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  1. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-12-04

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1(HIGH) cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1(HIGH) cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions.

  2. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1HIGH cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1HIGH cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions. PMID:26634814

  3. The ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord differs from other species and shows ependymoma-like features.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Florensa-Vila, José; Ferrer, Isidro; Grassner, Lukas; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    Several laboratories have described the existence of undifferentiated precursor cells that may act like stem cells in the ependyma of the rodent spinal cord. However, there are reports showing that this region is occluded and disassembled in humans after the second decade of life, although this has been largely ignored or interpreted as a post-mortem artefact. To gain insight into the patency, actual structure, and molecular properties of the adult human spinal cord ependymal region, we followed three approaches: (i) with MRI, we estimated the central canal patency in 59 control subjects, 99 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, and 26 patients with non-traumatic spinal cord injuries. We observed that the central canal is absent from the vast majority of individuals beyond the age of 18 years, gender-independently, throughout the entire length of the spinal cord, both in healthy controls and after injury; (ii) with histology and immunohistochemistry, we describe morphological properties of the non-lesioned ependymal region, which showed the presence of perivascular pseudorosettes, a common feature of ependymoma; and (iii) with laser capture microdissection, followed by TaqMan® low density arrays, we studied the gene expression profile of the ependymal region and found that it is mainly enriched in genes compatible with a low grade or quiescent ependymoma (53 genes); this region is enriched only in 14 genes related to neurogenic niches. In summary, we demonstrate here that the central canal is mainly absent in the adult human spinal cord and is replaced by a structure morphologically and molecularly different from that described for rodents and other primates. The presented data suggest that the ependymal region is more likely to be reminiscent of a low-grade ependymoma. Therefore, a direct translation to adult human patients of an eventual therapeutic potential of this region based on animal models should be approached with caution. PMID:25882650

  4. The ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord differs from other species and shows ependymoma-like features.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Florensa-Vila, José; Ferrer, Isidro; Grassner, Lukas; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    Several laboratories have described the existence of undifferentiated precursor cells that may act like stem cells in the ependyma of the rodent spinal cord. However, there are reports showing that this region is occluded and disassembled in humans after the second decade of life, although this has been largely ignored or interpreted as a post-mortem artefact. To gain insight into the patency, actual structure, and molecular properties of the adult human spinal cord ependymal region, we followed three approaches: (i) with MRI, we estimated the central canal patency in 59 control subjects, 99 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, and 26 patients with non-traumatic spinal cord injuries. We observed that the central canal is absent from the vast majority of individuals beyond the age of 18 years, gender-independently, throughout the entire length of the spinal cord, both in healthy controls and after injury; (ii) with histology and immunohistochemistry, we describe morphological properties of the non-lesioned ependymal region, which showed the presence of perivascular pseudorosettes, a common feature of ependymoma; and (iii) with laser capture microdissection, followed by TaqMan® low density arrays, we studied the gene expression profile of the ependymal region and found that it is mainly enriched in genes compatible with a low grade or quiescent ependymoma (53 genes); this region is enriched only in 14 genes related to neurogenic niches. In summary, we demonstrate here that the central canal is mainly absent in the adult human spinal cord and is replaced by a structure morphologically and molecularly different from that described for rodents and other primates. The presented data suggest that the ependymal region is more likely to be reminiscent of a low-grade ependymoma. Therefore, a direct translation to adult human patients of an eventual therapeutic potential of this region based on animal models should be approached with caution.

  5. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults Download Printable ... the topics below to get started. What Is Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults? What are adult brain ...

  6. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, V.; Kaila, R.; Wilson, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the safety and efficacy of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) compared with bone graft when used specifically for revision spinal fusion surgery secondary to pseudarthrosis. Methods The MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases were searched using defined search terms. The primary outcome measure was spinal fusion, assessed as success or failure in accordance with radiograph, MRI or CT scan review at 24-month follow-up. The secondary outcome measure was time to fusion. Results A total of six studies (three prospective and three retrospective) reporting on the use of BMP2 met the inclusion criteria (203 patients). Of these, four provided a comparison of BMP2 and bone graft whereas the other two solely investigated the use of BMP2. The primary outcome was seen in 92.3% (108/117) of patients following surgery with BMP2. Although none of the studies showed superiority of BMP2 to bone graft for fusion, its use was associated with a statistically quicker time to achieving fusion. BMP2 did not appear to increase the risk of complication. Conclusion The use of BMP2 is both safe and effective within the revision setting, ideally in cases where bone graft is unavailable or undesirable. Further research is required to define its optimum role. Cite this article: Mr P. Bodalia. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:145–152. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000418. PMID:27121215

  7. Classification of neurons by dendritic branching pattern. A categorisation based on Golgi impregnation of spinal and cranial somatic and visceral afferent and efferent cells in the adult human.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Maguid, T E; Bowsher, D

    1984-06-01

    Neurons from adult human brainstem and spinal cord, fixed by immersion in formalin, were impregnated by a Golgi method and examined in sections 100 micron thick. Objective numerical criteria were used to classify completely impregnated neurons. Only the parameters mentioned below were found to be valid. Neurons in 100 micron sections were classified on the basis of (i) the primary dendrite number, indicated by a Roman numeral and called group; (ii) the dendritic branching pattern, comprising the highest branching order seen, indicated by an Arabic numeral and called category; the lowest dendritic branching order observed in complete neurons, indicated by an upper case letter and called class; and the number of branching orders seen between the two preceding, indicated by a lower case letter and called subclass. On the basis of the above characteristics, all neurons seen in the grey matter of the spinal cord and cranial nerve nuclei could be classified into thirteen 'families'. The results of other investigations (Abdel-Maguid & Bowsher, 1979, 1984) showed that this classification has functional value. PMID:6204961

  8. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes. PMID:27250041

  9. Current Status of Adult Spinal Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, J. A.; Orndorff, D. O.; Patty, C. A.; Scott, M. A.; Price, H. L.; Hamlin, L. F.; Williams, T. L.; Uribe, J. S.; Deviren, V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To review the current literature for the nonoperative and operative treatment for adult spinal deformity. Recent Findings With more than 11 million baby boomers joining the population of over 60 years of age in the United States, the incidence of lumbar deformity is greatly increasing. Recent literature suggests that a lack of evidence exists to support the effectiveness of nonoperative treatment for adult scoliosis. In regards to operative treatment, current literature reports a varying range of improved clinical outcomes, curve correction, and complication rates. The extension of fusion to S1 compared with L5 and lower thoracic levels compared with L1 remains a highly controversial topic among literature. Summary Most adult deformity patients never seek nonoperative or operative treatment. Of the few that seek treatment, many can benefit from nonoperative treatment. However, in selected patients who have failed nonoperative treatment and who are candidates for surgical intervention, the literature reflects positive outcomes related to surgical intervention as compared with nonoperative treatment despite varying associated ranges in morbidity and mortality rates. If nonoperative therapy fails in addressing a patient's complaints, then an appropriate surgical procedure that relieves neural compression, corrects excessive sagittal or coronal imbalance, and results in a solidly fused, pain-free spine is warranted. PMID:24436852

  10. Decision Making Algorithm for Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongjung J.; Cheh, Gene; Cho, Samuel K.; Rhim, Seung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Adult spinal deformity (ASD) is one of the most challenging spinal disorders associated with broad range of clinical and radiological presentation. Correct selection of fusion levels in surgical planning for the management of adult spinal deformity is a complex task. Several classification systems and algorithms exist to assist surgeons in determining the appropriate levels to be instrumented. In this study, we describe our new simple decision making algorithm and selection of fusion level for ASD surgery in terms of adult idiopathic idiopathic scoliosis vs. degenerative scoliosis. PMID:27446511

  11. Complications after spinal anesthesia in adult tethered cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Jie; Guan, Zheng; Gao, Zhen; Xiang, Li; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Sheng-Li

    2016-07-01

    Since little has been reported about complications of spinal anesthesia in adult tethered cord syndrome (TCS), we sought to delineate the characteristics of the condition.A total of 4 cases of adult TCS after spinal anesthesia were reviewed. The medical charts of the patients were obtained. Anesthesia, which was combined spinal and epidural anesthesia or spinal anesthesia was performed, and follow-up were carried out in all patients.The most common neurological symptom of adult TCS before surgery was occasional severe pain in back, perineal region, or legs. Frequent micturition, diminished knee and ankle reflexes, and difficulty in bending were exhibited in partial patients. Paraesthesia of perineal region or/and lower extremities existed 2 to 3 days after spinal anesthesia in all the cases. Weakness of lower extremities existed in 1 case. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed the low location of conus medullaris. At follow-up, 3 cases recovered completely within 3 weeks, and 1 case underwent permanent disability.These cases suggest anesthesiologists and surgeons alert to the association of adult TCS and spinal anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia should be prohibited in patients with adult TCS to prevent neurological damages. PMID:27442670

  12. Effects of Rolipram on Adult Rat Oligodendrocytes and Functional Recovery after Contusive Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Eric; Whitaker, Christopher M.; Burke, Darlene A.; Hetman, Michal; Onifer, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic human spinal cord injury causes devastating and long-term hardships. These are due to the irreparable primary mechanical injury and secondary injury cascade. In particular, oligodendrocyte cell death, white matter axon damage, spared axon demyelination, and the ensuing dysfunction in action potential conduction lead to the initial deficits and impair functional recovery. For these reasons, and that oligodendrocyte and axon survival may be related, various neuroprotective strategies after SCI are being investigated. We previously demonstrated that oligodendrocytes in the adult rat epicenter ventrolateral funiculus express 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent phosphodiesterase 4 subtypes and that their death was attenuated up to 3 days after contusive cervical spinal cord injury when rolipram, a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4, was administered. Here, we report that 1) there are more oligodendrocyte somata in the adult rat epicenter ventrolateral funiculus, 2) descending and ascending axonal conductivity in the ventrolateral funiculus improves, and that 3) there are fewer hindlimb footfall errors during grid-walking at 5 weeks after contusive cervical spinal cord injury when rolipram is delivered for 2 weeks. This is the first demonstration of improved descending and ascending long-tract axonal conductivity across a spinal cord injury with this pharmacological approach. Since descending long-tract axonal conductivity did not return to normal, further evaluations of the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic window of rolipram as well as optimal combinations are necessary before consideration for neuroprotection in humans with spinal cord injury. PMID:19635528

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation and characterization from human spinal ligaments.

    PubMed

    Asari, Toru; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi; Tanaka, Sunao; Kudo, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Hiroki; Ono, Atsushi; Numasawa, Takuya; Kumagai, Gentaro; Motomura, Shigeru; Yagihashi, Soroku; Toh, Satoshi

    2012-01-27

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a fibroblast-like morphology, multilineage potential, long-term viability and capacity for self-renewal. While several articles describe isolating MSCs from various human tissues, there are no reports of isolating MSCs from human spinal ligaments, and their localization in situ. If MSCs are found in human spinal ligaments, they could be used to investigate hypertrophy or ossification of spinal ligaments. To isolate and characterize MSCs from human spinal ligaments, spinal ligaments were harvested aseptically from eight patients during surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. After collagenase digestion, nucleated cells were seeded at an appropriate density to avoid colony-to-colony contact. Cells were cultured in osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic media to evaluate their multilineage differentiation potential. Immunophenotypic analysis of cell surface markers was performed by flow cytometry. Spinal ligaments were processed for immunostaining using MSC-related antibodies. Cells from human spinal ligaments could be extensively expanded with limited senescence. They were able to differentiate into osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic cells. Flow cytometry revealed that their phenotypic characteristics met the minimum criteria of MSCs. Immunohistochemistry revealed the localization of CD90-positive cells in the collagenous matrix of the ligament, and in adjacent small blood vessels. We isolated and expanded MSCs from human spinal ligaments and demonstrated localization of MSCs in spinal ligaments. These cells may play an indispensable role in elucidating the pathogenesis of numerous spinal diseases.

  14. Coping and adaptation in adults living with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Barone, Stacey Hoffman; Waters, Katherine

    2012-10-01

    Biopsychosocial adaptation remains a multifaceted challenge for individuals with spinal cord injury, their families, and healthcare providers alike. The development of frequent medical complications necessitating healthcare interventions is an ongoing, debilitating, and costly problem for those living with spinal cord injuries. Although several demographic variables have been correlated with positive adaptation in individuals with spinal cord injury, the research outcome data present limitations in understanding and facilitating which coping techniques work best to augment biopsychosocial adaptation in this population. Coping facilitates adaptation and adjustment to stress and can help to increase quality of life in people living with spinal cord injury and reduce common complications. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which sociodemographic characteristics and hardiness explain coping in 243 adults living with a spinal cord injury. In addition, this study examined which predictors of coping explain biopsychosocial adaptation. A descriptive explanatory design was utilized. Standardized instruments were administered nationally to assess hardiness, coping, and physiological and psychosocial adaptation. Canonical correlation and multiple regression analyses indicated that less educated, less hardy, and recently injured participants were more likely to use escape-avoidance coping and less likely to use social support, problem solving, and positive reappraisal coping behaviors (p < .05). Individuals with paraplegia had a higher level of functional ability, spent less time in rehabilitation, had a greater sense of control, and experienced less frequent complications. The control dimension of hardiness was the only dimension that significantly related to biopsychosocial adaptation within this sample.

  15. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  16. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  17. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs

    PubMed Central

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  18. Wnt/β-catenin signaling promotes regeneration after adult zebrafish spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Strand, Nicholas S; Hoi, Kimberly K; Phan, Tien M T; Ray, Catherine A; Berndt, Jason D; Moon, Randall T

    2016-09-01

    Unlike mammals, zebrafish can regenerate their injured spinal cord and regain control of caudal tissues. It was recently shown that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for spinal cord regeneration in the larval zebrafish. However, the molecular mechanisms of regeneration may or may not be conserved between larval and adult zebrafish. To test this, we assessed the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling after spinal cord injury in the adult zebrafish. We show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is increased after spinal cord injury in the adult zebrafish. Moreover, overexpression of Dkk1b inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the regenerating spinal cord of adult zebrafish. Dkk1b overexpression also inhibited locomotor recovery, axon regeneration, and glial bridge formation in the injured spinal cord. Thus, our data illustrate a conserved role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in adult and larval zebrafish spinal cord regeneration.

  19. Human Evolution and Osteoporosis-Related Spinal Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Meghan M.; Loomis, David A.; Simpson, Scott W.; Latimer, Bruce; Hernandez, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The field of evolutionary medicine examines the possibility that some diseases are the result of trade-offs made in human evolution. Spinal fractures are the most common osteoporosis-related fracture in humans, but are not observed in apes, even in cases of severe osteopenia. In humans, the development of osteoporosis is influenced by peak bone mass and strength in early adulthood as well as age-related bone loss. Here, we examine the structural differences in the vertebral bodies (the portion of the vertebra most commonly involved in osteoporosis-related fractures) between humans and apes before age-related bone loss occurs. Vertebrae from young adult humans and chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and gibbons (T8 vertebrae, n = 8–14 per species, male and female, humans: 20–40 years of age) were examined to determine bone strength (using finite element models), bone morphology (external shape), and trabecular microarchitecture (micro-computed tomography). The vertebrae of young adult humans are not as strong as those from apes after accounting for body mass (p<0.01). Human vertebrae are larger in size (volume, cross-sectional area, height) than in apes with a similar body mass. Young adult human vertebrae have significantly lower trabecular bone volume fraction (0.26±0.04 in humans and 0.37±0.07 in apes, mean ± SD, p<0.01) and thinner vertebral shells than apes (after accounting for body mass, p<0.01). Since human vertebrae are more porous and weaker than those in apes in young adulthood (after accounting for bone mass), even modest amounts of age-related bone loss may lead to vertebral fracture in humans, while in apes, larger amounts of bone loss would be required before a vertebral fracture becomes likely. We present arguments that differences in vertebral bone size and shape associated with reduced bone strength in humans is linked to evolutionary adaptations associated with bipedalism. PMID:22028933

  20. Spinal Cord Stimulation and Augmentative Control Strategies for Leg Movement after Spinal Paralysis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Karen; Hofstoetter, Ursula S

    2016-04-01

    Severe spinal cord injury is a devastating condition, tearing apart long white matter tracts and causing paralysis and disability of body functions below the lesion. But caudal to most injuries, the majority of neurons forming the distributed propriospinal system, the localized gray matter spinal interneuronal circuitry, and spinal motoneuron populations are spared. Epidural spinal cord stimulation can gain access to this neural circuitry. This review focuses on the capability of the human lumbar spinal cord to generate stereotyped motor output underlying standing and stepping, as well as full weight-bearing standing and rhythmic muscle activation during assisted treadmill stepping in paralyzed individuals in response to spinal cord stimulation. By enhancing the excitability state of the spinal circuitry, the stimulation can have an enabling effect upon otherwise "silent" translesional volitional motor control. Strategies for achieving functional movement in patients with severe injuries based on minimal translesional intentional control, task-specific proprioceptive feedback, and next-generation spinal cord stimulation systems will be reviewed. The role of spinal cord stimulation can go well beyond the immediate generation of motor output. With recently developed training paradigms, it can become a major rehabilitation approach in spinal cord injury for augmenting and steering trans- and sublesional plasticity for lasting therapeutic benefits.

  1. Neurocontrol of Movement in Humans With Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, Milan R; Danner, Simon M; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    In this review of neurocontrol of movement after spinal cord injury, we discuss neurophysiological evidences of conducting and processing mechanisms of the spinal cord. We illustrate that external afferent inputs to the spinal cord below the level of the lesion can modify, initiate, and maintain execution of movement in absence or partial presence of brain motor control after chronic spinal cord injury. We review significant differences between spinal reflex activity elicited by single and repetitive stimulation. The spinal cord can respond with sensitization, habituation, and dis-habituation to regular repetitive stimulation. Therefore, repetitive spinal cord reflex activity can contribute to the functional configuration of the spinal network. Moreover, testing spinal reflex activity in individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury provided evidences for subclinical residual brain influence, suggesting the existence of axons traversing the injury site and influencing the activities below the level of lesion. Thus, there are two motor control models of chronic spinal cord injury in humans: "discomplete" and "reduced and altered volitional motor control." We outline accomplishments in modification and initiation of altered neurocontrol in chronic spinal cord injury people with epidural and functional electrical stimulation. By nonpatterned electrical stimulation of lumbar posterior roots, it is possible to evoke bilateral extension as well as rhythmic motor outputs. Epidural stimulation during treadmill stepping shows increased and/or modified motor activity. Finally, volitional efforts can alter epidurally induced rhythmic activities in incomplete spinal cord injury. Overall, we highlight that upper motor neuron paralysis does not entail complete absence of connectivity between cortex, brain stem, and spinal motor cells, but there can be altered anatomy and corresponding neurophysiological characteristics. With specific input to the spinal cord below the level

  2. Is sheep lumbar spine a suitable alternative model for human spinal researches? Morphometrical comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Dagmar; Jülke, Henriette; Hohaus, Christian; Brehm, Walter; Gerlach, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Sheep are commonly used as a model for human spinal orthopaedic research due to their similarity in morphological and biomechanical features. This study aimed to document the volumes of vertebral bodies and compare the generated results as well as morphometry of the sheep lumbar spine to human published data. For this purpose, computed tomography scans were carried out on five adult Merino sheep under general anaesthesia. Transverse 5 mm thick images were acquired from L1 to L6 using a multi-detector-row helical CT scanner. Volume measurements were performed with dedicated software. Four spinal indices and Pavlov's ratio were calculated. Thereafter, the generated data were compared to published literature on humans. The mean vertebral body volume showed an increase towards the caudal vertebrae, but there were no significant differences between the vertebral levels (P>0.05). Compared to humans, sheep vertebral body volumes were 48.6% smaller. The comparison of absolute values between both species revealed that sheep had smaller, longer and narrower vertebral bodies, thinner intervertebral discs, narrower spinal canal, longer transverse processes, shorter dorsal spinous processes and narrower, higher pedicles with more lateral angulations. The comparison of the spinal indices showed a good similarity to human in terms of the vertebral endplates and spinal canal. The results of this study may be helpful for using the sheep as a model for human orthopaedic spinal research if anatomical differences are taken into account. PMID:24396382

  3. Intravenous multipotent adult progenitor cell treatment decreases inflammation leading to functional recovery following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    DePaul, Marc A.; Palmer, Marc; Lang, Bradley T.; Cutrone, Rochelle; Tran, Amanda P.; Madalena, Kathryn M.; Bogaerts, Annelies; Hamilton, Jason A.; Deans, Robert J.; Mays, Robert W.; Busch, Sarah A.; Silver, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), immune-mediated secondary processes exacerbate the extent of permanent neurological deficits. We investigated the capacity of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells, which exhibit immunomodulatory properties, to alter inflammation and promote recovery following SCI. In vitro, we show that human multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) have the ability to modulate macrophage activation, and prior exposure to MAPC secreted factors can reduce macrophage-mediated axonal dieback of dystrophic axons. Using a contusion model of SCI, we found that intravenous delivery of MAPCs one day, but not immediately, after SCI significantly improves urinary and locomotor recovery, which was associated with marked spinal cord tissue sparing. Intravenous MAPCs altered the immune response in the spinal cord and periphery, however biodistribution studies revealed that no MAPCs were found in the cord and instead preferentially homed to the spleen. Our results demonstrate that MAPCs exert their primary effects in the periphery and provide strong support for the use of these cells in acute human contusive SCI. PMID:26582249

  4. Regeneration of adult rat spinal cord is promoted by the soluble KDI domain of gamma1 laminin.

    PubMed

    Wiksten, Markus; Väänänen, Antti J; Liebkind, Ron; Liesi, Päivi

    2004-11-01

    Regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammals is hampered by formation of a glial scar and by proteins released from the myelin sheaths of injured neuronal pathways. Our recent data indicate that the KDI (Lys-Asp-Ile) domain of gamma1 laminin neutralizes both glial- and myelin-derived inhibitory signals and promotes survival and neurite outgrowth of cultured human spinal cord neurons. We show that after complete transection of the adult rat spinal cord, animals receiving onsite infusion of the KDI domain via osmotic mini-pumps recover and are able to sustain their body weights and walk with their hindlimbs. Animals treated with placebo suffer from irreversible hindlimb paralysis. Microscopic and molecular analyses of the spinal cords indicate that the KDI domain reduces tissue damage at the lesion site and enables neurite outgrowth through the injured area to effect functional recovery of the initially paralyzed animals. That the KDI domain enhances regeneration of acute spinal cord injuries in the adult rat suggests that it may be used to promote regeneration of spinal cord injuries in humans.

  5. The older adult with a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Roth, E J; Lovell, L; Heinemann, A W; Lee, M Y; Yarkony, G M

    1992-07-01

    Sixty-two consecutive acute spinal cord injury (SCI) patients who were aged 55 years or older were studied and compared to 296 SCI patients of age less than 55 years. Compared to younger patients, the older group had significantly more females (29%), preexisting medical conditions (87%), associated injuries (55%), incomplete quadriplegic patients (63%), and persons whose injuries resulted from falls (53%). There were no differences between groups in frequency of ventilator use, occurrence of medical complications, or acute length of stay, but older patients tended to have fewer surgical spinal fusions (40%), shorter rehabilitation stays (66.5 days), more indwelling urethral cathteters (31%), and more nursing home discharges (19%). With other factors being controlled, advancing age was predictive only of nursing home discharge, and not of acute or rehabilitation lengths of stay. Among older SCI patients, those with complete injuries were nearly 3 times as likely to have been discharged to nursing homes in our series compared to older patients with incomplete lesions. Although many aspects of the presentation, course, and care of older SCI individuals are similar to those of younger patients, there are several unique features of older adults with a SCI. PMID:1508569

  6. Segmentation of the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    De Leener, Benjamin; Taso, Manuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Callot, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Segmenting the spinal cord contour is a necessary step for quantifying spinal cord atrophy in various diseases. Delineating gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) is also useful for quantifying GM atrophy or for extracting multiparametric MRI metrics into specific WM tracts. Spinal cord segmentation in clinical research is not as developed as brain segmentation, however with the substantial improvement of MR sequences adapted to spinal cord MR investigations, the field of spinal cord MR segmentation has advanced greatly within the last decade. Segmentation techniques with variable accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper, we review some of the existing methods for cord and WM/GM segmentation, including intensity-based, surface-based, and image-based methods. We also provide recommendations for validating spinal cord segmentation techniques, as it is important to understand the intrinsic characteristics of the methods and to evaluate their performance and limitations. Lastly, we illustrate some applications in the healthy and pathological spinal cord. One conclusion of this review is that robust and automatic segmentation is clinically relevant, as it would allow for longitudinal and group studies free from user bias as well as reproducible multicentric studies in large populations, thereby helping to further our understanding of the spinal cord pathophysiology and to develop new criteria for early detection of subclinical evolution for prognosis prediction and for patient management. Another conclusion is that at the present time, no single method adequately segments the cord and its substructure in all the cases encountered (abnormal intensities, loss of contrast, deformation of the cord, etc.). A combination of different approaches is thus advised for future developments, along with the introduction of probabilistic shape models. Maturation of standardized frameworks, multiplatform availability, inclusion

  7. Myelin water fraction in human cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yijing; Alexander, Andrew L; Fleming, John O; Duncan, Ian D; Field, Aaron S

    2006-01-01

    The noninvasive discrimination of myelin disease from axonal loss and other pathologic confounds remains an unsolved problem in multiple sclerosis but may be possible through magnetic resonance quantitation of the intramyelinic water compartment. Technical challenges have limited the study of this approach in the spinal cord, a common site of involvement in multiple sclerosis. This technical note reports the test-retest reproducibility of a short T2-based estimate of myelin content in human spinal cord in vivo.

  8. High yield extraction of pure spinal motor neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single embryo and adult mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Marie-Josée; Yang, Qiurui; Cadau, Sébastien; Blais, Mathieu; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Gros-Louis, François; Berthod, François

    2015-01-01

    Extraction of mouse spinal motor neurons from transgenic mouse embryos recapitulating some aspects of neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has met with limited success. Furthermore, extraction and long-term culture of adult mouse spinal motor neurons and glia remain also challenging. We present here a protocol designed to extract and purify high yields of motor neurons and glia from individual spinal cords collected on embryos and adult (5-month-old) normal or transgenic mice. This method is based on mild digestion of tissue followed by gradient density separation allowing to obtain two millions motor neurons over 92% pure from one E14.5 single embryo and more than 30,000 from an adult mouse. These cells can be cultured more than 14 days in vitro at a density of 100,000 cells/cm2 to maintain optimal viability. Functional astrocytes and microglia and small gamma motor neurons can be purified at the same time. This protocol will be a powerful and reliable method to obtain motor neurons and glia to better understand mechanisms underlying spinal cord diseases. PMID:26577180

  9. Human Mesenchymal Cells from Adipose Tissue Deposit Laminin and Promote Regeneration of Injured Spinal Cord in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Karla; Nascimento, Marcos Assis; Gonçalves, Juliana Pena; Cruz, Aline Silva; Lopes, Daiana Vieira; Curzio, Bianca; Bonamino, Martin; de Menezes, João Ricardo Lacerda; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel Doria; Coelho-Sampaio, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising strategy to pursue the unmet need for treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Although several studies have shown that adult mesenchymal cells contribute to improve the outcomes of SCI, a descripton of the pro-regenerative events triggered by these cells is still lacking. Here we investigated the regenerative properties of human adipose tissue derived stromal cells (hADSCs) in a rat model of spinal cord compression. Cells were delivered directly into the spinal parenchyma immediately after injury. Human ADSCs promoted functional recovery, tissue preservation, and axonal regeneration. Analysis of the cord tissue showed an abundant deposition of laminin of human origin at the lesion site and spinal midline; the appearance of cell clusters composed of neural precursors in the areas of laminin deposition, and the appearance of blood vessels with separated basement membranes along the spinal axis. These effects were also observed after injection of hADSCs into non-injured spinal cord. Considering that laminin is a well-known inducer of axonal growth, as well a component of the extracellular matrix associated to neural progenitors, we propose that it can be the paracrine factor mediating the pro-regenerative effects of hADSCs in spinal cord injury. PMID:24830794

  10. Human mesenchymal cells from adipose tissue deposit laminin and promote regeneration of injured spinal cord in rats.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Karla; Nascimento, Marcos Assis; Gonçalves, Juliana Pena; Cruz, Aline Silva; Lopes, Daiana Vieira; Curzio, Bianca; Bonamino, Martin; de Menezes, João Ricardo Lacerda; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel Doria; Coelho-Sampaio, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising strategy to pursue the unmet need for treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Although several studies have shown that adult mesenchymal cells contribute to improve the outcomes of SCI, a description of the pro-regenerative events triggered by these cells is still lacking. Here we investigated the regenerative properties of human adipose tissue derived stromal cells (hADSCs) in a rat model of spinal cord compression. Cells were delivered directly into the spinal parenchyma immediately after injury. Human ADSCs promoted functional recovery, tissue preservation, and axonal regeneration. Analysis of the cord tissue showed an abundant deposition of laminin of human origin at the lesion site and spinal midline; the appearance of cell clusters composed of neural precursors in the areas of laminin deposition, and the appearance of blood vessels with separated basement membranes along the spinal axis. These effects were also observed after injection of hADSCs into non-injured spinal cord. Considering that laminin is a well-known inducer of axonal growth, as well a component of the extracellular matrix associated to neural progenitors, we propose that it can be the paracrine factor mediating the pro-regenerative effects of hADSCs in spinal cord injury.

  11. Adult spinal cord ependymal layer: a promising pool of quiescent stem cells to treat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Elena; Malas, Stavros

    2013-11-28

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major health burden and currently there is no effective medical intervention. Research performed over the last decade revealed that cells surrounding the central canal of the adult spinal cord and forming the ependymal layer acquire stem cell properties either in vitro or in response to injury. Following SCI activated ependymal cells generate progeny cells which migrate to the injury site but fail to produce the appropriate type of cells in sufficient number to limit the damage, rendering this physiological response mainly ineffective. Research is now focusing on the manipulation of ependymal cells to produce cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage which are primarily lost in such a situation leading to secondary neuronal degeneration. Thus, there is a need for a more focused approach to understand the molecular properties of adult ependymal cells in greater detail and develop effective strategies for guiding their response during SCI.

  12. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  13. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bustoros, Mark; Thomas, Cheddhi; Frenster, Joshua; Modrek, Aram S; Bayin, N Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Rosen, Gerald; Schiff, Peter B; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  14. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes.

  15. Respiration following Spinal Cord Injury: Evidence for Human Neuroplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hoh, Daniel J.; Mercier, Lynne M.; Hussey, Shaunn P.; Lane, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory dysfunction is one of the most devastating consequences of cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) with impaired breathing being a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this population. However, there is mounting experimental and clinical evidence for moderate spontaneous respiratory recovery, or “plasticity”, after some spinal cord injuries. Pre-clinical models of respiratory dysfunction following SCI have demonstrated plasticity at neural and behavioral levels that result in progressive recovery of function. Temporal changes in respiration after human SCI have revealed some functional improvements suggesting plasticity paralleling that seen in experimental models – a concept that has been previously under-appreciated. While the extent of spontaneous recovery remains limited, it is possible that enhancing or facilitating neuroplastic mechanisms may have significant therapeutic potential. The next generation of treatment strategies for SCI and related respiratory dysfunction should aim to optimize these recovery processes of the injured spinal cord for lasting functional restoration. PMID:23891679

  16. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org).

  17. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org). PMID:22832508

  18. Traumatic spinal cord injury in mice with human immune systems

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Randall S.; Kigerl, Kristina A.; Marbourg, Jessica M.; Gaudet, Andrew D.; Huey, Devra; Niewiesk, Stefan; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models have provided key insight into the cellular and molecular control of human immune system function. However, recent data indicate that extrapolating the functional capabilities of the murine immune system into humans can be misleading. Since immune cells significantly affect neuron survival and axon growth and also are required to defend the body against infection, it is important to determine the pathophysiological significance of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced changes in human immune system function. Research projects using monkeys or humans would be ideal; however, logistical and ethical barriers preclude detailed mechanistic studies in either species. Humanized mice, i.e., immunocompromised mice reconstituted with human immune cells, can help overcome these barriers and can be applied in various experimental conditions that are of interest to the SCI community. Specifically, newborn NOD-SCID-IL2rgnull (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells develop normally without neurological impairment. In this report, new data show that when mice with human immune systems receive a clinically-relevant spinal contusion injury, spontaneous functional recovery is indistinguishable from that achieved after SCI using conventional inbred mouse strains. Moreover, using routine immunohistochemical and flow cytometry techniques, one can easily phenotype circulating human immune cells and document the composition and distribution of these cells in the injured spinal cord. Lesion pathology in humanized mice is typical of mouse contusion injuries, producing a centralized lesion epicenter that becomes occupied by phagocytic macrophages and lymphocytes and enclosed by a dense astrocytic scar. Specific human immune cell types, including three distinct subsets of human monocytes, were readily detected in blood, spleen and liver. Future studies that aim to understand the functional consequences of manipulating the neuro-immune axis after SCI should

  19. Traumatic spinal cord injury in mice with human immune systems.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Randall S; Kigerl, Kristina A; Marbourg, Jessica M; Gaudet, Andrew D; Huey, Devra; Niewiesk, Stefan; Popovich, Phillip G

    2015-09-01

    Mouse models have provided key insight into the cellular and molecular control of human immune system function. However, recent data indicate that extrapolating the functional capabilities of the murine immune system into humans can be misleading. Since immune cells significantly affect neuron survival and axon growth and also are required to defend the body against infection, it is important to determine the pathophysiological significance of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced changes in human immune system function. Research projects using monkeys or humans would be ideal; however, logistical and ethical barriers preclude detailed mechanistic studies in either species. Humanized mice, i.e., immunocompromised mice reconstituted with human immune cells, can help overcome these barriers and can be applied in various experimental conditions that are of interest to the SCI community. Specifically, newborn NOD-SCID-IL2rg(null) (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells develop normally without neurological impairment. In this report, new data show that when mice with human immune systems receive a clinically-relevant spinal contusion injury, spontaneous functional recovery is indistinguishable from that achieved after SCI using conventional inbred mouse strains. Moreover, using routine immunohistochemical and flow cytometry techniques, one can easily phenotype circulating human immune cells and document the composition and distribution of these cells in the injured spinal cord. Lesion pathology in humanized mice is typical of mouse contusion injuries, producing a centralized lesion epicenter that becomes occupied by phagocytic macrophages and lymphocytes and enclosed by a dense astrocytic scar. Specific human immune cell types, including three distinct subsets of human monocytes, were readily detected in the blood, spleen and liver. Future studies that aim to understand the functional consequences of manipulating the neuro-immune axis after SCI

  20. Traumatic spinal cord injury in mice with human immune systems.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Randall S; Kigerl, Kristina A; Marbourg, Jessica M; Gaudet, Andrew D; Huey, Devra; Niewiesk, Stefan; Popovich, Phillip G

    2015-09-01

    Mouse models have provided key insight into the cellular and molecular control of human immune system function. However, recent data indicate that extrapolating the functional capabilities of the murine immune system into humans can be misleading. Since immune cells significantly affect neuron survival and axon growth and also are required to defend the body against infection, it is important to determine the pathophysiological significance of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced changes in human immune system function. Research projects using monkeys or humans would be ideal; however, logistical and ethical barriers preclude detailed mechanistic studies in either species. Humanized mice, i.e., immunocompromised mice reconstituted with human immune cells, can help overcome these barriers and can be applied in various experimental conditions that are of interest to the SCI community. Specifically, newborn NOD-SCID-IL2rg(null) (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells develop normally without neurological impairment. In this report, new data show that when mice with human immune systems receive a clinically-relevant spinal contusion injury, spontaneous functional recovery is indistinguishable from that achieved after SCI using conventional inbred mouse strains. Moreover, using routine immunohistochemical and flow cytometry techniques, one can easily phenotype circulating human immune cells and document the composition and distribution of these cells in the injured spinal cord. Lesion pathology in humanized mice is typical of mouse contusion injuries, producing a centralized lesion epicenter that becomes occupied by phagocytic macrophages and lymphocytes and enclosed by a dense astrocytic scar. Specific human immune cell types, including three distinct subsets of human monocytes, were readily detected in the blood, spleen and liver. Future studies that aim to understand the functional consequences of manipulating the neuro-immune axis after SCI

  1. Transplantation of specific human astrocytes promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Stephen J A; Shih, Chung-Hsuan; Noble, Mark; Mayer-Proschel, Margot; Davies, Jeannette E; Proschel, Christoph

    2011-03-02

    Repairing trauma to the central nervous system by replacement of glial support cells is an increasingly attractive therapeutic strategy. We have focused on the less-studied replacement of astrocytes, the major support cell in the central nervous system, by generating astrocytes from embryonic human glial precursor cells using two different astrocyte differentiation inducing factors. The resulting astrocytes differed in expression of multiple proteins thought to either promote or inhibit central nervous system homeostasis and regeneration. When transplanted into acute transection injuries of the adult rat spinal cord, astrocytes generated by exposing human glial precursor cells to bone morphogenetic protein promoted significant recovery of volitional foot placement, axonal growth and notably robust increases in neuronal survival in multiple spinal cord laminae. In marked contrast, human glial precursor cells and astrocytes generated from these cells by exposure to ciliary neurotrophic factor both failed to promote significant behavioral recovery or similarly robust neuronal survival and support of axon growth at sites of injury. Our studies thus demonstrate functional differences between human astrocyte populations and suggest that pre-differentiation of precursor cells into a specific astrocyte subtype is required to optimize astrocyte replacement therapies. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show functional differences in ability to promote repair of the injured adult central nervous system between two distinct subtypes of human astrocytes derived from a common fetal glial precursor population. These findings are consistent with our previous studies of transplanting specific subtypes of rodent glial precursor derived astrocytes into sites of spinal cord injury, and indicate a remarkable conservation from rat to human of functional differences between astrocyte subtypes. In addition, our studies provide a specific population of human astrocytes that

  2. Pharmacological activation of locomotor patterns in larval and adult frog spinal cords.

    PubMed

    McClellan, A D; Farel, P B

    1985-04-15

    The effects of amino acids, catecholamines, and their agonists shown to elicit locomotor activity in several vertebrate species were examined in spinal animals and isolated nervous systems of developing tadpoles (Rana catesbiana) and adult frogs (R. catesbiana and pipiens). Elicited activity was correlated in spinal animals by video and electromyographic analysis, and in in vitro spinal cords by recordings of tail and hindlimb motor activity. Of the agents tested, only N-methyl-DL-aspartate (NMA), an amino acid agonist, was effective in eliciting motor activity in spinal animals. In isolated nervous systems, both NMA and D-glutamate added to the bath activated locomotor activity. NMA injected i.p. into tadpoles with high spinal cord transections elicited coordinated swimming motor activity in axial and hindlimb muscles that was roughly typical for the stage of development of the animal. In late stage tadpoles (st. XX), NMA also elicited wiping and alternating or synchronous (i.e. kicking or jumping) hindlimb movements. Addition of NMA or glutamate to a bath containing an in vitro tadpole spinal cord preparation elicited ventral root motor activity characteristic of swimming, but without a rostrocaudal phase lag. Rhythmic activity thought to underlie stepping and kicking was seen in lateral ventral rootlets innervating the hindlimbs. In adult frogs with high spinal cord transections, injection of NMA elicited a general sequence of spontaneous hindlimb motor functions: reflex wiping, stepping, and kicking or jumping. Isolated frog spinal cords were not responsive to bath applied NMA, under the present conditions. The activation by amino acids or their agonists of different motor functions in both larval and adult frogs, as well as in higher and lower vertebrates, suggests a general significance of amino acid-activated receptors in the neural networks controlling locomotor function. PMID:3888346

  3. Nestin-Positive Ependymal Cells Are Increased in the Human Spinal Cord after Traumatic Central Nervous System Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cawsey, Thomas; Duflou, Johan; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Endogenous neural progenitor cell niches have been identified in adult mammalian brain and spinal cord. Few studies have examined human spinal cord tissue for a neural progenitor cell response in disease or after injury. Here, we have compared cervical spinal cord sections from 14 individuals who died as a result of nontraumatic causes (controls) with 27 who died from injury with evidence of trauma to the central nervous system. Nestin immunoreactivity was used as a marker of neural progenitor cell response. There were significant increases in the percentage of ependymal cells that were nestin positive between controls and trauma cases. When sections from lumbar and thoracic spinal cord were available, nestin positivity was seen at all three spinal levels, suggesting that nestin reactivity is not simply a localized reaction to injury. There was a positive correlation between the percentage of ependymal cells that were nestin positive and post-injury survival time but not for age, postmortem delay, or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity. No double-labelled nestin and GFAP cells were identified in the ependymal, subependymal, or parenchymal regions of the spinal cord. We need to further characterize this subset of ependymal cells to determine their role after injury, whether they are a population of neural progenitor cells with the potential for proliferation, migration, and differentiation for spinal cord repair, or whether they have other roles more in line with hypothalamic tanycytes, which they closely resemble. PMID:25599268

  4. Forebrain GABAergic neuron precursors integrate into adult spinal cord and reduce injury-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, JM; Sharif-Naeini, R; Vogt, D; Kriegstein, A; Alvarez-Buylla, A; Rubenstein, JL; Basbaum, AI

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain. Because symptoms are often unresponsive to conventional methods of pain treatment, new therapeutic approaches are essential. Here, we describe a strategy that not only ameliorates symptoms of neuropathic pain, but is also potentially disease modifying. We show that transplantation of immature telencephalic GABAergic interneurons from the mouse medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) into the adult mouse spinal cord completely reverses the mechanical hypersensitivity produced by peripheral nerve injury. Underlying this improvement is a remarkable integration of the MGE transplants into the host spinal cord circuitry, in which the transplanted cells make functional connections with both primary afferent and spinal cord neurons. By contrast, MGE transplants were not effective against inflammatory pain. Our findings suggest that MGE-derived GABAergic interneurons overcome the spinal cord hyperexcitability that is a hallmark of nerve-injury induced neuropathic pain. PMID:22632725

  5. Functional Expression of T-Type Ca2+ Channels in Spinal Motoneurons of the Adult Turtle

    PubMed Central

    Canto-Bustos, Martha; Loeza-Alcocer, Emanuel; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A.; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo; Felix, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels are transmembrane proteins comprising three subfamilies named CaV1, CaV2 and CaV3. The CaV3 channel subfamily groups the low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels (LVA or T-type) a significant role in regulating neuronal excitability. CaV3 channel activity may lead to the generation of complex patterns of action potential firing such as the postinhibitory rebound (PIR). In the adult spinal cord, these channels have been found in dorsal horn interneurons where they control physiological events near the resting potential and participate in determining excitability. In motoneurons, CaV3 channels have been found during development, but their functional expression has not yet been reported in adult animals. Here, we show evidence for the presence of CaV3 channel-mediated PIR in motoneurons of the adult turtle spinal cord. Our results indicate that Ni2+ and NNC55-0396, two antagonists of CaV3 channel activity, inhibited PIR in the adult turtle spinal cord. Molecular biology and biochemical assays revealed the expression of the CaV3.1 channel isotype and its localization in motoneurons. Together, these results provide evidence for the expression of CaV3.1 channels in the spinal cord of adult animals and show also that these channels may contribute to determine the excitability of motoneurons. PMID:25255145

  6. Cognitive Training Program for Youths/Young Adults Having a Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirling, Gloria; And Others

    The pilot study determined the effectiveness of a cognitive skills training program on both the vocational retraining of five young adults with traumatic spinal cord injuries and learning difficulties and the adaptation process to an altered lifestyle required by permanent paralysis. After a 40-hour Instrumental Enrichment (IE) program, Ss showed…

  7. Neuronal labeling patterns in the spinal cord of adult transgenic Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stil, Aurélie; Drapeau, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    We describe neuronal patterns in the spinal cord of adult zebrafish. We studied the distribution of cells and processes in the three spinal regions reported in the literature: the 8th vertebra used as a transection injury site, the 15th vertebra mainly used for motor cell recordings and also for crush injury, and the 24th vertebra used to record motor nerve activity. We used well-known transgenic lines in which expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is driven by promoters to hb9 and isl1 in motoneurons, alx/chx10 and evx1 interneurons, ngn1 in sensory neurons and olig2 in oligodendrocytes, as well as antibodies for neurons (HuC/D, NF and SV2) and glia (GFAP). In isl1:GFP fish, GFP-positive processes are retained in the upper part of ventral horns and two subsets of cell bodies are observed. The pattern of the transgene in hb9:GFP adults is more diffuse and fibers are present broadly through the adult spinal cord. In alx/chx10 and evx1 lines we respectively observed two and three different GFP-positive populations. Finally, the ngn1:GFP transgene identifies dorsal root ganglion and some cells in dorsal horns. Interestingly some GFP positive fibers in ngn1:GFP fish are located around Mauthner axons and their density seems to be related to a rostrocaudal gradient. Many other cell types have been described in embryos and need to be studied in adults. Our findings provide a reference for further studies on spinal cytoarchitecture. Combined with physiological, histological and pathological/traumatic approaches, these studies will help clarify the operation of spinal locomotor circuits of adult zebrafish.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of human spinal cord-derived neural precursor cells after transplantation to the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Emgård, Mia; Piao, Jinghua; Aineskog, Helena; Liu, Jia; Calzarossa, Cinzia; Odeberg, Jenny; Holmberg, Lena; Samuelsson, Eva-Britt; Bezubik, Bartosz; Vincent, Per Henrik; Falci, Scott P; Seiger, Åke; Åkesson, Elisabet; Sundström, Erik

    2014-03-01

    To validate human neural precursor cells (NPCs) as potential donor cells for transplantation therapy after spinal cord injury (SCI), we investigated the effect of NPCs, transplanted as neurospheres, in two different rat SCI models. Human spinal cord-derived NPCs (SC-NPCs) transplanted 9 days after spinal contusion injury enhanced hindlimb recovery, assessed by the BBB locomotor test. In spinal compression injuries, SC-NPCs transplanted immediately or after 1 week, but not 7 weeks after injury, significantly improved hindlimb recovery compared to controls. We could not detect signs of mechanical allodynia in transplanted rats. Four months after transplantation, we found more human cells in the host spinal cord than were transplanted, irrespective of the time of transplantation. There was no focal tumor growth. In all groups the vast majority of NPCs differentiated into astrocytes. Importantly, the number of surviving rat spinal cord neurons was highest in groups transplanted acutely and subacutely, which also showed the best hindlimb function. This suggests that transplanted SC-NPCs improve the functional outcome by a neuroprotective effect. We conclude that SC-NPCs reliably enhance the functional outcome after SCI if transplanted acutely or subacutely, without causing allodynia. This therapeutic effect is mainly the consequence of a neuroprotective effect of the SC-NPCs.

