Science.gov

Sample records for adult human liver

  1. Adult human liver mesenchymal progenitor cells express phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Baruteau, Julien; Nyabi, Omar; Najimi, Mustapha; Fauvart, Maarten; Sokal, Etienne

    2014-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases and is accountable for a severe encephalopathy by progressive intoxication of the brain by phenylalanine. This results from an ineffective L-phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme (PAH) due to a mutated phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Neonatal screening programs allow an early dietetic treatment with restrictive phenylalanine intake. This diet prevents most of the neuropsychological disabilities but remains challenging for lifelong compliance. Adult-derived human liver progenitor cells (ADHLPC) are a pool of precursors that can differentiate into hepatocytes. We aim to study PAH expression and PAH activity in a differenciated ADHLPC. ADHLPC were isolated from human hepatocyte primary culture of two different donors and differenciated under specific culture conditions. We demonstrated the high expression of PAH and a large increase of PAH activity in differenciated LPC. The age of the donor, the cellular viability after liver digestion and cryopreservation affects PAH activity. ADHLPC might therefore be considered as a suitable source for cell therapy in PKU.

  2. Expression pattern of thymosin beta 4 in the adult human liver

    PubMed Central

    Nemolato, S.; Van Eyken, P.; Cabras, T.; Cau, F.; Fanari, M.U.; Locci, A.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2011-01-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a member of beta-thymosins, a family of small peptides involved in polymerization of G-actin, and in many critical biological processes including apoptosis, cell migration, angiogenesis, and fibrosis. Previous studies in the newborn liver did not reveal any significant reactivity for Tβ4 during the intrauterine life. The aim of the present study was to investigate by immunohistochemistry Tβ4 expression in the adult normal liver. Thirty-five human liver samples, including 11 needle liver biopsies and 24 liver specimens obtained at autopsy, in which no pathological change was detected at the histological examination, were immunostained utilizing an anti-Tβ4 commercial antibody. Tβ4 was detected in the hepatocytes of all adult normal livers examined. A zonation of Tβ4 expression was evident in the vast majority of cases. Immunostaining was preferentially detected in zone 3, while a minor degree of reactivity was detected in periportal hepatocytes (zone 1). At higher power, Tβ4-reactive granules appeared mainly localized at the biliary pole of hepatocytes. In cases with a strong immunostaining, even perinuclear areas and the sinusoidal pole of hepatocytes appeared interested by immunoreactivity for Tβ4. The current work first evidences a strong diffuse expression of Tβ4 in the adult human liver, and adds hepatocytes to the list of human cells able to synthesize large amounts of Tβ4 in adulthood. Moreover, Tβ4 should be added to the liver proteins characterized by a zonate expression pattern, in a descending gradient from the terminal vein to the periportal areas of the liver acinus. Identifying the intimate role played by this peptide intracellularly and extracellularly, in physiology and in different liver diseases, is a major challenge for future research focusing on Tβ4. PMID:22073372

  3. In Vitro Generation of Functional Liver Organoid-Like Structures Using Adult Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sarada Devi; Schirmer, Katharina; Münst, Bernhard; Heinz, Stefan; Ghafoory, Shahrouz; Wölfl, Stefan; Simon-Keller, Katja; Marx, Alexander; Øie, Cristina Ionica; Ebert, Matthias P.; Walles, Heike

    2015-01-01

    In this study we used differentiated adult human upcyte® cells for the in vitro generation of liver organoids. Upcyte® cells are genetically engineered cell strains derived from primary human cells by lenti-viral transduction of genes or gene combinations inducing transient proliferation capacity (upcyte® process). Proliferating upcyte® cells undergo a finite number of cell divisions, i.e., 20 to 40 population doublings, but upon withdrawal of proliferation stimulating factors, they regain most of the cell specific characteristics of primary cells. When a defined mixture of differentiated human upcyte® cells (hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)) was cultured in vitro on a thick layer of Matrigel™, they self-organized to form liver organoid-like structures within 24 hours. When further cultured for 10 days in a bioreactor, these liver organoids show typical functional characteristics of liver parenchyma including activity of cytochromes P450, CYP3A4, CYP2B6 and CYP2C9 as well as mRNA expression of several marker genes and other enzymes. In summary, we hereby describe that 3D functional hepatic structures composed of primary human cell strains can be generated in vitro. They can be cultured for a prolonged period of time and are potentially useful ex vivo models to study liver functions. PMID:26488607

  4. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Finoli, Anthony; Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications.

  5. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C.

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27403430

  6. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  7. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccination Recommendations Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... critical for people with health conditions such as liver disease. If you have chronic liver disease, talk ...

  8. Adult-Derived Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells Infused 3 Days Postsurgery Improve Liver Regeneration in a Mouse Model of Extended Hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Astrid; Prigent, Julie; Lombard, Catherine; Rosseels, Valérie; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Breckpot, Karine; Najimi, Mustapha; Deblandre, Gisèle; Sokal, Etienne M

    2017-02-16

    There is growing evidence that cell therapy constitutes a promising strategy for liver regenerative medicine. In the setting of hepatic cancer treatments, cell therapy could prove a useful therapeutic approach for managing the acute liver failure that occurs following extended hepatectomy. In this study, we examined the influence of delivering adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSCs) at two different early time points in an immunodeficient mouse model (Rag2-/-IL2Rγ-/-) that had undergone a 70% hepatectomy procedure. The hepatic mesenchymal cells were intrasplenically infused either immediately after surgery (n = 26) or following a critical 3-day period (n = 26). We evaluated the cells' capacity to engraft at day 1 and day 7 following transplantation by means of human Alu qPCR quantification, along with histological assessment of human albumin and α-smooth muscle actin. In addition, cell proliferation (anti-mouse and human Ki-67 staining) and murine liver weight were measured in order to evaluate liver regeneration. At day 1 posttransplantation, the ratio of human to mouse cells was similar in both groups, whereas 1 week posttransplantation this ratio was significantly improved (p < 0.016) in mice receiving ADHLSC injection at day 3 posthepatectomy (1.7%), compared to those injected at the time of surgery (1%). On the basis of liver weight, mouse liver regeneration was more extensive 1 week posttransplantation in mice transplanted with ADHLSCs (+65.3%) compared to that of mice from the sham vehicle group (+42.7%). In conclusion, infusing ADHLSCs 3 days after extensive hepatectomy improves the cell engraftment and murine hepatic tissue regeneration, thereby confirming that ADHLSCs could be a promising cell source for liver cell therapy and hepatic tissue repair.

  9. Expression in Escherichia coli of the flavin-containing monooxygenase D (form II) from adult human liver: determination of a distinct tertiary amine substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Lomri, N; Yang, Z; Cashman, J R

    1993-01-01

    The cDNA for a major component of the family of flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) present in adult human liver (i.e., HLFMO-D) has been cloned and expressed in a prokaryotic system. Escherichia coli strain NM522 was transformed with pTrcHLFMO-D, and the HLFMO-D cDNA was expressed under the control of the Trc promoter. A variety of tertiary amine substrates [i.e., chlorpromazine and 10-[(N,N-dimethylamino)alkyl]- 2-(trifluoromethyl)phenothiazines] were efficiently oxygenated by HLFMO-D cDNA expressed in E. coli or by adult human liver microsomes. Approximate dimensions of the substrate binding channel for both adult human liver microsomal FMO and cDNA-expressed HLFMO-D were apparent from an examination of the N-oxygenation of a series of 10-[(N,N-dimethylamino)alkyl]-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenothiazines. The substrate regioselectivity studies suggest that adult human liver FMO form D possesses a distinct substrate specificity compared with form A FMO from animal hepatic sources. It is likely that the substrate specificity observed for cDNA-expressed adult human liver FMO-D may have consequences for the metabolism and distribution of tertiary amines and phosphorus- and sulfur-containing drugs in humans and may provide insight into the physiologic substrate(s) for adult human liver FMO.

  10. Treatment Options for Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Primary Liver Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  12. Stages of Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  13. General Information about Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  14. Tissue-resident Eomes(hi) T-bet(lo) CD56(bright) NK cells with reduced proinflammatory potential are enriched in the adult human liver.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Cathal; Robinson, Mark W; Fahey, Ronan; Whelan, Sarah; Houlihan, Diarmaid D; Geoghegan, Justin; O'Farrelly, Cliona

    2016-09-01

    The adult human liver is enriched with natural killer (NK) cells, accounting for 30-50% of hepatic lymphocytes, which include tissue-resident hepatic NK-cell subpopulations, distinct from peripheral blood NK cells. In murine liver, a subset of liver-resident hepatic NK cells have altered expression of the two highly related T-box transcription factors, T-bet and eomesodermin (Eomes). Here, we investigate the heterogeneity of T-bet and Eomes expression in NK cells from healthy adult human liver with a view to identifying human liver-resident populations. Hepatic NK cells were isolated from donor liver perfusates and biopsies obtained during orthotopic liver transplantation (N = 28). Hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells were Eomes(hi) T-bet(lo) , a phenotype virtually absent from peripheral blood. These NK cells express the chemokine receptor CXCR6 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 6), a marker of tissue residency, which is absent from hepatic CD56(dim) and blood NK cells. Compared to blood populations, these hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells have increased expression of activatory receptors (NKp44, NKp46, and NKG2D). They show reduced ability to produce IFN-γ but enhanced degranulation in response to challenge with target cells. This functionally distinct population of hepatic NK cells constitutes 20-30% of the total hepatic lymphocyte repertoire and represents a tissue-resident immune cell population adapted to the tolerogenic liver microenvironment.

  15. Split liver transplantation in adults

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Koji; Fujiki, Masato; Quintini, Cristiano; Aucejo, Federico N; Uso, Teresa Diago; Kelly, Dympna M; Eghtesad, Bijan; Fung, John J; Miller, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Split liver transplantation (SLT), while widely accepted in pediatrics, remains underutilized in adults. Advancements in surgical techniques and donor-recipient matching, however, have allowed expansion of SLT from utilization of the right trisegment graft to now include use of the hemiliver graft as well. Despite less favorable outcomes in the early experience, better outcomes have been reported by experienced centers and have further validated the feasibility of SLT. Importantly, more than two decades of experience have identified key requirements for successful SLT in adults. When these requirements are met, SLT can achieve outcomes equivalent to those achieved with other types of liver transplantation for adults. However, substantial challenges, such as surgical techniques, logistics, and ethics, persist as ongoing barriers to further expansion of this highly complex procedure. This review outlines the current state of SLT in adults, focusing on donor and recipient selection based on physiology, surgical techniques, surgical outcomes, and ethical issues. PMID:27672272

  16. Mice with human livers.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; Strom, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Animal models are used to study many aspects of human disease and to test therapeutic interventions. However, some very important features of human biology cannot be replicated in animals, even in nonhuman primates or transgenic rodents engineered with human genes. Most human microbial pathogens do not infect animals and the metabolism of many xenobiotics is different between human beings and animals. The advent of transgenic immune-deficient mice has made it possible to generate chimeric animals harboring human tissues and cells, including hepatocytes. The liver plays a central role in many human-specific biological processes and mice with humanized livers can be used to model human metabolism, liver injury, gene regulation, drug toxicity, and hepatotropic infections.

  17. Human liver nucleolar antigens.

    PubMed

    Busch, R K; Busch, H

    1981-10-01

    In an extension of previous studies on the antigens in rat liver nucleoli (R. K. Busch, R. C. Reddy, D. H. Henning, and H. Busch, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 160, 185 (1979); R. K. Busch and H. Busch, Tumori 63, 347 (1977); F. M. Davis, R. K. Busch, L. C. Yeoman, and H. Busch, Cancer Res. 38, 1906 (1978), rabbit antibodies were elicited to human liver nucleoli isolated by the sucrose--Mg2+ method (10). Fluorescent nucleoli were found in liver cryostat sections treated with rabbit anti-human liver nucleolar antibodies followed by fluorescein-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibodies. In HeLa cells, fluorescence was distributed throughout the nucleus and in a nuclear network but was not localized to the nucleolus. In placental cryostat sections, an overall nuclear fluorescence was observed with some localization to nucleoli. Immunodiffusion analysis revealed two immunoprecipitin bands which appeared to be liver specific. Other immunoprecipitin bands were common to liver, placenta, and HeLa nuclear extracts. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed two liver-specific antigens, one migrating to the cathode and the other to the anode Other rockets exhibited identity to antigens of other nuclear extracts. These results demonstrate the presence of human liver nucleolar-specific antigens which were not found in the HeLa and placental cells.

  18. Comparison of hepatic-like cell production from human embryonic stem cells and adult liver progenitor cells: CAR transduction activates a battery of detoxification genes.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Natalie; Duret, Cédric; Pascussi, Jean-Marc; Blanc, Pierre; Maurel, Patrick; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine

    2011-09-01

    In vitro production of human hepatocytes is of primary importance in basic research, pharmacotoxicology and biotherapy of liver diseases. We have developed a protocol of differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (ES) towards hepatocyte-like cells (ES-Hep). Using a set of human adult markers including CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBPalpha), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4/7 ratio (HNF4alpha1/HNF4alpha7), cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), CYP3A4 and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and fetal markers including alpha-fetoprotein, CYP3A7 and glutathione S-transferase P1, we analyzed the expression of a panel of 41 genes in ES-Hep comparatively with human adult primary hepatocytes, adult and fetal liver. The data revealed that after 21 days of differentiation, ES-Hep are representative of fetal hepatocytes at less than 20 weeks of gestation. The glucocorticoid receptor pathway was functional in ES-Hep. Extending protocols of differentiation to 4 weeks did not improve cell maturation. When compared with hepatocyte-like cells derived from adult liver non parenchymal epithelial (NPE) cells (NPE-Hep), ES-Hep expressed several adult and fetal liver makers at much greater levels (at least one order of magnitude), consistent with greater expression of liver-enriched transcription factors Forkhead box A2, C/EBPalpha, HNF4alpha and HNF6. It therefore seems that ES-Hep reach a better level of differentiation than NPE-Hep and that these cells use different lineage pathways towards the hepatic phenotype. Finally we showed that lentivirus-mediated expression of xenoreceptor CAR in ES-Hep induced the expression of several detoxification genes including CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP3A4, UDP-glycosyltransferase 1A1, solute carriers 21A6, as well as biotransformation of midazolam, a CYP3A4-specific substrate.

  19. Adrenergic receptors in human fetal liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Falkay, G.; Kovacs, L. )

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptor binding capacities in human fetal and adult livers were measured to investigate the mechanism of the reduced alpha-1 adrenoreceptor response of the liver associated with a reciprocal increase in beta-adrenoreceptor activity in a number of conditions. Alpha-1 and beta-adrenoreceptor density were determined using {sup 3}H-prazosin and {sup 3}H-dihydroalprenolol, respectively, as radioligand. Heterogeneous populations of beta-adrenoreceptors were found in fetal liver contrast to adult. Decreased alpha-1 and increased beta-receptor density were found which may relate to a decreased level in cellular differentiation. These findings may be important for the investigation of perinatal hypoglycemia of newborns after treatment of premature labor with beta-mimetics. This is the first demonstration of differences in the ratio of alpha-1 and beta-adrenoceptors in human fetal liver.

  20. Comprehensive Screening of Cell Surface Markers Expressed by Adult-Derived Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells Harvested at Passage 5: Potential Implications for Engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Sokal, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are known to have potential therapeutic benefits for a number of diseases. However, many studies report low engraftment levels, regardless of the target organ. One possible explanation could be that MSCs do not express the necessary receptors for engraftment. Indeed, MSCs appear to use a similar mechanism to leukocytes to engraft into injured organs, relying on various receptors for rolling, firm adhesion, and transmigration. In this study, we conducted an extensive surface molecule screening of adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSC) in an attempt to shed some light on this subject. We observed that ADHLSCs lack expression of most of the costimulatory molecules tested. Furthermore, study of the adhesion molecule profile of ADHLSCs revealed that they do not express selectin ligands or LFA-1 which are, respectively, involved in the rolling process and the firm adhesion. In addition, ADHLSCs slightly express VLA-4 and lose expression of CXCR4 altogether on their surface during culture expansion. However, ADHLSCs express all the integrin couples and matrix metalloproteinases needed to bind and integrate the extracellular matrix once the endothelial barrier is crossed. Collectively, these results suggest that binding to the endothelium may be the critical weak point in the engraftment process. PMID:27956903

  1. Zebrafish Models of Human Liver Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs a large number of essential synthetic and regulatory functions that are acquired during fetal development and persist throughout life. Their disruption underlies a diverse group of heritable and acquired diseases that affect both pediatric and adult patients. Although experimental analyses used to study liver development and disease are typically performed in cell culture models or rodents, the zebrafish is increasingly used to complement discoveries made in these systems. Forward and reverse genetic analyses over the past two decades have shown that the molecular program for liver development is largely conserved between zebrafish and mammals, and that the zebrafish can be used to model heritable human liver disorders. Recent work has demonstrated that zebrafish can also be used to study the mechanistic basis of acquired liver diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive summary of how the zebrafish has contributed to our understanding of human liver development and disease. PMID:23897685

  2. Liver regeneration after living donor transplantation: adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation cohort study.

    PubMed

    Olthoff, Kim M; Emond, Jean C; Shearon, Tempie H; Everson, Greg; Baker, Talia B; Fisher, Robert A; Freise, Chris E; Gillespie, Brenda W; Everhart, James E

    2015-01-01

    Adult-to-adult living donors and recipients were studied to characterize patterns of liver growth and identify associated factors in a multicenter study. Three hundred and fifty donors and 353 recipients in the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL) receiving transplants between March 2003 and February 2010 were included. Potential predictors of 3-month liver volume included total and standard liver volumes (TLV and SLV), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score (in recipients), the remnant and graft size, remnant-to-donor and graft-to-recipient weight ratios (RDWR and GRWR), remnant/TLV, and graft/SLV. Among donors, 3-month absolute growth was 676 ± 251 g (mean ± SD), and percentage reconstitution was 80% ± 13%. Among recipients, GRWR was 1.3% ± 0.4% (8 < 0.8%). Graft weight was 60% ± 13% of SLV. Three-month absolute growth was 549 ± 267 g, and percentage reconstitution was 93% ± 18%. Predictors of greater 3-month liver volume included larger patient size (donors and recipients), larger graft volume (recipients), and larger TLV (donors). Donors with the smallest remnant/TLV ratios had larger than expected growth but also had higher postoperative bilirubin and international normalized ratio at 7 and 30 days. In a combined donor-recipient analysis, donors had smaller 3-month liver volumes than recipients adjusted for patient size, remnant or graft volume, and TLV or SLV (P = 0.004). Recipient graft failure in the first 90 days was predicted by poor graft function at day 7 (HR = 4.50, P = 0.001) but not by GRWR or graft fraction (P > 0.90 for each). Both donors and recipients had rapid yet incomplete restoration of tissue mass in the first 3 months, and this confirmed previous reports. Recipients achieved a greater percentage of expected total volume. Patient size and recipient graft volume significantly influenced 3-month volumes. Importantly, donor liver volume is a

  3. Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alice A; Thomas, David K; Ong, Luvena L; Schwartz, Robert E; Golub, Todd R; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2011-07-19

    "Humanized" mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury but these methods have not gained widespread use due to the duration and variability of hepatocyte repopulation. In light of the significant progress that has been achieved in clinical cell transplantation through tissue engineering, we sought to develop a humanized mouse model based on the facile and ectopic implantation of a tissue-engineered human liver. These human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs) stabilize the function of cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes through juxtacrine and paracrine signals in polymeric scaffolds. In contrast to current methods, HEALs can be efficiently established in immunocompetent mice with normal liver function. Mice transplanted with HEALs exhibit humanized liver functions persistent for weeks, including synthesis of human proteins, human drug metabolism, drug-drug interaction, and drug-induced liver injury. Here, mice with HEALs are used to predict the disproportionate metabolism and toxicity of "major" human metabolites using multiple routes of administration and monitoring. These advances may enable manufacturing of reproducible in vivo models for diverse drug development and research applications.

  4. Vitamin A concentrations in liver determined by isotope dilution assay with tetradeuterated vitamin A and by biopsy in generally healthy adult humans

    SciTech Connect

    Furr, H.C.; Amedee-Manesme, O.; Clifford, A.J.; Bergen, H.R. 3d.; Jones, A.D.; Anderson, D.P.; Olson, J.A.

    1989-04-01

    The vitamin A status in 11 generally healthy surgical patients was estimated by measuring the dilution of a 45-mg oral dose of tetradeuterated retinyl acetate (99% pure). After purification of retinol by high-performance liquid chromatography, the ratio of /sup 2/H/sub 4/-retinol:/sup 1/H-retinol in plasma was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. On the basis of the observed ratios of (/sup 2/H/sub 4/)retinol:(/sup 1/H)retinol over 19-47 d, the total body reserves and liver concentrations of vitamin A were calculated. Liver biopsy samples taken at surgery were directly analyzed for vitamin A. The correlation coefficient between calculated and measured liver vitamin A concentrations for 10 of the subjects was 0.88, and the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was 0.95 (p less than 0.002). Thus, total body reserves of vitamin A in humans can be estimated validly in the marginal and satisfactory ranges by a benign, relatively noninvasive procedure.

  5. Human metapneumovirus in adults.

    PubMed

    Haas, Lenneke E M; Thijsen, Steven F T; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A

    2013-01-08

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination.

  6. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and the liver.

    PubMed

    Crane, Megan; Iser, David; Lewin, Sharon R

    2012-03-27

    Liver disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals encompasses the spectrum from abnormal liver function tests, liver decompensation, with and without evidence of cirrhosis on biopsy, to non-alcoholic liver disease and its more severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular cancer. HIV can infect multiple cells in the liver, leading to enhanced intrahepatic apoptosis, activation and fibrosis. HIV can also alter gastro-intestinal tract permeability, leading to increased levels of circulating lipopolysaccharide that may have an impact on liver function. This review focuses on recent changes in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of liver disease in HIV-infected patients, in the absence of co-infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus, with a specific focus on issues relevant to low and middle income countries.

  8. Evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transitions in adult liver cells.

    PubMed

    Sicklick, Jason K; Choi, Steve S; Bustamante, Marcia; McCall, Shannon J; Pérez, Elizabeth Hernández; Huang, Jiawen; Li, Yin-Xiong; Rojkind, Marcos; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2006-10-01

    Both myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and hepatic epithelial progenitors accumulate in damaged livers. In some injured organs, the ability to distinguish between fibroblastic and epithelial cells is sometimes difficult because cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT). During EMT, cells coexpress epithelial and mesenchymal cell markers. To determine whether EMT occurs in adult liver cells, we analyzed the expression profile of primary HSC, two HSC lines, and hepatic epithelial progenitors. As expected, all HSC expressed HSC markers. Surprisingly, these markers were also expressed by epithelial progenitors. In addition, one HSC line expressed typical epithelial progenitor mRNAs, and these epithelial markers were inducible in the second HSC line. In normal and damaged livers, small ductular-type cells stained positive for an HSC marker. In conclusion, HSC and hepatic epithelial progenitors both coexpress epithelial and mesenchymal markers, providing evidence that EMT occurs in adult liver cells.

  9. Critical care issues in adult liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Palepu B.; Kapoor, Dharmesh; Raya, Ravichandra; Subrahmanyam, M.; Juneja, Deven; Sukanya, B.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, liver transplantation has become an operational reality in our part of the world. As a result, clinicians working in an intensive care unit are more likely to be exposed to these patients in the immediate postoperative period, and thus, it is important that they have a working knowledge of the common complications, when they are likely to occur, and how to deal with them. The main focus of this review is to address the variety of critical care issues in liver transplant recipients and to impress upon the need to provide favorable circumstances for the new liver to start functioning and maintain the function of other organs to aid in this process. PMID:20040807

  10. Enzymes of fructose metabolism in human liver

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Fritz; Lamprecht, Walther; Kirsch, Joachim

    1968-01-01

    The enzyme activities involved in fructose metabolism were measured in samples of human liver. On the basis of U/g of wet-weight the following results were found: ketohexokinase, 1.23; aldolase (substrate, fructose-1-phosphate), 2.08; aldolase (substrate, fructose-1,6-diphosphate), 3.46; triokinase, 2.07; aldehyde dehydrogenase (substrate, D-glyceraldehyde), 1.04; D-glycerate kinase, 0.13; alcohol dehydrogenase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide [NAD]) substrate, D-glyceraldehyde), 3.1; alcohol dehydrogenase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NADP]) (substrate, D-glyceraldehyde), 3.6; and glycerol kinase, 0.62. Sorbitol dehydrogenases (25.0 U/g), hexosediphosphatase (4.06 U/g), hexokinase (0.23 U/g), and glucokinase (0.08 U/g) were also measured. Comparing these results with those of the rat liver it becomes clear that the activities of alcohol dehydrogenases (NAD and NADP) in rat liver are higher than those in human liver, and that the values of ketohexokinase, sorbitol dehydrogenases, and hexosediphosphatase in human liver are lower than those values found in rat liver. Human liver contains only traces of glycerate kinase. The rate of fructose uptake from the blood, as described by other investigators, can be based on the activity of ketohexokinase reported in the present paper. In human liver, ketohexokinase is present in a four-fold activity of glucokinase and hexokinase. This result may explain the well-known fact that fructose is metabolized faster than glucose. PMID:4385849

  11. Liver Progenitors Isolated from Adult Healthy Mouse Liver Efficiently Differentiate to Functional Hepatocytes In Vitro and Repopulate Liver Tissue.

    PubMed

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Ishii, Masayuki; Kino, Junichi; Mizuguchi, Toru; Hirata, Koichi; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2016-12-01

    It has been proposed that tissue stem cells supply multiple epithelial cells in mature tissues and organs. However, it is unclear whether tissue stem cells generally contribute to cellular turnover in normal healthy organs. Here, we show that liver progenitors distinct from bipotent liver stem/progenitor cells (LPCs) persistently exist in mouse livers and potentially contribute to tissue maintenance. We found that, in addition to LPCs isolated as EpCAM(+) cells, liver progenitors were enriched in CD45(-) TER119(-) CD31(-) EpCAM(-) ICAM-1(+) fraction isolated from late-fetal and postnatal livers. ICAM-1(+) liver progenitors were abundant by 4 weeks (4W) after birth. Although their number decreased with age, ICAM-1(+) liver progenitors existed in livers beyond that stage. We established liver progenitor clones derived from ICAM-1(+) cells between 1 and 20W and found that those clones efficiently differentiated into mature hepatocytes (MHs), which secreted albumin, eliminated ammonium ion, stored glycogen, and showed cytochrome P450 activity. Even after long-term culture, those clones kept potential to differentiate to MHs. When ICAM-1(+) clones were transplanted into nude mice after retrorsine treatment and 70% partial hepatectomy, donor cells were incorporated into liver plates and expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α, and carbamoylphosphate synthetase I. Moreover, after short-term treatment with oncostatin M, ICAM-1(+) clones could efficiently repopulate the recipient liver tissues. Our results indicate that liver progenitors that can efficiently differentiate to MHs exist in normal adult livers. Those liver progenitors could be an important source of new MHs for tissue maintenance and repair in vivo, and for regenerative medicine ex vivo. Stem Cells 2016;34:2889-2901.

  12. Prognosis of adult patients transplanted with liver grafts < 35% of their standard liver volume.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Toshihiko; Masuda, Yuichi; Ohno, Yasunari; Mita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Akira; Urata, Koichi; Nakazawa, Yuichi; Miwa, Shirou; Hashikura, Yasuhiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2009-11-01

    We have previously reported that a graft volume (GV) > 30% of the recipient's standard liver volume (SLV) can meet the recipient's metabolic demands. Here we report our experience with adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation using left side grafts < 35% of the recipient's SLV. Of 143 adult living donor liver transplants, 13 auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplants, 8 right side grafts, and 2 retransplantation cases were excluded. The resulting 120 cases were divided into 2 groups: group S consisted of 33 patients who received liver grafts < 35% of their SLV, and group L consisted of 87 patients who received liver grafts > or = 35% of their SLV. Patient characteristics, postoperative liver function, duration of hospital stay, and recipient survival rates were compared between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences between groups in recipient or donor background characteristics. The mean GV/SLV ratio of group S was 31.8%, whereas that of group L was 42.5%. There were no significant differences in the postoperative serum total bilirubin levels, prothrombin time international normalized ratio, daily ascites volume, or duration of postoperative hospital stay between the groups. The 1- and 5-year survival rates in group S were 80.7% and 64.2%, respectively, whereas those of group L were 90.8% and 84.9%, respectively, with no significant difference between groups. In conclusion, graft size was not considered to be the only cause of so-called small-for-size graft syndrome, and left side grafting appears to be the procedure of choice for adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation because of the lower risk to donors in comparison with right lobe grafting.

  13. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  14. Obesity accelerates epigenetic aging of human liver.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Steve; Erhart, Wiebke; Brosch, Mario; Ammerpohl, Ole; von Schönfels, Witigo; Ahrens, Markus; Heits, Nils; Bell, Jordana T; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Spector, Tim D; Deloukas, Panos; Siebert, Reiner; Sipos, Bence; Becker, Thomas; Röcken, Christoph; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen

    2014-10-28

    Because of the dearth of biomarkers of aging, it has been difficult to test the hypothesis that obesity increases tissue age. Here we use a novel epigenetic biomarker of aging (referred to as an "epigenetic clock") to study the relationship between high body mass index (BMI) and the DNA methylation ages of human blood, liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. A significant correlation between BMI and epigenetic age acceleration could only be observed for liver (r = 0.42, P = 6.8 × 10(-4) in dataset 1 and r = 0.42, P = 1.2 × 10(-4) in dataset 2). On average, epigenetic age increased by 3.3 y for each 10 BMI units. The detected age acceleration in liver is not associated with the Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score or any of its component traits after adjustment for BMI. The 279 genes that are underexpressed in older liver samples are highly enriched (1.2 × 10(-9)) with nuclear mitochondrial genes that play a role in oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport. The epigenetic age acceleration, which is not reversible in the short term after rapid weight loss induced by bariatric surgery, may play a role in liver-related comorbidities of obesity, such as insulin resistance and liver cancer.

  15. Liver glucose metabolism in humans

    PubMed Central

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Pérez-Felpete, Noemi; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Pazos-García, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Information about normal hepatic glucose metabolism may help to understand pathogenic mechanisms underlying obesity and diabetes mellitus. In addition, liver glucose metabolism is involved in glycosylation reactions and connected with fatty acid metabolism. The liver receives dietary carbohydrates directly from the intestine via the portal vein. Glucokinase phosphorylates glucose to glucose 6-phosphate inside the hepatocyte, ensuring that an adequate flow of glucose enters the cell to be metabolized. Glucose 6-phosphate may proceed to several metabolic pathways. During the post-prandial period, most glucose 6-phosphate is used to synthesize glycogen via the formation of glucose 1-phosphate and UDP–glucose. Minor amounts of UDP–glucose are used to form UDP–glucuronate and UDP–galactose, which are donors of monosaccharide units used in glycosylation. A second pathway of glucose 6-phosphate metabolism is the formation of fructose 6-phosphate, which may either start the hexosamine pathway to produce UDP-N-acetylglucosamine or follow the glycolytic pathway to generate pyruvate and then acetyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA may enter the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to be oxidized or may be exported to the cytosol to synthesize fatty acids, when excess glucose is present within the hepatocyte. Finally, glucose 6-phosphate may produce NADPH and ribose 5-phosphate through the pentose phosphate pathway. Glucose metabolism supplies intermediates for glycosylation, a post-translational modification of proteins and lipids that modulates their activity. Congenital deficiency of phosphoglucomutase (PGM)-1 and PGM-3 is associated with impaired glycosylation. In addition to metabolize carbohydrates, the liver produces glucose to be used by other tissues, from glycogen breakdown or from de novo synthesis using primarily lactate and alanine (gluconeogenesis). PMID:27707936

  16. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Alison E. M.; Ulyanov, Anatoly V.; Fisher, Robyn L.

    2017-01-01

    Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM), diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM) and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM). Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM) and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM), while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM), terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM), and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM). Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%), CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%–11%), and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%–6%). Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%), while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%). Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%), ETM (66%), DCF, TBF, MMI (61%–60%), APAP, CBZ (57%–56%), and DTL (48%). Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%), CBZ and ETM (44%–43%), APAP and DCF (40%–38%), MMI, TBF and CSA (37%–35%). This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects. PMID:28272341

  17. Decellularized human liver as a natural 3D-scaffold for liver bioengineering and transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Giuseppe; Rombouts, Krista; Rennie Hall, Andrew; Urbani, Luca; Vinh Luong, Tu; Al-Akkad, Walid; Longato, Lisa; Brown, David; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Dhillon, Amar P.; Fuller, Barry; Davidson, Brian; Moore, Kevin; Dhar, Dipok; De Coppi, Paolo; Malago, Massimo; Pinzani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Liver synthetic and metabolic function can only be optimised by the growth of cells within a supportive liver matrix. This can be achieved by the utilisation of decellularised human liver tissue. Here we demonstrate complete decellularization of whole human liver and lobes to form an extracellular matrix scaffold with a preserved architecture. Decellularized human liver cubic scaffolds were repopulated for up to 21 days using human cell lines hepatic stellate cells (LX2), hepatocellular carcinoma (Sk-Hep-1) and hepatoblastoma (HepG2), with excellent viability, motility and proliferation and remodelling of the extracellular matrix. Biocompatibility was demonstrated by either omental or subcutaneous xenotransplantation of liver scaffold cubes (5 × 5 × 5 mm) into immune competent mice resulting in absent foreign body responses. We demonstrate decellularization of human liver and repopulation with derived human liver cells. This is a key advance in bioartificial liver development. PMID:26248878

  18. Distribution of elastic system fibres in human fetal liver.

    PubMed Central

    Monte, A; Costa, A; Porto, L C

    1996-01-01

    Elastic system fibres are extracellular matrix components found in different organs for which they provide elasticity and some mechanical resistance. Oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibres, which possess graduated amounts of elastin, are the 3 forms of elastic system fibres that are identifiable by their tinctorial and ultrastructural features. The distribution of these fibres in adult human liver is well-established but little, if anything, is known about them in fetal liver. The distribution of elastic system fibres was therefore investigated in human fetal liver, and the process of elastogenesis characterised. Specimens of liver from 24 human fetuses ranging in age from 13 to 38 wk postfertilisation were studied. The results are presented in relation to gestational age and the size of the portal tracts. Portal tracts exhibited a network of oxytalan fibres at 13 wk; elaunin fibres appeared later after 20 wk postfertilisation. Elastogenesis occurred more rapidly in venous than in arterial walls, and in veins it was more evident in the adventitia. A microfibrillar network of oxytalan fibres was observed around biliary ducts from the outset of their development. Elastogenesis follows the sequence oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibres, but the elastogenetic process only completes its maturation in arterial walls, thus leading to the internal elastic lamina. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8763481

  19. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  20. Ontogeny, distribution and potential roles of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in human liver function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interindividual differences in liver functions such as protein synthesis, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and drug metabolism are influenced by epigenetic factors. The role of the epigenetic machinery in such processes has, however, been barely investigated. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is a recently re-discovered epigenetic DNA modification that plays an important role in the control of gene expression. Results In this study, we investigate 5hmC occurrence and genomic distribution in 8 fetal and 7 adult human liver samples in relation to ontogeny and function. LC-MS analysis shows that in the adult liver samples 5hmC comprises up to 1% of the total cytosine content, whereas in all fetal livers it is below 0.125%. Immunohistostaining of liver sections with a polyclonal anti-5hmC antibody shows that 5hmC is detected in most of the hepatocytes. Genome-wide mapping of the distribution of 5hmC in human liver samples by next-generation sequencing shows significant differences between fetal and adult livers. In adult livers, 5hmC occupancy is overrepresented in genes involved in active catabolic and metabolic processes, whereas 5hmC elements which are found in genes exclusively in fetal livers and disappear in the adult state, are more specific to pathways for differentiation and development. Conclusions Our findings suggest that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine plays an important role in the development and function of the human liver and might be an important determinant for development of liver diseases as well as of the interindividual differences in drug metabolism and toxicity. PMID:23958281

  1. Acute liver failure caused by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shide; Li, Ying; Long, Jun; Liu, Qichuan; Yang, Fangwan; He, Yihuai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare condition that can be caused by a primary or acquired disorder of uncontrolled immune response. Liver injury is a common complication of HLH; however, HLH presenting as acute liver failure (ALF) has rarely been reported in adults. Case summary: A 34-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with nausea and fatigue persisting for 2 weeks and jaundice for 1 week. He had hyperthermia at the onset of disease. At admission, he had severe liver injury with unknown etiology. The laboratory data showed that he had hyperferritinemia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Finally, a bone marrow biopsy revealed hemophagocytic cells, and he was diagnosed with HLH. The patient was treated with prednisone and plasma exchange. However, the liver function of the patient deteriorated, and he finally died of multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Reports of adult patients with ALF caused by HLH have increased, and HLH should be suspected in patients with ALF of indeterminate cause. Although the efficacy of the treatment strategy recommended by the HLH 2004 remains to be confirmed in adult patients with ALF caused by HLH, early diagnosis and prompt combined treatment with steroids and cyclosporin A or etoposide should be emphasized. PMID:27893685

  2. Native fluorescence characterization of human liver abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Madhuri, S.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Suchitra, S.; Srinivasan, T. G.

    1999-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules has been extensively used in biology and medicine for the past several decades. In the present study, we report the native fluorescence characteristics of blood plasma from normal human subjects and patients with different liver abnormalities such as hepatitis, leptospirosis, jaundice, cirrhosis and liver cell failure. Native fluorescence spectra of blood plasma -- acetone extract were measured at 405 nm excitation. The average spectrum of normal blood plasma has a prominent emission peak around 464 nm whereas in the case of liver diseased subjects, the primary peak is red shifted with respect to normal. In addition, liver diseased cases show distinct secondary emission peak around 615 nm, which may be attributed to the presence of endogenous porphyrins. The red shift of the prominent emission peak with respect to normal is found to be maximum for hepatitis and minimum for cirrhosis whereas the secondary emission peak around 615 nm was found to be more prominent in the case of cirrhosis than the rest. The ratio parameter I465/I615 is found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.001) in discriminating liver abnormalities from normal.

  3. Orthotopic liver transplantation in an adult with situs inversus: an easy way to fit the liver.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Sergio; Guzmán, Carlos; Correa, Gonzalo; Restrepo, Juan Carlos; Franco, Hernán; Cárdenas, Andrés

    2006-01-01

    Situs inversus (SI) is a rare congenital disorder with a complete mirror image of thoracic and abdominal organs. In adults with SI and decompensated cirrhosis experience with liver transplantation is limited. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in an adult with cirrhosis using a technique where the recipient liver was placed using a 90-degree rotation of the graft was previously reported by Klintmalm et al, however no other reports using this technique have been described. We report a case of a 41 year-old man with situs inversus and decompensated cirrhosis who successfully underwent OLT using this technique. The donor liver was rotated 90-degrees towards the left and easily fitted into the recipients'fossa with the left lobe pointing toward the left lower quadrant. The patient had an uneventful recovery and has been followed for 21 months without any complications. This technique has the advantage of preventing compromise of the size of the donor liver, permits an easy reconstruction of vascular and biliary tree and in this case was associated with an excellent outcome.

  4. Extensive double humanization of both liver and hematopoiesis in FRGN mice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Elizabeth M; Bial, J; Tarlow, Branden; Bial, G; Jensen, B; Greiner, D L; Brehm, M A; Grompe, M

    2014-11-01

    Preclinical research in animals often fails to adequately predict the outcomes observed in human patients. Chimeric animals bearing individual human tissues have been developed to provide improved models of human-specific cellular processes. Mice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells can be used to study human immune responses, infections of blood cells and processes of hematopoiesis. Animals with humanized livers are useful for modeling hepatotropic infections as well as drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, many pathophysiologic processes involve both the liver and the hematolymphoid system. Examples include hepatitis C/HIV co-infection, immune mediated liver diseases, liver injuries with inflammation such as steatohepatitis and alcoholic liver disease. We developed a robust protocol enabling the concurrent double-humanization of mice with mature hepatocytes and human blood. Immune-deficient, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah(-/-)), Rag2(-/-) and Il2rg(-/-) deficient animals on the NOD-strain background (FRGN) were simultaneously co-transplanted with adult human hepatocytes and hematopoietic stem cells after busulfan and Ad:uPA pre-conditioning. Four months after transplantation the average human liver repopulation exceeded 80% and hematopoietic chimerism also was high (40-80% in bone marrow). Importantly, human macrophages (Kupffer cells) were present in the chimeric livers. Double-chimeric FRGN mice will serve as a new model for disease processes that involve interactions between hepatocytes and hematolymphoid cells.

  5. Congenital hepatic fibrosis, liver cell carcinoma and adult polycystic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Manes, J L; Kissane, J M; Valdes, A J

    1977-06-01

    In reviewing the literature, we found no liver cell carcinoma (LCC) or well-documented adult polycystic kidneys (APK) associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). We report a 69-year-old man with CHF, LCC, APK, duplication cyst of distal portion of stomach, two calcified splenic artery aneurysms, myocardial fibrosis and muscular hypertrophy of esophagus. The LCC was grossly predunculated and microscopically showed prominent fibrosis and hyaline intracytoplasmic inclusions in the tumor cells.

  6. [Adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure requiring liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Terán, Alvaro; Casafont, Fernando; Fábrega, Emilio; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Rodríguez-Valverde, Vicente; Pons-Romero, Fernando

    2009-12-01

    We present the case of a 23-year-old man with fever of unknown origin, who developed acute liver failure 2 months after symptom onset, requiring an urgent liver transplantation. The diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease was established after the reappearance of symptoms after transplantation, and high doses of corticosteroids were used to control disease activity. Subsequently, given the impossibility of tapering the steroid dose, interleukin-1 receptor blocking treatment was started with satisfactory outcome. We also review the published literature.

  7. Towards a Humanized Mouse Model of Liver Stage Malaria Using Ectopic Artificial Livers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shengyong; March, Sandra; Galstian, Ani; Gural, Nil; Stevens, Kelly R.; Mota, Maria M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2017-01-01

    The malaria liver stage is an attractive target for antimalarial development, and preclinical malaria models are essential for testing such candidates. Given ethical concerns and costs associated with non‐human primate models, humanized mouse models containing chimeric human livers offer a valuable alternative as small animal models of liver stage human malaria. The best available human liver chimeric mice rely on cellular transplantation into mice with genetically engineered liver injury, but these systems involve a long and variable humanization process, are expensive, and require the use of breeding-challenged mouse strains which are not widely accessible. We previously incorporated primary human hepatocytes into engineered polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoporous human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs), implanted them in mice without liver injury, and rapidly generated human liver chimeric mice in a reproducible and scalable fashion. By re-designing the PEG scaffold to be macroporous, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of implantable porous HEALs that support liver stage human malaria (P. falciparum) infection in vitro, and also after implantation in mice with normal liver function, 60% of the time. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a tissue engineering strategy towards the development of scalable preclinical models of liver stage malaria infection for future applications. PMID:28361899

  8. Adult Embryonal Sarcoma of the Liver: Management of a Massive Liver Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Roudenko, Alexandra; El Hussein, Siba; Rizer, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcomas of the liver are extremely rare cases in adults. We report the case of a 30-year-old male who presented with early satiety and abdominal pain due to a massive tumor originating from the left liver and occupying the entire epigastrium. The patient underwent bland embolization in an attempt to decrease the size of the tumor. He then underwent a formal left hepatectomy with resection of liver segments 2, 3, and 4. Extrahepatic inflow control of the portal vein and hepatic artery was performed prior to parenchymal transection. No Pringle maneuver was required. Pathology analysis showed a 45 cm tumor consistent with an undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma and negative microscopic margins. The epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis of this unusual cancer presentation are reviewed. PMID:27895954

  9. Pharmacologic therapy for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Scott S; Byrd, Jennifer S; Bell, Allison M; Wofford, Marion R; Riche, Daniel M

    2013-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides in hepatocytes in the absence of excessive alcohol intake, ranging in severity from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis can ultimately progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with cardiometabolic risk factors and is the most common chronic liver disease among adults in the Western Hemisphere. Although simple steatosis is generally considered a self-limiting disease, evidence suggests an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and, less conclusively, mortality, among individuals with NAFLD and/or NASH. The current standard of care for the treatment of patients with NAFLD focuses on lifestyle interventions, particularly diet and exercise. There is a lack of consensus regarding the most effective and appropriate pharmacologic therapy. A PubMed search was conducted using the medical subject heading terms "fatty liver" and "steatohepatitis." This review focuses on the current pharmacologic options available for treating adults with NAFLD and/or NASH. Continued investigation of drugs or combinations that improve NAFLD progression is crucial. Clinicians, particularly pharmacists, must take an active role in identification and appropriate selection of pharmacotherapy for NAFLD.

  10. Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Across ABO-Incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Fang; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Yu-Chao; Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Wu, Tsung-Han; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Wu, Ting-Jung; Chan, Kun-Ming; Lee, Ching-Song; Lee, Wei-Chen

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of adult ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation (LDLT).ABO-incompatible LDLT is an aggressive treatment that crosses the blood-typing barrier for saving lives from liver diseases. Although graft and patient survival have been improved recently by various treatments, the results of adult ABO-incompatible LDLT require further evaluation.Two regimens were designed based on isoagglutinin IgG and IgM titers and the time course of immunological reactions at this institute. When isoagglutinin IgG and IgM titers were ≤64, liver transplantation was directly performed and rituximab (375 mg/m) was administrated on postoperative day 1 (regimen I). When isoagglutinin titers were >64, rituximab (375 mg/m) was administered preoperatively with or without plasmapheresis and boosted on postoperative day 1 (regimen II). Immunosuppression was achieved by administration of mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and steroids.Forty-six adult ABO-incompatible and 340 ABO-compatible LDLTs were performed from 2006 to 2013. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores for ABO-incompatible recipients ranged from 7 to 40, with a median of 14. The graft-to-recipient weight ratio ranged from 0.61% to 1.61% with a median of 0.91%. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 81.7%, 75.7%, and 71.0%, respectively, for ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients, compared to 81.0%, 75.2%, and 71.5% for ABO-C recipients (P = 0.912). The biliary complication rate was higher in ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients than in the ABO-compatible recipients (50.0% vs 29.7%, P = 0.009).In the rituximab era, the blood type barrier can be crossed to achieve adult ABO-incompatible LDLT with survival rates comparable to those of ABO-compatible LDLT, but with more biliary complications.

  11. Humanization of excretory pathway in chimeric mice with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hirotoshi; Katoh, Miki; Sawada, Toshiro; Nakajima, Miki; Soeno, Yoshinori; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2007-06-01

    The liver of a chimeric urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)(+/+)/severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse line recently established in Japan could be replaced by more than 80% with human hepatocytes. We previously reported that the chimeric mice with humanized liver could be useful as a human model in studies on drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics. In the present study, the humanization of an excretory pathway was investigated in the chimeric mice. Cefmetazole (CMZ) was used as a probe drug. The CMZ excretions in urine and feces were 81.0 and 5.9% of the dose, respectively, in chimeric mice and were 23.7 and 59.4% of the dose, respectively, in control uPA(-/-)/SCID mice. Because CMZ is mainly excreted in urine in humans, the excretory profile of chimeric mice was demonstrated to be similar to that of humans. In the chimeric mice, the hepatic mRNA expression of human drug transporters could be quantified. On the other hand, the hepatic mRNA expression of mouse drug transporters in the chimeric mice was significantly lower than in the control uPA(-/-)/SCID mice. In conclusion, chimeric mice exhibited a humanized profile of drug excretion, suggesting that this chimeric mouse line would be a useful animal model in excretory studies.

  12. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described.

  13. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro. Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described. PMID:27385595

  14. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    PubMed

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients.

  15. Reducing Liver Fat by Low Carbohydrate Caloric Restriction Targets Hepatic Glucose Production in Non-Diabetic Obese Adults with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haoyong; Jia, Weiping; Guo, ZengKui

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) impairs liver functions, the organ responsible for the regulation of endogenous glucose production and thus plays a key role in glycemic homeostasis. Therefore, interventions designed to normalize liver fat content are needed to improve glucose metabolism in patients affected by NAFLD such as obesity. Objective: this investigation is designed to determine the effects of caloric restriction on hepatic and peripheral glucose metabolism in obese humans with NAFLD. Methods: eight non-diabetic obese adults were restricted for daily energy intake (800 kcal) and low carbohydrate (<10%) for 8 weeks. Body compositions, liver fat and hepatic glucose production (HGP) and peripheral glucose disposal before and after the intervention were determined. Results: the caloric restriction reduced liver fat content by 2/3 (p = 0.004). Abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat, body weight, BMI, waist circumference and fasting plasma triglyceride and free fatty acid concentrations all significantly decreased (p < 0.05). The suppression of post-load HGP was improved by 22% (p = 0.002) whereas glucose disposal was not affected (p = 0.3). Fasting glucose remained unchanged and the changes in the 2-hour plasma glucose and insulin concentration were modest and statistically insignificant (p > 0.05). Liver fat is the only independent variable highly correlated to HGP after the removal of confounders. Conclusion: NAFLD impairs HGP but not peripheral glucose disposal; low carbohydrate caloric restriction effectively lowers liver fat which appears to directly correct the HGP impairment. PMID:25411646

  16. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchini, Andrea; Montaldo, Claudia; Conigliaro, Alice; Grimaldi, Alessio; Correani, Virginia; Mura, Francesco; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Rotiroti, Nicolina; Brenna, Alessia; Montalbano, Marzia; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Alessandro, Riccardo; Piacentini, Mauro; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Del Nonno, Franca; Tripodi, Marco; Mancone, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis). Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies. PMID:26998606

  17. Mouse models of liver fibrosis mimic human liver fibrosis of different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Allyson K.; Maroni, Luca; Marzioni, Marco; Ahmed, Syed T.; Milad, Mena; Ray, Debolina; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver has the amazing capacity to repair itself after injury; however, the same processes that are involved in liver regeneration after acute injury can cause serious consequences during chronic liver injury. In an effort to repair damage, activated hepatic stellate cells trigger a cascade of events that lead to deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix components causing the progressive replacement of the liver parenchyma by scar tissue, thus resulting in fibrosis. Although fibrosis occurs as a result of many chronic liver diseases, the molecular mechanisms involved depend on the underlying etiology. Since studying liver fibrosis in human subjects is complicated by many factors, mouse models of liver fibrosis that mimic the human conditions fill this void. This review summarizes the general mouse models of liver fibrosis and mouse models that mimic specific human disease conditions that result in liver fibrosis. Additionally, recent progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the fibrogenic processes of each of the human disease conditions is highlighted. PMID:25396098

  18. On 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase of adult frog liver.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, S; Odelhög, B; Rundgren, M

    1982-01-01

    1. It has been reported that 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.27) activity in the liver from Rana esculenta is present only after autolysis of trypsin digestion, which releases a heat-and acid-stable inhibitor of low molecular mass. 2. Attempts to demonstrate similar effects with the liver enzyme from adult Rana pipiens were unsuccessful. Trypsin had only an inhibitory effect on the enzyme activity in crude extracts. 3. Both untreated and trypsin-treated enzyme had a molecular mass of about 100,000 daltons as determined by gel filtration. The pI was around pH 4.6. One pH-optimum between pH 7 and 8 was observed. 4. At pH 7.5 and 37 degrees C the basal enzyme activity was 1.3 mumol/min per g of protein. It was increased six-fold by a reductant in the presence of catalase. Fe2+ (50 muM) increased the activity further 1.6-fold when the reaction was carried out in Tris-HCl buffer, but not in potassium phosphate buffer. 5. The Km for 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate was 50 muM and the Vmax was around 10 mumol/min per g of soluble protein with reductively activated enzyme. 6. Substrate inhibition was observed above 20 muM concentrations of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate.

  19. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  20. Plasmodium vivax liver stage development and hypnozoite persistence in human liver-chimeric mice.

    PubMed

    Mikolajczak, Sebastian A; Vaughan, Ashley M; Kangwanrangsan, Niwat; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Fishbaugher, Matthew; Yimamnuaychok, Narathatai; Rezakhani, Nastaran; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Singh, Naresh; Kaushansky, Alexis; Camargo, Nelly; Baldwin, Michael; Lindner, Scott E; Adams, John H; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Prachumsri, Jetsumon; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2015-04-08

    Plasmodium vivax malaria is characterized by periodic relapses of symptomatic blood stage parasite infections likely initiated by activation of dormant liver stage parasites-hypnozoites. The lack of tractable P. vivax animal models constitutes an obstacle in examining P. vivax liver stage infection and drug efficacy. To overcome this obstacle, we have used human liver-chimeric (huHep) FRG KO mice as a model for P. vivax infection. FRG KO huHep mice support P. vivax sporozoite infection, liver stage development, and hypnozoite formation. We show complete P. vivax liver stage development, including maturation into infectious exo-erythrocytic merozoites as well as the formation and persistence of hypnozoites. Prophylaxis or treatment with the antimalarial primaquine can prevent and eliminate liver stage infection, respectively. Thus, P. vivax-infected FRG KO huHep mice are a model to investigate liver stage development and dormancy and may facilitate the discovery of drugs targeting relapsing malaria.

  1. Plasmodium vivax liver stage development and hypnozoite persistence in human liver-chimeric mice

    PubMed Central

    Mikolajczak, Sebastian A.; Vaughan, Ashley M.; Kangwanrangsan, Niwat; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Fishbaugher, Matthew; Yimamnuaychok, Narathatai; Rezakhani, Nastaran; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Singh, Naresh; Kaushansky, Alexis; Camargo, Nelly; Baldwin, Michael; Lindner, Scott E.; Adams, John H.; Prachumsri, Jetsumon; Kappe, Stefan H.I.

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax malaria is characterized by periodic relapses of symptomatic blood stage parasite infections likely initiated by activation of dormant liver stage parasites -hypnozoites. The lack of tractable animal models for P. vivax constitutes a severe obstacle to investigate this unique aspect of its biology and to test drug efficacy against liver stages. We show that the FRG KO huHep liver-humanized mice support P. vivax sporozoite infection, development of liver stages, and the formation of small non-replicating hypnozoites. Cellular characterization of P. vivax liver stage development in vivo demonstrates complete maturation into infectious exo-erythrocytic merozoites and continuing persistence of hypnozoites. Primaquine prophylaxis or treatment prevents and eliminates liver stage infection. Thus, the P. vivax/FRG KO huHep mouse infection model constitutes an important new tool to investigate the biology of liver stage development and dormancy and might aid in the discovery of new drugs for the prevention of relapsing malaria. PMID:25800544

  2. Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation: Operative techniques to optimize the recipient's outcome

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Peng Soon; Chan, See Ching

    2017-01-01

    Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is widely accepted today with good outcomes and safety reported worldwide for both donor and recipient. Nonetheless, it remained a highly demanding technical and complex surgery if undertaken. The last two decades have seen an increased in adult-to-adult LDLT following our first report of right lobe LDLT in overcoming graft size limitation in adults. In this article, we discussed the operative techniques and challenges of adult right lobe LDLT incorporating the middle hepatic vein, which is practiced in our center for the recipient operation. The various issues and challenges faced by the transplant surgeon in ensuring good recipient outcome are explored and discussed here as well. Hence, it is important to understand that a successful recipient operation is dependent of multifactorial events starting at the preoperative stage of planning, understanding the intraoperative technical challenges and the physiology of flow modulation that goes hand-in-hand with the operation. Therefore, one needs to arm oneself with all the possible knowledge in overcoming these technical challenges and the ability to be flexible and adaptable during LDLT by tailoring the needs of each patient individually. PMID:28250667

  3. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  4. Immunological quantitation and localization of ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 in human liver and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Chang, C C; Sakashita, N; Ornvold, K; Lee, O; Chang, E T; Dong, R; Lin, S; Lee, C Y; Strom, S C; Kashyap, R; Fung, J J; Farese, R V; Patoiseau, J F; Delhon, A; Chang, T Y

    2000-09-08

    By using specific anti-ACAT-1 antibodies in immunodepletion studies, we previously found that ACAT-1, a 50-kDa protein, plays a major catalytic role in the adult human liver, adrenal glands, macrophages, and kidneys but not in the intestine. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the intestine may be largely derived from a different ACAT protein. To test this hypothesis, we produced specific polyclonal anti-ACAT-2 antibodies that quantitatively immunodepleted human ACAT-2, a 46-kDa protein expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. In hepatocyte-like HepG2 cells, ACAT-1 comprises 85-90% of the total ACAT activity, with the remainder attributed to ACAT-2. In adult intestines, most of the ACAT activity can be immunodepleted by anti-ACAT-2. ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 do not form hetero-oligomeric complexes. In differentiating intestinal enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells, ACAT-2 protein content increases by 5-10-fold in 6 days, whereas ACAT-1 protein content remains relatively constant. In the small intestine, ACAT-2 is concentrated at the apices of the villi, whereas ACAT-1 is uniformly distributed along the villus-crypt axis. In the human liver, ACAT-1 is present in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. In contrast, ACAT-2 is evident in fetal but not adult hepatocytes. Our results collectively suggest that in humans, ACAT-2 performs significant catalytic roles in the fetal liver and in intestinal enterocytes.

  5. Regeneration of Human Liver After Hepatic Lobectomy Studied by Repeated Liver Scanning and Repeated Needle Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Yu; Lee, Chue-Shue; Chen, Chiou-Chiang; Liau, Kuong-Yi; Lin, Wen-Shih-Jen

    1979-01-01

    Regeneration of the residual lobe of the liver after hepatic lobectomy in humans was studied by repeated liver scanning in seven noncirrhotic and three cirrhotic patients. Each patient was studied for several months during the study which lasted from 1-12 years. Regeneration was apparent in noncirrhotic liver remnants following hepatic lobectomy. In the case of a long standing, space occupying lesions such as benign giant cysts, the liver remnant would complete its regeneration process rather early, usually within a few months of hepatic lobectomy. In hepatoma cases, however, regeneration of the residual lobe after hepatic resection usually took five or six months for completion. On the contrary, no definite increase in the size of the liver remnant was seen on repeated liver scanning in cirrhotic patients. Histologic study of the residual lobe was repeated on needle biopsy specimens in two noncirrhotic and four cirrhotic patients. Regenerative hyperplasia of liver cells with large hyperchromatic, or double nuclei never seen in the preresection liver appeared in the liver remnant five, 11, and 27 days after hepatic lobectomy in noncirrhotic patients. In cirrhotics, however, there were no histologic changes between the preresection liver and the postresection remnant studied three, five, 15, 40 days or even two years and 8 months after hepatic lobectomy. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:464678

  6. Immunodepletion experiments suggest that acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) protein plays a major catalytic role in adult human liver, adrenal gland, macrophages, and kidney, but not in intestines.

    PubMed

    Lee, O; Chang, C C; Lee, W; Chang, T Y

    1998-08-01

    The first acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) cDNA cloned and expressed in 1993 is designated as ACAT-1. In various human tissue homogenates, ACAT-1 protein is effectively solubilized with retention of enzymatic activity by the detergent CHAPS along with high salt. After using anti-ACAT-1 antibodies to quantitatively remove ACAT-1 protein from the solubilized enzyme, measuring the residual ACAT activity remaining in the immunodepleted supernatants allows us to assess the functional significance of ACAT-1 protein in various human tissues. The results showed that ACAT activity was immunodepleted 90% in liver (83% in hepatocytes), 98% in adrenal gland, 91% in macrophages, 80% in kidney, and 19% in intestines, suggesting that ACAT-1 protein plays a major catalytic role in all of the human tissue/cell homogenates examined except intestines. Intestinal ACAT activity is largely resistant to immunodepletion and is much more sensitive to inhibition by the ACAT inhibitor Dup 128 than liver ACAT activity.

