or renal components. In this review, we highlight the advances in regenerative medicine for the kidney from the perspective of renotropic factors, renal stem/progenitor cells, and stem cell therapies and discuss the issues to be solved to realize regenerative therapy for kidney diseases in humans.

  20. Kidney Stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  1. The role of sensitivity of ALA (PpIX)-based PDT on Human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhar-e-Alam, M.; Atif, M.; Rehman, T.; Sadia, H.; Firdous, S.

    2011-08-01

    Present study evaluates the effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) as photo sensitizer using Human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cell line as an experimental model. Porphyrins derivatives are used as active cytotoxic antitumor agents in PDT. Above mentioned cell line were irradiated with red light (a diode laser, λ = 635 nm) at different doses (0-160 J/cm2) of light. The influence/effectiveness of incubation time, various concentrations of aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and light doses on the cellular viability was studied. HEK293T cells were deliberated by exposing the ALA-PpIX (0-1000 μg/ml) of concentrations. The optimal uptakes of photosensitizer (PS) in cell lines were investigated by means of spectro photo metric measurements. Cells viability was determined by means of neutral red assay (NRA). It was observed that alone, neither photosensitizer nor light dose have significant effect on cells viability, but optimal concentration of PS along with suitable dose of light exhibit effective impact on the viability of cell. Our results showed that light doses of 40 J/cm2 demonstrates effective PDT outcome for HEK293T cell line when incubated with 400 μg/ml, with wrapping up view that HEK293T cell line is very sensitive to ALA-mediated PDT as compared to cell line published in our data. At the end results has been verified by using reactive oxygen species (ROS) measure test.

  2. Preparation, characterization and toxicological investigation of copper loaded chitosan nanoparticles in human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed

    Arora, Divya; Dhanwal, Vandna; Nayak, Debasis; Saneja, Ankit; Amin, Hina; Ur Rasool, Reyaz; Gupta, Prem Narayan; Goswami, Anindya

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles often attribute severe adverse effects to the various organs or tissues at the molecular level despite of their applications in medical, laboratory and industrial sectors. The present study highlights the preparation of copper adsorbed chitosan nanoparticles (CuCSNPs), its characterization and validation of cytotoxicity in human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells. Particle size of the CuCSNPs was determined by using Zetasizer and the copper loading was quantified with the help of ICP/MS. Further characterization of CuCSNPs was carried out by FT-IR analysis to determine the formation of nanoparticles and SEM was conducted for the morphological analysis of the CuCSNPs. The CuCSNPs exhibited pronounced cytotoxic effects towards HEK-293 cells as analyzed by MTT assay. Moreover, the CuCSNPs inhibited the colony formation and induced nuclear damage at the dose of 100 μg/mL, much more effectively than the in built control copper sulfate (CuSO4). At the molecular level, the CuCSNPs were found to be triggering reactive oxygen species (ROS), activating effector caspases and subsequent PARP cleavage to induce cell death in HEK-293 cells.

  3. Osmotic induction of calcium accumulation in human embryonic kidney cells detected with a high sensitivity FRET calcium sensor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bi-Huei; Takanaga, Hitomi; Griesbeck, Oliver; Frommer, Wolf B

    2009-08-01

    Calcium serves as a second messenger in glucose-triggered insulin secretion of pancreatic cells. Less is known about sugar signaling in non-excitable cells. Here, the high sensitivity FRET calcium sensor TN-XXL was used to characterize glucose-induced calcium responses in non-excitable human embryonic kidney HEK293T cells. HEK293T cells responded to perfusion with glucose with a sustained and concentration-dependent increase in cytosolic calcium levels. Sucrose and mannitol triggered comparable calcium responses, suggesting that the increase of the calcium concentration was caused by osmotic effects. HEK293T cells are characterized by low endogenous glucose uptake capacity as shown with a high sensitivity glucose sensor. Consistently, when glucose influx was artificially increased by co-expression of GLUT glucose transporters, the glucose-induced calcium increase was significantly reduced. Neither calcium depletion, nor gadolinium or thapsigargin were able to inhibit the calcium accumulation. Taken together, membrane impermeable osmolytes such as sucrose and mannitol lead to an increase in calcium levels, while the effect of glucose depends on the cell's glucose uptake capacity and will thus vary between cell types in the body that differ in their glucose uptake capacity.

  4. Mislocalization of prelamin A Tyr646Phe mutant to the nuclear pore complex in human embryonic kidney 293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yong; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2007-01-01

    Mature lamin A is formed after post-translational processing of prelamin A, which includes prenylation and carboxymethylation of cysteine 661 in the CAAX motif, followed by two proteolytic cleavages by zinc metalloprotease (ZMPSTE24). We expressed several prelamin A mutants, C661S (defective in prenylation), Y646F (designed to undergo prenylation but not second proteolytic cleavage), double mutant, Y646F/C661S and Y646X (mature lamin A), and the wild type construct in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Only the Y646F mutant co-localized with nuclear pore complex proteins, including Nup53 and Nup98, whereas the other mutants localized to the nuclear envelope rim. The cells expressing Y646F mutant also revealed abnormal nuclear morphology which was partially rescued with the farnesyl transferase inhibitors. These data suggest that the unprenylated prelamin A is not toxic to the cells. The toxicity of prenylated prelamin A may be due to its association and/or accumulation at the nuclear pore complex which could be partially reversed by farnesyl transferase inhibitors. PMID:17291448

  5. Bufadienolides from parotoid gland secretions of Cuban toad Peltophryne fustiger (Bufonidae): Inhibition of human kidney Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Perera Córdova, Wilmer H; Leitão, Suzana Guimarães; Cunha-Filho, Geraldino; Bosch, Roberto Alonso; Alonso, Isel Pascual; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio; Gervou, Rodrigo; Touza, Natália Araújo; Quintas, Luis Eduardo M; Noël, François

    2016-02-01

    Parotoid gland secretions of toad species are a vast reservoir of bioactive molecules with a wide range of biological properties. Herein, for the first time, it is described the isolation by preparative reversed-phase HPLC and the structure elucidation by NMR spectroscopy and/or mass spectrometry of nine major bufadienolides from parotoid gland secretions of the Cuban endemic toad Peltophryne fustiger: ψ-bufarenogin, gamabufotalin, bufarenogin, arenobufagin, 3-(N-suberoylargininyl) marinobufagin, bufotalinin, telocinobufagin, marinobufagin and bufalin. In addition, the secretion was analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS which also allowed the identification of azelayl arginine. The effect of arenobufagin, bufalin and ψ-bufarenogin on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in a human kidney preparation was evaluated. These bufadienolides fully inhibited the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in a concentration-dependent manner, although arenobufagin (IC50 = 28.3 nM) and bufalin (IC50 = 28.7 nM) were 100 times more potent than ψ-bufarenogin (IC50 = 3020 nM). These results provided evidence about the importance of the hydroxylation at position C-14 in the bufadienolide skeleton for the inhibitory activity on the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase.

  6. Evaluation of “Dream Herb,” Calea zacatechichi, for Nephrotoxicity Using Human Kidney Proximal Tubule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Thomas J.; Vohra, Sanah; Wiesenfeld, Paddy; Sprando, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    A recent surge in the use of dietary supplements, including herbal remedies, necessitates investigations into their safety profiles. “Dream herb,” Calea zacatechichi, has long been used in traditional folk medicine for a variety of purposes and is currently being marketed in the US for medicinal purposes, including diabetes treatment. Despite the inherent vulnerability of the renal system to xenobiotic toxicity, there is a lack of safety studies on the nephrotoxic potential of this herb. Additionally, the high frequency of diabetes-associated kidney disease makes safety screening of C. zacatechichi for safety especially important. We exposed human proximal tubule HK-2 cells to increasing doses of this herb alongside known toxicant and protectant control compounds to examine potential toxicity effects of C. zacatechichi relative to control compounds. We evaluated both cellular and mitochondrial functional changes related to toxicity of this dietary supplement and found that even at low doses evidence of cellular toxicity was significant. Moreover, these findings correlated with significantly elevated levels of nephrotoxicity biomarkers, lending further support for the need to further scrutinize the safety of this herbal dietary supplement. PMID:27703475

  7. Mislocalization of prelamin A Tyr646Phe mutant to the nuclear pore complex in human embryonic kidney 293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yong; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K. . E-mail: anil.agarwal@utsouthwestern.edu

    2007-03-30

    Mature lamin A is formed after post-translational processing of prelamin A, which includes prenylation and carboxymethylation of cysteine 661 in the CaaX motif, followed by two proteolytic cleavages by zinc metalloprotease (ZMPSTE24). We expressed several prelamin A mutants, C661S (defective in prenylation), Y646F (designed to undergo prenylation but not second proteolytic cleavage), double mutant, Y646F/C661S and Y646X (mature lamin A), and the wild-type construct in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells. Only the Y646F mutant co-localized with nuclear pore complex proteins, including Nup53 and Nup98, whereas the other mutants localized to the nuclear envelope rim. The cells expressing Y646F mutant also revealed abnormal nuclear morphology which was partially rescued with the farnesyl transferase inhibitors. These data suggest that the unprenylated prelamin A is not toxic to the cells. The toxicity of prenylated prelamin A may be due to its association and/or accumulation at the nuclear pore complex which could be partially reversed by farnesyl transferase inhibitors.

  8. Cytotoxic effect of microbial biosurfactants against human embryonic kidney cancerous cell: HEK-293 and their possible role in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Arun Kumar; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Mohapatra, Purusottam; Kundu, Chanakya Nath; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2014-11-01

    Two different microbial biosurfactants S9BS and CHBS were isolated from Lysinibacillus fusiformis S9 and Bacillus tequilensis CH. Cytotoxicity effect of these biosurfactants on human embryonic kidney cancerous cell (HEK-293) were studied with the help of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl-)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and morphological changes were observed under inverted microscope. The biosurfactants exhibited positive cytotoxic effect on HEK-293 cell line. It was found that LC50 of S9BS and CHBS were 75 and 100 μg ml(-1), respectively. Further cell cycle and apoptosis analysis of biosurfactant-treated HEK-293 cell line were done by FACS. In this study, cytotoxic effect of glycolipid biosurfactant against HEK-293 cell lines is reported for the first time. Mechanism towards increased membrane permeability of biosurfactant-treated cancer cell may be the incorporation of its lipid moiety into the plasma membrane leading to formation of pores and membrane disruption. Hence, these microbial biosurfactants can prove to be significant biomolecule for cancer treatment.

