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Sample records for adult human liver

  1. Simultaneous characterization of progenitor cell compartments in adult human liver.

    PubMed

    Porretti, Laura; Cattaneo, Alessandra; Colombo, Federico; Lopa, Raffaella; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Battiston, Carlo; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Bertolini, Francesco; Rebulla, Paolo; Prati, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The human liver is a complex tissue consisting of epithelial, endothelial, hematopoietic, and mesenchymal elements that probably derive from multiple lineage-committed progenitors, but no comprehensive study aimed at identifying and characterizing intrahepatic precursors has yet been published. Cell suspensions for this study were obtained by enzymatic digestion of liver specimens taken from 20 patients with chronic liver disease and 13 multiorgan donors. Stem and progenitor cells were first isolated, amplified, and characterized ex vivo according to previously validated methods, and then optimized flow cytometry was used to assess their relative frequencies and characterize their immunophenotypes in the clinical specimens. Stem and progenitor cells committed to hematopoietic, endothelial, epithelial, and mesenchymal lineages were clearly identifiable in livers from both healthy and diseased subjects. Within the mononuclear liver cell compartment, epithelial progenitors [epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)(+)/CD49f(+)/CD29(+)/CD45(-)] accounted for 2.7-3.5% whereas hematopoietic (CD34(+)/CD45(+)), endothelial [vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (KDR)(+)/CD146(+)/CD45(-)], and mesenchymal [CD73(+)/CD105(+)/CD90 (Thy-1)(+)/CD45 (-)] stem cells and progenitors accounted for smaller fractions (0.02-0.6%). The patients' livers had higher percentages of hematopoietic and endothelial precursors than those of the donors. In conclusion, we identified and characterized precursors committed to four different lineages in adult human liver. We also optimized a flow cytometry approach that will be useful in exploring the contribution of these cells to the pathogenesis of liver disease. PMID:19960544

  2. Perivascular mesenchymal progenitors in human fetal and adult liver.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Jörg C; Over, Patrick; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Foka, Hubert G; Chen, William C W; Péault, Bruno; Gridelli, Bruno; Schmelzer, Eva

    2012-12-10

    The presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been described in various organs. Pericytes possess a multilineage differentiation potential and have been suggested to be one of the developmental sources for MSCs. In human liver, pericytes have not been defined. Here, we describe the identification, purification, and characterization of pericytes in human adult and fetal liver. Flow cytometry sorting revealed that human adult and fetal liver contains 0.56%±0.81% and 0.45%±0.39% of CD146(+)CD45(-)CD56(-)CD34(-) pericytes, respectively. Of these, 41% (adult) and 30% (fetal) were alkaline phosphatase-positive (ALP(+)). In situ, pericytes were localized around periportal blood vessels and were positive for NG2 and vimentin. Purified pericytes could be cultured extensively and had low population doubling times. Immunofluorescence of cultures demonstrated that cells were positive for pericyte and mesenchymal cell markers CD146, NG2, CD90, CD140b, and vimentin, and negative for endothelial, hematopoietic, stellate, muscle, or liver epithelial cell markers von Willebrand factor, CD31, CD34, CD45, CD144, CD326, CK19, albumin, α-fetoprotein, CYP3A7, glial fibrillary acid protein, MYF5, and Pax7 by gene expression; myogenin and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression were variable. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of cultures confirmed surface expression of CD146, CD73, CD90, CD10, CD13, CD44, CD105, and ALP and absence of human leukocyte antigen-DR. In vitro differentiation assays demonstrated that cells possessed robust osteogenic and myogenic, but low adipogenic and low chondrogenic differentiation potentials. In functional in vitro assays, cells had typical mesenchymal strong migratory and invasive activity. In conclusion, human adult and fetal livers harbor pericytes that are similar to those found in other organs and are distinct from hepatic stellate cells. PMID:22931482

  3. BCRP protein levels do not differ regionally in adult human livers, but decline in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Riches, Zoe; Abanda, Ngu; Collier, Abby C

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the ontogeny and variability of the BCRP (ABCG2) transporter in healthy human liver. Levels of BCRP mRNA and protein were determined with q-RT-PCR and western blot in a cohort of 87 human livers aged from 7 days to 87 years. A study of the regional expression of BCRP within adult livers was also performed in a nested cohort of 14 individuals with multiple samples per person collected from pre-selected sites. Levels of BCRP mRNA were not significantly different at any age, but protein levels for BCRP were lower in the elderly compared with adults (p < 0.001) and children (p < 0.05). The intra-liver levels of BCRP protein ranged approximately 6.5-fold and inter-liver BCRP protein varied 8.5-fold in the cohort. No differences in BCRP mRNA or protein were observed with sex or ethnicity, although higher levels of BCRP mRNA were observed in livers from overweight individuals (Body Mass Index ≥ 25-29.9) as compared to underweight or ideal weight individuals. There were no differences in the levels of BCRP mRNA or protein in different regions of the large lobe (n = 3 regions), small lobe (n = 3 regions), directly adjacent to the portal vein or directly adjacent to the common bile duct. This indicates that BCRP researchers can source tissue from all parts of the adult liver without artificial bias in their results. Lower BCRP protein expression in the elderly may be associated with compromised xeno- and endobiotic transport. PMID:26462791

  4. Long-Term Culture of Genome-Stable Bipotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; van Boxtel, Ruben; Hamer, Karien; Blokzijl, Francis; Verstegen, Monique M.A.; Ellis, Ewa; van Wenum, Martien; Fuchs, Sabine A.; de Ligt, Joep; van de Wetering, Marc; Sasaki, Nobuo; Boers, Susanne J.; Kemperman, Hans; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N.M.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje; Strom, Stephen; Vries, Robert R.G.; van der Laan, Luc J.W.; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro and can be differentiated into functional hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. We now describe conditions allowing long-term expansion of adult bile duct-derived bipotent progenitor cells from human liver. The expanded cells are highly stable at the chromosome and structural level, while single base changes occur at very low rates. The cells can readily be converted into functional hepatocytes in vitro and upon transplantation in vivo. Organoids from α1-antitrypsin deficiency and Alagille syndrome patients mirror the in vivo pathology. Clonal long-term expansion of primary adult liver stem cells opens up experimental avenues for disease modeling, toxicology studies, regenerative medicine, and gene therapy. PMID:25533785

  5. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C.

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27403430

  6. Cyclophilin D-Sensitive Mitochondrial Permeability Transition in Adult Human Brain and Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Morota, Saori; Chen, Li; Matsuyama, Nagahisa; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Satoshi; Tanoue, Tadashi; Omi, Akibumi; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Shimazu, Motohide; Ikeda, Yukio; Uchino, Hiroyuki; Elmér, Eskil

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) is considered to be a major cause of cell death under a variety of pathophysiological conditions of the central nervous system (CNS) and other organs. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic knockout of the matrix protein cyclophilin D (CypD) prevents mPT and cell degeneration in several models of brain injury. If these findings in animal models are translatable to human disease, pharmacological inhibition of mPT offers a promising therapeutic target. The objective of this study was to validate the presence of a CypD-sensitive mPT in adult human brain and liver mitochondria. In order to perform functional characterization of human mitochondria, fresh tissue samples were obtained during hemorrhage or tumor surgery and mitochondria were rapidly isolated. Mitochondrial calcium retention capacity, a quantitative assay for mPT, was significantly increased by the CypD inhibitor cyclosporin A in both human brain and liver mitochondria, whereas thiol-reactive compounds and oxidants sensitized mitochondria to calcium-induced mPT. Brain mitochondria underwent swelling upon calcium overload, which was reversible upon calcium removal. To further explore mPT of human mitochondria, liver mitochondria were demonstrated to exhibit several classical features of the mPT phenomenon, such as calcium-induced loss of membrane potential and respiratory coupling, as well as release of the pro-apoptotic protein cytochrome c. We concluded that adult viable human brain and liver mitochondria possess an active CypD-sensitive mPT. Our findings support the rationale of CypD and mPT inhibition as pharmacological targets in acute and chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:21121808

  7. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  8. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  9. General Information about Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  10. Two distinct genes for ADP/ATP translocase are expressed at the mRNA level in adult human liver

    SciTech Connect

    Houldsworth, J.; Attardi, G.

    1988-01-01

    Several clones hybridizing with a bovine ADP/ATP translocase cDNA were isolated from an adult human liver cDNA library in the vector pEX1. DNA sequence analysis revealed that these clones encode two distinct forms of translocase. In particular, two clones specifying the COOH-end-proximal five-sixths of the protein exhibit a 9% amino acid sequence divergence and totally dissimilar 3' untranslated regions. One of these cDNAs is nearly identical in sequence to an ADP/ATP translocase clone (hp2F1) recently isolated from a human fibroblast cDNA library with three amino acid changes and a few differences in the 3' untranslated region. Another clone isolated from the pEX1 library contains a reading frame encoding the remaining, NH/sub 2/-end-proximal, 37 amino acids of the translocase. This sequence differs significantly (14% amino acid sequence divergence) from the corresponding segment of hp2F1, and the 5' untranslated regions of the two clones are totally dissimilar. RNA transfer hybridization experiments utilizing the clones isolated from the pEX1 library revealed the presence in HeLa cells of three distinct mRNA species. The pattern of hybridization and the sizes of these mRNAs suggest a greater complexity of organization and expression of the ADP/ATP translocase genes in human cells than indicated by the analysis of the cDNA clones.

  11. Adult living donor liver imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Larry; Yeh, Benjamin M.; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Roberts, John P.; Wang, Zhen J.

    2016-01-01

    Adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is increasingly used for the treatment of end-stage liver disease. The three most commonly harvested grafts for LDLT are left lateral segment, left lobe, and right lobe grafts. The left lateral segment graft, which includes Couinaud’s segments II and III, is usually used for pediatric recipients or small size recipients. Most of the adult recipients need either a left or a right lobe graft. Whether a left or right lobe graft should be harvested from the donors depends on estimated graft and donor remnant liver volume, as well as biliary and vascular anatomy. Detailed preoperative assessment of the potential donor liver volumetrics, biliary and vascular anatomy, and liver parenchyma is vital to minimize risks to the donors and maximize benefits to the recipients. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are currently the imaging modalities of choice in the preoperative evaluation of potential donors. This review provides an overview of key surgical considerations in LDLT that the radiologists must be aware of, and imaging findings on CT and MRI that the radiologists must convey to the surgeons when evaluating potential donors for LDLT. PMID:26912106

  12. Adult living donor liver imaging.

    PubMed

    Cai, Larry; Yeh, Benjamin M; Westphalen, Antonio C; Roberts, John P; Wang, Zhen J

    2016-01-01

    Adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is increasingly used for the treatment of end-stage liver disease. The three most commonly harvested grafts for LDLT are left lateral segment, left lobe, and right lobe grafts. The left lateral segment graft, which includes Couinaud's segments II and III, is usually used for pediatric recipients or small size recipients. Most of the adult recipients need either a left or a right lobe graft. Whether a left or right lobe graft should be harvested from the donors depends on estimated graft and donor remnant liver volume, as well as biliary and vascular anatomy. Detailed preoperative assessment of the potential donor liver volumetrics, biliary and vascular anatomy, and liver parenchyma is vital to minimize risks to the donors and maximize benefits to the recipients. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are currently the imaging modalities of choice in the preoperative evaluation of potential donors. This review provides an overview of key surgical considerations in LDLT that the radiologists must be aware of, and imaging findings on CT and MRI that the radiologists must convey to the surgeons when evaluating potential donors for LDLT. PMID:26912106

  13. Culture and establishment of self-renewing human and mouse adult liver and pancreas 3D organoids and their genetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Broutier, Laura; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Hindley, Christopher J; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-09-01

    Adult somatic tissues have proven difficult to expand in vitro, largely because of the complexity of recreating appropriate environmental signals in culture. We have overcome this problem recently and developed culture conditions for adult stem cells that allow the long-term expansion of adult primary tissues from small intestine, stomach, liver and pancreas into self-assembling 3D structures that we have termed 'organoids'. We provide a detailed protocol that describes how to grow adult mouse and human liver and pancreas organoids, from cell isolation and long-term expansion to genetic manipulation in vitro. Liver and pancreas cells grow in a gel-based extracellular matrix (ECM) and a defined medium. The cells can self-organize into organoids that self-renew in vitro while retaining their tissue-of-origin commitment, genetic stability and potential to differentiate into functional cells in vitro (hepatocytes) and in vivo (hepatocytes and endocrine cells). Genetic modification of these organoids opens up avenues for the manipulation of adult stem cells in vitro, which could facilitate the study of human biology and allow gene correction for regenerative medicine purposes. The complete protocol takes 1-4 weeks to generate self-renewing 3D organoids and to perform genetic manipulation experiments. Personnel with basic scientific training can conduct this protocol. PMID:27560176

  14. Adrenergic receptors in human fetal liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Falkay, G.; Kovacs, L. )

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptor binding capacities in human fetal and adult livers were measured to investigate the mechanism of the reduced alpha-1 adrenoreceptor response of the liver associated with a reciprocal increase in beta-adrenoreceptor activity in a number of conditions. Alpha-1 and beta-adrenoreceptor density were determined using {sup 3}H-prazosin and {sup 3}H-dihydroalprenolol, respectively, as radioligand. Heterogeneous populations of beta-adrenoreceptors were found in fetal liver contrast to adult. Decreased alpha-1 and increased beta-receptor density were found which may relate to a decreased level in cellular differentiation. These findings may be important for the investigation of perinatal hypoglycemia of newborns after treatment of premature labor with beta-mimetics. This is the first demonstration of differences in the ratio of alpha-1 and beta-adrenoceptors in human fetal liver.

  15. Isolation of adult human pluripotent stem cells from mesenchymal cell populations and their application to liver damages.

    PubMed

    Wakao, Shohei; Kitada, Masaaki; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Dezawa, Mari

    2012-01-01

    We have found a novel type of pluripotent stem cells, Multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse) cells that can be isolated from mesenchymal cell populations. Muse cells are characterized by stress tolerance, expression of pluripotency markers, self-renewal, and the ability to differentiate into endodermal-, mesodermal-, and ectodermal-lineage cells from a single cell, demonstrating that they are pluripotent stem cells. They can be isolated as cells positive for stage-specific embryonic antigen-3, a human pluripotent stem cell marker. Here, we introduce the isolation method for Muse cells and the effect of transplantation of these cells on chronic liver diseases. PMID:22167642

  16. Liver involvement in adults with measles.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Aurélien; Fleuret, Victoire; Hanslik, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    We retrospectively collected the characteristics of 80 consecutive adult patients with biologically confirmed measles during a recent epidemic in France. We report on the frequency and severity of liver involvement in adult patients with measles. In our experience, measles in adults was not severe and hepatitis was not correlated with severe cases or bacterial infection. Therefore, hepatitis should be regarded as a usual symptom rather than a complication of measles infection in adults. PMID:23938044

  17. Fibrosis progression in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfected adults: Prospective analysis of 435 liver biopsy pairs

    PubMed Central

    Konerman, Monica A.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Sutcliffe, Catherine G.; Vu, Trang; Higgins, Yvonne; Torbenson, Michael S.; Moore, Richard D.; Thomas, David L.; Sulkowski, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection is associated with progressive liver disease. However, the rate of progression is variable and the ability to differentiate patients with stable versus progressive HCV disease is limited. The objective of this study was to assess the incidence of and risk factors for fibrosis progression in a prospective cohort of coinfected patients. Overall, 435 liver biopsy pairs from 282 non-cirrhotic patients were analyzed. Biopsies were scored according to the METAVIR system by a single pathologist blind to biopsy sequence. Fibrosis progression was defined as an increase of at least one METAVIR fibrosis stage between paired biopsies. The majority of patients were African American (84.8%), male (67.7%) and infected with HCV genotype 1 (93.4%). On initial biopsy, no or minimal fibrosis was identified in 243 patients (86%). The median interval between biopsies was 2.5 years. Fibrosis progression was observed in 97 of 282 (34%) patients and 149 of 435 (34%) biopsy pairs. After adjustment, greater body mass index (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.04 per 1 unit increase), diabetes (aOR: 1.56) and hepatic steatosis (aOR: 1.78) at time of initial biopsy were associated with subsequent fibrosis progression. Between biopsies, elevated serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferase (AST, ALT) (aOR AST: 3.34, ALT: 2.18 for >25% values >100 U/l vs. < 25% values >100 U/l) were strongly associated with fibrosis progression. Conclusion Fibrosis progression is common among HIV/HCV coinfected patients; these data suggest that progression can be rapid. Persistent elevations in serum transaminase levels may serve as important non-invasive markers to identify subsets of patients who are more likely to progress and thus warrant closer monitoring and consideration of HCV treatment. PMID:24436062

  18. Comparative Analysis of AhR-Mediated TCDD-Elicited Gene Expression in Human Liver Adult Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suntae; Dere, Edward; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    Time course and dose-response studies were conducted in HL1-1 cells, a human liver cell line with stem cell–like characteristics, to assess the differential gene expression elicited by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) compared with other established models. Cells were treated with 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100nM TCDD or dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle control for 12 h for the dose-response study, or with 10nM TCDD or vehicle for 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, or 48 h for the time course study. Elicited changes were monitored using a human cDNA microarray with 6995 represented genes. Empirical Bayes analysis identified 144 genes differentially expressed at one or more time points following treatment. Most genes exhibited dose-dependent responses including CYP1A1, CYP1B1, ALDH1A3, and SLC7A5 genes. Comparative analysis of HL1-1 differential gene expression to human HepG2 data identified 74 genes with comparable temporal expression profiles including 12 putative primary responses. HL1-1–specific changes were related to lipid metabolism and immune responses, consistent with effects elicited in vivo. Furthermore, comparative analysis of HL1-1 cells with mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cell lines and C57BL/6 hepatic tissue identified 18 and 32 commonly regulated orthologous genes, respectively, with functions associated with signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, metabolism and transport. Although some common pathways are affected, the results suggest that TCDD elicits species- and model-specific gene expression profiles. PMID:19684285

  19. Human liver endothelial cells, but not macrovascular or microvascular endothelial cells, engraft in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Filali, Ebtisam El; Hiralall, Johan K; van Veen, Henk A; Stolz, Donna B; Seppen, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation has had limited clinical success so far, partly due to poor engraftment of hepatocytes. Instead of hepatocytes. other cell types, such as endothelial cells, could be used in ex vivo liver gene therapy. The goal of the present study was to compare the grafting and repopulation capacity of human endothelial cells derived from various tissues. Human endothelial cells were isolated from adult and fetal livers using anti-human CD31 antibody-conjugated magnetic beads. Human macrovascular endothelial cells were obtained from umbilical vein. Human microvascular endothelial cells were isolated from adipose tissue. Cells were characterized using flow cytometry. Liver engraftment and repopulation of endothelial cells was studied after intrasplenic transplantation in monocrotaline-treated immunodeficient mice. Following transplantation, human liver endothelial cells engrafted throughout the mouse liver. With immunoscanning electron microscopy, fenestrae in engrafted human liver endothelial cells were identified, a characteristic feature of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. In contrast, CD31-negative liver cells, human macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells were not capable of repopulating mouse liver. Characterization of human liver, macrovascular, and microvascular endothelial cells demonstrated expression of CD31, CD34, and CD146 but not CD45. Our study shows that only human liver endothelial cells, but not macro- and microvascular endothelial cells, have the unique capacity to engraft and repopulate the mouse liver. These results indicate that mature endothelial cells cannot transdifferentiate in vivo and thus do not exhibit phenotypic plasticity. Our results have set a basis for further research to the potential of human liver endothelial cells in liver-directed cell and gene therapy. PMID:23044355

  20. Ontogeny of iodothyronine deiodinases in human liver.

    PubMed

    Richard, K; Hume, R; Kaptein, E; Sanders, J P; van Toor, H; De Herder, W W; den Hollander, J C; Krenning, E P; Visser, T J

    1998-08-01

    The role of the deiodinases D1, D2, and D3 in the tissue-specific and time-dependent regulation of thyroid hormone bioactivity during fetal development has been investigated in animals but little is known about the ontogeny of these enzymes in humans. We analyzed D1, D2, and D3 activities in liver microsomes from 10 fetuses of 15-20 weeks gestation and from 8 apparently healthy adult tissue transplant donors, and in liver homogenates from 2 fetuses (20 weeks gestation), 5 preterm infants (27-32 weeks gestation), and 13 term infants who survived up to 39 weeks postnatally. D1 activity was determined using 1 microM [3',5'-125I]rT3 as substrate and 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) as cofactor, D2 activity using 1 nM [3',5'-125I]T4 and 25 mM DTT in the presence of 1 mM 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (to block D1 activity) and 1 microM T3 (to block D3 activity), and D3 activity using 10 nM [3,5-125I]T3 and 50 mM DTT, by quantitation of the release of 125I. The assays were validated by high performance liquid chromatography of the products, and kinetic analysis [Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of rT3 for D1: 0.5 microM; Km of T3 for D3: 2 nM]. In liver homogenates, D1 activity was not correlated with age, whereas D3 activity showed a strong negative correlation with age (r -0.84), with high D3 activities in preterm infants and (except in 1 infant of 35 weeks) absent D3 activity in full-term infants. In microsomes, D1 activities amounted to 4.3-60 pmol/min/mg protein in fetal livers and to 170-313 pmol/min/mg protein in adult livers, whereas microsomal D3 activities were 0.15-1.45 pmol/min/mg protein in fetuses and <0.1 pmol/min/mg protein in all but one adult. In the latter sample, D3 activity amounted to 0.36 pmol/min/mg protein. D2 activity was negligible in both fetal and adult livers. These findings indicate high D1 and D3 activities in fetal human liver, and high D1 and mostly absent D3 activities in adult human liver. Therefore, the low serum T3 levels in the human fetus appear to

  1. Adult liver transplantation at UCL: update 2002.

    PubMed

    Lerut, J; Matthys, J; Lemaire, J; Van Thuyne, V; Ciccarelli, O; Goffette, P; Peeters, A; Aunac, S; Boddeus, M; Carlier, M A; Danse, E; De Kock, M; De Reyck, Ch; Donataccio, M; Geubel, A; Gonze, D; Goubau, P; Latinne, D; Laterre, P F; Luts, A; Cool, G; Otte, J B; Horsmans, Y; Martinez, J; Orlando, G; Rahier, J; Reding, R; Reynaert, M; Starkel, P; Sempoux, Ch; Talpe, St; Van Obbergh, L; Veyckemans, F; Wallemacq, P; Wittebolle, X; Roggen, F

    2004-01-01

    The authors present the results of a single centre study of 587 liver transplants performed in 522 adults during the period 1984-2002. Results have improved significantly over time due to better pre-, peri- and post-transplant care. One, five, ten and fifteen year actuarial survivals for the whole patient group are 81.2; 69.8; 58.9 and 51.2%. The high incidence of de novo tumors (12.3%), of cardiovascular diseases (7.5%) and of end-stage renal function (3.6%) should be further incentives to tailor the immunosuppression to the individual patient and to direct the attention of the transplant physician to the long-term quality of life of the liver recipient. PMID:15285577

  2. Human Liver Progenitor Cells for Liver Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, Catherine A.; Prigent, Julie; Sokal, Etienne M.

    2013-01-01

    Because of their high proliferative capacity, resistance to cryopreservation, and ability to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, stem and progenitor cells have recently emerged as attractive cell sources for liver cell therapy, a technique used as an alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation in the treatment of various hepatic ailments ranging from metabolic disorders to end-stage liver disease. Although stem and progenitor cells have been isolated from various tissues, obtaining them from the liver could be an advantage for the treatment of hepatic disorders. However, the techniques available to isolate these stem/progenitor cells are numerous and give rise to cell populations with different morphological and functional characteristics. In addition, there is currently no established consensus on the tests that need to be performed to ensure the quality and safety of these cells when used clinically. The purpose of this review is to describe the different types of liver stem/progenitor cells currently reported in the literature, discuss their suitability and limitations in terms of clinical applications, and examine how the culture and transplantation techniques can potentially be improved to achieve a better clinical outcome. PMID:26858860

  3. Zebrafish Models of Human Liver Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs a large number of essential synthetic and regulatory functions that are acquired during fetal development and persist throughout life. Their disruption underlies a diverse group of heritable and acquired diseases that affect both pediatric and adult patients. Although experimental analyses used to study liver development and disease are typically performed in cell culture models or rodents, the zebrafish is increasingly used to complement discoveries made in these systems. Forward and reverse genetic analyses over the past two decades have shown that the molecular program for liver development is largely conserved between zebrafish and mammals, and that the zebrafish can be used to model heritable human liver disorders. Recent work has demonstrated that zebrafish can also be used to study the mechanistic basis of acquired liver diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive summary of how the zebrafish has contributed to our understanding of human liver development and disease. PMID:23897685

  4. Liver Transplantation for Cholestatic Liver Diseases in Adults.

    PubMed

    Khungar, Vandana; Goldberg, David Seth

    2016-02-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is an established lifesaving therapy for patients with cholestatic liver diseases, including primary cholestatic diseases, namely primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis, as well as secondary forms of cholestatic liver disease, including those with cholestatic complications of LT needing a retransplant. Patients with cholestatic liver diseases can be transplanted for complications of end-stage liver disease or for disease-specific symptoms before the onset of end-stage liver disease. These patients should be regularly assessed. Patient survival after LT for cholestatic liver diseases is generally better than for other indications. PMID:26593299

  5. Human metapneumovirus in adults.

    PubMed

    Haas, Lenneke E M; Thijsen, Steven F T; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  6. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and the liver

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Megan; Iser, David; Lewin, Sharon R

    2012-01-01

    Liver disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals encompasses the spectrum from abnormal liver function tests, liver decompensation, with and without evidence of cirrhosis on biopsy, to non-alcoholic liver disease and its more severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular cancer. HIV can infect multiple cells in the liver, leading to enhanced intrahepatic apoptosis, activation and fibrosis. HIV can also alter gastro-intestinal tract permeability, leading to increased levels of circulating lipopolysaccharide that may have an impact on liver function. This review focuses on recent changes in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of liver disease in HIV-infected patients, in the absence of co-infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus, with a specific focus on issues relevant to low and middle income countries. PMID:22489261

  8. Liver lobe torsion in three adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wenger, S; Barrett, E L; Pearson, G R; Sayers, I; Blakey, C; Redrobe, S

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes three cases of liver lobe torsion in rabbits presenting with anorexia, lethargy, jaundice and abdominal pain. This condition was associated with anaemia and elevation of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase. Abnormal radiological findings included hepatomegaly, gas-filled intestinal loops consistent with gastrointestinal ileus and ascites. Ultrasonographic findings included heterogeneous liver parenchyma, free abdominal fluid and reduced bowel motility. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination of the liver in all three cases. PMID:19527423

  9. The isolation and properties of phenylalanine hydroxylase from human liver

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Savio L. C.; Gillam, Shirley Su; Woolf, Louis I.

    1974-01-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase was prepared from human foetal liver and purified 800-fold; it appeared to be essentially pure. The phenylalanine hydroxylase activity of the liver was confined to a single protein of mol.wt. approx. 108000, but omission of a preliminary filtration step resulted in partial conversion into a second enzymically active protein of mol.wt. approx. 250000. Human adult and full-term infant liver also contained a single phenylalanine hydroxylase with molecular weights and kinetic parameters the same as those of the foetal enzyme; foetal, newborn and adult phenylalanine hydroxylase are probably identical. The Km values for phenylalanine and cofactor were respectively one-quarter and twice those found for rat liver phenylalanine hydroxylase. As with the rat enzyme, human phenylalanine hydroxylase acted also on p-fluorophenylalanine, which was inhibitory at high concentrations, and p-chlorophenylalanine acted as an inhibitor competing with phenylalanine. Iron-chelating and copper-chelating agents inhibited human phenylalanine hydroxylase. Thiol-binding reagents inhibited the enzyme but, as with the rat enzyme, phenylalanine both stabilized the human enzyme and offered some protection against these inhibitors. It is hoped that isolation of the normal enzyme will further the study of phenylketonuria. PMID:4854919

  10. Conserved POU-binding site linked to SP1-binding site within FZD5 promoter: Transcriptional mechanisms of FZD5 in undifferentiated human ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, adult colon, pancreatic islet, and diffuse-type gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-03-01

    Canonical WNT signals are transduced through Frizzled (FZD) family receptor and LRP5/LRP6 co-receptor to upregulate FGF20, JAG1, DKK1, WISP1, CCND1 and MYC genes for cell-fate determination, while non-canonical WNT signals are transduced through FZD family receptor and ROR2/PTK7/RYK co-receptor to activate RHOA/RHOU/RAC/CDC42, JNK, PKC, NLK and NFAT signaling cascades for the regulation of tissue polarity, cell movement, and adhesion. We previously reported molecular cloning and characterization of human FZD5, which showed six amino-acid substitutions with human Hfz5. FZD5, functioning as WNT5A receptor, is the key molecule in the fields of oncology, regenerative medicine, cardiology, rheumatology, diabetology, and gastroenterology. Here, comparative integromics analyses on FZD5 orthologs were performed by using bioinformatics (Techint) and human intelligence (Humint). Chimpanzee FZD5 and cow Fzd5 genes were identified within NW_104292.1 and AC166656.2 genome sequences, respectively. FZD5 orthologs were seven-transmembrane proteins with extracellular Frizzled domain, leucine zipper motif around the 5th transmembrane domain, and cytoplasmic DVL- and PDZ-binding motifs. Ser523 and Ser529 around the DVL-binding motif of FZD5 orthologs were putative aPKC phosphorylation sites. POU5F1 (OCT4)-binding site linked to SP1-binding site within the 5'-promoter region of human FZD5 gene was evolutionarily conserved among mammalian FZD5 orthologs. POU5F1 was more related to POU2F and POU3F subfamily members. POU5F1 was preferentially expressed in undifferentiated human embryonic stem (ES) cells, pancreatic islet, and diffuse-type gastric cancer. POU2F1 (OCT1) was expressed in ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, adult colon, POU2F2 in ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, and POU2F3 in diffuse-type gastric cancer. Multiple SP1/KLF family members, other than KLF2 or KLF4, were expressed in undifferentiated human ES cells. Together, these facts indicate that POU5F1 and POU2F subfamily members

  11. Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation for acute liver failure in China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ding; Liu, Fei; Wei, Yong-Gang; Li, Bo; Yan, Lv-Nan; Wen, Tian-Fu; Zhao, Ji-Chun; Zeng, Yong; Chen, Ke-Fei

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the long-term outcome of recipients and donors of adult-to-adult living-donor liver transplantation (AALDLT) for acute liver failure (ALF). METHODS: Between January 2005 and March 2010, 170 living donor liver transplantations were performed at West China Hospital of Sichuan University. All living liver donor was voluntary and provided informed consent. Twenty ALF patients underwent AALDLT for rapid deterioration of liver function. ALF was defined based on the criteria of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, including evidence of coagulation abnormality [international normalized ratio (INR) ≥ 1.5] and degree of mental alteration without pre-existing cirrhosis and with an illness of < 26 wk duration. We reviewed the clinical indications, operative procedure and prognosis of AALDTL performed on patients with ALF and corresponding living donors. The potential factors of recipient with ALF and corresponding donor outcome were respectively investigated using multivariate analysis. Survival rates after operation were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was undertaken to identify the threshold of potential risk factors. RESULTS: The causes of ALF were hepatitis B (n = 18), drug-induced (n = 1) and indeterminate (n = 1). The score of the model for end-stage liver disease was 37.1 ± 8.6, and the waiting duration of recipients was 5 ± 4 d. The graft types included right lobe (n = 17) and dual graft (n = 3). The mean graft weight was 623.3 ± 111.3 g, which corresponded to graft-to-recipient weight ratio of 0.95% ± 0.14%. The segment Vor VIII hepatic vein was reconstructed in 11 right-lobe grafts. The 1-year and 3-year recipient’s survival and graft survival rates were 65% (13 of 20). Postoperative results of total bilirubin, INR and creatinine showed obvious improvements in the survived patients. However, the creatinine level of the deaths was increased postoperatively

  12. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Mössbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Prokopenko, P. G.; Malakheeva, L. I.

    2004-12-01

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Mössbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  13. Genetic variants in adult liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Dröge, C; Häussinger, D; Keitel, V

    2015-12-01

    In the last decades, understanding of genetic variants contributing to liver disease development has considerably improved through novel genotyping techniques. Genetic variants of single genes are known to be decisive for the development of monogenetic liver diseases of varying severity. Identification of genetic variants is an important part of the diagnostic process, e. g. the majority of patients with high iron [Fe] (HFE)-associated hemochromatosis carry the homozygous mutation p.C282Y. Detection of mutations in genes encoding hepatobiliary transport proteins like familial intrahepatic cholestasis 1 (FIC1), bile salt export pump (BSEP), or multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3) is the basis to differentiate various forms of intrahepatic cholestasis. Moreover, genetic variants in a variety of genes are known to act as disease modifiers and represent risk factors for disease progression and the development of cirrhosis or even hepatocellular carcinoma. Success of drug treatment or appearance of severe side effects can also be influenced by specific genetic variants. All these aspects underscore the increasing importance of genetic variants, which in the future may help to identify patients at risk for disease progression or help to guide treatment decisions. In the present overview, specific frequent genetic variants are summarized that play roles in monogenetic liver diseases, forms of intrahepatic cholestasis, gallstone development, fatty liver disease, drug-induced liver injury, and liver disease progression as well as hepatocellular carcinoma development. PMID:26666282

  14. Outcomes of liver transplantation with liver grafts from pediatric donors used in adult recipients.

    PubMed

    Croome, Kristopher P; Lee, David D; Burns, Justin M; Saucedo-Crespo, Hector; Perry, Dana K; Nguyen, Justin H; Taner, C Burcin

    2016-08-01

    Although there is an agreement that liver grafts from pediatric donors (PDs) should ideally be used for pediatric patients, there remain situations when these grafts are turned down for pediatric recipients and are then offered to adult recipients. The present study aimed to investigate the outcomes of using these grafts for liver transplantation (LT) in adult patients. Data from all patients undergoing LT between 2002 and 2014 were obtained from the United Network for Organ Sharing Standard Analysis and Research file. Adult recipients undergoing LT were divided into 2 groups: those receiving a pediatric liver graft (pediatric-to-adult group) and those receiving a liver graft from adult donors (adult-to-adult group). A separate subgroup analysis comparing the PDs used for adult recipients and those used for pediatric recipients was also performed. Patient and graft survival were not significantly different between pediatric-to-adult and adult-to-adult groups (P = 0.08 and P = 0.21, respectively). Hepatic artery thrombosis as the cause for graft loss was higher in the pediatric-to-adult group (3.6%) than the adult-to-adult group (1.9%; P < 0.001). A subanalysis looking at the pediatric-to-adult group found that patients with a predicted graft-to-recipient weight ratio (GRWR) < 0.8 had a higher 90-day graft loss rate than those with a GRWR ≥ 0.8 (39% versus 9%; P < 0.001). PDs used for adult recipients had a higher proportion of donors with elevated aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase (20% vs. 12%; P < 0.001), elevated creatinine (11% vs. 4%; P < 0.001), donation after cardiac death donors (12% vs. 0.9%; P < 0.001), and were hepatitis B virus core positive (1% vs. 0.3%; P = 0.002) than PDs used for pediatric recipients. In conclusion, acceptable patient and graft survival can be achieved with the use of pediatric liver grafts in adult recipients, when these grafts have been determined to be inappropriate for

  15. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults.

    PubMed

    Dey, Jaideep; Gautam, Hitender; Venugopal, Shwetha; Porwal, Chhavi; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Gupta, Naresh; Singh, Urvashi B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  16. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Jaideep; Venugopal, Shwetha; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  17. Function of GATA Factors in the Adult Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rena; Rebolledo-Jaramillo, Boris; Zong, Yiwei; Wang, Liqing; Russo, Pierre; Hancock, Wayne; Stanger, Ben Z.; Hardison, Ross C.; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2013-01-01

    GATA transcription factors and their Friend of Gata (FOG) cofactors control the development of diverse tissues. GATA4 and GATA6 are essential for the expansion of the embryonic liver bud, but their expression patterns and functions in the adult liver are unclear. We characterized the expression of GATA and FOG factors in whole mouse liver and purified hepatocytes. GATA4, GATA6, and FOG1 are the most prominently expressed family members in whole liver and hepatocytes. GATA4 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 4409 occupied sites, associated with genes enriched in ontologies related to liver function, including lipid and glucose metabolism. However, hepatocyte-specific excision of Gata4 had little impact on gross liver architecture and function, even under conditions of regenerative stress, and, despite the large number of GATA4 occupied genes, resulted in relatively few changes in gene expression. To address possible redundancy between GATA4 and GATA6, both factors were conditionally excised. Surprisingly, combined Gata4,6 loss did not exacerbate the phenotype resulting from Gata4 loss alone. This points to the presence of an unusually robust transcriptional network in adult hepatocytes that ensures the maintenance of liver function. PMID:24367609

  18. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches. PMID:16989722

  19. A comparative analysis of liver transcriptome suggests divergent liver function among human, mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao; Ping, Jie; Chen, Hui; Jiao, Longxian; Zheng, Siyuan; Han, Ze-Guang; Hao, Pei; Huang, Jian

    2010-11-01

    The human liver plays a vital role in meeting the body's metabolic needs and maintaining homeostasis. To address the molecular mechanisms of liver function, we integrated multiple gene expression datasets from microarray, MPSS, SAGE and EST platforms to generate a transcriptome atlas of the normal human liver. Our results show that 17396 genes are expressed in the human liver. 238 genes were identified as liver enrichment genes, involved in the functions of immune response and metabolic processes, from the MPSS and EST datasets. A comparative analysis of liver transcriptomes was performed in humans, mice and rats with microarray datasets shows that the expression profile of homologous genes remains significantly different between mouse/rat and human, suggesting a functional variance and regulation bias of genes expressed in the livers. The integrated liver transcriptome data should provide a valuable resource for the in-depth understanding of human liver biology and liver disease. PMID:20800674

  20. Assessment of adult patients with chronic liver failure for liver transplantation in 2015: who and when?

    PubMed

    McCaughan, G W; Crawford, M; Sandroussi, C; Koorey, D J; Bowen, D G; Shackel, N A; Strasser, S I

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, there are a few absolute contraindications to liver transplantation. In adult patients, survival post-liver transplant is excellent, with 1-year survival rate >90% and 5-year survival rates >80% and predicted median allograft survival beyond 20 years. Patients with a Child-Turcotte Pugh score ≥9 or a model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score >15 should be referred for liver transplantation, with patients who have a MELD score >17 showing a 1-year survival benefit with liver transplantation. A careful selection of hepatocellular cancer patients results in excellent outcomes, while consideration of extra-hepatic disease (reversible vs irreversible) and social support structures are crucial to patient assessment. Alcoholic liver disease remains a challenge, and the potential to cure hepatitis C virus infection together with the emerging issue of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease-associated chronic liver failure will change the landscape of the who in the years ahead. The when will continue to be determined largely by the severity of liver disease based on the MELD score for the foreseeable future. PMID:27062203

  1. Human Ex-Vivo Liver Model for Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Schreiter, Thomas; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Schlattjan, Martin; Treckmann, Jürgen; Paul, Andreas; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Baba, Hideo A.; Odenthal, Margarete; Gieseler, Robert K.; Gerken, Guido; Arteel, Gavin E.; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Reliable test systems to identify hepatotoxicity are essential to predict unexpected drug-related liver injury. Here we present a human ex-vivo liver model to investigate acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Human liver tissue was perfused over a 30 hour period with hourly sampling from the perfusate for measurement of general metabolism and clinical parameters. Liver function was assessed by clearance of indocyanine green (ICG) at 4, 20 and 28 hours. Six pieces of untreated human liver specimen maintained stable liver function over the entire perfusion period. Three liver sections incubated with low-dose acetaminophen revealed strong damage, with ICG half-lives significantly higher than in non-treated livers. In addition, the release of microRNA-122 was significantly higher in acetaminophen-treated than in non-treated livers. Thus, this model allows for investigation of hepatotoxicity in human liver tissue upon applying drug concentrations relevant in patients. PMID:27550092

  2. Expression of tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) in fetal and adult liver: changes in liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Burt, A D; Stewart, J A; Aitchison, M; MacSween, R N

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of tissue polypeptide antigen (40 kD molecular weight) in normal adult and fetal liver, and in liver disease was investigated and compared with the distribution of low and high molecular weight cytokeratins. In normal liver tissue polypeptide antigen was found only in bile duct epithelium; this distribution is similar to that of high molecular weight cytokeratin, but differs from that of low molecular weight cytokeratins. In liver disease it was found in areas of ductular transformation; in Mallory's bodies; and in alcoholic liver disease and primary biliary cirrhosis in some hepatocytes that did not contain Mallory's bodies. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 PMID:2442199

  3. Telomere length in human liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Y; Nouso, K; Higashi, T; Nakatsukasa, H; Hino, N; Ashida, K; Kinugasa, N; Yoshida, K; Uematsu, S; Tsuji, T

    1996-10-01

    To determine the role of telomere-mediated gene stability in hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined the telomere length of human liver with or without chronic liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). The mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) length of normal liver (n = 13), chronic hepatitis (n = 11), liver cirrhosis (n = 24) and HCC (n = 24) was 7.8 +/- 0.2, 7.1 +/- 0.3, 6.4 +/- 0.2 and 5.2 +/- 0.2 kb, respectively (mean +/- standard error). TRF length decreased with a progression of chronic liver diseases and that in HCC was significantly shorter than that in other chronic liver diseases (p < 0.05). The ratios of TRF length of HCC to that of corresponding surrounding liver of well differentiated (n = 7), moderately differentiated (n = 10) and poorly differentiated (n = 4) HCCs were 0.83 +/- 0.06, 0.75 +/- 0.05 and 0.98 +/- 0.09, respectively. The ratio of poorly differentiated HCC was significantly higher than that of moderately differentiated HCC (p < 0.05). A comparison between the size and telomere length ratio of moderately differentiated HCCs revealed a decrease of the ratio with size until it reached 50 mm in diameter. In contrast, the ratio increased as the size enlarged over 50 mm. These findings suggest that the gene stability of the liver cells mediated by the telomere is reduced as chronic liver disease progresses and that telomerase is activated in poorly differentiated HCC and moderately differentiated HCC over 50 mm in diameter. PMID:8938628

  4. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  5. Ontogeny, distribution and potential roles of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in human liver function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interindividual differences in liver functions such as protein synthesis, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and drug metabolism are influenced by epigenetic factors. The role of the epigenetic machinery in such processes has, however, been barely investigated. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is a recently re-discovered epigenetic DNA modification that plays an important role in the control of gene expression. Results In this study, we investigate 5hmC occurrence and genomic distribution in 8 fetal and 7 adult human liver samples in relation to ontogeny and function. LC-MS analysis shows that in the adult liver samples 5hmC comprises up to 1% of the total cytosine content, whereas in all fetal livers it is below 0.125%. Immunohistostaining of liver sections with a polyclonal anti-5hmC antibody shows that 5hmC is detected in most of the hepatocytes. Genome-wide mapping of the distribution of 5hmC in human liver samples by next-generation sequencing shows significant differences between fetal and adult livers. In adult livers, 5hmC occupancy is overrepresented in genes involved in active catabolic and metabolic processes, whereas 5hmC elements which are found in genes exclusively in fetal livers and disappear in the adult state, are more specific to pathways for differentiation and development. Conclusions Our findings suggest that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine plays an important role in the development and function of the human liver and might be an important determinant for development of liver diseases as well as of the interindividual differences in drug metabolism and toxicity. PMID:23958281

  6. Embryonal Sarcoma of the Liver in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Nicole; Nikfarjam, Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcomas (UESs) are uncommon tumours that are seen predominantly in late childhood. Cases in adults are rare and generally present once a large mass develops and may be mistaken for other tumours. A case of an UES of the liver with an isolated peritoneal metastasis is described. The patient presented with a palpable mass with imaging findings suggestive of a cystic tumour. She had complete surgical resection of the liver mass and isolated peritoneal metastasis. She was tumour-free on imaging at 6 months without adjuvant chemotherapy. An UES should be considered in the differential of large cystic hepatic lesions, with aggressive surgical resection considered when possible. PMID:22690347

  7. Peculiar magnetic observations in pathological human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felner, I.; Alenkina, I. V.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Oshtrakh, M. I.

    2016-02-01

    DC magnetic measurements confirm presence of (i) diamagnetic, (ii) ferri-magnetic (probably magnetite) and (iii) paramagnetic components in human liver tissues obtained from a normal person and two patients with hematological malignancies. The main observation is that patients' liver tissues show a pronounced magnetic peak at 54(1) K in their zero-field-cooled (ZFC) branches; its origin is not known. One sample shows unusual magnetic features: (i) this peak is irreversible and totally suppressed in the second ZFC sweep, (ii) around the peak position the field-cooled (FC) curve crosses the ZFC one (ZFC>FC). The two phenomena are related to each other.

  8. Native fluorescence characterization of human liver abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Madhuri, S.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Suchitra, S.; Srinivasan, T. G.

    1999-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules has been extensively used in biology and medicine for the past several decades. In the present study, we report the native fluorescence characteristics of blood plasma from normal human subjects and patients with different liver abnormalities such as hepatitis, leptospirosis, jaundice, cirrhosis and liver cell failure. Native fluorescence spectra of blood plasma -- acetone extract were measured at 405 nm excitation. The average spectrum of normal blood plasma has a prominent emission peak around 464 nm whereas in the case of liver diseased subjects, the primary peak is red shifted with respect to normal. In addition, liver diseased cases show distinct secondary emission peak around 615 nm, which may be attributed to the presence of endogenous porphyrins. The red shift of the prominent emission peak with respect to normal is found to be maximum for hepatitis and minimum for cirrhosis whereas the secondary emission peak around 615 nm was found to be more prominent in the case of cirrhosis than the rest. The ratio parameter I465/I615 is found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.001) in discriminating liver abnormalities from normal.

  9. Hepatic haemangioendothelioma in adults: excellent outcome following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lerut, Jan P; Orlando, Giuseppe; Sempoux, Christine; Ciccarelli, Olga; Van Beers, Bernard E; Danse, Etienne; Horsmans, Yves; Rahier, Jacques; Roggen, Francine

    2004-05-01

    Hepatic epithelioid haemangioendotheliomas (HEHEs) are rare, low-grade vascular tumours. Five adults with HEHEs and one adult with a vascular tumour showing combined features of haemangioma and haemangioendothelioma underwent liver transplantation. Two HEHE patients had extrahepatic metastases at the time of transplantation. Median survival time following diagnosis was 10.7 years (range 40 months to 195 months). One patient needed resection of a HEHE in the breast 13 years post-transplantation. All six patients are surviving free from disease 22 to 166 months after transplantation (median 77 months). One HEHE-patient who had been treated for 8 years for vertebral and cerebral localisations is free of disease without immunosuppression 56 months after transplantation. We can conclude that liver transplantation is a valuable treatment for hepatic haemangioendothelioma, even in cases of extrahepatic localisation of the disease. PMID:15114438

  10. Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Modelling Human Liver Diseases and Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Noushin; Steichen, Clara; Vallier, Ludovic; Weber, Anne; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The liver is affected by many types of diseases, including metabolic disorders and acute liver failure. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is currently the only effective treatment for life-threatening liver diseases but transplantation of allogeneic hepatocytes has now become an alternative as it is less invasive than OLT and can be performed repeatedly. However, this approach is hampered by the shortage of organ donors, and the problems related to the isolation of high quality adult hepatocytes, their cryopreservation and their absence of proliferation in culture. Liver is also a key organ to assess the pharmacokinetics and toxicology of xenobiotics and for drug discovery, but appropriate cell culture systems are lacking. All these problems have highlighted the need to explore other sources of cells such as stem cells that could be isolated, expanded to yield sufficiently large populations and then induced to differentiate into functional hepatocytes. The presence of a niche of “facultative” progenitor and stem cells in the normal liver has recently been confirmed but they display no telomerase activity. The recent discovery that human induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated from somatic cells has renewed hopes for regenerative medicine and in vitro disease modelling, as these cells are easily accessible. We review here the present progresses, limits and challenges for the generation of functional hepatocytes from human pluripotent stem cells in view of their potential use in regenerative medicine and drug discovery. PMID:23444872

  11. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bin; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Chen, Cheng; Li, Jialun; Powell, Prudence O.; Hu, Zhenxia; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets. PMID:26934359

  12. Human liver steroid sulphotransferase sulphates bile acids.

    PubMed Central

    Radominska, A; Comer, K A; Zimniak, P; Falany, J; Iscan, M; Falany, C N

    1990-01-01

    The sulphation of bile acids is an important pathway for the detoxification and elimination of bile acids during cholestatic liver disease. A dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulphotransferase has been purified from male and female human liver cytosol using DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate-agarose affinity chromatography [Falany, Vazquez & Kalb (1989) Biochem. J. 260, 641-646]. Results in the present paper show that the DHEA sulphotransferase, purified to homogeneity, is also reactive towards bile acids, including lithocholic acid and 6-hydroxylated bile acids, as well as 3-hydroxylated short-chain bile acids. The highest activity towards bile acids was observed with lithocholic acid (54.3 +/- 3.6 nmol/min per mg of protein); of the substrates tested, the lowest activity was detected with hyodeoxycholic acid (4.2 +/- 0.01 nmol/min per mg of protein). The apparent Km values for the enzyme are 1.5 +/- 0.31 microM for lithocholic acid and 4.2 +/- 0.73 microM for taurolithocholic acid. Lithocholic acid also competitively inhibits DHEA sulphation by the purified sulphotransferase (Ki 1.4 microM). No evidence was found for the formation of bile acid sulphates by sulphotransferases different from the DHEA sulphotransferase during purification work. The above results suggest that a single steroid sulphotransferase with broad specificity encompassing neutral steroids and bile acids exists in human liver. PMID:2268288

  13. Etoxazole is Metabolized Enantioselectively in Liver Microsomes of Rat and Human in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhoulin; Qian, Mingrong; Zhang, Hu; Nie, Jing; Ye, Jingqing; Li, Zuguang

    2016-09-01

    Acaricide etoxazole belongs to the ovicides/miticides diphenyloxazole class, affecting adults to lay sterile eggs by inhibiting chitin biosynthesis possibly. The reverse-phase HPLC-MS/MS method was used to determine the etoxazole enantiomers. The enantioselective degradation behavior of rac-etoxazole in liver microsomes of rat and human in vitro with NADPH was dramatically different. The t1/2 of (R)-etoxazole was 15.23 min in rat liver microsomes and 30.54 min in human liver microsomes, while 21.73 and 23.50 min were obtained for (S)-etoxazole, respectively. The Vmax of (R)-etoxazole was almost 5-fold of (S)-etoxazole in liver microsomes of rat in vitro. However, the Vmax of (S)-etoxazole was almost 2-fold of (R)-etoxazole in liver microsomes of human in vitro. The CLint of etoxazole was also shown the enantioselectivity on the contrary in liver microsomes of rat and human. These results indicated that the metabolism of two etoxazole enantiomers was selective in liver microsomes of rat and human in vitro, and enantioselectivity in the two kinds of liver microsomes was in the difference in degradation performance. The reason might be related to the composition and content involved in the enzyme system. PMID:27479246

  14. Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Across ABO-Incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Fang; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Yu-Chao; Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Wu, Tsung-Han; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Wu, Ting-Jung; Chan, Kun-Ming; Lee, Ching-Song; Lee, Wei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of adult ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). ABO-incompatible LDLT is an aggressive treatment that crosses the blood-typing barrier for saving lives from liver diseases. Although graft and patient survival have been improved recently by various treatments, the results of adult ABO-incompatible LDLT require further evaluation. Two regimens were designed based on isoagglutinin IgG and IgM titers and the time course of immunological reactions at this institute. When isoagglutinin IgG and IgM titers were ≤64, liver transplantation was directly performed and rituximab (375 mg/m2) was administrated on postoperative day 1 (regimen I). When isoagglutinin titers were >64, rituximab (375 mg/m2) was administered preoperatively with or without plasmapheresis and boosted on postoperative day 1 (regimen II). Immunosuppression was achieved by administration of mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and steroids. Forty-six adult ABO-incompatible and 340 ABO-compatible LDLTs were performed from 2006 to 2013. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores for ABO-incompatible recipients ranged from 7 to 40, with a median of 14. The graft-to-recipient weight ratio ranged from 0.61% to 1.61% with a median of 0.91%. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 81.7%, 75.7%, and 71.0%, respectively, for ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients, compared to 81.0%, 75.2%, and 71.5% for ABO-C recipients (P = 0.912). The biliary complication rate was higher in ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients than in the ABO-compatible recipients (50.0% vs 29.7%, P = 0.009). In the rituximab era, the blood type barrier can be crossed to achieve adult ABO-incompatible LDLT with survival rates comparable to those of ABO-compatible LDLT, but with more biliary complications. PMID:26496313

  15. Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Across ABO-Incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Fang; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Yu-Chao; Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Wu, Tsung-Han; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Wu, Ting-Jung; Chan, Kun-Ming; Lee, Ching-Song; Lee, Wei-Chen

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of adult ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation (LDLT).ABO-incompatible LDLT is an aggressive treatment that crosses the blood-typing barrier for saving lives from liver diseases. Although graft and patient survival have been improved recently by various treatments, the results of adult ABO-incompatible LDLT require further evaluation.Two regimens were designed based on isoagglutinin IgG and IgM titers and the time course of immunological reactions at this institute. When isoagglutinin IgG and IgM titers were ≤64, liver transplantation was directly performed and rituximab (375 mg/m) was administrated on postoperative day 1 (regimen I). When isoagglutinin titers were >64, rituximab (375 mg/m) was administered preoperatively with or without plasmapheresis and boosted on postoperative day 1 (regimen II). Immunosuppression was achieved by administration of mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and steroids.Forty-six adult ABO-incompatible and 340 ABO-compatible LDLTs were performed from 2006 to 2013. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores for ABO-incompatible recipients ranged from 7 to 40, with a median of 14. The graft-to-recipient weight ratio ranged from 0.61% to 1.61% with a median of 0.91%. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 81.7%, 75.7%, and 71.0%, respectively, for ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients, compared to 81.0%, 75.2%, and 71.5% for ABO-C recipients (P = 0.912). The biliary complication rate was higher in ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients than in the ABO-compatible recipients (50.0% vs 29.7%, P = 0.009).In the rituximab era, the blood type barrier can be crossed to achieve adult ABO-incompatible LDLT with survival rates comparable to those of ABO-compatible LDLT, but with more biliary complications. PMID:26496313

  16. [Comparison of serum trace element spectrum of liver cancer patients and healthy adults].

    PubMed

    Yin, D Z

    1990-05-01

    The contents of 15 trace elements in the sera of 30 liver cancer patients and 30 healthy adults were assayed by ICP-AES method. The data obtained were analysed by routine statistical tests, multi-variate discrimination analysis, multi-variate stepwise regression analysis and non-linear mapping algorithm. The results showed that the contents of copper, vanadium, cadmium, stannum, cobalt, nickel in liver cancer patients were significantly higher than those in healthy adults. The serum trace element spectrum of liver cancer patients was different from that of healthy adults. Hence, the liver cancer patients could be differentiated from healthy adults by serum trace element spectrum. PMID:2249593

  17. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described. PMID:27385595

  18. ESRP2 controls an adult splicing programme in hepatocytes to support postnatal liver maturation.

    PubMed

    Bhate, Amruta; Parker, Darren J; Bebee, Thomas W; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Arif, Waqar; Rashan, Edrees H; Chorghade, Sandip; Chau, Anthony; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Anakk, Sayeepriyadarshini; Carstens, Russ P; Xiao, Xinshu; Kalsotra, Auinash

    2015-01-01

    Although major genetic networks controlling early liver specification and morphogenesis are known, the mechanisms responsible for postnatal hepatic maturation are poorly understood. Here we employ global analyses of the mouse liver transcriptome to demonstrate that postnatal remodelling of the liver is accompanied by large-scale transcriptional and post-transcriptional transitions that are cell-type-specific and temporally coordinated. Combining detailed expression analyses with gain- and loss-of-function studies, we identify epithelial splicing regulatory protein 2 (ESRP2) as a conserved regulatory factor that controls the neonatal-to-adult switch of ∼20% of splice isoforms in mouse and human hepatocytes. The normal shift in splicing coincides tightly with dramatic postnatal induction of ESRP2 in hepatocytes. We further demonstrate that forced expression of ESRP2 in immature mouse and human hepatocytes is sufficient to drive a reciprocal shift in splicing and causes various physiological abnormalities. These findings define a direct role for ESRP2 in the generation of conserved repertoires of adult splice isoforms that facilitate terminal differentiation and maturation of hepatocytes. PMID:26531099

  19. Adult to adult living related liver transplantation: Where do we currently stand?

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, Erica M; Testa, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Adult to adult living donor liver transplantation (AALDLT) was first preformed in the United States in 1997. The procedure was rapidly integrated into clinical practice, but in 2002, possibly due to the first widely publicized donor death, the number of living liver donors plummeted. The number of donors has since reached a steady plateau far below its initial peak. In this review we evaluate the current climate of AALDLT. Specifically, we focus on several issues key to the success of AALDLT: determining the optimal indications for AALDLT, balancing graft size and donor safety, assuring adequate outflow, minimizing biliary complications, and maintaining ethical practices. We conclude by offering suggestions for the future of AALDLT in United States transplantation centers. PMID:23239910

  20. Adult to adult living related liver transplantation: where do we currently stand?

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Erica M; Testa, Giuliano

    2012-12-14

    Adult to adult living donor liver transplantation (AALDLT) was first preformed in the United States in 1997. The procedure was rapidly integrated into clinical practice, but in 2002, possibly due to the first widely publicized donor death, the number of living liver donors plummeted. The number of donors has since reached a steady plateau far below its initial peak. In this review we evaluate the current climate of AALDLT. Specifically, we focus on several issues key to the success of AALDLT: determining the optimal indications for AALDLT, balancing graft size and donor safety, assuring adequate outflow, minimizing biliary complications, and maintaining ethical practices. We conclude by offering suggestions for the future of AALDLT in United States transplantation centers. PMID:23239910

  1. Evaluation of porcine mesenchymal stem cells for therapeutic use in human liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Groth, Ariane; Ottinger, Sabine; Kleist, Christian; Mohr, Elisabeth; Golriz, Mohammad; Schultze, Daniel; Bruns, Helge; Mehrabi, Arianeb; Schemmer, Peter; Büchler, Markus W; Herr, Ingrid

    2012-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation is suggested for therapy of end-stage liver disease, due to e.g. liver cancer and metastasis. Liver transplantation is the only therapeutic option so far but donor organs are short. Also, the availability of allogeneic human MSCs for liver regeneration is limited. Therefore, we evaluated the suitability of porcine bone marrow MSCs from semi-adult pigs and found that morphology, surface expression pattern and multilineage differentiation are similar to those of human MSCs. Porcine MSCs differentiated to a hepatocyte-like phenotype and expressed porcine mRNA of typical liver proteins. However, hepatocyte-like MSCs failed to express the corresponding proteins and did not produce glycogen and urea as primary porcine hepatocytes do. Porcine MSCs were immunotolerated, since they did not activate resting human PBMCs, and were not attacked by human activated PBMCs. However, porcine MSCs led to enhanced proliferation of human pre-activated PBMCs suggesting that immunotoleration of porcine MSCs in the human system has limitations. Together, the potential of porcine MSCs for xenogenous use in human liver therapy is promising but needs further evaluation prior to clinical use. PMID:21964567

  2. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchini, Andrea; Montaldo, Claudia; Conigliaro, Alice; Grimaldi, Alessio; Correani, Virginia; Mura, Francesco; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Rotiroti, Nicolina; Brenna, Alessia; Montalbano, Marzia; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Alessandro, Riccardo; Piacentini, Mauro; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Del Nonno, Franca; Tripodi, Marco; Mancone, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis). Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies. PMID:26998606

  3. Accessory liver lobe of the gallbladder in adults.

    PubMed

    Handra-Luca, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    The accessory liver lobe (ALL) of the gallbladder wall is rare, mentioned by Meckel since 1822. We present two cases of ALL occurring in two adult women. The ALLs were diagnosed at microscopic examination of cholecystectomy specimens for lithiasic cholecystitis and were located at the gallbladder body level. They measured 0.5 and 1.1 cm and were pediculated from the gallbladder serosa. Luschka duct complexes were seen in the adjacent subserosa in one of the cases. The main clinical relevance of ALL of the gallbladder resides in the differential diagnosis with a lymph node and in the risk of peroperative hemorragia or bile leakage by sectioning of the connecting blood vessels and/or bile duct. Intraparietal ALL may interfere with dysmotility, possibly resulting in bile stagnation and stone formation. PMID:27147442

  4. Mouse models of liver fibrosis mimic human liver fibrosis of different etiologies.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Allyson K; Maroni, Luca; Marzioni, Marco; Ahmed, Syed T; Milad, Mena; Ray, Debolina; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S

    2014-12-01

    The liver has the amazing capacity to repair itself after injury; however, the same processes that are involved in liver regeneration after acute injury can cause serious consequences during chronic liver injury. In an effort to repair damage, activated hepatic stellate cells trigger a cascade of events that lead to deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix components causing the progressive replacement of the liver parenchyma by scar tissue, thus resulting in fibrosis. Although fibrosis occurs as a result of many chronic liver diseases, the molecular mechanisms involved depend on the underlying etiology. Since studying liver fibrosis in human subjects is complicated by many factors, mouse models of liver fibrosis that mimic the human conditions fill this void. This review summarizes the general mouse models of liver fibrosis and mouse models that mimic specific human disease conditions that result in liver fibrosis. Additionally, recent progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the fibrogenic processes of each of the human disease conditions is highlighted. PMID:25396098

  5. Mouse models of liver fibrosis mimic human liver fibrosis of different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Allyson K.; Maroni, Luca; Marzioni, Marco; Ahmed, Syed T.; Milad, Mena; Ray, Debolina; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver has the amazing capacity to repair itself after injury; however, the same processes that are involved in liver regeneration after acute injury can cause serious consequences during chronic liver injury. In an effort to repair damage, activated hepatic stellate cells trigger a cascade of events that lead to deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix components causing the progressive replacement of the liver parenchyma by scar tissue, thus resulting in fibrosis. Although fibrosis occurs as a result of many chronic liver diseases, the molecular mechanisms involved depend on the underlying etiology. Since studying liver fibrosis in human subjects is complicated by many factors, mouse models of liver fibrosis that mimic the human conditions fill this void. This review summarizes the general mouse models of liver fibrosis and mouse models that mimic specific human disease conditions that result in liver fibrosis. Additionally, recent progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the fibrogenic processes of each of the human disease conditions is highlighted. PMID:25396098

  6. Sequential and simultaneous revascularization in adult orthotopic piggyback liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Polak, Wojciech G; Miyamoto, Shungo; Nemes, Balazs A; Peeters, Paul M J G; de Jong, Koert P; Porte, Robert J; Slooff, Maarten J H

    2005-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether there is a difference in outcome after sequential or simultaneous revascularization during orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in terms of patient and graft survival, mortality, morbidity, and liver function. The study population consisted of 102 adult patients with primary full-size piggyback OLT transplanted between January 1998 and December 2001. In 71 patients (70%) the grafts were sequentially reperfused after completion of the portal vein anastomosis and subsequent arterial reconstruction was performed (sequential reperfusion [SeqR] group). In 31 patients (30%) the graft was reperfused simultaneously via the portal vein and hepatic artery (simultaneous reperfusion [SimR] group). Patient and graft survival at 1, 3, and 6 months and at 1 year did not differ between the SeqR group and the SimR group. The red blood cell (RBC) requirements were significantly higher in the SimR group (5.5 units; range 0-20) in comparison to the SeqR group (2 units; range 0-19) (P = 0.02). Apart from a higher number of biliary anastomotic complications and abdominal bleeding complications in the SimR group in comparison to the SeqR group (13% vs. 2% and 19% vs. 6%, respectively; P = 0.06), morbidity was not different between the groups. No differences between the groups were observed regarding the incidence of primary nonfunction (PNF), intensive care unit stay, and acute rejection. This was also true for the severity of rejections. Postoperative recuperation of liver function was not different between the groups. In conclusion, no advantage of either of the 2 reperfusion protocols could be observed in this analysis, especially with respect to the incidence of ischemic type biliary lesions (ITBL). PMID:16035059

  7. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-08-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  8. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  9. Characterization of Liver-Specific Functions of Human Fetal Hepatocytes in Culture.