  7. Arterial conduits for hepatic artery revascularisation in adult liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Vijayaragavan; Imber, Charles; Leelaudomlipi, Surasak; Gunson, Bridget K; Buckels, John A C; Mirza, Darius F; Mayer, A David; Bramhall, Simon R

    2004-05-01

    Arterial complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), including hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT), are important causes of early graft failure. The use of an arterial conduit is an accepted alternative to the utilisation of native recipient hepatic artery for specific indications. This study aims to determine the efficacy of arterial conduits and the outcome in OLT. We retrospectively reviewed 1,575 cadaveric adult OLTs and identified those in which an arterial conduit was used for hepatic revascularisation. Data on the primary disease, indication for using arterial conduit, type of vascular graft, operative technique and outcome were obtained. Thirty-six (2.3%) patients underwent OLT in which arterial conduits were used for hepatic artery (HA) revascularisation. Six of these were performed on the primary transplant, while the rest (n=30) were performed in patients undergoing re-transplantation, including six who had developed hepatic artery aneurysms. The incidence of arterial conduits was 0.4% (6/1,426 cases) in all primary OLTs and 20.1% (30/149 cases) in all re-transplants. Twenty-nine procedures utilised iliac artery grafts from the same donor as the liver, six used iliac artery grafts from a different donor, and a single patient underwent a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft. Two techniques were used: infra-renal aorto-hepatic artery conduit and interposition between the donor and recipient native HAs, or branches of the HAs. The 30-day mortality rate for operations using an arterial conduit was 30.6%. Three conduits thrombosed at 9, 25 and 155 months, respectively, but one liver graft survived without re-transplantation. The arterial conduits had 1- and 5-year patency rates of 88.5% and 80.8%. The 1- and 5-year patient survival rates were 66.7% and 44%. We can thus conclude that an arterial conduit is a viable alternative option for hepatic revascularisation in both primary and re-transplantation. Despite a lower patency rate than that of

  8. Adult to adult right lobe living donor liver transplantation: does biological relationship matter?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Tan, Yifei; Shen, Shu; Jiang, Li; Yan, Lunan; Yang, Jiayin; Li, Bo; Wen, Tianfu; Zeng, Yong; Wang, WenTao; Xu, Mingqing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The influence of the biological relationship between the donor and the recipient is rarely discussed in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), although it is believed to be an important risk factor in other types of organ transplantations. A total of 272 consecutive patients undergoing adult to adult right lobe LDLT were retrospectively analyzed and stratified into a nonbiologically related (NBR) group (69 patients) and a biologically related (BR) group (203 patients). The preoperative data and postoperative outcomes of both recipients and donors were evaluated. More than two-thirds of the recipients had histories of HBV infection, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was the main reason for the patients undergoing LDLT in both groups. The percentage of female donors in the NBR group was more than the percentage in the BR group (P = 0.000). There were no differences between the groups in postoperative laboratory testing or daily immunosuppression dose, and the complication rates in both the recipient and donor surgeries showed no significant differences. For patients with benign diseases, the cumulative 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rate were 92.9% in the 4 periods in the NBR group and 89.1%, 87.6%, 83.7%, and 83.7%, respectively, in BR group, while for the patients diagnosed as HCC, if patients exceeding the Milan criteria were involved, the 5-year survival rate was 41.2%, compared to 82% for patients within the Milan criteria, which was nearly the same as for those with the benign disease. In conclusion, our findings suggested that the biological relationship between the donor and the recipient in adult to adult LDLT was not associated with the short- and long-term outcomes of recipients diagnosed with benign liver diseases and early stage HCC. Moreover, the criteria for patients diagnosed with HCC to undergo LDLT should be restrictively selected. PMID:28121912

  9. Collagen polymorphism in normal and cirrhotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, J M; Hutcheson, E T; Kang, A H

    1977-01-01

    Collagens in normal human liver and in alcoholic cirrhotic liver were investigated. Collagens were solubilized by limited proteolysis with pepsin under nondenaturing conditions, and after purification, were fractionated into types I and III by selective precipitation with NaCl. After carboxymethyl cellulose and agarose chromatography, the resulting alpha-chains from each of the collagen types were analyzed with respect to their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions. A comparison of the results obtained from normal liver with those from the diseases organ revealed no significant differences. The isolated human liver alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) chains were digested with CNBr and the generated peptides were separated and purified by a combination of ion-exchange and molecular sieve chromatography. The molecular weight and the amino acid and the carbohydrate compositions of each of the peptides were identical to those of the corresponding human skin peptides except for the slightly higher content of hydroxylysine in some of the peptides. The relative content of type III in relation to type I collagen in both normal anc cirrhotic liver was determined by digesting washed liver homogenates directly with CNBr and quantitating the resultant alpha1(I) and alpha 1(III) peptides after chromatographic separation. The relative quantities of these peptides indicated that normal human liver contained an average of 47% type III, with the remainder being type I. Cirrhotic liver, on the other hand, contained a significantly smaller proportion of type III, ranging from 18 to 34% in different samples, with a corresponding increase in type I. These findings indicate that although the amino acid and carbohydrate compositions of collagens deposited in cirrhotic liver are normal, the fibrotic process of alcoholic liver disease in humans is accompanied by an alteration in tissue collagen polymorphism, and suggest that the observed alterations may have pathogenetic implications. PMID:833273

  10. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Liver Cancer Who Have Undergone a Liver Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-25

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer

  11. Immature mice are more susceptible than adult mice to acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose induces acute liver injury. The aim of the present study was to analyze the difference of susceptibility between immature and adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. Weanling immature and adult mice were injected with APAP (300 mg/kg). As expected, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced acute liver injury. APAP-evoked hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation was stronger in immature mice than in adult mice. Hepatic receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 was obviously activated at APAP-exposed immature and adult mice. Interestingly, hepatic RIP3 activation was more obvious in APAP-treated immature mice than adult mice. Although there was no difference on hepatic GSH metabolic enzymes between immature and adult mice, immature mice were more susceptible than adult mice to APAP-induced hepatic GSH depletion. Of interest, immature mice expressed a much higher level of hepatic Cyp2e1 and Cyp3a11 mRNAs than adult mice. Correspondingly, immature mice expressed a higher level of hepatic CYP2E1, the key drug metabolic enzyme that metabolized APAP into the reactive metabolite NAPQI. These results suggest that a higher level of hepatic drug metabolic enzymes in immature mice than adult mice might contribute to the difference of susceptibility to APAP-induced acute liver injury. PMID:28205631

  12. A microfluidically perfused three dimensional human liver model.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Knut; Steinborn, Sandra; Gröger, Marko; Ungerböck, Birgit; Jank, Anne-Marie; Ehgartner, Josef; Nietzsche, Sandor; Dinger, Julia; Kiehntopf, Michael; Funke, Harald; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Gärtner, Claudia; Mayr, Torsten; Bauer, Michael; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2015-12-01

    Within the liver, non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) are critically involved in the regulation of hepatocyte polarization and maintenance of metabolic function. We here report the establishment of a liver organoid that integrates NPCs in a vascular layer composed of endothelial cells and tissue macrophages and a hepatic layer comprising stellate cells co-cultured with hepatocytes. The three-dimensional liver organoid is embedded in a microfluidically perfused biochip that enables sufficient nutrition supply and resembles morphological aspects of the human liver sinusoid. It utilizes a suspended membrane as a cell substrate mimicking the space of Disse. Luminescence-based sensor spots were integrated into the chip to allow online measurement of cellular oxygen consumption. Application of microfluidic flow induces defined expression of ZO-1, transferrin, ASGPR-1 along with an increased expression of MRP-2 transporter protein within the liver organoids. Moreover, perfusion was accompanied by an increased hepatobiliary secretion of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein and an enhanced formation of hepatocyte microvilli. From this we conclude that the perfused liver organoid shares relevant morphological and functional characteristics with the human liver and represents a new in vitro research tool to study human hepatocellular physiology at the cellular level under conditions close to the physiological situation.

  13. Statistical modeling of human liver incorporating the variations in shape, size, and material properties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan-Chiao; Kemper, Andrew R; Gayzik, Scott; Untaroiu, Costin D; Beillas, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    The liver is one of the most frequently injured abdominal organs during motor vehicle crashes. Realistic numerical assessments of liver injury risk for the entire occupant population require incorporating inter-subject variations into numerical models. The main objective of this study was to quantify the shape variations of human liver in a seated posture and the statistical distributions of its material properties. Statistical shape analysis was applied to construct shape models of the livers of 15 adult human subjects, recorded in a typical seated (occupant) posture. The principal component analysis was then utilized to obtain the modes of variation, the mean model, and 95% statistical boundary shape models. In addition, a total of 52 tensile tests were performed on the parenchyma of three fresh human livers at four loading rates (0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 s^-1) to characterize the rate-dependent and failure properties of the human liver. A FE-based optimization approach was employed to identify the material parameters of an Ogden material model for each specimen. The mean material parameters were then determined for each loading rate from the characteristic averages of the stress-strain curves, and a stochastic optimization approach was utilized to determine the standard deviations of the material parameters. Results showed that the first five modes of the human liver shape models account for more than 60% of the overall anatomical variations. The distributions of the material parameters combined with the mean and statistical boundary shape models could be used to develop probabilistic finite element (FE) models, which may help to better understand the variability in biomechanical responses and injuries to the abdominal organs under impact loading.

  14. Human liver proteome project: plan, progress, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    He, Fuchu

    2005-12-01

    The Human Liver Proteome Project is the first initiative of the human proteome project for human organs/tissues and aims at writing a modern Prometheus myth. Its global scientific objectives are to reveal the "solar system" of the human liver proteome, expression profiles, modification profiles, a protein linkage (protein-protein interaction) map, and a proteome localization map, and to define an ORFeome, physiome, and pathome. Since it was first proposed in April 2002, the Human Liver Proteome Project has attracted more than 100 laboratories from all over the world. In the ensuing 3 years, we set up a management infrastructure, identified reference laboratories, confirmed standard operating procedures, initiated international research collaborations, and finally achieved the first set of expression profile data.

  15. Organoids from adult liver and pancreas: Stem cell biology and biomedical utility.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Christopher J; Cordero-Espinoza, Lucía; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-12-15

    The liver and pancreas are critical organs maintaining whole body metabolism. Historically, the expansion of adult-derived cells from these organs in vitro has proven challenging and this in turn has hampered studies of liver and pancreas stem cell biology, as well as being a roadblock to disease modelling and cell replacement therapies for pathologies in these organs. Recently, defined culture conditions have been described which allow the in vitro culture and manipulation of adult-derived liver and pancreatic material. Here we review these systems and assess their physiological relevance, as well as their potential utility in biomedicine.

  16. Human platelets inhibit liver fibrosis in severe combined immunodeficiency mice

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Murata, Soichiro; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of human platelets in liver fibrosis. METHODS: Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were administered CCl4 and either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS group) or human platelet transfusions (hPLT group). Concentrations of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), matrix metallopeptidases (MMP)-9, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in the liver tissue were compared between the PBS and the hPLT groups by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The effects of a human platelet transfusion on liver fibrosis included the fibrotic area, hydroxyproline content, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, which were evaluated by picrosirius red staining, ELISA, and immunohistochemical staining using an anti-mouse α-SMA antibody, respectively. Phosphorylations of mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (Met) and SMAD3, downstream signals of HGF and TGF-β, were compared between the two groups by Western blotting and were quantified using densitometry. Hepatocyte apoptosis was evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. Furthermore, the accumulation of human platelets in the liver 2 h after platelet transfusion was compared between normal and fibrotic livers by immunohistochemical staining using an anti-human CD41 antibody. RESULTS: The fibrotic area and hydroxyproline content in the liver were both significantly lower in the hPLT group when compared to the PBS group (fibrotic area, 1.7% ± 0.6% vs 2.5% ± 0.6%, P = 0.03; hydroxyproline content, 121 ± 26 ng/g liver vs 156 ± 47 ng/g liver, P = 0.04). There was less α-smooth muscle actin staining in the hPLT group than in the PBS group (0.5% ± 0.1% vs 0.8% ± 0.3%, P = 0.02). Hepatic expression levels of mouse HGF and MMP-9 were significantly higher in the hPLT group than in the PBS group (HGF, 109 ± 13 ng/g liver vs 88 ± 22 ng/g liver, P = 0.03; MMP-9, 113% ± 7%/GAPDH vs 92% ± 11%/GAPDH, P = 0.04). In contrast, the

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Liver Disease Forum 2010: Conference Proceedings

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Thomas, David L.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Liver disease continues to represent a critical mediator of morbidity and mortality in those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The frequent presence and overlap of concomitant injurious processes, including hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus infections, hepatoxicity associated with antiretroviral therapeutic agents, alcohol, and other toxins, in the setting of immunosuppression lead to rapid fibrotic progression and early development of end-stage liver disease. This conference summary describes the proceedings of a state-of-the-art gathering of international experts designed to highlight the status of current research in epidemiology, natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment of HIV and liver disease. PMID:21898501

  18. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells improve liver function and ascites in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Hu; Shi, Ming; Xu, Ruonan; Fu, Junliang; Lv, Jiyun; Chen, Liming; Lv, Sa; Li, Yuanyuan; Yu, Shuangjie; Geng, Hua; Jin, Lei; Lau, George K K; Wang, Fu-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC), a life-threatening complication of chronic liver disease, is one of the major indications for liver transplantation. Recently, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transfusion has been shown to lead to the regression of liver fibrosis in mice and humans. This study examined the safety and efficacy of umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) in patients with decompensated LC. A total of 45 chronic hepatitis B patients with decompensated LC, including 30 patients receiving UC-MSC transfusion, and 15 patients receiving saline as the control, were recruited; clinical parameters were detected during a 1-year follow-up period. No significant side-effects and complications were observed in either group. There was a significant reduction in the volume of ascites in patients treated with UC-MSC transfusion compared with controls (P < 0.05). UC-MSC therapy also significantly improved liver function, as indicated by the increase of serum albumin levels, decrease in total serum bilirubin levels, and decrease in the sodium model for end-stage liver disease scores. UC-MSC transfusion is clinically safe and could improve liver function and reduce ascites in patients with decompensated LC. UC-MSC transfusion, therefore, might present a novel therapeutic approach for patients with decompensated LC.

  19. Liver-derived human mesenchymal stem cells: a novel therapeutic source for liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yini; Yu, Xiaopeng; Chen, Ermei; Li, Lanuan

    2016-05-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent an attractive cell type for research and therapy due to their ability to proliferate, differentiate, modulate immune reactions, and secrete trophic factors. MSCs exist in a multitude of tissues, including bone marrow, umbilical cord, and adipose tissues. Moreover, MSCs have recently been isolated from the liver. Compared with other MSC types, liver-derived human MSCs (LHMSCs) possess general morphologies, immune functions, and differentiation capacities. Interestingly, LHMCSs produce higher levels of pro-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic cytokines than those of bone marrow-derived MSCs. Thus, these cells may be a promising therapeutic source for liver diseases. This paper summarizes the biological characteristics of LHMSCs and their potential benefits and risks for the treatment of liver diseases.

  20. Opisthorchis viverrini: The carcinogenic human liver fluke

    PubMed Central

    Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Pengsaa, Prasit; Sripa, Banchob

    2008-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Southeast Asia, including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia. The infection is associated with a number of hepatobiliary diseases, including cholangitis, obstructive jaundice, hepatomegaly, cholecystitis and cholelithiasis. Multi-factorial etiology of cholangiocarcinoma, mechanical damage, parasite secretions, and immunopathology may enhance cholangiocarcinogenesis. Moreover, both experimental and epidemiological evidences strongly implicate liver fluke infection as the major risk factor in cholangiocarcinoma, cancer of the bile ducts. The liver fluke infection is induced by eating raw or uncooked fish products that is the tradition and popular in the northeastern and northern region, particularly in rural areas, of Thailand. The health education programs to prevent and control opisthorchiasis are still required in the high-risk areas. PMID:18205254

  1. Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protects human hepatocytes against apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ilowski, Maren; Kleespies, Axel; Toni, Enrico N. de; Donabauer, Barbara; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hengstler, Jan G.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALR decreases cytochrome c release from mitochondria. {yields} ALR protects hepatocytes against apoptosis induction by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. {yields} ALR exerts a liver-specific anti-apoptotic effect. {yields} A possible medical usage of ALR regarding protection of liver cells during apoptosis inducing therapies. -- Abstract: Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is known to support liver regeneration and to stimulate proliferation of hepatocytes. However, it is not known if ALR exerts anti-apoptotic effects in human hepatocytes and whether this protective effect is cell type specific. This is relevant, because compounds that protect the liver against apoptosis without undesired effects, such as protection of metastatic tumour cells, would be appreciated in several clinical settings. Primary human hepatocytes (phH) and organotypic cancer cell lines were exposed to different concentrations of apoptosis inducers (ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta}, actinomycin D) and cultured with or without recombinant human ALR (rhALR). Apoptosis was evaluated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and by FACS with propidium iodide (PI) staining. ALR significantly decreased apoptosis induced by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. Further, the anti-apoptotic effect of ALR was observed in primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells but not in bronchial (BC1), colonic (SW480), gastric (GC1) and pancreatic (L3.6PL) cell lines. Therefore, the hepatotrophic growth factor ALR acts in a liver specific manner with regards to both its mitogenic and its anti-apoptotic effect. Unlike the growth factors HGF and EGF, rhALR acts in a liver specific manner. Therefore, ALR is a promising candidate for further evaluation as a possible hepatoprotective factor in clinical settings.

  2. Immunolocalization of putative human liver progenitor cells in livers from patients with end-stage primary biliary cirrhosis and sclerosing cholangitis using the monoclonal antibody OV-6.

    PubMed

    Crosby, H A; Hubscher, S; Fabris, L; Joplin, R; Sell, S; Kelly, D; Strain, A J

    1998-03-01

    The term oval cell describes small cells with oval nuclei that arise in the periphery of the portal tracts in rat models of hepatocarcinogenesis and injury and can differentiate into either hepatocytes or bile duct cells, ie, are bipotential. The presence of such cells in human liver is controversial. Here, immunolocalization of OV-6 and two biliary markers, cytokeratin 19 (CK-19) and human epithelial antigen 125 (HEA-125) is compared in normal adult human livers and in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) liver sections. CK-19 and HEA-125 stained bile ducts and ductules in normal liver as well as proliferating ductular structures in diseased livers. OV-6 did not label ducts or ductules in normal liver, but in PBC and PSC stained numerous proliferating ductular and periductular cells and lobular hepatocytes. In PBC, discrete OV-6-positive cells with a mature biliary-cell-like morphology were seen integrated into some intact bile ducts as well as occasional small immature oval-like cells. In addition, in PSC, hepatocytes in regenerating lobules were also strongly stained with OV-6, and on close inspection, in both PBC and PSC, oval cells and small hepatocytes at the margins of the lobules were strongly labeled. In contrast to the rat liver, OV-6 and CK-19 staining did not always co-localize. It is proposed that the small OV-6-positive oval cells are analogous to those seen in rat models and may represent human liver progenitor cells that may differentiate into OV-6-positive ductal cells or lobular hepatocytes.

  3. Gene Expression Patterns in Human Liver Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Cheung, Siu Tim; So, Samuel; Fan, Sheung Tat; Barry, Christopher; Higgins, John; Lai, Kin-Man; Ji, Jiafu; Dudoit, Sandrine; Ng, Irene O.L.; van de Rijn, Matt; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.

    2002-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Using cDNA microarrays to characterize patterns of gene expression in HCC, we found consistent differences between the expression patterns in HCC compared with those seen in nontumor liver tissues. The expression patterns in HCC were also readily distinguished from those associated with tumors metastatic to liver. The global gene expression patterns intrinsic to each tumor were sufficiently distinctive that multiple tumor nodules from the same patient could usually be recognized and distinguished from all the others in the large sample set on the basis of their gene expression patterns alone. The distinctive gene expression patterns are characteristic of the tumors and not the patient; the expression programs seen in clonally independent tumor nodules in the same patient were no more similar than those in tumors from different patients. Moreover, clonally related tumor masses that showed distinct expression profiles were also distinguished by genotypic differences. Some features of the gene expression patterns were associated with specific phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the tumors, including growth rate, vascular invasion, and p53 overexpression. PMID:12058060

  4. Liver Stem Cells: Experimental Findings and Implications for Human Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulos, George K; Khan, Zahida

    2015-10-01

    Evidence from human histopathology and experimental studies with rodents and zebrafish has shown that hepatocytes and cholangiocytes may function as facultative stem cells for each other in conditions of impaired regeneration. The interpretation of the findings derived from these studies has generated considerable discussion and some controversies. This review examines the evidence obtained from the different experimental models and considers implications that these studies may have for human liver disease.

  5. Adult mouse model of early hepatocellular carcinoma promoted by alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Aditya; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Gyongyosi, Benedek; Lowe, Patrick; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a mouse model of alcohol-driven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that develops in livers with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). METHODS: Adult C57BL/6 male mice received multiple doses of chemical carcinogen diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) followed by 7 wk of 4% Lieber-DeCarli diet. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and liver Cyp2e1 were assessed. Expression of F4/80, CD68 for macrophages and Ly6G, MPO, E-selectin for neutrophils was measured. Macrophage polarization was determined by IL-1β/iNOS (M1) and Arg-1/IL-10/CD163/CD206 (M2) expression. Liver steatosis and fibrosis were measured by oil-red-O and Sirius red staining respectively. HCC development was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging, confirmed by histology. Cellular proliferation was assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). RESULTS: Alcohol-DEN mice showed higher ALTs than pair fed-DEN mice throughout the alcohol feeding without weight gain. Alcohol feeding resulted in increased ALT, liver steatosis and inflammation compared to pair-fed controls. Alcohol-DEN mice had reduced steatosis and increased fibrosis indicating advanced liver disease. Molecular characterization showed highest levels of both neutrophil and macrophage markers in alcohol-DEN livers. Importantly, M2 macrophages were predominantly higher in alcohol-DEN livers. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased numbers of intrahepatic cysts and liver histology confirmed the presence of early HCC in alcohol-DEN mice compared to all other groups. This correlated with increased serum alpha-fetoprotein, a marker of HCC, in alcohol-DEN mice. PCNA immunostaining revealed significantly increased hepatocyte proliferation in livers from alcohol-DEN compared to pair fed-DEN or alcohol-fed mice. CONCLUSION: We describe a new 12-wk HCC model in adult mice that develops in livers with alcoholic hepatitis and defines ALD as co-factor in HCC. PMID:27122661

  6. Immunocytochemical localization of peroxisomal enzymes in human liver biopsies.

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, J. A.; Völkl, A.; Müller-Höcker, J.; Hashimoto, T.; Fahimi, H. D.

    1987-01-01

    The immunocytochemical localization of catalase and three enzymes of the peroxisomal lipid beta-oxidation system--acyl-CoA oxidase, the bifunctional protein enoyl-CoA hydratase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase--in human liver biopsies was investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. The antisera raised against all four enzymes from rat liver cross-reacted with the corresponding proteins in homogenates of human liver as revealed by immunoblotting. For light-microscopic localization in glutaraldehyde-fixed Epon-embedded material, the removal of resin and controlled digestion with trypsin was necessary. At the ultrastructural level specific labeling for all four antigens was found by the protein A-gold technique in peroxisomes of liver parenchymal cells fixed with formaldehyde-low glutaraldehyde concentrations and embedded in Lowicryl K4M. In biopsies fixed with glutaraldehyde and embedded in Epon, treatment with metaperiodate or etching with sodium ethoxide improved the immunolabeling. After such treatment catalase showed the most intense labeling and acyl-CoA oxidase the weakest, the two other proteins exhibiting an intermediate immunoreaction. In material postfixed with osmium only catalase could be visualized in peroxisomes. The immunocytochemical investigation of peroxisomal proteins in human liver biopsies provides a simple and highly promising approach for further elucidation of the pathophysiology of peroxisomal disorders. Images Figures 2 and 3 Figure 4-7 Figures 9-12 Figure 1 Figure 8 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 PMID:2886050

  7. Cultivation of human liver cell lines with microcarriers acting as biological materials of bioartificial liver

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Hu, Huan-Zhang; Yang, Ji-Zhen

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To improve the cultivation efficiency and yield of human liver cell line Cl-1. METHODS: High-density cultivation of Cl-1 on microcarriers was carried out with periodic observation of their growth and proliferation. The specific functions of human liver cell were also determined. RESULTS: Cells of Cl-1 cell line grew well on microcarrier Cytodex-3 and on the 7th day the peak was reached. The amount of Cl-1 cells was 2.13 × 108 and the total amount of albumin synthesis reached 71.23 μg, urea synthesis 23.32 mg and diazepam transformation 619.7 μg respectively. The yield of Cl-1 on microcarriers was 49.3 times that of conventional cultivation. The amounts of albumin synthesis, urea synthesis and diazepam transformation were 39.8 times, 41.6 times and 33.3 times those of conventional cultivation, respectively. CONCLUSION: The human liver cell line Cl-1 can be cultivated to a high density with Cytodex-3 and has better biological functions. High-density cultivation of Cl-1 on microcarriers can act as the biological material of bioartificial liver. PMID:11819434

  8. Relationship between phenytoin and tolbutamide hydroxylations in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Doecke, C J; Veronese, M E; Pond, S M; Miners, J O; Birkett, D J; Sansom, L N; McManus, M E

    1991-01-01

    1. The metabolic interaction of phenytoin and tolbutamide in human liver microsomes was investigated. 2. Phenytoin 4-hydroxylation (mean Km 29.6 microM, n = 3) was competitively inhibited by tolbutamide (mean Ki 106.2 microM, n = 3) and tolbutamide methylhydroxylation (mean Km 85.6 microM, n = 3) was competitively inhibited by phenytoin (mean Ki 22.6 microM, n = 3). 3. A significant correlation was obtained between phenytoin and tolbutamide hydroxylations in microsomes from 18 human livers (rs = 0.82, P less than 0.001). 4. Sulphaphenazole was a potent inhibitor of both phenytoin and tolbutamide hydroxylations with IC50 values of 0.4 microM and 0.6 microM, respectively. 5. Mephenytoin was a poor inhibitor of both phenytoin and tolbutamide hydroxylations with IC50 values greater than 400 microM for both reactions. 6. Anti-rabbit P450IIC3 IgG inhibited both phenytoin and tolbutamide hydroxylations in human liver microsomes by 62 and 68%, respectively. 7. These in vitro studies are consistent with phenytoin 4-hydroxylation and tolbutamide methylhydroxylation being catalysed by the same cytochrome P450 isozyme(s) in human liver microsomes. PMID:2049228

  9. Expression, purification and bioactivity of human augmenter of liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang-De; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Jin-Feng; Peng, Jian; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Xin-Sheng; Jia, Ze-Ming

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To construct the expression vectors for prokaryotic and eukaryotic human augmenter of liver regeneration (hALR) and to study their biological activity. METHODS: hALRcDNA clone was obtained from plasmid pGEM-T-hALR, and cDNA was subcloned into the prokatyotic expression vector pGEX-4T-2. The recombinant vector and pGEX-4T-2hALR were identified by enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing and transformed into E coli JM109. The positively selected clone was induced by the expression of GST-hALR fusion protein with IPTG, then the fusion protein was purified by glutathine s-transferase (GST) sepharose 4B affinity chromatography, cleaved by thrombin and the hALR monomer was obtained and detected by measuring H thymidine incorporation. RESULTS: The product of PCR from plasmid pGEM-T-hALR was examined by 1.5% sepharose electrophoresis. The specific strap was coincident with the theoretical one. The sequence was accurate and pGEX-4T-hALP digested by enzymes was coincident with the theoretical one. The sequence was accurate and the fragment was inserted in the positive direction. The recombinant vector was transformed into E coli JM109. SDS-PAGE proved that the induced expressive fusion protein showed a single band with a molecular weight of 41 kDa. The product was purified and cleaved. The molecular weights of GST and hALR were 26 kDa, 15 kDa respectively. The recombinant fusion protein accounted for 31% of the total soluble protein of bacterial lysate. HALR added to the culture medium of adult rat hepatocytes in primary culture and HepG2 cell line could significantly enhance the rate of DNA synthesis compared to the relevant control groups (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Purified hALR has the ability to stimulate DNA synthesis of adult rat hepatocytes in primary culture and HepG2 cells in vitro, and can provide evidence for its clinical application. PMID:16865786

  10. Human fetal liver stromal cells expressing erythropoietin promote hematopoietic development from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Ji, Lei; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Ruo-Yong; Li, Yan-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Xi, Jia-Fei; He, Li-Juan; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Blood cells transfusion and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation are important methods for cell therapy. They are widely used in the treatment of incurable hematological disorder, infectious diseases, genetic diseases, and immunologic deficiency. However, their availability is limited by quantity, capacity of proliferation and the risk of blood transfusion complications. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been shown to be an alternative resource for the generation of hematopoietic cells. In the current study, we describe a novel method for the efficient production of hematopoietic cells from hESCs. The stable human fetal liver stromal cell lines (hFLSCs) expressing erythropoietin (EPO) were established using the lentiviral system. We observed that the supernatant from the EPO transfected hFLSCs could induce the hESCs differentiation into hematopoietic cells, especially erythroid cells. They not only expressed fetal and embryonic globins but also expressed the adult-globin chain on further maturation. In addition, these hESCs-derived erythroid cells possess oxygen-transporting capacity, which indicated hESCs could generate terminally mature progenies. This should be useful for ultimately developing an animal-free culture system to generate large numbers of erythroid cells from hESCs and provide an experimental model to study early human erythropoiesis.

  11. Age-related changes in microRNA expression and pharmacogenes in human liver

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Kimberly S.; Philips, Santosh; Benson, Eric A.; Desta, Zeruesenay; Gaedigk, Andrea; Gaedigk, Roger; Segar, Matthew W.; Liu, Yunlong; Skaar, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental changes in the liver can significantly impact drug disposition. Due to the emergence of microRNAs (miRNAs) as important regulators of drug disposition gene expression, we studied age-dependent changes in miRNA expression. Expression of 533 miRNAs was measured in 90 human liver tissues (fetal, pediatric (1-17 years), and adult (28-80 years); n=30 each). 114 miRNAs were upregulated and 72 were downregulated from fetal to pediatric, and 2 and 3, respectively, from pediatric to adult. Among the developmentally changing miRNAs, 99 miRNA-mRNA interactions were predicted or experimentally validated (e.g. hsamiR-125b-5p-CYP1A1; hsa-miR-34a-5p-HNF4A). In human liver samples (n=10 each), analyzed by RNA-sequencing, significant negative correlations were observed between the expression of >1000 miRNAs and mRNAs of drug disposition and regulatory genes. Our data suggest a mechanism for the marked changes in hepatic gene expression between the fetal and pediatric developmental periods, and support a role for these age-dependent miRNAs in regulating drug disposition. PMID:25968989

  12. Genotyping diagnosis of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Saudi adults with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jameil, Noura; Hassan, Amina A.; Buhairan, Ahlam; Hassanato, Rana; Isac, Sree R.; Al-Otaiby, Maram; Al-Maarik, Basmah; Al-Ajeyan, Iman

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The acute phase protein alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is mainly produced in liver cells. AAT deficiency affects the lungs and liver. We conducted a case-control study to define a valuable method for the proper diagnosis of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), as well as the association of liver cirrhosis with AATD in Saudi adults. Blood samples from 300 liver cirrhosis patients and 400 controls were analyzed according to serum AAT concentration, phenotyping, and genotyping. Nephelometry was used for AAT quantification, isoelectric focusing electrophoresis was used for phenotyping detection, and real-time PCR was used for genotyping to determine the Z and S deficiency alleles. This study highlights the accuracy of using genotyping in addition to AAT quantification, since this technique has proven to be successful in the diagnosis of AATD for 100% of our cases. A significant deviation in AAT genotypes frequencies from the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in the adult cirrhosis group occurred due to a higher observed frequency than expected for the Pi ZZ homozygous genotype. Pi ZZ in adults may be considered as the risk factor for liver cirrhosis. However, we could not establish this relationship for heterozygous AATD genotypes (such as Pi MZ and Pi SZ). PMID:28178162

  13. Biological and immunological characterization of a human liver immunoregulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Schrempf-Decker, G E; Baron, D P; Brattig, N W; Bockhorn, H; Berg, P A

    1983-01-01

    The liver immunoregulatory protein (LIP) was originally characterized as human liver-derived soluble factor which inhibited the alloantigen and phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation of human lymphocytes (1). Soluble extracts prepared under the same experimental conditions from kidney, spleen, heart, lymph nodes, and erythrocytes did not exert any inhibitory activity (2). The purpose of this study was to characterize the immunobiological properties of LIP. In the primary one-way mixed lymphocyte culture, LIP depressed the generation of suppressor T cells which inhibited the lymphocyte proliferation induced by phytohemagglutinin or alloantigens. In addition, LIP suppressed in primary mixed lymphocyte culture the induction of cytotoxic T cells and memory cells as determined by cell-mediated lympholysis and secondary mixed lymphocyte culture, respectively. In the presence of LIP, the concanavalin A-mediated induction of suppressor T cells, the pokeweed mitogen-induced IgG synthesis in vitro and the cytolytic activity of K cells reacting in the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity were also inhibited. Cytotoxic effects could be excluded since the viability of human lymphoblastoid cells, hepatocytes, and allogeneically stimulated lymphocytes was not affected by LIP. LIP was shown to be different from other liver-derived substances like acute phase proteins, immunoregulatory alpha-globulins, C-reactive protein, lipoproteins, and F antigen. Furthermore, LIP is not identical to other serum components like the immunoregulatory rosette inhibition factor and the serum inhibitory factor (3). However, the characteristics described herein strongly indicate that LIP is very similar to the liver extract described by Chisari (4) and the liver-derived inhibitory protein (LIP) described by Grol and Schumacher (5).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Undifferentiated (embryonal) sarcoma of liver in adult: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao-Liu; Xu, Feng; Shu, Hong; Xu, Yong-Qing; Huang, Yong

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of undifferentiated (embryonal) sarcoma of the liver (UESL), which showed cystic formation in a 20-year-old man with no prior history of any hepatitis or liver cirrhosis. He was admitted with abdominal pain and a palpable epigastric mass. The physical examination findings were unremarkable except for a tenderness mass and the results of routine laboratory studies were all within normal limits. Abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) both showed a cystic mass in the left hepatic lobe. Subsequently, the patient underwent a tumor excision and another two times of hepatectomy because of tumor recurrence. Immunohistochemical study results showed that the tumor cells were positive for vimentin, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (AACT) and desmin staining, and negative for alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), and eosinophilic hyaline globules in the cytoplasm of some giant cells were strongly positive for periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. The pathological diagnosis was UESL. The patient is still alive with no tumor recurrence for four months. PMID:15682496

  15. Angiogenic properties of adult human thymus fat.

    PubMed

    Salas, Julián; Montiel, Mercedes; Jiménez, Eugenio; Valenzuela, Miguel; Valderrama, José Francisco; Castillo, Rafael; González, Sergio; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2009-11-01

    The endogenous proangiogenic properties of adipose tissue are well recognized. Although the adult human thymus has long been known to degenerate into fat tissue, it has never been considered as a potential source of angiogenic factors. We have investigated the expression of diverse angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor A and B, angiopoietin 1, and tyrosine-protein kinase receptor-2 (an angiopoietin receptor), and then analyzed their physiological role on endothelial cell migration and proliferation, two relevant events in angiogenesis. The detection of the gene and protein expression of the various proteins has been performed by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We show, for the first time, that adult thymus fat produces a variety of angiogenic factors and induces the proliferation and migration of human umbilical cord endothelial cells. Based on these findings, we suggest that this fat has a potential angiogenic function that might affect thymic function and ongoing adipogenesis within the thymus.

  16. GMP-grade human fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells for clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Larijani, Bagher; Aghayan, Hamid-Reza; Goodarzi, Parisa; Arjmand, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy seems a promising avenue in regenerative medicine. Within various stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells have progressively used for cellular therapy. Because of the age-related decreasing in the frequency and differentiating capacity of adult MSCs, fetal tissues such as fetal liver, lung, pancreas, spleen, etc. have been introduced as an alternative source of MSCs for cellular therapy. On the other hand, using stem cells as advanced therapy medicinal products, must be performed in compliance with cGMP as a quality assurance system to ensure the safety, quality, and identity of cell products during translation from the basic stem cell sciences into clinical cell transplantation. In this chapter the authors have demonstrated the manufacturing of GMP-grade human fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  17. [Metabolism of mitomycin C by human liver microsomes in vitro].

    PubMed

    Hao, Fu-rong; Yan, Min-fen; Hu, Zhuo-han; Jin, Yi-zun

    2007-02-01

    To provide the profiles of metabolism of mitomycin C (MMC) by human liver microsomes in vitro, MMC was incubated with human liver microsomes, then the supernatant component was isolated and detected by HPLC. Types of metabolic enzymes were estimated by the effect of NADPH or dicumarol (DIC) on metabolism of MMC. Standard, reaction, background control (microsomes was inactivated), negative control (no NADPH), and inhibitor group (adding DIC) were assigned, the results were analyzed by Graphpad Prism 4. 0 software. Reaction group compared with background control and negative control groups, 3 NADPH-dependent absorption peaks were additionally isolated by HPLC after MMC were incubated with human liver microsomes. Their retention times were 10. 0, 14. 0, 14. 8 min ( named as Ml, M2, M3) , respectively. Their formation was kept as Sigmoidal dose-response and their Km were 0. 52 (95% CI, 0. 40 - 0.67) mmol x L(-1), 0. 81 (95% CI, 0. 59 - 1. 10) mmol x L(-1), 0. 54 (95% CI, 0. 41 -0. 71) mmol x L(-1) , respectively. The data indicated that the three absorption peaks isolated by HPLC were metabolites of MMC. DIC can inhibit formation of M2, it' s dose-effect fitted to Sigmoidal curve and it' s IC50 was 59. 68 (95% CI, 40. 66 - 87. 61) micromol x L(-1) , which indicated DT-diaphorase could take part in the formation of M2. MMC can be metabolized by human liver microsomes in vitro, and at least three metabolites of MMC could be isolated by HPLC in the experiment, further study showed DT-diaphorase participated in the formation of M2.

  18. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus test of 4,4'-methylenedianiline using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Hisakazu; Koyama, Naomi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    Liver micronucleus (MN) tests using partial hepatectomized rats or juvenile rats have been shown to be useful for the detection of hepatic carcinogens. Moreover, Narumi et al. established the repeated-dose liver MN test using young adult rats for integration into general toxicity. In the present study, in order to examine the usefulness of the repeated-dose liver MN test, we investigated MN induction with a 14 or 28 day treatment protocol using young adult rats treated with 4,4′-methylenedianiline (MDA), a known hepatic carcinogen. MDA dose-dependently induced micronuclei in hepatocytes in 14- and 28-day repeated-dose tests. However, although statistically significant increases in micronuclei were observed in bone marrow cells at two dose levels in the 14-day study, there was no dose response and no increases in micronuclei in the 28-day study. These results indicate that the evaluation of genotoxic effects using hepatocytes is effective in cases where chromosomal aberrations are not clearly detectable in bone marrow cells. Moreover, the repeated-dose liver MN test allows evaluation at a dose below the maximum tolerable dose, which is required for the conventional MN test because micronucleated hepatocytes accumulate. The repeated-dose liver MN test employed in the present study can be integrated into the spectrum of general toxicity tests without further procedural modifications.

  19. Role of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Agarwal, Kosh

    2015-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality amongst human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, drug-induced hepatotoxicity related to combined anti-retro-viral therapy, alcohol related liver disease and non-alcohol related fatty liver disease appear to be the leading causes. It is therefore, anticipated that more HIV-positive patients with ESLD will present as potential transplant candidates. HIV infection is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation. Key transplantation outcomes such as rejection and infection rates as well as medium term graft and patient survival match those seen in the non-HIV infected patients in the absence of co-existing HCV infection. HIV disease does not seem to be negatively impacted by transplantation. However, HIV-HCV co-infection transplant outcomes remain suboptimal due to recurrence. In this article, we review the key challenges faced by this patient cohort in the pre- and post-transplant period. PMID:26604639

  20. Uniquely hominid features of adult human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oberheim, Nancy Ann; Takano, Takahiro; Han, Xiaoning; He, Wei; Lin, Jane H C; Wang, Fushun; Xu, Qiwu; Wyatt, Jeffrey D; Pilcher, Webster; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Ransom, Bruce R; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2009-03-11

    Defining the microanatomic differences between the human brain and that of other mammals is key to understanding its unique computational power. Although much effort has been devoted to comparative studies of neurons, astrocytes have received far less attention. We report here that protoplasmic astrocytes in human neocortex are 2.6-fold larger in diameter and extend 10-fold more GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein)-positive primary processes than their rodent counterparts. In cortical slices prepared from acutely resected surgical tissue, protoplasmic astrocytes propagate Ca(2+) waves with a speed of 36 microm/s, approximately fourfold faster than rodent. Human astrocytes also transiently increase cystosolic Ca(2+) in response to glutamatergic and purinergic receptor agonists. The human neocortex also harbors several anatomically defined subclasses of astrocytes not represented in rodents. These include a population of astrocytes that reside in layers 5-6 and extend long fibers characterized by regularly spaced varicosities. Another specialized type of astrocyte, the interlaminar astrocyte, abundantly populates the superficial cortical layers and extends long processes without varicosities to cortical layers 3 and 4. Human fibrous astrocytes resemble their rodent counterpart but are larger in diameter. Thus, human cortical astrocytes are both larger, and structurally both more complex and more diverse, than those of rodents. On this basis, we posit that this astrocytic complexity has permitted the increased functional competence of the adult human brain.

  1. Liver stem cells: Experimental findings and implications for human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from human histopathology and experimental studies with rodents and zebrafish has shown that hepatocytes and cholangiocytes may function as facultative stem cells for each other in conditions of impaired regeneration. The interpretation of the findings derived from these studies has generated considerable discussion and some controversies. This review examines the evidence obtained from the different experimental models and considers implications that these studies may have for human liver disease. Few topics of liver tissue biology have attracted as much attention as the existence of liver-specific tissue stem cells. Routine liver histology reveals two types of epithelial cells, hepatocytes and cholangiocytes (also known as biliary epithelial cells). Endothelial cells line the hepatic capillaries (sinusoids), with macrophages (Kupffer cells) interspersed along the sinusoid lumen. Stellate cells exist under the sinusoids and in close proximity to hepatocytes. None of these cells appears to have functions of a fully committed tissue specific stem cell, analogous to the cells of the intestinal crypts, the basal layer of the epidermis, bone marrow stem cells, etc. Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes can be easily identified based on their morphology and cell-specific biomarkers. Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, however, often have mutually mixed expression of biomarkers in pathologic conditions. In patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), there is rampant proliferation of cholangiocytes organized in ductular structures (“ductular reaction”1, 2). Many of these cholangiocytes (known as ductular hepatocytes) express biomarkers associated with hepatocytes, (HNF4, albumin, HEPPAR3, etc.). They are seen surrounding cells ranging in size from small to typical hepatocytes, and with a gradient of expression of cholangiocyte-associated biomarkers (e.g. EpCAM) decreasing from the periphery to the center (Regenerative Clusters: see Figure 1). It is not clear in FHF

  2. In vitro biotransformation of tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) in human liver and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Eede, Nele; Erratico, Claudio; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Maho, Walid; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-04-15

    Tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) is a plasticizer present in indoor dust, reaching levels of several micrograms per gram. Such levels could lead to significant daily exposure of adults and children. Currently, no toxicokinetic data are available to estimate TBOEP clearance in humans after uptake and therefore, one objective of this study was to investigate intrinsic clearance of TBOEP by human liver microsome (HLM) and serum enzymes. Another objective was to generate information to identify and prioritize several metabolites of TBOEP for investigation of human exposure by biomonitoring. 1D and 2D-NMR methodologies were successfully applied on a mixture of the metabolites to confirm the structure of 3-HO-TBOEP (bis(2-butoxyethyl) 3-hydroxyl-2-butoxyethyl phosphate) and to tentatively assign structures to 1-HO-TBOEP and 2-HO-TBOEP. HO-TBOEP isomers and bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (BBOEP), bis(2-butoxyethyl) hydroxyethyl phosphate (BBOEHEP) were further monitored by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Rates of formation of BBOEHEP and HO-TBOEP metabolites by liver enzymes were best described by the Michaelis–Menten model. Apparent K{sub m} values for BBOEHEP, 3-HO-TBOEP, and sum of 1- and 2-HO-TBOEP isomer formation were 152, 197 and 148 μM, respectively. Apparent V{sub max} values for the formation of BBOEHEP, 3-HO-TBOEP, and the sum of 1- and 2-HO-TBOEP isomers were 2560, 643, and 254 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. No detectable formation of BBOEP occurred with liver or serum enzymes. Our findings indicate that intrinsic clearance of TBOEP is mainly catalyzed by oxidative enzymes in the liver and that its major in vitro metabolite is BBOEHEP. These findings can be applied in human biomonitoring studies and risk assessment. - Highlights: • First steps in the elucidation of TBOEP toxicokinetics • Quantification of TBOEP metabolites in human serum and liver microsomes • No detectable formation of BBOEP occurred with liver or serum

  3. Cultures of human liver cells in simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoffe, B.; Darlington, G. J.; Soriano, H. E.; Krishnan, B.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; Khaoustov, V. I.

    1999-01-01

    We used microgravity-simulated bioreactors that create the unique environment of low shear force and high-mass transfer to establish long-term cultures of primary human liver cells (HLC). To assess the feasibility of establishing HLC cultures, human liver cells obtained either from cells dissociated by collagenase perfusion or minced tissues were cultured in rotating vessels. Formation of multidimensional tissue-like spheroids (up to 1.0 cm) comprised of hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells that arranged as bile duct-like structures along newly formed vascular sprouts were observed. Electron microscopy revealed clusters of round hepatocytes and bile canaliculi with multiple microvilli and tight junctions. Scanning EM revealed rounded hepatocytes that were organized in tight clusters surrounded by a complex mesh of extracellular matrix. Also, we observed that co-culture of hepatocytes with endothelial cells stimulate albumin mRNA expression. In summary, a simulated microgravity environment is conducive for the establishment of long-term HLC cultures and allows the dissection of the mechanism of liver regeneration and cell-to-cell interactions that resembles in vivo conditions.

  4. Uptake and cytotoxicity of chitosan nanoparticles in human liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Jing Wen; Yeoh, George; Saunders, Martin; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2010-12-01

    Despite extensive research into the biomedical and pharmaceutical applications of nanoparticles, and the liver being the main detoxifying organ in the human body, there are limited studies which delineate the hepatotoxicity of nanoparticles. This paper reports on the biological interactions between liver cells and chitosan nanoparticles, which have been widely recognised as biocompatible. Using the MTT assay, human liver cells were shown to tolerate up to 4 h of exposure to 0.5% w/v of chitosan nanoparticles (18 {+-} 1 nm, 7.5 {+-} 1.0 mV in culture medium). At nanoparticle concentrations above 0.5% w/v, cell membrane integrity was compromised as evidenced by leakage of alanine transaminase into the extracellular milieu, and there was a dose-dependent increase in CYP3A4 enzyme activity. Uptake of chitosan nanoparticles into the cell nucleus was observed by confocal microscopic analysis after 4 h exposure with 1% w/v of chitosan nanoparticles. Electron micrographs further suggest necrotic or autophagic cell death, possibly caused by cell membrane damage and resultant enzyme leakage.

  5. Immunogenicity of inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine in adult and pediatric liver transplant recipients over two seasons.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michio; Torii, Yuka; Kawada, Jun-ichi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kamei, Hideya; Onishi, Yasuharu; Kaneko, Kenitiro; Ando, Hisami; Kiuchi, Tetsuya; Ito, Yoshinori

    2013-10-01

    Immunological responses to influenza vaccination administered to liver transplantation recipients are not fully elucidated. To compare inactivated influenza vaccine's immunogenicity between adult and pediatric recipients, 16 adult and 15 pediatric living donor liver transplantation recipients in the 2010-11 influenza season, and 53 adult and 21 pediatric recipients in the 2011-12 season, were investigated. Seroprotection rates (hemagglutinin-inhibition [HI] antibody titer 1:40) were 50-94% to all three antigens among adults and 27-80% among children in both seasons. Seroconversion rates (fourfold or more HI antibody rise) were 32-56% among adults and 13-67% among children in both seasons. No significant differences were observed between the two groups. In addition, 20/53 adult and 13/21 pediatric recipients received a vaccine containing identical antigens in both of these seasons. Geometric mean titer fold increases of all three antigens in adult recipients were significantly lower than those in recipients who had not received a preceding vaccination. In contrast, in pediatric recipients, there were no significant differences between the groups who had and had not received preceding vaccinations. The number of patients with rejection did not differ significantly between the two groups (0/53 vs. 1/21) in the 2011-12 season. The incidence of influenza after vaccination was significantly different between adult and pediatric recipients (0/16 vs. 5/15 in 2010-11 and 0/53 vs. 3/21 in 2011-12, respectively). Overall, there were no significant differences in antibody responses between adult and pediatric groups. Influenza infection was more frequent in pediatric recipients. Long-term response to preceding vaccinations appeared to be insufficient in both groups.

  6. Serial volumetric assessment of large for size liver grafts after whole cadaveric liver transplant in adults: do large liver grafts shrink in size?

    PubMed Central

    Bekheit, Mohamed; Rajakannu, Muthukumarassamy; Bucur, Petru; Adam, Rene; SaCunha, Antonio; Castaing, Denis; Cherqui, Daniel; Vibert, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background After whole graft orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), adaptation of the large grafts' volume to recipient weight is widely accepted despite the paucity of evidence on this subject. Methods Thirty nine patients with GRWR > 2.5% were included in this study and subsequently divided into two groups with 3 ≥ GRWR > 3%. Patients had CT scans at three predetermined time points after OLT used for measuring the liver volume. The objective of this study is to evaluate the volumetric changes of whole large liver grafts after adult OLT. Results At LT, the mean graft recipient body weight ratio (GRWR) was 3.1 ± 0.4%. The mean liver weight was 1881 ± 68 g at LT, 2014 ± 99 ml at one week, 1725 ± 126 ml at 3 months, and 1632 ± 117 (ml) at >6 months. There is an initial increase at 1 week after LT and a subsequent decrease of liver volume on later measurements. None of the late volume measurements were significantly different from the initial graft volume at liver transplant in pair wise comparisons ANOVA repeated measures (p > 0.05). Similarly, the mean GRWR did not change significantly between the initial calculation at transplantation date and the subsequent measurements during the different study time points (F = 0.04, p = 0.96) with a mean of 3.1% (95% CI = 2.2–4.2). AUC ROC discriminated a cutoff of 3% for the initial GRWR above which grafts tend to decrease in size over time (c statistics = 0.74, p = 0.036). In a Clustered ANOVA repeated measures, there was no significant difference in the changes of liver volume between both groups. However, patients with GRWR > 3 showed a trend towards a latent reduction in volume over the tracing period. There was a tendency, but none significant; towards a higher bilirubin, AST, ALT levels over the first postoperative days in recipients with GRWR > 3. Conclusion Large grafts do not significantly decrease in size. Nonetheless, grafts weighing >3% of the GRWR show a different trend

  7. Radionuclide imaging of the liver in human fascioliasis

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, J.V.; Bermudez, R.H.

    1984-08-01

    The clinical, laboratory, and scintigraphic findings in four cases of human fascioliasis are described. Acute onset of fever, abdominal pain, and weight loss in a person who has ingested watercress constitutes the clinical syndrome often seen. Eosinophilia and alteration in liver function tests, particularly alkaline phosphatase are frequent. Tc-99m sulfur colloid images showed hepatomegaly in four patients, focal defects in two, splenomegaly in three, and increased splenic uptake in two. Gallium citrate (Ga 67) images show increased uptake in the focal lesions in two of two. Sonographic imaging showed focal lucent abnormality in one of three. Liver biopsy findings were nonspecific. The differential diagnosis from other invasive parasitic diseases is discussed. A possible role of hepatic imaging in the evaluation of fascioliasis is suggested.

  8. Oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by human liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Nada; Prip-Buus, Carina; Vons, Corinne; Lenoir, Véronique; Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Guedouari-Bounihi, Hala; Lombès, Anne; Bouillaud, Frédéric

    2014-09-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third gasotransmitter discovered. Sulfide shares with the two others (NO and CO) the same inhibiting properties towards mitochondrial respiration. However, in contrast with NO or CO, sulfide at concentrations lower than the toxic (μM) level is an hydrogen donor and a substrate for mitochondrial respiration. This is due to the activity of a sulfide quinone reductase found in a large majority of mitochondria. An ongoing study of the metabolic state of liver in obese patients allowed us to evaluate the sulfide oxidation capacity with twelve preparations of human liver mitochondria. The results indicate relatively high rates of sulfide oxidation with a large variability between individuals. These observations made with isolated mitochondria appear in agreement with the main characteristics of sulfide oxidation as established before with the help of cellular models.

  9. Anti-hepatitis C virus potency of a new autophagy inhibitor using human liver slices model

    PubMed Central

    Lagaye, Sylvie; Brun, Sonia; Gaston, Jesintha; Shen, Hong; Stranska, Ruzena; Camus, Claire; Dubray, Clarisse; Rousseau, Géraldine; Massault, Pierre-Philippe; Courcambeck, Jerôme; Bassisi, Firas; Halfon, Philippe; Pol, Stanislas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antiviral potency of a new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antiviral agent targeting the cellular autophagy machinery. METHODS: Non-infected liver slices, obtained from human liver resection and cut in 350 μm-thick slices (2.7 × 106 cells per slice) were infected with cell culture-grown HCV Con1b/C3 supernatant (multiplicity of infection = 0.1) cultivated for up to ten days. HCV infected slices were treated at day 4 post-infection with GNS-396 for 6 d at different concentrations. HCV replication was evaluated by strand-specific real-time quantitative reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. The infectivity titers of supernatants were evaluated by foci formation upon inoculation into naive Huh-7.5.1 cells. The cytotoxic effect of the drugs was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase leakage assays. RESULTS: The antiviral efficacy of a new antiviral drug, GNS-396, an autophagy inhibitor, on HCV infection of adult human liver slices was evidenced in a dose-dependent manner. At day 6 post-treatment, GNS-396 EC50 was 158 nmol/L without cytotoxic effect (compared to hydroxychloroquine EC50 = 1.17 μmol/L). CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated that our ex vivo model is efficient for evaluation the potency of autophagy inhibitors, in particular a new quinoline derivative GNS-396 as antiviral could inhibit HCV infection in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxic effect. PMID:27478540

  10. The 14-day repeated dose liver micronucleus test with methapyrilene hydrochloride using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenji; Ochi, Akimu; Koda, Akira; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Doi, Takaaki

    2015-03-01

    The repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect genotoxic hepatocarcinogens that can be integrated into a general toxicity study. The assay methods were thoroughly validated by 19 Japanese facilities. Methapyrilene hydrochloride (MP), known to be a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, was examined in the present study. MP was dosed orally at 10, 30 and 100mg/kg/day to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats daily for 14 days. Treatment with MP resulted in an increase in micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) with a dosage of only 100mg/kg/day. At this dose level, cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell growth was noted in the liver. These findings suggest that MP may induce clastogenic effects indirectly on the liver or hepatotoxicity of MP followed by regeneration may cause increase in spontaneous incidence of MNHEPs.

  11. Child-to-Adult Liver Transplantation With Donation After Cardiac Death Donors: Three Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liangshuo; Liu, Xuemin; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Liang; Sha, Huanchen; Zhou, Ying; Tian, Min; Shi, Jianhua; Wang, Wanli; Liu, Chang; Guo, Kun; Lv, Yi; Wang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Development of organ transplantation is restricted by the discrepancy between the lack of donors and increasing number of patients. The outcome of pediatric donors transplanted into adult recipients especially with donation after circulatory death (DCD) pattern has not been well studied. The aim of this paper is to describe our experience of 3 successful DCD donor child-to-adult liver transplantations lately. Three DCD donors were separately 7, 5, and 8 years old. The ratio between donor graft weight and recipient body weight was 1.42%, 1.00%, and 1.33%, respectively. Ratio between the volume of donor liver and the expected liver volume was 0.65, 0.46, and 0.60. Splenectomy was undertaken for the second recipient according to the portal vein pressure (PVP) which was observed during the operation. Two out of 3 of the recipients suffered with acute kidney injury and got recovered after renal replacement therapy. The first recipient also went through early allograft dysfunction and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The hospital course of the third recipient was uneventful. After 1 year of follow-up visit, the first and second recipients maintain good quality of life and liver function. The third patient was followed up for 5 months until now and recovered well. DCD child-to-adult liver transplantation should only be used for comparatively matched donor and recipient. PVP should be monitored during the operation. The short-term efficacy is good, but long-term follow-up and clinical study with large sample evaluation are still needed.

  12. A Monte Carlo approach to assessing 147Pm in the liver of the adult phantom.

    PubMed

    Bhati, S

    1993-06-01

    A low-background phoswich detector is used to detect small amounts of 147Pm--a pure beta-emitting nuclide--present in the liver of an occupational worker. The assessment was based on the measurement of bremsstrahlung radiation produced by the beta particles in the tissue. Computer programs based on Monte Carlo techniques for photon transport have been developed to calculate the response of an external phoswich detector to 1) a 147Pm point source embedded in tissue-equivalent slabs of various thicknesses; and 2) various source distributions of 147Pm in the liver of an adult phantom. The goal is to theoretically calibrate the phoswich detector for each source distribution and to study the variation of maxima of the spectra with the depth of the source in the adult phantom liver and tissue-equivalent slabs. The initial bremsstrahlung photon distribution of 147Pm in water has been computed using Wyard's and Pratt's methods. These calculations have been compared with experimental measurements using Perspex acrylic sheet slabs. Good agreements have been noted when the initial bremsstrahlung spectrum is obtained by using Wyard's method. These results find applications in monitoring the liver burdens in occupational workers handling 147Pm-based radioluminous paints.

  13. Epinephrine and phenylephrine pretreatments for preventing postreperfusion syndrome during adult liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ho-Geol; Jung, Chul-Woo; Lee, Hyung-Chul; Cho, Youn-Joung

    2012-12-01

    Acute hypotension after reperfusion of the liver graft occurs frequently during liver transplantation. A randomized, prospective trial was performed to test the effects of epinephrine and phenylephrine pretreatments for attenuating postreperfusion syndrome (PRS). Ninety-three adult liver recipients were randomly allocated to receive an intravenous bolus of 10 μg of epinephrine, 100 μg of phenylephrine, or normal saline (the control group) at the time of graft reperfusion. The occurrence of PRS, the use of vasoactive drugs, and the postoperative courses were compared. The epinephrine and phenylephrine groups showed PRS less frequently (39% and 48%) than the control group (77%, P = 0.006) as well as higher mean arterial pressures (MAPs) immediately after reperfusion (P < 0.05). An overshoot of MAP was observed in one-third of the pretreated patients with minimal heart rate changes. Only 2 patients in each pretreatment group showed an increase in MAP that was greater than 20% of the baseline value. The intraoperative epinephrine and dopamine requirements were significantly lower in both pretreatment groups. Perioperative laboratory data, postoperative stays, and in-hospital mortality rates were similar for the 3 groups. In conclusion, pretreatment with 10 μg of epinephrine or 100 μg of phenylephrine significantly reduces the occurrence of PRS and vasopressor requirements without immediate or delayed adverse effects in adult liver transplantation.

  14. Does Lysosomial Acid Lipase Reduction Play a Role in Adult Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Polimeni, Licia; Tozzi, Giulia; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco; Del Ben, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal Acid Lipase (LAL) is a key enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, responsible for hydrolysing the cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Wolman Disease represents the early onset phenotype of LAL deficiency rapidly leading to death. Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease is a late onset phenotype that occurs with fatty liver, elevated aminotransferase levels, hepatomegaly and dyslipidaemia, the latter characterized by elevated LDL-C and low HDL-C. The natural history and the clinical manifestations of the LAL deficiency in adults are not well defined, and the diagnosis is often incidental. LAL deficiency has been suggested as an under-recognized cause of dyslipidaemia and fatty liver. Therefore, LAL activity may be reduced also in non-obese patients presenting non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), unexplained persistently elevated liver transaminases or with elevation in LDL cholesterol. In these patients, it could be indicated to test LAL activity. So far, very few studies have been performed to assess LAL activity in representative samples of normal subjects or patients with NAFLD. Moreover, no large study has been carried out in adult subjects with NAFLD or cryptogenic cirrhosis. PMID:26602919

  15. Plasma selenium levels and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Chinese adults: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Yan, Chonghuai; Liu, Gang; Niu, Yixin; Zhang, Weiwei; Lu, Shuai; Li, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Hongmei; Ning, Guang; Fan, Jiangao; Qin, Li; Su, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Selenium exposure can induce liver insulin resistance and increased liver triglyceride concentrations in animals, which may link to an increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, epidemiological studies investigating the association between elevated plasma selenium levels and NAFLD were not available. We aimed to investigate the association of selenium levels with the prevalence of NAFLD in Chinese adults. This was a cross-sectional study of 8550 Chinese adults aged 40 yr or older in Shanghai, China. A questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, and laboratory tests were conducted. NAFLD was diagnosed by hepatic ultrasound after the exclusion of alcohol abuse and other liver diseases. Plasma selenium concentration was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The median concentration of plasma selenium was 213.0 μg/L. Elevated plasma selenium levels were associated with higher triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, post-loading plasma glucose, A1c, HOMA-IR, as well as ALT, AST and γ-GT (all P < 0.05). The odds ratios were substantially higher for NAFLD (OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.13–2.18) in the highest selenium quartile compared with those in the lowest quartile, after adjustment for potential cofounder. The results of this study provided epidemiological evidence that increased plasma selenium level is associated with elevated prevalence of NAFLD. PMID:27853246

  16. Does Lysosomial Acid Lipase Reduction Play a Role in Adult Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?

    PubMed

    Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Polimeni, Licia; Tozzi, Giulia; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco; Del Ben, Maria

    2015-11-25

    Lysosomal Acid Lipase (LAL) is a key enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, responsible for hydrolysing the cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Wolman Disease represents the early onset phenotype of LAL deficiency rapidly leading to death. Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease is a late onset phenotype that occurs with fatty liver, elevated aminotransferase levels, hepatomegaly and dyslipidaemia, the latter characterized by elevated LDL-C and low HDL-C. The natural history and the clinical manifestations of the LAL deficiency in adults are not well defined, and the diagnosis is often incidental. LAL deficiency has been suggested as an under-recognized cause of dyslipidaemia and fatty liver. Therefore, LAL activity may be reduced also in non-obese patients presenting non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), unexplained persistently elevated liver transaminases or with elevation in LDL cholesterol. In these patients, it could be indicated to test LAL activity. So far, very few studies have been performed to assess LAL activity in representative samples of normal subjects or patients with NAFLD. Moreover, no large study has been carried out in adult subjects with NAFLD or cryptogenic cirrhosis.

  17. Hepatic resection for giant haemangioma in a patient with a contemporaneous adult polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Levi Sandri, G B; Lai, Q; Melandro, F; Guglielmo, N; Garofalo, M; Morabito, V; Cirelli, C; Lucatelli, P; Di Laudo, M; Rossi, M; Berloco, P B

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic resection for giant haemangioma in a patient with a contemporaneous adult polycystic liver disease. According to Gigot classification, and to the characteristics of haemangioma surgery in these patients can be considered safe. We report the case of a 55 year-old man affected by an adult polycystic liver disease (PCLD) and a contemporaneous symptomatic haemangioma of the III segment. At the preoperative imaging scans, APCLD was classified in a type II grading according to Gigot classification. The patient underwent surgery: a wedge resection of the III segment with the exportation of the haemangioma and a fenestration of a large cyst placed in the VIII segment were performed. Post-operative course was regular and the patient was discharged uneventfully in post-operative 9th day, with a total regress of the initial symptoms. APCLD and haemangioma are two benign conditions that do not require surgery except if they cause important symptoms, such as pain. The good clinical conditions of the patient, the moderate gravity of the APCLD and the particular exofitic localisation of the cavernous haemangioma gave us the possibility to make a safe surgery for the patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported in literature in which a liver resection for haemangioma in patient with APCLD was performed. In conclusion, liver resection for haemangioma is not contraindicated, mainly if it is symptomatic, even in the contemporaneous presence of an APCLD.