  9. Prevalence and predictors of chronic kidney disease in newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus patients in Owerri, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Anyabolu, E. N.; Chukwuonye, I. I.; Arodiwe, E.; Ijoma, C. K.; Ulasi, I.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a common cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Sub-Saharan Africa. This study aims at identifying the prevalence and predictors of CKD in newly diagnosed HIV patients in Owerri, South East Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional study consisting of 393 newly diagnosed HIV-seropositive subjects and 136 age- and sex-matched seronegative subjects as controls. CKD was defined as 24-hour urine protein (24-HUP) ≥0.3 g and/or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 60 ml/min. Subjects were recruited from the HIV clinic and the Medical Outpatient Department of Federal Medical Centre, Owerri. Clinical and anthropometric data were collected. Relevant investigations were performed, including HIV screening and relevant urine and blood investigations. The mean age of the HIV subjects was 38.84 ± 10.65 years. CKD was present in 86 (22.9%) HIV subjects and 11 (8.l %) controls. Low waist circumference (WC), high serum creatinine, high spot urine protein/creatinine ratio (SUPCR), high 24-HUP/creatinine Ratio (24-HUPCR), high 24-HUP/osmolality Ratio (24-HUPOR) predicted CKD in HIV subjects. CKD prevalence is high (22.9%) among newly diagnosed HIV patients in South East Nigeria. The predictors of CKD included WC, serum creatinine, SUPCR, 24-HUPCR, and 24-HUPOR. PMID:26937072

  10. "Adult Education Is about Human Being in All Its Aspects"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Derek Legge, who celebrated his 95th birthday at the end of last month, is one of the most dedicated and influential of the largely unsung heroes of the adult education movement in Britain. As modesty is one of the many qualities with which his friends and colleagues credit him, he is certain to shrink from the description, but there is little…

  11. The Human Function Compunction: Teleological Explanation in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelemen, Deborah; Rosset, Evelyn

    2009-01-01

    Research has found that children possess a broad bias in favor of teleological--or purpose-based--explanations of natural phenomena. The current two experiments explored whether adults implicitly possess a similar bias. In Study 1, undergraduates judged a series of statements as "good" (i.e., correct) or "bad" (i.e., incorrect) explanations for…

  12. Human Capital Development: Reforms for Adult and Community Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Sarojni; Haukka, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The adult and community education (ACE) sector is consistently responsive to changing community needs and government priorities. It is this particular function that has drawn ACE into the lifelong learning debate as one model for sustaining communities. The responsiveness of ACE means that the sector and its programs continue to make valuable…

  13. Ghrelin and cachexia in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hajime; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; Nakamura, Norifumi; Inui, Akio

    2013-04-01

    Ghrelin is a growth hormone (GH) secretagogue and a potent orexigenic factor that stimulates feeding by interacting with hypothalamic feeding-regulatory nuclei. Its multifaceted effects are potentially beneficial as a treatment in human disease states. In both adult and pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, decreased appetite plays a major role in wasting, which in turn is linked to morbidity and mortality; wasting has also been linked to high levels of leptin and proinflammatory cytokines. The beneficial effects of ghrelin treatment in CKD are potentially mediated by multiple concurrent actions, including the stimulation of appetite-regulating centers, anti-inflammatory effects, and direct kidney effects. Further evaluation of this appetite-regulating hormone in CKD is needed to confirm previous findings and to determine the underlying mechanisms.

  14. Flow cytometric and autoradiographic studies of human kidney carcinomas surgically removed after preirradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Linden, W. A.; Köllermann, M.; König, K.

    1980-01-01

    In a randomized study of human renal adenocarcinomas the tumours were either preirradiated with 25 Gy of 42 MeV X-rays or removed without pretreatment. Nephrectomy was performed 3 1/2 weeks after the end of irradiation or in the untreated series immediately after diagnosis. The impairment of cell proliferation after irradiation was determined by flow cytometry (FCM) and 3H-autoradiography after in vitro incubation. From FCM DNA distributions the fractions of cells in the phases of cell cycle were computed. The results show good agreement between the S-phase fractions determined by FCM and autoradiography. Preliminary data from 14 patients, 5 preirradiated and 9 unirradiated show that the fraction of cells in S-phase was reduced from 0.06 +/- 0.03 in the unirradiated patients to 0.01 +/- 0.01 in the irradiated ones. 12 of the 14 adenocarcinomas had diploid DNA content (2C) and 2 were hyperdiploid. The results demonstrate that FCM can supplement the techniques available for the assessment of radiation response of human tumours. PMID:7000121

  15. Anaemia and fever in Kidney transplant. The role of human parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Parodis López, Yanet; Santana Estupiñán, Raquel; Marrero Robayna, Silvia; Gallego Samper, Roberto; Henríquez Palop, Fernando; Rivero Vera, José Carlos; Camacho Galán, Rafael; Pena López, María José; Sablón González, Nery; González Cabrera, Fayna; Oliva Dámaso, Elena; Vega Díaz, Nicanor; Rodríguez Pérez, José Carlos

    2016-11-16

    Infections remain an issue of particular relevance in renal transplant patients, particularly viral infections. Human parvovirus B19 infection causes severe refractory anaemia, pancytopenia and thrombotic microangiopathy. Its presence is recognized by analysing blood polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by the discovery of typical giant proerythroblasts in the bone marrow. We report the case of a 65 year-old man with a history of deceased donor renal transplant in September 2014. At 38 days after the transplant, the patient presented progressive anaemia that was resistant to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. At 64 days after transplant, hyperthermia occurred with progressive deterioration of the patient's general condition. The viral serology and the first blood PCR for human parvovirus B19 were both negative. At 4 months and 19 days after, a bone marrow biopsy was conducted, showing giant erythroblasts with nuclear viral inclusions that were compatible with parvovirus; a PCR in the tissue confirmed the diagnosis. A second blood PCR was positive for parvovirus. After treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and the temporary discontinuation of mycophenolate mofetil, a complete remission of the disease occurred, although the blood PCR for parvovirus B19 remained positive, so monitoring is necessary for future likely recurrence.

  16. 77 FR 28890 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases D Subcommittee. Date... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Initial...

  17. 75 FR 3741 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases D Subcommittee. Date... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Initial...

  18. 78 FR 9063 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Kidney, Urologic and Hematologic Diseases D Subcommittee. Date... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Initial...

  19. An Inventory of Skills and Attitudes Necessary for a Career in Human Services/Adult Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, William

    This document is an inventory of skills identified as necessary by professionals in the human services field specializing in adult care. It is intended as a mechanism whereby educators can compare that which they teach against what the human services industry feels is relevant. Introductory material discusses the process of the occupational…

  20. [The determination of the natural content of chemical elements in human biological objects (liver, kidney, stomach) by mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma].

    PubMed

    Luzanova, I S; Svetlolobov, D Iu; Zorin, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to continue the studies of the sites of concentration of the chemical elements corresponding to normal homeostasis in human biological objects by mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. The study yielded the data on the natural content of 27 elements in the cadaveric liver, kidney, and stomach. It is recommended to use these findings as the reference parameters corresponding to normal homeostasis.

  1. Size and DNA distributions of electrophoretically separated cultured human kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Electrophoretic purification of purifying cultured cells according to function presumes that the size of cycle phase of a cell is not an overriding determinant of its electrophoretic velocity in an electrophoretic separator. The size distributions and DNA distributions of fractions of cells purified by density gradient electrophoresis were determined. No systematic dependence of electrophoretic migration upward in a density gradient column upon either size or DNA content were found. It was found that human leukemia cell populations, which are more uniform function and found in all phases of the cell cycle during exponential growth, separated on a vertical sensity gradient electrophoresis column according to their size, which is shown to be strictly cell cycle dependent.

  2. Immune Repertoire Profiling Reveals that Clonally Expanded B and T Cells Infiltrating Diseased Human Kidneys Can Also Be Tracked in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Susanne; Suessner, Susanne; Sunzenauer, Judith; Reindl-Schwaighofer, Roman; Weiss, Richard; Winkler, Stephan; Gabriel, Christian; Danzer, Martin; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing allow for the competitive analysis of the human B and T cell immune repertoire. In this study we compared Immunoglobulin and T cell receptor repertoires of lymphocytes found in kidney and blood samples of 10 patients with various renal diseases based on next-generation sequencing data. We used Biomed-2 primer panels and ImmunExplorer software to sequence, analyze and compare complementarity determining regions and V-(D)-J elements. While generally an individual’s renal receptor repertoire is different from the repertoire present in blood, 94% (30/32) of the lymphocytes with clonal expansion in kidney can also be traced in blood however, not all of these clonotypes are equally abundant. Summarizing the data of all analyzed patients, 68% of highly expanded T cell clonotypes and 30% of the highly expanded B cell clonotypes that have infiltrated the kidney can be found amongst the five most abundant clonotypes in blood. In addition, complementarity determining region 3 sequences of the immunoglobulin heavy chains are on average more diverse than T cell receptor beta chains. Immune repertoire analysis of tissue infiltrating B and T cells adds new approaches to the assessment of adaptive immune response in kidney diseases. Our data suggest that expanded clonotypes in the tissues might be traceable in blood samples in the course of treatment or the natural history of the disease. PMID:26600245

  3. Postnatal and adult neurogenesis in the development of human disease.

    PubMed

    Danzer, Steve C

    2008-10-01

    The mammalian brain contains a population of neurons that are continuously generated from late embryogenesis through adulthood-after the generation of almost all other neuronal types. This brain region-the hippocampal dentate gyrus-is in a sense, therefore, persistently immature. Postnatal and adult neurogenesis is likely an essential feature of the dentate, which is critical for learning and memory. Protracted neurogenesis after birth would allow the new cells to develop in conjunction with external events-but it may come with a price: while neurogenesis in utero occurs in a protected environment, children and adults are exposed to any number of hazards, such as toxins and infectious agents. Mature neurons might be resistant to such exposures, but new neurons may be vulnerable. Consistent with this prediction, in adult rodents seizures disrupt the integration of newly generated granule cells, whereas mature granule cells are comparatively unaffected. Significantly, abnormally interconnected cells may contribute to epileptogenesis and/or associated cognitive and memory deficits. Finally, studies increasingly indicate that new granule cells are extremely sensitive to a host of endogenous and exogenous factors, raising the possibility that disrupted granule cell integration may be a common feature of many neurological diseases.

  4. Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys. They are fist-sized organs on either side of your backbone above your waist. The tubes inside filter and ... blood, taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney cancer forms in the lining of tiny tubes ...