  9. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  10. Ultrastructure of the human spinal arachnoid mater and dura mater.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, F; Creemers, J; Lambrichts, I

    1996-01-01

    Human spinal dura and arachnoid, obtained during neurosurgical operations, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructure of spinal meninges largely conformed to the morphology of the cranial meninges, but some minor differences were detected. The dura was composed of an outermost loosely arranged fibroelastic layer, a middle basically fibrous portion and an innermost cellular layer (dural border cell layer). The dural border cell layer was characterised by multiple interdigitating cell processes, no extracellular collagen, significant extracellular spaces and few cell junctions. Paravascular vesiculated nerve profiles were encountered within the fibroadipose epidural tissue. The arachnoid was composed of an outermost portion (arachnoid barrier cell layer), presenting tightly packed cells, numerous tight junctions and no extracellular collagen. In view of its numerous tight junctions, the arachnoid barrier cell layer is considered to represent an effective morphological and physiological meningeal barrier between the cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space and the blood circulation in the dura. The arachnoid barrier layer was always characterised by a distinct continuous basal lamina on its inner surface towards the innermost collagenous portion of the arachnoid (arachnoid reticular cell layer). The interweaving arachnoid trabecular cells within this layer possessed numerous mitochondria and were anchored to the inner surface of the arachnoid barrier cell layer by desmosomes. An additional layer of flattened branching cells was demonstrated along the inner surface of the arachnoid reticular cell layer and assumed to be an "arachnoid border cell layer'. Morphological data suggest that the dura and arachnoid closely adhere at spinal levels in man without any naturally occurring "subdural space'. However, structurally, the dural border cell layer forms a weak cell layer at the dura-arachnoid continuum that is easily disrupted. The creation

  11. Plasticity of interneuronal networks of the functionally isolated human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    The loss of walking after human spinal cord injury has been attributed to the dominance of supraspinal over spinal mechanisms. The evidence for central pattern generation in humans is limited due to the inability to conclusively isolate the circuitry from descending and afferent input. However, studying individuals following spinal cord injury with no detectable influence on spinal networks from supraspinal centers can provide insight to their interaction with afferent input. The focus of this article is on the interaction of sensory input with human spinal networks in the generation of locomotor patterns. The functionally isolated human spinal cord has the capacity to generate locomotor patterns with appropriate afferent input. Locomotor Training is a rehabilitative strategy that has evolved from animal and humans studies focused on the neural plasticity of the spinal cord and has been successful for many people with acute and chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. However, even those individuals with clinically complete spinal cord injury that generate appropriate locomotor patterns during stepping with assistance on a treadmill with body weight support cannot sustain overground walking. This suggests that although a significant control of locomotion can occur at the level of spinal interneuronal networks the level of sustainable excitability of these circuits is still compromised. Future studies should focus on approaches to increase the central state of excitability and may include neural repair strategies, pharmacological interventions or epidural stimulation in combination with Locomotor Training. PMID:18042493

  12. Differential modulation of crossed and uncrossed reflex pathways by clonidine in adult cats following complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C J

    2012-02-15

    Clonidine, an α-noradrenergic agonist, facilitates hindlimb locomotor recovery after complete spinal transection (i.e. spinalization) in adult cats. However, the mechanisms involved in clonidine-induced functional recovery are poorly understood. Sensory feedback from the legs is critical for hindlimb locomotor recovery in spinalized mammals and clonidine could alter how spinal neurons respond to peripheral inputs in adult spinalized cats. To test this hypothesis we evaluated the effect of clonidine on the responses of hindlimb muscles, primarily in the left hindlimb, evoked by stretching the left triceps surae muscles and by stimulating the right tibial and superficial peroneal nerves in eight adult decerebrate cats that were spinalized 1 month before the terminal experiment. Cats were not trained following spinalization. Clonidine had no consistent effect on responses of ipsilateral muscles evoked by triceps surae muscle stretch. However, clonidine consistently potentiated the amplitude and duration of crossed extensor responses. Moreover, following clonidine injection, stretch and tibial nerve stimulation triggered episodes of locomotor-like activity in approximately one-third of trials. Differential effects of clonidine on crossed reflexes and on ipsilateral responses to muscle stretch indicate an action at a pre-motoneuronal site. We conclude that clonidine facilitates hindlimb locomotor recovery following spinalization in untrained cats by enhancing the excitability of central pattern generating spinal neurons that also participate in crossed extensor reflex transmission.

  13. Combined Transplantation of Human Neuronal and Mesenchymal Stem Cells following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Park, D Y; Mayle, R E; Smith, R L; Corcoran-Schwartz, I; Kharazi, A I; Cheng, I

    2013-03-01

    Transplantation of human fetal neural stem cells (hNSCs) previously demonstrated significant functional recovery after spinal cord contusion in rats. Other studies indicated that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can home to areas of damage and cross the blood-brain barrier. The purpose of this article is to determine if combined administration of mesenchymal stem cells and neuronal stem cells improves functional outcomes in rats. The study design was a randomized controlled animal trial. Female adult Long-Evans hooded rats underwent laminectomy at T10 level. Moderate spinal cord contusion at T10 level was induced by the MASCIS Impactor. Four groups were identified. The MSC + NSC group received hMSCs intravenously (IV) immediately after spinal cord injury (acute) and returned 1 week later (subacute) for injection of hNSC directly at site of injury. The MSC-only group received hMSC IV acutely and cell media subacutely. The NSC-only group received cell media IV acutely and hNSC subacutely. The control group received cell media IV acutely and subacutely. Subjects were assessed for 6 weeks using Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan Locomotor Rating Score. Twenty-four subjects were utilized, six subjects in each group. Statistically significant functional improvement was seen in the MSC + NSC group and the NSC-only group versus controls (p = 0.027, 0.042, respectively). The MSC-only group did not demonstrate a significant improvement over control (p = 0.145). Comparing the MSC + NSC group and the NSC-only group, there was no significant difference (p = 0.357). Subacute transplantation of hNSCs into contused spinal cord of rats led to significant functional recovery when injected either with or without acute IV administration of hMSCs. Neither hMSCs nor addition of hMSC to hNSC resulted in significant improvement.

  14. Combined Transplantation of Human Neuronal and Mesenchymal Stem Cells following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Park, D Y; Mayle, R E; Smith, R L; Corcoran-Schwartz, I; Kharazi, A I; Cheng, I

    2013-03-01

    Transplantation of human fetal neural stem cells (hNSCs) previously demonstrated significant functional recovery after spinal cord contusion in rats. Other studies indicated that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can home to areas of damage and cross the blood-brain barrier. The purpose of this article is to determine if combined administration of mesenchymal stem cells and neuronal stem cells improves functional outcomes in rats. The study design was a randomized controlled animal trial. Female adult Long-Evans hooded rats underwent laminectomy at T10 level. Moderate spinal cord contusion at T10 level was induced by the MASCIS Impactor. Four groups were identified. The MSC + NSC group received hMSCs intravenously (IV) immediately after spinal cord injury (acute) and returned 1 week later (subacute) for injection of hNSC directly at site of injury. The MSC-only group received hMSC IV acutely and cell media subacutely. The NSC-only group received cell media IV acutely and hNSC subacutely. The control group received cell media IV acutely and subacutely. Subjects were assessed for 6 weeks using Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan Locomotor Rating Score. Twenty-four subjects were utilized, six subjects in each group. Statistically significant functional improvement was seen in the MSC + NSC group and the NSC-only group versus controls (p = 0.027, 0.042, respectively). The MSC-only group did not demonstrate a significant improvement over control (p = 0.145). Comparing the MSC + NSC group and the NSC-only group, there was no significant difference (p = 0.357). Subacute transplantation of hNSCs into contused spinal cord of rats led to significant functional recovery when injected either with or without acute IV administration of hMSCs. Neither hMSCs nor addition of hMSC to hNSC resulted in significant improvement. PMID:24436845

  15. Combined Transplantation of Human Neuronal and Mesenchymal Stem Cells following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, D. Y.; Mayle, R. E.; Smith, R. L.; Corcoran-Schwartz, I.; Kharazi, A. I.; Cheng, I.

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of human fetal neural stem cells (hNSCs) previously demonstrated significant functional recovery after spinal cord contusion in rats. Other studies indicated that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can home to areas of damage and cross the blood–brain barrier. The purpose of this article is to determine if combined administration of mesenchymal stem cells and neuronal stem cells improves functional outcomes in rats. The study design was a randomized controlled animal trial. Female adult Long-Evans hooded rats underwent laminectomy at T10 level. Moderate spinal cord contusion at T10 level was induced by the MASCIS Impactor. Four groups were identified. The MSC + NSC group received hMSCs intravenously (IV) immediately after spinal cord injury (acute) and returned 1 week later (subacute) for injection of hNSC directly at site of injury. The MSC-only group received hMSC IV acutely and cell media subacutely. The NSC-only group received cell media IV acutely and hNSC subacutely. The control group received cell media IV acutely and subacutely. Subjects were assessed for 6 weeks using Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan Locomotor Rating Score. Twenty-four subjects were utilized, six subjects in each group. Statistically significant functional improvement was seen in the MSC + NSC group and the NSC-only group versus controls (p = 0.027, 0.042, respectively). The MSC-only group did not demonstrate a significant improvement over control (p = 0.145). Comparing the MSC + NSC group and the NSC-only group, there was no significant difference (p = 0.357). Subacute transplantation of hNSCs into contused spinal cord of rats led to significant functional recovery when injected either with or without acute IV administration of hMSCs. Neither hMSCs nor addition of hMSC to hNSC resulted in significant improvement. PMID:24436845

  16. Cadmium induces alterations in the human spinal cord morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sarchielli, Erica; Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Marini, Mirca; Vannelli, Gabriella B; Gulisano, Massimo

    2012-02-01

    The effects of cadmium on the central nervous system are still relatively poorly understood and its role in neurodegenerative diseases has been debated. In our research, cultured explants from 25 human foetal spinal cords (10-11 weeks gestational age) were incubated with 10 and 100 μM cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)) for 24 h. After treatment, an immunohistochemical study [for Sglial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)], a Western blot analysis (for GFAP, β-Tubulin III, nerve growth factor receptor, Caspase 8 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase), and a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay (for detection of apoptotic bodies) were performed. The treatment with CdCl(2) induced a significant and dose-dependent change in the ratio motor neurons/glial cells in the ventral horns of human foetal spinal cord. The decrease of the choline acetyltransferase-positive cells (motor neurons) and the reduction of β Tubulin III indicate that CdCl(2) specifically affects motor neurons of the ventral horns. While the number of motor neurons decreased for the activation of apoptotic pathways (as shown by the increased expression of Caspase 8, nerve growth factor receptor, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase), glial cells, both in the subependymal zone and in the gray matter of the ventral horns, increased (as shown by the increase of GFAP expression). These results provide the evidence that during human spinal cord development, CdCl(2) may affect the fate of neural and glial cells thus, being potentially involved in the etiopathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Implanting glass spinal cord windows in adult mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; Weber, Pascal; Rougon, Genevieve; Debarbieux, Franck

    2013-12-21

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in adult rodents is the standard experimental model for studying autonomic demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here we present a low-cost and reproducible glass window implantation protocol that is suitable for intravital microscopy and studying the dynamics of spinal cord cytoarchitecture with subcellular resolution in live adult mice with EAE. Briefly, we surgically expose the vertebrae T12-L2 and construct a chamber around the exposed vertebrae using a combination of cyanoacrylate and dental cement. A laminectomy is performed from T13 to L1, and a thin layer of transparent silicone elastomer is applied to the dorsal surface of the exposed spinal cord. A modified glass cover slip is implanted over the exposed spinal cord taking care that the glass does not directly contact the spinal cord. To reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells between the window and spinal cord, anti-inflammatory treatment is administered every 2 days (as recommended by ethics committee) for the first 10 days after implantation. EAE is induced only 2-3 weeks after the cessation of anti-inflammatory treatment. Using this approach we successfully induced EAE in 87% of animals with implanted windows and, using Thy1-CFP-23 mice (blue axons in dorsal spinal cord), quantified axonal loss throughout EAE progression. Taken together, this protocol may be useful for studying the recruitment of various cell populations as well as their interaction dynamics, with subcellular resolution and for extended periods of time. This intravital imaging modality represents a valuable tool for developing therapeutic strategies to treat autoimmune demyelinating diseases such as EAE.

  18. Characterization of Proliferating Neural Progenitors after Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Subhra Prakash; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Ghosh, Sukla

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish can repair their injured brain and spinal cord after injury unlike adult mammalian central nervous system. Any injury to zebrafish spinal cord would lead to increased proliferation and neurogenesis. There are presences of proliferating progenitors from which both neuronal and glial loss can be reversed by appropriately generating new neurons and glia. We have demonstrated the presence of multiple progenitors, which are different types of proliferating populations like Sox2+ neural progenitor, A2B5+ astrocyte/ glial progenitor, NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitor, radial glia and Schwann cell like progenitor. We analyzed the expression levels of two common markers of dedifferentiation like msx-b and vimentin during regeneration along with some of the pluripotency associated factors to explore the possible role of these two processes. Among the several key factors related to pluripotency, pou5f1 and sox2 are upregulated during regeneration and associated with activation of neural progenitor cells. Uncovering the molecular mechanism for endogenous regeneration of adult zebrafish spinal cord would give us more clues on important targets for future therapeutic approach in mammalian spinal cord repair and regeneration. PMID:26630262

  19. A comprehensive study of long-term skeletal changes after spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tiao; Tong, Wei; Chandra, Abhishek; Hsu, Shao-Yun; Jia, Haoruo; Zhu, Ji; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Levine, Michael A; Zhang, Yejia; Yan, Shi-Gui; Liu, X Sherry; Sun, Dongming; Young, Wise; Qin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced bone loss represents the most severe osteoporosis with no effective treatment. Past animal studies have focused primarily on long bones at the acute stage using adolescent rodents. To mimic chronic SCI in human patients, we performed a comprehensive analysis of long-term structural and mechanical changes in axial and appendicular bones in adult rats after SCI. In this experiment, 4-month-old Fischer 344 male rats received a clinically relevant T13 contusion injury. Sixteen weeks later, sublesional femurs, tibiae, and L4 vertebrae, supralesional humeri, and blood were collected from these rats and additional non-surgery rats for micro-computed tomography (µCT), micro-finite element, histology, and serum biochemical analyses. At trabecular sites, extreme losses of bone structure and mechanical competence were detected in the metaphysis of sublesional long bones after SCI, while the subchondral part of the same bones showed much milder damage. Marked reductions in bone mass and strength were also observed in sublesional L4 vertebrae but not in supralesional humeri. At cortical sites, SCI induced structural and strength damage in both sub- and supralesional long bones. These changes were accompanied by diminished osteoblast number and activity and increased osteoclast number and activity. Taken together, our study revealed site-specific effects of SCI on bone and demonstrated sustained inhibition of bone formation and elevation of bone resorption at the chronic stage of SCI. PMID:26528401

  20. A comprehensive study of long-term skeletal changes after spinal cord injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tiao; Tong, Wei; Chandra, Abhishek; Hsu, Shao-Yun; Jia, Haoruo; Zhu, Ji; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Levine, Michael A; Zhang, Yejia; Yan, Shi-Gui; Liu, X Sherry; Sun, Dongming; Young, Wise; Qin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced bone loss represents the most severe osteoporosis with no effective treatment. Past animal studies have focused primarily on long bones at the acute stage using adolescent rodents. To mimic chronic SCI in human patients, we performed a comprehensive analysis of long-term structural and mechanical changes in axial and appendicular bones in adult rats after SCI. In this experiment, 4-month-old Fischer 344 male rats received a clinically relevant T13 contusion injury. Sixteen weeks later, sublesional femurs, tibiae, and L4 vertebrae, supralesional humeri, and blood were collected from these rats and additional non-surgery rats for micro-computed tomography (µCT), micro-finite element, histology, and serum biochemical analyses. At trabecular sites, extreme losses of bone structure and mechanical competence were detected in the metaphysis of sublesional long bones after SCI, while the subchondral part of the same bones showed much milder damage. Marked reductions in bone mass and strength were also observed in sublesional L4 vertebrae but not in supralesional humeri. At cortical sites, SCI induced structural and strength damage in both sub- and supralesional long bones. These changes were accompanied by diminished osteoblast number and activity and increased osteoclast number and activity. Taken together, our study revealed site-specific effects of SCI on bone and demonstrated sustained inhibition of bone formation and elevation of bone resorption at the chronic stage of SCI. PMID:26528401

  1. Human lumbosacral spinal cord interprets loading during stepping.

    PubMed

    Harkema, S J; Hurley, S L; Patel, U K; Requejo, P S; Dobkin, B H; Edgerton, V R

    1997-02-01

    Studies suggest that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can generate steplike oscillating electromyographic (EMG) patterns, but it remains unclear to what degree these efferent patterns depend on the phasic peripheral sensory information associated with bilateral limb movements and loading. We examined the role of sensory information related to lower-extremity weight bearing in modulating the efferent motor patterns of spinal-cord-injured (SCI) subjects during manually assisted stepping on a treadmill. Four nonambulatory subjects, each with a chronic thoracic spinal cord injury, and two nondisabled subjects were studied. The level of loading, EMG patterns, and kinematics of the lower limbs were studied during manually assisted or unassisted stepping on a treadmill with body weight support. The relationships among lumbosacral motor pool activity [soleus (SOL), medial gastrocnemius (MG), and tibialis anterior (TA)], limb load, muscle-tendon length, and velocity of muscle-tendon length change were examined. The EMG mean amplitude of the SOL, MG, and TA was directly related to the peak load per step on the lower limb during locomotion. The effects on the EMG amplitude were qualitatively similar in subjects with normal, partial, or no detectable supraspinal input. Responses were most consistent in the SOL and MG at load levels of < 50% of a subject's body weight. The modulation of the EMG amplitude from the SOL and MG, both across steps and within a step, was more closely associated with limb peak load than muscle-tendon stretch or the velocity of muscle-tendon stretch. Thus stretch reflexes were not the sole source of the phasic EMG activity in flexors and extensors during manually assisted stepping in SCI subjects. The EMG amplitude within a step was highly dependent on the phase of the step cycle regardless of level of load. These data suggest that level of loading on the lower limbs provides cues that enable the human lumbosacral spinal cord to modulate efferent

  2. Changing Balance of Spinal Cord Excitability and Nociceptive Brain Activity in Early Human Development.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Caroline; Moultrie, Fiona; Gursul, Deniz; Hoskin, Amy; Adams, Eleri; Rogers, Richard; Slater, Rebeccah

    2016-08-01

    In adults, nociceptive reflexes and behavioral responses are modulated by a network of brain regions via descending projections to the spinal dorsal horn [1]. Coordinated responses to noxious inputs manifest from a balance of descending facilitation and inhibition. In contrast, young infants display exaggerated and uncoordinated limb reflexes [2]. Our understanding of nociceptive processing in the infant brain has been advanced by the use of electrophysiological and hemodynamic imaging [3-6]. From approximately 35 weeks' gestation, nociceptive-specific patterns of brain activity emerge [7], whereas prior to this, non-specific bursts of activity occur in response to noxious, tactile, visual, and auditory stimulation [7-10]. During the preterm period, refinement of spinal cord excitability is also observed: reflex duration shortens, response threshold increases, and improved discrimination between tactile and noxious events occurs [2, 11, 12]. However, the development of descending modulation in human infants remains relatively unexplored. In 40 infants aged 28-42 weeks' gestation, we examined the relationship between nociceptive brain activity and spinal reflex withdrawal activity in response to a clinically essential noxious procedure. Nociceptive-specific brain activity increases in magnitude with gestational age, whereas reflex withdrawal activity decreases in magnitude, duration, and latency across the same developmental period. By recording brain and spinal cord activity in the same infants, we demonstrate that the maturation of nociceptive brain activity is concomitant with the refinement of noxious-evoked limb reflexes. We postulate that, consistent with studies in animals, infant reflexes are influenced by the development of top-down inhibitory modulation from maturing subcortical and cortical brain networks. PMID:27374336

  3. Plasticity of functional connectivity in the adult spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Cai, L.L; Courtine, G; Fong, A.J; Burdick, J.W; Roy, R.R; Edgerton, V.R

    2006-01-01

    This paper emphasizes several characteristics of the neural control of locomotion that provide opportunities for developing strategies to maximize the recovery of postural and locomotor functions after a spinal cord injury (SCI). The major points of this paper are: (i) the circuitry that controls standing and stepping is extremely malleable and reflects a continuously varying combination of neurons that are activated when executing stereotypical movements; (ii) the connectivity between neurons is more accurately perceived as a functional rather than as an anatomical phenomenon; (iii) the functional connectivity that controls standing and stepping reflects the physiological state of a given assembly of synapses, where the probability of these synaptic events is not deterministic; (iv) rather, this probability can be modulated by other factors such as pharmacological agents, epidural stimulation and/or motor training; (v) the variability observed in the kinematics of consecutive steps reflects a fundamental feature of the neural control system and (vi) machine-learning theories elucidate the need to accommodate variability in developing strategies designed to enhance motor performance by motor training using robotic devices after an SCI. PMID:16939979

  4. Abundance of gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in adult Mosquitofish spinal cord neurons

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Velez, Jose L.; Rodriguez-Alvarado, Melanie; Torres-Vazquez, Irma I.; Fraser, Scott E.; Yasumura, Thomas; Vanderpool, Kimberly G.; Rash, John E.; Rosa-Molinar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    “Dye-coupling”, whole-mount immunohistochemistry for gap junction channel protein connexin 35 (Cx35), and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling (FRIL) reveal an abundance of electrical synapses/gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in the 14th spinal segment that innervates the adult male gonopodium of Western Mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis (Mosquitofish). To study gap junctions’ role in fast motor behavior, we used a minimally-invasive neural-tract-tracing technique to introduce gap junction-permeant or -impermeant dyes into deep muscles controlling the gonopodium of the adult male Mosquitofish, a teleost fish that rapidly transfers (complete in <20 mS) spermatozeugmata into the female reproductive tract. Dye-coupling in the 14th spinal segment controlling the gonopodium reveals coupling between motor neurons and a commissural primary ascending interneuron (CoPA IN) and shows that the 14th segment has an extensive and elaborate dendritic arbor and more gap junctions than do other segments. Whole-mount immunohistochemistry for Cx35 results confirm dye-coupling and show it occurs via gap junctions. Finally, FRIL shows that gap junctions are at mixed synapses and reveals that >50 of the 62 gap junctions at mixed synapses are in the 14th spinal segment. Our results support and extend studies showing gap junctions at mixed synapses in spinal cord segments involved in control of genital reflexes in rodents, and they suggest a link between mixed synapses and fast motor behavior. The findings provide a basis for studies of specific roles of spinal neurons in the generation/regulation of sex-specific behavior and for studies of gap junctions’ role in regulating fast motor behavior. Finally, the CoPA IN provides a novel candidate neuron for future studies of gap junctions and neural control of fast motor behaviors. PMID:25018700

  5. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan M.; Wells, Jonathon D.; Malphrus, Jonathan D.; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B.; Konrad, Peter E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients (n=7) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and 1.23  J/cm2. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at 1.09  J/cm2 and a 2∶1 safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans. PMID:26157986

  6. Resting state functional connectivity in the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Barry, Robert L; Smith, Seth A; Dula, Adrienne N; Gore, John C

    2014-08-05

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast is well established as one of the most powerful methods for mapping human brain function. Numerous studies have measured how low-frequency BOLD signal fluctuations from the brain are correlated between voxels in a resting state, and have exploited these signals to infer functional connectivity within specific neural circuits. However, to date there have been no previous substantiated reports of resting state correlations in the spinal cord. In a cohort of healthy volunteers, we observed robust functional connectivity between left and right ventral (motor) horns, and between left and right dorsal (sensory) horns. Our results demonstrate that low-frequency BOLD fluctuations are inherent in the spinal cord as well as the brain, and by analogy to cortical circuits, we hypothesize that these correlations may offer insight into the execution and maintenance of sensory and motor functions both locally and within the cerebrum.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02812.001.

  7. Altered differentiation of CNS neural progenitor cells after transplantation into the injured adult rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Onifer, S M; Cannon, A B; Whittemore, S R

    1997-01-01

    Denervation of CNS neurons and peripheral organs is a consequence of traumatic SCI. Intraspinal transplantation of embryonic CNS neurons is a potential strategy for reinnervating these targets. Neural progenitor cell lines are being investigated as alternates to embryonic CNS neurons. RN33B is an immortalized neural progenitor cell line derived from embryonic rat raphe nuclei following infection with a retrovirus encoding the temperature-sensitive mutant of SV40 large T-antigen. Transplantation studies have shown that local epigenetic signals in intact or partially neuron-depleted adult rat hippocampal formation or striatum direct RN33B cell differentiation to complex multipolar morphologies resembling endogenous neurons. After transplantation into neuron-depleted regions of the hippocampal formation or striatum, RN33B cells were relatively undifferentiated or differentiated with bipolar morphologies. The present study examines RN33B cell differentiation after transplantation into normal spinal cord and under different lesion conditions. Adult rats underwent either unilateral lesion of lumbar spinal neurons by intraspinal injection of kainic acid or complete transection at the T10 spinal segment. Neonatal rats underwent either unilateral lesion of lumbar motoneurons by sciatic nerve crush or complete transection at the T10 segment. At 2 or 6-7 wk postinjury, lacZ-labeled RN33B cells were transplanted into the lumbar enlargement of injured and age-matched normal rats. At 2 wk posttransplantation, bipolar and some multipolar RN33B cells were found throughout normal rat gray matter. In contrast, only bipolar RN33B cells were seen in gray matter of kainic acid lesioned, sciatic nerve crush, or transection rats. These observations suggest that RN33B cell multipolar morphological differentiation in normal adult spinal cord is mediated by direct cell-cell interaction through surface molecules on endogenous neurons and may be suppressed by molecules released after SCI

  8. Cervical Spinal Cord Atrophy Profile in Adult SMN1-Linked SMA

    PubMed Central

    El Mendili, Mohamed-Mounir; Lenglet, Timothée; Stojkovic, Tanya; Behin, Anthony; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Salachas, François; Meininger, Vincent; Bruneteau, Gaelle; Le Forestier, Nadine; Laforêt, Pascal; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Benali, Habib; Pradat, Pierre-François

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The mechanisms underlying the topography of motor deficits in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) remain unknown. We investigated the profile of spinal cord atrophy (SCA) in SMN1-linked SMA, and its correlation with the topography of muscle weakness. Materials and Methods Eighteen SMN1-linked SMA patients type III/V and 18 age/gender-matched healthy volunteers were included. Patients were scored on manual muscle testing and functional scales. Spinal cord was imaged using 3T MRI system. Radial distance (RD) and cord cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements in SMA patients were compared to those in controls and correlated with strength and disability scores. Results CSA measurements revealed a significant cord atrophy gradient mainly located between C3 and C6 vertebral levels with a SCA rate ranging from 5.4% to 23% in SMA patients compared to controls. RD was significantly lower in SMA patients compared to controls in the anterior-posterior direction with a maximum along C4 and C5 vertebral levels (p-values < 10−5). There were no correlations between atrophy measurements, strength and disability scores. Conclusions Spinal cord atrophy in adult SMN1-linked SMA predominates in the segments innervating the proximal muscles. Additional factors such as neuromuscular junction or intrinsic skeletal muscle defects may play a role in more complex mechanisms underlying weakness in these patients. PMID:27089520

  9. Development of a multi-electrode array for spinal cord epidural stimulation to facilitate stepping and standing after a complete spinal cord injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    spinal cord levels and by specific stimulation parameters, i.e., stimulation frequency and intensity, and cathode/anode orientation. The array also was used to assess functional connectivity between the cord dorsum to interneuronal circuits and specific motor pools via evoked potentials induced at 1 Hz stimulation in the absence of any anesthesia. Conclusions Therefore the high density electrode array allows high spatial resolution and the ability to selectively activate different neural pathways within the lumbosacral region of the spinal cord to facilitate standing and stepping in adult spinal rats and provides the capability to evoke motor potentials and thus a means for assessing connectivity between sensory circuits and specific motor pools and muscles. PMID:23336733

  10. Somatotopic arrangement of thermal sensory regions in the healthy human spinal cord determined by means of spinal cord functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Stroman, Patrick W; Bosma, Rachael L; Tsyben, Anastasia

    2012-09-01

    Previous functional MRI studies of normal sensory function in the human spinal cord, including right-to-left symmetry of activity, have been influenced by order effects between repeated studies. In this study, we apply thermal sensory stimulation to four dermatomes within each functional MRI time-series acquisition. Each of the four dermatomes receives a unique stimulation paradigm, such that the four paradigms form a linearly independent set, enabling detection of each individual stimulus response. Functional MRI data are shown spanning the cervical spinal cord and brainstem in 10 healthy volunteers. Results of general linear model analysis demonstrate consistent patterns of activity within the spinal cord segments corresponding to each dermatome, and a high degree of symmetry between right-side and left-side stimulation. Connectivity analyses also demonstrate consistent areas of activity and connectivity between spinal cord and brainstem regions corresponding to known anatomy. However, right-side and left-side responses are not at precisely the same rostral-caudal positions, but are offset by several millimeters, with left-side responses consistently more caudal than right-side responses. The results confirm that distinct responses to multiple interleaved sensory stimuli can be distinguished, enabling studies of sensory responses within the spinal cord without the confounding effects of comparing sequential studies.

  11. Distribution of Neuron Cell Bodies in the Intraspinal Portion of the Spinal Accessory Nerve in Humans.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Karl E; Kondrashov, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The spinal accessory nerve is often identified as a purely motor nerve innervating the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles. Although it may contain proprioceptive neurons found in cervical spinal levels C2-C4, limited research has focused on the histology of the spinal accessory nerve. The objective of the present study was to examine the spinal accessory nerve to determine if there are neuronal cell bodies within the spinal accessory nerve in humans. Cervical spinal cords were dissected from eight cadavers that had previously been used for dissection in other body regions. The segmental rootlets were removed to quantify the neuron cell bodies present at each spinal level. Samples were embedded in paraffin; sectioned; stained with hematoxylin and eosin; and examined using a microscope at 4×, 10×, and 40× magnification. Digital photography was used to image the samples. Neuronal cell bodies were found in 100% of the specimens examined, with non-grossly visible ganglia found at spinal levels C1-C4. The C1 spinal level of the spinal accessory nerve had the highest number of neuron cell bodies.

  12. The Radiation Dose-Response of the Human Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize the radiation dose-response of the human spinal cord. Methods and Materials: Because no single institution has sufficient data to establish a dose-response function for the human spinal cord, published reports were combined. Requisite data were dose and fractionation, number of patients at risk, number of myelopathy cases, and survival experience of the population. Eight data points for cervical myelopathy were obtained from five reports. Using maximum likelihood estimation correcting for the survival experience of the population, estimates were obtained for the median tolerance dose, slope parameter, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio in a logistic dose-response function. An adequate fit to thoracic data was not possible. Hyperbaric oxygen treatments involving the cervical cord were also analyzed. Results: The estimate of the median tolerance dose (cervical cord) was 69.4 Gy (95% confidence interval, 66.4-72.6). The {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy. At 45 Gy, the (extrapolated) probability of myelopathy is 0.03%; and at 50 Gy, 0.2%. The dose for a 5% myelopathy rate is 59.3 Gy. Graphical analysis indicates that the sensitivity of the thoracic cord is less than that of the cervical cord. There appears to be a sensitizing effect from hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Conclusions: The estimate of {alpha}/{beta} is smaller than usually quoted, but values this small were found in some studies. Using {alpha}/{beta} = 0.87 Gy, one would expect a considerable advantage by decreasing the dose/fraction to less than 2 Gy. These results were obtained from only single fractions/day and should not be applied uncritically to hyperfractionation.

  13. Hindlimb Stretching Alters Locomotor Function Post-Spinal Cord Injury in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Caudle, Krista L.; Atkinson, Darryn A.; Brown, Edward H.; Donaldson, Katie; Seibt, Erik; Chea, Tim; Smith, Erin; Chung, Karianne; Shum-Siu, Alice; Cron, Courtney C.; Magnuson, David S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Stretching is a widely accepted standard-of-care therapy following spinal cord injury that has not been systematically studied in animal models. Objective To investigate the influence of a daily stretch-based physical therapy program on locomotor recovery in adult rats with moderate T9 contusive SCI. Methods A randomized treatment and control study of stretching in an animal model of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Moderate spinal cord injuries were delivered with the NYU Impactor. Daily stretching (30 min./day, 5 days/wk for 8 wks) was provided by a team of animal handlers. Hindlimb function was assessed using the BBB Open Field Locomotor Scale and kinematically. Passive range-of-motion for each joint was determined weekly using a goniometer. Results Declines in hindlimb function during overground stepping were observed for the first 4 weeks. BBB scores improved weeks 5–10 but remained below the control group. Stretched animals had significant deficits in knee passive ROM starting at week 4 and for the duration of the study. Kinematic assessment showed decreased joint excursion during stepping that partially recovered beginning at week 5. Conclusion Stretch-based therapy significantly impaired functional recovery in adult rats with a moderate contusive SCI at T10. The negative impact on function was greatest acutely, but persisted even after the stretching ceased at 8 weeks post-injury. PMID:25106555

  14. Impact of spine surgery complications on costs associated with management of adult spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Yeramaneni, Samrat; Robinson, Chessie; Hostin, Richard

    2016-09-01

    A better understanding of the consequences of spine surgery complications is warranted to optimize patient-reported outcomes and contain the rising health care costs associated with the management of adult spinal deformity (ASD). We systematically searched PubMed and Scopus databases using keywords "adult spinal deformity surgery," "complications," and "cost" for published studies on costs of complications associated with spinal surgery, with a particular emphasis on ASD and scoliosis. In the 17 articles reviewed, we identified 355,354 patients with 11,148 reported complications. Infection was the most commonly reported complication, with an average treatment cost ranging from $15,817 to $38,701. Hospital costs for patients with deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary thromboembolism, and surgical site infection were 2.3 to 3.1 times greater than for patients without those complications. An effort to collect and characterize data on cost of complications is encouraged, which may help health care providers to identify potential resources to limit complications and overall costs. PMID:27278531

  15. Peripheral Nerve Transplantation Combined with Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor and Chondroitinase Induces Regeneration and Improves Urinary Function in Complete Spinal Cord Transected Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    DePaul, Marc A.; Lin, Ching-Yi; Silver, Jerry; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2015-01-01

    The loss of lower urinary tract (LUT) control is a ubiquitous consequence of a complete spinal cord injury, attributed to a lack of regeneration of supraspinal pathways controlling the bladder. Previous work in our lab has utilized a combinatorial therapy of peripheral nerve autografts (PNG), acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF), and chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to treat a complete T8 spinal cord transection in the adult rat, resulting in supraspinal control of bladder function. In the present study we extended these findings by examining the use of the combinatorial PNG+aFGF+ChABC treatment in a T8 transected mouse model, which more closely models human urinary deficits following spinal cord injury. Cystometry analysis and external urethral sphincter electromyograms reveal that treatment with PNG+aFGF+ChABC reduced bladder weight, improved bladder and external urethral sphincter histology, and significantly enhanced LUT function, resulting in more efficient voiding. Treated mice’s injured spinal cord also showed a reduction in collagen scaring, and regeneration of serotonergic and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons across the lesion and into the distal spinal cord. Regeneration of serotonin axons correlated with LUT recovery. These results suggest that our mouse model of LUT dysfunction recapitulates the results found in the rat model and may be used to further investigate genetic contributions to regeneration failure. PMID:26426529

  16. Lessons for spinal cord injury rehabilitation taken from adult developmental psychology: 2011 Essie Morgan Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Background/objective Developmental phases affect how individuals cope with and challenge threats to self-concept, health and functioning. Understanding prominent models of adult psychological development can help spinal cord injury/disease (SCI/D) rehabilitation professionals facilitate positive change and growth. Design Author's theoretical model informed by literature review and personal experience. Setting Veterans administration (VA) medical center interdisciplinary outpatient clinic providing primary and specialty care to veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders. Conclusion Threats to life expectations, health, well-being, identity, and other aspects of self create crises that can result in psychopathology or psychological growth. SCI/D can present multiple threats across the lifespan. For example, self-image, ability to perform various activities, ability to feel attractive, and even life itself may be challenged by SCI/D or its complications. Threats may be perceived at the time of injury or onset of symptoms. Also, as the injured body declines further over time, complications can cause significant temporary or permanent functional decline. Individuals interpret each of these threats in the context of current developmental needs. How people cope is influenced by developmental factors and personality traits. An integrated model of adult psychological development based on the works of Erikson, Gutmann, and Baltes is related to the literature on coping with SCI/D. This model provides insights that interdisciplinary rehabilitation teams may use to facilitate personal growth, optimal functioning, and physical health as adults with SCI negotiate normal developmental challenges throughout their lifetimes. PMID:22507022

  17. Nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells reside in adult spinal cord meninges and participate in injury-induced parenchymal reaction.

    PubMed

    Decimo, Ilaria; Bifari, Francesco; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier; Malpeli, Giorgio; Dolci, Sissi; Lavarini, Valentina; Pretto, Silvia; Vasquez, Sandra; Sciancalepore, Marina; Montalbano, Alberto; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido

    2011-12-01

    Adult spinal cord has little regenerative potential, thus limiting patient recovery following injury. In this study, we describe a new population of cells resident in the adult rat spinal cord meninges that express the neural stem/precursor markers nestin and doublecortin. Furthermore, from dissociated meningeal tissue a neural stem cell population was cultured in vitro and subsequently shown to differentiate into functional neurons or mature oligodendrocytes. Proliferation rate and number of nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells increased in vivo in meninges following spinal cord injury. By using a lentivirus-labeling approach, we show that meningeal cells, including nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells, migrate in the spinal cord parenchyma and contribute to the glial scar formation. Our data emphasize the multiple roles of meninges in the reaction of the parenchyma to trauma and indicate for the first time that spinal cord meninges are potential niches harboring stem/precursor cells that can be activated by injury. Meninges may be considered as a new source of adult stem/precursor cells to be further tested for use in regenerative medicine applied to neurological disorders, including repair from spinal cord injury.

  18. Transplanted Oligodendrocytes and Motoneuron Progenitors Generated from Human Embryonic Stem Cells Promote Locomotor Recovery After Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Oria, Marc; García Roselló, Mireia; Aragó, Maria Amparo Pérez; Lopez, Maria Gomez; Radojevic, Ivana; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Francisco-Javier; Shanker Bhattacharya, Shom; Cordoba, Juan; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) hold great promise for the treatment of patients with many neurodegenerative diseases particularly those arising from cell loss or neural dysfunction including spinal cord injury. This study evaluates the therapeutic effects of transplanted hESC-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPC) and/or motoneuron progenitors (MP) on axonal remyelination and functional recovery of adult rats after complete spinal cord transection. OPC and/or MP were grafted into the site of injury in the acute phase. Based on Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scores recovery of locomotor function was significantly enhanced in rats treated with OPC and/or MP when compared with control animals. When transplanted into the spinal cord immediately after complete transection, OPC and MP survived, migrated, and differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes and neurons showing in vivo electrophysiological activity. Taken together, these results indicate that OPC and MP derived from hESC could be a useful therapeutic strategy to repair injured spinal cord. Stem Cells 2010; 28:1541–1549. PMID:20665739

  19. The burden of acute traumatic spinal cord injury among adults in the united states: an update.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Shalini; Hammond, Edward R; Haider, Adil H; Abularrage, Christopher J; Becker, Daniel; Dhiman, Nitasha; Hyder, Omar; Gupta, Deepak; Black, James H; Schneider, Eric B

    2014-02-01

    The current incidence estimate of 40 traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCI) per million population/year in the United States (U.S.) is based on data from the 1990s. We sought to update the incidence and epidemiology of TSCI in U.S adults by using the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), the largest all-payer emergency department (ED) database in the United States. Adult ED visits between 2007 and 2009 with a principal diagnosis of TSCI were identified using International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 codes (806.0-806.9 and 952.0-952.9). We describe TSCI cumulative incidence, mortality, discharge disposition, and hospital charges weighted to the U.S. population. The estimated 3-year cumulative incidence of TSCI was 56.4 per million adults. Cumulative incidence of TSCI in older adults increased from 79.4 per million older adults in 2007 to 87.7 by the end of 2009, but remained steady among younger adults. Overall, falls were the leading cause of TSCI (41.5%). ED charges rose by 20% over the study period, and death occurred in 5.7% of patients. Compared with younger adults, older adults demonstrated higher adjusted odds of mortality in the ED (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=4.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-16.6), mortality during hospitalization (AOR=5.9; 95% CI: 4.7-7.4), and being discharged to chronic care (AOR=3.7; 95% CI: 3.0-4.5). The incidence of TSCI is higher than previously reported with a progressive increase among older adults who also experience worse outcomes compared with younger adults. ED-related TSCI charges are also increasing. These updated national estimates support the development of customized prevention strategies based on age-specific risk factors.

  20. Effects of mechanical horseback riding velocity on spinal alignment in young adults.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae-Heon; Cho, Woon-Su; Lee, Seong-Jin; Park, Chi-Bok; Park, Jang-Sung

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine if the velocity of mechanical horseback-riding training can improve spinal alignment in young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six subjects were enrolled in this study. The subjects were randomly allocated into high-, moderate-, and low-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training groups. All participants completed one 20-minute session per day, 3 days per week, for 6 weeks. The evaluation was performed before and 6 weeks after the training intervention. The spinal alignment was measured by a Formetric III device. The measurement items were kyphotic angle, lordotic angle, trunk inclination, pelvic torsion, pelvic rotation, and lateral deviation. The data were analyzed using analysis of covariance to determine the statistical significance. [Results] The kyphotic angle and trunk inclination were significantly different among the groups. The kyphotic angles of the high- and moderate-velocity groups were significantly lower than that of the low-velocity group after the intervention. The trunk inclination of the high-velocity group was significantly lower than that of the low-velocity group after intervention. [Conclusion] Higher-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training is more effective than lower-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training for improving spinal alignment.