  18. 3-Tesla MRI Response to TACE in HCC (Liver Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Stage A Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Stage B Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC)

  19. Human Liver Infection in a Dish: Easy-To-Build 3D Liver Models for Studying Microbial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Debora B.; Faust, Daniela M.; Tolle, Matthieu; Rivière, Lise; Valentin, Tanguy; Neuveut, Christine; Hernandez-Cuevas, Nora; Dufour, Alexandre; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Guillen, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Human liver infection is a major cause of death worldwide, but fundamental studies on infectious diseases affecting humans have been hampered by the lack of robust experimental models that accurately reproduce pathogen-host interactions in an environment relevant for the human disease. In the case of liver infection, one consequence of this absence of relevant models is a lack of understanding of how pathogens cross the sinusoidal endothelial barrier and parenchyma. To fill that gap we elaborated human 3D liver in vitro models, composed of human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and Huh-7 hepatoma cells as hepatocyte model, layered in a structure mimicking the hepatic sinusoid, which enable studies of key features of early steps of hepatic infection. Built with established cell lines and scaffold, these models provide a reproducible and easy-to-build cell culture approach of reduced complexity compared to animal models, while preserving higher physiological relevance compared to standard 2D systems. For proof-of-principle we challenged the models with two hepatotropic pathogens: the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica and hepatitis B virus (HBV). We constructed four distinct setups dedicated to investigating specific aspects of hepatic invasion: 1) pathogen 3D migration towards hepatocytes, 2) hepatocyte barrier crossing, 3) LSEC and subsequent hepatocyte crossing, and 4) quantification of human hepatic virus replication (HBV). Our methods comprise automated quantification of E. histolytica migration and hepatic cells layer crossing in the 3D liver models. Moreover, replication of HBV virus occurs in our virus infection 3D liver model, indicating that routine in vitro assays using HBV or others viruses can be performed in this easy-to-build but more physiological hepatic environment. These results illustrate that our new 3D liver infection models are simple but effective, enabling new investigations on infectious disease mechanisms. The better

  20. Human Liver Infection in a Dish: Easy-To-Build 3D Liver Models for Studying Microbial Infection.

    PubMed

    Petropolis, Debora B; Faust, Daniela M; Tolle, Matthieu; Rivière, Lise; Valentin, Tanguy; Neuveut, Christine; Hernandez-Cuevas, Nora; Dufour, Alexandre; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Guillen, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Human liver infection is a major cause of death worldwide, but fundamental studies on infectious diseases affecting humans have been hampered by the lack of robust experimental models that accurately reproduce pathogen-host interactions in an environment relevant for the human disease. In the case of liver infection, one consequence of this absence of relevant models is a lack of understanding of how pathogens cross the sinusoidal endothelial barrier and parenchyma. To fill that gap we elaborated human 3D liver in vitro models, composed of human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and Huh-7 hepatoma cells as hepatocyte model, layered in a structure mimicking the hepatic sinusoid, which enable studies of key features of early steps of hepatic infection. Built with established cell lines and scaffold, these models provide a reproducible and easy-to-build cell culture approach of reduced complexity compared to animal models, while preserving higher physiological relevance compared to standard 2D systems. For proof-of-principle we challenged the models with two hepatotropic pathogens: the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica and hepatitis B virus (HBV). We constructed four distinct setups dedicated to investigating specific aspects of hepatic invasion: 1) pathogen 3D migration towards hepatocytes, 2) hepatocyte barrier crossing, 3) LSEC and subsequent hepatocyte crossing, and 4) quantification of human hepatic virus replication (HBV). Our methods comprise automated quantification of E. histolytica migration and hepatic cells layer crossing in the 3D liver models. Moreover, replication of HBV virus occurs in our virus infection 3D liver model, indicating that routine in vitro assays using HBV or others viruses can be performed in this easy-to-build but more physiological hepatic environment. These results illustrate that our new 3D liver infection models are simple but effective, enabling new investigations on infectious disease mechanisms. The better

  1. Deep sexual dimorphism in adult medaka fish liver highlighted by multi-omic approach

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qin; Le Manach, Séverine; Sotton, Benoit; Huet, Hélène; Duvernois-Berthet, Evelyne; Paris, Alain; Duval, Charlotte; Ponger, Loïc; Marie, Arul; Blond, Alain; Mathéron, Lucrèce; Vinh, Joelle; Bolbach, Gérard; Djediat, Chakib; Bernard, Cécile; Edery, Marc; Marie, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism describes the features that discriminate between the two sexes at various biological levels. Especially, during the reproductive phase, the liver is one of the most sexually dimorphic organs, because of different metabolic demands between the two sexes. The liver is a key organ that plays fundamental roles in various physiological processes, including digestion, energetic metabolism, xenobiotic detoxification, biosynthesis of serum proteins, and also in endocrine or immune response. The sex-dimorphism of the liver is particularly obvious in oviparous animals, as the female liver is the main organ for the synthesis of oocyte constituents. In this work, we are interested in identifying molecular sexual dimorphism in the liver of adult medaka fish and their sex-variation in response to hepatotoxic exposures. By developing an integrative approach combining histology and different high-throughput omic investigations (metabolomics, proteomics and transcriptomics), we were able to globally depict the strong sexual dimorphism that concerns various cellular and molecular processes of hepatocytes comprising protein synthesis, amino acid, lipid and polysaccharide metabolism, along with steroidogenesis and detoxification. The results of this work imply noticeable repercussions on the biology of oviparous organisms environmentally exposed to chemical or toxin issues. PMID:27561897

  2. Deep sexual dimorphism in adult medaka fish liver highlighted by multi-omic approach.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Qin; Le Manach, Séverine; Sotton, Benoit; Huet, Hélène; Duvernois-Berthet, Evelyne; Paris, Alain; Duval, Charlotte; Ponger, Loïc; Marie, Arul; Blond, Alain; Mathéron, Lucrèce; Vinh, Joelle; Bolbach, Gérard; Djediat, Chakib; Bernard, Cécile; Edery, Marc; Marie, Benjamin

    2016-08-26

    Sexual dimorphism describes the features that discriminate between the two sexes at various biological levels. Especially, during the reproductive phase, the liver is one of the most sexually dimorphic organs, because of different metabolic demands between the two sexes. The liver is a key organ that plays fundamental roles in various physiological processes, including digestion, energetic metabolism, xenobiotic detoxification, biosynthesis of serum proteins, and also in endocrine or immune response. The sex-dimorphism of the liver is particularly obvious in oviparous animals, as the female liver is the main organ for the synthesis of oocyte constituents. In this work, we are interested in identifying molecular sexual dimorphism in the liver of adult medaka fish and their sex-variation in response to hepatotoxic exposures. By developing an integrative approach combining histology and different high-throughput omic investigations (metabolomics, proteomics and transcriptomics), we were able to globally depict the strong sexual dimorphism that concerns various cellular and molecular processes of hepatocytes comprising protein synthesis, amino acid, lipid and polysaccharide metabolism, along with steroidogenesis and detoxification. The results of this work imply noticeable repercussions on the biology of oviparous organisms environmentally exposed to chemical or toxin issues.

  3. Effect of chromium supplementation on the diabetes induced-oxidative stress in liver and brain of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Refaie, Fawzia M; Esmat, Amr Y; Mohamed, Aly F; Aboul Nour, Wael H

    2009-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the susceptibility of liver and brain tissues, as insulinin-dependent tissues, of normal adult male rats to the oxidative challenge of subchronic supplementation with chromium picolinate (CrPic) at low (human equivalent) and high doses (2.90 and 13.20 μg Cr kg(-1) day(-1), respectively). Also, the modulative effect of CrPic administration on the enhanced oxidative stress in the liver and brain tissues of alloxan-diabetic rats was studied. Fasting serum glucose level was not modified in normal rats but significantly reduced in diabetic rats that had received CrPic supplement. A mild oxidative stress was observed in the liver and brain of CrPic-supplemented normal rats confirmed by the dose-dependent reductions in the levels of hepatic and cerebral free fatty acids, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, and in contrast increased tissue malondialdehyde concentration. On the other hand, hepatic and cerebral catalase activity was reduced in the high dose group only. CrPic supplementation did not act as a peroxisome proliferator confirmed by the significant reductions in liver and brain peroxisomal palmitoyl CoA oxidase activity. The non significant alterations in liver protein/DNA and RNA/DNA ratios indicate that CrPic did not affect protein synthesis per cell, and that mild elevations in hepatic total protein and RNA concentrations might be due to block or decrease in the export rate of synthesized proteins from the liver to the plasma. In diabetic rats, elevated levels of hepatic and cerebral free fatty acids and malondialdehyde, and in contrast the overwhelmed antioxidant enzymes, were significantly modulated in the low dose group and near-normalized in the high dose group. The significant increases observed in liver total protein and RNA concentrations, as well as protein/DNA and RNA/ DNA ratios in diabetic rats supplemented with the high dose of Cr, compared to untreated diabetics, may be related to the

  4. Liver X Receptor (LXR) Regulates Human Adipocyte Lipolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Stenson, Britta M.; Rydén, Mikael; Venteclef, Nicolas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Pettersson, Annie M. L.; Mairal, Aline; Åström, Gaby; Blomqvist, Lennart; Wang, Victoria; Jocken, Johan W. E.; Clément, Karine; Langin, Dominique; Arner, Peter; Laurencikiene, Jurga

    2011-01-01

    The Liver X receptor (LXR) is an important regulator of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in humans and mice. We have recently shown that activation of LXR regulates cellular fuel utilization in adipocytes. In contrast, the role of LXR in human adipocyte lipolysis, the major function of human white fat cells, is not clear. In the present study, we stimulated in vitro differentiated human and murine adipocytes with the LXR agonist GW3965 and observed an increase in basal lipolysis. Microarray analysis of human adipocyte mRNA following LXR activation revealed an altered gene expression of several lipolysis-regulating proteins, which was also confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. We show that expression and intracellular localization of perilipin1 (PLIN1) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are affected by GW3965. Although LXR activation does not influence phosphorylation status of HSL, HSL activity is required for the lipolytic effect of GW3965. This effect is abolished by PLIN1 knockdown. In addition, we demonstrate that upon activation, LXR binds to the proximal regions of the PLIN1 and HSL promoters. By selective knock-down of either LXR isoform, we show that LXRα is the major isoform mediating the lipolysis-related effects of LXR. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that activation of LXRα up-regulates basal human adipocyte lipolysis. This is at least partially mediated through LXR binding to the PLIN1 promoter and down-regulation of PLIN1 expression. PMID:21030586

  5. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from adult human testis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Sabine; Renninger, Markus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Wiesner, Tina; Just, Lothar; Bonin, Michael; Aicher, Wilhelm; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Mattheus, Ulrich; Mack, Andreas; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Minger, Stephen; Matzkies, Matthias; Reppel, Michael; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Stenzl, Arnulf; Skutella, Thomas

    2008-11-20

    Human primordial germ cells and mouse neonatal and adult germline stem cells are pluripotent and show similar properties to embryonic stem cells. Here we report the successful establishment of human adult germline stem cells derived from spermatogonial cells of adult human testis. Cellular and molecular characterization of these cells revealed many similarities to human embryonic stem cells, and the germline stem cells produced teratomas after transplantation into immunodeficient mice. The human adult germline stem cells differentiated into various types of somatic cells of all three germ layers when grown under conditions used to induce the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. We conclude that the generation of human adult germline stem cells from testicular biopsies may provide simple and non-controversial access to individual cell-based therapy without the ethical and immunological problems associated with human embryonic stem cells.

  6. Stoichiometries of Transferrin Receptors 1 and 2 in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Chloupková, Maja; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in either the hereditary hemochromatosis protein, HFE, or transferrin receptor 2, TfR2, result in a similarly severe form of the most common type of iron overload disease called hereditary hemochromatosis. Models of the interactions between HFE, TfR1, and TfR2 imply that these proteins are present in different molar concentrations in the liver, where they control expression of the iron regulatory hormone, hepcidin, in response to body iron loading. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo levels of mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR and concentrations of these proteins by quantitative immunoblotting in human liver tissues. The level of TfR2 mRNA was 21- and 63- fold higher than that of TfR1 and HFE, respectively. Molar concentration of TfR2 protein was the highest and determined to be 1.95 nmoles/g protein in whole cell lysates and 10.89 nmoles/g protein in microsomal membranes. Molar concentration of TfR1 protein was 4.5- and 6.1-fold lower than that of TfR2 in whole cell lysates and membranes, respectively. The level of HFE protein was below 0.53 nmoles/g of total protein. HFE is thus present in substoichiometric concentrations with respect to both TfR1 and TfR2 in human liver tissue. This finding supports a model, in which availability of HFE is limiting for formation of complexes with TfR1 or TfR2. PMID:19819738

  7. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Hepatic Artery Stenosis in Adult and Pediatric Patients After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Maruzzelli, Luigi; Miraglia, Roberto Caruso, Settimo; Milazzo, Mariapina; Mamone, Giuseppe; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous endovascular techniques for the treatment of hepatic artery stenosis (HAS) occurring after liver transplantation (LT) in adult and pediatrics patients. From February 2003 to March 2009, 25 patients (15 adults and 10 children) whose developed HAS after LT were referred to our interventional radiology unit. Technical success was achieved in 96% (24 of 25) of patients. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed in 13 patients (7 children), and stenting was performed in 11 patients (2 children). After the procedure, all patients were followed-up with liver function tests, Doppler ultrasound, and/or computed tomography. Mean follow-up was 15.8 months (range 5 days to 58 months). Acute hepatic artery thrombosis occurred immediately after stent deployment in 2 patients and was successfully treated with local thrombolysis. One patient developed severe HA spasm, which reverted after 24 h. After the procedure, mean trans-stenotic pressure gradient decreased from 30.5 to 6.2 mmHg. Kaplan-Meyer curve of HA primary patency was 77% at 1 and 2 years. During the follow-up period, 5 patients (20%) had recurrent stenosis, and 2 patients (8.3%) had late thrombosis. Two of 7 patients with stenosis/thrombosis underwent surgical revascularization (n = 1) and liver retransplantation (n = 1). Six (25%) patients died during follow-up, but overall mortality was not significantly different when comparing patients having patent hepatic arteries with those having recurrent stenosis/thrombosis. There were no significant differences in recurrent stenosis/thrombosis and mortality comparing patients treated by PTA versus stenting and comparing adult versus pediatric status. Percutaneous interventional treatment of HAS in LT recipients is safe and effective and decreases the need for surgical revascularization and liver retransplantation. However, the beneficial effects for survival are not clear, probably because

  8. Effect of benidipine on simvastatin metabolism in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yuka; Mimura, Nobuhito; Kuwabara, Takashi; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Ushiki, Junko; Fuse, Eiichi

    2007-06-01

    Benidipine, which is a calcium channel blocker that has clinical advantages in the treatment of hypertension, is metabolized by CYP3A4 in humans. The effect of benidipine on the metabolism of simvastatin by human liver microsomes was investigated in order to predict the potential of in vivo drug-drug interactions between benidipine and other substrates of CYP3A4. The results were compared with data generated with azelnidipine, which is also metabolized by CYP3A4. Both benidipine and azelnidipine inhibited simvastatin metabolism in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Assuming competitive inhibition, the K(i) values based on the unbound concentrations, were calculated to be 0.846 and 0.0181 microM for benidipine and azelnidipine, respectively. If simvastatin (10 mg) and benidipine (8 mg, the clinically recommended highest dose) were to be administered concomitantly, the ratio of the areas under the concentration-time curves of simvastatin with and without benidipine (AUC((+I))/AUC) was predicted to be 1.01. On the other hand, if simvastatin (10 mg) and azelnidipine (8 mg) were co-administered, the AUC((+I))/AUC for simvastatin was predicted to be 1.72, which is close to the observed value (1.9) in healthy volunteers. These data suggest that benidipine is unlikely to cause a drug interaction by inhibiting CYP3A4 activity in the liver.

  9. Donor Safety in Adult-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience of 356 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Haipeng; Yang, Jiayin; Yan, Lunan

    2016-01-01

    Background As an important means to tackle the worldwide shortage of liver grafts, adult-adult living donor liver transplantation (A-ALDLT) is the most massive operation a healthy person could undergo, so donor safety is of prime importance. However, most previous research focused on recipients, while complications in donors have not been fully described or investigated. Material/Methods To investigate donor safety in terms of postoperative complications, the clinical data of 356 A-ALDLT donors in our center from January 2002 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were divided into a pre-2008 group (before January 2008) and a post-2008 group (after January 2008). Donor safety was evaluated with regard to the type, frequency, and severity of postoperative complications. Results There were no donor deaths in our center during this period. The overall complication rate was 23.0% (82/356). The proportion of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 51.2% (42/82), 25.6% (21/82), 22.0% (18/82), and 1.2% (1/82), respectively. In all the donors, the incidence of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 11.8% (42/356), 5.9% (21/356), 5.1% (18/356), and 0.3% (1/356), respectively. The overall complication rate in the post-2008 group was significantly lower than that in the pre-2008 group (18.1% (41/227) vs. 32.6% (42/129), P<0.01). Biliary complications were the most common, with an incidence of 8.4% (30/356). Conclusions The risk to A-ALDLT donors is controllable and acceptable with improvement in preoperative assessment and liver surgery. PMID:27178367

  10. Application of chimeric mice with humanized liver for study of human-specific drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Thomas J; Reddy, Vijay G B; Kakuni, Masakazu; Morikawa, Yoshio; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Human-specific or disproportionately abundant human metabolites of drug candidates that are not adequately formed and qualified in preclinical safety assessment species pose an important drug development challenge. Furthermore, the overall metabolic profile of drug candidates in humans is an important determinant of their drug-drug interaction susceptibility. These risks can be effectively assessed and/or mitigated if human metabolic profile of the drug candidate could reliably be determined in early development. However, currently available in vitro human models (e.g., liver microsomes, hepatocytes) are often inadequate in this regard. Furthermore, the conduct of definitive radiolabeled human ADME studies is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor that is more suited for later in development when the risk of failure has been reduced. We evaluated a recently developed chimeric mouse model with humanized liver on uPA/SCID background for its ability to predict human disposition of four model drugs (lamotrigine, diclofenac, MRK-A, and propafenone) that are known to exhibit human-specific metabolism. The results from these studies demonstrate that chimeric mice were able to reproduce the human-specific metabolite profile for lamotrigine, diclofenac, and MRK-A. In the case of propafenone, however, the human-specific metabolism was not detected as a predominant pathway, and the metabolite profiles in native and humanized mice were similar; this was attributed to the presence of residual highly active propafenone-metabolizing mouse enzymes in chimeric mice. Overall, the data indicate that the chimeric mice with humanized liver have the potential to be a useful tool for the prediction of human-specific metabolism of xenobiotics and warrant further investigation.

  11. Obesity and the extent of liver damage among adult New Zealanders: findings from a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J. C.; Gray, A. R.; Schultz, M.; Mann, J. I.; Parnell, W. R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined as excessive fat accumulation in hepatocytes when no other pathologic causes are present, is an increasingly common obesity‐related disorder. We sought to describe the prevalence of elevated liver enzymes, a marker of liver damage, among New Zealand adults, and high‐risk subgroups including those with an elevated body mass index and those with pre‐diabetes or diabetes, to gain a better understanding of the burden of liver disease. Methods A total of 4,721 New Zealanders aged 15+ years participated in a nationally representative nutrition survey. Liver enzymes, alanine transaminase (ALT) and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) were measured in serum. Results were available for 3,035 participants, of whom 10.8% were Māori and 4.5% Pacific. Results Overall, the prevalence of elevated ALT and elevated GGT was 13.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.2 – 15.0) and 13.7% (95% CI: 12.0 – 15.4), respectively. Odds ratios for an elevated ALT or GGT markedly increased with increasing body mass index. Men with obesity had the highest elevated ALT prevalence (28.5%; 95% CI: 21.7–35.4), and women with diabetes had the highest elevated GGT prevalence (36.5%; 95% CI: 26.0–47.0). Adding alcohol consumption categories to each of the adjusted models did not meaningfully change any results, although for women, heavy alcohol consumption was associated with an elevated GGT (overall p = 0.03). Conclusions Obesity‐related liver disease is likely to increasingly burden the New Zealand health sector and contribute to health disparities unless effective obesity treatment and prevention measures are given high priority. © 2015 The Authors. Obesity Science & Practice published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, World Obesity and The Obesity Society. PMID:27774250

  12. Disparate regulation of human fetal erythropoiesis by the microenvironments of the liver and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Muench, M O; Namikawa, R

    2001-01-01

    The liver and the bone marrow (BM) are the major organs that support hematopoiesis in the human fetus. Although both tissues contain the spectrum of hematopoietic cells, erythropoiesis dominates the liver. Previous studies suggested that a unique responsiveness of fetal burst-forming units erythroid (BFU-E) to erythropoietin (EPO) obviates the need for cytokines with burst-promoting activity (BPA) in fetal erythropoiesis. This potential regulatory mechanism whereby fetal erythropoiesis is enhanced was further investigated. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was used to isolate liver and BM progenitors based on their levels of CD34 and CD38 expression. The most mature population of CD34+ lineage (Lin-) cells was also the most prevalent of the three subpopulations and contained BFU-E responsive to EPO alone under serum-deprived conditions. Kit ligand (KL) also strongly synergized with EPO in stimulating the growth of these BFU-E. An intermediate subset of CD34++CD38+Lin- cells contained erythroid progenitors responsive to EPO alone, but also displayed synergism between EPO and KL, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or interleukin (IL)-3, demonstrating that erythroid progenitors that respond to cytokines with BPA do exist in fetal tissues as in the adult BM. Candidate stem cells (CD34++CD38-Lin- cells) did not respond to EPO. Synergisms among KL, GM-CSF, and IL-3, and to a lesser extent granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and FLK-2/FLT-3 ligand (FL), supported the growth of primitive multipotent progenitors that became responsive to EPO. These data define the limits of EPO activity in fetal erythropoiesis to cells that express CD38 and demonstrate the potential for various cytokine interactions to be involved in regulating fetal erythropoiesis. Furthermore, a comparison of the responses of liver and BM erythroid progenitors revealed similarity in their responses to cytokines but a difference in the frequency of BFU-E among the three

  13. Latent inhibition in human adults without masking.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Martha; Arcediano, Francisco; Miller, Ralph R

    2003-09-01

    Latent inhibition refers to attenuated responding to Cue X observed when the X-outcome pairings are preceded by X-alone presentations. It has proven difficult to obtain in human adults unless the preexposure (X-alone) presentations are embedded within a masking (i.e., distracting) task. The authors hypothesized that the difficulty in obtaining latent inhibition with unmasked tasks is related to the usual training procedures, in which the preexposure and conditioning experiences are separated by a set of instructions. Experiment 1 reports latent inhibition without masking in a task in which preexposure and conditioning occur without interruption. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrate that this attenuation in responding to target Cue X does not pass a summation test for conditioned inhibition and is context specific, thereby confirming that it is latent inhibition. Experiments 3 and 4 confirm that introducing instructions between preexposure and conditioning disrupts latent inhibition.

  14. Development of a New Diagnostic System for Human Liver Diseases Based on Conventional Ultrasonic Diagnostic Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tsuneo; Nakazawa, Toshihiro; Harada, Akimitsu; Sato, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Yukio; Sato, Sojun

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, the authors present the experimental results of using a quantitative ultrasonic diagnosis technique for human liver diseases using the fractal dimension (FD) of the shape of the power spectra (PS) of RF signals. We have developed an experimental system based on a conventional ultrasonic diagnostic system. As a result, we show that normal livers, fatty livers and liver cirrhosis can be identified using the FD values.

  15. Combined Detection of Serum IL-10, IL-17, and CXCL10 Predicts Acute Rejection Following Adult Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung; Yoon, Young-In; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Tak, Eunyoung; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Song, Gi-Won; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Hwang, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of non-invasive diagnostic and predictive biomarkers for acute rejection in liver transplant patients would help to ensure the preservation of liver function in the graft, eventually contributing to improved graft and patient survival. We evaluated selected cytokines and chemokines in the sera from liver transplant patients as potential biomarkers for acute rejection, and found that the combined detection of IL-10, IL-17, and CXCL10 at 1-2 weeks post-operation could predict acute rejection following adult liver transplantation with 97% specificity and 94% sensitivity. PMID:27498551

  16. Interaction of human lactoferrin with the rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Debanne, M.T.; Regoeczi, E.; Sweeney, G.D.; Krestynski, F.

    1985-04-01

    Binding of human lactoferrin (hLf) by purified rat liver plasma membranes was studied to clarify whether the liver possesses specific hLf receptors. The binding was rapid between 4 degrees and 37 degrees C, with a pH optimum close to 5.0. At 22 degrees C and in glycine-NaOH (5 mM, pH 7.4) containing 150 mM NaCl and 0.5% albumin, 1 microgram of membrane bound a maximum of 11.8 ng hLf. The dissociation constant of the interaction was 1.6 X 10(-7) M. Other proteins of high isoelectric points (lactoperoxidase, lysozyme, and particularly salmine sulfate) and a piperazine derivative inhibited hLf binding in a concentration- dependent manner. In contrast, monosaccharides (galactose, N- acetylgalactosamine, mannose, and fucose) were ineffective. By omitting NaCl from the incubation buffer, binding was increased 3.6-fold. Erythrocyte ghosts bound hLf less firmly and alveolar macrophages more firmly than hepatic plasma membranes. Liver cell fractionations performed after the intravenous injection of labeled hLf showed that approximately 88% of the hepatic radioligand was associated with parenchymal cells. When binding was expressed per unit of cell volume, however, more hLf was present in nonparenchymal than in parenchymal cells, implying that the above value was determined by the relative cell masses rather than affinities alone. It is concluded that the binding of hLf by hepatic plasma membranes is electrostatic, i.e., is mediated by the cationic nature of the ligand, and that it is explicable in terms of a ''specific nonreceptor interaction'' of the generalized type proposed by Cuatrecasas and Hollenberg.

  17. Outcomes Among Older Adult Liver Transplantation Recipients in the Model of End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) Era

    PubMed Central

    Malinis, Maricar F.; Chen, Shu; Allore, Heather G.; Quagliarello, Vincent J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2002, the Model of End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score has been the basis of the liver transplant (LT) allocation system. Among older adult LT recipients, short-term outcomes in the MELD era were comparable to the pre-MELD era, but long-term outcomes remain unclear. Material/Methods This is a retrospective cohort study using the UNOS data on patients age ≥50 years who underwent primary LT from February 27, 2002 until October 31, 2011. Results A total of 35,686 recipients met inclusion criteria. The cohort was divided into 5-year interval age groups. Five-year over-all survival rates for ages 50–54, 55–59, 60–64, 65–69, and 70+ were 72.2%, 71.6%, 69.5%, 65.0%, and 57.5%, respectively. Five-year graft survival rates after adjusting for death as competing risk for ages 50–54, 55–59,60–64, 65–69 and 70+ were 85.8%, 87.3%, 89.6%, 89.1% and 88.9%, respectively. By Cox proportional hazard modeling, age ≥60, increasing MELD, donor age ≥60, hepatitis C, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), dialysis and impaired pre-transplant functional status (FS) were associated with increased 5-year mortality. Using Fine and Gray sub-proportional hazard modeling adjusted for death as competing risk, 5-year graft failure was associated with donor age ≥60, increasing MELD, hepatitis C, HCC, and impaired pre-transplant FS. Conclusions Among older LT recipients in the MELD era, long-term graft survival after adjusting for death as competing risk was improved with increasing age, while over-all survival was worse. Donor age, hepatitis C, and pre-transplant FS represent potentially modifiable risk factors that could influence long-term graft and patient survival. PMID:25256592

  18. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  19. Gene discovery for the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Laha, Thewarach; Pinlaor, Porntip; Mulvenna, Jason; Sripa, Banchob; Sripa, Manop; Smout, Michael J; Gasser, Robin B; Brindley, Paul J; Loukas, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) – cancer of the bile ducts – is associated with chronic infection with the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. Despite being the only eukaryote that is designated as a 'class I carcinogen' by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, little is known about its genome. Results Approximately 5,000 randomly selected cDNAs from the adult stage of O. viverrini were characterized and accounted for 1,932 contigs, representing ~14% of the entire transcriptome, and, presently, the largest sequence dataset for any species of liver fluke. Twenty percent of contigs were assigned GO classifications. Abundantly represented protein families included those involved in physiological functions that are essential to parasitism, such as anaerobic respiration, reproduction, detoxification, surface maintenance and feeding. GO assignments were well conserved in relation to other parasitic flukes, however, some categories were over-represented in O. viverrini, such as structural and motor proteins. An assessment of evolutionary relationships showed that O. viverrini was more similar to other parasitic (Clonorchis sinensis and Schistosoma japonicum) than to free-living (Schmidtea mediterranea) flatworms, and 105 sequences had close homologues in both parasitic species but not in S. mediterranea. A total of 164 O. viverrini contigs contained ORFs with signal sequences, many of which were platyhelminth-specific. Examples of convergent evolution between host and parasite secreted/membrane proteins were identified as were homologues of vaccine antigens from other helminths. Finally, ORFs representing secreted proteins with known roles in tumorigenesis were identified, and these might play roles in the pathogenesis of O. viverrini-induced CCA. Conclusion This gene discovery effort for O. viverrini should expedite molecular studies of cholangiocarcinogenesis and accelerate research focused on developing new interventions, drugs and vaccines, to

  20. Patterns and Predictors of Sexual Function After Liver Donation: the Adult to Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL)

    PubMed Central

    DiMartini, AF.; Dew, MA.; Butt, Z.; Simpson, MA.; Ladner, DP.; Smith, AR.; Hill-Callahan, P.; Gillespie, BW.

    2015-01-01

    Although sexual functioning is an important facet of living donor quality of life, it has not received extensive evaluation in this population. Using data from the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study, we examined donor sexual functioning across the donation process from the predonation evaluation to 3 months and 1 year postdonation. Donors (n=208) and a comparison group of non-donors (n=155) completed self-reported surveys with specific questions on sexual desire, satisfaction, orgasm, and (for men) erectile function. Across the three time points, donor sexual functioning was lower at the evaluation phase and 3 months postdonation than at one year postdonation. In the early recovery period, abdominal pain was associated with difficulty reaching orgasm (OR = 3.98, 95% CI 1.30–12.16), concerns over appearance with lower sexual desire (OR = 4.14, 95% CI 1.02–16.79), and not feeling back to normal was associated with dissatisfaction with sexual life (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.43–8.99). Efforts to educate donors before the surgery and prepare them for the early recovery phase may improve recovery and reduce distress regarding sexual functioning. PMID:25779554

  1. Epigenomic Landscape of Human Fetal Brain, Heart, and Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liying; Guo, Hongshan; Hu, Boqiang; Li, Rong; Yong, Jun; Zhao, Yangyu; Zhi, Xu; Fan, Xiaoying; Guo, Fan; Wang, Xiaoye; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Wen, Lu; Qiao, Jie; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic regulation of spatiotemporal gene expression is crucial for human development. Here, we present whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses of a wide variety of histone markers in the brain, heart, and liver of early human embryos shortly after their formation. We identified 40,181 active enhancers, with a large portion showing tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific patterns, pointing to their roles in controlling the ordered spatiotemporal expression of the developmental genes in early human embryos. Moreover, using sequential ChIP-seq, we showed that all three organs have hundreds to thousands of bivalent domains that are marked by both H3K4me3 and H3K27me3, probably to keep the progenitor cells in these organs ready for immediate differentiation into diverse cell types during subsequent developmental processes. Our work illustrates the potentially critical roles of tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific epigenomes in regulating the spatiotemporal expression of developmental genes during early human embryonic development. PMID:26719341

  2. Epigenomic Landscape of Human Fetal Brain, Heart, and Liver.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liying; Guo, Hongshan; Hu, Boqiang; Li, Rong; Yong, Jun; Zhao, Yangyu; Zhi, Xu; Fan, Xiaoying; Guo, Fan; Wang, Xiaoye; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Wen, Lu; Qiao, Jie; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-02-26

    The epigenetic regulation of spatiotemporal gene expression is crucial for human development. Here, we present whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses of a wide variety of histone markers in the brain, heart, and liver of early human embryos shortly after their formation. We identified 40,181 active enhancers, with a large portion showing tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific patterns, pointing to their roles in controlling the ordered spatiotemporal expression of the developmental genes in early human embryos. Moreover, using sequential ChIP-seq, we showed that all three organs have hundreds to thousands of bivalent domains that are marked by both H3K4me3 and H3K27me3, probably to keep the progenitor cells in these organs ready for immediate differentiation into diverse cell types during subsequent developmental processes. Our work illustrates the potentially critical roles of tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific epigenomes in regulating the spatiotemporal expression of developmental genes during early human embryonic development.

  3. Astrocitary niches in human adult medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Dermengiu, Dan; Loreto, Carla; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Pop, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Astrocytes are considered as neuromodulators of the CNS. Whereas experimental studies on astrocitary functions are gaining importance, the anatomy of the astrocitary niches in the human CNS has been overlooked. The study was performed on the brainstem of 10 adult cadavers. We aimed to determine astrocitary niches in the human medulla oblongata using immunohistochemical labeling with vimentin and also CD34 immunostaining to accurately diagnose associated microvessels. Niches rich in astrocytes were identified as follows: (a) the superficial layer of astrocytes, ventral and ventrolateral, in the rostral medulla oblongata; (b) the median raphe; (c) medullary nuclei: arcuate nucleus, area postrema, nucleus of the solitary tract; (d) the subependymal zone (SEZ, caudal medulla) and subventricular zone (SVZ, rostral medulla). Astrocytes were scarce in the ventrolateral medulla, and mostly present within the pyramidal tract and the olivary nucleus. Apart from the SEZ and SVZ, the brainstem niches of astrocytes mostly overlap those regions known to perform roles as central respiratory chemoreceptors. The astrocytes of the SEZ and SVZ, which are known as stem cell niches, are related to an increased microvascular density.

  4. Preoperative Thromboelastometry as a Predictor of Transfusion Requirements during Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fayed, Nirmeen; Mourad, Wessam; Yassen, Khaled; Görlinger, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability to predict transfusion requirements may improve perioperative bleeding management as an integral part of a patient blood management program. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate preoperative thromboelastometry as a predictor of transfusion requirements for adult living donor liver transplant recipients. Methods The correlation between preoperative thromboelastometry variables in 100 adult living donor liver transplant recipients and intraoperative blood transfusion requirements was examined by univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. Thresholds of thromboelastometric parameters for prediction of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), platelets, and cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements were determined with receiver operating characteristics analysis. The attending anesthetists were blinded to the preoperative thromboelastometric analysis. However, a thromboelastometry-guided transfusion algorithm with predefined trigger values was used intraoperatively. The transfusion triggers in this algorithm did not change during the study period. Results Univariate analysis confirmed significant correlations between PRBCs, FFP, platelets or cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements and most thromboelastometric variables. Backward stepwise logistic regression indicated that EXTEM coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) and INTEM CT, clot formation time (CFT) and MCF are independent predictors for PRBC transfusion. EXTEM CT, CFT and FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for FFP transfusion. Only EXTEM and INTEM MCF were independent predictors of platelet transfusion. EXTEM CFT and MCF, INTEM CT, CFT and MCF as well as FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for cryoprecipitate transfusion. Thromboelastometry-based regression equation accounted for 63% of PRBC, 83% of FFP, 61% of cryoprecipitate, and 44% of platelet transfusion requirements. Conclusion Preoperative thromboelastometric analysis is

  5. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  6. Development of in silico models for human liver microsomal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pil H.; Cucurull-Sanchez, Lourdes; Lu, Jing; Du, Yuhua J.

    2007-12-01

    We developed highly predictive classification models for human liver microsomal (HLM) stability using the apparent intrinsic clearance (CLint, app) as the end point. HLM stability has been shown to be an important factor related to the metabolic clearance of a compound. Robust in silico models that predict metabolic clearance are very useful in early drug discovery stages to optimize the compound structure and to select promising leads to avoid costly drug development failures in later stages. Using Random Forest and Bayesian classification methods with MOE, E-state descriptors, ADME Keys, and ECFP_6 fingerprints, various highly predictive models were developed. The best performance of the models shows 80 and 75% prediction accuracy for the test and validation sets, respectively. A detailed analysis of results will be shown, including an assessment of the prediction confidence, the significant descriptors, and the application of these models to drug discovery projects.

  7. Chromosome Studies of Virus-infected Semi-continuous Human Embryonic Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, A. J.; Taylor, P. E.; Jacobs, J. P.; Jones, C. A.

    1970-01-01

    Semi-continuous human embryonic liver cells infected with San Carlos virus 3 exhibited an increased frequency of chromosomal breaks and other chromosomal abnormalities when compared with uninoculated control cultures. The chromosomes of cells inoculated with AR-17 virus retained their normal structure. The strain of liver cells used in this study is essentially diploid. It represents the first strain of diploid cells so far described from human liver. ImagesFigs. 2-3Fig. 1 PMID:4985032

  8. Left lobe living donor liver transplantation in adults: What is the safety limit?

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Toru; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Sakata, Kazuhito; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Harimoto, Norifumi; Harada, Noboru; Itoh, Shinji; Nagatsu, Akihisa; Soejima, Yuji; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    Small-for-size syndrome (SFSS) is the most significant cause of graft loss after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), especially after left lobe (LL) LDLT in adults. The safety limit of applying LL-LDLT in adults without severe SFSS with a high rate of lethality needs to be determined. A total of 207 LL-LDLTs in adults since September 2005 were evaluated to analyze the risk factors for severe SFSS, defined as a serum total bilirubin concentration of ≥20.0 mg/dL after LDLT. Although there were no significant differences in cumulative graft survival after LDLT between medium grafts (graft volume [GV] to standard liver volume [SLV] ratio ≥ 40.0%), small grafts (35.0% ≤ GV/SLV < 40.0%), and extra small grafts (GV/SLV < 35.0%), patients with severe SFSS showed a significantly lower 5-year graft survival rate than those without (42.9% versus 94.3%, respectively; P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis for severe SFSS after LL-LDLT showed that donor age of ≥48 years (P = 0.01), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of ≥ 19 (P < 0.01), and end portal venous pressure of ≥19 mm Hg (P = 0.04) were the significant and independent factors for severe SFSS after LL-LDLT. Within such high-risk subgroups of patients with a donor age of ≥48 years or MELD score of ≥ 19 before LDLT, operative blood loss volume of ≥8.0 L was a risk factor for severe SFSS. LL-LDLT in adults could be indicated and provide acceptable outcomes for the combinations of donors aged < 48 years and recipients with a MELD score of <19. Smaller grafts might yield acceptable outcomes in appropriately selected donor-recipient combinations. Liver Transplantation 22 1666-1675 2016 AASLD.

  9. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Catherine C.; Hendriks, Delilah F. G.; Moro, Sabrina M. L.; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C. A.; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B. Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Goldring, Christopher E. P.; Lauschke, Volker M.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  10. Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Mateevici, Cristina; Lin, Belinda; Chandra, Ronil V; Chong, Victor H T

    2015-11-01

    Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection.

  11. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  12. Steroid metabolism in chimeric mice with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Lootens, Leen; Van Eenoo, Peter; Meuleman, Philip; Pozo, Oscar J; Van Renterghem, Pieter; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Delbeke, Frans T

    2009-11-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are considered to be doping agents and are prohibited in sports. Their metabolism needs to be elucidated to allow for urinary detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Steroid metabolism was assessed using uPA(+/+) SCID mice with humanized livers (chimeric mice). This study presents the results of 19-norandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione (19-norAD) administration to these in vivo mice. As in humans, 19-norandrosterone and 19-noretiocholanolone are the major detectable metabolites of 19-norAD in the urine of chimeric mice.A summary is given of the metabolic pathways found in chimeric mice after administration of three model steroid compounds (methandienone, androst-4-ene-3,17-dione and 19-norandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione). From these studies we can conclude that all major metabolic pathways for anabolic steroids in humans are present in the chimeric mouse. It is hoped that, in future, this promising chimeric mouse model might assist the discovery of new and possible longer detectable metabolites of (designer) steroids.

  13. Effect of the Human Amniotic Membrane on Liver Regeneration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Şahin, Sevinç; Arslan, Ergin; Börekci, Hasan; Metin, Bayram; Cantürk, Nuh Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Operations are performed for broader liver surgery indications for a better understanding of hepatic anatomy/physiology and developments in operation technology. Surgery can cure some patients with liver metastasis of some tumors. Nevertheless, postoperative liver failure is the most feared complication causing mortality in patients who have undergone excision of a large liver mass. The human amniotic membrane has regenerative effects. Thus, we investigated the effects of the human amniotic membrane on regeneration of the resected liver. Methods. Twenty female Wistar albino rats were divided into control and experimental groups and underwent a 70% hepatectomy. The human amniotic membrane was placed over the residual liver in the experimental group. Relative liver weight, histopathological features, and biochemical parameters were assessed on postoperative day 3. Results. Total protein and albumin levels were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group. No difference in relative liver weight was observed between the groups. Hepatocyte mitotic count was significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Hepatic steatosis was detected in the experimental group. Conclusion. Applying the amniotic membrane to residual liver adversely affected liver regeneration. However, mesenchymal stem cell research has the potential to accelerate liver regeneration investigations. PMID:26457000

  14. Human Cord Blood Stem Cells Generate Human Cytokeratin 18-Negative Hepatocyte-Like Cells in Injured Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amar Deep; Cantz, Tobias; Richter, Rudolf; Eckert, Klaus; Henschler, Reinhard; Wilkens, Ludwig; Jochheim-Richter, Andrea; Arseniev, Lubomir; Ott, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Differentiation of adult bone marrow (BM) cells into nonhematopoietic cells is a rare phenomenon. Several reports, however, suggest that human umbilical cord blood (hUCB)-derived cells give rise to hepatocytes after transplantation into nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice. Therefore, we analyzed the hepatic differentiation potential of hUCB cells and compared the frequency of newly formed hepatocyte-like cells in the livers of recipient NOD-SCID mice after transplantation of hUCB versus murine BM cells. Mononuclear cell preparations of hUCB cells or murine BM from enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic or wild-type mice were transplanted into sublethally irradiated NOD-SCID mice. Liver regeneration was induced by carbon tetrachloride injury with and without sub-sequent hepatocyte growth factor treatment. By immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction, we detected clusters of hepatocyte-like cells in the livers of hUCB-transplanted mice. These cells expressed human albumin and Hep Par 1 but mouse CK18, suggesting the formation of chimeric hepatocyte-like cells. Native fluorescence microscopy and double immunofluorescence failed to detect single hepatocytes derived from transplanted enhanced green fluorescent protein-transgenic mouse BM. Fluorescent in situ hybridization rarely revealed donor-derived hepatocyte-like cells after cross-gender mouse BM transplantation. Thus, hUCB cells have differentiation capabilities different from murine BM cells after transplantation into NOD-SCID mice, demonstrating the importance of further testing before hUCB cells can be used therapeutically. PMID:16049339

  15. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  16. Proteomic Study of Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium Vivax Liver Stages for Development of Vaccines and Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-02

    Proteomic Study of Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium Vivax Liver Stages for Development of Vaccines and Drugs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteomic Study of Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium Vivax 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-2-0090 Liver Stages...3. Production of sporozoite and preparation for transcriptome and proteomic analysis: Sporozoites harvested from salivary gland, haemolymph

  17. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin.

    Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  18. A Convenient and Efficient Method to Enrich and Maintain Highly Proliferative Human Fetal Liver Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuan; Wang, Shu; Dou, Ya-ling; Guo, Xiang-fei; Chen, Zhao-li; Wang, Xin-wei; Shen, Zhi-qiang; Qiu, Zhi-gang; Jin, Min; Li, Jun-wen

    2015-06-01

    Pluripotent human hepatic stem cells have broad research and clinical applications, which are, however, restricted by both limited resources and technical difficulties with respect to isolation of stem cells from the adult or fetal liver. In this study, we developed a convenient and efficient method involving a two-step in situ collagenase perfusion, gravity sedimentation, and Percoll density gradient centrifugation to enrich and maintain highly proliferative human fetal liver stem cells (hFLSCs). Using this method, the isolated hFLSCs entered into the exponential growth phase within 10 days and maintained sufficient proliferative activity to permit subculture for at least 20 passages without differentiation. Immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry results showed that these cells expressed stem cell markers, such as c-kit, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), oval cell marker-6 (OV-6), epithelial marker cytokeratin 18 (CK18), biliary ductal marker CK19, and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Gene expression analysis showed that these cells had stable mRNA expression of c-Kit, EpCAM, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), CK19, CK18, AFP, and claudin 3 (CLDN-3) throughout each passage while maintaining low levels of ALB, but with complete absence of cytochrome P450 3A4 (C3A4), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), telomeric repeat binding factor (TRF), and connexin 26 (CX26) expression. When grown in appropriate medium, these isolated liver stem cells could differentiate into hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, osteoblasts, adipocytes, or endothelial cells. Thus, we have demonstrated a more economical and efficient method to isolate hFLSCs than magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). This novel approach may provide an excellent tool to isolate highly proliferative hFLSCs for tissue engineering and regenerative therapies.

  19. Adult human brain cell culture for neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Hannah M; Dragunow, Mike

    2010-06-01

    Studies of the brain have progressed enormously through the use of in vivo and in vitro non-human models. However, it is unlikely such studies alone will unravel the complexities of the human brain and so far no neuroprotective treatment developed in animals has worked in humans. In this review we discuss the use of adult human brain cell culture methods in brain research to unravel the biology of the normal and diseased human brain. The advantages of using adult human brain cells as tools to study human brain function from both historical and future perspectives are discussed. In particular, studies using dissociated cultures of adult human microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons are described and the applications of these types of study are evaluated. Alternative sources of human brain cells such as adult neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and slice cultures of adult human brain tissue are also reviewed. These adult human brain cell culture methods could benefit basic research and more importantly, facilitate the translation of basic neuroscience research to the clinic for the treatment of brain disorders.

  20. Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells to model monogenic metabolic disorders of the liver.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Maria Paulina; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2012-11-01

    A crucial problem in liver disease biology and a major obstacle to the development of new therapies is the inability to conduct mechanistic studies of live human hepatocytes. Liver tissue from patients is difficult to obtain and only reveals the disease aftermath, while animal models lack the significant genetic diversity of humans. Monogenic metabolic disorders of the liver are an ideal platform to explore the complex gene-environment interactions and the role of genetic variation in the onset and progression of liver disease. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC) technology provides an unprecedented opportunity to generate live cellular models of disease for therapeutic candidate discovery and cell replacement therapy. In this review, we discuss the potential of hIPSC to increase our understanding of human disease with a focus on the current efforts to model metabolic diseases of the liver and to generate suitable populations of human hepatocytes for cell transplantation.

  1. Immunohistochemical Heterogeneity of the Endothelium of Blood and Lymphatic Vessels in the Developing Human Liver and in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Ivan; Todorović, Vera; Petrović, Aleksandar; Petrović, Vladimir; Jović, Marko; Vladičić, Jelena; Puškaš, Nela

    2017-01-01

    The endothelium of liver sinusoids in relation to the endothelium of other blood vessels has specific antigen expression similar to the endothelium of lymphatic vessels. Bearing in mind that there is no consensus as to the period or intensity of the expression of certain antigens in the endothelium of blood and lymphatic vessels in the liver, the aim of our study was to immunohistochemically investigate the dynamic patterns of the expression of CD31, CD34, D2-40, and LYVE-1 antigens during liver development and in adulthood on paraffin tissue sections of human livers of 4 embryos, 38 fetuses, 6 neonates, and 6 adults. The results show that, in a histologically immature liver at the end of the embryonic period, CD34 molecules are expressed only on vein endothelium localized in developing portal areas, whereby the difference between portal venous branches and CD34-negative central veins belongs to the collecting venous system. In the fetal period, with aging, expression of CD34 and CD31 molecules on the endothelium of central veins and blood vessels of the portal areas increases. Sinusoidal endothelium shows light and sporadic CD34 immunoreactivity in the late embryonic and fetal periods, and is lost in the neonatal and adult periods, unlike CD31 immunoreactivity, which is poorly expressed in the fetal and neonatal periods but is present in adults. The endothelium of sinusoids and lymphatic vessels express LYVE-1, and the endothelium of lymphatic vessels express LYVE-1 and D2-40 but not CD34. Similarity between the sinusoidal and lymphatic endothelium includes the fact that both types are LYVE-1 positive and CD34 negative.

  2. The dynamics of adult neurogenesis in human hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ihunwo, Amadi O.; Tembo, Lackson H.; Dzamalala, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of adult neurogenesis is now an accepted occurrence in mammals and also in humans. At least two discrete places house stem cells for generation of neurons in adult brain. These are olfactory system and the hippocampus. In animals, newly generated neurons have been directly or indirectly demonstrated to generate a significant amount of new neurons to have a functional role. However, the data in humans on the extent of this process is still scanty and such as difficult to comprehend its functional role in humans. This paper explores the available data on as extent of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in humans and makes comparison to animal data. PMID:28197172

  3. Photoacoustic physio-chemical analysis of liver conditions in animal and human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Xu, Guan; Tian, Chao; Wan, Shanshan; Welling, Theodore H.; Lok, Anna S. F.; Rubin, Jonathan M.

    2016-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease affecting 30% of the population in the United States. Biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosing NAFLD. Liver histology assesses the amount of fat, and determines type and extent of cell injury, inflammation and fibrosis. However, liver biopsy is invasive and is limited by sampling error. Current radiological diagnostic modalities can evaluate the 'physical' morphology in liver by quantifying the backscattered US signals, but cannot interrogate the 'histochemical' components forming these backscatterers. For example, ultrasound (US) imaging can detect the presence of fat but cannot differentiate steatosis alone from steatohepatitis. Our previous study of photoacoustic physiochemical analysis (PAPCA) has demonstrated that this method can characterize the histological changes in livers during the progression of NAFLD in animal models. In this study, we will further validate PAPCA with human livers. Ex vivo human liver samples with steatosis, fibrosis and cirrhosis will be scanned using optical illumination at wavelengths of 680-1700 nm and compared to histology results. In vivo study on human subjects with confirmed steatosis is planned using our PA-ultrasound (US) parallel imaging system based on Verasonic US imaging flatform with an L7-4 probe. 10 mJ/cm2 per pulse optical energy at 755 nm will be delivered to the skin surface, which is under the safety limit of American National Standard Institute. Preliminary study with ex vivo human tissue has demonstrated the potential of the proposed approach in differentiating human liver conditions.

  4. Vascular complications after adult living donor liver transplantation: Evaluation with ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Lu, Qiang; Luo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been widely used to treat end-stage liver disease with improvement in surgical technology and the application of new immunosuppressants. Vascular complications after liver transplantation remain a major threat to the survival of recipients. LDLT recipients are more likely to develop vascular complications because of their complex vascular reconstruction and the slender vessels. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical for the survival of graft and recipients. As a non-invasive, cost-effective and non-radioactive method with bedside availability, conventional gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography play important roles in identifying vascular complications in the early postoperative period and during the follow-up. Recently, with the detailed vascular tracing and perfusion visualization, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has significantly improved the diagnosis of postoperative vascular complications. This review focuses on the role of conventional gray-scale ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound and CEUS for early diagnosis of vascular complications after adult LDLT. PMID:26819527

  5. Comparison of liver progenitor cells in human atypical ductular reactions with those seen in experimental models of liver injury.

    PubMed

    Sell, S

    1998-02-01

    The ultrastructural characteristics of liver progenitor cell types of human atypical ductular reactions seen in chronic cholestasis, in regenerating human liver after submassive necrosis, in alcoholic liver disease, and in focal nodular hyperplasia are compared with liver progenitor cell types seen during experimental cholangiocarcinogenesis in hamsters; during hepatocarcinogenesis in rats; and in response to periportal liver injury induced by allyl alcohol in rats. Three types of progenitor cells have been identified in human atypical ductular reactions: type I: primitive, has an oval shape, marginal chromatin, few cellular organelles, rare tonofilaments, and forms desmosomal junctions with adjacent liver cells; type II: bile duct-like, is located within ducts, has few organelles, and forms lateral membrane interdigitations with other duct-like cells; and type III: hepatocyte-like, is located in hepatic cords, forms a bile canaliculus, has tight junctions with other hepatocyte-like cells, prominent mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum, and some have lysosomes and a poorly developed Golgi apparatus. Each type is seen during cholangiocarcinogenesis in hamsters, but the most prominent cell type is type II, duct-like. A more primitive cell type ("type 0 cell"), as well as type I cells, are seen in the intraportal zone of the liver within 1 to 2 days after carcinogen exposure or periportal injury in the rat, but both type II and type III are seen later as the progenitor cells expand into the liver lobule. After allyl alcohol injury, type 0 cells precede the appearance of type I and type III cells, but most of the cells that span the periportal necrotic zone are type III hepatocyte-like cells showing different degrees of hepatocytic differentiation. Some type II cells are also seen, but these are essentially limited to ducts. It is concluded that there is a primitive stem cell type in the liver (type 0) that may differentiate directly into type I and then into

  6. Isolation and cultivation of adult primary bovine hepatocytes from abattoir derived liver

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, Sonja; Schmicke, Marion

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to establish a cell culture of adult primary bovine hepatocytes obtained from liver following slaughter and to cultivate the cells in a sandwich culture. Cells and medium samples were taken after separation of cells (day 0), during monolayer (days 1, 2 and 3) and during sandwich culture (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 14). The mRNA expression of BAX, BCL2L, FAS, IGF-1 and GHR1A was measured as well as urea and LDH. Hepatocytes were obtained by using a two-step collagenase perfusion and were purified thereafter by density gradient centrifugation. The viability was 68.2 ± 9.5 %. In sandwich culture, cells have a typical polygonal hepatocyte-like shape, build cell-cell contacts, and show irregularity of cell borders suggesting bile canaliculi generation. The BAX mRNA expression increased on day 1 as well but decreased steadily until day 3 and remained constant for 14 days. Urea- and LDH-concentrations increased from day 4 to day 7. In conclusion, we found that it is possible to gather viable primary hepatocytes from adult bovine liver after slaughter, and that cells gathered this way show typical morphologies, urea-production and low LDH-leakage especially at day 4 in a sandwich system. PMID:28275320

  7. Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation with ABO-Incompatible Grafts: A German Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Goralczyk, Armin D.; Obed, Aiman; Schnitzbauer, Andreas; Doenecke, Axel; Tsui, Tung Yu; Scherer, Marcus N.; Ramadori, Giuliano; Lorf, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Adult living donor liver transplantations (ALDLTs) across the ABO blood group barrier have been reported in Asia, North Americas, and Europe, but not yet in Germany. Several strategies have been established to overcome the detrimental effects that are attached with such a disparity between donor and host, but no gold standard has yet emerged. Here, we present the first experiences with three ABO-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantations in Germany applying different immunosuppressive strategies. Four patient-donor couples were considered for ABO-incompatible ALDLT. In these patients, resident ABO blood group antibodies (isoagglutinins) were depleted by plasmapheresis or immunoadsorption and replenishment was inhibited by splenectomy and/or B-cell-targeted immunosuppression. Despite different treatments ALDLT could safely be performed in three patients and all patients had good initial graft function without signs for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Two patients had long-term graft survival with stable graft function. We thus propose the feasibility of ABO-incompatible ALDLT with these protocols and advocate further expansion of ABO incompatible ALDLT in multicenter trials to improve efficacy and safety. PMID:20148072

  8. ABO-Incompatible Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Under the Desensitization Protocol With Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Song, G-W; Lee, S-G; Hwang, S; Kim, K-H; Ahn, C-S; Moon, D-B; Ha, T-Y; Jung, D-H; Park, G-C; Kim, W-J; Sin, M-H; Yoon, Y-I; Kang, W-H; Kim, S-H; Tak, E-Y

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatibility is no longer considered a contraindication for adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT) due to various strategies to overcome the ABO blood group barrier. We report the largest single-center experience of ABO-incompatible (ABOi) ALDLT in 235 adult patients. The desensitization protocol included a single dose of rituximab and total plasma exchange. In addition, local graft infusion therapy, cyclophosphamide, or splenectomy was used for a certain time period, but these treatments were eventually discontinued due to adverse events. There were three cases (1.3%) of in-hospital mortality. The cumulative 3-year graft and patient survival rates were 89.2% and 92.3%, respectively, and were comparable to those of the ABO-compatible group (n = 1301). Despite promising survival outcomes, 17 patients (7.2%) experienced antibody-mediated rejection that manifested as diffuse intrahepatic biliary stricture; six cases required retransplantation, and three patients died. ABOi ALDLT is a feasible method for expanding a living liver donor pool, but the efficacy of the desensitization protocol in targeting B cell immunity should be optimized.

  9. Omega-3-enriched lipid emulsion for liver salvage in parenteral nutrition-induced cholestasis in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Jurewitsch, Brian; Gardiner, Geoffrey; Naccarato, Mark; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed N

    2011-05-01

    The intrahepatic cholestasis attributed to parenteral nutrition (PN) in the adult patient is relatively rare and usually occurs in patients receiving long-term PN. This article reports the first case of an adult patient with cholestatic PN-associated liver disease without sepsis who received almost all her nutrition requirements through PN. Administration of an ω-3-enriched lipid emulsion added to the PN regimen reversed cholestasis and demonstrated histologic improvement on serial liver biopsy. The patient had failed to respond to other modalities of treatment for this condition and was deeply jaundiced. Liver biochemistry profiles returned to baseline, and follow-up liver biopsy showed that cholestasis had resolved and that the only residual changes were mild portal inflammation with no histochemical or ultrastructural progression. The PN regimen for the patient was restored to provide total estimated energy requirements and remains the principle source of the patient's nutrition to date.

  10. Eomeshi NK Cells in Human Liver Are Long-Lived and Do Not Recirculate but Can Be Replenished from the Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Cuff, Antonia O.; Robertson, Francis P.; Stegmann, Kerstin A.; Pallett, Laura J.; Maini, Mala K.; Davidson, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Human liver contains an Eomeshi population of NK cells that is not present in the blood. In this study, we show that these cells are characterized by a molecular signature that mediates their retention in the liver. By examining liver transplants where donors and recipients are HLA mismatched, we distinguish between donor liver–derived and recipient-derived leukocytes to show that Eomeslo NK cells circulate freely whereas Eomeshi NK cells are unable to leave the liver. Furthermore, Eomeshi NK cells are retained in the liver for up to 13 y. Therefore, Eomeshi NK cells are long-lived liver-resident cells. We go on to show that Eomeshi NK cells can be recruited from the circulation during adult life and that circulating Eomeslo NK cells are able to upregulate Eomes and molecules mediating liver retention under cytokine conditions similar to those in the liver. This suggests that circulating NK cells are a precursor of their liver-resident counterparts. PMID:27798170

  11. Differential expression of HLA class II antigens on human fetal and adult lymphocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J A; Jones, D B; Evans, P R; Smith, J L

    1985-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies to monomorphic determinants of the MHC class II subregion locus products: DP, DR and DQ, was used to investigate the expression of these antigens on early lymphocytes and macrophages from human fetal liver (13-20 weeks), placenta (16 weeks and term) and cord blood, in relation to the class II phenotype of cells from adult tonsil and peripheral blood. Fetal liver sections and cell suspensions showed differential expression of class II antigens. DP was expressed at a higher frequency (11.0% of nucleated cells) than DR on lymphoid cells and macrophages from fetal liver, and DQ was either absent or expressed on less than 0.3% of nucleated cells. Consistent with this finding, DP but not DR or DQ antigens were observed on vascular elements and macrophages in the villi of 16-week placenta. At term, all three subregion locus products were expressed. Adult tonsil and peripheral blood B lymphocytes expressed DP, DR and DQ antigens with similar frequency; however, DQ was expressed at a lower frequency than DP and DR on cord blood B lymphocytes. In contrast, 30-50% macrophages from cord blood and adult peripheral blood expressed DP and DR, but fewer (5% and 18%, respectively) expressed DQ. These data suggest that class II antigens are expressed in the sequence DP, DR, DQ on developing lymphocytes. A similar sequence is suggested for macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3894221

  12. Comparison between psychosocial long-term outcomes of recipients and donors after adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Noma, Shun'ichi; Hayashi, Akiko; Uehara, Minako; Uemoto, Shinji; Murai, Toshiya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine psychosocial states of recipients and donors several years after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to find out the pre-transplant predictors of desirable post-transplant psychosocial states. The recipients and donors of adult-to-adult LDLT at Kyoto University Hospital, Japan, from November 2001 through July 2003 were interviewed and examined by means of questionnaires about anxiety, depression, and quality of life (QOL), and the participants were evaluated by the same test batteries sent by mail three to five yr after LDLT. Twenty-seven pairs of recipients and donors, 13 recipients, and three donors participated in this study. The recipients and the donors had a decline in social QOL. The main predictor of psychosocial states of the recipients was the length of wait for LDLT, and the predictors of the donors were family or support system availability and recipients' depressive states at LDLT. The donors who were spouses of the recipients had better QOL than other donors. It might be better to perform LDLT as soon as possible once LDLT has been judged to be necessary, and the relative who is on close terms with the recipient should be selected as donor.

  13. Discoidin domain receptor 1: isoform expression and potential functions in cirrhotic human liver.

    PubMed

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A; Wang, Xin M; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2011-03-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell-collagen interactions in chronic liver injury.