  5. Kidney Stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... great pain. The following may be signs of kidney stones that need a doctor's help: Extreme pain in your back ... won't pass on its own, you may need treatment. It can be done with shock waves; with a ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  6. Effects of Biebersteinia multifida hydro-ethanol extract on proliferation and apoptosis of human prostate cancer and human embryonic kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    Golshan, Alireza; Hassanzadeh, Samira; Mojdekanloo, Maryam; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Biebersteinia (Geraniaceae) has a history of use in traditional medicine in some countries including Iran. In the present study, cytotoxic and apoptogenic properties of hydro-ethanol extract of B. multifidi was investigated on human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and DU 145) and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Materials and Methods: Cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 10% FBS at 37ºC in a humidified atmosphere of 95% air and 5% CO2. The root of the plant was macerated with EtOH 70%. Cytotoxic activity of ethanol extract of B. multifida was assessed using alamarBlue® assay after 48 hr of treatment. Apoptotic cells were stained with propidium iodide (PI) and detected by flow cytometry (sub-G1 peak). Results: B. multifidi had cytotoxic effect on malignant cells and normal HEK293 cells in a dose-dependent manner and significantly decreased the cell viability (IC50 values were between 199.2 and 302.9 µg/ml). B. multifida increased the sub-G1 peak in flow cytometry histogram of treated PC3 cells compared to control showing the induction of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation. Conclusion: Due to cytotoxic and apoptotic activity of B. multifida, the plant is suggested for further phytochemical analysis and mechanistic evaluation. PMID:28078247

  7. Structures and biosynthesis of the N- and O-glycans of recombinant human oviduct-specific glycoprotein expressed in human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojing; Tao, Shujuan; Orlando, Ron; Brockhausen, Inka; Kan, Frederick W K

    2012-09-01

    Oviduct-specific glycoprotein (OVGP1) is a major mucin-like glycoprotein synthesized and secreted exclusively by non-ciliated secretory cells of mammalian oviduct. In vitro functional studies showed that OVGP1 plays important roles during fertilization and early embryo development. We have recently produced recombinant human oviduct-specific glycoprotein (rhOVGP1) in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. The present study was undertaken to characterize the structures and determine the biosynthetic pathways of the N- and O-glycans of rhOVGP1. Treatment of the stable rhOVGP1-expressing HEK293 cells with either GalNAcα-Bn to block O-glycan extension, tunicamycin to block N-glycosylation, or neuraminidase increased the electrophoretic mobility of rhOVGP1. A detailed analysis of O- and N-linked glycans of rhOVGP1 by mass spectrometry showed a broad range of many simple and complex glycan structures. In order to identify the enzymes involved in the glycosylation of rhOVGP1, we assayed glycosyltransferase activities involved in the assembly of O- and N-glycans in HEK293 cells, and compared these to those from the immortalized human oviductal cells (OE-E6/E7). Our results demonstrate that HEK293 and OE-E6/E7 cells exhibit a similar spectrum of glycosyltransferase activities that can synthesize elongated and sialylated O-glycans with core 1 and 2 structures, as well as complex multiantennary N-glycans. It is anticipated that the knowledge gained from the present study will facilitate future studies of the role of the glycans of human OVGP1 in fertilization and early embryo development.

  8. Alternative Sources of Adult Stem Cells: Human Amniotic Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbank, Susanne; van Griensven, Martijn; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Peterbauer-Scherb, Anja

    Human amniotic membrane is a highly promising cell source for tissue engineering. The cells thereof, human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) and human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSC), may be immunoprivileged, they represent an early developmental status, and their application is ethically uncontroversial. Cell banking strategies may use freshly isolated cells or involve in vitro expansion to increase cell numbers. Therefore, we have thoroughly characterized the effect of in vitro cultivation on both phenotype and differentiation potential of hAEC. Moreover, we present different strategies to improve expansion including replacement of animal-derived supplements by human platelet products or the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase to extend the in vitro lifespan of amniotic cells. Characterization of the resulting cultures includes phenotype, growth characteristics, and differentiation potential, as well as immunogenic and immunomodulatory properties.

  9. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB-153) and (PCB-77) absorption in human liver (HepG2) and kidney (HK2) cells in vitro: PCB levels and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Somiranjan; De, Supriyo; Chen, Yongqing; Sutton, Darryl C.; Ayorinde, Folahan O.; Dutta, Sisir K.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of congener specific cellular absorption of PCBs is important to the study of the organ specific body burden of an individual and to their toxic effects. We have previously demonstrated that single PCB congeners induce cytotoxicity, as evidenced by decreased cellular viability and accelerated apoptotic death. There is very little, if any, information available on the differences in toxicity due to the nature of absorption of PCBs in different cells. To obtain such information human liver (HepG2) cells (in medium with 10% FBS) were exposed to 70μM of both PCB-153 (non-coplanar hexachlorobiphenyl) and PCB-77 (coplanar tetrachlorobiphenyl), and human kidney (HK2) cells in serum free medium were exposed to 80 and 40 μM of PCB-153 and PCB-77 respectively, according to their LC50 values in these cells. Medium and cells were collected separately at each time interval from 30 minutes to 48 hours, and PCB concentrations were analyzed in both by GC-MS using biphenyl as an internal standard following hexane: acetone (50:50) extraction. We also performed trypan blue exclusion, DNA fragmentation and fluorescence microscopic studies in assessing cell viability and apoptotic cell death. About 40% of PCB-153 (35 μM, 50% of the maximum value) was detected in HepG2 cells within 30 minutes, and it reached its highest concentration at 6 hours (60 μM), concomitant with the PCB depletion in the medium (5μM). For PCB-77, the highest concentrations within the cells were reached at 3 hours. However, the absorption levels of PCB-153 and PCB-77 in HK2 cells reached their peaks at 3 and 6 hours respectively. Exposure of human liver and kidney cells to PCB-153 and PCB-77 caused accelerated apoptotic cell death in a time-dependent manner. The studies demonstrated that (1) liver cells initiate the absorption of PCBs much faster than kidney cells; however, the concentration reaches its maximum level much earlier in kidney cells; (2) both PCB-153 and PCB-77 induced enhanced

  10. USPIO-enhanced MR imaging of macrophage infiltration in native and transplanted kidneys: initial results in humans.

    PubMed

    Hauger, Olivier; Grenier, Nicolas; Deminère, Colette; Lasseur, Catherine; Delmas, Yahsou; Merville, Pierre; Combe, Christian

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the detection and characterization of macrophage infiltration in native and transplanted kidneys using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIO). Among 21 patients initially enrolled, 12 scheduled for renal biopsy for acute or rapidly progressive renal failure (n = 7) or renal graft rejection (n = 5) completed the study. Three magnetic resonance (MR) sessions were performed with a 1.5-T system, before, immediately after and 72 h after i.v. injection of USPIO at doses of 1.7-2.6 mg of iron/kg. Signal intensity change was evaluated visually and calculated based on a region of interest (ROI) positioned on the kidney compartments. Histological examination showed cortical macrophage infiltration in four patients (>5 macrophages/mm(2)), two in native kidneys (proliferative extracapillary glomerulonephritis) and two in transplants (acute rejection). These patients showed a 33 +/- 18% mean cortical signal loss on T2*-weighted images. In the remaining eight patients, with <5 macrophages/mm(2), there was no cortical signal loss. However, in three of these, presenting with ischemic acute tubular necrosis, a strong (42 +/- 18%) signal drop was found in the medulla exclusively. USPIO-enhanced MR imaging can demonstrate infiltration of the kidneys by macrophages both in native and transplanted kidneys and may help to differentiate between kidney diseases.

  11. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Harimurti, Kuntjoro; Saldi, Siti R F; Dewiasty, Esthika; Khoeri, Miftahuddin M; Yunihastuti, Evi; Putri, Tiara; Tafroji, Wisnu; Safari, Dodi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the distribution of serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae carried by adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Jakarta, Indonesia. Specimens of nasopharyngeal swab were collected from 200 HIV infected adults aged 21 to 63 years. Identification of S. pneumoniae was done by optochin susceptibility test and PCR for the presence of psaA and lytA genes. Serotyping was performed with sequential multiplex PCR and antibiotic susceptibility with the disk diffusion method. S. pneumoniae strains were carried by 10% adults with serotype 6A/B 20% was common serotype among cultured strains in 20 adults. Most of isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol (80%) followed by clindamycin (75%), erythromycin (75%), penicillin (55%), and tetracycline (50%). This study found resistance to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was most common with only 15% of strains being susceptible. High non-susceptibility to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was observed in S. pneumoniae strains carried by HIV infected adults in Jakarta, Indonesia.

  12. A comparison of the binding of urinary calcium oxalate monohydrate and dihydrate crystals to human kidney cells in urine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Thurgood, Lauren A.; Grover, Phulwinder K.; Ryall, Rosemary L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the binding kinetics of urinary calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals to human kidney (HK-2) cells in ultra-filtered (UF), and centrifuged and filtered (CF) human urine; and to quantify the binding of COM and COD crystals to cultured HK-2 cells in UF and CF urine samples collected from different individuals. Materials and methods Urine was collected from healthy subjects, pooled, centrifuged and filtered. 14C-oxalate-labelled COM and COD crystals were precipitated from the urine by adding oxalate after adjustment of two aliquots of the urine to 2 and 8 mm Ca2+, respectively. For the kinetic study, the crystals were incubated with HK-2 cells for up to 120 min in pooled CF urine adjusted to 2 and 8 mm Ca2+. Identical experiments were also carried out in UF urine samples collected from the same individuals. For the quantitative study, the same radioactively labelled COM and COD crystals were incubated with HK-2 cells for 50 min in separate CF and UF urines collected from eight healthy individuals at the native Ca2+ concentrations of the urines. Field emission electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy were used to confirm crystal morphology. Results Binding of both COM and COD crystals generally bound more strongly at 8 mm than at 2 mm Ca2+. The kinetic binding curves of COM were smooth, while those of COD were consistently biphasic, suggesting that the two crystal types induce different cellular metabolic responses: HK-2 cells crystals appear to possess a transitory mechanism for detaching COD, but not COM crystals. In UF urine, COM binding was significantly greater than that of COD at 2 mm Ca2+, but at 8 mm Ca2+ the binding of COD was greater at early and late time points. COD also bound significantly more strongly at early time points in CF urine at both 2 and 8 mm Ca2+. In both CF and UF urine, there was no difference between the binding affinity of urinary COM and COD crystals. Conclusion

  13. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Song, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and brain tumors. PMID:27375363

  14. In vitro regeneration of kidney from pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Osafune, Kenji

    2010-10-01

    Although renal transplantation has proved a successful treatment for the patients with end-stage renal failure, the therapy is hampered by the problem of serious shortage of donor organs. Regenerative medicine using stem cells, including cell transplantation therapy, needs to be developed to solve the problem. We previously identified the multipotent progenitor cells in the embryonic mouse kidney that can give rise to several kinds of epithelial cells found in adult kidney, such as glomerular podocytes and renal tubular epithelia. Establishing the method to generate the progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells that have the capacity to indefinitely proliferate in vitro is required for the development of kidney regeneration strategy. We review the current status of the research on the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into renal lineages and describe cues to promote this research field.

  15. [Dietary phytoestrogen and its potential benefits in adult human health].