    PubMed

    Chinnici, Cinzia Maria; Timoneri, Francesca; Amico, Giandomenico; Pietrosi, Giada; Vizzini, Giovanni; Spada, Marco; Pagano, Duilio; Gridelli, Bruno; Conaldi, Pier Giulio

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess liver-specific functions of human fetal liver cells proposed as a potential source for hepatocyte transplantation. Fetal liver cells were isolated from livers of different gestational ages (16-22 weeks), and the functions of cell preparations were evaluated by establishing primary cultures. We observed that 20- to 22-week-gestation fetal liver cell cultures contained a predominance of cells with hepatocytic traits that did not divide in vitro but were functionally competent. Fetal hepatocytes performed liver-specific functions at levels comparable to those of their adult counterpart. Moreover, exposure to dexamethasone in combination with oncostatin M promptly induced further maturation of the cells through the acquisition of additional functions (i.e., ability to store glycogen and uptake of indocyanine green). In some cases, particularly in cultures obtained from fetuses of earlier gestational ages (16-18 weeks gestation), cells with mature hepatocytic traits proved to be sporadic, and the primary cultures were mainly populated by clusters of proliferating cells. Consequently, the values of liver-specific functions detected in these cultures were low. We observed that a low cell density culture system rapidly prompted loss of the mature hepatocytic phenotype with downregulations of all the liver-specific functions. We found that human fetal liver cells can be cryopreserved without significant loss of viability and function and evaluated up to 1 year in storage in liquid nitrogen. They might, therefore, be suitable for cell banking and allow for the transplantation of large numbers of cells, thus improving clinical outcomes. Overall, our results indicate that fetal hepatocytes could be used as a cell source for hepatocyte transplantation. Fetal liver cells have been used so far to treat end-stage liver disease. Additional studies are needed to include these cells in cell-based therapies aimed to treat liver failure and inborn

  10. Novel management of acute or secondary biliary liver conditions using hepatically differentiated human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Ishkitiev, Nikolay; Yaegaki, Ken; Imai, Toshio; Tanaka, Tomoko; Fushimi, Naho; Mitev, Vanyo; Okada, Mio; Tominaga, Noriko; Ono, Sachie; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    The current definitive treatment for acute or chronic liver condition, that is, cirrhosis, is liver transplantation from a limited number of donors, which might cause complications after donation. Hence, bone marrow stem cell transplantation has been developed, but the risk of carcinogenesis remains. We have recently developed a protocol for hepatic differentiation of CD117(+) stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED). In the present study, we examine whether SHED hepatically differentiated (hd) in vitro could be used to treat acute liver injury (ALI) and secondary biliary cirrhosis. The CD117(+) cell fraction was magnetically separated from SHED and then differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. The cells were transplanted into rats with either ALI or induced secondary biliary cirrhosis. Engraftment of human liver cells was determined immunohistochemically and by in situ hybridization. Recovery of liver function was examined by means of histochemical and serological tests. Livers of transplanted animals were strongly positive for human immunohistochemical factors, and in situ hybridization confirmed engraftment of human hepatocytes. The tests for recovery of liver function confirmed the presence of human hepatic markers in the animals' blood serum and lack of fibrosis and functional integration of transplanted human cells into livers. No evidence of malignancy was found. We show that in vitro hdSHED engraft morphologically and functionally into the livers of rats having acute injury or secondary biliary cirrhosis. SHED are readily accessible adult stem cells, capable of proliferating in large numbers before differentiating in vitro. This makes SHED an appropriate and safe stem cell source for regenerative medicine. PMID:25234861

  11. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  12. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  13. Urinary enterolactone associated with liver enzyme levels in US adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Qunwei; Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Gu, Aihua

    2015-07-14

    Phyto-oestrogens are a family of plant-derived xeno-oestrogens that appear to have beneficial effects on human health. To date, no data are available about phyto-oestrogen consumption affecting liver health in a population. The present study aimed to explore the relationship of urinary phyto-oestrogen metabolites with serum liver enzymes in US adults. A nationally representative sample of US adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-10 was analysed. The cross-sectional study sample consisted of 6438 adults with data on urinary phyto-oestrogen levels, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and γ-glutamyl transaminase (GGT) concentrations and data on other potential confounders. Multivariate logistic regression and linear regression were applied to assess associations between urinary phyto-oestrogen levels and ALT, AST, ALP and GGT concentrations. We found a remarkable association between urinary enterolactone and GGT in both adult males (OR 0.37, 95 % CI 0.22, 0.61; P= 0.003) and females (OR 0.37, 95 % CI 0.26, 0.54; P= 0.009). Moreover, elevated enterolactone levels were inversely associated with ALT and AST levels in adult males. However, no association was present between levels of urinary daidzein, O-desmethylangolensin, equol, enterodiol or genistein with liver enzyme levels in this population. The present study results provide epidemiological evidence that urinary enterolactone levels are associated with liver GGT levels in humans. This suggests a potential protective effect of enterolactone on human liver function. However, the underlying mechanisms still need further investigation. PMID:25990984

  14. Differences in Liver Impairment Between Adults and Children with Dengue Infection.

    PubMed

    Martínez Vega, Rosario; Phumratanaprapin, Weerapong; Phonrat, Benjaluck; Dhitavat, Jittima; Sutherat, Maleerat; Choovichian, Vorada

    2016-05-01

    Dengue infection (DI) is a major vector-borne disease in southeast Asia and an important cause of morbidity. The complications such as hepatic impairment are common, and because the physiology of the liver differs between children and adults, the DI-associated liver impairments might be expected to differ as well. This study aims to compare the differences in liver impairment between adults and children with DI. We retrospectively studied 158 adults and 79 children with serologically confirmed DI admitted to the Bangkok Hospital for Tropical Diseases from 2008 to 2012. In total, 93% of adults and 87% of children exhibited abnormal liver enzyme levels during hospitalization. Overall, 76 (42.4%) adults and 16 (20.3%) children had dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Compared with children, adults with dengue fever (DF) presented a significantly higher incidence of liver function impairment (alanine transaminase [ALT] > 2 × upper limit of normal [ULN]) (47.1% versus 25.5%), hepatitis (ALT > 4 × ULN) (29.4% versus 12.8%), and severe hepatitis (aspartate transaminase [AST]/ALT > 10 × ULN) (16.5% versus 4.3%). Children with DHF showed a significantly higher incidence of liver function impairment due to AST derangement than did adults (100% versus 73%). There were no differences in the total bilirubin, albumin, or total protein levels between adults and children. Liver enzymes normalized significantly more slowly in adults, and AST recovery was faster than ALT. In conclusion, liver function impairment was more common among adults than children with DF. As the severity progressed to DHF, liver injury became more common in children. PMID:26976884

  15. Patterns and predictors of sexual function after liver donation: The Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort study.

    PubMed

    DiMartini, Andrea F; Dew, Mary Amanda; Butt, Zeeshan; Simpson, Mary Ann; Ladner, Daniela P; Smith, Abigail R; Hill-Callahan, Peg; Gillespie, Brenda W

    2015-05-01

    Although sexual functioning is an important facet of a living donor's quality of life, it has not received an extensive evaluation in this population. Using data from the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study, we examined donor sexual functioning across the donation process from the predonation evaluation to 3 months and 1 year after donation. Donors (n = 208) and a comparison group of nondonors (n = 155) completed self-reported surveys with specific questions on sexual desire, satisfaction, orgasm, and (for men) erectile function. Across the 3 time points, donor sexual functioning was lower at the evaluation phase and 3 months after donation versus 1 year after donation. In the early recovery period, abdominal pain was associated with difficulty reaching orgasm [odds ratio (OR), 3.98; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.30-12.16], concerns over appearance were associated with lower sexual desire (OR, 4.14; 95% CI, 1.02-16.79), and not feeling back to normal was associated with dissatisfaction with sexual life (OR, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.43-8.99). Efforts to educate donors before the surgery and prepare them for the early recovery phase may improve recovery and reduce distress regarding sexual functioning. PMID:25779554

  16. Immobilised monomers of human liver arginase.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, N; Martinez, J; Fernandez, M

    1977-03-15

    Human liver arginase (L-arginine amidinohydrolase, EC 3.5.3.1) was immobilised by attachment to nylon with glutaraldehyde as a crosslinking agent. Incubation of the immobilised tetrameric enzyme with EDTA followed by dialysis resulted in the dissociation of the enzyme into inactive matrix-bound and solubilised subunits. Both species recovered enzymatic activity after incubation with Mn2+, and the activity of the reactivated matrix-bound subunits was nearly 25% of that shown by the enzyme initially attached to the support in the tetrameric form. When the reactivated bound subunits were incubated with soluble subunits in the presence of Mn2+, they 'picked-up' from the solution an amount of protein and enzymatic activity almost identical to that initially lost by the immobilised tetramer after the dissociating treatment with EDTA. This occurred only in the presence of Mn2+. It is suggested that the reactivation of the subunits of arginase involves the initial formation of an active monomer, which then acquires a conformation that favours a reassociation to the tetrameric state. PMID:402942

  17. Expression of tmp21 in normal adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Yang, Yuan; Li, Jianbo; Hou, Jing; Xia, Kun; Song, Weihong; Liu, Shengchun

    2014-01-01

    TMP21, known as p23 protein, is one important member of the p24 protein families. The degradation of TMP21 is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as with the other presenilin-associated γ-secretase complex members. NFAT plays a very important role in regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. Compared with the function of TMP21, the studies about the distribution of this protein in human tissues are limited. We collected 19 normal adult human tissues from a healthy adult man died in a traffic accident and did examination of all the tissues collected for ICH, western blot and RT-PCR. It was shown that the expression of TMP21 is at high levels in heart, liver, lung, kidney and adrenal gland; moderate levels in brain, pancreas, prostate gland, testicle, small intestine, colon, stomach, gall bladder, thyroid gland and trachea; low levels in skeletal muscle, skin and lymphonodus. TMP21 is widely existed in normal adult human tissues. The current study provided for the first time a comprehensive expression of TMP21 in normal adult human tissues. It will benefit on helping in the design and interpretation of future studies focused on expounding the function of TMP21. PMID:25356171

  18. Collagen polymorphism in normal and cirrhotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, J M; Hutcheson, E T; Kang, A H

    1977-01-01

    Collagens in normal human liver and in alcoholic cirrhotic liver were investigated. Collagens were solubilized by limited proteolysis with pepsin under nondenaturing conditions, and after purification, were fractionated into types I and III by selective precipitation with NaCl. After carboxymethyl cellulose and agarose chromatography, the resulting alpha-chains from each of the collagen types were analyzed with respect to their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions. A comparison of the results obtained from normal liver with those from the diseases organ revealed no significant differences. The isolated human liver alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) chains were digested with CNBr and the generated peptides were separated and purified by a combination of ion-exchange and molecular sieve chromatography. The molecular weight and the amino acid and the carbohydrate compositions of each of the peptides were identical to those of the corresponding human skin peptides except for the slightly higher content of hydroxylysine in some of the peptides. The relative content of type III in relation to type I collagen in both normal anc cirrhotic liver was determined by digesting washed liver homogenates directly with CNBr and quantitating the resultant alpha1(I) and alpha 1(III) peptides after chromatographic separation. The relative quantities of these peptides indicated that normal human liver contained an average of 47% type III, with the remainder being type I. Cirrhotic liver, on the other hand, contained a significantly smaller proportion of type III, ranging from 18 to 34% in different samples, with a corresponding increase in type I. These findings indicate that although the amino acid and carbohydrate compositions of collagens deposited in cirrhotic liver are normal, the fibrotic process of alcoholic liver disease in humans is accompanied by an alteration in tissue collagen polymorphism, and suggest that the observed alterations may have pathogenetic implications. PMID:833273

  19. Feelings of living donors about adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Tomoko; Irie, Shinji; Ito, Naomi; Kazuma, Keiko

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the feelings of living donors about adult-to-adult liver transplantation. We interviewed 18 donors about their feelings before and after transplantation using semistructured interviews and then conducted a content analysis of their responses. Before transplantation, many donors reported that they wanted recipients to live for the donor or his or her family, and there was no one else to donate. Many donors were not anxious, did not feel coerced, and did not consider donation dangerous. Some reported being excited at facing a new experience. Some said they would not mind whatever happens. Others were anxious or unsure about the operation. Diagnostic testing and preoperative blood banking were painful. Donors experienced increasing stress just before the operation. After transplantation, some donors verbalized feeling more grateful to others and that they gained maturity. Throughout the process, donors were concerned about their recipients. Our results suggest that donors might act for themselves or their family. It is important to recognize the varied responses of donors' feelings toward liver transplant recipients. PMID:18708830

  20. Hepatocytic Differentiation Potential of Human Fetal Liver Mesenchymal Stem Cells: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hamidouche, Zahia; Sokal, Etienne; Charbord, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In line with the search of effective stem cell population that would progress liver cell therapy and because the rate and differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) decreases with age, the current study investigates the hepatogenic differentiation potential of human fetal liver MSCs (FL-MSCs). After isolation from 11-12 gestational weeks' human fetal livers, FL-MSCs were shown to express characteristic markers such as CD73, CD90, and CD146 and to display adipocytic and osteoblastic differentiation potential. Thereafter, we explored their hepatocytic differentiation potential using the hepatogenic protocol applied for adult human liver mesenchymal cells. FL-MSCs differentiated in this way displayed significant features of hepatocyte-like cells as demonstrated in vitro by the upregulated expression of specific hepatocytic markers and the induction of metabolic functions including CYP3A4 activity, indocyanine green uptake/release, and glucose 6-phosphatase activity. Following transplantation, naive and differentiated FL-MSC were engrafted into the hepatic parenchyma of newborn immunodeficient mice and differentiated in situ. Hence, FL-MSCs appeared to be interesting candidates to investigate the liver development at the mesenchymal compartment level. Standardization of their isolation, expansion, and differentiation may also support their use for liver cell-based therapy development. PMID:27057173

  1. Expression of nestin-GFP transgene marks oval cells in the adult liver

    PubMed Central

    Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Encinas, Juan M.; Mignone, John L.; Michurina, Tatyana; Rosenfeld, Michael G.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2009-01-01

    Oval cells which become apparent in the liver after chronic injury, serve as bi-potent progenitors for differentiated hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. We found that in the liver of adult transgenic mice in which expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is driven by regulatory elements of the nestin gene, the GFP signal marks a subpopulation of small epithelial cells which meet the criteria for oval cells, including morphology, localization, antigenic profile, and reactivity in response to injury. In the regenerating and developing liver we also found nestin-GFP-positive cells which express hepatocyte markers; such cells may correspond to transiently appearing differentiating progeny of oval cells. During development, GFP-expressing cells in the liver emerge relatively late, after the appearance of differentiated hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Our results suggest that nestin-GFP cells in the liver correspond to a specialized cell type whose primary function may be to serve as a reserve for adult liver epithelial cell types. PMID:16127706

  2. Constitutive modeling of human liver based on in vivo measurements.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Edoardo; Grau, Patrick; Hollenstein, Marc; Bajka, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In vivo aspiration experiments on human livers are analyzed and material parameters for a non-linear-viscoelastic constitutive model are determined. A novel procedure is applied for the inverse analysis that accounts for the initial tissue deformation in the experiment and for the non-homogeneity of liver tissue. A numerical model is used consisting of a surface layer (capsule) and an underlying non-linear-viscoelastic solid (parenchyma). The capsule is modeled as hyperelastic membrane using data from measurements on bovine and human tissue. In a two step optimization procedure the set of constitutive model parameters for the "average" response of liver parenchyma is obtained. The proposed model is in line with literature values of high strain rate elastic modulus obtained from dynamic elastography. The model can be used to predict the nonlinear, time dependent behavior of human liver in computer simulations related to surgery training and planning. PMID:18982669

  3. A microfluidically perfused three dimensional human liver model.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Knut; Steinborn, Sandra; Gröger, Marko; Ungerböck, Birgit; Jank, Anne-Marie; Ehgartner, Josef; Nietzsche, Sandor; Dinger, Julia; Kiehntopf, Michael; Funke, Harald; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Gärtner, Claudia; Mayr, Torsten; Bauer, Michael; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2015-12-01

    Within the liver, non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) are critically involved in the regulation of hepatocyte polarization and maintenance of metabolic function. We here report the establishment of a liver organoid that integrates NPCs in a vascular layer composed of endothelial cells and tissue macrophages and a hepatic layer comprising stellate cells co-cultured with hepatocytes. The three-dimensional liver organoid is embedded in a microfluidically perfused biochip that enables sufficient nutrition supply and resembles morphological aspects of the human liver sinusoid. It utilizes a suspended membrane as a cell substrate mimicking the space of Disse. Luminescence-based sensor spots were integrated into the chip to allow online measurement of cellular oxygen consumption. Application of microfluidic flow induces defined expression of ZO-1, transferrin, ASGPR-1 along with an increased expression of MRP-2 transporter protein within the liver organoids. Moreover, perfusion was accompanied by an increased hepatobiliary secretion of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein and an enhanced formation of hepatocyte microvilli. From this we conclude that the perfused liver organoid shares relevant morphological and functional characteristics with the human liver and represents a new in vitro research tool to study human hepatocellular physiology at the cellular level under conditions close to the physiological situation. PMID:26322723

  4. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Ho; Maratovich, Mussin Nadiar; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-06-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) is rare primary hepatic sarcoma and is known to occur in pediatric patients. This case is the UESL occurred in a 51-year old male patient. Multilocular cystic lesion was composed of primitive spindle cells without specific differentiation. This rare case would help to review differential diagnosis of primary sarcoma in liver and cystic neoplasm of the liver. PMID:27377912

  5. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Ho; Maratovich, Mussin Nadiar; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) is rare primary hepatic sarcoma and is known to occur in pediatric patients. This case is the UESL occurred in a 51-year old male patient. Multilocular cystic lesion was composed of primitive spindle cells without specific differentiation. This rare case would help to review differential diagnosis of primary sarcoma in liver and cystic neoplasm of the liver. PMID:27377912

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays a role in the regulation of liver and plasma lipid levels in adult male mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuqi; Garcia, Oscar A.; Wang, Rebecca F.; Stevenson, Mary C.; Threadgill, David W.; Russell, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Dsk5 mice have a gain of function in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), caused by a point mutation in the kinase domain. We analyzed the effect of this mutation on liver size, histology, and composition. We found that the livers of 12-wk-old male Dsk5 heterozygotes (+/Dsk5) were 62% heavier compared with those of wild-type controls (+/+). The livers of the +/Dsk5 mice compared with +/+ mice had larger hepatocytes with prominent, polyploid nuclei and showed modestly increased cell proliferation indices in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. An analysis of total protein, DNA, and RNA (expressed relative to liver weight) revealed no differences between the mutant and wild-type mice. However, the livers of the +/Dsk5 mice had more cholesterol but less phospholipid and fatty acid. Circulating cholesterol levels were twice as high in adult male +/Dsk5 mice but not in postweaned young male or female mice. The elevated total plasma cholesterol resulted mainly from an increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The +/Dsk5 adult mouse liver expressed markedly reduced protein levels of LDL receptor, no change in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, and a markedly increased fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase. Increased expression of transcription factors associated with enhanced cholesterol synthesis was also observed. Together, these findings suggest that the EGFR may play a regulatory role in hepatocyte proliferation and lipid metabolism in adult male mice, explaining why elevated levels of EGF or EGF-like peptides have been positively correlated to increased cholesterol levels in human studies. PMID:24407590

  7. In Vitro Modeling of Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lipeng; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been associated with a majority of liver diseases and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. In spite of being one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, currently, there are no effective strategies that can prevent or treat alcoholic liver disease (ALD), due to a lack of human-relevant research models. Recent success in generation of functionally active mature hepatocyte-like cells from human-induced pluripotent cells (iPSCs) enables us to better understand the effects of alcohol on liver functions. Here, we describe the method and effect of alcohol exposure on multistage hepatic cell types derived from human iPSCs, in an attempt to recapitulate the early stages of liver tissue injury associated with ALD. We exposed different stages of iPSC-induced hepatic cells to ethanol at a pathophysiological concentration. In addition to stage-specific molecular markers, we measured several key cellular parameters of hepatocyte injury, including apoptosis, proliferation, and lipid accumulation. PMID:25520290

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Liver Disease Forum 2010: Conference Proceedings

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Thomas, David L.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Liver disease continues to represent a critical mediator of morbidity and mortality in those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The frequent presence and overlap of concomitant injurious processes, including hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus infections, hepatoxicity associated with antiretroviral therapeutic agents, alcohol, and other toxins, in the setting of immunosuppression lead to rapid fibrotic progression and early development of end-stage liver disease. This conference summary describes the proceedings of a state-of-the-art gathering of international experts designed to highlight the status of current research in epidemiology, natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment of HIV and liver disease. PMID:21898501

  9. Deceased Donor Split Liver Transplantation In Adult Recipients: Is The Learning Curve Over?

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Ryan P.; Vakili, Khashayar; Fullington, Nora; Potanos, Kristina; Graham, Dionne A.; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.; Kim, Heung Bae

    2016-01-01

    Background Infants have the highest waitlist mortality of all liver transplant candidates. Deceased-donor split liver transplantation, a technique that provides both an adult and pediatric graft, may be the best way to decrease this disproportionate mortality. Yet concern for an increased risk to adult split recipients has discouraged its widespread adoption. We aimed to determine the current risk of graft failure in adult recipients following split liver transplantation. Study Design United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data from 62,190 first-time adult recipients of deceased-donor liver transplants (1995–2010) were analyzed (889 split grafts). Bivariate risk factors (p<0.2) were included in cox proportional hazards models of the effect of transplant type on graft failure. Results Split liver recipients had an over-all hazard-ratio (HR) of graft failure of 1.26 (p<.001) compared to whole liver recipients. The split liver HR was 1.45 (p<.001) in the pre-MELD era (1995–2002), and 1.10 (p=.28) in the MELD era (2002–2010). Interaction analyses suggested an increased risk of split graft failure in Status 1 recipients and those given an exception for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Excluding higher-risk recipients, split and whole grafts had similar outcomes (HR .94, p=.59). Conclusions The risk of graft failure is now similar between split and whole liver recipients in the vast majority of cases – demonstrating that the expansion of split liver allocation may be possible without increasing the overall risk of long-term graft failure in adult recipients. Further prospective analysis should examine if selection bias may account for the possible increase in risk for recipients with HCC or designated Status 1. PMID:23978530

  10. Liver-derived human mesenchymal stem cells: a novel therapeutic source for liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yini; Yu, Xiaopeng; Chen, Ermei; Li, Lanuan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent an attractive cell type for research and therapy due to their ability to proliferate, differentiate, modulate immune reactions, and secrete trophic factors. MSCs exist in a multitude of tissues, including bone marrow, umbilical cord, and adipose tissues. Moreover, MSCs have recently been isolated from the liver. Compared with other MSC types, liver-derived human MSCs (LHMSCs) possess general morphologies, immune functions, and differentiation capacities. Interestingly, LHMCSs produce higher levels of pro-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic cytokines than those of bone marrow-derived MSCs. Thus, these cells may be a promising therapeutic source for liver diseases. This paper summarizes the biological characteristics of LHMSCs and their potential benefits and risks for the treatment of liver diseases. PMID:27176654

  11. Functional Blood Progenitor Markers in Developing Human Liver Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Orit; Cohen, Idan; Gouon-Evans, Valerie

    2016-08-01

    In the early fetal liver, hematopoietic progenitors expand and mature together with hepatoblasts, the liver progenitors of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Previous analyses of human fetal livers indicated that both progenitors support each other's lineage maturation and curiously share some cell surface markers including CD34 and CD133. Using the human embryonic stem cell (hESC) system, we demonstrate that virtually all hESC-derived hepatoblast-like cells (Hep cells) transition through a progenitor stage expressing CD34 and CD133 as well as GATA2, an additional hematopoietic marker that has not previously been associated with human hepatoblast development. Dynamic expression patterns for CD34, CD133, and GATA2 in hepatoblasts were validated in human fetal livers collected from the first and second trimesters of gestation. Knockdown experiments demonstrate that each gene also functions to regulate hepatic fate mostly in a cell-autonomous fashion, revealing unprecedented roles of fetal hematopoietic progenitor markers in human liver progenitors. PMID:27509132

  12. Esterase detoxication of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors using human liver samples in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moser, Virginia C; Padilla, Stephanie

    2016-04-15

    Organophosphorus (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxication can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON1) are considered factors underlying age-related sensitivity differences. We used an in vitro system to measure detoxication of AChE-inhibiting pesticides mediated via these esterases. Recombinant human AChE was used as a bioassay of inhibitor concentration following incubation with detoxifying tissue: liver plus Ca(+2) (to stimulate PON1s, measuring activity of both esterases) or EGTA (to inhibit PON1s, thereby measuring CaE activity). AChE inhibitory concentrations of aldicarb, chlorpyrifos oxon, malaoxon, methamidophos, oxamyl, paraoxon, and methylparaoxon were incubated with liver homogenates from adult male rat or one of 20 commercially provided human (11-83 years of age) liver samples. Detoxication was defined as the difference in inhibition produced by the pesticide alone and inhibition measured in combination with liver plus Ca(+2) or liver plus EGTA. Generally, rat liver produced more detoxication than did the human samples. There were large detoxication differences across human samples for some pesticides (especially malaoxon, chlorpyrifos oxon) but not for others (e.g., aldicarb, methamidophos); for the most part these differences did not correlate with age or sex. Chlorpyrifos oxon was fully detoxified only in the presence of Ca(+2) in both rat and human livers. Detoxication of paraoxon and methylparaoxon in rat liver was greater with Ca(+2), but humans showed less differentiation than rats between Ca(+2) and EGTA conditions. This suggests the importance of PON1 detoxication for these three OPs in the rat, but mostly only for chlorpyrifos oxon in human samples. Malaoxon was detoxified similarly with Ca(+2) or EGTA, and the differences across humans correlated with metabolism of p

  13. Identification of CYP3A7 for Glyburide Metabolism in Human Fetal Livers

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Diana L.; Risler, Linda J.; Prasad, Bhagwat; Calamia, Justina C.; Voellinger, Jenna L.; Kelly, Edward J.; Unadkat, Jashvant D.; Hebert, Mary F.; Shen, Danny D.; Thummel, Kenneth E.; Mao, Qingcheng

    2014-01-01

    Glyburide is commonly prescribed for the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus; however, fetal exposure to glyburide is not well understood and may have short- and long-term consequences for the health of the child. Glyburide can cross the placenta; fetal concentrations at term are nearly comparable to maternal levels. Whether or not glyburide is metabolized in the fetus and by what mechanisms has yet to be determined. In this study, we determined the kinetic parameters for glyburide depletion by CYP3A isoenzymes; characterized glyburide metabolism by human fetal liver tissues collected during the first or early second trimester of pregnancy; and identified the major enzyme responsible for glyburide metabolism in human fetal livers. CYP3A4 had the highest metabolic capacity towards glyburide, followed by CYP3A7 and CYP3A5 (Clint,u = 37.1, 13.0, and 8.7 ml/min/nmol P450, respectively). M5 was the predominant metabolite generated by CYP3A7 and human fetal liver microsomes (HFLMs) with approximately 96% relative abundance. M5 was also the dominant metabolite generated by CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and adult liver microsomes; however, M1-M4 were also present, with up to 15% relative abundance. CYP3A7 protein levels in HFLMs were highly correlated with glyburide Clint, 16α-OH DHEA formation, and 4′-OH midazolam formation. Likewise, glyburide Clint was highly correlated with 16α-OH DHEA formation. Fetal demographics as well as CYP3A5 and CYP3A7 genotype did not alter CYP3A7 protein levels or glyburide Clint. These results indicate that human fetal livers metabolize glyburide predominantly to M5 and that CYP3A7 is the major enzyme responsible for glyburide metabolism in human fetal livers. PMID:25450675

  14. Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protects human hepatocytes against apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ilowski, Maren; Kleespies, Axel; Toni, Enrico N. de; Donabauer, Barbara; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hengstler, Jan G.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALR decreases cytochrome c release from mitochondria. {yields} ALR protects hepatocytes against apoptosis induction by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. {yields} ALR exerts a liver-specific anti-apoptotic effect. {yields} A possible medical usage of ALR regarding protection of liver cells during apoptosis inducing therapies. -- Abstract: Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is known to support liver regeneration and to stimulate proliferation of hepatocytes. However, it is not known if ALR exerts anti-apoptotic effects in human hepatocytes and whether this protective effect is cell type specific. This is relevant, because compounds that protect the liver against apoptosis without undesired effects, such as protection of metastatic tumour cells, would be appreciated in several clinical settings. Primary human hepatocytes (phH) and organotypic cancer cell lines were exposed to different concentrations of apoptosis inducers (ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta}, actinomycin D) and cultured with or without recombinant human ALR (rhALR). Apoptosis was evaluated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and by FACS with propidium iodide (PI) staining. ALR significantly decreased apoptosis induced by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. Further, the anti-apoptotic effect of ALR was observed in primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells but not in bronchial (BC1), colonic (SW480), gastric (GC1) and pancreatic (L3.6PL) cell lines. Therefore, the hepatotrophic growth factor ALR acts in a liver specific manner with regards to both its mitogenic and its anti-apoptotic effect. Unlike the growth factors HGF and EGF, rhALR acts in a liver specific manner. Therefore, ALR is a promising candidate for further evaluation as a possible hepatoprotective factor in clinical settings.

  15. Comparison of human liver and small intestinal glutathione S-transferase-catalyzed busulfan conjugation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, J P; Yang, J S; Slattery, J T

    1998-01-01

    The apparent oral clearance of busulfan has been observed to vary as much as 10-fold in the population of children and adults receiving high-dose busulfan. The only identified elimination pathway for busulfan involves glutathione conjugation. The reaction is predominantly catalyzed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1-1, which is present in both liver and intestine. The purpose of this study was to compare busulfan Vmax/Km in cytosol prepared from adult human liver and small intestine. Tetrahydrothiophenium ion formation rate per milligram of cytosolic protein was constant along the length (assessed in 30-cm segments) of three individual small intestines. A 30-cm-long intestinal segment 90-180 cm from the pylorus was chosen to be representative of intestinal cytosolic busulfan conjugating activity. Busulfan Vmax/Km (mean +/- SD) in cytosol prepared from 23 livers and 12 small intestines was 0.166 +/- 0.066 and 0.176 +/- 0.085 microl/min/mg cytosolic protein, respectively, in incubations with 5 microM busulfan, 1 mM glutathione, and 2 mg of cytosolic protein. The relative content of GSTalpha (A1-1, A1-2, and A2-2) was compared for human liver and intestinal cytosol using Western blot. The levels of GSTalpha in liver and intestinal cytosol were 1.12 +/- 0.56 and 1.36 +/- 0.32 integrated optimal density units/5 microg cytosolic protein, respectively. Busulfan conjugation in vitro was comparable per milligram of cytosolic protein in liver and intestinal cytosol. PMID:9443852

  16. Downregulation of Sulfotransferase Expression and Activity in Diseased Human Livers

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Emine B.; More, Vijay; Neira, Karissa L.; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J.; Slitt, Angela L.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfotransferase (SULT) function has been well studied in healthy human subjects by quantifying mRNA and protein expression and determining enzyme activity with probe substrates. However, it is not well known if sulfotransferase activity changes in metabolic and liver disease, such as diabetes, steatosis, or cirrhosis. Sulfotransferases have significant roles in the regulation of hormones and excretion of xenobiotics. In the present study of normal subjects with nonfatty livers and patients with steatosis, diabetic cirrhosis, and alcoholic cirrhosis, we sought to determine SULT1A1, SULT2A1, SULT1E1, and SULT1A3 activity and mRNA and protein expression in human liver tissue. In general, sulfotransferase activity decreased significantly with severity of liver disease from steatosis to cirrhosis. Specifically, SULT1A1 and SULT1A3 activities were lower in disease states relative to nonfatty tissues. Alcoholic cirrhotic tissues further contained lower SULT1A1 and 1A3 activities than those affected by either of the two other disease states. SULT2A1, on the other hand, was only reduced in alcoholic cirrhotic tissues. SULT1E1 was reduced both in diabetic cirrhosis and in alcoholic cirrhosis tissues, relative to nonfatty liver tissues. In conclusion, the reduced levels of sulfotransferase expression and activity in diseased versus nondiseased liver tissue may alter the metabolism and disposition of xenobiotics and affect homeostasis of endobiotic sulfotransferase substrates. PMID:23775849

  17. Scar formation and lack of regeneration in adult and neonatal liver after stromal injury.

    PubMed

    Masuzaki, Ryota; Zhao, Sophia R; Csizmadia, Eva; Yannas, Ioannis; Karp, Seth J

    2013-01-01

    Known as a uniquely regenerative tissue, the liver shows a remarkable capacity to heal without scarring after many types of acute injury. In contrast, during chronic liver disease, the liver responds with fibrosis, which can progress to cirrhosis and ultimately liver failure. The cause of this shift from a nonfibrotic to a fibrotic response is unknown. We hypothesized that stromal injury is a key event that prevents restoration of normal liver architecture. To test this, we developed a model of stromal injury using a surgical incision through the normal liver in adult and neonatal mice. This injury produces minimal cell death but locally complete stromal (extracellular matrix) disruption. The adult liver responds with inflammation and stellate cell activation, culminating in fibrosis characterized by collagen deposition. This sequence of events is remarkably similar to the fibrotic response leading to cirrhosis. Studies in neonates reveal a similar fibrotic response to a stromal injury. These findings suggest that extracellular matrix disruption leads not to regeneration but rather to scar, similar to other mammalian organs. These findings may shed light on the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease, and suggest therapeutic strategies. PMID:23228176

  18. Liver transplantation for a giant mesenchymal hamartoma of the liver in an adult: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang; Cai, Jin-Zhen; Guo, Qing-Jun; Li, Jun-Jie; Sun, Xiao-Ye; Hu, Zhan-Dong; Cooper, David KC; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal hamartomas of the liver (MHLs) in adults are rare and potentially premalignant lesions, which present as solid/cystic neoplasms. We report a rare case of orthotopic liver transplantation in a patient with a giant MHL. In 2013, a 34-year-old female sought medical advice after a 2-year history of progressive abdominal distention and respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed an extensive mass in the abdomen. Computed tomography (CT) of her abdomen revealed multiple liver cysts, with the diameter of largest cyst being 16 cm × 14 cm. The liver hilar structures were not clearly displayed. The adjacent organs were compressed and displaced. Initial laboratory tests, including biochemical investigations and coagulation profile, were unremarkable. Tumor markers, including levels of AFP, CEA and CA19-9, were within the normal ranges. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation in November 2013, the liver being procured from a 40-year-old man after cardiac death following traumatic brain injury. Warm ischemic time was 7.5 min and cold ischemic time was 3 h. The recipient underwent classical orthotopic liver transplantation. The recipient operative procedure took 8.5 h, the anhepatic phase lasting for 1 h without the use of venovenous bypass. The immunosuppressive regimen included intraoperative induction with basiliximab and high-dose methylprednisolone, and postoperative maintenance with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. The recipient’s diseased liver weighed 21 kg (dry weight) and measured 41 cm × 32 cm × 31 cm. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of an MHL. The patient did not experience any acute rejection episode or other complication. All the laboratory tests returned to normal within one month after surgery. Three months after transplantation, the immunosuppressive therapy was reduced to tacrolimus monotherapy, and the T-tube was removed after cholangiography showed no abnormalities. Twelve months

  19. Liver transplantation for a giant mesenchymal hamartoma of the liver in an adult: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Cai, Jin-Zhen; Guo, Qing-Jun; Li, Jun-Jie; Sun, Xiao-Ye; Hu, Zhan-Dong; Cooper, David K C; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-05-28

    Mesenchymal hamartomas of the liver (MHLs) in adults are rare and potentially premalignant lesions, which present as solid/cystic neoplasms. We report a rare case of orthotopic liver transplantation in a patient with a giant MHL. In 2013, a 34-year-old female sought medical advice after a 2-year history of progressive abdominal distention and respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed an extensive mass in the abdomen. Computed tomography (CT) of her abdomen revealed multiple liver cysts, with the diameter of largest cyst being 16 cm × 14 cm. The liver hilar structures were not clearly displayed. The adjacent organs were compressed and displaced. Initial laboratory tests, including biochemical investigations and coagulation profile, were unremarkable. Tumor markers, including levels of AFP, CEA and CA19-9, were within the normal ranges. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation in November 2013, the liver being procured from a 40-year-old man after cardiac death following traumatic brain injury. Warm ischemic time was 7.5 min and cold ischemic time was 3 h. The recipient underwent classical orthotopic liver transplantation. The recipient operative procedure took 8.5 h, the anhepatic phase lasting for 1 h without the use of venovenous bypass. The immunosuppressive regimen included intraoperative induction with basiliximab and high-dose methylprednisolone, and postoperative maintenance with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. The recipient's diseased liver weighed 21 kg (dry weight) and measured 41 cm × 32 cm × 31 cm. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of an MHL. The patient did not experience any acute rejection episode or other complication. All the laboratory tests returned to normal within one month after surgery. Three months after transplantation, the immunosuppressive therapy was reduced to tacrolimus monotherapy, and the T-tube was removed after cholangiography showed no abnormalities. Twelve months

  20. Adult mouse model of early hepatocellular carcinoma promoted by alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Aditya; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Gyongyosi, Benedek; Lowe, Patrick; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a mouse model of alcohol-driven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that develops in livers with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). METHODS: Adult C57BL/6 male mice received multiple doses of chemical carcinogen diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) followed by 7 wk of 4% Lieber-DeCarli diet. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and liver Cyp2e1 were assessed. Expression of F4/80, CD68 for macrophages and Ly6G, MPO, E-selectin for neutrophils was measured. Macrophage polarization was determined by IL-1β/iNOS (M1) and Arg-1/IL-10/CD163/CD206 (M2) expression. Liver steatosis and fibrosis were measured by oil-red-O and Sirius red staining respectively. HCC development was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging, confirmed by histology. Cellular proliferation was assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). RESULTS: Alcohol-DEN mice showed higher ALTs than pair fed-DEN mice throughout the alcohol feeding without weight gain. Alcohol feeding resulted in increased ALT, liver steatosis and inflammation compared to pair-fed controls. Alcohol-DEN mice had reduced steatosis and increased fibrosis indicating advanced liver disease. Molecular characterization showed highest levels of both neutrophil and macrophage markers in alcohol-DEN livers. Importantly, M2 macrophages were predominantly higher in alcohol-DEN livers. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased numbers of intrahepatic cysts and liver histology confirmed the presence of early HCC in alcohol-DEN mice compared to all other groups. This correlated with increased serum alpha-fetoprotein, a marker of HCC, in alcohol-DEN mice. PCNA immunostaining revealed significantly increased hepatocyte proliferation in livers from alcohol-DEN compared to pair fed-DEN or alcohol-fed mice. CONCLUSION: We describe a new 12-wk HCC model in adult mice that develops in livers with alcoholic hepatitis and defines ALD as co-factor in HCC. PMID:27122661

  1. A study of the awareness of chronic liver diseases among Korean adults

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Dae Won; Cho, Yong Kyun; Lee, Chang Hyeong; Kim, Seok Hyun; Eun, Jong Ryul

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic liver disease is closely associated with lifestyle, and public enlightenment of the lifestyle factors is important in reducing prevalence of chronic liver disease. The KASL (Korean Association for the Study of the Liver) conducted a survey of basic information and epidemiological data regarding chronic liver diseases. Methods A survey of chronic liver disease involving a total of 2,794 respondents was conducted. The respondents included patients and their guardians, visitors for health check-ups, and online pollees who completed a questionnaire on the awareness of fatty liver or chronic liver disease. Results Of the entire cohort, 854 (39.7%) said they have had or still have fatty liver or an elevated transaminase level (>40 IU/L), but only 23.4% of the respondents had visited a hospital. It was found that 35% of healthy subjects and 45% of patients and their guardians misunderstood hepatitis B as the hereditary disesase. Furthermore, 26% of the subjects responded that patients with inactive hepatitis B do not require regular follow-up. While 17.9% answered that it is not too late to test for liver cancer when symptoms arise, 38.8% believed that liver transplant in liver cancer patients has a low success rate and is thus not recommended. Conclusions Despite the inundation of information and widespread media advertising, the awareness of chronic liver disease is unsatisfactory among Korean adults. Systematic nationwide studies are needed to obtain data and information regarding the prevalence of chronic liver disease and patterns of use of the health-care system. PMID:21757980

  2. Liver transplantation with preservation of the inferior vena cava in case of symptomatic adult polycystic disease.

    PubMed

    Lerut, Jan; Ciccarelli, Olga; Rutgers, Matthieu; Orlando, Giuseppe; Mathijs, Jules; Danse, Etienne; Goffin, Eric; Gigot, Jean-François; Goffette, Pierre

    2005-05-01

    Adult polycystic liver disease (APLD) is a rare disorder of the liver parenchyma, the treatment of which is still controversial. Conservative surgery may have a significant morbidity and is often ineffective in the long run. Liver replacement may be indicated in case of incapacitating hepatomegaly. Patients (one male, five females) undergoing liver transplantation for symptomatic APLD is presented in this study. The particular nature of this series is the fact that successful transplantation was performed in all cases with preservation of the recipient's inferior vena cava and without use of veno-venous bypass despite massive hepatomegaly and previous extensive liver surgery (in three cases). There was minimal morbidity and no mortality. All patients have excellent quality of life with a median follow-up of 41 months (range: 12-58) as testified by a median Karnofsky score of 90% (range: 80-100%). PMID:15819798

  3. Production of Factor VIII by Human Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Transplanted in Immunodeficient uPA Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fomin, Marina E.; Zhou, Yanchen; Beyer, Ashley I.; Publicover, Jean; Baron, Jody L.; Muench, Marcus O.

    2013-01-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) form a semi-permeable barrier between parenchymal hepatocytes and the blood. LSECs participate in liver metabolism, clearance of pathological agents, immunological responses, architectural maintenance of the liver and synthesis of growth factors and cytokines. LSECs also play an important role in coagulation through the synthesis of Factor VIII (FVIII). Herein, we phenotypically define human LSECs isolated from fetal liver using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Isolated LSECs were cultured and shown to express endothelial markers and markers specific for the LSEC lineage. LSECs were also shown to engraft the liver when human fetal liver cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice with liver specific expression of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) transgene (uPA-NOG mice). Engrafted cells expressed human Factor VIII at levels approaching those found in human plasma. We also demonstrate engraftment of adult LSECs, as well as hepatocytes, transplanted into uPA-NOG mice. We propose that overexpression of uPA provides beneficial conditions for LSEC engraftment due to elevated expression of the angiogenic cytokine, vascular endothelial growth factor. This work provides a detailed characterization of human midgestation LSECs, thereby providing the means for their purification and culture based on their expression of CD14 and CD32 as well as a lack of CD45 expression. The uPA-NOG mouse is shown to be a permissive host for human LSECs and adult hepatocytes, but not fetal hepatoblasts. Thus, these mice provide a useful model system to study these cell types in vivo. Demonstration of human FVIII production by transplanted LSECs encourages further pursuit of LSEC transplantation as a cellular therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A. PMID:24167566

  4. The mesenchymal transcription factor SNAI-1 instructs human liver specification.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Orit; Valdes, Victor Julian; Ezhkova, Elena; Gouon-Evans, Valerie

    2016-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) are processes required for embryo organogenesis. Liver develops from the epithelial foregut endoderm from which the liver progenitors, hepatoblasts, are specified. The migrating hepatoblasts acquire a mesenchymal phenotype to form the liver bud. In mid-gestation, hepatoblasts mature into epithelial structures: the hepatocyte cords and biliary ducts. While EMT has been associated with liver bud formation, nothing is known about its contribution to hepatic specification. We previously established an efficient protocol from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to generate hepatic cells (Hep cells) resembling the hepatoblasts expressing alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and albumin (ALB). Here we show that Hep cells express both epithelial (EpCAM and E-cadherin) and mesenchymal (vimentin and SNAI-1) markers. Similar epithelial and mesenchymal hepatoblasts were identified in human and mouse fetal livers, suggesting a conserved interspecies phenotype. Knock-down experiments demonstrated the importance of SNAI-1 in Hep cell hepatic specification. Moreover, ChIP assays revealed direct binding of SNAI-1 in the promoters of AFP and ALB genes consistent with its transcriptional activator function in hepatic specification. Altogether, our hESC-derived Hep cell cultures reveal the dual mesenchymal and epithelial phenotype of hepatoblast-like cells and support the unexpected transcriptional activator role of SNAI-1 in hepatic specification. PMID:27240252

  5. Outcomes of adult living donor liver transplantation: comparison of the Adult-to-adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study and the national experience.

    PubMed

    Olthoff, Kim M; Abecassis, Michael M; Emond, Jean C; Kam, Igal; Merion, Robert M; Gillespie, Brenda W; Tong, Lan

    2011-07-01

    The study objectives were to determine whether the findings of the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL) reflect the U.S. national experience and to define risk factors for patient mortality and graft loss in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). A2ALL previously identified risk factors for mortality after LDLT, which included early center experience, older recipient age, and longer cold ischemia time. LDLT procedures at 9 A2ALL centers (n = 702) and 67 non-A2ALL centers (n = 1664) from January 1998 through December 2007 in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients database were analyzed. Potential predictors of time from transplantation to death or graft failure were tested using Cox regression. No significant difference in overall mortality between A2ALL and non-A2ALL centers was found. Higher hazard ratios (HRs) were associated with donor age (HR = 1.13 per 10 years, P = 0.0002), recipient age (HR = 1.20 per 10 years, P = 0.0003), serum creatinine levels (HR = 1.52 per loge unit increase, P < 0.0001), hepatocellular carcinoma (HR = 2.12, P<0.0001) or hepatitis C virus (HR = 1.18, P = 0.026), intensive care unit stay (HR = 2.52, P< 0.0001) or hospitalization (HR = 1.62, P < 0.0001) versus home, earlier center experience (LDLT case number 15: HR = 1.61, P < 0.0001, and a cold ischemia time >4.5 hours (HR = 1.79, P = 0.0006). Except for center experience, risk factor effects between A2ALL and non-A2ALL centers were not significantly different. Variables associated with graft loss were identified and showed similar trends. In conclusion, mortality and graft loss risk factors were similar in A2ALL and non-A2ALL centers. These analyses demonstrate that findings from the A2ALL consortium are relevant to other centers in the U.S. performing LDLT, and conclusions and recommendations from A2ALL may help to guide clinical decision making. PMID:21360649

  6. Biomechanical response of human liver in tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; Santago, Anthony C; Stitzel, Joel D; Sparks, Jessica L; Duma, Stefan M

    2010-01-01

    Motor vehicle collisions commonly result in serious life threatening liver injuries. Although finite element models are becoming an integral tool in the reduction of automotive related liver injuries, the establishment of accurate material models and tissue level tolerance values is critical for accurate injury risk assessment. This study presents a total of 51 tension tests performed on human liver parenchyma at various loading rates in order to characterize the viscoelastic and failure properties of human liver. Standard dog-bone coupons were obtained from fresh human livers and tested within 48 hours of death. Each coupon was tested once to failure at one of four loading rates (0.008 s(-1), 0.089 s(-1), 0.871 s(-1), and 9.477 s(-1)) to investigate the effects of rate dependence. Load and acceleration data were obtained from each of the specimen grips. High-speed video and optical markers placed on the specimens were used to measure local displacement. Failure stress and strain were calculated at the location of failure in the gage length of the coupon. The results of the study showed that liver parenchyma is rate dependent, with higher rate tests giving higher failure stresses and lower failure strains. The failure strains for all tests ranged from 11% to 54% and the failure stresses ranged from 7 kPa to 95 kPa. This study provides novel biomechanical data that can be used in the development of both rate dependent material models and tissue level tolerance values critical for the validation of finite element models used to assess injury risk in automobile collisions. PMID:21050588

  7. Biomechanical Response of Human Liver in Tensile Loading

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Andrew R.; Santago, Anthony C.; Stitzel, Joel D.; Sparks, Jessica L.; Duma, Stefan M.

    2010-01-01

    Motor vehicle collisions commonly result in serious life threatening liver injuries. Although finite element models are becoming an integral tool in the reduction of automotive related liver injuries, the establishment of accurate material models and tissue level tolerance values is critical for accurate injury risk assessment. This study presents a total of 51 tension tests performed on human liver parenchyma at various loading rates in order to characterize the viscoelastic and failure properties of human liver. Standard dog-bone coupons were obtained from fresh human livers and tested within 48 hours of death. Each coupon was tested once to failure at one of four loading rates (0.008 s–1, 0.089 s–1, 0.871 s–1, and 9.477 s–1) to investigate the effects of rate dependence. Load and acceleration data were obtained from each of the specimen grips. High-speed video and optical markers placed on the specimens were used to measure local displacement. Failure stress and strain were calculated at the location of failure in the gage length of the coupon. The results of the study showed that liver parenchyma is rate dependent, with higher rate tests giving higher failure stresses and lower failure strains. The failure strains for all tests ranged from 11% to 54% and the failure stresses ranged from 7 kPa to 95 kPa. This study provides novel biomechanical data that can be used in the development of both rate dependent material models and tissue level tolerance values critical for the validation of finite element models used to assess injury risk in automobile collisions. PMID:21050588

  8. Fetal Liver Bisphenol A Concentrations and Biotransformation Gene Expression Reveal Variable Exposure and Altered Capacity for Metabolism in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Muna S.; Liao, Chunyang; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Dolinoy, Dana C.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread exposure to the endocrine active compound, bisphenol A (BPA), is well documented in humans. A growing body of literature suggests adverse health outcomes associated with varying ranges of exposure to BPA. In the current study, we measured the internal dose of free BPA and conjugated BPA and evaluated gene expression of bio-transformation enzymes specific for BPA metabolism in 50 first- and second-trimester human fetal liver samples. Both free BPA and conjugated BPA concentrations varied widely, with free BPA exhibiting three times higher concentrations than conjugated BPA concentrations. As compared to gender-matched adult liver controls, UDP-glucuronyltransferase, sulfotransferase, and steroid sulfatase genes exhibited reduced expression whereas β-glucuronidase mRNA expression remained unchanged in the fetal tissues. This study provides evidence that there is considerable exposure to BPA during human pregnancy and that the capacity for BPA metabolism is altered in the human fetal liver. PMID:23208979

  9. Age-related changes in microRNA expression and pharmacogenes in human liver

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Kimberly S.; Philips, Santosh; Benson, Eric A.; Desta, Zeruesenay; Gaedigk, Andrea; Gaedigk, Roger; Segar, Matthew W.; Liu, Yunlong; Skaar, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental changes in the liver can significantly impact drug disposition. Due to the emergence of microRNAs (miRNAs) as important regulators of drug disposition gene expression, we studied age-dependent changes in miRNA expression. Expression of 533 miRNAs was measured in 90 human liver tissues (fetal, pediatric (1-17 years), and adult (28-80 years); n=30 each). 114 miRNAs were upregulated and 72 were downregulated from fetal to pediatric, and 2 and 3, respectively, from pediatric to adult. Among the developmentally changing miRNAs, 99 miRNA-mRNA interactions were predicted or experimentally validated (e.g. hsamiR-125b-5p-CYP1A1; hsa-miR-34a-5p-HNF4A). In human liver samples (n=10 each), analyzed by RNA-sequencing, significant negative correlations were observed between the expression of >1000 miRNAs and mRNAs of drug disposition and regulatory genes. Our data suggest a mechanism for the marked changes in hepatic gene expression between the fetal and pediatric developmental periods, and support a role for these age-dependent miRNAs in regulating drug disposition. PMID:25968989

  10. The usefulness of hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the diagnosis of complications after adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Seung; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Sung Gyu; Lee, Young Joo; Park, Kwang Min; Hwang, Shin; Lee, Hee Kyung

    2002-04-01

    Living donor liver transplantation has become an accepted procedure to overcome the shortage of adult donor organs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the diagnosis of complications after adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation. We analysed 82 hepatobiliary scintigraphy studies performed using technetium-99m DISIDA in 60 adult patients (44 males, 16 females) who had been transplanted with a living donor's hepatic lobe (right lobe, 32; left lobe, 28). Indications for hepatobiliary scintigraphy were abnormal symptoms and/or liver function tests ( n=54) or suspected bile leak or biloma ( n=28). Median interval between transplantation and scintigraphy was 69 days (9 days to 23 months). Scintigraphic findings were classified into hepatic parenchymal dysfunction, total biliary obstruction, segmental biliary obstruction, bile leak and normal graft. Scintigraphic findings were confirmed by liver biopsy in 17 cases, and by radiological and clinical follow-up in 65 cases. There were 29 events relating to biliary complications (six total biliary obstructions, eight segmental biliary obstructions and 15 bile leaks) and 19 relating to non-biliary complications (15 cases of rejection, two of infection and two of vascular compromise) in 38 patients. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy provided the correct diagnosis in all eight segmental and five of six total biliary obstructions, and in all 15 cases of bile leak. Of the 19 non-biliary complications, 16 showed parenchymal dysfunction regardless of the aetiology and three showed total biliary obstruction on scintigraphy. All but three of 34 normally functioning grafts were normal on scintigraphy. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of scintigraphy for biliary obstruction in the 54 patients with abnormal symptoms or liver function tests were 93% (100% for segmental, 83% for total) and 88% (35/40), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity were each 100% (15/15, 13

  11. Human Liver Transplantation As A Model To Study HCV Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael G.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a leading etiology of liver cancer and cause for liver transplantation. Although new therapies have improved the rates of sustained response, a large proportion of patients (~50%) fail to respond to antiviral treatment, thus remaining at risk for disease progression. While chimpanzees have been used to study HCV biology and treatments, their cost is quite high and their use is strictly regulated; indeed, the NIH no longer supports the breeding of chimpanzees for study. The development of HCV therapies has been hindered by the relative paucity of small animal models to study HCV pathogenesis. This review presents the strengths of the human liver transplant, highlighting the advances derived from this model, including insights into viral kinetics and quasispecies, viral receptor binding and entry, innate and adaptive immunity. Moreover, consideration is made of current and emerging antiviral therapeutic approaches based on translational research results. PMID:19877210

  12. Cellular localization of type I III and IV procollagen gene transcripts in normal and fibrotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Milani, S.; Herbst, H.; Schuppan, D.; Surrenti, C.; Riecken, E. O.; Stein, H.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have determined the cell types producing alpha 1 (I), alpha 2 (I), alpha 1 (III), and alpha 1 (IV) procollagen gene transcripts in adult human liver by in situ hybridization with [35S]-labeled RNA probes. The liver specimens comprised a total of 20 biopsies with normal histology and biopsies with fibrosis or cirrhosis at different clinical stages and of heterogeneous origins. In normal liver, procollagen type I, III, and IV transcripts were detected in stromal and vascular mesenchymal cells of portal tracts and central veins, as well as in some perisinusoidal cells of the lobule. In fibrotic liver, increased levels of these procollagen mRNAs were observed in the same locations, and particularly enhanced in stromal cells of fibrotic septa and portal tracts, as well as in perisinusoidal cells. Expression of alpha 1 (IV) procollagen RNA was additionally found in some vascular endothelial and bile duct epithelial cells. Although previously suggested as the major source of liver collagens, hepatocytes showed no significant procollagen transcript levels in any of our samples. Thus, procollagen synthesis does not appear to be a function of hepatocytes, but rather of mesenchymal, endothelial, and bile duct epithelial cells in adult human liver. These findings may have implications for the development of specifically targeted antifibrotic therapies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2372043

  13. Serum from patients with hepatitis E virus-related acute liver failure induces human liver cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    WU, FAN; WANG, MINXIN; TIAN, DEYING

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute liver failure has not been fully elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of the serum from patients with hepatitis E virus (HEV)-related acute liver failure on human liver cell survival and apoptosis, and evaluated the protective effects of anti-lipopolysaccharide(LPS) antibody recognizing core polysaccharide against acute liver failure serum-induced apoptosis. Serum was collected from patients with HEV-related acute liver failure. The levels of endotoxin (LPS) in the serum were measured using a quantitative tachypleus amebocyte lysate endotoxin detection kit with a chromogenic endpoint. Serum with a mean concentration of LPS was incubated with L02 human liver cells and the rate of apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. The apoptotic rate was also evaluated in liver cells incubated with antibody and the HEV-related acute liver failure serum. The results indicated that the concentration of LPS in the serum of patients with HEV-related acute liver failure was 0.26±0.02 EU/ml, which was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). The rate of apoptosis in the human liver cells induced by acute liver failure serum was 5.83±0.42%, which was significantly increased compared with that in the cells treated with the serum of healthy individuals (P<0.05). The apoptotic rate of the cells incubated with antibody and the acute liver failure serum was 5.53±0.51%, which was lower than that of the cells incubated with acute liver failure serum alone (P>0.05). These results indicate that the serum of patients with HEV-related acute liver failure induces the apoptosis of human liver cells. LPS may be directly involved in the apoptosis of human liver cells. Moreover, the presence of the antibody did not significantly reduce the level of apoptosis of liver cells exposed to HEV-related acute liver failure serum. PMID:24348810

  14. Is severe progressive liver disease caused by alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency more common in children or adults?

    PubMed

    Chu, Andrew S; Chopra, Kapil B; Perlmutter, David H

    2016-07-01

    The classical form of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is known to cause liver disease in children and adults, but there is relatively little information about the risk of severe, progressive liver disease and the need for liver transplantation. To better understand how newly evolving pharmacological, genetic, and cellular therapies may be targeted according to risk for progressive liver disease, we sought to determine the age distribution of A1ATD as a cause of severe liver disease, as defined by the need for liver transplantation. Using 3 US liver transplantation databases for the period 1991-2012, we found 77.2% of 1677 liver transplants with a reported diagnosis of A1ATD were adults. The peak age range was 50-64 years. Using 2 of the databases which included specific A1AT phenotypes, we found that many of these adults who undergo liver transplantation with A1ATD as the diagnosis are heterozygotes and have other potential causes of liver disease, most notably obesity and ethanol abuse. However, even when these cases are excluded and only ZZ and SZ phenotypes are considered, severe liver disease requiring transplantation is more than 2.5 times as likely in adults. The analysis also showed a markedly increased risk for males. In the pediatric group, almost all of the transplants are done in children less than 5 years of age. In conclusion, A1ATD causes progressive liver disease most commonly in adults with males in the highest risk category. In the pediatric group, children less than 5 years of age are highest in risk. These results suggest that A1ATD most commonly causes liver disease by mechanisms similar to age-dependent degenerative diseases and more rarely in children by powerful modifiers. Liver Transplantation 22 886-894 2016 AASLD. PMID:26946192

  15. A novel immunoradiometric assay for human liver ferritin.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shawi, A; Dawnay, A; Landon, J

    1983-01-01

    Rivanol, the cationic salt of an acridine base, has been used as a novel separation procedure in an immunoradiometric assay for human liver ferritin. The separation step is based on the differences in charge and molecular weight between the labelled antibody-ferritin complex and free labelled immunoglobulins. The resultant assay is simple, reproducible and sufficiently sensitive to determine serum concentrations of ferritin. PMID:6403597

  16. Acquisition and use of human in vitro liver preparations.

    PubMed

    Guillouzo, A

    1995-08-01

    Human in vitro liver preparations-i.e., slices, hepatocyte suspensions, primary hepatocyte cultures and microsomes-are increasingly used in the drug development process. The main applications are prediction of drug metabolite profiles, drug-drug interactions and toxicity. The use of these in vitro models is limited, however, because of their erratic availability, the absence of validated protocols and the difficulties of extrapolation of in vitro data to the in vivo situation. PMID:8564642

  17. Cloning and expression of special F protein from human liver

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-Ye; Yu, Xin-Da; Song, Chun-Juan; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Shi, Xin-Rong; Duan, Ying; Zhang, Ju

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To clone human liver special F protein and to express it in a prokaryotic system. METHODS: Total RNA was isolated from human liver tissue and first-strand cDNA was reverse transcribed using the PCR reverse primer. Following this, cDNA of the F protein was ligated into the clone vector pUCm-T. The segment of F protein’s cDNA was subcloned into the expression vector pET-15b and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) pLyss. Isopropy-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) was then used to induce expression of the target protein. RESULTS: The cDNA clone of human liver special F protein (1134bp) was successfully produced, with the cDNA sequence being published in Gene-bank: DQ188836. We confirmed the expression of F protein by Western blot with a molecular weight of 43 kDa. The expressed protein accounted for 40% of the total protein extracted. CONCLUSION: F protein expresses cDNA clone in a prokaryotic system, which offers a relatively simple way of producing sufficient quantities of F protein and contributes to understanding the principal biological functions of this protein. PMID:17465469

  18. Unique multipotent cells in adult human mesenchymal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Kitada, Masaaki; Wakao, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kouki; Tanimura, Yukihiro; Makinoshima, Hideki; Goda, Makoto; Akashi, Hideo; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Niwa, Akira; Shigemoto, Taeko; Nabeshima, Yoko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Dezawa, Mari

    2010-01-01

    We found adult human stem cells that can generate, from a single cell, cells with the characteristics of the three germ layers. The cells are stress-tolerant and can be isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells, or directly from bone marrow aspirates. These cells can self-renew; form characteristic cell clusters in suspension culture that express a set of genes associated with pluripotency; and can differentiate into endodermal, ectodermal, and mesodermal cells both in vitro and in vivo. When transplanted into immunodeficient mice by local or i.v. injection, the cells integrated into damaged skin, muscle, or liver and differentiated into cytokeratin 14-, dystrophin-, or albumin-positive cells in the respective tissues. Furthermore, they can be efficiently isolated as SSEA-3(+) cells. Unlike authentic ES cells, their proliferation activity is not very high and they do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mouse testes. Thus, nontumorigenic stem cells with the ability to generate the multiple cell types of the three germ layers can be obtained through easily accessible adult human mesenchymal cells without introducing exogenous genes. These unique cells will be beneficial for cell-based therapy and biomedical research. PMID:20421459

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Liver Disease Forum 2012

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Thomas, David; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    In the U.S. more than 1.1 million individuals are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These patients exhibit a high frequency of coinfections with other hepatotropic viruses and ongoing fibrosis leading to cirrhosis and liver-related mortality. The etiologies of liver disease include viral hepatitis coinfections, drug-related hepatotoxicity, fatty liver disease, and direct and indirect effects from HIV infection including increased bacterial translocation, immune activation, and presence of soluble proteins that modulate the hepatic cytokine environment. New treatments for HCV using direct acting agents appear viable, though issues related to intrinsic toxicities and drug:drug interactions remain. Recent research suggests that acute HCV infection, unrecognized hepatitis D infection, and hepatitis E may all represent emergent areas of concern. Antiretroviral agents, including those used in past years may represent risk factors for hepatic injury and portal hypertension. Key issues in the future include systematic implementation of liver disease management and new treatment in HIV-infected populations with concomitant injection drug use, alcohol use, and low socioeconomic status. PMID:23904401

  20. Role of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Agarwal, Kosh

    2015-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality amongst human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, drug-induced hepatotoxicity related to combined anti-retro-viral therapy, alcohol related liver disease and non-alcohol related fatty liver disease appear to be the leading causes. It is therefore, anticipated that more HIV-positive patients with ESLD will present as potential transplant candidates. HIV infection is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation. Key transplantation outcomes such as rejection and infection rates as well as medium term graft and patient survival match those seen in the non-HIV infected patients in the absence of co-existing HCV infection. HIV disease does not seem to be negatively impacted by transplantation. However, HIV-HCV co-infection transplant outcomes remain suboptimal due to recurrence. In this article, we review the key challenges faced by this patient cohort in the pre- and post-transplant period. PMID:26604639

  1. Changes in liver and spleen volumes after living liver donation: A report from the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL)

    PubMed Central

    Emond, Jean C.; Fisher, Robert A.; Everson, Gregory; Samstein, Benjamin; Pomposelli, James J.; Zhao, Binsheng; Forney, Sarah; Olthoff, Kim M.; Baker, Talia B.; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Merion, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have drawn attention to persistently decreased platelet counts among liver donors. We hypothesized an etiologic association between altered platelet counts and post-donation splenomegaly and sought to explore this relationship. This study analyzed de-identified CT/MR scans of 388 donors from 9 A2ALL centers read at a central computational image analysis lab. Resulting liver and spleen volumes were correlated with time-matched clinical lab values. Pre-donation liver volumes varied twofold in healthy subjects, even when normalized by body surface area (BSA) (range: 522 – 1887cc/m2, N=346). At 3 months post-donation liver volumes were, on average, 79% of pre-donation volumes (IQR: 73-86%, N=165) and approached 88% at 1 year (IQR: 80-93%, N=75). The mean spleen volume pre-donation was 245 cc (N=346). Spleen volumes greater than 100% of pre-donation volume occurred in 92% of donors at 3 months (N=165) and 88% at 1 year post-donation (N=75). We sought to develop a standard spleen volume (SSV) model to predict “normal” spleen volumes in donors pre-donation and found that decreased platelet counts, younger age, higher pre-donation liver volume, higher hemoglobin and higher BSA predicted a larger spleen volume (N=344, R2=0.52). When applied to post-donation values some large volumes were under predicted by the SSV model. Models developed on the reduced sample of post-donation volumes yielded smaller under-predictions. These findings confirm previous observations of thrombocytopenia associated with splenomegaly post-donation. The results of the SSV model suggest the biology of this phenomenon is complex. This merits further long term mechanistic studies of liver donors with investigation into the role of other factors such as thrombopoietin, and exposure to viral infections to better understand the evolution of spleen volume after liver donation. PMID:25488878

  2. In vitro biotransformation of tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) in human liver and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Eede, Nele; Erratico, Claudio; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Maho, Walid; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-04-15

    Tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) is a plasticizer present in indoor dust, reaching levels of several micrograms per gram. Such levels could lead to significant daily exposure of adults and children. Currently, no toxicokinetic data are available to estimate TBOEP clearance in humans after uptake and therefore, one objective of this study was to investigate intrinsic clearance of TBOEP by human liver microsome (HLM) and serum enzymes. Another objective was to generate information to identify and prioritize several metabolites of TBOEP for investigation of human exposure by biomonitoring. 1D and 2D-NMR methodologies were successfully applied on a mixture of the metabolites to confirm the structure of 3-HO-TBOEP (bis(2-butoxyethyl) 3-hydroxyl-2-butoxyethyl phosphate) and to tentatively assign structures to 1-HO-TBOEP and 2-HO-TBOEP. HO-TBOEP isomers and bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (BBOEP), bis(2-butoxyethyl) hydroxyethyl phosphate (BBOEHEP) were further monitored by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Rates of formation of BBOEHEP and HO-TBOEP metabolites by liver enzymes were best described by the Michaelis–Menten model. Apparent K{sub m} values for BBOEHEP, 3-HO-TBOEP, and sum of 1- and 2-HO-TBOEP isomer formation were 152, 197 and 148 μM, respectively. Apparent V{sub max} values for the formation of BBOEHEP, 3-HO-TBOEP, and the sum of 1- and 2-HO-TBOEP isomers were 2560, 643, and 254 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. No detectable formation of BBOEP occurred with liver or serum enzymes. Our findings indicate that intrinsic clearance of TBOEP is mainly catalyzed by oxidative enzymes in the liver and that its major in vitro metabolite is BBOEHEP. These findings can be applied in human biomonitoring studies and risk assessment. - Highlights: • First steps in the elucidation of TBOEP toxicokinetics • Quantification of TBOEP metabolites in human serum and liver microsomes • No detectable formation of BBOEP occurred with liver or serum

  3. Uptake and cytotoxicity of chitosan nanoparticles in human liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Jing Wen; Yeoh, George; Saunders, Martin; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2010-12-01

    Despite extensive research into the biomedical and pharmaceutical applications of nanoparticles, and the liver being the main detoxifying organ in the human body, there are limited studies which delineate the hepatotoxicity of nanoparticles. This paper reports on the biological interactions between liver cells and chitosan nanoparticles, which have been widely recognised as biocompatible. Using the MTT assay, human liver cells were shown to tolerate up to 4 h of exposure to 0.5% w/v of chitosan nanoparticles (18 {+-} 1 nm, 7.5 {+-} 1.0 mV in culture medium). At nanoparticle concentrations above 0.5% w/v, cell membrane integrity was compromised as evidenced by leakage of alanine transaminase into the extracellular milieu, and there was a dose-dependent increase in CYP3A4 enzyme activity. Uptake of chitosan nanoparticles into the cell nucleus was observed by confocal microscopic analysis after 4 h exposure with 1% w/v of chitosan nanoparticles. Electron micrographs further suggest necrotic or autophagic cell death, possibly caused by cell membrane damage and resultant enzyme leakage.