  14. Adult Human Neurogenesis: From Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases. PMID:21519376

  15. Adult human neurogenesis: from microscopy to magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases.

  16. Risk Factors for Intractable Ascites After Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Using Left Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Matsudaira, Shinichi; Ishizaki, Yoichi; Yoshimoto, Jiro; Fujiwara, Noriko; Kawasaki, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Background Intractable ascites is one of the causes of graft loss after adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using a small graft. Identification of factors associated with increasing posttransplant ascites has important implications for prevention and treatment. Methods All 59 consecutive adult patients who underwent left lobe LDLT without portal inflow modulation between October 2002 and February 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Factors associated with the average daily amount of ascites for 2 weeks after LDLT were assessed. Results The median daily amount of ascites during the 2 weeks was 1052 mL (range, 52-3480 mL). Although 16 of the 59 patients developed intractable ascites, exceeding 1500 mL daily (massive ascites group), the remaining 43 patients produced less than 1500 mL of ascites daily (nonmassive ascites group). The presence of pretransplant ascites (P = 0.001), albumin (P = 0.011), albumin/globulin ratio (P = 0.026), cold ischemia time (P = 0.004), operation time (P = 0.022), and pretransplant portal vein pressure (PVP) (P = 0.047) differed significantly between the 2 groups. Neither posttransplant PVP nor portal vein flow differed between the 2 groups. The variables associated with intractable ascites that remained significant after logistic regression analysis were pretransplant PVP (P = 0.047) and cold ischemia time (P = 0.049). After appropriate fluid resuscitation for intractable ascites, 58 (98%) of the 59 recipients were discharged from hospital after removal of the indwelling drains. Conclusions It is important to shorten the scold ischemia time to reduce massive ascites after LDLT. Pretransplant portal hypertension is more closely associated with ascites production than posttransplant hemodynamic status. PMID:28361122

  17. Molecular expression and enzymatic characterization of thioredoxin from the carcinogenic human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini.

    PubMed

    Suttiprapa, Sutas; Matchimakul, Pitchaya; Loukas, Alex; Laha, Thewarach; Wongkham, Sopit; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Brindley, Paul J; Sripa, Banchob

    2012-03-01

    The human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, induces inflammation of the hepatobiliary system. Despite being constantly exposed to inimical oxygen radicals released from inflammatory cells, the parasite survives for years. Defense against oxidative damage can be mediated through glutathione and/or thioredoxin utilizing systems. Here, we report the molecular expression and biochemical characterization of a thioredoxin (Trx) from O. viverrini. O. viverrini Trx cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 105 amino acid residues, of molecular mass 11.63 kDa. The predicted protein has similarity to previously characterized thioredoxins with 26-51% identity. Recombinant O. viverrini Trx (Ov-Trx-1) was expressed as soluble protein in E. coli. The recombinant protein showed insulin reduction activity and supported the enzymatic function of O. viverrini thioredoxin peroxidase. Expression of Ov-Trx-1 at mRNA and protein levels was observed in all obtainable developmental stages of the liver fluke. Ov-Trx-1 was also detected in excretory-secretory products released by adult O. viverrini. Immunohistochemistry, Ov-Trx-1 was expressed in nearly all parasite tissue excepted ovary and mature sperms. Interestingly, Ov-Trx-1 was observed in the infected biliary epithelium but not in normal bile ducts. These results suggest that Ov-Trx-1 is essential for the parasite throughout the life cycle. In the host-parasite interaction aspect, Ov-Trx-1 may support thioredoxin peroxidase in protecting the parasite against damage induced by reactive oxygen species from inflammation.

  18. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response. PMID:27127520

  19. Concise Review: Organoids Are a Powerful Tool for the Study of Liver Disease and Personalized Treatment Design in Humans and Animals

    PubMed Central

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak; de Bruin, Alain; Rothuizen, Jan; Penning, Louis C.

    2016-01-01

    Organoids are three-dimensional culture systems in which adult stem cells and their progeny grow and represent the native physiology of the cells in vivo. Organoids have been successfully derived from several organ systems in both animal models and human patients. Organoids have been used for fundamental research, disease modeling, drug testing, and transplantation. In this review, we summarize the applications of liver-derived organoids and discuss their potential. It is likely that organoids will provide an invaluable tool to unravel disease mechanisms, design novel (personalized) treatment strategies, and generate autologous stem cells for gene editing and transplantation purposes. Significance Organoids derived from the liver have hepatocellular differentiation potential and can be an unlimited source for hepatocytes for application in in vitro toxicology testing and for transplantation purposes as an alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. The in vitro representation of the native physiology and epigenetic background of the adult liver stem cells makes the organoid technology an excellent tool to study and model liver diseases, for drug screening, and for the design of personalized treatments. This review summarizes the applications of liver organoids and discusses their potential in the study and modeling of liver diseases, and in the development and testing of novel drugs. PMID:26798060

  20. Detection of morphine-3-sulfate and morphine-6-sulfate in human urine and plasma, and formation in liver cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Maria; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Ekström, Lena; Bergqvist, Lena; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Rane, Anders; Beck, Olof

    2014-01-01

    Morphine is still the mainstay in treatment of severe pain and is metabolized in the liver mainly by glucuronidation, partly to the pharmacologically active morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G). The sulfation pathway has attracted much less attention but may also form active metabolites. The aim of the present study was to study two sulfate metabolites of morphine in humans. Urine and plasma from newborns, adult heroin addicts, and terminal cancer patients was analyzed for the presence of morphine-3-sulfate (M3S) and morphine-6-sulfate (M6S) by a new liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. In addition, morphine sulfation was studied in vitro in human liver cytosol preparations. M3S was present in urine and plasma from all study groups although at lower concentrations than morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G). The plasma M3S/M3G ratio was 30 times higher in newborns than in adults indicating that the relative sulfation is more important at early stage of life. M6S was measurable in only one plasma sample from a newborn patient, and in one of the urine sample from the drug testing group. The incubation of morphine with liver cytosol extracts resulted in approximately equal rate of formation of both M3S and M6S. In conclusion, sulfation of morphine is catalyzed in human liver but this minor metabolic pathway probably lacks clinical significance. The M6S metabolite is formed at a low rate, making it undetectable in most individuals. PMID:25505615

  1. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and carotid artery atherosclerosis in children and adults: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Madan, Shivank A; John, Febin; Pyrsopoulos, Nikolaos; Pitchumoni, Capecomorin S

    2015-11-01

    Observational studies suggest that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with increased carotid intimal medial thickness (C-IMT) and carotid plaques in both children and adults. We carried out a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between NAFLD and carotid atherosclerosis measured as C-IMT and carotid plaque prevalence. Medline (Ovid), PubMed, Web of Science, and CINAHL databases were searched from 1946 to September 2014, complemented with a manual review of references of the published articles for studies that compared C-IMT or carotid plaque prevalence in adults and children. Results were pooled using both fixed and random effects models. Of the studies identified, 20 were suitable for testing the effect of NAFLD on C-IMT in adults, 13 for testing the effect of NAFLD on carotid plaque prevalence in adults, and five for testing the effect of NAFLD on C-IMT in the pediatric population. The pooled data from 20 studies (19,274 adult participants: NAFLD=8652, controls=10,622) showed significantly increased C-IMT in patients with NAFLD, compared with controls without NAFLD, according to both fixed [standardized mean difference (SMD)=0.251, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.220-0.282, P<0.001] and random effects models (SMD=0.944, 95% CI: 0.728-1.160, P<0.001). NAFLD was also found to be associated with a higher carotid artery plaque prevalence when compared with controls, according to both fixed (OR=1.273, 95% CI=1.162-1.394, P<0.001) and random effects models (OR=1.769, 95% CI: 1.213-2.581, P=0.003), on pooling of 13 studies (14,445 adult participants: NAFLD=5399 and controls=9046). Analysis of pooled data from five studies in the pediatric population (1121 pediatric participants: NAFLD=312 and controls=809) also found NAFLD to be associated with significantly increased C-IMT according to fixed (SMD=0.995, 95% CI: 0.840-1.150, P<0.001) and random effects models (1.083, 95% CI: 0.457-1.709, P=0.001). NAFLD is associated with increased C-IMT in

  2. Campylobacter spp. in New Zealand raw sheep liver and human campylobacteriosis cases.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, A J; Nicol, C; Hudson, J A

    2005-03-01

    Sheep liver samples were tested for the presence and numbers of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli during both spring and autumn. Over the same period, isolates were obtained from human clinical cases from the same geographical area as where the food samples were purchased. A subset of the C. jejuni isolates was typed by both Penner serotyping and pulsed field gel electrophoresis using the restriction enzyme SmaI, to estimate the proportion of liver isolate types that were also isolated from human cases of campylobacteriosis. Of the 272 liver samples tested, 180 (66.2%) contained Campylobacter. Most of the positive samples contained <3 MPN/g of the organism, and only 12 (6.7%) were contaminated at a level exceeding 100 MPN/g. A total of 180 C. jejuni isolates were obtained from sheep liver and another 200 from human faeces. Of these, 212 isolates were randomly selected for typing, half from raw liver and half from human faeces. More than half (61.1%) of the 106 C. jejuni isolates from liver were of subtypes that were also isolated from human cases. While the C. jejuni present in sheep liver were mostly of subtypes also isolated from human cases, the significance of this food as a vehicle of human campylobacteriosis needs to be examined further in respect to other factors such as dose-response information, consumption data, frequency of undercooking and cross contamination.

  3. Developing Resourceful Humans. Adult Education within the Economic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynn Elen, Ed.

    This book, which explores the shifting paradigm from human resource development to developing resourceful humans, establishes the historical position of adult education within the economic context, discusses human capital propositions, and examines the learning dimensions of economic and educational change. The following chapters are included:…

  4. Role of Chymase in the Development of Liver Cirrhosis and Its Complications: Experimental and Human Data

    PubMed Central

    Sansoè, Giovanni; Aragno, Manuela; Mastrocola, Raffaella; Mengozzi, Giulio; Novo, Erica; Parola, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue Angiotensin II (Ang-II), produced through local non ACE-dependent pathways, stimulates liver fibrogenesis, renal vasoconstriction and sodium retention. Aim To highlight chymase-dependent pathway of Ang-II production in liver and kidney during cirrhosis development. Methods Liver histology, portal pressure, liver and kidney function, and hormonal status were investigated in rat liver cirrhosis induced through 13 weeks of CCl4, with or without chymase inhibitor SF2809E, administered between 4th and 13th CCl4 weeks; liver and kidney chymase immunolocation and Ang-II content were assessed. Chymase immunohistochemistry was also assessed in normal and cirrhotic human liver, and chymase mRNA transcripts were measured in human HepG2 cells and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC/MFs) in vitro. Results Rats receiving both CCl4 and SF2809E showed liver fibrotic septa focally linking portal tracts but no cirrhosis, as compared to ascitic cirrhotic rats receiving CCl4. SF2809E reduced portal pressure, plasma bilirubin, tissue content of Ang-II, plasma renin activity, norepinephrine and vasopressin, and increased glomerular filtration rate, water clearance, urinary sodium excretion. Chymase tissue content was increased and detected in α-SMA-positive liver myofibroblasts and in kidney tubular cells of cirrhotic rats. In human cirrhosis, chymase was located in hepatocytes of regenerative nodules. Human HepG2 cells and HSC/MFs responded to TGF-β1 by up-regulating chymase mRNA transcription. Conclusions Chymase, through synthesis of Ang-II and other mediators, plays a role in the derangement of liver and kidney function in chronic liver diseases. In human cirrhosis, chymase is well-represented and apt to become a future target of pharmacological treatment. PMID:27637026

  5. Characterisation of theophylline metabolism in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Robson, R A; Matthews, A P; Miners, J O; McManus, M E; Meyer, U A; Hall, P M; Birkett, D J

    1987-01-01

    1. A radiometric high performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the assay of theophylline metabolism in vitro by the microsomal fraction of human liver. 2. Formation of the three metabolites of theophylline (3-methylxanthine, 1-methylxanthine and 1,3-dimethyluric acid) were linear with protein concentrations to 4 mg ml-1 and with incubation times up to 180 min. 3. The coefficients of variation for the formation of 3-methylxanthine, 1-methylxanthine and 1,3-dimethyluric acid were 1.2%, 1% and 1.6%, respectively. 4. Theophylline is metabolised by microsomal enzymes with a requirement for NADPH. 5. The mean (n = 7) Km values for 1-demethylation, 3-demethylation and 8-hydroxylation were 545, 630 and 788 microM, respectively, and the mean Vmax values were 2.65, 2.84 and 11.23 pmol min-1 mg-1, respectively. 6. There was a high correlation between the Km and Vmax values for the two demethylation pathways suggesting that the demethylations are performed by the same enzyme. 7. Overall the in vitro studies are consistent with the in vivo results which suggest the involvement of two cytochrome P-450 isozymes in the metabolism of theophylline. PMID:3663445

  6. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  7. Treatment of surgically induced acute liver failure with transplantation of highly differentiated immortalized human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Miyazaki, M; Fukaya, K; Inoue, Y; Sakaguchi, M; Noguchi, H; Matsumura, T; Watanabe, T; Totsugawa, T; Tanaka, N; Namba, M

    2000-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes are an ideal source of hepatic function in bioartficial liver (BAL), but the shortage of human livers available for hepatocyte isolation limits this modality. To resolve this issue, primary human fetal hepatocytes were immortalized using simian virus 40 large T antigen. One of the immortal cell lines, OUMS-29, showed highly differentiated liver functions. Intrasplenic transplantation of OUMS-29 cells protected 90% hepatectomized rats from hyperammonemia and significantly prolonged their survival. Essentially unlimited availability of OUMS-29 cells supports their clinical use for BAL treatment.

  8. Macrophage derived Wnt signalling opposes Notch signalling in a Numb mediated manner to specify HPC fate in chronic liver disease in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Boulter, Luke; Govaere, Olivier; Bird, Tom G; Radulescu, Sorina; Ramachandran, Prakash; Pellicoro, Antonella; Ridgway, Rachel A; Seo, Sang Soo; Spee, Bart; Van Rooijen, Nico; Sansom, Owen J.; Iredale, John P; Lowell, Sally; Roskams, Tania; Forbes, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    During chronic injury, regeneration of the adult liver becomes impaired. In this context bipotent Hepatic Progenitor Cells (HPCs) become activated and can regenerate both cholangiocytes and hepatocytes. Notch and Wnt signalling during hepatic ontogeny are described, but their roles in HPC mediated liver regeneration are unclear. Here we show in human diseased liver and murine models of the ductular reaction with biliary and hepatocyte regeneration that Notch and Wnt signalling direct HPC specification within the activated myofibroblasts and macrophages HPC niche. During biliary regeneration, Numb is downregulated in HPCs, Jagged1 promotes biliary specification within HPCs. During hepatocyte regeneration, macrophage derived canonical Wnt signalling maintains Numb within HPCs, and Notch signalling is reduced promoting hepatocyte specification. This dominant Wnt state is stimulated through engulfment of hepatocyte debris by niche macrophages and can directly influence the HPCs. Macrophage Wnt3a expression in turn facilitates hepatocyte regeneration – thus exemplifying a novel positive feedback mechanism in adult parenchymal regeneration. PMID:22388089

  9. Plasma cathepsin D correlates with histological classifications of fatty liver disease in adults and responds to intervention

    PubMed Central

    Walenbergh, Sofie M. A.; Houben, Tom; Rensen, Sander S.; Bieghs, Veerle; Hendrikx, Tim; van Gorp, Patrick J.; Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Jeurissen, Mike L. J.; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; Buurman, Wim A.; Vreugdenhil, Anita C. E.; Greve, Jan Willem M.; Plat, Jogchum; Hofker, Marten H.; Kalhan, Satish; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Lindsey, Patrick; Koek, Ger H.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized by liver lipid accumulation and inflammation. The mechanisms that trigger hepatic inflammation are poorly understood and subsequently, no specific non-invasive markers exist. We previously demonstrated a reduction in the plasma lysosomal enzyme, cathepsin D (CatD), in children with NASH compared to children without NASH. Recent studies have raised the concept that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adults is distinct from children due to a different histological pattern in the liver. Yet, the link between plasma CatD to adult NASH was not examined. In the current manuscript, we investigated whether plasma CatD in adults correlates with NASH development and regression. Biopsies were histologically evaluated for inflammation and NAFLD in three complementary cohorts of adults (total n = 248). CatD and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were measured in plasma. Opposite to our previous observations with childhood NASH, we observed increased levels of plasma CatD in patients with NASH compared to adults without hepatic inflammation. Furthermore, after surgical intervention, we found a reduction of plasma CatD compared to baseline. Our observations highlight a distinct pathophysiology between NASH in children and adults. The observation that plasma CatD correlated with NASH development and regression is promising for NASH diagnosis. PMID:27922112

  10. Data-Driven Identification of Structural Alerts for Mitigating the Risk of Drug-Induced Human Liver Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-11

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Data-driven identification of structural alerts for mitigating the risk of drug-induced human liver injuries Ruifeng Liu...structural alerts before use. Method: To derive human liver toxicity structural alerts, we retrieved all small-molecule entries from LiverTox, a U.S...National Institutes of Health online resource for information on human liver injuries induced by prescription and over-the-counter drugs and dietary

  11. Relationship between hemoglobin levels and risk for suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver in Taiwanese adults.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chyi-Huey; Wu, Ming-Shun; Owaga, Eddy; Cheng, Shu-Yu; Pan, Wen-Harn; Chang, Jung-Su

    2014-10-31

    Body iron levels have recently been shown to be a strong predictor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of NAFLD in a general adult population, and to investigate the relationship between body iron levels, NAFLD and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). 2186 adults participated in the third National Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan (NAHSIT, 2005-2008). The participants underwent anthropometry measurements and phlebotomy after an overnight fast, and those with excessive alcohol intake, iron overload of serum ferritin > 600 ng/ml, hepatitis viral infection and hepatocellular carcinoma were excluded. Suspected NAFLD was diagnosed by three alanine transaminase (ALT) cut-points: cut-point 1: serum ALT > 40 U/l; cut-point 2: ALT ≥ 25 U/l for male and ALT ≥ 17 U/l for female; and cut-point 3: ALT ≥ 35 U/l for male and ALT ≥ 26 U/l for female. The prevalence proportion of suspected NAFLD among Taiwanese adults was 6.6% (cut-point 1), 36% (cut-point 2); and 14.3% (cut-point 3). Body iron levels were significantly higher in individuals with suspected NAFLD compared with those without. Distribution of hemoglobin levels, but not serum ferritin levels, by decade of age showed strong correlation with the prevalence of suspected NAFLD in individuals with MetS. Multivariate adjusted odds ratio (OR) showed that the best predictors for suspected NAFLD with the MetS were hemoglobin [OR 1.43 (1.21-1.68); P < 0.0001] and hyperlipidemia [OR 1.52 (1.19-1.94); P = 0.0007]. In individuals without MetS, the adjusted OR of suspected NAFLD was markedly higher for hemoglobin [OR 1.25 (1.12-1.41); P < 0.0001]. In conclusion, adults with high hemoglobin levels (14.4 μg/dl for male and 13.2 μg/dl for female) are at the greatest risk for developing abnormal liver function. Hemoglobin test should be considered as a part of clinical evaluation for patients with NAFLD.

  12. Reduced Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity in Adult Patients With Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Del Ben, Maria; Polimeni, Licia; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Di Santo, Serena; Piemonte, Fiorella; Tozzi, Giulia; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by intra-hepatic fat accumulation and mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis are not fully explained. Lysosomal Acid Lipase (LAL) is a key enzyme in lipid metabolism. We investigated its activity in patients with fatty liver. LAL activity (nmol/spot/h) was measured in 100 adult healthy subjects (HS) and in 240 NAFLD patients. A sub-analysis on 35 patients with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was performed. Median LAL activity was 1.15 (0.95–1.72) in HS. It was significantly reduced in NAFLD [0.78 (0.61–1.01), p < 0.001 vs. HS]. A further reduction was observed in the subgroup of NASH [0.67 (0.51–0.77), p < 0.001 vs. HS]. Patients with LAL activity below median had higher values of serum total cholesterol (p < 0.05) and LDL-c (p < 0.05), and increased serum liver enzymes (ALT, p < 0.001; AST, p < 0.01; GGT, p < 0.01). At multivariable logistic regression analysis, factors associated with LAL activity below median were ALT (OR: 1.018, 95% CI 1.004–1.032, p = 0.011) and metabolic syndrome (OR: 2.551, 95% CI 1.241–5.245, p = 0.011), whilst statin use predicted a better LAL function (OR: 0.464, 95% CI 0.248–0.866, p = 0.016). Our findings suggest a strong association between impaired LAL activity and NAFLD. A better knowledge of the role of LAL may provide new insights in NAFLD pathogenesis. PMID:26288848

  13. Reduced Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity in Adult Patients With Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Del Ben, Maria; Polimeni, Licia; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Di Santo, Serena; Piemonte, Fiorella; Tozzi, Giulia; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by intra-hepatic fat accumulation and mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis are not fully explained. Lysosomal Acid Lipase (LAL) is a key enzyme in lipid metabolism. We investigated its activity in patients with fatty liver. LAL activity (nmol/spot/h) was measured in 100 adult healthy subjects (HS) and in 240 NAFLD patients. A sub-analysis on 35 patients with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was performed. Median LAL activity was 1.15 (0.95-1.72) in HS. It was significantly reduced in NAFLD [0.78 (0.61-1.01), p < 0.001 vs. HS]. A further reduction was observed in the subgroup of NASH [0.67 (0.51-0.77), p < 0.001 vs. HS]. Patients with LAL activity below median had higher values of serum total cholesterol (p < 0.05) and LDL-c (p < 0.05), and increased serum liver enzymes (ALT, p < 0.001; AST, p < 0.01; GGT, p < 0.01). At multivariable logistic regression analysis, factors associated with LAL activity below median were ALT (OR: 1.018, 95% CI 1.004-1.032, p = 0.011) and metabolic syndrome (OR: 2.551, 95% CI 1.241-5.245, p = 0.011), whilst statin use predicted a better LAL function (OR: 0.464, 95% CI 0.248-0.866, p = 0.016). Our findings suggest a strong association between impaired LAL activity and NAFLD. A better knowledge of the role of LAL may provide new insights in NAFLD pathogenesis.

  14. Acute Liver Failure in Adults: An Evidence-Based Management Protocol for Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Misel, Michael; Gish, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    With the goal of providing guidance on the provision of optimal intensive care to adult patients with acute liver failure (ALF), this paper defines ALF and describes a protocol for appropriately diagnosing this relatively rare clinical entity and ascertaining its etiology, where possible. This paper also identifies the few known therapies that may be effective for specific causes of ALF and provides a comprehensive approach for anticipating, identifying, and managing complications. Finally, one of the more important aspects of care for patients with ALF is the determination of prognosis and, specifically, the need for liver transplantation. Prognostic tools are provided to help guide the clinician in this critical decision process. Management of patients with ALF is complex and challenging, even in centers where staff members have high levels of expertise and substantial experience. This evidence-based protocol may, therefore, assist in the delivery of optimal care to this critically ill patient population and may substantially increase the likelihood of positive outcomes. PMID:22675278

  15. Metabolism of zaleplon by human liver: evidence for involvement of aldehyde oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lake, B G; Ball, S E; Kao, J; Renwick, A B; Price, R J; Scatina, J A

    2002-10-01

    1. The metabolism of Zaleplon (CL-284,846; ZAL) has been studied in precision-cut human liver slices and liver cytosol preparations. 2. Human liver slices metabolized ZAL to a number of products including 5-oxo-ZAL (M2), N-desethyl-5-oxo-ZAL (M1) and N-desethyl-ZAL (DZAL), the latter metabolite being known to be formed by CYP3A forms. 3. Human liver cytosol preparations catalysed the metabolism of ZAL to M2. Kinetic analysis of three cytosol preparations revealed mean (+/- SEM) K(m) and V(max) of 93 +/- 18 mm and 317 +/- 241 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. 4. Using 16 individual human liver cytosol preparations a 33-fold variability in the metabolism of 80 micro M ZAL to M2 was observed. Correlations were observed between M2 formation and the metabolism of the aldehyde oxidase substrates phenanthridine (r(2) = 0.774) and phthalazine (r(2) = 0.460). 5. The metabolism of 80 micro M ZAL to M2 in liver cytosol preparations was markedly inhibited by the aldehyde oxidase inhibitors chlorpromazine, promethazine, hydralazine and menadione. Additional kinetic analysis suggested that chlorpromazine and promethazine were non-competitive inhibitors of M2 formation with K(i) of 2.3 and 1.9 micro M, respectively. ZAL metabolism to M2 was also inhibited by cimetidine. 6. Incubations conducted with human liver cytosol and H(2)(18)O demonstrated that the oxygen atom incorporated into ZAL and DZAL to form M2 and M1, respectively, was derived from water and not from molecular oxygen. 7. In summary, by correlation analysis, chemical inhibition and H(2)(18)O incorporation studies, ZAL metabolism to M2 in human liver appears to be catalysed by aldehyde oxidase. With human liver slices, ZAL was metabolized to products dependent on both aldehyde oxidase and CYP3A forms.

  16. Sequential metabolism of sesamin by cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in human liver.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kaori; Ikushiro, Shinichi; Kamakura, Masaki; Munetsuna, Eiji; Ohta, Miho; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2011-09-01

    Our previous study revealed that CYP2C9 played a central role in sesamin monocatecholization. In this study, we focused on the metabolism of sesamin monocatechol that was further converted into the dicatechol form by cytochrome P450 (P450) or the glucuronide by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT). Catecholization of sesamin monocatechol enhances its antioxidant activity, whereas glucuronidation strongly reduces its antioxidant activity. In human liver microsomes, the glucuronidation activity was much higher than the catecholization activity toward sesamin monocatechol. In contrast, in rat liver microsomes, catecholization is predominant over glucuronidation. In addition, rat liver produced two isomers of the glucuronide, whereas human liver produced only one glucuronide. These results suggest a significant species-based difference in the metabolism of sesamin between humans and rats. Kinetic studies using recombinant human UGT isoforms identified UGT2B7 as the most important UGT isoform for glucuronidation of sesamin monocatechol. In addition, a good correlation was observed between the glucuronidation activity and UGT2B7-specific activity in in vitro studies using 10 individual human liver microsomes. These results strongly suggest that UGT2B7 plays an important role in glucuronidation of sesamin monocatechol. Interindividual difference among the 10 human liver microsomes is approximately 2-fold. These results, together with our previous results on the metabolism of sesamin by human P450, suggest a small interindividual difference in sesamin metabolism. We observed the methylation activity toward sesamin monocatechol by catechol O-methyl transferase (COMT) in human liver cytosol. On the basis of these results, we concluded that CYP2C9, UGT2B7, and COMT played essential roles in the metabolism of sesamin in the human liver.

  17. IRF5 governs liver macrophage activation that promotes hepatic fibrosis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Alzaid, Fawaz; Lagadec, Floriane; Albuquerque, Miguel; Ballaire, Raphaëlle; Orliaguet, Lucie; Hainault, Isabelle; Blugeon, Corinne; Lemoine, Sophie; Lehuen, Agnès; Saliba, David G.; Udalova, Irina A.; Paradis, Valérie; Foufelle, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis arises from inflammation in the liver initiated by resident macrophage activation and massive leukocyte accumulation. Hepatic macrophages hold a central position in maintaining homeostasis in the liver and in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic liver injury linked to fibrogenesis. Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has recently emerged as an important proinflammatory transcription factor involved in macrophage activation under acute and chronic inflammation. Here, we revealed that IRF5 is significantly induced in liver macrophages from human subjects developing liver fibrosis from nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or hepatitis C virus infection. Furthermore, IRF5 expression positively correlated with clinical markers of liver damage, such as plasma transaminase and bilirubin levels. Interestingly, mice lacking IRF5 in myeloid cells (MKO) were protected from hepatic fibrosis induced by metabolic or toxic stresses. Transcriptional reprogramming of macrophages lacking IRF5 was characterized by immunosuppressive and antiapoptotic properties. Consequently, IRF5 MKO mice respond to hepatocellular stress by promoting hepatocyte survival, leading to complete protection from hepatic fibrogenesis. Our findings reveal a regulatory network, governed by IRF5, that mediates hepatocyte death and liver fibrosis in mice and humans. Therefore, modulating IRF5 function may be an attractive approach to experimental therapeutics in fibroinflammatory liver disease. PMID:27942586

  18. Blocking porcine sialoadhesin improves extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion with human blood

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Joshua P.; Vogel, Thomas; Burlak, Christopher; Coussios, Constantin; Dominguez, Javier; Friend, Peter; Rees, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Patients in fulminant hepatic failure currently do not have a temporary means of support while awaiting liver transplantation. A potential therapeutic approach for such patients is the use of extracorporeal perfusion with porcine livers as a form of “liver dialysis”. During a 72-hour extracorporeal perfusion of porcine livers with human blood, porcine Kupffer cells bind to and phagocytose human red blood cells (hRBC) causing the hematocrit to decrease to 2.5% of the original value. Our laboratory has identified porcine sialoadhesin expressed on Kupffer cells as the lectin responsible for binding N-acetylneuraminic acid on the surface of the hRBC. We evaluated whether blocking porcine sialoadhesin prevents the recognition and subsequent destruction of hRBCs seen during extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion. Ex vivo studies were performed using wild type pig livers perfused with isolated hRBCs for 72-hours in the presence of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody or isotype control. The addition of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody to an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model reduces the loss of hRBC over a 72 hour period. Sustained liver function was demonstrated throughout the perfusion. This study illustrates the role of sialoadhesin in mediating the destruction of hRBCs in an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model. PMID:23822217

  19. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  20. Comparative metabolism of mycophenolic acid by glucuronic acid and glucose conjugation in human, dog, and cat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Slovak, J E; Mealey, K; Court, M H

    2017-04-01

    Use of the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid (MPA) in cats is limited because MPA elimination depends on glucuronidation, which is deficient in cats. We evaluated formation of major (phenol glucuronide) and minor (acyl glucuronide, phenol glucoside, and acyl glucoside) MPA metabolites using liver microsomes from 16 cats, 26 dogs, and 48 humans. All MPA metabolites were formed by human liver microsomes, while dog and cat liver microsomes formed both MPA glucuronides, but only one MPA glucoside (phenol glucoside). Intrinsic clearance (CLint) of MPA for phenol glucuronidation by cat liver microsomes was only 15-17% that of dog and human liver microsomes. However, CLint for acyl glucuronide and phenol glucoside formation in cat liver microsomes was similar to or greater than that for dog and human liver microsomes. While total MPA conjugation CLint was generally similar for cat liver microsomes compared with dog and human liver microsomes, relative contributions of each pathway varied between species with phenol glucuronidation predominating in dog and human liver microsomes and phenol glucosidation predominating in cat liver microsomes. MPA conjugation variation between cat liver microsomes was threefold for total conjugation and for phenol glucosidation, sixfold for phenol glucuronidation, and 11-fold for acyl glucuronidation. Our results indicate that total MPA conjugation is quantitatively similar between liver microsomes from cats, dogs, and humans despite large differences in the conjugation pathways that are utilized by these species.

  1. Modulation of alpha smooth muscle actin and desmin expression in perisinusoidal cells of normal and diseased human livers.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Gräff, A.; Krüger, S.; Bochard, F.; Gabbiani, G.; Denk, H.

    1991-01-01

    It has been suggested that perisinusoidal liver cells (PSC) play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of fibrocontractive changes. Using light and electron microscopic immunolocalization techniques, a series of 207 normal and pathologic human liver specimens were evaluated for the expression of alpha smooth muscle (SM) actin and desmin in this and other nonparenchymal cell types. In normal adult liver tissue, PSCs were practically devoid of desmin and exceptionally stained for alpha-SM actin, whereas this actin isoform frequently was encountered in PSCs from the embryonic to the adolescent period. A broad spectrum of pathologic conditions was accompanied by the presence of alpha-SM actin containing PSCs; these were detected preferentially in periportal or perivenular zones according to the predominant location of the underlying hepatocellular damage. The occurrence of this PSC phenotype generally was associated with fibrogenesis and was in some cases detected earlier than overt collagen accumulation. Fibrous bands subdividing liver tissue in cirrhosis and focal nodular hyperplasia, as well as desmoplastic reaction to malignant tumors, contained alpha-SM actin-rich cells admixed with variable proportions of cells coexpressing desmin. In end stages, this population was less numerous than in active fibrotic or cirrhotic processes. Using immunogold electron microscopy, alpha-SM actin was localized in microfilament bundles of typical PSCs. Our results are compatible with the assumption that the appearance of alpha-SM actin and desmin-expressing myofibroblasts results at least in part from a phenotypic modulation of PSCs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2024709

  2. Metabolism and Metabolic Inhibition of Xanthotoxol in Human Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianbao; Zhang, Gang; Guo, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome p450 (CYP450) enzymes are predominantly involved in Phase I metabolism of xenobiotics. In this study, the CYP450 isoforms involved in xanthotoxol metabolism were identified using recombinant CYP450s. In addition, the inhibitory effects of xanthotoxol on eight CYP450 isoforms and its pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using human liver microsomes. CYP1A2, one of CYP450s, played a key role in the metabolism of xanthotoxol compared to other CYP450s. Xanthotoxol showed stronger inhibition on CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 compared to other isoenzymes with the IC50 of 7.43 μM for CYP3A4 and 27.82 μM for CYP1A2. The values of inhibition kinetic parameters (Ki) were 21.15 μM and 2.22 μM for CYP1A2 and CYP3A4, respectively. The metabolism of xanthotoxol obeyed the typical monophasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Vmax, Km, and CLint values were calculated as 0.55 nmol·min−1·mg−1, 8.46 μM, and 0.06 mL·min−1·mg−1. In addition, the results of molecular docking showed that xanthotoxol was bound to CYP1A2 with hydrophobic and π-π bond and CYP3A4 with hydrogen and hydrophobic bond. We predicted the hepatic clearance (CLH) and the CLH value was 15.91 mL·min−1·kg−1 body weight. These data were significant for the application of xanthotoxol and xanthotoxol-containing herbs. PMID:27034690

  3. Selenium chemoprevention of liver cancer in animals and possible human applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, S Y; Chu, Y J; Li, W G

    1988-01-01

    An inverse correlation between geographic distribution of liver cancer incidence and the selenium (Se) contents of whole blood and grains was observed in Qidong county, Jiangsu province, a high liver cancer area of the People's Republic of China. Animal experiments demonstrated that supplementation of Se reduced the incidence of liver cancer in rats exposed to aflatoxin B1. Se was also shown to inhibit the growth of transplanted tumors. A lower incidence of liver preneoplastic alterations and reduction of hepatitis B virus infection in ducks by Se-supplementation was observed, and three pilot studies for a Se-intervention trial on human liver cancer were carried out on the residents of Qidong county. A protective effect on the cellular DNA damage induced by aflatoxin B1 was observed in lympocytes from human with Se-supplements.

  4. Comparison of histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK) and University of Wisconsin solution (UW) in adult liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mangus, Richard S; Tector, A Joseph; Agarwal, Avinash; Vianna, Rodrigo; Murdock, Phillip; Fridell, Jonathan A

    2006-02-01

    Histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK) and University of Wisconsin solution (UW) have been shown to have similar outcomes in cadaveric kidney, pancreas, and liver transplantation. Our institution changed from UW to HTK as the primary preservation solution for liver, kidney and pancreas transplantation. This study compares the perioperative and first year outcomes of liver transplantation using UW or HTK. Primary use of HTK began on May 1, 2003. We reviewed the records of all adult liver transplant recipients from July 1, 2002 to December 31, 2004. Recipients were compared based on organ preservation solution (UW n = 204, HTK n = 174). Outcomes included 1-, 6- and 12-month graft and patient survival and 1-, 7-, 14-, and 30-day liver function and serum creatinine. During the entire study period, the two groups were managed similarly in operative technique, immunosuppressive regimens, and donor liver criteria. Over 30 months, 378 adult patients underwent liver transplantation. There were no significant differences between UW and HTK in 1-, 6-, or 12-month graft or patient survival. The HTK group had a higher day 1 median AST, ALT, and total bilirubin, but the two groups were similar thereafter. An anticipated difference in infused volume between UW and HTK was demonstrated. In conclusion, to our knowledge, this is the first reported large case series from North America comparing HTK and UW in liver transplantation with 2- to 12-month follow-up. There were no significant differences between HTK and UW in this population when comparing 1 month graft function and first-year graft and patient survival.

  5. Assessment of liver function in chronic liver diseases and regional function of irradiated liver by means of 99mTc-galactosyl-human serum albumin liver scintigraphy and quantitative spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Fukui, A; Murase, K; Tsuda, T; Fujii, T; Ikezoe, J

    2000-12-01

    Scintigraphy with 99mTc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid galactosyl human serum albumin (99mTc-GSA) was performed on 102 patients, then the hepatic extraction fraction (HEF), the rate constant for liver uptake of the tracer from the blood (K1) and the hepatic blood flow index (HBFI) were determined by spectral analysis. The HEF, K1 and HBFI values correlated moderately or closely with various indices of hepatic function, and the HEF and K1 values decreased according to the stage of liver dysfunction. The HEF and K1 values linearly and nonlinearly correlated with HH15 and LHL15, respectively. The HEF, K1 and HBFI values for the irradiated portion of 20 patients before and alter irradiation were compared. The HEF value in patients with a cirrhotic liver significantly (p < 0.002) decreased compared with that in patients with a normal liver at a dose of less than 40 Gy, whereas the HBFI value in patients with a normal liver significantly (p < 0.05) decreased compared with that in patients with a cirrhotic liver at a dose of 40 Gy or greater. This method appears to be a simple, non-invasive and useful tool with which to quantitatively evaluate liver function and it also helps clarify changes in regional function of the irradiated liver.

  6. Vascularized subcutaneous human liver tissue from engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yusuke; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Ohashi, Kazuo; Koike, Makiko; Utoh, Rie; Hasegawa, Hideko; Muraoka, Izumi; Suematsu, Takashi; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    Subcutaneous liver tissue engineering is an attractive and minimally invasive approach used to curative treat hepatic failure and inherited liver diseases. However, graft failure occurs frequently due to insufficient infiltration of blood vessels (neoangiogenesis), while the maintenance of hepatocyte phenotype and function requires in vivo development of the complex cellular organization of the hepatic lobule. Here we describe a subcutaneous human liver construction allowing for rapidly vascularized grafts by transplanting engineered cellular sheets consisting of human primary hepatocytes adhered onto a fibroblast layer. The engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets (EHFSs) showed superior expression levels of vascularization-associated growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta 1, and hepatocyte growth factor) in vitro. EHFSs developed into vascularized subcutaneous human liver tissues contained glycogen stores, synthesized coagulation factor IX, and showed significantly higher synthesis rates of liver-specific proteins (albumin and alpha 1 anti-trypsin) in vivo than tissues from hepatocyte-only sheets. The present study describes a new approach for vascularized human liver organogenesis under mouse skin. This approach could prove valuable for establishing novel cell therapies for liver diseases.

  7. Humanities and the Adult Learner in an Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Dale; Kamholtz, Jonathan

    Humanities courses have often been given little attention in continuing education for adults, possibly because they have been viewed as not "practical" or not "job-oriented" enough in our career-oriented, technologically advanced society. However, the humanities should be an integral part of our culture and of the lives of…

  8. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 greatly contributes to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in human liver.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Mitsutoshi; Fujii, Hideaki; Atsuda, Koichiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2015-04-01

    The major metabolic pathway of vildagliptin in mice, rats, dogs, and humans is hydrolysis at the cyano group to produce a carboxylic acid metabolite M20.7 (LAY151), whereas the major metabolic enzyme of vildagliptin has not been identified. In the present study, we determined the contribution rate of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in the liver. We performed hydrolysis assay of the cyano group of vildagliptin using mouse, rat, and human liver samples. Additionally, DPP-4 activities in each liver sample were assessed by DPP-4 activity assay using the synthetic substrate H-glycyl-prolyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (Gly-Pro-AMC). M20.7 formation rates in liver microsomes were higher than those in liver cytosol. M20.7 formation rate was significantly positively correlated with the DPP-4 activity using Gly-Pro-AMC in liver samples (r = 0.917, P < 0.01). The formation of M20.7 in mouse, rat, and human liver S9 fraction was inhibited by sitagliptin, a selective DPP-4 inhibitor. These findings indicate that DPP-4 is greatly involved in vildagliptin hydrolysis in the liver. Additionally, we established stable single expression systems of human DPP-4 and its R623Q mutant, which is the nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism of human DPP-4, in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells to investigate the effect of R623Q mutant on vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity. M20.7 formation rate in HEK293 cells expressing human DPP-4 was significantly higher than that in control HEK293 cells. Interestingly, R623Q mutation resulted in a decrease of the vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity. Our findings might be useful for the prediction of interindividual variability in vildagliptin pharmacokinetics.

  9. Variations in human liver fucosyltransferase activities in hepatobiliary diseases.

    PubMed

    Jezequel-Cuer, M; Dalix, A M; Flejou, J F; Durand, G

    1992-06-01

    The hyperfucosylation of a number of glycoconjugates observed in liver diseases involves the action of several specific fucosyltransferases (F.T.) notably responsible for synthesizing histo-blood group antigens. We determined the activities of alpha 3, alpha 2 and alpha 3/4 F.T. in 35 liver biopsy samples from patients with fatty liver, alcoholic or post-hepatic liver cirrhosis, primary or secondary biliary cirrhosis, acute hepatitis or a normal liver. F.T. activities were measured by transfer of GDP [14C] fucose to asialotransferrin for alpha 3 F.T., to phenyl beta-D-galactoside for alpha 2 F.T. and to 2' fucosyllactose for alpha 3/4 F.T. The diseased liver extracts showed an early increase in non-Le gene-associated alpha 3 F.T. activity (p = 0.001), which was related to the number of steatosic hepatocytes and the degree of intralobular inflammatory infiltration. Overexpression of this alpha 3 F.T. provides an explanation for the strong expression of 3-fucosyl lactosamine structures described in several hepatobiliary diseases. alpha 2 F.T. levels were significantly elevated in the two groups of liver cirrhosis and acute hepatitis (p = 0.05), but not enough to consider alpha 2 F.T. as a sensitive feature of mesenchymal cell injury. All Lewis-positive biopsies displaying biliary alterations showed increased Le gene-encoded alpha 3/4 F.T. activity (p = 0.001), which was related to the intensity of neoductular proliferation. Elevated levels of alpha 3/4 F.T. may be a very early sign of biliary regeneration.

  10. Morphological and biochemical characterization of a human liver in a uPA-SCID mouse chimera.

    PubMed

    Meuleman, Philip; Libbrecht, Louis; De Vos, Rita; de Hemptinne, Bernard; Gevaert, Kris; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Roskams, Tania; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2005-04-01

    A small animal model harboring a functional human liver cell xenograft would be a useful tool to study human liver cell biology, drug metabolism, and infections with hepatotropic viruses. Here we describe the repopulation, organization, and function of human hepatocytes in a mouse recipient and the infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) of the transplanted cells. Homozygous urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-SCID mice underwent transplantation with primary human hepatocytes, and at different times animals were bled and sacrificed to analyze plasma and liver tissue, respectively. The plasma of mice that were successfully transplanted contained albumin and an additional 21 human proteins. Liver histology showed progressive and massive replacement of diseased mouse tissue by human hepatocytes. These cells were accumulating glycogen but appeared otherwise normal and showed no signs of damage or death. They formed functional bile canaliculi that connected to mouse canaliculi. Besides mature hepatocytes, human hepatic progenitor cells that were differentiating into mature hepatocytes could be identified within liver parenchyma. Infection of chimeric mice with HBV or HCV resulted in an active infection that did not alter the liver function and architecture. Electron microscopy showed the presence of viral and subviral structures in HBV infected hepatocytes. In conclusion, human hepatocytes repopulate the uPA(+/+)-SCID mouse liver in a very organized fashion with preservation of normal cell function. The presence of human hepatic progenitor cells in these chimeric animals necessitates a critical review of the observations and conclusions made in experiments with isolated "mature" hepatocytes. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the HEPATOLOGY website (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0270-9139/suppmat/index.html).

  11. Laminin alpha 5, a major transcript of normal and malignant rat liver epithelial cells, is differentially expressed in developing and adult liver.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, T; Medina, J L; Bade, E G

    1997-11-25

    The laminin family of extracellular matrix glycoproteins plays a major role in cell migration and differentiation and in tumor cell invasion. As previously shown, the laminin deposited by normal and malignant rat liver epithelial cells in their extracellular matrix (ECM) and into their ECM migration tracks does not contain a typical (EHS-like) alpha 1 heavy chain. By RT-PCR screening we have now identified two alpha chains among a total of five additional laminin chains produced by these cells. Three of the newly identified chains were not previously known for the rat. Their sequences have been deposited in the EMBL nucleotide sequence data bank. The alpha 5 chain now identified is expressed at comparably high levels by both the normal and the malignant liver epithelial cells. The chain is also expressed in fetal liver together with the alpha 2 and beta 2 chains, but it is only vestigially expressed in the mature organ as shown by RT-PCR. These results suggest for alpha 5 a role in development and production of the chain by only a small subset of cells in adult liver. At the level of detection used, no changes were observed in regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy. In addition to the alpha 5 chain, the cultured cells express the beta 1 and beta 2 light chains, indicating the expression of more than one laminin isoform by the same cell line. The expression of the alpha 5 chain and of the other new non-EHS isoform chains was also analyzed in various tissues. The malignant liver epithelial cells, but not their nontumorigenic parental cells, also express, in addition to the alpha 5 chain the alpha 2 chain, which is expressed at high level by the NBT II bladder carcinoma cell line, suggesting a relationship with malignancy.

  12. Alterations of the human gut microbiome in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Nan; Yang, Fengling; Li, Ang; Prifti, Edi; Chen, Yanfei; Shao, Li; Guo, Jing; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Yao, Jian; Wu, Lingjiao; Zhou, Jiawei; Ni, Shujun; Liu, Lin; Pons, Nicolas; Batto, Jean Michel; Kennedy, Sean P; Leonard, Pierre; Yuan, Chunhui; Ding, Wenchao; Chen, Yuanting; Hu, Xinjun; Zheng, Beiwen; Qian, Guirong; Xu, Wei; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Zheng, Shusen; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-09-04

    Liver cirrhosis occurs as a consequence of many chronic liver diseases that are prevalent worldwide. Here we characterize the gut microbiome in liver cirrhosis by comparing 98 patients and 83 healthy control individuals. We build a reference gene set for the cohort containing 2.69 million genes, 36.1% of which are novel. Quantitative metagenomics reveals 75,245 genes that differ in abundance between the patients and healthy individuals (false discovery rate < 0.0001) and can be grouped into 66 clusters representing cognate bacterial species; 28 are enriched in patients and 38 in control individuals. Most (54%) of the patient-enriched, taxonomically assigned species are of buccal origin, suggesting an invasion of the gut from the mouth in liver cirrhosis. Biomarkers specific to liver cirrhosis at gene and function levels are revealed by a comparison with those for type 2 diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease. On the basis of only 15 biomarkers, a highly accurate patient discrimination index is created and validated on an independent cohort. Thus microbiota-targeted biomarkers may be a powerful tool for diagnosis of different diseases.

  13. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  14. Use of liposome encapsulated hemoglobin as an oxygen carrier for fetal and adult rat liver cell culture.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Kevin; Huang, Hongyun; Ohara, Keikou; Matsumoto, Kunio; Mizuno, Atsushi; Ohta, Katsuji; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2011-11-01

    Engineering liver tissue constructs with sufficient cell mass for transplantation implies culturing large numbers of hepatocytes in a reduced volume; however, providing sufficient oxygen to dense cell cultures is still not feasible using only conventional culture medium. Liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH), an oxygen-carrying blood substitute originally designed for short-term perfusion, may be a good candidate as an oxygen carrier to cultured liver cells. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of maintaining long term hepatocyte cultures using LEH. Primary fetal and adult rat liver cells were directly exposed to LEH for 6 to 14 days in static culture or in a perfused flat plate bioreactor. The functions and viability of adult rat hepatocytes exposed to LEH were not adversely affected in static monolayer culture and were even improved in the bioreactor. However, some cytotoxicity of LEH was observed with fetal rat liver cells after 4 days of culture. LEH, though a suitable oxygen carrier for long-term culture of mature hepatocytes, is not suitable in its present form for perfusing fetal hepatocyte cultures in direct contact with the liposomes; either the LEH will have to be made less toxic or a more sophisticated bioreactor that prevents the direct contact between hepatocytes and perfusates will have to be designed if fetal cells are to be used for liver tissue engineering.

  15. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of cDNA for human liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Takiguchi, M.; Amaya, Y.; Kawamoto, S.; Matsuda, I.; Mori, M.

    1987-01-01

    Arginase (EC3.5.3.1) catalyzes the last step of the urea cycle in the liver of ureotelic animals. Inherited deficiency of the enzyme results in argininemia, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hyperammonemia. To facilitate investigation of the enzyme and gene structures and to elucidate the nature of the mutation in argininemia, the authors isolated cDNA clones for human liver arginase. Oligo(dT)-primed and random primer human liver cDNA libraries in lambda gt11 were screened using isolated rat arginase cDNA as a probe. Two of the positive clones, designated lambda hARG6 and lambda hARG109, contained an overlapping cDNA sequence with an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 322 amino acid residues (predicted M/sub r/, 34,732), a 5'-untranslated sequence of 56 base pairs, a 3'-untranslated sequence of 423 base pairs, and a poly(A) segment. Arginase activity was detected in Escherichia coli cells transformed with the plasmid carrying lambda hARG6 cDNA insert. RNA gel blot analysis of human liver RNA showed a single mRNA of 1.6 kilobases. The predicted amino acid sequence of human liver arginase is 87% and 41% identical with those of the rat liver and yeast enzymes, respectively. There are several highly conserved segments among the human, rat, and yeast enzymes.

  16. Characterization of human foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatase. Comparison with the isoenzymes from the adult intestine and human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, C M; Enns, C A; Sussman, H H

    1983-01-01

    The molecular structure of human foetal intestinal alkaline phosphatase was defined by high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and amino acid inhibition studies. Comparison was made with the adult form of intestinal alkaline phosphatase, as well as with alkaline phosphatases isolated from cultured foetal amnion cells (FL) and a human tumour cell line (KB). Two non-identical subunits were isolated from the foetal intestinal isoenzyme, one having same molecular weight and isoelectric point as placental alkaline phosphatase, and the other corresponding to a glycosylated subunit of the adult intestinal enzyme. The FL-cell and KB-cell alkaline phosphatases were also found to contain two subunits similar to those of the foetal intestinal isoenzyme. Characterization of neuraminidase digests of the non-placental subunit showed it to be indistinguishable from the subunits of the adult intestinal isoenzyme. This implies that no new phosphatase structural gene is involved in the transition from the expression of foetal to adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase, but that the molecular changes involve suppression of the placental subunit and loss of neuraminic acid from the non-placental subunit. Enzyme-inhibition studies demonstrated an intermediate response to the inhibitors tested for the foetal intestinal, FL-cell and KB-cell isoenzymes when compared with the placental, adult intestinal and liver forms. This result is consistent with the mixed-subunit structure observed for the former set of isoenzymes. In summary, this study has defined the molecular subunit structure of the foetal intestinal form of alkaline phosphatase and has demonstrated its expression in a human tumour cell line. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6882358

  17. Tissue-specific mutation accumulation in human adult stem cells during life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokzijl, Francis; de Ligt, Joep; Jager, Myrthe; Sasselli, Valentina; Roerink, Sophie; Sasaki, Nobuo; Huch, Meritxell; Boymans, Sander; Kuijk, Ewart; Prins, Pjotr; Nijman, Isaac J.; Martincorena, Inigo; Mokry, Michal; Wiegerinck, Caroline L.; Middendorp, Sabine; Sato, Toshiro; Schwank, Gerald; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Vries, Robert G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Stratton, Michael R.; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin; van Boxtel, Ruben

    2016-10-01

    The gradual accumulation of genetic mutations in human adult stem cells (ASCs) during life is associated with various age-related diseases, including cancer. Extreme variation in cancer risk across tissues was recently proposed to depend on the lifetime number of ASC divisions, owing to unavoidable random mutations that arise during DNA replication. However, the rates and patterns of mutations in normal ASCs remain unknown. Here we determine genome-wide mutation patterns in ASCs of the small intestine, colon and liver of human donors with ages ranging from 3 to 87 years by sequencing clonal organoid cultures derived from primary multipotent cells. Our results show that mutations accumulate steadily over time in all of the assessed tissue types, at a rate of approximately 40 novel mutations per year, despite the large variation in cancer incidence among these tissues. Liver ASCs, however, have different mutation spectra compared to those of the colon and small intestine. Mutational signature analysis reveals that this difference can be attributed to spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine residues in the colon and small intestine, probably reflecting their high ASC division rate. In liver, a signature with an as-yet-unknown underlying mechanism is predominant. Mutation spectra of driver genes in cancer show high similarity to the tissue-specific ASC mutation spectra, suggesting that intrinsic mutational processes in ASCs can initiate tumorigenesis. Notably, the inter-individual variation in mutation rate and spectra are low, suggesting tissue-specific activity of common mutational processes throughout life.

  18. Gluconeogenesis, glucose handling, and structural changes in livers of the adult offspring of rats partially deprived of protein during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, S P; Desai, M; Cohen, R D; Hales, C N; Iles, R A; Germain, J P; Going, T C; Bailey, R A

    1997-01-01

    Maternal protein restriction is a model of fetal programming of adult glucose intolerance. Perfused livers of 48-h- starved adult offspring of rat dams fed 8% protein diets during pregnancy and lactation produced more glucose from 6 mM lactate than did control livers from rats whose dams were fed 20% protein. In control livers, a mean of 24% of the glucose formed from lactate in the periportal region of the lobule was taken up by the most distal perivenous cells; this distal perivenous uptake was greatly diminished in maternal low protein (MLP) livers, accounting for a major fraction of the increased glucose output of MLP livers. In control livers, the distal perivenous cells contained 40% of the total glucokinase of the liver; this perivenous concentration of glucokinase was greatly reduced in MLP livers. Intralobular distribution of phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase was unaltered, though overall increased activity could have contributed to the elevated glucose output. Hepatic lobular volume in MLP livers was twice that in control livers, indicating that MLP livers had half the normal number of lobules. Fetal programming of adult glucose metabolism may operate partly through structural alterations and changes in glucokinase expression in the immediate perivenous region. PMID:9312176

  19. Reconstruction and analysis of human liver-specific metabolic network based on CNHLPP data.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Geng, Chao; Tao, Lin; Zhang, Duanfeng; Jiang, Ying; Tang, Kailin; Zhu, Ruixin; Yu, Hong; Zhang, Weidong; He, Fuchu; Li, Yixue; Cao, Zhiwei

    2010-04-05

    Liver is the largest internal organ in the body that takes central roles in metabolic homeostasis, detoxification of various substances, as well as in the synthesis and storage of nutrients. To fulfill these complex tasks, thousands of biochemical reactions are going on in liver to cope with a wide range of foods and environmental variations, which are densely interconnected into an intricate metabolic network. Here, the first human liver-specific metabolic network was reconstructed according to proteomics data from Chinese Human Liver Proteome Project (CNHLPP), and then investigated in the context of the genome-scale metabolic network of Homo sapiens. Topological analysis shows that this organ-specific metabolic network exhibits similar features as organism-specific networks, such as power-law degree distribution, small-world property, and bow-tie structure. Furthermore, the structure of liver network exhibits a modular organization where the modules are formed around precursors from primary metabolism or hub metabolites from derivative metabolism, respectively. Most of the modules are dominated by one major category of metabolisms, while enzymes within same modules have a tendency of being expressed concertedly at protein level. Network decomposition and comparison suggest that the liver network overlays a predominant area in the global metabolic network of H. sapiens genome; meanwhile the human network may develop extra modules to gain more specialized functionality out of liver. The results of this study would permit a high-level interpretation of the metabolite information flow in human liver and provide a basis for modeling the physiological and pathological metabolic states of liver.

  20. Greater serum carotenoid levels associated with lower prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Chinese adults

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jun; Liu, Zhao-min; Ling, Wen-hua; Chen, Yu-ming

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that serum carotenoids may be inversely associated with liver injury, but limited data are available from population-based studies. We examined the relationship between serum carotenoid levels and the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in Chinese adults. A total of 2935 participants aged 40–75 years were involved in this community-based cross-sectional study. General information, lifestyle factors, serum levels of carotenoid and the presence and degree of NAFLD were determined. After adjusting for potential covariates, we observed a dose-dependent inverse association between NAFLD risk and each individual serum carotenoid and total carotenoids (all p-values < 0.001). The ORs of NAFLD for the highest (vs. lowest) quartile were 0.44 (95% CI 0.35, 0.56) for α-carotene, 0.32 (95% CI 0.25, 0.41) for β-carotene, 0.62 (95% CI 0.49, 0.79) for β-cryptoxanthin, 0.54 (95% CI 0.42, 0.68) for lycopene, 0.56 (95% CI 0.44, 0.72) for lutein + zeaxanthin and 0.41 (95% CI 0.32, 0.53) for total carotenoids. Higher levels of α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein + zeaxanthin and total carotenoids were significantly associated with a decrease in the degree of NAFLD (p-trend: < 0.001 to 0.003). Serum carotenoids are inversely associated with prevalence of NAFLD in middle aged and elderly Chinese. PMID:26256414

  1. Monocytic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells and fetal liver share common differentiation pathways and homeostatic functions.

    PubMed

    Klimchenko, Olena; Di Stefano, Antonio; Geoerger, Birgit; Hamidi, Sofiane; Opolon, Paule; Robert, Thomas; Routhier, Mélanie; El-Benna, Jamel; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Boukour, Siham; Lescure, Bernadette; Solary, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Norol, Françoise

    2011-03-17

    The early emergence of macrophages and their large pattern of tissue distribution during development suggest that they may play a critical role in the initial steps of embryogenesis. In the present study, we show that monocytic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and from fetal liver follow a differentiation pathway different to that of adult cells, leading to specific functions. Embryonic and fetal monocytic cells differentiated from a CD14(low)CD16(-) precursor to form CD14(high)CD16(+) cells without producing the CD14(high)CD16(-) cell population that predominates in adult peripheral blood. Both demonstrated an enhanced expression of genes encoding tissue-degrading enzymes, chemokines, and scavenger receptors, as was previously reported for M2 macrophages. Compared with adult blood monocytes, embryonic and fetal monocytic cells secreted high amounts of proteins acting on tissue remodeling and angiogenesis, and most of them expressed the Tie2 receptor. Furthermore, they promoted vascular remodeling in xenotransplanted human tumors. These findings suggest that the regulation of human fetal and embryonic monocytic cell differentiation leads to the generation of cells endowed mainly with anti-inflammatory and remodeling functions. Trophic and immunosuppressive functions of M2-polarized macrophages link fetus and tumor development, and hESCs offer a valuable experimental model for in vitro studies of mechanisms sustaining these processes.

  2. Clinical translation of bioartificial liver support systems with human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakiyama, Ryoichi; Blau, Brandon J; Miki, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    There is currently a pressing need for alternative therapies to liver transplantation. The number of patients waiting for a liver transplant is substantially higher than the number of transplantable donor livers, resulting in a long waiting time and a high waiting list mortality. An extracorporeal liver support system is one possible approach to overcome this problem. However, the ideal cell source for developing bioartificial liver (BAL) support systems has yet to be determined. Recent advancements in stem cell technology allow researchers to generate highly functional hepatocyte-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). In this mini-review, we summarize previous clinical trials with different BAL systems, and discuss advantages of and potential obstacles to utilizing hPSC-derived hepatic cells in clinical-scale BAL systems. PMID:28373763

  3. Involvement of human liver cytochrome P4502B6 in the metabolism of propofol

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yutaka; Hamaoka, Naoya; Hiroi, Toyoko; Imaoka, Susumu; Hase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Kazuo; Funae, Yoshihiko; Ishizaki, Takashi; Asada, Akira

    2001-01-01

    Aims To determine the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms involved in the oxidation of propofol by human liver microsomes. Methods The rate constant calculated from the disappearance of propofol in an incubation mixture with human liver microsomes and recombinant human CYP isoforms was used as a measure of the rate of metabolism of propofol. The correlation of these rate constants with rates of metabolism of CYP isoform-selective substrates by liver microsomes, the effect of CYP isoform-selective chemical inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies on propofol metabolism by liver microsomes, and its metabolism by recombinant human CYP isoforms were examined. Results The mean rate constant of propofol metabolism by liver microsomes obtained from six individuals was 4.2 (95% confidence intervals 2.7, 5.7) nmol min−1 mg−1 protein. The rate constants of propofol by microsomes were significantly correlated with S-mephenytoin N-demethylation, a marker of CYP2B6 (r = 0.93, P < 0.0001), but not with the metabolic activities of other CYP isoform-selective substrates. Of the chemical inhibitors of CYP isoforms tested, orphenadrine, a CYP2B6 inhibitor, reduced the rate constant of propofol by liver microsomes by 38% (P < 0.05), while other CYP isoform-selective inhibitors had no effects. Of the recombinant CYP isoforms screened, CYP2B6 produced the highest rate constant for propofol metabolism (197 nmol min−1 nmol P450−1). An antibody against CYP2B6 inhibited the disappearance of propofol in liver microsomes by 74%. Antibodies raised against other CYP isoforms had no effect on the metabolism of propofol. Conclusions CYP2B6 is predominantly involved in the oxidation of propofol by human liver microsomes. PMID:11298076

  4. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  5. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Human isoenzymes of adenylate kinase: isolation and physicochemical comparison of the crystalline human ATP-AMP transphosphorylases from muscle and liver.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Frischat, A; Cress, M C; Hamada, M

    1983-02-10

    Procedures are described for the isolation, in crystalline form, of the adenylate kinases from autopsy samples of human muscle and from human liver. Weight average molecular weights were determined by sedimentation equilibrium to be 22,000 (+/- 700) and 25,450 (+/- 160) for the human muscle and liver isoenzymes, respectively. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, their molecular weights were estimated to be 21,700 and 26,500 for the muscle and liver enzymes, respectively. Both isoenzymes are accordingly monomeric proteins in their native state. Amino acid analyses are reported here for the normal human liver, calf liver, and rabbit liver adenylate kinases and compared with the normal human muscle, calf muscle, and rabbit muscle myokinases. The liver types as a group and the muscle types as a group show a great deal of homology, but some distinct differences are evident between the liver and muscle enzyme groups, especially in the number of residues of His, Pro, half-cystine, and the presence of tryptophan in the liver enzymes. The normal human liver adenylate kinase, as isolated in this report, has proved to be similar in its properties, if not identical, to the adenylate kinase isolated directly from human liver mitochondria (Hamada, M., Sumida, M., Okuda, H., Watanabe, T., Nojima, M., and Kuby, S. A. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13120-13128). Therefore, the liver-type adenylate kinase may be considered a mitochondrial type.