  1. Effects of mechanical horseback riding velocity on spinal alignment in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae-Heon; Cho, Woon-Su; Lee, Seong-Jin; Park, Chi-Bok; Park, Jang-Sung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine if the velocity of mechanical horseback-riding training can improve spinal alignment in young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-six subjects were enrolled in this study. The subjects were randomly allocated into high-, moderate-, and low-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training groups. All participants completed one 20-minute session per day, 3 days per week, for 6 weeks. The evaluation was performed before and 6 weeks after the training intervention. The spinal alignment was measured by a Formetric III device. The measurement items were kyphotic angle, lordotic angle, trunk inclination, pelvic torsion, pelvic rotation, and lateral deviation. The data were analyzed using analysis of covariance to determine the statistical significance. [Results] The kyphotic angle and trunk inclination were significantly different among the groups. The kyphotic angles of the high- and moderate-velocity groups were significantly lower than that of the low-velocity group after the intervention. The trunk inclination of the high-velocity group was significantly lower than that of the low-velocity group after intervention. [Conclusion] Higher-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training is more effective than lower-velocity mechanical horseback-riding training for improving spinal alignment. PMID:27390428

  2. Effects of enriched housing on functional recovery after spinal cord contusive injury in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Lankhorst, A J; ter Laak, M P; van Laar, T J; van Meeteren, N L; de Groot, J C; Schrama, L H; Hamers, F P; Gispen, W H

    2001-02-01

    To date, most research performed in the area of spinal cord injury focuses on treatments designed to either prevent spreading lesion (secondary injury) or to enhance outgrowth of long descending and ascending fiber tracts around or through the lesion. In the last decade, however, several authors have shown that it is possible to enhance locomotor function after spinal cord injury in both animals and patients using specific training paradigms. As a first step towards combining such training paradigms with pharmacotherapy, we evaluated recovery of function in adult rats sustaining a spinal cord contusion injury (MASCIS device, 12.5 mm at T8), either housed in an enriched environment or in standard cages (n = 15 in both groups). The animals in the enriched environment were stimulated to increase their locomotor activity by placing water and food on opposite sides of the cage. As extra stimuli, a running wheel and several other objects were added to the cage. We show that exposure to the enriched environment improves gross and fine locomotor recovery as measured by the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, the BBB subscale, the Gridwalk, and the Thoracolumbar height test. However, no group differences were found on our electrophysiological parameters nor on the amount of spared white matter. These data justify further studies on enriched housing and more controlled exercise training, with their use as potential additive to pharmacological intervention. PMID:11229712

  3. Does Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2) Use in Adult Spinal Deformity (ASD) Increase Complications and Are Complications Associated With Location of rhBMP-2 Use?: A Prospective, Multicenter Study of 279 Consecutive Patients.

    PubMed

    Bess, Shay; Line, Breton G; Lafarge, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Hart, Robert A; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba; Akbarnia, Behrooz A; Ames, Christopher P; Burton, Douglas C; Deverin, Vedat; Fu, Kai-Ming G; Gupta, Munish; Hostin, Richard; Kebaish, Khaled; Klineberg, Eric; Mundis, Gregory; O'Brien, Michael; Shelokov, Alexis; Smith, Justin S

    2013-11-18

    Study Design. Multi-center, prospective analysis of consecutive ASD patients.Objective. Evaluate complications associated with rhBMP-2 use in ASDSummary of Background Data. Off-label rhBMP-2 use is common, however under-reporting of rhBMP-2 associated complications has been recently scrutinized.Methods. ASD patients consecutively enrolled into a prospective, multicenter database, were evaluated for type and timing of acute perioperative complications. Inclusion criteria: age ≥ 18 years, ASD, spinal arthrodesis >4 levels, and ≥3 months follow-up. Patients divided into those receiving rhBMP-2 (BMP) or no rhBMP-2 (NOBMP). BMP divided into location of use: posterior (PBMP), interbody (IBMP), and interbody + posterior spine (I+PBMP). Correlations between acute perioperative complications and rhBMP-2 use including total dose, dose/level and location of use were evaluated.Results. 279 patients (mean age 57 years, mean spinal levels fused 12.0, mean follow-up 28.8 months) met inclusion criteria. BMP (n = 172; average posterior dose = 2.5 mg/level, average interbody dose = 5 mg/level) had similar age, smoking history, previous spine surgery, total spinal levels fused, estimated blood loss, and duration of hospital stay as NOBMP (n = 107; p>0.05). BMP had greater Charlson Comorbidity Index (1.9 vs. 1.2), greater scoliosis (43° vs. 38°), longer operative time (488.2 vs. 414.6 minutes), more osteotomies/patient (4.0 vs. 1.6) and greater percentage of anteroposterior fusion (APSF; 20.9% vs. 8.4%) than NOBMP, respectively (p<0.05). BMP had more total complications/patient (1.4 vs.0.6) and more minor complications/patient (0.9 vs. 0.2) than NOBMP, respectively (p<0.05). NOBMP had more complications requiring surgery/patient than BMP (0.3 vs. 0.2; p<0.05). Major, neurological, wound, and infection complications were similar for NOBMP, BMP, PBMP, IBMP, and I+PBMP (p>0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated small to non-existent correlations between rhBMP-2 use and

  4. Human spinal cord injury: motor unit properties and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C K; Bakels, R; Klein, C S; Zijdewind, I

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in widespread variation in muscle function. Review of motor unit data shows that changes in the amount and balance of excitatory and inhibitory inputs after SCI alter management of motoneurons. Not only are units recruited up to higher than usual relative forces when SCI leaves few units under voluntary control, the force contribution from recruitment increases due to elevation of twitch/tetanic force ratios. Force gradation and precision are also coarser with reduced unit numbers. Maximal unit firing rates are low in hand muscles, limiting voluntary strength, but are low, normal or high in limb muscles. Unit firing rates during spasms can exceed voluntary rates, emphasizing that deficits in descending drive limit force production. SCI also changes muscle properties. Motor unit weakness and fatigability seem universal across muscles and species, increasing the muscle weakness that arises from paralysis of units, motoneuron death and sensory impairment. Motor axon conduction velocity decreases after human SCI. Muscle contractile speed is also reduced, which lowers the stimulation frequencies needed to grade force when paralysed muscles are activated with patterned electrical stimulation. This slowing does not necessarily occur in hind limb muscles after cord transection in cats and rats. The nature, duration and level of SCI underlie some of these species differences, as do variations in muscle function, daily usage, tract control and fibre-type composition. Exploring this diversity is important to promote recovery of the hand, bowel, bladder and locomotor function most wanted by people with SCI. PMID:23901835

  5. Modeling of Spinal Column of Seated Human Body under Exposure to Whole-Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaoki, Gen; Yoshimura, Takuya; Kuriyama, Kaoru; Nakai, Kazuma

    In vehicle systems occupational drivers might expose themselves to vibration for a long time. This may cause illness of the spinal column such as low back pain. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the influence of vibration to the spinal column. Thus the modeling of seated human body is conducted in order to evaluate the effect of whole-body vibration to the spinal column. This model has the spinal column and the support structures such as the muscles of the back and the abdomen. The spinal column is made by the vertebrae and the intervertebral disks that are considered the rigid body and the rotational spring and damper respectively. The parameter of this model is decided by the literature and the body type of the subject with respect to the mass and the model structure. And stiffness and damping parameters are searched by fitting the model simulation results to the experimental measured data with respect to the vibration transmissibilities from the seat surface to the spinal column and the head and with respect to the driving-point apparent mass. In addition, the natural modes of the model compare with the result of experimental modal analysis. The influence of the abdomen and the muscles of the back are investigated by comparing three models with respect to above vibration characteristics. Three model are the proposed model, the model that has the spinal column and the model that has the muscles of the back in addition to the spinal column.

  6. Does social support impact depression in caregivers of adults ageing with spinal cord injuries?

    PubMed Central

    Rodakowski, Juleen; Skidmore, Elizabeth R.; Rogers, Joan C.; Schulz, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine the role of social support in predicting depression in caregivers of adults aging with spinal cord injuries (SCI). Design Cross-sectional secondary data analyses were conducted for this study. Setting Participants were recruited from multiple community locations in Pittsburgh, PA and Miami, FL. Subjects Community-dwelling caregivers of aging adults with SCI (N=173) were interviewed as part of a multisite randomized clinical trial. Main measures The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale measured caregiver depression symptom levels. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis examined the effect of social support (social integration, received social support, and negative social interactions) on depressive symptoms levels for the caregivers of adults aging with SCI, controlling for demographic characteristics and caregiving characteristics. Results Caregivers were, on average, 53 years old (SD=15) and care-recipients were 55 years old (SD=13). Average Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores indicated that sixty-nine (40%) caregivers had significant depressive symptoms (mean 8.69, SD=5.5). Negative social interactions (β̂ =.27, P<.01) and social integration (β̂ =−.25, P<.01) were significant independent predictors of depressive symptom levels in caregivers of adults aging with SCI. Conclusions Findings demonstrate that negative social interactions and social integration are associated with burden in caregivers of adults aging with SCI. Negative social interactions and social integration should be investigated in assessments and interventions intended to target caregiver depressive symptom levels. PMID:23117350

  7. Evaluation of the Behavior of Spinal Deformities in Tuberculosis of the Spine in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Magu, Narender Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A prospective clinical study. Purpose The objective of the present study was to evaluate the behavior of spinal deformities in tuberculosis (TB) of the spine during the initial 2 years and to suggest remedial measures. Overview of Literature Spinal TB is the most common cause of a kyphotic deformity in many parts of the world. Treatment of the established deformity is difficult, hazardous and has a high complication rate. Methods We followed 50 adult patients treated for spinal TB for a minimum of 2 years. Average values of vertebral body height loss (VBL), deformity angle, kyphosis angle, and lumbosacral joint angle at the final follow-up were compared with the values at initial presentation. The relationship between the amount of initial VBL and final kyphotic angle was analyzed. Results Average values of VBL, deformity angle, kyphosis angle, and lumbosacral joint angle at initial presentation were 0.26, 12.51°, 2.26°, and 12.3°, respectively; and the corresponding values at the final follow-up were 0.7, 17.8°, 5.64°, and 10.8°, respectively. The increase was extremely significant for the deformity angle (initial vs. 6th month, p=0.000; 6th month vs. 24th month, p=0.000) and kyphotic angle (initial vs. 6th month, p=0.003; 6th month vs. 24th month, p=0.000) in the thoracic and thoracolumbar regions during the first 2 years of the disease process. The increase in the deformity angle in the lumbar region was significant only in the initial 6 months (p=0.01). We could not find any correlation between the initial VBL and the final kyphotic angle (r=0.302, p>0.05). Conclusions Different regions of the vertebral column respond differently to bony destruction caused by spinal TB. Deformity progression is more significant during the initial 6 months of the disease process, and this may be the best time to take remedial measures to prevent development/progression of the deformity. Kyphotic deformity keeps increasing even after 6 months of antituberculous

  8. Influence of Spinal Cord Integrity on Gait Control in Human Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Awai, Lea; Bolliger, Marc; Ferguson, Adam R; Courtine, Grégoire; Curt, Armin

    2016-07-01

    Background Clinical trials in spinal cord injury (SCI) primarily rely on simplified outcome metrics (ie, speed, distance) to obtain a global surrogate for the complex alterations of gait control. However, these assessments lack sufficient sensitivity to identify specific patterns of underlying impairment and to target more specific treatment interventions. Objective To disentangle the differential control of gait patterns following SCI beyond measures of time and distance. Methods The gait of 22 individuals with motor-incomplete SCI and 21 healthy controls was assessed using a high-resolution 3-dimensional motion tracking system and complemented by clinical and electrophysiological evaluations applying unbiased multivariate analysis. Results Motor-incomplete SCI patients showed varying degrees of spinal cord integrity (spinal conductivity) with severe limitations in walking speed and altered gait patterns. Principal component (PC) analysis applied on all the collected data uncovered robust coherence between parameters related to walking speed, distortion of intralimb coordination, and spinal cord integrity, explaining 45% of outcome variance (PC 1). Distinct from the first PC, the modulation of gait-cycle variables (step length, gait-cycle phases, cadence; PC 2) remained normal with respect to regained walking speed, whereas hip and knee ranges of motion were distinctly altered with respect to walking speed (PC 3). Conclusions In motor-incomplete SCI, distinct clusters of discretely controlled gait parameters can be discerned that refine the evaluation of gait impairment beyond outcomes of walking speed and distance. These findings are specifically different from that in other neurological disorders (stroke, Parkinson) and are more discrete at targeting and disentangling the complex effects of interventions to improve walking outcome following motor-incomplete SCI.

  9. Spinal motor outputs during step-to-step transitions of diverse human gaits.

    PubMed

    La Scaleia, Valentina; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Zelik, Karl E; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of human motor control can be inferred from the coordination of muscles during movement. For instance, by combining multimuscle electromyographic (EMG) recordings with human neuroanatomy, it is possible to estimate alpha-motoneuron (MN) pool activations along the spinal cord. It has previously been shown that the spinal motor output fluctuates with the body's center-of-mass motion, with bursts of activity around foot-strike and foot lift-off during walking. However, it is not known whether these MN bursts are generalizable to other ambulation tasks, nor is it clear if the spatial locus of the activity (along the rostrocaudal axis of the spinal cord) is fixed or variable. Here we sought to address these questions by investigating the spatiotemporal characteristics of the spinal motor output during various tasks: walking forward, backward, tiptoe and uphill. We reconstructed spinal maps from 26 leg muscle EMGs, including some intrinsic foot muscles. We discovered that the various walking tasks shared qualitative similarities in their temporal spinal activation profiles, exhibiting peaks around foot-strike and foot-lift. However, we also observed differences in the segmental level and intensity of spinal activations, particularly following foot-strike. For example, forward level-ground walking exhibited a mean motor output roughly 2 times lower than the other gaits. Finally, we found that the reconstruction of the spinal motor output from multimuscle EMG recordings was relatively insensitive to the subset of muscles analyzed. In summary, our results suggested temporal similarities, but spatial differences in the segmental spinal motor outputs during the step-to-step transitions of disparate walking behaviors.

  10. Revisiting the segmental organization of the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Leijnse, J N; D'Herde, K

    2016-09-01

    In classic anatomic atlases, the spinal cord is standardly represented in its anatomical form with symmetrically emerging anterior and posterior roots, which at the level of the intervertebral foramen combine into the spinal nerves. The parts of the cord delimited by the boundaries of the roots are called segments or myelomeres. Associated with their regular repetitive appearance is the notion that the cord is segmentally organized. This segmental view is reinforced by clinical practice. Spinal cord roots innervate specific body parts. The level of cord trauma is diagnosed by the de-innervation symptoms of these parts. However, systemically, the case for a segmentally organized cord is not so clear. To date, developmental and genetic research points to a regionally rather than a segmentally organized cord. In the present study, to what degree the fila radicularia are segmentally implanted along the cord was investigated. The research hypothesis was that if the fila radicularia were non-segmentally implanted at the cord surface, it would be unlikely that the internal neuron stratum would be segmented. The visual segmented aspect of the myelomeres would then be the consequence of the necessary bundling of axons towards the vertebral foramen as the only exits of the vertebral canal, rather than of an underlying segment organization of the cord itself. To investigate the research hypothesis, the fila radicularia in the cervical-upper thoracic part of five spinal cords were detached from their spinal nerves and dissected in detail. The principal research question was if the fila radicularia are separated from their spinal nerves and dissected from their connective tissues up to the cord, would it be possible to reconstruct the original spinal segments from the morphology and interspaces of the fila? The dissections revealed that the anterior fila radicularia emerge from the cord at regular regionally modulated interspaces without systematic segmental delineations. The

  11. Transcutaneous electrical spinal-cord stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Gerasimenko, Yury; Gorodnichev, Ruslan; Moshonkina, Tatiana; Sayenko, Dimitry; Gad, Parag; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2016-01-01

    Locomotor behavior is controlled by specific neural circuits called central pattern generators primarily located at the lumbosacral spinal cord. These locomotor-related neuronal circuits have a high level of automaticity; that is, they can produce a “stepping” movement pattern also seen on electromyography (EMG) in the absence of supraspinal and/or peripheral afferent inputs. These circuits can be modulated by epidural spinal-cord stimulation and/or pharmacological intervention. Such interventions have been used to neuromodulate the neuronal circuits in patients with motor-complete spinal-cord injury (SCI) to facilitate postural and locomotor adjustments and to regain voluntary motor control. Here, we describe a novel non-invasive stimulation strategy of painless transcutaneous electrical enabling motor control (pcEmc) to neuromodulate the physiological state of the spinal cord. The technique can facilitate a stepping performance in non-injured subjects with legs placed in a gravity-neutral position. The stepping movements were induced more effectively with multi-site than single-site spinal-cord stimulation. From these results, a multielectrode surface array technology was developed. Our preliminary data indicate that use of the multielectrode surface array can fine-tune the control of the locomotor behavior. As well, the pcEmc strategy combined with exoskeleton technology is effective for improving motor function in paralyzed patients with SCI. The potential impact of using pcEmc to neuromodulate the spinal circuitry has significant implications for furthering our understanding of the mechanisms controlling locomotion and for rehabilitating sensorimotor function even after severe SCI. PMID:26205686

  12. Serotonin differentially modulates the intrinsic properties of spinal motoneurons from the adult turtle

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Jean-François; Cotel, Florence

    2008-01-01

    This report considers serotonergic (5-HT) effects on spinal motoneurons, reviewing previous data and presenting a new study showing distinct effects of two 5-HT receptor subtypes. We previously investigated the effects of 5-HT on motoneurons in a slice preparation from the spinal cord of the adult turtle. In agreement with previous studies, we had found that 5-HT applied to the extracellular medium promoted a voltage sensitive plateau potential. However, we also reported that this effect was only observed in half of the motoneurons; 5-HT inhibited the firing of the other half of the motoneurons recorded from. To investigate the reasons for this, we applied 5-HT focally by means of the microiontophoresis technique. Facilitation of plateau potentials was observed when 5-HT was released at sites throughout the somatodendritic region. However, motoneurons were inhibited by 5-HT when selectively applied in the perisomatic region. These two effects could be induced in the same motoneuron. With pharmacological tools, we demonstrate here that the facilitation of plateau potentials is mediated by 5-HT2 receptors and the inhibitory effect is due to the activation of 5-HT1A/7 receptors. PMID:18096602

  13. Psychological defenses and psychiatric symptoms in adults with pediatric spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Sammallahti, P; Kannisto, M; Aalberg, V

    1996-11-01

    The psychological defenses and psychiatric morbidity of 30 adults with pediatric spinal cord injury and of 235 community controls were compared several years after the occurence of the injury. The patient group did not report more symptoms when measured with the Symptom Checklist-90 than the control group, but there were some characteristic features in their use of defenses as measured with the Defense Style Questionnaire. The adaptation process seems to follow a pattern: the greater the length of time since the injury, the less likely were the immature defenses omnipotence-devaluation and regression and the higher were the scores on the mature defense anticipation. It appears that the same result-symptom free adaptation-is first achieved by more immature means but as the adaptation process evolves, the psychological equilibrium can be maintained by mature defenses which do not distort reality. Furthermore, the results that patients with pediatric spinal cord injury scored higher on fantasy (daydreaming) and passive aggression (silent resistance) suggest that being injured very young may leave some faint, yet permanent psychodynamic traces.

  14. Significant clinical, neuropathological and behavioural recovery from acute spinal cord trauma by transplantation of a well-defined somatic stem cell from human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Schira, Jessica; Gasis, Marcia; Estrada, Veronica; Hendricks, Marion; Schmitz, Christine; Trapp, Thorsten; Kruse, Fabian; Kögler, Gesine; Wernet, Peter; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Müller, Hans Werner

    2012-02-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential treatment for spinal cord injury and different stem cell types have been grafted into animal models and humans suffering from spinal trauma. Due to inconsistent results, it is still an important and clinically relevant question which stem cell type will prove to be therapeutically effective. Thus far, stem cells of human sources grafted into spinal cord mostly included barely defined heterogeneous mesenchymal stem cell populations derived from bone marrow or umbilical cord blood. Here, we have transplanted a well-defined unrestricted somatic stem cell isolated from human umbilical cord blood into an acute traumatic spinal cord injury of adult immune suppressed rat. Grafting of unrestricted somatic stem cells into the vicinity of a dorsal hemisection injury at thoracic level eight resulted in hepatocyte growth factor-directed migration and accumulation within the lesion area, reduction in lesion size and augmented tissue sparing, enhanced axon regrowth and significant functional locomotor improvement as revealed by three behavioural tasks (open field Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor score, horizontal ladder walking test and CatWalk gait analysis). To accomplish the beneficial effects, neither neural differentiation nor long-lasting persistence of the grafted human stem cells appears to be required. The secretion of neurite outgrowth-promoting factors in vitro further suggests a paracrine function of unrestricted somatic stem cells in spinal cord injury. Given the highly supportive functional characteristics in spinal cord injury, production in virtually unlimited quantities at GMP grade and lack of ethical concerns, unrestricted somatic stem cells appear to be a highly suitable human stem cell source for clinical application in central nervous system injuries. PMID:21903726

  15. Outcomes in adult scoliosis patients who undergo spinal fusion stopping at L5 compared with extension to the sacrum.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Zeeshan M; Ouellet, Jean A; Fischer, Dena J; Skelly, Andrea C

    2013-10-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale Adult scoliosis is a common disorder that is associated with significantly higher pain, functional impairment, and effect on quality of life than those without scoliosis. Surgical spinal fusion has led to quantifiable improvement in patient's quality of life. However, for patients undergoing long lumbar fusion, the decision to stop the fusion at L5 or to extend to S1, particularly if the L5-S1 disc is healthy, remains controversial. Objective The aim of the study is to evaluate if fusion stopping at L5 increases the comparative rates of revision, correction loss, and/or poor functional outcomes compared with extension to the sacrum in adult scoliosis patients who require spinal fusion surgery. Materials and Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse Database and bibliographies of key articles that evaluated adult scoliosis patients who required spinal fusion surgery and compared outcomes for fusions to the sacrum versus stopping at L5. Articles were included on the basis of predetermined criteria and were appraised using a predefined quality-rating scheme. Results From 111 citations, 26 articles underwent full-text review, and 3 retrospective cohort studies met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. Revision rates in subjects who underwent spinal fusion to L5 (20.8-23.5%) were lower in two studies compared with those with fusion extending to the sacrum (19.0-58.3%). Studies that assessed deformity correction used different measures, making comparison across studies difficult. No significant differences were found in patient-reported functional outcomes across two studies that used different measures. Conclusion The limited data available suggest that differences in revision rates did not consistently reach statistical significance across studies that compared spinal fusion to L5 versus extension to sacrum in adult scoliosis patients.

  16. Human spinal locomotor control is based on flexibly organized burst generators.

    PubMed

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Constant drive provided to the human lumbar spinal cord by epidural electrical stimulation can cause local neural circuits to generate rhythmic motor outputs to lower limb muscles in people paralysed by spinal cord injury. Epidural spinal cord stimulation thus allows the study of spinal rhythm and pattern generating circuits without their configuration by volitional motor tasks or task-specific peripheral feedback. To reveal spinal locomotor control principles, we studied the repertoire of rhythmic patterns that can be generated by the functionally isolated human lumbar spinal cord, detected as electromyographic activity from the legs, and investigated basic temporal components shared across these patterns. Ten subjects with chronic, motor-complete spinal cord injury were studied. Surface electromyographic responses to lumbar spinal cord stimulation were collected from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae in the supine position. From these data, 10-s segments of rhythmic activity present in the four muscle groups of one limb were extracted. Such samples were found in seven subjects. Physiologically adequate cycle durations and relative extension- and flexion-phase durations similar to those needed for locomotion were generated. The multi-muscle activation patterns exhibited a variety of coactivation, mixed-synergy and locomotor-like configurations. Statistical decomposition of the electromyographic data across subjects, muscles and samples of rhythmic patterns identified three common temporal components, i.e. basic or shared activation patterns. Two of these basic patterns controlled muscles to contract either synchronously or alternatingly during extension- and flexion-like phases. The third basic pattern contributed to the observed muscle activities independently from these extensor- and flexor-related basic patterns. Each bifunctional muscle group was able to express both extensor- and flexor-patterns, with variable ratios across the

  17. Neurochemical profile of the human cervical spinal cord determined by MRS.

    PubMed

    Hock, Andreas; Wilm, Bertram; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Franckenberg, Sabine; Zoelch, Niklaus; Wyss, Patrik Oliver; De Zanche, Nicola; Nordmeyer-Maßner, Jurek; Kraemer, Thomas; Thali, Michael; Ernst, Matthias; Kollias, Spyros; Henning, Anke

    2016-10-01

    MRS enables insight into the chemical composition of central nervous system tissue. However, technical challenges degrade the data quality when applied to the human spinal cord. Therefore, to date detection of only the most prominent metabolite resonances has been reported in the healthy human spinal cord. The aim of this investigation is to provide an extended metabolic profile including neurotransmitters and antioxidants in addition to metabolites involved in the energy and membrane metabolism of the human cervical spinal cord in vivo. To achieve this, data quality was improved by using a custom-made, cervical detector array together with constructive averaging of a high number of echo signals, which is enabled by the metabolite cycling technique at 3T. In addition, the improved spinal cord spectra were extensively cross-validated, in vivo, post-mortem in situ and ex vivo. Reliable identification of up to nine metabolites was achieved in group analyses for the first time. Distinct features of the spinal cord neurochemical profile, in comparison with the brain neurotransmission system, include decreased concentrations of the sum of glutamate and glutamate and increased concentrations of aspartate, γ-amino-butyric acid, scyllo-inositol and the sum of myo-inositol and glycine. PMID:27580498

  18. Comprehensive assessment of walking function after human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Awai, Lea; Curt, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Regaining any locomotor function after spinal cord injury is not only of immediate importance for affected patients but also for clinical research as it allows to investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment and locomotor recovery. Clinical scores inform on functional outcomes that are clinically meaningful to value effects of therapy while they all lack the ability to explain underlying mechanisms of recovery. For this purpose, more elaborate recordings of walking kinematics combined with assessments of spinal cord conductivity and muscle activation patterns are required. A comprehensive assessment framework comprising of multiple complementary modalities is necessary. This will not only allow for capturing even subtle changes induced by interventions that are likely missed by standard clinical outcome measures. It will be fundamental to attribute observed changes to naturally occurring spontaneous recovery in contrast to specific changes induced by novel therapeutic interventions beyond the improvements achieved by conventional therapy.

  19. Potential of adult mammalian lumbosacral spinal cord to execute and acquire improved locomotion in the absence of supraspinal input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Prober, R. J.; de Guzman, C. P.; de Leon, R.

    1992-01-01

    The neural circuitry of the lumbar spinal cord can generate alternating extension and flexion of the hindlimbs. The hindlimbs of adult cats with complete transection of the spinal cord at a low thoracic level (T12-T13) can perform full weight-supporting locomotion on a treadmill belt moving at a range of speeds. Some limitations in the locomotor capacity can be associated with a deficit in the recruitment level of the fast extensors during the stance phase and the flexors during the swing phase of a step cycle. The level of locomotor performance, however, can be enhanced by daily training on a treadmill while emphasizing full weight-support stepping and by providing appropriately timed sensory stimulation, loading, and/or pharmacologic stimulation of the hindlimb neuromuscular apparatus. Furthermore, there appears to be an interactive effect of these interventions. For example, the maximum treadmill speed that a spinal adult cat can attain and maintain is significantly improved with daily full weight-supporting treadmill training, but progressive recruitment of fast extensors becomes apparent only when the hindlimbs are loaded by gently pulling down on the tail during the stepping. Stimulation of the sural nerve at the initiation of the flexion phase of the step cycle can likewise markedly improve the locomotor capability. Administration of clonidine, in particular in combination with an elevated load, resulted in the most distinct and consistent alternating bursts of electromyographic activity during spinal stepping. These data indicate that the spinal cord has the ability to execute alternating activation of the extensor and flexor musculature of the hindlimbs (stepping) and that this ability can be improved by several interventions such as training, sensory stimulation, and use of some pharmacologic agents. Thus, it appears that the spinal cord, without supraspinal input, is highly plastic and has the potential to "learn," that is, to acquire and improve its

  20. Heart Rate Response During Underwater Treadmill Training in Adults with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Walking on a submerged treadmill can improve mobility in persons displaying lower limb muscle weakness and balance deficits. Little is known, however, regarding the effect of water treadmill exercise on cardiac performance in persons with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Objective: To assess heart rate response during underwater treadmill training (UTT) in adults with iSCI. Methods: Seven males and 4 females with iSCI (age = 48 ± 13 years; 5 ± 8 years after injury) completed 8 weeks of UTT (3 sessions per week; 3 walks per session) incorporating individually determined walking speeds, personalized levels of body weight unloading, and gradual, alternating increases in speed and duration. Heart rate was monitored during the last 15 seconds of the final 2 minutes of each walk. Results: Over the course of 3 biweekly periods in which walking speed remained constant, heart rate fell by 7% (7 ± 1 b•min-1; P < .001) in weeks 2 and 3, 14% (17 ± 6 b•min-1; P < .001) in weeks 4 and 5, and 17% (21 ± 11 b•min-1; P < .001) in weeks 6 and 7. Conclusion: In adults with iSCI, progressively greater absolute and relative reductions in submaximal exercise heart rate occurred after 2 months of UTT featuring a systematic increase in training volume. PMID:25762859

  1. Human Neural Stem Cell Replacement Therapy for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis by Spinal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hefferan, Michael P.; Galik, Jan; Kakinohana, Osamu; Sekerkova, Gabriela; Santucci, Camila; Marsala, Silvia; Navarro, Roman; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Johe, Karl; Feldman, Eva; Cleveland, Don W.; Marsala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Mutation in the ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase (SOD1) causes an inherited form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Mutant synthesis in motor neurons drives disease onset and early disease progression. Previous experimental studies have shown that spinal grafting of human fetal spinal neural stem cells (hNSCs) into the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1G93A rats leads to a moderate therapeutical effect as evidenced by local α-motoneuron sparing and extension of lifespan. The aim of the present study was to analyze the degree of therapeutical effect of hNSCs once grafted into the lumbar spinal ventral horn in presymptomatic immunosuppressed SOD1G93A rats and to assess the presence and functional integrity of the descending motor system in symptomatic SOD1G93A animals. Methods/Principal Findings Presymptomatic SOD1G93A rats (60–65 days old) received spinal lumbar injections of hNSCs. After cell grafting, disease onset, disease progression and lifespan were analyzed. In separate symptomatic SOD1G93A rats, the presence and functional conductivity of descending motor tracts (corticospinal and rubrospinal) was analyzed by spinal surface recording electrodes after electrical stimulation of the motor cortex. Silver impregnation of lumbar spinal cord sections and descending motor axon counting in plastic spinal cord sections were used to validate morphologically the integrity of descending motor tracts. Grafting of hNSCs into the lumbar spinal cord of SOD1G93A rats protected α-motoneurons in the vicinity of grafted cells, provided transient functional improvement, but offered no protection to α-motoneuron pools distant from grafted lumbar segments. Analysis of motor-evoked potentials recorded from the thoracic spinal cord of symptomatic SOD1G93A rats showed a near complete loss of descending motor tract conduction, corresponding to a significant (50–65%) loss of large caliber descending motor axons. Conclusions/Significance These data

  2. Intermittent noxious stimulation following spinal cord contusion injury impairs locomotor recovery and reduces spinal BDNF-TrkB signaling in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Garraway, Sandra M.; Turtle, Joel D.; Huie, J. Russell; Lee, Kuan H.; Hook, Michelle A.; Woller, Sarah A.; Grau, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent nociceptive stimulation following a complete transection or contused spinal cord injury (SCI) has been shown to exert several short and long lasting negative consequences. These include maladaptive spinal plasticity, enhanced mechanical allodynia and impaired functional recovery of locomotor and bladder functions. The neurotrophin, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to play an important role in adaptive plasticity and also to restore functions following SCI. This suggests that the negative behavioral effects of shock are most likely related to corresponding changes in BDNF spinal levels. In this study we investigated the cellular effects of nociceptive stimulation in contused adult rats focusing on BDNF, its receptor, TrkB, and the subsequent downstream signaling system. The goal was to determine whether the behavioral effect of stimulation is associated with concomitant cellular changes induced during the initial post-injury period. Quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting were used to assess changes in the mRNA and/or protein levels of BDNF, TrkB and the downstream signaling proteins CAMKII and ERK1/2 at 1 hour, 24 hours and 7 days following administration of intermittent noxious shock to the tail of contused subjects. In addition, recovery of locomotor function (BBB score) was assessed daily for the first week post injury. The results showed that, while nociceptive stimulation failed to induce any changes in gene expression at 1 hour, it significantly reduced the expression of BDNF, TrkB, ERK2 and CAMKII, at 24 hours. In general, changes in gene expression were spatially localized to the dorsal spinal cord. In addition, locomotor recovery was impaired by shock. Evidence is also provided suggesting that shock engages a neuronal circuitry without having any negative effects on neuronal survival at 24 hours. These results suggest that nociceptive activity following SCI decreases BDNF and TrkB levels, which may significantly

  3. Acute and Chronic Deficits in the Urinary Bladder after Spinal Contusion Injury in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Juan J.; Haywood-Watson, Ricky J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) permanently alters bladder function in humans. Hematuria and cystitis occur in both human SCI as well as in rodent models of SCI. Others have reported early SCI-dependent disruption to bladder uroepithelial integrity that results in increased permeability to urine and urine-borne substances. This can result in cystitis, or inflammation of the bladder, an ongoing pathological condition present throughout the chronic phase of SCI in humans. The goals of our study were twofold: (1) to begin to examine the inflammatory and molecular changes that occur within the bladder uroepithelium using a clinically-relevant spinal contusion model of injury, and (2) to assess whether these alterations continue into the chronic phase of SCI. Rats received either moderate SCI or sham surgery. Urine was collected from SCI and sham subjects over 7 days or at 7 months to assess levels of excreted proteins. Inflammation in the bladder wall was assessed via biochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Bladder tight junction proteins, mediators of uroepithelial integrity, were also measured in both the acute and chronic phases of SCI. Urine protein and hemoglobin levels rapidly increase following SCI. An SCI-dependent elevation in numbers of neutrophils within the bladder wall peaked at 48 h. Bladder tight junction proteins demonstrate a rapid but transient decrease as early as 2 h post-SCI. Surprisingly, elevated levels of urine proteins and significant deficits in bladder tight junction proteins could be detected in chronic SCI, suggesting that early pathological changes to the bladder may continue throughout the chronic phase of injury. PMID:19891526

  4. Cyp26b1 mediates differential neurogenicity in axial-specific populations of adult spinal cord progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, Carly; Chan, Sherwin Chun Leung; Tsang, Sze Lan; Wu, Wutian; Sham, Mai Har

    2012-08-10

    Utilization of endogenous adult spinal cord progenitor cells (SCPCs) for neuronal regeneration is a promising strategy for spinal cord repair. To mobilize endogenous SCPCs for injury repair, it is necessary to understand their intrinsic properties and to identify signaling factors that can stimulate their neurogenic potential. In this study, we demonstrate that adult mouse SCPCs express distinct combinatorial Hox genes and exhibit axial-specific stem cell properties. Lumbar-derived neurospheres displayed higher primary sphere formation and greater neurogenicity compared with cervical- and thoracic-derived neurospheres. To further understand the mechanisms governing neuronal differentiation of SCPCs from specific axial regions, we examined the neurogenic responses of adult SCPCs to retinoic acid (RA), an essential factor for adult neurogenesis. Although RA is a potent inducer of neuronal differentiation, we found that RA enhanced the generation of neurons specifically in cervical- but not lumbar-derived cells. We further demonstrate that the differential RA response was mediated by the RA-degrading enzyme cytochrome P450 oxidase b1 Cyp26b1. Lumbar cells express high levels of Cyp26b1 and low levels of the RA-synthesizing enzyme retinaldehyde dehydrogenase Raldh2, resulting in limited activation of the RA signaling pathway in these cells. In contrast, low Cyp26b1 expression in cervical spinal cord progenitor cells allows RA signaling to be readily activated upon RA treatment. The intrinsic heterogeneity and signaling factor regulation among adult SCPCs suggest that different niche factor regimens are required for site-specific mobilization of endogenous SCPCs from distinct spatial regions of the spinal cord for injury repair.

  5. Further amputations of the tail in adult Triturus carnifex: contribution to the study on the nature of regenerated spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Margotta, Vito

    2008-01-01

    Adult Urodele Amphibians, if deprived of the tail, are able to fully regenerate it. This occurs owing to a typical epimorphic phenomenon which takes place in various phases. Within this matter, in particular on the reconstruction of the caudal nervous component, literature sources refer to a great quantity of research following only one amputation of the tail. Being aware of these data we programmed to investigate the possible persistence, decrease or disappearance of the medullary regenerative power after repeated amputations of the regenerated tail. With this objective in view, we have performed on adult Triturus carnifex a series of such operations at time spaced out from one another. In previous experiments, the amputations of the tail have been before seven and then nine. In the current experiment, the same specimens have been subjected to further removals of the tail. This study has developed into three cycles going on over a period of more than ten years. Overall, our panorama rising from the integration of present results and those of former observations is in agreement with what occurs in the area which is the centre of the beginnings of medullary regeneration processes and the bibliographic information concerning the pre-blastematic and blastematic phases. In the subsequent morphogenetic and differentiative phases, however, with the recurrence of the re-establishment of the spinal cord, these events proceed more slowly (gap which reduces when the time interval starting from the operation increases) than in the spinal cords which regenerated after only one tail amputation. Furthermore, although the regenerated spinal cords, if compared to normal spinal cord, show some anomalies (regarding medullary length and diameter, distribution of the spinal nerves and ganglia), the regenerated spinal cords (as well-known uncapable to re-form the Mauthner fibres and supplied with the Rohon-Beard sensitive neurons), their nerves and ganglia reacquire the same complex

  6. Rat locomotor spinal circuits in vitro are activated by electrical stimulation with noisy waveforms sampled from human gait

    PubMed Central

    Dose, Francesco; Menosso, Rachele; Taccola, Giuliano

    2013-01-01

    Noisy waveforms, sampled from an episode of fictive locomotion (FL) and delivered to a dorsal root (DR), are a novel electrical stimulating protocol demonstrated as the most effective for generating the locomotor rhythm in the rat isolated spinal cord. The present study explored if stimulating protocols constructed by sampling real human locomotion could be equally efficient to activate these locomotor networks in vitro. This approach may extend the range of usable stimulation protocols and provide a wide palette of noisy waveforms for this purpose. To this end, recorded electromyogram (EMG) from leg muscles of walking adult volunteers provided a protocol named ReaListim (Real Locomotion-induced stimulation) that applied to a single DR successfully activated FL. The smoothed kinematic profile of the same gait failed to do so like nonphasic noisy patterns derived from standing and isometric contraction. Power spectrum analysis showed distinctive low-frequency domains in ReaListim, along with the high-frequency background noise. The current study indicates that limb EMG signals (recorded during human locomotion) applied to DR of the rat spinal cord are more effective than EMG traces taken during standing or isometric contraction of the same muscles to activate locomotor networks. Finally, EMGs recorded during various human motor tasks demonstrated that noisy waves of the same periodicity as ReaListim, could efficiently activate the in vitro central pattern generator (CPG), regardless of the motor task from which they had been sampled. These data outline new strategies to optimize functional stimulation of spinal networks after injury. PMID:24303112

  7. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study.

    PubMed

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation, and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and, more recently, by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. We used a detailed three-dimensional volume conductor model of the torso and the McIntyre-Richard-Grill axon model to calculate the thresholds of axons within the posterior columns in response to transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation. Superficially located large-diameter posterior column fibers with multiple collaterals have a threshold of 45.4 V, three times higher than posterior root fibers (14.1 V). With the stimulation strength needed to activate posterior column axons, posterior root fibers of large and small diameters as well as anterior root fibers are coactivated. The reported results inform on these threshold differences, when stimulation is applied to the posterior structures of the lumbar cord at intensities above the threshold of large-diameter posterior root fibers. PMID:21401670

  8. Spinal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Tali, E Turgut; Koc, A Murat; Oner, A Yusuf

    2015-05-01

    Spinal involvement in human brucellosis is a common condition and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in endemic areas, because it is often associated with therapeutic failure. Most chronic brucellosis cases are the result of inadequate treatment of the initial episode. Recognition of spinal brucellosis is challenging. Early diagnosis is important to ensure proper treatment and decrease morbidity and mortality. Radiologic evaluation has gained importance in diagnosis and treatment planning, including interventional procedures and monitoring of all spinal infections.

  9. A neural circuitry that emphasizes spinal feedback generates diverse behaviours of human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Seungmoon; Geyer, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Neural networks along the spinal cord contribute substantially to generating locomotion behaviours in humans and other legged animals. However, the neural circuitry involved in this spinal control remains unclear. We here propose a specific circuitry that emphasizes feedback integration over central pattern generation. The circuitry is based on neurophysiologically plausible muscle-reflex pathways that are organized in 10 spinal modules realizing limb functions essential to legged systems in stance and swing. These modules are combined with a supraspinal control layer that adjusts the desired foot placements and selects the leg that is to transition into swing control during double support. Using physics-based simulation, we test the proposed circuitry in a neuromuscular human model that includes neural transmission delays, musculotendon dynamics and compliant foot–ground contacts. We find that the control network is sufficient to compose steady and transitional 3-D locomotion behaviours including walking and running, acceleration and deceleration, slope and stair negotiation, turning, and deliberate obstacle avoidance. The results suggest feedback integration to be functionally more important than central pattern generation in human locomotion across behaviours. In addition, the proposed control architecture may serve as a guide in the search for the neurophysiological origin and circuitry of spinal control in humans. PMID:25920414

  10. Spinal Cord Lesions in Congenital Toxoplasmosis Demonstrated with Neuroimaging, Including Their Successful Treatment in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Burrowes, Delilah; Boyer, Kenneth; Swisher, Charles N.; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Sautter, Mari; Heydemann, Peter; Rabiah, Peter; Lee, Daniel; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies for persons in the National Collaborative Chicago-Based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS) with symptoms and signs referable to the spinal cord were reviewed. Three infants had symptomatic spinal cord lesions, another infant a Chiari malformation, and another infant a symptomatic peri-spinal cord lipoma. One patient had an unusual history of prolonged spinal cord symptoms presenting in middle age. Neuroimaging was used to establish her diagnosis and response to treatment. This 43 year-old woman with congenital toxoplasmosis developed progressive leg spasticity, weakness, numbness, difficulty walking, and decreased visual acuity and color vision without documented re-activation of her chorioretinal disease. At 52 years of age, spinal cord lesions in locations correlating with her symptoms and optic atrophy were diagnosed with 3 Tesla MRI scan. Treatment with pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine decreased her neurologic symptoms, improved her neurologic examination, and resolved her enhancing spinal cord lesions seen on MRI. PMID:23487348

  11. Iso-effect table for radiation tolerance of the human spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, L.; Creditor, M.

    1981-07-01

    Available literature on radiation injury to the human spinal cord was collected into a comprehensive data set relating the incidence of myelopathy to dosage, number of fractions and total treatment time. The data was analyzed using a search program (RAD3) to derive best-fitting cell kinetic parameters on the assumption that radiation myelopathy arises from cellular depletion in the irradiated tissues. From these parameters iso-effect tables were constructed for a wide range of treatment schedules, including daily treatment as well as fractionation at longer intervals. The tables provide a set of limiting doses, above which the risk of radiation injury to the spinal cord becomes substantial. General application of NSD tolerance limits could lead to systematic overdosage of the spinal cord, especially with large individual fractions or short treatment times. We conclude that the computed iso-effect tables provide a more reliable clinical guide than conventional time-dose equations.