  4. Cultures of human liver cells in simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoffe, B.; Darlington, G. J.; Soriano, H. E.; Krishnan, B.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; Khaoustov, V. I.

    1999-01-01

    We used microgravity-simulated bioreactors that create the unique environment of low shear force and high-mass transfer to establish long-term cultures of primary human liver cells (HLC). To assess the feasibility of establishing HLC cultures, human liver cells obtained either from cells dissociated by collagenase perfusion or minced tissues were cultured in rotating vessels. Formation of multidimensional tissue-like spheroids (up to 1.0 cm) comprised of hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells that arranged as bile duct-like structures along newly formed vascular sprouts were observed. Electron microscopy revealed clusters of round hepatocytes and bile canaliculi with multiple microvilli and tight junctions. Scanning EM revealed rounded hepatocytes that were organized in tight clusters surrounded by a complex mesh of extracellular matrix. Also, we observed that co-culture of hepatocytes with endothelial cells stimulate albumin mRNA expression. In summary, a simulated microgravity environment is conducive for the establishment of long-term HLC cultures and allows the dissection of the mechanism of liver regeneration and cell-to-cell interactions that resembles in vivo conditions.

  5. Quantitative analysis of miRNA expression in seven human foetal and adult organs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanping; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Lijie; Ingvarsson, Sigurdur; Chen, Huiping

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs have been found to repress gene expression at posttranscriptional level in cells. Studies have shown that expression of miRNAs is tissue-specific and developmental-stage-specific. The mechanism behind this could be explained by miRNA pathways. In this study, totally 54 miRNAs were analysed in 7 matched human foetal and adult organs (brain, colon, heart, kidney, liver, lung and spleen) using real-time PCR. Quantitative analysis showed that a big proportion of the 54 miRNAs have higher general expression in the organs of the foetal period than the adult period, with the exception of the heart. The miRNA gene promoter methylation level in the adult stages was higher than in the foetal stages. Moreover, there is a high general expression level of several miRNAs in both stages of brain, kidney, liver, lung and spleen, but not seen in colon and heart. Our results indicate that the miRNAs may play a bigger role in the foetal stage than the adult stage of brain, colon, kidney, liver, lung and spleen. The majority of the miRNAs analysed may play an important role in the growth and development of brain, kidney, liver, lung and spleen. However, a minority of the miRNAs may be functional in colon and heart. PMID:22194897

  6. Serial volumetric assessment of large for size liver grafts after whole cadaveric liver transplant in adults: do large liver grafts shrink in size?

    PubMed Central

    Bekheit, Mohamed; Rajakannu, Muthukumarassamy; Bucur, Petru; Adam, Rene; SaCunha, Antonio; Castaing, Denis; Cherqui, Daniel; Vibert, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background After whole graft orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), adaptation of the large grafts' volume to recipient weight is widely accepted despite the paucity of evidence on this subject. Methods Thirty nine patients with GRWR > 2.5% were included in this study and subsequently divided into two groups with 3 ≥ GRWR > 3%. Patients had CT scans at three predetermined time points after OLT used for measuring the liver volume. The objective of this study is to evaluate the volumetric changes of whole large liver grafts after adult OLT. Results At LT, the mean graft recipient body weight ratio (GRWR) was 3.1 ± 0.4%. The mean liver weight was 1881 ± 68 g at LT, 2014 ± 99 ml at one week, 1725 ± 126 ml at 3 months, and 1632 ± 117 (ml) at >6 months. There is an initial increase at 1 week after LT and a subsequent decrease of liver volume on later measurements. None of the late volume measurements were significantly different from the initial graft volume at liver transplant in pair wise comparisons ANOVA repeated measures (p > 0.05). Similarly, the mean GRWR did not change significantly between the initial calculation at transplantation date and the subsequent measurements during the different study time points (F = 0.04, p = 0.96) with a mean of 3.1% (95% CI = 2.2–4.2). AUC ROC discriminated a cutoff of 3% for the initial GRWR above which grafts tend to decrease in size over time (c statistics = 0.74, p = 0.036). In a Clustered ANOVA repeated measures, there was no significant difference in the changes of liver volume between both groups. However, patients with GRWR > 3 showed a trend towards a latent reduction in volume over the tracing period. There was a tendency, but none significant; towards a higher bilirubin, AST, ALT levels over the first postoperative days in recipients with GRWR > 3. Conclusion Large grafts do not significantly decrease in size. Nonetheless, grafts weighing >3% of the GRWR show a different trend

  7. Comparison of tetrodotoxin uptake and gene expression in the liver between juvenile and adult tiger pufferfish, Takifugu rubripes.

    PubMed

    Kiriake, Aya; Ohta, Akira; Suga, Emi; Matsumoto, Takuya; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Marine pufferfish of the family Tetraodontidae accumulate high levels of tetrodotoxin (TTX). The profile of TTX accumulation is reported to differ between tiger pufferfish Takifugu rubripes juveniles and adults administered TTX. Adults mainly accumulate TTX in liver, while juveniles transfer TTX from the liver to the skin. In the present study, we investigated TTX uptake into liver tissue slices of T. rubripes juveniles (4-month-old) and adults (18-month-old) in an in vitro incubation experiment, and compared their differential gene expression profiles in the liver by suppression subtracted hybridization (SSH). The tissue culture experiment revealed that TTX uptake in the liver itself was indistinguishable between the juveniles and the adults. In SSH analysis, a total of 176 clones were upregulated in the juvenile liver, the majority of which comprised hemoglobin subunit alpha-2-like gene (53 clones), hemoglobin subunit beta-like gene (40 clones), and type-4 ice-structuring protein LS-12-like gene (20 clones). A total of 211 clones were upregulated in the adult liver, including serotransferrin-like gene (84 clones), fibrinogen beta chain-like gene (15 clones), and 14 kDa apolipoprotein gene (10 clones). Based on these and previous findings on genes related to TTX intoxication in pufferfish, serotransferrin-like gene, complement C3-like gene, water-temperature-acclimation-related-65 kDa-protein-like gene, and chymotrypsin elastase family member 2A-like gene appear to be involved in TTX toxification of the T. rubripes liver. PMID:26708657

  8. Radionuclide imaging of the liver in human fascioliasis

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, J.V.; Bermudez, R.H.

    1984-08-01

    The clinical, laboratory, and scintigraphic findings in four cases of human fascioliasis are described. Acute onset of fever, abdominal pain, and weight loss in a person who has ingested watercress constitutes the clinical syndrome often seen. Eosinophilia and alteration in liver function tests, particularly alkaline phosphatase are frequent. Tc-99m sulfur colloid images showed hepatomegaly in four patients, focal defects in two, splenomegaly in three, and increased splenic uptake in two. Gallium citrate (Ga 67) images show increased uptake in the focal lesions in two of two. Sonographic imaging showed focal lucent abnormality in one of three. Liver biopsy findings were nonspecific. The differential diagnosis from other invasive parasitic diseases is discussed. A possible role of hepatic imaging in the evaluation of fascioliasis is suggested.

  9. The role of C/EBP-α expression in human liver and liver fibrosis and its relationship with autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Li-Li; Zhai, Yin-Zhen; Ding, Di; Yin, Wei-Hua; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Yu, Guang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the expression of CCAAT enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBP-α) in normal human liver and liver fibrosis and its probable association with autophagy. Methods: Double label immunohistochemistry was used to detect the location of C/EBP-α in hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The expression of C/EBP-α, Atg5, and Atg6 was also evaluated by immunohistochemistry in paraffin sections of human liver. HSC-T6 cells were treated with rapamycin and 3-methyladenine (3MA) to induce or inhibit autophagy, and the expression of C/EBP-α protein was detected by Western blotting. Results: Double label immunohistochemistry showed that C/EBP-α was predominantly located in hepatocytes and that its expression was significantly decreased in fibrosis compared with normal liver. Atg5 expression was increased in fibrosis but was located primarily in liver septa and peri-vascular areas, which was consistent with the distribution of HSCs. In contrast, Atg6 was not expressed in normal or fibrotic liver. Treatment of HSC-T6 cells in culture with rapamycin or 3MA decreased or increased C/EBP-α expression, respectively, as shown by Western blotting. Conclusion: C/EBP-α was primarily expressed in hepatocytes in normal liver, but its expression decreased significantly in liver fibrosis. Autophagy might play a role in liver fibrosis through its association with C/EBP-α, but this hypothesis warrants further investigation. PMID:26722507

  10. Anti-hepatitis C virus potency of a new autophagy inhibitor using human liver slices model

    PubMed Central

    Lagaye, Sylvie; Brun, Sonia; Gaston, Jesintha; Shen, Hong; Stranska, Ruzena; Camus, Claire; Dubray, Clarisse; Rousseau, Géraldine; Massault, Pierre-Philippe; Courcambeck, Jerôme; Bassisi, Firas; Halfon, Philippe; Pol, Stanislas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antiviral potency of a new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antiviral agent targeting the cellular autophagy machinery. METHODS: Non-infected liver slices, obtained from human liver resection and cut in 350 μm-thick slices (2.7 × 106 cells per slice) were infected with cell culture-grown HCV Con1b/C3 supernatant (multiplicity of infection = 0.1) cultivated for up to ten days. HCV infected slices were treated at day 4 post-infection with GNS-396 for 6 d at different concentrations. HCV replication was evaluated by strand-specific real-time quantitative reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. The infectivity titers of supernatants were evaluated by foci formation upon inoculation into naive Huh-7.5.1 cells. The cytotoxic effect of the drugs was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase leakage assays. RESULTS: The antiviral efficacy of a new antiviral drug, GNS-396, an autophagy inhibitor, on HCV infection of adult human liver slices was evidenced in a dose-dependent manner. At day 6 post-treatment, GNS-396 EC50 was 158 nmol/L without cytotoxic effect (compared to hydroxychloroquine EC50 = 1.17 μmol/L). CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated that our ex vivo model is efficient for evaluation the potency of autophagy inhibitors, in particular a new quinoline derivative GNS-396 as antiviral could inhibit HCV infection in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxic effect. PMID:27478540

  11. Cell therapy for the diseased liver: from stem cell biology to novel models for hepatotropic human pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Brezillon, Nicolas; Kremsdorf, Dina; Weiss, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    It has long been known that hepatocytes possess the potential to replicate through many cell generations because regeneration can be achieved in rodents after serial two-thirds hepatectomy. It has taken considerable time and effort to harness this potential, with liver regeneration models involving hepatocyte transplantation developing over the past 15 years. This review will describe the experiments that have established the models and methodology for liver repopulation, and the use of cells other than adult hepatocytes in liver repopulation, including hepatic cell lines and hematopoietic, cord blood, hepatic and embryonic stem cells. Emphasis will be placed on the characteristics of the models and how they can influence the outcome of the experiments. Finally, an account of the development of murine models that are competent to accept human hepatocytes is provided. In these models, liver deficiencies are induced in immunodeficient mice, where healthy human cells have a selective advantage. These mice with humanized livers provide a powerful new experimental tool for the study of human hepatotropic pathogens. PMID:19048074

  12. Comparison of the Phenotype and Approach to Pediatric vs Adult Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Valerio; Alisi, Anna; Newton, Kimberly P; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B

    2016-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the main chronic noncommunicable diseases in Westernized societies; its worldwide prevalence has doubled during the last 20 years. NAFLD has serious health implications not only for adults, but also for children. However, pediatric NAFLD is not only an important global problem in itself, but it is likely to be associated with increases in comorbidities, such as metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. There are several differences between NAFLD in children and adults, and it is not clear whether the disease observed in children is the initial phase of a process that progresses with age. The increasing prevalence of pediatric NAFLD has serious implications for the future adult population requiring appropriate action. Studies of NAFLD progression, pathogenesis, and management should evaluate disease phenotypes in children and follow these over the patient's lifetime. We review the similarities and differences of NAFLD between children and adults. PMID:27003600

  13. The 14-day repeated dose liver micronucleus test with methapyrilene hydrochloride using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenji; Ochi, Akimu; Koda, Akira; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Doi, Takaaki

    2015-03-01

    The repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect genotoxic hepatocarcinogens that can be integrated into a general toxicity study. The assay methods were thoroughly validated by 19 Japanese facilities. Methapyrilene hydrochloride (MP), known to be a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, was examined in the present study. MP was dosed orally at 10, 30 and 100mg/kg/day to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats daily for 14 days. Treatment with MP resulted in an increase in micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) with a dosage of only 100mg/kg/day. At this dose level, cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell growth was noted in the liver. These findings suggest that MP may induce clastogenic effects indirectly on the liver or hepatotoxicity of MP followed by regeneration may cause increase in spontaneous incidence of MNHEPs. PMID:24768639

  14. 3-Tesla MRI Response to TACE in HCC (Liver Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Stage A Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Stage B Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC)

  15. Child-to-Adult Liver Transplantation With Donation After Cardiac Death Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liangshuo; Liu, Xuemin; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Liang; Sha, Huanchen; Zhou, Ying; Tian, Min; Shi, Jianhua; Wang, Wanli; Liu, Chang; Guo, Kun; Lv, Yi; Wang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Development of organ transplantation is restricted by the discrepancy between the lack of donors and increasing number of patients. The outcome of pediatric donors transplanted into adult recipients especially with donation after circulatory death (DCD) pattern has not been well studied. The aim of this paper is to describe our experience of 3 successful DCD donor child-to-adult liver transplantations lately. Three DCD donors were separately 7, 5, and 8 years old. The ratio between donor graft weight and recipient body weight was 1.42%, 1.00%, and 1.33%, respectively. Ratio between the volume of donor liver and the expected liver volume was 0.65, 0.46, and 0.60. Splenectomy was undertaken for the second recipient according to the portal vein pressure (PVP) which was observed during the operation. Two out of 3 of the recipients suffered with acute kidney injury and got recovered after renal replacement therapy. The first recipient also went through early allograft dysfunction and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The hospital course of the third recipient was uneventful. After 1 year of follow-up visit, the first and second recipients maintain good quality of life and liver function. The third patient was followed up for 5 months until now and recovered well. DCD child-to-adult liver transplantation should only be used for comparatively matched donor and recipient. PVP should be monitored during the operation. The short-term efficacy is good, but long-term follow-up and clinical study with large sample evaluation are still needed. PMID:26886643

  16. Different sensitivity of PPARalpha gene expression to nutritional changes in liver of suckling and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Panadero, Maribel; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2005-01-14

    The amount of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) protein was markedly augmented in the liver of suckling rats compared to adult rats. This different PPARalpha abundance was used to study the sensitivity to nutritional changes in the expression and activity of this receptor. Thus, 10-day-old and adult rats were orally given either glucose, Intralipid or a combination of both diets, and liver mRNA levels of PPARalpha and the PPAR related genes, acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and plasma metabolites were measured. In neonates, the expression of PPARalpha and ACO was seen to increase when the level of FFA in plasma was also high, unless an elevated level of insulin was also present. However, this fatty acid-induced effect was not detected in adult rats. On the contrary, the hepatic expression of PEPCK was modulated by the nutritional changes similarly in both neonates and adult rats. Thus, it may be concluded that the expression of the PPARalpha gene in adult rats seems to be less sensitive to nutritional changes than in neonates. PMID:15607334

  17. Concealed expansion of immature precursors underpins acute burst of adult HSC activity in foetal liver.

    PubMed

    Rybtsov, Stanislav; Ivanovs, Andrejs; Zhao, Suling; Medvinsky, Alexander

    2016-04-15

    One day prior to mass emergence of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the foetal liver at E12.5, the embryo contains only a few definitive HSCs. It is thought that the burst of HSC activity in the foetal liver is underpinned by rapid maturation of immature embryonic precursors of definitive HSCs, termed pre-HSCs. However, because pre-HSCs are not detectable by direct transplantations into adult irradiated recipients, the size and growth of this population, which represents the embryonic rudiment of the adult haematopoietic system, remains uncertain. Using a novel quantitative assay, we demonstrate that from E9.5 the pre-HSC pool undergoes dramatic growth in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region and by E11.5 reaches the size that matches the number of definitive HSCs in the E12.5 foetal liver. Thus, this study provides for the first time a quantitative basis for our understanding of how the large population of definitive HSCs emerges in the foetal liver. PMID:27095492

  18. Concealed expansion of immature precursors underpins acute burst of adult HSC activity in foetal liver

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovs, Andrejs; Zhao, Suling; Medvinsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    One day prior to mass emergence of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the foetal liver at E12.5, the embryo contains only a few definitive HSCs. It is thought that the burst of HSC activity in the foetal liver is underpinned by rapid maturation of immature embryonic precursors of definitive HSCs, termed pre-HSCs. However, because pre-HSCs are not detectable by direct transplantations into adult irradiated recipients, the size and growth of this population, which represents the embryonic rudiment of the adult haematopoietic system, remains uncertain. Using a novel quantitative assay, we demonstrate that from E9.5 the pre-HSC pool undergoes dramatic growth in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region and by E11.5 reaches the size that matches the number of definitive HSCs in the E12.5 foetal liver. Thus, this study provides for the first time a quantitative basis for our understanding of how the large population of definitive HSCs emerges in the foetal liver. PMID:27095492

  19. A Monte Carlo approach to assessing 147Pm in the liver of the adult phantom.

    PubMed

    Bhati, S

    1993-06-01

    A low-background phoswich detector is used to detect small amounts of 147Pm--a pure beta-emitting nuclide--present in the liver of an occupational worker. The assessment was based on the measurement of bremsstrahlung radiation produced by the beta particles in the tissue. Computer programs based on Monte Carlo techniques for photon transport have been developed to calculate the response of an external phoswich detector to 1) a 147Pm point source embedded in tissue-equivalent slabs of various thicknesses; and 2) various source distributions of 147Pm in the liver of an adult phantom. The goal is to theoretically calibrate the phoswich detector for each source distribution and to study the variation of maxima of the spectra with the depth of the source in the adult phantom liver and tissue-equivalent slabs. The initial bremsstrahlung photon distribution of 147Pm in water has been computed using Wyard's and Pratt's methods. These calculations have been compared with experimental measurements using Perspex acrylic sheet slabs. Good agreements have been noted when the initial bremsstrahlung spectrum is obtained by using Wyard's method. These results find applications in monitoring the liver burdens in occupational workers handling 147Pm-based radioluminous paints. PMID:8491620

  20. The frequency of multipotent CD133(+)CD45RA(-)CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells is not increased in fetal liver compared with adult stem cell sources.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Stefan; Haworth, Kevin G; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2016-06-01

    The cell surface marker CD133 has been used to describe a revised model of adult human hematopoiesis, with hematopoietic stem cells and multipotent progenitors (HSCs/MPPs: CD133(+)CD45RA(-)CD34(+)) giving rise to lymphomyeloid-primed progenitors (LMPPs: CD133(+)CD45RA(+)CD34(+)) and erythromyeloid progenitors (EMPs: CD133(low)CD45RA(-)CD34(+)). Because adult and fetal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) differ in their gene expression profile, differentiation capabilities, and cell surface marker expression, we were interested in whether the reported segregation of lineage potentials in adult human hematopoiesis would also apply to human fetal liver. CD133 expression was easily detected in human fetal liver cells, and the defined hematopoietic subpopulations were similar to those found for adult HSPCs. Fetal HSPCs were enriched for EMPs and HSCs/MPPs, which were primed toward erythromyeloid differentiation. However, the frequency of multipotent CD133(+)CD45RA(-)CD34(+) HSPCs was much lower than previously reported and comparable to that of umbilical cord blood. We noted that engraftment in NSG (NOD scid gamma [NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ]) mice was driven mostly by LMPPs, confirming recent findings that repopulation in mice is not a unique feature of multipotent HSCs/MPPs. Thus, our data challenge the general assumption that human fetal liver contains a greater percentage of multipotent HSCs/MPPs than any adult HSC source, and the mouse model may have to be re-evaluated with respect to the type of readout it provides. PMID:27016273

  1. Sexually Dimorphic Patterns of Episomal rAAV Genome Persistence in the Adult Mouse Liver and Correlation With Hepatocellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Dane, Allison P; Cunningham, Sharon C; Graf, Nicole S; Alexander, Ian E

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors (rAAVs) show exceptional promise for liver-targeted gene therapy, with phenotype correction in small and large animal disease models being reported with increasing frequency. Success in humans, however, remains a considerable challenge that demands greater understanding of host–vector interactions, notably those governing the efficiency of initial gene transfer and subsequent long-term persistence of gene expression. In this study, we examined long-term enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genome persistence in the mouse liver after rAAV2/8-mediated gene transfer in early adulthood. Two intriguing findings emerged of considerable scientific and clinical interest. First, adult female and male mice showed distinctly different patterns of persistence of eGFP expression across the hepatic lobule after exhibiting similar patterns initially. Female mice retained a predominantly perivenous pattern of expression, whereas male mice underwent inversion of this pattern with preferential loss of perivenous expression and relative retention of periportal expression. Second, these changing patterns of expression correlated with sexually dimorphic patterns of genome persistence that appear linked both spatially and temporally to underlying hepatocellular proliferation. Observation of the equivalent phenomenon in man could have significant implications for the long-term therapeutic efficacy of rAAV-mediated gene transfer, particularly in the context of correction of liver functions showing metabolic zonation. PMID:19568224

  2. Human Liver Infection in a Dish: Easy-To-Build 3D Liver Models for Studying Microbial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Debora B.; Faust, Daniela M.; Tolle, Matthieu; Rivière, Lise; Valentin, Tanguy; Neuveut, Christine; Hernandez-Cuevas, Nora; Dufour, Alexandre; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Guillen, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Human liver infection is a major cause of death worldwide, but fundamental studies on infectious diseases affecting humans have been hampered by the lack of robust experimental models that accurately reproduce pathogen-host interactions in an environment relevant for the human disease. In the case of liver infection, one consequence of this absence of relevant models is a lack of understanding of how pathogens cross the sinusoidal endothelial barrier and parenchyma. To fill that gap we elaborated human 3D liver in vitro models, composed of human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and Huh-7 hepatoma cells as hepatocyte model, layered in a structure mimicking the hepatic sinusoid, which enable studies of key features of early steps of hepatic infection. Built with established cell lines and scaffold, these models provide a reproducible and easy-to-build cell culture approach of reduced complexity compared to animal models, while preserving higher physiological relevance compared to standard 2D systems. For proof-of-principle we challenged the models with two hepatotropic pathogens: the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica and hepatitis B virus (HBV). We constructed four distinct setups dedicated to investigating specific aspects of hepatic invasion: 1) pathogen 3D migration towards hepatocytes, 2) hepatocyte barrier crossing, 3) LSEC and subsequent hepatocyte crossing, and 4) quantification of human hepatic virus replication (HBV). Our methods comprise automated quantification of E. histolytica migration and hepatic cells layer crossing in the 3D liver models. Moreover, replication of HBV virus occurs in our virus infection 3D liver model, indicating that routine in vitro assays using HBV or others viruses can be performed in this easy-to-build but more physiological hepatic environment. These results illustrate that our new 3D liver infection models are simple but effective, enabling new investigations on infectious disease mechanisms. The better

  3. Human Liver Infection in a Dish: Easy-To-Build 3D Liver Models for Studying Microbial Infection.

    PubMed

    Petropolis, Debora B; Faust, Daniela M; Tolle, Matthieu; Rivière, Lise; Valentin, Tanguy; Neuveut, Christine; Hernandez-Cuevas, Nora; Dufour, Alexandre; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Guillen, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Human liver infection is a major cause of death worldwide, but fundamental studies on infectious diseases affecting humans have been hampered by the lack of robust experimental models that accurately reproduce pathogen-host interactions in an environment relevant for the human disease. In the case of liver infection, one consequence of this absence of relevant models is a lack of understanding of how pathogens cross the sinusoidal endothelial barrier and parenchyma. To fill that gap we elaborated human 3D liver in vitro models, composed of human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and Huh-7 hepatoma cells as hepatocyte model, layered in a structure mimicking the hepatic sinusoid, which enable studies of key features of early steps of hepatic infection. Built with established cell lines and scaffold, these models provide a reproducible and easy-to-build cell culture approach of reduced complexity compared to animal models, while preserving higher physiological relevance compared to standard 2D systems. For proof-of-principle we challenged the models with two hepatotropic pathogens: the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica and hepatitis B virus (HBV). We constructed four distinct setups dedicated to investigating specific aspects of hepatic invasion: 1) pathogen 3D migration towards hepatocytes, 2) hepatocyte barrier crossing, 3) LSEC and subsequent hepatocyte crossing, and 4) quantification of human hepatic virus replication (HBV). Our methods comprise automated quantification of E. histolytica migration and hepatic cells layer crossing in the 3D liver models. Moreover, replication of HBV virus occurs in our virus infection 3D liver model, indicating that routine in vitro assays using HBV or others viruses can be performed in this easy-to-build but more physiological hepatic environment. These results illustrate that our new 3D liver infection models are simple but effective, enabling new investigations on infectious disease mechanisms. The better

  4. Molecular Changes in Opisthorchis viverrini (Southeast Asian Liver Fluke) during the Transition from the Juvenile to the Adult Stage

    PubMed Central

    Sripa, Jittiyawadee; Hall, Ross S.; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob; Gasser, Robin B.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Southeast Asian liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini) chronically infects and affects tens of millions of people in regions of Asia, leading to chronic illness and, importantly, inducing malignant cancer ( = cholangiocarcinoma). In spite of this, little is known, at the molecular level, about the parasite itself, its interplay with its hosts or the mechanisms of disease and/or carcinogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we generated extensive RNA-Seq data (Illumina) representing adult and juvenile stages of O. viverrini, and combined these sequences with previously published transcriptomic data (454 technology) for this species, yielding a combined assembly of significantly increased quality and allowing quantitative assessment of transcription in the juvenile and adult stage. Conclusions This enhanced assembly reveals that, despite the substantial biological similarities between the human liver flukes, O. viverinni and Clonorchis sinensis, there are previously unrecognized differences in major aspects of their molecular biology. Most notable are differences among the C13 and cathepsin L-like cysteine peptidases, which play key roles in tissue migration, immune evasion and feeding, and, thus, represent potential drug and/or vaccine targets. Furthermore, these data indicate that major lineages of cysteine peptidases of socioeconomically important trematodes have evolved through a process of gene loss rather than independent radiation, contrasting previous proposals. PMID:23209858

  5. Deep sexual dimorphism in adult medaka fish liver highlighted by multi-omic approach

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qin; Le Manach, Séverine; Sotton, Benoit; Huet, Hélène; Duvernois-Berthet, Evelyne; Paris, Alain; Duval, Charlotte; Ponger, Loïc; Marie, Arul; Blond, Alain; Mathéron, Lucrèce; Vinh, Joelle; Bolbach, Gérard; Djediat, Chakib; Bernard, Cécile; Edery, Marc; Marie, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism describes the features that discriminate between the two sexes at various biological levels. Especially, during the reproductive phase, the liver is one of the most sexually dimorphic organs, because of different metabolic demands between the two sexes. The liver is a key organ that plays fundamental roles in various physiological processes, including digestion, energetic metabolism, xenobiotic detoxification, biosynthesis of serum proteins, and also in endocrine or immune response. The sex-dimorphism of the liver is particularly obvious in oviparous animals, as the female liver is the main organ for the synthesis of oocyte constituents. In this work, we are interested in identifying molecular sexual dimorphism in the liver of adult medaka fish and their sex-variation in response to hepatotoxic exposures. By developing an integrative approach combining histology and different high-throughput omic investigations (metabolomics, proteomics and transcriptomics), we were able to globally depict the strong sexual dimorphism that concerns various cellular and molecular processes of hepatocytes comprising protein synthesis, amino acid, lipid and polysaccharide metabolism, along with steroidogenesis and detoxification. The results of this work imply noticeable repercussions on the biology of oviparous organisms environmentally exposed to chemical or toxin issues. PMID:27561897

  6. Deep sexual dimorphism in adult medaka fish liver highlighted by multi-omic approach.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Qin; Le Manach, Séverine; Sotton, Benoit; Huet, Hélène; Duvernois-Berthet, Evelyne; Paris, Alain; Duval, Charlotte; Ponger, Loïc; Marie, Arul; Blond, Alain; Mathéron, Lucrèce; Vinh, Joelle; Bolbach, Gérard; Djediat, Chakib; Bernard, Cécile; Edery, Marc; Marie, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism describes the features that discriminate between the two sexes at various biological levels. Especially, during the reproductive phase, the liver is one of the most sexually dimorphic organs, because of different metabolic demands between the two sexes. The liver is a key organ that plays fundamental roles in various physiological processes, including digestion, energetic metabolism, xenobiotic detoxification, biosynthesis of serum proteins, and also in endocrine or immune response. The sex-dimorphism of the liver is particularly obvious in oviparous animals, as the female liver is the main organ for the synthesis of oocyte constituents. In this work, we are interested in identifying molecular sexual dimorphism in the liver of adult medaka fish and their sex-variation in response to hepatotoxic exposures. By developing an integrative approach combining histology and different high-throughput omic investigations (metabolomics, proteomics and transcriptomics), we were able to globally depict the strong sexual dimorphism that concerns various cellular and molecular processes of hepatocytes comprising protein synthesis, amino acid, lipid and polysaccharide metabolism, along with steroidogenesis and detoxification. The results of this work imply noticeable repercussions on the biology of oviparous organisms environmentally exposed to chemical or toxin issues. PMID:27561897

  7. Magnetoacoustic imaging of human liver tumor with magnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gang; Cressman, Erik; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging technique under development to achieve imaging of electrical impedance contrast in biological tissues with spatial resolution close to ultrasound imaging. However, previously reported MAT-MI experimental results are obtained either from low salinity gel phantoms, or from normal animal tissue samples. In this study, we report the experimental study on the performance of the MAT-MI imaging method for imaging in vitro human liver tumor tissue. The present promising experimental results suggest the feasibility of MAT-MI to image electrical impedance contrast between the cancerous tissue and its surrounding normal tissues.

  8. The Role of MicroRNAs in Human Liver Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Chiara; Henry, Jon C.; Kogure, Takayuki; Schmittgen, Thomas; Patel, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver of global importance. Recent studies of the expression and role of microRNA (miRNA) in HCC are providing new insights into disease pathogenesis. In addition, therapeutic efforts targeting specific miRNAs are being evaluated in animal models of HCC. The potential of miRNAs as biomarkers of disease or prognostic markers is being explored. Herein, we review studies of miRNA expression in human HCC, and discuss recent advances in knowledge about the involvement and role of selected miRNAs in disease pathogenesis, as biomarkers, or as therapeutic targets for HCC. PMID:22082761

  9. The role of microRNAs in human liver cancers.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Chiara; Henry, Jon C; Kogure, Takayuki; Schmittgen, Thomas; Patel, Tushar

    2011-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver of global importance. Recent studies of the expression and role of microRNA (miRNA) in HCC are providing new insights into disease pathogenesis. In addition, therapeutic efforts targeting specific miRNAs are being evaluated in animal models of HCC. The potential of miRNAs as biomarkers of disease or prognostic markers is being explored. Herein, we review studies of miRNA expression in human HCC, and discuss recent advances in knowledge about the involvement and role of selected miRNAs in disease pathogenesis, as biomarkers, or as therapeutic targets for HCC. PMID:22082761

  10. Comparison of liver oncogenic potential among human RAS isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sook In; Moon, Hyuk; Ju, Hye-Lim; Kim, Dae Yeong; Cho, Kyung Joo; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Calvisi, Diego F.; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2016-01-01

    Mutation in one of three RAS genes (i.e., HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS) leading to constitutive activation of RAS signaling pathways is considered a key oncogenic event in human carcinogenesis. Whether activated RAS isoforms possess different oncogenic potentials remains an unresolved question. Here, we compared oncogenic properties among RAS isoforms using liver-specific transgenesis in mice. Hydrodynamic transfection was performed using transposons expressing short hairpin RNA downregulating p53 and an activated RAS isoform, and livers were harvested at 23 days after gene delivery. No differences were found in the hepatocarcinogenic potential among RAS isoforms, as determined by both gross examination of livers and liver weight per body weight ratio (LW/BW) of mice expressing HRASQ61L, KRAS4BG12V and NRASQ61K. However, the tumorigenic potential differed significantly between KRAS splicing variants. The LW/BW ratio in KRAS4AG12V mice was significantly lower than in KRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.001), and KRAS4AG12V mice lived significantly longer than KRRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.0001). Notably, tumors from KRAS4AG12V mice displayed higher expression of the p16INK4A tumor suppressor when compared with KRAS4BG12V tumors. Forced overexpression of p16INK4A significantly reduced tumor growth in KRAS4BG12V mice, suggesting that upregulation of p16INK4A by KRAS4AG12V presumably delays tumor development driven by the latter oncogene. PMID:26799184

  11. Improved survival of porcine acute liver failure by a bioartificial liver device implanted with induced human functional hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Yimeng; Yan, Yupeng; Ma, Hucheng; Sun, Lulu; Huang, Pengyu; Ni, Xuan; Zhang, Ludi; Zhao, Xin; Ren, Haozhen; Hu, Dan; Zhou, Yan; Tian, Feng; Ji, Yuan; Cheng, Xin; Pan, Guoyu; Ding, Yi-Tao; Hui, Lijian

    2016-02-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a life-threatening illness. The extracorporeal cell-based bioartificial liver (BAL) system could bridge liver transplantation and facilitate liver regeneration for ALF patients by providing metabolic detoxification and synthetic functions. Previous BAL systems, based on hepatoma cells and non-human hepatocytes, achieved limited clinical advances, largely due to poor hepatic functions, cumbersome preparation or safety concerns of these cells. We previously generated human functional hepatocytes by lineage conversion (hiHeps). Here, by improving functional maturity of hiHeps and producing hiHeps at clinical scales (3 billion cells), we developed a hiHep-based BAL system (hiHep-BAL). In a porcine ALF model, hiHep-BAL treatment restored liver functions, corrected blood levels of ammonia and bilirubin, and prolonged survival. Importantly, human albumin and α-1-antitrypsin were detectable in hiHep-BAL-treated ALF pigs. Moreover, hiHep-BAL treatment led to attenuated liver damage, resolved inflammation and enhanced liver regeneration. Our findings indicate a promising clinical application of the hiHep-BAL system. PMID:26768767

  12. Improved survival of porcine acute liver failure by a bioartificial liver device implanted with induced human functional hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Yimeng; Yan, Yupeng; Ma, Hucheng; Sun, Lulu; Huang, Pengyu; Ni, Xuan; Zhang, Ludi; Zhao, Xin; Ren, Haozhen; Hu, Dan; Zhou, Yan; Tian, Feng; Ji, Yuan; Cheng, Xin; Pan, Guoyu; Ding, Yi-Tao; Hui, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a life-threatening illness. The extracorporeal cell-based bioartificial liver (BAL) system could bridge liver transplantation and facilitate liver regeneration for ALF patients by providing metabolic detoxification and synthetic functions. Previous BAL systems, based on hepatoma cells and non-human hepatocytes, achieved limited clinical advances, largely due to poor hepatic functions, cumbersome preparation or safety concerns of these cells. We previously generated human functional hepatocytes by lineage conversion (hiHeps). Here, by improving functional maturity of hiHeps and producing hiHeps at clinical scales (3 billion cells), we developed a hiHep-based BAL system (hiHep-BAL). In a porcine ALF model, hiHep-BAL treatment restored liver functions, corrected blood levels of ammonia and bilirubin, and prolonged survival. Importantly, human albumin and α-1-antitrypsin were detectable in hiHep-BAL-treated ALF pigs. Moreover, hiHep-BAL treatment led to attenuated liver damage, resolved inflammation and enhanced liver regeneration. Our findings indicate a promising clinical application of the hiHep-BAL system. PMID:26768767

  13. Liver X Receptor (LXR) Regulates Human Adipocyte Lipolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Stenson, Britta M.; Rydén, Mikael; Venteclef, Nicolas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Pettersson, Annie M. L.; Mairal, Aline; Åström, Gaby; Blomqvist, Lennart; Wang, Victoria; Jocken, Johan W. E.; Clément, Karine; Langin, Dominique; Arner, Peter; Laurencikiene, Jurga

    2011-01-01

    The Liver X receptor (LXR) is an important regulator of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in humans and mice. We have recently shown that activation of LXR regulates cellular fuel utilization in adipocytes. In contrast, the role of LXR in human adipocyte lipolysis, the major function of human white fat cells, is not clear. In the present study, we stimulated in vitro differentiated human and murine adipocytes with the LXR agonist GW3965 and observed an increase in basal lipolysis. Microarray analysis of human adipocyte mRNA following LXR activation revealed an altered gene expression of several lipolysis-regulating proteins, which was also confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. We show that expression and intracellular localization of perilipin1 (PLIN1) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are affected by GW3965. Although LXR activation does not influence phosphorylation status of HSL, HSL activity is required for the lipolytic effect of GW3965. This effect is abolished by PLIN1 knockdown. In addition, we demonstrate that upon activation, LXR binds to the proximal regions of the PLIN1 and HSL promoters. By selective knock-down of either LXR isoform, we show that LXRα is the major isoform mediating the lipolysis-related effects of LXR. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that activation of LXRα up-regulates basal human adipocyte lipolysis. This is at least partially mediated through LXR binding to the PLIN1 promoter and down-regulation of PLIN1 expression. PMID:21030586

  14. Liver X receptor (LXR) regulates human adipocyte lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Britta M; Rydén, Mikael; Venteclef, Nicolas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Pettersson, Annie M L; Mairal, Aline; Aström, Gaby; Blomqvist, Lennart; Wang, Victoria; Jocken, Johan W E; Clément, Karine; Langin, Dominique; Arner, Peter; Laurencikiene, Jurga

    2011-01-01

    The Liver X receptor (LXR) is an important regulator of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in humans and mice. We have recently shown that activation of LXR regulates cellular fuel utilization in adipocytes. In contrast, the role of LXR in human adipocyte lipolysis, the major function of human white fat cells, is not clear. In the present study, we stimulated in vitro differentiated human and murine adipocytes with the LXR agonist GW3965 and observed an increase in basal lipolysis. Microarray analysis of human adipocyte mRNA following LXR activation revealed an altered gene expression of several lipolysis-regulating proteins, which was also confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. We show that expression and intracellular localization of perilipin1 (PLIN1) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are affected by GW3965. Although LXR activation does not influence phosphorylation status of HSL, HSL activity is required for the lipolytic effect of GW3965. This effect is abolished by PLIN1 knockdown. In addition, we demonstrate that upon activation, LXR binds to the proximal regions of the PLIN1 and HSL promoters. By selective knock-down of either LXR isoform, we show that LXRα is the major isoform mediating the lipolysis-related effects of LXR. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that activation of LXRα up-regulates basal human adipocyte lipolysis. This is at least partially mediated through LXR binding to the PLIN1 promoter and down-regulation of PLIN1 expression. PMID:21030586

  15. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Hepatic Artery Stenosis in Adult and Pediatric Patients After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Maruzzelli, Luigi; Miraglia, Roberto Caruso, Settimo; Milazzo, Mariapina; Mamone, Giuseppe; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous endovascular techniques for the treatment of hepatic artery stenosis (HAS) occurring after liver transplantation (LT) in adult and pediatrics patients. From February 2003 to March 2009, 25 patients (15 adults and 10 children) whose developed HAS after LT were referred to our interventional radiology unit. Technical success was achieved in 96% (24 of 25) of patients. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed in 13 patients (7 children), and stenting was performed in 11 patients (2 children). After the procedure, all patients were followed-up with liver function tests, Doppler ultrasound, and/or computed tomography. Mean follow-up was 15.8 months (range 5 days to 58 months). Acute hepatic artery thrombosis occurred immediately after stent deployment in 2 patients and was successfully treated with local thrombolysis. One patient developed severe HA spasm, which reverted after 24 h. After the procedure, mean trans-stenotic pressure gradient decreased from 30.5 to 6.2 mmHg. Kaplan-Meyer curve of HA primary patency was 77% at 1 and 2 years. During the follow-up period, 5 patients (20%) had recurrent stenosis, and 2 patients (8.3%) had late thrombosis. Two of 7 patients with stenosis/thrombosis underwent surgical revascularization (n = 1) and liver retransplantation (n = 1). Six (25%) patients died during follow-up, but overall mortality was not significantly different when comparing patients having patent hepatic arteries with those having recurrent stenosis/thrombosis. There were no significant differences in recurrent stenosis/thrombosis and mortality comparing patients treated by PTA versus stenting and comparing adult versus pediatric status. Percutaneous interventional treatment of HAS in LT recipients is safe and effective and decreases the need for surgical revascularization and liver retransplantation. However, the beneficial effects for survival are not clear, probably because

  16. Quality of Life in Adults with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Baseline Data from the NASH CRN

    PubMed Central

    David, Kristin; Kowdley, Kris V.; Unalp, Aynur; Kanwal, Fasiha; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the United States. The association between NAFLD and quality of life (QOL) remains unclear. These data are important to estimate the burden of illness in NAFLD. The aim was to report QOL scores of adults with NAFLD, and examine the association between NAFLD severity and QOL. QOL data were collected from adults with NAFLD enrolled in the NASH Clinical Research Network using the SF-36 survey and scores were compared to normative U.S. population scores. Liver biopsy histology was reviewed by a central pathology committee. A total of 713 subjects with NAFLD (M=269, F=444) were included. Mean age of subjects was 48.3 years; 61% had definite NASH, and 28% had bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis. Diabetes was present in 27% of subjects. Subjects with NAFLD had worse physical (mean=45.2) and mental health scores (mean=47.6) compared to the U.S. population with (mean=50) and without (physical: 55.8, mental: 52.5) chronic illness. Subjects with NASH reported lower physical health compared to subjects with fatty liver disease without NASH (44.5 vs. 47.1, p=.02). Subjects with cirrhosis had significantly (P<0.001) poorer physical health scores (38.4) vs. subjects with no (47.6), mild (46.2), moderate (44.6) or bridging fibrosis (44.6). Cirrhosis was associated with poorer physical health after adjusting for potential confounders. Mental health scores did not differ between participants with and without NASH or by degree of fibrosis. Conclusion Adults with NAFLD have a significant decrement in QOL. Treatment of NAFLD should incorporate strategies to improve QOL, especially physical health. PMID:19434741

  17. Donor Safety in Adult-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience of 356 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Haipeng; Yang, Jiayin; Yan, Lunan

    2016-01-01

    Background As an important means to tackle the worldwide shortage of liver grafts, adult-adult living donor liver transplantation (A-ALDLT) is the most massive operation a healthy person could undergo, so donor safety is of prime importance. However, most previous research focused on recipients, while complications in donors have not been fully described or investigated. Material/Methods To investigate donor safety in terms of postoperative complications, the clinical data of 356 A-ALDLT donors in our center from January 2002 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were divided into a pre-2008 group (before January 2008) and a post-2008 group (after January 2008). Donor safety was evaluated with regard to the type, frequency, and severity of postoperative complications. Results There were no donor deaths in our center during this period. The overall complication rate was 23.0% (82/356). The proportion of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 51.2% (42/82), 25.6% (21/82), 22.0% (18/82), and 1.2% (1/82), respectively. In all the donors, the incidence of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 11.8% (42/356), 5.9% (21/356), 5.1% (18/356), and 0.3% (1/356), respectively. The overall complication rate in the post-2008 group was significantly lower than that in the pre-2008 group (18.1% (41/227) vs. 32.6% (42/129), P<0.01). Biliary complications were the most common, with an incidence of 8.4% (30/356). Conclusions The risk to A-ALDLT donors is controllable and acceptable with improvement in preoperative assessment and liver surgery. PMID:27178367

  18. Donor Safety in Adult-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience of 356 Cases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Haipeng; Yang, Jiayin; Yan, Lunan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND As an important means to tackle the worldwide shortage of liver grafts, adult-adult living donor liver transplantation (A-ALDLT) is the most massive operation a healthy person could undergo, so donor safety is of prime importance. However, most previous research focused on recipients, while complications in donors have not been fully described or investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS To investigate donor safety in terms of postoperative complications, the clinical data of 356 A-ALDLT donors in our center from January 2002 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were divided into a pre-2008 group (before January 2008) and a post-2008 group (after January 2008). Donor safety was evaluated with regard to the type, frequency, and severity of postoperative complications. RESULTS There were no donor deaths in our center during this period. The overall complication rate was 23.0% (82/356). The proportion of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 51.2% (42/82), 25.6% (21/82), 22.0% (18/82), and 1.2% (1/82), respectively. In all the donors, the incidence of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 11.8% (42/356), 5.9% (21/356), 5.1% (18/356), and 0.3% (1/356), respectively. The overall complication rate in the post-2008 group was significantly lower than that in the pre-2008 group (18.1% (41/227) vs. 32.6% (42/129), P<0.01). Biliary complications were the most common, with an incidence of 8.4% (30/356). CONCLUSIONS The risk to A-ALDLT donors is controllable and acceptable with improvement in preoperative assessment and liver surgery. PMID:27178367

  19. Application of chimeric mice with humanized liver for study of human-specific drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Thomas J; Reddy, Vijay G B; Kakuni, Masakazu; Morikawa, Yoshio; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Human-specific or disproportionately abundant human metabolites of drug candidates that are not adequately formed and qualified in preclinical safety assessment species pose an important drug development challenge. Furthermore, the overall metabolic profile of drug candidates in humans is an important determinant of their drug-drug interaction susceptibility. These risks can be effectively assessed and/or mitigated if human metabolic profile of the drug candidate could reliably be determined in early development. However, currently available in vitro human models (e.g., liver microsomes, hepatocytes) are often inadequate in this regard. Furthermore, the conduct of definitive radiolabeled human ADME studies is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor that is more suited for later in development when the risk of failure has been reduced. We evaluated a recently developed chimeric mouse model with humanized liver on uPA/SCID background for its ability to predict human disposition of four model drugs (lamotrigine, diclofenac, MRK-A, and propafenone) that are known to exhibit human-specific metabolism. The results from these studies demonstrate that chimeric mice were able to reproduce the human-specific metabolite profile for lamotrigine, diclofenac, and MRK-A. In the case of propafenone, however, the human-specific metabolism was not detected as a predominant pathway, and the metabolite profiles in native and humanized mice were similar; this was attributed to the presence of residual highly active propafenone-metabolizing mouse enzymes in chimeric mice. Overall, the data indicate that the chimeric mice with humanized liver have the potential to be a useful tool for the prediction of human-specific metabolism of xenobiotics and warrant further investigation. PMID:24700822

  20. Development of a New Diagnostic System for Human Liver Diseases Based on Conventional Ultrasonic Diagnostic Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tsuneo; Nakazawa, Toshihiro; Harada, Akimitsu; Sato, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Yukio; Sato, Sojun

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, the authors present the experimental results of using a quantitative ultrasonic diagnosis technique for human liver diseases using the fractal dimension (FD) of the shape of the power spectra (PS) of RF signals. We have developed an experimental system based on a conventional ultrasonic diagnostic system. As a result, we show that normal livers, fatty livers and liver cirrhosis can be identified using the FD values.

  1. Combined Detection of Serum IL-10, IL-17, and CXCL10 Predicts Acute Rejection Following Adult Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung; Yoon, Young-In; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Tak, Eunyoung; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Song, Gi-Won; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Hwang, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of non-invasive diagnostic and predictive biomarkers for acute rejection in liver transplant patients would help to ensure the preservation of liver function in the graft, eventually contributing to improved graft and patient survival. We evaluated selected cytokines and chemokines in the sera from liver transplant patients as potential biomarkers for acute rejection, and found that the combined detection of IL-10, IL-17, and CXCL10 at 1-2 weeks post-operation could predict acute rejection following adult liver transplantation with 97% specificity and 94% sensitivity. PMID:27498551

  2. Similarities and differences between pediatric and adult nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Maricruz; Lappe, Sara; Feldstein, Ariel E; Alkhouri, Naim

    2016-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is highly common and potentially serious in children and adolescents. The term NAFLD refers to a spectrum of diseases ranging from accumulation of fat in the liver (simple steatosis or nonalcoholic fatty liver "NAFL") to the potentially progressive form of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) characterized by hepatocyte ballooning, inflammation, and often associated with fibrosis. While large prospective longitudinal studies in pediatric NAFLD are still lacking, growing evidence suggests that children with NAFL are at increased risk for cardiometabolic complications, while those with NASH and advance fibrosis are also at risk for significant liver-related morbidity including cirrhosis and its complications. Pediatric NAFLD shares features of adult NAFLD but also shows many different characteristics in terms of prevalence, histology, diagnosis and management. Translational studies suggest that NAFLD is a highly heritable disease in which genetic variations and environment closely interact to determine the disease phenotype and the progression to the more advanced forms of the disease. Changes in lifestyle, targeting gradual weight reduction, and physical exercise continue to be the mainstay of treatment for NAFLD in children. Recent advances in development of noninvasive diagnostic modalities and the potential for identifying effective pharmacological interventions may result in significant progress in the management of NAFLD in the pediatric population. PMID:26961580

  3. Interaction of human lactoferrin with the rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Debanne, M.T.; Regoeczi, E.; Sweeney, G.D.; Krestynski, F.

    1985-04-01

    Binding of human lactoferrin (hLf) by purified rat liver plasma membranes was studied to clarify whether the liver possesses specific hLf receptors. The binding was rapid between 4 degrees and 37 degrees C, with a pH optimum close to 5.0. At 22 degrees C and in glycine-NaOH (5 mM, pH 7.4) containing 150 mM NaCl and 0.5% albumin, 1 microgram of membrane bound a maximum of 11.8 ng hLf. The dissociation constant of the interaction was 1.6 X 10(-7) M. Other proteins of high isoelectric points (lactoperoxidase, lysozyme, and particularly salmine sulfate) and a piperazine derivative inhibited hLf binding in a concentration- dependent manner. In contrast, monosaccharides (galactose, N- acetylgalactosamine, mannose, and fucose) were ineffective. By omitting NaCl from the incubation buffer, binding was increased 3.6-fold. Erythrocyte ghosts bound hLf less firmly and alveolar macrophages more firmly than hepatic plasma membranes. Liver cell fractionations performed after the intravenous injection of labeled hLf showed that approximately 88% of the hepatic radioligand was associated with parenchymal cells. When binding was expressed per unit of cell volume, however, more hLf was present in nonparenchymal than in parenchymal cells, implying that the above value was determined by the relative cell masses rather than affinities alone. It is concluded that the binding of hLf by hepatic plasma membranes is electrostatic, i.e., is mediated by the cationic nature of the ligand, and that it is explicable in terms of a ''specific nonreceptor interaction'' of the generalized type proposed by Cuatrecasas and Hollenberg.

  4. Rethinking Adult Literacy Programs: A Humanities-Based Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anania, Joanne

    The Roosevelt University Humanities Enrichment Program tries to acknowledge the adult part of adult literacy. Its instructional materials are of interest and value to the adult student and, therefore, provide incentives for reading and discussion instead of serving merely as skill-building exercises. The materials are drawn from literature,…

  5. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  6. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2(+) cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a "Percoll-Plate-Wait" procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 10(6) cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2(+) cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2(+) cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  7. Patterns and Predictors of Sexual Function After Liver Donation: the Adult to Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL)

    PubMed Central

    DiMartini, AF.; Dew, MA.; Butt, Z.; Simpson, MA.; Ladner, DP.; Smith, AR.; Hill-Callahan, P.; Gillespie, BW.

    2015-01-01

    Although sexual functioning is an important facet of living donor quality of life, it has not received extensive evaluation in this population. Using data from the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study, we examined donor sexual functioning across the donation process from the predonation evaluation to 3 months and 1 year postdonation. Donors (n=208) and a comparison group of non-donors (n=155) completed self-reported surveys with specific questions on sexual desire, satisfaction, orgasm, and (for men) erectile function. Across the three time points, donor sexual functioning was lower at the evaluation phase and 3 months postdonation than at one year postdonation. In the early recovery period, abdominal pain was associated with difficulty reaching orgasm (OR = 3.98, 95% CI 1.30–12.16), concerns over appearance with lower sexual desire (OR = 4.14, 95% CI 1.02–16.79), and not feeling back to normal was associated with dissatisfaction with sexual life (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.43–8.99). Efforts to educate donors before the surgery and prepare them for the early recovery phase may improve recovery and reduce distress regarding sexual functioning. PMID:25779554

  8. Brief Report: The Deletion of the Phosphatase Regulator NIPP1 Causes Progenitor Cell Expansion in the Adult Liver.

    PubMed

    Boens, Shannah; Verbinnen, Iris; Verhulst, Stefaan; Szekér, Kathelijne; Ferreira, Monica; Gevaert, Thomas; Baes, Myriam; Roskams, Tania; van Grunsven, Leo A; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2016-08-01

    The Ppp1r8 gene encodes NIPP1, a nuclear interactor of protein phosphatase PP1. The deletion of NIPP1 is embryonic lethal at the gastrulation stage, which has hampered its functional characterization in adult tissues. Here, we describe the effects of a conditional deletion of NIPP1 in mouse liver epithelial cells. Ppp1r8(-/-) livers developed a ductular reaction, that is, bile-duct hyperplasia with associated fibrosis. The increased proliferation of biliary epithelial cells was at least partially due to an expansion of the progenitor cell compartment that was independent of liver injury. Gene-expression analysis confirmed an upregulation of progenitor cell markers in the liver knockout livers but showed no effect on the expression of liver-injury associated regulators of cholangiocyte differentiation markers. Consistent with an inhibitory effect of NIPP1 on progenitor cell proliferation, Ppp1r8(-/-) livers displayed an increased sensitivity to diet-supplemented 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine, which also causes bile-duct hyperplasia through progenitor cell expansion. In contrast, the liver knockouts responded normally to injuries (partial hepatectomy, single CCl4 administration) that are restored through proliferation of differentiated parenchymal cells. Our data indicate that NIPP1 does not regulate the proliferation of hepatocytes but is a suppressor of biliary epithelial cell proliferation, including progenitor cells, in the adult liver. Stem Cells 2016;34:2256-2262. PMID:27068806

  9. Evolution of anterior segment reconstruction after live donor adult liver transplantation: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Pomposelli, James J; Akoad, Mohamed; Khwaja, Khalid; Lewis, W D; Cheah, Yee L; Verbesey, Jennifer; Jenkins, Roger L; Pomfret, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the best method for venous outflow reconstruction after live donor liver transplantation using right lobe grafts. Some authors advocate routine inclusion of the middle hepatic vein with the graft, whereas others favor a more selective approach. In this report, we examine the evolution of our decision making and technique of selective anterior venous segment reconstruction during live donor adult liver transplantation performed in 226 recipients. We have developed a simplified back-bench procedure using sequential-composite anastomosis using various vascular conduits with syndactylization to the right hepatic vein creating a single large-outflow anastomosis in the recipient. Conduits used include iliac artery or vein allograft, recanalized umbilical vein, cryopreserved iliac artery allograft, and 6-mm synthetic expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular graft. This technique can be performed quickly, safely, and under cold storage conditions and results in excellent outcome while minimizing donor risk. PMID:21980936

  10. Conversion of 5-aminolaevulinate into haem by homogenates of human liver. Comparison with rat and chick-embryo liver homogenates.