  6. Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal, not adult, β cells.

    PubMed

    Hrvatin, Sinisa; O'Donnell, Charles W; Deng, Francis; Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia Walton; DiIorio, Philip; Rezania, Alireza; Gifford, David K; Melton, Douglas A

    2014-02-25

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to generate any human cell type, and one widely recognized goal is to make pancreatic β cells. To this end, comparisons between differentiated cell types produced in vitro and their in vivo counterparts are essential to validate hPSC-derived cells. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of sorted insulin-expressing (INS(+)) cells derived from three independent hPSC lines, human fetal pancreata, and adult human islets points to two major conclusions: (i) Different hPSC lines produce highly similar INS(+) cells and (ii) hPSC-derived INS(+) (hPSC-INS(+)) cells more closely resemble human fetal β cells than adult β cells. This study provides a direct comparison of transcriptional programs between pure hPSC-INS(+) cells and true β cells and provides a catalog of genes whose manipulation may convert hPSC-INS(+) cells into functional β cells.

  7. Human precision-cut liver slices as a model to test antifibrotic drugs in the early onset of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Westra, Inge M; Mutsaers, Henricus A M; Luangmonkong, Theerut; Hadi, Mackenzie; Oosterhuis, Dorenda; de Jong, Koert P; Groothuis, Geny M M; Olinga, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Liver fibrosis is the progressive accumulation of connective tissue ultimately resulting in loss of organ function. Currently, no effective antifibrotics are available due to a lack of reliable human models. Here we investigated the fibrotic process in human precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) and studied the efficacy of multiple putative antifibrotic compounds. Our results demonstrated that human PCLS remained viable for 48h and the early onset of fibrosis was observed during culture, as demonstrated by an increased gene expression of Heat Shock Protein 47 (HSP47) and Pro-Collagen 1A1 (PCOL1A1) as well as increased collagen 1 protein levels. SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) showed a marked decrease in HSP47 and PCOL1A1 gene expression, whereas specific inhibitors of Smad 3 and Rac-1 showed no or only minor effects. Regarding the studied antifibrotics, gene levels of HSP47 and PCOL1A1 could be down-regulated with sunitinib and valproic acid, while PCOL1A1 expression was reduced following treatment with rosmarinic acid, tetrandrine and pirfenidone. These results are in contrast with prior data obtained in rat PCLS, indicating that antifibrotic drug efficacy is clearly species-specific. Thus, human PCLS is a promising model for liver fibrosis. Moreover, MAPK signaling plays an important role in the onset of fibrosis in this model and transforming growth factor beta pathway inhibitors appear to be more effective than platelet-derived growth factor pathway inhibitors in halting fibrogenesis in PCLS.

  8. Processing highly porous calcium phosphate ceramics for use in bioreactor cores for culturing human liver cells in-vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finoli, Anthony

    Chronic liver disease is the 11th highest cause of death in the United States claiming over 30,000 lives in 2009. The current treatment for chronic liver failure is liver transplantation but the availability of tissue is far less than the number of patients in need. To develop human liver tissue in the lab a 3D culturing environment must be created to support the growth of a complex tissue. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been chosen as a scaffold material because of its biocompatibility in the body and the ability to create a bioresorbable scaffold. By using a ceramic material, it is possible to create a three dimensional, protective environment in which tissue can grow. The first part of this study is to examine the behavior of adult human liver cells grown on composites of HAp and different biocompatible hydrogels. Porous HAp has been created using an emulsion foaming technique and cells are injected into the structure after being suspended in a hydrogel and are kept in culture for up to 28 days. Functional assays, gene expression and fluorescent microscopy will be used to examine these cultures. The second part of this study will be to develop a processing technique to create a resorbable scaffold that incorporates a vascular system template. Previous experiments have shown the high temperature decomposition of HAp into resorbable calcium phosphates will be used to create a multiphase material. By controlling the amount of transformation product formed, it is proposed that the resorption of the scaffold can be tailored. To introduce a pore network to guide the growth of a vascular system, a positive-negative casting technique has also been developed. A positive polymer copy can be made of a natural vascular system and ceramic is foamed around the copy. During sintering, the polymer is pyrolyzed leaving a multiscale pore network in the ceramic. By combining these techniques, it is proposed that a calcium phosphate bioreactor core can be processed that is suitable for

  9. Clinical evaluation of liver structure and function in humans exposed to halogenated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed Central

    Guzelian, P S

    1985-01-01

    An unresolved question is whether humans exposed to comparatively low doses of persistent environmental chemicals such as polyhalogenated biphenyls or organochlorine pesticides are at risk for injury to the liver. Cross-sectional epidemiologic studies suggest that these chemicals may produce statistically significant but clinically mild abnormalities in the commonly employed chemical tests of liver function. The few reports of human liver morphology reveal nonspecific changes reflecting effects of lipophilic chemicals. There is evidence that chemicals of this category in at least some doses cause induction of liver microsomal enzymes involved in biotransformation of foreign substances. This finding has been documented by measurements of the clearance of model drugs or the appearance in the urine of steroid metabolites or glucaric acid. Although a positive statistical correlation between the concentrations of these chemicals in serum and the serum gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity has been reported, the non-specificity of the latter enzyme precludes conclusion that this change is indicative of induction of liver microsomal enzymes. Although the effects of this type of environmental chemical are not indicative of progressive liver disease, only prospective clinical trials can resolve the issue of the risk for future development of liver malignancy. PMID:2411535

  10. Flexible transgastric endoscopic liver cyst fenestration: A feasibility study in humans (with video).

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Liu, Yaping; Chen, Danlei; Li, Xi; Wu, Renpei; Liu, Weifen; Leung, Joseph W; Zhang, Chuansen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2016-12-01

    There is no clinical report on the use of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) for the management of patients with large liver cysts.This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and safety of NOTES for liver cyst fenestration in humans using a currently available technique.From February 2009 to June 2010, 4 cases of transgastric endoscopic liver cyst fenestration were performed; in which 3 cases received NOTES only, while 1 case received additional laparoscopic assistance.Mean time to endoscopically locate the liver cyst was 16 minutes (5-22 minutes). Cysts that were present in the left lobe or on the liver surface were easier to locate endoscopically. Transgastric endoscopic liver cyst fenestration was successful in all patients. The use of an occlusion balloon helped in the endoscopic clipping of the gastrotomy incision. Mean operative time was 101.3 minutes (range, 90-112 minutes), and there were no intra- or postoperative complications including infections. All patients recovered well after the surgery, with only minor postoperative throat pain. There was no recurrence at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-48 months).Small sample size.It may be technically feasible and safe to perform transgastric endoscopic liver cyst fenestration in humans with no recurrence at follow up.

  11. A New Human 3D-Liver Model Unravels the Role of Galectins in Liver Infection by the Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Debora B.; Faust, Daniela M.; Deep Jhingan, Gagan; Guillen, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of human parasitic diseases depend on the availability of appropriate in vivo animal models and ex vivo experimental systems, and are particularly difficult for pathogens whose exclusive natural hosts are humans, such as Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite responsible for amoebiasis. This common infectious human disease affects the intestine and liver. In the liver sinusoids E. histolytica crosses the endothelium and penetrates into the parenchyma, with the concomitant initiation of inflammatory foci and subsequent abscess formation. Studying factors responsible for human liver infection is hampered by the complexity of the hepatic environment and by the restrictions inherent to the use of human samples. Therefore, we built a human 3D-liver in vitro model composed of cultured liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes in a 3D collagen-I matrix sandwich. We determined the presence of important hepatic markers and demonstrated that the cell layers function as a biological barrier. E. histolytica invasion was assessed using wild-type strains and amoebae with altered virulence or different adhesive properties. We showed for the first time the dependence of endothelium crossing upon amoebic Gal/GalNAc lectin. The 3D-liver model enabled the molecular analysis of human cell responses, suggesting for the first time a crucial role of human galectins in parasite adhesion to the endothelial cells, which was confirmed by siRNA knockdown of galectin-1. Levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including galectin-1 and -3, were highly increased upon contact of E. histolytica with the 3D-liver model. The presence of galectin-1 and -3 in the extracellular medium stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokine release, suggesting a further role for human galectins in the onset of the hepatic inflammatory response. These new findings are relevant for a better understanding of human liver infection by E. histolytica. PMID:25211477

  12. Overall Quality of Life in Adult Biliary Atresia Survivors with or without Liver Transplantation: Results from a National Cohort.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Willemien; Lind, Robert C; Sze, Yuk-Kueng; van der Steeg, Alida F W; Sieders, Egbert; Porte, Robert Jack; Verkade, Henkjan J; Hulscher, Jan B F; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E H M

    2016-08-01

    Background Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare cholestatic disease of infancy. Kasai portoenterostomy and liver transplantation (LT) are the two sequential treatment options. An increasing number of patients survive into adulthood. Little is known about their health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study aims to compare HRQOL of transplanted and nontransplanted patients in a cohort of young adult BA survivors. Patients and Methods RAND-36 and Liver Disease Index Score (LDSI) questionnaires were sent to eligible adult patients with BA. Clinical characteristics were obtained from the NeSBAR (Netherlands Study group on Biliary Atresia Registry) and the national pediatric LT database. RAND-36 domain and summary scores were compared with those of an age-matched Dutch reference group. The correlations between several clinical variables and HRQOL were analyzed. Results Mean RAND-36 domain and summary scores of transplanted (n = 15) and nontransplanted (n = 25) patients with BA (response 74%) were similar to the reference scores, with the exception of a decreased general health perception in nontransplanted patients (63 ± 21 vs. 75 ± 17; [p < 0.001], particularly in females. RAND-36 domain and summary scores were not significantly correlated to age at LT, time since LT, serum bilirubin, aspartate amino transferase or albumin levels, but were moderately to strongly correlated to LDSI total scores (r values 0.35-0.77). Conclusions Overall, young adult patients with BA have a HRQOL similar to an age-matched reference group. However, general health perception of nontransplanted patients, particularly of females, was decreased. HRQOL is correlated to liver disease symptoms but not to liver biochemistry parameters. Nontransplanted females and patients suffering from liver disease-associated symptoms may be a target for tailored supportive interventions.

  13. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  14. Human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets accelerate liver regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Itaba, Noriko; Matsumi, Yoshiaki; Okinaka, Kaori; Ashla, An Afida; Kono, Yohei; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Morimoto, Minoru; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Shiota, Goshi

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cell therapy. Based on our hypothesis that suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signal enhances hepatic differentiation of human MSCs, we developed human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets by a small molecule compound. Screening of 10 small molecule compounds was performed by WST assay, TCF reporter assay, and albumin mRNA expression. Consequently, hexachlorophene suppressed TCF reporter activity in time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hexachlorophene rapidly induced hepatic differentiation of human MSCs judging from expression of liver-specific genes and proteins, PAS staining, and urea production. The effect of orthotopic transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets against acute liver injury was examined in one-layered to three-layered cell sheets system. Transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets enhanced liver regeneration and suppressed liver injury. The survival rates of the mice were significantly improved. High expression of complement C3 and its downstream signals including C5a, NF-κB, and IL-6/STAT-3 pathway was observed in hepatic cell sheets-grafted tissues. Expression of phosphorylated EGFR and thioredoxin is enhanced, resulting in reduction of oxidative stress. These findings suggest that orthotopic transplantation of hepatic cell sheets manufactured from MSCs accelerates liver regeneration through complement C3, EGFR and thioredoxin. PMID:26553591

  15. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a possible tool to complement liver biopsy for grading hepatic fibrosis in paraffin-preserved human liver specimens.

    PubMed

    Fabila-Bustos, Diego A; Arroyo-Camarena, Ursula D; López-Vancell, María D; Durán-Padilla, Marco A; Azuceno-García, Itzel; Stolik-Isakina, Suren; Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth; Brown, Blair; Escobedo, Galileo; de la Rosa-Vázquez, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A diffuse reflectance spectroscopy-based method to score fibrosis in paraffin-preserved human liver specimens has been developed and is reported here. Paraffin blocks containing human liver tissue were collected from the General Hospital of Mexico and included in the study with the patients' written consent. The score of liver fibrosis was determined in each sample by two experienced pathologists in a single-blind fashion. Spectral measurements were acquired at 450-750 nm by establishing surface contact between the optical probe and the preserved tissue. According to the histological evaluation, four liver samples showed no evidence of fibrosis and were categorized as F0, four hepatic specimens exhibited an initial degree of fibrosis (F1-F2), five liver specimens showed a severe degree of fibrosis (F3), and six samples exhibited cirrhosis (F4). The human liver tissue showed a characteristic diffuse reflectance spectrum associated with the progressive stages of fibrosis. In the F0 liver samples, the diffuse reflection intensity gradually increased in the wavelength range of 450-750 nm. In contrast, the F1-F2, F3, and F4 specimens showed corresponding 1.5-, 2-, and 5.5-fold decreases in the intensity of diffuse reflectance compared to the F0 liver specimens. At 650 nm, all the stages of liver fibrosis were clearly distinguished from each other with high sensitivity and specificity (92-100%). To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting a distinctive diffuse reflectance spectrum for each stage of fibrosis in paraffin-preserved human liver specimens. These results suggest that diffuse reflectance spectroscopy may represent a complementary tool to liver biopsy for grading fibrosis.

  16. Why do most human liver cytosol preparations lack xanthine oxidase activity?

    PubMed

    Barr, John T; Choughule, Kanika V; Nepal, Sahadev; Wong, Timothy; Chaudhry, Amarjit S; Joswig-Jones, Carolyn A; Zientek, Michael; Strom, Stephen C; Schuetz, Erin G; Thummel, Kenneth E; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2014-04-01

    When investigating the potential for xanthine oxidase (XO)-mediated metabolism of a new chemical entity in vitro, selective chemical inhibition experiments are typically used. Most commonly, these inhibition experiments are performed using the inhibitor allopurinol (AP) and commercially prepared human liver cytosol (HLC) as the enzyme source. For reasons detailed herein, it is also a common practice to perfuse livers with solutions containing AP prior to liver harvest. The exposure to AP in HLC preparations could obviously pose a problem for measuring in vitro XO activity. To investigate this potential problem, an HPLC-MS/MS assay was developed to determine whether AP and its primary metabolite, oxypurinol, are retained within the cytosol for livers that were treated with AP during liver harvest. Differences in enzymatic activity for XO and aldehyde oxidase (AO) in human cytosol that can be ascribed to AP exposure were also evaluated. The results confirmed the presence of residual AP (some) and oxypurinol (all) human liver cytosol preparations that had been perfused with an AP-containing solution. In every case where oxypurinol was detected, XO activity was not observed. In contrast, the presence of AP and oxypurinol did not appear to have an impact on AO activity. Pooled HLC that was purchased from a commercial source also contained residual oxypurinol and did not show any XO activity. In the future, it is recommended that each HLC batch is screened for oxypurinol and/or XO activity prior to testing for XO-mediated metabolism of a new chemical entity.

  17. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  18. Ultrastructure of Ebola virus particles in human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, D S; Simpson, I H; Francis, D P; Knobloch, J; Bowen, E T; Lolik, P; Deng, I M

    1978-01-01

    Electron microscopy of tissues from two necropsies carried out in the Sudan on patients with Ebola virus infection identified virus particles in lung and spleen, but the main concentrations of Ebola particles were seen in liver sections. Viral precursor proteins and cores were found in functional liver cells, often aligned in membrane-bound aggregations. Complete virions, usually found only extracellularly, were mainly seen as long tubular forms, some without cores. Many tubular forms had 'enlarged heads' or 'spores' and some branched and torus forms were identified. The size and structure of the Ebola virus forms appear to be virtually indistinguishable from those of Marburg virus. Images Figs 6, 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:641193

  19. Non-invasive Investigations for the Diagnosis of Fontan-Associated Liver Disease in Pediatric and Adult Fontan Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fidai, Amyna; Dallaire, Frederic; Alvarez, Nanette; Balon, Yvonne; Clegg, Robin; Connelly, Michael; Dicke, Frank; Fruitman, Deborah; Harder, Joyce; Myers, Kimberley; Patton, David J.; Prieur, Tim; Vorhies, Erika; Myers, Robert P.; Martin, Steven R.; Greenway, Steven C.

    2017-01-01

    Fontan-associated liver disease (FALD) is a serious complication related to the chronically elevated venous pressure and low cardiac output of this abnormal circulation. However, diagnostic markers for this condition are limited. We hypothesized that specific tests for fibrosis developed for other chronic liver diseases would identify a higher prevalence of FALD than ultrasound and standard laboratory tests and that identified abnormalities would correlate with time post-Fontan. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed 19 children (average age 8.4 ± 4.3 and 5.4 ± 4.1 years post-Fontan) and 8 adults (average age 31.5 ± 8.9 and 21.1 ± 4 years post-Fontan) using standard serum laboratory investigations assessing hepatic integrity and function, the FibroTest, liver ultrasound, and transient elastography (FibroScan). In adult Fontan patients, hemoglobin, C-reactive protein, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase were significantly increased, and white blood cell and platelet counts were significantly decreased in comparison to the pediatric cohort. International normalized ratio was mildly elevated in both children and adults. FibroTest results were suggestive of fibrosis regardless of time post-Fontan. FibroScan measurements were significantly correlated with time post-Fontan, but the incidence of ultrasound-detected liver abnormalities was variable. No cases of hepatocellular carcinoma were identified. Abnormalities suggestive of FALD occur in both children and adults post-Fontan. Select laboratory tests, and possibly ultrasound and FibroScan in some patients, appear to have the most promise for the non-invasive detection of FALD.

  20. Bacteraemic pneumonia caused by Neisseria lactamica with reduced susceptibility to penicillin and ciprofloxacin in an adult with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Yi; Chuang, Yu-Min; Teng, Lee-Jene; Lee, Li-Na; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Kuo, Sow-Hsong; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2006-08-01

    This report presents a case of bacteraemic pneumonia caused by Neisseria lactamica in an adult patient with liver cirrhosis who was successfully treated with ceftriaxone. The isolate was confirmed as N. lactamica by analysis of a partial sequence of the 16S rRNA gene; it had reduced susceptibilities to penicillin (MIC 0.75 microg ml(-1)) and ciprofloxacin (MIC > or =0.5 mg l(-1)).

  1. Identification of human cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the 7-hydroxylation of chlorpromazine by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, K; Kobayashi, K; Tsumuji, M; Tani, M; Shimada, N; Chiba, K

    2000-01-01

    Studies to identify the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoform(s) involved in chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation were performed using human liver microsomes and cDNA-expressed human CYPs. The kinetics of chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation in human liver microsomes showed a simple Michaelis-Menten behavior. The apparent Km and Vmax values were 3.4+/-1.0 microM and 200.5+/-83.7 pmol/min/mg, respectively. The chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylase activity in human liver microsomes showed good correlations with desipramine 2-hydroxylase activity (r = 0.763, p < 0.05), a marker activity for CYP2D6, and phenacetin O-deethylase activity (r = 0.638, p < 0.05), a marker activity for CYP1A2. Quinidine (an inhibitor of CYP2D6) completely inhibited while alpha-naphthoflavone (an inhibitor of CYP1A2) marginally inhibited the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylase activity in a human liver microsomal sample showing high CYP2D6 activity. On the other hand, alpha-naphthoflavone inhibited the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylase activity to 55-65% of control in a human liver microsomal sample showing low CYP2D6 activity. Among eleven cDNA-expressed CYPs studied, CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 exhibited significant activity for the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation. The Km values for the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation of both cDNA-expressed CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 were in agreement with the Km values of human liver microsomes. These results suggest that chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation is catalyzed mainly by CYP2D6 and partially by CYP1A2.

  2. Modeling and Therapy of Human Liver Diseases Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: How Far Have We Come?

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Tafaleng, Edgar; Kelly, Victoria; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Fox, Ira J.

    2011-01-01

    Rashid ST, Corbineau S, Hannan N, Marciniak SJ, Miranda E, Alexander G, Huang-Doran I, Griffin J, Ahrlund-Richter L, Skepper J, Semple R, Weber A, Lomas DA, Vallier L. Modeling inherited metabolic disorders of the liver using human induced pluripotent stem cells. J Clin Invest. 2010 Sep 1;120(9):3127–36. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells hold great promise for advancements in developmental biology, cell-based therapy, and modeling of human disease. Here, we examined the use of human iPS cells for modeling inherited metabolic disorders of the liver. Dermal fibroblasts from patients with various inherited metabolic diseases of the liver were used to generate a library of patient-specific human iPS cell lines. Each line was differentiated into hepatocytes using what we believe to be a novel 3-step differentiation protocol in chemically defined conditions. The resulting cells exhibited properties of mature hepatocytes, such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 metabolism. Moreover, cells generated from patients with 3 of the inherited metabolic conditions studied in further detail (alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial hypercholesterolemia, and glycogen storage disease type 1a) were found to recapitulate key pathological features of the diseases affecting the patients from which they were derived, such as aggregation of misfolded alpha1-antitrypsin in the endoplasmic reticulum, deficient LDL receptor-mediated cholesterol uptake, and elevated lipid and glycogen accumulation. Therefore, we report a simple and effective platform for hepatocyte generation from patient-specific human iPS cells. These patient-derived hepatocytes demonstrate that it is possible to model diseases whose phenotypes are caused by pathological dysregulation of key processes within adult cells. Espejel S, Roll GR, McLaughlin KJ, Lee AY, Zhang JY, Laird DJ, Okita K, Yamanaka S, Willenbring H. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes have the functional and proliferative

  3. Reelin Expression in Human Liver of Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carotti, Simone; Perrone, Giuseppe; Amato, Michelina; Gentilucci, Umberto Vespasiani; Righi, Daniela; Francesconi, Maria; Pellegrini, Claudio; Zalfa, Francesca; Zingariello, Maria; Picardi, Antonio; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Morini, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Reelin is a secreted extracellular glyco-protein that plays a critical role during brain development. Several studies have described Reelin expression in hepatic stellate cells of the human liver. In order to investigate the possible role of Reelin in the process of hepatic fibrogenesis, in this study we investigated Reelin expression in the liver tissue of patients infected with the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). On this basis, Reelin expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry during liver biopsies of 81 patients with HCV-related chronic hepatitis. A Knodell score was used to stage liver fibrosis. Hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblast immunohistochemical markers (CRBP-1, alpha-SMA) were also evaluated. As further confirmed by colocalization experiments (Reelin +CRBP-1), Reelin protein was expressed by hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts, and a significant positive correlation was found between Reelin expression and the stage of liver fibrosis (P=0.002). Moreover, Reelin correlated with CRBP-1 positive cells (P=0.002), but not with alpha-SMA, suggesting that Reelin should not be regarded as a marker of hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts differentiation but rather as a functional protein expressed during some phases of liver fibrosis. Furthermore, Disabled-1 (Dab1), a Reelin adaptor protein, was expressed in cells of ductular reaction suggesting a paracrine role for Reelin with regards these elements. In conclusion, Reelin was expressed by human hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts and the number of these cells increased significantly in the lobule as the liver fibrosis progressed, suggesting a role for Reelin in the activation of hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts during liver injury. Reelin may potentially be incorporated into liver injury evaluations in combination with other histological data. PMID:28348420

  4. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Exosomes derived from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells alleviate liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingfen; Yan, Yongmin; Wang, Bingying; Qian, Hui; Zhang, Xu; Shen, Li; Wang, Mei; Zhou, Ying; Zhu, Wei; Li, Wei; Xu, Wenrong

    2013-03-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been considered as an attractive tool for the therapy of diseases. Exosomes excreted from MSCs can reduce myocardial ischemia/reperfusion damage and protect against acute tubular injury. However, whether MSC-derived exosomes can relieve liver fibrosis and its mechanism remain unknown. Previous work showed that human umbilical cord-MSCs (hucMSCs) transplanted into acutely injured and fibrotic livers could restore liver function and improve liver fibrosis. In this study, it was found that transplantation of exosomes derived from hucMSC (hucMSC-Ex) reduced the surface fibrous capsules and got their textures soft, alleviated hepatic inflammation and collagen deposition in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced fibrotic liver. hucMSC-Ex also significantly recovered serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity, decreased collagen type I and III, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and phosphorylation Smad2 expression in vivo. In further experiments, we found that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated markers E-cadherin-positive cells increased and N-cadherin- and vimentin-positive cells decreased after hucMSC-Ex transplantation. Furthermore, the human liver cell line HL7702 underwent typical EMT after induction with recombinant human TGF-β1, and then hucMSC-Ex treatment reversed spindle-shaped and EMT-associated markers expression in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that hucMSC-Ex could ameliorate CCl4-induced liver fibrosis by inhibiting EMT and protecting hepatocytes. This provides a novel approach for the treatment of fibrotic liver disease.

  6. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  7. Maps of the adult human hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Nezzar, Hachemi; Sakka, Laurent; Boirie, Yves; Fontaine, Denys; Coste, Aurélien; Coll, Guillaume; Sontheimer, Anna; Sarret, Catherine; Gabrillargues, Jean; De Salles, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The human hypothalamus is a small deeply located region placed at the crossroad of neurovegetative, neuroendocrine, limbic, and optic systems. Although deep brain stimulation techniques have proven that it could be feasible to modulate these systems, targeting the hypothalamus and in particular specific nuclei and white bundles, is still challenging. Our goal was to make a synthesis of relevant topographical data of the human hypothalamus, under the form of magnetic resonance imaging maps useful for mastering its elaborated structure as well as its neighborhood. As from 1.5 Tesla, Inversion-Recovery sequence allows locating the hypothalamus and most of its components. Spotting hypothalamic compartments is possible according to specific landmarks: the anterior commissure, the mammillary bodies, the preoptic recess, the infundibular recess, the crest between the preoptic and the infundibular recesses, the optical tract, the fornix, and the mammillo-thalamic bundle. The identification of hypothalamus and most of its components could be useful to allow the quantification of local pathological processes and to target specific circuitry to alleviate severe symptoms, using physical or biological agents. PMID:23682342

  8. The complete sequence of a full length cDNA for human liver glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: evidence for multiple mRNA species.

    PubMed Central

    Arcari, P; Martinelli, R; Salvatore, F

    1984-01-01

    A recombinant M13 clone (O42) containing a 65 b.p. cDNA fragment from human fetal liver mRNA coding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase has been identified and it has been used to isolate from a full-length human adult liver cDNA library a recombinant clone, pG1, which has been subcloned in M13 phage and completely sequenced with the chain terminator method. Besides the coding region of 1008 b.p., the cDNA sequence includes 60 nucleotides at the 5'-end and 204 nucleotides at the 3'-end up to the polyA tail. Hybridization of pG1 to human liver total RNA shows only one band about the size of pG1 cDNA. A much stronger hybridization signal was observed using RNA derived from human hepatocarcinoma and kidney carcinoma cell lines. Sequence homology between clone 042 and the homologous region of clone pG1 is 86%. On the other hand, homology among the translated sequences and the known human muscle protein sequence ranges between 77 and 90%; these data demonstrate the existence of more than one gene coding for G3PD. Southern blot of human DNA, digested with several restriction enzymes, also indicate that several homologous sequences are present in the human genome. Images PMID:6096821

  9. Liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection: Diagnostic methods and clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Sagnelli, Caterina; Martini, Salvatore; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Macera, Margherita; Zampino, Rosa; Coppola, Nicola; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Several non-invasive surrogate methods have recently challenged the main role of liver biopsy in assessing liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, applied to avoid the well-known side effects of liver puncture. Serological tests involve the determination of biochemical markers of synthesis or degradation of fibrosis, tests not readily available in clinical practice, or combinations of routine tests used in chronic hepatitis and HIV/HCV coinfection. Several radiologic techniques have also been proposed, some of which commonly used in clinical practice. The studies performed to compare the prognostic value of non-invasive surrogate methods with that of the degree of liver fibrosis assessed on liver tissue have not as yet provided conclusive results. Each surrogate technique has shown some limitations, including the risk of over- or under-estimating the extent of liver fibrosis. The current knowledge on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients will be summarized in this review article, which is addressed in particular to physicians involved in this setting in their clinical practice. PMID:26523204

  10. Subnormothermic machine perfusion for ex vivo preservation and recovery of the human liver for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, B G; Yeh, H; Ozer, S; Martins, P N; Farmer, A; Wu, W; Saeidi, N; Op den Dries, S; Berendsen, T A; Smith, R N; Markmann, J F; Porte, R J; Yarmush, M L; Uygun, K; Izamis, M-L

    2014-06-01

    To reduce widespread shortages, attempts are made to use more marginal livers for transplantation. Many of these grafts are discarded for fear of inferior survival rates or biliary complications. Recent advances in organ preservation have shown that ex vivo subnormothermic machine perfusion has the potential to improve preservation and recover marginal livers pretransplantation. To determine the feasibility in human livers, we assessed the effect of 3 h of oxygenated subnormothermic machine perfusion (21°C) on seven livers discarded for transplantation. Biochemical and microscopic assessment revealed minimal injury sustained during perfusion. Improved oxygen uptake (1.30 [1.11-1.94] to 6.74 [4.15-8.16] mL O2 /min kg liver), lactate levels (4.04 [3.70-5.99] to 2.29 [1.20-3.43] mmol/L) and adenosine triphosphate content (45.0 [70.6-87.5] pmol/mg preperfusion to 167.5 [151.5-237.2] pmol/mg after perfusion) were observed. Liver function, reflected by urea, albumin and bile production, was seen during perfusion. Bile production increased and the composition of bile (bile salts/phospholipid ratio, pH and bicarbonate concentration) became more favorable. In conclusion, ex vivo subnormothermic machine perfusion effectively maintains liver function with minimal injury and sustains or improves various hepatobiliary parameters postischemia.

  11. Hydration of arene and alkene oxides by epoxide hydrase in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kapitulnik, J; Levin, W; Morecki, R; Dansette, P M; Jerina, D M; Conney, A H

    1977-02-01

    The comparative hydration of styrene 7,8-oxide, octene 1,2-oxide, naphthalene 1,2-oxide, phenanthrene 9,10-oxide, benzo[a]anthracene 5,6-oxide, 3-methylcholanthrene 11,12-oxide, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene 5,6-oxide, and benzo[a, 7,8-, 9,10-, and 11,12-oxides to their respective dihydrodiols was investigated in microsomes from nine human autopsy livers. The substrate specificity of the epoxide hydrase in human liver microsomes was very similar to that of the epoxide hydrase in rat liver microsomes. Phenanthrene 9,10-oxide was the best substrate for the human and rat epoxide hydrases and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene 5,6-oxide and benzo[a-a)pyrene 11, 12-oxide were the poorest substrates. Plotting epoxide hydrase activity obtained with one substrate against epoxide hydrase activity for another substrate for each of the nine human livers revealed excellent correlations for all combinations of the 11 substrates studied (r = 0.87 to 0.99). The data suggest the presence in human liver of a single epoxide hydrase with broad substrate specificity. However, the results do not exclude the possible presence in human liver of several epoxide hydrases that are under similar regulatory control. These results suggest the need for further investigation to determine whether there is a safe epoxide of a drug whose in vivo metabolism is predictive of the capacity of different individuals to metabolize a wide variety of epoxides of drugs and environmental chemicals.

  12. Human liver tumors in relation to steroidal usage.

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, G H; Christopherson, W M

    1983-01-01

    Since 1973 a number of investigators have reported an association between liver neoplasia and steroid usage. Through referral material we have examined the histology of over 250 cases of hepatic neoplasia, most in patients receiving steroid medications. The majority have been benign, predominantly focal nodular hyperplasia (55%) and hepatocellular adenoma (39%). The average age was 31.4 years; 83% had significant steroid exposure with an average duration of 71 months for focal nodular hyperplasia and 79.6 months for hepatocellular adenoma. The type of estrogenic agent was predominantly mestranol; however, during the period mestranol was the most frequently used synthetic steroid. A distinct clinical entity of life threatening hemorrhage from the lesion occurred in 31% of patients with hepatocellular adenoma and 9% of patients with focal nodular hyperplasia. Recurrence of benign tumors has occurred in some patients who continued using steroids and regression has been observed in patients who had incomplete tumor removal but discontinued steroid medication. Medial and intimal vascular changes have been present in a large number of the benign tumors. The relationship of these vascular changes to oncogenesis is unclear, but similar lesions have been described in the peripheral vasculature associated with steroid administration. A number of hepatocellular carcinomas have also been seen. Of significance is the young age of these patients and lack of abnormal histology in adjacent nonneoplastic liver. A striking number of the malignant hepatocellular tumors have been of the uncommon type described as "eosinophilic hepatocellular carcinoma with lamellar fibrosis." The epidemiology of liver lesions within this series is difficult to assess, since the material has been referred from very diverse locations. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:6307679

  13. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Human Orthotopic Liver Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. Jake; Jaffe, Ron; Tzakis, A.; Ramsey, Glenn; Todo, S.; Belle, Steven; Esquivel, Carlos; Shapiro, Ron; Markus, Bernd; Mroczek, Elizabeth; Van Thiel, D. H.; Sysyn, Greg; Gordon, Robert; Makowka, Leonard; Starzl, Tom

    1988-01-01

    A clinicopathologic analysis of liver transplantation across major ABO blood group barriers was carried out 1) to determine if antibody-mediated (humoral) rejection was a cause of graft failure and if humoral rejection can be identified, 2) to propose criteria for establishing the diagnosis, and 3) to describe the clinical and pathologic features of humoral rejection. A total of 51 (24 primary) ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) liver grafts were transplanted into 49 recipients. There was a 46% graft failure rate during the first 30 days for primary ABO-I grafts compared with an 11% graft failure rate for primary ABO compatible (ABO-C), crossmatch negative, age, sex and priority-matched control patients (P < 0.02). A similarly high early graft failure rate (60%) was seen for nonprimary ABO-I grafts during the first 30 days. Clinically, the patients experienced a relentless rise in serum transaminases, hepatic failure, and coagulopathy during the first weeks after transplant. Pathologic examination of ABO-I grafts that failed early demonstrated widespread areas of geographic hemorrhagic necrosis with diffuse intraorgan coagulation. Prominent arterial deposition of antibody and complement components was demonstrated by immunoflourescent staining. Elution studies confirmed the presence of tissue-bound, donor-specific isoagglutinins within the grafts. No such deposition was seen in control cases. These studies confirm that antibody mediated rejection of the liver occurs and allows for the development of criteria for establishing the diagnosis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:3046369

  14. PEDIATRIC LIVER TRANSPLANTATION WITH EX-SITU LIVER TRANSECTION AND THE APPLICATION OF THE HUMAN FIBRINOGEN AND THROMBIN SPONGE IN THE WOUND AREA

    PubMed Central

    VICENTINE, Fernando Pompeu Piza; GONZALEZ, Adriano Miziara; de AZEVEDO, Ramiro Anthero; BENINI, Barbara Burza; LINHARES, Marcelo Moura; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; MARTINS, Jose Luiz; SALZEDAS-NETTO, Alcides Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Surgical strategy to increase the number of liver transplants in the pediatric population is the ex-situ liver transection (reduction or split). However, it is associated with complications such as hemorrhage and leaks. The human fibrinogen and thrombin sponge is useful for improving hemostasis in liver surgery. Aim: Compare pediatric liver transplants with ex-situ liver transection (reduction or split) with or without the human fibrinogen and thrombin sponge. Methods: Was performed a prospective analysis of 21 patients submitted to liver transplantation with ex-situ liver transection with the application of the human fibrinogen and thrombin sponge in the wound area (group A) and retrospective analysis of 59 patients without the sponge (group B). Results: The characteristics of recipients and donors were similar. There were fewer reoperations due to bleeding in the wound area in group A (14.2%) compared to group B (41.7%, p=0.029). There was no difference in relation to the biliary leak (group A: 17.6%, group B: 5.1%, p=0.14). Conclusion: There was a lower number of reoperations due to bleeding of the wound area of ​​the hepatic graft when the human fibrinogen and thrombin sponge were used. PMID:28076477

  15. HMG-CoA reductase activity in human liver microsomes: comparative inhibition by statins.

    PubMed

    Dansette, P M; Jaoen, M; Pons, C

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a number of vastatins, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, in human liver microsomes. HMG-CoA reductase activity was four times lower than the activity in untreated rat liver microsomes. Vastatins could be classified in this in vitro assay in three classes both in human and rat microsomes: the first one including cerivastatin with an IC50 of 6 nM, the second one with atorvastatin and fluvastatin (IC50) between 40 and 100 nM) and the third one containing pravastatin, simvastatin and lovastatin (IC50 between 100 and 300 nM).

  16. High resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human brain and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Barany, M.; Spigos, D.G.; Mok, E.; Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Wilbur, A.C.; Langer, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    Water-suppressed and slice-selective proton spectra of live human brain exhibited several resonances that were tentatively assigned to metabolites such as N-acetylaspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine and creatine, choline derivatives, and taurine. In the liver spectrum of a healthy volunteer, the major resonance was tentatively assigned to a fatty acyl methylene and the minor resonances to protons in carnitine, taurine, glutamate, and glutamine. In the spectrum of a cancerous liver, resonances in addition to those present in the normal liver were seen. Protein degradation in the liver with cancer was indicated by resonances from urea and from the ring protons in tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Furthermore, increased nucleic acid synthesis was indicated by resonances from nucleotide protons.

  17. Survey of adult liver transplantation techniques (SALT): an international study of current practices in deceased donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, Michael D; Memeo, Riccardo; Laurent, Alexis; Tayar, Claude; Cherqui, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been little focus lately on operative techniques for full graft liver transplantation, and the standard technique is unclear. Methods An internet survey addressing the key technical issues was e-mailed to programme directors. Results Responses were obtained from 93 out of 128 (73%) directors contacted. Programmes performed a median of 60 (8–240) transplants per year. Maximum mean cold time of 13 ± 3 h and maximum median steatosis of 40% (15–90%) were tolerated. The inferior vena cava was preserved by 48% of centres all the time and 43% selectively. European centres used temporary portacaval shunting (42%) four times more often than USA programmes. Venous bypass was always used when not preserving the inferior vena cava by less than 25%, and used selectively by approximately 40% of centres. Portal vein anastomosis with room for expansion (88%), graft hepatic artery to native gastroduodenal/common hepatic artery bifurcation (57%) and bile duct-to-duct (47%) were the favoured techniques. Discussion A standard international operative technique for deceased donor liver transplantation does not exist, although there is a trend towards inferior vena cava preservation. Donor selection criteria were more homogenous across programmes. As suggested by the high response rate, there likely exists interest to investigate technical variations on an international scale. PMID:21929669

  18. Strategic breakthrough in adult ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation: preliminary results of consecutive seven cases.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Yuji; Muto, Jyun; Matono, Rumi; Ninomiya, Mizuki; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Ikegami, Toru; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    ABO-incompatibility is a major obstacle to expanding exiguous donor pools in adult liver transplantation, especially in countries where grafts from deceased donors are uncommon. We present our preliminary results of ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using a new, simple protocol. Seven consecutive cases of ABO-I LDLT were managed by the same protocol including pre-operative administration of a single dose of rituximab (375 mg/m(2) ) followed by three to five sessions of plasma exchange before LDLT without portal infusion therapy. The triple immunosuppression protocol consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and steroids, with mycophenolate mofetil starting seven d before LDLT. Splenectomy was performed for all cases. All patients are alive (100% survival) with a mean follow-up of 852 d (715-990 d). Neither antibody-mediated nor hyperacute rejection were encountered. There was only one episode of mild acute cellular rejection, for which steroid augmentation was effective. The median preformed isoagglutinin antibody titer before plasma exchange was 256, while the median antibody titer immediately before LDLT was 16. In conclusion, adult ABO-I LDLT results were excellent - comparable or even superior to those of ABO-compatible LDLT. ABO-I adult LDLT has now become a more applicable modality without the need for an appropriate donor.

  19. Transcriptional networks implicated in human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hua; Liu, Wei

    2015-10-01

    The transcriptome of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was investigated in several studies. However, the implications of transcriptional networks in progressive NAFLD are not clear and mechanisms inducing transition from nonalcoholic simple fatty liver (NAFL) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are still elusive. The aims of this study were to (1) construct networks for progressive NAFLD, (2) identify hub genes and functional modules in these networks and (3) infer potential linkages among hub genes, transcription factors and microRNAs (miRNA) for NAFLD progression. A systems biology approach by combining differential expression analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was utilized to dissect transcriptional profiles in 19 normal, 10 NAFL and 16 NASH patients. Based on this framework, 3 modules related to chromosome organization, proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation and immune response were identified in NASH network. Furthermore, 9 modules of co-expressed genes associated with NAFL/NASH transition were found. Further characterization of these modules defined 13 highly connected hub genes in NAFLD progression network. Interestingly, 11 significantly changed miRNAs were predicted to target 10 of the 13 hub genes. Characterization of modules and hub genes that may be regulated by miRNAs could facilitate the identification of candidate genes and pathways responsible for NAFL/NASH transition and lead to a better understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. The identified modules and hub genes may point to potential targets for therapeutic interventions.

  20. Repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using adult mice with multiple genotoxicity assays concurrently performed as a combination test.

    PubMed

    Hagio, Soichiro; Furukawa, Satoshi; Abe, Masayoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi

    2014-06-01

    Recently, the liver micronucleus (MN) assay using young adult rats with repeated administrations has been investigated by employing a new method without partial hepatectomy or in situcollagenase perfusion as the repeated dose liver MN (RDLMN) assay by Narumi et al. (2012). In our study, in order to investigate the possibility of the RDLMN assay using young adult mice instead of rats and the feasibility of employing some genotoxicity assays along with the RDLMN assay as a combination test, two genotoxic carcinogens (N,N-diethylnitrosoamine (DEN) and cisplatin (CIS)) and a nongenotoxic carcinogen (phenobarbital sodium (PHE)) were administered to mice for 15 or 29 days. Then, the liver MN assay, peripheral blood (PB) MN assay and comet assay using the liver and kidney were concurrently performed as a combination test. DEN showed positive responses to all endpoints except MN induction in PB after 15 days of repeat administration. A cross-linking agent, CIS, showed MN induction in liver after 29 days of repeat administration, and in PB after 15 and 29 days of repeat administration, although the comet assay yielded negative responses for both organs at both sampling times. PHE yielded negative responses for all endpoints. In conclusion, it is suggested that the RDLMN assay using mice is a feasible method to be integrated into the general repeated toxicity test along with the combination assays, i.e., comet assay or PB MN assay, which would help in risk assessment for carcinogenicity by comparing the results of combination assays with each other.

  1. Living related liver transplantation in adults: first year experience at the University of Liège.

    PubMed

    Detry, O; De Roover, A; Delwaide, J; Coimbra, C; Kaba, A; Joris, J; Damas, P; Meurisse, M; Honoré, P

    2004-04-01

    Living related liver transplantation (LRLT) in adult recipients has been recently developed to overcome the organ donor shortage, but LRLT leaves the healthy donors at risk of serious post-operative complications, or even death. The aim of this paper is to report the prospective evaluation of the initial experience of adult LRLT at the University of Liège. From March 2002 till March 2003, in a consecutive series of 35 adult liver transplantations, five recipients (mean age: 51 years) underwent LRLT, including one retransplantation. Indications for transplantation were autoimmune hepatitis, hepatitis B virus related cirrhosis with hepatocarcinoma (two cases), hepatitis C virus related cirrhosis with hepatocarcinoma, and ischemic intrahepatic bile duct necrosis 10 years after primary liver transplantation. Mean age of the donors was 34 years (range: 21-53 years). All donation cases were intra familial at first degree. The right lobe was used as a graft in four cases and the left lobe in one case. All right lobe donors developed transient hyperbilirubinemia and hypocoagulation for 4 to 6 days. No severe complication (transfusion, bile duct fistula, reintervention, rehospitalization) nor significant long-term sequelae were observed in the donors. In the recipients, graft function was immediate, and there was no small-for-size syndrome. One recipient developed biliary fistula treated by reoperation. One recipient died from invasive aspergillosis 11 days after the procedure. The four other recipients were alive without recurrence of the disease at follow-up. This report confirmed that LRLT may be a valuable alternative to cadaveric liver transplantation in the era of organ donor shortage. However, even if there was no severe complication for the donors in our preliminary experience, LRLT puts healthy living donors at risk of significant morbidity and even death.

  2. Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Lead, and Mercury Are Associated with Liver Disease in American Adults: NHANES 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Matt; Appana, Savitri; Patel, Mihir; Falkner, Keith Cameron; McClain, Craig J.; Brock, Guy

    2010-01-01

    Background High-level occupational exposures to some industrial chemicals have been associated with liver diseases, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the potential role of low-level environmental pollution on liver disease in the general population has not been evaluated. Objective We determined whether environmental pollutants are associated with an elevation in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity and suspected NAFLD in U.S. adults. Methods This cross-sectional cohort study evaluated adult participants without viral hepatitis, hemochromatosis, or alcoholic liver disease from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for 2003–2004. ALT elevation was defined in men as ≥ 37 IU/L (age18–20 years) and ≥ 48 IU/L (age ≥ 21 years) and in women as ≥ 30 IU/L (age 18–20 years) and ≥ 31 IU/L (age ≥ 21 years). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for ALT elevation were determined across exposure quartiles for 17 pollutant subclasses comprising 111 individual pollutants present with at least a 60% detection rate. Adjustments were made for age, race/ethnicity, sex, body mass index, poverty income ratio, and insulin resistance. Individual pollutants from subclasses associated with ALT elevation were subsequently analyzed. Results The overall prevalence of ALT elevation was 10.6%. Heavy metals and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were associated with dose-dependent increased adjusted ORs for ALT elevation. Within these subclasses, increasing whole-blood levels of lead and mercury and increasing lipid-adjusted serum levels of 20 PCBs were individually associated with ALT elevation. Conclusions PCB, lead, and mercury exposures were associated with unexplained ALT elevation, a proxy marker of NAFLD, in NHANES 2003–2004 adult participants. PMID:21126940

  3. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunopathogenesis in a Humanized Mouse Model: Induction of Human-Specific Liver Fibrosis and M2-Like Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bility, Moses T.; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Luan, Yan; Li, Feng; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo; Tu, Zhengkun; Gao, Yanhang; Fu, Yangxin; Niu, Junqi; Wang, Fusheng; Su, Lishan

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of chronic HBV infection and immunopathogenesis are poorly understood due to a lack of a robust small animal model. Here we report the development of a humanized mouse model with both human immune system and human liver cells by reconstituting the immunodeficient A2/NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice with human HLA-A2 transgene) with human hematopoietic stem cells and liver progenitor cells (A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mice). The A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse supported HBV infection and approximately 75% of HBV infected mice established persistent infection for at least 4 months. We detected human immune responses, albeit impaired in the liver, chronic liver inflammation and liver fibrosis in infected animals. An HBV neutralizing antibody efficiently inhibited HBV infection and associated liver diseases in humanized mice. In addition, we found that the HBV mediated liver disease was associated with high level of infiltrated human macrophages with M2-like activation phenotype. Importantly, similar M2-like macrophage accumulation was confirmed in chronic hepatitis B patients with liver diseases. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that induction of M2-like macrophage in the liver is associated with accelerated liver fibrosis and necrosis in patients with acute HBV-induced liver failure. Lastly, we demonstrate that HBV promotes M2-like activation in both M1 and M2 macrophages in cell culture studies. Our study demonstrates that the A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse model is valuable in studying HBV infection, human immune responses and associated liver diseases. Furthermore, results from this study suggest a critical role for macrophage polarization in hepatitis B virus-induced immune impairment and liver pathology. PMID:24651854

  4. Hepatitis B virus infection and immunopathogenesis in a humanized mouse model: induction of human-specific liver fibrosis and M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bility, Moses T; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Luan, Yan; Li, Feng; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo; Tu, Zhengkun; Gao, Yanhang; Fu, Yangxin; Niu, Junqi; Wang, Fusheng; Su, Lishan

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms of chronic HBV infection and immunopathogenesis are poorly understood due to a lack of a robust small animal model. Here we report the development of a humanized mouse model with both human immune system and human liver cells by reconstituting the immunodeficient A2/NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice with human HLA-A2 transgene) with human hematopoietic stem cells and liver progenitor cells (A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mice). The A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse supported HBV infection and approximately 75% of HBV infected mice established persistent infection for at least 4 months. We detected human immune responses, albeit impaired in the liver, chronic liver inflammation and liver fibrosis in infected animals. An HBV neutralizing antibody efficiently inhibited HBV infection and associated liver diseases in humanized mice. In addition, we found that the HBV mediated liver disease was associated with high level of infiltrated human macrophages with M2-like activation phenotype. Importantly, similar M2-like macrophage accumulation was confirmed in chronic hepatitis B patients with liver diseases. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that induction of M2-like macrophage in the liver is associated with accelerated liver fibrosis and necrosis in patients with acute HBV-induced liver failure. Lastly, we demonstrate that HBV promotes M2-like activation in both M1 and M2 macrophages in cell culture studies. Our study demonstrates that the A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse model is valuable in studying HBV infection, human immune responses and associated liver diseases. Furthermore, results from this study suggest a critical role for macrophage polarization in hepatitis B virus-induced immune impairment and liver pathology.

  5. Immunofluorescence identifies distinct subsets of endothelial cells in the human liver

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Otto; Phillips, Anthony; Ruggiero, Katya; Bartlett, Adam; Dunbar, P. Rod

    2017-01-01

    As well as systemic vascular endothelial cells, the liver has specialised sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC). LSEC dysfunction has been documented in many diseased states yet their phenotype in normal human liver has not been comprehensively assessed. Our aim was to improve characterisation of subsets of endothelial cells and associated pericytes in the human liver. Immunofluorescence microscopy was performed on normal human liver tissue samples to assess endothelial and structural proteins in a minimum of three donors. LSEC are distributed in an acinar pattern and universally express CD36, but two distinctive subsets of LSEC can be identified in different acinar zones. Type 1 LSEC are CD36hiCD32−CD14−LYVE-1− and are located in acinar zone 1 of the lobule, while Type 2 LSEC are LYVE-1+CD32hiCD14+CD54+CD36mid-lo and are located in acinar zones 2 and 3 of the lobule. Portal tracts and central veins can be identified using markers for systemic vascular endothelia and pericytes, none of which are expressed by LSEC. In areas of low hydrostatic pressure LSEC are lined by stellate cells that express the pericyte marker CD146. Our findings identify distinctive populations of LSEC and distinguish these cells from adjacent stellate cells, systemic vasculature and pericytes in different zones of the liver acinus. PMID:28287163

  6. Criteria for viability assessment of discarded human donor livers during ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Michael E; op den Dries, Sanna; Karimian, Negin; Weeder, Pepijn D; de Boer, Marieke T; Wiersema-Buist, Janneke; Gouw, Annette S H; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Although normothermic machine perfusion of donor livers may allow assessment of graft viability prior to transplantation, there are currently no data on what would be a good parameter of graft viability. To determine whether bile production is a suitable biomarker that can be used to discriminate viable from non-viable livers we have studied functional performance as well as biochemical and histological evidence of hepatobiliary injury during ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion of human donor livers. After a median duration of cold storage of 6.5 h, twelve extended criteria human donor livers that were declined for transplantation were ex vivo perfused for 6 h at 37 °C with an oxygenated solution based on red blood cells and plasma, using pressure controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous portal perfusion. During perfusion, two patterns of bile flow were identified: (1) steadily increasing bile production, resulting in a cumulative output of ≥ 30 g after 6 h (high bile output group), and (2) a cumulative bile production <20 g in 6 h (low bile output group). Concentrations of transaminases and potassium in the perfusion fluid were significantly higher in the low bile output group, compared to the high bile output group. Biliary concentrations of bilirubin and bicarbonate were respectively 4 times and 2 times higher in the high bile output group. Livers in the low bile output group displayed more signs of hepatic necrosis and venous congestion, compared to the high bile output group. In conclusion, bile production could be an easily assessable biomarker of hepatic viability during ex vivo machine perfusion of human donor livers. It could potentially be used to identify extended criteria livers that are suitable for transplantation. These ex vivo findings need to be confirmed in a transplant experiment or a clinical trial.

  7. Towards a three-dimensional microfluidic liver platform for predicting drug efficacy and toxicity in humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although the process of drug development requires efficacy and toxicity testing in animals prior to human testing, animal models have limited ability to accurately predict human responses to xenobiotics and other insults. Societal pressures are also focusing on reduction of and, ultimately, replacement of animal testing. However, a variety of in vitro models, explored over the last decade, have not been powerful enough to replace animal models. New initiatives sponsored by several US federal agencies seek to address this problem by funding the development of physiologically relevant human organ models on microscopic chips. The eventual goal is to simulate a human-on-a-chip, by interconnecting the organ models, thereby replacing animal testing in drug discovery and development. As part of this initiative, we aim to build a three-dimensional human liver chip that mimics the acinus, the smallest functional unit of the liver, including its oxygen gradient. Our liver-on-a-chip platform will deliver a microfluidic three-dimensional co-culture environment with stable synthetic and enzymatic function for at least 4 weeks. Sentinel cells that contain fluorescent biosensors will be integrated into the chip to provide multiplexed, real-time readouts of key liver functions and pathology. We are also developing a database to manage experimental data and harness external information to interpret the multimodal data and create a predictive platform. PMID:24565476

  8. A shift in paradigm towards human biology-based systems for cholestatic-liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Noor, Fozia

    2015-12-01

    Cholestatic-liver diseases (CLDs) arise from diverse causes ranging from genetic factors to drug-induced cholestasis. The so-called diseases of civilization (obesity, diabetes, metabolic disorders, non-alcoholic liver disease, cardiovascular diseases, etc.) are intricately implicated in liver and gall bladder diseases. Although CLDs have been extensively studied, there seem to be important gaps in the understanding of human disease. Despite the fact that many animal models exist and substantial clinical data are available, translation of this knowledge towards therapy has been disappointingly limited. Recent advances in liver cell culture such as in vivo-like 3D cultivation of human primary hepatic cells, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes; and cutting-edge analytical techniques such as 'omics' technologies and high-content screenings could play a decisive role in deeper mechanistic understanding of CLDs. This Topical Review proposes a roadmap to human biology-based research using omics technologies providing quantitative information on mechanisms in an adverse outcome/disease pathway framework. With modern sensitive tools, a shift in paradigm in human disease research seems timely and even inevitable to overcome species barriers in translation.

  9. Oct4 expression in adult human stem cells: evidence in support of the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tai, Mei-Hui; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Kiupel, Matti; Webster, Joshua D; Olson, L Karl; Trosko, James E

    2005-02-01

    The Oct3/4 gene, a POU family transcription factor, has been noted as being specifically expressed in embryonic stem cells and in tumor cells but not in cells of differentiated tissues. With the ability to isolate adult human stem cells it became possible to test for the expression of Oct3/4 gene in adult stem cells and to test the stem cell theory of carcinogenesis. Using antibodies and PCR primers we tested human breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, mesenchyme and gastric stem cells, the cancer cell lines HeLa and MCF-7 and human, dog and rat tumors for Oct4 expression. The results indicate that adult human stem cells, immortalized non-tumorigenic cells and tumor cells and cell lines, but not differentiated cells, express Oct4. Oct4 is expressed in a few cells found in the basal layer of human skin epidermis. The data demonstrate that adult stem cells maintain expression of Oct4, consistent with the stem cell hypothesis of carcinogenesis.

  10. Prediction of Liver Injury Induced by Chemicals in Human With a Multiparametric Assay on Isolated Mouse Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Porceddu, Mathieu; Buron, Nelly; Borgne-Sanchez, Annie

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in humans is difficult to predict using classical in vitro cytotoxicity screening and regulatory animal studies. This explains why numerous compounds are stopped during clinical trials or withdrawn from the market due to hepatotoxicity. Thus, it is important to improve early prediction of DILI in human. In this study, we hypothesized that this goal could be achieved by investigating drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction as this toxic effect is a major mechanism of DILI. To this end, we developed a high-throughput screening platform using isolated mouse liver mitochondria. Our broad spectrum multiparametric assay was designed to detect the global mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (swelling), inner membrane permeabilization (transmembrane potential), outer membrane permeabilization (cytochrome c release), and alteration of mitochondrial respiration driven by succinate or malate/glutamate. A pool of 124 chemicals (mainly drugs) was selected, including 87 with documented DILI and 37 without reported clinical hepatotoxicity. Our screening assay revealed an excellent sensitivity for clinical outcome of DILI (94 or 92% depending on cutoff) and a high positive predictive value (89 or 82%). A highly significant relationship between drug-induced mitochondrial toxicity and DILI occurrence in patients was calculated (p < 0.001). Moreover, this multiparametric assay allowed identifying several compounds for which mitochondrial toxicity had never been described before and even helped to clarify mechanisms with some drugs already known to be mitochondriotoxic. Investigation of drug-induced loss of mitochondrial integrity and function with this multiparametric assay should be considered for integration into basic screening processes at early stage to select drug candidates with lower risk of DILI in human. This assay is also a valuable tool for assessing the mitochondrial toxicity profile and investigating the mechanism of action of new

  11. Adiponectin oligomers and ectopic fat in liver and skeletal muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Kantartzis, Konstantinos; Staiger, Harald; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Claussen, Claus D; Machicao, Fausto; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Stefan, Norbert

    2009-02-01

    We aimed at determining which circulating forms of the adipokine adiponectin that increases lipid oxidation in liver and skeletal muscle are related to ectopic fat in these depots in humans. Plasma total-, high-molecular weight (HMW)-, middle-molecular weight (MMW)-, and low-molecular weight (LMW) adiponectin were quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Their relationships with liver- and intramyocellular fat, measured using (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy, were investigated in 54 whites without type 2 diabetes. Liver fat, adjusted for gender, age, and total body fat, was associated only with HMW adiponectin (r = -0.35, P = 0.012), but not with total-, MMW-, or LMW adiponectin. In addition, subjects with fatty liver (liver fat > or =5.56%, n = 15) had significantly lower HMW- (P = 0.04), but not total-, MMW-, or LMW adiponectin levels, compared to controls (n = 39). Similarly, intramyocellular fat correlated only with HMW (r = -0.32, P = 0.039), but not with the other circulating forms of adiponectin. These data indicate that, among circulating forms of adiponectin, HMW is strongly related to ectopic fat, thus possibly representing the form of adiponectin regulating lipid oxidation in liver and skeletal muscle.

  12. Human Glucocorticoid Receptor β Regulates Gluconeogenesis and Inflammation in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Cruz-Topete, Diana; Oakley, Robert H; Xiao, Xiao; Cidlowski, John A

    2015-12-28

    While in vitro studies have demonstrated that a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) splice isoform, β-isoform of human GR (hGRβ), acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of the classic hGRα and confers glucocorticoid resistance, the in vivo function of hGRβ is poorly understood. To this end, we created an adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express hGRβ in the mouse liver under the control of the hepatocyte-specific promoter. Genome-wide expression analysis of mouse livers showed that hGRβ significantly increased the expression of numerous genes, many of which are involved in endocrine system disorders and the inflammatory response. Physiologically, hGRβ antagonized GRα's function and attenuated hepatic gluconeogenesis through downregulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in wild-type (WT) mouse liver. Interestingly, however, hGRβ did not repress PEPCK in GR liver knockout (GRLKO) mice. In contrast, hGRβ regulates the expression of STAT1 in the livers of both WT and GRLKO mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that hGRβ binds to the intergenic glucocorticoid response element (GRE) of the STAT1 gene. Furthermore, treatment with RU486 inhibited the upregulation of STAT1 mediated by hGRβ. Finally, our array data demonstrate that hGRβ regulates unique components of liver gene expression in vivo by both GRα-dependent and GRα-independent mechanisms.

  13. Specificity of procaine and ester hydrolysis by human, minipig, and rat skin and liver.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Christopher; Ackermann, Chrisita; Payne, N Ann; Fate, Gwendolyn; Voorman, Richard; Williams, Faith M

    2007-11-01

    The capacity of human, minipig, and rat skin and liver subcellular fractions to hydrolyze the anesthetic ester procaine was compared with carboxylesterase substrates 4-methylumbelliferyl-acetate, phenylvalerate, and para-nitrophenylacetate and the arylesterase substrate phenylacetate. Rates of procaine hydrolysis by minipig and human skin microsomal and cytosolic fractions were similar, with rat displaying higher activity. Loperamide inhibited procaine hydrolysis by human skin, suggesting involvement of human carboxylesterase hCE2. The esterase activity and inhibition profiles in the skin were similar for minipig and human, whereas rat had a higher capacity to metabolize esters and a different inhibition profile. Minipig and human liver and skin esterase activity was inhibited principally by paraoxon and bis-nitrophenyl phosphate, classical carboxylesterase inhibitors. Rat skin and liver esterase activity was inhibited additionally by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and the arylesterase inhibitor mercuric chloride, indicating a different esterase profile. These results have highlighted the potential of skin to hydrolyze procaine following topical application, which possibly limits its pharmacological effect. Skin from minipig used as an animal model for assessing transdermal drug preparations had similar capacity to hydrolyze esters to human skin.

  14. KINETICS OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE METABOLISM BY CYTOCHROME P450 ISOENZYMES IN HUMAN LIVER MICROSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kinetics of Bromodichloromethane Metabolism by
    Cytochrome P450 Isoenzymes in Human Liver Microsomes

    Guangyu Zhao and John W. Allis

    ABSTRACT
    The kinetic constants for the metabolism of bromodichloromethane (BDCM) by three cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes have ...