    PubMed

    Garrido, Argelia; de la Maza, María Pía; Valladares, Luis

    2003-11-01

    Human diet contains a series of bioactive vegetal compounds that can improve human health. Among these, there has been a special interest for phytoestrogens. This article reviews the evidence about the potential benefits of phytoestrogens for human health. Forty eight manuscripts were selected for their study design and relevance to human health. The cell growth inhibitory effects of phytoestrogens and their implication in breast cancer are reviewed. Also the effects of these compounds on serum lipid levels and the effectiveness of a phytoestrogen derivate, ipriflavone, on the prevention of osteoporosis are analyzed. Although these compounds have a great potential for improving health, there is still not enough evidence to recommend the routine use of phytoestrogens.

  16. Electroporation of Embryonic Kidney Explants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Nicholas; Houle, Daniel; Gupta, Indra R.

    Metanephric kidney development in the mouse begins at embryonic day (E) 10.5, when the ureteric bud (UB), an outgrowth of the epithelial nephric duct, invades the neighboring metanephric mesenchyme (MM). The ureteric bud then undergoes a series of branching events to form the collecting duct network of the adult kidney (Fig. 19.1). As each ureteric bud tip forms, the adjacent undifferentiated mesenchyme is induced to epithelialize and form a nephron, the functional unit of the adult kidney that filters waste. Rodent embryonic kidneys can be dissected and cultured as explants such that branching morphogenesis and nephrogenesis can be observed ex vivo (Rothenpieler and Dressler, 1993; Vega et al., 1996; Piscione et al., 1997; Gupta et al., 2003).

  17. Renal excretion of plasma soluble melanins by healthy human adults.

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Z L; Nayak, U

    1993-01-01

    The soluble melanins of blood plasma form in vivo and in vitro from dopa, catecholamines, catechol, hydroquinone, homogentisic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, p-aminophenol, p-phenylenediamine and other structurally related end(ex)ogenous compounds by oxidative polymerization. The mean quantity of natural melanins in normal plasma is 1.61 +/- 0.10 (standard deviation) mg/ml, (n = 20) and in uraemic plasma 2.72 +/- 0.38 mg/ml, (n = 16). The plasma melanins (approximately 3%), are associated with proteins (approximately 85%), mucoproteins (approximately 0.25%), lipids (approximately 0.4%), as soluble lipofuscins, and probably are associated with proteins without lipids as soluble melanoproteins. Fluorescence, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopies and the melanin isolation method show the presence of soluble melanins in the urine of healthy people. Soluble melanins can also be formed in vitro in the urine by oxidative polymerization of the precursors. In most of the urine samples we studied, melanins were present in larger amounts than the urinary proteins, indicating that the kidneys can selectively excrete the melanin components of the lipofuscins, and that the solubility of melanins does not depend upon combination with proteins. The quantities of purified melanins precipitated with 6 N HCl at 110 degrees C during 72 h from urine samples collected during 24 h periods ranged from 0.1460 g to 3.7627 g (mean 1.1303 +/- 1.1739 g, n = 8) and the plasma clearance rates ranged from 0.06 ml/min to 1.56 ml/min (mean 0.48 +/- 0.48 ml/min, n = 8). From the individual 24 h urine samples we obtained from 9 to 216 mg/dl of precipitated melanins while the individual plasma samples contained from 145 to 175 mg/dl.

  18. G-protein modulation of N-type calcium channel gating current in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293).

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L P; Patil, P G; Snutch, T P; Yue, D T

    1997-01-01

    1. Voltage-dependent inhibition of N-type calcium currents by G-proteins contributes importantly to presynaptic inhibition. To examine the effect of G-proteins on key intermediary transitions leading to channel opening, we measured both gating and ionic currents arising from recombinant N-type channels (alpha 1B, beta 1b and alpha 2) expressed in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293). Recombinant expression of a homogeneous population of channels provided a favourable system for rigorous examination of the mechanisms underlying G-protein modulation. 2. During intracellular dialysis with GTP gamma S to activate G-proteins, ionic currents demonstrated classic features of voltage-dependent inhibition, i.e. strong depolarizing prepulses increased ionic currents and produced hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependent activation of ionic current. No such effects were observed with GDP beta S present to minimize G-protein activity. 3. Gating currents were clearly resolved after ionic current blockade with 0.1 mM free La3+, enabling this first report of gating charge translocation arising exclusively from N-type channels. G-proteins decreased the amplitude of gating currents and produced depolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependent activation of gating charge movement. However, the greatest effect was to induce a approximately 20 mV separation between the voltage-dependent activation of gating charge movement and ionic current. Strong depolarizing prepulses largely reversed these effects. These modulatory features provide telling clues about the kinetic steps affected by G-proteins because gating currents arise from the movement of voltage sensors that trigger channel activation. 4. The mechanistic implications of concomitant G-protein-mediated changes in gating and ionic currents are discussed. We argue that G-proteins act to inhibit both voltage-sensor movement and the transduction of voltage-sensor activation into channel opening. Images

  19. Hepatocyte growth factor modification promotes the amelioration effects of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells on rat acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Qian, Hui; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Xu; Yan, Yongmin; Ye, Shengqin; Peng, Xiujuan; Li, Wei; Xu, Wenrong

    2011-01-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hucMSCs) are particularly attractive cells for cellular and gene therapy in acute kidney injury (AKI). Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy has been limited by immune reaction and target genes selection. However, in the present study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of hepatocyte growth factor modified hucMSCs (HGF-hucMSCs) in ischemia/reperfusion-induced AKI rat models. In vivo animal models were generated by subjecting to 60 min of bilateral renal injury by clamping the renal pedicles and then introduced HGF-hucMSCs via the left carotid artery. Our results revealed that serum creatinine and urea nitrogen levels decreased to the baseline more quickly in HGF-hucMSCs-treated group than that in hucMSCs- or green fluorescent protein-hucMSCs-treated groups at 72 h after injury. The percent of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells in HGF-hucMSCs-treated group was higher than that in the hucMSCs or green fluorescent protein-hucMSCs-treated groups. Moreover, injured renal tissues treated with HGF-hucMSCs also exhibited less hyperemia and renal tubule cast during the recovery process. Immunohistochemistry and living body imaging confirmed that HGF-hucMSCs localize to areas of renal injury. Real-time polymerase chain reaction result showed that HGF-hucMSCs also inhibited caspase-3 and interleukin-1β mRNA expression in injured renal tissues. Western blot also showed HGF-hucMSCs-treated groups had lower expression of interleukin-1β. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick end labeling method indicated that HGF-hucMSCs-treated group had the least apoptosis cells. In conclusion, our findings suggest that HGF modification promotes the amelioration of ischemia/reperfusion-induced rat renal injury via antiapoptotic and antiinflammatory mechanisms; thus, providing a novel therapeutic application for hucMSCs in AKI.

  20. Imaging of nuclear factor κB activation induced by ionizing radiation in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells.

    PubMed

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine E; Reitz, Günther

    2014-08-01

    Ionizing radiation modulates several signaling pathways resulting in transcription factor activation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the most important transcription factors that respond to changes in the environment of a mammalian cell. NF-κB plays a key role not only in inflammation and immune regulation but also in cellular radiation response. In response to DNA damage, NF-κB might inhibit apoptosis and promote carcinogenesis. Our previous studies showed that ionizing radiation is very effective in inducing biological damages. Therefore, it is important to understand the radiation-induced NF-κB signaling cascade. The current study aims to improve existing mammalian cell-based reporter assays for NF-κB activation by the use of DD-tdTomato which is a destabilized variant of red fluorescent protein tdTomato. It is demonstrated that exposure of recombinant human embryonic kidney cells (HEK/293 transfected with a reporter constructs containing NF-κB binding sites in its promoter) to ionizing radiation induces NF-κB-dependent DD-tdTomato expression. Using this reporter assays, NF-κB signaling in mammalian cells was monitored by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Activation of NF-κB by the canonical pathway was found to be quicker than by the genotoxin- and stress-induced pathway. X-rays activate NF-κB in HEK cells in a dose-dependent manner, and the extent of NF-κB activation is higher as compared to camptothecin.

  1. Trehalose effectiveness as a cryoprotectant in 2D and 3D cell cultures of human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Hara, Jared; Tottori, Jordan; Anders, Megan; Dadhwal, Smritee; Asuri, Prashanth; Mobed-Miremadi, Maryam

    2017-05-01

    Post cryopreservation viability of human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells under two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions was studied using trehalose as the sole cryoprotective agent. An L9 (3(4)) Taguchi design was used to optimize the cryoprotection cocktail seeding process prior to slow-freezing with the specific aim of maximizing cell viability measured 7 days post thaw, using the combinatorial cell viability and in-vitro cytotoxicity WST assay. At low (200 mM) and medium (800 mM) levels of trehalose concentration, encapsulation in alginate offered a greater protection to cryopreservation. However, at the highest trehalose concentration (1200 mM) and in the absence of the pre-incubation step, there was no statistical difference at the 95% CI (p = 0.0212) between the viability of the HEK cells under 2D and 3D culture conditions estimated to be 17.9 ± 4.6% and 14.0 ± 3.6%, respectively. A parallel comparison between cryoprotective agents conducted at the optimal levels of the L9 study, using trehalose, dimethylsulfoxide and glycerol in alginate microcapsules yielded a viability of 36.0 ± 7.4% for trehalose, in average 75% higher than the results associated with the other two cell membrane-permeating compounds. In summary, the effectiveness of trehalose has been demonstrated by the fact that 3D cell cultures can readily be equilibrated with trehalose before cryopreservation, thus mitigating the cytotoxic effects of glycerol and dimethylsulfoxide.