    PubMed

    Bonkovsky, H L; Healey, J F; Sinclair, P R; Sinclair, J F

    1985-05-01

    To assess whether the synthesis of haem can be studied in small amounts of human liver, we measured kinetics of the conversion of 5-aminolaevulinate into haem and haem precursors in homogenates of human livers. We used methods previously developed in our laboratory for studies of rat and chick-embryo livers [Healey, Bonkowsky, Sinclair & Sinclair (1981) Biochem. J. 198, 595-604]. The maximal rate at which homogenates of human livers converted 5-aminolaevulinate into protoporphyrin was only 26% of that for rat, and 58% of that for chick embryo. In the absence of added Fe2+, homogenates of fresh human liver resembled those of chick embryos in that protoporphyrin and haem accumulated in similar amounts, whereas fresh rat liver homogenate accumulated about twice as much haem as protoporphyrin. However, when Fe2+ (0.25 mM) was added to human liver homogenates, mainly haem accumulated, indicating that the supply of reduced iron limited the activity of haem synthase, the final enzyme in the haem-biosynthesis pathway. Addition of the potent iron chelator desferrioxamine after 30 min of incubation with 5-amino[14C]laevulinate stopped further haem synthesis without affecting synthesis of protoporphyrin. Thus the prelabelled haem was stable after addition of desferrioxamine. Since the conversion of 5-amino[14C]laevulinate into haem and protoporphyrin was carried out at pH 7.4, whereas the pH optimum for rat or bovine hepatic 5-aminolaevulinate dehydratase is about 6.3, we determined kinetic parameters of the human hepatic dehydrase at both pH values. The Vmax was the same at both pH values, whereas the Km was slightly higher at the lower pH. Our results indicate that the synthesis of porphyrins and haem from 5-aminolaevulinate can be studied with the small amounts of human liver obtainable by percutaneous needle biopsy. We discuss the implications of our results in relation to use of rat or chick-embryo livers as experimental models for the biochemical features of human acute

  11. Protein Targets of Reactive Electrophiles in Human Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Nah-Young; Liu, Qinfeng; Stamer, Sheryl L.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2008-01-01

    Liver microsomes are widely used to study xenobiotic metabolism in vitro and covalent binding to microsomal proteins serves as a surrogate marker for toxicity mediated by reactive metabolites. We have applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to identify protein targets of the biotin-tagged model electrophiles 1-biotinamido-4-(4′-[maleimidoethylcyclohexane]-carboxamido)butane (BMCC) and N-iodoacetyl-N-biotinylhexylenediamine (IAB) in human liver microsomes. The biotin-tagged peptides resulting from in-gel tryptic digestion were enriched by biotin-avidin chromatography and LC-MS-MS was used to identify 376 microsomal cysteine thiol targets of BMCC and IAB in 263 proteins. Protein adduction was selective and reproducible and only 90 specific cysteine sites in 70 proteins (approximately 25% of the total) were adducted by both electrophiles. Differences in adduction selectivity correlated with different biological effects of the compounds, as IAB, but not BMCC induced ER stress in HEK293 cells. Targeted LC-MS-MS analysis of microsomal glutathione-S-transferase cysteine 50, a target of both IAB and BMCC, detected time-dependent adduction by the reactive acetaminophen metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine during microsomal incubations. The results indicate that electrophiles selectively adduct microsomal proteins, but display differing target selectivities that correlate with differences in toxicity. Analysis of selected microsomal protein adduction reactions thus could provide a more specific indication of potential toxicity than bulk covalent binding of radiolabeled compounds. PMID:17480101

  12. Liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: procoagulant, but is antithrombotic prophylaxis required?

    PubMed

    Cherian, P Thomas; Alrabih, Wesal; Douiri, Abdel; Quaglia, Alberto; Heneghan, Michael A; O'Grady, John; Rela, Mohamed; Heaton, Nigel D

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive recipients with end-stage liver disease has become an accepted practice. However, because these patients are increasingly being recognized as prothrombotic, we reviewed their posttransplant thrombotic complications. Because morphological changes might be responsible in part for this prothrombotic state, we also conducted a histopathological review of explants from HIV-positive patients. Between 1990 and 2010, 24 of 3502 recipients (including 23 adults) were HIV-positive at LT. These patients and their postoperative courses were reviewed with a particular focus on vascular complications, risk factors, and outcomes. Another patient in whom HIV was detected 12 years after LT was also examined. Among the 24 HIV-positive LT recipients (17 males and 22 whole liver grafts; median age = 40 years), 5 developed arterial complications [including 3 cases of hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT), 1 case of generalized arteriopathy (on angiography), and 1 case of endoarteritis (on histological analysis)]. Multiple arterial anastomoses were performed in 8 of the 24 recipients, and HAT occurred twice within this anastomosis group. The outcomes of the 3 patients with HAT included retransplantation, biliary stenting for ischemic cholangiopathy followed by retransplantation, and observation only. In addition, 5 separate venous thrombotic events were detected in the 24 recipients during this period. Moreover, the delayed-HIV recipient developed delayed HAT and subsequently ischemic cholangiopathy and was being assessed for retransplantation at the time of this writing. In conclusion, the prothrombotic state associated with combined HIV and liver disease is a cause of morbidity after LT: 8 of the 24 recipients (33%) in this series suffered vascular thrombotic complications. There is a potential increase in the risk of HAT: the rate for the HIV-positive cohort was higher than the rate for historical HIV

  13. Activation, isolation, identification and in vitro proliferation of oval cells from adult rat livers.

    PubMed

    He, Z P; Tan, W Q; Tang, Y F; Zhang, H J; Feng, M F

    2004-04-01

    Oval cells, putative hepatic stem cells, could potentially provide a novel solution to the severe shortage of donor livers, because of their ability to proliferate and differentiate into functional hepatocytes. We have previously demonstrated that oval cells can be induced to differentiate into cells with morphologic, phenotypic, and functional characteristics of mature hepatocytes. In this study, we have established a new model combining ethionine treatment with partial hepatectomy to activate oval cells, then developed a procedure utilizing selective enzymatic digestion and density gradient centrifugation to isolate and purify such cells from heterogeneous liver cell population. We identified oval cells by their morphological characteristics and phenotypic properties, thereby providing definitive evidence of the presence of hepatic stem-like cells in adult rat livers. Viewed by transmission electron microscopy, they were small cells with ovoid nuclei, a high nucleus/cytoplasm ratio and few organelles, including mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Flow cytometric assay showed that these cells highly expressed OV-6, cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) and albumin. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis displayed that the freshly isolated cells co-expressed albumin, cytokeratin-7 (CK-7) and CK-19 mRNA, indicating that they were essentially bipotential hepatic stem-like cells. Furthermore, we set up a culture system containing growth factors and a fibroblast feeder layer, to provide nourishment to these cells. Thus, we were able to culture them in vitro for more than 3 months, with the number of cells doubling 100 times. Gene expressions of albumin, CK-7 and CK-19 in the cells derived from the expanding colonies at day 95 were confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. These data suggested that the hepatic oval cells derived from adult rat livers possess a high potential to proliferate in vitro with a large increase in number, while maintaining the bipotential

  14. Constitutive expression of cytochrome P450 in foetal and adult porcine livers-Effects of body weight.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Martin Krøyer; Theil, Peter Kappel; Oksbjerg, Niels

    2016-09-01

    The liver hosts a great number of enzymatically driven processes, including detoxification. The super-family of enzymes named cytochrome P450 (CYP) is the major participant in that process. The expression of CYPs is affected by several factors including life-stage (foetal vs. adult). In the present study we investigated the impact of birth-weight (high or low birth weight) and life-stage on constitutive expression of porcine hepatic CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2A19, CYP2B22, CYP2C33, CYP2D25, CYP2E1 and CYP3A29, as well as the transcription factors controlling their expression; aryl hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, pregnane X receptor, C/EBP and hepatocyte nuclear factors 1 and 4. Both RT-PCR and western blotting showed a marked increase in the expression of the adult pigs compared with prenatal pigs. Moreover, CYP2E1 mRNA expression was 7.5 fold higher in foetuses with low birth weight compared with foetuses with high birth weight. Gender did not affect the mRNA expression within the different life-stages. These results indicate a similarity to what is observed in humans and porcine foetuses may therefore be a model for humans when studying expression of CYPs. PMID:27320961

  15. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  16. Stereoselective sulphate conjugation of racemic terbutaline by human liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Walle, T; Walle, U K

    1990-07-01

    1. The enantioselectivity of the sulphation of racemic terbutaline by phenolsulphotransferases was examined in vitro using cytosol from human livers (n = 3) and [35S]-3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulphate (PAP35S) as the sulphate donor. 2. The radioactive sulphate conjugate formed was isolated by h.p.l.c. and its enantiomers were separated intact by h.p.l.c. after chiral derivatization. 3. Sulphation of racemic terbutaline occurred with the same apparent Km value for both enantiomers (270 microM). The extent of sulphation of the (+)-enantiomer was double that of the (-)-enantiomer, solely due to a difference in their apparent Vmax values. 4. Sulphation of racemic prenalterol, a structural analogue of terbutaline, also showed a two-fold preference for the (+)-enantiomer. 5. These findings suggest that enantioselective sulphate conjugation of chiral phenolic sympathomimetic amine drugs may lead to enantioselective pharmacokinetics that should be considered in the clinical use of these drugs. PMID:2390423

  17. Ultrastructural pathology of human liver in Rift Valley fever.

    PubMed

    Shraim, Mubarak Al; Eid, Refaat; Radad, Khaled; Saeed, Noora

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonotic disease that primarily affects ruminant animals and can also cause fatal disease in humans. In the current report, we present the ultrastructural changes in the liver of a man aged 60 years who died from RVF in the Aseer Central Hospital, Abha, Saudi Arabia. The main hepatic changes by transmission electron microscopy included the presence of 95-115 nm electron-dense particles consistent with RVF virions, nuclear condensation, vacuolar degeneration, lipid droplet accumulation and mitochondrial damage and dilation. There were also viral inclusion bodies with electron-dense aggregates, dilation of intercellular spaces, damage of sinusoidal microvilli with widening of space of Disse, dilation of bile canaliculi and increasing number of phagolysosomes. PMID:27485877

  18. Adult Education and Human Resource Development: A Symbiotic Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, Robert E.; Hemby, K. Virginia; Conerly-Stewart, Donna L.

    1998-01-01

    Top-ranked competencies for graduate education in human resources development (HRD) identified by 55 (of 195) HRD practitioners were adult learning, presentation, facilitation, needs assessment, and human relations. Seven of the top 10 were allied with adult education graduate program content. (SK)

  19. Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Mateevici, Cristina; Lin, Belinda; Chandra, Ronil V.; Chong, Victor H.T.

    2015-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection, PMID:26488420

  20. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  1. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Catherine C; Hendriks, Delilah F G; Moro, Sabrina M L; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C A; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R; Goldring, Christopher E P; Lauschke, Volker M; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  2. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Catherine C.; Hendriks, Delilah F. G.; Moro, Sabrina M. L.; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C. A.; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B. Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Goldring, Christopher E. P.; Lauschke, Volker M.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  3. Human liver iduronate-2-sulphatase. Purification, characterization and catalytic properties.

    PubMed Central

    Bielicki, J; Freeman, C; Clements, P R; Hopwood, J J

    1990-01-01

    Human iduronate-2-sulphatase (EC 3.1.6.13), which is involved in the lysosomal degradation of the glycosaminoglycans heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate, was purified more than 500,000-fold in 5% yield from liver with a six-step column procedure, which consisted of a concanavalin A-Sepharose-Blue A-agarose coupled step, chromatofocusing, gel filtration on TSK HW 50S-Fractogel, hydrophobic separation on phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B and size separation on TSK G3000SW Ultrapac. Two major forms were identified. Form A and form B, with pI values of 4.5 and less than 4.0 respectively, separated at the chromatofocusing step in approximately equal amounts of recovered enzyme activity. By gel-filtration methods form A had a native molecular mass in the range 42-65 kDa. When analysed by SDS/PAGE, dithioerythritol-reduced and non-reduced form A and form B consistently contained polypeptides of molecular masses 42 kDa and 14 kDa. Iduronate-2-sulphatase was purified from human kidney, placenta and lung, and form A was shown to have similar native molecular mass and subunit components to those observed for liver enzyme. Both forms of liver iduronate-2-sulphatase were active towards a variety of substrates derived from heparin and dermatan sulphate. Kinetic parameters (Km and Kcat) of form A were determined with a variety of substrates matching structural aspects of the physiological substrates in vivo, namely heparan sulphate, heparin and dermatan sulphate. Substrate with 6-sulphate esters on the aglycone residue adjacent to the iduronic acid 2-sulphate residue being attack were hydrolysed with catalytic efficiencies up to 200 times above that observed for the simplest disaccharide substrate without a 6-sulphated aglycone residue. The effect of incubation pH on enzyme activity towards the variety of substrates evaluated was complex and dependent on substrate aglycone structure, substrate concentration, buffer type and the presence of other proteins. Sulphate and phosphate ions and

  4. Steroid metabolism in chimeric mice with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Lootens, Leen; Van Eenoo, Peter; Meuleman, Philip; Pozo, Oscar J; Van Renterghem, Pieter; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Delbeke, Frans T

    2009-11-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are considered to be doping agents and are prohibited in sports. Their metabolism needs to be elucidated to allow for urinary detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Steroid metabolism was assessed using uPA(+/+) SCID mice with humanized livers (chimeric mice). This study presents the results of 19-norandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione (19-norAD) administration to these in vivo mice. As in humans, 19-norandrosterone and 19-noretiocholanolone are the major detectable metabolites of 19-norAD in the urine of chimeric mice.A summary is given of the metabolic pathways found in chimeric mice after administration of three model steroid compounds (methandienone, androst-4-ene-3,17-dione and 19-norandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione). From these studies we can conclude that all major metabolic pathways for anabolic steroids in humans are present in the chimeric mouse. It is hoped that, in future, this promising chimeric mouse model might assist the discovery of new and possible longer detectable metabolites of (designer) steroids. PMID:20355169

  5. Effect of the Human Amniotic Membrane on Liver Regeneration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Şahin, Sevinç; Arslan, Ergin; Börekci, Hasan; Metin, Bayram; Cantürk, Nuh Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Operations are performed for broader liver surgery indications for a better understanding of hepatic anatomy/physiology and developments in operation technology. Surgery can cure some patients with liver metastasis of some tumors. Nevertheless, postoperative liver failure is the most feared complication causing mortality in patients who have undergone excision of a large liver mass. The human amniotic membrane has regenerative effects. Thus, we investigated the effects of the human amniotic membrane on regeneration of the resected liver. Methods. Twenty female Wistar albino rats were divided into control and experimental groups and underwent a 70% hepatectomy. The human amniotic membrane was placed over the residual liver in the experimental group. Relative liver weight, histopathological features, and biochemical parameters were assessed on postoperative day 3. Results. Total protein and albumin levels were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group. No difference in relative liver weight was observed between the groups. Hepatocyte mitotic count was significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Hepatic steatosis was detected in the experimental group. Conclusion. Applying the amniotic membrane to residual liver adversely affected liver regeneration. However, mesenchymal stem cell research has the potential to accelerate liver regeneration investigations. PMID:26457000

  6. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  7. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin.

    Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  8. Development of a normothermic extracorporeal liver perfusion system toward improving viability and function of human extended criteria donor livers.

    PubMed

    Banan, Babak; Watson, Rao; Xu, Min; Lin, Yiing; Chapman, William

    2016-07-01

    Donor organ shortages have led to an increased interest in finding new approaches to recover organs from extended criteria donors (ECD). Normothermic extracorporeal liver perfusion (NELP) has been proposed as a superior preservation method to reduce ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), precondition suboptimal grafts, and treat ECD livers so that they can be successfully used for transplantation. The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of a modified NELP circuit on discarded human livers. Seven human livers that were rejected for transplantation were placed on a modified NELP circuit for 8 hours. Perfusate samples and needle core biopsies were obtained at hourly intervals. A defatting solution that contained exendin-4 (50 nM) and L-carnitine (10 mM) was added to the perfusate for 2 steatotic livers. NELP provided normal temperature, electrolytes, and pH and glucose levels in the perfusate along with physiological vascular flows and pressures. Functional, biochemical, and microscopic evaluation revealed no additional injuries to the grafts during NELP with an improved oxygen extraction ratio (>0.5) and stabilized markers of hepatic injury. All livers synthesized adequate amounts of bile and coagulation factors. We also demonstrated a mild reduction (10%) of macroglobular steatosis with the use of the defatting solution. Histology demonstrated normal parenchymal architecture and a minimal to complete lack of IRI at the end of NELP. In conclusion, a modified NELP circuit preserved hepatocyte architecture, recovered synthetic functions, and hepatobiliary parameters of ECD livers without additional injuries to the grafts. This approach has the potential to increase the donor pool for clinical transplantation. Liver Transplantation 22 979-993 2016 AASLD. PMID:27027254

  9. Sexually dimorphic effect of in vitro fertilization (IVF) on adult mouse fat and liver metabolomes.

    PubMed

    Feuer, Sky K; Donjacour, Annemarie; Simbulan, Rhodel K; Lin, Wingka; Liu, Xiaowei; Maltepe, Emin; Rinaudo, Paolo F

    2014-11-01

    The preimplantation embryo is particularly vulnerable to environmental perturbation, such that nutritional and in vitro stresses restricted exclusively to this stage may alter growth and affect long-term metabolic health. This is particularly relevant to the over 5 million children conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF). We previously reported that even optimized IVF conditions reprogram mouse postnatal growth, fat deposition, and glucose homeostasis in a sexually dimorphic fashion. To more clearly interrogate the metabolic changes associated with IVF in adulthood, we used nontargeted mass spectrometry to globally profile adult IVF- and in vivo-conceived liver and gonadal adipose tissues. There was a sex- and tissue-specific effect of IVF on adult metabolite signatures indicative of metabolic reprogramming and oxidative stress and reflective of the observed phenotypes. Additionally, we observed a striking effect of IVF on adult sexual dimorphism. Male-female differences in metabolite concentration were exaggerated in hepatic IVF tissue and significantly reduced in IVF adipose tissue, with the majority of changes affecting amino acid and lipid metabolites. We also observed female-specific changes in markers of oxidative stress and adipogenesis, including reduced glutathione, cysteine glutathione disulfide, ophthalmate, urate, and corticosterone. In summary, embryo manipulation and early developmental experiences can affect adult patterns of sexual dimorphism and metabolic physiology. PMID:25211591

  10. Liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, W R; Lake, J R; Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Schladt, D P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Wainright, J L; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    The median waiting time for patients with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 18 days in 2012 to 9 days in 2014, after implementation of the Share 35 policy in June 2013. Similarly, mortality among candidates listed with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 366 per 100 waitlist years in 2012 to 315 in 2014. The number of new active candidates added to the pediatric liver transplant waiting list in 2014 was 655, down from a peak of 826 in 2005. The number of prevalent candidates (on the list on December 31 of the given year) continued to decline, 401 active and 173 inactive. The number of deceased donor pediatric liver transplants peaked at 542 in 2008 and was 478 in 2014. The number of living donor liver pediatric transplants was 52 in 2014; most were from donors closely related to the recipients. Graft survival continued to improve among pediatric recipients of deceased donor and living donor livers. PMID:26755264

  11. Toward an understanding of the protein interaction network of the human liver

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Huo, Keke; Ma, Lixin; Tang, Liujun; Li, Dong; Huang, Xiaobi; Yuan, Yanzhi; Li, Chunhua; Wang, Wei; Guan, Wei; Chen, Hui; Jin, Chaozhi; Wei, Junchen; Zhang, Wanqiao; Yang, Yongsheng; Liu, Qiongming; Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Cuili; Wu, Zhihao; Xu, Wangxiang; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Tao; Yu, Donghui; Zhang, Yaping; Chen, Liang; Zhu, Dewu; Zhong, Xing; Kang, Lixin; Gan, Xiang; Yu, Xiaolan; Ma, Qi; Yan, Jing; Zhou, Li; Liu, Zhongyang; Zhu, Yunping; Zhou, Tao; He, Fuchu; Yang, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Proteome-scale protein interaction maps are available for many organisms, ranging from bacteria, yeast, worms and flies to humans. These maps provide substantial new insights into systems biology, disease research and drug discovery. However, only a small fraction of the total number of human protein–protein interactions has been identified. In this study, we map the interactions of an unbiased selection of 5026 human liver expression proteins by yeast two-hybrid technology and establish a human liver protein interaction network (HLPN) composed of 3484 interactions among 2582 proteins. The data set has a validation rate of over 72% as determined by three independent biochemical or cellular assays. The network includes metabolic enzymes and liver-specific, liver-phenotype and liver-disease proteins that are individually critical for the maintenance of liver functions. The liver enriched proteins had significantly different topological properties and increased our understanding of the functional relationships among proteins in a liver-specific manner. Our data represent the first comprehensive description of a HLPN, which could be a valuable tool for understanding the functioning of the protein interaction network of the human liver. PMID:21988832

  12. Photoacoustic physio-chemical analysis of liver conditions in animal and human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Xu, Guan; Tian, Chao; Wan, Shanshan; Welling, Theodore H.; Lok, Anna S. F.; Rubin, Jonathan M.

    2016-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease affecting 30% of the population in the United States. Biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosing NAFLD. Liver histology assesses the amount of fat, and determines type and extent of cell injury, inflammation and fibrosis. However, liver biopsy is invasive and is limited by sampling error. Current radiological diagnostic modalities can evaluate the 'physical' morphology in liver by quantifying the backscattered US signals, but cannot interrogate the 'histochemical' components forming these backscatterers. For example, ultrasound (US) imaging can detect the presence of fat but cannot differentiate steatosis alone from steatohepatitis. Our previous study of photoacoustic physiochemical analysis (PAPCA) has demonstrated that this method can characterize the histological changes in livers during the progression of NAFLD in animal models. In this study, we will further validate PAPCA with human livers. Ex vivo human liver samples with steatosis, fibrosis and cirrhosis will be scanned using optical illumination at wavelengths of 680-1700 nm and compared to histology results. In vivo study on human subjects with confirmed steatosis is planned using our PA-ultrasound (US) parallel imaging system based on Verasonic US imaging flatform with an L7-4 probe. 10 mJ/cm2 per pulse optical energy at 755 nm will be delivered to the skin surface, which is under the safety limit of American National Standard Institute. Preliminary study with ex vivo human tissue has demonstrated the potential of the proposed approach in differentiating human liver conditions.

  13. Metabolic alterations in liver and testes of adult and newborn rats following cadmium administration

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.

    1988-04-01

    A large number of studies have been conducted to understand the effect of cadmium on cellular intermediary metabolism. Although, most of the metal is stored in liver and kidney, the organ affected most in acute toxicity is testis. Increased lipid peroxidation and decreased mitochondrial respiration along with other cellular enzyme activities have been reported to take place due to cadmium administration. The present experiment was designed to study the effect of acute cadmium administration on the activities of some of the tissue enzyme systems that provide the reducing equivalent NADPH. The levels of NADH and NADPH were also measured. All the measurements were conducted in two tissues: liver and testes. The effect of simultaneous administration of zinc on cadmium induced changes was also determined. Newborn animals have been found to be resistant to many effects of cadmium. The present studies were also conducted in newborn rat liver and testes. The purpose of the study is to compare the effects of cadmium on adult and new born rats.

  14. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver in a middle-aged adult with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adult primary undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) is a rare disease. While the etiology of UESL remains largely unknown, association with systemic inflammatory disorders has been observed. Here, we report a case of UESL in a 46-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and without chronic hepatitis or liver cirrhosis. Systematic review of the publicly available English language medical literature identified only 27 cases of UESL in patients aged >45 years and none with SLE. Our patient presented with abdominal pain and had a 2-year history of SLE. Abdominal ultrasonography and enhanced computed tomography revealed a solid mass in the right lobe of the liver. Presumptive diagnosis of atypical hepatocellular carcinoma was made and the patient was treated with segmentectomy of S5 and S4a and cholecystectomy. The final diagnosis of UESL was made according to the pathology results. Since SLE patients may be at increased risk of malignancy, it is possible that the SLE pathogenesis may have contributed to the development of UESL in our patient. According to this case, UESL should be considered when SLE patients present with hepatic space-occupying lesions. PMID:24073982

  15. Hepatoprotective activity of bacoside A against N-nitrosodiethylamine-induced liver toxicity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Janani, Panneerselvam; Sivakumari, Kanakarajan; Parthasarathy, Chandrakesan

    2009-10-01

    N-Nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) is a notorious carcinogen, present in many environmental factors. DEN induces oxidative stress and cellular injury due to enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species; free radical scavengers protect the membranes from DEN-induced damage. The present study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of bacoside A (the active principle isolated from Bacopa monniera Linn.) on carcinogen-induced damage in rat liver. Adult male albino rats were pretreated with 15 mg/kg body weight/day of bacoside A orally (for 14 days) and then intoxicated with single necrogenic dose of N-nitrosodiethylamine (200 mg/kg bodyweight, intraperitonially) and maintained for 7 days. The liver weight, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and activity of serum marker enzymes (aspartate transaminases, alanine transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase) were markedly increased in carcinogen-administered rats, whereas the activities of marker enzymes were near normal in bacoside A-pretreated rats. Activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutatione-S-transferase, and reduced glutathione) in liver also decreased in carcinogen-administered rats, which were significantly elevated in bacoside A-pretreated rats. It is concluded that pretreatment of bacoside A prevents the elevation of LPO and activity of serum marker enzymes and maintains the antioxidant system and thus protects the rats from DEN-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:18679812

  16. Vascular complications after adult living donor liver transplantation: Evaluation with ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Lu, Qiang; Luo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been widely used to treat end-stage liver disease with improvement in surgical technology and the application of new immunosuppressants. Vascular complications after liver transplantation remain a major threat to the survival of recipients. LDLT recipients are more likely to develop vascular complications because of their complex vascular reconstruction and the slender vessels. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical for the survival of graft and recipients. As a non-invasive, cost-effective and non-radioactive method with bedside availability, conventional gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography play important roles in identifying vascular complications in the early postoperative period and during the follow-up. Recently, with the detailed vascular tracing and perfusion visualization, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has significantly improved the diagnosis of postoperative vascular complications. This review focuses on the role of conventional gray-scale ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound and CEUS for early diagnosis of vascular complications after adult LDLT. PMID:26819527

  17. Oral exposure of pubertal male mice to endocrine-disrupting chemicals alters fat metabolism in adult livers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Lin, Xiaojian; Miao, Wenyu; Wang, Linggang; Wu, Yan; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-12-01

    The potential for the exposure of humans and wildlife to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been increasing. Risk assessment for such EDCs is primarily based on detecting the main endpoints related to the endocrine and reproductive systems, while the effects on glucose and fat metabolism have only received limited attention. In this study, pubertal male C57BL/6J mice were orally administered 10 mg/kg body weight cypermethrin (CYP), 100 mg/kg body weight atrazine (ATZ), and 0.1 mg/kg body weight 17α-ethynyestradiol (EE2) for 4 weeks and then switched to a high-energy diet (HD) for 8 weeks. The body weight gain in the EDC-treated groups was lower than that in the control group during exposure and then tended to show values similar to the HD group. The epididymal fat weight, cell size and serum triacylglycerol (TG) and total cholesterol (TCH) levels in the EDC-HD groups were lower than those in the HD group. The transcription of genes related to glycolytic and gluconeogenic processes in the liver was affected by EDC exposure. Furthermore, the expression levels of transcriptional factors including PPARα, PPARγ, and SREBP1C and their target genes related to fatty acid synthesis and oxidation in the liver were also influenced by early life EDC administration. The results showed that early-life-stage exposure to high doses of various environmental EDCs affected the homeostasis of glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the livers of adult male mice. PMID:24916741

  18. Bioreactance Is Not Interchangeable with Thermodilution for Measuring Cardiac Output during Adult Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sangbin; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Gaabsoo; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Choi, Soo Joo; Kwon, Ji Hae; Heo, Burn Young; Gwak, Mi Sook

    2015-01-01

    Background Thermodilution technique using a pulmonary artery catheter is widely used for the assessment of cardiac output (CO) in patients undergoing liver transplantation. However, the unclearness of the risk-benefit ratio of this method has led to an interest in less invasive modalities. Thus, we evaluated whether noninvasive bioreactance CO monitoring is interchangeable with thermodilution technique. Methods Nineteen recipients undergoing adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation were enrolled in this prospective observational study. COs were recorded automatically by the two devices and compared simultaneously at 3-minute intervals. The Bland–Altman plot was used to evaluate the agreement between bioreactance and thermodilution. Clinically acceptable agreement was defined as a percentage error of limits of agreement <30%. The four quadrant plot was used to evaluate concordance between bioreactance and thermodilution. Clinically acceptable concordance was defined as a concordance rate >92%. Results A total of 2640 datasets were collected. The mean CO difference between the two techniques was 0.9 l/min, and the 95% limits of agreement were -3.5 l/min and 5.4 l/min with a percentage error of 53.9%. The percentage errors in the dissection, anhepatic, and reperfusion phase were 50.6%, 56.1%, and 53.5%, respectively. The concordance rate between the two techniques was 54.8%. Conclusion Bioreactance and thermodilution failed to show acceptable interchangeability in terms of both estimating CO and tracking CO changes in patients undergoing liver transplantation. Thus, the use of bioreactance as an alternative CO monitoring to thermodilution, in spite of its noninvasiveness, would be hard to recommend in these surgical patients. PMID:26017364

  19. Adult Human Neurogenesis: From Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases. PMID:21519376

  20. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, Vanessa J

    2006-06-01

    There are essentially 3 types of hepatobiliary disorders associated with parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy: steatosis, cholestasis, and gallbladder sludge/stones. Reported prevalence rates of PN-associated liver disease (PNALD) vary greatly, and there are distinct differences between adult and pediatric patients. Various etiologic factors have been evaluated for significance in contributing to PNALD, including enteral feeding history, septic events, bacterial overgrowth, length of intestinal resection, and prematurity/low birth weight. Etiologic factors specifically related to the PN formulation or nutrient intake have also been evaluated, including excessive calorie intake, dextrose-to-lipid ratio, amino acid dose, taurine deficiency, IV fat emulsion (IVFE) dose, carnitine deficiency, choline deficiency, and continuous vs cyclic infusion. Minor increases in serum aminotransferase concentrations are relatively common in patients receiving PN therapy and generally require no intervention. The primary indicator of cholestasis is a serum conjugated bilirubin >2 mg/dL. When a patient receiving PN develops liver complications, it is necessary to rule out all treatable causes and minimize other risk factors. All potential hepatotoxic medications and herbal supplements should be eliminated. Modifications to the PN regimen that may be helpful include reduction of calories, reduction of IVFE dose to <1 g/kg/d, supplementation of taurine in the infant, and use of cyclic infusion. Initiation of even small amounts of enteral nutrition and use of ursodiol may be beneficial in stimulating bile flow. In the long-term PN patient with severe and progressive liver disease, intestinal or liver transplantation may be the only remaining treatment option. PMID:16772545

  1. Molecular expression and enzymatic characterization of thioredoxin from the carcinogenic human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini.

    PubMed

    Suttiprapa, Sutas; Matchimakul, Pitchaya; Loukas, Alex; Laha, Thewarach; Wongkham, Sopit; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Brindley, Paul J; Sripa, Banchob

    2012-03-01

    The human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, induces inflammation of the hepatobiliary system. Despite being constantly exposed to inimical oxygen radicals released from inflammatory cells, the parasite survives for years. Defense against oxidative damage can be mediated through glutathione and/or thioredoxin utilizing systems. Here, we report the molecular expression and biochemical characterization of a thioredoxin (Trx) from O. viverrini. O. viverrini Trx cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 105 amino acid residues, of molecular mass 11.63 kDa. The predicted protein has similarity to previously characterized thioredoxins with 26-51% identity. Recombinant O. viverrini Trx (Ov-Trx-1) was expressed as soluble protein in E. coli. The recombinant protein showed insulin reduction activity and supported the enzymatic function of O. viverrini thioredoxin peroxidase. Expression of Ov-Trx-1 at mRNA and protein levels was observed in all obtainable developmental stages of the liver fluke. Ov-Trx-1 was also detected in excretory-secretory products released by adult O. viverrini. Immunohistochemistry, Ov-Trx-1 was expressed in nearly all parasite tissue excepted ovary and mature sperms. Interestingly, Ov-Trx-1 was observed in the infected biliary epithelium but not in normal bile ducts. These results suggest that Ov-Trx-1 is essential for the parasite throughout the life cycle. In the host-parasite interaction aspect, Ov-Trx-1 may support thioredoxin peroxidase in protecting the parasite against damage induced by reactive oxygen species from inflammation. PMID:21740981

  2. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response. PMID:27127520

  3. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed. PMID:27517891

  4. Human precision-cut liver slices as an ex vivo model to study idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Mackenzie; Westra, Inge M; Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Dragovic, Sanja; Merema, Marjolijn T; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2013-05-20

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) is a major problem during drug development and has caused drug withdrawal and black-box warnings. Because of the low concordance of the hepatotoxicity of drugs in animals and humans, robust screening methods using human tissue are needed to predict IDILI in humans. According to the inflammatory stress hypothesis, the effects of inflammation interact with the effects of a drug or its reactive metabolite, precipitating toxic reactions in the liver. As a follow-up to our recently published mouse precision-cut liver slices model, an ex vivo model involving human precision-cut liver slices (hPCLS), co-incubated for 24 h with IDILI-related drugs and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was developed to study IDILI mechanisms related to inflammatory stress in humans and to detect potential biomarkers. LPS exacerbated the effects of ketoconazole and clozapine toxicity but not those of their non-IDILI-related comparators, voriconazole and olanzapine. However, the IDILI-related drugs diclofenac, carbamazepine, and troglitazone did not show synergistic toxicity with LPS after incubation for 24 h. Co-incubation of ketoconazole and clozapine with LPS decreased the levels of glutathione in hPCLS, but this was not seen for the other drugs. All drugs affected LPS-induced cytokine release, but interestingly, only ketoconazole and clozapine increased the level of LPS-induced TNF release. Decreased levels of glutathione and cysteine conjugates of clozapine were detected in IDILI-responding livers following cotreatment with LPS. In conclusion, we identified ketoconazole and clozapine as drugs that exhibited synergistic toxicity with LPS, while glutathione and TNF were found to be potential biomarkers for IDILI-inducing drugs mediated by inflammatory stress. hPCLS appear to be suitable for further unraveling the mechanisms of inflammatory stress-associated IDILI. PMID:23565644

  5. Campylobacter spp. in New Zealand raw sheep liver and human campylobacteriosis cases.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, A J; Nicol, C; Hudson, J A

    2005-03-01

    Sheep liver samples were tested for the presence and numbers of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli during both spring and autumn. Over the same period, isolates were obtained from human clinical cases from the same geographical area as where the food samples were purchased. A subset of the C. jejuni isolates was typed by both Penner serotyping and pulsed field gel electrophoresis using the restriction enzyme SmaI, to estimate the proportion of liver isolate types that were also isolated from human cases of campylobacteriosis. Of the 272 liver samples tested, 180 (66.2%) contained Campylobacter. Most of the positive samples contained <3 MPN/g of the organism, and only 12 (6.7%) were contaminated at a level exceeding 100 MPN/g. A total of 180 C. jejuni isolates were obtained from sheep liver and another 200 from human faeces. Of these, 212 isolates were randomly selected for typing, half from raw liver and half from human faeces. More than half (61.1%) of the 106 C. jejuni isolates from liver were of subtypes that were also isolated from human cases. While the C. jejuni present in sheep liver were mostly of subtypes also isolated from human cases, the significance of this food as a vehicle of human campylobacteriosis needs to be examined further in respect to other factors such as dose-response information, consumption data, frequency of undercooking and cross contamination. PMID:15718033

  6. Noninvasive methods, including transient elastography, for the detection of liver disease in adults with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Matthew D; Crotty, Pam; Fatovich, Linda; Wilson, Stephanie; Rabin, Harvey R; Myers, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver disease is the third leading cause of mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, detection of CF-associated liver disease (CFLD) is challenging. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of noninvasive methods for the detection of CFLD with a focus on transient elastography (TE). METHODS: Patients at the Adult CF Clinic of Calgary and Southern Alberta (n=127) underwent liver stiffness measurement (LSM) by TE using the FibroScan (FS, Ecosens, France) M probe; aspartate amino-transferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) and FibroTest (FT) scores were also calculated. The diagnostic performance of these tools for the detection of CFLD (defined as two or more the following criteria: abnormal liver biochemistry, hepatomegaly or sonographic abnormalities other than steatosis) were compared using the area under ROC curves. RESULTS: Forty-seven percent of the cohort was male. The median age was 27 years (interquartile range [IQR] 22 to 37 years) and body mass index 21 kg/m2 (IQR 19 kg/m2 to 23 kg/m2); 25% of patients were on ursodeoxycholic acid and 12% had undergone lung transplantation. The prevalence of CFLD was 14% (n=18). FS was successful in all patients; one (0.8%) patient had poorly reliable results (IQR/M >30% and LSM ≥7.1kPa). Compared with patients without CFLD (n=109), individuals with CFLD had higher median LSM according to FS (3.9 kPa [IQR 3.4 to 4.9 kPa] versus 6.4 kPa [IQR 4.4 to 8.0 kPa]), APRI (0.24 [IQR 0.17 to 0.31] versus 0.50 [IQR 0.22 to 1.18]) and FT scores (0.08 [IQR 0.05 to 1.5] versus 0.18 [IQR 0.11 to 0.35]; all P<0.05). Area under ROC curve for FS, APRI and FT for the detection of CFLD were 0.78 (95% CI 0.65 to 0.92), 0.72 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.87) and 0.76 (95% CI 0.62 to 0.90) (P not significant). At a threshold of >5.2 kPa, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of LSM according to FS for detecting CFLD were 67%, 83%, 40% and 94%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: FS, APRI and FT

  7. Functional Human Liver Preservation and Recovery by Means of Subnormothermic Machine Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Weeder, Pepijn D.; Sridharan, Gautham V.; Uygun, Basak E.; Karimian, Negin G.; Porte, Robert J.; Markmann, James F.; Yeh, Heidi; Uygun, Korkut

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a severe shortage of liver grafts available for transplantation. Novel organ preservation techniques are needed to expand the pool of donor livers. Machine perfusion of donor liver grafts is an alternative to traditional cold storage of livers and holds much promise as a modality to expand the donor organ pool. We have recently described the potential benefit of subnormothermic machine perfusion of human livers. Machine perfused livers showed improving function and restoration of tissue ATP levels. Additionally, machine perfusion of liver grafts at subnormothermic temperatures allows for objective assessment of the functionality and suitability of a liver for transplantation. In these ways a great many livers that were previously discarded due to their suboptimal quality can be rescued via the restorative effects of machine perfusion and utilized for transplantation. Here we describe this technique of subnormothermic machine perfusion in detail. Human liver grafts allocated for research are perfused via the hepatic artery and portal vein with an acellular oxygenated perfusate at 21 °C. PMID:25938299

  8. Developing Resourceful Humans. Adult Education within the Economic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynn Elen, Ed.

    This book, which explores the shifting paradigm from human resource development to developing resourceful humans, establishes the historical position of adult education within the economic context, discusses human capital propositions, and examines the learning dimensions of economic and educational change. The following chapters are included:…

  9. Characterisation of theophylline metabolism in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Robson, R A; Matthews, A P; Miners, J O; McManus, M E; Meyer, U A; Hall, P M; Birkett, D J

    1987-01-01

    1. A radiometric high performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the assay of theophylline metabolism in vitro by the microsomal fraction of human liver. 2. Formation of the three metabolites of theophylline (3-methylxanthine, 1-methylxanthine and 1,3-dimethyluric acid) were linear with protein concentrations to 4 mg ml-1 and with incubation times up to 180 min. 3. The coefficients of variation for the formation of 3-methylxanthine, 1-methylxanthine and 1,3-dimethyluric acid were 1.2%, 1% and 1.6%, respectively. 4. Theophylline is metabolised by microsomal enzymes with a requirement for NADPH. 5. The mean (n = 7) Km values for 1-demethylation, 3-demethylation and 8-hydroxylation were 545, 630 and 788 microM, respectively, and the mean Vmax values were 2.65, 2.84 and 11.23 pmol min-1 mg-1, respectively. 6. There was a high correlation between the Km and Vmax values for the two demethylation pathways suggesting that the demethylations are performed by the same enzyme. 7. Overall the in vitro studies are consistent with the in vivo results which suggest the involvement of two cytochrome P-450 isozymes in the metabolism of theophylline. PMID:3663445

  10. Why Teach the Humanities to Adult Basic Education Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mocker, Donald W., Ed.; Jones, William C., Ed.

    The publication contains an article on curriculum selection in adult basic education (ABE), three presentations on the humanities and ABE, and a concluding commentary. An introductory article, "Criteria for Selecting Curriculum in Adult Basic Education" by Donald Mocker, emphasizes the need for broader criteria for selection of ABE curriculum.…

  11. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  12. Humanizing Adult Education Research: Five Stories from the 1930's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Ronald

    Taken from the author's doctoral dissertation, this award-winning monograph describes a method for humanizing educational research in adult education and provides five stories of adult education efforts in the 1930's as examples of such research. The method described suggests valuing qualitative data as much as quantitative in the field of…

  13. Technology and the Adult Degree Program: The Human Element

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriquez, Frank G.; Nash, Susan Smith

    2004-01-01

    While technology has for many years been a critical component in programs for adults and calls to mind sophisticated gadgetry with expensive price tags, it is often the nexus where technology and humans intersect that proves most critical to the success and quality of adult degree programs.

  14. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  15. In vitro metabolism of (-)-camphor using human liver microsomes and CYP2A6.

    PubMed

    Gyoubu, Kunihiko; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2007-02-01

    The in vitro metabolism of (-)-camphor was examined in human liver microsomes and recombinant enzymes. Biotransformation of (-)-camphor was investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). (-)-Camphor was oxidized to 5-exo-hydroxyfenchone by human liver microsomal cytochrome (P450) enzymes. The formation of metabolites of (-)-camphor was determined by the relative abundance of mass fragments and retention time on gas chromatography (GC). CYP2A6 was the major enzyme involved in the hydroxylation of (-)-camphor by human liver microsomes, based on the following lines of evidence. First, of eleven recombinant human P450 enzymes tested, CYP2A6 catalyzed the oxidation of (-)-camphor. Second, oxidation of (-)-camphor was inhibited by (+)-menthofuran and anti-CYP2A6 antibody. Finally, there was a good correlation between CYP2A6 contents and (-)-camphor hydroxylation activities in liver microsomes of 9 human samples. PMID:17268056

  16. Effects of donor/recipient human leukocyte antigen mismatch on human cytomegalovirus replication following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, RW; Mattes, FM; Rolando, N; Rolles, K; Smith, C; Shirling, G; Atkinson, C; Burroughs, AK; Milne, RSB; Emery, VC; Griffiths, PD

    2015-01-01

    Background Natural immunity against cytomegalovirus (CMV) can control virus replication after solid organ transplantation; however, it is not known which components of the adaptive immune system mediate this protection. We investigated whether this protection requires human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching between donor and recipient by exploiting the fact that, unlike transplantation of other solid organs, liver transplantation does not require HLA matching, but some donor and recipient pairs may nevertheless be matched by chance. Methods To further investigate this immune control, we determined whether chance HLA matching between donor (D) and recipient (R) in liver transplants affected a range of viral replication parameters. Results In total, 274 liver transplant recipients were stratified according to matches at the HLA A, HLA B, and HLA DR loci. The incidence of CMV viremia, kinetics of replication, and peak viral load were similar between the HLA matched and mismatched patients in the D+/R+ and D−/R+ transplant groups. D+/R− transplants with 1 or 2 mismatches at the HLA DR locus had a higher incidence of CMV viremia >3000 genomes/mL blood compared to patients matched at this locus (78% vs. 17%; P = 0.01). Evidence was seen that matching at the HLA A locus had a small effect on peak viral loads in D+/R− patients, with median peak loads of 3540 and 14,706 genomes/mL in the 0 and combined (1 and 2) mismatch groups, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusion Overall, our data indicate that, in the setting of liver transplantation, prevention of CMV infection and control of CMV replication by adaptive immunity is minimally influenced by HLA matching of the donor and recipient. Our data raise questions about immune control of CMV in the liver and also about the cells in which the virus is amplified to give rise to CMV viremia. PMID:25572799

  17. Volumetric Growth of the Liver in the Human Fetus: An Anatomical, Hydrostatic, and Statistical Study

    PubMed Central

    Szpinda, Michał; Paruszewska-Achtel, Monika; Woźniak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Elminowska-Wenda, Gabriela; Dombek, Małgorzata; Szpinda, Anna; Badura, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Using anatomical, hydrostatic, and statistical methods, liver volumes were assessed in 69 human fetuses of both sexes aged 18–30 weeks. No sex differences were found. The median of liver volume achieved by hydrostatic measurements increased from 6.57 cm3 at 18–21 weeks through 14.36 cm3 at 22–25 weeks to 20.77 cm3 at 26–30 weeks, according to the following regression: y = −26.95 + 1.74 × age ± Z  × (−3.15 + 0.27 × age). The median of liver volume calculated indirectly according to the formula liver volume = 0.55 × liver length × liver transverse diameter × liver sagittal diameter increased from 12.41 cm3 at 18–21 weeks through 28.21 cm3 at 22–25 weeks to 49.69 cm3 at 26–30 weeks. There was a strong relationship (r = 0.91, p < 0.001) between the liver volumes achieved by hydrostatic (x) and indirect (y) methods, expressed by y = −0.05 + 2.16x  ± 7.26. The liver volume should be calculated as follows liver volume = 0.26 × liver length × liver transverse diameter × liver sagittal diameter. The age-specific liver volumes are of great relevance in the evaluation of the normal hepatic growth and the early diagnosis of fetal micro- and macrosomias. PMID:26413551

  18. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  19. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults.

    PubMed

    Khonsari, Shadi; Suganthy, Mayuran; Burczynska, Beata; Dang, Vu; Choudhury, Manika; Pachenari, Azra

    2016-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  20. Fixation methods for electron microscopy of human and other liver

    PubMed Central

    Wisse, Eddie; Braet, Filip; Duimel, Hans; Vreuls, Celien; Koek, Ger; Olde Damink, Steven WM; van den Broek, Maartje AJ; De Geest, Bart; Dejong, Cees HC; Tateno, Chise; Frederik, Peter

    2010-01-01

    For an electron microscopic study of the liver, expertise and complicated, time-consuming processing of hepatic tissues and cells is needed. The interpretation of electron microscopy (EM) images requires knowledge of the liver fine structure and experience with the numerous artifacts in fixation, embedding, sectioning, contrast staining and microscopic imaging. Hence, the aim of this paper is to present a detailed summary of different methods for the preparation of hepatic cells and tissue, for the purpose of preserving long-standing expertise and to encourage new investigators and clinicians to include EM studies of liver cells and tissue in their projects. PMID:20556830

  1. The human liver-specific proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Mardinoglu, Adil; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Edlund, Karolina; Lundberg, Emma; Pontén, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-07-01

    Human liver physiology and the genetic etiology of the liver diseases can potentially be elucidated through the identification of proteins with enriched expression in the liver. Here, we combined data from RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and antibody-based immunohistochemistry across all major human tissues to explore the human liver proteome with enriched expression, as well as the cell type-enriched expression in hepatocyte and bile duct cells. We identified in total 477 protein-coding genes with elevated expression in the liver: 179 genes have higher expression as compared to all the other analyzed tissues; 164 genes have elevated transcript levels in the liver shared with at least one other tissue type; and an additional 134 genes have a mild level of increased expression in the liver. We identified the precise localization of these proteins through antibody-based protein profiling and the subcellular localization of these proteins through immunofluorescent-based profiling. We also identified the biological processes and metabolic functions associated with these proteins, investigated their contribution in the occurrence of liver diseases, and identified potential targets for their treatment. Our study demonstrates the use of RNA-Seq and antibody-based immunohistochemistry for characterizing the human liver proteome, as well as the use of tissue-specific proteins in identification of novel drug targets and discovery of biomarkers.-Kampf, C., Mardinoglu, A., Fagerberg, L., Hallström, B. M., Edlund, K., Lundberg, E., Pontén, F., Nielsen, J., Uhlen, M. The human liver-specific proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling. PMID:24648543

  2. Metabolism of chamaechromone in vitro with human liver microsomes and recombinant human drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yan; Hu, Haihong; Qiu, Yunqing; Zheng, Jinqi; Wang, Linrun; Zhang, Xingguo; Zeng, Su

    2014-04-01

    Chamaechromone is a major component in the dried roots of Stellera chamaejasme with antihepatitis B virus and insecticidal activity. In this study, metabolic profiles of chamaechromone were investigated in human liver microsomes. One monohydroxide and two monoglucuronides of chamaechromone were identified. The enzyme kinetics for both hydroxylation and glucuronidation were fitted to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The hydroxylation of chamaechromone was inhibited by α-naphthoflavone, and predominantly catalyzed by recombinant human cytochrome P450 1A2, whereas the glucuronidation was inhibited by quercetin, 1-naphthol, and fluconazole, and mainly catalyzed by recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A3, 1A7, 1A9, and 2B7. PMID:24687737

  3. Vascularized subcutaneous human liver tissue from engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yusuke; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Ohashi, Kazuo; Koike, Makiko; Utoh, Rie; Hasegawa, Hideko; Muraoka, Izumi; Suematsu, Takashi; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    Subcutaneous liver tissue engineering is an attractive and minimally invasive approach used to curative treat hepatic failure and inherited liver diseases. However, graft failure occurs frequently due to insufficient infiltration of blood vessels (neoangiogenesis), while the maintenance of hepatocyte phenotype and function requires in vivo development of the complex cellular organization of the hepatic lobule. Here we describe a subcutaneous human liver construction allowing for rapidly vascularized grafts by transplanting engineered cellular sheets consisting of human primary hepatocytes adhered onto a fibroblast layer. The engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets (EHFSs) showed superior expression levels of vascularization-associated growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta 1, and hepatocyte growth factor) in vitro. EHFSs developed into vascularized subcutaneous human liver tissues contained glycogen stores, synthesized coagulation factor IX, and showed significantly higher synthesis rates of liver-specific proteins (albumin and alpha 1 anti-trypsin) in vivo than tissues from hepatocyte-only sheets. The present study describes a new approach for vascularized human liver organogenesis under mouse skin. This approach could prove valuable for establishing novel cell therapies for liver diseases. PMID:26142777

  4. Humanities and the Adult Learner in an Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Dale; Kamholtz, Jonathan

    Humanities courses have often been given little attention in continuing education for adults, possibly because they have been viewed as not "practical" or not "job-oriented" enough in our career-oriented, technologically advanced society. However, the humanities should be an integral part of our culture and of the lives of educated persons--a…

  5. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 greatly contributes to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in human liver.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Mitsutoshi; Fujii, Hideaki; Atsuda, Koichiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2015-04-01

    The major metabolic pathway of vildagliptin in mice, rats, dogs, and humans is hydrolysis at the cyano group to produce a carboxylic acid metabolite M20.7 (LAY151), whereas the major metabolic enzyme of vildagliptin has not been identified. In the present study, we determined the contribution rate of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in the liver. We performed hydrolysis assay of the cyano group of vildagliptin using mouse, rat, and human liver samples. Additionally, DPP-4 activities in each liver sample were assessed by DPP-4 activity assay using the synthetic substrate H-glycyl-prolyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (Gly-Pro-AMC). M20.7 formation rates in liver microsomes were higher than those in liver cytosol. M20.7 formation rate was significantly positively correlated with the DPP-4 activity using Gly-Pro-AMC in liver samples (r = 0.917, P < 0.01). The formation of M20.7 in mouse, rat, and human liver S9 fraction was inhibited by sitagliptin, a selective DPP-4 inhibitor. These findings indicate that DPP-4 is greatly involved in vildagliptin hydrolysis in the liver. Additionally, we established stable single expression systems of human DPP-4 and its R623Q mutant, which is the nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism of human DPP-4, in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells to investigate the effect of R623Q mutant on vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity. M20.7 formation rate in HEK293 cells expressing human DPP-4 was significantly higher than that in control HEK293 cells. Interestingly, R623Q mutation resulted in a decrease of the vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity. Our findings might be useful for the prediction of interindividual variability in vildagliptin pharmacokinetics. PMID:25597851

  6. Laminin alpha 5, a major transcript of normal and malignant rat liver epithelial cells, is differentially expressed in developing and adult liver.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, T; Medina, J L; Bade, E G

    1997-11-25

    The laminin family of extracellular matrix glycoproteins plays a major role in cell migration and differentiation and in tumor cell invasion. As previously shown, the laminin deposited by normal and malignant rat liver epithelial cells in their extracellular matrix (ECM) and into their ECM migration tracks does not contain a typical (EHS-like) alpha 1 heavy chain. By RT-PCR screening we have now identified two alpha chains among a total of five additional laminin chains produced by these cells. Three of the newly identified chains were not previously known for the rat. Their sequences have been deposited in the EMBL nucleotide sequence data bank. The alpha 5 chain now identified is expressed at comparably high levels by both the normal and the malignant liver epithelial cells. The chain is also expressed in fetal liver together with the alpha 2 and beta 2 chains, but it is only vestigially expressed in the mature organ as shown by RT-PCR. These results suggest for alpha 5 a role in development and production of the chain by only a small subset of cells in adult liver. At the level of detection used, no changes were observed in regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy. In addition to the alpha 5 chain, the cultured cells express the beta 1 and beta 2 light chains, indicating the expression of more than one laminin isoform by the same cell line. The expression of the alpha 5 chain and of the other new non-EHS isoform chains was also analyzed in various tissues. The malignant liver epithelial cells, but not their nontumorigenic parental cells, also express, in addition to the alpha 5 chain the alpha 2 chain, which is expressed at high level by the NBT II bladder carcinoma cell line, suggesting a relationship with malignancy. PMID:9417868

  7. Distribution of nitric oxide synthase in normal and cirrhotic human liver

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Lance; Puttagunta, Lakshmi; Martinez-Cuesta, Maria Angeles; Kneteman, Norm; Mayers, Irvin; Moqbel, Redwan; Hamid, Qutayba; Radomski, Marek W.

    2002-01-01

    Chronic liver disorders represent a serious health problem, considering that 300 million people worldwide are hepatitis B virus carriers, and 8,000–10,000 patients per year, in the U.S. alone, die as a result of liver failure caused by hepatitis C infection. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) regulates hepatic vasculature; however, the patterns of expression and activity of NOS proteins in healthy and diseased human livers are unknown. Sections of diseased (n = 42) and control livers (n = 14) were collected during orthotopic liver transplants and partial hepatectomy. The diseased sections included alcoholic cirrhosis, viral hepatitis, cholestasis, acute necrosis, and uncommon pathologies including α1-anti-trypsin disorder. The endothelial NOS (eNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS), and neuronal NOS (nNOS) were studied by using the citrulline assay, Western immunoblot, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. The systemic generation of plasma NO metabolites was measured by HPLC. In control livers, Ca2+-dependent and –independent NOS activities were identified by Western analysis as eNOS and iNOS, respectively. The eNOS was uniformly distributed in the hepatocytes and also detected in the endothelium of hepatic arteries, terminal hepatic venules, sinusoids, and in biliary epithelium. The iNOS was detected in hepatocytes and localized mainly in the periportal zone of the liver acinus. This pattern of distribution of eNOS and iNOS in normal liver was confirmed by in situ hybridization. In diseased livers, there was a significant increase in Ca2+-independent NOS with the corresponding strong appearance of iNOS in the cirrhotic areas. The eNOS was translocated to hepatocyte nuclei. Thus, eNOS and iNOS proteins are differentially expressed in healthy human liver, and this expression is significantly altered in cirrhotic liver disorders. PMID:12482944

  8. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  9. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of cDNA for human liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Takiguchi, M.; Amaya, Y.; Kawamoto, S.; Matsuda, I.; Mori, M.

    1987-01-01

    Arginase (EC3.5.3.1) catalyzes the last step of the urea cycle in the liver of ureotelic animals. Inherited deficiency of the enzyme results in argininemia, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hyperammonemia. To facilitate investigation of the enzyme and gene structures and to elucidate the nature of the mutation in argininemia, the authors isolated cDNA clones for human liver arginase. Oligo(dT)-primed and random primer human liver cDNA libraries in lambda gt11 were screened using isolated rat arginase cDNA as a probe. Two of the positive clones, designated lambda hARG6 and lambda hARG109, contained an overlapping cDNA sequence with an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 322 amino acid residues (predicted M/sub r/, 34,732), a 5'-untranslated sequence of 56 base pairs, a 3'-untranslated sequence of 423 base pairs, and a poly(A) segment. Arginase activity was detected in Escherichia coli cells transformed with the plasmid carrying lambda hARG6 cDNA insert. RNA gel blot analysis of human liver RNA showed a single mRNA of 1.6 kilobases. The predicted amino acid sequence of human liver arginase is 87% and 41% identical with those of the rat liver and yeast enzymes, respectively. There are several highly conserved segments among the human, rat, and yeast enzymes.

  10. Embryonic----Fetal Hb switch in humans: studies on erythroid bursts generated by embryonic progenitors from yolk sac and liver.

    PubMed

    Peschle, C; Migliaccio, A R; Migliaccio, G; Petrini, M; Calandrini, M; Russo, G; Mastroberardino, G; Presta, M; Gianni, A M; Comi, P

    1984-04-01

    The synthesis of embryonic (zeta, epsilon), fetal (alpha, gamma), and adult (beta) globin was evaluated in human yolk sacs (YS) and livers at different ontogenic stages (i.e., from 6 through 10-12 wk of age) by means of analytical isoelectric focusing. Globin production was comparatively evaluated in vivo (i.e., in directly labeled erythroblasts from YS and liver) and in vitro [i.e., in erythroid bursts generated in culture by erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) from the same erythropoietic tissues]. Erythroid bursts generated in vitro by BFU-E from 6-wk livers and YS show essentially a "fetal" globin synthetic pattern: this is in sharp contrast to the "embryonic" pattern in corresponding liver and YS erythroblasts directly labeled in vivo. The invitro phenomenon suggests that (i) 6-wk BFU-E constitute a new generation of progenitors, which have already switched from an embryonic to a fetal program, and/or (ii) expression of their fetal program is induced by unknown in vitro factor(s), which may underlie the in vivo switch at later ontogenic stages. It is emphasized that 6- to 7-wk BFU-E are endowed with the potential for in vitro synthesis of not only epsilon- and gamma-chains but also some beta-globin. In general, we observed an inverse correlation between the levels of epsilon- and beta-chain synthesis. These results, together with previous studies on fetal, perinatal, and adult BFU-E, are compatible with models suggesting that in ontogeny the chromatin configuration is gradually modified at the level of the non-alpha gene cluster, thus leading to a 5'----3' activation of globin genes in a balanced fashion. PMID:6201856

  11. Isolation and characterization of human liver guanine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N K; Glantz, M D

    1985-01-01

    Guanine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.3, guanine aminohydrolase [GAH]) was purified 3248-fold from human liver to homogeneity with a specific activity of 21.5. A combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation, and DEAE-cellulose, hydroxylapatite, and affinity chromatography with guanine triphosphate ligand were used to purify the enzyme. The enzyme was a dimer protein of a molecular weight of 120,000 with each subunit of 59,000 as determined by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. Isoelectric focusing gave a pI of 4.76. It was found to be an acidic protein, as evidenced by the amino acid analysis, enriched with glutamate, aspartate, alanine and glycine. It showed a sharp pH optimum of 8.0. The apparent Km for guanine was determined to be 1.53 X 10(-5) M at pH 6.0 and 2 X 10(-4) M for 8-azaguanine as a substrate at pH 6.0. The enzyme was found to be sensitive to p-hydroxymercuribenzoate inhibition with a Ki of 1.53 X 10(-5) M and a Ki of 5 X 10(-5) M with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide as an inhibitor. The inhibition with iodoacetic acid showed only a 7% loss in the activity at 1 X 10(-4) M and a 24% loss at 1 X 10(-3) M after 30 min of incubation, whereas p-hydroxymercuribenzoate incubation for 30 min resulted in a 91% loss of activity at a concentration of 1 X 10(-4) M. Guanine was the substrate for all of the inhibition studies. The enzyme was observed to be stable up to 40 degrees C, with a loss of almost all activity at 65 degrees C with 30 min incubation. Two pKa values were obtained at 5.85 and 8.0. Analysis of the N-terminal amino acid proved to be valine while the C-terminal residue was identified as alanine. PMID:3966794

  12. Acute lethal graft-versus-host disease stimulates cellular proliferation in the adult rat liver.

    PubMed

    Klein, R M; Clancy, J; Stuart, S

    1982-11-01

    The present investigation was designed to analyse the effects of acute lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in adult (DA x LEW)F1 rats on cellular proliferation within the liver. The influence of the host thymus on GVHD-induced proliferation was also assessed. From 1-28 days after initiation of GVHD [3H]thymidine ([3H]-TdR) was injected i.v. and rats were killed one hour later. Percentage labelled cells (LI) of periportal infiltrating cells (PIC), hepatocytes (H), and sinusoidal lining cells (SC) were counted. Mean values for control rats were 0.3 +/- 0.1% (H), 0.4 +/- 0.1% (SC) and 0.2 +/- 0.1% (PIC). GVHD rats demonstrated a significant increase in LI of PIC (days 1-21), SC (days 2-17) and H (days 2-17). Most labelled cells in PIC were large lymphocytes. Peak LI values were 7.0 +/- 1.0% PIC (day 17), 6.8 +/- 0.9% SC (day 17), and 5.2 +/- 0.9% H (day 7), with all cellular compartments returning to near normal LI values by day 28. Stimulation of cellular proliferation occurred in all three liver cell compartments in neonatally thymectomized (TXM) rats. The intensity of GVHD-induced cell proliferation was significantly decreased at day 7 in all compartments and PIC was dramatically decreased at day 21 in TXM-GVHD rats as compared to non-TXM-GVHD rats. It is hypothesized that the general stimulation of hepatocyte cell proliferation in GVHD is related to the secretion of lymphokines by primarily donor and secondarily host T cells in the periportal infiltrate. PMID:7172201

  13. Neonatal Androgenization Exacerbates Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury in Adult Rats, an Effect Abrogated by Estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Ellefson, Whitney M.; Lakner, Ashley M.; Hamilton, Alicia; McKillop, Iain H.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Steuerwald, Nury M.; Huet, Yvette M.; Schrum, Laura W.

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) affects millions of people worldwide and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. However, fewer than 10% of heavy drinkers progress to later stages of injury, suggesting other factors in ALD development, including environmental exposures and genetics. Females display greater susceptibility to the early damaging effects of ethanol. Estrogen (E2) and ethanol metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, CYP450) are implicated in sex differences of ALD. Sex steroid hormones are developmentally regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, which controls sex-specific cycling of gonadal steroid production and expression of hepatic enzymes. The aim of this study was to determine if early postnatal inhibition of adult cyclic E2 alters ethanol metabolizing enzyme expression contributing to the development of ALD in adulthood. An androgenized rat model was used to inhibit cyclic E2 production. Control females (Ctrl), androgenized females (Andro) and Andro females with E2 implants were administered either an ethanol or isocalorically-matched control Lieber-DeCarli diet for four weeks and liver injury and CYP450 expression assessed. Androgenization exacerbated the deleterious effects of ethanol demonstrated by increased steatosis, lipid peroxidation, profibrotic gene expression and decreased antioxidant defenses compared to Ctrl. Additionally, CYP2E1 expression was down-regulated in Andro animals on both diets. No change was observed in CYP1A2 protein expression. Further, continuous exogenous administration of E2 to Andro in adulthood attenuated these effects, suggesting that E2 has protective effects in the androgenized animal. Therefore, early postnatal inhibition of cyclic E2 modulates development and progression of ALD in adulthood. PMID:22206017

  14. Liver and lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis: an adult cystic fibrosis centre's experience.

    PubMed

    Sivam, S; Al-Hindawi, Y; Di Michiel, J; Moriarty, C; Spratt, P; Jansz, P; Malouf, M; Plit, M; Pleass, H; Havryk, A; Bowen, D; Haber, P; Glanville, A R; Bye, P T P

    2016-07-01

    Liver disease develops in one-third of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). It is rare for liver disease to have its onset after 20 years of age. Lung disease, however, is usually more severe in adulthood. A retrospective analysis was performed on nine patients. Three patients required lung transplantation approximately a decade after liver transplant, and another underwent combined liver and lung transplants. Four additional patients with liver transplants are awaiting assessment for lung transplants. One patient is awaiting combined liver and lung transplants. With increased survival in CF, several patients may require more than single organ transplantation. PMID:27405894

  15. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  16. Human precision-cut liver slices as a model to test antifibrotic drugs in the early onset of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Westra, Inge M; Mutsaers, Henricus A M; Luangmonkong, Theerut; Hadi, Mackenzie; Oosterhuis, Dorenda; de Jong, Koert P; Groothuis, Geny M M; Olinga, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Liver fibrosis is the progressive accumulation of connective tissue ultimately resulting in loss of organ function. Currently, no effective antifibrotics are available due to a lack of reliable human models. Here we investigated the fibrotic process in human precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) and studied the efficacy of multiple putative antifibrotic compounds. Our results demonstrated that human PCLS remained viable for 48h and the early onset of fibrosis was observed during culture, as demonstrated by an increased gene expression of Heat Shock Protein 47 (HSP47) and Pro-Collagen 1A1 (PCOL1A1) as well as increased collagen 1 protein levels. SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) showed a marked decrease in HSP47 and PCOL1A1 gene expression, whereas specific inhibitors of Smad 3 and Rac-1 showed no or only minor effects. Regarding the studied antifibrotics, gene levels of HSP47 and PCOL1A1 could be down-regulated with sunitinib and valproic acid, while PCOL1A1 expression was reduced following treatment with rosmarinic acid, tetrandrine and pirfenidone. These results are in contrast with prior data obtained in rat PCLS, indicating that antifibrotic drug efficacy is clearly species-specific. Thus, human PCLS is a promising model for liver fibrosis. Moreover, MAPK signaling plays an important role in the onset of fibrosis in this model and transforming growth factor beta pathway inhibitors appear to be more effective than platelet-derived growth factor pathway inhibitors in halting fibrogenesis in PCLS. PMID:27235791

  17. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, April D; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the 'classical' (neutral) and 'alternative' (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. PMID:23391614

  18. A Milestone: Approval of CEUS for Diagnostic Liver Imaging in Adults and Children in the USA.

    PubMed

    Seitz, K; Strobel, D

    2016-06-01

    The approval of microbubbles with the inert gas sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and a palmitic acid shell (SonoVue(®), Bracco Geneva, CH) for the diagnostic imaging of liver tumors in adults and children by the FDA in the United States represents a milestone for contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS).This warrants a look back at the history of the development of CEUS. The first publications based on echocardiographic observations of right ventricular contrast phenomena caused by tiny air bubbles following i. v. injection of indocyanine green appeared around 1970 1 2 3. A longer period of sporadic publications but no real progress then followed since, in contrast to X-ray methods, ultrasound works quite well without a contrast agent.It is noteworthy that the foundations for further development were primarily laid in Europe. The development and approval (1991) of the contrast agent Echovist(®) by a German contrast manufacturer for echocardiography unsuitable for passing through lungcapillaries 4 5 resulted in the first extracardiac indications, e. g. for detecting retrovesical reflux and tubal patency, in the mid-1980 s 6 7 8. The sensitivity of color Doppler was not able to compensate for the lack of an ultrasound contrast agent compared to CT with its obligatory contrast administration.Studies of SHU 508 - microbubbles of air moderately stabilized with galactose and palmitic acid - began in 1990 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 and the contrast agent was then introduced in 1995 in Germany as Levovist(®). The most important publications by Blomley, Cosgrove, Leen, and Albrecht are named here on a representative basis 16 17 18 19 20.SHU 508 along with other US contrast agents provided impressive proof of the superiority of CEUS for the diagnosis of liver metastases. However, practical application remained complicated and required skill and technical know-how because of a lack of suitable software on US units 21 22 23 24 25. The monograph regarding the use of contrast agent in

  19. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD. PMID:26988110

  20. Processing highly porous calcium phosphate ceramics for use in bioreactor cores for culturing human liver cells in-vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finoli, Anthony

    Chronic liver disease is the 11th highest cause of death in the United States claiming over 30,000 lives in 2009. The current treatment for chronic liver failure is liver transplantation but the availability of tissue is far less than the number of patients in need. To develop human liver tissue in the lab a 3D culturing environment must be created to support the growth of a complex tissue. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been chosen as a scaffold material because of its biocompatibility in the body and the ability to create a bioresorbable scaffold. By using a ceramic material, it is possible to create a three dimensional, protective environment in which tissue can grow. The first part of this study is to examine the behavior of adult human liver cells grown on composites of HAp and different biocompatible hydrogels. Porous HAp has been created using an emulsion foaming technique and cells are injected into the structure after being suspended in a hydrogel and are kept in culture for up to 28 days. Functional assays, gene expression and fluorescent microscopy will be used to examine these cultures. The second part of this study will be to develop a processing technique to create a resorbable scaffold that incorporates a vascular system template. Previous experiments have shown the high temperature decomposition of HAp into resorbable calcium phosphates will be used to create a multiphase material. By controlling the amount of transformation product formed, it is proposed that the resorption of the scaffold can be tailored. To introduce a pore network to guide the growth of a vascular system, a positive-negative casting technique has also been developed. A positive polymer copy can be made of a natural vascular system and ceramic is foamed around the copy. During sintering, the polymer is pyrolyzed leaving a multiscale pore network in the ceramic. By combining these techniques, it is proposed that a calcium phosphate bioreactor core can be processed that is suitable for

  1. Metabolic profiling during ex vivo machine perfusion of the human liver

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Bote G.; Sridharan, Gautham V.; Weeder, Pepijn D.; Avruch, James H.; Saeidi, Nima; Özer, Sinan; Geerts, Sharon; Porte, Robert J.; Heger, Michal; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Martins, Paulo N.; Markmann, James F.; Yeh, Heidi; Uygun, Korkut

    2016-01-01

    As donor organ shortages persist, functional machine perfusion is under investigation to improve preservation of the donor liver. The transplantation of donation after circulatory death (DCD) livers is limited by poor outcomes, but its application may be expanded by ex vivo repair and assessment of the organ before transplantation. Here we employed subnormothermic (21 °C) machine perfusion of discarded human livers combined with metabolomics to gain insight into metabolic recovery during machine perfusion. Improvements in energetic cofactors and redox shifts were observed, as well as reversal of ischemia-induced alterations in selected pathways, including lactate metabolism and increased TCA cycle intermediates. We next evaluated whether DCD livers with steatotic and severe ischemic injury could be discriminated from ‘transplantable’ DCD livers. Metabolomic profiling was able to cluster livers with similar metabolic patterns based on the degree of injury. Moreover, perfusion parameters combined with differences in metabolic factors suggest variable mechanisms that result in poor energy recovery in injured livers. We conclude that machine perfusion combined with metabolomics has significant potential as a clinical instrument for the assessment of preserved livers. PMID:26935866

  2. Metabolic profiling during ex vivo machine perfusion of the human liver.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Bote G; Sridharan, Gautham V; Weeder, Pepijn D; Avruch, James H; Saeidi, Nima; Özer, Sinan; Geerts, Sharon; Porte, Robert J; Heger, Michal; van Gulik, Thomas M; Martins, Paulo N; Markmann, James F; Yeh, Heidi; Uygun, Korkut

    2016-01-01

    As donor organ shortages persist, functional machine perfusion is under investigation to improve preservation of the donor liver. The transplantation of donation after circulatory death (DCD) livers is limited by poor outcomes, but its application may be expanded by ex vivo repair and assessment of the organ before transplantation. Here we employed subnormothermic (21 °C) machine perfusion of discarded human livers combined with metabolomics to gain insight into metabolic recovery during machine perfusion. Improvements in energetic cofactors and redox shifts were observed, as well as reversal of ischemia-induced alterations in selected pathways, including lactate metabolism and increased TCA cycle intermediates. We next evaluated whether DCD livers with steatotic and severe ischemic injury could be discriminated from 'transplantable' DCD livers. Metabolomic profiling was able to cluster livers with similar metabolic patterns based on the degree of injury. Moreover, perfusion parameters combined with differences in metabolic factors suggest variable mechanisms that result in poor energy recovery in injured livers. We conclude that machine perfusion combined with metabolomics has significant potential as a clinical instrument for the assessment of preserved livers. PMID:26935866

  3. [Macrophage activation syndrome in primary human herpes virus-6 infection: a rare condition after liver transplantation in infants].