  15. Bacteriology of moderate (chronic) periodontitis in mature adult humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Cato, E P; Smibert, R M; Burmeister, J A; Ranney, R R

    1983-01-01

    A total of 171 taxa was represented among 1,900 bacterial isolates from 60 samples of sites affected with moderate periodontitis in 22 mature adult humans. The composition of the subgingival sulcus flora was statistically significantly different from that of the adjacent supragingival flora and the subgingival flora of 14 people with healthy gingiva, but was not significantly different from that of sulci affected with severe periodontitis in 21 young human adults. The sulcus floras of moderate periodontitis and severe periodontitis shared many of their predominant bacterial species, but there were differences in the relative proportions of some of these species. Similar relationships were found for seven taxa of treponemes that were cultured from the samples. PMID:6642641

  16. MicroRNA-Mediated Suppression of Oncolytic Adenovirus Replication in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3′ untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver. PMID:23349911

  17. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    PubMed

    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of human hemoglobin switching: selective undermethylation and expression of globin genes in embryonic, fetal, and adult erythroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Mavilio, F; Giampaolo, A; Carè, A; Migliaccio, G; Calandrini, M; Russo, G; Pagliardi, G L; Mastroberardino, G; Marinucci, M; Peschle, C

    1983-01-01

    The globin chain synthetic pattern and the extent of DNA methylation within embryonic, fetal, and adult beta-like globin gene domains were evaluated in greater than or equal to 90% purified human erythroblasts from yolk sacs and fetal livers in the 6- to 12-wk gestational period as well as from adult marrows. The 6-wk erythroblasts produce essentially embryonic epsilon chains, whereas the 12-wk erythroblasts synthesize largely fetal gamma globin and the adult marrow erythroblasts synthesize almost exclusively adult beta chains. In all phases of ontogenic development, a strong correlation exists between DNA hypomethylation in the close flanking sequences of globin genes and their expression. These results suggest that modulation of the methylation pattern may represent a key mechanism for regulating expression of human globin genes during embryonic leads to fetal and fetal leads to adult Hb switches in humans. In ontogenic development this mechanism might in turn correlate with a gradual modification of chromatin structure in the non-alpha gene cluster, thus leading to a 5' leads to 3' activation of globin genes in a balanced fashion. Images PMID:6316333

  19. Ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion and viability testing of discarded human donor livers.

    PubMed

    op den Dries, S; Karimian, N; Sutton, M E; Westerkamp, A C; Nijsten, M W N; Gouw, A S H; Wiersema-Buist, J; Lisman, T; Leuvenink, H G D; Porte, R J

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to traditional static cold preservation of donor livers, normothermic machine perfusion may reduce preservation injury, improve graft viability and potentially allows ex vivo assessment of graft viability before transplantation. We have studied the feasibility of normothermic machine perfusion in four discarded human donor livers. Normothermic machine perfusion consisted of pressure and temperature controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous portal perfusion for 6 h. Two hollow fiber membrane oxygenators provided oxygenation of the perfusion fluid. Biochemical markers in the perfusion fluid reflected minimal hepatic injury and improving function. Lactate levels decreased to normal values, reflecting active metabolism by the liver (mean lactate 10.0 ± 2.3 mmol/L at 30 min to 2.3 ± 1.2 mmol/L at 6 h). Bile production was observed throughout the 6 h perfusion period (mean rate 8.16 ± 0.65 g/h after the first hour). Histological examination before and after 6 h of perfusion showed well-preserved liver morphology without signs of additional hepatocellular ischemia, biliary injury or sinusoidal damage. In conclusion, this study shows that normothermic machine perfusion of human donor livers is technically feasible. It allows assessment of graft viability before transplantation, which opens new avenues for organ selection, therapeutic interventions and preconditioning.

  20. New evidence for the therapeutic potential of curcumin to treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Inzaugarat, María Eugenia; De Matteo, Elena; Baz, Placida; Lucero, Diego; García, Cecilia Claudia; Gonzalez Ballerga, Esteban; Daruich, Jorge; Sorda, Juan Antonio; Wald, Miriam Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The immune system acts on different metabolic tissues that are implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Leptin and linoleic acid have the ability to potentially affect immune cells, whereas curcumin is a known natural polyphenol with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Aims This study was designed to evaluate the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant effects of leptin and linoleic acid on immune cells from patients with NAFLD and to corroborate the modulatory effects of curcumin and its preventive properties against the progression of NAFLD using a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis mouse model. Results The ex vivo experiments showed that linoleic acid increased the production of reactive oxygen species in monocytes and liver macrophages, whereas leptin enhanced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production in monocytes and interferon-γ production in circulating CD4+ cells. Conversely, oral administration of curcumin prevented HFD-induced liver injury, metabolic alterations, intrahepatic CD4+ cell accumulation and the linoleic acid- and leptin- induced pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant effects on mouse liver macrophages. Conclusion Our findings provide new evidence for the therapeutic potential of curcumin to treat human NAFLD. However, the development of a preventive treatment targeting human circulating monocytes and liver macrophages as well as peripheral and hepatic CD4+ cells requires additional research. PMID:28257515

  1. Differential Expression of Matrix-Metalloproteinase-1 and -2 Genes in Normal and Fibrotic Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Stefano; Herbst, Hermann; Schuppan, Detlef; Grappone, Cecilia; Pellegrini, Giulia; Pinzani, Massimo; Casini, Alessandro; Calabró, Antonio; Ciancio, Giuseppe; Stefanini, Francesco; Ciancio, Andrew K.; Surrenti, Calogero

    1994-01-01

    Altered degradation of extracellular matrix has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. We investigated levels and cellular sites of gene expression of two major collagebn-degrading enzymes, matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP)-l (fibroblast type-interstitial collagenase)and MMP-2 (72-kd gelatinase, type IV collagenase) in five normal and 18 fibrotic human livers as well as in cultured human hepatic fat-storing cells by Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. Fatstoring cells expressed both MMP-1 and MMP-2 RNA in vitro. In vivo, MMP-1 was undetectable in mesenchymal and parenchymal cells of all liver specimens, whereas MMP-2 transcripts were expressed in all livers by vimentin-positive, CD68 negative mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells of all fibrotic livers displayed high transcript levels of transforming growth factor-β1, which is known to modulate MMP expression. Along with de novo fibrogenesis and possibly influenced by transforming growth factor-β1, expression of MMP-2 in the absence of MMP-1 expression may be responsible for the quantitative and qualitative changes of extracellular matrix observed in chronic liver disease. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 7 PMID:8129038

  2. Differences in Redox Regulatory Systems in Human Lung and Liver Tumors Suggest Different Avenues for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Ryuta; Carlson, Bradley A.; Tsuji, Petra A.; Lee, Byeong Jae; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2015-01-01

    A common characteristic of many cancer cells is that they suffer from oxidative stress. They, therefore, require effective redox regulatory systems to combat the higher levels of reactive oxygen species that accompany accelerated growth compared to the normal cells of origin. An elevated dependence on these systems in cancers suggests that targeting these systems may provide an avenue for retarding the malignancy process. Herein, we examined the redox regulatory systems in human liver and lung cancers by comparing human lung adenocarcinoma and liver carcinoma to their respective surrounding normal tissues. Significant differences were found in the two major redox systems, the thioredoxin and glutathione systems. Thioredoxin reductase 1 levels were elevated in both malignancies, but thioredoxin was highly upregulated in lung tumor and only slightly upregulated in liver tumor, while peroxiredoxin 1 was highly elevated in lung tumor, but downregulated in liver tumor. There were also major differences within the glutathione system between the malignancies and their normal tissues. The data suggest a greater dependence of liver on either the thioredoxin or glutathione system to drive the malignancy, while lung cancer appeared to depend primarily on the thioredoxin system. PMID:26569310

  3. Induction of three-dimensional assembly of human liver cells by simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaoustov, V. I.; Darlington, G. J.; Soriano, H. E.; Krishnan, B.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; Yoffe, B.

    1999-01-01

    The establishment of long-term cultures of functional primary human liver cells (PHLC) is formidable. Developed at NASA, the Rotary Cell Culture System (RCCS) allows the creation of the unique microgravity environment of low shear force, high-mass transfer, and 3-dimensional cell culture of dissimilar cell types. The aim of our study was to establish long-term hepatocyte cultures in simulated microgravity. PHLC were harvested from human livers by collagenase perfusion and were cultured in RCCS. PHLC aggregates were readily formed and increased up to 1 cm long. The expansion of PHLC in bioreactors was further evaluated with microcarriers and biodegradable scaffolds. While microcarriers were not conducive to formation of spheroids, PHLC cultured with biodegradable scaffolds formed aggregates up to 3 cm long. Analyses of PHLC spheroids revealed tissue-like structures composed of hepatocytes, biliary epithelial cells, and/or progenitor liver cells that were arranged as bile duct-like structures along nascent vascular sprouts. Electron microscopy revealed groups of cohesive hepatocytes surrounded by complex stromal structures and reticulin fibers, bile canaliculi with multiple microvilli, and tight cellular junctions. Albumin mRNA was expressed throughout the 60-d culture. A simulated microgravity environment is conducive to maintaining long-term cultures of functional hepatocytes. This model system will assist in developing improved protocols for autologous hepatocyte transplantation, gene therapy, and liver assist devices, and facilitate studies of liver regeneration and cell-to-cell interactions that occur in vivo.

  4. PET-CT in Determining the Radioembolization Dose Delivered to Patients With Liver Metastasis, Primary Liver Cancer, or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage D Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  5. Lymphatic Stomata in the Adult Human Pulmonary Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Masahiro; Iobe, Hiroaki; Kudo, Tomoo; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Okudela, Koji; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Yoshida, Maki; Nagao, Toshitaka; Nakaya, Takeo; Kurata, Atsushi; Ohtani, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymphatic stomata are small lymphatic openings in the serosal membrane that communicate with the serosal cavity. Although these stomata have primarily been studied in experimental mammals, little is known concerning the presence and properties of lymphatic stomata in the adult human pleura. Thus, adult human pleurae were examined for the presence or absence of lymphatic stomata. Methods and Results: A total of 26 pulmonary ligaments (13 left and 13 right) were obtained from 15 adult human autopsy cases and examined using electron and light microscopy. The microscopic studies revealed the presence of apertures fringed with D2-40-positive, CD31-positive, and cytokeratin-negative endothelial cells directly communicating with submesothelial lymphatics in all of the pulmonary ligaments. The apertures' sizes and densities varied from case to case according to the serial tissue section. The medians of these aperture sizes ranged from 2.25 to 8.75 μm in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2.50 to 12.50 μm in the right pulmonary ligaments. The densities of the apertures ranged from 2 to 9 per mm2 in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2 to 18 per mm2 in the right pulmonary ligaments. However, no significant differences were found regarding the aperture size (p=0.359) and density (p=0.438) between the left and the right pulmonary ligaments. Conclusions: Our study revealed that apertures exhibit structural adequacy as lymphatic stomata on the surface of the pulmonary ligament, thereby providing evidence that lymphatic stomata are present in the adult human pleura. PMID:25526320

  6. [The hepatic differentiation of adult and fetal liver stromal cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Kholodenko, I V; Kholodenko, R V; Manukyan, G V; Yarygin, K N

    2016-11-01

    The liver has a marked capacity for regeneration. In most cases the liver regeneration is determined by hepatocytes. The regenerative capacity of hepatocytes is significantly reduced in acute or chronic damage. In particular, repair mechanisms are not activated in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. Organ transplantation or advanced methods of regenerative medicine can help such patients. The promising results were obtained in clinical trials involving patients with various forms of liver disease who received transplantation of autologous bone marrow stem cells. However, to improve the effectiveness of such treatment it is necessary to search for more optimal sources of progenitor cells, as well as to evaluate the possibility of using descendants of these cells differentiated in vitro. In this study we isolated stromal cells from the liver biopsies of three patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, conducted their morphological and phenotypic analysis, and evaluated the hepatic potential of these cells in vitro. The stromal cells isolated from fetal liver were used for comparison. The results of this can serve as a basis for the development of a new method for the treatment of end-stage liver disease. The stromal cells isolated from the liver biopsies for a long time proliferate in a culture and this which makes it possible to expand them to large amounts for subsequent differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells and autologous transplantation.

  7. Doublecortin expression in the normal and epileptic adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y W J; Curtis, M A; Gibbons, H M; Mee, E W; Bergin, P S; Teoh, H H; Connor, B; Dragunow, M; Faull, R L M

    2008-12-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a neurological disorder associated with spontaneous recurrent complex partial seizures and hippocampal sclerosis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported in animal models of MTLE, increased neurogenesis has not been reported in the hippocampus of adult human MTLE cases. Here we showed that cells expressing doublecortin (Dcx), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in migrating neuroblasts, were present in the hippocampus and temporal cortex of the normal and MTLE adult human brain. In particular, increased numbers of Dcx-positive cells were observed in the epileptic compared with the normal temporal cortex. Importantly, 56% of Dcx-expressing cells in the epileptic temporal cortex coexpressed both the proliferative cell marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and early neuronal marker, TuJ1, suggesting that they may be newly generated neurons. A subpopulation of Dcx-positive cells in the epileptic temporal cortex also coexpressed the mature neuronal marker, NeuN, suggesting that epilepsy may promote the generation of new neurons in the temporal cortex. This study has identified, for the first time, a novel population of Dcx-positive cells in the adult human temporal cortex that can be upregulated by epilepsy and thus, raises the possibility that these cells may have functional significance in the pathophysiology of epilepsy.

  8. The CYP2A3 gene product catalyzes coumarin 7-hydroxylation in human liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamano, Shigeru; Tatsuno, Jun; Gonzalez, F.J. )

    1990-02-06

    Three cDNAs, designated IIA3, IIA3v, and IIA4, coding for P450s in the CYP2A gene subfamily were isolated from a {lambda}gt11 library prepared from human hepatic mRNA. Only three nucleotide differences and a single amino acid difference, Leu{sup 160}{yields}His, were found between IIA3 and IIA3v, indicating that they are probably allelic variants. IIA4 displayed 94% amino acid similarity with IIA3 and IIA3v. The three cDNAs were inserted into vaccinia virus, and recombinant viruses were used to infect human hepatoma Hep G2 cells. Only IIA3 was able to produce an enzyme that had a reduced CO-bound spectrum with a {lambda}{sub max} at 450 nm. This expressed enzyme was able to carry out coumarin 7-hydroxylation and ethoxycoumarin O-deethylation. cDNA-expressed IIA3v and IIA4 failed to incorporate heme and were enzymatically inactive. Analysis of IIA proteins in human liver microsomes, using antibody against rat IIA2, revealed two proteins of 49 and 50 kDa, the former of which appeared to correlate with human microsomal coumarin 7-hydroxylase activity. A more striking correlation was found between IIa mRNA and enzyme activity. The rat antibody was able to completely abolish coumarin 7-hydroxylase activity in 12 liver samples. These data establish that the CYP2A3 gene product is primarily responsible for coumarin 7-hydroxylase activity in human liver. The level of expression of this activity varied up to 40-fold between livers. Levels of IIA mRNA also varied significantly between liver specimens, and three specimens had no detectable mRNA.

  9. Variability in Expression of CYP3A5 in Human Fetal Liver.

    PubMed

    Vyhlidal, Carrie A; Pearce, Robin E; Gaedigk, Roger; Calamia, Justina C; Shuster, Diana L; Thummel, Kenneth E; Leeder, J Steven

    2015-08-01

    Members of the cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) subfamily of drug metabolizing enzymes exhibit developmental changes in expression in human liver characterized by a transition between CYP3A7 and CYP3A4 over the first few years of life. In contrast, the developmental expression of CYP3A5 is less well understood due to polymorphic expression of the enzyme in human tissues as a result of the prevalence of the CYP3A5*3 allele, which leads to alternative splicing. We further explored the expression of CYP3A5 and the impact of alternative splicing on the variability of CYP3A5 functional activity in a large bank of human prenatal liver samples (7 to 32 weeks of age postconception). The expression of normally spliced CYP3A5 mRNA in all human fetal liver samples varied 235-fold whereas CYP3A5 SV1 mRNA was only detected in fetal liver samples with at least one CYP3A5*3 allele. Formation of 1'-OH midazolam (MDZ) varied 79-fold, and the ratio of 1'-OH MDZ to 4-OH MDZ varied 8-fold and depended on the presence or absence of the CYP3A5*3 allele. Formation of 4-OH MDZ was significantly associated with 1'-OH MDZ (r(2) = 0.76, P < 0.0001) but varied (36-fold) independently of CYP3A5 genotype or expression. The substantial interindividual variability that remains even after stratification for CYP3A5 genotype suggests that factors such as environmental exposure and epigenetic alterations act in addition to genetic variation to contribute to the variability of CYP3A5 expression in human prenatal liver.

  10. Hepatogenic differentiation from human adipose-derived stem cells and application for mouse acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, De-Liang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Xiong, Liang-Kun; Pan, Le-Yu; Zhu, Qian; Yuan, Yu-Feng; Liu, Zhi-Su

    2017-03-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) derived from adipose tissue have the capacity to differentiate into endodermal, mesoderm, and ectodermal cell lineages in vitro, which are an ideal engraft in tissue-engineered repair. In this study, human ADSCs were isolated from subcutaneous fat. The markers of ADSCs, CD13, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD166, CYP3A4, and ALB were detected by immunofluorescence assays. Human ADSCs were cultured in a specific hepatogenesis differentiation medium containing HGF, bFGF, nicotinamide, ITS, and oncostatin M for hepatogenic differentiation. The hepatocyte markers were analyzed using immunofluorescence and real-time PCR after dramatic changes in morphology. Hepatocytes derived from ADSCs or ADSCs were transplanted into the mice of liver injury for observation cells colonization and therapy in liver tissue. The result demonstrated that human ADSCs were positive for the CD13, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD166 but negative for hepatocyte markers, ALB and CYP3A4. After hepatogenic differentiation, the hepatocytes were positive for liver special markers, gene expression level showed a time-lapse increase with induction time. Human ADSCs or ADSCs-derived hepatocyte injected into the vein could improve liver function repair and functionally rescue the CCl4-treated mice with liver injury, but the ADSCs transplantation was better than ADSCs-derived hepatocyte transplantation. In conclusion, our research shows that a population of hepatocyte can be specifically generated from human ADSCs and that cells may allow for participation in tissue-repair.

  11. Histology of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Adults and Children.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, David E; Makhlouf, Hala R

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the liver disease associated with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. Although steatosis is a key histologic feature, liver biopsies of patients with NAFLD can show a wide range of findings. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a progressive subtype of NAFLD first defined by analogy to alcoholic hepatitis. Young children may have an alternate pattern of progressive NAFLD characterized by a zone 1 distribution of steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Several grading and staging systems exist, but all require adequate biopsies. Although NASH generally shows fibrosis progression over time, some patients show regression of disease.

  12. Dietary Patterns Modulate the Risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Qun; Shu, Long; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Jia-Jia; Zhou, Yu; Xuan, Yu-Jie; Wang, Su-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies reported the associations between the intakes of individual foods or nutrients and the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the relationship between dietary patterns and NAFLD in the Chinese population has been rarely studied to date. This study aimed to investigate the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of NAFLD in a middle-aged Chinese population. The Study subjects were 999 Chinese adults aged 45–60 years in the Anhui province who participated in the Hefei Nutrition and Health Study. Dietary intake was collected by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. NAFLD was defined as the presence of moderate-severe hepatic steatosis (by B-ultrasonic examination); the absence of excessive alcohol use (>20 g day−1 in men and 10 g day−1 in women); no use of steatogenic medications within the past six months; no exposure to hepatotoxins; and no history of bariatric surgery. Log-binomial regression analysis was used to examine the association between dietary patterns and NAFLD with adjustment of potential confounding variables. Out of 999 participants, 345 (34.5%) were classified as having NAFLD. Four major dietary patterns were identified: “Traditional Chinese”, “Animal food”, “Grains-vegetables” and “High-salt” dietary patterns. After adjusting for potential confounders, subjects in the highest quartile of the “Animal food” pattern scores had greater prevalence ratio for NAFLD (prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.354; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.063–1.724; p < 0.05) than did those in the lowest quartile. After adjustment for body mass index (BMI), compared with the lowest quartile of the “Grains-vegetables” pattern, the highest quartile had a lower prevalence ratio for NAFLD (PR = 0.777; 95% CI: 0.618–0.977, p < 0.05). However, the “traditional Chinese” and “high-salt” dietary patterns showed no association with the risk of NAFLD. Our findings indicated that the

  13. Dietary Patterns Modulate the Risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Chinese Adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Qun; Shu, Long; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Jia-Jia; Zhou, Yu; Xuan, Yu-Jie; Wang, Su-Fang

    2015-06-15

    Although previous studies reported the associations between the intakes of individual foods or nutrients and the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the relationship between dietary patterns and NAFLD in the Chinese population has been rarely studied to date. This study aimed to investigate the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of NAFLD in a middle-aged Chinese population. The Study subjects were 999 Chinese adults aged 45-60 years in the Anhui province who participated in the Hefei Nutrition and Health Study. Dietary intake was collected by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. NAFLD was defined as the presence of moderate-severe hepatic steatosis (by B-ultrasonic examination); the absence of excessive alcohol use (>20 g day(-1) in men and 10 g day(-1) in women); no use of steatogenic medications within the past six months; no exposure to hepatotoxins; and no history of bariatric surgery. Log-binomial regression analysis was used to examine the association between dietary patterns and NAFLD with adjustment of potential confounding variables. Out of 999 participants, 345 (34.5%) were classified as having NAFLD. Four major dietary patterns were identified: "Traditional Chinese", "Animal food", "Grains-vegetables" and "High-salt" dietary patterns. After adjusting for potential confounders, subjects in the highest quartile of the "Animal food" pattern scores had greater prevalence ratio for NAFLD (prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.354; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.063-1.724; p < 0.05) than did those in the lowest quartile. After adjustment for body mass index (BMI), compared with the lowest quartile of the "Grains-vegetables" pattern, the highest quartile had a lower prevalence ratio for NAFLD (PR = 0.777; 95% CI: 0.618-0.977, p < 0.05). However, the "traditional Chinese" and "high-salt" dietary patterns showed no association with the risk of NAFLD. Our findings indicated that the "Animal food" dietary pattern was associated with

  14. Epigenetic silencing of glutaminase 2 in human liver and colon cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glutaminase 2 (Gls2) is a p53 target gene and is known to play an important role in energy metabolism. Gls2 has been reported to be downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). However, the underlying mechanism responsible for its downregulation is still unclear. Here, we investigated Gls2 expression and its promoter methylation status in human liver and colon cancers. Methods mRNA expression of Gls2 was determined in human liver and colon cancer cell lines and HCC tissues by real-time PCR and promoter methylation was analyzed by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and validated by bisulfite genome sequencing (BGS). Cell growth was determined by colony formation assay and MTS assay. Statistical analysis was performed by Wilcoxon matched-pairs test or non-parametric t test. Results First, we observed reduced Gls2 mRNA level in a selected group of liver and colon cancer cell lines and in the cancerous tissues from 20 HCC and 5 human colon cancer patients in comparison to their non-cancerous counter parts. Importantly, the lower level of Gls2 in cancer cells was closely correlated to its promoter hypermethylation; and chemical demethylation treatment with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Aza) increased Gls2 mRNA level in both liver and colon cancer cells, indicating that direct epigenetic silencing suppressed Gls2 expression by methylation. Next, we further examined this correlation in human HCC tissues, and 60% of primary liver tumor tissues had higher DNA methylation levels when compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues. Detailed methylation analysis of 23 CpG sites at a 300-bp promoter region by bisulfite genomic sequencing confirmed its methylation. Finally, we examined the biological function of Gls2 and found that restoring Gls2 expression in cancer cells significantly inhibited cancer cell growth and colony formation ability through induction of cell cycle arrest. Conclusions We provide evidence showing that epigenetic silencing of Gls2 via promoter

  15. Obstructive jaundice leads to accumulation of oxidized low density lipoprotein in human liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Comert, Mustafa; Ustundag, Yucel; Tekin, Ishak Ozel; Gun, Banu Dogan; Barut, Figen

    2006-08-21

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) molecule is one of the most important modified lipoproteins produced during the oxidative stress. Modified lipoproteins have been defined as being part of the immune inflammatory mechanisms in association with oxidant stress. We have reported the accumulation of ox-LDL in Balb/c mice liver after bile duct ligation previously. Here, we investigated this finding in human beings with obstructive jaundice. Our study demonstrates that obstructive jaundice results in tremendous accumulation of ox-LDL in the liver tissue of patients.

  16. Human Liver Cell Trafficking Mutants: Characterization and Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fei; Snapp, Erik L.; Novikoff, Phyllis M.; Suadicani, Sylvia O.; Spray, David C.; Potvin, Barry; Wolkoff, Allan W.; Stanley, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α’’. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype. PMID:24466322

  17. Human liver cell trafficking mutants: characterization and whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fei; Snapp, Erik L; Novikoff, Phyllis M; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Spray, David C; Potvin, Barry; Wolkoff, Allan W; Stanley, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α''. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype.

  18. Regulation of hepatic EAAT-2 glutamate transporter expression in human liver cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Najimi, Mustapha; Stéphenne, Xavier; Sempoux, Christine; Sokal, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the activity and expression of EAAT2 glutamate transporter in both in vitro and in vivo models of cholestasis. METHODS: This study was conducted on human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cell cultures, the liver of bile duct ligated rats and human specimens from cholestatic patients. EAAT2 glutamate transporter activity and expression were analyzed using a substrate uptake assay, immunofluorescence, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry, respectively. RESULTS: In HepG2 cells, cholestasis was mimicked by treating cells with the protein kinase C activator, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Under such conditions, EAAT2 transporter activity was decreased both at the level of substrate affinity and maximal transport velocity. The decreased uptake was correlated with intracellular translocation of EAAT2 molecules as demonstrated using immunofluorescence. In the liver of bile duct ligated rats, an increase in EAAT2 transporter protein expression in hepatocytes was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry. The same findings were observed in human liver specimens of cholestasis in which high levels of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase were documented in patients with biliary atresia and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the alteration in glutamate handling by hepatocytes in liver cholestasis and suggests a potential cross-talk between glutamatergic and bile systems. PMID:24587631

  19. Long Term Maintenance of a Microfluidic 3-D Human Liver Sinusoid

    PubMed Central

    Prodanov, Ljupcho; Jindal, Rohit; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Hegde, Manjunath; McCarty, William J.; Golberg, Inna; Bhushan, Abhinav; Yarmush, Martin L.; Usta, O. Berk

    2016-01-01

    The development of long-term human organotypic liver-on-a-chip models for successful prediction of toxic response is one of the most important and urgent goals of the NIH/DARPA’s initiative to replicate and replace chronic and acute drug testing in animals. For this purpose we developed a microfluidic chip that consists of two microfluidic chambers separated by a porous membrane. The aim of this communication is to demonstrate the recapitulation of a liver sinusoid-on-a-chip using human cells only for a period of 28 days. Using a step-by-step method for building a 3D microtissue on-a-chip, we demonstrate that an organotypic in vitro model that reassembles the liver sinusoid microarchitecture can be maintained successfully for a period of 28 days. In addition, higher albumin synthesis (synthetic), urea excretion (detoxification) was observed under flow compared to static cultures. This human liver-on-a-chip should be further evaluated in drug-related studies. PMID:26152452

  20. Long-term maintenance of a microfluidic 3D human liver sinusoid.

    PubMed

    Prodanov, Ljupcho; Jindal, Rohit; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Hegde, Manjunath; McCarty, William J; Golberg, Inna; Bhushan, Abhinav; Yarmush, Martin L; Usta, Osman Berk

    2016-01-01

    The development of long-term human organotypic liver-on-a-chip models for successful prediction of toxic response is one of the most important and urgent goals of the NIH/DARPA's initiative to replicate and replace chronic and acute drug testing in animals. For this purpose, we developed a microfluidic chip that consists of two microfluidic chambers separated by a porous membrane. The aim of this communication is to demonstrate the recapitulation of a liver sinusoid-on-a-chip, using human cells only for a period of 28 days. Using a step-by-step method for building a 3D microtissue on-a-chip, we demonstrate that an organotypic in vitro model that reassembles the liver sinusoid microarchitecture can be maintained successfully for a period of 28 days. In addition, higher albumin synthesis (synthetic) and urea excretion (detoxification) were observed under flow compared to static cultures. This human liver-on-a-chip should be further evaluated in drug-related studies.

  1. Isolation and Culture of Adult Intestinal, Gastric, and Liver Organoids for Cre-recombinase-Mediated Gene Deletion.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dustin J; Schwab, Renate H M; Tran, Bang M; Phesse, Toby J; Vincan, Elizabeth

    2016-10-05

    The discovery of Lgr5 as a marker of adult stem cells meant that stem cell populations could be purified and studied in isolation. Importantly, when cultured under the appropriate conditions these stem cells form organoids in tissue culture that retain many features of the tissue of origin. The organoid cultures are accessible to genetic and biochemical manipulation, bridging the gap between in vivo mouse models and conventional tissue culture. Here we describe robust protocols to establish organoids from gastrointestinal tissues (stomach, intestine, liver) and Cre-recombinase mediated gene manipulation in vitro.

  2. Associations between Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Middle-Aged Adults: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study

    PubMed Central

    VanWagner, Lisa B.; Ning, Hongyan; Lewis, Cora E.; Shay, Christina M.; Wilkins, John; Carr, J Jeffrey; Terry, James G.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Jacobs, David R.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an obesity-related condition associated with cardiovascular mortality. Yet, whether or not NAFLD is independently related to atherosclerosis is unclear. In a population-based cross-sectional sample of middle-aged adults free from liver or heart disease, we tested the hypothesis that NAFLD is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC)) independent of obesity. Methods Participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study with CT quantification of liver fat, CAC and AAC were included (n=2,424). NAFLD was defined as liver attenuation ≤ 40 Hounsfield Units after exclusion of other causes of liver fat. CAC and AAC presence was defined as Agatston score > 0. Results Mean participant age was 50.1±3.6 years, (42.7% men, 50.0% black) and BMI was 30.6±7.2 kg/m2. The prevalence of NAFLD, CAC, and AAC was 9.6%, 27.1%, and 51.4%. NAFLD participants had increased prevalence of CAC (37.9% vs. 26.0%, p<0.001) and AAC (65.1% vs. 49.9%, p<0.001). NAFLD remained associated with CAC (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.001–1.82) and AAC (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.29–2.35) after adjustment for demographics and health behaviors. However, these associations were attenuated after additional adjustment for visceral adipose tissue (CAC OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.74–1.48, AAC OR=1.20; 95% CI, 0.86–1.67). There was no interaction by race or sex. Conclusion In contrast to prior research, these findings suggest that obesity attenuates the relationship between NAFLD and subclinical atherosclerosis. Further studies evaluating the role of NAFLD duration on atherosclerotic progression and cardiovascular events are needed. PMID:24956534

  3. Disseminated Gonococcal Infection Presenting as Bacteremia and Liver Abscesses in a Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Jongkyu; Yang, John Jeongseok

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we describe a bacteremia caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae that presented as liver abscesses. The patient had no risk factors for disseminated gonococcal infection. Periodic fever, skin rashes, and papules were present and the results of an abdominal computed tomography scan indicated the presence of small liver abscesses. The results of blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing of the bacterial isolates confirmed the presence of N. gonorrhoeae. The patient improved with antibiotic therapy. PMID:25844265

  4. Regulation of haematopoietic stem cell proliferation by stimulatory factors produced by murine fetal and adult liver.

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, K A; Briscoe, C V; Thomas, D B; Riches, A C

    1990-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells in murine fetal liver are in a proliferative state unlike those in normal bone marrow which are quiescent. A regulatory activity is produced by cells in the fetal liver which will switch quiescent normal bone marrow haematopoietic stem cells into cell cycle in vitro. This regulator from Day 15 fetal liver cells is produced by adherent cells and by cells fractionated on a Percoll gradient in the 1.064 and 1.076 g per cm3 density bands but not in the 1.123 g per cm3 band. Colony-stimulating factor cannot be detected in the supernatants containing the stem cell regulatory activity. The stimulator can be detected in supernatants produced from cell suspensions of liver cells at Day 15 and Day 17 of gestation and 24 hours and 72 hours after birth. However by 1 week after birth the production of the stimulator decreases and is undetectable 3 and 10 weeks after birth. The total numbers of haematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) in fetal liver decrease from Day 15 of gestation and only small numbers are present 1 week after birth. Thus the decline in the production of haematopoietic stem cell proliferation stimulator correlates with the decrease in haematopoietic stem cell numbers in the liver through gestation and after birth. PMID:2323992

  5. In vitro Phase I and Phase II metabolism of α-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP), methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and methedrone by human liver microsomes and human liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Negreira, Noelia; Erratico, Claudio; Kosjek, Tina; van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Heath, Ester; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the in vitro Phase I and Phase II metabolites of three new psychoactive substances: α-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP), methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and methedrone, using human liver microsomes and human liver cytosol. Accurate-mass spectra of metabolites were obtained using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Six Phase I metabolites of α-PVP were identified, which were formed involving reduction, hydroxylation, and pyrrolidine ring opening reactions. The lactam compound was the major metabolite observed for α-PVP. Two glucuronidated metabolites of α-PVP, not reported in previous in vitro studies, were further identified. MDPV was transformed into 10 Phase I metabolites involving reduction, hydroxylation, and loss of the pyrrolidine ring. Also, six glucuronidated and two sulphated metabolites were detected. The major metabolite of MDPV was the catechol metabolite. Methedrone was transformed into five Phase I metabolites, involving N- and O-demethylation, hydroxylation, and reduction of the ketone group. Three metabolites of methedrone are reported for the first time. In addition, the contribution of individual human CYP enzymes in the formation of the detected metabolites was investigated.

  6. Early cytokine signatures of ischemia/reperfusion injury in human orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Rebecca A; Zarrinpar, Ali; Rossetti, Maura; Lassman, Charles R; Naini, Bita V; Datta, Nakul; Rao, Ping; Harre, Nicholas; Zheng, Ying; Spreafico, Roberto; Hoffmann, Alexander; Busuttil, Ronald W; Gjertson, David W; Zhai, Yuan; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Reed, Elaine F

    2016-12-08

    BACKGROUND. Orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) is the primary therapy for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. However, ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) can severely compromise allograft survival. To understand the evolution of immune responses underlying OLT-IRI, we evaluated longitudinal cytokine expression profiles from adult OLT recipients before transplant through 1 month after transplant. METHODS. We measured the expression of 38 cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in preoperative and postoperative recipient circulating systemic blood (before transplant and 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after transplant) and intraoperative portal blood (before and after reperfusion) of 53 OLT patients and analyzed this expression in relation to biopsy-proven IRI (n = 26 IRI+; 27 IRI-), clinical liver function tests early (days 1-7) after transplant, and expression of genes encoding cytokine receptors in biopsies of donor allograft taken before and after reperfusion. RESULTS. Bilirubin and arginine transaminase levels early after transplant correlated with IRI. Fourteen cytokines were significantly increased in the systemic and/or portal blood of IRI+ recipients that shifted from innate to adaptive-immune responses over time. Additionally, expression of cognate receptors for 10 of these cytokines was detected in donor organ biopsies by RNAseq. CONCLUSION. These results provide a mechanistic roadmap of the early immunological events both before and after IRI and suggest several candidates for patient stratification, monitoring, and treatment. FUNDING. Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award T32CA009120, Keck Foundation award 986722, and a Quantitative & Computational Biosciences Collaboratory Postdoctoral Fellowship.

  7. Early cytokine signatures of ischemia/reperfusion injury in human orthotopic liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Rebecca A.; Zarrinpar, Ali; Lassman, Charles R.; Naini, Bita V.; Datta, Nakul; Rao, Ping; Harre, Nicholas; Zheng, Ying; Hoffmann, Alexander; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Gjertson, David W.; Zhai, Yuan; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) is the primary therapy for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. However, ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) can severely compromise allograft survival. To understand the evolution of immune responses underlying OLT-IRI, we evaluated longitudinal cytokine expression profiles from adult OLT recipients before transplant through 1 month after transplant. METHODS. We measured the expression of 38 cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in preoperative and postoperative recipient circulating systemic blood (before transplant and 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after transplant) and intraoperative portal blood (before and after reperfusion) of 53 OLT patients and analyzed this expression in relation to biopsy-proven IRI (n = 26 IRI+; 27 IRI–), clinical liver function tests early (days 1–7) after transplant, and expression of genes encoding cytokine receptors in biopsies of donor allograft taken before and after reperfusion. RESULTS. Bilirubin and arginine transaminase levels early after transplant correlated with IRI. Fourteen cytokines were significantly increased in the systemic and/or portal blood of IRI+ recipients that shifted from innate to adaptive-immune responses over time. Additionally, expression of cognate receptors for 10 of these cytokines was detected in donor organ biopsies by RNAseq. CONCLUSION. These results provide a mechanistic roadmap of the early immunological events both before and after IRI and suggest several candidates for patient stratification, monitoring, and treatment. FUNDING. Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award T32CA009120, Keck Foundation award 986722, and a Quantitative & Computational Biosciences Collaboratory Postdoctoral Fellowship. PMID:27942590

  8. Long-term follow-up of donor chimerism and tolerance after human liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Rosa; Grande, Silvia; Albizua, Enriqueta; Crooke, Almudena; Meneu, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Almudena; Pérez, Baltasar; Gilsanz, Florinda; Moreno, Enrique; Martínez-Lopez, Joaquín

    2009-06-01

    We aimed to quantify peripheral donor chimerism (DC) and to analyze its association with graft and recipient outcome. Forty-two liver transplant recipients and their respective donors were studied, providing a total of 148 posttransplantation serum samples. DC was assessed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to detect polymorphic markers. DC did not decrease with time post-transplantation and was higher in child recipients versus adults and in recipients of deceased donor liver transplants versus recipients of live donor liver transplants. Higher levels of DC were detected in Rh-positive blood group donors, in O blood group recipients versus A blood group recipients, and in recipients with hepatitis C virus versus recipients with alcoholic cirrhosis. High DC was associated with patients with organ damage due to recurrent disease and rejection. Stable, high levels of DC, in the absence of other major clinical events, may thus be a marker of transplantation tolerance, and this knowledge may help to tailor immunosuppressive treatment. In conclusion, qPCR is a useful technique for DC follow-up in liver transplantation, although the evolution of DC levels should be analyzed in accordance with the clinical outcome of the patient.

  9. EXPRESSION OF CYP4F2 IN HUMAN LIVER AND KIDNEY: ASSESSMENT USING TARGETED PEPTIDE ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Vandana; Yarovoy, Anton; Kozeska, Anita; Magnusson, Ronald P.; Lasker, Jerome M.

    2008-01-01

    P450 enzymes comprising the human CYP4F gene subfamily are catalysts of eicosanoid (e.g., 20-HETE and leukotriene B4) formation and degradation, although the role that individual CYP4F proteins play in these metabolic processes is not well defined. Thus, we developed antibodies to assess the tissue-specific expression and function of CYP4F2, one of four CYP4F P450s found in human liver and kidney. Peptide antibodies elicited in rabbits to CYP4F2 amino acid residues 61–74 (WGHQGMVNPTEEG) and 65–77 (GMVNPTEEGMRVL) recognized on immunoblots only CYP4F2 and not CYP4F3b, CYP4F11 or CYP4F12. Immunoquantitation with anti-CYP4F2 peptide IgG showed highly-variable CYP4F2 expression in liver (16.4 ± 18.6 pmol/mg microsomal protein; n = 29) and kidney cortex (3.9 ± 3.8 pmol/mg; n = 10), with two subjects lacking the hepatic or renal enzyme entirely. CYP4F2 content in liver microsomes was significantly correlated (r ≥ 0.63; p < 0.05) with leukotriene B4 and arachidonate ω-hydroxylase activities, which are both CYP4F2-catalyzed. Our study provides the first example of a peptide antibody that recognizes a single CYP4F P450 expressed in human liver and kidney, namely CYP4F2. Immunoquantitation and correlation analyses performed with this antibody suggest that CYP4F2 functions as a predominant LTB4 and arachidonate ω-hydroxylase in human liver. PMID:18662666

  10. The adaptive endoplasmic reticulum stress response to lipotoxicity in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, April D; Novak, Petr; Hardwick, Rhiannon N; Flores-Keown, Brieanna; Zhao, Fei; Klimecki, Walter T; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may progress from simple steatosis to severe, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in 7%-14% of the U.S. population through a second "hit" in the form of increased oxidative stress and inflammation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling and the unfolded protein response (UPR) are triggered when high levels of lipids and misfolded proteins alter ER homeostasis creating a lipotoxic environment within NAFLD livers. The objective of this study was to determine the coordinate regulation of ER stress-associated genes in the progressive stages of human NAFLD. Human liver samples categorized as normal, steatosis, NASH (Fatty), and NASH (Not Fatty) were analyzed by individual Affymetrix GeneChip Human 1.0 ST microarrays, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. A gene set enrichment analysis was performed on autophagy, apoptosis, lipogenesis, and ER stress/UPR gene categories. An enrichment of downregulated genes in the ER stress-associated lipogenesis and ER stress/UPR gene categories was observed in NASH. Conversely, an enrichment of upregulated ER stress-associated genes for autophagy and apoptosis gene categories was observed in NASH. Protein expression of the adaptive liver response protein STC2 and the transcription factor X-box binding protein 1 spliced (XBP-1s) were significantly elevated among NASH samples, whereas other downstream ER stress proteins including CHOP, ATF4, and phosphorylated JNK and eIF2α were not significantly changed in disease progression. Increased nuclear accumulation of total XBP-1 protein was observed in steatosis and NASH livers. The findings reveal the presence of a coordinated, adaptive transcriptional response to hepatic ER stress in human NAFLD.

  11. Monocyte-induced recovery of inflammation-associated hepatocellular dysfunction in a biochip-based human liver model

    PubMed Central

    Gröger, Marko; Rennert, Knut; Giszas, Benjamin; Weiß, Elisabeth; Dinger, Julia; Funke, Harald; Kiehntopf, Michael; Peters, Frank T.; Lupp, Amelie; Bauer, Michael; Claus, Ralf A.; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Liver dysfunction is an early event in sepsis-related multi-organ failure. We here report the establishment and characterization of a microfluidically supported in vitro organoid model of the human liver sinusoid. The liver organoid is composed of vascular and hepatocyte cell layers integrating non-parenchymal cells closely reflecting tissue architecture and enables physiological cross-communication in a bio-inspired fashion. Inflammation-associated liver dysfunction was mimicked by stimulation with various agonists of toll-like receptors. TLR-stimulation induced the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and diminished expression of endothelial VE-cadherin, hepatic MRP-2 transporter and apolipoprotein B (ApoB), resulting in an inflammation-related endothelial barrier disruption and hepatocellular dysfunction in the liver organoid. However, interaction of the liver organoid with human monocytes attenuated inflammation-related cell responses and restored MRP-2 transporter activity, ApoB expression and albumin/urea production. The cellular events observed in the liver organoid closely resembled pathophysiological responses in the well-established sepsis model of peritoneal contamination and infection (PCI) in mice and clinical observations in human sepsis. We therefore conclude that this human liver organoid model is a valuable tool to investigate sepsis-related liver dysfunction and subsequent immune cell-related tissue repair/remodeling processes. PMID:26902749

  12. Cytotoxicity of gold nanoclusters in human liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanjie; Nan, Jing; Hou, Jianwen; Yu, Bianfei; Zhao, Tong; Xu, Shuang; Lv, Shuangyu; Zhang, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized water-soluble fluorescent gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) stabilized with dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA). The cytotoxicity of these Au NCs was then assessed in the normal human hepatic cell line (L02) and the human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) at different exposure times. Cell viability was normal in both cell lines at 24 hours and 48 hours; however, the growth of HepG2 cells was significantly inhibited at 72 hours. The change in lactate dehydrogenase level was strongly correlated with cell viability after 72 hours incubation with DHLA–capped Au NCs, and the increase in cellular reactive oxygen species may be related to the decrease in cell viability. Growth inhibition of HepG2 cells was possibly due to difficultly passing the checkpoint between G1 phase and S phase. The anticancer activity of DHLA–capped Au NCs should be considered when used in biomedical imaging and drug delivery. PMID:25473282

  13. In vivo time-harmonic multifrequency elastography of the human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Guo, Jing; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Gentz, Enno; Fischer, Thomas; Klaua, Robert; Schultz, Michael; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-04-01

    Elastography is capable of noninvasively detecting hepatic fibrosis by imposing mechanical stress and measuring the viscoelastic response in the liver. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) relies on time-harmonic vibrations, while most dynamic ultrasound elastography methods employ transient stimulation methods. This study attempts to benefit from the advantages of time-harmonic tissue stimulation, i.e. relative insensitivity to obesity and ascites and mechanical approachability of the entire liver, and the advantages of ultrasound, i.e. time efficiency, low costs, and wide availability, by introducing in vivo time-harmonic elastography (THE) of the human liver using ultrasound and a broad range of harmonic stimulation frequencies. THE employs continuous harmonic shear vibrations at 7 frequencies from 30 to 60 Hz in a single examination and determines the elasticity and the viscosity of the liver from the dispersion of the shear wave speed within the applied frequency range. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the livers of eight healthy volunteers and a patient with cirrhosis. Multifrequency MRE at the same drive frequencies was used as elastographic reference method. Similar values of shear modulus and shear viscosity according the Kelvin-Voigt model were obtained by MRE and THE, indicating that the new method is suitable for in vivo quantification of the shear viscoelastic properties of the liver, however, in real-time and at a fraction of the costs of MRE. In conclusion, THE may provide a useful tool for fast assessment of the viscoelastic properties of the liver at low costs and without limitations in obesity, ascites or hemochromatosis.

  14. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI; Roskams, Tania; Oben, Jude A.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  15. Novel hepatic microRNAs upregulated in human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Soronen, Jarkko; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Zhou, You; Sädevirta, Sanja; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Leivonen, Marja; Sevastianova, Ksenia; Perttilä, Julia; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Sigruener, Alexander; Schmitz, Gerd; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression by reducing mRNA stability and translation. We aimed to identify alterations in human liver miRNA expression/function in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Subjects with the highest (median liver fat 30%, n = 15) and lowest (0%, n = 15) liver fat content were selected from >100 obese patients for miRNA profiling of liver biopsies on microarrays carrying probes for 1438 human miRNAs (a cross-sectional study). Target mRNAs and pathways were predicted for the miRNAs most significantly upregulated in NAFLD, their cell-type-specific expression was investigated by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and the transcriptome of immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) transfected with the miRNA with the highest number of predicted targets, miR-576-5p, was studied. The screen revealed 42 miRNAs up- and two downregulated in the NAFLD as compared to non-NAFLD liver. The miRNAs differing most significantly between the groups, miR-103a-2*, miR-106b, miR-576-5p, miRPlus-I137*, miR-892a, miR-1282, miR-3663-5p, and miR-3924, were all upregulated in NAFLD liver. Target pathways predicted for these miRNAs included ones involved in cancer, metabolic regulation, insulin signaling, and inflammation. Consistent transcriptome changes were observed in IHH transfected with miR-576-5p, and western analysis revealed a marked reduction of the RAC1 protein belonging to several miR-576-5p target pathways. To conclude, we identified 44 miRNAs differentially expressed in NAFLD versus non-NAFLD liver, 42 of these being novel in the context of NAFLD. The study demonstrates that by applying a novel study set-up and a broad-coverage array platform one can reveal a wealth of previously undiscovered miRNA dysregulation in metabolic disease.

  16. Metabolism of (+)-terpinen-4-ol by cytochrome P450 enzymes in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Haigou, Risa; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2012-01-01

    We examined the in vitro metabolism of (+)-terpinen-4-ol by human liver microsomes and recombinant enzymes. The biotransformation of (+)-terpinen-4-ol was investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). (+)-Terpinen-4-ol was found to be oxidized to (+)-(1R,2S,4S)-1,2-epoxy-p-menthan-4-ol, (+)-(1S,2R,4S)-1,2-epoxy-p-menthan-4-ol, and (4S)-p-menth-1-en-4,8-diol by human liver microsomal P450 enzymes. The identities of (+)-terpinen-4-ol metabolites were determined through the relative abundance of mass fragments and retention times on GC-MS. Of 11 recombinant human P450 enzymes tested, CYP1A2, CYP2A6, and CYP3A4 were found to catalyze the oxidation of (+)-terpinen-4-ol. Based on several lines of evidence, CYP2A6 and CYP3A4 were determined to be major enzymes involved in the oxidation of (+)-terpinen-4-ol by human liver microsomes. First, of the 11 recombinant human P450 enzymes tested, CYP1A2, CYP2A6 and CYP3A4 catalyzed oxidation of (+)-terpinen-4-ol. Second, oxidation of (+)-terpinen-4-ol was inhibited by (+)-menthofuran and ketoconazole, inhibitors known to be specific for these enzymes. Finally, there was a good correlation between CYP2A6 and CYP3A4 activities and (+)-terpinen-4-ol oxidation activities in the 10 human liver microsomes.

  17. Proteomic Profiling of Human Liver Biopsies: Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Fibrosis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Paeper, Bryan; Proll, Sean; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Larson , Anne M.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2007-09-01

    Liver biopsies from HCV-infected patients offer the unique opportunity to study human liver biology and disease in vivo. However, the low protein yields associated with these small samples present a significant challenge for proteomic analysis. In this study we describe the application of an ultra-sensitive proteomics platform for performing robust quantitative proteomic studies on microgram amounts of HCV-infected human liver tissue from 15 patients at different stages of fibrosis. A high quality liver protein data base containing 5,920 unique protein identifications supported high throughput quantitative studies using 16O:18O stable isotope labeling in combination with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach. A total of 1,641 liver biopsy proteins were quantified and ANOVA identified 210 proteins exhibiting statistically significant differences associated with fibrosis stage. Hierarchical clustering revealed that biopsies representative of later fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 3-4) exhibited a distinct protein expression profile indicating an apparent down-regulation of many proteins when compared to samples from earlier fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 0-2). Functional analysis of these signature proteins suggests that impairment of key mitochondrial processes including fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, and response to oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species occurs during advanced stage 3-4 fibrosis. In conclusion, the results reported here represent a significant advancement in clinical proteomics providing to our knowledge, the first demonstration of global proteomic alterations accompanying liver disease progression in patients chronically infected with HCV. Our findings contribute to a generally emerging theme associating oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction with HCV pathogenesis.

  18. [Effect of combined administration of Angelica polysaccharide and cytarabine on liver of human leukemia NOD/SCID mouse model].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Hong; Xu, Chun-Yan; Mu, Xin-Yi; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Meng-Si; Jia, Dao-Yong; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Huang, Guo-Ning; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia is a type of malignant tumors of hematopoietic system with the abnormal increased immature leukemia cells showing metastasis and invasion ability. Liver is one of the main targets of the leukemia cells spread to, where they may continue to proliferate and differentiate and cause liver function damage, even liver failure. Our previous studies showed that Angelica polysscharides (APS), the main effective components in Angelica sinensis of Chinese traditional medicine, was able to inhibit the proliferation and induced differentiation of the leukemia cells, however, its effect on the liver during the treatment remains elucidated. In the present study, the human leukemia NOD/SCID mouse model were established by implantation human leukemia K562 cells line, then the leukemia mouse were treated with APS, Ara-c or APS + Ara-c respectively by peritoneal injection for 14 days, to explore the effect and mechanism of the chemicals on the mouse liver. Compared to the human leukemia NOD/SCID mouse model group with the treatments of APS, Ara-c and APS + Ara-c, We found that severe liver damage and pathological changes of the liver were able to alleviate: First, the number of white blood cells in the peripheral blood was significantly lower and with less transplanted K562 leukemia cells; Second, liver function damage was alleviated as liver function tests showed that alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and total bilirubin (TBiL) were significantly reduced, while the albumin (Alb) was notably increased; Third, liver antioxidant ability was improved as the activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly increased, and the contents of GSH and malonaldehyde (MDA) were decreased significantly in the liver; Fourth, the inflammation of the liver was relieved as the level of IL-1beta and IL-6, the inflammatory cytokines, were decreased significantly in the liver. Fifth, liver index

  19. Covert spatial attention is functionally intact in amblyopic human adults

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mariel; Cymerman, Rachel; Smith, R. Theodore; Kiorpes, Lynne; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Certain abnormalities in behavioral performance and neural signaling have been attributed to a deficit of visual attention in amblyopia, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a diverse array of visual deficits following abnormal binocular childhood experience. Critically, most have inferred attention's role in their task without explicitly manipulating and measuring its effects against a baseline condition. Here, we directly investigate whether human amblyopic adults benefit from covert spatial attention—the selective processing of visual information in the absence of eye movements—to the same degree as neurotypical observers. We manipulated both involuntary (Experiment 1) and voluntary (Experiment 2) attention during an orientation discrimination task for which the effects of covert spatial attention have been well established in neurotypical and special populations. In both experiments, attention significantly improved accuracy and decreased reaction times to a similar extent (a) between the eyes of the amblyopic adults and (b) between the amblyopes and their age- and gender-matched controls. Moreover, deployment of voluntary attention away from the target location significantly impaired task performance (Experiment 2). The magnitudes of the involuntary and voluntary attention benefits did not correlate with amblyopic depth or severity. Both groups of observers showed canonical performance fields (better performance along the horizontal than vertical meridian and at the lower than upper vertical meridian) and similar effects of attention across locations. Despite their characteristic low-level vision impairments, covert spatial attention remains functionally intact in human amblyopic adults. PMID:28033433

  20. The nutrition intervention improved adult human capital and economic productivity.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Reynaldo; Melgar, Paul; Maluccio, John A; Stein, Aryeh D; Rivera, Juan A

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews key findings about the long-term impact of a nutrition intervention carried out by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama from 1969 to 1977. Results from follow-up studies in 1988-89 and 2002-04 show substantial impact on adult human capital and economic productivity. The 1988-89 study showed that adult body size and work capacity increased for those provided improved nutrition through age 3 y, whereas the 2002-04 follow-up showed that schooling was increased for women and reading comprehension and intelligence increased in both men and women. Participants were 26-42 y of age at the time of the 2002-04 follow-up, facilitating the assessment of economic productivity. Wages of men increased by 46% in those provided with improved nutrition through age 2 y. Findings for cardiovascular disease risk factors were heterogeneous; however, they suggest that improved nutrition in early life is unlikely to increase cardiovascular disease risk later in life and may indeed lower risk. In conclusion, the substantial improvement in adult human capital and economic productivity resulting from the nutrition intervention provides a powerful argument for promoting improvements in nutrition in pregnant women and young children.

  1. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations.

  2. Association between Noninvasive Fibrosis Markers and Chronic Kidney Disease among Adults with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sesti, Giorgio; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Arturi, Franco; Perticone, Maria; Sciacqua, Angela; Perticone, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are associated with an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study we aimed to evaluate whether the severity of liver fibrosis estimated by NAFLD fibrosis score is associated with higher prevalence of CKD in individuals with NAFLD. To this end NAFLD fibrosis score and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were assessed in 570 White individuals with ultrasonography-diagnosed NAFLD. As compared with subjects at low probability of liver fibrosis, individuals at high and intermediate probability showed an unfavorable cardio-metabolic risk profile having significantly higher values of waist circumference, insulin resistance, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, uric acid and lower insulin-like growth factor-1 levels. Individuals at high and intermediate probability of liver fibrosis have lower eGFR after adjustment for gender, smoking, glucose tolerance status, homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index), diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, statin therapy, anti-diabetes and anti-hypertensive treatments (P = 0.001). Individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 5.1-fold increased risk of having CKD (OR 5.13, 95%CI 1.13–23.28; P = 0.03) as compared with individuals at low probability after adjustment for age, gender, and BMI. After adjustment for glucose tolerance status, statin therapy, and anti-hypertensive treatment in addition to gender, individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 3.9-fold increased risk of CKD (OR 3.94, 95%CI 1.11–14.05; P = 0.03) as compared with individuals at low probability. In conclusion, advanced liver fibrosis, determined by noninvasive fibrosis markers, is associated with CKD independently from other known factors. PMID:24520400

  3. Health-related quality of life after liver transplantation for adult recipients.

    PubMed

    Bownik, Hillary; Saab, Sammy

    2009-11-01

    1. Pretransplantation health-related quality of life scores are affected by the etiology of liver cirrhosis, with hepatocellular and cholestatic etiologies having higher health-related quality of life scores than alcohol or viral hepatitis etiologies. 2. Posttransplantation health-related quality of life scores are not affected by the etiology of the original liver cirrhosis, but transplant recipient scores continue to remain significantly lower than those of healthy patient controls. 3. During the first 6 months after liver transplantation, the majority of physical and mental components of health-related quality of life scores improve, but these increases are not sustained in the long term. 4. At 1 year after liver transplantation, emotional and mental health-related quality of life scores begin to decrease. 5. During postoperative years 1 to 5, episodes of acute cellular rejection and patient age over 60 years decrease physical function and overall general health-related quality of life scores. 6. Beyond 5 years after orthotopic liver transplantation, age over 60, osteoporosis, and episodes of chronic rejection decrease health-related quality of life scores through decreases in the physical function and bodily pain domains. 7. Hepatitis C as an indication for liver transplantation is an independent factor in decreasing posttransplantation health-related quality of life scores. 8. Further studies are necessary that include a complete evaluation of the effects of gender, socioeconomic status, education, and ethnicity in order to better understand factors influencing post-liver transplantation health-related quality of life scores. 9. The development of a health-related quality of life assessment tool specific to transplantation could help us to more accurately assess factors (such as immunosuppression) that alter posttransplantation health-related quality of life.

  4. Improving animal and human health through understanding liver fluke immunology.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, D; Spithill, T W; Smith, R E; Raadsma, H W

    2010-08-01

    Sheep, goats and cattle represent the most numerous and economically important agricultural species worldwide used as sources for milk, fibre and red meat. In addition, in the developing world, these species often represent the sole asset base for small-holder livestock farmers and cattle/buffaloes often provide the majority of draught power for crop production. Production losses caused by helminth diseases of these animals are a major factor in extending the cycle of poverty in developing countries and a major food security issue for developed economies. Fasciola spp. are one of the most important zoonotic diseases with a global economic impact in livestock production systems and a poorly defined but direct effect on human health. Improvements in human and animal health will require a concerted research effort into the development of new accurate and simple diagnostic tests and increased vaccine and drug development against Fasciola infections. Here, the use of definitive natural host breeds with contrasting resistance to Fasciola infections is discussed as a resource to contrast parasite-host interactions and identify parasite immune evasion strategies. Such studies are likely to boost the discovery of new vaccine, drug and diagnostic candidates and provide the foundation for future genetic selection of resistant animals.

  5. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese adults: clinical aspects and current management strategies.

    PubMed

    Pallayova, M; Taheri, S

    2014-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder whose prevalence is strongly linked to the current epidemic of obesity in many western countries. The prevalence of NAFLD is two to four times higher in populations with pre-existing metabolic comorbidities than in the general population. The diagnosis of primary NAFLD involves establishing the presence of hepatic steatosis or steatohepatitis by imaging or histology, along with establishing the non-alcoholic nature of the disease process and excluding competing aetiologies for hepatic steatosis. Among the indirect serum biomarkers, the NAFLD fibrosis score can help to identify patients with NAFLD and with higher likelihood of having fibrosis or cirrhosis. A liver biopsy should be considered in NAFLD patients at increased risk for steatohepatitis/advanced fibrosis and in cases where a liver biopsy is necessary to exclude co-existing chronic liver diseases and other aetiologies for hepatic steatosis. The treatment and management recommendations for obesity-associated NAFLD are aimed towards weight reduction. The currently available interventions employed to promote weight loss and improve the metabolic responses in NAFLD include lifestyle modification, pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery.

  6. The association between MMF and risk of progressive renal dysfunction and death in adult liver transplant recipients with HCV.

    PubMed

    Lake, John; Patel, Dharmesh; David, Kristin; Richwine, Jason; Morris, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The impact of a three-drug regimen including mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) vs. a two-drug (no MMF) regimen on progressive renal dysfunction (PRD) in liver transplant recipients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has not been well described. Adults with HCV who received a primary liver transplant between January 1, 2000 and December. 31, 2005 and were discharged from the hospital on a three-drug regimen [CNI+MMF+steroids (S)] (n = 4 946) were compared with those discharged on two-drug regimen (CNI+S) (n = 3 884). Time to PRD (defined by a post-transplant 25% decline in estimated GFR, based on the four-variable MDRD equation) and recipient death were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the risk for post-transplant PRD and death after controlling for baseline characteristics and extended steroid use. The two groups were similar in baseline characteristics. The percentage of recipients on three- vs. two-drug regimen without PRD was higher, 36.8% vs. 31.9%, (p < 0.001), at three yrs post-transplant; three-drug therapy was associated with a 6% lower adjusted risk of PRD. The death rate and adjusted risk for death was lower for recipients on a three- vs. two-drug regimen. Liver transplant recipients with HCV on a MMF-containing regimen are at a lower risk for PRD and death compared with recipients on a regimen not including MMF.