  12. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulate Inflammatory Cytokines after Spinal Cord Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Machová Urdzíková, Lucia; Růžička, Jiří; LaBagnara, Michael; Kárová, Kristýna; Kubinová, Šárka; Jiráková, Klára; Murali, Raj; Syková, Eva; Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena; Jendelová, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) improves functional recovery in experimental models of spinal cord injury (SCI); however, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not completely understood. We investigated the effect of intrathecal implantation of human MSC on functional recovery, astrogliosis and levels of inflammatory cytokines in rats using balloon-induced spinal cord compression lesions. Transplanted cells did not survive at the lesion site of the spinal cord; however, functional recovery was enhanced in the MSC-treated group as was confirmed by the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) and the flat beam test. Morphometric analysis showed a significantly higher amount of remaining white matter in the cranial part of the lesioned spinal cords. Immunohistochemical analysis of the lesions indicated the rearrangement of the glial scar in MSC-treated animals. Real-time PCR analysis revealed an increased expression of Irf5, Mrc1, Fgf2, Gap43 and Gfap. Transplantation of MSCs into a lesioned spinal cord reduced TNFα, IL-4, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-12 and increased the levels of MIP-1α and RANTES when compared to saline-treated controls. Intrathecal implantation of MSCs reduces the inflammatory reaction and apoptosis, improves functional recovery and modulates glial scar formation after SCI, regardless of cell survival. Therefore, repeated applications may prolong the beneficial effects induced by MSC application. PMID:24968269

  13. Electron microscopic study of demyelination in an experimentally induced lesion in adult cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    BUNGE, R P; BUNGE, M B; RISH

    1960-07-01

    Plaques of subpial demyelination were induced in adult cat spinal cords by repeated withdrawal and reinjection of cerebrospinal fluid. Peripheral cord was fixed by replacing cerebrospinal fluid available at cisternal puncture with 3 per cent buffered OsO(4). Following extirpation, surface tissue was further fixed in 2 per cent buffered OsO(4), dehydrated in ethanol, and embedded in araldite. Normal subpial cord consists mainly of myelinated axons and two types of macroglia, fibrous astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Twenty-nine hours after lesion induction most myelin sheaths are deteriorating and typical macroglia are no longer visible. Phagocytosis of myelin debris has begun. In 3-day lesions, axons are intact and their mitochondria and neurofibrils appear normal despite continued myelin breakdown. All axons are completely demyelinated by 6 days. They lack investments only briefly, however, for at 10 and 14 days, macroglial processes appear and embrace them. These macroglia do not resemble either one of the normally occurring glia; their dense cytoplasm contains fibrils in addition to the usual organelles. It is proposed that these macroglia, which later accomplish remyelination, are the hypertrophic or swollen astrocytes of classical neuropathology. The suggestion that these astrocytes possess the potential to remyelinate axons in addition to their known ability to form cicatrix raises the possibility of pharmacological control of their expression.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of evoked potentials for functional impairment after contusive spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy; Zhou, James; Krishnan, Rohan; Manem, Nihita; Umredkar, Shreya; Hamilton, D K; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Oudega, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Iatrogenic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a cause of potentially debilitating post-operative neurologic complications. Currently, intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) via somatosensory evoked potentials and motor-evoked potentials is used to detect and prevent impending SCI. However, no empirically validated interventions exist to halt the progression of iatrogenic SCI once it is detected. This is in part due to the lack of a suitable translational model that mimics the circumstances surrounding iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM. Here, we evaluate a model of simulated contusive iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. We show that transient losses of somatosensory evoked potentials responses are 88.24% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI] 63.53-98.20) and 80% specific (95% CI 51.91-95.43) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. Similarly, we show that transient losses in motor-evoked potentials responses are 70.83% sensitive (95% CI 48.91-87.33) and 100% specific (95% CI 62.91-100.00) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. These results indicate that our model is a suitable replica of the circumstances surrounding clinical iatrogenic SCI.

  15. Altered Cerebellar Circuitry following Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar function is critical for coordinating movement and motor learning. However, events occurring in the cerebellum following spinal cord injury (SCI) have not been investigated in detail. We provide evidence of SCI-induced cerebellar synaptic changes involving a loss of granule cell parallel fiber input to distal regions of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. This is accompanied by an apparent increase in synaptic contacts to Purkinje cell proximal dendrites, presumably from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive. We also observed an early stage injury-induced decrease in the levels of cerebellin-1, a synaptic organizing molecule that is critical for establishing and maintaining parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic integrity. Interestingly, this transsynaptic reorganizational pattern is consistent with that reported during development and in certain transgenic mouse models. To our knowledge, such a reorganizational event has not been described in response to SCI in adult rats. Regardless, the novel results of this study are important for understanding SCI-induced synaptic changes in the cerebellum, which may prove critical for strategies focusing on promoting functional recovery. PMID:27504204

  16. Altered Cerebellar Circuitry following Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Visavadiya, Nishant P; Springer, Joe E

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar function is critical for coordinating movement and motor learning. However, events occurring in the cerebellum following spinal cord injury (SCI) have not been investigated in detail. We provide evidence of SCI-induced cerebellar synaptic changes involving a loss of granule cell parallel fiber input to distal regions of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. This is accompanied by an apparent increase in synaptic contacts to Purkinje cell proximal dendrites, presumably from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive. We also observed an early stage injury-induced decrease in the levels of cerebellin-1, a synaptic organizing molecule that is critical for establishing and maintaining parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic integrity. Interestingly, this transsynaptic reorganizational pattern is consistent with that reported during development and in certain transgenic mouse models. To our knowledge, such a reorganizational event has not been described in response to SCI in adult rats. Regardless, the novel results of this study are important for understanding SCI-induced synaptic changes in the cerebellum, which may prove critical for strategies focusing on promoting functional recovery. PMID:27504204

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of evoked potentials for functional impairment after contusive spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy; Zhou, James; Krishnan, Rohan; Manem, Nihita; Umredkar, Shreya; Hamilton, D K; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Oudega, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Iatrogenic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a cause of potentially debilitating post-operative neurologic complications. Currently, intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) via somatosensory evoked potentials and motor-evoked potentials is used to detect and prevent impending SCI. However, no empirically validated interventions exist to halt the progression of iatrogenic SCI once it is detected. This is in part due to the lack of a suitable translational model that mimics the circumstances surrounding iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM. Here, we evaluate a model of simulated contusive iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. We show that transient losses of somatosensory evoked potentials responses are 88.24% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI] 63.53-98.20) and 80% specific (95% CI 51.91-95.43) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. Similarly, we show that transient losses in motor-evoked potentials responses are 70.83% sensitive (95% CI 48.91-87.33) and 100% specific (95% CI 62.91-100.00) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. These results indicate that our model is a suitable replica of the circumstances surrounding clinical iatrogenic SCI. PMID:26677784

  18. Reirradiation Human Spinal Cord Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Ma, Lijun; Weinberg, Vivian; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chao, Sam; Chang, Ung-Kyu; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Angelov, Liliyanna; Chang, Eric L.; Sohn, Moon-Jun; Soltys, Scott G.; Letourneau, Daniel; Ryu, Sam; Gerszten, Peter C.; Fowler, Jack; Wong, C. Shun; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed the treatment for patients with spine metastases who initially received conventional external beam radiation (EBRT) and were reirradiated with 1-5 fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) who did or did not subsequently develop radiation myelopathy (RM). Methods and Materials: Spinal cord dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for 5 RM patients (5 spinal segments) and 14 no-RM patients (16 spine segments) were based on thecal sac contours at retreatment. Dose to a point within the thecal sac that receives the maximum dose (P{sub max}), and doses to 0.1-, 1.0-, and 2.0-cc volumes within the thecal sac were reviewed. The biologically effective doses (BED) using {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy for late spinal cord toxicity were calculated and normalized to a 2-Gy equivalent dose (nBED = Gy{sub 2/2}). Results: The initial conventional radiotherapy nBED ranged from {approx}30 to 50 Gy{sub 2/2} (median {approx}40 Gy{sub 2/2}). The SBRT reirradiation thecal sac mean P{sub max} nBED in the no-RM group was 20.0 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.8-29.2), which was significantly lower than the corresponding 67.4 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 51.0-83.9) in the RM group. The mean total P{sub max} nBED in the no-RM group was 62.3 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 50.3-74.3), which was significantly lower than the corresponding 105.8 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 84.3-127.4) in the RM group. The fraction of the total P{sub max} nBED accounted for by the SBRT P{sub max} nBED for the RM patients ranged from 0.54 to 0.78 and that for the no-RM patients ranged from 0.04 to 0.53. Conclusions: SBRT given at least 5 months after conventional palliative radiotherapy with a reirradiation thecal sac P{sub max} nBED of 20-25 Gy{sub 2/2} appears to be safe provided the total P{sub max} nBED does not exceed approximately 70 Gy{sub 2/2}, and the SBRT thecal sac P{sub max} nBED comprises no more than approximately 50% of the total nBED.

  19. Impact of Increasing Age on Outcomes of Spinal Fusion in Adult Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Verla, Terence; Adogwa, Owoicho; Toche, Ulysses; Farber, S. Harrison; Petraglia, Frank; Murphy, Kelly R.; Thomas, Steven; Fatemi, Parastou; Gottfried, Oren; Bagley, Carlos A.; Lad, Shivanand P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of advancing age on postoperative complications and revision surgery after fusion for scoliosis. Methods A retrospective, cohort study was performed using the Thomson Reuters MarketScan database, examining patients with adult scoliosis who underwent spinal fusion from 2000 to 2009. Primary outcomes included infection, hemorrhage and pulmonary embolism (PE) within 90 days of surgery, and refusion. The effect of increasing age was estimated using the odds ratio (OR) of complications in a multivariate logistic regression analysis, and a Cox proportional hazard model estimated the hazard ratio of refusion. Results A total of 8432 patients were included in this study. Overall, the average age was 53.3 years, with 26.90% males and 39% with a Charlson Comorbidity Score of ≥1. Most patients had commercial insurance (66.81%), with 26.03% and 7.16% covered by Medicare and Medicaid, respectively. Increasing age (per 5-year increment) was a significant predictor of hemorrhagic complication (OR, 1.06; confidence interval [CI], 1.01–1.11; P = 0.0196), PE (OR, 1.09; CI, 1.03–1.16; P = 0.0031), infection (OR, 1.04; CI, 1.01–1.07; P = 0.0053), and refusion (hazard ratio, 1.07; CI, 1.02–1.13; P = 0.0103). Conclusions In this study, age was associated with increased risk of hemorrhage, PE, infection, and refusion. With the aging population, the role of patient age on postoperative healing and outcomes deserves deeper investigation after repair of adult idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:26546999

  20. The effect of July admission on inpatient morbidity and mortality after adult spinal deformity surgery

    PubMed Central

    De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Passias, Peter G.; Schwab, Frank J.; Lafage, Virginie

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have suggested patients who undergo surgery in July have worse outcomes compared to patients treated during other months. The purpose of this study is to compare inpatient morbidity and mortality among patients who underwent adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery in July with those who underwent surgery in other months. Methods Admission data for patients who underwent ASD surgery were extracted from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the years 2002 to 2011. Only adult patients (over 21 years of age) and elective admissions to teaching hospitals were included. A multivariable regression analysis was performed to examine the independent effect of July admissions on overall complications, major complications, and inpatient mortality. Results A total of 27,794 patients were identified, with 2,023 (7.8%) admitted in July and 25,771 (92.2%) in other months. Overall complication rates in July (43.1%) were not different from rates in other months (44.9%, p=0.468). Similarly, major complication rates were similar; 12.9% in July and 12.4% in other months (p=0.764). Mortality was not different between groups (p=0.807). After multivariable analysis, July admissions were not found to increase the odds of developing any complication (OR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.77 - 1.12; p=0.403), major complications (OR 1.04; 95% CI, 0.76 - 1.41; p=0.788) or inpatient mortality (OR 1.35; 95% CI, 0.31 - 5.84; p=0.684). Conclusion In this study of a nationwide database, patients who underwent ASD surgery in July did not have increased odds of developing a complication or inpatient mortality compared to patients admitted in other months. PMID:26913223

  1. Paired associative transspinal and transcortical stimulation produces plasticity in human cortical and spinal neuronal circuits.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Luke; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Santora, Danielle; Knikou, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Anatomical, physiological, and functional connectivity exists between the neurons of the primary motor cortex (M1) and spinal cord. Paired associative stimulation (PAS) produces enduring changes in M1, based on the Hebbian principle of associative plasticity. The present study aimed to establish neurophysiological changes in human cortical and spinal neuronal circuits by pairing noninvasive transspinal stimulation with transcortical stimulation via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We delivered paired transspinal and transcortical stimulation for 40 min at precise interstimulus intervals, with TMS being delivered after (transspinal-transcortical PAS) or before (transcortical-transspinal PAS) transspinal stimulation. Transspinal-transcortical PAS markedly decreased intracortical inhibition, increased intracortical facilitation and M1 excitability with concomitant decreases of motor threshold, and reduced the soleus Hoffmann's reflex (H-reflex) low frequency-mediated homosynaptic depression. Transcortical-transspinal PAS did not affect intracortical circuits, decreased M1 excitability, and reduced the soleus H-reflex-paired stimulation pulses' mediated postactivation depression. Both protocols affected the excitation threshold of group Ia afferents and motor axons. These findings clearly indicate that the pairing of transspinal with transcortical stimulation produces cortical and spinal excitability changes based on the timing interval and functional network interactions between the two associated inputs. This new PAS paradigm may constitute a significant neuromodulation method with physiological impact, because it can be used to alter concomitantly excitability of intracortical circuits, corticospinal neurons, and spinal inhibition in humans. PMID:27281748

  2. Comparison of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase and melatonin receptor type 1B immunoreactivity between young adult and aged canine spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Park, Joon Ha; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Jae-Chul; Yan, Bing Chun; Yong, Min Sik; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Hwang, In Koo; Moon, Seung Myung

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin affects diverse physiological functions through its receptor and plays an important role in the central nervous system. In the present study, we compared immunoreactivity patterns of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), an enzyme essential for melatonin synthesis, and melatonin receptor type 1B (MT2) in the spinal cord of young adult (2~3 years) and aged (10~12 years) beagle dogs using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. AANAT-specific immunoreactivity was observed in the nuclei of spinal neurons, and was significantly increased in aged dog spinal neurons compared to young adult spinal neurons. MT2-specific immunoreactivity was found in the cytoplasm of spinal neurons, and was predominantly increased in the margin of the neuron cytoplasm in aged spinal cord compared to that in the young adult dogs. These increased levels of AANAT and MT2 immunoreactivity in aged spinal cord might be a feature of normal aging and associated with a feedback mechanism that compensates for decreased production of melatonin during aging. PMID:24962405

  3. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Danner, Simon M.; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22–60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5–26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits. PMID:25904708

  4. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Danner, Simon M; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-07-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22-60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5-26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits. PMID:25904708

  5. Tenascin-R restricts posttraumatic remodeling of motoneuron innervation and functional recovery after spinal cord injury in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Irintchev, Andrey; Schachner, Melitta

    2006-07-26

    Tenascin-R (TNR) is an extracellular glycoprotein in the CNS implicated in neural development and plasticity. Its repellent properties for growing axons in a choice situation with a conducive substrate in vitro have indicated that TNR may impede regeneration in the adult mammalian CNS. Here we tested whether constitutive lack of TNR has beneficial impacts on recovery from spinal cord injury in adult mice. Using the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, we found that open-field locomotion in TNR-deficient (TNR-/-) mice recovered better that in wild-type (TNR+/+) littermates after compression of the thoracic spinal cord. We also designed, validated, and applied a motion analysis approach allowing numerical assessment of motor functions. We found, in agreement with the BBB score, that functions requiring low levels of supraspinal control such as plantar stepping improved more in TNR-/- mice. This was not the case for motor tasks demanding precision such as ladder climbing. Morphological analyses revealed no evidence that improved recovery of some functions in the mutant mice were attributable to enhanced tissue sparing or axonal regrowth. Estimates of perisomatic puncta revealed reduced innervation by cholinergic and GABAergic terminals around motoneurons in intact TNR-/- compared with TNR+/+ mice. Relative to nonlesioned animals, spinal cord repair was associated with increase in GABAergic and decrease of glutamatergic puncta in TNR-/- but not in TNR+/+ mice. Our results suggest that TNR restricts functional recovery by limiting posttraumatic remodeling of synapses around motoneuronal cell bodies where TNR is normally expressed in perineuronal nets.

  6. Recovery of function following grafting of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells into the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Himes, B Timothy; Neuhuber, Birgit; Coleman, Carl; Kushner, Robert; Swanger, Sharon A; Kopen, Gene C; Wagner, Joseph; Shumsky, Jed S; Fischer, Itzhak

    2006-06-01

    This study evaluates functional recovery after transplanting human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) into contusion models of spinal cord injury (SCI). The authors used a high-throughput process to expand BMSCs and characterized them by flow cytometry, ELISA, and gene expression. They found that BMSCs secrete neurotrophic factors and cytokines with therapeutic potential for cell survival and axon growth. In adult immune-suppressed rats, mild, moderate, or severe contusions were generated using the MASCIS impactor. One week following injury, 0.5 to 1 x 106 BMSCs were injected into the lesioned spinal cord; control animals received vehicle injection. Biweekly behavioral tests included the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan Locomotor Rating Scale (BBB), exploratory rearing, grid walking, and thermal sensitivity. Animals receiving moderate contusions followed by BMSC grafts showed significant behavioral recovery in BBB and rearing tests when compared to controls. Animals receiving BMSC grafts after mild or severe contusion showed trends toward improved recovery. Immunocytochemistry identified numerous axons passing through the injury in animals with BMSC grafts but few in controls. BMSCS were detected at 2 weeks after transplantation; however, at 11 weeks very few grafted cells remained. The authors conclude that BMSCs show potential for repairing SCI. However, the use of carefully characterized BMSCs improved transplantation protocols ensuring BMSC, survival, and systematic motor and sensory behavioral testing to identify robust recovery is imperative for further improvement. PMID:16679505

  7. Transcutaneous spinal cord direct current stimulation inhibits the lower limb nociceptive flexion reflex in human beings.

    PubMed

    Cogiamanian, Filippo; Vergari, Maurizio; Schiaffi, Elena; Marceglia, Sara; Ardolino, Gianluca; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2011-02-01

    Aiming at developing a new, noninvasive approach to spinal cord neuromodulation, we evaluated whether transcutaneous direct current (DC) stimulation induces long-lasting changes in the central pain pathways in human beings. A double-blind crossover design was used to investigate the effects of anodal direct current (2mA, 15min) applied on the skin overlying the thoracic spinal cord on the lower-limb flexion reflex in a group of 11 healthy volunteers. To investigate whether transcutaneous spinal cord DC stimulation (tsDCS) acts indirectly on the nociceptive reflex by modulating excitability in mono-oligosynaptic segmental reflex pathways, we also evaluated the H-reflex size from soleus muscle after tibial nerve stimulation. In our healthy subjects, anodal thoracic tsDCS reduced the total lower-limb flexion reflex area by 40.25% immediately after stimulation (T0) and by 46.9% 30min after stimulation offset (T30). When we analyzed the 2 lower-limb flexion reflex components (RII tactile and RIII nociceptive) separately, we found that anodal tsDCS induced a significant reduction in RIII area with a slight but not significant effect on RII area. After anodal tsDCS, the RIII area decreased by 27% at T0 and by 28% at T30. Both sham and active tsDCS left all the tested H-reflex variables unchanged. None of our subjects reported adverse effects after active stimulation. These results suggest that tsDCS holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain. Thoracic transcutaneous direct current stimulation induces depression of nociceptive lower limb flexion reflex in human beings that persists after stimulation offset; this form of stimulation holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain.

  8. Assessing Nociception by fMRI of the Human Spinal Cord: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kolesar, Tiffany A.; Fiest, Kirsten M.; Smith, Stephen D.; Kornelsen, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the use of fMRI of the spinal cord in measuring noxious stimulation. METHODS The Scopus, Medline, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases were searched, along with the reference lists of included articles. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts, full-text articles, and extracted data. Original research was included if fMRI of the human spinal cord was used to measure responses to noxious stimulation. RESULTS Of the 192 abstracts screened, 19 met the search criteria and were divided according to their focus: investigating pain responses (n = 6), methodology (n = 6), spinal cord injury (n = 2), or cognition–pain interactions (n = 5). All but one study appear to have observed activity in ipsilateral and dorsal gray matter regions in response to noxious stimuli, although contralateral or ventral activity was also widely observed. CONCLUSIONS Although nociception can be investigated using spinal fMRI, establishing reliability, standardizing methodology, and reporting of results will greatly advance this field. PMID:26543372

  9. HEAVEN: The head anastomosis venture Project outline for the first human head transplantation with spinal linkage (GEMINI)

    PubMed Central

    Canavero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    In 1970, the first cephalosomatic linkage was achieved in the monkey. However, the technology did not exist for reconnecting the spinal cord, and this line of research was no longer pursued. In this paper, an outline for the first total cephalic exchange in man is provided and spinal reconnection is described. The use of fusogens, special membrane-fusion substances, is discussed in view of the first human cord linkage. Several human diseases without cure might benefit from the procedure. PMID:24244881

  10. Further amputations of the tail in adult Triturus carnifex: contribution to the study on the nature of regenerated spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Margotta, Vito

    2008-01-01

    Adult Urodele Amphibians, if deprived of the tail, are able to fully regenerate it. This occurs owing to a typical epimorphic phenomenon which takes place in various phases. Within this matter, in particular on the reconstruction of the caudal nervous component, literature sources refer to a great quantity of research following only one amputation of the tail. Being aware of these data we programmed to investigate the possible persistence, decrease or disappearance of the medullary regenerative power after repeated amputations of the regenerated tail. With this objective in view, we have performed on adult Triturus carnifex a series of such operations at time spaced out from one another. In previous experiments, the amputations of the tail have been before seven and then nine. In the current experiment, the same specimens have been subjected to further removals of the tail. This study has developed into three cycles going on over a period of more than ten years. Overall, our panorama rising from the integration of present results and those of former observations is in agreement with what occurs in the area which is the centre of the beginnings of medullary regeneration processes and the bibliographic information concerning the pre-blastematic and blastematic phases. In the subsequent morphogenetic and differentiative phases, however, with the recurrence of the re-establishment of the spinal cord, these events proceed more slowly (gap which reduces when the time interval starting from the operation increases) than in the spinal cords which regenerated after only one tail amputation. Furthermore, although the regenerated spinal cords, if compared to normal spinal cord, show some anomalies (regarding medullary length and diameter, distribution of the spinal nerves and ganglia), the regenerated spinal cords (as well-known uncapable to re-form the Mauthner fibres and supplied with the Rohon-Beard sensitive neurons), their nerves and ganglia reacquire the same complex

  11. Management of Spinal Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Schmidt, Meic H

    2016-04-01

    Spinal meningiomas are the most common spinal tumors encountered in adults, and account for 6.5% of all craniospinal tumors. The treatment for these lesions is primarily surgical, but emerging modalities may include chemotherapy and radiosurgery. In this article, the current management of spinal meningiomas and the body of literature surrounding conventional treatment is reviewed and discussed.

  12. Sustaining intrinsic growth capacity of adult neurons promotes spinal cord regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Skinner, Kate; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2005-11-01

    The peripheral axonal branch of primary sensory neurons readily regenerates after peripheral nerve injury, but the central branch, which courses in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord, does not. However, if a peripheral nerve is transected before a spinal cord injury, sensory neurons that course in the dorsal columns will regenerate, presumably because their intrinsic growth capacity is enhanced by the priming peripheral nerve lesion. As the effective priming lesion is made before the spinal cord injury it would clearly have no clinical utility, and unfortunately, a priming lesion made after a spinal cord injury results in an abortive regenerative response. Here, we show that two priming lesions, one made at the time of a spinal cord injury and a second 1 week after a spinal cord injury, in fact, promote dramatic regeneration, within and beyond the lesion. The first lesion, we hypothesize, enhances intrinsic growth capacity, and the second one sustains it, providing a paradigm for promoting CNS regeneration after injury. primary afferents | dorsal columns | neurite outgrowth | sprouting | priming

  13. Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood or amniotic epithelial stem cells alleviates mechanical allodynia after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Roh, Dae-Hyun; Seo, Min-Soo; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Park, Sang-Bum; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), and a variety of different stem cell types have been grafted into humans suffering from spinal cord trauma or into animal models of spinal injury. Although several studies have reported functional motor improvement after transplantation of stem cells into injured spinal cord, the benefit of these cells for treating SCI-induced neuropathic pain is not clear. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of transplanting human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) or amniotic epithelial stem cells (hAESCs) on SCI-induced mechanical allodynia (MA) and thermal hyperalgesia (TH) in T13 spinal cord hemisected rats. Two weeks after SCI, hUCB-MSCs or hAESCs were transplanted around the spinal cord lesion site, and behavioral tests were performed to evaluate changes in SCI-induced MA and TH. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were also performed to evaluate possible therapeutic effects on SCI-induced inflammation and the nociceptive-related phosphorylation of the NMDA NR1 receptor subunit. While transplantation of hUCB-MSCs showed a tendency to reduce MA, transplantation of hAESCs significantly reduced MA. Neither hUCB-MSC nor hAESC transplantation had any effect on SCI-induced TH. Transplantation of hAESCs also significantly reduced the SCI-induced increase in NMDA receptor NR1 subunit phosphorylation (pNR1) expression in the spinal cord. Both hUCB-MSCs and hAESCs reduced the SCI-induced increase in spinal cord expression of the microglial marker, F4/80, but not the increased expression of GFAP or iNOS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the transplantation of hAESCs into the injured spinal cord can suppress mechanical allodynia, and this effect seems to be closely associated with the modulation of spinal cord microglia activity and NR1 phosphorylation.

  14. Neural coding of nociceptive stimuli-from rat spinal neurones to human perception.

    PubMed

    Sikandar, Shafaq; Ronga, Irene; Iannetti, Gian Domenico; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2013-08-01

    Translational studies are key to furthering our understanding of nociceptive signalling and bridging the gaps between molecules and pathways to the patients. This requires use of appropriate preclinical models that accurately depict outcome measures used in humans. Whereas behavioural animal studies classically involve reports related to nociceptive thresholds of, for example, withdrawal, electrophysiological recordings of spinal neurones that receive convergent input from primary afferents permits investigation of suprathreshold events and exploration of the full-range coding of different stimuli. We explored the central processing of nociceptive inputs in a novel parallel investigation between rats and humans. Using radiant laser pulses, we first compared the electrophysiological responses of deep wide dynamic range and superficial nociceptive-specific neurones in the rat dorsal horn with human psychophysics and cortical responses. Secondly, we explored the effects of spatial summation using laser pulses of identical energy and different size. We observed 3 main findings. Firstly, both rodent and human data confirmed that neodymium-yttrium aluminium perovskite laser stimulation is a nociceptive-selective stimulus that never activates Aβ afferents. Secondly, graded laser stimulation elicited similarly graded electrophysiological and behavioural responses in both species. Thirdly, there was a significant degree of spatial summation of laser nociceptive input. The remarkable similarity in rodent and human coding indicates that responses of rat dorsal horn neurones can translate to human nociceptive processing. These findings suggest that recordings of spinal neuronal activity elicited by laser stimuli could be a valuable predictive measure of human pain perception. PMID:23719576

  15. Neural coding of nociceptive stimuli-from rat spinal neurones to human perception.

    PubMed

    Sikandar, Shafaq; Ronga, Irene; Iannetti, Gian Domenico; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2013-08-01

    Translational studies are key to furthering our understanding of nociceptive signalling and bridging the gaps between molecules and pathways to the patients. This requires use of appropriate preclinical models that accurately depict outcome measures used in humans. Whereas behavioural animal studies classically involve reports related to nociceptive thresholds of, for example, withdrawal, electrophysiological recordings of spinal neurones that receive convergent input from primary afferents permits investigation of suprathreshold events and exploration of the full-range coding of different stimuli. We explored the central processing of nociceptive inputs in a novel parallel investigation between rats and humans. Using radiant laser pulses, we first compared the electrophysiological responses of deep wide dynamic range and superficial nociceptive-specific neurones in the rat dorsal horn with human psychophysics and cortical responses. Secondly, we explored the effects of spatial summation using laser pulses of identical energy and different size. We observed 3 main findings. Firstly, both rodent and human data confirmed that neodymium-yttrium aluminium perovskite laser stimulation is a nociceptive-selective stimulus that never activates Aβ afferents. Secondly, graded laser stimulation elicited similarly graded electrophysiological and behavioural responses in both species. Thirdly, there was a significant degree of spatial summation of laser nociceptive input. The remarkable similarity in rodent and human coding indicates that responses of rat dorsal horn neurones can translate to human nociceptive processing. These findings suggest that recordings of spinal neuronal activity elicited by laser stimuli could be a valuable predictive measure of human pain perception.

  16. Concise review: Spinal cord injuries: how could adult mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells take up the challenge?

    PubMed

    Neirinckx, Virginie; Cantinieaux, Dorothée; Coste, Cécile; Rogister, Bernard; Franzen, Rachelle; Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    Since several years, adult/perinatal mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells have been widely used to help experimental animal to recover from spinal cord injury. More interestingly, recent clinical trials confirmed the beneficial effect of those stem cells, which improve functional score of patients suffering from such lesions. However, a complete understanding of the mechanisms of stem cell-induced recovery is seriously lacking. Indeed, spinal cord injuries gathered a wide range of biochemical and physiopathological events (such as inflammation, oxidative stress, axonal damage, demyelination, etc.) and the genuine healing process after cell transplantation is not sufficiently defined. This review aims to sum up recent data about cell therapy in spinal cord lesions using mesenchymal or recently identified neural crest stem cells, by describing precisely which physiopathological parameter is affected and the exact processes underlying the observed changes. Overall, although significant advances are acknowledged, it seems that further deep mechanistic investigation is needed for the development of optimized and efficient cell-based therapy protocols.

  17. Spatio-Temporal Expression Pattern of Frizzled Receptors after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Ernest; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    Background Wnt proteins are a large family of molecules that are critically involved in multiple central nervous system (CNS) developmental processes. Experimental evidences suggest a role for this family of proteins in many CNS disorders, including spinal cord injury (SCI), which is a major neuropathology owing to its high prevalence and chronic sensorimotor functional sequelae. Interestingly, most Wnt proteins and their inhibitors are expressed in the uninjured spinal cord, and their temporal expression patterns are dramatically altered after injury. However, little is known regarding the expression of their better-known receptors, the Frizzled family, after SCI. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of Frizzled receptors in the damaged spinal cord. Findings Based on the evidence that Wnts are expressed in the spinal cord and are transcriptionally regulated by SCI in adulthood, we analysed the spatio-temporal mRNA and protein expression patterns of Frizzled receptors after contusive SCI using quantitative RT-PCR and single and double immunohistochemistry, respectively. Our results show that almost all of the 10 known Frizzled receptors were expressed in specific spatial patterns in the uninjured spinal cords. Moreover, the Frizzled mRNAs and proteins were expressed after SCI, although their expression patterns were altered during the temporal progression of SCI. Finally, analysis of cellular Frizzled 5 expression pattern by double immunohistochemistry showed that, in the uninjured spinal cord, this receptor was expressed in neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, microglia and NG2+ glial precursors. After injury, Frizzled 5 was not only still expressed in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and NG2+ glial precursors but also in axons at all evaluated time points. Moreover, Frizzled 5 was expressed in reactive microglia/macrophages from 3 to 14 days post-injury. Conclusions Our data suggest the involvement of Frizzled receptors in physiological

  18. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  19. Tolerance of the human spinal cord to high energy p(66)Be(49) neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, L.; Ten Haken, R.K.; Mansell, J.; Yalavarthi, S.D.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Awschalom, M.

    1985-04-01

    The risk of post irradiation myelopathy was evaluated in 76 patients followed for 1-5 years after neutron irradiation of the cervical and thoracic regions. No overt myelopathy was observed. Forty-six patients received doses (central cord dose) in excess of 10 Gy, 9 received doses in excess of 12 Gy, and 5 received doses between 13 and 17 Gy, all without any evidence of spinal cord injury. A review of available literature revealed a total of 14 patients with myelopathy, 13 of whom received doses in excess of 13 Gy delivered with relatively low energy neutrons generated by the deuteron + beryllium reaction. It is concluded from these studies that the tolerance limit for the human spinal cord irradiated with high energy (p(66)Be(49)) neutrons is close to 15 Gy, above which the risk of cord injury becomes significant. Central cord doses of 13 Gy or less appear to be well tolerated with little, if any, risk of myelopathy. These conclusions are valid for a treatment time of 4 weeks or more with two or more fractions per week (9 or more fractions). The RBE for the human spinal cord irradiated under the above conditions compared with conventionally fractionated photon therapy does not exceed 4.0.

  20. Improved in vivo diffusion tensor imaging of human cervical spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junqian; Shimony, Joshua S.; Klawiter, Eric C.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Naismith, Robert T.; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Cross, Anne H.; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2012-01-01

    We describe a cardiac gated high in-plane resolution axial human cervical spinal cord diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) protocol. Multiple steps were taken to optimize both image acquisition and image processing. The former includes slice-by-slice cardiac triggering and individually tiltable slices. The latter includes (i) iterative 2D retrospective motion correction, (ii) image intensity outlier detection to minimize the influence of physiological noise, (iii) a non-linear DTI estimation procedure incorporating non-negative eigenvalue priors, and (iv) tract-specific region-of-interest (ROI) identification based on an objective geometry reference. Using these strategies in combination, radial diffusivity (λ⊥) was reproducibly measured in white matter (WM) tracts (adjusted mean [95% confidence interval]=0.25 [0.22, 0.29]µm2/ms), lower than previously reported λ⊥ values in the in vivo human spinal cord DTI literature. Radial diffusivity and fractional anisotropy (FA) measured in WM varied from rostral to caudal as did mean translational motion, likely reflecting respiratory motion effect. Given the considerable sensitivity of DTI measurements to motion artifact, we believe outlier detection is indispensable in spinal cord diffusion imaging. We also recommend using a mixed-effects model to account for systematic measurement bias depending on cord segment. PMID:23178538

  1. The human spinal cord interprets velocity-dependent afferent input during stepping.

    PubMed

    Beres-Jones, Janell A; Harkema, Susan J

    2004-10-01

    We studied the motor response to modifying the rate of application of sensory input to the human spinal cord during stepping. We measured the electromyographic (EMG), kinematic and kinetic patterns of the legs during manually assisted or unassisted stepping using body weight support on a treadmill (BWST) in eight individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). At various treadmill speeds (0.27-1.52 m/s), we measured the EMG activity of the soleus (SOL), medial gastrocnemius (MG), tibialis anterior (TA), medial hamstrings (MH), vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF) and iliopsoas (ILIO); the hip, knee and ankle joint angles; the amount of body weight support (BWS); and lower limb loading. The EMG amplitude and burst duration of the SOL, MG, TA, MH, VL, RF and ILIO were related to the step cycle duration during stepping using BWST. EMG mean amplitudes increased at faster treadmill speeds, and EMG burst durations shortened with decreased step cycle durations. Muscle stretch of an individual muscle could not account for the EMG amplitude modulation in response to stepping speed. The effects on the EMG amplitude and burst duration were similar in subjects with partial and no detectable supraspinal input. We propose that the human spinal cord can interpret complex step-related, velocity-dependent afferent information to contribute to the neural control of stepping.

  2. Hindlimb Immobilization in a Wheelchair Alters Functional Recovery Following Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Caudle, Krista L.; Brown, Edward H.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Burke, Darlene A.; Magnuson, Trystan S. G.; Voor, Michael J.; Magnuson, David S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Locomotor training of rats with thoracic contusion spinal cord injuries can induce task-specific changes in stepping but rarely results in improved overground locomotion, possibly due to a ceiling effect. Thus, the authors hypothesize that incompletely injured rats maximally retrain themselves while moving about in their cages over the first few weeks postinjury. Objective To test the hypothesis using hindlimb immobilization after mild thoracic contusion spinal cord injury in adult female rats. A passive stretch protocol was included as an independent treatment. Methods Wheelchairs were used to hold the hindlimbs stationary in an extended position leaving the forelimbs free. The wheelchairs were used for 15 to 18 hours per day, 5 days per week for 8 weeks, beginning at 4 days postinjury. A 20-minute passive hindlimb stretch therapy was applied to half of the animals. Results Hindlimb locomotor function of the wheelchair group was not different from controls at 1 week postinjury but declined significantly over the next 4 weeks. Passive stretch had no influence on wheelchair animals but limited functional recovery of normally housed animals, preventing them from regaining forelimb–hindlimb coordination. Following 8 weeks of wheelchair immobilization and stretch therapy, only the wheelchair group displayed an improvement in function when returned to normal housing but retained significant deficits in stepping and coordination out to 16 weeks. Conclusion Hindlimb immobilization and passive stretch may hinder or conceal the normal course of functional recovery of spinal cord injured rats. These observations have implications for the management of acute clinical spinal cord injuries. PMID:21697451

  3. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-García, Concepción; Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Azcona-Gutiérrez, José M; Herraiz, María J; Ibarra, Valvanera; Oteo, José A

    2015-05-01

    Neurological complications in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are still common, even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections, immune reconstitution, the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and neurocognitive disorders have to be considered when establishing the differential diagnosis. Toxoplasmic encephalitis remains the major cause of space-occupying lesions in the brain of patients with HIV/AIDS; however, spinal cord involvement has been reported infrequently. Here, we review spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection and illustrate the condition with a recent case from our hospital. We suggest that most patients with HIV/AIDS and myelitis with enhanced spine lesions, multiple brain lesions and positive serology for Toxoplasma gondii should receive immediate empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis, and a biopsy should be performed in those cases without clinical improvement or with deterioration.

  4. Action of thymol on spontaneous excitatory transmission in adult rat spinal substantia gelatinosa neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Hao; Wang, Chong; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, Chang-Yu; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2015-10-01

    Thymol, which is contained in thyme essential oil, has various actions including antinociception and nerve conduction inhibition. Although thymol activates transient receptor potential (TRP) channels expressed in heterologous cells, it remains to be examined whether this is so in native neurons. It has not yet been examined how thymol affects synaptic transmission. In order to know how thymol modulates excitatory transmission with a focus on TRP activation, we investigated its effect on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in lamina II (substantia gelatinosa; SG) neurons with which nerve terminals expressing TRP channels make synaptic contacts. The experiment was performed by using the blind whole-cell patch-clamp technique in adult rat spinal cord slices. Superfusing thymol (1 mM) for 3 min reversibly increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) with a minimal increase in its amplitude in all neurons examined. Seventy-seven% of the neurons produced an outward current at a holding potential of -70 mV. The sEPSC frequency increase and outward current produced by thymol were concentration-dependent with almost the same half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 0.18 and 0.14 mM, respectively. These activities were repeated at a time interval of 30 min, although the sEPSC frequency increase but not outward current recovered with a slow time course. Voltage-gated Na(+)-channel blocker tetrodotoxin did not affect the thymol activities. The sEPSC frequency increase was inhibited by TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 but not TRPV1 and TRPM8 antagonist (capsazepine and BCTC, respectively), while these antagonists had no effect on the outward current. This was so, albeit the two thymol activities had similar EC50 values. It is concluded that thymol increases the spontaneous release of L-glutamate onto SG neurons by activating TRPA1 channels while producing an outward current without TRP activation. Considering that the SG

  5. Angiogenic properties of adult human thymus fat.

    PubMed

    Salas, Julián; Montiel, Mercedes; Jiménez, Eugenio; Valenzuela, Miguel; Valderrama, José Francisco; Castillo, Rafael; González, Sergio; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2009-11-01

    The endogenous proangiogenic properties of adipose tissue are well recognized. Although the adult human thymus has long been known to degenerate into fat tissue, it has never been considered as a potential source of angiogenic factors. We have investigated the expression of diverse angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor A and B, angiopoietin 1, and tyrosine-protein kinase receptor-2 (an angiopoietin receptor), and then analyzed their physiological role on endothelial cell migration and proliferation, two relevant events in angiogenesis. The detection of the gene and protein expression of the various proteins has been performed by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We show, for the first time, that adult thymus fat produces a variety of angiogenic factors and induces the proliferation and migration of human umbilical cord endothelial cells. Based on these findings, we suggest that this fat has a potential angiogenic function that might affect thymic function and ongoing adipogenesis within the thymus.

  6. Differentiation of the nuclear groups in the posterior horn of the human embryonic spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Pytel, A; Bruska, M; Woźniak, W

    2011-11-01

    The formation of nuclear groups in the posterior horns of the human embryonic spinal cord was traced in serial sections of embryos of developmental stages 13 to 23 (32 to 56 postovulatory days). The following observations, new for the human, are presented: 1. The differentiation of the neural tube into 3 zones (germinal, mantle and marginal) is detected in the middle of the 5(th) week. 2. The primordia of the posterior horns are marked at stage 14 (33 days). 3. In the middle of the 7(th) week the nucleus proprius and substantia gelatinosa are discerned. 4. Differentiation of the nuclei within the posterior horns proceeds in the ventrodorsal and rostrocaudal gradients.

  7. Confocal raman microspectral imaging of ex vivo human spinal cord tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Liang, Zhuowen; Gong, Yuzhe; Yin, Yaning; Wang, Kaige; He, Qingli; Wang, Zhe; Bai, Jintao

    2016-10-01

    Confocal Raman microspectral imaging (CRMI) provides a versatile tool to illustrate the biochemical nature and structure of biological tissue without introducing any external labels. In this work, a precise correlation was established between the biochemical profile and histological architecture of ex vivo human spinal cord tissue by using CRMI with 633nm excitation. After precisely linking the spectral features to the chemical constituents, much information about the molecular composition of both gray and white matter were revealed. Two-dimensional Raman images were generated by integrating the intensities of the characteristic Raman bands in the area of the intermediate column and ventral horn. K-mean cluster analysis was further applied to visualize the underlying morphological basis of spinal cord tissue by chemical component types and their distribution pattern. Lipid-rich white matter could be visually distinguished from gray matter considering a CH2 bending/scissoring band at 1445cm(-1) and an amide III band at 1250cm(-1). Meanwhile, the formation and distribution pattern of perineuronal nets (PNNs) in the scanning area was validated by the integration of saccharides (617cm(-1)) and amide III bands. Moreover, the heme profile indicated a higher degree of vascularization in gray matter. All of the results obtained testified to the possibility that gray matter could be more susceptible to spinal cord injury (SCI) because of capillary network distribution and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) aggregation. These findings are important for interpreting the morphological specificity of human spinal cord tissue, and also for studying the molecular basis of SCI. PMID:27588715

  8. Differential regulation of proliferation and neuronal differentiation in adult rat spinal cord neural stem/progenitors by ERK1/2, Akt, and PLCγ

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai Si; Sideris, Alexandra; Sutachan, Jhon J.; Montoya G, Jose V.; Blanck, Thomas J. J.; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has been identified in both normal and injured adult mammalian spinal cord. Yet the signaling mechanisms underlying the regulation of adult spinal cord NSPCs proliferation and commitment toward a neuronal lineage remain undefined. In this study, the role of three growth factor-mediated signaling pathways in proliferation and neuronal differentiation was examined. Adult spinal cord NSPCs were enriched in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). We observed an increase in the number of cells expressing the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) over time, indicating neuronal differentiation in the culture. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase 1 and 2/ERK 1 and 2 (MEK/ERK1/2) or the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways suppressed active proliferation in adult spinal cord NSPC cultures; whereas neuronal differentiation was negatively affected only when the ERK1/2 pathway was inhibited. Inhibition of the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) pathway did not affect proliferation or neuronal differentiation. Finally, we demonstrated that the blockade of either the ERK1/2 or PLCγ signaling pathways reduced neurite branching of MAP2+ cells derived from the NSPC cultures. Many of the MAP2+ cells expressed synaptophysin and had a glutamatergic phenotype, indicating that over time adult spinal cord NSPCs had differentiated into mostly glutamatergic neurons. Our work provides new information regarding the contribution of these pathways to the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of NSPCs derived from adult spinal cord cultures, and emphasizes that the contribution of these pathways is dependent on the origin of the NSPCs. PMID:23986655

  9. Minimally invasive technique for direct repair of the pars defects in young adults using a spinal endoscope: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Higashino, K; Sairyo, K; Katoh, S; Sakai, T; Kosaka, H; Yasui, N

    2007-06-01

    Pars defect (spondylolysis) of the lumbar spine can cause chronic low back pain, and it sometimes requires surgical intervention. Direct repair is selected for the surgery if young adult patients do not present significant disc degeneration and lumbar instability. In order to lessen damages of back muscles during surgery, we added the use of a spinal endoscope to the "Buck's screwing procedure" the direct repair. There are four steps in this procedure: 1) identification of the defect, 2) curettage (refresh) of the defect, 3) percutaneous insertion of the annulated screws and 4) cancellous bone grafting. All these steps can be done endoscopically. We treated 3 young adults--a baseball player, a professional cycle-racer and a sculptor--using this endoscopic procedure. There were no complications during or after the operation. Union was obtained in all defects within 3 months, and they returned to their previous activities within 6 months after the surgery.