    PubMed

    Lecointe, D; Fabre, M; Habes, D; Mielot, F; Bernard, O; Nordmann, P

    2000-12-01

    Human herpes virus-6 primary infection generally occurs during the first three years of childhood and is generally asymptomatic. The virus has been identified as the causal agent of exanthemum subitum in children or mononucleosis-like disease in adults, and may also cause several disorders in immunocompromised patients. We report a clinical case of acute rejection observed 29 days after orthotopic liver transplantation in a 22-month-old child associated with acute hepatitis and a hemophagocytic syndrome on day 38. Human herpes virus-6 primary infection was identified based on several virological tests: seroconversion, detection of viral DNA in bone marrow and peripheral blood after polymerase chain reaction, and detection of viral replication in peripheral blood. Tests for Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus or Parvovirus B19 infections were negative. After treatment by ganciclovir (Cymévan(R)), clinical status improved. PMID:11173737

  4. Analysis of histone modifications at human ribosomal DNA in liver cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Feng; Shen, Xingyong; Fan, Li; Yu, Zhaocai

    2015-01-01

    Human liver cancer is the cancer commonly seen clinically. The transcription of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a critical step for cells, and epigenetic marks such as post-translational histone modifications have been involved in the regulation of rDNA transcription. But less is known about the pathogenesis of the liver cancers concerning the rDNA transcription regulation. Here we aligned the ChIP-seq data of histone modification markers and CTCF to the human genome assembly which contains a single rDNA repeat in human liver cancer cell and validated their distribution with ChIP-QPCR. Human liver cancer cell possesses a higher enrichment of H3K4me1 and H3K27me3 at ~28 kb within the intergenic spacer (IGS) of rDNA and a higher enrichment of H3K4me3 and H3K27ac upstream of TSS. Furtherly, we studied whether UBF could affect histone modification markers and CTCF at rDNA in human liver cancer cell. UBF depletion leads to a decrease of gene activation mark H3K4me3 across the rDNA promoter. And other histone modification marks and CTCF were not altered after UBF depletion. Taken together, our data showed a high resolution map of histone modification marks at rDNA in human liver cancer cell and provide novel evidence to decipher chromatin-mediated regulation of rDNA in liver cancer. PMID:26657029

  5. Increased reprogramming of human fetal hepatocytes compared with adult hepatocytes in feeder-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Marc C; Gramignoli, Roberto; Blake, William; Davila, Julio; Skvorak, Kristen; Dorko, Kenneth; Tahan, Veysel; Lee, Brian R; Tafaleng, Edgar; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Fox, Ira J; Strom, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been used to treat liver disease. The availability of cells for these procedures is quite limited. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) may be a useful source of hepatocytes for basic research and transplantation if efficient and effective differentiation protocols were developed and problems with tumorigenicity could be overcome. Recent evidence suggests that the cell of origin may affect hiPSC differentiation. Thus, hiPSCs generated from hepatocytes may differentiate back to hepatocytes more efficiently than hiPSCs from other cell types. We examined the efficiency of reprogramming adult and fetal human hepatocytes. The present studies report the generation of 40 hiPSC lines from primary human hepatocytes under feeder-free conditions. Of these, 37 hiPSC lines were generated from fetal hepatocytes, 2 hiPSC lines from normal hepatocytes, and 1 hiPSC line from hepatocytes of a patient with Crigler-Najjar syndrome, type 1. All lines were confirmed reprogrammed and expressed markers of pluripotency by gene expression, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and teratoma formation. Fetal hepatocytes were reprogrammed at a frequency over 50-fold higher than adult hepatocytes. Adult hepatocytes were only reprogrammed with six factors, while fetal hepatocytes could be reprogrammed with three (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG) or four factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LIN28 or OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, C-MYC). The increased reprogramming efficiency of fetal cells was not due to increased transduction efficiency or vector toxicity. These studies confirm that hiPSCs can be generated from adult and fetal hepatocytes including those with genetic diseases. Fetal hepatocytes reprogram much more efficiently than adult hepatocytes, although both could serve as useful sources of hiPSC-derived hepatocytes for basic research or transplantation. PMID:23394081

  6. The weight of nations: an estimation of adult human biomass

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The energy requirement of species at each trophic level in an ecological pyramid is a function of the number of organisms and their average mass. Regarding human populations, although considerable attention is given to estimating the number of people, much less is given to estimating average mass, despite evidence that average body mass is increasing. We estimate global human biomass, its distribution by region and the proportion of biomass due to overweight and obesity. Methods For each country we used data on body mass index (BMI) and height distribution to estimate average adult body mass. We calculated total biomass as the product of population size and average body mass. We estimated the percentage of the population that is overweight (BMI > 25) and obese (BMI > 30) and the biomass due to overweight and obesity. Results In 2005, global adult human biomass was approximately 287 million tonnes, of which 15 million tonnes were due to overweight (BMI > 25), a mass equivalent to that of 242 million people of average body mass (5% of global human biomass). Biomass due to obesity was 3.5 million tonnes, the mass equivalent of 56 million people of average body mass (1.2% of human biomass). North America has 6% of the world population but 34% of biomass due to obesity. Asia has 61% of the world population but 13% of biomass due to obesity. One tonne of human biomass corresponds to approximately 12 adults in North America and 17 adults in Asia. If all countries had the BMI distribution of the USA, the increase in human biomass of 58 million tonnes would be equivalent in mass to an extra 935 million people of average body mass, and have energy requirements equivalent to that of 473 million adults. Conclusions Increasing population fatness could have the same implications for world food energy demands as an extra half a billion people living on the earth. PMID:22709383

  7. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) glucuronidation in vitro: assay development, human liver microsome activities and species differences.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, S; Duan, S X; Von Moltke, L L; Greenblatt, D J; Sudmeier, J L; Bachovchin, W W; Court, M H

    2003-02-01

    1. The main purpose was to develop a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based method to assay serotonin glucuronidation activity using liver microsomal fractions. Application of this method was then demonstrated by determining serotonin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzyme kinetics using human liver microsomes and recombinant human UGT1A6. Interspecies differences were also evaluated using liver microsomes from 10 different mammalian species. 2. Incubation of liver microsomes with serotonin, UDP-glucuronic acid and magnesium resulted in the formation of a single product peak using HPLC with fluorescence and ultraviolet absorbance detection. This peak was confirmed as serotonin glucuronide based on sensitivity to beta-glucuronidase and by obtaining the expected mass of 352 with positive-ion mass spectrometry. 3. Following a preparative HPLC isolation, the structure of this metabolite was established as serotonin-5-O-glucuronide by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. 4. Enzyme kinetic studies showed apparent K(m) and V(max) of 8.8 +/- 0.3 mM and 43.4 +/- 0.4 nmoles min(-1) mg(-1) protein, respectively, for human liver microsomes, and 5.9 +/- 0.2 mM and 15.8 +/- 0.2 nmoles min(-1) mg(-1), respectively, for recombinant UGT1A6. 5. The order of serotonin-UGT activities in animal liver microsomes was rat > mouse > human > cow > pig > horse > dog > rabbit > monkey > ferret. Cat livers showed no serotonin-UGT activity. Heterozygous and homozygous mutant Gunn rat livers had 40 and 13%, respectively, of the activity of the normal Wistar rat, indicating a significant contribution by a rat UGT1A isoform to serotonin glucuronidation. 6. This assay provides a novel sensitive and specific technique for the measurement of serotonin-UGT activity in vitro. PMID:12623759

  8. Overall Quality of Life in Adult Biliary Atresia Survivors with or without Liver Transplantation: Results from a National Cohort.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Willemien; Lind, Robert C; Sze, Yuk-Kueng; van der Steeg, Alida F W; Sieders, Egbert; Porte, Robert Jack; Verkade, Henkjan J; Hulscher, Jan B F; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E H M

    2016-08-01

    Background Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare cholestatic disease of infancy. Kasai portoenterostomy and liver transplantation (LT) are the two sequential treatment options. An increasing number of patients survive into adulthood. Little is known about their health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study aims to compare HRQOL of transplanted and nontransplanted patients in a cohort of young adult BA survivors. Patients and Methods RAND-36 and Liver Disease Index Score (LDSI) questionnaires were sent to eligible adult patients with BA. Clinical characteristics were obtained from the NeSBAR (Netherlands Study group on Biliary Atresia Registry) and the national pediatric LT database. RAND-36 domain and summary scores were compared with those of an age-matched Dutch reference group. The correlations between several clinical variables and HRQOL were analyzed. Results Mean RAND-36 domain and summary scores of transplanted (n = 15) and nontransplanted (n = 25) patients with BA (response 74%) were similar to the reference scores, with the exception of a decreased general health perception in nontransplanted patients (63 ± 21 vs. 75 ± 17; [p < 0.001], particularly in females. RAND-36 domain and summary scores were not significantly correlated to age at LT, time since LT, serum bilirubin, aspartate amino transferase or albumin levels, but were moderately to strongly correlated to LDSI total scores (r values 0.35-0.77). Conclusions Overall, young adult patients with BA have a HRQOL similar to an age-matched reference group. However, general health perception of nontransplanted patients, particularly of females, was decreased. HRQOL is correlated to liver disease symptoms but not to liver biochemistry parameters. Nontransplanted females and patients suffering from liver disease-associated symptoms may be a target for tailored supportive interventions. PMID:26018212

  9. Characterization of fimasartan metabolites in human liver microsomes and human plasma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Yoon; Choi, Young Jae; Oh, Soo Jin; Chi, Yong Ha; Paik, Soo Heui; Lee, Ki Ho; Jung, Jae-Kyung; Ryu, Chang Seon; Kim, Kwon-Bok; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Yoon, Young-Ran; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2016-01-01

    1. The metabolites of fimasartan (FMS), a new angiotensin II receptor antagonist, were characterized in human liver microsomes (HLM) and human subjects. 2. We developed a method for a simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis using predictive multiple reaction monitoring information-dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion scanning. To characterize metabolic reactions, FMS metabolites were analyzed using quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometer in full-scan mode. 3. The structures of metabolites were confirmed by comparison of chromatographic retention times and mass spectra with those of authentic metabolite standards. 4. In the cofactor-dependent microsomal metabolism study, the half-lives of FMS were 56.7, 247.9 and 53.3 min in the presence of NADPH, UDPGA and NADPH + UDPGA, respectively. 5. The main metabolic routes in HLM were S-oxidation, oxidative desulfuration, n-butyl hydroxylation and N-glucuronidation. 6. In humans orally administered with 120 mg FMS daily for 7 days, the prominent metabolites were FMS S-oxide and FMS N-glucuronide in the 0-8-h pooled plasma sample of each subject. 7. This study characterizes, for the first time, the metabolites of FMS in humans to provide information for its safe use in clinical medicine. PMID:26068523

  10. A New Human 3D-Liver Model Unravels the Role of Galectins in Liver Infection by the Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Debora B.; Faust, Daniela M.; Deep Jhingan, Gagan; Guillen, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of human parasitic diseases depend on the availability of appropriate in vivo animal models and ex vivo experimental systems, and are particularly difficult for pathogens whose exclusive natural hosts are humans, such as Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite responsible for amoebiasis. This common infectious human disease affects the intestine and liver. In the liver sinusoids E. histolytica crosses the endothelium and penetrates into the parenchyma, with the concomitant initiation of inflammatory foci and subsequent abscess formation. Studying factors responsible for human liver infection is hampered by the complexity of the hepatic environment and by the restrictions inherent to the use of human samples. Therefore, we built a human 3D-liver in vitro model composed of cultured liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes in a 3D collagen-I matrix sandwich. We determined the presence of important hepatic markers and demonstrated that the cell layers function as a biological barrier. E. histolytica invasion was assessed using wild-type strains and amoebae with altered virulence or different adhesive properties. We showed for the first time the dependence of endothelium crossing upon amoebic Gal/GalNAc lectin. The 3D-liver model enabled the molecular analysis of human cell responses, suggesting for the first time a crucial role of human galectins in parasite adhesion to the endothelial cells, which was confirmed by siRNA knockdown of galectin-1. Levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including galectin-1 and -3, were highly increased upon contact of E. histolytica with the 3D-liver model. The presence of galectin-1 and -3 in the extracellular medium stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokine release, suggesting a further role for human galectins in the onset of the hepatic inflammatory response. These new findings are relevant for a better understanding of human liver infection by E. histolytica. PMID:25211477

  11. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  12. Human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets accelerate liver regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Itaba, Noriko; Matsumi, Yoshiaki; Okinaka, Kaori; Ashla, An Afida; Kono, Yohei; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Morimoto, Minoru; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Shiota, Goshi

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cell therapy. Based on our hypothesis that suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signal enhances hepatic differentiation of human MSCs, we developed human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets by a small molecule compound. Screening of 10 small molecule compounds was performed by WST assay, TCF reporter assay, and albumin mRNA expression. Consequently, hexachlorophene suppressed TCF reporter activity in time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hexachlorophene rapidly induced hepatic differentiation of human MSCs judging from expression of liver-specific genes and proteins, PAS staining, and urea production. The effect of orthotopic transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets against acute liver injury was examined in one-layered to three-layered cell sheets system. Transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets enhanced liver regeneration and suppressed liver injury. The survival rates of the mice were significantly improved. High expression of complement C3 and its downstream signals including C5a, NF-κB, and IL-6/STAT-3 pathway was observed in hepatic cell sheets-grafted tissues. Expression of phosphorylated EGFR and thioredoxin is enhanced, resulting in reduction of oxidative stress. These findings suggest that orthotopic transplantation of hepatic cell sheets manufactured from MSCs accelerates liver regeneration through complement C3, EGFR and thioredoxin. PMID:26553591

  13. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  14. Blood flow to and the metabolism of glucose and lactate by the liver in vivo in fetal, newborn and adult sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Apatu, R S; Barnes, R J

    1991-01-01

    1. The blood flow to the liver in fetuses near to term, in newborn and in adult sheep was measured in vivo by the Fick principle using radionuclide-labelled plastic microspheres and timed withdrawal of reference organ blood samples. 2. There is a rapid flow of blood, 410.1 +/- 41.8 ml min-1 (100 g liver)-1, mean +/- S.E.M., to the liver in the fetus. Immediately after birth the blood flow is significantly less (172.5 +/- 27.5 ml min-1 (100 g liver)-1), reflecting the loss of the umbilical venous return to the liver following delivery and separation from the placenta. Arterial blood flow to the liver per unit weight of liver was small in the fetus (9.5 +/- 1.2 ml min-1 (100 g liver)-1), significantly greater in the immediate newborn (27.9 +/- 7.9 ml min-1 (100 g)-1) but appeared to decline with age after birth to 12.2 +/- 6.6 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 in lambs at 16 weeks of age. Portal blood flow to the liver, on a weight basis, changed little with age being 126 +/- 20.9 ml min-1 (100 g liver)-1 in the fetus, 144.7 +/- 21.1 ml min-1 (100 g liver)-1 in the immediate newborn and 203.2 +/- 27.8 ml min-1 (100 g liver)-1 in the adult. 3. Oxygen consumption and glucose and lactate fluxes across the sheep liver were determined from 132 days of gestation into adulthood. 4. The oxygen consumption by the fetal liver was 0.11 +/- 0.02 mmol min-1 (100 g)-1 which represents about 6% of the total fetal oxygen metabolism. Immediately after birth there was an apparent increase in liver oxygen consumption but the wide variation in the values recorded means that the change is not statistically significant. There were no significant changes in liver oxygen consumption with age after delivery, oxygen consumption by the adult liver was 0.16 +/- 0.05 mmol min-1 (100 g)-1. 5. The liver at all ages studied consumed lactate. Lactate consumption was particularly high in the fetus (0.13 +/- 0.04 mmol min-1 (100 g)-1 and could account for three times the oxygen consumed by the fetal liver, but the

  15. Functional Integrity of the Chimeric (Humanized) Mouse Liver: Enzyme Zonation, Physiologic Spaces, and Hepatic Enzymes and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Chow, Edwin C Y; Wang, Jason Z Ya; Quach, Holly P; Tang, Hui; Evans, David C; Li, Albert P; Silva, Jose; Pang, K Sandy

    2016-09-01

    Chimeric mouse liver models are useful in vivo tools for human drug metabolism studies; however, liver integrity and the microcirculation remain largely uninvestigated. Hence, we conducted liver perfusion studies to examine these attributes in FRGN [Fah(-/-), Rag2(-/-), and Il2rg(-/-), NOD strain] livers (control) and chimeric livers repopulated with mouse (mFRGN) or human (hFRGN) hepatocytes. In single-pass perfusion studies (2.5 ml/min), outflow dilution profiles of noneliminated reference indicators ((51)Cr-RBC, (125)I-albumin, (14)C-sucrose, and (3)H-water) revealed preservation of flow-limited distribution and reduced water and albumin spaces in hFRGN livers compared with FRGN livers, a view supported microscopically by tightly packed sinusoids. With prograde and retrograde perfusion of harmol (50 µM) in FRGN livers, an anterior sulfation (Sult1a1) over the posterior distribution of glucuronidation (Ugt1a1) activity was preserved, evidenced by the 42% lower sulfation-to-glucuronidation ratio (HS/HG) and 14% higher harmol extraction ratio (E) upon switching from prograde to retrograde flow. By contrast, zonation was lost in mFRGN and hFRGN livers, with HS/HG and E for both flows remaining unchanged. Remnant mouse genes persisted in hFRGN livers (10%-300% those of FRGN). When hFRGN livers were compared with human liver tissue, higher UGT1A1 and MRP2, lower MRP3, and unchanged SULT1A1 and MRP4 mRNA expression were observed. Total Sult1a1/SULT1A1 protein expression in hFRGN livers was higher than that of FRGN livers, consistent with higher harmol sulfate formation. The composite data on humanized livers suggest a loss of zonation, lack of complete liver humanization, and persistence of murine hepatocyte activities leading to higher sulfation. PMID:27342868

  16. Deleted in liver cancer protein family in human malignancies (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Lukasik, D.; Wilczek, E.; Wasiutynski, A.; Gornicka, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Deleted in Liver Cancer (DLC) protein family comprises proteins that exert their function mainly by the Rho GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and by regulation of the small GTPases. Since Rho GTPases are key factors in cell proliferation, polarity, cytoskeletal remodeling and migration, the aberrant function of their regulators may lead to cell transformation. One subgroup of these proteins is the DLC family. It was found that the first identified gene from this family, DLC1, is often lost in hepatocellular carcinoma and may be involved as a tumor suppressor in the liver. Subsequent studies evaluated the hypothesis that the DLC1 gene acts as a tumor suppressor, not only in liver cancer, but also in other types of cancer. Following DLC1, two other members of the DLC protein family, DLC2 and DLC3, were identified. However, limited published data are available concerning the role of these proteins in malignant transformation. This review focuses on the structure and the role of DLC1 and its relatives in physiological conditions and summarizes data published thus far regarding DLC function in the neoplastic process. PMID:22866123

  17. Novel surface markers directed against adult human gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Galivo, Feorillo H.; Dorrell, Craig S.; Grompe, Maria; Zhong, Yong-Ping; Streeter, Philip; Grompe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Novel cell surface-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated against extrahepatic biliary cells were developed for the isolation and characterization of different cell subsets from normal adult human gallbladder. Eleven antigenically distinct gallbladder subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. They were classified into epithelial, mesenchymal, and pancreatobiliary (PDX1+SOX9+) subsets based on gene expression profiling. These antigenically distinct human gallbladder cell subsets could potentially also reflect different functional properties in regards to bile physiology, cell renewal and plasticity. Three of the novel monoclonal antibodies differentially labeled archival sections of primary carcinoma of human gallbladder relative to normal tissue. The novel monoclonal antibodies described herein enable the identification and characterization of antigenically diverse cell subsets within adult human gallbladder and are putative tumor biomarkers. PMID:26079872

  18. Age-Related Gene Expression Differences in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Young Adults, and Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lissner, Michelle M; Thomas, Brandon J; Wee, Kathleen; Tong, Ann-Jay; Kollmann, Tobias R; Smale, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    A variety of age-related differences in the innate and adaptive immune systems have been proposed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection of human neonates and older adults. The emergence of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides an opportunity to obtain an unbiased, comprehensive, and quantitative view of gene expression differences in defined cell types from different age groups. An examination of ex vivo human monocyte responses to lipopolysaccharide stimulation or Listeria monocytogenes infection by RNA-seq revealed extensive similarities between neonates, young adults, and older adults, with an unexpectedly small number of genes exhibiting statistically significant age-dependent differences. By examining the differentially induced genes in the context of transcription factor binding motifs and RNA-seq data sets from mutant mouse strains, a previously described deficiency in interferon response factor-3 activity could be implicated in most of the differences between newborns and young adults. Contrary to these observations, older adults exhibited elevated expression of inflammatory genes at baseline, yet the responses following stimulation correlated more closely with those observed in younger adults. Notably, major differences in the expression of constitutively expressed genes were not observed, suggesting that the age-related differences are driven by environmental influences rather than cell-autonomous differences in monocyte development. PMID:26147648

  19. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890418

  20. Dendritic cells in humans--from fetus to adult.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Naomi; Chan, Jerry K Y; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-02-01

    The human immune system evolves continuously during development from the embryo into the adult, reflecting the ever-changing environment and demands of our body. This ability of our immune system to sense external cues and adapt as we develop is just as important in the early tolerogenic environment of the fetus, as it is in the constantly pathogen-challenged adult. Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen-sensing and antigen-presenting components of the immune system, play a crucial role in this process where they act as sentinels, both initiating and regulating immune responses. Here, we provide an overview of the human immune system in the developing fetus and the adult, with a focus on DC ontogeny and function during these discrete but intimately linked life stages. PMID:25323843

  1. All-In-One: Advanced preparation of Human Parenchymal and Non-Parenchymal Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Melanie; Driftmann, Sabrina; Kleinehr, Kathrin; Kaiser, Gernot M.; Mathé, Zotlan; Treckmann, Juergen-Walter; Paul, Andreas; Skibbe, Kathrin; Timm, Joerg; Canbay, Ali; Gerken, Guido; Schlaak, Joerg F.; Broering, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver cells are key players in innate immunity. Thus, studying primary isolated liver cells is necessary for determining their role in liver physiology and pathophysiology. In particular, the quantity and quality of isolated cells are crucial to their function. Our aim was to isolate a large quantity of high-quality human parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells from a single liver specimen. Methods Hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and stellate cells were isolated from liver tissues by collagenase perfusion in combination with low-speed centrifugation, density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic-activated cell sorting. The purity and functionality of cultured cell populations were controlled by determining their morphology, discriminative cell marker expression, and functional activity. Results Cell preparation yielded the following cell counts per gram of liver tissue: 2.0±0.4×107 hepatocytes, 1.8±0.5×106 Kupffer cells, 4.3±1.9×105 liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and 3.2±0.5×105 stellate cells. Hepatocytes were identified by albumin (95.5±1.7%) and exhibited time-dependent activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes. Kupffer cells expressed CD68 (94.5±1.2%) and exhibited phagocytic activity, as determined with 1μm latex beads. Endothelial cells were CD146+ (97.8±1.1%) and exhibited efficient uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Hepatic stellate cells were identified by the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (97.1±1.5%). These cells further exhibited retinol (vitamin A)-mediated autofluorescence. Conclusions Our isolation procedure for primary parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells resulted in cell populations of high purity and quality, with retained physiological functionality in vitro. Thus, this system may provide a valuable tool for determining liver function and disease. PMID:26407160

  2. [Liver and artificial liver].

    PubMed

    Chamuleau, R A

    1998-06-01

    Despite good results of orthotopic liver transplantation in patients with fulminant hepatic failure the need still exists for an effective and safe artificial liver, able to temporarily take over the complex liver function so as to bridge the gap with transplantation or regeneration. Attempts to develop non-biological artificial livers have failed, mostly when controlled clinical trials were performed. In the last decade several different types of bioartificial livers have been devised, in which the biocomponent consists of freshly isolated porcine hepatocytes or a human hepatoblastoma cell line. The majority use semipermeable hollow fibers known from artificial kidney devices. The liver cells may lie either inside or outside the lumen of these fibers. In vitro analysis of liver function and animal experimental work showing that the bioartificial liver increases survival justify clinical application. Bioartificial livers are connected to patients extracorporeally by means of plasmapheresis circuit for periods of about 6 hours. In different trials about 40 patients with severe liver failure have been treated. No important adverse effects have not been reported in these phase I trials. Results of controlled studies are urgently needed. As long as no satisfactory immortalised human liver cell line with good function is available, porcine hepatocytes will remain the first choice, provided transmission of porcine pathogens to man is prevented. PMID:9752034

  3. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  4. The adult human brain harbors multipotent perivascular mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gesine; Özen, Ilknur; Christophersen, Nicolaj S; Reinbothe, Thomas; Bengzon, Johan; Visse, Edward; Jansson, Katarina; Dannaeus, Karin; Henriques-Oliveira, Catarina; Roybon, Laurent; Anisimov, Sergey V; Renström, Erik; Svensson, Mikael; Haegerstrand, Anders; Brundin, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Blood vessels and adjacent cells form perivascular stem cell niches in adult tissues. In this perivascular niche, a stem cell with mesenchymal characteristics was recently identified in some adult somatic tissues. These cells are pericytes that line the microvasculature, express mesenchymal markers and differentiate into mesodermal lineages but might even have the capacity to generate tissue-specific cell types. Here, we isolated, purified and characterized a previously unrecognized progenitor population from two different regions in the adult human brain, the ventricular wall and the neocortex. We show that these cells co-express markers for mesenchymal stem cells and pericytes in vivo and in vitro, but do not express glial, neuronal progenitor, hematopoietic, endothelial or microglial markers in their native state. Furthermore, we demonstrate at a clonal level that these progenitors have true multilineage potential towards both, the mesodermal and neuroectodermal phenotype. They can be epigenetically induced in vitro into adipocytes, chondroblasts and osteoblasts but also into glial cells and immature neurons. This progenitor population exhibits long-term proliferation, karyotype stability and retention of phenotype and multipotency following extensive propagation. Thus, we provide evidence that the vascular niche in the adult human brain harbors a novel progenitor with multilineage capacity that appears to represent mesenchymal stem cells and is different from any previously described human neural stem cell. Future studies will elucidate whether these cells may play a role for disease or may represent a reservoir that can be exploited in efforts to repair the diseased human brain. PMID:22523602

  5. Human Service Planning as a Collective Adult Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Joan

    Based on a study by the Department of Community Service Education, Cornell University, to evaluate human service planning (HSP) nationwide, this paper discusses the premises that HSP may be defined as community learning and that the community (according to the Robert Boyd and Jerold Apps model for adult education) is both a beneficiary of and…

  6. [The existence vomeronasal organ in adult humans].

    PubMed

    Rapiejko, Piotr; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Wojdas, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Jan; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2007-01-01

    The influence of chemical substances (feromones) on human emotional and physical condition has fascinated psychologists, sexuologists and laryngologists since centurie. Literature conveys inconsistent information on vomeronasal organ (VNO) occurrence in humans. This organ is often called Jacobson's, and 2 symmetrical openings leading into it, located on both sides of septum, are called Ruyasch's ducts. The aim of the study was to analyze vomeronasal organ occurrence in humans in relation to age and sex. The study was conducted in a group of 634 patients, aged 18-80 years. All patients underwent routine ENT examination including rhinoscopy, nasal cavity examination with usage of 2.5x magnification lens (surgical glasses) and surgical microscope with 10x magnification. All persons had nasal cavities examined endoscopically. Every time presence of vomeronasal organ openings, along with localization, size and symmetry of these was noted. Subjects, who presented Jacobson's organ, were asked to fill a questionnaire concerning influence of smells on erotic sensations. Vomeronasal organ was fund in 312 persons, that is 49.21%. In 83.65% of cases vomeronasal organ opening size was smaller than 0.2 mm, what restricted its visibility to usage of magnifying lens, microscope, or endoscope. In 16.34% of cases only vomeronasal organ ducts openings were well visible in routine rhinoscopy without magnification. Vomeronasal organ was found more often in men than women. VNO was significantly more rare in patients with nasal septal deviation. In these cases, vomeronasal organ was usually found unilaterally, in all the cases on the concave side of deviated nasal septum. PMID:18260256

  7. Decreased liver triglyceride content in adult rats exposed to protein restriction during gestation and lactation: role of hepatic triglyceride utilization.

    PubMed

    Qasem, Rani J; Li, Jing; Tang, Hee Man; Browne, Veron; Mendez-Garcia, Claudia; Yablonski, Elizabeth; Pontiggia, Laura; D'Mello, Anil P

    2015-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated that protein restriction throughout gestation and lactation reduces liver triglyceride content in adult rat offspring. However, the mechanisms mediating the decrease in liver triglyceride content are not understood. The aim of the current study was to use a new group of pregnant animals and their offspring and determine the contribution of increased triglyceride utilization via the hepatic fatty-acid oxidation and triglyceride secretory pathways to the reduction in liver triglyceride content. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received either a control or a low protein diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. Pups were weaned onto laboratory chow on day 28 and killed on day 65. Liver triglyceride content was reduced in male, but not female, low-protein offspring, both in the fed and fasted states. The reduction was accompanied by a trend towards higher liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1a activity, suggesting increased fatty-acid transport into the mitochondrial matrix. However, medium-chain acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase activity within the mitochondrial matrix, expression of nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, and plasma levels of β-hydroxybutyrate were similar between low protein and control offspring, indicating a lack of change in fatty-acid oxidation. Hepatic triglyceride secretion, assessed by blocking peripheral triglyceride utilization and measuring serum triglyceride accumulation rate, and the activity of microsomal transfer protein, were similar between low protein and control offspring. Because enhanced triglyceride utilization is not a significant contributor, the decrease in liver triglyceride content in male low-protein offspring is likely due to alterations in liver fatty-acid transport or triglyceride biosynthesis. PMID:25641378

  8. Decreased liver triglyceride content in adult rats exposed to protein restriction during gestation and lactation: role of hepatic triglyceride utilization

    PubMed Central

    Qasem, Rani J.; Li, Jing; Tang, Hee Man; Browne, Veron; Mendez, Claudia; Yablonski, Elizabeth; Pontiggia, Laura; D’mello, Anil P.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that protein restriction throughout gestation and lactation reduced liver triglyceride content in adult rat offspring. The mechanism(s) mediating the decrease in liver triglyceride content are not understood. The objective of the current study was to use a new group of pregnant animals and their offspring and determine the contribution of increased triglyceride utilization via the hepatic fatty acid oxidation and triglyceride secretory pathways to the reduction in liver triglyceride content. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received either a control or a low protein diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. Pups were weaned onto laboratory chow on day 28 and sacrificed on day 65. Liver triglyceride content was reduced in male, but not female, low protein offspring both in the fed and fasted states. The reduction was accompanied by a trend towards higher liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1a activity suggesting increased fatty acid transport into the mitochondrial matrix. However, medium chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase activity within the mitochondrial matrix, expression of nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, and plasma levels of β-hydroxybutyrate were similar between low protein and control offspring indicating a lack of change in fatty acid oxidation. Hepatic triglyceride secretion, assessed by blocking peripheral triglyceride utilization and measuring serum triglyceride accumulation rate, and the activity of microsomal transfer protein were similar between low protein and control offspring. Since enhanced triglyceride utilization is not a significant contributor, the decrease in liver triglyceride content in male low protein offspring is likely due to alterations in liver fatty acid transport or triglyceride biosynthesis. PMID:25641378

  9. Fractionation of human liver mitochondria: enzymic and morphological characterization of the inner and outer membranes as compared to rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Benga, G; Hodarnau, A; Tilinca, R; Porutiu, D; Dancea, S; Pop, V; Wrigglesworth, J

    1979-02-01

    The fractionation of human liver mitochondria into inner membrane, outer membrane and matrix material is reported. Compared with rat, human liver mitochondria are more fragile. Fractionation can be achieved in only 2 steps, a digitonin treatment for removal of the outer membrane and centrifugation of the inner membrane plus matrix particles through a linear sucrose gradient resulting in purified inner membranes and matrix. PMID:422680

  10. Liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection: Diagnostic methods and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Caterina; Martini, Salvatore; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Macera, Margherita; Zampino, Rosa; Coppola, Nicola; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-10-28

    Several non-invasive surrogate methods have recently challenged the main role of liver biopsy in assessing liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, applied to avoid the well-known side effects of liver puncture. Serological tests involve the determination of biochemical markers of synthesis or degradation of fibrosis, tests not readily available in clinical practice, or combinations of routine tests used in chronic hepatitis and HIV/HCV coinfection. Several radiologic techniques have also been proposed, some of which commonly used in clinical practice. The studies performed to compare the prognostic value of non-invasive surrogate methods with that of the degree of liver fibrosis assessed on liver tissue have not as yet provided conclusive results. Each surrogate technique has shown some limitations, including the risk of over- or under-estimating the extent of liver fibrosis. The current knowledge on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients will be summarized in this review article, which is addressed in particular to physicians involved in this setting in their clinical practice. PMID:26523204

  11. Liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection: Diagnostic methods and clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Sagnelli, Caterina; Martini, Salvatore; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Macera, Margherita; Zampino, Rosa; Coppola, Nicola; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Several non-invasive surrogate methods have recently challenged the main role of liver biopsy in assessing liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, applied to avoid the well-known side effects of liver puncture. Serological tests involve the determination of biochemical markers of synthesis or degradation of fibrosis, tests not readily available in clinical practice, or combinations of routine tests used in chronic hepatitis and HIV/HCV coinfection. Several radiologic techniques have also been proposed, some of which commonly used in clinical practice. The studies performed to compare the prognostic value of non-invasive surrogate methods with that of the degree of liver fibrosis assessed on liver tissue have not as yet provided conclusive results. Each surrogate technique has shown some limitations, including the risk of over- or under-estimating the extent of liver fibrosis. The current knowledge on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients will be summarized in this review article, which is addressed in particular to physicians involved in this setting in their clinical practice. PMID:26523204

  12. Subnormothermic Machine Perfusion for ex vivo Preservation and Recovery of the Human Liver for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, B.G.; Yeh, H.; Özer, S; Martins, P.N.; Farmer, A.; Wu, W.; Saeidi, N.; op den Dries, S.; Berendsen, T.A.; Smith, R.N.; Markmann, J.F.; Porte, R.; Yarmush, M.L.; Uygun, K.; Izamis, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    To reduce widespread shortages, attempts are made to use more marginal livers for transplantation. Many of these grafts are discarded for fear of inferior survival rates or biliary complications. Recent advances in organ preservation have shown that ex vivo subnormothermic machine perfusion has the potential to improve preservation and recover marginal livers pre- transplantation. To determine the feasibility in human livers, we assessed the effect of 3 hours of oxygenated subnormothermic machine perfusion (21 °C) on seven livers discarded for transplantation. Biochemical and microscopic assessment revealed minimal injury sustained during perfusion. Improved oxygen uptake (1.30 [1.11–1.94] to 6.74 [4.15–8.16] mL O2/min.kg liver), lactate levels (4.04 [3.70–6.00] to 2.29 [1.20–3.42] mmol/L) and adenosine triphosphate content (45.0 [70.6–87.5] pre-perfusion to 167.5 [151.5–237.2] pmol/mg after perfusion) were observed. Liver function, reflected by urea, albumin and bile production was seen during perfusion. Bile production increased and the composition of bile (bile salts/phospholipid ratio, pH and bicarbonate concentration) became more favorable. In conclusion, ex vivo subnormothermic machine perfusion effectively maintains liver function with minimal injury and sustains or improves various hepatobiliary parameters post-ischemia. PMID:24758155

  13. Doxorubicin-loaded glycyrrhetinic acid modified recombinant human serum albumin nanoparticles for targeting liver tumor chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wen-Wen; Yu, Hai-Yan; Guo, Hui; Lou, Jun; Wang, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Peng; Sapin-Minet, Anne; Maincent, Philippe; Hong, Xue-Chuan; Hu, Xian-Ming; Xiao, Yu-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Due to overexpression of glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) receptor in liver cancer cells, glycyrrhetinic acid modified recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) nanoparticles for targeting liver tumor cells may result in increased therapeutic efficacy and decreased adverse effects of cancer therapy. In this study, doxorubicin (DOX) loaded and glycyrrhetinic acid modified recombinant human serum albumin nanoparticles (DOX/GA-rHSA NPs) were prepared for targeting therapy for liver cancer. GA was covalently coupled to recombinant human serum albumin nanoparticles, which could efficiently deliver DOX into liver cancer cells. The resultant GA-rHSA NPs exhibited uniform spherical shape and high stability in plasma with fixed negative charge (∼-25 mV) and a size about 170 nm. DOX was loaded into GA-rHSA NPs with a maximal encapsulation efficiency of 75.8%. Moreover, the targeted NPs (DOX/GA-rHSA NPs) showed increased cytotoxic activity in liver tumor cells compared to the nontargeted NPs (DOX/rHSA NPs, DOX loaded recombinant human serum albumin nanoparticles without GA conjugating). The targeted NPs exhibited higher cellular uptake in a GA receptor-positive liver cancer cell line than nontargeted NPs as measured by both flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biodistribution experiments showed that DOX/GA-rHSA NPs exhibited a much higher level of tumor accumulation than nontargeted NPs at 1 h after injection in hepatoma-bearing Balb/c mice. Therefore, the DOX/GA-rHSA NPs could be considered as an efficient nanoplatform for targeting drug delivery system for liver cancer. PMID:25584860

  14. Telocytes of the human adult trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Cretoiu, Dragos; Vrapciu, Alexandra Diana; Hostiuc, Sorin; Dermengiu, Dan; Manoiu, Vasile Sorin; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Mirancea, Nicolae

    2016-06-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are typically defined as cells with telopodes by their ultrastructural features. Their presence was reported in various organs, however little is known about their presence in human trigeminal ganglion. To address this issue, samples of trigeminal ganglia were tested by immunocytochemistry for CD34 and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that TCs are CD34 positive and form networks within the ganglion in close vicinity to microvessels and nerve fibers around the neuronal-glial units (NGUs). TEM examination confirmed the existence of spindle-shaped and bipolar TCs with one or two telopodes measuring between 15 to 53 μm. We propose that TCs are cells with stemness capacity which might contribute in regeneration and repair processes by: modulation of the stem cell activity or by acting as progenitors of other cells present in the normal tissue. In addition, further studies are needed to establish if they might influence the neuronal circuits. PMID:27147447

  15. Content and activity of human liver microsomal protein and prediction of individual hepatic clearance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haifeng; Gao, Na; Tian, Xin; Liu, Tingting; Fang, Yan; Zhou, Jun; Wen, Qiang; Xu, Binbin; Qi, Bing; Gao, Jie; Li, Hongmeng; Jia, Linjing; Qiao, Hailing

    2015-01-01

    The lack of information concerning individual variation in content and activity of human liver microsomal protein is one of the most important obstacles for designing personalized medicines. We demonstrated that the mean value of microsomal protein per gram of liver (MPPGL) was 39.46 mg/g in 128 human livers and up to 19-fold individual variations existed. Meanwhile, the metabolic activities of 10 cytochrome P450 (CYPs) were detected in microsomes and liver tissues, respectively, which showed huge individual variations (200-fold). Compared with microsomes, the activities of liver tissues were much suitable to express the individual variations of CYP activities. Furthermore, individual variations in the in vivo clearance of tolbutamide were successfully predicted with the individual parameter values. In conclusion, we offer the values for MPPGL contents in normal liver tissues and build a new method to assess the in vitro CYP activities. In addition, large individual variations exist in predicted hepatic clearance of tolbutamide. These findings provide important physiological parameters for physiologically-based pharmacokinetics models and thus, establish a solid foundation for future development of personalized medicines. PMID:26635233

  16. Human pancreatic polypeptide in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Hanukoglu, A; Chalew, S; Kowarski, A A

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of human pancreatic polypeptide may be useful for assessment of gastrointestinal function, integrity of the parasympathetic nervous system or screening for endocrine neoplasia. In adults hPP levels have been reported to increase with age. However hPP levels throughout childhood have not been well characterized in comparison with the adult range. We studied fasting human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) from 45 pediatric patients, from infancy - 15 years, and 18 older adolescents and adults aged 16-45 years. The mean hPP level of children (233 +/- 147 pg/ml) was significantly higher than that (113 +/- 35 pg/ml) of adults (P less than .0001). There was no difference in mean hPP levels of children with normal growth hormone secretion compared to growth hormone deficient patients. There was no effect of gender or body mass index on hPP levels. We conclude that fasting hPP levels must be interpreted with respect to the age of the subject, children particularly, in that preteens may have higher fasting levels than older teenagers and adults. PMID:2307392

  17. Survey of adult liver transplantation techniques (SALT): an international study of current practices in deceased donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, Michael D; Memeo, Riccardo; Laurent, Alexis; Tayar, Claude; Cherqui, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been little focus lately on operative techniques for full graft liver transplantation, and the standard technique is unclear. Methods An internet survey addressing the key technical issues was e-mailed to programme directors. Results Responses were obtained from 93 out of 128 (73%) directors contacted. Programmes performed a median of 60 (8–240) transplants per year. Maximum mean cold time of 13 ± 3 h and maximum median steatosis of 40% (15–90%) were tolerated. The inferior vena cava was preserved by 48% of centres all the time and 43% selectively. European centres used temporary portacaval shunting (42%) four times more often than USA programmes. Venous bypass was always used when not preserving the inferior vena cava by less than 25%, and used selectively by approximately 40% of centres. Portal vein anastomosis with room for expansion (88%), graft hepatic artery to native gastroduodenal/common hepatic artery bifurcation (57%) and bile duct-to-duct (47%) were the favoured techniques. Discussion A standard international operative technique for deceased donor liver transplantation does not exist, although there is a trend towards inferior vena cava preservation. Donor selection criteria were more homogenous across programmes. As suggested by the high response rate, there likely exists interest to investigate technical variations on an international scale. PMID:21929669

  18. Human Adult Cortical Reorganization and Consequent Visual Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Dilks, Daniel D.; Serences, John T.; Rosenau, Benjamin J.; Yantis, Steven; McCloskey, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Neural and behavioral evidence for cortical reorganization in the adult somatosensory system after loss of sensory input (e.g., amputation) has been well documented. In contrast, evidence for reorganization in the adult visual system is far less clear: neural evidence is the subject of controversy, behavioral evidence is sparse, and studies combining neural and behavioral evidence have not previously been reported. Here, we report converging behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from a stroke patient (B.L.) in support of cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system. B.L.’s stroke spared the primary visual cortex (V1), but destroyed fibers that normally provide input to V1 from the upper left visual field (LVF). As a consequence, B.L. is blind in the upper LVF, and exhibits distorted perception in the lower LVF: stimuli appear vertically elongated, toward and into the blind upper LVF. For example, a square presented in the lower LVF is perceived as a rectangle extending upward. We hypothesized that the perceptual distortion was a consequence of cortical reorganization in V1. Extensive behavioral testing supported our hypothesis, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) confirmed V1 reorganization. Together, the behavioral and fMRI data show that loss of input to V1 after a stroke leads to cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system, and provide the first evidence that reorganization of the adult visual system affects visual perception. These findings contribute to our understanding of the human adult brain’s capacity to change and has implications for topics ranging from learning to recovery from brain damage. PMID:17804619

  19. Alterations in Human Liver Metabolome during Prolonged Cryostorage.

    PubMed

    Abuja, Peter M; Ehrhart, Friederike; Schoen, Uwe; Schmidt, Tomm; Stracke, Frank; Dallmann, Guido; Friedrich, Torben; Zimmermann, Heiko; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2015-07-01

    Tissue metabolomics requires high sample quality that crucially depends on the biobanking storage protocol. Hence, we systematically analyzed the influence of realistic storage scenarios on the liver metabolome with different storage temperatures and repeated transfer of samples between storage and retrieval environments, simulating the repeated temperature changes affecting unrelated samples stored in the same container as the sample that is to be retrieved. By cycling between storage (-80 °C freezer, liquid nitrogen, cold nitrogen gas) and retrieval (room temperature, -80 °C), assuming three cycles per day and sample, we simulated biobank storage between 3 months and 10 years. Liver tissue metabolome was analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Most metabolite concentrations changed <5% for the first "year" of time-compressed biobanking simulation, predominantly due to hydrolysis of peptides and lipids. Interestingly, storage temperature affected metabolite concentrations only little, while there was a linear dependence on the number of temperature change cycles. Elevated sample temperature during (prolonged) retrieval time led to a distinctly different signature of metabolite changes that were induced by cycling. Our findings allow giving recommendations for optimized storage protocols and provide signatures that allow detection of deviations from protocol. PMID:26036795

  20. Transcriptional networks implicated in human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hua; Liu, Wei

    2015-10-01

    The transcriptome of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was investigated in several studies. However, the implications of transcriptional networks in progressive NAFLD are not clear and mechanisms inducing transition from nonalcoholic simple fatty liver (NAFL) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are still elusive. The aims of this study were to (1) construct networks for progressive NAFLD, (2) identify hub genes and functional modules in these networks and (3) infer potential linkages among hub genes, transcription factors and microRNAs (miRNA) for NAFLD progression. A systems biology approach by combining differential expression analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was utilized to dissect transcriptional profiles in 19 normal, 10 NAFL and 16 NASH patients. Based on this framework, 3 modules related to chromosome organization, proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation and immune response were identified in NASH network. Furthermore, 9 modules of co-expressed genes associated with NAFL/NASH transition were found. Further characterization of these modules defined 13 highly connected hub genes in NAFLD progression network. Interestingly, 11 significantly changed miRNAs were predicted to target 10 of the 13 hub genes. Characterization of modules and hub genes that may be regulated by miRNAs could facilitate the identification of candidate genes and pathways responsible for NAFL/NASH transition and lead to a better understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. The identified modules and hub genes may point to potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25851235

  1. Repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using adult mice with multiple genotoxicity assays concurrently performed as a combination test.

    PubMed

    Hagio, Soichiro; Furukawa, Satoshi; Abe, Masayoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi

    2014-06-01

    Recently, the liver micronucleus (MN) assay using young adult rats with repeated administrations has been investigated by employing a new method without partial hepatectomy or in situcollagenase perfusion as the repeated dose liver MN (RDLMN) assay by Narumi et al. (2012). In our study, in order to investigate the possibility of the RDLMN assay using young adult mice instead of rats and the feasibility of employing some genotoxicity assays along with the RDLMN assay as a combination test, two genotoxic carcinogens (N,N-diethylnitrosoamine (DEN) and cisplatin (CIS)) and a nongenotoxic carcinogen (phenobarbital sodium (PHE)) were administered to mice for 15 or 29 days. Then, the liver MN assay, peripheral blood (PB) MN assay and comet assay using the liver and kidney were concurrently performed as a combination test. DEN showed positive responses to all endpoints except MN induction in PB after 15 days of repeat administration. A cross-linking agent, CIS, showed MN induction in liver after 29 days of repeat administration, and in PB after 15 and 29 days of repeat administration, although the comet assay yielded negative responses for both organs at both sampling times. PHE yielded negative responses for all endpoints. In conclusion, it is suggested that the RDLMN assay using mice is a feasible method to be integrated into the general repeated toxicity test along with the combination assays, i.e., comet assay or PB MN assay, which would help in risk assessment for carcinogenicity by comparing the results of combination assays with each other. PMID:24849678

  2. Hypoxia promotes liver-stage malaria infection in primary human hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shengyong; March, Sandra; Galstian, Ani; Hanson, Kirsten; Carvalho, Tânia; Mota, Maria M; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2014-02-01

    Homeostasis of mammalian cell function strictly depends on balancing oxygen exposure to maintain energy metabolism without producing excessive reactive oxygen species. In vivo, cells in different tissues are exposed to a wide range of oxygen concentrations, and yet in vitro models almost exclusively expose cultured cells to higher, atmospheric oxygen levels. Existing models of liver-stage malaria that utilize primary human hepatocytes typically exhibit low in vitro infection efficiencies, possibly due to missing microenvironmental support signals. One cue that could influence the infection capacity of cultured human hepatocytes is the dissolved oxygen concentration. We developed a microscale human liver platform comprised of precisely patterned primary human hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells to model liver-stage malaria, but the oxygen concentrations are typically higher in the in vitro liver platform than anywhere along the hepatic sinusoid. Indeed, we observed that liver-stage Plasmodium parasite development in vivo correlates with hepatic sinusoidal oxygen gradients. Therefore, we hypothesized that in vitro liver-stage malaria infection efficiencies might improve under hypoxia. Using the infection of micropatterned co-cultures with Plasmodium berghei, Plasmodium yoelii or Plasmodium falciparum as a model, we observed that ambient hypoxia resulted in increased survival of exo-erythrocytic forms (EEFs) in hepatocytes and improved parasite development in a subset of surviving EEFs, based on EEF size. Further, the effective cell surface oxygen tensions (pO2) experienced by the hepatocytes, as predicted by a mathematical model, were systematically perturbed by varying culture parameters such as hepatocyte density and height of the medium, uncovering an optimal cell surface pO2 to maximize the number of mature EEFs. Initial mechanistic experiments revealed that treatment of primary human hepatocytes with the hypoxia mimetic, cobalt(II) chloride, as well as a HIF-1

  3. All-Trans-Retinoic Acid Enhances Mitochondrial Function in Models of Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Chapman, John D; Han, Chang Y; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Arnold, Samuel L M; Onken, Jennifer; Kent, Travis; Goodlett, David R; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-05-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A. The liver is the main storage organ of vitamin A, but activation of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in mouse liver and in human liver cell lines has also been shown. AlthoughatRA treatment improves mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in rodents, its role in modulating mitochondrial function in the liver is controversial, and little data are available regarding the human liver. The aim of this study was to determine whetheratRA regulates hepatic mitochondrial activity.atRA treatment increased the mRNA and protein expression of multiple components of mitochondrialβ-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and respiratory chain. Additionally,atRA increased mitochondrial biogenesis in human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells with and without lipid loading based on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1αand 1βand nuclear respiratory factor 1 mRNA and mitochondrial DNA quantification.atRA also increasedβ-oxidation and ATP production in HepG2 cells and in human hepatocytes. Knockdown studies of RARα, RARβ, and PPARδrevealed that the enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis andβ-oxidation byatRA requires peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta. In vivo in mice,atRA treatment increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers after an overnight fast. Inhibition ofatRA metabolism by talarozole, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26 specific inhibitor, increased the effects ofatRA on mitochondrial biogenesis markers in HepG2 cells and in vivo in mice. These studies show thatatRA regulates mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism and that increasingatRA concentrations in human liver via CYP26 inhibition may increase mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acidβ-oxidation and provide therapeutic benefit in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26921399

  4. Human SREBP1c Expression in Liver Is Directly Regulated by Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor α (PPARα)*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alvarez, Ana; Alvarez, María Soledad; Gonzalez, Raúl; Cucarella, Carme; Muntané, Jordi; Casado, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) regulate the expression of a number of enzymes, which catalyze the synthesis of fatty acids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and phospholipids. SREBP1c is the most relevant isoform in the adult liver, and its expression is controlled by the nutritional state. Transcriptional regulation studies into the SREBP1c gene, performed in the last few years, have improved our knowledge of the variability of signals that converge on its promoter region. Insulin, cholesterol derivatives, T3 and other endogenous molecules have been demonstrated to regulate the SREBP1c expression, particularly in rodents. The present study aimed to perform a detailed analysis of the human SREBP1c gene promoter structure in liver cells by focusing on responses to diverse metabolic signals. Serial deletion and mutation assays reveal that both SREBP (SRE) and LXR (LXRE) response elements are involved in SREBP1c transcription regulation mediated by insulin and cholesterol derivatives. We discovered that peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonists enhance the activity of the SREBP1c promoter; a DR1 element, at −453 in the human promoter was involved in this activation. Moreover, PPARα agonists act in cooperation with LXR or insulin to induce lipogenesis. Collectively, our results identify PPARα as a novel regulatory factor in SREBP1c regulation which plays a relevant role in the interplay between lipids and insulin metabolic regulation. PMID:21540177

  5. Adult human sarcomas. II. Medical oncology.

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2007-02-01

    Human sarcoma cells can be killed by radio- and chemotherapy, but tumor cells acquiring resistance frequently kill the patient. A keen understanding of the intracellular course of oncogenic cascades leads to the discovery of small molecular inhibitors of the involved phosphorylated kinases. Targeted therapy complements chemotherapy. Oncogene silencing is feasible by small interfering RNA. The restoration of some of the mutated or deleted tumor-suppressor genes (p53, Rb, PTEN, hSNF, INK/ARF and WT) by demethylation or reacetylation of their histones has been accomplished. Genetically engineered or naturally oncolytic viruses selectively lyse tumors and leave healthy tissues intact. Adeno- or retroviral vectors deliver genes of immunological costimulators, tumor antigens, chemo- or cytokines and/or tumor-suppressor proteins into tumor (sarcoma) cells. Suicide gene delivery results in apoptosis induction. Genes of enzymes that target prodrugs as their substrates render tumor cells highly susceptible to chemotherapy, with the prodrug to be targeted intracellularly. It will be combinations of sophisticated surgical removal of the nonencapsulated and locally invasive primary sarcomas, advanced forms of radiotherapy to the involved sites and immunotherapy with sarcoma vaccines that will cure primary sarcomas. Adoptive immunotherapy with immune lymphocytes will be operational in metastatic disease only when populations of regulatory T cells are controlled. Targeted therapy with small molecular inhibitors of oncogene cascades, the driving forces of sarcoma cells, alteration of the tumor stroma from a supportive to a tumor-hostile environment, reactivation or replacement of wild-type tumor-suppressor genes, and radio-chemotherapy (with much reduced toxicity) will eventually accomplish the cure of metastatic sarcomas. PMID:17288529

  6. Oral tocotrienols are transported to human tissues and delay the progression of the model for end-stage liver disease score in patients.

    PubMed

    Patel, Viren; Rink, Cameron; Gordillo, Gayle M; Khanna, Savita; Gnyawali, Urmila; Roy, Sashwati; Shneker, Bassel; Ganesh, Kasturi; Phillips, Gary; More, J Layne; Sarkar, Atom; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Elkhammas, Elmahdi A; Klatte, Emily; Miller, Michael; Firstenberg, Michael S; Chiocca, E Antonio; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi; Sen, Chandan K

    2012-03-01

    The natural vitamin E family is composed of 8 members equally divided into 2 classes: tocopherols (TCP) and tocotrienols (TE). A growing body of evidence suggests TE possess potent biological activity not shared by TCP. The primary objective of this work was to determine the concentrations of TE (200 mg mixed TE, b.i.d.) and TCP [200 mg α-TCP, b.i.d.)] in vital tissues and organs of adults receiving oral supplementation. Eighty participants were studied. Skin and blood vitamin E concentrations were determined from healthy participants following 12 wk of oral supplementation of TE or TCP. Vital organ vitamin E levels were determined by HPLC in adipose, brain, cardiac muscle, and liver of surgical patients following oral TE or TCP supplementation (mean duration, 20 wk; range, 1-96 wk). Oral supplementation of TE significantly increased the TE tissue concentrations in blood, skin, adipose, brain, cardiac muscle, and liver over time. α-TE was delivered to human brain at a concentration reported to be neuroprotective in experimental models of stroke. In prospective liver transplantation patients, oral TE lowered the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score in 50% of patients supplemented, whereas only 20% of TCP-supplemented patients demonstrated a reduction in MELD score. This work provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence demonstrating that orally supplemented TE are transported to vital organs of adult humans. The findings of this study, in the context of the current literature, lay the foundation for Phase II clinical trials testing the efficacy of TE against stroke and end-stage liver disease in humans. PMID:22298568

  7. A shift in paradigm towards human biology-based systems for cholestatic-liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Noor, Fozia

    2015-12-01

    Cholestatic-liver diseases (CLDs) arise from diverse causes ranging from genetic factors to drug-induced cholestasis. The so-called diseases of civilization (obesity, diabetes, metabolic disorders, non-alcoholic liver disease, cardiovascular diseases, etc.) are intricately implicated in liver and gall bladder diseases. Although CLDs have been extensively studied, there seem to be important gaps in the understanding of human disease. Despite the fact that many animal models exist and substantial clinical data are available, translation of this knowledge towards therapy has been disappointingly limited. Recent advances in liver cell culture such as in vivo-like 3D cultivation of human primary hepatic cells, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes; and cutting-edge analytical techniques such as 'omics' technologies and high-content screenings could play a decisive role in deeper mechanistic understanding of CLDs. This Topical Review proposes a roadmap to human biology-based research using omics technologies providing quantitative information on mechanisms in an adverse outcome/disease pathway framework. With modern sensitive tools, a shift in paradigm in human disease research seems timely and even inevitable to overcome species barriers in translation. PMID:26417843

  8. Metabolism of (+)- and (-)-menthols by CYP2A6 in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Marumoto, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nakahashi, Hiroshi; Haigou, Risa; Nakanishi, Kyousuke

    2011-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of (+)-(1S,3S,4R) and (-)-(1R,3R,4S)-menthol enantiomers was examined by incubation with human liver microsomes, and the oxidative metabolites thus formed were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The (+)- and (-)-menthols were found to be oxidized to the respective (+)-(1S,3S,4S)- and (-)-(1R,3R,4R)-trans-p-menthane-3,8-diol derivatives by human liver microsomal P450 enzymes. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A6 was determined to be the major enzyme involved in the hydroxylation of (+)- and (-)-menthols by human liver microsomes on the basis of the following lines of evidence. First, of 11 recombinant human P450 enzymes tested, CYP2A6 catalyzed the oxidation of (+)- and (-)-menthols. Second, oxidation of (+)- and (-)-menthols was inhibited by (+)-menthofuran and anti-CYP2A6 antibody. Finally, (+)- and (-)-menthol activities were found to correlate with contents of CYP2A6 in liver microsomes of 9 human samples. PMID:21343660

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jake; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell

    2016-08-01

    Improved survival with combination antiretroviral therapy has led to a dramatic increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals 50 years of age or older such that by 2020 more than 50% of HIV-infected persons in the United States will be above this age. Recent studies confirm that antiretroviral therapy should be offered to all HIV-infected patients regardless of age, symptoms, CD4+ cell count, or HIV viral load. However, when compared with HIV-uninfected populations, even with suppression of measurable HIV replication, older individuals are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, malignancies, liver disease, and other comorbidities. PMID:27394024

  10. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C. ); Grzeschik, K.H. )

    1988-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration.

  11. Prediction of Liver Injury Induced by Chemicals in Human With a Multiparametric Assay on Isolated Mouse Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Porceddu, Mathieu; Buron, Nelly; Borgne-Sanchez, Annie

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in humans is difficult to predict using classical in vitro cytotoxicity screening and regulatory animal studies. This explains why numerous compounds are stopped during clinical trials or withdrawn from the market due to hepatotoxicity. Thus, it is important to improve early prediction of DILI in human. In this study, we hypothesized that this goal could be achieved by investigating drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction as this toxic effect is a major mechanism of DILI. To this end, we developed a high-throughput screening platform using isolated mouse liver mitochondria. Our broad spectrum multiparametric assay was designed to detect the global mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (swelling), inner membrane permeabilization (transmembrane potential), outer membrane permeabilization (cytochrome c release), and alteration of mitochondrial respiration driven by succinate or malate/glutamate. A pool of 124 chemicals (mainly drugs) was selected, including 87 with documented DILI and 37 without reported clinical hepatotoxicity. Our screening assay revealed an excellent sensitivity for clinical outcome of DILI (94 or 92% depending on cutoff) and a high positive predictive value (89 or 82%). A highly significant relationship between drug-induced mitochondrial toxicity and DILI occurrence in patients was calculated (p < 0.001). Moreover, this multiparametric assay allowed identifying several compounds for which mitochondrial toxicity had never been described before and even helped to clarify mechanisms with some drugs already known to be mitochondriotoxic. Investigation of drug-induced loss of mitochondrial integrity and function with this multiparametric assay should be considered for integration into basic screening processes at early stage to select drug candidates with lower risk of DILI in human. This assay is also a valuable tool for assessing the mitochondrial toxicity profile and investigating the mechanism of action of new

  12. Recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis in the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study: Comparison of risk factors between living and deceased donor recipients.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Fredric D; Goldberg, David S; Goodrich, Nathan P; Lok, Anna S F; Verna, Elizabeth C; Selzner, Nazia; Stravitz, R Todd; Merion, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) recurs in 15%-25% of patients transplanted for PSC. In the United States, PSC transplant patients are more likely to receive an organ from a living donor (LD) than patients without PSC. Our aims were to (1) compare risk of PSC recurrence in LD versus deceased donor recipients and (2) identify risk factors for PSC recurrence. There were 241 living donor liver transplantations (LDLTs) and 65 deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) patients transplanted between 1998 and 2013 enrolled in the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study who were evaluated. PSC recurrence risk for LDLT and DDLT recipients was compared using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and log-rank tests. Cox models were used to evaluate PSC risk factors. Overall PSC recurrence probabilities were 8.7% and 22.4% at 5 and 10 years after liver transplantation (LT), respectively. The risk of PSC recurrence was not significantly different for DDLT versus LDLT recipients (P = 0.36). For DDLT versus LDLT recipients, unadjusted 5- and 10-year PSC recurrence was 9.4% versus 9.5% and 36.9% versus 21.1%. Higher laboratory Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score at LT, onset of a biliary complication, cholangiocarcinoma, and higher donor age were associated with increased risks of PSC recurrence: for MELD (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.10 per MELD point, P = 0.002); for biliary complication (HR, 2.82; 95% CI, 1.28-6.25; P = 0.01); for cholangiocarcinoma (HR, 3.98; 95% CI, 1.43-11.09; P = 0.008); for donor age (per 5-years donor age; HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.02-1.35; P = 0.02). Factors not significantly associated with PSC recurrence included the following: first-degree relative donor (P = 0.11), post-LT cytomegalovirus infection (P = 0.38), and acute rejection (P = 0.22). Risk of recurrent PSC was not significantly different for DDLT and LDLT recipients. Biliary complications

  13. Pericentral activity of AFP enhancer E3 and glutamine synthetase upstream enhancer in the adult liver are regulated by β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Clinkenbeard, Erica L.; Butler, James E.; Spear, Brett T.