  2. Nutrition and dietary intake and their association with mortality and hospitalisation in adults with chronic kidney disease treated with haemodialysis: protocol for DIET-HD, a prospective multinational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Suetonia C; Ruospo, Marinella; Campbell, Katrina L; Garcia Larsen, Vanessa; Saglimbene, Valeria; Natale, Patrizia; Gargano, Letizia; Craig, Jonathan C; Johnson, David W; Tonelli, Marcello; Knight, John; Bednarek-Skublewska, Anna; Celia, Eduardo; del Castillo, Domingo; Dulawa, Jan; Ecder, Tevfik; Fabricius, Elisabeth; Frazão, João Miguel; Gelfman, Ruben; Hoischen, Susanne Hildegard; Schön, Staffan; Stroumza, Paul; Timofte, Delia; Török, Marietta; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Wollheim, Charlotta; Frantzen, Luc; Strippoli, G F M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adults with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) treated with haemodialysis experience mortality of between 15% and 20% each year. Effective interventions that improve health outcomes for long-term dialysis patients remain unproven. Novel and testable determinants of health in dialysis are needed. Nutrition and dietary patterns are potential factors influencing health in other health settings that warrant exploration in multinational studies in men and women treated with dialysis. We report the protocol of the “DIETary intake, death and hospitalisation in adults with end-stage kidney disease treated with HaemoDialysis (DIET-HD) study,” a multinational prospective cohort study. DIET-HD will describe associations of nutrition and dietary patterns with major health outcomes for adults treated with dialysis in several countries. Methods and analysis DIET-HD will recruit approximately 10 000 adults who have ESKD treated by clinics administered by a single dialysis provider in Argentina, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden and Turkey. Recruitment will take place between March 2014 and June 2015. The study has currently recruited 8000 participants who have completed baseline data. Nutritional intake and dietary patterns will be measured using the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN) food frequency questionnaire. The primary dietary exposures will be n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid consumption. The primary outcome will be cardiovascular mortality and secondary outcomes will be all-cause mortality, infection-related mortality and hospitalisation. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the relevant Ethics Committees in participating countries. All participants will provide written informed consent and be free to withdraw their data at any time. The findings of the study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and to participants via regular newsletters

  3. Osteoprotegerin and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Montañez-Barragán, Alejandra; Gómez-Barrera, Isaias; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Ucero, Alvaro C; González-Espinoza, Liliana; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is associated to increased mortality. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily receptor that inhibits the actions of the cytokines receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) by preventing their binding to signaling receptors in the cell membrane. OPG-deficient mice display vascular calcification while OPG prevented calcification of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and protected kidney cells from TRAIL-induced death. OPG may be a biomarker in patients with kidney disease. Circulating OPG is increased in predialysis, dialysis and transplant CKD patients and may predict vascular calcification progression and patient survival. By contrast, circulating OPG is decreased in nephrotic syndrome. In addition, free and exosome-bound urinary OPG is increased in human kidney disease. Increased urinary OPG has been associated with lupus nephritis activity. Despite the association of high OPG levels with disease, experimental functional information available suggests that OPG might be protective in kidney disease and in vascular injury in the context of uremia. Thus, tissue injury results in increased OPG, while OPG may protect from tissue injury. Recombinant OPG was safe in phase I randomized controlled trials. Further research is needed to fully define the therapeutic and biomarker potential of OPG in patients with kidney disease.

  4. A century of trends in adult human height.

    PubMed

    2016-07-26

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5-22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3-19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8-144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries.

  5. A century of trends in adult human height

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13410.001 PMID:27458798

  6. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ...

  7. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Kidney Failure Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, ... evaluated? How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain ...

  8. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  9. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases A ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  10. Kidney disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - kidney disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on kidney disease: National Kidney Disease Education Program -- www.nkdep.nih.gov National Kidney Foundation -- www.kidney.org National ...

  11. Immune physiology and oogenesis in fetal and adult humans, ovarian infertility, and totipotency of adult ovarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Caudle, Michael R; Virant-Klun, Irma; Gupta, Satish K; Dominguez, Roberto; Svetlikova, Marta; Xu, Fei

    2009-03-01

    It is still widely believed that while oocytes in invertebrates and lower vertebrates are periodically renewed throughout life, oocytes in humans and higher vertebrates are formed only during the fetal/perinatal period. However, this dogma is questioned, and clashes with Darwinian evolutionary theory. Studies of oogenesis and follicular renewal from ovarian stem cells (OSCs) in adult human ovaries, and of the role of third-party bone marrow-derived cells (monocyte-derived tissue macrophages and T lymphocytes) could help provide a better understanding of the causes of ovarian infertility, its prevention, and potential treatment. We have reported differentiation of distinct cell types from OSC and the production of new eggs in cultures derived from premenopausal and postmenopausal human ovaries. OSCs are also capable of producing neural/neuronal cells in vitro after sequential stimulation with sex steroid combinations. Hence, OSC represent a unique type of totipotent adult stem cells, which could be utilized for autologous treatment of premature ovarian failure and also for autologous stem cell therapy of neurodegenerative diseases without use of allogeneic embryonic stem cells or somatic cell nuclear transfer. The in vivo application of sex steroid combinations may augment the proliferation of existing neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neuronal cells (systemic regenerative therapy). Such treatment may also stimulate the transdifferentiation of autologous neural stem cell precursors into neural stem cells useful for topical or systemic regenerative treatment.

  12. World Kidney Day 2016: averting the legacy of kidney disease-focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.

  13. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Lung, Liver and Kidney Diseases to Infectious Disease, Sickle Cell Disease and Endometrium Disease.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tai-You

    2011-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of naturally occurring small non-coding RNAs of about 22 nucleotides that have recently emerged as important regulators of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Recent studies provided clear evidence that microRNAs are abundant in the lung, liver and kidney and modulate a diverse spectrum of their functions. Moreover, a large number of studies have reported links between alterations of miRNA homeostasis and pathological conditions such as infectious diseases, sickle cell disease and endometrium diseases as well as lung, liver and kidney diseases. As a consequence of extensive participation of miRNAs in normal functions, alteration and/or abnormalities in miRNAs should have importance in human diseases. Beside their important roles in patterning and development, miRNAs also orchestrated responses to pathogen infections. Particularly, emerging evidence indicates that viruses use their own miRNAs to manipulate both cellular and viral gene expression. Furthermore, viral infection can exert a profound impact on the host cellular miRNA expression profile, and several RNA viruses have been reported to interact directly with cellular miRNAs and/or to use these miRNAs to augment their replication potential. Here I briefly summarize the newly discovered roles of miRNAs in various human diseases including infectious diseases, sickle cell disease and enodmetrium diseases as well as lung, liver and kidney diseases.

  14. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Lung, Liver and Kidney Diseases to Infectious Disease, Sickle Cell Disease and Endometrium Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of naturally occurring small non-coding RNAs of about 22 nucleotides that have recently emerged as important regulators of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Recent studies provided clear evidence that microRNAs are abundant in the lung, liver and kidney and modulate a diverse spectrum of their functions. Moreover, a large number of studies have reported links between alterations of miRNA homeostasis and pathological conditions such as infectious diseases, sickle cell disease and endometrium diseases as well as lung, liver and kidney diseases. As a consequence of extensive participation of miRNAs in normal functions, alteration and/or abnormalities in miRNAs should have importance in human diseases. Beside their important roles in patterning and development, miRNAs also orchestrated responses to pathogen infections. Particularly, emerging evidence indicates that viruses use their own miRNAs to manipulate both cellular and viral gene expression. Furthermore, viral infection can exert a profound impact on the host cellular miRNA expression profile, and several RNA viruses have been reported to interact directly with cellular miRNAs and/or to use these miRNAs to augment their replication potential. Here I briefly summarize the newly discovered roles of miRNAs in various human diseases including infectious diseases, sickle cell disease and enodmetrium diseases as well as lung, liver and kidney diseases. PMID:22346770

  15. Hesperetin induces melanin production in adult human epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Usach, Iris; Taléns-Visconti, Raquel; Magraner-Pardo, Lorena; Peris, José-Esteban

    2015-06-01

    One of the major sources of flavonoids for humans are citrus fruits, hesperidin being the predominant flavonoid. Hesperetin (HSP), the aglycon of hesperidin, has been reported to provide health benefits such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. However, the effect of HSP on skin pigmentation is not clear. Some authors have found that HSP induces melanogenesis in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells, which, if extrapolated to in vivo conditions, might protect skin against photodamage. Since the effect of HSP on normal melanocytes could be different to that observed on melanoma cells, the described effect of HSP on murine melanoma cells has been compared to the effect obtained using normal human melanocytes. HSP concentrations of 25 and 50 µM induced melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in human melanocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to control melanocytes, 25 µM HSP increased melanin production and tyrosinase activity 1.4-fold (p < 0.01) and 1.1-fold (p < 0.01), respectively, and the corresponding increases in the case of 50 µM HSP were 1.9-fold (p < 0.001) and 1.3-fold (p < 0.001). Therefore, HSP could be considered a valuable photoprotective substance if its capacity to increase melanin production in human melanocyte cultures could be reproduced on human skin.

  16. Comparison of proliferating cells between human adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Hong; Fu, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Gang

    2008-04-01

    Studies of sweat glands had demonstrated that there were degenerating cells and proliferating cells in the eccrine sweat glands. To compare the differences in the proliferating cells between human adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands, immunostaining of proliferating-associated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki67 nuclear antigen (Ki67) was performed, and the location and the percentage of the positive staining cells were analyzed. The results showed that a few cells of the secretory and ductal portion in both the adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands stained positive with Ki67 and PCNA. The labeling index of PCNA in adult eccrine sweat glands was 34.71 +/- 8.37%, while that in the fetal was 62.72 +/- 6.54%. The labeling index of PCNA in fetal eccrine sweat glands was higher than that in adult. Myoepithelial cells were negative staining with anti-PCNA antibody in adult eccrine sweat glands, while in the fetal a few myoepithelial cells were positive staining. Labeling index of Ki67 in adult eccrine sweat glands was similar to that in the fetal, ranging from 0.5 to 4.3%. Myoepithelial cells of the adult and fetal eccrine sweat glands both were negative staining with anti-Ki67 antibody. We concluded that the myoepithelial cells had proliferating ability only in fetal eccrine sweat glands, and that the proliferating ability of fetal eccrine sweat glands was stronger than that of the adult.

  17. Development of Eimeria bovis in vitro: suitability of several bovine, human and porcine endothelial cell lines, bovine fetal gastrointestinal, Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) and African green monkey kidney (VERO) cells.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, C; Barbisch, B; Heise, A; Kowalik, S; Zahner, H

    2002-04-01

    Several bovine, human and porcine endothelial cell lines, bovine fetal gastrointestinal cells (BFGC), Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) and African green monkey kidney (VERO) cells were exposed in vitro to sporozoites of Eimeria bovis. Parasites invaded all cells used and changed their shape to more stumpy forms within 12 h. Sporozoites left their host cells and invaded new ones frequently within the first 12 h post-infection. Further development took place only in bovine cells, although parasites survived in the other cells for at least 3 weeks. Within the non-bovine cells, conspicuously enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles developed in VERO cells and reached a diameter of 15-20 microm. The best development to first generation schizonts with regard both to time required to mature, to schizont size and to merozoite yields was observed in BFGC, followed by bovine umbilical vein and bovine spleen lymphatic endothelial cells. MDBK cells were less suitable. The life cycle was completed (development of oocysts) only occasionally in BFGC. Results are considered under several aspects. Thus, infected VERO cells may represent a suitable tool for studying the parasitophorous vacuole, while infected endothelial cells represent a system quite narrow to the in vivo situation and should allow basic studies on parasite/host cell interactions and BFGC can be used for the mass production of E. bovis first generation merozoites.