  7. Human relevance framework for rodent liver tumors induced by the insecticide sulfoxaflor.

    PubMed

    LeBaron, Matthew J; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Terry, Claire; Billington, Richard; Rasoulpour, Reza J

    2014-05-01

    Sulfoxaflor, a novel active substance that targets sap-feeding insects, induced rodent hepatotoxicity when administered at high dietary doses. Specifically, hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas increased after 18 months in male and female CD-1 mice at 750 and 1250 ppm, respectively, and hepatocellular adenomas increased after 2 years in male F344 rats at 500 ppm. Studies to determine the mode of action (MoA) for these liver tumors were performed in an integrated and prospective manner as part of the standard battery of toxicology studies such that the MoA data were available prior to, or by the time of, the completion of the carcinogenicity studies. Sulfoxaflor is not genotoxic and the MoA data support the following key events in the etiology of the rodent liver tumors: (1) CAR nuclear receptor activation and (2) hepatocellular proliferation. The MoA data were evaluated in a weight of evidence approach using the Bradford Hill criteria for causation and were found to align with dose and temporal concordance, biological plausibility, coherence, strength, consistency, and specificity for a CAR-mediated MoA while excluding other alternate MoAs. The available data include: activation of CAR, Cyp2b induction, hepatocellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia, absence of liver effects in KO mice, absence of proliferation in humanized mice, and exclusion of other possible mechanisms (e.g., genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, AhR, or PPAR activation), and indicate that the identified rodent liver tumor MoA for sulfoxaflor would not occur in humans. In this case, sulfoxaflor is considered not to be a potential human liver carcinogen.

  8. Mechanism of action of novel piperazine containing a toxicant against human liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanthimathi, MS; Haerian, Batoul Sadat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cytotoxic potential of a novel piperazine derivative (PCC) against human liver cancer cells. SNU-475 and 423 human liver cancer cell lines were used to determine the IC50 of PCC using the standard MTT assay. PCC displayed a strong suppressive effect on liver cancer cells with an IC50 value of 6.98 ± 0.11 µM and 7.76 ± 0.45 µM against SNU-475 and SNU-423 respectively after 24 h of treatment. Significant dipping in the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevation in the released of cytochrome c from the mitochondria indicated the induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by PCC. Activation of this pathway was further evidenced by significant activation of caspase 3/7 and 9. PCC was also shown to activate the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 which is linked to the suppression of NF-κB translocation to the nucleus. Cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase was confirmed by flow cytometry and up-regulation of glutathione reductase expression was quantified by qPCR. Results of this study suggest that PCC is a potent anti-cancer agent inducing both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. PMID:27019772

  9. An integrated genomic and epigenomic approach predicts therapeutic response to zebularine in human liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jesper B; Factor, Valentina M; Marquardt, Jens U; Raggi, Chiara; Lee, Yun-Han; Seo, Daekwan; Conner, Elizabeth A; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S

    2010-10-20

    Epigenomic changes such as aberrant hypermethylation and subsequent atypical gene silencing are characteristic features of human cancer. Here, we report a comprehensive characterization of epigenomic modulation caused by zebularine, an effective DNA methylation inhibitor, in human liver cancer. Using transcriptomic and epigenomic profiling, we identified a zebularine response signature that classified liver cancer cell lines into two major subtypes with different drug responses. In drug-sensitive cell lines, zebularine caused inhibition of proliferation coupled with increased apoptosis, whereas drug-resistant cell lines showed up-regulation of oncogenic networks (for example, E2F1, MYC, and TNF) that drive liver cancer growth in vitro and in preclinical mouse models. Assessment of zebularine-based therapy in xenograft mouse models demonstrated potent therapeutic effects against tumors established from zebularine-sensitive but not zebularine-resistant liver cancer cells, leading to increased survival and decreased pulmonary metastasis. Integration of the zebularine gene expression and demethylation response signatures allowed differentiation of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma according to their survival and disease recurrence. This integrated signature identified a subclass of patients within the poor-survivor group that is likely to benefit from therapeutic agents that target the cancer epigenome.

  10. Use of a three-dimensional humanized liver model for the study of viral gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anke; Röhrs, Viola; Materne, Eva-Maria; Hiller, Thomas; Kedzierski, Radoslaw; Fechner, Henry; Lauster, Roland; Kurreck, Jens

    2015-10-20

    Reconstituted three-dimensional (3D) liver models obtained by engrafting hepatic cells into an extracellular matrix (ECM) are valuable tools to study tissue regeneration, drug action and toxicology ex vivo. The aim of the present study was to establish a system for the functional investigation of a viral vector in a 3D liver model composed of human HepG2 cells on a rat ECM. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expressing the Emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) and a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed against human cyclophilin b (hCycB) was injected into the portal vein of 3D liver models. Application of the vector did not exert toxic effects, as shown by analysis of metabolic parameters. Six days after transduction, fluorescence microscopy analysis of EmGFP production revealed widespread distribution of the AAV vectors. After optimization of the recellularization and transduction conditions, averages of 55 and 90 internalized vector genomes per cell in two replicates of the liver model were achieved, as determined by quantitative PCR analysis. Functionality of the AAV vector was confirmed by efficient shRNA-mediated knockdown of hCycB by 70-90%. Our study provides a proof-of-concept that a recellularized biological ECM provides a valuable model to study viral vectors ex vivo.

  11. Overfeeding polyunsaturated and saturated fat causes distinct effects on liver and visceral fat accumulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Rosqvist, Fredrik; Iggman, David; Kullberg, Joel; Cedernaes, Jonathan; Johansson, Hans-Erik; Larsson, Anders; Johansson, Lars; Ahlström, Håkan; Arner, Peter; Dahlman, Ingrid; Risérus, Ulf

    2014-07-01

    Excess ectopic fat storage is linked to type 2 diabetes. The importance of dietary fat composition for ectopic fat storage in humans is unknown. We investigated liver fat accumulation and body composition during overfeeding saturated fatty acids (SFAs) or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). LIPOGAIN was a double-blind, parallel-group, randomized trial. Thirty-nine young and normal-weight individuals were overfed muffins high in SFAs (palm oil) or n-6 PUFAs (sunflower oil) for 7 weeks. Liver fat, visceral adipose tissue (VAT), abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), total adipose tissue, pancreatic fat, and lean tissue were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Transcriptomics were performed in SAT. Both groups gained similar weight. SFAs, however, markedly increased liver fat compared with PUFAs and caused a twofold larger increase in VAT than PUFAs. Conversely, PUFAs caused a nearly threefold larger increase in lean tissue than SFAs. Increase in liver fat directly correlated with changes in plasma SFAs and inversely with PUFAs. Genes involved in regulating energy dissipation, insulin resistance, body composition, and fat-cell differentiation in SAT were differentially regulated between diets, and associated with increased PUFAs in SAT. In conclusion, overeating SFAs promotes hepatic and visceral fat storage, whereas excess energy from PUFAs may instead promote lean tissue in healthy humans.

  12. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 RNA expression in rat and human liver fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, H.; Wege, T.; Milani, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Orzechowski, H. D.; Bechstein, W. O.; Neuhaus, P.; Gressner, A. M.; Schuppan, D.

    1997-01-01

    The remodeling of extracellular matrix during chronic liver disease may partially be attributed to altered activity of matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs). Expression of TIMP-1 and -2 was studied by in situ hybridization combined with immunohistochemistry in rat (acute and chronic carbon tetrachloride intoxication and secondary biliary fibrosis) and human livers and on isolated rat hepatic stellate cells. TIMP-1 and -2 transcripts appeared in rat livers within 1 to 3 hours after intoxication, pointing to a role in the protection against accidental activation of matrix metalloproteinases, and were present at high levels in all fibrotic rat and human livers predominantly in stellate cells. TIMP-2 RNA distribution largely matched with previously reported patterns of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (72-kd gelatinase) expression, suggesting generation of a TIMP-2/matrix metalloproteinase-2 complex (large inhibitor of metalloproteinases). Isolated stellate cells expressed TIMP-1 and -2 RNA. Addition of transforming growth factor-beta 1 enhanced TIMP-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 RNA levels in vitro, whereas TIMP-2-specific signals were reduced, likely to result in a stoichiometric excess of matrix-metalloproteinase-2 over TIMP-2. In the context of previous demonstrations of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in vivo, these patterns suggest an intrahepatic environment permitting only limited matrix degradation, ultimately resulting in redistribution of extracellular matrix with relative accumulation of collagen type 1. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9137090

  13. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures.

  14. Isolated intestinal transplants vs. liver-intestinal transplants in adult patients in the United States: 22 yr of OPTN data.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag S; Gruessner, Angelika C; Khan, Khalid M; Fishbein, Thomas M; Jie, Tun; Rodriguez Rilo, Horacio L; Gruessner, Rainer W G

    2012-01-01

    We examined the outcomes of adult intestinal transplants (ITx); isolated ITx vs. liver-intestinal transplants (L-ITx) were compared using the UNOS database (1987-2009). Of 759 ITx transplants in 687 patients, 463 (61%) were isolated and 296 (39%) were L-ITx. Patient survival for primary isolated ITx at one, three, and five yr was 84%, 66.7%, and 54.2%; and primary L-ITx was, 67%, 53.3%, and 46% (p = 0.0005). Primary isolated ITx graft survival at one, three, and five yr was 80.7%, 57.6%, 42.8%; primary L-ITx was 64.1%, 51%, 44.1% (p = 0.0003 at one, three yr, Wilcoxon test). For retransplants (n = 72), patient and graft survival for isolated ITx (n = 41) at five yr was 40% in era 1 (1987-2000) and 16% in era 2 (p = 0.47); for retransplanted L-ITx (n = 31), it improved from 14% to 64% in era 2 (p = 0.01). Cox regression: creatinine >1.3 mg/dL and pre-transplant hospitalization were negative predictors for outcome of both; bilirubin >1.3 mg/dL was a negative predictor for isolated ITx and donor age >40 yr for L-ITx. Isolated ITx should be considered prior to liver disease for adults with intestinal failure; L-ITx is preferable for retransplantation.

  15. Impact of rituximab desensitization on blood-type-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantation: a Japanese multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Egawa, H; Teramukai, S; Haga, H; Tanabe, M; Mori, A; Ikegami, T; Kawagishi, N; Ohdan, H; Kasahara, M; Umeshita, K

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of rituximab prophylaxis on outcomes of ABO-blood-type-incompatible living donor liver transplantation (ABO-I LDLT) in 381 adult patients in the Japanese registry of ABO-I LDLT. Patients underwent dual or triple immunosuppression with or without B cell desensitization therapies such as plasmapheresis, splenectomy, local infusion, intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab. Era before 2005, intensive care unit-bound status, high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score and absence of rituximab prophylaxis were significant risk factors for overall survival and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the univariate analysis. After adjustment for era effects in the multivariate analysis, only absence of rituximab prophylaxis was a significant risk factor for AMR, and there were no significant risk factors for survival. Rituximab prophylaxis significantly decreased the incidence of AMR, especially hepatic necrosis (p < 0.001). In the rituximab group, other B cell desensitization therapies had no add-on effects. Multiple or large rituximab doses significantly increased the incidence of infection, and early administration had no advantage. In conclusion, outcomes in adult ABO-I LDLT have significantly improved in the latest era coincident with the introduction of rituximab.

  16. Novel piperazine core compound induces death in human liver cancer cells: possible pharmacological properties

    PubMed Central

    Samie, Nima; Muniandy, Sekaran; Kanthimathi, M. S.; Haerian, Batoul Sadat; Raja Azudin, Raja Elina

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluates the cytotoxic mechanism of a novel piperazine derivate designated as PCC against human liver cancer cells. In this context, human liver cancer cell lines, SNU-475 and 243, human monocyte/macrophage cell line, CRL-9855, and human B lymphocyte cell line, CCL-156, were used to determine the IC50 of PCC using the standard MTT assay. PCC displayed a strong suppressive effect on SNU-475 and SNU-423 cells with an IC50 value of 6.98 ± 0.11 μg/ml and 7.76 ± 0.45 μg/ml respectively, after 24 h of treatment. Significant dipping in the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevation in the released of cytochrome c from the mitochondria indicated the induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by PCC. Activation of this pathway was further evidenced by significant activation of caspase 3/7 and 9. PCC was also shown to activate the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 which is linked to the suppression of NF-ƙB translocation to the nucleus. Cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase was confirmed by flow cytometry and up-regulation of glutathione reductase expression was quantified by qPCR. This study suggests that PCC is a simultaneous inducer of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. PMID:27072064

  17. Metabolism of sesamin by cytochrome P450 in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kaori; Ikushiro, Shinichi; Kamakura, Masaki; Ohta, Miho; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2010-12-01

    Metabolism of sesamin by cytochrome P450 (P450) was examined using yeast expression system and human liver microsomes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing each of human P450 isoforms (CYP1A1, 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4) were cultivated with sesamin, and monocatechol metabolite was observed in most of P450s. Kinetic analysis using the microsomal fractions of the recombinant S. cerevisiae cells revealed that CYP2C19 had the largest k(cat)/K(m) value. Based on the kinetic data and average contents of the P450 isoforms in the human liver, the putative contribution of P450s for sesamin metabolism was large in the order of CYP2C9, 1A2, 2C19, and 2D6. A good correlation was observed between sesamin catecholization activity and CYP2C9-specific activity in in vitro studies using 10 individual human liver microsomes, strongly suggesting that CYP2C9 is the most important P450 isoform for sesamin catecholization in human liver. Inhibition studies using each anti-P450 isoform-specific antibody confirmed that CYP2C9 was the most important, and the secondary most important P450 was CYP1A2. We also examined the inhibitory effect of sesamin for P450 isoform-specific activities and found a mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C9 by sesamin. In contrast, no mechanism-based inhibition by sesamin was observed in CYP1A2-specific activity. Our findings strongly suggest that further studies are needed to reveal the interaction between sesamin and therapeutic drugs mainly metabolized by CYP2C9.

  18. Implantation of human colorectal carcinoma cells in the liver studied by in vivo fluorescence videomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S; Mizoi, T; Kawano, K; Cay, O; Thomas, P; Nachman, A; Ford, R; Shoji, Y; Kruskal, J B; Steele, G; Jessup, J M

    1996-03-01

    In vivo fluorescence videomicroscopy (IVFM) was used to analyse the behavior of weakly and highly metastatic human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells during implantation in the liver. A highly metastatic human CRC cell line, CX-1, and a weakly metastatic line, Clone A, were double-labeled with rhodamine B isothiocyanate-dextran (Rd-Dx) to locate cells and with calcein AM to assess cell metabolic activity in an experimental metastasis model. Double-labeled CRC cells (2.0 x 10(6)) were injected into the spleens of groups of nude mice and the livers observed by IVFM over the next 72 h. CRC cells were implanted within 30 s after injection into either portal venules or the proximal third of hepatic sinusoids. Approximately 0.5% of CRC cells traversed the liver through portal-central venous shunts and implanted in the lung. The number of CX-1 cells in the liver was similar to that of Clone A cells during the first 12 h. However, more CX-1 cells than Clone A cells remained in the liver at 4 h and were in groups of 8-12 cells whereas only a few, single Clone A cells were detected in the liver at 72 h. Not all Clone A cells are committed to die within 4 h of implantation because cells harvested 4 h after hepatic implantation proliferated normally in vitro when removed from the hepatic microenvironment. Since the stress of mechanical deformation during implantation may cause differences in cell survival, CX-1 and Clone A cells were passed through filters with 8 microM pores in vitro at 10-15 cm of water pressure to recreate the trauma of hepatic implantation. Approximately 50% of both CX-1 and Clone A cells were lysed. Furthermore, both CRC lines remained metabolically active when co-cultivated with liver cells for at least 24 h in vitro. Thus, the difference in metastatic potential between the two CRC lines may reside in their response to the combination of mechanical implantation and subsequent growth in the liver parenchyma.

  19. CCM2 expression during prenatal development and adult human neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tanriover, Gamze; Sozen, Berna; Gunel, Murat; Demir, Necdet

    2011-08-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is one of the most common types of vascular malformations of the central nervous system, affecting nearly one in 200 people. CCM lesions are characterized by grossly dilated vascular channels lined by a single layer of endothelium. Genetic linkage analyses have mapped three CCM loci to CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3. All three causative genes have now been identified allowing new insights into CCM pathophysiology. We focused on the CCM2 protein that might take place in blood vessel formation; we report here the expression patterns of CCM2 in prenatal development and adult human neocortex by means of immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. CCM2 was obviously detected in vascular endothelium and neuroglial precursor cells during development and also observed in arterial endothelium, neurons, some of the glial cells in adult neocortex. The expression patterns suggest that it could be one of the arterial markers whether this is a cause or a consequence of an altered vascular identity. CCM2 might play a role during vasculogenesis and angiogenesis during human brain development. Furthermore, with this study, CCM2 have been described for the first time in developing human neocortex.

  20. Silencing porcine CMAH and GGTA1 genes significantly reduces xenogeneic consumption of human platelets by porcine livers

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James R.; Paris, Leela L.; Blankenship, Ross L.; Sidner, Richard A.; Martens, Gregory R.; Ladowski, Joeseph M.; Li, Ping; Estrada, Jose L; Tector, Matthew; Tector, A. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background A profound thrombocytopenia limits hepatic xenotransplantation in the pig-to-primate model. Porcine livers also have shown the ability to phagocytose human platelets in the absence of immune-mediate injury. Recently, inactivation of the porcine ASGR1 gene has been shown to decrease this phenomenon. Inactivating GGTA1 and CMAH genes has reduced the antibody-mediated barrier to xenotransplantation; herein we describe the effect that these modifications have on xenogeneic consumption of human platelets in the absence of immune-mediated graft injury. Methods WT, ASGR1−/−, GGTA1−/−, and GGTA1−/−CMAH−/− knockout pigs were compared for their xenogeneic hepatic consumption of human platelets. An in vitro assay was established to measure the association of human platelets with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) by immunohistochemistry. Perfusion models were used to measure human platelet uptake in livers from WT, ASGR1−/−, GGTA1−/−, and GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− pigs. Results GGTA1−/−, CMAH−/− LSECs exhibited reduced levels of human platelet binding in vitro, when compared to GGTA1−/− and WT LSECs. In a continuous perfusion model, GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− livers consumed fewer human platelets than GGTA1−/− and WT livers. GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− livers also consumed fewer human platelets than ASGR1−/− livers in a single pass model. Conclusions Silencing the porcine carbohydrate genes necessary to avoid antibody-mediated rejection in a pig-to-human model also reduces the xenogeneic consumption of human platelets by the porcine liver. The combination of these genetic modifications may be an effective strategy to limit the thrombocytopenia associated with pig-to-human hepatic xenotransplantation. PMID:26906939

  1. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Linlong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE+ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE+HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE+HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a "two-programming" hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is "the first programming", and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as "the second programming".

  2. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Linlong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE + ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE + HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE + HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a “two-programming” hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is “the first programming”, and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as “the second programming”. - Highlights: • Prenatal ethanol exposure increase the susceptibility of NAFLD in female offspring. • Prenatal ethanol exposure reprograms fetal liver’s glucose and lipid metabolism . • Prenatal ethanol exposure cause

  3. Energy balance, glucose and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular risk and liver disease burden in adult patients with type 1 Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Nascimbeni, Fabio; Dalla Salda, Annalisa; Carubbi, Francesca

    2016-10-20

    Gaucher disease (GD), the most prevalent lysosomal storage disease, is characterized by systemic accumulation of macrophages engorged with glycosphingolipid-laden lysosomes. Even though both lysosomes and sphingolipids play a pivotal role in metabolic homeostasis, little is known on metabolic abnormalities associated with GD. In this review, we discuss the peculiarity of energy balance and glucose and lipid metabolism in adult type 1 GD patients. Moreover, we evaluate the potential relationship between these metabolic derangements, cardiovascular risk and chronic liver disease. The limited data available show that adult type 1 GD is characterized by a hypermetabolic state, peripheral insulin resistance and hypolipidemia with markedly reduced HDL-cholesterol levels, partially reverted by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) or substrate reduction therapy (SRT). Although this unfavorable metabolic profile has not been associated with increased incidence of type 2 diabetes and premature atherosclerosis, a natural history study has shown that cardio-cerebrovascular events and malignancy are the leading causes of death in treated type 1 GD patients. Hepatomegaly is frequently observed in GD and ERT/SRT are highly effective in reducing liver volume. Nevertheless, patients with GD may be at increased risk of long-term liver complications including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The role that ERT/SRT and/or lifestyle habits may have on such metabolic features of GD patients, and subsequently on long-term prognosis, deserves further investigations. To gain more insights into the peculiarity of GD metabolism may serve both surveillance and treatment purposes by helping to identify new markers of disease severity and define an updated natural history of GD.

  4. Concise Review: Organoids Are a Powerful Tool for the Study of Liver Disease and Personalized Treatment Design in Humans and Animals.

    PubMed

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak; de Bruin, Alain; Rothuizen, Jan; Penning, Louis C; Schotanus, Baukje A

    2016-03-01

    Organoids are three-dimensional culture systems in which adult stem cells and their progeny grow and represent the native physiology of the cells in vivo. Organoids have been successfully derived from several organ systems in both animal models and human patients. Organoids have been used for fundamental research, disease modeling, drug testing, and transplantation. In this review, we summarize the applications of liver-derived organoids and discuss their potential. It is likely that organoids will provide an invaluable tool to unravel disease mechanisms, design novel (personalized) treatment strategies, and generate autologous stem cells for gene editing and transplantation purposes.

  5. Thiamethoxam induced mouse liver tumors and their relevance to humans. Part 2: species differences in response.

    PubMed

    Green, Trevor; Toghill, Alison; Lee, Robert; Waechter, Felix; Weber, Edgar; Peffer, Richard; Noakes, James; Robinson, Mervyn

    2005-07-01

    Thiamethoxam is a neonicotinoid insecticide that is not a mutagen, but it did cause a significant increase in liver cancer in mice, but not rats, in chronic dietary feeding studies. Previous studies in mice have characterized a carcinogenicity mode of action that involved depletion of plasma cholesterol, cell death, both as single cell necrosis and as apoptosis, and sustained increases in cell replication rates. In a study reported in this article, female rats have been exposed to thiamethoxam in their diet at concentrations of 0, 1000, and 3000 ppm for 50 weeks, a study design directly comparable to the mouse study in which the mode of action changes were characterized. In rats, thiamethoxam had no adverse effects on either the biochemistry or histopathology of the liver at any time point during the study. Cell replication rates were not increased, in fact they were significantly decreased at several time points. The lack of effect on the rat liver is entirely consistent with the lack of liver tumor formation in the two-year cancer bioassay. Comparisons of the metabolism of thiamethoxam in rats and mice have shown that concentrations of the parent chemical were either similar or higher in rat blood than in mouse blood in both single dose and the dietary studies strongly indicating that thiamethoxam itself is unlikely to play a role in the development of liver tumors. In contrast, the concentrations of the two metabolites, CGA265307 and CGA330050, shown to play a role in the development of liver damage in the mouse, were 140- (CGA265307) and 15- (CGA330050) fold lower in rats than in mice following either a single oral dose, or dietary administration of thiamethoxam for up to 50 weeks. Comparisons of the major metabolic pathways of thiamethoxam in vitro using mouse, rat, and human liver fractions have shown that metabolic rates in humans are lower than those in the rat suggesting that thiamethoxam is unlikely to pose a hazard to humans exposed to this chemical at

  6. Histopathological effects of sub-chronic lamivudine-artesunate co-administration on the liver of diseased adult Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Olurishe, Temidayo Olutoyin; Kwanashie, Helen Ochuko; Anuka, Joseph; Muktar, Haruna; Bisalla, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Background: Lamivudine and artesunate are sometimes co administered in HIV-malaria co morbidity. Both drugs are used concurrently in presumptive malaria treatment and simultaneous HIV post exposure prophylaxis. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lamivudine-artesunate co administration on the histology of the liver of diseased adult Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Five groups of rats of both sexes were used for the study and placed on feed and water ad libitum. Disease state consisted of immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide, and infection with Plasmodium berghei. Group 1 animals served as vehicle control, while group 2 were the diseased controls. Group 3 animals received 20 mg/kg lamivudine for three weeks, while group 4 similarly received 20 mg/kg Lamivudine but also received 10 mg/kg artesunate from day 12. Animals in group 5 received 10 mg/kg artesunate from day 12. All drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The animals were treated for twenty-one days, at the end of which they were sacrificed and their livers fixed in 10% formalin for histological studies. Result: Results from the study show the presence of regions of focal necrosis and perivascular cuffing with animals that received artesunate. Hemosiderosis was a common feature in all the parasitized groups, while fatty degeneration was observed in the group that received artesunate alone. Conclusion: Concurrent lamivudine-artesunate administration resulted in some histopathological changes in the liver. This study suggests there may be considerable histological changes with repeated occurrence of malaria and immunosuppression that may warrant intermittent lamivudine-artesunate administration, and may require evaluation as well as monitoring of liver function during such therapeutic interventions. PMID:22540106

  7. Lack of in vitro interactions using human liver microsomes between rabeprazole and anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Tamaro, Ilaria; Genazzani, Armando; Canonico, Pierluigi; Grosa, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    The potential interactions between rabeprazole, a widely used proton pump inhibitor, and anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil, docetaxel, cyclophosphamide, gemcitabine, methotrexate, doxorubicin, etoposide) or drugs commonly present in the therapy of oncological patients (fluoxetine and ondansetron), were studied using in vitro human liver microsomes. The interactions between rabeprazole and the anticancer drugs were evaluated by measuring their concentrations in test and control incubations with HPLC-DAD-UV methods. To achieve this aim, nine HPLC-DAD-UV methods were developed using different stationary and mobile phases. The methods were then validated for the following parameters: selectivity, linearity, precision, and accuracy. As expected rabeprazole did not significantly inhibit the metabolism of the evaluated drugs in human liver microsomal preparations at the selected concentrations. These results shows that rabeprazole probably could be devoid of pharmacokinetic interactions with common drugs used during chemotherapy.

  8. Production of monospecific antiserum to a cytosolic epoxide hydrolase from human liver.

    PubMed

    Qato, M K; Reinmund, S G; Guenthner, T M

    1990-01-15

    A method for the purification to apparent homogeneity of cytosolic trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase from human liver is presented. The method employed ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. From 50 g of human liver, 4.9 mg of homogenous enzyme protein was obtained. Although the enzyme had lost much of its catalytic activity during purification, it was nevertheless suitable for the preparation of antibodies to the enzyme. Only one immunogenic species was present in the antigen preparation, but some antibodies that were cross-reactive to sites on catalase were present in the antiserum. These catalase-specific antibodies were removed by immunoaffinity chromatography, and an IgG fraction that is monospecific to the cytosolic epoxide hydrolase was obtained. The usefulness of antibodies to this enzyme in immunoblotting experiments, following either sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or isoelectric focussing, as well as in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, is demonstrated.

  9. Standardized surgical techniques for adult living donor liver transplantation using a modified right lobe graft: a video presentation from bench to reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    After having experienced more than 2,000 cases of adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), we established the concepts of right liver graft standardization. Right liver graft standardization intends to provide hemodynamics-based and regeneration-compliant reconstruction of vascular inflow and outflow. Right liver graft standardization consists of the following components: Right hepatic vein reconstruction includes a combination of caudal-side deep incision and patch venoplasty of the graft right hepatic vein to remove the acute angle between the graft right hepatic vein and the inferior vena cava; middle hepatic vein reconstruction includes interposition of a uniform-shaped conduit with large-sized homologous or prosthetic grafts; if the inferior right hepatic vein is present, its reconstruction includes funneling and unification venoplasty for multiple short hepatic veins; if donor portal vein anomaly is present, its reconstruction includes conjoined unification venoplasty for two or more portal vein orifices. This video clip that shows the surgical technique from bench to reperfusion was a case presentation of adult LDLT using a modified right liver graft from the patient's son. Our intention behind proposing the concept of right liver graft standardization is that it can be universally applicable and may guarantee nearly the same outcomes regardless of the surgeon's experience. We believe that this reconstruction model would be primarily applied to a majority of adult LDLT cases.

  10. Langerhans cell histiocytosis misdiagnosed as liver cancer and pituitary tumor in an adult: A case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MA, JING; JIANG, YONGFANG; CHEN, XIANGYU; GONG, GUOZHONG

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare proliferative disorder in which pathological Langerhans cells accumulate in a variety of organs. LCH usually affects the bone, skin and lymph nodes of children; however, LCH occasionally affects vital organs, including the liver, spleen and pituitary gland. The present study reports a case of an adult LCH patient with marked liver damage, splenomegaly and pituitary damage treated using a new therapeutic strategy. This case was misdiagnosed as liver cancer and pituitary tumor on the basis of abdominal ultrasound, abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and head MRI. The final diagnosis was established by identifying the proliferation of cluster of differentiation 1a-positive LCs in liver tissues. A new regimen of combined 12-week therapy of prednisolone/desmopressin/vincristine and 10 months of maintenance therapy of prednisolone/vinblastine/6-mercaptopurine improved symptoms, liver function and blood cell tests. PMID:24765185

  11. Retinoid Homeostatic Gene Expression in Liver, Lung and Kidney: Ontogeny and Response to Vitamin A-Retinoic Acid (VARA) Supplementation from Birth to Adult Age

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Sarah A.; Ross, A. Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA, retinol) metabolism is homeostatically controlled, but little is known of its regulation in the postnatal period. Here, we determined the postnatal trajectory of VA storage and metabolism in major compartments of VA metabolism–plasma, liver, lung, and kidney from postnatal (P) day 1 to adulthood. We also investigated the response to supplementation with VARA, a combination of VA and 10% all-trans-retinoic acid that previously was shown to synergistically increase retinol uptake and storage in lung. Nursling pups of dams fed a VA-marginal diet received an oral dose of oil (placebo) or VARA on each of four neonatal days: P1, P4, P7, and P10; and again as adults. Tissues were collected 6 h after the final dosing on P1, P4, P10, and at adult age. Gene transcripts for Lrat and Rbp4 in liver and Raldh-1 and Raldh-3 in lung, did not differ in the neonatal period but were higher, P<0.05, in adults, while Cyp26B1, Stra6, megalin, and Raldh-2 in lung did not differ from perinatal to adult ages. VARA supplementation increased total retinol in plasma, liver and lung, with a dose-by-dose accumulation in neonatal liver and lung, while transcripts for Lrat in liver, megalin in kidney, Cyp26A1/B1 in liver and lung, respectively, and Stra6 in lung, were all increased, suggesting pathways of VA uptake, storage and RA oxidation were each augmented after VARA. VARA decreased hepatic expression of Rbp4, responsible for VA trafficking from liver to plasma, and, in lung, of Raldh-1 and Raldh-2, which function in RA production. Our results define retinoid homeostatic gene expression from neonatal and adult age and show that while supplementation with VARA acutely alters retinol content and retinoid homeostatic gene expression in neonatal and adult lung, liver and kidney, VARA supplementation of neonates increased adult-age VA content only in the liver. PMID:26731668

  12. Elevated Liver Function Enzymes Are Related to the Development of Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Younger Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Xu, Ji-Hua; Chen, Wei; Hassig, Susan; Rice, Janet; Berenson, Gerald S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Elevations in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT), surrogate markers of liver dysfunction and nonalcoholic fatty liver, are considered as part of metabolic syndrome and related type 2 diabetes. However, information is limited regarding the long-term predictability of ALT and GGT in the development of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this retrospective cohort study, normoglycemic (n = 874), prediabetic (n = 101), and diabetic (n = 80) adults aged 26–50 years (average age 41.3 years) were followed over an average period of 16 years since their young adulthood (aged 18–38 years, average age 25.1 years), with measurements of cardiometabolic risk factor variables including ALT and GGT. RESULTS The follow-up prevalence rate of adult diabetes status by quartiles of baseline ALT and GGT levels showed an adverse trend for both prediabetes (P < 0.05) and diabetes (P < 0.01). In a longitudinal multivariate logistic regression analysis that included anthropometric, hemodynamic, and metabolic variables, as well as alcohol consumption and smoking, individuals with elevated baseline ALT and GGT levels (per 1-SD increment) were 1.16 and 1.20 times, respectively, more likely to develop diabetes (P = 0.05 for ALT and P < 0.01 for GGT); no such associations were noted for prediabetes. Regarding the predictive value of ALT and GGT, the area under the receiver operating curve analysis yielded C values ranging from 0.70 to 0.82, with values significantly higher for diabetes compared with prediabetes. CONCLUSIONS These findings in younger adults suggest potential clinical utility of including ALT and GGT as biomarkers in diabetes risk assessment formulations. PMID:21953798

  13. Differential receptor targeting of liver cells using 99mTc-neoglycosylated human serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungeun; Jeong, Jae Min; Hong, Mee Kyung; Jang, Ja-June; Lee, Jaetae; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2008-01-01

    Neolactosyl human serum albumin (LSA) targets asialoglycoprotein receptor and shows high liver uptake due to accumulation in hepatocytes. Although neomannosyl human serum albumin (MSA) also shows high liver uptake, it has been reported to be taken up by Kupffer cells and endothelial cells. We compared the biological properties of LSA and MSA. 99mTc-LSA and 99mTc-MSA biodistribution in mice were investigated after intravenous injection. In vivo localization of rhodaminisothiocyanate (RITC)-LSA and fluoresceineisothiocyanate (FITC)-MSA were investigated in mouse liver. Excretion routes of 99mTc-LSA and 99mTc-MSA metabolites were examined. Both 99mTc-LSA and 99mTc-MSA showed high liver uptakes. RITC-LSA was taken up by hepatocytes whereas FITC-MSA was taken up by Kupffer cells and endothelial cells. 99mTc-MSA showed higher spleen and kidney uptakes than 99mTc-LSA. 99mTc-LSA metabolites excreted in urine and feces accounted for 44.4 and 50.0% of 99mTc-LSA injected, respectively, while 99mTc-MSA metabolites accounted for 51.5 and 10.3%, respectively. In conclusion, LSA is specifically taken up by hepatcytes while MSA by Kupffer cells and endothelial cells. After taken up by the liver, LSA is metabolized by the hepatocytes and then excreted through both the hepatobiliary tract and kidney, whereas MSA is metabolized by Kupffer cells and endoghelial cells and then excreted mainly through the kidney.

  14. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies.

  15. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness ( r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores ( r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness.

  16. Phenotype Determines Nanoparticle Uptake by Human Macrophages from Liver and Blood.

    PubMed

    MacParland, Sonya A; Tsoi, Kim M; Ouyang, Ben; Ma, Xue-Zhong; Manuel, Justin; Fawaz, Ali; Ostrowski, Mario A; Alman, Benjamin A; Zilman, Anton; Chan, Warren C W; McGilvray, Ian D

    2017-01-17

    A significant challenge to delivering therapeutic doses of nanoparticles to targeted disease sites is the fact that most nanoparticles become trapped in the liver. Liver-resident macrophages, or Kupffer cells, are key cells in the hepatic sequestration of nanoparticles. However, the precise role that the macrophage phenotype plays in nanoparticle uptake is unknown. Here, we show that the human macrophage phenotype modulates hard nanoparticle uptake. Using gold nanoparticles, we examined uptake by human monocyte-derived macrophages that had been driven to a "regulatory" M2 phenotype or an "inflammatory" M1 phenotype and found that M2-type macrophages preferentially take up nanoparticles, with a clear hierarchy among the subtypes (M2c > M2 > M2a > M2b > M1). We also found that stimuli such as LPS/IFN-γ rather than with more "regulatory" stimuli such as TGF-β/IL-10 reduce per cell macrophage nanoparticle uptake by an average of 40%. Primary human Kupffer cells were found to display heterogeneous expression of M1 and M2 markers, and Kupffer cells expressing higher levels of M2 markers (CD163) take up significantly more nanoparticles than Kupffer cells expressing lower levels of surface CD163. Our results demonstrate that hepatic inflammatory microenvironments should be considered when studying liver sequestration of nanoparticles, and that modifying the hepatic microenvironment might offer a tool for enhancing or decreasing this sequestration. Our findings also suggest that models examining the nanoparticle/macrophage interaction should include studies with primary tissue macrophages.

  17. Allicin induces p53-mediated autophagy in Hep G2 human liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yung-Lin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Chung, Jing-Gung; Rajasekaran, Raghu; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2012-08-29

    Garlic has been used throughout history for both culinary and medicinal purpose. Allicin is a major component of crushed garlic. Although it is sensitive to heat and light and easily metabolized into various compounds such as diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, and diallyl sulfide, allicin is still a major bioactive compound of crushed garlic. The mortality of hepatocellular carcinoma is quite high and ranks among the top 10 cancer-related deaths in Taiwan. Although numerous studies have shown the cancer-preventive properties of garlic and its components, there is no study on the effect of allicin on the growth of human liver cancer cells. In this study, we focused on allicin-induced autophagic cell death in human liver cancer Hep G2 cells. Our results indicated that allicin induced p53-mediated autophagy and inhibited the viability of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Using Western blotting, we observed that allicin decreased the level of cytoplasmic p53, the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway, and the level of Bcl-2 and increased the expression of AMPK/TSC2 and Beclin-1 signaling pathways in Hep G2 cells. In addition, the colocalization of LC3-II with MitoTracker-Red (labeling mitochondria), resulting in allicin-induced degradation of mitochondria, could be observed by confocal laser microscopy. In conclusion, allicin of garlic shows great potential as a novel chemopreventive agent for the prevention of liver cancer.

  18. Benzene metabolism by human liver microsomes in relation to cytochrome P450 2E1 activity.

    PubMed

    Seaton, M J; Schlosser, P M; Bond, J A; Medinsky, M A

    1994-09-01

    Low levels of benzene from sources including cigarette smoke and automobile emissions are ubiquitous in the environment. Since the toxicity of benzene probably results from oxidative metabolites, an understanding of the profile of biotransformation of low levels of benzene is critical in making a valid risk assessment. To that end, we have investigated metabolism of a low concentration of [14C]benzene (3.4 microM) by microsomes from human, mouse and rat liver. The extent of phase I benzene metabolism by microsomal preparations from 10 human liver samples and single microsomal preparations from both mice and rats was then related to measured activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1. Measured CYP 2E1 activities, as determined by hydroxylation of p-nitrophenol, varied 13-fold (0.253-3.266 nmol/min/mg) for human samples. The fraction of benzene metabolized in 16 min ranged from 10% to 59%. Also at 16 min, significant amounts of oxidative metabolites were formed. Phenol was the main metabolite formed by all but two human microsomal preparations. In those samples, both of which had high CYP 2E1 activity, hydroquinone was the major metabolite formed. Both hydroquinone and catechol formation showed a direct correlation with CYP 2E1 activity over the range of activities present. A simulation model was developed based on a mechanism of competitive inhibition between benzene and its oxidized metabolites, and was fit to time-course data for three human liver preparations. Model calculations for initial rates of benzene metabolism ranging from 0.344 to 4.442 nmol/mg/min are directly proportional to measured CYP 2E1 activities. The model predicted the dependence of benzene metabolism on the measured CYP 2E1 activity in human liver samples, as well as in mouse and rat liver samples. These results suggest that differences in measured hepatic CYP 2E1 activity may be a major factor contributing to both interindividual and interspecies variations in hepatic metabolism of benzene

  19. Studies on immunoproteasome in human liver. Part I: Absence in fetuses, presence in normal subjects, and increased levels in chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vasuri, Francesco; Capizzi, Elisa; Bellavista, Elena; Mishto, Michele; Santoro, Aurelia; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Capri, Miriam; Cescon, Matteo; Grazi, Gian Luca; Grigioni, Walter Franco; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Franceschi, Claudio

    2010-06-25

    Despite the central role of proteasomes in relevant physiological pathways and pathological processes, this topic is unexpectedly largely unexplored in human liver. Here we present data on the presence of proteasome and immunoproteasome in human livers from normal adults, fetuses and patients affected by major hepatic diseases such as cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis. Immunohistochemistry for constitutive ({alpha}4 and {beta}1) and inducible (LMP2 and LMP7) proteasome subunits, and for the PA28{alpha}{beta} regulator, was performed in liver samples from 38 normal subjects, 6 fetuses, 2 pediatric cases, and 19 pathological cases (10 chronic active hepatitis and 9 cirrhosis). The immunohistochemical data have been validated and quantified by Western blotting analysis. The most striking result we found was the concomitant presence in hepatocyte cytoplasm of all healthy subjects, including the pediatric cases, of constitutive proteasome and immunoproteasome subunits, as well as PA28{alpha}{beta}. At variance, immunoproteasome was not present in hepatocytes from fetuses, while a strong cytoplasmic and nuclear positivity for LMP2 and LMP7 was found in pathological samples, directly correlated to the histopathological grade of inflammation. At variance from other organs such as the brain, immunoproteasome is present in livers from normal adult and pediatric cases, in apparent absence of pathological processes, suggesting the presence of a peculiar regulation of the proteasome/immunoproteasome system, likely related to the physiological stimuli derived from the gut microbiota after birth. Other inflammatory stimuli contribute in inducing high levels of immunoproteasome in pathological conditions, where its role deserve further attention.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum full life cycle and Plasmodium ovale liver stages in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Soulard, Valérie; Bosson-Vanga, Henriette; Lorthiois, Audrey; Roucher, Clémentine; Franetich, Jean- François; Zanghi, Gigliola; Bordessoulles, Mallaury; Tefit, Maurel; Thellier, Marc; Morosan, Serban; Le Naour, Gilles; Capron, Frédérique; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Snounou, Georges; Moreno-Sabater, Alicia; Mazier, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of Plasmodium parasites that infect humans are restricted by their host specificity. Humanized mice offer a means to overcome this and further provide the opportunity to observe the parasites in vivo. Here we improve on previous protocols to achieve efficient double engraftment of TK-NOG mice by human primary hepatocytes and red blood cells. Thus, we obtain the complete hepatic development of P. falciparum, the transition to the erythrocytic stages, their subsequent multiplication, and the appearance of mature gametocytes over an extended period of observation. Furthermore, using sporozoites derived from two P. ovale-infected patients, we show that human hepatocytes engrafted in TK-NOG mice sustain maturation of the liver stages, and the presence of late-developing schizonts indicate the eventual activation of quiescent parasites. Thus, TK-NOG mice are highly suited for in vivo observations on the Plasmodium species of humans. PMID:26205537

  1. Protocol for Isolation of Primary Human Hepatocytes and Corresponding Major Populations of Non-parenchymal Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Victoria; Deharde, Daniela; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Zeilinger, Katrin; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2016-03-30

    Beside parenchymal hepatocytes, the liver consists of non-parenchymal cells (NPC) namely Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC) and hepatic Stellate cells (HSC). Two-dimensional (2D) culture of primary human hepatocyte (PHH) is still considered as the "gold standard" for in vitro testing of drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. It is well-known that the 2D monoculture of PHH suffers from dedifferentiation and loss of function. Recently it was shown that hepatic NPC play a central role in liver (patho-) physiology and the maintenance of PHH functions. Current research focuses on the reconstruction of in vivo tissue architecture by 3D- and co-culture models to overcome the limitations of 2D monocultures. Previously we published a method to isolate human liver cells and investigated the suitability of these cells for their use in cell cultures in Experimental Biology and Medicine(1). Based on the broad interest in this technique the aim of this article was to provide a more detailed protocol for the liver cell isolation process including a video, which will allow an easy reproduction of this technique. Human liver cells were isolated from human liver tissue samples of surgical interventions by a two-step EGTA/collagenase P perfusion technique. PHH were separated from the NPC by an initial centrifugation at 50 x g. Density gradient centrifugation steps were used for removal of dead cells. Individual liver cell populations were isolated from the enriched NPC fraction using specific cell properties and cell sorting procedures. Beside the PHH isolation we were able to separate KC, LEC and HSC for further cultivation. Taken together, the presented protocol allows the isolation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from one donor tissue sample. The access to purified liver cell populations could allow the creation of in vivo like human liver models.

  2. Primary Human Hepatocytes Repopulate Livers of Mice After In Vitro Culturing and Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bierwolf, Jeanette; Volz, Tassilo; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Allweiss, Lena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Warlich, Michael; Fehse, Boris; Kalff, Joerg C.; Dandri, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies represent a promising alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. However, therapeutic effects are limited by low cell engraftment rates. We recently introduced a technique creating human hepatocyte spheroids for potential therapeutic application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether these spheroids are suitable for engraftment in diseased liver tissues. Intrasplenic spheroid transplantation into immunodeficient uPA/SCID/beige mice was performed. Hepatocyte transduction ability prior to transplantation was tested by lentiviral labeling using red-green-blue (RGB) marking. Eight weeks after transplantation, animals were sacrificed and livers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. To investigate human hepatocyte-specific gene expression profiles in mice, quantitative real-time-PCR was applied. Human albumin and alpha-1-antitrypsin concentrations in mouse serum were quantified to assess the levels of human chimerism. Precultured human hepatocytes reestablished their physiological liver tissue architecture and function upon transplantation in mice. Positive immunohistochemical labeling of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that human hepatocytes retained their in vivo proliferation capacity. Expression profiles of human genes analyzed in chimeric mouse livers resembled levels determined in native human tissue. Extensive vascularization of human cell clusters was detected by demonstration of von Willebrand factor activity. To model gene therapy approaches, lentiviral transduction was performed ex vivo and fluorescent microscopic imaging revealed maintenance of RGB marking in vivo. Altogether, this is the first report demonstrating that cultured and retroviral transduced human hepatocyte spheroids are able to engraft and maintain their regenerative potential in vivo. PMID:27068494

  3. Induction of Three-Dimensional Growth of Human Liver Cells in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Khaoustov, V. I.; Yoffe, B.; Murry, D. J.; Soriano, H. E.; Risin, D.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that a NASA-developed bioreactor that simulates microgravity environment and creates the unique environment of low shear force and high-mass transfer is conducive for maintaining long term 3-D cell cultures of functional hepatocytes (60 days). However, significant further expansion of liver mass, or the remodeling of liver in vitro was jeopardized by the appearance of apoptotic zones in the center of large cell aggregates. To optimize oxygenation and nutritional uptake within growing cellular aggregates we cultured primary human liver cells (HLC) in a bioreactor in the presence or absence of microcarriers and biodegradable scaffolds. Also, to promote angiogenesis, HLC were cultured with or without microvascular endothelial cells. HLC were harvested from human livers by collagenase perfusion. While microcarriers did not affect cell growth, HLC cultured with biodegradable scaffolds made from polyglycolic acid (PGA) formed aggregates up to 3 cm in length. Culturing cells with PGA scaffolds increased the efficiency of cell self-assembly and the formation of larger cell aggregates. Based on histological evaluation it appears that the degree of apoptotic cells was diminished as compared to cultures without scaffolds. Histology of HLC with PGA-scaffolds revealed cell distribution between the fibers of the scaffolds, and cell-cell and cell-fiber interactions. Analyses of HLC spheroids revealed tissue-like structures comprised of hepatocytes, biliary epithelial cells and/or progenitor liver cells that were arranged as bile duct-like structures along nascent vascular sprouts. Electron microscopy revealed groups of cohesive hepatocytes and bile canaliculi with multiple microvilli and tight cellular junctions. Hepatocytes were further organized into tight clusters surrounded by complex stromal structures and reticulin fibers. Also, we observed higher levels of albumin mRNA expression when hepatocytes were co-cultured with endothelial cells. To evaluate

  4. Genetically engineered mannosylated-human serum albumin as a versatile carrier for liver-selective therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kenshiro; Maruyama, Toru; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maeda, Hitoshi; Nakajou, Keisuke; Iwao, Yasunori; Ishima, Yu; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Hashida, Mitsuru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2010-07-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), a non-glycosylated protein, is widely employed as carrier for drug delivery systems. A series of recombinant, mannosylated-HSA mutants (Man-rHSAs: D63N, A320T and D494N) and their triple mutant (TM-rHSA: D63N/A320T/D494N) were prepared, that can be selectively delivered to the liver via mannose receptor (MR) on the liver non-parenchymal cells. A pharmacokinetic analysis of (111)In-Man-rHSAs in mice showed that they were rapidly cleared from the blood circulation, and were largely taken up by the liver rapidly in the order: TM-rHSA>D494N>A320T=D63N, consistent with their degree of mannosylation. In vivo competition experiments with an excess amount of chemically modified Man-BSA or mannan suggested that the hepatic uptake of TM-rHSA was selectively mediated by MR on Kupffer cells. Lastly, a TM-rHSA-NO conjugate, S-nitrosylated TM-rHSA, effectively delivered NO to the liver and then exhibited a significant inhibitory effect against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury model rats, accompanied by the induction of heme oxygenase-1.

  5. Anticarcinogenic effects of glycoalkaloids from potatoes against human cervical, liver, lymphoma, and stomach cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel; Lee, Kap-Rang; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, In-Seon; Kozukue, Nobuyuke

    2005-07-27

    Methods were devised for the isolation of large amounts of pure alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine from Dejima potatoes and for the extraction and analysis of total glycoalkaloids from five fresh potato varieties (Dejima, Jowon, Sumi, Toya, and Vora Valley). These compounds were then evaluated in experiments using a tetrazolium microculture (MTT) assay to assess the anticarcinogenic effects of (a) the isolated pure glycoalkaloids separately, (b) artificial mixtures of the two glycoalkaloids, and (c) the total glycoalkaloids isolated from each of the five potato varieties. All samples tested reduced the numbers of the following human cell lines: cervical (HeLa), liver (HepG2), lymphoma (U937), stomach (AGS and KATO III) cancer cells and normal liver (Chang) cells. The results show that (a) the effects of the glycoalkaloids were concentration dependent in the range of 0.1-10 mug/mL (0.117-11.7 nmol/mL); (b) alpha-chaconine was more active than was alpha-solanine; (c) some mixtures exhibited synergistic effects, whereas other produced additive ones; (d) the different cancer cells varied in their susceptibilities to destruction; and (e) the destruction of normal liver cells was generally lower than that of cancer liver cells. The decreases in cell populations were also observed visually by reversed-phase microscopy. The results complement related observations on the anticarcinogenic potential of food ingredients.

  6. High frequency of Human Cytomegalovirus DNA in the Liver of Infants with Extrahepatic Neonatal Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    De Tommaso, Adriana MA; Andrade, Paula D; Costa, Sandra CB; Escanhoela, Cecília AF; Hessel, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Background Biliary atresia (BA) is the most severe hepatic disorder in newborns and its etiopathogenesis remains unknown. Viral involvement has been proposed, including the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The aims of the study were to use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to screen the liver tissue of infants with extrahepatic cholestasis for HCMV and to correlate the results with serological antibodies against HCMV and histological findings. Methods A retrospective study in a tertiary care setting included 35 patients (31 BA, 1 BA associated with a choledochal cyst, 2 congenital stenosis of the distal common bile duct and 1 hepatic cyst). HCMV serology was determined by ELISA. Liver and porta hepatis were examined histologically. Liver samples from infants and a control group were screened for HCMV DNA. Results Twelve patients had HCMV negative serology, 9 were positive for IgG antibodies and 14 were positive for IgG and IgM. Nine liver and seven porta hepatis samples were positive for HCMV DNA but none of the control group were positive (general frequency of positivity was 34.3% – 12/35). There was no correlation between HCMV positivity by PCR and the histological findings. The accuracy of serology for detecting HCMV antibodies was low. Conclusion These results indicate an elevated frequency of HCMV in pediatric patients with extrahepatic neonatal cholestasis. They also show the low accuracy of serological tests for detecting active HCMV infection and the lack of correlation between HCMV positivity by PCR and the histopathological changes. PMID:16321152

  7. Characterization of the Mouse and Human Monoacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase 1 (Mogat1) Promoter in Human Kidney Proximal Tubule and Rat Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sankella, Shireesha; Garg, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (Mogat1) catalyzes the conversion of monoacylglycerols (MAG) to diacylglycerols (DAG), the precursor of several physiologically important lipids such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and triacylglycerol (TAG). Expression of Mogat1 is tissue restricted and it is highly expressed in the kidney, stomach and adipose tissue but minimally in the normal adult liver. To understand the transcriptional regulation of Mogat1, we characterized the mouse and human Mogat1 promoters in human kidney proximal tubule-2 (HK-2) cells. In-silico analysis revealed several peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) binding sites in the promoters of both human and mouse Mogat1. These sites responded to all three peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms such that their respective agonist or antagonist activated or inhibited the expression of Mogat1. PPRE site mutagenesis revealed that sites located at -592 and -2518 are very effective in decreasing luciferase reporter gene activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using PPARα antibody further confirmed the occupancy of these sites by PPARα. While these assays revealed the core promoter elements necessary for Mogat1 expression, there are additional elements required to regulate its tissue specific expression. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) assay revealed additional cis-elements located ~10–15 kb upstream which interact with the core promoter. These chromosomal regions are responsive to both PPARα agonist and antagonist. PMID:27611931

  8. Metabolic conversion of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in adult and newborn mouse skin and mouse liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Berry, D L; Bracken, W M; Fischer, S M; Viaje, A; Slaga, T J

    1978-08-01

    Tritiated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was applied to adult mouse skin; at specified time intervals the mice were killed, and the labeled phorbol was extracted and subjected to separation and quantitation by high-pressure liquid chromatography. After 24 hr, TPA comprised greater than 96% of the recovered label from the skin, and its apparent half-life was 17.8 hr. Pretreatment of adult skin with TPA for 4 weeks before treatment with labeled TPA resulted in an increase in the clearance rate of TPA from the skin. Skin from newborn mice was capable of converting TPA into monoesters and phorbol, but the clearance rate in the adult was about 12 times more rapid than it was in the newborn. Epidermal homogenates converted TPA into 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol, phorbol-13-acetate, and phorbol. Hepatic homogenates were able to convert TPA to monoesters and phorbol at rates 14 to 15 times faster than were epidermal homogenates. Attempts to isolate any previously undescribed metabolites of TPA by use of liver homogenates were unsuccessful, and mixed-function oxidation did not contribute to the metabolism of TPA. From inhibitor studies it was judged that esterases were implicated in the conversion of TPA to monoesters and phorbol. The results support the hypothesis that the tumor-promoting activity of TPA is directly related to its concentration in a specific tissue and that conversion of TPA to an active metabolite probably does not occur.

  9. Parents in transition: Experiences of parents of young people with a liver transplant transferring to adult services.

    PubMed

    Wright, J; Elwell, L; McDonagh, J E; Kelly, D A; Wray, J

    2017-02-01

    Predictors of successful transition from pediatric to adult services include ability to self-manage and engage with healthcare services. Parents have a key role in healthcare management throughout childhood and adolescence including encouraging development of self-management skills in their children. Transition to adult services can be challenging for parents and young people, yet parents' views regarding transition remain largely unexplored. Nine parents of pediatric liver transplant recipients (15.2-25.1 yr) participated in semistructured interviews. Interviews were analyzed using IPA. Analysis revealed three key themes: "emotional impact of transplantation," "protection vs. independence," and "ending relationships and changing roles." Parents expressed the dichotomous nature of the desire to promote independence in their child while still maintaining control and protection, and discussed how changing roles and relationships were difficult to navigate. Parents are important facilitators of young people's development of self-management skills for successful transfer to adult services. Parents should be supported to move from a "managerial" to a "supervisory" role during transition to help young people engage independently with the healthcare team. Findings support the development of interventions for parents to emphasize their role in transition and guide the transfer of self-management skills from parent to young person.

  10. Comparison of metabolism of sesamin and episesamin by drug-metabolizing enzymes in human liver.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kaori; Ikushiro, Shinichi; Wakayama, Shuto; Itoh, Toshimasa; Yamamoto, Keiko; Kamakura, Masaki; Munetsuna, Eiji; Ohta, Miho; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2012-10-01

    Sesamin and episesamin are two epimeric lignans that are found in refined sesame oil. Commercially available sesamin supplements contain both sesamin and episesamin at an approximate 1:1 ratio. Our previous study clarified the sequential metabolism of sesamin by cytochrome P450 (P450) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in human liver. In addition, we revealed that sesamin caused a mechanism-based inhibition (MBI) of CYP2C9, the P450 enzyme responsible for sesamin monocatecholization. In the present study, we compared the metabolism and the MBI of episesamin with those of sesamin. Episesamin was first metabolized to the two epimers of monocatechol, S- and R-monocatechols in human liver microsomes. The P450 enzymes responsible for S- and R-monocatechol formation were CYP2C9 and CYP1A2, respectively. The contribution of CYP2C9 was much larger than that of CYP1A2 in sesamin metabolism, whereas the contribution of CYP2C9 was almost equal to that of CYP1A2 in episesamin metabolism. Docking of episesamin to the active site of CYP1A2 explained the stereoselectivity in CYP1A2-dependent episesamin monocatecholization. Similar to sesamin, the episesamin S- and R-monocatechols were further metabolized to dicatechol, glucuronide, and methylate metabolites in human liver; however, the contribution of each reaction was significantly different between sesamin and episesamin. The liver microsomes from CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizers showed a significant amount of episesamin dicatechol. In this study, we have revealed significantly different metabolism by P450, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and catechol-O-methyltransferase for sesamin and episesamin, resulting in different biological effects.

  11. Distribution of Tight Junction Proteins in Adult Human Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Ola M.; Kim, Jung-Wan Martin; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A.; Baum, Bruce J.; Tran, Simon D.

    2008-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are an essential structure of fluid-secreting cells, such as those in salivary glands. Three major families of integral membrane proteins have been identified as components of the TJ: claudins, occludin, and junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs), plus the cytosolic protein zonula occludens (ZO). We have been working to develop an orally implantable artificial salivary gland that would be suitable for treating patients lacking salivary parenchymal tissue. To date, little is known about the distribution of TJ proteins in adult human salivary cells and thus what key molecular components might be desirable for the cellular component of an artificial salivary gland device. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of TJ proteins in human salivary glands. Salivary gland samples were obtained from 10 patients. Frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained using IHC methods. Claudin-1 was expressed in ductal, endothelial, and ∼25% of serous cells. Claudins-2, -3, and -4 and JAM-A were expressed in both ductal and acinar cells, whereas claudin-5 was expressed only in endothelial cells. Occludin and ZO-1 were expressed in acinar, ductal, and endothelial cells. These results provide new information on TJ proteins in two major human salivary glands and should serve as a reference for future studies to assess the presence of appropriate TJ proteins in a tissue-engineered human salivary gland. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:1093–1098, 2008) PMID:18765838

  12. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Elferink, M.G.L.; Olinga, P.; van Leeuwen, E.M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W.G.; Heisterkamp, S.H.; Groothuis, G.M.M.

    2011-05-15

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be directly extrapolated to humans due to species differences. The aim of this study was to evaluate precision-cut human liver slices as in vitro method for the prediction of human specific toxicity by toxicogenomics. The liver slices contain all cell types of the liver in their natural architecture. This is important since drug-induced toxicity often is a multi-cellular process. Previously we showed that toxicogenomic analysis of rat liver slices is highly predictive for rat in vivo toxicity. In this study we investigated the levels of gene expression during incubation up to 24 h with Affymetrix microarray technology. The analysis was focused on a broad spectrum of genes related to stress and toxicity, and on genes encoding for phase-I, -II and -III metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Observed changes in gene expression were associated with cytoskeleton remodeling, extracellular matrix and cell adhesion, but for the ADME-Tox related genes only minor changes were observed. PCA analysis showed that changes in gene expression were not associated with age, sex or source of the human livers. Slices treated with acetaminophen showed patterns of gene expression related to its toxicity. These results indicate that precision-cut human liver slices are relatively stable during 24 h of incubation and represent a valuable model for human in vitro hepatotoxicity testing despite the human inter-individual variability.

  13. Value of energy substrates in HTK and UW to protect human liver endothelial cells against ischemia and reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Hermann; Janssen, Petra H E; Broelsch, Christoph E

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) depletion is a major cause of cellular injury during ischemia and reperfusion in organ transplantation. Therefore, histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK; alpha-ketoglutarate) and University of Wisconsin solution (UW; adenosine) were supplied with energy substrates to achieve graft viability. Nevertheless, their efficacy for maintaining the ATP level, particularly in human liver endothelial cells, was uncertain. Furthermore, it is of interest whether a high ATP level is beneficial in human liver endothelial cell viability. We used human liver endothelial cells between the 3rd and 6th passages in a cell culture model. Human liver endothelial cells were exposed to hypothermic preservation (4 degrees C) in HTK and UW for 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h with subsequent reperfusion of 6 h. ATP and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured after each interval. In comparison to HTK, UW demonstrates a statistically significantly higher level of ATP after each interval of ischemia (p < 0.001) and reperfusion (p < 0.002). Additionally, UW-preserved human liver endothelial cells exceed the ATP level of the warm control during all intervals of ischemia. The loss of cell viability (LDH) was statistically significantly higher after ischemia (p < 0.01) and reperfusion (p < 0.01) in HTK than in UW except after the interval of 48 h. In conclusion, adenosine was more effective than alpha-ketoglutarate in maintaining a high ATP level in human liver endothelial cells after ischemia and reperfusion. Different pathways of energy substrate utilization were a contributing factor. The beneficial effect of the higher ATP level caused by adenosine to human liver endothelial cell viability was limited to 24 h of ischemia. Beyond this ischemia time we could not prove a favorable impact of adenosine on human liver endothelial cells.

  14. Cholestatic liver diseases from child to adult: the diversity of MDR3 disease.

    PubMed

    Kubitz, R; Bode, J; Erhardt, A; Graf, D; Kircheis, G; Müller-Stöver, I; Reinehr, R; Reuter, S; Richter, J; Sagir, A; Schmitt, M; Donner, M

    2011-06-01

    The phospholipidfloppase MDR3 (gene symbol: ABCB4) is expressed in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes and mediates the biliary excretion of phosphatidylcholine, which is required for the formation of mixed micelles in bile. Several mutations of ABCB4 have been identified, which cause cholestatic liver diseases of varying severity including progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC-3), intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and the low phospholipid associated cholelithiasis syndrome (LPAC). Here, we report on four new (S1076N; L 23Hfs16X; c.286 + 1G > A; Q 1181E) and one known (S27G) MDR3 mutations in eight patients of three families. The patients presented with a wide spectrum of liver diseases. The clinical presentation and decisive laboratory findings or the association to a trend-setting family history led to the identification of the genetic background in these patients. Even the same mutation may be associated with varying disease progression.