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that mouse alpha-fetoprotein enhancer E3 activity is highly restricted to pericentral hepatocytes in the adult liver. Here, using transgenic mice, we show that the upstream enhancer of the rat glutamine synthetase gene is also active specifically in pericentral regions. Activity of both enhancers is lost in the absence of β-catenin, a key regulator of zonal gene expression in the adult liver. Both enhancers contain a single highly conserved TCF/LEF binding site that is required for responsiveness to β-catenin. We also show that endogenous AFP mRNA levels in the perinatal liver are lower when β-catenin is reduced. These data identify the first distinct zonally-active regulatory regions required for β-catenin responsiveness in the adult liver and suggest that postnatal AFP repression and the establishment of zonal regulation are controlled, at least in part, by the same factors. PMID:22544812

  14. PET-CT in Determining the Radioembolization Dose Delivered to Patients With Liver Metastasis, Primary Liver Cancer, or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage D Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  15. Repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with CI Solvent Yellow 14 (Sudan I) using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shoji; Ikeda, Naohiro; Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Kasamatsu, Toshio; Nishiyama, Naohiro

    2015-03-01

    The in vivo genotoxicity of CI Solvent Yellow 14 (Sudan I) was examined using repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus (MN) assays in young adult rats. Sudan I is a mono-azo dye based on aniline and 1-amino-2-hydroxynaphthalene. This dye was demonstrated as a rat liver carcinogen in a National Toxicology Program (NTP) bioassay, and genotoxicity was noted in a rat bone marrow micronucleus (BMMN) assay. In the present study, Sudan I was administered orally to rats for 14-days, and the MN frequency in the liver, stomach, colon, and bone marrow were analyzed. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) was not significantly increased by the administration of the Sudan I. Gastrointestinal tract MNs were also not induced. However, in the BMMN assay, a significant increase in micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIMEs) was observed in a dose-dependent manner. While Sudan I has been reported to lack hepatic genotoxicity, it has also exhibited tumor-promoting activities. These results are consistent with the lack of induction of MN in the hepatocytes. The lack of MN induction in cells of the gastrointestinal tract was also logical because azo-compounds are reported to be unlikely to induce DNA damage in the rat gut. The repeated-dose rat liver and gastrointestinal tract MN assays have the potential to be used in the evaluation of the genotoxicity of a chemical in each organ in accordance with its mode of action. PMID:25892626

  16. Human Glucocorticoid Receptor β Regulates Gluconeogenesis and Inflammation in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Cruz-Topete, Diana; Oakley, Robert H; Xiao, Xiao; Cidlowski, John A

    2015-01-01

    While in vitro studies have demonstrated that a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) splice isoform, β-isoform of human GR (hGRβ), acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of the classic hGRα and confers glucocorticoid resistance, the in vivo function of hGRβ is poorly understood. To this end, we created an adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express hGRβ in the mouse liver under the control of the hepatocyte-specific promoter. Genome-wide expression analysis of mouse livers showed that hGRβ significantly increased the expression of numerous genes, many of which are involved in endocrine system disorders and the inflammatory response. Physiologically, hGRβ antagonized GRα's function and attenuated hepatic gluconeogenesis through downregulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in wild-type (WT) mouse liver. Interestingly, however, hGRβ did not repress PEPCK in GR liver knockout (GRLKO) mice. In contrast, hGRβ regulates the expression of STAT1 in the livers of both WT and GRLKO mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that hGRβ binds to the intergenic glucocorticoid response element (GRE) of the STAT1 gene. Furthermore, treatment with RU486 inhibited the upregulation of STAT1 mediated by hGRβ. Finally, our array data demonstrate that hGRβ regulates unique components of liver gene expression in vivo by both GRα-dependent and GRα-independent mechanisms. PMID:26711253

  17. Toward the identification of liver toxicity markers: a proteome study in human cell culture and rats.

    PubMed

    Thome-Kromer, Birgit; Bonk, Ines; Klatt, Mathias; Nebrich, Grit; Taufmann, Marion; Bryant, Stewart; Wacker, Ulrich; Köpke, Andreas

    2003-10-01

    The effects of toxic and nontoxic compound treatments were investigated by high resolution custom developed 2-11 pH gradient NEPHGE (non equilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) two-dimensional electrophoresis. Two models were compared: (i) in vivo rat and (ii) the human cell line HepG2, to test their suitability in a proteomics based approach to identify a toxicity marker. 163 and 321 proteins were identified from the rat liver and the HepG2 proteome. These represent various isoforms of 113 and 194 different NCBI annotated gene sequences, respectively. Nine compounds were selected to induce proteome variations associated with liver toxicity and metabolism. The rat liver proteome database consists of 78 gels, the HepG2 database of 52 gels. Variant proteins were assessed regarding their usefulness as a toxicity marker by evaluating their treatment specificity against multiple control treatments. Thirteen potential toxicity marker proteins were found in rat liver and eight in HepG2. Catalase and carbamoylphosphate synthetase-1 isoforms were found to be significantly changed after treatment by 4/4 and 3/4 toxic compounds in rat liver, respectively. Aldo-keto-reductase family 1, member C1 was implicated for 3/4 liver cell toxic compounds in HepG2. Our approach was able to differentiate the quality of potential toxicity markers and provided useful information for an ongoing characterization of more compounds in a wider number of toxicity classes. PMID:14625847

  18. Human Carboxymethylenebutenolidase as a Bioactivating Hydrolase of Olmesartan Medoxomil in Liver and Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Fujimori, Izumi; Kato, Mitsunori; Noji-Sakikawa, Chisa; Saito, Motoko; Yoshigae, Yasushi; Kubota, Kazuishi; Kurihara, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Okazaki, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    Olmesartan medoxomil (OM) is a prodrug type angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist widely prescribed as an antihypertensive agent. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of the OM bioactivating enzyme that hydrolyzes the prodrug and converts to its pharmacologically active metabolite olmesartan in human liver and intestine. The protein was purified from human liver cytosol by successive column chromatography and was identified by mass spectrometry to be a carboxymethylenebutenolidase (CMBL) homolog. Human CMBL, whose endogenous function has still not been reported, is a human homolog of Pseudomonas dienelactone hydrolase involved in the bacterial halocatechol degradation pathway. The ubiquitous expression of human CMBL gene transcript in various tissues was observed. The recombinant human CMBL expressed in mammalian cells was clearly shown to activate OM. By comparing the enzyme kinetics and chemical inhibition properties between the recombinant protein and human tissue preparations, CMBL was demonstrated to be the primary OM bioactivating enzyme in the liver and intestine. The recombinant CMBL also converted other prodrugs having the same ester structure as OM, faropenem medoxomil and lenampicillin, to their active metabolites. CMBL exhibited a unique sensitivity to chemical inhibitors, thus, being distinguishable from other known esterases. Site-directed mutagenesis on the putative active residue Cys132 of the recombinant CMBL caused a drastic reduction of the OM-hydrolyzing activity. We report for the first time that CMBL serves as a key enzyme in the bioactivation of OM, hydrolyzing the ester bond of the prodrug type xenobiotics. PMID:20177059

  19. Human carboxymethylenebutenolidase as a bioactivating hydrolase of olmesartan medoxomil in liver and intestine.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Tomoko; Fujimori, Izumi; Kato, Mitsunori; Noji-Sakikawa, Chisa; Saito, Motoko; Yoshigae, Yasushi; Kubota, Kazuishi; Kurihara, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Okazaki, Osamu

    2010-04-16

    Olmesartan medoxomil (OM) is a prodrug type angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist widely prescribed as an antihypertensive agent. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of the OM bioactivating enzyme that hydrolyzes the prodrug and converts to its pharmacologically active metabolite olmesartan in human liver and intestine. The protein was purified from human liver cytosol by successive column chromatography and was identified by mass spectrometry to be a carboxymethylenebutenolidase (CMBL) homolog. Human CMBL, whose endogenous function has still not been reported, is a human homolog of Pseudomonas dienelactone hydrolase involved in the bacterial halocatechol degradation pathway. The ubiquitous expression of human CMBL gene transcript in various tissues was observed. The recombinant human CMBL expressed in mammalian cells was clearly shown to activate OM. By comparing the enzyme kinetics and chemical inhibition properties between the recombinant protein and human tissue preparations, CMBL was demonstrated to be the primary OM bioactivating enzyme in the liver and intestine. The recombinant CMBL also converted other prodrugs having the same ester structure as OM, faropenem medoxomil and lenampicillin, to their active metabolites. CMBL exhibited a unique sensitivity to chemical inhibitors, thus, being distinguishable from other known esterases. Site-directed mutagenesis on the putative active residue Cys(132) of the recombinant CMBL caused a drastic reduction of the OM-hydrolyzing activity. We report for the first time that CMBL serves as a key enzyme in the bioactivation of OM, hydrolyzing the ester bond of the prodrug type xenobiotics. PMID:20177059

  20. Ultrastructural characteristics of human adult and infant cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, W Y; Garey, L J

    1991-01-01

    Biopsy specimens of human cerebral cortex from three adults and two infants were studied by correlating their light microscopic features in semithin sections with their ultrastructural characteristics. There was good tissue preservation, due to a minimum delay between obtaining the specimens and fixation. Pyramidal cells had a prominent apical dendrite, fine heterochromatin clumps in the nucleus and generally small numbers of cytoplasmic organelles, except for numerous free ribosomes in some of the large pyramids of Layers III to VI. Non-pyramidal cells lacked an apical dendrite and were further classified, on size and ultrastructure, into small, medium and large types. Large numbers of asymmetrical and symmetrical synapses were present in the neuropil but very few axosomatic synapses were found in the human cerebral cortex compared with subhuman primates and other mammals. Some symmetrical synapses were characterised by the presence of wide pre- and postsynaptic densities. The same general features of the adult cortex were also encountered in the infant, with certain exceptions. Many of the infant neurons had less densely packed heterochromatin, but greater numbers of free ribosomes, compared with the adult, and lipofuscin was absent. There was a total absence of myelinated fibres from the infant cortex; more large diameter dendrites were present than in the adult and axosomatic synapses were commoner. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:2050578

  1. KINETICS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE METABOLISM BY CYTOCHROME P450 ISOENZYMES IN HUMAN LIVER MICROSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kinetics of Bromodichloromethane Metabolism by
    Cytochrome P450 Isoenzymes in Human Liver Microsomes

    Guangyu Zhao and John W. Allis

    ABSTRACT
    The kinetic constants for the metabolism of bromodichloromethane (BDCM) by three cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes have ...

  2. METABOLISM OF MYCLOBUTANIL AND TRIADIMEFON BY HUMAN AND RAT CYTOCHROME P450 ENZYMES AND LIVER MICROSOMES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolism of two triazole-containing antifungal azoles was studied using expressed human and rat cytochrome P450s (CYP) and liver microsomes. Substrate depletion methods were used due to the complex array of metabolites produced from myclobutanil and triadimefon. Myclobutanil wa...

  3. Differences in Redox Regulatory Systems in Human Lung and Liver Tumors Suggest Different Avenues for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Ryuta; Carlson, Bradley A.; Tsuji, Petra A.; Lee, Byeong Jae; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2015-01-01

    A common characteristic of many cancer cells is that they suffer from oxidative stress. They, therefore, require effective redox regulatory systems to combat the higher levels of reactive oxygen species that accompany accelerated growth compared to the normal cells of origin. An elevated dependence on these systems in cancers suggests that targeting these systems may provide an avenue for retarding the malignancy process. Herein, we examined the redox regulatory systems in human liver and lung cancers by comparing human lung adenocarcinoma and liver carcinoma to their respective surrounding normal tissues. Significant differences were found in the two major redox systems, the thioredoxin and glutathione systems. Thioredoxin reductase 1 levels were elevated in both malignancies, but thioredoxin was highly upregulated in lung tumor and only slightly upregulated in liver tumor, while peroxiredoxin 1 was highly elevated in lung tumor, but downregulated in liver tumor. There were also major differences within the glutathione system between the malignancies and their normal tissues. The data suggest a greater dependence of liver on either the thioredoxin or glutathione system to drive the malignancy, while lung cancer appeared to depend primarily on the thioredoxin system. PMID:26569310

  4. Metabolomic profiling can predict which humans will develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Wei; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Fischer, Leslie M.; Milburn, Michael V.; Lawton, Kay A.; Berger, Alvin; Jia, Wei; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient, and deficiency causes liver and muscle dysfunction. Common genetic variations alter the risk of developing organ dysfunction when choline deficient, probably by causing metabolic inefficiencies that should be detectable even while ingesting a normal choline-adequate diet. We determined whether metabolomic profiling of plasma at baseline could predict whether humans will develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline. Fifty-three participants were fed a diet containing 550 mg choline/70 kg/d for 10 d and then fed <50 mg choline/70 kg/d for up to 42 d. Participants who developed organ dysfunction on this diet were repleted with a choline-adequate diet for ≥3 d. Plasma samples, obtained at baseline, end of depletion, and end of repletion, were used for targeted and nontargeted metabolomic profiling. Liver fat was assessed using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Metabolomic profiling and targeted biochemical analyses were highly correlated for the analytes assessed by both procedures. In addition, we report relative concentration changes of other small molecules detected by the nontargeted metabolomic analysis after choline depletion. Finally, we show that metabolomic profiles of participants when they were consuming a control baseline diet could predict whether they would develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline.—Sha, W., da Costa, K., Fischer, L. M., Milburn, M. V., Lawton, K. A., Berger, A., Jia, W., Zeisel, S. H. Metabolomic profiling can predict which humans will develop liver dysfunction when deprived of dietary choline. PMID:20371621

  5. Clinical significance of donor-specific human leukocyte antigen antibodies in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado, Antonio; San Segundo, David; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Crespo, Javier; Fábrega, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) caused by donor-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies (DSA) is widely accepted to be a risk factor for decreased graft survival after kidney transplantation. This entity also plays a pathogenic role in other solid organ transplants as it appears to be an increasingly common cause of heart graft dysfunction and an emerging issue in lung transplantation. In contrast, the liver appears relatively resistant to DSA-mediated injury. This “immune-tolerance” liver property has been sustained by a low rate of liver graft loss in patients with preformed DSA and by the intrinsic liver characteristics that favor the absorption and elimination of DSA; however, alloantibody-mediated adverse consequences are increasingly being recognized, and several cases of acute AMR after ABO-compatible liver transplant (LT) have been reported. Furthermore, the availability of new solid-phase assays, allowing the detection of low titers of DSA and the refinement of objective diagnostic criteria for AMR in solid organ transplants and particularly in LT, have improved the recognition and management of this entity. A cost-effective strategy of DSA monitoring, avoidance of class II human leukocyte antigen mismatching, judicious immunosuppression attached to a higher level of clinical suspicion of AMR, particularly in cases unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, can allow a rational approach to this threat. PMID:26494958

  6. Induction of three-dimensional assembly of human liver cells by simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaoustov, V. I.; Darlington, G. J.; Soriano, H. E.; Krishnan, B.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; Yoffe, B.

    1999-01-01

    The establishment of long-term cultures of functional primary human liver cells (PHLC) is formidable. Developed at NASA, the Rotary Cell Culture System (RCCS) allows the creation of the unique microgravity environment of low shear force, high-mass transfer, and 3-dimensional cell culture of dissimilar cell types. The aim of our study was to establish long-term hepatocyte cultures in simulated microgravity. PHLC were harvested from human livers by collagenase perfusion and were cultured in RCCS. PHLC aggregates were readily formed and increased up to 1 cm long. The expansion of PHLC in bioreactors was further evaluated with microcarriers and biodegradable scaffolds. While microcarriers were not conducive to formation of spheroids, PHLC cultured with biodegradable scaffolds formed aggregates up to 3 cm long. Analyses of PHLC spheroids revealed tissue-like structures composed of hepatocytes, biliary epithelial cells, and/or progenitor liver cells that were arranged as bile duct-like structures along nascent vascular sprouts. Electron microscopy revealed groups of cohesive hepatocytes surrounded by complex stromal structures and reticulin fibers, bile canaliculi with multiple microvilli, and tight cellular junctions. Albumin mRNA was expressed throughout the 60-d culture. A simulated microgravity environment is conducive to maintaining long-term cultures of functional hepatocytes. This model system will assist in developing improved protocols for autologous hepatocyte transplantation, gene therapy, and liver assist devices, and facilitate studies of liver regeneration and cell-to-cell interactions that occur in vivo.

  7. Human herpesvirus 6-related fulminant myocarditis and hepatitis in an immunocompetent adult with fatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yilan L; Parker, Mark E; Nuovo, Gerard; Miller, Joel B

    2009-05-01

    A 59-year-old previously healthy man had flulike symptoms of fever and diarrhea for a week, which worsened despite treatment with antibiotics. After admission, his medical condition rapidly deteriorated with renal failure, heart failure, and a marked increase of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase. The patient died of a cardiac arrhythmia 3 days after the admission. The autopsy showed diffuse myocarditis with a granulocytic and monocytic infiltrate, necrotizing arteritis of the coronary arteries, and fulminant hepatitis, with microvesicular steatosis and necrosis. Cell-free serum showed high copies of human herpesvirus 6 B variant DNA by polymerase chain reaction. Human herpesvirus 6 B was identified in the heart, liver, lung, and spleen by immunohistochemistry. No parvovirus B19 was evident in the heart by immunohistochemistry. Human herpesvirus 6 is increasingly found in association with myocarditis in immunocompromised patients; however, histopathologic features and the clinical severity of this disease have not yet been clearly defined. Only 4 to 5 cases of human herpesvirus 6 fulminant myocarditis have been reported, all in young children or immunosuppressed patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case in the English literature of human herpesvirus 6 fulminant myocarditis and hepatitis in an immunocompetent adult with a fatal outcome. In addition, several pathologic features of our case have not been previously reported. PMID:19144379

  8. Preoperative single-dose methylprednisolone versus placebo after major liver resection in adults: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Alexsander K; Roberts, Derek J; Bhatti, Sana U; Dixon, Elijah; Sutherland, Francis R; Bathe, Oliver F; Ball, Chad G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although randomised controlled trials have demonstrated that preoperative glucocorticoids may improve postoperative surrogate outcomes among patients undergoing major liver resection, evidence supporting improved patient-important outcomes is lacking. This superiority trial aims to evaluate the effect of administration of a bolus of the glucocorticoid methylprednisolone versus placebo during induction of anaesthesia on postoperative morbidity among adults undergoing elective major liver resection. Methods and analysis This will be a randomised, dual-arm, parallel-group, superiority trial. All consecutive adults presenting to a large Canadian tertiary care hospital who consent to undergo major liver resection will be included. Patients aged <18 years and those currently receiving systemic corticosteroid therapy will be excluded. We will randomly allocate participants to a preoperative 500 mg intravenous bolus of methylprednisolone versus placebo. Surgical team members and outcome assessors will be blinded to treatment allocation status. The primary outcome measure will be postoperative complications. Secondary outcome measures will include mortality, the incidence of several specific postoperative complications, and blood levels of select proinflammatory cytokines, acute-phase proteins, and laboratory liver enzymes or function tests on postoperative days 0, 1, 2 and 5. The incidence of postoperative complications and mortality will be compared using Fisher's exact test, while the above laboratory measures will be compared using mixed-effects models with a subject-specific random intercept. Ethics and dissemination This trial will evaluate the protective effect of a single preoperative dose of methylprednisolone on the hazard of postoperative complications. A report releasing study results will be submitted for publication in an appropriate journal, approximately 3 months after finishing the data collection. Trial registration number NCT01997658

  9. Dietary Patterns Modulate the Risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Qun; Shu, Long; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Jia-Jia; Zhou, Yu; Xuan, Yu-Jie; Wang, Su-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies reported the associations between the intakes of individual foods or nutrients and the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the relationship between dietary patterns and NAFLD in the Chinese population has been rarely studied to date. This study aimed to investigate the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of NAFLD in a middle-aged Chinese population. The Study subjects were 999 Chinese adults aged 45–60 years in the Anhui province who participated in the Hefei Nutrition and Health Study. Dietary intake was collected by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. NAFLD was defined as the presence of moderate-severe hepatic steatosis (by B-ultrasonic examination); the absence of excessive alcohol use (>20 g day−1 in men and 10 g day−1 in women); no use of steatogenic medications within the past six months; no exposure to hepatotoxins; and no history of bariatric surgery. Log-binomial regression analysis was used to examine the association between dietary patterns and NAFLD with adjustment of potential confounding variables. Out of 999 participants, 345 (34.5%) were classified as having NAFLD. Four major dietary patterns were identified: “Traditional Chinese”, “Animal food”, “Grains-vegetables” and “High-salt” dietary patterns. After adjusting for potential confounders, subjects in the highest quartile of the “Animal food” pattern scores had greater prevalence ratio for NAFLD (prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.354; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.063–1.724; p < 0.05) than did those in the lowest quartile. After adjustment for body mass index (BMI), compared with the lowest quartile of the “Grains-vegetables” pattern, the highest quartile had a lower prevalence ratio for NAFLD (PR = 0.777; 95% CI: 0.618–0.977, p < 0.05). However, the “traditional Chinese” and “high-salt” dietary patterns showed no association with the risk of NAFLD. Our findings indicated that the

  10. Histology of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Adults and Children.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, David E; Makhlouf, Hala R

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the liver disease associated with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. Although steatosis is a key histologic feature, liver biopsies of patients with NAFLD can show a wide range of findings. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a progressive subtype of NAFLD first defined by analogy to alcoholic hepatitis. Young children may have an alternate pattern of progressive NAFLD characterized by a zone 1 distribution of steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Several grading and staging systems exist, but all require adequate biopsies. Although NASH generally shows fibrosis progression over time, some patients show regression of disease. PMID:27063270

  11. Graft selection strategy in adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation: When both hemiliver grafts meet volumetric criteria.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Takeshi; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Yoshida, Yoshihiro; Ikegami, Toru; Itoh, Shinji; Harimoto, Norifumi; Ninomiya, Mizuki; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Okabe, Hirohisa; Kimura, Koichi; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-07-01

    To ensure donor safety in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), the left and caudate lobe (LL) is the preferred graft choice. However, patient prognosis may still be poor even if graft volume (GV) selection criteria are met. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of right lobe (RL) donation when the LL graft selection criteria are met. Consecutive donors (n = 135) with preoperative LL graft volumetric GV/standard liver volume (SLV) of ≥35% and RL remnant of ≥35% were retrospectively studied. Patients were divided into 2 groups: LL graft and RL graft. Recipient's body surface area (BSA), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and the donor's age were higher in the RL group. The donor's BSA and preoperative volumetric GV/SLV of the LL graft were smaller in the RL group. The predicted score (calculated using data for graft size, donor age, MELD score, and the presence of portosystemic shunt, which correlated well with graft function and with 6-month graft survival) of the RL group, was significantly lower if the LL graft were used, but using the actual RL graft improved the score equal to that of the LL group. Six-month and 12-month graft survival rates did not differ between the 2 groups. In patients with a poor prognosis, a larger RL graft improved the predicted score and survival was equal to that of patients who received LL grafts. In conclusion, graft selection by GV, donor age, and recipient MELD score improves outcomes in LDLT. Liver Transplantation 22 914-922 2016 AASLD. PMID:26953726

  12. Phenotypic characterization of stem cell factor-dependent human foetal liver-derived mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, G; Forsberg, K; Bodger, M P; Ashman, L K; Zsebo, K M; Ishizaka, T; Irani, A M; Schwartz, L B

    1993-01-01

    Human foetal liver cells are an enriched source of mast cell progenitors that complete their differentiation and mature in response to stem cell factor, the ligand for Kit, in liquid culture. These mast cells are Kit+, metachromatic with toluidine blue+, tryptase+, histamine+ and show ultrastructure features of mast cells. Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against different cell-surface antigens (33 mAb were used), the cell-surface phenotype of human stem cell factor-dependent foetal liver-derived mast cells was examined by flow cytometry. Consistent with previous reports on tissue-derived mast cells, those derived from foetal liver in vitro expressed HLA class I, CD9, CD29, CD33, CD43, CD45 and Kit. Unlike mast cells dispersed from tissue, a high expression of CD13 was found. Also, these in vitro-derived mast cells express little, if any, high-affinity IgE receptor. However, small amounts of mRNA for the alpha-chain in foetal liver-derived mast cells compared to KU812 cells (a human basophil-like cell line) could be detected by Northern blotting. Full expression of Fc epsilon RI may require additional growth factor(s). Images Figure 2 PMID:7688344

  13. The organ-specificity of ferritin in human and horse liver and spleen

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, R. R.; Millar, J. A.; Cumming, R. L. C.; Bryce, C. F. A.

    1973-01-01

    1. Ferritin was isolated from human and horse spleen and liver, and apoferritin prepared therefrom. 2. The electrophoretic mobilities of the four apoferritins were determined on polyacrylamide gels and on cellulose acetate strips, and all found to be equal. 3. Homologous ferritins share reactions of identity in immunodiffusion experiments, whereas heterologous ferritins show only partial identity. 4. The subunit molecular weight of each of the apoferritins was determined by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate and by chromatography on agarose columns in 6m-guanidine–HCl. A value of approx. 18500 was found in all cases. The proteins all had sedimentation coefficients of 17–18S. It thus seems that they have identical quaternary structures. 5. The amino acid compositions of the proteins revealed distinct differences both between organs and between species. This was confirmed by analysis of the tryptic peptide patterns, where it was found that about one-third of the peptides were common to the four proteins and the other two-thirds varied from protein to protein. 6. It is concluded that the apoferritins present in the liver and spleen of human and horse are both organ- and species-specific. 7. The apoferritin isolated from the liver of a patient with idiopathic haemochromatosis was identical with normal human liver apoferritin by the criteria described above. ImagesPLATE 2PLATE 1(a)PLATE 1(b) PMID:4198584

  14. In vitro Phase I and Phase II metabolism of α-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP), methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and methedrone by human liver microsomes and human liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Negreira, Noelia; Erratico, Claudio; Kosjek, Tina; van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Heath, Ester; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the in vitro Phase I and Phase II metabolites of three new psychoactive substances: α-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP), methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and methedrone, using human liver microsomes and human liver cytosol. Accurate-mass spectra of metabolites were obtained using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Six Phase I metabolites of α-PVP were identified, which were formed involving reduction, hydroxylation, and pyrrolidine ring opening reactions. The lactam compound was the major metabolite observed for α-PVP. Two glucuronidated metabolites of α-PVP, not reported in previous in vitro studies, were further identified. MDPV was transformed into 10 Phase I metabolites involving reduction, hydroxylation, and loss of the pyrrolidine ring. Also, six glucuronidated and two sulphated metabolites were detected. The major metabolite of MDPV was the catechol metabolite. Methedrone was transformed into five Phase I metabolites, involving N- and O-demethylation, hydroxylation, and reduction of the ketone group. Three metabolites of methedrone are reported for the first time. In addition, the contribution of individual human CYP enzymes in the formation of the detected metabolites was investigated. PMID:26014283

  15. EXPRESSION OF CYP4F2 IN HUMAN LIVER AND KIDNEY: ASSESSMENT USING TARGETED PEPTIDE ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Vandana; Yarovoy, Anton; Kozeska, Anita; Magnusson, Ronald P.; Lasker, Jerome M.

    2008-01-01

    P450 enzymes comprising the human CYP4F gene subfamily are catalysts of eicosanoid (e.g., 20-HETE and leukotriene B4) formation and degradation, although the role that individual CYP4F proteins play in these metabolic processes is not well defined. Thus, we developed antibodies to assess the tissue-specific expression and function of CYP4F2, one of four CYP4F P450s found in human liver and kidney. Peptide antibodies elicited in rabbits to CYP4F2 amino acid residues 61–74 (WGHQGMVNPTEEG) and 65–77 (GMVNPTEEGMRVL) recognized on immunoblots only CYP4F2 and not CYP4F3b, CYP4F11 or CYP4F12. Immunoquantitation with anti-CYP4F2 peptide IgG showed highly-variable CYP4F2 expression in liver (16.4 ± 18.6 pmol/mg microsomal protein; n = 29) and kidney cortex (3.9 ± 3.8 pmol/mg; n = 10), with two subjects lacking the hepatic or renal enzyme entirely. CYP4F2 content in liver microsomes was significantly correlated (r ≥ 0.63; p < 0.05) with leukotriene B4 and arachidonate ω-hydroxylase activities, which are both CYP4F2-catalyzed. Our study provides the first example of a peptide antibody that recognizes a single CYP4F P450 expressed in human liver and kidney, namely CYP4F2. Immunoquantitation and correlation analyses performed with this antibody suggest that CYP4F2 functions as a predominant LTB4 and arachidonate ω-hydroxylase in human liver. PMID:18662666

  16. Comparative metabolism of chloroacetamide herbicides and selected metabolites in human and rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, S; Linderman, R; Hodgson, E; Rose, R L

    2000-01-01

    Acetochlor [2-chloro-N-(ethoxymethyl)-N-(2-ethyl-6-methyl-phenyl)-acetamide], alachlor [N-(methoxymethyl)-2-chloro-N-(2, 6-diethyl-phenyl)acetamide], butachlor [N-(butoxymethyl)-2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethyl-phenyl)acetamide], and metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide] are pre-emergent herbicides used in the production of agricultural crops. These herbicides are carcinogenic in rats: acetochlor and alachlor cause tumors in the nasal turbinates, butachlor causes stomach tumors, and metolachlor causes liver tumors. It has been suggested that the carcinogenicity of these compounds involves a complex metabolic activation pathway leading to a DNA-reactive dialkylbenzoquinone imine. Important intermediates in this pathway are 2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)acetamide (CDEPA) produced from alachlor and butachlor and 2-chloro-N-(2-methyl-6-ethylphenyl)acetamide (CMEPA) produced from acetochlor and metolachlor. Subsequent metabolism of CDEPA and CMEPA produces 2,6-diethylaniline (DEA) and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA), which are bioactivated through para-hydroxylation and subsequent oxidation to the proposed carcinogenic product dialkylbenzoquinone imine. The current study extends our earlier studies with alachlor and demonstrates that rat liver microsomes metabolize acetochlor and metolachlor to CMEPA (0.065 nmol/min/mg and 0.0133 nmol/min/mg, respectively), whereas human liver microsomes can metabolize only acetochlor to CMEPA (0.023 nmol/min/mg). Butachlor is metabolized to CDEPA to a much greater extent by rat liver microsomes (0.045 nmol/min/mg) than by human liver microsomes (< 0.001 nmol/min/mg). We have determined that both rat and human livers metabolize both CMEPA to MEA (0.308 nmol/min/mg and 0.541 nmol/min/mg, respectively) and CDEPA to DEA (0.350 nmol/min/mg and 0.841 nmol/min/mg, respectively). We have shown that both rat and human liver microsomes metabolize MEA (0.035 nmol/min/mg and 0.069 nmol/min/mg, respectively

  17. Monocyte-induced recovery of inflammation-associated hepatocellular dysfunction in a biochip-based human liver model

    PubMed Central

    Gröger, Marko; Rennert, Knut; Giszas, Benjamin; Weiß, Elisabeth; Dinger, Julia; Funke, Harald; Kiehntopf, Michael; Peters, Frank T.; Lupp, Amelie; Bauer, Michael; Claus, Ralf A.; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Liver dysfunction is an early event in sepsis-related multi-organ failure. We here report the establishment and characterization of a microfluidically supported in vitro organoid model of the human liver sinusoid. The liver organoid is composed of vascular and hepatocyte cell layers integrating non-parenchymal cells closely reflecting tissue architecture and enables physiological cross-communication in a bio-inspired fashion. Inflammation-associated liver dysfunction was mimicked by stimulation with various agonists of toll-like receptors. TLR-stimulation induced the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and diminished expression of endothelial VE-cadherin, hepatic MRP-2 transporter and apolipoprotein B (ApoB), resulting in an inflammation-related endothelial barrier disruption and hepatocellular dysfunction in the liver organoid. However, interaction of the liver organoid with human monocytes attenuated inflammation-related cell responses and restored MRP-2 transporter activity, ApoB expression and albumin/urea production. The cellular events observed in the liver organoid closely resembled pathophysiological responses in the well-established sepsis model of peritoneal contamination and infection (PCI) in mice and clinical observations in human sepsis. We therefore conclude that this human liver organoid model is a valuable tool to investigate sepsis-related liver dysfunction and subsequent immune cell-related tissue repair/remodeling processes. PMID:26902749

  18. Monocyte-induced recovery of inflammation-associated hepatocellular dysfunction in a biochip-based human liver model.

    PubMed

    Gröger, Marko; Rennert, Knut; Giszas, Benjamin; Weiß, Elisabeth; Dinger, Julia; Funke, Harald; Kiehntopf, Michael; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Bauer, Michael; Claus, Ralf A; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Liver dysfunction is an early event in sepsis-related multi-organ failure. We here report the establishment and characterization of a microfluidically supported in vitro organoid model of the human liver sinusoid. The liver organoid is composed of vascular and hepatocyte cell layers integrating non-parenchymal cells closely reflecting tissue architecture and enables physiological cross-communication in a bio-inspired fashion. Inflammation-associated liver dysfunction was mimicked by stimulation with various agonists of toll-like receptors. TLR-stimulation induced the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and diminished expression of endothelial VE-cadherin, hepatic MRP-2 transporter and apolipoprotein B (ApoB), resulting in an inflammation-related endothelial barrier disruption and hepatocellular dysfunction in the liver organoid. However, interaction of the liver organoid with human monocytes attenuated inflammation-related cell responses and restored MRP-2 transporter activity, ApoB expression and albumin/urea production. The cellular events observed in the liver organoid closely resembled pathophysiological responses in the well-established sepsis model of peritoneal contamination and infection (PCI) in mice and clinical observations in human sepsis. We therefore conclude that this human liver organoid model is a valuable tool to investigate sepsis-related liver dysfunction and subsequent immune cell-related tissue repair/remodeling processes. PMID:26902749

  19. Assembly of Human Organs from Stem Cells to Study Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Kan; Matsubara, Kentaro; Fukumitsu, Ken; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Watson, Alicia; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Recently, significant developments in the field of liver tissue engineering have raised new possibilities for the study of complex physiological and pathophysiological processes in vitro, as well as the potential to assemble entire organs for transplantation. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells have been differentiated into relatively functional populations of hepatic cells, and novel techniques to generate whole organ acellular three-dimensional scaffolds have been developed. In this review, we highlight the most recent advances in organ assembly regarding the development of liver tissue in vitro. We emphasize applications that involve multiple types of cells with a biomimetic spatial organization for which three-dimensional configurations could be used for drug development or to explain mechanisms of disease. We also discuss applications of liver organotypic surrogates and the challenges of translating the highly promising new field of tissue engineering into a proven platform for predicting drug metabolism and toxicity. PMID:24333262

  20. In vivo time-harmonic multifrequency elastography of the human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Guo, Jing; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Gentz, Enno; Fischer, Thomas; Klaua, Robert; Schultz, Michael; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-04-01

    Elastography is capable of noninvasively detecting hepatic fibrosis by imposing mechanical stress and measuring the viscoelastic response in the liver. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) relies on time-harmonic vibrations, while most dynamic ultrasound elastography methods employ transient stimulation methods. This study attempts to benefit from the advantages of time-harmonic tissue stimulation, i.e. relative insensitivity to obesity and ascites and mechanical approachability of the entire liver, and the advantages of ultrasound, i.e. time efficiency, low costs, and wide availability, by introducing in vivo time-harmonic elastography (THE) of the human liver using ultrasound and a broad range of harmonic stimulation frequencies. THE employs continuous harmonic shear vibrations at 7 frequencies from 30 to 60 Hz in a single examination and determines the elasticity and the viscosity of the liver from the dispersion of the shear wave speed within the applied frequency range. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the livers of eight healthy volunteers and a patient with cirrhosis. Multifrequency MRE at the same drive frequencies was used as elastographic reference method. Similar values of shear modulus and shear viscosity according the Kelvin-Voigt model were obtained by MRE and THE, indicating that the new method is suitable for in vivo quantification of the shear viscoelastic properties of the liver, however, in real-time and at a fraction of the costs of MRE. In conclusion, THE may provide a useful tool for fast assessment of the viscoelastic properties of the liver at low costs and without limitations in obesity, ascites or hemochromatosis.

  1. In vivo time-harmonic multifrequency elastography of the human liver.

    PubMed

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Guo, Jing; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Gentz, Enno; Fischer, Thomas; Klaua, Robert; Schultz, Michael; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-04-01

    Elastography is capable of noninvasively detecting hepatic fibrosis by imposing mechanical stress and measuring the viscoelastic response in the liver. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) relies on time-harmonic vibrations, while most dynamic ultrasound elastography methods employ transient stimulation methods. This study attempts to benefit from the advantages of time-harmonic tissue stimulation, i.e. relative insensitivity to obesity and ascites and mechanical approachability of the entire liver, and the advantages of ultrasound, i.e. time efficiency, low costs, and wide availability, by introducing in vivo time-harmonic elastography (THE) of the human liver using ultrasound and a broad range of harmonic stimulation frequencies. THE employs continuous harmonic shear vibrations at 7 frequencies from 30 to 60 Hz in a single examination and determines the elasticity and the viscosity of the liver from the dispersion of the shear wave speed within the applied frequency range. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the livers of eight healthy volunteers and a patient with cirrhosis. Multifrequency MRE at the same drive frequencies was used as elastographic reference method. Similar values of shear modulus and shear viscosity according the Kelvin-Voigt model were obtained by MRE and THE, indicating that the new method is suitable for in vivo quantification of the shear viscoelastic properties of the liver, however, in real-time and at a fraction of the costs of MRE. In conclusion, THE may provide a useful tool for fast assessment of the viscoelastic properties of the liver at low costs and without limitations in obesity, ascites or hemochromatosis. PMID:24614751

  2. Influence of nanoparticles accumulation on optical properties of human normal and cancerous liver tissue in vitro estimated by OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fang; Wei, Huajiang; Ye, Xiangping; Hu, Kun; Wu, Guoyong; Yang, Hongqin; He, Yonghong; Xie, Shusen; Guo, Zhouyi

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the potential use of nanoparticles as contrast agents by using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in liver tissue was demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles (average size of 25 and 70 nm), were studied in human normal and cancerous liver tissues in vitro, respectively. Each sample was monitored with SD-OCT functional imaging for 240 min. Continuous OCT monitoring showed that, after application of gold nanoparticles, the OCT signal intensities of normal liver and cancerous liver tissue both increase with time, and the larger nanoparticles tend to produce a greater signal enhancement in the same type of tissue. The results show that the values of attenuation coefficients have significant differences between normal liver tissue and cancerous liver tissue. In addition, 25 nm gold nanoparticles allow higher penetration depth than 70 nm gold nanoparticles in liver tissues.

  3. Novel hepatic microRNAs upregulated in human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Soronen, Jarkko; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Zhou, You; Sädevirta, Sanja; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Leivonen, Marja; Sevastianova, Ksenia; Perttilä, Julia; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Sigruener, Alexander; Schmitz, Gerd; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression by reducing mRNA stability and translation. We aimed to identify alterations in human liver miRNA expression/function in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Subjects with the highest (median liver fat 30%, n = 15) and lowest (0%, n = 15) liver fat content were selected from >100 obese patients for miRNA profiling of liver biopsies on microarrays carrying probes for 1438 human miRNAs (a cross-sectional study). Target mRNAs and pathways were predicted for the miRNAs most significantly upregulated in NAFLD, their cell-type-specific expression was investigated by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and the transcriptome of immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) transfected with the miRNA with the highest number of predicted targets, miR-576-5p, was studied. The screen revealed 42 miRNAs up- and two downregulated in the NAFLD as compared to non-NAFLD liver. The miRNAs differing most significantly between the groups, miR-103a-2*, miR-106b, miR-576-5p, miRPlus-I137*, miR-892a, miR-1282, miR-3663-5p, and miR-3924, were all upregulated in NAFLD liver. Target pathways predicted for these miRNAs included ones involved in cancer, metabolic regulation, insulin signaling, and inflammation. Consistent transcriptome changes were observed in IHH transfected with miR-576-5p, and western analysis revealed a marked reduction of the RAC1 protein belonging to several miR-576-5p target pathways. To conclude, we identified 44 miRNAs differentially expressed in NAFLD versus non-NAFLD liver, 42 of these being novel in the context of NAFLD. The study demonstrates that by applying a novel study set-up and a broad-coverage array platform one can reveal a wealth of previously undiscovered miRNA dysregulation in metabolic disease. PMID:26733244

  4. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI; Roskams, Tania; Oben, Jude A.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  5. The nutrition intervention improved adult human capital and economic productivity.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Reynaldo; Melgar, Paul; Maluccio, John A; Stein, Aryeh D; Rivera, Juan A

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews key findings about the long-term impact of a nutrition intervention carried out by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama from 1969 to 1977. Results from follow-up studies in 1988-89 and 2002-04 show substantial impact on adult human capital and economic productivity. The 1988-89 study showed that adult body size and work capacity increased for those provided improved nutrition through age 3 y, whereas the 2002-04 follow-up showed that schooling was increased for women and reading comprehension and intelligence increased in both men and women. Participants were 26-42 y of age at the time of the 2002-04 follow-up, facilitating the assessment of economic productivity. Wages of men increased by 46% in those provided with improved nutrition through age 2 y. Findings for cardiovascular disease risk factors were heterogeneous; however, they suggest that improved nutrition in early life is unlikely to increase cardiovascular disease risk later in life and may indeed lower risk. In conclusion, the substantial improvement in adult human capital and economic productivity resulting from the nutrition intervention provides a powerful argument for promoting improvements in nutrition in pregnant women and young children. PMID:20032473

  6. Human Amnion-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation Ameliorates Liver Fibrosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Kimitoshi; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Hosono, Hidetaka; Fukai, Moto; Kameya, Ayano; Higashi, Ryosuke; Yamada, Takahiro; Onishi, Reizo; Yamahara, Kenichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a valuable cell source in regenerative medicine. Recently, several studies have shown that MSCs can be easily isolated from human amnion. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of transplantation of human amnion-derived MSCs (hAMSCs) in rats with liver fibrosis. Methods Liver fibrosis was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of 2 mL/kg of 50% carbon tetrachloride twice a week for 6 weeks. At 3 weeks, hAMSCs (1 × 106 cells) were transplanted intravenously. Rats were sacrificed at 7 weeks, and histological analyses and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed. In vitro experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of hAMSCs on the activation of Kupffer cells. Results Transplantation of hAMSCs significantly reduced the fibrotic area, deposition of type-I collagen, the number of α-smooth muscle actin–positive hepatic stellate cells, and CD68-positive Kupffer cells in the livers. messenger RNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 was significantly decreased and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and hepatocyte growth factor was significantly increased in the liver of hAMSC-treated rats. Transplantation of hAMSCs at 3 weeks plus 5 weeks did not have an additive effect. In vitro experiments demonstrated that Kupffer cell activation induced by lipopolysaccharide was significantly decreased by culturing with conditioned medium obtained from hAMSCs. Conclusions Transplantation of hAMSCs provided significant improvement in a rat model of liver fibrosis, possibly through the inhibition of Kupffer cell and hepatic stellate cell activation. hAMSCs may be a potential new treatment for liver fibrosis.

  7. Proteomic Profiling of Human Liver Biopsies: Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Fibrosis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Paeper, Bryan; Proll, Sean; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Larson , Anne M.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2007-09-01

    Liver biopsies from HCV-infected patients offer the unique opportunity to study human liver biology and disease in vivo. However, the low protein yields associated with these small samples present a significant challenge for proteomic analysis. In this study we describe the application of an ultra-sensitive proteomics platform for performing robust quantitative proteomic studies on microgram amounts of HCV-infected human liver tissue from 15 patients at different stages of fibrosis. A high quality liver protein data base containing 5,920 unique protein identifications supported high throughput quantitative studies using 16O:18O stable isotope labeling in combination with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach. A total of 1,641 liver biopsy proteins were quantified and ANOVA identified 210 proteins exhibiting statistically significant differences associated with fibrosis stage. Hierarchical clustering revealed that biopsies representative of later fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 3-4) exhibited a distinct protein expression profile indicating an apparent down-regulation of many proteins when compared to samples from earlier fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 0-2). Functional analysis of these signature proteins suggests that impairment of key mitochondrial processes including fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, and response to oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species occurs during advanced stage 3-4 fibrosis. In conclusion, the results reported here represent a significant advancement in clinical proteomics providing to our knowledge, the first demonstration of global proteomic alterations accompanying liver disease progression in patients chronically infected with HCV. Our findings contribute to a generally emerging theme associating oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction with HCV pathogenesis.

  8. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations. PMID:18196797

  9. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver

    SciTech Connect

    Bortolussi, S.; Altieri, S.

    2007-12-15

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ({phi}{sub max}/{phi}{sub min}) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a {phi}{sub max}/{phi}{sub min} ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations.

  10. Human CD34(lo)CD133(lo) fetal liver cells support the expansion of human CD34(hi)CD133(hi) hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kylie Su Mei; Keng, Choong Tat; Tan, Shu Qi; Loh, Eva; Chang, Kenneth Te; Tan, Thiam Chye; Hong, Wanjin; Chen, Qingfeng

    2016-09-01

    We have recently discovered a unique CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cell population in the human fetal liver (FL) that gives rise to cells in the hepatic lineage. In this study, we further characterized the biological functions of FL CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells. Our findings show that these CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells express markers of both endodermal and mesodermal lineages and have the capability to differentiate into hepatocyte and mesenchymal lineage cells by ex vivo differentiation assays. Furthermore, we show that CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells express growth factors that are important for human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion: stem cell factor (SCF), insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12), and factors in the angiopoietin-like protein family. Co-culture of autologous FL HSCs and allogenic HSCs derived from cord blood with CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells supports and expands both types of HSCs.These findings are not only essential for extending our understanding of the HSC niche during the development of embryonic and fetal hematopoiesis but will also potentially benefit adult stem cell transplantations in clinics because expanded HSCs demonstrate the same capacity as primary cells to reconstitute the human immune system and mediate long-term hematopoiesis in vivo. Together, CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells not only serve as stem/progenitor cells for liver development but are also an essential component of the HSC niche in the human FL. PMID:27593483

  11. How long have adult humans been consuming milk?

    PubMed

    Gerbault, Pascale; Roffet-Salque, Mélanie; Evershed, Richard P; Thomas, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down the milk sugar lactose, and in most mammals, including most humans, lactase activity is down-regulated after the weaning period is completed. However, in about 35% of adults worldwide, lactase continues to be expressed throughout adulthood, a feature termed lactase persistence (LP). Genetic evidence indicates that LP is a recent human adaptation, and its current geographic distribution correlates with the relative historical importance of dairying in different human populations. Investigating archaeological evidence for fresh milk consumption has proved crucial in building an account of the joint evolution of LP and dairying. A powerful technique for investigating food processing, including milk processing, in ancient populations is lipid residue analysis on archaeological pottery. We review here the archaeological and genetic evidence available that have contributed to a better understanding of the gene-culture co-evolution of LP and dairying. PMID:24339181

  12. Effect of selenium on methimazole-induced liver damage and oxidative stress in adult rats and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Sefi, Mediha; Ben Amara, Ibtissem; Troudi, Afef; Soudani, Nejla; Hakim, Ahmed; Zeghal, Khaled Mounir; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of selenium (Se) on methimazole (MMI; an antithyroid drug)-induced hepatotoxicity in adult rats and their progeny. Female Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups of six rats in each group: group I served as controls that received standard diet; group II received MMI in drinking water as 250 mg L(-1) and standard diet; group III received both MMI (250 mg L(-1), orally) and Se (0.5 mg kg(-1) of diet); group IV received Se (0.5 mg kg(-1) of diet) as sodium selenite. Treatments were started from the 14th day of pregnancy until day 14 after delivery. Exposure of rats to MMI promoted oxidative stress with an increase in liver malondialdehyde levels, advanced oxidation protein products and protein carbonyl contents and a decrease in the levels of glutathione, nonprotein thiols and vitamin C. A decrease in the activities of liver glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase and in the levels of plasma total protein and albumin was also observed. Plasma transaminase activities and total, direct and indirect bilirubin levels increased. Coadministration of Se through diet improved all biochemical parameters. The histopathological changes confirmed the biochemical results. Therefore, our investigation revealed that Se, a trace element with antioxidant properties, was effective in preventing MMI-induced liver damage. PMID:23047615

  13. Human relevance framework for rodent liver tumors induced by the insecticide sulfoxaflor.

    PubMed

    LeBaron, Matthew J; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Terry, Claire; Billington, Richard; Rasoulpour, Reza J

    2014-05-01

    Sulfoxaflor, a novel active substance that targets sap-feeding insects, induced rodent hepatotoxicity when administered at high dietary doses. Specifically, hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas increased after 18 months in male and female CD-1 mice at 750 and 1250 ppm, respectively, and hepatocellular adenomas increased after 2 years in male F344 rats at 500 ppm. Studies to determine the mode of action (MoA) for these liver tumors were performed in an integrated and prospective manner as part of the standard battery of toxicology studies such that the MoA data were available prior to, or by the time of, the completion of the carcinogenicity studies. Sulfoxaflor is not genotoxic and the MoA data support the following key events in the etiology of the rodent liver tumors: (1) CAR nuclear receptor activation and (2) hepatocellular proliferation. The MoA data were evaluated in a weight of evidence approach using the Bradford Hill criteria for causation and were found to align with dose and temporal concordance, biological plausibility, coherence, strength, consistency, and specificity for a CAR-mediated MoA while excluding other alternate MoAs. The available data include: activation of CAR, Cyp2b induction, hepatocellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia, absence of liver effects in KO mice, absence of proliferation in humanized mice, and exclusion of other possible mechanisms (e.g., genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, AhR, or PPAR activation), and indicate that the identified rodent liver tumor MoA for sulfoxaflor would not occur in humans. In this case, sulfoxaflor is considered not to be a potential human liver carcinogen. PMID:24832551

  14. Antifibrotic Effects of CXCL9 and Its Receptor CXCR3 in Livers of Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    WASMUTH, HERMANN E.; LAMMERT, FRANK; ZALDIVAR, MIRKO MORENO; WEISKIRCHEN, RALF; HELLERBRAND, CLAUS; SCHOLTEN, DAVID; BERRES, MARIE-LUISE; ZIMMERMANN, HENNING; STREETZ, KONRAD L.; TACKE, FRANK; HILLEBRANDT, SONJA; SCHMITZ, PETRA; KEPPELER, HILDEGARD; BERG, THOMAS; DAHL, EDGAR; GASSLER, NIKOLAUS; FRIEDMAN, SCOTT L.; TRAUTWEIN, CHRISTIAN

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Fibrosis is the hallmark of chronic liver diseases, yet many aspects of its mechanism remain to be defined. Chemokines are ubiquitous chemotactic molecules that mediate many acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, and CXC chemokine genes colocalize with a locus previously shown to include fibrogenic genes. We investigated the roles of the chemokine CXCL9 and its receptor CXCR3 in liver fibrosis. METHODS The effects of CXCL variants on fibrogenesis were analyzed using samples from patients with hepatitis C virus infection and by induction of fibrosis in CXCR3−/− and wild-type mice. In mice, intrahepatic immune cell subsets were investigated and interferon gamma messenger RNA levels were measured at baseline and after injury. Human serum CXCL9 levels were measured and correlated with CXCL9 variant and fibrosis severity. The effects of stimulation with CXCL9 were investigated on human hepatic stellate cells (LX-2). RESULTS Specific CXCL9 variants were associated with liver fibrosis in mice and humans; CXCL9 serum concentrations correlated with genotypes and levels of fibrosis in patients. In contrast to other chemokines, CXCL9 exerted antifibrotic effects in vitro, suppressing collagen production in LX-2 cells. CXCR3−/− mice had increased liver fibrosis; progression was associated with decreased numbers of intra-hepatic interferon gamma–positive T cells and reduced interferon gamma messenger RNA, indicating that CXCL9-CXCR3 regulates Th1-associated immune pathways. CONCLUSIONS This is the first description of a chemokine-based antifibrotic pathway in the liver; antifibrotic therapies might be developed to modulate CXC chemokine levels. PMID:19344719

  15. An integrated genomic and pharmacoepigenomic approach predicts therapeutic response of zebularine in human liver cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jesper B.; Factor, Valentina M.; Marquardt, Jens U.; Raggi, Chiara; Lee, Yun-Han; Seo, Daekwan; Conner, Elizabeth A.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2010-01-01

    Epigenomic changes such as aberrant hypermethylation and subsequent atypical gene silencing are characteristic features of human cancer. Here, we report a comprehensive characterization of epigenomic modulation caused by zebularine, an effective DNA methylation inhibitor, in human liver cancer. Using transcriptomic and epigenomic profiling, we identified a zebularine signature that classified liver cancer cell lines into two major subtypes with different drug-responses. In drug-sensitive cell lines, zebularine caused inhibition of proliferation coupled with increased apoptosis, whereas drug-resistant cell lines were associated with upregulation of oncogenic networks (e.g. E2F1, MYC, and TNF) driving liver cancer growth in vitro and in preclinical mouse models. Assessment of zebularine-based therapy in xenograft mouse models demonstrated potent therapeutic effects against tumors established from zebularine-sensitive but not zebularine-resistant liver cancer cells leading to increased survival and decreased pulmonary metastasis. Integration of zebularine gene expression and demethylation response signatures differentiated patients with HCC according to their survival and disease recurrence and identified a subclass of patients within the poor survivors likely to benefit from therapeutic agents that target the cancer epigenome. PMID:20962331

  16. Use of a three-dimensional humanized liver model for the study of viral gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anke; Röhrs, Viola; Materne, Eva-Maria; Hiller, Thomas; Kedzierski, Radoslaw; Fechner, Henry; Lauster, Roland; Kurreck, Jens

    2015-10-20

    Reconstituted three-dimensional (3D) liver models obtained by engrafting hepatic cells into an extracellular matrix (ECM) are valuable tools to study tissue regeneration, drug action and toxicology ex vivo. The aim of the present study was to establish a system for the functional investigation of a viral vector in a 3D liver model composed of human HepG2 cells on a rat ECM. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expressing the Emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) and a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed against human cyclophilin b (hCycB) was injected into the portal vein of 3D liver models. Application of the vector did not exert toxic effects, as shown by analysis of metabolic parameters. Six days after transduction, fluorescence microscopy analysis of EmGFP production revealed widespread distribution of the AAV vectors. After optimization of the recellularization and transduction conditions, averages of 55 and 90 internalized vector genomes per cell in two replicates of the liver model were achieved, as determined by quantitative PCR analysis. Functionality of the AAV vector was confirmed by efficient shRNA-mediated knockdown of hCycB by 70-90%. Our study provides a proof-of-concept that a recellularized biological ECM provides a valuable model to study viral vectors ex vivo. PMID:26356676

  17. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 RNA expression in rat and human liver fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, H.; Wege, T.; Milani, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Orzechowski, H. D.; Bechstein, W. O.; Neuhaus, P.; Gressner, A. M.; Schuppan, D.