  18. Polymorphisms of the UCP2 Gene Are Associated with Glomerular Filtration Rate in Type 2 Diabetic Patients and with Decreased UCP2 Gene Expression in Human Kidney

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Bianca Marmontel; Michels, Marcus; Sortica, Denise Alves; Bouças, Ana Paula; Rheinheimer, Jakeline; Buffon, Marjoriê Piuco; Bauer, Andrea Carla; Canani, Luís Henrique; Crispim, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) reduces production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mitochondria. ROS overproduction is one of the major contributors to the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications, such as diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Thus, deleterious polymorphisms in the UCP2 gene are candidate risk factors for DKD. In this study, we investigated whether UCP2 -866G/A, Ala55Val and Ins/Del polymorphisms were associated with DKD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and whether they had an effect on UCP2 gene expression in human kidney tissue biopsies. Materials and Methods In a case-control study, frequencies of the UCP2 -866G/A, Ala55Val and Ins/Del polymorphisms as well as frequencies of the haplotypes constituted by them were analyzed in 287 T2DM patients with DKD and 281 T2DM patients without this complication. In a cross-sectional study, UCP2 gene expression was evaluated in 42 kidney biopsy samples stratified according to the presence of the UCP2 mutated -866A/55Val/Ins haplotype. Results In the T2DM group, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the -866A/55Val/Ins haplotype was an independent risk factor for DKD (OR = 2.136, 95% CI 1.036–4.404), although neither genotype nor allele frequencies of the individual polymorphisms differed between case and control groups. Interestingly, T2DM patients carrying the mutated haplotype showed decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) when compared to subjects with the reference haplotype (adjusted P= 0.035). In kidney biopsy samples, UCP2 expression was significantly decreased in UCP2 mutated haplotype carriers when compared to kidneys from patients with the reference haplotype (0.32 ± 1.20 vs. 1.85 ± 1.16 n fold change; adjusted P< 0.000001). Discussion Data reported here suggest that the UCP2 -866A/55Val/Ins haplotype is associated with an increased risk for DKD and with a lower eGFR in T2DM patients. Furthermore, this mutated haplotype was associated

  19. Cytotoxicity of Gold Nanoparticles with Varying Concentration and Under Low Dose Environmental Radiation on Human Embryonic Kidney 293 Cells (HEK-293)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crudup, Shalana; Braender, Bruce; Iftode, Cristina; Dobbins, Tabbetha

    2013-03-01

    Nanomaterials are increasingly being used in medicine. Most research surrounding the health and safety effects of nanomaterials examine the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles alone. Few studies, as this one does, examines the combined effects of nanoparticle concentration and radiation exposure on cytotoxicity to human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK-293). Nanoparticles injected in the body are supposed to undergo biodegradation once they are done their specified task, however, some do not and accumulate in the cells (particularly at the liver and kidney) and this causes intracellular changes. Examples of intracellular changes are the disruption of organelle integrity or gene alterations. This will cause the cells to die because the cells are very sensitive to changes in their pH. The experiments reported here focus on the cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles as a function of varying particle concentrations and also with and without exposure to UV radiation.

  20. Androgen responsive adult human prostatic epithelial cell lines immortalized by human papillomavirus 18.

    PubMed

    Bello, D; Webber, M M; Kleinman, H K; Wartinger, D D; Rhim, J S

    1997-06-01

    Prostate cancer and benign tumors of the prostate are the two most common neoplastic diseases in men in the United States, however, research on their causes and treatment has been slow because of the difficulty in obtaining fresh samples of human tissue and a lack of well characterized cell lines which exhibit growth and differentiation characteristics of normal prostatic epithelium. Non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial cells from a white male donor were immortalized with human papillomavirus 18 which resulted in the establishment of the RWPE-1 cell line. Cells from the RWPE-1 cell line were further transformed by v-Ki-ras to establish the RWPE-2 cell line. The objectives of this study were to: (1) establish the prostatic epithelial origin and androgen responsiveness of RWPE-1 and RWPE-2 cell lines; (2) examine their response to growth factors; and (3) establish the malignant characteristics of the RWPE-2 cell line. Immunoperoxidase staining showed that both RWPE-1 and RWPE-2 cells express cytokeratins 8 and 18, which are characteristic of luminal prostatic epithelial cells, but they also coexpress basal cell cytokeratins. These cell lines show growth stimulation and prostate specific antigen (PSA) and androgen receptor (AR) expression in response to the synthetic androgen mibolerone, which establishes their prostatic epithelial origin. Both cell lines also show a dose-dependent growth stimulation by EGF and bFGF and growth inhibition when exposed to TGF-beta, however, the transformed RWPE-2 cells are less responsive. RWPE-1 cells neither grow in agar nor form tumors when injected into nude mice with or without Matrigel. However, RWPE-2 cells form colonies in agar and tumors in nude mice. In the in vitro invasion assay, RWPE-1 cells are not invasive whereas RWPE-2 cells are invasive. Nuclear expression of p53 and Rb proteins was heterogeneous but detectable by immunostaining in both cell lines. The RWPE-1 cells, which show many normal cell

  1. Human Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (hAAT) therapy reduces renal dysfunction and acute tubular necrosis in a murine model of bilateral kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Maicas, Nuria; van der Vlag, Johan; Bublitz, Janin; Florquin, Sandrine; Bakker-van Bebber, Marinka; Dinarello, Charles A.; Verweij, Vivienne; Masereeuw, Roos; Joosten, Leo A.

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), the major serum serine protease inhibitor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of human AAT (hAAT) monotherapy during the early and recovery phase of ischemia-induced acute kidney injury. Mild renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury was induced in male C57Bl/6 mice by bilateral clamping of the renal artery and vein for 20 min. hAAT (80 mg/kg, Prolastin®) was administered daily intraperitoneally (i.p.) from day -1 until day 7 after surgery. Control animals received the same amount of human serum albumin (hAlb). Plasma, urine and kidneys were collected at 2h, 1, 2, 3, 8 and 15 days after reperfusion for histological and biochemical analysis. hAAT partially preserved renal function and tubular integrity after induction of bilateral kidney I/R injury, which was accompanied with reduced renal influx of macrophages and a significant decrease of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) protein levels in urine and plasma. During the recovery phase, hAAT significantly decreased kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) protein levels in urine but showed no significant effect on renal fibrosis. Although the observed effect size of hAAT administration was limited and therefore the clinical relevance of our findings should be evaluated carefully, these data support the potential of this natural protein to ameliorate ischemic and inflammatory conditions. PMID:28235038

  2. Global and local processing in adult humans (Homo sapiens), 5-year-old children (Homo sapiens), and adult cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus).

    PubMed

    Neiworth, Julie J; Gleichman, Amy J; Olinick, Anne S; Lamp, Kristen E

    2006-11-01

    This study compared adults (Homo sapiens), young children (Homo sapiens), and adult tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) while they discriminated global and local properties of stimuli. Subjects were trained to discriminate a circle made of circle elements from a square made of square elements and were tested with circles made of squares and squares made of circles. Adult humans showed a global bias in testing that was unaffected by the density of the elements in the stimuli. Children showed a global bias with dense displays but discriminated by both local and global properties with sparse displays. Adult tamarins' biases matched those of the children. The striking similarity between the perceptual processing of adult monkeys and humans diagnosed with autism and the difference between this and normatively developing human perception is discussed.

  3. Kidney stones

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... ureter. As urine can become very concentrated as it passes through the kidneys. When the urine becomes ... being stretched, and when stones form and distend it, the stretching can be very painful. Often, people ...

  4. Kidney biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Renal biopsy; Biopsy - kidney ... Barisoni L, Arend LJ, Thomas DB. Introduction to renal biopsy. In: Zhou M, Mari-Galluzzi C, eds. ... Saunders; 2015:chap 7. Topham PS, Chen Y. Renal biopsy. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, ...

  5. Kidney removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... and medical centers are doing this surgery using robots . Why the Procedure is Performed Kidney removal may ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  6. Kidney Stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain medication and drink lots of water to pass a kidney stone. In other instances — for example, ... through a strainer to catch stones that you pass. Lab analysis will reveal the makeup of your ...

  7. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. October 2, 2013 Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  8. Averting the legacy of kidney disease--focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-03-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and chronic kidney disease in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have a relatively increased risk for the development of chronic kidney disease later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced chronic kidney disease in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplant, whereas only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers, and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.

  9. Identification and isolation of kidney-derived stem cells from transgenic rats with diphtheria toxin-induced kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing-Zhen; Chen, Xu-Dong; Liu, Gang; Guan, Guang-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells have been well characterized in numerous organs, with the exception of the kidneys. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify and isolate kidney-derived stem cells. A total of 12 Fischer 344 transgenic rats expressing the human diphtheria toxin receptor in podocyte cells of the kidney, were used in the present study. The rats were administered 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in order to detect cellular proliferation. After 60 days, the rats were treated with the diphtheria toxin (DT), in order to induce kidney injury. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that the number of BrdU-positive cells were increased following DT treatment. In addition, the expression of octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct-4), a stem cell marker, was detected and suggested that kidney-specific stem cells were present in the DT-treated tissue samples. Furthermore, tissue samples exhibited repair of the DT-induced injury. Further cellular culturing was conducted in order to isolate the kidney-specific stem cells. After 5 weeks of culture, the majority of the cells were non-viable, with the exception of certain specialized, unique cell types, which were monomorphic and spindle-shaped in appearance. The unique cells were isolated and subjected to immunostaining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses in order to reconfirm the expression of Oct-4 and to detect the expression of Paired box 2 (Pax-2), which is necessary for the formation of kidney structures. The unique cells were positive for Oct-4 and Pax-2; thus suggesting that the identified cells were kidney-derived stem cells. The results of the present study suggested that the unique cell type identified in the kidneys of the DT-treated rats were kidney-specific stem cells that may have been involved in the repair of DT-induced tissue injury. In addition, these cells may provide a useful cell line for studying the fundamental characteristics of kidney stem cells, as well as identifying

  10. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiling of normal human kidney glomerulus proteome and construction of an extensible markup language (XML)-based database.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Kenji; Kamiie, Junichi; Sato, Masao; Okuizumi, Seiji; Kenmochi, Akihisa; Kamijo, Ken'ichi; Nabetani, Takuji; Tsugita, Akira; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Yaoita, Eishin; Osawa, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2005-03-01

    To contribute to physiology and pathophysiology of the glomerulus of human kidney, we have launched a proteomic study of human glomerulus, and compiled a profile of proteins expressed in the glomerulus of normal human kidney by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and identification with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and/or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Kidney cortices with normal appearance were obtained from patients under surgical nephrectomy due to renal tumor, and glomeruli were highly purified by a standard sieving method followed by picking-up under a phase-contrast microscope. The glomerular proteins were separated by 2-DE with 24 cm immobilized pH gradient strips in the 3-10 range in the first dimension and 26 x 20 cm sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels of 12.5% in the second dimension. Gels were silver-stained, and valid spots were processed for identification through an integrated robotic system that consisted of a spot picker, an in-gel digester, and a MALDI-TOF MS and / or a LC-MS/MS. From 2-DE gel images of glomeruli of four subjects with no apparent pathologic manifestations, a synthetic gel image of normal glomerular proteins was created. The synthetic gel image contained 1713 valid spots, of which 1559 spots were commonly observed in the respective 2-DE gels. Among the 1559 spots, 347 protein spots, representing 212 proteins, have so far been identified, and used for the construction of an extensible markup language (XML)-based database. The database is deposited on a web site (http://www.sw.nec.co.jp/bio/rd/hgldb/index.html) in a form accessible to researchers to contribute to proteomic studies of human glomerulus in health and disease.