  10. Surgical management of intradural spinal cord tumors in children and young adults: A single-center experience with 50 patients

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Neriman; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Wrede, Karsten Henning; Sariaslan, Zeynep; Stein, Klaus Peter; Dammann, Philipp; Ringelstein, Adrian; Sure, Ulrich; Sandalcioglu, Erol Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intradural spinal cord tumors (IDSCTs) in children and young adults are rare diseases. This present study is aimed to demonstrate our experience with a large series of children and young adults with IDSCT. Methods: A total of 50 patients aged <20 years with IDSCT treated in our department between 1990 and 2010 were included in the study. Clinical, histological, and radiological findings, treatment strategies, and clinical outcome were retrospectively assessed. Depending on the relation to the spinal cord, IDSCT were dichotomized into intramedullary SCT (IMSCT) and extramedullary SCT (EMSCT). The functional outcome was evaluated with the Frankel score assessing the longest available follow-up period. Results: Mean age was 10.3 years (range 6 months–19 years). IDSCT surgery was performed in 44 patients (88%). A common first symptom in patients with EMSCT was neck and back pain (41%), whereas monoparesis of arms (43%) were often seen in patients with IMSCT. The main duration of the symptoms was longer in patients with IMSCT. The postoperative functional outcome was generally comparable to the preoperative functional condition, while better for EMSCT (P < 0.01). The functional outcome at last follow-up correlated significantly with the preoperative Frankel score (P < 0.002). Conclusion: Due to the mostly mild impact of the surgery on the functional outcome, the surgical treatment of IDSCT in children and young patients can be uniquely advocated. PMID:26713174

  11. Embryonic and adult stem cells promote raphespinal axon outgrowth and improve functional outcome following spinal hemisection in mice.

    PubMed

    Boido, Marina; Rupa, Rosita; Garbossa, Diego; Fontanella, Marco; Ducati, Alessandro; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2009-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in permanent neurological deficits below the injury site. Serotonergic raphespinal projections promote functional recovery after SCI, but spontaneous regeneration of most severed axons is limited by the glial cyst and scar that form at the lesion site. Stem cell (SC) transplantation offers a promising approach for inducing regeneration through the damaged area. Here we compare the effects of transplantation of embryonic neural precursors (NPs) or adult mesenchymal SCs, both of which are potential candidates for SC therapy. The spinal cord was hemisected at the L2 neuromer in adult mice. Two weeks post-injury, we transplanted neural precursors or mesenchymal SCs into the cord, caudal to the hemisection. Injured mice without a graft served as controls. Mice were tested for functional recovery on a battery of motor tasks, then killed and analysed for survival of grafted cells, for effects of engraftment on the local cellular environment and for the sprouting of serotonergic axons. Both types of SCs survived and were integrated into the host tissue, but only the NPs expressed neuronal markers. All transplanted animals displayed an increased number of serotonin-positive fibres caudal to the hemisection, compared with untreated mice. And both cell types led to improved motor performance. These results point to a therapeutic potential for such cell grafting.

  12. [Evolutionary aspect of spinal ligaments in the human fetus].

    PubMed

    Bourges, M; Vanneuville, G

    1994-06-01

    Preliminary histological observations concerning interspinal ligament, at level T1 T2 and far the 14th, 24th and 37th post-ovulatory (P.O.) weeks, are presented here. In an histological, then biological context, these observation take place into an evolutive study of the muscular and ligamentous material of the human fetus spine. The paraffin included biopsy sections were examined after being colored with Mallory blue and picro-indigo-carmin chlorhydric orcein. After 14 weeks P.O., an heterogeneous structure appears with muscular, mixt and fibrous fascicules in a polygonal cellulo-fibrous network. After 24 weeks P.O., the structure is entirely fibrous, in a long, plexiform web. The evolution become more acute after 37 weeks P.O. After chlorhydric orcein coloration, no elastic fibers were observed in the collagen network, during the first two stages of observation cholorhydric orcein coloration, however, revealed a small quantity of them, 37 weeks after ovulation.

  13. A Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion Injury Model in Non-Human Primates (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Salegio, Ernesto A.; Sparrey, Carolyn J.; Camisa, William; Fischer, Jason; Leasure, Jeremi; Buckley, Jennifer; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S.; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Moseanko, Rod; Strand, Sarah; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Lemoy, Marie-Josee; Haefeli, Jenny; Ma, Xiaokui; Nielson, Jessica L.; Edgerton, V.R.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The development of a non-human primate (NHP) model of spinal cord injury (SCI) based on mechanical and computational modeling is described. We scaled up from a rodent model to a larger primate model using a highly controllable, friction-free, electronically-driven actuator to generate unilateral C6-C7 spinal cord injuries. Graded contusion lesions with varying degrees of functional recovery, depending upon pre-set impact parameters, were produced in nine NHPs. Protocols and pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to optimize the predictability of outcomes by matching impact protocols to the size of each animal's spinal canal, cord, and cerebrospinal fluid space. Post-operative MRI confirmed lesion placement and provided information on lesion volume and spread for comparison with histological measures. We evaluated the relationships between impact parameters, lesion measures, and behavioral outcomes, and confirmed that these relationships were consistent with our previous studies in the rat. In addition to providing multiple univariate outcome measures, we also developed an integrated outcome metric describing the multivariate cervical SCI syndrome. Impacts at the higher ranges of peak force produced highly lateralized and enduring deficits in multiple measures of forelimb and hand function, while lower energy impacts produced early weakness followed by substantial recovery but enduring deficits in fine digital control (e.g., pincer grasp). This model provides a clinically relevant system in which to evaluate the safety and, potentially, the efficacy of candidate translational therapies. PMID:26788611

  14. Quantification of locomotor recovery following spinal cord contusion in adult rats.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Melanie L; Springer, Joe E

    2006-11-01

    Injury to the spinal cord not only disrupts the functioning of spinal circuits at the site of the impact, but also limits sensorimotor function caudal to the level of the lesion. Ratings of gross locomotor skill are generally used to quantify locomotor recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study was to assess behavioral recovery following SCI with three tasks: (1) BBB ratings, (2) walking on a horizontal ladder, and (3) footprint analyses. Behavioral testing was conducted for 6 postoperative weeks, and then the spinal cords were processed for the amount of white matter spared. As expected, BBB ratings dramatically decreased and then improved during recovery. The number of hindlimb foot-faults on the horizontal ladder increased after injury and remained elevated during the recovery period. Footprint analyses revealed that sham-control rats used several different gaits to cross the runway. In contrast, the locomotor function of rats with a SCI was impaired throughout the postoperative period. Some locomotor parameters of the injured rats improved slightly (velocity, stride length, stride duration, stance duration), some did not change (interlimb coordination, swing duration, forelimb base of support, hindpaw angle), and others declined (hindlimb base of support) during the recovery period. Together, these results show that gross locomotor skill improved after SCI, while recovery of fine locomotor function was more limited. Multiple tests should be included in future experiments in order to assess gross and fine changes in sensorimotor function following SCI. PMID:17115910

  15. Transplantation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene-transfected Schwann cells for repairing spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu-quan; Wu, Min-fei; Liu, Jia-bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-san; Gu, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Transfection of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene has been shown to increase cell proliferation and enhance tissue repair. In the present study, hTERT was transfected into rat Schwann cells. A rat model of acute spinal cord injury was established by the modified free-falling method. Retrovirus PLXSN was injected at the site of spinal cord injury as a vector to mediate hTERT gene-transfected Schwann cells (1 × 1010/L; 10 μL) or Schwann cells (1 × 1010/L; 10 μL) without hTERT gene transfection. Between 1 and 4 weeks after model establishment, motor function of the lower limb improved in the hTERT-transfected group compared with the group with non-transfected Schwann cells. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results revealed that the number of apoptotic cells, and gene expression of aquaporin 4/9 and matrix metalloproteinase 9/2 decreased at the site of injury in both groups; however, the effect improved in the hTERT-transfected group compared with the Schwann cells without hTERT transfection group. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, PKH26 fluorescent labeling, and electrophysiological testing demonstrated that compared with the non-transfected group, spinal cord cavity and motor and sensory evoked potential latencies were reduced, while the number of PKH26-positive cells and the motor and sensory evoked potential amplitude increased at the site of injury in the hTERT-transfected group. These findings suggest that transplantation of hTERT gene-transfected Schwann cells repairs the structure and function of the injured spinal cord. PMID:26889196

  16. Effects of Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Epidural Stimulation for Standing after Chronic Complete Paralysis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rejc, Enrico; Angeli, Claudia; Harkema, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Sensory and motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI) has been considered functionally complete resulting in permanent paralysis with no recovery of voluntary movement, standing or walking. Previous findings demonstrated that lumbosacral spinal cord epidural stimulation can activate the spinal neural networks in one individual with motor complete, but sensory incomplete SCI, who achieved full body weight-bearing standing with independent knee extension, minimal self-assistance for balance and minimal external assistance for facilitating hip extension. In this study, we showed that two clinically sensory and motor complete participants were able to stand over-ground bearing full body-weight without any external assistance, using their hands to assist balance. The two clinically motor complete, but sensory incomplete participants also used minimal external assistance for hip extension. Standing with the least amount of assistance was achieved with individual-specific stimulation parameters, which promoted overall continuous EMG patterns in the lower limbs’ muscles. Stimulation parameters optimized for one individual resulted in poor standing and additional need of external assistance for hip and knee extension in the other participants. During sitting, little or negligible EMG activity of lower limb muscles was induced by epidural stimulation, showing that the weight-bearing related sensory information was needed to generate sufficient EMG patterns to effectively support full weight-bearing standing. In general, electrode configurations with cathodes selected in the caudal region of the array at relatively higher frequencies (25–60 Hz) resulted in the more effective EMG patterns for standing. These results show that human spinal circuitry can generate motor patterns effective for standing in the absence of functional supraspinal connections; however the appropriate selection of stimulation parameters is critical. PMID:26207623

  17. Assessment of axonal dysfunction in an in vitro model of acute compressive injury to adult rat spinal cord axons.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, M G; Nashmi, R

    1995-04-24

    An in vitro model of spinal cord injury was developed to study the pathophysiology of posttraumatic axonal dysfunction. A 25 mm length of thoracic spinal cord was removed from the adult male rat (n = 27). A dorsal column segment was isolated and pinned in a recording chamber and superfused with oxygenated (95% O2/5% CO2) Ringer. The cord was stimulated with a bipolar electrode, while two point responses were recorded extracellularly. Injury was accomplished by compression with a modified aneurysm clip which applied a 2 g force for 15 s. With injury the compound action potential (CAP) amplitude decreased to 53.7 +/- 5.4% (P < 0.001), while the latency increased to 115.6 +/- 3.1% (P < 0.0025) of control values. The absolute refractory period increased with injury from 1.7 +/- 0.1 ms to 2.1 +/- 0.1 ms (P < 0.05). The infusion of 5 mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a blocker of voltage-sensitive 'fast' K channels confined to internodal regions, resulted in broadening of the CAP of injured axons to 114.9 +/- 3.1% of control (P < 0.05). Ultrastructural analysis of the injured dorsal column segments revealed marked axonal and myelin pathology, including considerable myelin disruption. In conclusion, we have developed and characterized an in vitro model of mammalian spinal cord injury which simulates many of the features of in vivo trauma. Injured axons display characteristic changes in physiological function including a shift in refractory period and high frequency conduction failure. The ultrastructural data and response of injured axons to 4-AP suggest that myelin disruption with exposure of 'fast' K+ channels contributes to posttraumatic axonal dysfunction.

  18. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) modulates neurological function when intravenously infused in acute and, chronically injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Mousa, Alyaa; Karam, Shaima M; Abul, Habib; Asfar, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes severe and long lasting motor and sensory deficits, chronic pain, and autonomic dysreflexia. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has shown to produce neuroprotective effect in a broad range of neurodegenerative disease animal models. This study designed to test the efficacy of intravenous infusion of EGCG for 36 h, in acutely injured rats' spinal cord: within first 4 h post-injury and, in chronically SC injured rats: after one year of injury. Functional outcomes measured using standard BBB scale, The Louisville Swim Scale (LSS) and, pain behavior assessment tests. 72 Female adult rats subjected to moderate thoracic SCI using MASCIS Impactor, blindly randomized as the following: (I) Acute SCI + EGCG (II) Acute SCI + saline. (III) Chronic SCI + EGCG. (IV) Chronic SCI + saline and, sham SCI animals. EGCG i.v. treatment of acute and, chronic SCI animals resulted in significantly better recovery of motor and sensory functions, BBB and LSS (P < 0.005) and (P < 0.05) respectively. Tactile allodynia, mechanical nociception (P < 0.05) significantly improved. Paw withdrawal and, tail flick latencies increase significantly (P < 0.05). Moreover, in the EGCG treated acute SCI animals the percentage of lesion size area significantly reduced (P < 0.0001) and, the number of neurons in the spinal cord increased (P < 0.001). Percent areas of GAP-43 and GFAP immunohistochemistry showed significant (P < 0.05) increase. We conclude that the therapeutic window of opportunity for EGCG to depict neurological recovery in SCI animals, is viable up to one year post SCI when intravenously infused for 36 h. PMID:24071567

  19. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) modulates neurological function when intravenously infused in acute and, chronically injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Mousa, Alyaa; Karam, Shaima M; Abul, Habib; Asfar, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes severe and long lasting motor and sensory deficits, chronic pain, and autonomic dysreflexia. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has shown to produce neuroprotective effect in a broad range of neurodegenerative disease animal models. This study designed to test the efficacy of intravenous infusion of EGCG for 36 h, in acutely injured rats' spinal cord: within first 4 h post-injury and, in chronically SC injured rats: after one year of injury. Functional outcomes measured using standard BBB scale, The Louisville Swim Scale (LSS) and, pain behavior assessment tests. 72 Female adult rats subjected to moderate thoracic SCI using MASCIS Impactor, blindly randomized as the following: (I) Acute SCI + EGCG (II) Acute SCI + saline. (III) Chronic SCI + EGCG. (IV) Chronic SCI + saline and, sham SCI animals. EGCG i.v. treatment of acute and, chronic SCI animals resulted in significantly better recovery of motor and sensory functions, BBB and LSS (P < 0.005) and (P < 0.05) respectively. Tactile allodynia, mechanical nociception (P < 0.05) significantly improved. Paw withdrawal and, tail flick latencies increase significantly (P < 0.05). Moreover, in the EGCG treated acute SCI animals the percentage of lesion size area significantly reduced (P < 0.0001) and, the number of neurons in the spinal cord increased (P < 0.001). Percent areas of GAP-43 and GFAP immunohistochemistry showed significant (P < 0.05) increase. We conclude that the therapeutic window of opportunity for EGCG to depict neurological recovery in SCI animals, is viable up to one year post SCI when intravenously infused for 36 h.

  20. Thiamin requirement of the adult human.

    PubMed

    Sauberlich, H E; Herman, Y F; Stevens, C O; Herman, R H

    1979-11-01

    Young adult male subjects maintained on a metabolic ward were fed diets providing controlled intakes of thiamin and either 2800 or 3600 kcal. The higher level of calories was attained by an increased intake of carbohydrates. Constant weights were maintained by the subjects by adjusting daily activity and exercise schedules. Thiamin requirements were evaluated in terms of erythrocyte transketolase activity and urinary excretion of the vitamin. The results of the study revealed that a relationship exists between thiamin requirement and caloric intake and expenditure. Thus, when the calories being utilized were derived primarily from carbohydrate sources, the minimum adult male requirement for thiamin appeared to be 0.30 mg of thiamin per 1000 kcal. Urinary excretion of thiamin and erythrocyte transketolase activity appear to be reasonably reliable reflections of thiamin intakes and thiamin nutritional status. The use of these measurements in nutrition surveys appears justified. The microbiological assay (Lactobacillus viridescens) for measuring thiamin levels in urine samples appears to be a somewhat more sensitive but valid procedure as an alternate for the thiochrome method. Judged from the results of this study, the recommended intake for the adult human of 0.40 mg of thiamin per 1000 kcal by FAO/WHO and the recommended allowance of 0.5 mg per 1000 kcal by the Food and Nutrition Board of the NAS-NRC appear reasonable and amply allow for biological variations and other factors that may influence the requirement for this vitamin.

  1. Neurochemistry Study of Spinal Cord in Non-Human Primate (Sapajus Spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Torres-da-Silva, K.R.; da Silva, A.V.; Barioni, N.O.; Tessarin, G.W.L.; de Oliveira, J.A.; Ervolino, E.; Horta-Júnior, J.A.C.; Casatti, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    The spinal cord is involved in local, ascending and descending neural pathways. Few studies analyzed the distribution of neuromediators in the laminae of non-human primates along all segments. The present study described the classic neuromediators in the spinal cord of the non-human primate Sapajus spp. through histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) method showed neuronal somata in the intermediolateral column (IML), central cervical nucleus (CCN), laminae I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII and X, besides dense presence of nerve fibers in laminae II and IX. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was evident in the neuronal somata in laminae V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, CCN, IML and in the Clarke’s column (CC). Immunohistochemistry data revealed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity in neuronal somata and in fibers of laminae I, II, III, VII, VIII, X and IML; choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in neuronal somata and in fibers of laminae VII, VIII and IX; calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was noticed in neuronal somata of lamina IX and in nerve fibers of laminae I, II, III, IV, V, VI and VII; substance P (SP) in nerve fibers of laminae I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, CCN, CC and IML; serotonin (5-HT) and vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT1) was noticed in nerve fibers of all laminae; somatostatin (SOM) in neuronal somata of laminae III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII and IX and nerve fibers in laminae I, II, V, VI, VII, X and IML; calbindin (Cb) in neuronal somata of laminae I, II, VI, VII, IX and X; parvalbumin (PV) was found in neuronal somata and in nerve fibers of laminae III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX and CC; finally, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) was present in neuronal somata of laminae V, VI, VII, VIII, IX and X. This study revealed interesting results concerning the chemoarchitecture of the Sapajus spp. spinal cord with a distribution pattern mostly similar to

  2. Functional electrical stimulation helps replenish progenitor cells in the injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Becker, Daniel; Gary, Devin S; Rosenzweig, Ephron S; Grill, Warren M; McDonald, John W

    2010-04-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) can restore control and offset atrophy to muscles after neurological injury. However, FES has not been considered as a method for enhancing CNS regeneration. This paper demonstrates that FES dramatically enhanced progenitor cell birth in the spinal cord of rats with a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). A complete SCI at thoracic level 8/9 was performed on 12 rats. Three weeks later, a FES device to stimulate hindlimb movement was implanted into these rats. Twelve identically-injured rats received inactive FES implants. An additional control group of uninjured rats were also examined. Ten days after FES implantation, dividing cells were marked with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). The "cell birth" subgroup (half the animals in each group) was sacrificed immediately after completion of BrdU administration, and the "cell survival" subgroup was sacrificed 7 days later. In the injured "cell birth" subgroup, FES induced an 82-86% increase in cell birth in the lumbar spinal cord. In the injured "cell survival" subgroup, the increased lumbar newborn cell counts persisted. FES doubled the proportion of the newly-born cells which expressed nestin and other markers suggestive of tripotential progenitors. In uninjured rats, FES had no effect on cell birth/survival. This report suggests that controlled electrical activation of the CNS may enhance spontaneous regeneration after neurological injuries.

  3. Structural and functional alterations of spinal cord axons in adult Long Evans Shaker (LES) dysmyelinated rats.

    PubMed

    Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila; Sinha, Kusum; Velumian, Alexander A; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Fehlings, Michael G

    2005-06-01

    Abnormal formation or loss of myelin is a distinguishing feature of many neurological disorders and contributes to the pathobiology of neurotrauma. In this study we characterize the functional and molecular changes in CNS white matter in Long Evans Shaker (LES) rats. These rats have a spontaneous mutation of the gene encoding myelin basic protein which results in severe dysmyelination of the central nervous system (CNS), providing a unique model for demyelinating/dysmyelinating disorders. To date, the functional and molecular changes in CNS white matter in this model are not well understood. We have used in vivo somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), in vitro compound action potential (CAP) recording in isolated dorsal columns, confocal immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and real-time PCR to examine the electrophysiological, molecular and cellular changes in spinal cord white matter in LES rats. We observed that dysmyelination is associated with dispersed labeling of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 K+ channel subunits, as well as Caspr, a protein normally confined to paranodes, along the LES rat spinal cord axons. Abnormal electrophysiological properties including attenuation of CAP amplitude and conduction velocity, high frequency conduction failure and enhanced sensitivity to K+ channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and dendrotoxin-I were observed in spinal cord axons from LES rats. Our results in LES rats clarify some of the key molecular, cellular and functional consequences of dysmyelination and myelin-axon interactions. Further understanding of these issues in this model could provide critical insights for neurological disorders characterized by demyelination. PMID:15869936

  4. Antinociceptive Effects of Spinal Manipulative Therapy on Nociceptive Behavior of Adult Rats during the Formalin Test

    PubMed Central

    Onifer, Stephen M.; Reed, William R.; Sozio, Randall S.; Long, Cynthia R.

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing pain relief resulting from spinal manipulative therapies, including low velocity variable amplitude spinal manipulation (LVVA-SM), requires determining their mechanisms. Pain models that incorporate simulated spinal manipulative therapy treatments are needed for these studies. The antinociceptive effects of a single LVVA-SM treatment on rat nociceptive behavior during the commonly used formalin test were investigated. Dilute formalin was injected subcutaneously into a plantar hindpaw. Licking behavior was video-recorded for 5 minutes. Ten minutes of LVVA-SM at 20° flexion was administered with a custom-made device at the lumbar (L5) vertebra of isoflurane-anesthetized experimental rats (n = 12) beginning 10 minutes after formalin injection. Hindpaw licking was video-recorded for 60 minutes beginning 5 minutes after LVVA-SM. Control rats (n = 12) underwent the same methods except for LVVA-SM. The mean times spent licking the formalin-injected hindpaw of both groups 1–5 minutes after injection were not different. The mean licking time during the first 20 minutes post-LVVA-SM of experimental rats was significantly less than that of control rats (P < 0.001). The mean licking times of both groups during the second and third 20 minutes post-LVVA-SM were not different. Administration of LVVA-SM had a short-term, remote antinociceptive effect similar to clinical findings. Therefore, mechanistic investigations using this experimental approach are warranted. PMID:26693243

  5. Human Perivascular Stem Cell-Based Bone Graft Substitute Induces Rat Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Choon G.; James, Aaron W.; Asatrian, Greg; Chang, Le; Nguyen, Alan; Le, Khoi; Bayani, Georgina; Lee, Robert; Stoker, David; Zhang, Xinli

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) because of its abundance and accessibility. We have previously defined a population of native MSCs termed perivascular stem cells (PSCs), purified from diverse human tissues, including adipose tissue. Human PSCs (hPSCs) are a bipartite cell population composed of pericytes (CD146+CD34−CD45−) and adventitial cells (CD146−CD34+CD45−), isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and with properties identical to those of culture identified MSCs. Our previous studies showed that hPSCs exhibit improved bone formation compared with a sample-matched unpurified population (termed stromal vascular fraction); however, it is not known whether hPSCs would be efficacious in a spinal fusion model. To investigate, we evaluated the osteogenic potential of freshly sorted hPSCs without culture expansion and differentiation in a rat model of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. We compared increasing dosages of implanted hPSCs to assess for dose-dependent efficacy. All hPSC treatment groups induced successful spinal fusion, assessed by manual palpation and microcomputed tomography. Computerized biomechanical simulation (finite element analysis) further demonstrated bone fusion with hPSC treatment. Histological analyses showed robust endochondral ossification in hPSC-treated samples. Finally, we confirmed that implanted hPSCs indeed differentiated into osteoblasts and osteocytes; however, the majority of the new bone formation was of host origin. These results suggest that implanted hPSCs positively regulate bone formation via direct and paracrine mechanisms. In summary, hPSCs are a readily available MSC population that effectively forms bone without requirements for culture or predifferentiation. Thus, hPSC-based products show promise for future efforts in clinical bone regeneration and repair. PMID:25154782

  6. Differential Activation of TRP Channels in the Adult Rat Spinal Substantia Gelatinosa by Stereoisomers of Plant-Derived Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Kumamoto, Eiichi; Fujita, Tsugumi

    2016-01-01

    Activation of TRPV1, TRPA1 or TRPM8 channel expressed in the central terminal of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron increases the spontaneous release of l-glutamate onto spinal dorsal horn lamina II (substantia gelatinosa; SG) neurons which play a pivotal role in regulating nociceptive transmission. The TRP channels are activated by various plant-derived chemicals. Although stereoisomers activate or modulate ion channels in a distinct manner, this phenomenon is not fully addressed for TRP channels. By applying the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to SG neurons of adult rat spinal cord slices, we found out that all of plant-derived chemicals, carvacrol, thymol, carvone and cineole, increase the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current, a measure of the spontaneous release of l-glutamate from nerve terminals, by activating TRP channels. The presynaptic activities were different between stereoisomers (carvacrol and thymol; (−)-carvone and (+)-carvone; 1,8-cineole and 1,4-cineole) in the extent or the types of TRP channels activated, indicating that TRP channels in the SG are activated by stereoisomers in a distinct manner. This result could serve to know the properties of the central terminal TRP channels that are targets of drugs for alleviating pain. PMID:27483289

  7. Concurrent Intraventricular and Sacral Spinal Drop Metastasis of Ganglioglioma in an Adult Patient: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Jay W; Jha, Ribhu T; Felbaum, Daniel; Kalhorn, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    Gangliogliomas are uncommon tumors of the central nervous system and rarely occur in the lateral ventricle or present with drop metastasis. We report a 49-year-old male who presented with a six-week history of left leg pain and numbness. Clinical examination revealed no focal neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated enhancing nodular lesions in the sacral spine abutting the S2 nerve root. Further imaging of the neuroaxis demonstrated a cystic lesion in the left frontal horn of the lateral ventricle. Gross total surgical resection of the ventricular lesion was performed through a transcortical approach, followed by resection of the sacral spinal drop metastasis in a staged manner. A histopathological analysis revealed the diagnosis of low-grade ganglioglioma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a low-grade intraventricular ganglioglioma presenting with symptoms associated with drop metastasis in an adult patient. PMID:27158568

  8. Human iPS cell-derived astrocyte transplants preserve respiratory function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Javed, Elham; Scura, Daniel; Hala, Tamara J; Seetharam, Suneil; Falnikar, Aditi; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Chorath, Ashley; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Wright, Megan C; Lepore, Angelo C

    2015-09-01

    Transplantation-based replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes is a promising therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) that has not been extensively explored, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a clinically-relevant source of pluripotent cells that both avoid ethical issues of embryonic stem cells and allow for homogeneous derivation of mature cell types in large quantities, potentially in an autologous fashion. Despite their promise, the iPS cell field is in its infancy with respect to evaluating in vivo graft integration and therapeutic efficacy in SCI models. Astrocytes express the major glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in spinal cord. Following SCI, compromised GLT1 expression/function can increase susceptibility to excitotoxicity. We therefore evaluated intraspinal transplantation of human iPS cell-derived astrocytes (hIPSAs) following cervical contusion SCI as a novel strategy for reconstituting GLT1 expression and for protecting diaphragmatic respiratory neural circuitry. Transplant-derived cells showed robust long-term survival post-injection and efficiently differentiated into astrocytes in injured spinal cord of both immunesuppressed mice and rats. However, the majority of transplant-derived astrocytes did not express high levels of GLT1, particularly at early times post-injection. To enhance their ability to modulate extracellular glutamate levels, we engineered hIPSAs with lentivirus to constitutively express GLT1. Overexpression significantly increased GLT1 protein and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake levels in hIPSAs both in vitro and in vivo post-transplantation. Compared to human fibroblast control and unmodified hIPSA transplantation, GLT1-overexpressing hIPSAs reduced (1) lesion size within the injured cervical spinal cord, (2) morphological denervation by respiratory phrenic motor

  9. Human iPS cell-derived astrocyte transplants preserve respiratory function after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Javed, Elham; Scura, Daniel; Hala, Tamara J.; Seetharam, Suneil; Falnikar, Aditi; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Chorath, Ashley; Maragakis, Nicholas J.; Wright, Megan C.; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation-based replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes is a promising therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) that has not been extensively explored, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a clinically-relevant source of pluripotent cells that both avoid ethical issues of embryonic stem cells and allow for homogeneous derivation of mature cell types in large quantities, potentially in an autologous fashion. Despite their promise, the iPS cell field is in its infancy with respect to evaluating in vivo graft integration and therapeutic efficacy in SCI models. Astrocytes express the major glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in spinal cord. Following SCI, compromised GLT1 expression/function can increase susceptibility to excitotoxicity. We therefore evaluated intraspinal transplantation of human iPS cell-derived astrocytes (hIPSAs) following cervical contusion SCI as a novel strategy for reconstituting GLT1 expression and for protecting diaphragmatic respiratory neural circuitry. Transplant-derived cells showed robust long-term survival post-injection and efficiently differentiated into astrocytes in injured spinal cord of both immunesuppressed mice and rats. However, the majority of transplant-derived astrocytes did not express high levels of GLT1, particularly at early times post-injection. To enhance their ability to modulate extracellular glutamate levels, we engineered hIPSAs with lentivirus to constitutively express GLT1. Overexpression significantly increased GLT1 protein and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake levels in hIPSAs both in vitro and in vivo post-transplantation. Compared to human fibroblast control and unmodified hIPSA transplantation, GLT1-overexpressing hIPSAs reduced (1) lesion size within the injured cervical spinal cord, (2) morphological denervation by respiratory phrenic motor

  10. Glial changes in the phrenic nucleus following superimposed cervical spinal cord hemisection and peripheral chronic phrenicotomy injuries in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Gould, D J; Goshgarian, H G

    1997-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the microglial and astroglial reaction in the phrenic nucleus following either an ipsilateral C2 spinal cord hemisection, a peripheral phrenicotomy, or a combination of the two injuries in the same adult rat. The present study used three different fluorescent markers and a confocal laser image analysis system to study glial cells and phrenic motoneurons at the light microscopic level. Young adult female rats were divided into one combined injury group (left phrenicotomy and left C2 spinal hemisection with periods of 1 to 4 weeks between injuries, N = 12) and three other groups consisting of noninjured animals (N = 3), animals that received C2 hemisection only (N = 3), and animals with phrenicotomy only (survival periods of 2 (N = 3) and 4 (N = 3) weeks after phrenicotomy). Fluorogold was injected into the diaphragm to label phrenic motoneurons in all animals. Microglia and astrocytes were labeled with Texas red and fluorescein, respectively, and were visualized simultaneously along with phrenic motoneurons. The results suggest that the microglial and astrocytic response in the superimposed injury model are similar to the glial reactions characteristically seen in a peripheral axotomy alone model. These reactions include proliferation and migration of microglial cells along the perineuronal surface (peaking at 2 weeks) and the hypertrophy of astrocytes (peaking at 4 weeks). In addition, the increase in astrocytic tissue, which is characteristically seen in response to axotomy alone, is significantly enhanced in the superimposed injury model. Also, there is a large and rapid increase in GFAP-positive astrocytes within 24 hours after hemisection alone. The information gained from the present study will aid in determining, predicting, and eventually manipulating central nervous system responses to multiple injuries with the objective of reestablishing function in the damaged CNS.

  11. Evidence of a specific spinal pathway for the sense of warmth in humans.

    PubMed

    Iannetti, G D; Truini, A; Romaniello, A; Galeotti, F; Rizzo, C; Manfredi, M; Cruccu, G

    2003-01-01

    While research on human sensory processing shows that warm input is conveyed from the periphery by specific, unmyelinated primary sensory neurons, its pathways in the central nervous system (CNS) remain unclear. To gain physiological information on the spinal pathways that convey warmth or nociceptive sensations, in 15 healthy subjects, we studied the cerebral evoked responses and reaction times in response to laser stimuli selectively exciting Adelta nociceptors or C warmth receptors at different levels along the spine. To minimize the conduction distance along the primary sensory neuron, we directed CO(2)-laser pulses to the skin overlying the vertebral spinous processes. Using brain source analysis of the evoked responses with high-resolution electroencephalography and a realistic model of the head based on individual magnetic resonance imaging scans, we also studied the cortical areas involved in the cerebral processing of warm and nociceptive inputs. The activation of C warmth receptors evoked cerebral potentials with a main positive component peaking at 470-540 ms, i.e., a latency clearly longer than that of the corresponding wave yielded by Adelta nociceptive input (290-320 ms). Spinal neurons activated by the warm input had a slower conduction velocity (2.5 m/s) than the nociceptive spinal neurons (11.9 m/s). Brain source analysis of the cerebral responses evoked by the Adelta input yielded a very strong fit for one single generator in the mid portion of the cingulate gyrus; the warmth-related responses were best explained by three generators, one within the cingulate and two in the right and left opercular-insular cortices. Our results support the existence of slow-conducting second-order neurons specific for the sense of warmth.

  12. Effects of Serotonergic Medications on Locomotor Performance in Humans with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Leech, Kristan A.; Kinnaird, Catherine R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) often results in significant motor impairments that lead to decreased functional mobility. Loss of descending serotonergic (5HT) input to spinal circuits is thought to contribute to motor impairments, with enhanced motor function demonstrated through augmentation of 5HT signaling. However, the presence of spastic motor behaviors in SCI is attributed, in part, to changes in spinal 5HT receptors that augment their activity in the absence of 5HT, although data demonstrating motor effects of 5HT agents that deactivate these receptors are conflicting. The effects of enhancement or depression of 5HT signaling on locomotor function have not been thoroughly evaluated in human iSCI. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate acute effects of 5HT medications on locomotion in 10 subjects with chronic (>1 year) iSCI. Peak overground and treadmill locomotor performance, including measures of gait kinematics, electromyographic (EMG) activity, and oxygen consumption, were assessed before and after single-dose administration of either a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or a 5HT antagonist using a double-blinded, randomized, cross-over design. Results indicate that neither medication led to improvements in locomotion, with a significant decrease in peak overground gait speed observed after 5HT antagonists (from 0.8±0.1 to 0.7±0.1 m/s; p=0.01). Additionally, 5-HT medications had differential effects on EMG activity, with 5HT antagonists decreasing extensor activity and SSRIs increasing flexor activity. Our data therefore suggest that acute manipulation of 5HT signaling, despite changes in muscle activity, does not improve locomotor performance after iSCI. PMID:24742292

  13. Transverse diameter of the lumbar spinal canal in normal adult Saudis.

    PubMed

    Amonoo-Kuofi, H S; Patel, P J; Fatani, J A

    1990-01-01

    Pathological changes in the diameters of the lumbar spinal canal may be associated with low back pain. The assessment of the size of the canal is therefore an important diagnostic procedure. Evidence suggests that there are ethnic differences in the dimensions of the canal. A radiogrammetric study was therefore undertaken to establish norms of the transverse diameter for the Saudi population. The results show that the transverse diameter of the canal in Saudis differ from that of other populations, but the shape is similar to those of earlier reports. Intersegmental differences which are useful for the detection of isolated segmental anomalies were also calculated. The significance of the findings is discussed.

  14. Transplantation of Human Umbilical Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Wharton's Jelly after Complete Transection of the Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shao-Yun; Cheng, Henrich; Fu, Yu-Show

    2008-01-01

    Background Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) isolated from Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord can be easily obtained and processed compared with embryonic or bone marrow stem cells. These cells may be a valuable source in the repair of spinal cord injury. Methodology/Principal Findings We examine the effects of HUMSC transplantation after complete spinal cord transection in rats. Approximately 5×105 HUMSCs were transplanted into the lesion site. Three groups of rats were implanted with either untreated HUMSCs (referred to as the stem cell group), or HUMSCs treated with neuronal conditioned medium (NCM) for either three days or six days (referred to as NCM-3 and NCM-6 days, respectively). The control group received no HUMSCs in the transected spinal cord. Three weeks after transplantation, significant improvements in locomotion were observed in all the three groups receiving HUMSCs (stem cell, NCM-3 and NCM-6 days groups). This recovery was accompanied by increased numbers of regenerated axons in the corticospinal tract and neurofilament-positive fibers around the lesion site. There were fewer microglia and reactive astrocytes in both the rostral and caudal stumps of the spinal cord in the stem cell group than in the control group. Transplanted HUMSCs survived for 16 weeks and produced large amounts of human neutrophil-activating protein-2, neurotrophin-3, basic fibroblast growth factor, glucocorticoid induced tumor necrosis factor receptor, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 in the host spinal cord, which may help spinal cord repair. Conclusions/Significance Transplantation of HUMSCs is beneficial to wound healing after spinal cord injury in rats. PMID:18852872

  15. Locomotor training alters the behavior of flexor reflexes during walking in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In humans, a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs the excitability of pathways mediating early flexor reflexes and increases the excitability of late, long-lasting flexor reflexes. We hypothesized that in individuals with SCI, locomotor training will alter the behavior of these spinally mediated reflexes. Nine individuals who had either chronic clinically motor complete or incomplete SCI received an average of 44 locomotor training sessions. Flexor reflexes, elicited via sural nerve stimulation of the right or left leg, were recorded from the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before and after body weight support (BWS)-assisted treadmill training. The modulation pattern of the ipsilateral TA responses following innocuous stimulation of the right foot was also recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they stepped at 25% BWS to investigate whether body unloading during walking affects the behavior of these responses. Healthy subjects did not receive treadmill training. We observed a phase-dependent modulation of early TA flexor reflexes in healthy subjects with reduced body weight during walking. The early TA flexor reflexes were increased at heel contact, progressively decreased during the stance phase, and then increased throughout the swing phase. In individuals with SCI, locomotor training induced the reappearance of early TA flexor reflexes and changed the amplitude of late TA flexor reflexes during walking. Both early and late TA flexor reflexes were modulated in a phase-dependent pattern after training. These new findings support the adaptive capability of the injured nervous system to return to a prelesion excitability and integration state.

  16. Rethinking Adult Literacy Programs: A Humanities-Based Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anania, Joanne

    The Roosevelt University Humanities Enrichment Program tries to acknowledge the adult part of adult literacy. Its instructional materials are of interest and value to the adult student and, therefore, provide incentives for reading and discussion instead of serving merely as skill-building exercises. The materials are drawn from literature,…

  17. Transplantation of Adult Monkey Neural Stem Cells into A Contusion Spinal Cord Injury Model in Rhesus Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hajinasrollah, Mostafa; Zare Mehrjerdi, Nargess; Azizi, Hossein; Hemmesi, Katayoun; Moghiminasr, Reza; Azhdari, Zahra; Talebi, Ardeshir; Mohitmafi, Soroush; Vosough Taqi Dizaj, Ahmad; Sharifi, Giuve; Baharvand, Hossein; Rezaee, Omidvar; Kiani, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    Objective Currently, cellular transplantation for spinal cord injuries (SCI) is the subject of numerous preclinical studies. Among the many cell types in the adult brain, there is a unique subpopulation of neural stem cells (NSC) that can self-renew and differentiate into neurons. The study aims, therefore, to explore the efficacy of adult monkey NSC (mNSC) in a primate SCI model. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, isolated mNSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and RT-PCR. Next, BrdU-labeled cells were transplanted into a SCI model. The SCI animal model was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analysis. Animals were clinically observed for 6 months. Results Analysis confirmed homing of mNSCs into the injury site. Transplanted cells expressed neuronal markers (TubIII). Hind limb performance improved in trans- planted animals based on Tarlov’s scale and our established behavioral tests for monkeys. Conclusion Our findings have indicated that mNSCs can facilitate recovery in contusion SCI models in rhesus macaque monkeys. Additional studies are necessary to determine the im- provement mechanisms after cell transplantation. PMID:24567941

  18. Astrocytic and vascular remodeling in the injured adult rat spinal cord after chondroitinase ABC treatment.

    PubMed

    Milbreta, Ulla; von Boxberg, Ysander; Mailly, Philippe; Nothias, Fatiha; Soares, Sylvia

    2014-05-01

    Upregulation of extracellular chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) is a primary cause for the failure of axons to regenerate after spinal cord injury (SCI), and the beneficial effect of their degradation by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) is widely documented. Little is known, however, about the effect of ChABC treatment on astrogliosis and revascularization, two important factors influencing axon regrowth. This was investigated in the present study. Immediately after a spinal cord hemisection at thoracic level 8-9, we injected ChABC intrathecally at the sacral level, repeated three times until 10 days post-injury. Our results show an effective cleavage of CSPG glycosaminoglycan chains and stimulation of axonal remodeling within the injury site, accompanied by an extended period of astrocyte remodeling (up to 4 weeks). Interestingly, ChABC treatment favored an orientation of astrocytic processes directed toward the injury, in close association with axons at the lesion entry zone, suggesting a correlation between axon and astrocyte remodeling. Further, during the first weeks post-injury, ChABC treatment affected the morphology of laminin-positive blood vessel basement membranes and vessel-independent laminin deposits: hypertrophied blood vessels with detached or duplicated basement membrane were more numerous than in lesioned untreated animals. In contrast, at later time points, laminin expression increased and became more directly associated with newly formed blood vessels, the size of which tended to be closer to that found in intact tissue. Our data reinforce the idea that ChABC injection in combination with other synergistic treatments is a promising therapeutic strategy for SCI repair.

  19. Objective measures of motor dysfunction after compression spinal cord injury in adult rats: correlations with locomotor rating scores.

    PubMed

    Semler, Joerg; Wellmann, Katharina; Wirth, Felicitas; Stein, Gregor; Angelova, Srebrina; Ashrafi, Mahak; Schempf, Greta; Ankerne, Janina; Ozsoy, Ozlem; Ozsoy, Umut; Schönau, Eckhard; Angelov, Doychin N; Irintchev, Andrey

    2011-07-01

    Precise assessment of motor deficits after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in rodents is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of functional recovery and testing therapeutic approaches. Here we analyzed the applicability to a rat SCI model of an objective approach, the single-frame motion analysis, created and used for functional analysis in mice. Adult female Wistar rats were subjected to graded compression of the spinal cord. Recovery of locomotion was analyzed using video recordings of beam walking and inclined ladder climbing. Three out of four parameters used in mice appeared suitable: the foot-stepping angle (FSA) and the rump-height index (RHI), measured during beam walking, and for estimating paw placement and body weight support, respectively, and the number of correct ladder steps (CLS), assessing skilled limb movements. These parameters, similar to the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scores, correlated with lesion volume and showed significant differences between moderately and severely injured rats at 1-9 weeks after SCI. The beam parameters, but not CLS, correlated well with the BBB scores within ranges of poor and good locomotor abilities. FSA co-varied with RHI only in the severely impaired rats, while RHI and CLS were barely correlated. Our findings suggest that the numerical parameters estimate, as intended by design, predominantly different aspects of locomotion. The use of these objective measures combined with BBB rating provides a time- and cost-efficient opportunity for versatile and reliable functional evaluations in both severely and moderately impaired rats, combining clinical assessment with precise numerical measures. PMID:21428717

  20. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  1. Spinal cord glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands with 1p/19q deletion in an adult with low-grade cerebral oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Fraum, Tyler J; Barak, Stephanie; Pack, Svetlana; Lonser, Russell R; Fine, Howard A; Quezado, Martha; Iwamoto, Fabio M

    2012-04-01

    Glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands (GTNI) is considered a rare variant of astrocytoma, characterized by discrete aggregates of cells expressing neuronal markers that punctuate a GFAP-positive glial background. Of the 24 published GTNI cases, only two occurred in adult spinal cords; none occurred concurrent with another CNS tumor; and none of those tested exhibited the 1p/19q deletion typical of oligodendroglioma. A 48-year-old man without significant past medical history was diagnosed with a WHO grade II oligodendroglioma by stereotactic biopsy of a lesion discovered after the patient suffered a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. By FISH analysis, this tumor exhibited the 1p/19q deletion present in up to 80% of oligodendrogliomas. The patient received 14 monthly cycles of temozolomide, and his cerebral tumor had a minor response. When the patient subsequently reported progressive paresthesias of his lower extremities, an MRI revealed an enhancing, cystic tumor of the thoracic spinal cord that was diagnosed as GTNI by histological analysis. By FISH analysis, this lesion exhibited the same 1p/19q deletion present in the concurrent cerebral oligodendroglioma. This case of a spinal cord GTNI with 1p/19q deletions constitutes the third report of a spinal cord GTNI in an adult patient; the first report of a GTNI in an individual with a separate CNS neoplasm; and the first report of a GTNI with 1p/19q deletions. This case establishes a potential genetic kinship between GTNI and oligodendroglioma that warrants further investigation.