    1997-01-01

    The remodeling of extracellular matrix during chronic liver disease may partially be attributed to altered activity of matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs). Expression of TIMP-1 and -2 was studied by in situ hybridization combined with immunohistochemistry in rat (acute and chronic carbon tetrachloride intoxication and secondary biliary fibrosis) and human livers and on isolated rat hepatic stellate cells. TIMP-1 and -2 transcripts appeared in rat livers within 1 to 3 hours after intoxication, pointing to a role in the protection against accidental activation of matrix metalloproteinases, and were present at high levels in all fibrotic rat and human livers predominantly in stellate cells. TIMP-2 RNA distribution largely matched with previously reported patterns of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (72-kd gelatinase) expression, suggesting generation of a TIMP-2/matrix metalloproteinase-2 complex (large inhibitor of metalloproteinases). Isolated stellate cells expressed TIMP-1 and -2 RNA. Addition of transforming growth factor-beta 1 enhanced TIMP-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 RNA levels in vitro, whereas TIMP-2-specific signals were reduced, likely to result in a stoichiometric excess of matrix-metalloproteinase-2 over TIMP-2. In the context of previous demonstrations of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in vivo, these patterns suggest an intrahepatic environment permitting only limited matrix degradation, ultimately resulting in redistribution of extracellular matrix with relative accumulation of collagen type 1. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9137090

  18. Mechanism of action of novel piperazine containing a toxicant against human liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanthimathi, MS; Haerian, Batoul Sadat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cytotoxic potential of a novel piperazine derivative (PCC) against human liver cancer cells. SNU-475 and 423 human liver cancer cell lines were used to determine the IC50 of PCC using the standard MTT assay. PCC displayed a strong suppressive effect on liver cancer cells with an IC50 value of 6.98 ± 0.11 µM and 7.76 ± 0.45 µM against SNU-475 and SNU-423 respectively after 24 h of treatment. Significant dipping in the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevation in the released of cytochrome c from the mitochondria indicated the induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by PCC. Activation of this pathway was further evidenced by significant activation of caspase 3/7 and 9. PCC was also shown to activate the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 which is linked to the suppression of NF-κB translocation to the nucleus. Cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase was confirmed by flow cytometry and up-regulation of glutathione reductase expression was quantified by qPCR. Results of this study suggest that PCC is a potent anti-cancer agent inducing both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. PMID:27019772

  19. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures. PMID:25857839

  20. A novel isolation method for macrophage-like cells from mixed primary cultures of adult rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Hiroshi; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2010-08-31

    We report a simple and efficient method to obtain macrophage-like cells from the mixed primary cultures of adult rat liver cells. A parenchymal hepatocyte enriched fraction was prepared from adult rat livers and seeded into culture flasks. After 7 to 10 days of culture, when most hepatocytes were degenerated or transformed into fibroblastic cells, macrophage-like cells vigorously proliferated on the cell sheet. By shaking the flasks, macrophage-like cells were readily detached. Subsequent transfer and incubation in plastic dishes resulted in quick and selective adhesion of macrophage-like cells, while other contaminating cells remained suspended in the medium. After rinsing with saline, attached macrophage-like cells were harvested with 95 to 99% purity, as evaluated by flow cytometry or immunocytochemistry. These cells showed typical macrophage morphology and were strongly positive for markers of rat macrophages, such as ED-1, ED-3, and OX-41, but negative for cytokeratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin. They possessed functional properties of typical macrophages, including active phagocytosis of latex beads, proliferative response to recombinant GM-CSF, secretion of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines upon stimulation with LPS, and formation of multinucleated giant cells. As more than 10(6) cells can be recovered repeatedly from a T75 culture flask at two to three day intervals for more than two weeks, our procedure might implicate a novel alternative to obtain Kupffer cells in sufficient number and purity without complex equipment and skills. PMID:20600081

  1. Isolated intestinal transplants vs. liver-intestinal transplants in adult patients in the United States: 22 yr of OPTN data.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag S; Gruessner, Angelika C; Khan, Khalid M; Fishbein, Thomas M; Jie, Tun; Rodriguez Rilo, Horacio L; Gruessner, Rainer W G

    2012-01-01

    We examined the outcomes of adult intestinal transplants (ITx); isolated ITx vs. liver-intestinal transplants (L-ITx) were compared using the UNOS database (1987-2009). Of 759 ITx transplants in 687 patients, 463 (61%) were isolated and 296 (39%) were L-ITx. Patient survival for primary isolated ITx at one, three, and five yr was 84%, 66.7%, and 54.2%; and primary L-ITx was, 67%, 53.3%, and 46% (p = 0.0005). Primary isolated ITx graft survival at one, three, and five yr was 80.7%, 57.6%, 42.8%; primary L-ITx was 64.1%, 51%, 44.1% (p = 0.0003 at one, three yr, Wilcoxon test). For retransplants (n = 72), patient and graft survival for isolated ITx (n = 41) at five yr was 40% in era 1 (1987-2000) and 16% in era 2 (p = 0.47); for retransplanted L-ITx (n = 31), it improved from 14% to 64% in era 2 (p = 0.01). Cox regression: creatinine >1.3 mg/dL and pre-transplant hospitalization were negative predictors for outcome of both; bilirubin >1.3 mg/dL was a negative predictor for isolated ITx and donor age >40 yr for L-ITx. Isolated ITx should be considered prior to liver disease for adults with intestinal failure; L-ITx is preferable for retransplantation. PMID:22192061

  2. Sex-specific associations between birth weight and adult primary liver cancer in a large cohort of Danish children.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Esther; Berentzen, Tina L; Gamborg, Michael; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Baker, Jennifer L

    2016-03-15

    Whether the prenatal period is critical for the development of adult primary liver cancer (PLC) is sparsely investigated. Recently, attention has been drawn to potential sex-differences in the early origins of adult disease. The association between birth weight and adult PLC, separately in men and women was investigated, using a large cohort of 217,227 children (51% boys), born from 1936 to 1980, from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, and followed them until 2010 in national registers. Hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of PLC (30 years or older) were estimated by Cox regression models stratified by birth cohort. During 5.1 million person-years of follow-up, 185 men and 65 women developed PLC. Sex modified the association between birth weight and adult PLC (p values for interaction = 0.0005). Compared with a sex-specific reference group of birth weights between 3.25 and 3.75 kg, men with birth weights between 2.00 and 3.25 kg and 3.75-5.50 kg, had HRs of 1.48 (1.06-2.05) and 0.85 (0.56-1.28), respectively. Among women the corresponding HRs were 1.71 (0.90-3.29) and 3.43 (1.73-6.82). Associations were similar for hepatocellular carcinoma only, across year of birth, and after accounting for diagnoses of alcohol-related disorders, viral hepatitis and biliary cirrhosis. Prenatal exposures influenced the risk of adult PLC, and the effects at the high birth weight levels appeared to be sex-specific. These findings underscore the importance of considering sex-specific mechanisms in the early origins of adult PLC. PMID:26506514

  3. Mice with Chimeric Livers Are an Improved Model for Human Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Ewa C. S.; Nauglers, Scott; Parini, Paolo; Mörk, Lisa-Mari; Jorns, Carl; Zemack, Helen; Sandblom, Anita Lövgren; Björkhem, Ingemar; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; Strom, Stephen C.; Grompe, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Objective Rodents are poor model for human hyperlipidemias because total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels are very low on a normal diet. Lipoprotein metabolism is primarily regulated by hepatocytes and we therefore assessed whether chimeric mice extensively repopulated with human cells can model human lipid and bile acid metabolism. Design FRG [Fah(−/−)Rag2(−/−)Il2rg(−/−)]) mice were repopulated with primary human hepatocytes. Serum lipoprotein lipid composition and distribution (VLDL, LDL, and HDL) was analyzed by size exclusion chromatography. Bile was analyzed by LC-MS or by GC-MS. RNA expression levels were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Results Chimeric mice displayed increased LDL and VLDL fractions and a lower HDL fraction compared to wild type, thus significantly shifting the ratio of LDL/HDL towards a human profile. Bile acid analysis revealed a human-like pattern with high amounts of cholic acid and deoxycholic acid (DCA). Control mice had only taurine-conjugated bile acids as expcted, but highly repopulated mice had glycine-conjugated cholic acid as found in human bile. RNA levels of human genes involved in bile acid synthesis including CYP7A1, and CYP27A1 were significantly upregulated as compared to human control liver. However, administration of recombinant hFGF19 restored human CYP7A1 levels to normal. Conclusion Humanized-liver mice showed a typical human lipoprotein profile with LDL as the predominant lipoprotein fraction even on a normal diet. The bile acid profile confirmed presence of an intact enterohepatic circulation. Although bile acid synthesis was deregulated in this model, this could be fully normalized by FGF19 administration. Taken together these data indicate that chimeric FRG-mice are a useful new model for human lipoprotein and bile-acid metabolism. PMID:24223822

  4. Novel piperazine core compound induces death in human liver cancer cells: possible pharmacological properties.

    PubMed

    Samie, Nima; Muniandy, Sekaran; Kanthimathi, M S; Haerian, Batoul Sadat; Raja Azudin, Raja Elina

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluates the cytotoxic mechanism of a novel piperazine derivate designated as PCC against human liver cancer cells. In this context, human liver cancer cell lines, SNU-475 and 243, human monocyte/macrophage cell line, CRL-9855, and human B lymphocyte cell line, CCL-156, were used to determine the IC50 of PCC using the standard MTT assay. PCC displayed a strong suppressive effect on SNU-475 and SNU-423 cells with an IC50 value of 6.98 ± 0.11 μg/ml and 7.76 ± 0.45 μg/ml respectively, after 24 h of treatment. Significant dipping in the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevation in the released of cytochrome c from the mitochondria indicated the induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by PCC. Activation of this pathway was further evidenced by significant activation of caspase 3/7 and 9. PCC was also shown to activate the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 which is linked to the suppression of NF-ƙB translocation to the nucleus. Cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase was confirmed by flow cytometry and up-regulation of glutathione reductase expression was quantified by qPCR. This study suggests that PCC is a simultaneous inducer of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. PMID:27072064

  5. Dydrogesterone metabolism in human liver by aldo-keto reductases and cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, Matthias; Weigl, Kevin; Kahler, Elke; Mihara, Katsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    1. The metabolism of dydrogesterone was investigated in human liver cytosol (HLC) and human liver microsomes (HLM). Enzymes involved in dydrogesterone metabolism were identified and their relative contributions were estimated. 2. Dydrogesterone clearance was clearly higher in HLC compared to HLM. The major active metabolite 20α-dihydrodydrogesterone (20α-DHD) was only produced in HLC. 3. The formation of 20α-DHD by cytosolic aldo-keto reductase 1C (AKR1C) was confirmed with isoenzyme-specific AKR inhibitors. 4. Using recombinantly expressed human cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, dydrogesterone was shown to be metabolically transformed by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19. 5. A clear contribution of CYP3A4 to microsomal metabolism of dydrogesterone was demonstrated with HLM and isoenzyme-specific CYP inhibitors, and confirmed by a significant correlation between dydrogesterone clearance and CYP3A4 activity. 6. Contribution of CYP2C19 was shown to be clearly less than CYP3A4 and restricted to a small group of human individuals with very high CYP2C19 activity. Therefore, it is expected that CYP2C19 genetic variations will not affect dydrogesterone pharmacokinetics in man. 7. In conclusion, dydrogesterone metabolism in the liver is dominated primarily by cytosolic enzymes (particularly AKR1C) and secondarily by CYP3A4, with the former exclusively responsible for 20α-DHD formation. PMID:26796435

  6. Novel piperazine core compound induces death in human liver cancer cells: possible pharmacological properties

    PubMed Central

    Samie, Nima; Muniandy, Sekaran; Kanthimathi, M. S.; Haerian, Batoul Sadat; Raja Azudin, Raja Elina

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluates the cytotoxic mechanism of a novel piperazine derivate designated as PCC against human liver cancer cells. In this context, human liver cancer cell lines, SNU-475 and 243, human monocyte/macrophage cell line, CRL-9855, and human B lymphocyte cell line, CCL-156, were used to determine the IC50 of PCC using the standard MTT assay. PCC displayed a strong suppressive effect on SNU-475 and SNU-423 cells with an IC50 value of 6.98 ± 0.11 μg/ml and 7.76 ± 0.45 μg/ml respectively, after 24 h of treatment. Significant dipping in the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevation in the released of cytochrome c from the mitochondria indicated the induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by PCC. Activation of this pathway was further evidenced by significant activation of caspase 3/7 and 9. PCC was also shown to activate the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 which is linked to the suppression of NF-ƙB translocation to the nucleus. Cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase was confirmed by flow cytometry and up-regulation of glutathione reductase expression was quantified by qPCR. This study suggests that PCC is a simultaneous inducer of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. PMID:27072064

  7. Toxicogenomics-based prediction of acetaminophen-induced liver injury using human hepatic cell systems.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Heymans, Anja; De Boe, Veerle; Sachinidis, Agapios; Chaudhari, Umesh; Govaere, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera; De Kock, Joery

    2016-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (hHEP), human HepaRG and HepG2 cell lines are the most used human liver-based in vitro models for hepatotoxicity testing, including screening of drug-induced liver injury (DILI)-inducing compounds. hHEP are the reference hepatic in vitro system, but their availability is limited and the cells available for toxicology studies are often of poor quality. Hepatic cell lines on the other hand are highly proliferative and represent an inexhaustible hepatic cell source. However, these hepatoma-derived cells do not represent the population diversity and display reduced hepatic metabolism. Alternatively, stem cell-derived hepatic cells, which can be produced in high numbers and can differentiate into multiple cell lineages, are also being evaluated as a cell source for in vitro hepatotoxicity studies. Human skin-derived precursors (hSKP) are post-natal stem cells that, after conversion towards hepatic cells (hSKP-HPC), respond to hepatotoxic compounds in a comparable way as hHEP. In the current study, four different human hepatic cell systems (hSKP-HPC, hHEP, HepaRG and HepG2) are evaluated for their capacity to predict hepatic toxicity. Their hepatotoxic response to acetaminophen (APAP) exposure is compared to data obtained from patients suffering from APAP-induced acute liver failure (ALF). The results indicate that hHEP, HepaRG and hSKP-HPC identify comparable APAP-induced hepatotoxic functions and that HepG2 cells show the slightest hepatotoxic response. Pathway analyses further points out that HepaRG cells show the highest predicted activation of the functional genes related to 'damage of liver', followed by hSKP-HPC and hHEP cells that generated similar results. HepG2 did not show any activation of this function. PMID:26497421

  8. Oxidative metabolism of BDE-99 by human liver microsomes: predominant role of CYP2B6.

    PubMed

    Erratico, Claudio A; Szeitz, András; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2012-10-01

    Hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been found in human serum, suggesting that they are formed by in vivo oxidative metabolism of PBDEs. However, the biotransformation of 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99), a major PBDE detected in human tissue and environmental samples, is poorly understood. In the present study, the oxidative metabolism of BDE-99 was assessed using pooled and single-donor human liver microsomes, a panel of human recombinant cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, and CYP-specific antibodies. Hydroxylated metabolites were quantified using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-based method. In total, 10 hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-99 were produced by human liver microsomes. Six metabolites were identified as 2,4,5-tribromophenol (2,4,5-TBP), 4-OH-BDE-90, 5'-OH-BDE-99, 6'-OH-BDE-99, 4'-OH-BDE-101, and 2-OH-BDE-123 using authentic standards. Three monohydroxy- and one dihydroxy-pentabrominated metabolites were unidentified. Rates of formation of the three major metabolites (2,4,5-TBP, 5'-OH-BDE-99, and 4'-OH-BDE-101) by human liver microsomes ranged from 24.4 to 44.8 pmol/min/mg protein. Additional experiments demonstrated that the dihydroxylated metabolite was a primary metabolite of BDE-99 and was not produced by hydroxylation of a monohydroxy metabolite. Among the panel of recombinant CYP enzymes tested, formation of all 10 hydroxylated metabolites was catalyzed solely by CYP2B6. A combined approach using antibodies to CYP2B6 and single-donor liver microsomes expressing a wide range of CYP2B6 levels confirmed that CYP2B6 was responsible for the biotransformation of BDE-99. Collectively, the results show that the oxidative metabolism of BDE-99 by human liver microsomes is catalyzed solely by CYP2B6 and is an important determinant of the toxicity and bioaccumulation of BDE-99 in humans. PMID:22738989

  9. Alcohol Disrupts Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xin; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Basson, Marc D; Upham, Brad L; Wei, Lixin; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective Excessive alcohol consumption injures the liver resulting in various liver diseases including liver cirrhosis. Advanced liver disease continues to be a major challenge to human health. Liver stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs) are tissue specific precursors with a distinct capacity of multi-lineage differentiation. These precursor cells may play an important role in the process of tissue injury repair and pathological transition of liver structures. At the present time, knowledge about the effect of alcohol on LSPC function during the development of alcoholic liver disease remains absent. This study was conducted to investigate changes in LSPC activity of proliferation and differentiation following alcohol exposure. The disruption of cell signaling mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced alteration of LSPC activities was also examined. Methods Primary and immortalized human liver stem cells (HL1-1 cells and HL1-hT1 cells, respectively) were cultured in media optimized for cell proliferation and hepatocyte differentiation in the absence and presence of ethanol. Changes in cell morphology, proliferation and differentiation were determined. Functional disruption of cell signaling components following alcohol exposure was examined. Results Ethanol exposure suppressed HL1-1 cell growth [as measured by cell 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation] mediated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) or EGF plus interleukin-6 (IL-6) in an ethanol dose-dependent manner. Similarly, ethanol inhibited BrdU incorporation into HL1-hT1 cells. Cyclin D1 mRNA expression by HL1-hT1 cells was suppressed when cells were cultured with 50 and 100 mM ethanol. Ethanol exposure induced morphological change of HL1-1 cells toward a myofibroblast-like phenotype. Furthermore, ethanol down-regulated E-cadherin expression while increasing collagen I expression by HL1-1 cells. Ethanol also stimulated Snail transcriptional repressor (Snail) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) gene expression by HL1

  10. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Linlong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE + ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE + HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE + HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a “two-programming” hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is “the first programming”, and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as “the second programming”. - Highlights: • Prenatal ethanol exposure increase the susceptibility of NAFLD in female offspring. • Prenatal ethanol exposure reprograms fetal liver’s glucose and lipid metabolism . • Prenatal ethanol exposure cause

  11. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Linlong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE+ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE+HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE+HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a "two-programming" hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is "the first programming", and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as "the second programming". PMID:24275070

  12. Amplification of Simian Retroviral Sequences from Human Recipients of Baboon Liver Transplants

    PubMed Central

    ALLAN, JONATHAN S.; BROUSSARD, SUZANNE R.; MICHAELS, MARIAN G.; STARZL, THOMAS E.; LEIGHTON, KAREN L.; WHITEHEAD, EVELYN M.; COMUZZIE, ANTHONY G.; LANFORD, ROBERT E.; LELAND, M. MICHELLE; SWITZER, WILLIAM M.; HENEINE, WALID

    2010-01-01

    Investigations into the use of baboons as organ donors for human transplant recipients, a procedure called xenotransplantation, have raised the specter of transmitting baboon viruses to humans and possibly establishing new human infectious diseases. Retrospective analysis of tissues from two human transplant recipients with end-stage hepatic disease who died 70 and 27 days after the transplantation of baboon livers revealed the presence of two simian retroviruses of baboon origin, simian foamy virus (SFV) and baboon endogenous virus (BaEV), in multiple tissue compartments. The presence of baboon mitochondrial DNA was also detected in these same tissues, suggesting that xenogeneic “passenger leukocytes” harboring latent or active viral infections had migrated from the xenografts to distant sites within the human recipients. The persistence of SFV and BaEV in human recipients throughout the posttransplant period underscores the potential infectious risks associated with xenotransplantation. PMID:9671210

  13. Humanized Mouse Models to Study Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to Liver-Stage Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Good, Michael F; Hawkes, Michael T; Yanow, Stephanie K

    2015-11-01

    Malaria vaccine development is hampered by the lack of small animal models that recapitulate human immune responses to Plasmodium falciparum. We review the burgeoning literature on humanized mice for P. falciparum infection, including challenges in engraftment of human immune cells, hepatocytes, and erythrocytes. Recent advances in immune-compromised mouse models and stem cell technology have already enabled proof of concept that the entire parasite life cycle can be sustained in a murine model and that adaptive human immune responses to several parasite stages can be measured. Nonetheless, optimization is needed to achieve a reproducible and relevant murine model for malaria vaccine development. This review is focused on the complexities of T cell development in a mouse humanized with both a lymphoid system and hepatocytes. An understanding of this will facilitate the use of humanized mice in the development of liver-stage vaccines. PMID:26458783

  14. Informed consent and decision-making about adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation: a systematic review of empirical research.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elisa J; Daud, Amna; Caicedo, Juan Carlos; Cameron, Kenzie A; Jay, Colleen; Fryer, Jonathan; Beauvais, Nicole; Skaro, Anton; Baker, Talia

    2011-12-27

    Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is a complex procedure that poses serious health risks to and provides no direct health benefit for the donor. Because of this uneven risk-benefit ratio, ensuring donor autonomy through informed consent is critical. To assess the current knowledge pertaining to informed consent for LDLT, we conducted a systematic review of the empirical literature on donors' decision-making process, comprehension about risks and outcomes, and information needs for LDLT. Of the 1423 identified articles, 24 met final review criteria, representing the perspective of approximately 2789 potential and actual donors. As donors' decisions to donate often occur before evaluation, they often make uninformed decisions. The review found that 88% to 95% of donors reported understanding information clinicians disclosed about risks and benefits. However, donors reported unmet information needs, knowledge gaps regarding risks, and unanticipated complications. Few donors reported feeling pressure to donate. Most studies were limited by cultural differences, small sample sizes, inconsistent measures, and poor methodological approaches. This systematic review suggests that informed consent for LDLT is sub-optimal as donors do not adequately appreciate disclosed information during the informed consent process, despite United Network for Organ Sharing/CMS regulations requiring formal psychological evaluation of donor candidates. Interventions are needed to improve donor-clinician communication during the LDLT informed consent process such as through the use of comprehension assessment tools and e-health educational tools that leverage adult learning theory to effectively convey LDLT outcome data. PMID:22143436

  15. Accessory lobe of the right liver mocking a pulmonary tumor in an adult woman.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yuka; Sakakura, Noriaki; Uchida, Tatsuo; Suyama, Motokazu

    2012-08-01

    We report a rare case of an accessory lobe of the liver in the right thoracic cavity with the past history of breast cancer. A 66-year-old woman underwent thoracotomy owing to a slowly growing suspected lung tumor identified by computed tomography. The intraoperative findings revealed an accessory lobe of the liver. If this possibility had been considered, the correct diagnosis could have been achieved using computed tomography with multi-directional scanning, so that an unnecessary operation could have been avoided. PMID:22618988

  16. Dissociation and rate constants of some human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Pietruszko, R; de Zalenski, C; Theorell, H

    1976-01-01

    ADH from human liver forms binary complexes with NADH, associated with a blue shift of the peak of the fluorescence emission of NADH. The wavelength shift is the same for all isoenzymes but the accompanying intensification of the fluorescence is different. The fluorescence is further increased by the formation of the very tight ternary enzyme-NADH-isobutyramide complexes. These properties are similar to those for the horse liver ADH, as well as the molecular weight of E=40 000 per active site of the dimer molecule (EE). "Stopped-flow" determined velocity constants (ER in equilibrium E+R) were found to be in good agreement with ethanol activity constants previously determined by activity measurement, confirming the validity of the ordered ternary complex mechanism also for the human ADH. No single isoenzyme activity as high as that reported by Mourad and Woronick or Drum has been found. PMID:184631

  17. Carbohydrate content of acid alpha-glucosidase (gamma-amylase) from human liver.

    PubMed

    Belen'ky, D M; Mikhajlov, V I; Rosenfeld, E L

    1979-05-01

    The presence of carbohydrates in homogeneous preparations of human liver acid alpha-glucosidase has been established and the carbohydrate content of the enzyme determined. The enzyme was purified with the specific purpose of removing all low-molecular-weight carbohydrates. It was specifically adsorbed on Concanavalin A-Sepharose, eluted with methyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside and gave a positive reaction with the phenol-sulphuric acid reagent. These facts taken together provide evidence that the enzyme studied is a glycoprotein. The analysis of the carbohydrate content of human liver acid alpha-glucosidase showed that there were 8.3 glucosamine, 13.2 mannose and possibly 3--4 glucose residues per molecule of the enzyme with a molecular weight of 98,000. PMID:376187

  18. Standardized surgical techniques for adult living donor liver transplantation using a modified right lobe graft: a video presentation from bench to reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    After having experienced more than 2,000 cases of adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), we established the concepts of right liver graft standardization. Right liver graft standardization intends to provide hemodynamics-based and regeneration-compliant reconstruction of vascular inflow and outflow. Right liver graft standardization consists of the following components: Right hepatic vein reconstruction includes a combination of caudal-side deep incision and patch venoplasty of the graft right hepatic vein to remove the acute angle between the graft right hepatic vein and the inferior vena cava; middle hepatic vein reconstruction includes interposition of a uniform-shaped conduit with large-sized homologous or prosthetic grafts; if the inferior right hepatic vein is present, its reconstruction includes funneling and unification venoplasty for multiple short hepatic veins; if donor portal vein anomaly is present, its reconstruction includes conjoined unification venoplasty for two or more portal vein orifices. This video clip that shows the surgical technique from bench to reperfusion was a case presentation of adult LDLT using a modified right liver graft from the patient's son. Our intention behind proposing the concept of right liver graft standardization is that it can be universally applicable and may guarantee nearly the same outcomes regardless of the surgeon's experience. We believe that this reconstruction model would be primarily applied to a majority of adult LDLT cases. PMID:27621745

  19. Standardized surgical techniques for adult living donor liver transplantation using a modified right lobe graft: a video presentation from bench to reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    After having experienced more than 2,000 cases of adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), we established the concepts of right liver graft standardization. Right liver graft standardization intends to provide hemodynamics-based and regeneration-compliant reconstruction of vascular inflow and outflow. Right liver graft standardization consists of the following components: Right hepatic vein reconstruction includes a combination of caudal-side deep incision and patch venoplasty of the graft right hepatic vein to remove the acute angle between the graft right hepatic vein and the inferior vena cava; middle hepatic vein reconstruction includes interposition of a uniform-shaped conduit with large-sized homologous or prosthetic grafts; if the inferior right hepatic vein is present, its reconstruction includes funneling and unification venoplasty for multiple short hepatic veins; if donor portal vein anomaly is present, its reconstruction includes conjoined unification venoplasty for two or more portal vein orifices. This video clip that shows the surgical technique from bench to reperfusion was a case presentation of adult LDLT using a modified right liver graft from the patient's son. Our intention behind proposing the concept of right liver graft standardization is that it can be universally applicable and may guarantee nearly the same outcomes regardless of the surgeon's experience. We believe that this reconstruction model would be primarily applied to a majority of adult LDLT cases. PMID:27621745

  20. Retinoid Homeostatic Gene Expression in Liver, Lung and Kidney: Ontogeny and Response to Vitamin A-Retinoic Acid (VARA) Supplementation from Birth to Adult Age

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Sarah A.; Ross, A. Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA, retinol) metabolism is homeostatically controlled, but little is known of its regulation in the postnatal period. Here, we determined the postnatal trajectory of VA storage and metabolism in major compartments of VA metabolism–plasma, liver, lung, and kidney from postnatal (P) day 1 to adulthood. We also investigated the response to supplementation with VARA, a combination of VA and 10% all-trans-retinoic acid that previously was shown to synergistically increase retinol uptake and storage in lung. Nursling pups of dams fed a VA-marginal diet received an oral dose of oil (placebo) or VARA on each of four neonatal days: P1, P4, P7, and P10; and again as adults. Tissues were collected 6 h after the final dosing on P1, P4, P10, and at adult age. Gene transcripts for Lrat and Rbp4 in liver and Raldh-1 and Raldh-3 in lung, did not differ in the neonatal period but were higher, P<0.05, in adults, while Cyp26B1, Stra6, megalin, and Raldh-2 in lung did not differ from perinatal to adult ages. VARA supplementation increased total retinol in plasma, liver and lung, with a dose-by-dose accumulation in neonatal liver and lung, while transcripts for Lrat in liver, megalin in kidney, Cyp26A1/B1 in liver and lung, respectively, and Stra6 in lung, were all increased, suggesting pathways of VA uptake, storage and RA oxidation were each augmented after VARA. VARA decreased hepatic expression of Rbp4, responsible for VA trafficking from liver to plasma, and, in lung, of Raldh-1 and Raldh-2, which function in RA production. Our results define retinoid homeostatic gene expression from neonatal and adult age and show that while supplementation with VARA acutely alters retinol content and retinoid homeostatic gene expression in neonatal and adult lung, liver and kidney, VARA supplementation of neonates increased adult-age VA content only in the liver. PMID:26731668

  1. Retinoid Homeostatic Gene Expression in Liver, Lung and Kidney: Ontogeny and Response to Vitamin A-Retinoic Acid (VARA) Supplementation from Birth to Adult Age.

    PubMed

    Owusu, Sarah A; Ross, A Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA, retinol) metabolism is homeostatically controlled, but little is known of its regulation in the postnatal period. Here, we determined the postnatal trajectory of VA storage and metabolism in major compartments of VA metabolism-plasma, liver, lung, and kidney from postnatal (P) day 1 to adulthood. We also investigated the response to supplementation with VARA, a combination of VA and 10% all-trans-retinoic acid that previously was shown to synergistically increase retinol uptake and storage in lung. Nursling pups of dams fed a VA-marginal diet received an oral dose of oil (placebo) or VARA on each of four neonatal days: P1, P4, P7, and P10; and again as adults. Tissues were collected 6 h after the final dosing on P1, P4, P10, and at adult age. Gene transcripts for Lrat and Rbp4 in liver and Raldh-1 and Raldh-3 in lung, did not differ in the neonatal period but were higher, P<0.05, in adults, while Cyp26B1, Stra6, megalin, and Raldh-2 in lung did not differ from perinatal to adult ages. VARA supplementation increased total retinol in plasma, liver and lung, with a dose-by-dose accumulation in neonatal liver and lung, while transcripts for Lrat in liver, megalin in kidney, Cyp26A1/B1 in liver and lung, respectively, and Stra6 in lung, were all increased, suggesting pathways of VA uptake, storage and RA oxidation were each augmented after VARA. VARA decreased hepatic expression of Rbp4, responsible for VA trafficking from liver to plasma, and, in lung, of Raldh-1 and Raldh-2, which function in RA production. Our results define retinoid homeostatic gene expression from neonatal and adult age and show that while supplementation with VARA acutely alters retinol content and retinoid homeostatic gene expression in neonatal and adult lung, liver and kidney, VARA supplementation of neonates increased adult-age VA content only in the liver. PMID:26731668

  2. An orphan esterase ABHD10 modulates probenecid acyl glucuronidation in human liver.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yusuke; Fukami, Tatsuki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Probenecid, a widely used uricosuric agent, is mainly metabolized to probenecid acyl glucuronide (PRAG), which is considered a causal substance of severe allergic or anaphylactoid reactions. PRAG can be hydrolyzed (deglucuronidated) to probenecid. The purpose of this study was to identify enzymes responsible for probenecid acyl glucuronidation and PRAG deglucuronidation in human livers and to examine the effect of deglucuronidation in PRAG formation. In human liver homogenates (HLHs), the intrinsic clearance (CLint) of PRAG deglucuronidation was much greater (497-fold) than that of probenecid acyl glucuronidation. Evaluation of PRAG formation by recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms and an inhibition study using HLHs as an enzyme source demonstrated that multiple UGT isoforms, including UGT1A1, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7, catalyzed probenecid acyl glucuronidation. We found that recombinant α/β hydrolase domain containing 10 (ABHD10) substantially catalyzed PRAG deglucuronidation activity, whereas carboxylesterases did not. Similar inhibitory patterns by chemicals between HLHs and recombinant ABHD10 supported the major contribution of ABHD10 to PRAG deglucuronidation in human liver. Interestingly, it was demonstrated that the CLint value of probenecid acyl glucuronidation in HLHs was increased by 1.7-fold in the presence of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, which potently inhibited ABHD10 activity. In conclusion, we found that PRAG deglucuronidation catalyzed by ABHD10 suppressively regulates PRAG formation via multiple UGT enzymes in human liver. The balance of activities by these enzymes is important for the formation of PRAG, which may be associated with the adverse reactions observed after probenecid administration. PMID:25217485

  3. Fatty acid induced remodeling within the human liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashwani; Sharma, Amit

    2011-09-01

    We crystallized human liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) in apo, holo, and intermediate states of palmitic acid engagement. Structural snapshots of fatty acid recognition, entry, and docking within LFABP support a heads-in mechanism for ligand entry. Apo-LFABP undergoes structural remodeling, where the first palmitate ingress creates the atomic environment for placement of the second palmitate. These new mechanistic insights will facilitate development of pharmacological agents against LFABP. PMID:21757748

  4. Nuclear microscopy of single whole cultured cells: Preparation and analysis of human Chang liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong, P. S. P.; Watt, F.; Paramanantham, R.; Bay, B. H.; Sit, K. H.

    1997-07-01

    Nuclear microscopy is a powerful tool for the measurement of elemental concentrations in single cells. Six methods involving the use of various fixing agents, rinsing agents and drying methods were tried in the preparation of cultured human Chang liver cells for nuclear microscopy and the suitability of each method was evaluated by monitoring the {K}/{Na} ratios and shapes of individual cells. The {K}/{Na} ratio is a commonly used criteria for the ionic integrity of cells; {K}/{Na} ratios well above 1 indicates minimal perturbation of the intracellular ionic composition. Non-stimulated human Chang liver cells in a resting state are usually polygonal in shape and flattened in firm anchorage to the substrate, while dividing or stimulated cells appear rounded. Therefore the shapes of the cells can be used as an indicator of whether the cells are in a resting or stimulated state. It is not desirable for cells to be in a stimulated state since then the effects of other external stimuli cannot be observed independently. Of the six methods tested, chemical fixation, as expected, was considered non-ideal for the preparation of human cultured Chang liver cells. Ice-cold 150 mM sucrose was found to be the most suitable rinsing solution for the preparation of cultured human Chang liver cells. Both freeze-drying and air-drying were used as drying methods and cells processed by either method were found to have {K}/{Na} ratios well above 1. Hence both drying methods were found to be suitable although membrane blotting followed by air-drying was preferred as excess rinsing solution can be very quickly removed during the blotting process. The {K}/{Na} ratios of cells on the same target holder but from different regions were found to be dependent on the local cell density. Cells which are locally dense-packed were found to have a much higher {K}/{Na} ratio than cells in a less dense region.

  5. Left lobe graft poses a potential risk of hepatic venous outflow obstruction in adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Toshihiro; Kaido, Toshimi; Iida, Taku; Yagi, Shintaro; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Kohei; Mori, Akira; Okajima, Hideaki; Imamine, Rinpei; Shibata, Toshiya; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-06-01

    Hepatic venous outflow obstruction (HVOO) is a critical complication after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of HVOO and the risk factors for HVOO in adults. From 2005 to 2015, 430 adult LDLT patients (right lobe [RL] graft, 270 patients; left lobe [LL] graft, 160 patients) were enrolled and divided into no HVOO (n = 413) and HVOO (n = 17) groups. Patient demographics and surgical data were compared, and risk factors for HVOO were analyzed. Furthermore, the longterm outcomes of percutaneous interventions as treatment for HVOO were assessed. HVOO occurred in 17 (4.0%) patients. The incidence of HVOO in patients receiving a LL graft was significantly higher than in those receiving a RL graft (8.1% versus 1.5%; P = 0.001). The body weight and caliber of hepatic vein anastomosis in the HVOO group were significantly lower compared with the no HVOO group (P = 0.02 and P = 0.008, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that only LL graft was an independent risk factor for HVOO (OR, 4.782; 95% CI, 1.387-16.488; P = 0.01). Among 17 patients with HVOO, 7 patients were treated with single balloon angioplasty, and 9 patients who developed recurrence were treated with repeated interventions. Overall, 6 patients underwent stent placement: 1 at the initial procedure, 3 at the second procedure for early recurrence, and 2 following repeated balloon angioplasty (≥3 interventions). These 6 patients experienced no recurrence. Overall graft survival was not significantly different between the HVOO and no HVOO groups (P = 0.99). In conclusion, the use of a LL graft was associated with HVOO, and percutaneous interventions were effective for treating adult HVOO after LDLT. Liver Transplantation 22 785-795 2016 AASLD. PMID:26785423

  6. The Medication Level Variability Index (MLVI) predicts rejection, possibly due to nonadherence, in adult liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Supelana, Christina; Annunziato, Rachel; Schiano, Thomas; Anand, Ravinder; Vaidya, Swapna; Chuang, Kelley; Zack, Yelena; Florman, Sander; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Shemesh, Eyal

    2014-01-01

    Nonadherence to immunosuppressants may play a role in late rejection in liver transplant recipients. In children, emerging data suggest that adherence can be measured by computing the standard deviation (SD) of consecutive blood levels of tacrolimus, resulting in a number that reflects the degree of variability between individual measures (the Medication Level Variability Index, MLVI). A higher MLVI value means erratic immunosuppression, likely due to less adherence. Data on this method in adults are limited. We obtained data from the medical charts of 150 randomly selected adult recipients. The MLVI was significantly higher in patients who had biopsy-confirmed rejection (mean MLVI=3.8, SD=3.2) as compared with the rest of the cohort (mean MLVI=2.3, SD=1.5; p<0.01), and it was significantly higher in patients who had a rejection as compared with patients who had a biopsy that was not read as a rejection (mean MLVI=2.6, SD=1.6; p<0.01). The MLVI was both associated with rejection and predicted its occurrence. A threshold MLVI of 2.0 resulted in 77% sensitivity and 60% specificity in predicting rejection; a threshold of 1.8 resulted in a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 48%. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) in a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.61–0.81). The MLVI is associated with and can predict rejection, possibly related to nonadherence, in adult liver transplant recipients. PMID:24931127

  7. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness ( r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores ( r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness.

  8. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan.

    PubMed

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness (r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores (r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness. PMID:26715354

  9. Local allograft irradiation as an adjunct for treating severe resistant rejection after liver transplantation in adults.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Sharma, Amit; Kaspar, Matthew; Behnke, Martha; Song, Shiyu; Stravitz, R Todd; Cotterell, Adrian; Posner, Marc; Fisher, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Acute rejection after liver transplantation occurs in one-third of all recipients and can be managed with conventional rejection therapy in the majority of cases. In rare instances, patients with severe acute rejection may be refractory to or have contraindications for conventional therapies. This case series evaluates the role of local allograft irradiation (LAI) as an adjunct for patients with rejection that is refractory to or contraindicated for conventional therapies. Additionally, the literature on the use of radiation therapy for reversing rejection in solid organ transplantation is reviewed. Five patients underwent 9 LAI treatments: 2 had refractory rejection, and 1 each had a malignancy, a concurrent life-threatening infection, and serum sickness with antibody therapy. Conventional rejection therapies included steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and antithymocyte globulin. LAI consisted of 3 cycles of 1.5 Gy directed toward the liver allograft. Two of the 5 patients remained alive with excellent graft function. Six of the 9 treatments were successful in rescuing the liver allograft (reversing the rejection episode). Treatment success was associated with lower pretreatment serum bilirubin levels and higher pretreatment alanine aminotransferase levels. Compared with patients with immunosuppression-responsive severe acute rejection, those requiring LAI trended toward a later onset of first rejection. In conclusion, local irradiation of liver allografts can be a useful adjunct in patients for whom conventional options have been exhausted or cannot be used. The ability of LAI to reverse allograft dysfunction and promote patient survival appears to be greatest before the onset of severe cholestatic injury. PMID:25287272

  10. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies. PMID:27511737

  11. Role of inflammation and infection in the pathogenesis of human acute liver failure: Clinical implications for monitoring and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Mhairi C; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare and devastating clinical condition. At present, emergency liver transplantation is the only life-saving therapy in advanced cases, yet the feasibility of transplantation is affected by the presence of systemic inflammation, infection and resultant multi-organ failure. The importance of immune dysregulation and acquisition of infection in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure and its associated complications is now recognised. In this review we discuss current thinking regarding the role of infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of and outcome in human acute liver failure, the implications for the management of such patients and suggest directions for future research. PMID:27468190

  12. Role of inflammation and infection in the pathogenesis of human acute liver failure: Clinical implications for monitoring and therapy.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Mhairi C; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2016-07-14

    Acute liver failure is a rare and devastating clinical condition. At present, emergency liver transplantation is the only life-saving therapy in advanced cases, yet the feasibility of transplantation is affected by the presence of systemic inflammation, infection and resultant multi-organ failure. The importance of immune dysregulation and acquisition of infection in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure and its associated complications is now recognised. In this review we discuss current thinking regarding the role of infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of and outcome in human acute liver failure, the implications for the management of such patients and suggest directions for future research. PMID:27468190

  13. Correlation between Conjugated Bisphenol A Concentrations and Efflux Transporter Expression in Human Fetal Livers.

    PubMed

    Moscovitz, Jamie E; Nahar, Muna S; Shalat, Stuart L; Slitt, Angela L; Dolinoy, Dana C; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-07-01

    Because of its widespread use in the manufacturing of consumer products over several decades, human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has been pervasive. Fetuses are particularly sensitive to BPA exposure, with a number of negative developmental and reproductive outcomes observed in rodent perinatal models. Xenobiotic transporters are one mechanism to extrude conjugated and unconjugated BPA from the liver. In this study, the mRNA expression of xenobiotic transporters and relationships with total, conjugated, and free BPA levels were explored utilizing human fetal liver samples. The mRNA expression of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance-associated transporter (MRP)4, as well as BCRP and multidrug resistance transporter 1 exhibited the highest degree of correlation, with r(2) values of 0.941 and 0.816 (P < 0.001 for both), respectively. Increasing concentrations of conjugated BPA significantly correlated with high expression of MRP1 (P < 0.001), MRP2 (P < 0.05), and MRP3 (P < 0.05) transporters, in addition to the NF-E2-related factor 2 transcription factor (P < 0.001) and its prototypical target gene, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (P < 0.001). These data demonstrate that xenobiotic transporters may be coordinately expressed in the human fetal liver. This is also the first report of a relationship between environmentally relevant fetal BPA levels and differences in the expression of transporters that can excrete the parent compound and its metabolites. PMID:26851240

  14. Studies on immunoproteasome in human liver. Part I: Absence in fetuses, presence in normal subjects, and increased levels in chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vasuri, Francesco; Capizzi, Elisa; Bellavista, Elena; Mishto, Michele; Santoro, Aurelia; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Capri, Miriam; Cescon, Matteo; Grazi, Gian Luca; Grigioni, Walter Franco; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Franceschi, Claudio

    2010-06-25

    Despite the central role of proteasomes in relevant physiological pathways and pathological processes, this topic is unexpectedly largely unexplored in human liver. Here we present data on the presence of proteasome and immunoproteasome in human livers from normal adults, fetuses and patients affected by major hepatic diseases such as cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis. Immunohistochemistry for constitutive ({alpha}4 and {beta}1) and inducible (LMP2 and LMP7) proteasome subunits, and for the PA28{alpha}{beta} regulator, was performed in liver samples from 38 normal subjects, 6 fetuses, 2 pediatric cases, and 19 pathological cases (10 chronic active hepatitis and 9 cirrhosis). The immunohistochemical data have been validated and quantified by Western blotting analysis. The most striking result we found was the concomitant presence in hepatocyte cytoplasm of all healthy subjects, including the pediatric cases, of constitutive proteasome and immunoproteasome subunits, as well as PA28{alpha}{beta}. At variance, immunoproteasome was not present in hepatocytes from fetuses, while a strong cytoplasmic and nuclear positivity for LMP2 and LMP7 was found in pathological samples, directly correlated to the histopathological grade of inflammation. At variance from other organs such as the brain, immunoproteasome is present in livers from normal adult and pediatric cases, in apparent absence of pathological processes, suggesting the presence of a peculiar regulation of the proteasome/immunoproteasome system, likely related to the physiological stimuli derived from the gut microbiota after birth. Other inflammatory stimuli contribute in inducing high levels of immunoproteasome in pathological conditions, where its role deserve further attention.

  15. In vitro metabolism of 2-ethylhexyldiphenyl phosphate (EHDPHP) by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Gómez, Ana; Erratico, Claudio A; Eede, Nele Van den; Ionas, Alin C; Leonards, Pim E G; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    2-ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDPHP) is used as flame retardant and plasticizer additive in a variety of consumer products. Since EHDPHP is toxic to aquatic organisms and has been detected in environmental samples, concerns about human exposure and toxicity are emerging. With the aim of identifying human-specific metabolites, the biotransformation of EHDPHP was investigated using human liver microsomes. Using an in silico program (Meteor) for the prediction of metabolites, untargeted screening tools (agilent Mass Hunter) and a suitable analysis platform based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and quadrupole time-of-flight high resolution mass spectrometer (QTOF-MS), for the first time a wide variety of phases-I and II metabolites of EHDPHP were identified. Mono- and di-hydroxylated metabolites, keto metabolites, mixed keto and hydroxylated metabolites and diphenyl phosphate were the major phase-I metabolites of EHDPHP. Glucuronidated metabolites of phase-I metabolites of EHDPHP were also formed by human liver microsomes. Using these results, we propose a general metabolism pathway for EHDPHP in humans and a number of candidate biomarkers for assessing the human exposure to this ubiquitous phosphate flame retardant and plasticizer in future biomonitoring studies. Furthermore, we provide a template analytical approach based on the combination of untargeted and targeted screening and UPLC-QTOF-MS analysis suitable for use in future metabolism studies. PMID:25448284

  16. Benzene metabolism by human liver microsomes in relation to cytochrome P450 2E1 activity.

    PubMed

    Seaton, M J; Schlosser, P M; Bond, J A; Medinsky, M A

    1994-09-01

    Low levels of benzene from sources including cigarette smoke and automobile emissions are ubiquitous in the environment. Since the toxicity of benzene probably results from oxidative metabolites, an understanding of the profile of biotransformation of low levels of benzene is critical in making a valid risk assessment. To that end, we have investigated metabolism of a low concentration of [14C]benzene (3.4 microM) by microsomes from human, mouse and rat liver. The extent of phase I benzene metabolism by microsomal preparations from 10 human liver samples and single microsomal preparations from both mice and rats was then related to measured activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1. Measured CYP 2E1 activities, as determined by hydroxylation of p-nitrophenol, varied 13-fold (0.253-3.266 nmol/min/mg) for human samples. The fraction of benzene metabolized in 16 min ranged from 10% to 59%. Also at 16 min, significant amounts of oxidative metabolites were formed. Phenol was the main metabolite formed by all but two human microsomal preparations. In those samples, both of which had high CYP 2E1 activity, hydroquinone was the major metabolite formed. Both hydroquinone and catechol formation showed a direct correlation with CYP 2E1 activity over the range of activities present. A simulation model was developed based on a mechanism of competitive inhibition between benzene and its oxidized metabolites, and was fit to time-course data for three human liver preparations. Model calculations for initial rates of benzene metabolism ranging from 0.344 to 4.442 nmol/mg/min are directly proportional to measured CYP 2E1 activities. The model predicted the dependence of benzene metabolism on the measured CYP 2E1 activity in human liver samples, as well as in mouse and rat liver samples. These results suggest that differences in measured hepatic CYP 2E1 activity may be a major factor contributing to both interindividual and interspecies variations in hepatic metabolism of benzene

  17. Plasmodium falciparum full life cycle and Plasmodium ovale liver stages in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Soulard, Valérie; Bosson-Vanga, Henriette; Lorthiois, Audrey; Roucher, Clémentine; Franetich, Jean-François; Zanghi, Gigliola; Bordessoulles, Mallaury; Tefit, Maurel; Thellier, Marc; Morosan, Serban; Le Naour, Gilles; Capron, Frédérique; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Snounou, Georges; Moreno-Sabater, Alicia; Mazier, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of Plasmodium parasites that infect humans are restricted by their host specificity. Humanized mice offer a means to overcome this and further provide the opportunity to observe the parasites in vivo. Here we improve on previous protocols to achieve efficient double engraftment of TK-NOG mice by human primary hepatocytes and red blood cells. Thus, we obtain the complete hepatic development of P. falciparum, the transition to the erythrocytic stages, their subsequent multiplication, and the appearance of mature gametocytes over an extended period of observation. Furthermore, using sporozoites derived from two P. ovale-infected patients, we show that human hepatocytes engrafted in TK-NOG mice sustain maturation of the liver stages, and the presence of late-developing schizonts indicate the eventual activation of quiescent parasites. Thus, TK-NOG mice are highly suited for in vivo observations on the Plasmodium species of humans. PMID:26205537

  18. Plasmodium falciparum full life cycle and Plasmodium ovale liver stages in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Soulard, Valérie; Bosson-Vanga, Henriette; Lorthiois, Audrey; Roucher, Clémentine; Franetich, Jean- François; Zanghi, Gigliola; Bordessoulles, Mallaury; Tefit, Maurel; Thellier, Marc; Morosan, Serban; Le Naour, Gilles; Capron, Frédérique; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Snounou, Georges; Moreno-Sabater, Alicia; Mazier, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of Plasmodium parasites that infect humans are restricted by their host specificity. Humanized mice offer a means to overcome this and further provide the opportunity to observe the parasites in vivo. Here we improve on previous protocols to achieve efficient double engraftment of TK-NOG mice by human primary hepatocytes and red blood cells. Thus, we obtain the complete hepatic development of P. falciparum, the transition to the erythrocytic stages, their subsequent multiplication, and the appearance of mature gametocytes over an extended period of observation. Furthermore, using sporozoites derived from two P. ovale-infected patients, we show that human hepatocytes engrafted in TK-NOG mice sustain maturation of the liver stages, and the presence of late-developing schizonts indicate the eventual activation of quiescent parasites. Thus, TK-NOG mice are highly suited for in vivo observations on the Plasmodium species of humans. PMID:26205537

  19. Protocol for Isolation of Primary Human Hepatocytes and Corresponding Major Populations of Non-parenchymal Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Victoria; Deharde, Daniela; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Zeilinger, Katrin; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Beside parenchymal hepatocytes, the liver consists of non-parenchymal cells (NPC) namely Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC) and hepatic Stellate cells (HSC). Two-dimensional (2D) culture of primary human hepatocyte (PHH) is still considered as the "gold standard" for in vitro testing of drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. It is well-known that the 2D monoculture of PHH suffers from dedifferentiation and loss of function. Recently it was shown that hepatic NPC play a central role in liver (patho-) physiology and the maintenance of PHH functions. Current research focuses on the reconstruction of in vivo tissue architecture by 3D- and co-culture models to overcome the limitations of 2D monocultures. Previously we published a method to isolate human liver cells and investigated the suitability of these cells for their use in cell cultures in Experimental Biology and Medicine(1). Based on the broad interest in this technique the aim of this article was to provide a more detailed protocol for the liver cell isolation process including a video, which will allow an easy reproduction of this technique. Human liver cells were isolated from human liver tissue samples of surgical interventions by a two-step EGTA/collagenase P perfusion technique. PHH were separated from the NPC by an initial centrifugation at 50 x g. Density gradient centrifugation steps were used for removal of dead cells. Individual liver cell populations were isolated from the enriched NPC fraction using specific cell properties and cell sorting procedures. Beside the PHH isolation we were able to separate KC, LEC and HSC for further cultivation. Taken together, the presented protocol allows the isolation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from one donor tissue sample. The access to purified liver cell populations could allow the creation of in vivo like human liver models. PMID:27077489

  20. Cohort Programming and Learning: Improving Educational Experiences for Adult Learners. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltiel, Iris M.; Russo, Charline S.

    This book, which is intended for adult educators and human resource developers, presents guidelines for using the principles of cohort programming and learning to improve adult learners' educational experiences. The following are among the topics covered in the book's eight chapters: (1) cohort programming and learning (cohort programs defined;…

  1. Assessing Adult Learning: A Guide for Practitioners. Revised Edition. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Joseph J.

    This book, which is intended for adult educators and human resource developers, presents guidelines for assessing adult learning. The following are among the topics covered in the book's eight chapters: (1) basic principles of informal assessment (relationship between learning and assessment activities; sequencing learning and assessment…

  2. Primary Human Hepatocytes Repopulate Livers of Mice After In Vitro Culturing and Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Bierwolf, Jeanette; Volz, Tassilo; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Allweiss, Lena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Warlich, Michael; Fehse, Boris; Kalff, Joerg C; Dandri, Maura; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Cell-based therapies represent a promising alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. However, therapeutic effects are limited by low cell engraftment rates. We recently introduced a technique creating human hepatocyte spheroids for potential therapeutic application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether these spheroids are suitable for engraftment in diseased liver tissues. Intrasplenic spheroid transplantation into immunodeficient uPA/SCID/beige mice was performed. Hepatocyte transduction ability prior to transplantation was tested by lentiviral labeling using red-green-blue (RGB) marking. Eight weeks after transplantation, animals were sacrificed and livers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. To investigate human hepatocyte-specific gene expression profiles in mice, quantitative real-time-PCR was applied. Human albumin and alpha-1-antitrypsin concentrations in mouse serum were quantified to assess the levels of human chimerism. Precultured human hepatocytes reestablished their physiological liver tissue architecture and function upon transplantation in mice. Positive immunohistochemical labeling of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that human hepatocytes retained their in vivo proliferation capacity. Expression profiles of human genes analyzed in chimeric mouse livers resembled levels determined in native human tissue. Extensive vascularization of human cell clusters was detected by demonstration of von Willebrand factor activity. To model gene therapy approaches, lentiviral transduction was performed ex vivo and fluorescent microscopic imaging revealed maintenance of RGB marking in vivo. Altogether, this is the first report demonstrating that cultured and retroviral transduced human hepatocyte spheroids are able to engraft and maintain their regenerative potential in vivo. PMID:27068494

  3. Primary Human Hepatocytes Repopulate Livers of Mice After In Vitro Culturing and Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bierwolf, Jeanette; Volz, Tassilo; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Allweiss, Lena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Warlich, Michael; Fehse, Boris; Kalff, Joerg C.; Dandri, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies represent a promising alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. However, therapeutic effects are limited by low cell engraftment rates. We recently introduced a technique creating human hepatocyte spheroids for potential therapeutic application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether these spheroids are suitable for engraftment in diseased liver tissues. Intrasplenic spheroid transplantation into immunodeficient uPA/SCID/beige mice was performed. Hepatocyte transduction ability prior to transplantation was tested by lentiviral labeling using red-green-blue (RGB) marking. Eight weeks after transplantation, animals were sacrificed and livers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. To investigate human hepatocyte-specific gene expression profiles in mice, quantitative real-time-PCR was applied. Human albumin and alpha-1-antitrypsin concentrations in mouse serum were quantified to assess the levels of human chimerism. Precultured human hepatocytes reestablished their physiological liver tissue architecture and function upon transplantation in mice. Positive immunohistochemical labeling of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that human hepatocytes retained their in vivo proliferation capacity. Expression profiles of human genes analyzed in chimeric mouse livers resembled levels determined in native human tissue. Extensive vascularization of human cell clusters was detected by demonstration of von Willebrand factor activity. To model gene therapy approaches, lentiviral transduction was performed ex vivo and fluorescent microscopic imaging revealed maintenance of RGB marking in vivo. Altogether, this is the first report demonstrating that cultured and retroviral transduced human hepatocyte spheroids are able to engraft and maintain their regenerative potential in vivo. PMID:27068494

  4. Identification of the human liver enzymes involved in the metabolism of the antimigraine agent almotriptan.

    PubMed

    Salva, Miquel; Jansat, Josep M; Martinez-Tobed, Antonio; Palacios, Jose M

    2003-04-01

    Almotriptan is a novel highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B/1D) agonist developed for the acute oral treatment of migraine. The in vitro metabolism of almotriptan has been investigated using human liver subcellular fractions and cDNA-expressed human enzymes, to study the metabolic pathways and identify the enzymes responsible for the formation of the major metabolites. Specific enzymes were identified by correlation analysis, chemical inhibition studies, and incubation with various cDNA expressed human enzymes. Human liver microsomes and S9 fraction metabolize almotriptan by 2-hydroxylation of the pyrrolidine group to form a carbinolamine metabolite intermediate, a reaction catalyzed by CYP3A4 and CYP2D6. This metabolite is further oxidized by aldehyde dehydrogenase to the open ring gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolite. Almotriptan is also metabolized at the dimethylaminoethyl group by N-demethylation, a reaction that is carried out by five different cytochrome P450s, flavin monooxygenase-3 mediated N-oxidation, and MAO-A catalyzed oxidative deamination to form the indole acetic acid and the indole ethyl alcohol derivatives of almotriptan. The use of human liver mitochondria confirmed the contribution of MAO-A to the metabolism of almotriptan. Both, the gamma-aminobutyric acid and the indole acetic acid metabolites have been found to be the major in vivo metabolites of almotriptan in humans. In addition, different clinical trials conducted to study the effects of CYP3A4, CYP2D6, and MAO-A on the pharmacokinetics of almotriptan confirmed the involvement of these enzymes in the metabolic clearance of this drug and that no dose changes are required in the presence of inhibitors of these enzymes. PMID:12642466

  5. Multipotent progenitor cells isolated from adult human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I; Nair, I; Ferreri, K; Rawson, J; Kuroda, A; Pascual, M; Omori, K; Valiente, L; Orr, C; Al-Abdullah, I; Riggs, A; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2005-10-01

    The supply of islet cells is a limiting factor for the widespread application of islet transplantation of type-1 diabetes. Islets constitute 1% to 2% of pancreatic tissue, leaving approximately 98% as discard after islet isolation and purification. In this report we present our data on the isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from discarded adult human pancreatic tissue. The collected cells from discarded nonislet fractions, after enzymatic digestion and gradient purification of islets, were dissociated for suspension culture in a serum-free medium. The cell clusters grown to a size of 100 to 150 mum contained cells staining for stage-specific embryonic antigens, but not insulin or C-peptide. To direct cell differentiation toward islets, clusters were recultured in a pancreatic differentiation medium. Insulin and C-peptide-positive cells by immunocytochemistry appeared within a week, reaching over 10% of the cell population. Glucagon and somatostatin-positive cells were also detected. The cell clusters were found to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Cells from the same clusters also had the capacity for differentiation into neural cells, as documented by staining for neural and glial cell markers when cultured as monolayers in media containing neurotrophic factors. These data suggest that multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells exist within the human pancreatic tissue that is typically discarded during islet isolation procedures. These adult progenitor cells can be successfully differentiated into insulin-producing cells, and thus they have the potential for treatment of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:16298614

  6. Induction of Three-Dimensional Growth of Human Liver Cells in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Khaoustov, V. I.; Yoffe, B.; Murry, D. J.; Soriano, H. E.; Risin, D.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that a NASA-developed bioreactor that simulates microgravity environment and creates the unique environment of low shear force and high-mass transfer is conducive for maintaining long term 3-D cell cultures of functional hepatocytes (60 days). However, significant further expansion of liver mass, or the remodeling of liver in vitro was jeopardized by the appearance of apoptotic zones in the center of large cell aggregates. To optimize oxygenation and nutritional uptake within growing cellular aggregates we cultured primary human liver cells (HLC) in a bioreactor in the presence or absence of microcarriers and biodegradable scaffolds. Also, to promote angiogenesis, HLC were cultured with or without microvascular endothelial cells. HLC were harvested from human livers by collagenase perfusion. While microcarriers did not affect cell growth, HLC cultured with biodegradable scaffolds made from polyglycolic acid (PGA) formed aggregates up to 3 cm in length. Culturing cells with PGA scaffolds increased the efficiency of cell self-assembly and the formation of larger cell aggregates. Based on histological evaluation it appears that the degree of apoptotic cells was diminished as compared to cultures without scaffolds. Histology of HLC with PGA-scaffolds revealed cell distribution between the fibers of the scaffolds, and cell-cell and cell-fiber interactions. Analyses of HLC spheroids revealed tissue-like structures comprised of hepatocytes, biliary epithelial cells and/or progenitor liver cells that were arranged as bile duct-like structures along nascent vascular sprouts. Electron microscopy revealed groups of cohesive hepatocytes and bile canaliculi with multiple microvilli and tight cellular junctions. Hepatocytes were further organized into tight clusters surrounded by complex stromal structures and reticulin fibers. Also, we observed higher levels of albumin mRNA expression when hepatocytes were co-cultured with endothelial cells. To evaluate

  7. Influence of human leukocyte antigen matching on liver allograft survival and rejection: "the dualistic effect".

    PubMed

    Donaldson, P; Underhill, J; Doherty, D; Hayllar, K; Calne, R; Tan, K C; O'Grady, J; Wight, D; Portmann, B; Williams, R

    1993-06-01

    To date only one published large series of human leukocyte antigen matching and liver allograft survival exists, and considerable confusion has arisen about the advantage or disadvantage of human leukocyte antigen matching. In the present study we have reinvestigated the relationship between human leukocyte antigen mismatch and graft survival in 466 first liver allografts, seeking to clarify the relationship between human leukocyte antigen and both acute rejection and the vanishing bile duct syndrome. In view of current criticism regarding the accuracy of serological tissue typing for human leukocyte antigen-DR, we have used both classic serology and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis to ensure the accurate assignment of recipient DR types. In addition, we have used polymerase chain reaction amplification and allele-specific and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes to retest the hypothesis that human leukocyte antigen class II matching may increase susceptibility to the vanishing bile duct syndrome. One-year graft survival was significantly lower in patients with zero or two human leukocyte antigen-A mismatches (52% and 63%, respectively) than in those with one human leukocyte antigen--A mismatch (69%) (p = 0.016 and p = 0.018). A similar effect of B mismatching was observed, with a 1-yr graft survival of 73% for those with one compared with 60% for those with two human leukocyte antigen-B mismatches. In contrast no correlation was found between DR mismatch and graft survival. Human leukocyte antigen class I matching appears to influence graft survival largely through the occurrence of acute rejection and the development of the vanishing bile duct syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8514248

  8. Characterization of the Mouse and Human Monoacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase 1 (Mogat1) Promoter in Human Kidney Proximal Tubule and Rat Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Sankella, Shireesha; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K

    2016-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (Mogat1) catalyzes the conversion of monoacylglycerols (MAG) to diacylglycerols (DAG), the precursor of several physiologically important lipids such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and triacylglycerol (TAG). Expression of Mogat1 is tissue restricted and it is highly expressed in the kidney, stomach and adipose tissue but minimally in the normal adult liver. To understand the transcriptional regulation of Mogat1, we characterized the mouse and human Mogat1 promoters in human kidney proximal tubule-2 (HK-2) cells. In-silico analysis revealed several peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) binding sites in the promoters of both human and mouse Mogat1. These sites responded to all three peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms such that their respective agonist or antagonist activated or inhibited the expression of Mogat1. PPRE site mutagenesis revealed that sites located at -592 and -2518 are very effective in decreasing luciferase reporter gene activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using PPARα antibody further confirmed the occupancy of these sites by PPARα. While these assays revealed the core promoter elements necessary for Mogat1 expression, there are additional elements required to regulate its tissue specific expression. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) assay revealed additional cis-elements located ~10-15 kb upstream which interact with the core promoter. These chromosomal regions are responsive to both PPARα agonist and antagonist. PMID:27611931

  9. [Acute liver failure due to human herpesvirus 6 in an infant].

    PubMed

    Tronconi, G M; Mariani, B; Pajno, R; Fomasi, M; Cococcioni, L; Biffi, V; Bove, M; Corsin, P; Garbetta, G; Barera, G

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 4-months infant with fever in the absence of other specific symptoms that has rapidly and unexpectedly developed acute liver failure (ALF) with coagulopathy and complicated with bone marrow failure without encephalopathy. The main viral infection agents (hepatitis virus A, B, C, Citomegalovirus, Ebstain Barr virus, Parvovirus B19, Adenovirus), drug-induced hepatotoxicity and metabolic disorders associated to ALF were excluded. Quantitative determination of Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) genome was positive with a significant number of copies for mL. A favorable evolution of the clinical symptoms and a progressive hematochemical resolution were obtained. Plasma and Vitamin K were administrated as a support therapy for treating coagulopathy. The present case report and the cases' review from the literature, evidence the importance of always including screening for HHV6 infection in the diagnostic approach to acute onset of liver failure. HHV6 is a common virus in the pediatric population with a greater number of cases of fulminant viral non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis in immunocompetent patients due to this virus: these forms have often a high mortality rate and maybe necessitate liver transplantation; for this reason correct etiological agent identification is mandatory for the prognosis and it has to be based on the quantitative search of the virus's genome. Pathogenesis of liver-induced damage associated to HHV6 remains unclear; however in vitro studies demonstrate the potential hepatotoxicity effects of this virus. PMID:23342747

  10. Molecular Recognition of Human Liver Cancer Cells Using DNA Aptamers Generated via Cell-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqin; Delgado, Stefanie; Champanhac, Carole; Cansiz, Sena; Wu, Cuichen; Shan, Hong; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Most clinical cases of liver cancer cannot be diagnosed until they have evolved to an advanced stage, thus resulting in high mortality. It is well recognized that the implementation of early detection methods and the development of targeted therapies for liver cancer are essential to reducing the high mortality rates associated with this disease. To achieve these goals, molecular probes capable of recognizing liver cancer cell-specific targets are needed. Here we describe a panel of aptamers able to distinguish hepatocarcinoma from normal liver cells. The aptamers, which were selected by cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), have Kd values in the range of 64-349 nM toward the target human hepatoma cell HepG2, and also recognize ovarian cancer cells and lung adenocarcinoma. The proteinase treatment experiment indicated that all aptamers could recognize target HepG2 cells through surface proteins. This outcome suggested that these aptamers could be used as potential probes for further research in cancer studies, such as developing early detection assays, targeted therapies, and imaging agents, as well as for the investigation of common membrane proteins in these distinguishable cancers. PMID:25938802

  11. Constitutive modeling of rate-dependent stress-strain behavior of human liver in blunt impact loading.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Jessica L; Dupaix, Rebecca B

    2008-11-01

    An understanding of the mechanical deformation behavior of the liver under high strain rate loading conditions could aid in the development of vehicle safety measures to reduce the occurrence of blunt liver injury. The purpose of this study was to develop a constitutive model of the stress-strain behavior of the human liver in blunt impact loading. Experimental stress and strain data was obtained from impact tests of 12 unembalmed human livers using a drop tower technique. A constitutive model previously developed for finite strain behavior of amorphous polymers was adapted to model the observed liver behavior. The elements of the model include a nonlinear spring in parallel with a linear spring and nonlinear dashpot. The model captures three features of liver stress-strain behavior in impact loading: (1) relatively stiff initial modulus, (2) rate-dependent yield or rollover to viscous "flow" behavior, and (3) strain hardening at large strains. Six material properties were used to define the constitutive model. This study represents a novel application of polymer mechanics concepts to understand the rate-dependent large strain behavior of human liver tissue under high strain rate loading. Applications of this research include finite element simulations of injury-producing liver or abdominal impact events. PMID:18751900

  12. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Elferink, M.G.L.; Olinga, P.; van Leeuwen, E.M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W.G.; Heisterkamp, S.H.; Groothuis, G.M.M.

    2011-05-15

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be directly extrapolated to humans due to species differences. The aim of this study was to evaluate precision-cut human liver slices as in vitro method for the prediction of human specific toxicity by toxicogenomics. The liver slices contain all cell types of the liver in their natural architecture. This is important since drug-induced toxicity often is a multi-cellular process. Previously we showed that toxicogenomic analysis of rat liver slices is highly predictive for rat in vivo toxicity. In this study we investigated the levels of gene expression during incubation up to 24 h with Affymetrix microarray technology. The analysis was focused on a broad spectrum of genes related to stress and toxicity, and on genes encoding for phase-I, -II and -III metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Observed changes in gene expression were associated with cytoskeleton remodeling, extracellular matrix and cell adhesion, but for the ADME-Tox related genes only minor changes were observed. PCA analysis showed that changes in gene expression were not associated with age, sex or source of the human livers. Slices treated with acetaminophen showed patterns of gene expression related to its toxicity. These results indicate that precision-cut human liver slices are relatively stable during 24 h of incubation and represent a valuable model for human in vitro hepatotoxicity testing despite the human inter-individual variability.