  11. Enantiomer selective glucuronidation of the non-steroidal pure anti-androgen bicalutamide by human liver and kidney: role of the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A9 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Laurent; Campeau, Anne-Sophie; Caron, Sarah; Morin, Frédéric-Alexandre; Meunier, Kim; Trottier, Jocelyn; Caron, Patrick; Verreault, Mélanie; Barbier, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    Bicalutamide (Casodex(®) ) is a non-steroidal pure anti-androgen used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. It is a racemate drug, and its activity resides in the (R)-enantiomer, with little in the (S)-enantiomer. A major metabolic pathway for bicalutamide is glucuronidation catalysed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes. While (S)bicalutamide is directly glucuronidated, (R)bicalutamide requires hydroxylation prior to glucuronidation. The contribution of human tissues and UGT isoforms in the metabolism of these enantiomers has not been extensively investigated. In this study, both (R) and/or (S)bicalutamide were converted into glucuronide (-G) derivatives after incubation of pure and racemic solutions with microsomal extracts from human liver and kidney. Intestinal microsomes exhibited only low reactivity with these substrates. Km values of liver and kidney samples for (S)bicalutamide glucuronidation were similar, and lower than values obtained with the (R)-enantiomer. Among the 16 human UGTs tested, UGT1A8 and UGT1A9 were able to form both (S) and (R)bicalutamide-G from pure or racemic substrates. UGT2B7 was also able to form (R)bicalutamide-G. Kinetic parameters of the recombinant UGT2B7, UGT1A8 and UGT1A9 enzymes support a predominant role of the UGT1A9 isoform in bicalutamide metabolism. Accordingly, (S)bicalutamide inhibited the ability of human liver and kidney microsomes to glucuronidate the UGT1A9 probe substrate, propofol. In conclusion, the present study provides the first comprehensive analysis of in vitro bicalutamide glucuronidation by human tissues and UGTs and identifies UGT1A9 as a major contributor for (R) and (S) glucuronidation in the human liver and kidney.

  12. Enantiomer selective glucuronidation of the non-steroidal pure anti-androgen bicalutamide by human liver and kidney: role of the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A9 enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Laurent; Campeau, Anne-Sophie; Caron, Sarah; Morin, Frédéric-Alexandre; Meunier, Kim; Trottier, Jocelyn; Caron, Patrick; Verreault, Mélanie; Barbier, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Bicalutamide (Casodex®) is a non-steroidal pure anti-androgen used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. It is a racemate drug and its activity resides in the (R)-enantiomer, with little in the (S)-enantiomer. A major metabolic pathway for bicalutamide is glucuronidation catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes. While (S)bicalutamide is directly glucuronidated, (R)bicalutamide requires hydroxylation prior to glucuronidation. The contribution of human tissues and UGT isoforms in the metabolism of these enantiomers has not been extensively investigated. In this study, both (R) and/or (S)bicalutamide were converted into glucuronide (-G) derivatives following incubation of pure and racemic solutions with microsomal extracts from human liver and kidney. Intestinal microsomes exhibited only low reactivity with these substrates. Km values of liver and kidney samples for (S)bicalutamide glucuronidation were similar, and lower than values obtained with the (R)-enantiomer. Among the 16 human UGTs tested, UGT1A8 and UGT1A9 were able to form both (S) and (R)bicalutamide-G from pure or racemic substrates. UGT2B7 was also able to form (R)bicalutamide-G. Kinetic parameters of the recombinant UGT2B7, UGT1A8 and UGT1A9 enzymes support a predominant role of the UGT1A9 isoform in bicalutamide metabolism. Accordingly, (S)bicalutamide inhibited the ability of human liver and kidney microsomes to glucuronidate the UGT1A9 probe substrate, propofol. In conclusion, the present study provides the first comprehensive analysis of in vitro bicalutamide glucuronidation by human tissues and UGTs, and identifies UGT1A9 as a major contributor for (R) and (S) glucuronidation in the human liver and kidney. PMID:23527766

  13. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high‐dose hormone application in adult female‐to‐male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel‐based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting‐state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone‐dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language‐specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738–1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  14. Bacteriology of severe periodontitis in young adult humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Smibert, R M; Hash, D E; Burmeister, J A; Ranney, R R

    1982-01-01

    A total of 78 bacteriological samples were taken from the supragingival tooth surface after superficial cleaning with toothpicks or from the periodontal sulci of 42 affected sites in 21 adolescents or young adults with severe generalized periodontitis. Of 190 bacterial species, subspecies, or serotypes detected among 2,723 isolates, 11 species exceeded 1% of the subgingival flora and were most closely associated with the diseased sulci. Eleven others were also sufficiently frequent to be suspect agents of tissue destruction. Many of these species are known pathogens of other body sites. In addition, 10 species of Treponema were isolated. One of these and the "large treponeme" were also more closely associated with severe periodontitis than they were with healthy sites or gingivitis. There were highly significant differences between the composition of the flora of the affected sulci and the flora of (i) the adjacent supragingival tooth surface, (ii) the gingival crevice of periodontally healthy people, and (iii) sites with a gingival index score of 0 or 2 in experimental gingivitis studies. The floras of different individuals were also significantly different. There was no statistically detectable effect of sampling per se upon the composition of the flora of subsequent samples from the same sites. The composition of the supragingival flora of the patients with severe generalized periodontitis that had serum antibody to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was significantly different from the supragingival flora of patients without this serum antibody. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the composition of their subgingival floras. PMID:7152665

  15. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2016-05-01

    Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high-dose hormone application in adult female-to-male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel-based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting-state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone-dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language-specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738-1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Body-mass index and risk of advanced chronic kidney disease: Prospective analyses from a primary care cohort of 1.4 million adults in England

    PubMed Central

    Bankhead, Clare; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Stevens, Sarah; Holt, Tim; Hobbs, F. D. Richard; Coresh, Josef; Woodward, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background It is uncertain whether being overweight, but not obese, is associated with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and how the size and shape of associations between body-mass index (BMI) and advanced CKD differs among different types of people. Methods We used Clinical Practice Research Datalink records (2000–2014) with linkage to English secondary care and mortality data to identify a prospective cohort with at least one BMI measure. Cox models adjusted for age, sex, smoking and social deprivation and subgroup analyses by diabetes, hypertension and prior cardiovascular disease assessed relationships between BMI and CKD stages 4–5 and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Findings 1,405,016 adults aged 20–79 with mean BMI 27.4kg/m2 (SD 5.6) were followed for 7.5 years. Compared to a BMI of 20 to <25kg/m2, higher BMI was associated with a progressively increased risk of CKD stages 4–5 (hazard ratio 1.34, 95% CI 1.30–1.38 for BMI 25 to <30kg/m2; 1.94, 1.87–2.01 for BMI 30 to <35kg/m2; and 3.10, 2.95–3.25 for BMI ≥35kg/m2). The association between BMI and ESRD was shallower and reversed at low BMI. Current smoking, prior diabetes, hypertension or cardiovascular disease all increased risk of CKD, but the relative strength and shape of BMI-CKD associations, which were generally log-linear above a BMI of 25kg/m2, were similar among those with and without these risk factors. There was direct evidence that being overweight was associated with increased risk of CKD stages 4–5 in these subgroups. Assuming causality, since 2000 an estimated 39% (36–42%) of advanced CKD in women and 26% (22–30%) in men aged 40–79 resulted from being overweight or obese. Conclusions This study provides direct evidence that being overweight increases risk of advanced CKD, that being obese substantially increases such risk, and that this remains true for those with and without diabetes, hypertension or cardiovascular disease. Strategies to reduce weight among those

  17. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) Protocol for Podocyte Isolation in Adult Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bates, Thomas J D; Naumann, Uta; Englert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a very important model for studying human diseases. The conserved structure of the nephrons in the kidney allows the user to answer questions relating to study human kidney disorders. Wt1a-expressing podocytes are the most important cells within the glomeruli of adult zebrafish. In order to understand the molecular characteristics of these cells, within damage models, we have established a method for isolating them.

  18. Wnt signalling in kidney diseases: dual roles in renal injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Takahisa; Ren, Shuyu; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2013-01-01

    Wnt signalling is a complex, highly conserved, cell-to-cell communication pathway in multicellular organisms, regulating cell fate, function and phenotype in development, and diseases, including neoplasia. Although the critical role of the Wnt pathway in nephrogenesis is well established, recent investigations have shown its involvement in many adult kidney diseases, including ischaemic kidney injury, glomerular diseases, diabetic nephropathy, interstitial fibrosis and cystic kidney diseases. Overall, activation of the Wnt pathway is deleterious to many chronic diseases of the kidney, contributing to the maintenance of cells in an activated state. In addition, the Wnt pathway is activated during repair and regeneration in animal models of acute ischaemic injury, a scenario that is frequently encountered in human acute kidney injury. This activation recapitulates features of nephrogenesis and appears to play an indispensable role in repair and regeneration in this acute setting. As tools are being developed to regulate the Wnt pathway intracellularly and at the cell surface, the Wnt pathway has become a potential avenue for urgently required novel therapeutics for treating human kidney diseases. In this review, we describe consensus models for major Wnt signalling cascades and then discuss their roles in kidney diseases.

  19. Does the adult human ciliary body epithelium contain "true" retinal stem cells?

    PubMed

    Frøen, Rebecca; Johnsen, Erik O; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Facskó, Andrea; Petrovski, Goran; Moe, Morten C

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports of retinal stem cells being present in several locations of the adult eye have sparked great hopes that they may be used to treat the millions of people worldwide who suffer from blindness as a result of retinal disease or injury. A population of proliferative cells derived from the ciliary body epithelium (CE) has been considered one of the prime stem cell candidates, and as such they have received much attention in recent years. However, the true nature of these cells in the adult human eye has still not been fully elucidated, and the stem cell claim has become increasingly controversial in light of new and conflicting reports. In this paper, we will try to answer the question of whether the available evidence is strong enough for the research community to conclude that the adult human CE indeed harbors stem cells.

  20. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease What is acquired cystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney disease happens when a ... cysts. What are the differences between acquired cystic kidney disease and polycystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney ...