  2. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  3. Generating Diverse Spinal Motor Neuron Subtypes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Patani, Rickie

    2016-01-01

    Resolving the mechanisms underlying human neuronal diversification remains a major challenge in developmental and applied neurobiology. Motor neurons (MNs) represent a diverse pool of neuronal subtypes exhibiting differential vulnerability in different human neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The ability to predictably manipulate MN subtype lineage restriction from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) will form the essential basis to establishing accurate, clinically relevant in vitro disease models. I first overview motor neuron developmental biology to provide some context for reviewing recent studies interrogating pathways that influence the generation of MN diversity. I conclude that motor neurogenesis from PSCs provides a powerful reductionist model system to gain insight into the developmental logic of MN subtype diversification and serves more broadly as a leading exemplar of potential strategies to resolve the molecular basis of neuronal subclass differentiation within the nervous system. These studies will in turn permit greater mechanistic understanding of differential MN subtype vulnerability using in vitro human disease models. PMID:26823667

  4. Upregulated human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression is associated with spinal chordoma growth, invasion and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ming-Xiang; Lv, Guo-Hua; Li, Jing; She, Xiao-Ling; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression or activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) has been associated with human carcinogenesis. This study detected hTERT expression in spinal chordoma tissues and associated the level of hTERT expression with clinicopathological data and patient survival. Tissue samples from 54 patients and 20 controls were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis of hTERT protein levels. hTERT expression levels were then analyzed for associations with patient survival rates and clinicopathological parameters (such as age, gender, tumor size, location, tumor grade, tumor stage, muscle invasion, recurrence or not, type of resection, tumor hemorrhage, tumor necrosis, levels of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and Ki-67 expression). hTERT expression was detected in all 54 spinal chordomas. Expression levels were weak in 7, moderate in 17 and strong in 30 spinal chordoma tissue samples. In contrast, hTERT was rarely expressed in nucleus pulposus tissues (20 samples). hTERT expression was significantly associated with the Ki-67-staining index (t = -6.616, p < 0.001), TIL levels (F = 5.27, p = 0.008) and tumor invasion of the surrounding muscle tissue (t = -4.49, p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier curves indicated that high hTERT expression was significantly associated with poor local recurrence-free survival of patients (χ(2) = 19.07, p < 0.001 via the log-rank test), but not associated with overall patient survival. Multivariate analysis of local recurrence-free survival demonstrated that hTERT expression was an independent prognostic factor among spinal chordoma patients (HR = 1.013, 95% CI: 1.002-1.024, p = 0.016). High hTERT expression was associated with spinal chordoma growth, invasion and poor patient prognosis. Future studies will investigate the use of hTERT as a biomarker to predict patient prognosis and disease progression or as a potential spinal chordoma therapy target.

  5. Upregulated human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression is associated with spinal chordoma growth, invasion and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ming-Xiang; Lv, Guo-Hua; Li, Jing; She, Xiao-Ling; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression or activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) has been associated with human carcinogenesis. This study detected hTERT expression in spinal chordoma tissues and associated the level of hTERT expression with clinicopathological data and patient survival. Tissue samples from 54 patients and 20 controls were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis of hTERT protein levels. hTERT expression levels were then analyzed for associations with patient survival rates and clinicopathological parameters (such as age, gender, tumor size, location, tumor grade, tumor stage, muscle invasion, recurrence or not, type of resection, tumor hemorrhage, tumor necrosis, levels of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and Ki-67 expression). hTERT expression was detected in all 54 spinal chordomas. Expression levels were weak in 7, moderate in 17 and strong in 30 spinal chordoma tissue samples. In contrast, hTERT was rarely expressed in nucleus pulposus tissues (20 samples). hTERT expression was significantly associated with the Ki-67-staining index (t = -6.616, p < 0.001), TIL levels (F = 5.27, p = 0.008) and tumor invasion of the surrounding muscle tissue (t = -4.49, p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier curves indicated that high hTERT expression was significantly associated with poor local recurrence-free survival of patients (χ2 = 19.07, p < 0.001 via the log-rank test), but not associated with overall patient survival. Multivariate analysis of local recurrence-free survival demonstrated that hTERT expression was an independent prognostic factor among spinal chordoma patients (HR = 1.013, 95% CI: 1.002-1.024, p = 0.016). High hTERT expression was associated with spinal chordoma growth, invasion and poor patient prognosis. Future studies will investigate the use of hTERT as a biomarker to predict patient prognosis and disease progression or as a potential spinal chordoma therapy target. PMID:27158344

  6. Increased spinal reflex excitability is associated with enhanced central activation during voluntary lengthening contractions in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyosub E; Corcos, Daniel M; Hornby, T George

    2015-07-01

    This study of chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects investigated patterns of central motor drive (i.e., central activation) of the plantar flexors using interpolated twitches, and modulation of soleus H-reflexes during lengthening, isometric, and shortening muscle actions. In a recent study of the knee extensors, SCI subjects demonstrated greater central activation ratio (CAR) values during lengthening (i.e., eccentric) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), compared with during isometric or shortening (i.e., concentric) MVCs. In contrast, healthy controls demonstrated lower lengthening CAR values compared with their isometric and shortening CARs. For the present investigation, we hypothesized SCI subjects would again produce their highest CAR values during lengthening MVCs, and that these increases in central activation were partially attributable to greater efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission during muscle lengthening following SCI. Results show SCI subjects produced higher CAR values during lengthening vs. isometric or shortening MVCs (all P < 0.001). H-reflex testing revealed normalized H-reflexes (maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratios) were greater for SCI than controls during passive (P = 0.023) and active (i.e., 75% MVC; P = 0.017) lengthening, suggesting facilitation of Ia transmission post-SCI. Additionally, measures of spinal reflex excitability (passive lengthening maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratio) in SCI were positively correlated with soleus electromyographic activity and CAR values during lengthening MVCs (both P < 0.05). The present study presents evidence that patterns of dynamic muscle activation are altered following SCI, and that greater central activation during lengthening contractions is partly due to enhanced efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission. PMID:25972590

  7. Could adult hippocampal neurogenesis be relevant for human behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Jason S.; Cameron, Heather A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the function of adult neurogenesis is still unclear, tools for directly studying the behavioral role of new hippocampal neurons now exist in rodents. Since similar studies are impossible to do in humans, it is important to assess whether the role of new neurons in rodents is likely to be similar to that in humans. One feature of adult neurogenesis that varies tremendously across species is the number of neurons that are generated, so a key question is whether there are enough neurons generated in humans to impact function. In this review we examine neuroanatomy and circuit function in the hippocampus to ask how many granule neurons are needed to impact hippocampal function and then discuss what is known about numbers of new neurons produced in adult rats and humans. We conclude that relatively small numbers of neurons could affect hippocampal circuits and that the magnitude of adult neurogenesis in adult rats and humans is probably larger than generally believed. PMID:21736900

  8. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L P; Iglesias, D; Nicola, F C; Steffens, D; Valentim, L; Witczak, A; Zanatta, G; Achaval, M; Pranke, P; Netto, C A

    2012-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old) were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a) 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 10(6) cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group); b) into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 10(6) cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group). The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day). The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05). The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation. PMID:22183246

  9. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, L.P.; Iglesias, D.; Nicola, F.C.; Steffens, D.; Valentim, L.; Witczak, A.; Zanatta, G.; Achaval, M.; Pranke, P.; Netto, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old) were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a) 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 106 cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group); b) into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 106 cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group). The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day). The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05). The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation. PMID:22183246

  10. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-08-09

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed.

  11. Health promotion through fitness for adolescents and young adults following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P A

    1996-09-01

    A study by Warms (1987) sought to determine both the health care actually received by individuals following a spinal cord injury and the services they desired but did not obtain. The findings suggest that the general health promotion needs of these individuals are the same as for the general population and, though disability related topics are discussed with health care providers, information on health promotion is not received. The leading two services desired by the respondents but not obtained were planning an exercise program (43%) and referral to a fitness center (26%). A plan for health promotion through fitness was designed for individuals with physical disabilities to assist in meeting the identified needs. The program provides several benefits which include: improved function, a positive impact on lifestyle, and a decrease in the risk of complications. The plan includes a general health appraisal and fitness assessment as well as an exercise and fitness prescription with adapted physical activity and sports participation as integral parts. Evaluation methodology is incorporated to demonstrate that health promotion activities positively effect function and lifestyle and decrease severity of complications.

  12. Rapid functional reorganization of the forelimb cortical representation after thoracic spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sydekum, Esther; Ghosh, Arko; Gullo, Miriam; Baltes, Christof; Schwab, Martin; Rudin, Markus

    2014-02-15

    Thoracic spinal cord injured rats rely largely on forelimbs to walk, as their hindlimbs are dysfunctional. This increased limb use is accompanied by expansion of the cortical forelimb sensory representation. It is unclear how quickly the representational changes occur and whether they are at all related to the behavioral adaptation. Using blood oxygenation level dependent functional mangetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) we show that major plastic changes of the somato-sensory map can occur as early as one day after injury. The extent of map increase was variable between animals, and some animals showed a reduction in map size. However, at three or seven days after injury a significant enhancement of the forelimb representation was evident in all the animals. In a behavioral test for precise limb control, crossing of a horizontal ladder, the injured rats relied almost entirely on their forelimbs; they initially made more mistakes than at 7 days post injury. Remarkably, in the individual animals the behavioral performance seen at seven days was proportional to the physiological change present at one day after injury. The rapid increase in cortical representation of the injury-spared body part may provide the additional neural substrate necessary for high level behavioral adaptation. PMID:24185021

  13. Postural and dynamic balance while walking in adults with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Jean-François; Duclos, Cyril; Nadeau, Sylvie; Gagnon, Dany; Desrosiers, Émilie

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize balance in individuals with and without an incomplete spinal cord injury (ISCI) during the single support phase of gait. Thirty-four individuals (17 with a ISCI, 17 able-bodied) walked at their self-selected walking speed. Among those, eighteen individuals (9 with ISCI, 9 able-bodied) with a similar walking speed were also analyzed. Stabilizing and destabilizing forces quantified balance during the single support phase of gait. The biomechanical factors included in the equation of the stabilizing and destabilizing forces served as explanatory factors. Individuals with ISCI had a lower stabilizing force and a higher destabilizing force compared to able-bodied individuals. The main explanatory factors of the forces extracted from the equations were the speed of the center of mass (maximal stabilizing force) and the distance between the center of pressure and the base of support (minimal destabilizing force). Only the minimal destabilizing force was significantly different among subgroups with a similar walking speed. The stabilizing and destabilizing forces suggest that individuals with ISCI were more stable than able-bodied, which was achieved by walking more slowly - which decrease the speed of the center of mass - and keeping the center of pressure away from the margin of the base of support in order to maintain balance within their range of physical ability.

  14. TMS reveals a direct influence of spinal projections from human SMAp on precise force production.

    PubMed

    Entakli, Jonathan; Bonnard, Mireille; Chen, Sophie; Berton, Eric; De Graaf, Jozina B

    2014-01-01

    The corticospinal (CS) system plays an important role in fine motor control, especially in precision grip tasks. Although the primary motor cortex (M1) is the main source of the CS projections, other projections have been found, especially from the supplementary motor area proper (SMAp). To study the characteristics of these CS projections from SMAp, we compared muscle responses of an intrinsic hand muscle (FDI) evoked by stimulation of human M1 and SMAp during an isometric static low-force control task. Subjects were instructed to maintain a small cursor on a target force curve by applying a pressure with their right precision grip on a force sensor. Neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to stimulate either left M1 or left SMAp with equal induced electric field values at the defined cortical targets. The results show that the SMAp stimulation evokes reproducible muscle responses with similar latencies and amplitudes as M1 stimulation, and with a clear and significant shorter silent period. These results suggest that (i) CS projections from human SMAp are as rapid and efficient as those from M1, (ii) CS projections from SMAp are directly involved in control of the excitability of spinal motoneurons and (iii) SMAp has a different intracortical inhibitory circuitry. We conclude that human SMAp and M1 both have direct influence on force production during fine manual motor tasks. PMID:24164635

  15. Integration of sensory, spinal, and volitional descending inputs in regulation of human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, Yury; Gad, Parag; Sayenko, Dimitry; McKinney, Zach; Gorodnichev, Ruslan; Puhov, Aleksandr; Moshonkina, Tatiana; Savochin, Aleksandr; Selionov, Victor; Shigueva, Tatiana; Tomilovskaya, Elena; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2016-07-01

    We reported previously that both transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation and direct pressure stimulation of the plantar surfaces of the feet can elicit rhythmic involuntary step-like movements in noninjured subjects with their legs in a gravity-neutral apparatus. The present experiments investigated the convergence of spinal and plantar pressure stimulation and voluntary effort in the activation of locomotor movements in uninjured subjects under full body weight support in a vertical position. For all conditions, leg movements were analyzed using electromyographic (EMG) recordings and optical motion capture of joint kinematics. Spinal cord stimulation elicited rhythmic hip and knee flexion movements accompanied by EMG bursting activity in the hamstrings of 6/6 subjects. Similarly, plantar stimulation induced bursting EMG activity in the ankle flexor and extensor muscles in 5/6 subjects. Moreover, the combination of spinal and plantar stimulation exhibited a synergistic effect in all six subjects, eliciting greater motor responses than either modality alone. While the motor responses to spinal vs. plantar stimulation seems to activate distinct but overlapping spinal neural networks, when engaged simultaneously, the stepping responses were functionally complementary. As observed during induced (involuntary) stepping, the most significant modulation of voluntary stepping occurred in response to the combination of spinal and plantar stimulation. In light of the known automaticity and plasticity of spinal networks in absence of supraspinal input, these findings support the hypothesis that spinal and plantar stimulation may be effective tools for enhancing the recovery of motor control in individuals with neurological injuries and disorders. PMID:27075538

  16. Relationships between joint motion and facet joint capsule strain during cat and human lumbar spinal motions

    PubMed Central

    Ianuzzi, Allyson; Pickar, Joel G; Khalsa, Partap S

    2011-01-01

    Objective The lumbar facet joint capsule (FJC) is innervated with mechanically sensitive neurons and is thought to contribute to proprioception and pain. Biomechanical investigations of the FJC have commonly used human cadaveric spines, while combined biomechanical and neurophysiological studies have typically used non-human animal models. The purpose of this study was develop mathematical relationships describing vertebral kinematics and facet joint capsule strain in cat and human lumbar spine specimens during physiological spinal motions in order to facilitate future efforts at understanding the mechanosensory role of the FJC. Methods Cat lumbar spine specimens were tested during extension, flexion and lateral bending. Joint kinematics and FJC principal strain were measured optically. FJC strain-intervertebral angle (IVA) regression relationships were established for the three most caudal lumbar joints using cat (current study) and human (prior study) data. FJC strain-IVA relationships were utilized to estimate cat and human spine kinematics that corresponded to published sensory neuron response thresholds for low threshold mechanoreceptors (5% and 10%). Results Significant linear relationships between IVA and strain were observed for both human and cat during motions that produced tension in the FJCs (p<0.01). During motions that produced tension in the FJCs, the models predicted that FJC strain magnitudes corresponding to published sensory neuron response thresholds would be produced by IVA magnitudes within the physiological range of lumbar motion. Conclusions Data from the current study support the proprioceptive role of lumbar spine FJC and low threshold mechanoreceptive afferents, and can be utilized in interpreting combined neurophysiological and biomechanical studies of cat lumbar spines. PMID:21875516

  17. Early Intervention for Spinal Cord Injury with Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Oligodendrocyte Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    All, Angelo H.; Gharibani, Payam; Gupta, Siddharth; Bazley, Faith A.; Pashai, Nikta; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Shah, Sandeep; Resar, Linda M.; Cheng, Linzhao; Gearhart, John D.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are at the forefront of research in regenerative medicine and are envisaged as a source for personalized tissue repair and cell replacement therapy. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPs) can be derived from iPS cells generated using either an episomal, non-integrating plasmid approach or standard integrating retroviruses that survive and differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes after early transplantation into the injured spinal cord. The efficiency of OP differentiation in all 3 lines tested ranged from 40% to 60% of total cells, comparable to those derived from human embryonic stem cells. iPS cell lines derived using episomal vectors or retroviruses generated a similar number of early neural progenitors and glial progenitors while the episomal plasmid-derived iPS line generated more OPs expressing late markers O1 and RIP. Moreover, we discovered that iPS-derived OPs (iPS-OPs) engrafted 24 hours following a moderate contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats survived for approximately two months and that more than 70% of the transplanted cells differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes that expressed myelin associated proteins. Transplanted OPs resulted in a significant increase in the number of myelinated axons in animals that received a transplantation 24 h after injury. In addition, nearly a 5-fold reduction in cavity size and reduced glial scarring was seen in iPS-treated groups compared to the control group, which was injected with heat-killed iPS-OPs. Although further investigation is needed to understand the mechanisms involved, these results provide evidence that patient-specific, iPS-derived OPs can survive for three months and improve behavioral assessment (BBB) after acute transplantation into SCI. This is significant as determining the time in which stem cells are injected after SCI may influence their survival and differentiation capacity. PMID:25635918

  18. Brief Report: Human Perivascular Stem Cells and Nel-Like Protein-1 Synergistically Enhance Spinal Fusion in Osteoporotic Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soonchul; Zhang, Xinli; Shen, Jia; James, Aaron W; Chung, Choon G; Hardy, Reef; Li, Chenshuang; Girgius, Caroline; Zhang, Yulong; Stoker, David; Wang, Huiming; Wu, Benjamin M; Peault, Bruno; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2015-10-01

    Autologous bone grafts (ABGs) are considered as the gold standard for spinal fusion. However, osteoporotic patients are poor candidates for ABGs due to limited osteogenic stem cell numbers and function of the bone microenvironment. There is a need for stem cell-based spinal fusion of proven efficacy under either osteoporotic or nonosteoporotic conditions. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of human perivascular stem cells (hPSCs), a population of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from adipose tissue, in the presence and absence of NELL-1, an osteogenic protein, for spinal fusion in the osteoporosis. Osteogenic differentiation of hPSCs with and without NELL-1 was tested in vitro. The results indicated that NELL-1 significantly increased the osteogenic potential of hPSCs in both osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic donors. Next, spinal fusion was performed by implanting scaffolds with regular or high doses of hPSCs, with or without NELL-1 in ovariectomized rats (n = 41). Regular doses of hPSCs or NELL-1 achieved the fusion rates of only 20%-37.5% by manual palpation. These regular doses had previously been shown to be effective in nonosteoporotic rat spinal fusion. Remarkably, the high dose of hPSCs+NELL-1 significantly improved the fusion rates among osteoporotic rats up to approximately 83.3%. Microcomputed tomography imaging and quantification further confirmed solid bony fusion with high dose hPSCs+NELL-1. Finally, histologically, direct in situ involvement of hPSCs in ossification was shown using undecalcified samples. To conclude, hPSCs combined with NELL-1 synergistically enhances spinal fusion in osteoporotic rats and has great potential as a novel therapeutic strategy for osteoporotic patients.

  19. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendrocyte Progenitors Aid in Functional Recovery of Sensory Pathways following Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    All, Angelo H.; Bazley, Faith A.; Gupta, Siddharth; Pashai, Nikta; Hu, Charles; Pourmorteza, Amir; Kerr, Candace

    2012-01-01

    Background Transplantations of human stem cell derivatives have been widely investigated in rodent models for the potential restoration of function of neural pathways after spinal cord injury (SCI). Studies have already demonstrated cells survival following transplantation in SCI. We sought to evaluate survival and potential therapeutic effects of transplanted human embryonic stem (hES) cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in a contusive injury in rats. Bioluminescence imaging was utilized to verify survivability of cells up to 4 weeks, and somatosensory evoked potential (SSEPs) were recorded at the cortex to monitor function of sensory pathways throughout the 6-week recovery period. Principal Findings hES cells were transduced with the firefly luciferase gene and differentiated into OPCs. OPCs were transplanted into the lesion epicenter of rat spinal cords 2 hours after inducing a moderate contusive SCI. The hES-treatment group showed improved SSEPs, including increased amplitude and decreased latencies, compared to the control group. The bioluminescence of transplanted OPCs decreased by 97% in the injured spinal cord compared to only 80% when injected into an uninjured spinal cord. Bioluminescence increased in both experimental groups such that by week 3, no statistical difference was detected, signifying that the cells survived and proliferated independent of injury. Post-mortem histology of the spinal cords showed integration of human cells expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and myelin basic protein without the expression of markers for astrocytes (GFAP) or pluripotent cells (OCT4). Conclusions hES-derived OPCs transplanted 2 hours after contusive SCI survive and differentiate into OLs that produce MBP. Treated rats demonstrated functional improvements in SSEP amplitudes and latencies compared to controls as early as 1 week post-injury. Finally, the hostile injury microenvironment at 2 hours post-injury initially caused increased cell

  20. Spinal cord contusion models.

    PubMed

    Young, Wise

    2002-01-01

    Most human spinal cord injuries involve contusions of the spinal cord. Many investigators have long used weight-drop contusion animal models to study the pathophysiology and genetic responses of spinal cord injury. All spinal cord injury therapies tested to date in clinical trial were validated in such models. In recent years, the trend has been towards use of rats for spinal cord injury studies. The MASCIS Impactor is a well-standardized rat spinal cord contusion model that produces very consistent graded spinal cord damage that linearly predicts 24-h lesion volumes, 6-week white matter sparing, and locomotor recovery in rats. All aspects of the model, including anesthesia for male and female rats, age rather than body weight criteria, and arterial blood gases were empirically selected to enhance the consistency of injury. PMID:12440371

  1. Adult Human Neurogenesis: From Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Amanda; Encinas, Juan M.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of generating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases. PMID:21519376

  2. Comparison of pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of spinal curvature of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Eung; Lee, Hye Young; Kim, Kyoung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] Degree of curvature on the spine is known to affect respiratory function and back muscle activation. We compared pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of curvature of the spine of healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled. They were divided into two groups according to the degree of curvature of the spine: the below 2° group, and the above 2° group. The degree of curvature was assessed using the Adams forward bending test and a scoliometer. A pulmonary function test (PFT) was conducted, and back muscle strength was measured. [Results] No significant differences in PFT were found between the below 2° group and the above 2° group, in terms of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), or peak expiratory flow (PEF). However, back muscle strength in the below 2 group was significantly higher than that of the above 2 group. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that the degree of curvature of the spine is associated with back muscle strength in subjects who have spinal curvature within the normal range. Therefore, evaluation and treatment of back muscle strength might be helpful for preventing the progress of curvature of the spine in adolescents with potential scoliosis. PMID:26180321

  3. Lifestyle Changes and Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Adults With Spinal Cord Injury in the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study Lifestyle Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ghaisas, Samruddhi; Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Blanche, Erna; Clark, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are a major burden to patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), affecting their psychological, physical, and social well-being. Lifestyle choices are thought to contribute to the risk of developing PrUs. This article focuses on the interaction between lifestyle choices and the development of PrUs in community settings among participants in the University of Southern California–Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS II), a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for adults with SCI. We conducted a secondary cross-case analysis of treatment notes of 47 PUPS II participants and identified four patterns relating PrU development to lifestyle changes: positive PrU changes (e.g., healing PrUs) with positive lifestyle changes, negative or no PrU changes with positive lifestyle changes, positive PrU changes with minor lifestyle changes, and negative or no PrU changes with no lifestyle changes. We present case studies exemplifying each pattern. PMID:25553751

  4. Postural control during gait initiation and termination of adults with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Jean-François; Duclos, Cyril; Nadeau, Sylvie; Gagnon, Dany H

    2015-06-01

    Gait initiation and termination are potentially challenging tasks for balance due to the transition from a quasi-static bipedal phase to a dynamic single-support phase. The purpose of this study was to compare the bipedal and single-support phases of gait initiation and termination in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (ISCI). Twelve individuals with ISCI were evaluated on the dynamic and postural components of balance using the stabilizing and destabilizing forces during gait initiation, termination and natural gait. Phase comparisons were made using non parametric tests. Visual inspection of the force profile of the factors explaining the forces was also conducted. Gait termination challenged more the postural control during the single-support phase than the bipedal phase for the dynamic component of the stabilizing/destabilizing forces model (p=.002). For gait initiation, the most challenging phase varied with the components analyzed (single-support phase for the dynamic component, bipedal phase for the postural component) (p⩽.008). The single support phase is more challenged during gait termination (both components) (p⩽.015) while the bipedal phase is more challenged during gait initiation (dynamic components) (p=.012). The stabilizing force and the speed of the center of mass on the one hand, and destabilizing force and the distance between the center of pressure and the base of support on the other hand, had a similar profile. The single-support phase of gait termination was the most challenging among all phases evaluated, being as challenging as the single-support phase of level natural gait. This phase should be targeted in rehabilitation in order to improve balance and decrease the risk of falling in this population.

  5. Docosahexaenoic Acid Pretreatment Confers Protection and Functional Improvements after Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Johnny D.; Cordero, Kathia; Baldeosingh, Keisha; Torrado, Aranza I.; Walker, Robert L.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Currently, few interventions have been shown to successfully limit the progression of secondary damage events associated with the acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI). Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3) is neuroprotective when administered following SCI, but its potential as a pretreatment modality has not been addressed. This study used a novel DHA pretreatment experimental paradigm that targets acute cellular and molecular events during the first week after SCI in rats. We found that DHA pretreatment reduced functional deficits during the acute phase of injury, as shown by significant improvements in Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scores, and the detection of transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (tcMMEPs) compared to vehicle-pretreated animals. We demonstrated that, at 7 days post-injury, DHA pretreatment significantly increased the percentage of white matter sparing, and resulted in axonal preservation, compared to the vehicle injections. We found a significant increase in the survival of NG2+, APC+, and NeuN+ cells in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF), dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST), and ventral horns, respectively. Interestingly, these DHA protective effects were observed despite the lack of inhibition of inflammatory markers for monocytes/macrophages and astrocytes, ED1/OX42 and GFAP, respectively. DHA pretreatment induced levels of Akt and cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) mRNA and protein. This study shows for the first time that DHA pretreatment ameliorates functional deficits, and increases tissue sparing and precursor cell survival. Further, our data suggest that DHA-mediated activation of pro-survival/anti-apoptotic pathways may be independent of its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:21970623

  6. Axon classes and internodal growth in the ventral spinal root L7 of adult and developing cats.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, I; Berthold, C H

    1988-01-01

    Internodal length, number of myelin sheath lamellae and axon diameter were estimated in samples of nerve fibres reconstructed from transverse sections (EM and LM) of the L7 ventral spinal root of adult cats, kittens and cat fetuses. The axon calibre spectrum was unimodal in the youngest fetuses, became bimodal at 47 days after mating, i.e. about 2 weeks before birth (63 days after mating) and trimodal at 1 week of postnatal age. Alpha-axons received myelin during the period 40-45 to 50-55 days after mating while gamma-axons became myelinated from 60-63 days after mating to 2-3 weeks of postnatal age. The mean length of the first completely myelinated internodes measured 139 microns and 209 microns in the alpha- and gamma-fibre group respectively. The adult mean values were 1390 microns and 640 microns respectively. The average internodal elongation was x 10 and x 3 in the two fibre groups, whereas the longitudinal growth of the whole ventral root was x 5.4 and x 3.5. A combined linlog function could be fitted to describe the regression between internodal length and axon diameter and was established from birth onwards. The separate alpha- and gamma-fibre samples were best described by linear functions, the alpha internodal length being independent of axon diameter while the gamma internodal length increased linearly with axon diameter. The amount of internodal myelin increased linearly with increasing mantle area of the internodal axon. The mean amount of internodal myelin of alpha-fibres showed two periods of intense growth; one from the start of myelination to 2 months postnatally and the other between 4 and 6 months of age. The mean length of the lamellar spiral forming the myelin sheath showed about the same increase per unit length of axon circumference (about 160:1) in both alpha- and gamma-fibre groups as long as longitudinal internodal growth persisted. PMID:3417553

  7. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed. PMID:27517891

  8. Spinal Motion and Muscle Activity during Active Trunk Movements - Comparing Sheep and Humans Adopting Upright and Quadrupedal Postures.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Stephanie; Licka, Theresia F

    2016-01-01

    Sheep are used as models for the human spine, yet comparative in vivo data necessary for validation is limited. The purpose of this study was therefore to compare spinal motion and trunk muscle activity during active trunk movements in sheep and humans. Three-dimensional kinematic data as well as surface electromyography (sEMG) of spinal flexion and extension was compared in twenty-four humans in upright (UR) and 4-point kneeling (KN) postures and in 17 Austrian mountain sheep. Kinematic markers were attached over the sacrum, posterior iliac spines, and spinous and transverse processes of T5, T8, T11, L2 and L5 in humans and over the sacrum, tuber sacrale, T5, T8, T12, L3 and L7 in sheep. The activity of erector spinae (ES), rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus externus (OE), and obliquus internus (OI) were collected. Maximum sEMG (MOE) was identified for each muscle and trial, and reported as a percentage (MOE%) of the overall maximally observed sEMG from all trials. Spinal range of motion was significantly smaller in sheep compared to humans (UR / KN) during flexion (sheep: 6-11°; humans 12-34°) and extension (sheep: 4°; humans: 11-17°). During extension, MOE% of ES was greater in sheep (median: 77.37%) than UR humans (24.89%), and MOE% of OE and OI was greater in sheep (OE 76.20%; OI 67.31%) than KN humans (OE 21.45%; OI 19.34%), while MOE% of RA was lower in sheep (21.71%) than UR humans (82.69%). During flexion, MOE% of RA was greater in sheep (83.09%) than humans (KN 47.42%; UR 41.38%), and MOE% of ES in sheep (45.73%) was greater than KN humans (14.45%), but smaller than UR humans (72.36%). The differences in human and sheep spinal motion and muscle activity suggest that caution is warranted when ovine data are used to infer human spine biomechanics.

  9. Spinal Motion and Muscle Activity during Active Trunk Movements – Comparing Sheep and Humans Adopting Upright and Quadrupedal Postures

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Stephanie; Licka, Theresia F.

    2016-01-01

    Sheep are used as models for the human spine, yet comparative in vivo data necessary for validation is limited. The purpose of this study was therefore to compare spinal motion and trunk muscle activity during active trunk movements in sheep and humans. Three-dimensional kinematic data as well as surface electromyography (sEMG) of spinal flexion and extension was compared in twenty-four humans in upright (UR) and 4-point kneeling (KN) postures and in 17 Austrian mountain sheep. Kinematic markers were attached over the sacrum, posterior iliac spines, and spinous and transverse processes of T5, T8, T11, L2 and L5 in humans and over the sacrum, tuber sacrale, T5, T8, T12, L3 and L7 in sheep. The activity of erector spinae (ES), rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus externus (OE), and obliquus internus (OI) were collected. Maximum sEMG (MOE) was identified for each muscle and trial, and reported as a percentage (MOE%) of the overall maximally observed sEMG from all trials. Spinal range of motion was significantly smaller in sheep compared to humans (UR / KN) during flexion (sheep: 6–11°; humans 12–34°) and extension (sheep: 4°; humans: 11–17°). During extension, MOE% of ES was greater in sheep (median: 77.37%) than UR humans (24.89%), and MOE% of OE and OI was greater in sheep (OE 76.20%; OI 67.31%) than KN humans (OE 21.45%; OI 19.34%), while MOE% of RA was lower in sheep (21.71%) than UR humans (82.69%). During flexion, MOE% of RA was greater in sheep (83.09%) than humans (KN 47.42%; UR 41.38%), and MOE% of ES in sheep (45.73%) was greater than KN humans (14.45%), but smaller than UR humans (72.36%). The differences in human and sheep spinal motion and muscle activity suggest that caution is warranted when ovine data are used to infer human spine biomechanics. PMID:26741136

  10. Vascular system of the human spinal cord in the prenatal period: a dye injection and corrosion casting study.

    PubMed

    Zawiliński, J; Litwin, J A; Nowogrodzka-Zagórska, M; Gorczyca, J; Miodoński, A J

    2001-07-01

    The vascularization of the spinal cord was investigated in 50 human fetuses aged from 10 to 28 gestational weeks using dye injection methods and corrosion casting accompanied by scanning electron microscopy. In the investigated period of fetal development, the general vascular architecture of the spinal cord, corresponding to that described postnatally, seemed to be already established. The observed changes included: (1) remodeling of the supplying (extrinsic) arterial branches, (2) transformation of the posterior anastomotic chain into two distinct posterior spinal arteries, and (3) development of the capillary networks in the gray and white matter. The remodeling of the radicular arteries supplying the spinal cord was accompanied by a decrease in their number and transition from regular to irregular distribution (appearance of intersegmental differences in their frequency). The anterior spinal artery and regular array of the central arteries were already present in the youngest fetuses examined, but the final remodeling of the posterior anastomotic chain into two posterior spinal arteries occurred between 15th and 20th week of fetal life indicating that the vascularization of the anterior region of the spinal cord in the investigated period of fetal life was more advanced as compared with that of the posterior region. The capillary network of the gray matter in the youngest fetuses had the form of discrete glomerular plexuses supplied by groups of central arteries and mainly vascularizing the anterior horns. Successively, the plexuses fused to form a continuous system along the anterior columns and the system expanded to fully vascularize the posterior horns. The white matter in the earlier fetal period seemed to be partially avascular, later the density of capillaries vascularizing those areas was still much lower than in the gray matter. The veins showed considerably greater variability than the arteries, as far as their topography and distribution was

  11. Spinal fusion with recombinant human growth and differentiation factor-5 combined with a mineralized collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Spiro, R C; Thompson, A Y; Poser, J W

    2001-08-01

    The availability of recombinant osteoinductive growth factors and new osteoconductive matrices offers an alternative to the use of autogenous bone (autograft) for grafting indications. This study evaluates the bone-forming activity of a mineralized collagen matrix combined with recombinant human growth and differentiation factor-5 in a rabbit posterolateral spinal fusion model. The activity of three distinct matrix-growth factor formulations is assessed by radiographic, histologic, and mechanical strength methods. Results show that the radiographic density, histologic quality, and mechanical strength of fusion at 12 weeks post-treatment rank consistently within the treatment groups. Optimal formulations are shown to perform similar to autograft in both the rate and strength of fusion. Fusion rates as high as 80% are observed within specific matrix/growth factor formulations. The average biomechanical strength of treated motion segments in the most efficacious formulation is 82% higher than that obtained with autograft, although this difference is not statistically significant. The fusion mass formed in response to matrix/growth factor formulations is composed of normal trabecular bone with a thin outer cortical plate and modest hematopoietic bone marrow. These results demonstrate that the combination of a mineralized collagen matrix with recombinant human growth and differentiation factor-5 maximizes the inherent conductive and inductive properties of each component, respectively, to provide an effective alternative to autograft for bone grafting procedures.

  12. Gustofacial and olfactofacial responses in human adults.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Romy; Ellgring, Heiner; Macht, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Adults' facial reactions in response to tastes and odors were investigated in order to determine whether differential facial displays observed in newborns remain stable in adults who exhibit a greater voluntary facial control. Twenty-eight healthy nonsmokers (14 females) tasted solutions of PROP (bitter), NaCl (salty), citric acid (sour), sucrose (sweet), and glutamate (umami) differing in concentration (low, medium, and high) and smelled different odors (banana, cinnamon, clove, coffee, fish, and garlic). Their facial reactions were video recorded and analyzed using the Facial Action Coding System. Adults' facial reactions discriminated between stimuli with opponent valences. Unpleasant tastes and odors elicited negative displays (brow lower, upper lip raise, and lip corner depress). The pleasant sweet taste elicited positive displays (lip suck), whereas the pleasant odors did not. Unlike newborns, adults smiled with higher concentrations of some unpleasant tastes that can be regarded as serving communicative functions. Moreover, adults expressed negative displays with higher sweetness. Except for the "social" smile in response to unpleasant tastes, adults' facial reactions elicited by tastes and odors mostly correspond to those found in newborns. In conclusion, adults' facial reactions to tastes and odors appear to remain stable in their basic displays; however, some additional reactions might reflect socialization influences.

  13. The Health Impact of Symptomatic Adult Spinal Deformity: Comparison of Deformity Types to United States Population Norms and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bess, Shay; Line, Breton; Fu, Kai-Ming; McCarthy, Ian; Lafage, Virgine; Schwab, Frank; Shaffrey, Christopher; Ames, Christopher; Akbarnia, Behrooz; Jo, Han; Kelly, Michael; Burton, Douglas; Hart, Robert; Klineberg, Eric; Kebaish, Khaled; Hostin, Richard; Mundis, Gregory; Mummaneni, Praveen; Smith, Justin S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design. A retrospective analysis of a prospective, multicenter database. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the health impact of symptomatic adult spinal deformity (SASD) by comparing Standard Form Version 2 (SF-36) scores for SASD with United States normative and chronic disease values. Summary of Background Data. Recent data have identified radiographic parameters correlating with poor health-related quality of life for SASD. Disability comparisons between SASD patients and patients with chronic diseases may provide further insight to the disease burden caused by SASD. Methods. Consecutive SASD patients, with no history of spine surgery, were enrolled into a multicenter database and evaluated for type and severity of spinal deformity. Baseline SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) values for SASD patients were compared with reported U.S. normative and chronic disease SF-36 scores. SF-36 scores were reported as normative-based scores (NBS) and evaluated for minimally clinical important difference (MCID). Results. Between 2008 and 2011, 497 SASD patients were prospectively enrolled and evaluated. Mean PCS for all SASD was lower than U.S. total population (ASD = 40.9; US = 50; P < 0.05). Generational decline in PCS for SASD patients with no other reported comorbidities was more rapid than U.S. norms (P < 0.05). PCS worsened with lumbar scoliosis and increasing sagittal vertical axis (SVA). PCS scores for patients with isolated thoracic scoliosis were similar to values reported by individuals with chronic back pain (45.5 vs 45.7, respectively; P > 0.05), whereas patients with lumbar scoliosis combined with severe sagittal malalignment (SVA >10 cm) demonstrated worse PCS scores than values reported by patients with limited use of arms and legs (24.7 vs 29.1, respectively; P < 0.05). Conclusions. SASD is a heterogeneous condition that, depending upon the type and severity of the deformity

  14. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  15. Age-Related Uptake of Heavy Metals in Human Spinal Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Kum Jew, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Toxic heavy metals have been implicated in the loss of spinal motoneurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND). Motoneuron loss in the spinal anterior horn is severe in ALS/MND at the time of death, making this tissue unsuitable for examination. We therefore examined spinal cords of people without muscle weakness to look for any presence of heavy metals that could make these neurons susceptible to damage. Spinal cord samples from 50 individuals aged 1–95 y who had no clinical or histopathological evidence of spinal motoneuron loss were studied. Seven μm formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained for heavy metals with silver nitrate autometallography (AMGHM) which detects intracellular mercury, silver or bismuth. Neurons in the spinal cord were classified as interneurons or α-motoneurons based on their site and cell body diameter. Spinal interneurons containing heavy metals were present in 8 of 24 people (33%) aged 61–95 y, but not at younger ages. These AMGHM interneurons were most numerous in the lumbar spinal cord, with moderate numbers in the caudal cervical cord, few in the rostral cervical cord, and almost none in the thoracic cord. All people with AMGHM interneurons had occasional AMGHM staining in α-motoneurons as well. In one man AMGHM staining was present in addition in dorsomedial nucleus and sensory neurons. In conclusion, heavy metals are present in many spinal interneurons, and in a few α-motoneurons, in a large proportion of older people. Damage to inhibitory interneurons from toxic metals in later life could result in excitotoxic injury to motoneurons and may underlie motoneuron injury or loss in conditions such as ALS/MND, multiple sclerosis, sarcopenia and calf fasciculations. PMID:27611334

  16. Age-Related Uptake of Heavy Metals in Human Spinal Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Toxic heavy metals have been implicated in the loss of spinal motoneurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND). Motoneuron loss in the spinal anterior horn is severe in ALS/MND at the time of death, making this tissue unsuitable for examination. We therefore examined spinal cords of people without muscle weakness to look for any presence of heavy metals that could make these neurons susceptible to damage. Spinal cord samples from 50 individuals aged 1-95 y who had no clinical or histopathological evidence of spinal motoneuron loss were studied. Seven μm formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained for heavy metals with silver nitrate autometallography (AMGHM) which detects intracellular mercury, silver or bismuth. Neurons in the spinal cord were classified as interneurons or α-motoneurons based on their site and cell body diameter. Spinal interneurons containing heavy metals were present in 8 of 24 people (33%) aged 61-95 y, but not at younger ages. These AMGHM interneurons were most numerous in the lumbar spinal cord, with moderate numbers in the caudal cervical cord, few in the rostral cervical cord, and almost none in the thoracic cord. All people with AMGHM interneurons had occasional AMGHM staining in α-motoneurons as well. In one man AMGHM staining was present in addition in dorsomedial nucleus and sensory neurons. In conclusion, heavy metals are present in many spinal interneurons, and in a few α-motoneurons, in a large proportion of older people. Damage to inhibitory interneurons from toxic metals in later life could result in excitotoxic injury to motoneurons and may underlie motoneuron injury or loss in conditions such as ALS/MND, multiple sclerosis, sarcopenia and calf fasciculations. PMID:27611334

  17. Age-Related Uptake of Heavy Metals in Human Spinal Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Toxic heavy metals have been implicated in the loss of spinal motoneurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND). Motoneuron loss in the spinal anterior horn is severe in ALS/MND at the time of death, making this tissue unsuitable for examination. We therefore examined spinal cords of people without muscle weakness to look for any presence of heavy metals that could make these neurons susceptible to damage. Spinal cord samples from 50 individuals aged 1-95 y who had no clinical or histopathological evidence of spinal motoneuron loss were studied. Seven μm formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections were stained for heavy metals with silver nitrate autometallography (AMGHM) which detects intracellular mercury, silver or bismuth. Neurons in the spinal cord were classified as interneurons or α-motoneurons based on their site and cell body diameter. Spinal interneurons containing heavy metals were present in 8 of 24 people (33%) aged 61-95 y, but not at younger ages. These AMGHM interneurons were most numerous in the lumbar spinal cord, with moderate numbers in the caudal cervical cord, few in the rostral cervical cord, and almost none in the thoracic cord. All people with AMGHM interneurons had occasional AMGHM staining in α-motoneurons as well. In one man AMGHM staining was present in addition in dorsomedial nucleus and sensory neurons. In conclusion, heavy metals are present in many spinal interneurons, and in a few α-motoneurons, in a large proportion of older people. Damage to inhibitory interneurons from toxic metals in later life could result in excitotoxic injury to motoneurons and may underlie motoneuron injury or loss in conditions such as ALS/MND, multiple sclerosis, sarcopenia and calf fasciculations.

  18. Electrophysiologic evidence of subclinical injury to the posterior columns of the human spinal cord after therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, L.J.; Donaldson, S.S.; Gupta, P.R.; Bosley, M.D.

    1982-12-15

    Spinal somatosensory conduction velocity (SSCV) was indirectly estimated from cerebral evoked potentials in 15 adults who had received therapeutic radiation (RT) (2000-4380 rad) to the thoracic spinal cord during treatment for lung cancer, and in 15 age-matched normal controls. Thirteen of the patients had also received 4400-5500 rad to the supraclavicular fossae. One-way impulse conduction time in the arm, estimated from F-wave latency, was prolonged in the patients as compared to controls but conduction time in the leg was similar in the two groups. SSCV was significantly slower in the patient group whereas supraspinal latency (cervical cord to cortex) was identical. SSCV in the patient group was not related to total RT dose but was correlated with both treatment time and number of fractions. These findings suggest that RT may produce subclinical spinal cord dysfunction even at conventional dosage schedules, and that it may be possible physiologically to monitor the myelopathic effects of RT in individual patients.