  15. Serum prolactin in patients with liver disease in comparison with healthy adults: A preliminary cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Sumit Kant; Kannan, Sridharan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Studies from the west have shown raised prolactin levels in patients with liver disease. Considering the lacunae on Indian context, we conducted the present study with an objective to assess the prolactin levels in patients with cirrhosis and viral hepatitis with or without features of encephalopathy. The data presented here are the results of the preliminary analysis. Materials and Methods: The present study was a prospective, cohort study among patients diagnosed as either viral hepatitis or cirrhosis liver. A cohort of normal healthy adults was selected based on history and laboratory investigations (complete blood count, liver and renal function tests). Serum prolactin was measured for all the study participants, and Kruskal–Wallis H-test with post-hoc Dunn's test was used to analyze the significance of the differences in the levels between various groups. Tests of diagnostic accuracy were used to assess the prediction capability of serum prolactin with a cut-off level of 50 ng/ml. Results: A total of 70 patients (10 - normal healthy; 25 - acute viral hepatitis; 35 - cirrhosis liver) were recruited in the present study with the median (range) age in years of 56 (34–68) and male: female ratio of 2:1. A statistically significant (P < 0.05) increase in the serum prolactin was observed in patients with cirrhosis with or without encephalopathy. But, among the patients with viral hepatitis, a significant elevation was observed only in patients with encephalopathy. Additionally, a statistically significant association was observed between serum prolactin levels with serum bilirubin (ρ =0.67, P = 0.04) and aspartate aminotransferase (ρ =0.72, P = 0.05). A cut-off value of 50 ng/ml of serum prolactin was found to predict the mortality. A total of 4/12 (33.3%) with prolactin value of <50 ng/ml died while 11/23 (47.8%) died with values >50 ng/ml (P < 0.05). Similarly, in patients with viral hepatitis with encephalopathy features, 1/4 (25%) with

  16. Inhibitor and temperature effect on catalase in the liver of adult diploid and haploid Rana rugosa.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, A; Kashiwagi, K; Takase, M; Hanada, H; Yamashita, M; Naitoh, T; Nakamura, M

    1998-01-01

    The authors succeeded in raising a single mature haploid Rana rugosa female to the age of 2 years from an egg artificially fertilized with ultraviolet-irradiated sperm. In order to discover why this particular haploid individual should survive so long, hydrogen peroxide detoxifying catalase in the liver of this individual and age-matched diploids was examined and compared for total activity, temperature stability, and chemical inhibition. Total activity was found to be significantly higher in the haploid frog than in the diploids, suggesting that this particular haploid had a unique system for hydrogen peroxide detoxification which protected the liver against cell death, preventing hepatic failure, and leading to a prolonged survival. Liver catalase from the haploid proved to be more labile to aminotriazole and urea, losing 60-70% of its original activity after 30 min treatment, whereas diploid catalase lost only 40% under the same conditions. Haploid and diploid catalase responded similarly to heat, however. It seems likely that inhibitor-binding sites differ considerably between the catalase of normal diploids and the catalase of this particular haploid, while overall structure is generally similar.

  17. Epigenetic Alterations in Human Liver From Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes in Parallel With Reduced Folate Levels

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Ashok; Perfilyev, Alexander; de Mello, Vanessa D.; Käkelä, Pirjo; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Epigenetic variation may contribute to the development of complex metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Hepatic insulin resistance is a hallmark of T2D. However, it remains unknown whether epigenetic alterations take place in the liver from diabetic subjects. Therefore, we investigated the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in the liver from subjects with T2D and nondiabetic controls and related epigenetic alterations to gene expression and circulating folate levels. Research Design and Methods: Liver biopsies were obtained from 35 diabetic and 60 nondiabetic subjects, which are part of the Kuopio Obesity Surgery Study. The genome-wide DNA methylation pattern was analyzed in the liver using the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. RNA expression was analyzed from a subset of subjects using the HumanHT-12 Expression BeadChip. Results: After correction for multiple testing, we identified 251 individual CpG sites that exhibit differential DNA methylation in liver obtained from T2D compared with nondiabetic subjects (Q < .05). These include CpG sites annotated to genes that are biologically relevant to the development of T2D such as GRB10, ABCC3, MOGAT1, and PRDM16. The vast majority of the significant CpG sites (94%) displayed decreased DNA methylation in liver from subjects with T2D. The hypomethylation found in liver from diabetic subjects may be explained by reduced folate levels. Indeed, subjects with T2D had significantly reduced erythrocyte folate levels compared with nondiabetic subjects. We further identified 29 genes that displayed both differential DNA methylation and gene expression in human T2D liver including the imprinted gene H19. Conclusions: Our study highlights the importance of epigenetic and transcriptional changes in the liver from subjects with T2D. Reduced circulating folate levels may provide an explanation for hypomethylation in the human diabetic liver. PMID:26418287

  18. Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Hepatic Endoderm and Its Role in Bioartificial Liver Construction

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ruchi; Greenhough, Sebastian; Medine, Claire N.; Hay, David C.

    2010-01-01

    The liver carries out a range of functions essential for bodily homeostasis. The impairment of liver functions has serious implications and is responsible for high rates of patient morbidity and mortality. Presently, liver transplantation remains the only effective treatment, but donor availability is a major limitation. Therefore, artificial and bioartificial liver devices have been developed to bridge patients to liver transplantation. Existing support devices improve hepatic encephalopathy to a certain extent; however their usage is associated with side effects. The major hindrance in the development of bioartificial liver devices and cellular therapies is the limited availability of human hepatocytes. Moreover, primary hepatocytes are difficult to maintain and lose hepatic identity and function over time even with sophisticated tissue culture media. To overcome this limitation, renewable cell sources are being explored. Human embryonic stem cells are one such cellular resource and have been shown to generate a reliable and reproducible supply of human hepatic endoderm. Therefore, the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic endoderm in combination with tissue engineering has the potential to pave the way for the development of novel bioartificial liver devices and predictive drug toxicity assays. PMID:20169088

  19. Butyltin residues in livers of humans and wild terrestrial mammals and in plastic products.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Mukai, H; Tanabe, S; Sakayama, K; Miyazaki, T; Masuno, H

    1999-08-01

    Butyltin compounds (BTs) including mono-(MBT), di-(DBT) and tributyltin (TBT) were determined in livers of humans and wild terrestrial mammals, such as raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoids) and monkeys (Macaca fuscata) from Japan. In addition, 22 samples of plastic products were analyzed. BT residues were detected in all the liver samples of humans and raccoon dogs, with concentrations of <360 ng/g wet wt, whereas concentrations in the liver of monkeys were either less than the detection limit or were only in trace levels. Elevated concentrations of BTs, particularly DBT (<140,000 ng/g) and MBT (<130,000 ng/g), were found in some plastic products, such as baking parchments made from siliconized paper and gloves made up from polyurethane. The results of a cooking test using the above baking parchment indicated the transfer of BTs to foodstuffs. These observations suggest expansion of BT contamination among terrestrial mammals. BT pollution from industrial appliances, such as plastic stabilizers and catalysts other than those of marine origin as antifouling agents, are suggested as alternative sources of exposure.

  20. Ovarian senescence increases liver fibrosis in humans and zebrafish with steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Turola, Elena; Petta, Salvatore; Vanni, Ester; Milosa, Fabiola; Valenti, Luca; Critelli, Rosina; Miele, Luca; Maccio, Livia; Calvaruso, Vincenza; Fracanzani, Anna L.; Bianchini, Marcello; Raos, Nazarena; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Mercorella, Serena; Di Giovanni, Marisa; Craxì, Antonio; Fargion, Silvia; Grieco, Antonio; Cammà, Calogero; Cotelli, Franco; Villa, Erica

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Contrasting data exist on the effect of gender and menopause on the susceptibility, development and liver damage progression in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Our aim was to assess whether menopause is associated with the severity of liver fibrosis in individuals with NAFLD and to explore the issue of ovarian senescence in experimental liver steatosis in zebrafish. In 244 females and age-matched males with biopsy-proven NAFLD, we assessed anthropometric, biochemical and metabolic features, including menopausal status (self-reported); liver biopsy was scored according to ‘The Pathology Committee of the NASH Clinical Research Network’. Young and old male and female zebrafish were fed for 24 weeks with a high-calorie diet. Weekly body mass index (BMI), histopathological examination and quantitative real-time PCR analysis on genes involved in lipid metabolism, inflammation and fibrosis were performed. In the entire cohort, at multivariate logistic regression, male gender [odds ratio (OR): 1.408, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.779-2.542, P=0.25] vs women at reproductive age was not associated with F2-F4 fibrosis, whereas a trend was observed for menopause (OR: 1.752, 95% CI: 0.956-3.208, P=0.06). In women, menopause (OR: 2.717, 95% CI: 1.020-7.237, P=0.04) was independently associated with F2-F4 fibrosis. Similarly, in overfed zebrafish, old female fish with failing ovarian function [as demonstrated by extremely low circulating estradiol levels (1.4±0.1 pg/µl) and prevailing presence of atretic follicles in the ovaries] developed massive steatosis and substantial fibrosis (comparable with that occurring in males), whereas young female fish developed less steatosis and were totally protected from the development of fibrosis. Ovarian senescence significantly increases the risk of fibrosis severity both in humans with NAFLD and in zebrafish with experimental steatosis. PMID:26183212

  1. The insecticide DDT decreases membrane potential and cell input resistance of cultured human liver cells.

    PubMed

    Schefczik, K; Buff, K

    1984-10-03

    The resting membrane potential, Em, and the cell input resistance, Rinp, of cultured human Chang liver cells were measured using the single electrode 'double-pulse' current clamp technique, following exposure of the cells to the insecticide DDT (20 microM). In control (unexposed) cells, the mean Em was -24 mV, and the mean Rinp was 30 M omega. Neither parameter was significantly impaired after 1 h of cell exposure to DDT. But after 7 and 48 h, the Em was depolarized by 15 and 25 mV, respectively, in parallel with a decrease of the cell input resistance. The strongly time-delayed effect of DDT on Chang liver cell membranes may indicate a mode of interaction different from excitable membranes.

  2. Long-term impact of liver transplantation on respiratory function and nutritional status in children and adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dowman, J K; Watson, D; Loganathan, S; Gunson, B K; Hodson, J; Mirza, D F; Clarke, J; Lloyd, C; Honeybourne, D; Whitehouse, J L; Nash, E F; Kelly, D; van Mourik, I; Newsome, P N

    2012-04-01

    Early liver transplant (LT) has been advocated for patients with cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD) and evidence of deterioration in nutritional state and respiratory function to prevent further decline. However, the impact of single LT on long-term respiratory function and nutritional status has not been adequately addressed. We performed a retrospective analysis of the outcomes of 40 (21 adult/19 pediatric) patients with CFLD transplanted between 1987 and 2009 with median follow-up of 47.8 months (range 4-180). One and five-year actuarial survival rates were 85%/64% for adult and 90%/85% for pediatric LT cohorts, respectively. Lung function remained stable until 4 years (FEV(1) % predicted; pretransplant 48.4% vs. 45.9%, 4 years posttransplant) but declined by 5 years (42.4%). Up to 4 years posttransplant mean annual decline in FEV(1) % was lower (0.74%; p = 0.04) compared with the predicted 3% annual decline in CF patients with comorbidity including diabetes. Number of courses of intravenous antibiotics was reduced following LT, from 3.9/year pretransplant to 1.1/year, 5 years posttransplant. Body mass index was preserved posttransplant; 18.0 kg/m(2) (range 15-24.3) pretransplant versus 19.6 kg/m(2) (range 16.4-22.7) 5 years posttransplant. In conclusion, LT is an effective treatment for selected patients with cirrhosis due to CFLD, stabilizing aspects of long-term lung function and preserving nutritional status.

  3. Basic investigation on acoustic velocity change imaging method for quantitative assessment of fat content in human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, Kazune; Tanigawa, Shohei; Hori, Makoto; Yokota, Daiki; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Fatty liver is a disease caused by the excess accumulation of fat in the human liver. The early diagnosis of fatty liver is very important, because fatty liver is the major marker linked to metabolic syndrome. We already proposed the ultrasonic velocity change imaging method to diagnose fatty liver by using the fact that the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is different in water and in fat. For the diagonosis of a fatty liver stage, we attempted a feasibility study of the quantitative assessment of the fat content in the human liver using our ultrasonic velocity change imaging method. Experimental results showed that the fat content in the tissue mimic phantom containing lard was determined by its ultrasonic velocity change in the flat temperature region formed by a circular warming ultrasonic transducer with an acoustic lens having an appropriate focal length. By considering the results of our simulation using a thermal diffusion equation, we determined whether this method could be applied to fatty liver assessment under the condition that the tissue had the thermal relaxation effect caused by blood flow.

  4. Comparative effects of nodularin and microcystin-LR in zebrafish: 2. Uptake and molecular effects in eleuthero-embryos and adult liver with focus on endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Faltermann, Susanne; Grundler, Verena; Gademann, Karl; Pernthaler, Jakob; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Microcystin (MC) and nodularin are structurally similar cyanobacterial toxins that inhibit protein phosphatases. Additional modes of action are poorly known, in particular for nodularin. In our associated work, we showed that active cellular uptake is mediated by the organic anion transporting polypeptide drOatp1d1 in zebrafish (Faltermann et al., 2016). Here, we assessed the transcriptional expression of three genes encoding three uptake transporters during embryonic development from 24h post fertilization (hpf) to 168 hpf. Transcripts of drOatp1d1 and drOatp2b1 are present at 24 hpf. The abundance increased after hatching and remained about constant up to 168 hpf. Transcripts of drOatp2b1 were most abundant, while drOapt1f transcripts showed very low relative abundance compared to drOatp1d1 and drOatp2b1. We further demonstrated the uptake of fluorescent labeled MC-LR in eleuthero-embryos and its accumulation in the glomerulus of the pronephros. An important molecular effect of MC-LR in human liver cells is the induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress. Here, we investigated, whether MC-LR and nodularin similarly lead to induction of ER-stress in zebrafish by analyzing changes of mRNA levels of genes indicative of ER-stress. In zebrafish liver organ cultures short- and long-term exposures to 0.15 and 0.3 μmol L(-1) MC-LR, and 0.5 and 1 μM L(-1) nodularin led to significant transcriptional induction of several ER-stress marker genes, including the chaperone glucose regulated protein 78 (bip), the spliced form of x-box binding protein (xbp-1s), the CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (chop) and activating transcription factor 4 (atf4). Furthermore, strong transcriptional changes occurred for tumor necrosis factor alpha (tnfa) and dual specificity phosphatase 5 (dusp5), associated with mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. However, no alterations in transcript levels of pro-apoptotic genes Bcl-2 like protein 4 (bax) and p53 occurred

  5. Neuropeptide Y in the adult and fetal human pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Badiu, Corin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we show by use of immunohistochemistry that neuropeptide Y is present in nerve fibers of the adult human pineal gland. The fibers are classical neuropeptidergic fibers endowed with large boutons en passage and primarily located in a perifollicular position with some fibers entering the pineal parenchyma inside the follicle. The distance from the immunoreactive terminals to the pinealocytes indicates a modulatory function of neuropeptide Y for pineal physiology. Some of the immunoreactive fibers might originate from neurons located in the brain and be a part of the central innervation of the pineal gland. In a series of human fetuses, neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers was present and could be detected as early as in the pineal of four- to five-month-old fetuses. This early innervation of the human pineal is different from most rodents, where the innervation starts postnatally.

  6. Thermotropic lipid phase separations in human erythrocyte ghosts and cholesterol-enriched rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, L M; Mobley, P W

    1984-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of human erythrocyte ghosts labeled with 5-nitroxide stearate, I(12,3), indicate that a temperature-dependent lipid phase separation occurs with a high onset at 38 degrees C. Cooling below 38 degrees C induces I(12,3) clustering. Similar phase separations were previously identified in human platelet and cholesterol-loaded [cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio (C/P) = 0.85] rat liver plasma membranes [L.M. Gordon et al., 1983; J. Membrane Biol. 76; 139-149]; these were attributed to redistribution of endogenous lipid components such that I(12,3) is excluded from cholesterol-rich domains and tends to reside in cholesterol-poor domains. Further enrichment of rat liver plasma membranes to C/P ratios of 0.94-0.98 creates an "artificial" system equivalent to human erythrocyte ghosts (C/P = 0.90), using such criteria as probe flexibility, temperature dependent I(12,3) clustering; and polarity of the probe environment. Consequently, cholesterol-rich and -poor domains probably exist in both erythrocyte ghosts and high cholesterol liver membranes at physiologic temperatures. The temperature dependence of cold-induced hypertonic lysis of intact human erythrocytes was examined by incubating cells in 0.9 M sucrose for 10 min at 1 degree C intervals between 9 and 46 degrees C (Stage 1), and then subjecting them to 0 degrees C for 10 min (Stage 2). Plots of released hemoglobin are approx. sigmoidal, with no lysis below 18 degrees C and maximal lysis above 40 degrees C. The protective effect of low temperatures during Stage 1 may be due to the formation of cholesterol-rich domains that alter the bilayer distribution and/or conformation of critical membrane-associated proteins.

  7. Liver Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Gao, Bin; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body and is generally regarded by non-immunologists as not having lymphoid function. However, such is far from accurate. This review highlights the importance of the liver as a lymphoid organ. Firstly, we discuss experimental data surrounding the role of liver as a lymphoid organ. The liver facilitates a tolerance rather than immunoreactivity, which protects the host from antigenic overload of dietary components and drugs derived from the gut and is also instrumental to fetal immune tolerance. Loss of liver tolerance leads to autoaggressive phenomena which if are not controlled by regulatory lymphoid populations may lead to the induction of autoimmune liver diseases. Liver-related lymphoid subpopulations also act as critical antigen-presenting cells. The study of the immunological properties of liver and delineation of the microenvironment of the intrahepatic milieu in normal and diseased livers provides a platform to understand the hierarchy of a series of detrimental events which lead to immune-mediated destruction of the liver and the rejection of liver allografts. The majority of emphasis within this review will be on the normal mononuclear cell composition of the liver. However, within this context, we will discus select, but not all, immune mediated liver disease and attempt to place these data in the context of human autoimmunity. PMID:23720323

  8. Biliary complications secondary to late hepatic artery thrombosis in adult liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Margarit, C; Hidalgo, E; Lázaro, J L; Murio, E; Charco, R; Balsells, J

    1998-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) are the usual presentation of late hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) of the liver graft. Our aim was to study the clinical features and outcome of BC secondary to HAT compared to BC which occurred in liver transplant (LT) patients with patent vessels. We present a retrospective study of 224 LTs performed in 204 patients between 1988 and 1996. The mean recipient x s age was 51 years. A choledochocholedochostomy without T-tube was used as biliary reconstruction in most cases (67%); in 12%, a choledochojejunostomy was performed. An iliac conduit was necessary in 15% of cases and back-table arterial reconstruction was performed in 10% of cases of anatomic variants in graft arteries. Different donor, recipient and intraoperative variables, as well as treatment and outcome. were studied in the two groups of patients presenting BC with or without HAT. BC occurred in 38 cases (17%) whereas HAT was diagnosed in 11 cases (4.9%). Therefore, 23% of BC encountered after LT were secondary to HAT. Nine cases of late HAT manifested as BC, septicaemia (88%) and hepatic bilomas (8 cases). Percutaneous or surgical drainage of hepatic bilomas was performed in all cases, followed by retransplantation in six cases (66%). BC secondary to HAT appeared later than the rest of BC. Donor age was the only significant predisposing factor found in our study. Graft survival is significantly reduced as most patients needed retransplantation. In conclusion, BC secondary to HAT presented later in livers from older donors in the form of biliary sepsis and hepatic biloma. Retransplantation was ultimately required in most cases and graft survival was significantly diminished.

  9. Contents of cesium, iodine, strontium, thorium, and uranium in selected human organs of adult asian population.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, G V; Kawamura, H; Dang, H S; Parr, R M; Wang, J W; Cho, S Y; Natera, E S

    2004-08-01

    Contents of cesium, iodine, strontium, thorium, and uranium in some selected human organs were estimated for adult Asian population using data obtained in four Asian countries: China, India, Philippines, and Republic of Korea, as part of a Coordinated Research Program of the International Atomic Energy Agency on "Ingestion and Organ contents of elements of importance in radiation protection." These countries together represent more than 40% of the world population. Highly sensitive analytical techniques were employed to measure cesium in skeletal muscle, iodine in thyroid, strontium in skeleton, thorium and uranium in skeleton, liver, kidneys, and lungs where, in comparison to other organs, these elements are present in higher concentrations. The organ contents for adult Asian population, when compared with the corresponding data proposed for Reference Man by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), showed about 40 times lower kidneys content and about 10 times lower skeleton content of uranium. The content of thorium in skeleton for Asian population was also half of the ICRP Reference Man value. Interestingly, organ contents for the other elements such as iodine in thyroid, cesium in skeletal muscle, and strontium in skeleton were comparable for Asian and the Caucasian population (represented by ICRP Reference Man). Organ contents for these elements were also calculated by applying the new ICRP models of these elements to their daily intakes. The comparison of the calculated and measured organ contents showed that despite uncertainties in the organ content values arising due to the inter-country variations in daily dietary intakes, the contents were within a factor of two to three. This observation is significant since human data both on organ contents and ingestion were obtained at environmental level of intakes. The study suggests that currently available ICRP models for these elements are quite realistic.

  10. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-05-23

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p < 0.0001). Human hepatic CXCR6+ NK had an immature phenotype (predominantly CD56(bright)CD16-CD57-), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6- fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity.

  11. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano; Alves da Silva, Ricardo Henrique

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects.

  12. The adult human pubic symphysis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Ines; Woodley, Stephanie J; Stringer, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    The pubic symphysis is a unique joint consisting of a fibrocartilaginous disc sandwiched between the articular surfaces of the pubic bones. It resists tensile, shearing and compressive forces and is capable of a small amount of movement under physiological conditions in most adults (up to 2 mm shift and 1° rotation). During pregnancy, circulating hormones such as relaxin induce resorption of the symphyseal margins and structural changes in the fibrocartilaginous disc, increasing symphyseal width and mobility. This systematic review of the English, German and French literature focuses on the normal anatomy of the adult human pubic symphysis. Although scientific studies of the joint have yielded useful descriptive data, comparison of results is hampered by imprecise methodology and/or poorly controlled studies. Several aspects of the anatomy of the pubic symphysis remain unknown or unclear: the precise attachments of surrounding ligaments and muscles; the arrangement of connective tissue fibres within the interpubic disc and the origin, structure and function of its associated interpubic cleft; the biomechanical consequences of sexual dimorphism; potential ethnic variations in morphology; and its precise innervation and blood supply. These deficiencies hinder our understanding of the normal form and function of the joint, which is particularly relevant when attempting to understand the mechanisms underlying pregnancy-related pubic symphyseal pain, a neglected and relatively common cause of pubic pain. A better understanding of the normal anatomy of the human pubic symphysis should improve our understanding of such problems and contribute to better treatments for patients suffering from symphyseal pain and dysfunction. PMID:20840351

  13. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano

    2016-01-01

    Absract The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects. PMID:27847394

  14. A novel splice variant of human gene NPL, mainly expressed in human liver, kidney and peripheral blood leukocyte.

    PubMed

    Wu, Maoqing; Gu, Shaohua; Xu, Jian; Zou, Xianqiong; Zheng, Huarui; Jin, Zhe; Xie, Yi; Ji, Chaoneng; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    From the human fetal brain cDNA library constructed by our lab, a novel variant cDNA of a human gene was successfully cloned and identified. Because the gene has been named N-acetylneuraminate pyruvate lyase (NPL), accordingly we term our splice variant NPL_v2. The cDNA of NPL_v2 has a full-length open reading frame (ORF) from the nucleotide position 320 to 1225 that encodes a protein comprising 301 amino acids. SMART analysis showed that our hypothetical protein has one dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) domain. Phosphorylation analysis of the deduced protein show that there are five phosphorylation sites including three "serine" and two "threonine" at the region that are not found in other splice variant. RT-PCR experiment revealed that our splice variant of the gene is mainly expressed in human placenta, liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen, thymus, ovary, small intestine and peripheral blood leukocyte.

  15. In vitro large scale production of human mature red blood cells from hematopoietic stem cells by coculturing with human fetal liver stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jiafei; Li, Yanhua; Wang, Ruoyong; Wang, Yunfang; Nan, Xue; He, Lijuan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Lin; Yue, Wen; Pei, Xuetao

    2013-01-01

    In vitro models of human erythropoiesis are useful in studying the mechanisms of erythroid differentiation in normal and pathological conditions. Here we describe an erythroid liquid culture system starting from cord blood derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs were cultured for more than 50 days in erythroid differentiation conditions and resulted in a more than 10(9)-fold expansion within 50 days under optimal conditions. Homogeneous erythroid cells were characterized by cell morphology, flow cytometry, and hematopoietic colony assays. Furthermore, terminal erythroid maturation was improved by cosculturing with human fetal liver stromal cells. Cocultured erythroid cells underwent multiple maturation events, including decrease in size, increase in glycophorin A expression, and nuclear condensation. This process resulted in extrusion of the pycnotic nuclei in up to 80% of the cells. Importantly, they possessed the capacity to express the adult definitive β -globin chain upon further maturation. We also show that the oxygen equilibrium curves of the cord blood-differentiated red blood cells (RBCs) are comparable to normal RBCs. The large number and purity of erythroid cells and RBCs produced from cord blood make this method useful for fundamental research in erythroid development, and they also provide a basis for future production of available RBCs for transfusion.

  16. Xmrk, Kras and Myc Transgenic Zebrafish Liver Cancer Models Share Molecular Signatures with Subsets of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weiling; Li, Zhen; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Li, Caixia; Emelyanov, Alexander; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Previously three oncogene transgenic zebrafish lines with inducible expression of xmrk, kras or Myc in the liver have been generated and these transgenic lines develop oncogene-addicted liver tumors upon chemical induction. In the current study, comparative transcriptomic approaches were used to examine the correlation of the three induced transgenic liver cancers with human liver cancers. RNA profiles from the three zebrafish tumors indicated relatively small overlaps of significantly deregulated genes and biological pathways. Nevertheless, the three transgenic tumor signatures all showed significant correlation with advanced or very advanced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interestingly, molecular signature from each oncogene-induced zebrafish liver tumor correlated with only a small subset of human HCC samples (24–29%) and there were conserved up-regulated pathways between the zebrafish and correlated human HCC subgroup. The three zebrafish liver cancer models together represented nearly half (47.2%) of human HCCs while some human HCCs showed significant correlation with more than one signature defined from the three oncogene-addicted zebrafish tumors. In contrast, commonly deregulated genes (21 up and 16 down) in the three zebrafish tumor models generally showed accordant deregulation in the majority of human HCCs, suggesting that these genes might be more consistently deregulated in a broad range of human HCCs with different molecular mechanisms and thus serve as common diagnosis markers and therapeutic targets. Thus, these transgenic zebrafish models with well-defined oncogene-induced tumors are valuable tools for molecular classification of human HCCs and for understanding of molecular drivers in hepatocarcinogenesis in each human HCC subgroup. PMID:24633177

  17. Featured Article: Isolation, characterization, and cultivation of human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Kegel, Victoria; Zeilinger, Katrin; Hengstler, Jan G; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are considered to be the gold standard for in vitro testing of xenobiotic metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, PHH cultivation in 2D mono-cultures leads to dedifferentiation and a loss of function. It is well known that hepatic non-parenchymal cells (NPC), such as Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), play a central role in the maintenance of PHH functions. The aims of the present study were to establish a protocol for the simultaneous isolation of human PHH and NPC from the same tissue specimen and to test their suitability for in vitro co-culture. Human PHH and NPC were isolated from tissue obtained by partial liver resection by a two-step EDTA/collagenase perfusion technique. The obtained cell fractions were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. KC, LEC, and HSC contained in the NPC fraction were separated using specific adherence properties and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS®). Identified NPC revealed a yield of 1.9 × 106 KC, 2.7 × 105 LEC and 4.7 × 105 HSC per gram liver tissue, showing viabilities >90%. Characterization of these NPC showed that all populations went through an activation process, which influenced the cell fate. The activation of KC strongly depended on the tissue quality and donor anamnesis. KC became activated in culture in association with a loss of viability within 4–5 days. LEC lost specific features during culture, while HSC went through a transformation process into myofibroblasts. The testing of different culture conditions for HSC demonstrated that they can attenuate, but not prevent dedifferentiation in vitro. In conclusion, the method described allows the isolation and separation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from the same donor. PMID:25394621

  18. Glucuronidation versus oxidation of the flavonoid galangin by human liver microsomes and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Otake, Yoko; Hsieh, Faye; Walle, Thomas

    2002-05-01

    In a previous study, we used human liver microsomes for the first time to study cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated oxidation of the flavonoid galangin. The combination of CYP1A2 and CYP2C9 produced a V(max)/K(m) value of 13.6 +/- 1.1 microl/min/mg of protein. In the present extended study, we determined glucuronidation rates for galangin with the same microsomes. Two major and one minor glucuronide were identified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The V(max)/K(m) values for the two major glucuronides conjugated in the 7- and 3-positions were 155 +/- 30 and 427 +/- 26 microl/min/mg of protein, thus, exceeding that of oxidation by 11 and 31 times, respectively. This highly efficient glucuronidation appeared to be catalyzed mainly by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A9 isoform but also by UGT1A1 and UGT2B15. Sulfation of galangin by the human liver cytosol, mediated mainly but not exclusively by sulfotransferase (SULT) 1A1, also appeared to be efficient. These conclusions were strongly supported by experiments using the S9 fraction of the human liver, in which all three metabolic pathways could be directly compared. When galangin metabolism was examined in fresh plated hepatocytes from six donors, glucuronidation clearly predominated followed by sulfation. Oxidation occurred only to a minor extent in two of the donors. This study for the first time establishes that glucuronidation and sulfation of galangin, and maybe other flavonoids, are more efficient than P450-mediated oxidation, clearly being the metabolic pathways of choice in intact cells and therefore likely also in vivo.

  19. Classification of Cholestatic and Necrotic Hepatotoxicants Using Transcriptomics on Human Precision-Cut Liver Slices.

    PubMed

    Vatakuti, Suresh; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Gore, Emilia; Olinga, Peter; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2016-03-21

    Human toxicity screening is an important stage in the development of safe drug candidates. Hepatotoxicity is one of the major reasons for the withdrawal of drugs from the market because the liver is the major organ involved in drug metabolism, and it can generate toxic metabolites. There is a need to screen molecules for drug-induced hepatotoxicity in humans at an earlier stage. Transcriptomics is a technique widely used to screen molecules for toxicity and to unravel toxicity mechanisms. To date, the majority of such studies were performed using animals or animal cells, with concomitant difficulty in interpretation due to species differences, or in human hepatoma cell lines or cultured hepatocytes, suffering from the lack of physiological expression of enzymes and transporters and lack of nonparenchymal cells. The aim of this study was to classify known hepatotoxicants on their phenotype of toxicity in humans using gene expression profiles ex vivo in human precision-cut liver slices (PCLS). Hepatotoxicants known to induce either necrosis (n = 5) or cholestasis (n = 5) were used at concentrations inducing low (<30%) and medium (30-50%) cytotoxicity, based on ATP content. Random forest and support vector machine algorithms were used to classify hepatotoxicants using a leave-one-compound-out cross-validation method. Optimized biomarker sets were compared to derive a consensus list of markers. Classification correctly predicted the toxicity phenotype with an accuracy of 70-80%. The classification is slightly better for the low than for the medium cytotoxicity. The consensus list of markers includes endoplasmic reticulum stress genes, such as C2ORF30, DNAJB9, DNAJC12, SRP72, TMED7, and UBA5, and a sodium/bile acid cotransporter (SLC10A7). This study shows that human PCLS are a useful model to predict the phenotype of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Additional compounds should be included to confirm the consensus list of markers, which could then be used to develop a

  20. Spontaneous dormancy of metastatic breast cancer cells in an all human liver microphysiologic system

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, S E; Clark, A M; Taylor, D P; Young, C L; Pillai, V C; Stolz, D B; Venkataramanan, R; Lauffenburger, D; Griffith, L; Wells, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metastatic outgrowth in breast cancer can occur years after a seeming cure. Existing model systems of dormancy are limited as they do not recapitulate human metastatic dormancy without exogenous manipulations and are unable to query early events of micrometastases. Methods: Here, we describe a human ex vivo hepatic microphysiologic system. The system is established with fresh human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) creating a microenvironment into which breast cancer cells (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) are added. Results: The hepatic tissue maintains function through 15 days as verified by liver-specific protein production and drug metabolism assays. The NPCs form an integral part of the hepatic niche, demonstrated within the system through their participation in differential signalling cascades and cancer cell outcomes. Breast cancer cells intercalate into the hepatic niche without interfering with hepatocyte function. Examination of cancer cells demonstrated that a significant subset enter a quiescent state of dormancy as shown by lack of cell cycling (EdU− or Ki67−). The presence of NPCs altered the cancer cell fraction entering quiescence, and lead to differential cytokine profiles in the microenvironment effluent. Conclusions: These findings establish the liver microphysiologic system as a relevant model for the study of breast cancer metastases and entry into dormancy. PMID:25314052

  1. Detection of anti-liver cell membrane antibody using a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo-Yeo, A.; McSorley, C.; McFarlane, B.M.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Mowat, A.P.; Vergani, D.

    1989-02-01

    A radioimmunometric technique for the detection of autoantibodies to liver membrane antigens has been developed using Alexander cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. After incubation of Alexander cells with serum, antimembrane antibodies were detected by addition of /sup 125/I-labeled Protein A. Binding ratios in 15 children with uncontrolled autoimmune chronic active hepatitis and in seven children with primary sclerosing cholangitis were significantly higher than in 18 age-matched normal controls. Nine patients with inactive autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, 13 with alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and five with fulminant hepatic failure had ratios similar to controls. In nine patients with Wilson's disease, there was a modest but significant increase in binding ratio. In four children with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, binding ratios fell during effective immunosuppressive therapy. Sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis gave normal results, excluding that binding derives from Fc-mediated immune complex capture. A positive correlation was found between Alexander cell binding values and anti-liver-specific protein antibody titers, suggesting that the two assays detect antibodies against shared antigenic determinants. The Alexander cell assay is a simple, rapid and sensitive technique to detect antibody to liver cell membrane antigens.

  2. Function of the liver and bile ducts in humans exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, A; Dziwisz, M; Ostałowska, A; Swietochowska, E; Birkner, E

    2013-08-01

    Lead is very common in the environment, and it is therefore important to characterize its possible adverse health effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of lead exposure on selected functions of the liver and bile ducts in people who are chronically exposed to the metal because of their occupations. To provide this information, the activity of specific enzymes and the bilirubin concentration were determined in blood serum, and morphological parameters of the liver and bile ducts were evaluated using the ultrasonic imaging method. Healthy male employees of a lead-zinc processing facility (n = 145) who were occupationally exposed to lead were divided into two subgroups as a function of the lead concentrations in blood (PbB): low lead exposure (PbB = 20-35 μg/dl; n = 57) and high lead exposure (PbB = 35-60 μg/dl; n = 88). Human exposure to lead compounds was found to cause liver enlargement and to activate inflammatory reactions with the characteristics of moderate cholestasis within the bile ducts, while no characteristics of necrotic damage of hepatic cells were noted. It seems that lipid peroxidation can be one of the toxic mechanisms of lead which induce moderate cholestasis. The effects depend on the extent of the lead exposure and were greater in subjects with higher exposure levels, particularly subjects with PbB values greater than 35 μg/dl.

  3. Pros and cons of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus infected recipients.

    PubMed

    Baccarani, Umberto; Righi, Elda; Adani, Gian Luigi; Lorenzin, Dario; Pasqualucci, Alberto; Bassetti, Matteo; Risaliti, Andrea

    2014-05-14

    Before the introduction of combined highly active antiretroviral therapy, a positive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serological status represented an absolute contraindication for solid organ transplant (SOT). The advent of highly effective combined antiretroviral therapy in 1996 largely contributed to the increased demand for SOT in HIV-positive individuals due to increased patients' life expectancy associated with the increasing prevalence of end-stage liver disease (ESLD). Nowadays, liver failure represents a frequent cause of mortality in the HIV-infected population mainly due to coinfection with hepatitis viruses sharing the same way of transmission. Thus, liver transplantation (LT) represents a reasonable approach in HIV patients with stable infection and ESLD. Available data presently supports with good evidence the practice of LT in the HIV-positive population. Thus, the issue is no longer "whether it is correct to transplant HIV-infected patients", but "who are the patients who can be safely transplanted" and "when is the best time to perform LT". Indeed, the benefits of LT in HIV-infected patients, especially in terms of mid- and long-term patient and graft survivals, are strictly related to the patients' selection and to the correct timing for transplantation, especially when hepatitis C virus coinfection is present. Aim of this article is to review the pros and cons of LT in the cohort of HIV infected recipients.

  4. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator in human liver is regulated by miR-24

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Yuki; Nakajima, Miki; Mohri, Takuya; Takamiya, Masataka; Aoki, Yasuhiro; Fukami, Tatsuki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) forms a heterodimer with aryl hydrocarbon receptor or hypoxia inducible factor 1α to mediate biological responses to xenobiotic exposure and hypoxia. Although the regulation mechanism of the ARNT expression is largely unknown, earlier studies reported that the human ARNT protein level was decreased by hydrogen peroxide or reactive oxygen species. These stimuli increase the miR-24 level in various human cell lines. In silico analysis predicts that some microRNAs including miR-16 and miR-23b may bind to ARNT mRNA. This background prompted us to investigate whether human ARNT is regulated by microRNAs. Overexpression of miR-24 into HuH-7 and HepG2 cells significantly decreased the ARNT protein level, but not the ARNT mRNA level, indicating translational repression. However, overexpression of miR-16 or miR-23b caused no change in the ARNT expression. The miR-24-dependent down-regulation of ARNT decreased the expression of its downstream genes such as CYP1A1 and carbonic anhydrase IX. Luciferase assay was performed to determine the element on the ARNT mRNA to which miR-24 binds. Finally, it was demonstrated that the miR-24 levels in a panel of 26 human livers were inversely correlated with the protein levels or the translational efficiency of ARNT. Taken together, we found that miR-24 negatively regulates ARNT expression in human liver, affecting the expression of its downstream genes. miR-24 would be one of the factors underlying the mechanisms by which ARNT protein is decreased by reactive oxygen species. -- Highlights: ► Overexpression of miR-24 into human cell lines decreased the ARNT protein level. ► miR-24-dependent down-regulation of ARNT affected the expression of CYP1A1 and CA IX. ► Luciferase assay was performed to identify functional MREs for miR-24 in ARNT mRNA. ► The miR-24 levels inversely correlated with the ARNT protein levels in human liver.

  5. Gene expression profiling and differentiation assessment in primary human hepatocyte cultures, established hepatoma cell lines, and human liver tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Olsavsky, Katy M.; Page, Jeanine L.; Johnson, Mary C.; Zarbl, Helmut; Strom, Stephen C.; Omiecinski, Curtis J. . E-mail: cjo10@psu.edu

    2007-07-01

    Frequently, primary hepatocytes are used as an in vitro model for the liver in vivo. However, the culture conditions reported vary considerably, with associated variability in performance. In this study, we characterized the differentiation character of primary human hepatocytes cultured using a highly defined, serum-free two-dimensional sandwich system, one that configures hepatocytes with collagen I as the substratum together with a dilute extracellular matrix (Matrigel{sup TM}) overlay combined with a defined serum-free medium containing nanomolar levels of dexamethasone. Gap junctional communication, indicated by immunochemical detection of connexin 32 protein, was markedly enhanced in hepatocytes cultured in the Matrigel sandwich configuration. Whole genome expression profiling enabled direct comparison of liver tissues to hepatocytes and to the hepatoma-derived cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7. PANTHER database analyses were used to identify biological processes that were comparatively over-represented among probe sets expressed in the in vitro systems. The robustness of the primary hepatocyte cultures was reflected by the extent of unchanged expression character when compared directly to liver, with more than 77% of the probe sets unchanged in each of the over-represented categories, representing such genes as C/EBP{alpha}, HNF4{alpha}, CYP2D6, and ABCB1. In contrast, HepG2 and Huh7 cells were unchanged from the liver tissues for fewer than 48% and 55% of these probe sets, respectively. Further, hierarchical clustering of the hepatocytes, but not the cell lines, shifted from donor-specific to treatment-specific when the probe sets were filtered to focus on phenobarbital-inducible genes, indicative of the highly differentiated nature of the hepatocytes when cultured in a highly defined two-dimensional sandwich system.

  6. Variation in dielectric properties due to pathological changes in human liver.

    PubMed

    Peyman, Azadeh; Kos, Bor; Djokić, Mihajlo; Trotovšek, Blaž; Limbaeck-Stokin, Clara; Serša, Gregor; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2015-12-01

    Dielectric properties of freshly excised human liver tissues (in vitro) with several pathological conditions including cancer were obtained in frequency range 100 MHz-5 GHz. Differences in dielectric behavior of normal and pathological tissues at microwave frequencies are discussed based on histological information for each tissue. Data presented are useful for many medical applications, in particular nanosecond pulsed electroporation techniques. Knowledge of dielectric properties is vital for mathematical calculations of local electric field distribution inside electroporated tissues and can be used to optimize the process of electroporation for treatment planning procedures.

  7. Potent inhibition of cytochrome P450 2B6 by sibutramine in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Hyeon; Kwon, Min Jo; Choi, Eu Jin; Zheng, Yu Fen; Yoon, Kee Dong; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2013-09-05

    The present study was performed to evaluate the potency and specificity of sibutramine as an inhibitor of the activities of nine human CYP isoforms in liver microsomes. Using a cocktail assay, the effects of sibutramine on specific marker reactions of the nine CYP isoforms were measured in human liver microsomes. Sibutramine showed potent inhibition of CYP2B6-mediated bupropion 6-hydroxylation with an IC50 value of 1.61μM and Ki value of 0.466μM in a competitive manner at microsomal protein concentrations of 0.25mg/ml; this was 3.49-fold more potent than the typical CYP2B6 inhibitor thio-TEPA (Ki=1.59μM). In addition, sibutramine slightly inhibited CYP2C19 activity (Ki=16.6μM, noncompetitive inhibition) and CYP2D6 activity (Ki=15.7μM, noncompetitive inhibition). These observations indicated 35.6- and 33.7-fold decreases in inhibition potency, respectively, compared with that of CYP2B6 by sibutramine. However, no inhibition of CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, or CYP2E1 activities was observed. In addition, the CYP2B6 inhibitory potential of sibutramine was enhanced at a lower microsomal protein concentration of 0.05mg/ml. After 30min preincubation of human liver microsomes with sibutramine in the presence of NADPH, no shift in IC50 was observed in terms of inhibition of the activities of the nine CYPs, suggesting that sibutramine is not a time-dependent inactivator. These observations suggest that sibutramine is a selective and potent inhibitor of CYP2B6 in vitro, whereas inhibition of other CYPs is substantially lower. These in vitro data support the use of sibutramine as a well-known inhibitor of CYP2B6 for routine screening of P450 reversible inhibition when human liver microsomes are used as the enzyme source.

  8. Phentermine inhibition of recombinant human liver monoamine oxidases A and B.

    PubMed

    Nandigama, Ravi K; Newton-Vinson, Paige; Edmondson, Dale E

    2002-03-01

    Recent studies with rat tissue preparations have suggested that the anorectic drug phentermine inhibits serotonin degradation by inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO) A with a K(I) value of 85-88 microM, a potency suggested to be similar to that of other reversible MAO inhibitors (Ulus et al., Biochem Pharmacol 2000;59:1611-21). Since there are known differences between rats and humans in substrate and inhibitor specificities of MAOs, the interactions of phentermine with recombinant human purified preparations of MAO A and MAO B were determined. Human MAO A was competitively inhibited by phentermine with a K(I) value of 498+/-60 microM, a value approximately 6-fold weaker than that observed for the rat enzyme. Phentermine was also observed to be a competitive inhibitor of recombinant human liver MAO B with a K(I) value of 375+/-42 microM, a value similar to that observed with the rat enzyme (310-416 microM). In contrast to the behavior with rat tissue preparations, no slow time-dependent behavior was observed for phentermine inhibition of purified soluble human MAO preparations. Difference absorption spectral studies showed similar perturbations of the covalent FAD moieties of both human MAO A and MAO B, which suggests a similar mode of binding in both enzymes. These data suggest that phentermine inhibition of human MAO A (or of MAO B) is too weak to be of pharmacological relevance.

  9. Differential TGFβ pathway targeting by miR-122 in humans and mice affects liver cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shenyi; Fan, Yu; Zhang, Hanshuo; Zhao, Zhihua; Hao, Yang; Li, Juan; Sun, Changhong; Yang, Junyu; Yang, Zhenjun; Yang, Xiao; Lu, Jian; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Downregulation of a predominantly hepatocyte-specific miR-122 is associated with human liver cancer metastasis, whereas miR-122-deficient mice display normal liver function. Here we show a functional conservation of miR-122 in the TGFβ pathway: miR-122 target site is present in the mouse but not human TGFβR1, whereas a noncanonical target site is present in the TGFβ1 5′UTR in humans and other primates. Experimental switch of the miR-122 target between the receptor TGFβR1 and the ligand TGFβ1 changes the metastatic properties of mouse and human liver cancer cells. High expression of TGFβ1 in human primary liver tumours is associated with poor survival. We identify over 50 other miRNAs orthogonally targeting ligand/receptor pairs in humans and mice, suggesting that these are evolutionarily common events. These results reveal an evolutionary mechanism for miRNA-mediated gene regulation underlying species-specific physiological or pathological phenotype and provide a potentially valuable strategy for treating liver-associated diseases. PMID:26987776

  10. The Effect of Body Mass on Outdoor Adult Human Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Spencer, Jessica R; Dabbs, Gretchen R

    2017-02-23

    Forensic taphonomy explores factors impacting human decomposition. This study investigated the effect of body mass on the rate and pattern of adult human decomposition. Nine males and three females aged 49-95 years ranging in mass from 73 to 159 kg who were donated to the Complex for Forensic Anthropology Research between December 2012 and September 2015 were included in this study. Kelvin accumulated degree days (KADD) were used to assess the thermal energy required for subjects to reach several total body score (TBS) thresholds: early decomposition (TBS ≥6.0), TBS ≥12.5, advanced decomposition (TBS ≥19.0), TBS ≥23.0, and skeletonization (TBS ≥27.0). Results indicate no significant correlation between body mass and KADD at any TBS threshold. Body mass accounted for up to 24.0% of variation in decomposition rate depending on stage, and minor differences in decomposition pattern were observed. Body mass likely has a minimal impact on postmortem interval estimation.

  11. Ossified Ligamentum Longitudinale Anterius in Adult Human Dry Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Venumadhav, Nelluri; KS, Siddaraju

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ligamentum longitudinale anterius is a broad and strong band of fibrous tissue that runs along the anterior surfaces of the bodies of the vertebrae. Aim: The study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius in adult dry human vertebra. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 95 sets of dry human vertebral columns irrespective of age and sex at Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences- Barabanki,-UP, Melaka Manipal Medical College-Manipal University and Department of Anatomy, KMCT Medical College, Manassery- Calicut, India. All the sets of vertebral columns were macroscopically inspected for the ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius. Results: It was observed that out of 95 sets of vertebral columns, 27 (28.42%) vertebral columns showed ossification. Out of 27 vertebral columns, 17 (17.89%) vertebral columns showed segmental type of ossification, 2 (2.11%) vertebral columns showed continuous type of ossification and 8 (8.42%) vertebral columns showed mixed type of ossification at different vertebral level. Conclusion: Such type of ossification will affect the biomechanics of the spine and may result in stiff neck, low back pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, compression of the brachial plexus, aphonia, immobility or mucosal thickening of larynx. Hence, knowledge of such abnormalities should be kept in mind to minimise serious complications in any surgical intervention or investigative procedures in the region. PMID:25302180

  12. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.

  13. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    DOE PAGES

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection.more » Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.« less

  14. Comprehensive cellular‐resolution atlas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Royall, Joshua J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A.C.; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet‐Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A.; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A.; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L.; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A.; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W.; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H. Ronald; Hohmann, John G.; Jones, Allan R.; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole‐brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high‐resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion‐weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large‐format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto‐ and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127–3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27418273

  15. Quantitative MR Imaging of Hepatic Steatosis: Validation in Ex Vivo Human Livers

    PubMed Central

    Bannas, Peter; Kramer, Harald; Hernando, Diego; Agni, Rashmi; Cunningham, Ashley M.; Mandal, Rakesh; Motosugi, Utaroh; Sharma, Samir D.; del Rio, Alejandro Munoz; Fernandez, Luis; Reeder, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers of hepatic steatosis have demonstrated tremendous promise for accurate quantification of hepatic triglyceride concentration. These methods quantify the “proton density fat-fraction” (PDFF), which reflects the concentration of triglycerides in tissue. Previous in vivo studies have compared MRI-PDFF with histologic steatosis grading for assessment of hepatic steatosis. However, the correlation of MRI-PDFF with the underlying hepatic triglyceride content remained unknown. The aim of this ex vivo study was to validate the accuracy of MRI-PDFF as an imaging biomarker of hepatic steatosis. Using ex vivo human livers, we compared MRI-PDFF with magnetic resonance spectroscopy-PDFF (MRS-PDFF), biochemical triglyceride extraction and histology as three independent reference standards. A secondary aim was to compare the precision of MRI-PDFF relative to biopsy for the quantification of hepatic steatosis. MRI-PDFF was prospectively performed at 1.5T in 13 explanted human livers. We performed co-localized paired evaluation of liver fat content in all nine Couinaud segments using single-voxel MRS-PDFF (n=117), tissue wedges for biochemical triglyceride extraction (n=117), and five core biopsies performed in each segment for histologic grading (n=585). Accuracy of MRI-PDFF was assessed through linear regression with MRS-PDFF, triglyceride extraction and histology. Intra-observer agreement, inter-observer agreement and repeatability of MRI-PDFF and histologic grading were assessed through Bland-Altman analyses. MRI-PDFF showed an excellent correlation with MRS-PDFF (r=0.984; CI: 0.978–0.989) and strong correlation with histology (r=0.850; CI: 0.791–0.894) and triglyceride extraction (r=0.871; CI: 0.818–0.909). Intra-observer agreement, inter-observer agreement and repeatability showed a significantly smaller variance for MRI-PDFF than for histologic steatosis grading (all p<0.001). Conclusion MRI-PDFF is an accurate

  16. Challenging small human hepatocytes with opiates: further characterization of a novel prototype bioartificial liver.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Martin; Woess, Claudia; Libiseller, Kathrin; Beer, Beate; Pavlic, Marion

    2010-03-01

    Bioartificial liver (BAL) systems can take over liver functions in patients undergoing liver failure until transplantation. Recently, a novel prototype rotary BAL has been developed using small human hepatocytes (SH). This study investigated the metabolism of opiates morphine and methadone in the BAL and their influence on the basic cell culture parameters, viability, and growth of SH. Opiates may be present in patients due to pain therapy, anticancer treatment, or drug abuse. Cells were cultivated in the BAL for a total of 12 days and exposed twice to 100 microg/L of morphine or methadone. Morphine and methadone concentrations were analyzed using gas chromatography with a mass spectrometry detector. Further, the production of albumin, lactate dehydrogenase release, lactate release, urea production, and glucose consumption were measured. Cell viability and growth were determined by confocal microscopy. Cytochrome P 3A4 and uridindiphosphat (UDP) glucuronosyl transferase 2B7 in SH were analyzed by western blot. The mean cell density during treatment was 5.5 +/- 0.7 x 10(6) cells/mL (n = 6) and was not altered significantly by the opiates. Cell viability stayed above 90%. Morphine was not reduced by SH and was a stress factor as determined by decreased metabolic activity. On the other hand, SH metabolized methadone showing first-order kinetics: the first-order rate constant k = 0,019, half-life t(1/2) = 36 h. Methadone metabolism led to decreased urea and albumin production. The expression of cytochrome P 3A4, mainly responsible for methadone metabolism, was proved in SH. The prototype BAL is basically suited to support liver functions, provided patients receive therapy with methadone.

  17. Measurement of liver iron overload by magnetic induction using a planar gradiometer: preliminary human results.

    PubMed

    Casañas, R; Scharfetter, H; Altes, A; Remacha, A; Sarda, P; Sierra, J; Merwa, R; Hollaus, K; Rosell, J

    2004-02-01

    The measurement of hepatic iron overload is of particular interest in cases of hereditary hemochromatosis or in patients subject to periodic blood transfusion. The measurement of plasma ferritin provides an indirect estimate but the usefulness of this method is limited by many common clinical conditions (inflammation, infection, etc). Liver biopsy provides the most quantitative direct measurement of iron content in the liver but the risk of the procedure limits its acceptability. This work studies the feasibility of a magnetic induction (MI) low-cost system to measure liver iron overload. The excitation magnetic field (B0, frequency: 28 kHz) was produced by a coil, the perturbation produced by the object (deltaB) was detected using a planar gradiometer. We measured ten patients and seven volunteers in supine and prone positions. Each subject was moved in a plane parallel to the gradiometer several times to estimate measurement repeatability. The real and imaginary parts of deltaB/B0 were measured. Plastic tanks filled with water, saline and ferric solutions were measured for calibration purposes. We used a finite element model to evaluate the experimental results. To estimate the iron content we used the ratio between the maximum values for real and imaginary parts of deltaB/B0 and the area formed by the Nyquist plot divided by the maximum imaginary part. Measurements in humans showed that the contribution of the permittivity is stronger than the contribution of the permeability produced by iron stores in the liver. Defined iron estimators show a limited correlation with expected iron content in patients (R < or = 0.56). A more precise control of geometry and position of the subjects and measurements at multiple frequencies would improve the method.

  18. Andrographolide induces autophagic cell death in human liver cancer cells through cyclophilin D-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Lina; Nie, Hao; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2012-11-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide and about half of the patients with liver cancer require adjuvant therapy after surgical resection. Therefore, development of novel agents to eradicate cancer cells may constitute a viable approach to treat patients with liver cancer. Andrographolide, a diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata, is known to possess potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of andrographolide on human liver cancer cells and explored the cell death mechanism. Andrographolide induced a cell death distinct from apoptosis in multiple human liver cancer cells. The death was characterized by autophagy as evidenced by the accumulation of LC3 II and autophagosomes, and the formation of puncta GFP-LC3. This autophagy as well as cytotoxicity caused by andrographolide could be effectively prevented by 3-methyladenine (a chemical inhibitor of autophagy). Mechanistic study indicated that andrographolide induced autophagic cell death by disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and elevation of reactive oxygen species, which were correlated with mitochondrial permeability transition pore Inhibition of cyclophilin D (a component of MPTP) by cyclosporin A or abrogation of its expression by small interfering RNA significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity of andrographolide, suggesting that cyclophilin D may play an important role in mediating andrographolide-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, our findings unveil a novel mechanism of drug action by andrographolide in liver cancer cells and suggest that andrographolide may represent a promising novel agent in the treatment of liver cancer.

  19. Therapeutic Efficacy of Human Hepatocyte Transplantation in a SCID/uPA Mouse Model with Inducible Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Donna N.; Kawahara, Toshiyasu; Sis, Banu; Bond, David; Fischer, Karl P.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J.; Lewis, Jamie T.; Kneteman, Norman M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Severe Combined Immune Deficient (SCID)/Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator (uPA) mice undergo liver failure and are useful hosts for the propagation of transplanted human hepatocytes (HH) which must compete with recipient-derived hepatocytes for replacement of the diseased liver parenchyma. While partial replacement by HH has proven useful for studies with Hepatitis C virus, complete replacement of SCID/uPA mouse liver by HH has never been achieved and limits the broader application of these mice for other areas of biomedical research. The herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system is a powerful tool for cell-specific ablation in transgenic animals. The aim of this study was to selectively eliminate murine-derived parenchymal liver cells from humanized SCID/uPA mouse liver in order to achieve mice with completely humanized liver parenchyma. Thus, we reproduced the HSVtk (vTK)/GCV system of hepatic failure in SCID/uPA mice. Methodology/Principal Findings In vitro experiments demonstrated efficient killing of vTK expressing hepatoma cells after GCV treatment. For in vivo experiments, expression of vTK was targeted to the livers of FVB/N and SCID/uPA mice. Hepatic sensitivity to GCV was first established in FVB/N mice since these mice do not undergo liver failure inherent to SCID/uPA mice. Hepatic vTK expression was found to be an integral component of GCV-induced pathologic and biochemical alterations and caused death due to liver dysfunction in vTK transgenic FVB/N and non-transplanted SCID/uPA mice. In SCID/uPA mice with humanized liver, vTK/GCV caused death despite extensive replacement of the mouse liver parenchyma with HH (ranging from 32–87%). Surprisingly, vTK/GCV-dependent apoptosis and mitochondrial aberrations were also localized to bystander vTK-negative HH. Conclusions/Significance Extensive replacement of mouse liver parenchyma by HH does not provide a secure therapeutic advantage against v

  20. Kinetics of tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP) metabolism in human liver microsomes and serum.

    PubMed

    Van den Eede, Nele; Tomy, Gregg; Tao, Fang; Halldorson, Thor; Harrad, Stuart; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP) is an emerging contaminant which is ubiquitous in the indoor and outdoor environment. Moreover, its presence in human body fluids and biota has been evidenced. Since no quantitative data exist on the biotransformation or stability of TCIPP in the human body, we performed an in vitro incubation of TCIPP with human liver microsomes (HLM) and human serum (HS). Two metabolites, namely bis(2-chloro-isopropyl) phosphate (BCIPP) and bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) 1-hydroxy-2-propyl phosphate (BCIPHIPP), were quantified in a kinetic study using HLM or HS (only BCIPP, the hydrolysis product) and LC-MS. The Michaelis-Menten model fitted best the NADPH-dependent formation of BCIPHIPP and BCIPP in HLM, with respective V(MAX) of 154 ± 4 and 1470 ± 110 pmol/min/mg protein and respective apparent K(m) of 80.2 ± 4.4 and 96.1 ± 14.5 μM. Hydrolases, which are naturally present in HLM, were also involved in the production of BCIPP. A HS paraoxonase assay could not detect any BCIPP formation above 38.6 ± 10.8 pmol/min/μL serum. Our data indicate that BCIPP is the major metabolite of TCIPP formed in the liver. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative assessment of the stability of TCIPP in tissues of humans or any other species. Further research is needed to confirm whether these biotransformation reactions are associated with a decrease or increase in toxicity.

  1. Liver transplantation☆

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M.; Mennini, G.; Lai, Q.; Ginanni Corradini, S.; Drudi, F.M.; Pugliese, F.; Berloco, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) involves the substitution of a diseased native liver with a normal liver (or part of one) taken from a deceased or living donor. Considered an experimental procedure through the 1980s, OLT is now regarded as the treatment of choice for a number of otherwise irreversible forms of acute and chronic liver disease. The first human liver transplantation was performed in the United States in 1963 by Prof. T.E. Starzl of the University of Colorado. The first OLT to be performed in Italy was done in 1982 by Prof. R. Cortesini. The procedure was successfully performed at the Policlinico Umberto I of the University of Rome (La Sapienza). The paper reports the indications for liver transplantation, donor selection and organ allocation in our experience, surgical technique, immunosuppression, complications and results of liver transplantation in our center. PMID:23396075

  2. Human plasma concentrations of herbicidal carbamate molinate extrapolated from the pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masanao; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Nishiyama, Sayako; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    To predict concentrations in humans of the herbicidal carbamate molinate, used exclusively in rice cultivation, a forward dosimetry approach was carried out using data from lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses orally administered to rats, wild type mice, and chimeric mice with humanized liver and from in vitro human and rodent experiments. Human liver microsomes preferentially mediated hydroxylation of molinate, but rat livers additionally produced molinate sulfoxide and an unidentified metabolite. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents for molinate and its primary sulfoxide from animal studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and human metabolic data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The slower disposition of molinate and accumulation of molinate sulfoxide in humans were estimated by modeling after single and multiple doses compared with elimination in rodents. The results from simplified PBPK modeling in combination with chimeric mice with humanized liver suggest that ratios of estimated parameters of molinate sulfoxide exposure in humans to those in rats were three times as many as general safety factor of 10 for species difference in toxicokinetics. Thus, careful regulatory decision is needed when evaluating the human risk resulting from exposure to low doses of molinate and related carbamates based on data obtained from rats.

  3. Prevalence and factors associated with the presence of non alcoholic fatty liver disease in an apparently healthy adult population in primary care units

    PubMed Central

    Caballería, Llorenç; Auladell, Ma Antonia; Torán, Pere; Miranda, Dolores; Aznar, Jesús; Pera, Guillem; Gil, Dolors; Muñoz, Laura; Planas, Jaume; Canut, Santiago; Bernad, Jesús; Aubà, Josep; Pizarro, Gregorio; Aizpurua, Miren Maite; Altaba, Anna; Tibau, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Background Fatty liver disease is characterized by the accumulation of fat vacuoles inside of the hepatocytes. Non alcoholic fatty liver is associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipemia, the intake of certain drugs and with the so-called metabolic syndrome. However, there is little information on the clinical relevance of this disorder as a healthcare problem in the general population, since the studies published generally include a limited number of patients and the diagnosis is established on the basis of clear biochemical alterations and liver biopsy. Methods/Design The aim of the study is the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in a general adult population by hepatic ultrasonography. A population-based, descriptive, transversal, multicentre study. Eighteen primary care centres of the north of Barcelona and the Maresme Areas of Healthcare Management attending an urban and semi-urban population of 360.000 inhabitants. A randomized sample of 786 subjects of 15 years or older were selected from the population and assigned to the participating centres according to the Primary Care Information System (SIAP): This population is practically the same as the general population of the area. The following determinations will be carried out in all the participants: hepatic ultrasonography to detect fatty liver, a questionnaire concerning liver diseases, alcohol intake, smoking and drug use, physical examination including abdominal perimeter and body mass index and biochemical analysis including liver function tests and parameters related to the metabolic syndrome and the HAIR score. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of fatty liver will be made according to established criteria (American Gastroenterology Association) and diagnosis of metabolic syndrome according to the criteria of the European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance. Discussion This study