  13. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina; Guo, Xuejiang; Hu, Jiayue; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-08-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50μM PFOA for 48h and 96h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50-100μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200-400μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure. PMID:27045622

  14. Serum prolactin in patients with liver disease in comparison with healthy adults: A preliminary cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Sumit Kant; Kannan, Sridharan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Studies from the west have shown raised prolactin levels in patients with liver disease. Considering the lacunae on Indian context, we conducted the present study with an objective to assess the prolactin levels in patients with cirrhosis and viral hepatitis with or without features of encephalopathy. The data presented here are the results of the preliminary analysis. Materials and Methods: The present study was a prospective, cohort study among patients diagnosed as either viral hepatitis or cirrhosis liver. A cohort of normal healthy adults was selected based on history and laboratory investigations (complete blood count, liver and renal function tests). Serum prolactin was measured for all the study participants, and Kruskal–Wallis H-test with post-hoc Dunn's test was used to analyze the significance of the differences in the levels between various groups. Tests of diagnostic accuracy were used to assess the prediction capability of serum prolactin with a cut-off level of 50 ng/ml. Results: A total of 70 patients (10 - normal healthy; 25 - acute viral hepatitis; 35 - cirrhosis liver) were recruited in the present study with the median (range) age in years of 56 (34–68) and male: female ratio of 2:1. A statistically significant (P < 0.05) increase in the serum prolactin was observed in patients with cirrhosis with or without encephalopathy. But, among the patients with viral hepatitis, a significant elevation was observed only in patients with encephalopathy. Additionally, a statistically significant association was observed between serum prolactin levels with serum bilirubin (ρ =0.67, P = 0.04) and aspartate aminotransferase (ρ =0.72, P = 0.05). A cut-off value of 50 ng/ml of serum prolactin was found to predict the mortality. A total of 4/12 (33.3%) with prolactin value of <50 ng/ml died while 11/23 (47.8%) died with values >50 ng/ml (P < 0.05). Similarly, in patients with viral hepatitis with encephalopathy features, 1/4 (25%) with

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo Hepatic Differentiation of Adult Somatic Stem Cells and Extraembryonic Stem Cells for Treating End Stage Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chenxia; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    The shortage of liver donors is a major handicap that prevents most patients from receiving liver transplantation and places them on a waiting list for donated liver tissue. Then, primary hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial livers have emerged as two alternative treatments for these often fatal diseases. However, another problem has emerged. Functional hepatocytes for liver regeneration are in short supply, and they will dedifferentiate immediately in vitro after they are isolated from liver tissue. Alternative stem-cell-based therapeutic strategies, including hepatic stem cells (HSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), are more promising, and more attention has been devoted to these approaches because of the high potency and proliferation ability of the cells. This review will focus on the general characteristics and the progress in hepatic differentiation of adult somatic stem cells and extraembryonic stem cells in vitro and in vivo for the treatment of end stage liver diseases. The hepatic differentiation of stem cells would offer an ideal and promising source for cell therapy and tissue engineering for treating liver diseases. PMID:26347063

  16. Epigenetic Alterations in Human Liver From Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes in Parallel With Reduced Folate Levels

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Ashok; Perfilyev, Alexander; de Mello, Vanessa D.; Käkelä, Pirjo; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Epigenetic variation may contribute to the development of complex metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Hepatic insulin resistance is a hallmark of T2D. However, it remains unknown whether epigenetic alterations take place in the liver from diabetic subjects. Therefore, we investigated the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in the liver from subjects with T2D and nondiabetic controls and related epigenetic alterations to gene expression and circulating folate levels. Research Design and Methods: Liver biopsies were obtained from 35 diabetic and 60 nondiabetic subjects, which are part of the Kuopio Obesity Surgery Study. The genome-wide DNA methylation pattern was analyzed in the liver using the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. RNA expression was analyzed from a subset of subjects using the HumanHT-12 Expression BeadChip. Results: After correction for multiple testing, we identified 251 individual CpG sites that exhibit differential DNA methylation in liver obtained from T2D compared with nondiabetic subjects (Q < .05). These include CpG sites annotated to genes that are biologically relevant to the development of T2D such as GRB10, ABCC3, MOGAT1, and PRDM16. The vast majority of the significant CpG sites (94%) displayed decreased DNA methylation in liver from subjects with T2D. The hypomethylation found in liver from diabetic subjects may be explained by reduced folate levels. Indeed, subjects with T2D had significantly reduced erythrocyte folate levels compared with nondiabetic subjects. We further identified 29 genes that displayed both differential DNA methylation and gene expression in human T2D liver including the imprinted gene H19. Conclusions: Our study highlights the importance of epigenetic and transcriptional changes in the liver from subjects with T2D. Reduced circulating folate levels may provide an explanation for hypomethylation in the human diabetic liver. PMID:26418287

  17. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. 2. The primary structure of the gamma 1 protein chain.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Hempel, J; Kaiser, R; de Zalenski, C; von Wartburg, J P; Jörnvall, H

    1984-12-17

    The primary structure of the gamma 1 subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme gamma 1 gamma 1 was deduced by characterization of 36 tryptic and 2 CNBr peptides. The polypeptide chain is composed of 373 amino acid residues. gamma 1 differs from the beta 1 subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 21 positions, and from the E subunit of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 43 positions including a gap at position 128 as in the beta 1 subunit. All zinc-liganding residues from the E subunit of the horse protein and the beta 1 subunit of the human enzyme are conserved, but like beta 1, gamma 1 also has an additional cysteine residue at position 286 (in the positional numbering system of the horse enzyme) due to a Tyr----Cys exchange. Most amino acid exchanges preserve the properties of the residues affected and are largely located on the surface of the molecules, away from the active site and the coenzyme binding region. However, eight positions with charge differences in relation to the E subunit of the horse enzyme are noticed. These result in a net positive charge increase of one in gamma 1 versus E, explaining the electrophoretic mobilities on starch gels. Of functional significance is the conservation of Ser-48 in gamma 1 relative to E. The residue is close to the active site but different (Thr-48) in the beta 1 subunit of the human enzyme. Thus, the closer structural relationship between human gamma 1 and horse E enzyme subunit than between beta 1 and E is also reflected in functionally important residues, explaining a greater similarity between gamma 1 gamma 1 and EE than between beta 1 beta 1 and EE. PMID:6391921

  18. Herpes Simplex Virus Hepatitis in an Immunocompetent Adult: A Fatal Outcome due to Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Poley, Rachel A.; Snowdon, Jaime F.; Howes, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To present a case of a healthy 41-year-old female who developed fulminant hepatic failure leading to death. The cause of hepatic failure identified on postmortem exam was herpes simplex virus hepatitis. Design. Observation of a single patient. Setting. Intensive care unit of a tertiary care university teaching hospital in Canada. Patient. 41-year-old previously healthy female presenting with a nonspecific viral illness and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Intervention. The patient was treated with intravenous fluids and broad-spectrum antibiotics. On the second day of admission, she was found to have elevated transaminases, and, over 48 hours, she progressed to fulminant liver failure with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, refractory lactic acidosis, and shock. She progressed to respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. She was started on N-acetylcysteine, a bicarbonate infusion, hemodialysis, and multiple vasopressors and inotropes. Measurements and Main Results. Despite treatment, the patient died roughly 70 hours after her initial presentation to hospital. Her postmortem liver biopsy revealed herpes simplex virus hepatitis as her cause of death. Conclusions. Herpes simplex virus must be considered in all patients presenting with liver failure of unknown cause. If suspected, prompt treatment with acyclovir should be initiated. PMID:24826316

  19. Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Hepatic Endoderm and Its Role in Bioartificial Liver Construction

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ruchi; Greenhough, Sebastian; Medine, Claire N.; Hay, David C.

    2010-01-01

    The liver carries out a range of functions essential for bodily homeostasis. The impairment of liver functions has serious implications and is responsible for high rates of patient morbidity and mortality. Presently, liver transplantation remains the only effective treatment, but donor availability is a major limitation. Therefore, artificial and bioartificial liver devices have been developed to bridge patients to liver transplantation. Existing support devices improve hepatic encephalopathy to a certain extent; however their usage is associated with side effects. The major hindrance in the development of bioartificial liver devices and cellular therapies is the limited availability of human hepatocytes. Moreover, primary hepatocytes are difficult to maintain and lose hepatic identity and function over time even with sophisticated tissue culture media. To overcome this limitation, renewable cell sources are being explored. Human embryonic stem cells are one such cellular resource and have been shown to generate a reliable and reproducible supply of human hepatic endoderm. Therefore, the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic endoderm in combination with tissue engineering has the potential to pave the way for the development of novel bioartificial liver devices and predictive drug toxicity assays. PMID:20169088

  20. Establishment of Metabolism and Transport Pathways in the Rodent and Human Fetal Liver

    PubMed Central

    Moscovitz, Jamie E.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate fate of drugs and chemicals in the body is largely regulated by hepatic uptake, metabolism, and excretion. The liver acquires the functional ability to metabolize and transport chemicals during the perinatal period of development. Research using livers from fetal and juvenile rodents and humans has begun to reveal the timing, key enzymes and transporters, and regulatory factors that are responsible for the establishment of hepatic phase I and II metabolism as well as transport. The majority of this research has been limited to relative mRNA and protein quantification. However, the recent utilization of novel technology, such as RNA-Sequencing, and the improved availability and refinement of functional activity assays, has begun to provide more definitive information regarding the extent of hepatic drug disposition in the developing fetus. The goals of this review are to provide an overview of the early regulation of the major phase I and II enzymes and transporters in rodent and human livers and to highlight potential mechanisms that control the ontogeny of chemical metabolism and excretion pathways. PMID:24322441

  1. Subcellular fractionation of human liver reveals limits in global proteomic quantification from isolated fractions.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Wegler, Christine; Artursson, Per

    2016-09-15

    The liver plays an important role in metabolism and elimination of xenobiotics, including drugs. Determination of concentrations of proteins involved in uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics is required to understand and predict elimination mechanisms in this tissue. In this work, we have fractionated homogenates of snap-frozen human liver by differential centrifugation and performed quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of each fraction. Concentrations of proteins were calculated by the "total protein approach". A total of 4586 proteins were identified by at least five peptides and were quantified in all fractions. We found that the xenobiotics transporters of the canalicular and basolateral membranes were differentially enriched in the subcellular fractions and that phase I and II metabolizing enzymes, the cytochrome P450s and the UDP-glucuronyl transferases, have complex subcellular distributions. These findings show that there is no simple way to scale the data from measurements in arbitrarily selected membrane fractions using a single scaling factor for all the proteins of interest. This study also provides the first absolute quantitative subcellular catalog of human liver proteins obtained from frozen tissue specimens. Our data provide quantitative insights into the subcellular distribution of proteins and can be used as a guide for development of fractionation procedures. PMID:27311553

  2. Liver Afferents Contribute to Water Drinking-Induced Sympathetic Activation in Human Subjects: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    May, Marcus; Gueler, Faikah; Barg-Hock, Hannelore; Heiringhoff, Karl-Heinz; Engeli, Stefan; Heusser, Karsten; Diedrich, André; Brandt, André; Strassburg, Christian P.; Tank, Jens; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Jordan, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Water drinking acutely increases sympathetic activity in human subjects. In animals, the response appears to be mediated through transient receptor potential channel TRPV4 activation on osmosensitive hepatic spinal afferents, described as osmopressor response. We hypothesized that hepatic denervation attenuates water drinking-induced sympathetic activation. We studied 20 liver transplant recipients (44±2.6 years, 1.2±0.1 years post transplant) as model of hepatic denervation and 20 kidney transplant recipients (43±2.6 years, 0.8±0.1 years post transplant) as immunosuppressive drug matched control group. Before and after 500 ml water ingestion, we obtained venous blood samples for catecholamine analysis. We also monitored brachial and finger blood pressure, ECG, and thoracic bioimpedance. Plasma norepinephrine concentration had changed by 0.01±0.07 nmol/l in liver and by 0.21±0.07 nmol/l in kidney transplant recipients (p<0.05 between groups) after 30–40 minutes of water drinking. While blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance increased in both groups, the responses tended to be attenuated in liver transplant recipients. Our findings support the idea that osmosensitive hepatic afferents are involved in water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01237431 PMID:22016786

  3. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of human liver samples with Wilson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grolmusová, Zuzana; Horňáčková, Michaela; Plavčan, Jozef; Kopáni, Martin; Babál, Pavel; Veis, Pavel

    2013-08-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an elemental analytical technique with various applications. The paper demonstrates the first LIBS measurements of human liver samples for the purpose of detecting the higher copper content related with the advanced stage of Wilson's disease. These measurements were implemented using a Nd:YAG laser working at the wavelength of 532 nm and an echelle type spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera allowing for a wide spectral range coverage (200-950 nm) and rapid camera gating (minimum gating time of 5 ns). Seven liver samples with suspected Wilson's disease and five reference samples were investigated. The main parameter of interest was the Cu/C ratio obtained at first from spectra and secondly directly from an iCCD image. Our experiment is a pilot study, which shows LIBS analysis of human liver samples for the purpose of detecting the normal and higher copper content for the first time. The method proved to be a quick and a low-cost approach for the detection of pathological accumulation of copper in the affected tissue.

  4. The mechanical response of human liver and its relation to histology: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Edoardo; Nava, Alessandro; Hahnloser, Dieter; Jochum, Wolfram; Bajka, Michael

    2007-12-01

    The mechanical response of human liver is characterized in vivo by means of intra-operative aspiration experiments. Mechanical characterization is combined with histological evaluation of liver tissue biopsies obtained from the resected liver at the site of mechanical testing. This procedure enables a quantitative analysis of the correlation between mechanical response and tissue micro-structure of normal and diseased liver. Ten organs were tested in vivo at multiple locations, as well as ex vivo immediately after resection. Biopsies were analyzed in terms of pathology and percentage of connective tissue content. The change of the mechanical parameters from in vivo to ex vivo has been determined, with an increase of 17% of the proposed stiffness index. The relationship between mechanical parameters and various pathologic conditions affecting the tissue samples has been quantified, with fibrosis leading to a response up to three times stiffer as compared with normal tissue. Increased stiffness can be detected by digital palpation (increased "consistency") and may suggest the presence of a tumor. The present observations suggest that stiffness increase cannot be attributed to the tumoral tissue itself, but rather to the fibrotic stroma that often arise within or adjacent to the tumor. Variation of the mechanical parameters as a function of connective tissue content has been evaluated based on the histological examinations and the results confirm a direct proportionality between stiffness index and connective tissue percentage. The approach described here might eventually lead to a diagnostic procedure and complement other clinical methods, like palpation and ultrasound examination of the liver. PMID:17719834

  5. Ovarian senescence increases liver fibrosis in humans and zebrafish with steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Turola, Elena; Petta, Salvatore; Vanni, Ester; Milosa, Fabiola; Valenti, Luca; Critelli, Rosina; Miele, Luca; Maccio, Livia; Calvaruso, Vincenza; Fracanzani, Anna L.; Bianchini, Marcello; Raos, Nazarena; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Mercorella, Serena; Di Giovanni, Marisa; Craxì, Antonio; Fargion, Silvia; Grieco, Antonio; Cammà, Calogero; Cotelli, Franco; Villa, Erica

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Contrasting data exist on the effect of gender and menopause on the susceptibility, development and liver damage progression in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Our aim was to assess whether menopause is associated with the severity of liver fibrosis in individuals with NAFLD and to explore the issue of ovarian senescence in experimental liver steatosis in zebrafish. In 244 females and age-matched males with biopsy-proven NAFLD, we assessed anthropometric, biochemical and metabolic features, including menopausal status (self-reported); liver biopsy was scored according to ‘The Pathology Committee of the NASH Clinical Research Network’. Young and old male and female zebrafish were fed for 24 weeks with a high-calorie diet. Weekly body mass index (BMI), histopathological examination and quantitative real-time PCR analysis on genes involved in lipid metabolism, inflammation and fibrosis were performed. In the entire cohort, at multivariate logistic regression, male gender [odds ratio (OR): 1.408, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.779-2.542, P=0.25] vs women at reproductive age was not associated with F2-F4 fibrosis, whereas a trend was observed for menopause (OR: 1.752, 95% CI: 0.956-3.208, P=0.06). In women, menopause (OR: 2.717, 95% CI: 1.020-7.237, P=0.04) was independently associated with F2-F4 fibrosis. Similarly, in overfed zebrafish, old female fish with failing ovarian function [as demonstrated by extremely low circulating estradiol levels (1.4±0.1 pg/µl) and prevailing presence of atretic follicles in the ovaries] developed massive steatosis and substantial fibrosis (comparable with that occurring in males), whereas young female fish developed less steatosis and were totally protected from the development of fibrosis. Ovarian senescence significantly increases the risk of fibrosis severity both in humans with NAFLD and in zebrafish with experimental steatosis. PMID:26183212

  6. Using chimeric mice with humanized livers to predict human drug metabolism and a drug-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Toshihiko; Nishimura, Toshiko; Hu, Yajing; Wu, Manhong; Pham, Edward; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Elazar, Menashe; Liu, Michael; Idilman, Ramazan; Yurdaydin, Cihan; Angus, Peter; Stedman, Catherine; Murphy, Brian; Glenn, Jeffrey; Nakamura, Masato; Nomura, Tatsuji; Chen, Yuan; Zheng, Ming; Fitch, William L; Peltz, Gary

    2013-02-01

    Interspecies differences in drug metabolism have made it difficult to use preclinical animal testing data to predict the drug metabolites or potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) that will occur in humans. Although chimeric mice with humanized livers can produce known human metabolites for test substrates, we do not know whether chimeric mice can be used to prospectively predict human drug metabolism or a possible DDI. Therefore, we investigated whether they could provide a more predictive assessment for clemizole, a drug in clinical development for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that analyses performed in chimeric mice can correctly identify the predominant human drug metabolite before human testing. The differences in the rodent and human pathways for clemizole metabolism were of importance, because the predominant human metabolite was found to have synergistic anti-HCV activity. Moreover, studies in chimeric mice also correctly predicted that a DDI would occur in humans when clemizole was coadministered with a CYP3A4 inhibitor. These results demonstrate that using chimeric mice can improve the quality of preclinical drug assessment. PMID:23143674

  7. Reliability and validity of the Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire (CLDQ) in adults with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kashmira S; Talwalkar, Jayant A; Keach, Jill C; Malinchoc, Michael; Lindor, Keith D; Jorgensen, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Significant impairments in health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease have been previously described. The disease-specific HRQL among patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), however, remains unknown. Aim To determine the degree of construct validity of the Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire (CLDQ) in adults with NASH. Methods Participants referred for the evaluation of histology-proven NASH at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, between 1996 and 2000, were evaluated. HRQL assessment by the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey and CLD) was performed. The primary outcome was to determine the level of correlation between overall and subscale scores for the CLDQ and SF-36 instruments. Results Among 79 participants (70%) with NASH completing both questionnaires (mean age, 51.2 years with 64% female gender), excellent reliability was noted for the CLDQ instrument. Significant reductions in all SF-36 domains (p<0.05 for all) including PCS and MCS scores (p<0.02 for both) among participants with NASH compared with normative data from an age-matched and sex-matched US general population sample was observed. Highly significant correlations were observed between overall CLDQ score with SF-36 PCS (r=0.82, p<0.0001) and SF-36 MCS (r=0.67, p<0.0001) scores. Similar degrees of correlation were observed between relevant subscales of the CLDQ and SF-36 as well. Discussion The CLDQ has excellent reliability and validity of construct for HRQL assessment in adults with NASH when compared with the SF-36. Future investigations among participants with NASH require assessing the responsiveness of the CLDQ to medical therapies and disease progression. PMID:27110379

  8. Comparative effects of nodularin and microcystin-LR in zebrafish: 2. Uptake and molecular effects in eleuthero-embryos and adult liver with focus on endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Faltermann, Susanne; Grundler, Verena; Gademann, Karl; Pernthaler, Jakob; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Microcystin (MC) and nodularin are structurally similar cyanobacterial toxins that inhibit protein phosphatases. Additional modes of action are poorly known, in particular for nodularin. In our associated work, we showed that active cellular uptake is mediated by the organic anion transporting polypeptide drOatp1d1 in zebrafish (Faltermann et al., 2016). Here, we assessed the transcriptional expression of three genes encoding three uptake transporters during embryonic development from 24h post fertilization (hpf) to 168 hpf. Transcripts of drOatp1d1 and drOatp2b1 are present at 24 hpf. The abundance increased after hatching and remained about constant up to 168 hpf. Transcripts of drOatp2b1 were most abundant, while drOapt1f transcripts showed very low relative abundance compared to drOatp1d1 and drOatp2b1. We further demonstrated the uptake of fluorescent labeled MC-LR in eleuthero-embryos and its accumulation in the glomerulus of the pronephros. An important molecular effect of MC-LR in human liver cells is the induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress. Here, we investigated, whether MC-LR and nodularin similarly lead to induction of ER-stress in zebrafish by analyzing changes of mRNA levels of genes indicative of ER-stress. In zebrafish liver organ cultures short- and long-term exposures to 0.15 and 0.3 μmol L(-1) MC-LR, and 0.5 and 1 μM L(-1) nodularin led to significant transcriptional induction of several ER-stress marker genes, including the chaperone glucose regulated protein 78 (bip), the spliced form of x-box binding protein (xbp-1s), the CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (chop) and activating transcription factor 4 (atf4). Furthermore, strong transcriptional changes occurred for tumor necrosis factor alpha (tnfa) and dual specificity phosphatase 5 (dusp5), associated with mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. However, no alterations in transcript levels of pro-apoptotic genes Bcl-2 like protein 4 (bax) and p53 occurred

  9. The Biomechanics of the Pediatric and Adult Human Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J.; Lau, Sabrina; Riley, Patrick; Lamp, John; Kent, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of literature points out the relevance of the thoracic spine dynamics in understanding the thorax-restraint interaction as well as in determining the kinematics of the head and cervical spine. This study characterizes the dynamic response in bending of eight human spinal specimens (4 pediatric: ages 7 and 15 years, 4 adult: ages 48 and 52 years) from two sections along the thoracic spine (T2–T4 and T7–T9). Each specimen consisted of three vertebral bodies connected by the corresponding intervertebral discs. All ligaments were preserved in the preparation with the exception of the inter-transverse ligament. Specimens were exposed to a series of five dynamic bending ramp-and-hold tests with varying amplitudes at a nominal rate of 2 rad/s. After this battery of tests, failure experiments were conducted. The 7-year-old specimen showed the lowest tolerance to a moment (T2–T4: 12.1 Nm; T7–T9: 11.6 Nm) with no significant reduction of the relative rotation between the vertebrae. The 15-year-old failure tolerance was comparable to that of the adult specimens. Failure of the adult specimens occurred within a wide range at the T2–T4 thoracic section (23.3 Nm- 53.0 Nm) while it was circumscribed to the interval 48.3 Nm-52.5 Nm for the T7–T9 section. The series of dynamic ramp-and-hold were used to assess two different scaling methods (mass scaling and SAE scaling). Neither method was able to capture the stiffness, peak moment and relaxation characteristics exhibited by the pediatric specimens. PMID:22105396

  10. Gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in human adults.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Manasi; Bhatia, Renu; Mathur, Rashmi

    2007-01-01

    Sweet, palatable substances such as sucrose are reported to calm infants undergoing routine investigative procedures. The analgesic effect persists in pre pubertal children and adults with a hint of gender dependent variation in the analgesic response. The present study was therefore designed to explore gender specificity of sucrose induced analgesia in adult volunteers utilizing the nociceptive flexion reflex, an objective tool for pain assessment. Nociceptive flexion reflex was recorded, both before and after (up to 15 min) ingestion of 100 ml of 25% sucrose solution in 6 male and 6 female volunteers. In the male volunteers the maximum amplitude of the response was 20.8 +/- 7.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 22.6 +/- 9.1 microV, 6.6 +/- 0.7 microV, 6.2 +/- 1.1 microV, 7.5 +/- 0.9 microV at 0, 5, 10 and 15 minutes post sucrose ingestion respectively. In female volunteers, the maximum amplitude of the response was 33.7 +/- 17.7 microV before sucrose ingestion and 43.6 +/- 17.2 microV, 7.1 +/- 1.2 microV, 25.9 +/- 16.1 microV, 50.6 +/- 16.3 microV at the same time intervals post sucrose ingestion. The maximum amplitude values were significantly lower in the males at 10 and 15 minutes after sucrose ingestion (P < 0.05). This is the first objective report of gender specificity in sucrose induced analgesia in adult humans. The gender dependent variation in sucrose induced analgesia is prolonged in male (15 min) and short lived in female (5 min) volunteers. This knowledge may have important implications in pain management. PMID:18476396

  11. Liver X receptor activation stimulates iron export in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bories, Gael; Colin, Sophie; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Copin, Corinne; Fanchon, Melanie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Belloy, Loic; Haulon, Stephan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In atherosclerotic plaques, iron preferentially accumulates in macrophages where it can exert pro-oxidant activities. Objective The objective of this study is, first, to better characterize the iron distribution and metabolism in macrophage sub-populations in human atherosclerotic plaques and, second, to determine whether iron homeostasis is under the control of nuclear receptors, such as the Liver X Receptors (LXR). Methods and Results Here we report that iron depots accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaque areas enriched in CD68 and Mannose Receptor (MR) positive (CD68+MR+) alternative M2 macrophages. In vitro IL-4 polarization of human monocytes into M2 macrophages also resulted in a gene expression profile and phenotype favouring iron accumulation. However, upon iron exposure, M2 macrophages acquire a phenotype favouring iron release, through a strong increase in ferroportin expression, illustrated by a more avid oxidation of extra-cellular LDL by iron-loaded M2 macrophages. In line, in human atherosclerotic plaques, CD68+MR+ macrophages accumulate oxidized lipids, which activate Liver X Receptors (LXRα and LXRβ), resulting in the induction of ABCA1, ABCG1 and ApoE expression. Moreover, in iron-loaded M2 macrophages, LXR activation induces nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NRF2) expression, hence increasing ferroportin expression, which, together with a decrease of hepcidin mRNA levels, promotes iron export. Conclusions These data identify a role for M2 macrophages in iron handling, a process which is regulated by LXR activation. PMID:24036496

  12. Basic investigation on acoustic velocity change imaging method for quantitative assessment of fat content in human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, Kazune; Tanigawa, Shohei; Hori, Makoto; Yokota, Daiki; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Fatty liver is a disease caused by the excess accumulation of fat in the human liver. The early diagnosis of fatty liver is very important, because fatty liver is the major marker linked to metabolic syndrome. We already proposed the ultrasonic velocity change imaging method to diagnose fatty liver by using the fact that the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is different in water and in fat. For the diagonosis of a fatty liver stage, we attempted a feasibility study of the quantitative assessment of the fat content in the human liver using our ultrasonic velocity change imaging method. Experimental results showed that the fat content in the tissue mimic phantom containing lard was determined by its ultrasonic velocity change in the flat temperature region formed by a circular warming ultrasonic transducer with an acoustic lens having an appropriate focal length. By considering the results of our simulation using a thermal diffusion equation, we determined whether this method could be applied to fatty liver assessment under the condition that the tissue had the thermal relaxation effect caused by blood flow.

  13. EFFECT OF SINGLE VERSUS SPLIT DOSES OF DIETHYINITROSAMINE ON THE INDUCTION OF GAMMA-GLUTAMYLTRANSPEPTIDASE-FOCI IN THE LIVERS OF ADULT AND JUVENILE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The induction of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT)-foci by single and by split doses of diethylnitrosamine (DENA) was evaluated in the livers of juvenile and young adult male, Sprague-Dawley rats. A single dose of DENA was administered at either 32, 41 or 52 days of age and foll...

  14. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p < 0.0001). Human hepatic CXCR6+ NK had an immature phenotype (predominantly CD56(bright)CD16-CD57-), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6- fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity. PMID:27210614

  15. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-betloEomeshi natural killer cells residing in human liver

    PubMed Central

    Stegmann, Kerstin A.; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J.; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R.; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p < 0.0001). Human hepatic CXCR6+ NK had an immature phenotype (predominantly CD56brightCD16−CD57−), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6− fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bethiEomeslo(CXCR6−) and T-betloEomeshi(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bethiEomeslo, suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6− peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-betloEomeshi NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity. PMID:27210614

  16. Systematic genetic and genomic analysis of cytochrome P450 enzyme activities in human liver

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xia; Zhang, Bin; Molony, Cliona; Chudin, Eugene; Hao, Ke; Zhu, Jun; Gaedigk, Andrea; Suver, Christine; Zhong, Hua; Leeder, J. Steven; Guengerich, F. Peter; Strom, Stephen C.; Schuetz, Erin; Rushmore, Thomas H.; Ulrich, Roger G.; Slatter, J. Greg; Schadt, Eric E.; Kasarskis, Andrew; Lum, Pek Yee

    2010-01-01

    Liver cytochrome P450s (P450s) play critical roles in drug metabolism, toxicology, and metabolic processes. Despite rapid progress in the understanding of these enzymes, a systematic investigation of the full spectrum of functionality of individual P450s, the interrelationship or networks connecting them, and the genetic control of each gene/enzyme is lacking. To this end, we genotyped, expression-profiled, and measured P450 activities of 466 human liver samples and applied a systems biology approach via the integration of genetics, gene expression, and enzyme activity measurements. We found that most P450s were positively correlated among themselves and were highly correlated with known regulators as well as thousands of other genes enriched for pathways relevant to the metabolism of drugs, fatty acids, amino acids, and steroids. Genome-wide association analyses between genetic polymorphisms and P450 expression or enzyme activities revealed sets of SNPs associated with P450 traits, and suggested the existence of both cis-regulation of P450 expression (especially for CYP2D6) and more complex trans-regulation of P450 activity. Several novel SNPs associated with CYP2D6 expression and enzyme activity were validated in an independent human cohort. By constructing a weighted coexpression network and a Bayesian regulatory network, we defined the human liver transcriptional network structure, uncovered subnetworks representative of the P450 regulatory system, and identified novel candidate regulatory genes, namely, EHHADH, SLC10A1, and AKR1D1. The P450 subnetworks were then validated using gene signatures responsive to ligands of known P450 regulators in mouse and rat. This systematic survey provides a comprehensive view of the functionality, genetic control, and interactions of P450s. PMID:20538623

  17. Featured Article: Isolation, characterization, and cultivation of human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Kegel, Victoria; Zeilinger, Katrin; Hengstler, Jan G; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-05-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are considered to be the gold standard for in vitro testing of xenobiotic metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, PHH cultivation in 2D mono-cultures leads to dedifferentiation and a loss of function. It is well known that hepatic non-parenchymal cells (NPC), such as Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), play a central role in the maintenance of PHH functions. The aims of the present study were to establish a protocol for the simultaneous isolation of human PHH and NPC from the same tissue specimen and to test their suitability for in vitro co-culture. Human PHH and NPC were isolated from tissue obtained by partial liver resection by a two-step EDTA/collagenase perfusion technique. The obtained cell fractions were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. KC, LEC, and HSC contained in the NPC fraction were separated using specific adherence properties and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS®). Identified NPC revealed a yield of 1.9 × 10(6) KC, 2.7 × 10(5) LEC and 4.7 × 10(5) HSC per gram liver tissue, showing viabilities >90%. Characterization of these NPC showed that all populations went through an activation process, which influenced the cell fate. The activation of KC strongly depended on the tissue quality and donor anamnesis. KC became activated in culture in association with a loss of viability within 4-5 days. LEC lost specific features during culture, while HSC went through a transformation process into myofibroblasts. The testing of different culture conditions for HSC demonstrated that they can attenuate, but not prevent dedifferentiation in vitro. In conclusion, the method described allows the isolation and separation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from the same donor. PMID:25394621

  18. Engineering a perfusable 3D human liver platform from iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Arnout; Li, Cheri; Chhabra, Arnav; Seney, Benjamin Tschudy; Bhatia, Sangeeta

    2016-07-01

    In vitro models of human tissue are crucial to our ability to study human disease as well as develop safe and effective drug therapies. Models of single organs in static and microfluidic culture have been established and shown utility for modeling some aspects of health and disease; however, these systems lack multi-organ interactions that are critical to some aspects of drug metabolism and toxicity. Thus, as part of a consortium of researchers, we have developed a liver chip that meets the following criteria: (1) employs human iPS cells from a patient of interest, (2) cultures cells in perfusable 3D organoids, and (3) is robust to variations in perfusion rate so as to be compatible in series with other specialized tissue chips (e.g. heart, lung). In order to achieve this, we describe methods to form hepatocyte aggregates from primary and iPS-derived cells, alone and in co-culture with support cells. This necessitated a novel culture protocol for the interrupted differentiation of iPS cells that permits their removal from a plated surface and aggregation while maintaining phenotypic hepatic functions. In order to incorporate these 3D aggregates in a perfusable platform, we next encapsulated the cells in a PEG hydrogel to prevent aggregation and overgrowth once on chip. We adapted a C-trap chip architecture from the literature that enabled robust loading with encapsulated organoids and culture over a range of flow rates. Finally, we characterize the liver functions of this iHep organoid chip under perfusion and demonstrate a lifetime of at least 28 days. We envision that such this strategy can be generalized to other microfluidic tissue models and provides an opportunity to query patient-specific liver responses in vitro. PMID:27296616

  19. Towards liver-directed gene therapy: retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M; Raper, S E; Wilson, J M

    1991-11-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy is being considered in the treatment of inherited metabolic diseases. One approach we are considering is the transplantation of autologous hepatocytes that have been genetically modified with recombinant retroviruses ex vivo. We describe, in this report, techniques for isolating human hepatocytes and efficiently transducing recombinant genes into primary cultures. Hepatocytes were isolated from tissue of four different donors, plated in primary culture, and exposed to recombinant retroviruses expressing either the LacZ reporter gene or the cDNA for rabbit LDL receptor. The efficiency of gene transfer under optimal conditions, as determined by Southern blot analysis, varied from a maximum of one proviral copy per cell to a minimum of 0.1 proviral copy per cell. Cytochemical assays were used to detect expression of the recombinant derived proteins, E. coli beta-galactosidase and rabbit LDL receptor. Hepatocytes transduced with the LDL receptor gene expressed levels of receptor protein that exceeded the normal endogenous levels. The ability to isolate and genetically modify human hepatocytes, as described in this report, is an important step towards the development of liver-directed gene therapies in humans. PMID:1767337

  20. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. 1. The primary structure of the beta 1 beta 1 isoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Hempel, J; Bühler, R; Kaiser, R; Holmquist, B; de Zalenski, C; von Wartburg, J P; Vallee, B; Jörnvall, H

    1984-12-17

    Determination of the amino acid sequence of the beta 1 subunit from the class I (pyrazole-sensitive) human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme beta 1 beta 1 revealed a 373-residue structure differing at 48 positions (including a gap) from that of the subunit of the well studied horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase EE isoenzyme. The structure deduced is compatible with known differences in composition, ultraviolet absorbance, electrophoretic mobility and catalytic properties between the horse and human enzymes. All zinc-liganding residues of the horse E subunit are strictly conserved in the human beta 1 subunit, despite an earlier report of a mutation involving Cys-46. This residue therefore remains conserved in all known alcohol dehydrogenase structures. However, the total cysteine content of the beta 1 structure is raised from 14 in the subunit of the horse enzyme to 15 by a Tyr----Cys exchange. Most exchanges are on the surface of the molecule and of a well conserved nature. Substitutions close to the catalytic centre are of interest to explain the altered substrate specificity and different catalytic activity of the beta 1 homodimer. Functionally, a Ser----Thr exchange at position 48 appears to be of special importance, since Thr-48 in beta 1 instead of Ser-48 in the horse enzyme can restrict available space. Four other substitutions also line the active-site pocket, and appear to constitute partly compensated exchanges. PMID:6391920

  1. Detection of anti-liver cell membrane antibody using a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo-Yeo, A.; McSorley, C.; McFarlane, B.M.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Mowat, A.P.; Vergani, D.

    1989-02-01

    A radioimmunometric technique for the detection of autoantibodies to liver membrane antigens has been developed using Alexander cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. After incubation of Alexander cells with serum, antimembrane antibodies were detected by addition of /sup 125/I-labeled Protein A. Binding ratios in 15 children with uncontrolled autoimmune chronic active hepatitis and in seven children with primary sclerosing cholangitis were significantly higher than in 18 age-matched normal controls. Nine patients with inactive autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, 13 with alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and five with fulminant hepatic failure had ratios similar to controls. In nine patients with Wilson's disease, there was a modest but significant increase in binding ratio. In four children with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, binding ratios fell during effective immunosuppressive therapy. Sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis gave normal results, excluding that binding derives from Fc-mediated immune complex capture. A positive correlation was found between Alexander cell binding values and anti-liver-specific protein antibody titers, suggesting that the two assays detect antibodies against shared antigenic determinants. The Alexander cell assay is a simple, rapid and sensitive technique to detect antibody to liver cell membrane antigens.

  2. Pros and cons of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients

    PubMed Central

    Baccarani, Umberto; Righi, Elda; Adani, Gian Luigi; Lorenzin, Dario; Pasqualucci, Alberto; Bassetti, Matteo; Risaliti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Before the introduction of combined highly active antiretroviral therapy, a positive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serological status represented an absolute contraindication for solid organ transplant (SOT). The advent of highly effective combined antiretroviral therapy in 1996 largely contributed to the increased demand for SOT in HIV-positive individuals due to increased patients’ life expectancy associated with the increasing prevalence of end-stage liver disease (ESLD). Nowadays, liver failure represents a frequent cause of mortality in the HIV-infected population mainly due to coinfection with hepatitis viruses sharing the same way of transmission. Thus, liver transplantation (LT) represents a reasonable approach in HIV patients with stable infection and ESLD. Available data presently supports with good evidence the practice of LT in the HIV-positive population. Thus, the issue is no longer “whether it is correct to transplant HIV-infected patients”, but “who are the patients who can be safely transplanted” and “when is the best time to perform LT”. Indeed, the benefits of LT in HIV-infected patients, especially in terms of mid- and long-term patient and graft survivals, are strictly related to the patients’ selection and to the correct timing for transplantation, especially when hepatitis C virus coinfection is present. Aim of this article is to review the pros and cons of LT in the cohort of HIV infected recipients. PMID:24833865

  3. Function of the liver and bile ducts in humans exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, A; Dziwisz, M; Ostałowska, A; Swietochowska, E; Birkner, E

    2013-08-01

    Lead is very common in the environment, and it is therefore important to characterize its possible adverse health effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of lead exposure on selected functions of the liver and bile ducts in people who are chronically exposed to the metal because of their occupations. To provide this information, the activity of specific enzymes and the bilirubin concentration were determined in blood serum, and morphological parameters of the liver and bile ducts were evaluated using the ultrasonic imaging method. Healthy male employees of a lead-zinc processing facility (n = 145) who were occupationally exposed to lead were divided into two subgroups as a function of the lead concentrations in blood (PbB): low lead exposure (PbB = 20-35 μg/dl; n = 57) and high lead exposure (PbB = 35-60 μg/dl; n = 88). Human exposure to lead compounds was found to cause liver enlargement and to activate inflammatory reactions with the characteristics of moderate cholestasis within the bile ducts, while no characteristics of necrotic damage of hepatic cells were noted. It seems that lipid peroxidation can be one of the toxic mechanisms of lead which induce moderate cholestasis. The effects depend on the extent of the lead exposure and were greater in subjects with higher exposure levels, particularly subjects with PbB values greater than 35 μg/dl. PMID:23529799

  4. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator in human liver is regulated by miR-24

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Yuki; Nakajima, Miki; Mohri, Takuya; Takamiya, Masataka; Aoki, Yasuhiro; Fukami, Tatsuki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) forms a heterodimer with aryl hydrocarbon receptor or hypoxia inducible factor 1α to mediate biological responses to xenobiotic exposure and hypoxia. Although the regulation mechanism of the ARNT expression is largely unknown, earlier studies reported that the human ARNT protein level was decreased by hydrogen peroxide or reactive oxygen species. These stimuli increase the miR-24 level in various human cell lines. In silico analysis predicts that some microRNAs including miR-16 and miR-23b may bind to ARNT mRNA. This background prompted us to investigate whether human ARNT is regulated by microRNAs. Overexpression of miR-24 into HuH-7 and HepG2 cells significantly decreased the ARNT protein level, but not the ARNT mRNA level, indicating translational repression. However, overexpression of miR-16 or miR-23b caused no change in the ARNT expression. The miR-24-dependent down-regulation of ARNT decreased the expression of its downstream genes such as CYP1A1 and carbonic anhydrase IX. Luciferase assay was performed to determine the element on the ARNT mRNA to which miR-24 binds. Finally, it was demonstrated that the miR-24 levels in a panel of 26 human livers were inversely correlated with the protein levels or the translational efficiency of ARNT. Taken together, we found that miR-24 negatively regulates ARNT expression in human liver, affecting the expression of its downstream genes. miR-24 would be one of the factors underlying the mechanisms by which ARNT protein is decreased by reactive oxygen species. -- Highlights: ► Overexpression of miR-24 into human cell lines decreased the ARNT protein level. ► miR-24-dependent down-regulation of ARNT affected the expression of CYP1A1 and CA IX. ► Luciferase assay was performed to identify functional MREs for miR-24 in ARNT mRNA. ► The miR-24 levels inversely correlated with the ARNT protein levels in human liver.

  5. Gene expression profiling and differentiation assessment in primary human hepatocyte cultures, established hepatoma cell lines, and human liver tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Olsavsky, Katy M.; Page, Jeanine L.; Johnson, Mary C.; Zarbl, Helmut; Strom, Stephen C.; Omiecinski, Curtis J. . E-mail: cjo10@psu.edu

    2007-07-01

    Frequently, primary hepatocytes are used as an in vitro model for the liver in vivo. However, the culture conditions reported vary considerably, with associated variability in performance. In this study, we characterized the differentiation character of primary human hepatocytes cultured using a highly defined, serum-free two-dimensional sandwich system, one that configures hepatocytes with collagen I as the substratum together with a dilute extracellular matrix (Matrigel{sup TM}) overlay combined with a defined serum-free medium containing nanomolar levels of dexamethasone. Gap junctional communication, indicated by immunochemical detection of connexin 32 protein, was markedly enhanced in hepatocytes cultured in the Matrigel sandwich configuration. Whole genome expression profiling enabled direct comparison of liver tissues to hepatocytes and to the hepatoma-derived cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7. PANTHER database analyses were used to identify biological processes that were comparatively over-represented among probe sets expressed in the in vitro systems. The robustness of the primary hepatocyte cultures was reflected by the extent of unchanged expression character when compared directly to liver, with more than 77% of the probe sets unchanged in each of the over-represented categories, representing such genes as C/EBP{alpha}, HNF4{alpha}, CYP2D6, and ABCB1. In contrast, HepG2 and Huh7 cells were unchanged from the liver tissues for fewer than 48% and 55% of these probe sets, respectively. Further, hierarchical clustering of the hepatocytes, but not the cell lines, shifted from donor-specific to treatment-specific when the probe sets were filtered to focus on phenobarbital-inducible genes, indicative of the highly differentiated nature of the hepatocytes when cultured in a highly defined two-dimensional sandwich system.

  6. ONTOGENIC EXPRESSION OF HUMAN CARBOXYLESTERASE-2 AND CYTOCHROME P450 3A4 IN LIVER AND DUODENUM: POSTNATAL SURGE AND ORGAN-DEPENDENT REGULATION1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Tzai; Trzoss, Lynnie; Yang, Dongfang; Yan, Bingfang

    2015-01-01

    Human carboxylesterase-2 (CES2) and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) are two major drug metabolizing enzymes that play critical roles in hydrolytic and oxidative biotransformation, respectively. They share substrates but may have opposite effect on therapeutic potential such as the metabolism of the anticancer prodrug irinotecan. Both CES2 and CYP3A4 are expressed in the liver and the gastrointestinal tract. This study was conducted to determine whether CES2 and CYP3A4 are expressed under developmental regulation and whether the regulation occurs differentially between the liver and duodenum. A large number of tissues (112) were collected with majority of them from donors at 1-198 days of age. In addition, multi-sampling (liver, duodenum and jejunum) was performed in some donors. The expression was determined at mRNA and protein levels. In the liver, CES2 and CYP3A4 mRNA exhibited a postnatal surge (1 versus 2 months of age) by 2.7 and 29 fold, respectively. CYP3A4 but not CES2 mRNA in certain pediatric groups reached or even exceeded the adult level. The duodenal samples, on the other hand, showed a gene-specific expression pattern at mRNA level. CES2 mRNA increased with age but the opposite was true with CYP3A4 mRNA. The levels of CES2 and CYP3A4 protein, on the other hand, increased with age in both liver and duodenum. The multi-sampling study demonstrated significant correlation of CES2 expression between the duodenum and jejunum. However, neither duodenal nor jejunal expression correlated with hepatic expression of CES2. These findings establish that developmental regulation occurs in a gene and organ-dependent manner. PMID:25724353

  7. Argininosuccinate synthetase as a plasma biomarker of liver injury after acetaminophen overdose in rodents and humans

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Cao, Mengde; Svetlov, Archie; Sharpe, Matthew R.; Williams, C. David; Curry, Steven C.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Svetlov, Stanislav I.

    2014-01-01

    Context New biomarkers are needed in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Plasma argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a promising candidate. Objective Characterize ASS in APAP hepatotoxicity. Methods ASS was measured in plasma from rodents and humans with APAP hepatotoxicity. Results In mice, ASS increased before injury, peaked before ALT, and decreased rapidly. Fischer rats had a greater increase in ASS relative to ALT. Patients with abnormal liver test results had very high ASS compared to controls. ASS appeared to increase early in some patients, and declined rapidly in all. Conclusions : ASS may be a useful biomarker of acute cell death in APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:24597531

  8. Variation in dielectric properties due to pathological changes in human liver.

    PubMed

    Peyman, Azadeh; Kos, Bor; Djokić, Mihajlo; Trotovšek, Blaž; Limbaeck-Stokin, Clara; Serša, Gregor; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2015-12-01

    Dielectric properties of freshly excised human liver tissues (in vitro) with several pathological conditions including cancer were obtained in frequency range 100 MHz-5 GHz. Differences in dielectric behavior of normal and pathological tissues at microwave frequencies are discussed based on histological information for each tissue. Data presented are useful for many medical applications, in particular nanosecond pulsed electroporation techniques. Knowledge of dielectric properties is vital for mathematical calculations of local electric field distribution inside electroporated tissues and can be used to optimize the process of electroporation for treatment planning procedures. PMID:26508012

  9. An Algorithm that Predicts the Viability and the Yield of Human Hepatocytes Isolated from Remnant Liver Pieces Obtained from Liver Resections

    PubMed Central

    Laubender, Rüdiger P.; Fröse, Natalja; Thasler, Reinhard M. K.; Schiergens, Tobias S.; Mansmann, Ulrich; Thasler, Wolfgang E.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated human primary hepatocytes are an essential in vitro model for basic and clinical research. For successful application as a model, isolated hepatocytes need to have a good viability and be available in sufficient yield. Therefore, this study aims to identify donor characteristics, intra-operative factors, tissue processing and cell isolation parameters that affect the viability and yield of human hepatocytes. Remnant liver pieces from tissue designated as surgical waste were collected from 1034 donors with informed consent. Human hepatocytes were isolated by a two-step collagenase perfusion technique with modifications and hepatocyte yield and viability were subsequently determined. The accompanying patient data was collected and entered into a database. Univariate analyses found that the viability and the yield of hepatocytes were affected by many of the variables examined. Multivariate analyses were then carried out to confirm the factors that have a significant relationship with the viability and the yield. It was found that the viability of hepatocytes was significantly decreased by the presence of fibrosis, liver fat and with increasing gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity and bilirubin content. Yield was significantly decreased by the presence of liver fat, septal fibrosis, with increasing aspartate aminotransferase activity, cold ischemia times and weight of perfused liver. However, yield was significantly increased by chemotherapy treatment. In conclusion, this study determined the variables that have a significant effect on the viability and the yield of isolated human hepatocytes. These variables have been used to generate an algorithm that can calculate projected viability and yield of isolated human hepatocytes. In this way, projected viability can be determined even before isolation of hepatocytes, so that donors that result in high viability and yield can be identified. Further, if the viability and yield of the isolated hepatocytes is lower

  10. Human herpesvirus 7 is a constitutive inhabitant of adult human saliva.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, L S; Frenkel, N

    1992-01-01

    We report the frequent isolation of human herpesvirus 7 from the saliva of healthy adults. Virus isolates recovered from different individuals exhibited minimal restriction enzyme polymorphism, which was mostly confined to heterogeneous (het) sequences in the genome. DNAs of isolates recovered from the same individual over a period of several months showed the same characteristic het fragments, indicating the stability of the het sequences upon virus replication and shedding in vivo. In contrast to the results of previous reports, human herpesvirus 6, the causative agent of roseola infantum, could not be isolated from the saliva specimens, raising questions regarding oral transmission of human herpesvirus 6 and human herpesvirus 7 to young children. Images PMID:1348548

  11. Differential TGFβ pathway targeting by miR-122 in humans and mice affects liver cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shenyi; Fan, Yu; Zhang, Hanshuo; Zhao, Zhihua; Hao, Yang; Li, Juan; Sun, Changhong; Yang, Junyu; Yang, Zhenjun; Yang, Xiao; Lu, Jian; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Downregulation of a predominantly hepatocyte-specific miR-122 is associated with human liver cancer metastasis, whereas miR-122-deficient mice display normal liver function. Here we show a functional conservation of miR-122 in the TGFβ pathway: miR-122 target site is present in the mouse but not human TGFβR1, whereas a noncanonical target site is present in the TGFβ1 5′UTR in humans and other primates. Experimental switch of the miR-122 target between the receptor TGFβR1 and the ligand TGFβ1 changes the metastatic properties of mouse and human liver cancer cells. High expression of TGFβ1 in human primary liver tumours is associated with poor survival. We identify over 50 other miRNAs orthogonally targeting ligand/receptor pairs in humans and mice, suggesting that these are evolutionarily common events. These results reveal an evolutionary mechanism for miRNA-mediated gene regulation underlying species-specific physiological or pathological phenotype and provide a potentially valuable strategy for treating liver-associated diseases. PMID:26987776

  12. Exchange delays and impulsive choice in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Hyten, C; Madden, G J; Field, D P

    1994-09-01

    Choice responding by adult humans in a discrete-trial task was examined as a function of conditions that manipulated either the delay to point delivery or the delay between points and their exchange for money. In point-delay conditions, subjects chose between an "impulsive" alternative that provided a small amount of points immediately and a "self-control" alternative that provided a larger amount of points delayed by 15, 30, or 60 s. Points were exchanged for money immediately following the session. Subjects preferred the self-control alternative. In exchange-delay conditions, subjects chose between a small amount of points exchangeable for money immediately following the session and a larger amount of points exchangeable for money after 1 day, 3 weeks, or 6 weeks. A self-control preference observed for all subjects in the 1-day exchange-delay condition reversed to exclusive impulsive preference for 4 of the 6 subjects when choice conditions involved exchange delays of 3 or 6 weeks. These results show that human choice is sensitive to the manipulation of exchange delays and that impulsive preference can be obtained with exchange delays on the order of weeks. PMID:7964366

  13. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.

  14. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection.more » Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.« less

  15. Ossified Ligamentum Longitudinale Anterius in Adult Human Dry Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Venumadhav, Nelluri; KS, Siddaraju

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ligamentum longitudinale anterius is a broad and strong band of fibrous tissue that runs along the anterior surfaces of the bodies of the vertebrae. Aim: The study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius in adult dry human vertebra. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 95 sets of dry human vertebral columns irrespective of age and sex at Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences- Barabanki,-UP, Melaka Manipal Medical College-Manipal University and Department of Anatomy, KMCT Medical College, Manassery- Calicut, India. All the sets of vertebral columns were macroscopically inspected for the ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius. Results: It was observed that out of 95 sets of vertebral columns, 27 (28.42%) vertebral columns showed ossification. Out of 27 vertebral columns, 17 (17.89%) vertebral columns showed segmental type of ossification, 2 (2.11%) vertebral columns showed continuous type of ossification and 8 (8.42%) vertebral columns showed mixed type of ossification at different vertebral level. Conclusion: Such type of ossification will affect the biomechanics of the spine and may result in stiff neck, low back pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, compression of the brachial plexus, aphonia, immobility or mucosal thickening of larynx. Hence, knowledge of such abnormalities should be kept in mind to minimise serious complications in any surgical intervention or investigative procedures in the region. PMID:25302180

  16. Association between sleep condition and arterial stiffness in Chinese adult with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xia; Zhou, Jiansong; Yuan, Hong; Chen, Zhiheng

    2016-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) usually has worse cardiovascular risk factors. Given the potential association between deterioration of sleep and arterial stiffness, we aim to investigate the association between deterioration of sleep and arterial stiffness in a middle-aged Chinese population with NAFLD. In this cross-sectional study, 15,372 Chinese aged 40-60 years who participated in periodic health checkups in central south China, were included. Self-reported sleep duration and sleep quality, anthropometric, biochemical, and liver ultrasound scan were analyzed and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was used as the indicator of arterial stiffness. Poor sleep quality was found to be associated with increased arterial stiffness, with odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of 2.28 (95 % CI, 1.53-3.38) compared with good sleep quality. Using sleep duration ≥ 8 h as the reference, there was no significant association between sleep duration of ≤ 6 or 6-8 h and arterial stiffness after multivariable-adjusted. In additional analyses, further investigation of the association of different combinations of sleep duration and quality in relation to arterial stiffness indicated participants with poor sleep quality and sleep duration ≤ 6 h were more likely to have arterial stiffness than those with good quality sleep who sleep for ≥ 8 h (OR 2.59, 95 % CI 1.58-4.24). The present study indicates that short sleep duration, poor sleep quality in individuals with NAFLD correlate with increased arterial stiffness. PMID:27034174

  17. Partitioning and levels of neutral organochlorine compounds in human serum, blood cells, and adipose and liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H

    1991-04-15

    Concentrations of neutral organochlorine compounds (OCs) in blood compartments and adipose tissue were determined in three groups of subjects. In 12 healthy volunteers a positive correlation was found between DDT residue levels in paired serum/adipose tissue samples when the concentrations were calculated on a fat-weight basis (r = 0.74, p less than 0.05); positive correlations were also found for PCB and HCB when the calculations were based on a wet-weight basis (r = 0.68, p less than 0.01; r = 0.69, p less than 0.01). For lindane the correlation coefficient for paired serum/adipose tissue samples was -0.94 (p less than 0.01). The association between adipose tissue and blood cells was weaker than that obtained for serum. These readily obtainable samples are adequate for estimating, or monitoring, the total burden of neutral organochlorines in adipose tissue, especially in cases of low chronic exposure, such as those found in epidemiological studies. In paired liver-adipose tissue samples from 23 autopsy cases, no correlation was found either on a wet- or fat-weight basis. In 131 adults resident in southern and eastern Finland the concentration medians for serum were 1.8, 2.0 and 0.3 ng g-1 wet wt for DDT compounds. PCB and HCB, respectively. This study indicates that monitoring of fat/serum ratios may provide, with tissue concentrations, more information about human exposure to OCs. PMID:1909054

  18. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human liver cytochrome(s) P450

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Mindaye, Samuel T.; Getie-Kebtie, Melkamu; Alterman, Michail A.

    2013-02-15

    The major objective of personalized medicine is to select optimized drug therapies and to a large degree such mission is determined by the expression profiles of cytochrome(s) P450 (CYP). Accordingly, a proteomic case study in personalized medicine is provided by the superfamily of cytochromes P450. Our knowledge about CYP isozyme expression on a protein level is very limited and based exclusively on DNA/mRNA derived data. Such information is not sufficient because transcription and translation events do not lead to correlated levels of expressed proteins. Here we report expression profiles of CYPs in human liver obtained by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approach. We analyzed 32 samples of human liver microsomes (HLM) of different sexes, ages and ethnicity along with samples of recombinant human CYPs. We have experimentally confirmed that each CYP isozyme can be effectively differentiated by their unique isozyme-specific tryptic peptide(s). Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes were established. Those findings should assist in selecting tryptic peptides suitable for MS-based quantitation. The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. CYP2E1, CYP2C8 and CYP4A11 were the only isozymes found in all HLM samples. Female and pediatric HLM samples revealed much more diverse spectrum of expressed CYPs isozymes compared to male HLM. We have confirmed expression of a number of “rare” CYP (CYP2J2, CYP4B1, CYP4V2, CYP4F3, CYP4F11, CYP8B1, CYP19A1, CYP24A1 and CYP27A1) and obtained first direct experimental data showing expression of such CYPs as CYP2F1, CYP2S1, CYP2W1, CYP4A22, CYP4X1, and CYP26A1 on a protein level. - Highlights: ► First detailed proteomic analysis of CYP isozymes expression in human liver ► Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes established ► The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. ► Female HLM samples revealed more

  19. Professional Fulfillment and Satisfaction of US and Canadian Adult Education and Human Resource Development Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shari L.; Wiesenberg, Faye

    2004-01-01

    This comparative study explored the professional fulfillment and job satisfaction of US and Canadian college and university faculty in the fields of Adult Education and Human Resource Development. In Autumn 2001, we disseminated electronically "The Adult Education and Human Resource Development Faculty Survey" to a selected sample of Canadian and…

  20. Kinetics of tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP) metabolism in human liver microsomes and serum.

    PubMed

    Van den Eede, Nele; Tomy, Gregg; Tao, Fang; Halldorson, Thor; Harrad, Stuart; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP) is an emerging contaminant which is ubiquitous in the indoor and outdoor environment. Moreover, its presence in human body fluids and biota has been evidenced. Since no quantitative data exist on the biotransformation or stability of TCIPP in the human body, we performed an in vitro incubation of TCIPP with human liver microsomes (HLM) and human serum (HS). Two metabolites, namely bis(2-chloro-isopropyl) phosphate (BCIPP) and bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) 1-hydroxy-2-propyl phosphate (BCIPHIPP), were quantified in a kinetic study using HLM or HS (only BCIPP, the hydrolysis product) and LC-MS. The Michaelis-Menten model fitted best the NADPH-dependent formation of BCIPHIPP and BCIPP in HLM, with respective V(MAX) of 154 ± 4 and 1470 ± 110 pmol/min/mg protein and respective apparent K(m) of 80.2 ± 4.4 and 96.1 ± 14.5 μM. Hydrolases, which are naturally present in HLM, were also involved in the production of BCIPP. A HS paraoxonase assay could not detect any BCIPP formation above 38.6 ± 10.8 pmol/min/μL serum. Our data indicate that BCIPP is the major metabolite of TCIPP formed in the liver. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative assessment of the stability of TCIPP in tissues of humans or any other species. Further research is needed to confirm whether these biotransformation reactions are associated with a decrease or increase in toxicity. PMID:26473552

  1. Role of basiliximab in the prevention of acute cellular rejection in adult to adult living-related liver transplantation: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Gruttadauria, S; Mandalà, L; Biondo, D; Spampinato, M; Lamonaca, V; Volpes, R; Vizzini, G; Marsh, JW; Marcos, A; Gridelli, B

    2007-01-01

    We report our single center experience with the use of basiliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against the alpha chain of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor (CD25), in combination with a steroid- and tacrolimus-based regimen in adult to adult living-related liver transplantation (ALRLT). Sixty consecutive ALRLTs were analyzed. All patients received two 20-mg doses of basiliximab (days 0 and 4 after transplantation) followed by tacrolimus (0.15 mg/kg/day; 10–15 ng/mL target trough levels) and a dose regimen of steroids (starting with 20 mg iv, switched to po as soon as the patient was able to eat, and weaned off within 1–2 months). Follow-up ranged from 6 to 1699.4 days after transplantation (mean 517.5 days, SD ± 413.4; median 424 days). Of the recipients, 95% remained rejection-free during follow-up, with an actuarial rejection-free probability of 96.61% within 3 months. Three patients had episodes of biopsy-proven acute cellular rejection (ACR). Actuarial patient and graft survival rates at 3 years were 82.09% and 75.61%. Six patients (10%) experienced sepsis. There was no evidence of cytomegalovirus infections or side-effects related to the basiliximab. We found zero de novo malignancy, although we observed 5 patients with metastatic spread of their primary malignancy during the follow-up. Basiliximab in association with tacrolimus and steroids is effective in reducing episodes of ACR and increasing ACR-free survival after ALRLT. PMID:19707350

  2. Liver transplantation☆

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M.; Mennini, G.; Lai, Q.; Ginanni Corradini, S.; Drudi, F.M.; Pugliese, F.; Berloco, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) involves the substitution of a diseased native liver with a normal liver (or part of one) taken from a deceased or living donor. Considered an experimental procedure through the 1980s, OLT is now regarded as the treatment of choice for a number of otherwise irreversible forms of acute and chronic liver disease. The first human liver transplantation was performed in the United States in 1963 by Prof. T.E. Starzl of the University of Colorado. The first OLT to be performed in Italy was done in 1982 by Prof. R. Cortesini. The procedure was successfully performed at the Policlinico Umberto I of the University of Rome (La Sapienza). The paper reports the indications for liver transplantation, donor selection and organ allocation in our experience, surgical technique, immunosuppression, complications and results of liver transplantation in our center. PMID:23396075

  3. A human liver microphysiology platform for investigating physiology, drug safety, and disease models.

    PubMed

    Vernetti, Lawrence A; Senutovitch, Nina; Boltz, Robert; DeBiasio, Richard; Shun, Tong Ying; Gough, Albert; Taylor, D Lansing

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of a microphysiology platform for drug safety and efficacy in liver models of disease that includes a human, 3D, microfluidic, four-cell, sequentially layered, self-assembly liver model (SQL-SAL); fluorescent protein biosensors for mechanistic readouts; as well as a microphysiology system database (MPS-Db) to manage, analyze, and model data. The goal of our approach is to create the simplest design in terms of cells, matrix materials, and microfluidic device parameters that will support a physiologically relevant liver model that is robust and reproducible for at least 28 days for stand-alone liver studies and microfluidic integration with other organs-on-chips. The current SQL-SAL uses primary human hepatocytes along with human endothelial (EA.hy926), immune (U937) and stellate (LX-2) cells in physiological ratios and is viable for at least 28 days under continuous flow. Approximately, 20% of primary hepatocytes and/or stellate cells contain fluorescent protein biosensors (called sentinel cells) to measure apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or cell location by high content analysis (HCA). In addition, drugs, drug metabolites, albumin, urea and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) are monitored in the efflux media. Exposure to 180 μM troglitazone or 210 μM nimesulide produced acute toxicity within 2-4 days, whereas 28 μM troglitazone produced a gradual and much delayed toxic response over 21 days, concordant with known mechanisms of toxicity, while 600 µM caffeine had no effect. Immune-mediated toxicity was demonstrated with trovafloxacin with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but not levofloxacin with LPS. The SQL-SAL exhibited early fibrotic activation in response to 30 nM methotrexate, indicated by increased stellate cell migration, expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen, type 1, alpha 2. Data collected from the in vitro model can be integrated into a database with access to related

  4. A human liver microphysiology platform for investigating physiology, drug safety, and disease models

    PubMed Central

    Vernetti, Lawrence A.; Senutovitch, Nina; Boltz, Robert; DeBiasio, Richard; Shun, Tong Ying; Gough, Albert; Taylor, D. Lansing

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of a microphysiology platform for drug safety and efficacy in liver models of disease that includes a human, 3D, microfluidic, four-cell, sequentially layered, self-assembly liver model (SQL-SAL); fluorescent protein biosensors for mechanistic readouts; as well as a microphysiology system database (MPS-Db) to manage, analyze, and model data. The goal of our approach is to create the simplest design in terms of cells, matrix materials, and microfluidic device parameters that will support a physiologically relevant liver model that is robust and reproducible for at least 28 days for stand-alone liver studies and microfluidic integration with other organs-on-chips. The current SQL-SAL uses primary human hepatocytes along with human endothelial (EA.hy926), immune (U937) and stellate (LX-2) cells in physiological ratios and is viable for at least 28 days under continuous flow. Approximately, 20% of primary hepatocytes and/or stellate cells contain fluorescent protein biosensors (called sentinel cells) to measure apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or cell location by high content analysis (HCA). In addition, drugs, drug metabolites, albumin, urea and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) are monitored in the efflux media. Exposure to 180μM troglitazone or 210μM nimesulide produced acute toxicity within 2–4 days, whereas 28μM troglitazone produced a gradual and much delayed toxic response over 21 days, concordant with known mechanisms of toxicity, while 600μM caffeine had no effect. Immune-mediated toxicity was demonstrated with trovafloxacin with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but not levofloxacin with LPS. The SQL-SAL exhibited early fibrotic activation in response to 30nM methotrexate, indicated by increased stellate cell migration, expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen, type 1, alpha 2. Data collected from the in vitro model can be integrated into a database with access to related chemical

  5. Metabolite Profiling and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Hydrocortisone in a Perfused Three-Dimensional Human Liver Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Ujjal; Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Large, Emma M.; Hughes, David J.; Ravindra, Kodihalli C.; Dyer, Rachel L.; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    Endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to cause liver injury primarily involving inflammatory cells such as Kupffer cells, but few in vitro culture models are applicable for investigation of inflammatory effects on drug metabolism. We have developed a three-dimensional human microphysiological hepatocyte–Kupffer cell coculture system and evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids on liver cultures. LPS was introduced to the cultures to elicit an inflammatory response and was assessed by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α. A sensitive and specific reversed-phase–ultra high-performance liquid chromatography–quadrupole time of flight–mass spectrometry method was used to evaluate hydrocortisone disappearance and metabolism at near physiologic levels. For this, the systems were dosed with 100 nM hydrocortisone and circulated for 2 days; hydrocortisone was depleted to approximately 30 nM, with first-order kinetics. Phase I metabolites, including tetrahydrocortisone and dihydrocortisol, accounted for 8–10% of the loss, and 45–52% consisted of phase II metabolites, including glucuronides of tetrahydrocortisol and tetrahydrocortisone. Pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., half-life, rate of elimination, clearance, and area under the curve, were 23.03 hours, 0.03 hour−1, 6.6 × 10−5 l⋅hour−1, and 1.03 (mg/l)*h, respectively. The ability of the bioreactor to predict the in vivo clearance of hydrocortisone was characterized, and the obtained intrinsic clearance values correlated with human data. This system offers a physiologically relevant tool for investigating hepatic function in an inflamed liver. PMID:25926431

  6. Human amnion epithelial cells expressing HLA-G as novel cell-based treatment for liver disease.

    PubMed

    Strom, Stephen C; Gramignoli, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Despite routine liver transplantation and supporting medical therapies, thousands of patients currently wait for an organ and there is an unmet need for more refined and widely available regenerative strategies to treat liver diseases. Cell transplants attempt to maximize the potential for repair and/or regeneration in liver and other organs. Over 40years of laboratory pre-clinical research and 25years of clinical procedures have shown that certain liver diseases can be treated by the infusion of isolated cells (hepatocyte transplant). However, like organ transplants, hepatocyte transplant suffers from a paucity of tissues useful for cell production. Alternative sources have been investigated, yet with limited success. The tumorigenic potential of pluripotent stem cells together with their primitive level of hepatic differentiation, have limited the use of stem cell populations. Stem cell sources from human placenta, and the amnion tissue in particular are receiving renewed interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Unlike pluripotent stem cells, human amnion epithelial (AE) cells are easily available without ethical or religious concerns; they do not express telomerase and are not immortal or tumorigenic when transplanted. In addition, AE cells have been reported to express genes normally expressed in mature liver, when transplanted into the liver. Moreover, because of the possibility of an immune-privileged status related to their expression of HLA-G, it might be possible to transplant human AE cells without immunosuppression of the recipient. PMID:27476049