  19. Inducing hindlimb locomotor recovery in adult rat after complete thoracic spinal cord section using repeated treadmill training with perineal stimulation only

    PubMed Central

    Alluin, Olivier; Delivet-Mongrain, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Although a complete thoracic spinal cord section in various mammals induces paralysis of voluntary movements, the spinal lumbosacral circuitry below the lesion retains its ability to generate hindlimb locomotion. This important capacity may contribute to the overall locomotor recovery after partial spinal cord injury (SCI). In rats, it is usually triggered by pharmacological and/or electrical stimulation of the cord while a robot sustains the animals in an upright posture. In the present study we daily trained a group of adult spinal (T7) rats to walk with the hindlimbs for 10 wk (10 min/day for 5 days/wk), using only perineal stimulation. Kinematic analysis and terminal electromyographic recordings revealed a strong effect of training on the reexpression of hindlimb locomotion. Indeed, trained animals gradually improved their locomotion while untrained animals worsened throughout the post-SCI period. Kinematic parameters such as averaged and instant swing phase velocity, step cycle variability, foot drag duration, off period duration, and relationship between the swing features returned to normal values only in trained animals. The present results clearly demonstrate that treadmill training alone, in a normal horizontal posture, elicited by noninvasive perineal stimulation is sufficient to induce a persistent hindlimb locomotor recovery without the need for more complex strategies. This provides a baseline level that should be clearly surpassed if additional locomotor-enabling procedures are added. Moreover, it has a clinical value since intrinsic spinal reorganization induced by training should contribute to improve locomotor recovery together with afferent feedback and supraspinal modifications in patients with incomplete SCI. PMID:26203108

  20. Injury to the Spinal Cord Niche Alters the Engraftment Dynamics of Human Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Christopher J.; Uchida, Nobuko; Cummings, Brian J.; Anderson, Aileen J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The microenvironment is a critical mediator of stem cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. The majority of preclinical studies involving transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into the CNS have focused on injured or degenerating microenvironments, leaving a dearth of information as to how NSCs differentially respond to intact versus damaged CNS. Furthermore, single, terminal histological endpoints predominate, providing limited insight into the spatiotemporal dynamics of NSC engraftment and migration. We investigated the early and long-term engraftment dynamics of human CNS stem cells propagated as neurospheres (hCNS-SCns) following transplantation into uninjured versus subacutely injured spinal cords of immunodeficient NOD-scid mice. We stereologically quantified engraftment, survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation at 1, 7, 14, 28, and 98 days posttransplantation, and identified injury-dependent alterations. Notably, the injured microenvironment decreased hCNS-SCns survival, delayed and altered the location of proliferation, influenced both total and fate-specific migration, and promoted oligodendrocyte maturation. PMID:24936450

  1. Augmented multisensory feedback enhances locomotor adaptation in humans with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yen, Sheng-Che; Landry, Jill M; Wu, Ming

    2014-06-01

    Different forms of augmented feedback may engage different motor learning pathways, but it is unclear how these pathways interact with each other, especially in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study was to test whether augmented multisensory feedback could enhance aftereffects following short term locomotor training (i.e., adaptation) in patients with incomplete SCI. A total of 10 subjects with incomplete SCI were recruited to perform locomotor adaptation. Three types of augmented feedback were provided during the adaptation: (a) computerized visual cues showing the actual and target stride length (augmented visual feedback); (b) a swing resistance applied to the leg (augmented proprioceptive feedback); (c) a combination of the visual cues and resistance (augmented multisensory feedback). The results showed that subjects' stride length increased in all conditions following the adaptation, but the increase was greater and retained longer in the multisensory feedback condition. The multisensory feedback provided in this study may engage both explicit and implicit learning pathways during the adaptation and in turn enhance the aftereffect. The results implied that multisensory feedback may be used as an adjunctive approach to enhance gait recovery in humans with SCI. PMID:24746604

  2. Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Posterolateral Spinal Fusion: What's the Right Dose?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Clifford Barry; Sietsema, Debra Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Single center retrospective cohort analysis. Purpose The goal was to evaluate the influence of varying amount of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) per level on fusion rates and complications in posterolateral spinal fusions. Overview of Literature rhBMP-2 has been utilized for lumbar posterolateral fusions for many years. Initial rhBMP-2 recommendations were 20 mg/level of fusion. Dose and concentration per level in current studies vary from 4.2 to 40 mg and 1.5 to 2.0 mg/mL, respectively. Variable fusion and complication rates have been reported. Methods Patients (n=1,610) undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion (2003–2009) with utilization of rhBMP-2 were retrospectively evaluated. Patient demographics, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities, number of levels, associated interbody fusion, and types of bone void filler were analyzed. Fusions rates and nonunions were subdivided into number of levels and amount of rhBMP-2 used per level. Results Patients (n=559) were evaluated with 58.5% females having an average age of 63 years, BMI of 31 kg/m2. Number of levels fused ranged from 1 to 8. rhBMP-2 averaged 7.3 mg/level (range, 1.5–24 mg/level) based upon length of collagen sponge in relation to length of fusion levels. Patients with non-union formation had lower rhBMP-2 dose per level (p=0.016). A significant difference in non-union rate was found between patients undergoing fusion with <6 mg/level compared to those with >6 mg/level (9.1% vs. 2.4%, χ2=0.012). No significant differences were noted between 6–11.9 mg/level and ≥12 mg/level. No threshold was found for seroma formation or bone overgrowth. Conclusions Previous recommendation of 20 mg/level of rhBMP-2 is more than what is required for predictable fusion rates of 98%. No dose related increase of infection, seroma formation, and bone overgrowth has been found. In order to provide variable dosing and cost reduction, industry generated rhBMP-2 kit size should be

  3. White matter atlas of the human spinal cord with estimation of partial volume effect.

    PubMed

    Lévy, S; Benhamou, M; Naaman, C; Rainville, P; Callot, V; Cohen-Adad, J

    2015-10-01

    Template-based analysis has proven to be an efficient, objective and reproducible way of extracting relevant information from multi-parametric MRI data. Using common atlases, it is possible to quantify MRI metrics within specific regions without the need for manual segmentation. This method is therefore free from user-bias and amenable to group studies. While template-based analysis is common procedure for the brain, there is currently no atlas of the white matter (WM) spinal pathways. The goals of this study were: (i) to create an atlas of the white matter tracts compatible with the MNI-Poly-AMU template and (ii) to propose methods to quantify metrics within the atlas that account for partial volume effect. The WM atlas was generated by: (i) digitalizing an existing WM atlas from a well-known source (Gray's Anatomy), (ii) registering this atlas to the MNI-Poly-AMU template at the corresponding slice (C4 vertebral level), (iii) propagating the atlas throughout all slices of the template (C1 to T6) using regularized diffeomorphic transformations and (iv) computing partial volume values for each voxel and each tract. Several approaches were implemented and validated to quantify metrics within the atlas, including weighted-average and Gaussian mixture models. Proof-of-concept application was done in five subjects for quantifying magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in each tract of the atlas. The resulting WM atlas showed consistent topological organization and smooth transitions along the rostro-caudal axis. The median MTR across tracts was 26.2. Significant differences were detected across tracts, vertebral levels and subjects, but not across laterality (right-left). Among the different tested approaches to extract metrics, the maximum a posteriori showed highest performance with respect to noise, inter-tract variability, tract size and partial volume effect. This new WM atlas of the human spinal cord overcomes the biases associated with manual delineation and partial

  4. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  5. Activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway is associated with glial proliferation in the adult spinal cord of ALS transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanchun; Guan, Yingjun; Liu, Huancai; Wu, Xin; Yu, Li; Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyan; Du, Hongmei; Wang, Xin

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 were upregulated in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus in the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin and Cyclin D1 co-localized for astrocytes were all increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. -- Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive and fatal loss of motor neurons. In ALS, there is a significant cell proliferation in response to neurodegeneration; however, the exact molecular mechanisms of cell proliferation and differentiation are unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative processes. Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 are three key signaling molecules of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. We determined the expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 in the adult spinal cord of SOD1{sup G93A} ALS transgenic mice at different stages by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling techniques. We found that the mRNA and protein of Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 in the spinal cord of the ALS mice were upregulated compared to those in wild-type mice. In addition, {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus and subsequently activated transcription of the target gene, Cyclin D1. BrdU and Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of these mice. Moreover, Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 were also expressed in both neurons and astrocytes. The expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin or Cyclin D1 in mature GFAP{sup +} astrocytes increased. Moreover, BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. Our findings suggest that

  6. Human NgR-Fc Decoy Protein via Lumbar Intrathecal Bolus Administration Enhances Recovery from Rat Spinal Cord Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Yigitkanli, Kazim; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Sekine-Komo, Tomoko; Wirak, Dana; Frieden, Eric; Bhargava, Ajay; Maynard, George; Cafferty, William B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Axonal growth and neurological recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited by the presence of inhibitory proteins in myelin, several of which act via the NgR1 protein in neurons. A truncated soluble ligand-binding fragment of NgR1 serves as a decoy and promotes recovery in acute and chronic rodent SCI models. To develop the translational potential of these observations, we created a human sequence-derived NgR1(310)-Fc protein. This protein is active in vitro. When the human NgR1 decoy is administered by continuous intracerebroventricular infusion to rats with a spinal contusion injury at doses of 0.09–0.53 mg/kg/d, neurological recovery is improved. Effective doses double the percentage of rats able to bear weight on their hindlimbs. Next, we considered the half-life and distribution of NgR1(310)-Fc after bolus delivery to the lumbar intrathecal space. The protein is found throughout the neuraxis and has a tissue half-life of approximately 2 days in the rat, and 5 days in the nonhuman primate. At an intermittent, once every 4 day, lumbar bolus dosing schedule of 0.14 mg/kg/d, NgR1(310)-Fc promoted locomotor rat recovery from spinal cord contusion at least as effectively as continuous infusion in open field and grid walking tasks. Moreover, the intermittent lumbar NgR1(310)-Fc treatment increased the growth of raphespinal axons into the lumbar spinal cord after injury. Thus, human NgR1(310)-Fc provides effective treatment for recovery from traumatic SCI in this preclinical model with a simplified administration regimen that facilitates clinical testing. PMID:24964223

  7. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  8. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  9. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca²⁺ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals.

  10. Safety of Epicenter Versus Intact Parenchyma as a Transplantation Site for Human Neural Stem Cells for Spinal Cord Injury Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Piltti, Katja M.; Salazar, Desirée L.; Uchida, Nobuko; Cummings, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cell transplantation may have the potential to yield repair and recovery of function in central nervous system injury and disease, including spinal cord injury (SCI). Multiple pathological processes are initiated at the epicenter of a traumatic spinal cord injury; these are generally thought to make the epicenter a particularly hostile microenvironment. Conversely, the injury epicenter is an appealing potential site of therapeutic human central nervous system-derived neural stem cell (hCNS-SCns) transplantation because of both its surgical accessibility and the avoidance of spared spinal cord tissue. In this study, we compared hCNS-SCns transplantation into the SCI epicenter (EPI) versus intact rostral/caudal (R/C) parenchyma in contusion-injured athymic nude rats, and assessed the cell survival, differentiation, and migration. Regardless of transplantation site, hCNS-SCns survived and proliferated; however, the total number of hCNS-SCns quantified in the R/C transplant animals was twice that in the EPI animals, demonstrating increased overall engraftment. Migration and fate profile were unaffected by transplantation site. However, although transplantation site did not alter the proportion of human astrocytes, EPI transplantation shifted the localization of these cells and exhibited a correlation with calcitonin gene-related peptide fiber sprouting. Critically, no changes in mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesia were observed. Taken together, these data suggest that the intact parenchyma may be a more favorable transplantation site than the injury epicenter in the subacute period post-SCI. PMID:23413374

  11. Coexistence of spinal teratoma of the conus medullaris and arteriovenous malformation in an adult: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinlu; Qu, Li Mei; Li, Ye; Huang, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    The coexistence of spinal teratoma of the conus medullaris and arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is exceptional, which has not been reported previously in the literature. The precise mechanism of the coexistence of these conditions is not known, however, the dysembryonic origin of spinal cord teratoma and AVM seems to play a part in this process. A 34-year-old male patient was admitted with lower back pain, bilateral lower extremity numbness and weakness, and sexual disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an AVM extended cranially from the top of a heterogeneous expansile lesion of the conus medullaris. Surgical exploration and histopathological examination revealed a mature teratoma associated with the AVM. A literature review supported the dysembryonic origin of spinal cord teratomas and AVMs. This unique case may provide insight into the etiopathogenesis of the coexistence of spinal teratoma of the conus medullaris and AVM.

  12. Neural stem cells in the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    For decades, it was believed that the adult brain was a quiescent organ unable to produce new neurons. At the beginning of the1960's, this dogma was challenged by a small group of neuroscientists. To date, it is well-known that new neurons are generated in the adult brain throughout life. Adult neurogenesis is primary confined to the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus within the hippocampus. In both the human and the rodent brain, the primary progenitor of adult SVZ is a subpopulation of astrocytes that have stem-cell-like features. The human SVZ possesses a peculiar cell composition and displays important organizational differences when compared to the SVZ of other mammals. Some evidence suggests that the human SVZ may be not only an endogenous source of neural precursor cells for brain repair, but also a source of brain tumors. In this review, we described the cytoarchitecture and cellular composition of the SVZ in the adult human brain. We also discussed some clinical implications of SVZ, such as: stem-cell-based therapies against neurodegenerative diseases and its potential as a source of malignant cells. Understanding the biology of human SVZ and its neural progenitors is one of the crucial steps to develop novel therapies against neurological diseases in humans. PMID:23181200

  13. Humanities and the Adult Learner in an Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Dale; Kamholtz, Jonathan

    Humanities courses have often been given little attention in continuing education for adults, possibly because they have been viewed as not "practical" or not "job-oriented" enough in our career-oriented, technologically advanced society. However, the humanities should be an integral part of our culture and of the lives of educated persons--a…

  14. Patterns of Phrenic Nerve Discharge after Complete High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury in the Decerebrate Rat.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki; Marchenko, Vitaliy

    2016-06-15

    Studies conducted since the second half of the 19th century have revealed spontaneous as well as pharmacologically induced phasic/rhythmic discharge in spinal respiratory motor outputs of cats, dogs, rabbits, and neonatal rats following high cervical transection (Tx). The extent to which these various studies validate the existence of a true spinal respiratory rhythm generator remains debated. In this set of studies, we seek to characterize patterns of spontaneous phasic/rhythmic, asphyxia-induced, and pharmacologically induced activity occurring in phrenic nerve (PhN) discharge after complete high cervical (C1-C2) spinal cord transection. Experiments were performed on 20 unanesthetized decerebrate Sprague-Dawley adult male rats. Patterns of spontaneous activity after spinalization included tonic, phasic, slow oscillatory, and long-lasting tonic discharges. Topical application of antagonists of GABAA and glycine receptors to C1- and C2- spinal segments induced left-right synchronized phasic decrementing activity in PhN discharge that was abolished by an additional C2Tx. Asphyxia elicited increases in tonic activity and left-right synchronized gasp-like bursts in PhN discharge, demonstrating the presence of spinal circuits that may underlie a spinal gasping-like mechanism. We conclude that intrinsic slow oscillators and a phasic burst/rhythm generator exist in the spinal cord of the adult rat. If present in humans, this mechanism may be exploited to recover respiratory function in patients sustaining severe spinal cord injury. PMID:26239508

  15. Teaching Human Rights: Grades 7 through Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiman, David A.

    This curriculum resource on human rights is rooted in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and seeks to help students understand the issues involved. Using the rights categories suggested by the Universal Declaration, this book offers new ways of teaching about familiar themes. The book contains activities to encourage students…

  16. Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 identifies a specific subpopulation of angiogenic blood vessels following contusive spinal cord injury in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Benton, Richard L; Maddie, Melissa A; Minnillo, Danielle R; Hagg, Theo; Whittemore, Scott R

    2008-03-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), disruption and plasticity of the microvasculature within injured spinal tissue contribute to the pathological cascades associated with the evolution of both primary and secondary injury. Conversely, preserved vascular function most likely results in tissue sparing and subsequent functional recovery. It has been difficult to identify subclasses of damaged or regenerating blood vessels at the cellular level. Here, adult mice received a single intravenous injection of the Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 (IB4) at 1-28 days following a moderate thoracic (T9) contusion. Vascular binding of IB4 was maximally observed 7 days following injury, a time associated with multiple pathologic aspects of the intrinsic adaptive angiogenesis, with numbers of IB4 vascular profiles decreasing by 21 days postinjury. Quantitative assessment of IB4 binding shows that it occurs within the evolving lesion epicenter, with affected vessels expressing a temporally specific dysfunctional tight junctional phenotype as assessed by occludin, claudin-5, and ZO-1 immunoreactivities. Taken together, these results demonstrate that intravascular lectin delivery following SCI is a useful approach not only for observing the functional status of neovascular formation but also for definitively identifying specific subpopulations of reactive spinal microvascular elements.

  17. A Fab fragment directed against the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 enhances functional recovery after injury of the adult mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Loers, Gabriele; Cui, Yi-Fang; Neumaier, Irmgard; Schachner, Melitta; Skerra, Arne

    2014-06-15

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery, which leads to severe disabilities in motor functions or pain. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration. In the present study, we describe the cloning, functional expression in Escherichia coli cells and purification of a recombinant αL1 Fab fragment that binds to L1 with comparable activity as the function-triggering monoclonal antibody 557.B6 and induces neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival in cultured neurons, despite its monovalent function. Infusion of αL1 Fab into the lesioned spinal cord of mice enhanced functional recovery after thoracic spinal cord compression injury. αL1 Fab treatment resulted in reduced scar volume, enhanced number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons and increased linear density of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1) on motoneurons. Furthermore, the number and soma size of ChAT (choline acetyltransferase)-positive motoneurons and the linear density of ChAT-positive boutons on motoneurons as well as parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the lumbar spinal cord were elevated. Stimulation of endogenous L1 by application of the αL1 Fab opens new avenues for recombinant antibody technology, offering prospects for therapeutic applications after traumatic nervous system lesions.

  18. A Fab fragment directed against the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 enhances functional recovery after injury of the adult mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Loers, Gabriele; Cui, Yi-Fang; Neumaier, Irmgard; Schachner, Melitta; Skerra, Arne

    2014-06-15

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery, which leads to severe disabilities in motor functions or pain. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration. In the present study, we describe the cloning, functional expression in Escherichia coli cells and purification of a recombinant αL1 Fab fragment that binds to L1 with comparable activity as the function-triggering monoclonal antibody 557.B6 and induces neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival in cultured neurons, despite its monovalent function. Infusion of αL1 Fab into the lesioned spinal cord of mice enhanced functional recovery after thoracic spinal cord compression injury. αL1 Fab treatment resulted in reduced scar volume, enhanced number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons and increased linear density of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1) on motoneurons. Furthermore, the number and soma size of ChAT (choline acetyltransferase)-positive motoneurons and the linear density of ChAT-positive boutons on motoneurons as well as parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the lumbar spinal cord were elevated. Stimulation of endogenous L1 by application of the αL1 Fab opens new avenues for recombinant antibody technology, offering prospects for therapeutic applications after traumatic nervous system lesions. PMID:24673421

  19. Compound action potentials recorded in the human spinal cord during neurostimulation for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Parker, John L; Karantonis, Dean M; Single, Peter S; Obradovic, Milan; Cousins, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord provides effective pain relief to hundreds of thousands of chronic neuropathic pain sufferers. The therapy involves implantation of an electrode array into the epidural space of the subject and then stimulation of the dorsal column with electrical pulses. The stimulation depolarises axons and generates propagating action potentials that interfere with the perception of pain. Despite the long-term clinical experience with spinal cord stimulation, the mechanism of action is not understood, and no direct evidence of the properties of neurons being stimulated has been presented. Here we report novel measurements of evoked compound action potentials from the spinal cords of patients undergoing stimulation for pain relief. The results reveal that Aβ sensory nerve fibres are recruited at therapeutic stimulation levels and the Aβ potential amplitude correlates with the degree of coverage of the painful area. Aβ-evoked responses are not measurable below a threshold stimulation level, and their amplitude increases with increasing stimulation current. At high currents, additional late responses are observed. Our results contribute towards efforts to define the mechanism of spinal cord stimulation. The minimally invasive recording technique we have developed provides data previously obtained only through microelectrode techniques in spinal cords of animals. Our observations also allow the development of systems that use neuronal recording in a feedback loop to control neurostimulation on a continuous basis and deliver more effective pain relief. This is one of numerous benefits that in vivo electrophysiological recording can bring to a broad range of neuromodulation therapies. PMID:22188868

  20. BD PuraMatrix peptide hydrogel as a culture system for human fetal Schwann cells in spinal cord regeneration.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Fateme; Bahktiari, Mehrdad; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Nobakht, Maliheh; Soleimani, Masoud; Hasanzadeh, Gholamreza; Fallah, Ali; Zarbakhsh, Sam; Hejazian, Leila Beigom; Shirmohammadi, Maryam; Maleki, Fatemeh

    2012-12-01

    BD PuraMatrix peptide hydrogel, a three-dimensional cell culture model of nanofiber scaffold derived from the self-assembling peptide RADA16, has been applied to regenerative tissue repair in order to develop novel nanomedicine systems. In this study with PuraMatrix, self-assembling nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) and Schwann cells (SCs) were isolated from human fetal sciatic nerves, cultured within SAPNS, and then transplanted into the spinal cord after injury (SCI) in rats. First, the peptide nanofiber scaffold was evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. With phase-contrast microscopy, the appearance of representative human fetal SCs encapsulated in PuraMatrix on days 3, 5, and 7 in 12-well plates was revealed. The Schwann cells in PuraMatrix were cultured for 2 days, and the SCs had active proliferative potential. Spinal cord injury was induced by placing a 35-g weight on the dura of T9-T10 segments for 15 min, followed by in vivo treatment with SAPNS and human fetal SCs (100,000 cells/10 μl/injection) grafted into spinal cord 7 days after SCI. After treatment, the recovery of motor function was assessed periodically using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scoring system. Eight weeks after grafting, animals were perfusion fixed, and the survival of implanted cells was analyzed with antibody recognizing SCs. Immunohistochemical analysis of grafted lumber segments at 8 weeks after grafting revealed reduced asterogliosis and considerably increased infiltration of endogenous S100(+) cells into the injury site, suggesting that PuraMatrix may play an important role in the repair observed after SAPNS and human fetal SC transplantation.

  1. Human dental pulp stem cells transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nicola, F C; Rodrigues, L P; Crestani, T; Quintiliano, K; Sanches, E F; Willborn, S; Aristimunha, D; Boisserand, L; Pranke, P; Netto, C A

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a disabling condition resulting in deficits of sensory and motor functions, and has no effective treatment. Considering that protocols with stem cell transplantation and treadmill training have shown promising results, the present study evaluated the effectiveness of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats with experimental spinal cord injury. Fifty-four Wistar rats were spinalized using NYU impactor. The rats were randomly distributed into 5 groups: Sham (laminectomy with no SCI, n=10); SCI (laminectomy followed by SCI, n=12); SHEDs (SCI treated with SHEDs, n=11); TT (SCI treated with treadmill training, n=11); SHEDs+TT (SCI treated with SHEDs and treadmill training; n=10). Treatment with SHEDs alone or in combination with treadmill training promoted functional recovery, reaching scores of 15 and 14, respectively, in the BBB scale, being different from the SCI group, which reached 11. SHEDs treatment was able to reduce the cystic cavity area and glial scar, increase neurofilament. Treadmill training alone had no functional effectiveness or tissue effects. In a second experiment, the SHEDs transplantation reduced the TNF-α levels in the cord tissue measured 6 h after the injury. Contrary to our hypothesis, treadmill training either alone or in combination, caused no functional improvement. However, SHEDs showed to be neuroprotective, by the reduction of TNF-α levels, the cystic cavity and the glial scar associated with the improvement of motor function after SCI. These results provide evidence that grafted SHEDs might be an effective therapy to spinal cord lesions, with possible anti-inflammatory action.

  2. Human dental pulp stem cells transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats after traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, F.C.; Rodrigues, L.P.; Crestani, T.; Quintiliano, K.; Sanches, E.F.; Willborn, S.; Aristimunha, D.; Boisserand, L.; Pranke, P.; Netto, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a disabling condition resulting in deficits of sensory and motor functions, and has no effective treatment. Considering that protocols with stem cell transplantation and treadmill training have shown promising results, the present study evaluated the effectiveness of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats with experimental spinal cord injury. Fifty-four Wistar rats were spinalized using NYU impactor. The rats were randomly distributed into 5 groups: Sham (laminectomy with no SCI, n=10); SCI (laminectomy followed by SCI, n=12); SHEDs (SCI treated with SHEDs, n=11); TT (SCI treated with treadmill training, n=11); SHEDs+TT (SCI treated with SHEDs and treadmill training; n=10). Treatment with SHEDs alone or in combination with treadmill training promoted functional recovery, reaching scores of 15 and 14, respectively, in the BBB scale, being different from the SCI group, which reached 11. SHEDs treatment was able to reduce the cystic cavity area and glial scar, increase neurofilament. Treadmill training alone had no functional effectiveness or tissue effects. In a second experiment, the SHEDs transplantation reduced the TNF-α levels in the cord tissue measured 6 h after the injury. Contrary to our hypothesis, treadmill training either alone or in combination, caused no functional improvement. However, SHEDs showed to be neuroprotective, by the reduction of TNF-α levels, the cystic cavity and the glial scar associated with the improvement of motor function after SCI. These results provide evidence that grafted SHEDs might be an effective therapy to spinal cord lesions, with possible anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27509306

  3. Human dental pulp stem cells transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nicola, F C; Rodrigues, L P; Crestani, T; Quintiliano, K; Sanches, E F; Willborn, S; Aristimunha, D; Boisserand, L; Pranke, P; Netto, C A

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a disabling condition resulting in deficits of sensory and motor functions, and has no effective treatment. Considering that protocols with stem cell transplantation and treadmill training have shown promising results, the present study evaluated the effectiveness of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats with experimental spinal cord injury. Fifty-four Wistar rats were spinalized using NYU impactor. The rats were randomly distributed into 5 groups: Sham (laminectomy with no SCI, n=10); SCI (laminectomy followed by SCI, n=12); SHEDs (SCI treated with SHEDs, n=11); TT (SCI treated with treadmill training, n=11); SHEDs+TT (SCI treated with SHEDs and treadmill training; n=10). Treatment with SHEDs alone or in combination with treadmill training promoted functional recovery, reaching scores of 15 and 14, respectively, in the BBB scale, being different from the SCI group, which reached 11. SHEDs treatment was able to reduce the cystic cavity area and glial scar, increase neurofilament. Treadmill training alone had no functional effectiveness or tissue effects. In a second experiment, the SHEDs transplantation reduced the TNF-α levels in the cord tissue measured 6 h after the injury. Contrary to our hypothesis, treadmill training either alone or in combination, caused no functional improvement. However, SHEDs showed to be neuroprotective, by the reduction of TNF-α levels, the cystic cavity and the glial scar associated with the improvement of motor function after SCI. These results provide evidence that grafted SHEDs might be an effective therapy to spinal cord lesions, with possible anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27509306

  4. The Louisville Swim Scale: A Novel Assessment of Hindlimb Function following Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca R.; Burke, Darlene A.; Baldini, Angela D.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Baltzley, Ryan; Bunger, Michelle; Magnuson, David S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of animal studies examining the recovery of function following spinal cord injury use the BBB Open-Field Locomotor Scale as a primary outcome measure. However, it is now well known that rehabilitation strategies can bring about significant improvements in hindlimb function in some animal models. Thus, improvements in walking following spinal cord injury in rats may be influenced by differences in activity levels and housing conditions during the first few weeks post-injury. Swimming is a natural form of locomotion that animals are not normally exposed to in the laboratory setting. We hypothesized that deficits in, and functional recovery of, swimming would accurately represent the locomotor capability of the nervous system in the absence of any retraining effects. To test this hypothesis, we have compared the recovery of walking and swimming in rats following a range of standardized spinal cord injuries and two different retraining strategies. In order to assess swimming, we developed a rating system we call the Louisville Swimming Scale (LSS) that evaluates three characteristics of swimming that are highly altered by spinal cord injury— namely, hindlimb movement, forelimb dependency, and body position. The data indicate that the LSS is a sensitive and reliable method of determining swimming ability and the improvement in hindlimb function after standardized contusion injury of the thoracic spinal cord. Furthermore, the data suggests that when used in conjunction with the BBB Open-field Locomotor Scale, the LSS assesses locomotor capabilities that are not influenced by a retraining effect. PMID:17115911

  5. New neurons in the adult striatum: from rodents to humans

    PubMed Central

    Inta, Dragos; Cameron, Heather A.; Gass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Most neurons are generated during development and are not replaced during adulthood, even if they are lost to injury or disease. It is firmly established, however, that new neurons are generated in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of virtually all adult mammals, including humans [1]. Many questions still remain, however, regarding adult neurogenesis in other brain regions and particularly in humans, where standard birthdating methods are not generally feasible. Exciting recent evidence indicates that calretinin-expressing interneurons are added to the adult human striatum at a substantial rate [2]. The role of new neurons is unknown, but studies in rodents will be able to further elucidate their identity and origin and then begin to understand their regulation and function. PMID:26298770

  6. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD.

  7. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD. PMID:26988110

  8. Age-dependent decline in density of human nerve and spinal ganglia neurons expressing the α3 isoform of Na/K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Romanovsky, D; Mrak, R E; Dobretsov, M

    2015-12-01

    Ambulatory instability and falls are a major source of morbidity in the elderly. Age-related loss of tendon reflexes is a major contributing factor to this morbidity, and deterioration of the afferent limb of the stretch reflex is a potential contributing factor to such age-dependent loss of tendon reflexes. To evaluate this, we assessed the number and distribution of muscle spindle afferent fibers in human sacral spinal ganglia (S1) and tibial nerve samples obtained at autopsy, using immunohistochemical staining for the α3 isoform of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (α3NKA), a marker of muscle spindle afferents. Across all age groups, an average of 26 ± 4% of myelinated fibers of tibial nerve and 17 ± 2% of ganglion neuronal profiles were α3NKA-positive (n = 8 per group). Subject age explained 85% of the variability in these counts. The relative frequency of α3NKA-labeled fibers/neurons starts to decline during the 5th decade of life, approaching half that of young adult values in 65-year-old subjects. At all ages, α3NKA-positive neurons were among the largest of spinal ganglia neurons. However, as compared to younger subjects, the population of α3NKA-positive neurons from advanced-age subjects showed diminished numbers of large (both moderately and strongly labeled), and medium-sized (strongly labeled) profiles. Considering the critical significance of ion transport by NKA for neuronal activity, our data suggest that functional impairment and, also, most likely atrophy and/or degeneration of muscle spindle afferents, are mechanisms underlying loss of tendon reflexes with age. The larger and more strongly α3NKA-expressing spindle afferents appear to be proportionally more vulnerable. PMID:26386295

  9. Electrophysiologic evidence of subclinical injury to the posterior columns of the human spinal cord after therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, L.J.; Donaldson, S.S.; Gupta, P.R.; Bosley, T.M.

    1982-12-15

    Spinal somatosensory conduction velocity (SSCV) was indirectly estimated from cerebral evoked potentials in 15 adults who had received therapeutic radiation (RT) (2000-4380 rad) to the thoracic spinal cord during treatment for lung cancer, and in 15 age-matched normal controls. Thirteen of the patients had also received 4400-5500 rad to the supraclavicular fossae. One-way impulse conduction time in the arm, estimated from F-wave latency, was prolonged in the patients as compared to controls (12.0 +/- 1.2 versus 10.4 +/- 1.0 msec; P less than 0.001) but conduction time in the leg was similar in the two groups (22.4 +/- 2.4 versus 22.0 +/- 2.5 msec; P less than 0.1). SSCV was significantly slower in the patient group (37.9 +/- 13.9 versus 54.5 +/- 12.9 m/sec; P less than 0.001) whereas supraspinal latency (cervical cord to cortex) was identical (5.5 +/- 0.9 versus 5.5 +/- 0.8 msec; P less than 0.1). SSCV in the patient group was not related to total RT dose (r . 0.15; P . 0.2), but was correlated with both treatment time and number of fractions (r . 0.49 and 0.43; P . 0.003 and 0.007, respectively). These findings suggest that RT may produce subclinical spinal cord dysfunction even at conventional dosage schedules, and that it may be possible physiologically to monitor the myelopathic effects of RT in individual patients.

  10. (1) H MRS in the human spinal cord at 7 T using a dielectric waveguide transmitter, RF shimming and a high density receive array.

    PubMed

    Henning, A; Koning, W; Fuchs, A; Raaijmakers, A; Bluemink, J J; van den Berg, C A T; Boer, V O; Klomp, D W J

    2016-09-01

    Multimodal MRI is the state of the art method for clinical diagnostics and therapy monitoring of the spinal cord, with MRS being an emerging modality that has the potential to detect relevant changes of the spinal cord tissue at an earlier stage and to enhance specificity. Methodological challenges related to the small dimensions and deep location of the human spinal cord inside the human body, field fluctuations due to respiratory motion, susceptibility differences to adjacent tissue such as vertebras and pulsatile flow of the cerebrospinal fluid hinder the clinical application of (1) H MRS to the human spinal cord. Complementary to previous studies that partly addressed these problems, this work aims at enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of (1) H MRS in the human spinal cord. To this end a flexible tight fit high density receiver array and ultra-high field strength (7 T) were combined. A dielectric waveguide and dipole antenna transmission coil allowed for dual channel RF shimming, focusing the RF field in the spinal cord, and an inner-volume saturated semi-LASER sequence was used for robust localization in the presence of B1 (+) inhomogeneity. Herein we report the first 7 T spinal cord (1) H MR spectra, which were obtained in seven independent measurements of 128 averages each in three healthy volunteers. The spectra exhibit high quality (full width at half maximum 0.09 ppm, SNR 7.6) and absence of artifacts and allow for reliable quantification of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) (NAA/Cr (creatine) 1.31 ± 0.20; Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) 5), total choline containing compounds (Cho) (Cho/Cr 0.32 ± 0.07; CRLB 7), Cr (CRLB 5) and myo-inositol (mI) (mI/Cr 1.08 ± 0.22; CRLB 6) in 7.5 min in the human cervical spinal cord. Thus metabolic information from the spinal cord can be obtained in clinically feasible scan times at 7 T, and its benefit for clinical decision making in spinal cord disorders will be investigated in the future using the

  11. (1) H MRS in the human spinal cord at 7 T using a dielectric waveguide transmitter, RF shimming and a high density receive array.

    PubMed

    Henning, A; Koning, W; Fuchs, A; Raaijmakers, A; Bluemink, J J; van den Berg, C A T; Boer, V O; Klomp, D W J

    2016-09-01

    Multimodal MRI is the state of the art method for clinical diagnostics and therapy monitoring of the spinal cord, with MRS being an emerging modality that has the potential to detect relevant changes of the spinal cord tissue at an earlier stage and to enhance specificity. Methodological challenges related to the small dimensions and deep location of the human spinal cord inside the human body, field fluctuations due to respiratory motion, susceptibility differences to adjacent tissue such as vertebras and pulsatile flow of the cerebrospinal fluid hinder the clinical application of (1) H MRS to the human spinal cord. Complementary to previous studies that partly addressed these problems, this work aims at enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of (1) H MRS in the human spinal cord. To this end a flexible tight fit high density receiver array and ultra-high field strength (7 T) were combined. A dielectric waveguide and dipole antenna transmission coil allowed for dual channel RF shimming, focusing the RF field in the spinal cord, and an inner-volume saturated semi-LASER sequence was used for robust localization in the presence of B1 (+) inhomogeneity. Herein we report the first 7 T spinal cord (1) H MR spectra, which were obtained in seven independent measurements of 128 averages each in three healthy volunteers. The spectra exhibit high quality (full width at half maximum 0.09 ppm, SNR 7.6) and absence of artifacts and allow for reliable quantification of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) (NAA/Cr (creatine) 1.31 ± 0.20; Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) 5), total choline containing compounds (Cho) (Cho/Cr 0.32 ± 0.07; CRLB 7), Cr (CRLB 5) and myo-inositol (mI) (mI/Cr 1.08 ± 0.22; CRLB 6) in 7.5 min in the human cervical spinal cord. Thus metabolic information from the spinal cord can be obtained in clinically feasible scan times at 7 T, and its benefit for clinical decision making in spinal cord disorders will be investigated in the future using the

  12. Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of modern humans in the Late Pleistocene, subsequent to their emergence in eastern Africa, is likely to have involved substantial population increases, during their initial dispersal across southern Asia and their subsequent expansions throughout Africa and into more northern Eurasia. An assessment of younger (20–40 y) versus older (>40 y) adult mortality distributions for late archaic humans (principally Neandertals) and two samples of early modern humans (Middle Paleolithic and earlier Upper Paleolithic) provides little difference across the samples. All three Late Pleistocene samples have a dearth of older individuals compared with Holocene ethnographic/historical samples. They also lack older adults compared with Holocene paleodemographic profiles that have been critiqued for having too few older individuals for subsistence, social, and demographic viability. Although biased, probably through a combination of preservation, age assessment, and especially Pleistocene mobility requirements, these adult mortality distributions suggest low life expectancy and demographic instability across these Late Pleistocene human groups. They indicate only subtle and paleontologically invisible changes in human paleodemographics with the establishment of modern humans; they provide no support for a life history advantage among early modern humans. PMID:21220336

  13. Novel surface markers directed against adult human gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Galivo, Feorillo H; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Maria T; Zhong, YongPing; Streeter, Philip R; Grompe, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Novel cell surface-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated against extrahepatic biliary cells were developed for the isolation and characterization of different cell subsets from normal adult human gallbladder. Eleven antigenically distinct gallbladder subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. They were classified into epithelial, mesenchymal, and pancreatobiliary (PDX1(+)SOX9(+)) subsets based on gene expression profiling. These antigenically distinct human gallbladder cell subsets could potentially also reflect different functional properties in regards to bile physiology, cell renewal and plasticity. Three of the novel monoclonal antibodies differentially labeled archival sections of primary carcinoma of human gallbladder relative to normal tissue. The novel monoclonal antibodies described herein enable the identification and characterization of antigenically diverse cell subsets within adult human gallbladder and are putative tumor biomarkers.

  14. In vivo mapping of human spinal cord microstructure at 300 mT/m

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Tanguy; McNab, Jennifer A.; Setsompop, Kawin; Witzel, Thomas; Schneider, Torben; Huang, Susie Yi; Keil, Boris; Klawiter, Eric C.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterize white matter microstructure non-invasively has important applications for the diagnosis and follow-up of several neurological diseases. There exists a family of diffusion MRI techniques, such as AxCaliber, that provide indices of axon microstructure, such as axon diameter and density. However, to obtain accurate measurements of axons with small diameters (<5 μm), these techniques require strong gradients, i.e. an order of magnitude higher than the 40–80 mT/m currently available in clinical systems. In this study we acquired AxCaliber diffusion data at a variety of different q-values and diffusion times in the spinal cord of five healthy subjects using a 300 mT/m whole body gradient system. Acquisition and processing were optimized using state-of-the-art methods (e.g., 64-channel coil, template-based analysis). Results consistently show an average axon diameter of 4.5 +/− 1.1 μm in the spinal cord white matter. Diameters ranged from 3.0 μm (gracilis) to 5.9 μm (spinocerebellar tracts). Values were similar across laterality (left-right), but statistically different across spinal cord pathways (p<10−5). The observed trends are similar to those observed in animal histology. This study shows, for the first time, in vivo mapping of axon diameter in the spinal cord at 300 mT/m, thus creating opportunities for applications in spinal cord diseases. PMID:26095093

  15. Interaction of transcutaneous spinal stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation in human leg muscles.

    PubMed

    Roy, François D; Bosgra, Dillen; Stein, Richard B

    2014-06-01

    Transcutaneous spinal stimulation is a noninvasive method that can activate dorsal and/or ventral roots depending on the location and intensity of stimulation. Reflex root-evoked potentials (REPs) were studied in muscles that traditionally evoke large (soleus) and small H-reflexes (tibialis anterior), as well as muscles where H-reflexes are difficult to study (hamstrings). This study characterizes the interaction of the REP and the motor-evoked potential (MEP). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivered 11-25 ms before spinal stimulation resulted in more than linear summation of the two responses. Because of overlap, the modulation was quantified after subtracting the contribution of the conditioning MEP or REP. At rest, the mean-rectified soleus response was facilitated by up to ~250 μV (21-times the MEP or 161% of the REP). The increases were more reliable during a voluntary contraction (up to ~300 μV, 517% of the MEP or 181% of the REP). At the 13-ms interval, the mean-rectified response in the pre-contracted hamstrings was increased by 227% of the MEP or 300% of the REP. In some subjects, TMS could also eliminate the post-activation depression produced using two spinal stimuli, confirming that the interaction can extend to presynaptic spinal neurons. The spatiotemporal facilitation in tibialis anterior was not significant. However, the large MEP was facilitated when the spinal stimulus preceded TMS by 100-150 ms, presumably because of rebound excitation. These strong interactions may be important for inducing motor plasticity and improved training procedures for recovery after neurological damage. PMID:24531641

  16. Age-Related Gene Expression Differences in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Young Adults, and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ann-Jay; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Smale, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of age-related differences in the innate and adaptive immune systems have been proposed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection of human neonates and older adults. The emergence of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides an opportunity to obtain an unbiased, comprehensive, and quantitative view of gene expression differences in defined cell types from different age groups. An examination of ex vivo human monocyte responses to lipopolysaccharide stimulation or Listeria monocytogenes infection by RNA-seq revealed extensive similarities between neonates, young adults, and older adults, with an unexpectedly small number of genes exhibiting statistically significant age-dependent differences. By examining the differentially induced genes in the context of transcription factor binding motifs and RNA-seq data sets from mutant mouse strains, a previously described deficiency in interferon response factor-3 activity could be implicated in most of the differences between newborns and young adults. Contrary to these observations, older adults exhibited elevated expression of inflammatory genes at baseline, yet the responses following stimulation correlated more closely with those observed in younger adults. Notably, major differences in the expression of constitutively expressed genes were not observed, suggesting that the age-related differences are driven by environmental influences rather than cell-autonomous differences in monocyte development. PMID:26147648

  17. [The existence vomeronasal organ in adult humans].