  1. Simple Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... How They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Simple Kidney Cysts What are simple kidney cysts? Simple kidney cysts are abnormal, fluid-filled ... that form in the kidneys. What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  2. Identification of Optimal Donor-Recipient Combinations Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Positive Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Locke, J E; Shelton, B A; Reed, R D; MacLennan, P A; Mehta, S; Sawinski, D; Segev, D L

    2016-08-01

    For some patient subgroups, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been associated with worse outcomes after kidney transplantation (KT); potentially modifiable factors may be responsible. The study goal was to identify factors that predict a higher risk of graft loss among HIV-positive KT recipients compared with a similar transplant among HIV-negative recipients. In this study, 82 762 deceased donor KT recipients (HIV positive: 526; HIV negative: 82 236) reported to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) (2001-2013) were studied by interaction term analysis. Compared to HIV-negative recipients, the hepatitis C virus (HCV) amplified risk 2.72-fold among HIV-positive KT recipients (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 2.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.75-4.22, p < 0.001). Forty-three percent of the excess risk was attributable to the interaction between HIV and HCV (attributable proportion of risk due to the interaction [AP]: 0.43, 95% CI: 0.23-0.63, p = 0.02). Among HIV-positive recipients with more than three HLA mismatches (MMs), risk was amplified 1.80-fold compared to HIV-negative (aHR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.31-2.47, p < 0.001); 42% of the excess risk was attributable to the interaction between HIV and more than three HLA MMs (AP: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.24-0.60, p = 0.01). High-HIV-risk (HIV-positive/HCV-positive HLAwith more than three MMs) recipients had a 3.86-fold increased risk compared to low-HIV-risk (HIV-positive/HCV-negative HLA with three or fewer MMs)) recipients (aHR: 3.86, 95% CI: 2.37-6.30, p < 0.001). Avoidance of more than three HLA MMs in HIV-positive KT recipients, particularly among coinfected patients, may mitigate the increased risk of graft loss associated with HIV infection.

  3. Genetic and functional characterization of clonally derived adult human brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Kosaku; Luijten, Ineke H N; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Hong, Haemin; Sonne, Si B; Kim, Miae; Xue, Ruidan; Chondronikola, Maria; Cypess, Aaron M; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Nedergaard, Jan; Sidossis, Labros S; Kajimura, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) acts in mammals as a natural defense system against hypothermia, and its activation to a state of increased energy expenditure is believed to protect against the development of obesity. Even though the existence of BAT in adult humans has been widely appreciated1–8, its cellular origin and molecular identity remain elusive largely because of high cellular heterogeneity within various adipose tissue depots. To understand the nature of adult human brown adipocytes at single cell resolution, we isolated clonally derived adipocytes from stromal vascular fractions of adult human BAT from two individuals and globally analyzed their molecular signatures. We used RNA sequencing followed by unbiased genome-wide expression analyses and found that a population of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)-positive human adipocytes possessed molecular signatures resembling those of a recruitable form of thermogenic adipocytes (that is, beige adipocytes). In addition, we identified molecular markers that were highly enriched in UCP1-positive human adipocytes, a set that included potassium channel K3 (KCNK3) and mitochondrial tumor suppressor 1 (MTUS1). Further, we functionally characterized these two markers using a loss-of-function approach and found that KCNK3 and MTUS1 were required for beige adipocyte differentiation and thermogenic function. The results of this study present new opportunities for human BAT research, such as facilitating cell-based disease modeling and unbiased screens for thermogenic regulators. PMID:25774848

  4. Characterization of colony-forming cells in adult human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ozbey, Ozlem; Sahin, Zeliha; Acar, Nuray; Ozcelik, Filiz Tepekoy; Ozenci, Alpay Merter; Koksoy, Sadi; Ustunel, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that adult human articular cartilage contains stem-like cells within the native structure. In this study, we aimed to determine the localization of putative stem cell markers such as CD90, STRO-1, OCT-3/4, CD105 and CD166 in adult human articular cartilage tissue sections and demonstrate the expression of these markers within the expanded surface zone colony-forming (CF) cells and evaluate their differentiation potential. Biopsy samples were either fixed immediately for immunohistochemical analyses or processed for in vitro cell culture. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometry analyses were performed by using CD90, STRO-1, OCT-3/4, CD105 and CD166 antibodies. Isolated colony-forming (CF) cells were further stimulated, by using the appropriate growth factors in their pellet culture, to obtain cartilage, bone and adipose lineages. We observed that the expression of the stem cell markers were in various zones of the human adult cartilage. Flow cytometry results showed that in CF cells the expression of CD90 and CD166 was high, while OCT-3/4 was low. We also determined that CF cells could be stimulated towards cartilage, bone and adipose lineages. The results of this research support the idea that the resident stem-like cells in adult human articular cartilage express these putative stem cell markers, but further experimental investigations are needed to determine the precise localization of these cells.

  5. Perspectives on Adult Education, Human Resource Development, and the Emergence of Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a perspective on the relationship between adult education and human resource development of the past two decades and the subsequent emergence of workforce development. The lesson taken from the article should be more than simply a recounting of events related to these fields of study. Instead, the more general lesson may be…

  6. Treatment of Human-Caused Trauma: Attrition in the Adult Outcomes Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthieu, Monica; Ivanoff, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Attrition or dropout is the failure of a participant to complete, comply, or the prematurely discontinuation or discharge from treatment, resulting in lost data and affecting outcomes. This review of 10 years of adult posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment outcome literature specific to Criterion A events of human origin examines how…

  7. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part One, Assumptions, Definitions, and Critiques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2006-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995).…

  8. Emotions and Human Concern: Adult Education and the Philosophical Thought of Martha Nussbaum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Donovan

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that philosopher Martha Nussbaum's reflections on the role of the emotions in human flourishing can contribute in important ways to our understanding of the emotions in adult education contexts. The article summarises Nussbaum's exploration of the contributions of classical philosophers like Socrates, Aristotle, and…

  9. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part Two, the Critical Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2006-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995). The…

  10. NIRS Measurement of Venous Oxygen Saturation in the Adult Human Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Derek W.; Haensse, Daniel; Bauschatz, Andrea; Wolf, Martin

    Provided that both the breathing frequency remains constant and that the temporal resolution of the instrument is sufficiently high, NIRS spiroximetry enables measurement of cerebral SvO2 in healthy human adults. Furthermore, simultaneous measurements of StO2, SaO2, and SvO2 enable calculation of both OEF and the compartmental distribution of cerebral blood volume.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Adenovirus 7 Associated with Fatal Adult Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshina, Svetlana B; Ageeva, Margarita R; Deviatkin, Andrey A; Pimkina, Ekaterina V; Markelov, Mikhail L; Dedkov, Vladimir G; Safonova, Marina V; Shumilina, Elena Y; Lukashev, Alexander N; Shipulin, German A

    2016-10-27

    Human adenovirus 7 (hAdv7) 19BOVLB/Volgograd/Rus/2014 was isolated from the autopsy material from an adult with fatal pneumonia in Volgograd, Russia, in March 2014. Whole-genome sequencing of the virus isolate was performed.

  12. Perspectives on Adult Education, Human Resource Development, and the Emergence of Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a perspective on the relationship between adult education and human resource development of the past two decades and the subsequent emergence of workforce development. The lesson taken from the article should be more than simply a recounting of events related to these fields of study. Instead, the more general lesson may be…

  13. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part Two, the Critical Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2014-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995). The…

  14. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part One, Assumptions, Definitions, and Critiques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2013-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995).…

  15. Concept Maps: Practice Applications in Adult Education and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Concept maps can be used as both a cognitive and constructivist learning strategy in teaching and learning in adult education and human resource development. The maps can be used to understand course readings, analyze case studies, develop reflective thinking and enhance research skills. The creation of concept maps can also be supported by the…

  16. Equality and Human Capital: Conflicting Concepts within State-Funded Adult Education in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a critique of the concept of equality as it informs the White Paper on Adult Education: Learning for Life (2000). It also outlines the extent to which human capital theory can be seen to have effectively colonised lifelong learning from the outset of its adoption by the European Union with highly constraining implications for…

  17. High-power diode laser at 980 nm for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: ex vivo investigations on porcine kidneys and human cadaver prostates.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Michael; Reich, Oliver; Gratzke, Christian; Schlenker, Boris; Karl, Alexander; Bader, Markus; Khoder, Wael; Fischer, Florian; Stief, Christian; Sroka, Ronald

    2009-03-01

    Diode laser systems at 980 nm have been introduced for the treatment of lower-urinary-tract-symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic enlargement (BPE). However, the coagulation and vaporization properties are unknown. We therefore aimed to evaluate these properties in ex vivo models in comparison with the kalium-titanyl-phosphate-(KTP) laser. The diode laser treatment was applied to isolated, blood-perfused porcine kidneys and fresh human cadaver prostates (HCPs) at different generator settings. We performed histological examination to compare the depth of coagulation and vaporization. The diode laser showed larger ablation and coagulation characteristics than the KTP laser did. Ablation of the diode laser was found to be 1.79-times (120 W in porcine kidney, P < 0.0001) and 3.0-5 times (200 W in HCP, P < 0.0005) larger. The diode laser created a nine-times (120 W in porcine kidney, P < 0.0001) and seven-times (200 W in HCP, P < 0.0001) deeper necrosis zone. The diode laser vaporization was highly effective ex vivo. Owing to the laser's deep coagulation zones, in vivo animal experiments are mandatory before the diode laser (980 nm) is applied in a clinical setting, so that damage to underlying structures is prevented.

  18. A Higher Risk of Acute Rejection of Human Kidney Allografts Can Be Predicted from the Level of CD45RC Expressed by the Recipients’ CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Laurence; Bernard, Isabelle; Chabod, Marianne; Augusto, Jean-François; Lauwers-Cances, Valerie; Cristini, Christelle; Cuturi, Maria-Cristina; Subra, Jean-François; Saoudi, Abdelhadi

    2013-01-01

    Although transplantation is the common treatment for end-stage renal failure, allograft rejection and marked morbidity from the use of immunosuppressive drugs remain important limitations. A major challenge in the field is to identify easy, reliable and noninvasive biomarkers allowing the prediction of deleterious alloreactive immune responses and the tailoring of immunosuppressive therapy in individuals according to the rejection risk. In this study, we first established that the expression of the RC isoform of the CD45 molecule (CD45RC) on CD4 and CD8 T cells from healthy individuals identifies functionally distinct alloreactive T cell subsets that behave differently in terms of proliferation and cytokine secretion. We then investigated whether the frequency of the recipients CD45RC T cell subsets before transplantation would predict acute graft rejection in a cohort of 89 patients who had undergone their first kidney transplantation. We showed that patients exhibiting more than 54.7% of CD8 CD45RChigh T cells before transplantation had a 6 fold increased risk of acute kidney graft rejection. In contrast, the proportions of CD4 CD45RC T cells were not predictive. Thus, a higher risk of acute rejection of human kidney allografts can be predicted from the level of CD45RC expressed by the recipients’ CD8 T cells. PMID:23894540

  19. Xenopus: leaping forward in kidney organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Krneta-Stankic, Vanja; DeLay, Bridget D; Miller, Rachel K

    2017-04-01

    While kidney donations stagna