    PubMed

    Rapiejko, Piotr; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Wojdas, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Jan; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2007-01-01

    The influence of chemical substances (feromones) on human emotional and physical condition has fascinated psychologists, sexuologists and laryngologists since centurie. Literature conveys inconsistent information on vomeronasal organ (VNO) occurrence in humans. This organ is often called Jacobson's, and 2 symmetrical openings leading into it, located on both sides of septum, are called Ruyasch's ducts. The aim of the study was to analyze vomeronasal organ occurrence in humans in relation to age and sex. The study was conducted in a group of 634 patients, aged 18-80 years. All patients underwent routine ENT examination including rhinoscopy, nasal cavity examination with usage of 2.5x magnification lens (surgical glasses) and surgical microscope with 10x magnification. All persons had nasal cavities examined endoscopically. Every time presence of vomeronasal organ openings, along with localization, size and symmetry of these was noted. Subjects, who presented Jacobson's organ, were asked to fill a questionnaire concerning influence of smells on erotic sensations. Vomeronasal organ was fund in 312 persons, that is 49.21%. In 83.65% of cases vomeronasal organ opening size was smaller than 0.2 mm, what restricted its visibility to usage of magnifying lens, microscope, or endoscope. In 16.34% of cases only vomeronasal organ ducts openings were well visible in routine rhinoscopy without magnification. Vomeronasal organ was found more often in men than women. VNO was significantly more rare in patients with nasal septal deviation. In these cases, vomeronasal organ was usually found unilaterally, in all the cases on the concave side of deviated nasal septum. PMID:18260256

  18. Release properties and functional integration of noradrenergic-rich tissue grafted to the denervated spinal cord of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Leanza, G; Cataudella, T; Dimauro, R; Monaco, S; Stanzani, S

    1999-05-01

    Noradrenaline- (NA-) containing grafts of central (embryonic locus coeruleus, LC) or peripheral (juvenile adrenal medullary, AM, autologous superior cervical ganglionic, SCG) tissue were implanted unilaterally into rat lumbar spinal cord previously depleted of its NA content by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) intraventricularly. A microdialysis probe was implanted in the spinal cord 3-4 months after transplantation, and extracellular levels of noradrenaline were monitored in freely moving animals during basal conditions and following administration of pharmacological or behavioural stimuli. Age-matched normal and lesioned animals both served as controls. Morphometric analyses were carried out on horizontal spinal sections processed for dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) immunocitochemistry, in order to assess lesion- or graft-induced changes in the density of spinal noradrenergic innervation, relative to the normal patterns. In lesioned animals, the entire spinal cord was virtually devoid of DBH-positive fibers, resulting in a dramatic 88% reduction in baseline NA, compared with that in controls, which did not change in response to the various stimuli. LC and SCG grafts reinstated approximately 80% and 50% of normal innervation density, respectively, but they differed strikingly in their release ability. Thus, LC grafts restored baseline NA levels up to 60% of those in controls, and responded with significantly increased NA release to KCl-induced depolarization, neuronal uptake blockade and handling. In contrast, very low NA levels and only poor and inconsistent responses to the various stimuli were observed in the SCG-grafted animals. In AM-grafted animals, spinal extracellular NA levels were restored up to 45% of those in controls, probably as a result of nonsynaptic, endocrine-like release, as grafted AM cells retained the chromaffine phenotype, showed no detectable fibre outgrowth and did not respond to any of the pharmacological or behavioural challenges. Thus, both a

  19. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  20. Grafted Human iPS Cell-Derived Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Contribute to Robust Remyelination of Demyelinated Axons after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Soya; Takano, Morito; Numasawa-Kuroiwa, Yuko; Itakura, Go; Kobayashi, Yoshiomi; Nishiyama, Yuichiro; Sugai, Keiko; Nishimura, Soraya; Iwai, Hiroki; Isoda, Miho; Shibata, Shinsuke; Kohyama, Jun; Iwanami, Akio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Summary Murine- and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (iPSC-NS/PCs) promote functional recovery following transplantation into the injured spinal cord in rodents and primates. Although remyelination of spared demyelinated axons is a critical mechanism in the regeneration of the injured spinal cord, human iPSC-NS/PCs predominantly differentiate into neurons both in vitro and in vivo. We therefore took advantage of our recently developed protocol to obtain human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte precursor cell-enriched neural stem/progenitor cells and report the benefits of transplanting these cells in a spinal cord injury (SCI) model. We describe how this approach contributes to the robust remyelination of demyelinated axons and facilitates functional recovery after SCI. PMID:26724902

  1. Repair of spinal cord injury by chitosan scaffold with glioma ECM and SB216763 implantation in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Jian, Rao; Yixu, Yang; Sheyu, Lin; Jianhong, Shen; Yaohua, Yan; Xing, Su; Qingfeng, Huang; Xiaojian, Lu; Lei, Zhang; Yan, Zhen; Fangling, Xiong; Huasong, Gao; Yilu, Gao

    2015-10-01

    The loss of spinal cord tissue and the cavity formation are major obstacles to the repair of spinal cord injury (SCI). In the study, the scaffold of chitosan+ECM+SB216763 was fabricated and used for the repair of injured spinal cord injury. First, the biocompatibility of the scaffold was analyzed and results showed that the scaffold had a good compatibility with the neural stem cells. Especially, the processes of differentiated neural stem cell embedded in the scaffold were found in the experiment. At the same time, we also investigated the effect of scaffold on the differentiation of neural stem cell. The results showed that the scaffold of chitosan+ECM+SB216763 could significantly promote the differentiation of neural stem cells into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes relative to those in other groups. In order to probe the application of scaffold in vivo, the rat models of spinal cord hemisection were set up and scaffolds were implanted into transected gap. Then the electrophysiology and BBB score were evaluated and results showed that the amplitude, latency period and BBB score in chitosan+ECM+SB216763 group were dramatically better than those in other groups. In addition, the differentiation of neural stem cells into nerve cells was also assayed and the results revealed that the number of neural stem cells differentiating into neuron, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in chitosan+ECM+SB216763 group was significantly bigger than those in other groups. All these data suggested that the scaffold of chitosan+ECM+SB216763 would be a promising medium for the repair of injured spinal cord.

  2. Cutaneous inputs from the back abolish locomotor-like activity and reduce spastic-like activity in the adult cat following complete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Frigon, Alain; Thibaudier, Yann; Johnson, Michael D.; Heckman, C.J.; Hurteau, Marie-France

    2012-01-01

    Spasticity is a condition that can include increased muscle tone, clonus, spasms, and hyperreflexia. In this study, we report the effect of manually stimulating the dorsal lumbosacral skin on spontaneous locomotor-like activity and on a variety of reflex responses in 5 decerebrate chronic spinal cats treated with clonidine. Cats were spinalized 1 month before the terminal experiment. Stretch reflexes were evoked by stretching the left triceps surae muscles. Crossed reflexes were elicited by electrically stimulating the right tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. Windup of reflex responses was evoked by electrically stimulating the left tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. We found that pinching the skin of the back abolished spontaneous locomotor-like activity. We also found that back pinch abolished the rhythmic activity observed during reflex testing without eliminating the reflex responses. Some of the rhythmic episodes of activity observed during reflex testing were consistent with clonus with an oscillation frequency greater than 3 Hz. Pinching the skin of the back effectively abolished rhythmic activity occurring spontaneously or evoked during reflex testing, irrespective of oscillation frequency. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that locomotion and clonus are produced by common central pattern-generators. Stimulating the skin of the back could prove helpful in managing undesired rhythmic activity in spinal cord-injured humans. PMID:22487200

  3. Temporal and spatial expression of major myelin proteins in the human fetal spinal cord during the second trimester

    SciTech Connect

    Weidenheim, K.M.; Bodhireddy, S.R.; Rashbaum, W.K.; Lyman, W.D.

    1996-06-01

    Immunohistochemical identification of myelin basic protein (MBP) is a sensitive method for assessing myelination in the human fetal central nervous system (CNS). However, the temporospatial relationship of expression of two other major myelin proteins, proteolipid protein (PLP) and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) to that of MBP during fetal development has not been assessed in human tissues. Vibratome sections of cervical, thoracic and lumbosacral levels from 37 normal spinal cords of {le} 10 to 24 gestational week (GW) fetuses were analyzed using immunohistochemical methods. Using light microscopy, MBP was the first oligodendrocyte marker detected, present by 10 GW at more rostral levels. PLP and MAG were detected rostrally between 12 to 14 GW. All myelin proteins were expressed in anterior to posterior and rostral to caudal gradients. By the late second trimester, expression of MBP, PLP and MAG was noted in all locations in the spinal white matter except for the corticospinal tract. Expression of MAG was particularly marked in the posterior root entry zone and propriospinal tracts. The results suggest that PLP and MAG are expressed later than MBP but follow similar spatial gradients. 44 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Human pancreatic polypeptide in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Hanukoglu, A; Chalew, S; Kowarski, A A

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of human pancreatic polypeptide may be useful for assessment of gastrointestinal function, integrity of the parasympathetic nervous system or screening for endocrine neoplasia. In adults hPP levels have been reported to increase with age. However hPP levels throughout childhood have not been well characterized in comparison with the adult range. We studied fasting human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) from 45 pediatric patients, from infancy - 15 years, and 18 older adolescents and adults aged 16-45 years. The mean hPP level of children (233 +/- 147 pg/ml) was significantly higher than that (113 +/- 35 pg/ml) of adults (P less than .0001). There was no difference in mean hPP levels of children with normal growth hormone secretion compared to growth hormone deficient patients. There was no effect of gender or body mass index on hPP levels. We conclude that fasting hPP levels must be interpreted with respect to the age of the subject, children particularly, in that preteens may have higher fasting levels than older teenagers and adults.

  5. Human pancreatic polypeptide in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Hanukoglu, A; Chalew, S; Kowarski, A A

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of human pancreatic polypeptide may be useful for assessment of gastrointestinal function, integrity of the parasympathetic nervous system or screening for endocrine neoplasia. In adults hPP levels have been reported to increase with age. However hPP levels throughout childhood have not been well characterized in comparison with the adult range. We studied fasting human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) from 45 pediatric patients, from infancy - 15 years, and 18 older adolescents and adults aged 16-45 years. The mean hPP level of children (233 +/- 147 pg/ml) was significantly higher than that (113 +/- 35 pg/ml) of adults (P less than .0001). There was no difference in mean hPP levels of children with normal growth hormone secretion compared to growth hormone deficient patients. There was no effect of gender or body mass index on hPP levels. We conclude that fasting hPP levels must be interpreted with respect to the age of the subject, children particularly, in that preteens may have higher fasting levels than older teenagers and adults. PMID:2307392

  6. Prospective multicenter assessment of perioperative and minimum 2-year postoperative complication rates associated with adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Justin S; Klineberg, Eric; Lafage, Virginie; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Renaud; Hostin, Richard; Mundis, Gregory M; Errico, Thomas J; Kim, Han Jo; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Hamilton, D Kojo; Scheer, Justin K; Soroceanu, Alex; Kelly, Michael P; Line, Breton; Gupta, Munish; Deviren, Vedat; Hart, Robert; Burton, Douglas C; Bess, Shay; Ames, Christopher P

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Although multiple reports have documented significant benefit from surgical treatment of adult spinal deformity (ASD), these procedures can have high complication rates. Previously reported complications rates associated with ASD surgery are limited by retrospective design, single-surgeon or single-center cohorts, lack of rigorous data on complications, and/or limited follow-up. Accurate definition of complications associated with ASD surgery is important and may serve as a resource for patient counseling and efforts to improve the safety of patient care. The authors conducted a study to prospectively assess the rates of complications associated with ASD surgery with a minimum 2-year follow-up based on a multicenter study design that incorporated standardized data-collection forms, on-site study coordinators, and regular auditing of data to help ensure complete and accurate reporting of complications. In addition, they report age stratification of complication rates and provide a general assessment of factors that may be associated with the occurrence of complications. METHODS As part of a prospective, multicenter ASD database, standardized forms were used to collect data on surgery-related complications. On-site coordinators and central auditing helped ensure complete capture of complication data. Inclusion criteria were age older than 18 years, ASD, and plan for operative treatment. Complications were classified as perioperative (within 6 weeks of surgery) or delayed (between 6 weeks after surgery and time of last follow-up), and as minor or major. The primary focus for analyses was on patients who reached a minimum follow-up of 2 years. RESULTS Of 346 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 291 (84%) had a minimum 2-year follow-up (mean 2.1 years); their mean age was 56.2 years. The vast majority (99%) had treatment including a posterior procedure, 25% had an anterior procedure, and 19% had a 3-column osteotomy. At least 1 revision was required in 82

  7. Predictors of food preferences in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Logue, A W; Smith, M E

    1986-06-01

    Predictors of preferences for a wide variety of foods were examined in 303 male and female human subjects ranging from 14-68 years of age. The subjects completed questionnaires which requested information on the subject's sex, age, thinness, sensation seeking and ethnic background, as well as on the subjects' food preferences. Largely consistent with previous studies, female subjects reported higher preferences for low-calorie foods, candy and wine, and lower preferences for meat, beer, spicy foods and milk. Younger subjects reported higher preferences for sweet foods and lower preferences for foods such as chili pepper that are considered acquired tastes. Thinner subjects tended to rate both sweet foods and meat lower than did other subjects. Preferences for spicy foods or foods likely to cause illness were positively correlated with sensation seeking while preferences for sweet or bland foods or foods unlikely to cause illness were negatively correlated with sensation seeking. Subjects for whom the primary cuisine on which they were raised was Oriental cuisine preferred alcoholic beverages and non-Oriental foods less than did other subjects. A factor analysis of the food preferences yielded ten factors including those for meat and potatoes, alcohol, spices and junk food. Data on predictors of food preferences can assist research on the determinants of food preferences, however much of the variance in food preferences remains to be explained.

  8. Beneficial Effect of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursors in Spinal Cord Injury Repair.

    PubMed

    Romanyuk, Nataliya; Amemori, Takashi; Turnovcova, Karolina; Prochazka, Pavel; Onteniente, Brigitte; Sykova, Eva; Jendelova, Pavla

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in our understanding and research of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), their use in clinical practice is still limited due to lack of preclinical experiments. Neural precursors (NPs) derived from a clone of human iPSCs (IMR90) were used to treat a rat spinal cord lesion 1 week after induction. Functional recovery was evaluated using the BBB, beam walking, rotarod, and plantar tests. Lesion morphology, endogenous axonal sprouting, graft survival, and iPSC-NP differentiation were analyzed immunohistochemically. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to evaluate the effect of transplanted iPSC-NPs on endogenous regenerative processes and also to monitor their behavior after transplantation. Human iPSC-NPs robustly survived in the lesion, migrated, and partially filled the lesion cavity during the entire period of observation. Transplanted animals displayed significant motor improvement already from the second week after the transplantation of iPSC-NPs. qPCR revealed the increased expression of human neurotrophins 8 weeks after transplantation. Simultaneously, the white and gray matter were spared in the host tissue. The grafted cells were immunohistochemically positive for doublecortin, MAP2, βIII-tubulin, GFAP, and CNPase 8 weeks after transplantation. Human iPSC-NPs further matured, and 17 weeks after transplantation differentiated toward interneurons, dopaminergic neurons, serotoninergic neurons, and ChAT-positive motoneurons. Human iPSC-NPs possess neurotrophic properties that are associated with significant early functional improvement and the sparing of spinal cord tissue. Their ability to differentiate into tissue-specific neurons leads to the long-term restoration of the lesioned tissue, making the cells a promising candidate for future cell-based therapy of SCI. PMID:25259685

  9. Delayed intramuscular human neurotrophin-3 improves recovery in adult and elderly rats after stroke.

    PubMed

    Duricki, Denise A; Hutson, Thomas H; Kathe, Claudia; Soleman, Sara; Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Shine, H David; Chen, Qin; Wood, Tobias C; Bernanos, Michel; Cash, Diana; Williams, Steven C R; Gage, Fred H; Moon, Lawrence D F

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a therapy that reverses disability after stroke when initiated in a time frame suitable for the majority of new victims. We show here that intramuscular delivery of neurotrophin-3 (NT3, encoded by NTF3) can induce sensorimotor recovery when treatment is initiated 24 h after stroke. Specifically, in two randomized, blinded preclinical trials, we show improved sensory and locomotor function in adult (6 months) and elderly (18 months) rats treated 24 h following cortical ischaemic stroke with human NT3 delivered using a clinically approved serotype of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV1). Importantly, AAV1-hNT3 was given in a clinically-feasible timeframe using a straightforward, targeted route (injections into disabled forelimb muscles). Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed that recovery was not due to neuroprotection, as expected given the delayed treatment. Rather, treatment caused corticospinal axons from the less affected hemisphere to sprout in the spinal cord. This treatment is the first gene therapy that reverses disability after stroke when administered intramuscularly in an elderly body. Importantly, phase I and II clinical trials by others show that repeated, peripherally administered high doses of recombinant NT3 are safe and well tolerated in humans with other conditions. This paves the way for NT3 as a therapy for stroke.

  10. Delayed intramuscular human neurotrophin-3 improves recovery in adult and elderly rats after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Duricki, Denise A.; Hutson, Thomas H.; Kathe, Claudia; Soleman, Sara; Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel; Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Shine, H. David; Chen, Qin; Wood, Tobias C.; Bernanos, Michel; Cash, Diana; Williams, Steven C. R.; Gage, Fred H.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a therapy that reverses disability after stroke when initiated in a time frame suitable for the majority of new victims. We show here that intramuscular delivery of neurotrophin-3 (NT3, encoded by NTF3) can induce sensorimotor recovery when treatment is initiated 24 h after stroke. Specifically, in two randomized, blinded preclinical trials, we show improved sensory and locomotor function in adult (6 months) and elderly (18 months) rats treated 24 h following cortical ischaemic stroke with human NT3 delivered using a clinically approved serotype of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV1). Importantly, AAV1-hNT3 was given in a clinically-feasible timeframe using a straightforward, targeted route (injections into disabled forelimb muscles). Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed that recovery was not due to neuroprotection, as expected given the delayed treatment. Rather, treatment caused corticospinal axons from the less affected hemisphere to sprout in the spinal cord. This treatment is the first gene therapy that reverses disability after stroke when administered intramuscularly in an elderly body. Importantly, phase I and II clinical trials by others show that repeated, peripherally administered high doses of recombinant NT3 are safe and well tolerated in humans with other conditions. This paves the way for NT3 as a therapy for stroke. PMID:26614754

  11. Human Adult Cortical Reorganization and Consequent Visual Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Dilks, Daniel D.; Serences, John T.; Rosenau, Benjamin J.; Yantis, Steven; McCloskey, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Neural and behavioral evidence for cortical reorganization in the adult somatosensory system after loss of sensory input (e.g., amputation) has been well documented. In contrast, evidence for reorganization in the adult visual system is far less clear: neural evidence is the subject of controversy, behavioral evidence is sparse, and studies combining neural and behavioral evidence have not previously been reported. Here, we report converging behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from a stroke patient (B.L.) in support of cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system. B.L.’s stroke spared the primary visual cortex (V1), but destroyed fibers that normally provide input to V1 from the upper left visual field (LVF). As a consequence, B.L. is blind in the upper LVF, and exhibits distorted perception in the lower LVF: stimuli appear vertically elongated, toward and into the blind upper LVF. For example, a square presented in the lower LVF is perceived as a rectangle extending upward. We hypothesized that the perceptual distortion was a consequence of cortical reorganization in V1. Extensive behavioral testing supported our hypothesis, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) confirmed V1 reorganization. Together, the behavioral and fMRI data show that loss of input to V1 after a stroke leads to cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system, and provide the first evidence that reorganization of the adult visual system affects visual perception. These findings contribute to our understanding of the human adult brain’s capacity to change and has implications for topics ranging from learning to recovery from brain damage. PMID:17804619

  12. Optimization of a single-shot EPI sequence for diffusion imaging of the human spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Cristina; Boss, Andreas; Steidle, Guenter; Martirosian, Petros; Klose, Uwe; Capuani, Silvia; Maraviglia, Bruno; Claussen, Claus D.; Schick, Fritz

    2007-03-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are established techniques of magnetic resonance widely used for the characterization of the cerebral tissue. Despite the successful application in the brain, diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging (EPI) of the spinal cord is hindered by the need for highly-resolved spatial encoding in an area of strong magnetic field inhomogeneities, and the shortness of transverse relaxation time. The major aim of this study was the optimization of a reliable single-shot EPI sequence for DTI of the spinal cord at 1.5T. Ten healthy volunteers participated in the study (mean age=28.4+/-3.1). A single-shot EPI sequence with double spinecho diffusion preparation and nominal in-plane resolution of 0.9x0.9mm2 was optimized with regard to cerebrospinal fluid artifacts, and contrast-to-noise ratio between gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM). The effective sequence resolution was evaluated on a phantom. A cardiac-pulse gated sequence with optimal matrix size (read x phase=64x32) and b-value (700s/mm2) allowed for the acquisition of highly-resolved images of the spinal cord (effective in-plane resolution=1.1mm). Preliminary results on two healthy volunteers showed that the butterfly-shaped GM is clearly recognizable in the reconstructed fractional anisotropy (FA) maps. Measured WM FA values were 0.698+/-0.076 and 0.756+/-0.046. No significant differences were found in the mean diffusivity computed in the WM as compared to the GM areas. Optimized spinal cord diffusion imaging provided promising preliminary results on healthy volunteers. The application of the proposed protocol in the assessment of neurological disorders may allow for improved characterization of healthy and impaired WM and GM.

  13. Altering spinal cord excitability enables voluntary movements after chronic complete paralysis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Claudia A.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury P.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that one individual who had a motor complete, but sensory incomplete spinal cord injury regained voluntary movement after 7 months of epidural stimulation and stand training. We presumed that the residual sensory pathways were critical in this recovery. However, we now report in three more individuals voluntary movement occurred with epidural stimulation immediately after implant even in two who were diagnosed with a motor and sensory complete lesion. We demonstrate that neuromodulating the spinal circuitry with epidural stimulation, enables completely paralysed individuals to process conceptual, auditory and visual input to regain relatively fine voluntary control of paralysed muscles. We show that neuromodulation of the sub-threshold motor state of excitability of the lumbosacral spinal networks was the key to recovery of intentional movement in four of four individuals diagnosed as having complete paralysis of the legs. We have uncovered a fundamentally new intervention strategy that can dramatically affect recovery of voluntary movement in individuals with complete paralysis even years after injury. PMID:24713270

  14. Effect of neural stem cell transplantation combined with erythropoietin injection on axon regeneration in adult rats with transected spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Zuo, Y; Wang, X L; Huo, H J; Jiang, J M; Yan, H B; Xiao, Y L

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of neural stem cells (NSC) and erythropoietin (EPO) on axon regeneration in adult rats with transected spinal cord injury, and provided an experimental basis for clinical treatment. Forty Wistar rats with T10-transected spinal cord injury were randomly divided into four groups of ten rats: a control group (group A), an NSC-transplant group (group B), an NSC-transplant and EPO group (group C), and an EPO group (group D). Biotinylated dextran amines (BDA) anterograde corticospinal cord neuronal tracing and Fluoro-Gold (FG) retrograde tracing were carried out at the 8th week after operation to observe the regeneration of nerve fibers. The Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor score was used to evaluate restoration. 1) BDA and FG immunofluorescence staining: in group C, a large number of regenerated axons were observed and some penetrated the injured area. In group B, only a small number of regenerated axons were observed and none penetrated the injured area. In group D, only sporadic regenerated nerve fibers were observed occasionally, while in group A, no axonal regeneration was observed. In group C, a small number of cones and axons emitted yellow fluorescence, and no FG-labeled cells were observed in the other groups. 2) The BBB scores for group C were higher than those for the other groups, and the differences were statistically significance (P < 0.05). NSC transplantation combined with EPO intraperitoneal injection may benefit axon regeneration in rats with transected spinal cord injury, and accelerate the functional recovery of the hindlimb locomotor. PMID:26782425

  15. Recurrence of spinal schwannoma: Is it preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Satya B.; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Dhir, Manmath K.; Patnaik, Ashis; Panigrahi, Souvagya

    2016-01-01

    Spinal schwannomas account for about 25% of primary intradural spinal cord tumors in adult. The prognosis for spinal schwannomas is excellent in most cases. Complete resection is curative. However following subtotal removal, recurrence develops after several years. We describe a case of recurrent spinal schwannoma who had been operated twice before for same disease. The possible cause of recurrence and difficulties in reoperation are discussed.

  16. Recurrence of spinal schwannoma: Is it preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Satya B.; Mishra, Sudhansu S.; Dhir, Manmath K.; Patnaik, Ashis; Panigrahi, Souvagya

    2016-01-01

    Spinal schwannomas account for about 25% of primary intradural spinal cord tumors in adult. The prognosis for spinal schwannomas is excellent in most cases. Complete resection is curative. However following subtotal removal, recurrence develops after several years. We describe a case of recurrent spinal schwannoma who had been operated twice before for same disease. The possible cause of recurrence and difficulties in reoperation are discussed. PMID:27695564

  17. Mapping of motor and sensory activity in the human spinal cord with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Dinorah; Rojas, Rafael; Barrios, Fernando A.

    2001-10-01

    Spinal cord fMRI images in control human volunteers were obtained at 1.5 T. Using a T2* weighted EPI-BOLD GE pulse sequence during a motor task activation scheme. The images were centered at C7 with five axial slices, 8 mm thick with zero separation. All the images were analyzed off-line with GE's Functool software to construct a functional map. This study was compared with a previous one at 1.5 T using FLASH sequences. After a small group of volunteers we can conclude that the EPI sequences are highly sensitive to flow effects in the CSF and may not have the functional resolution to use them in functional mapping in the human spine at 1.5 T.

  18. Lavandula angustifolia Extract Improves the Result of Human Umbilical Mesenchymal Wharton's Jelly Stem Cell Transplantation after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoobi, Kayvan; Kaka, Gholamreza; Mansouri, Korosh; Davoodi, Shaghayegh; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Hosseini, Seyed Ruhollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The primary trauma of spinal cord injury (SCI) results in severe damage to nervous functions. At the cellular level, SCI causes astrogliosis. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs), isolated from Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord, can be easily obtained. Previously, we showed that the neuroprotective effects of Lavandula angustifolia can lead to improvement in a contusive SCI model in rats. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of L. angustifolia (Lav) on HUMSC transplantation after acute SCI. Materials and Methods. Sixty adult female rats were randomly divided into eight groups. Every week after SCI onset, all animals were evaluated for behavior outcomes. H&E staining was performed to examine the lesions after injury. GFAP expression was assessed for astrogliosis. Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) testing was performed to detect the recovery of neural conduction. Results. Behavioral tests showed that the HUMSC group improved in comparison with the SCI group, but HUMSC + Lav 400 was very effective, resulting in a significant increase in locomotion activity. Sensory tests and histomorphological and immunohistochemistry analyses verified the potentiation effects of Lav extract on HUMSC treatment. Conclusion. Transplantation of HUMSCs is beneficial for SCI in rats, and Lav extract can potentiate the functional and cellular recovery with HUMSC treatment in rats after SCI. PMID:27057171

  19. Lavandula angustifolia Extract Improves the Result of Human Umbilical Mesenchymal Wharton's Jelly Stem Cell Transplantation after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Yaghoobi, Kayvan; Kaka, Gholamreza; Mansouri, Korosh; Davoodi, Shaghayegh; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Hosseini, Seyed Ruhollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The primary trauma of spinal cord injury (SCI) results in severe damage to nervous functions. At the cellular level, SCI causes astrogliosis. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs), isolated from Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord, can be easily obtained. Previously, we showed that the neuroprotective effects of Lavandula angustifolia can lead to improvement in a contusive SCI model in rats. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of L. angustifolia (Lav) on HUMSC transplantation after acute SCI. Materials and Methods. Sixty adult female rats were randomly divided into eight groups. Every week after SCI onset, all animals were evaluated for behavior outcomes. H&E staining was performed to examine the lesions after injury. GFAP expression was assessed for astrogliosis. Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) testing was performed to detect the recovery of neural conduction. Results. Behavioral tests showed that the HUMSC group improved in comparison with the SCI group, but HUMSC + Lav 400 was very effective, resulting in a significant increase in locomotion activity. Sensory tests and histomorphological and immunohistochemistry analyses verified the potentiation effects of Lav extract on HUMSC treatment. Conclusion. Transplantation of HUMSCs is beneficial for SCI in rats, and Lav extract can potentiate the functional and cellular recovery with HUMSC treatment in rats after SCI. PMID:27057171

  20. Lavandula angustifolia Extract Improves the Result of Human Umbilical Mesenchymal Wharton's Jelly Stem Cell Transplantation after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Yaghoobi, Kayvan; Kaka, Gholamreza; Mansouri, Korosh; Davoodi, Shaghayegh; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Hosseini, Seyed Ruhollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The primary trauma of spinal cord injury (SCI) results in severe damage to nervous functions. At the cellular level, SCI causes astrogliosis. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs), isolated from Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord, can be easily obtained. Previously, we showed that the neuroprotective effects of Lavandula angustifolia can lead to improvement in a contusive SCI model in rats. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of L. angustifolia (Lav) on HUMSC transplantation after acute SCI. Materials and Methods. Sixty adult female rats were randomly divided into eight groups. Every week after SCI onset, all animals were evaluated for behavior outcomes. H&E staining was performed to examine the lesions after injury. GFAP expression was assessed for astrogliosis. Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) testing was performed to detect the recovery of neural conduction. Results. Behavioral tests showed that the HUMSC group improved in comparison with the SCI group, but HUMSC + Lav 400 was very effective, resulting in a significant increase in locomotion activity. Sensory tests and histomorphological and immunohistochemistry analyses verified the potentiation effects of Lav extract on HUMSC treatment. Conclusion. Transplantation of HUMSCs is beneficial for SCI in rats, and Lav extract can potentiate the functional and cellular recovery with HUMSC treatment in rats after SCI.

  1. Potential use of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize hypermetabolism associated with muscle pain in patients with adult spinal deformity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yuki; Takahashi, Miwako; Matsudaira, Ko; Oka, Hiroyuki; Momose, Toshimitsu

    2016-11-01

    Patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) are surgically treated for pain relief; however, visualization of the exact origin of the pain with imaging modalities is still challenging. We report the first case of a 60-year-old female patient who presented with painful degenerative kyphoscoliosis and was evaluated with flourine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) preoperatively. Because her low back pain was resistant to conservative treatment, she was treated with posterior spinal correction and fusion surgery from Th2 to the ilium. One year after the surgery, her low back pain had disappeared completely. In accordance with her clinical course, (18)F-FDG-PET imaging revealed the uptake of (18)F-FDG in the paravertebral muscles preoperatively and showed the complete absence of uptake at 1 year after surgery. The uptake site coincided with the convex part of each curve of the lumbar spine and was thought to be the result of the increased activity of paravertebral muscles due to their chronic stretched state in the kyphotic posture. This case report suggests the possibility of using (18)F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize increased activity in paravertebral muscles and the ensuing pain in ASD patients. PMID:27562570

  2. Topographic maps of human motor cortex in normal and pathological conditions: mirror movements, amputations and spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Cohen, L G; Bandinelli, S; Topka, H R; Fuhr, P; Roth, B J; Hallett, M

    1991-01-01

    We studied motor evoked potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with unilateral upper limb amputations, complete T10-T12 spinal cord transection, and congenital mirror movements and in controls. Different muscles in the trunk and upper and lower extremities were evaluated at rest. In controls, muscles could be activated with stimulation of regions several centimeters wide. These areas overlapped extensively when muscles studied were from the same limb and shifted positions abruptly when muscles were from different limbs. Distal muscles were easier to activate than proximal muscles and normally evidenced exclusively a contralateral representation. Congenital defects in motor control in patients with mirror movements resulted in marked derangement of the map of outputs of distal hand muscles with enlarged and ipsilateral representations. Peripheral lesions, either acquired (amputations) or congenital (congenital absence of a limb), resulted in plastic reorganization of motor outputs targeting muscles immediately proximal to the stump. Central nervous system lesions (i.e., spinal cord injury producing paraplegia) also resulted in enlargement of the map of outputs targeting muscles proximal to the lesion. These results indicate that magnetic stimulation is a useful non-invasive tool for exploring plastic changes in human motor pathways following different types of injury.

  3. Divergent Modulation of Clinical Measures of Volitional and Reflexive Motor Behaviors following Serotonergic Medications in Human Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) can result in profound impairments in volitional strength and reflex excitability, which contribute to loss of function. Human and animal models suggest that disruption of endogenous monoaminergic input, particularly serotonin (5-HT), from supraspinal centers contributes to this impaired motor function following SCI. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 5-HT medications on motor function in individuals with chronic (>1 year) SCI. Clinical measures of strength, spasticity/spasms, and walking ability were assessed in 12 individuals with chronic incomplete SCI following acute administration of either 8 mg cyproheptadine, a 5-HT antagonist, or 10 mg escitalopram, a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), in a double-blinded, randomized, crossover fashion. Results indicated that 5-HT medications modulated both volitional and reflexive behaviors with little change in walking performance; 5-HT antagonist medications depressed clinical measures of strength and spasticity/spasms, whereas SSRIs augmented both strength and spasticity/spasms. These changes are consistent with the dysregulation of 5-HT sensitive spinal neurons following SCI. This understanding may augment clinicians' awareness of the motor consequences of 5-HT medications. PMID:22994901

  4. Muscle biopsies show that FES of denervated muscles reverses human muscle degeneration from permanent spinal motoneuron lesion.

    PubMed

    Kern, Helmut; Rossini, Katia; Carraro, Ugo; Mayr, Winfried; Vogelauer, Michael; Hoellwarth, Ursula; Hofer, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents biopsy analyses in support of the clinical evidence of muscle recovery induced by a new system of life-long functional-electrical-stimulation (FES) training in permanent spinal-motoneuron-denervated human muscle. Not earlier than 1 year after subjects experienced complete conus cauda lesion, their thigh muscles were electrically stimulated at home for several years with large skin surface electrodes and an expressly designed stimulator that delivered much longer impulses than those presently available for clinical use. The poor excitability of long-term denervated muscles was first improved by several months of twitch-contraction training. Then, the muscles were tetanically stimulated against progressively increased loads. Needle biopsies of vastus lateralis from long-term denervated subjects showed severe myofiber atrophy or lipodystrophy beginning 2 years after spinal cord injury (SCI). Muscle biopsies from a group of 3.6- to 13.5-year denervated subjects, who underwent 2.4 to 9.3 years of FES, show that this progressive training almost reverted long-term muscle atrophy/degeneration.

  5. Ultrastructural characteristics of human adult and infant cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, W Y; Garey, L J

    1991-01-01

    Biopsy specimens of human cerebral cortex from three adults and two infants were studied by correlating their light microscopic features in semithin sections with their ultrastructural characteristics. There was good tissue preservation, due to a minimum delay between obtaining the specimens and fixation. Pyramidal cells had a prominent apical dendrite, fine heterochromatin clumps in the nucleus and generally small numbers of cytoplasmic organelles, except for numerous free ribosomes in some of the large pyramids of Layers III to VI. Non-pyramidal cells lacked an apical dendrite and were further classified, on size and ultrastructure, into small, medium and large types. Large numbers of asymmetrical and symmetrical synapses were present in the neuropil but very few axosomatic synapses were found in the human cerebral cortex compared with subhuman primates and other mammals. Some symmetrical synapses were characterised by the presence of wide pre- and postsynaptic densities. The same general features of the adult cortex were also encountered in the infant, with certain exceptions. Many of the infant neurons had less densely packed heterochromatin, but greater numbers of free ribosomes, compared with the adult, and lipofuscin was absent. There was a total absence of myelinated fibres from the infant cortex; more large diameter dendrites were present than in the adult and axosomatic synapses were commoner. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:2050578

  6. Outcomes of a skiing program on level and stability of self-esteem and physical self in adults with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Barbin, Jean-Marc; Ninot, Grégory

    2008-03-01

    This study explored the intraindividual level and variability of global self-esteem and physical self-worth in adults with spinal cord injury over three consecutive periods, 4 weeks at home, 1 week in an adapted skiing program, and 4 weeks at home. Ten participants responded twice a day over a period of 9 weeks with the Physical Self Inventory, a six-item questionnaire with a visual analogue scale. The results showed that the program significantly increased the level of global self-esteem, physical self-worth, and three subdomains. The variability of the physical condition, sport competence, and physical strength subdomains was diminished after the program. The changes are discussed in terms of impact of a specific adapted physical activities program on physical self conceived as a complex system.

  7. [Generation of new nerve cells in the adult human brain].

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Meyer, Morten; Rasmussen, Jens Zimmer

    2003-03-31

    Generation of new nerve cells (neurogenesis) is normally considered to be limited to the fetal and early postnatal period. Thus, damaged nerve cells are not expected to be replaced by generation of new cells. The brain is, however, more plastic than previously assumed. This also includes neurogenesis in the adult human brain. In particular two brain regions show continuous division of neural stem and progenitor cells generating neurons and glial cells, namely the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zones of the lateral ventricles. From the latter region newly generated neuroblasts (immature nerve cells) migrate toward the olfactory bulb where they differentiate into neurons. In the dentate gyrus the newly generated neurons become functionally integrated in the granule cell layer, where they are believed to be of importance to learning and memory. It is at present not known whether neurogenesis in the adult human brain can be manipulated for specific repair after brain damage.

  8. Regulation of DM-20 mRNA expression and intracellular translocation of glutathione-S-transferase pi isoform during oligodendrocyte differentiation in the adult rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Kitada, Masaaki; Takeda, Kazuya; Dezawa, Mari

    2016-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that NG2-positive oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) do not express DM-20 mRNA and identified a distinct DM-20 mRNA-positive cell population expressing glutathione-S-transferase pi isoform (GST-pi) in the nucleus (GST-pi(Nuc)) of the adult rat spinal cord. As GST-pi intranuclear localization correlates with progenitor cell properties, we examined the differentiation status of this cell population under the intensive 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) administration method, consisting of intraperitoneal BrdU injections every 2 h for 48 h. We observed that a certain population of proliferating/proliferated cells expressed DM-20 mRNA, and sometimes two proliferating/proliferated cells were observed still attached to each other. We performed triple staining for BrdU, DM-20 mRNA, and NG2 and found pairs of neighboring BrdU-positive cells, which were considered to originate from the same progenitor cells and where both cells expressed DM-20 mRNA. Triple staining for BrdU, DM-20 mRNA, and GST-pi detected proliferating/proliferated cells exhibiting the GST-pi(Nuc)/DM-20 mRNA-positive expression pattern. These findings suggested the presence of a GST-pi(Nuc)/DM-20 mRNA-positive oligodendrocyte-lineage progenitor cell population in the adult rat spinal cord. However, we did not find any pair of neighboring BrdU-positive cells with this expression pattern. These observations collectively support the idea that GST-pi(Nuc)/DM-20 mRNA-expressing cells are the progeny of NG2-positive OPCs rather than a novel type of oligodendrocyte-lineage progenitor cells and that DM-20 mRNA expression is dynamically regulated during differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes.

  9. Alterations of action potentials and the localization of Nav1.6 sodium channels in spared axons after hemisection injury of the spinal cord in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Hunanyan, Arsen S.; Alessi, Valentina; Patel, Samik; Pearse, Damien D.; Matthews, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported a pronounced reduction in transmission through surviving axons contralateral to chronic hemisection (HX) of adult rat spinal cord. To examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for this diminished transmission, we recorded intracellularly from lumbar lateral white matter axons in deeply anesthetized adult rats in vivo and measured the propagation of action potentials (APs) through rubrospinal/reticulospinal tract (RST/RtST) axons contralateral to chronic HX at T10. We found decreased excitability in these axons, manifested by an increased rheobase to trigger APs and longer latency for AP propagation passing the injury level, without significant differences in axonal resting membrane potential and input resistance. These electrophysiological changes were associated with altered spatial localization of Nav1.6 sodium channels along axons: a subset of axons contralateral to the injury exhibited a diffuse localization (>10 μm spread) of Nav1.6 channels, a pattern characteristic of demyelinated axons (Craner MJ, Newcombe J, Black JA, Hartle C, Cuzner ML, Waxman SG. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101: 8168–8173, 2004b). This result was substantiated by ultrastructural changes seen with electron microscopy, in which an increased number of large-caliber, demyelinated RST axons were found contralateral to the chronic HX. Therefore, an increased rheobase, pathological changes in the distribution of Nav1.6 sodium channels, and the demyelination of contralateral RST axons are likely responsible for their decreased conduction chronically after HX and thus may provide novel targets for strategies to improve function following incomplete spinal cord injury. PMID:21177993

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor in adult human dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Huerta, J J; Diaz-Trelles, R; Naves, F J; Llamosas, M M; Del Valle, M E; Vega, J A

    1996-09-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha) enhances neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. It binds a membrane protein, denominated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr). EGFr has been localized in developing and adult human DRG. However, it remains to be elucidated whether all DRG neurons express EGFr or whether differences exist among neuronal subtypes. This study was undertaken to investigate these topics in adult human DRG using immunoblotting, and combined immunohistochemistry and image analysis techniques. A mouse monoclonal antibody (clone F4) mapping within the intracytoplasmic domain of EGFr was used. Immunoblotting revealed two main proteins with estimated molecular masses of approximately/equal to 65 kDa and 170 kDa, and thus consistent with the full-length EGFr. Additional protein bands were also encountered. Light immunohistochemistry revealed specific immunoreactivity (IR) for EGFr-like proteins in most (86%) primary sensory neurons, the intensity of immunostaining being stronger in the small- and intermediate-sized ones. Furthermore, EGFr-like IR was also observed in the satellite glial cells of the ganglia as well as in the intraganglionic and dorsal root Schwann cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that EGFr, and other related proteins containing the epitope labeled with the antibody F4, are responsible for the EGFr IR reported in DRG. Furthermore, we demonstrated heterogeneity in the expression of EGFr-like IR in adult human primary sensory neurons, which suggests different responsiveness to their ligands.

  11. Recurrent autonomic dysreflexia due to chronic aortic dissection in an adult male with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Hughes, Peter L; Oo, Tun; Soni, Bakul M

    2008-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a hypertensive clinical emergency for persons with spinal cord injury at T-6 level or above. Recurrent autonomic dysreflexia is uncommon in spinal cord injury patients and is usually caused by noxious stimuli that cannot be removed promptly, e.g., somatic pain, abdominal distension. A 61-year-old man, who sustained tetraplegia at C-5 (ASIA-A) 38 years ago, was admitted with chest infection. Computerised tomography (CT) of the chest showed the ascending aorta to measure 4 cm in anteroposterior diameter; descending thoracic aorta measured 3.5 cm. No dissection was seen. Normal appearances of abdominal aorta were seen. He was treated with noninvasive ventilation, antibiotics, and diuretics. Nineteen days later, when there was sudden deterioration in his clinical condition, CT of the pulmonary angiogram was performed to rule out pulmonary embolism. This showed no pulmonary embolus, but the upper abdominal aorta showed some dissection with thrombosis of the false lumen. Blood pressure was controlled with perindopril 2 mg, once a day, doxazosin 4 mg, twice a day, and furosemide 20 mg, twice a day. Since this patient did not show clinical features of mesenteric or lower limb ischaemia, the vascular surgeon did not recommend subdiaphragmatic aortic replacement. This patient subsequently developed recurrent episodes of autonomic dysreflexia. Each acute episode of dysreflexia was controlled by nifedipine given sublingually in doses varying from 5 to 20 mg. No inciting cause for autonomic dysreflexia could be found other than chronic aortic dissection. This patient's medication was then changed to doxazosin 8 mg, twice a day, and sustained-release nifedipine 10 mg, twice a day, which helped to prevent recurrent autonomic dysreflexia. Chronic aortic dissection is a very rare cause for recurrent autonomic dysreflexia in ageing spinal cord injury patients. When the inciting cause for dysreflexia is not amenable for treatment, recurrent dysreflexic

  12. Human adult bone marrow-derived somatic cell therapy results in functional recovery and axonal plasticity following stroke in the rat.

    PubMed

    Andrews, E M; Tsai, S-Y; Johnson, S C; Farrer, J R; Wagner, J P; Kopen, G C; Kartje, G L

    2008-06-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability in the United States. To date there is no satisfactory treatment for stroke once neuronal damage has occurred. Human adult bone marrow-derived somatic cells (hABM-SC) represent a homogenous population of CD49c/CD90 co-positive, non-hematopoietic cells that have been shown to secrete therapeutically relevant trophic factors and to support axonal growth in a rodent model of spinal cord injury. Here we demonstrate that treatment with hABM-SC after ischemic stroke in adult rats results in recovery of forelimb function on a skilled motor test, and that this recovery is positively correlated with increased axonal outgrowth of the intact, uninjured corticorubral tract. While the complete mechanism of repair is still unclear, we conclude that enhancement of structural neuroplasticity from uninjured brain areas is one mechanism by which hABM-SC treatment after stroke leads to functional recovery. PMID:18440506

  13. M.I.T./Canadian vestibular experiments on the Spacelab-1 mission. III - Effects of prolonged weightlessness on a human otolith-spinal reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watt, D. G. D.; Money, K. E.; Tomi, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Reflex responses that depend on human otolith organ sensitivity were measured before, during and after a 10 day space flight. Otolith-spinal reflexes were elicited by means of sudden, unexpected falls. In weightlessness, 'falls' were achieved using elastic cords running from a torso harness to the floor. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from gastrocnemius-soleus. The EMG response occurring in the first 100-120 ms of a fall, considered to be predominantly otolith-spinal in origin, decreased in amplitude immediately upon entering weightlessness, and continued to decline throughout the flight, especially during the first two mission days. The response returned to normal before the first post-flight testing session. The results suggest that information coming from the otolith organs is gradually ignored by the nervous system during prolonged space flight, although the possibility that otolith-spinal reflexes are decreased independent of other otolith output pathways cannot by ruled out.

  14. M.I.T./Canadian vestibular experiments on the Spacelab-1 mission: 3. Effects of prolonged weightlessness on a human otolith-spinal reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watt, D. G.; Money, K. E.; Tomi, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Reflex responses that depend on human otolith organ sensitivity were measured before, during and after a 10 day space flight. Otolith-spinal reflexes were elicited by means of sudden, unexpected falls. In weightlessness, "falls" were achieved using elastic cords running from a torso harness to the floor. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from gastrocnemius-soleus. The EMG response occurring in the first 100-120 ms of a fall, considered to be predominantly otolith-spinal in origin, decreased in amplitude immediately upon entering weightlessness, and continued to decline throughout the flight, especially during the first two mission days. The response returned to normal before the first post-flight testing session. The results suggest that information coming from the otolith organs is gradually ignored by the nervous system during prolonged space flight, although the possibility that otolith-spinal reflexes are decreased independent of other otolith output pathways cannot be ruled out.

  15. Diffusion restriction in the human spinal cord characterized in vivo with high b-value STEAM diffusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Rangwala, Novena A; Hackney, David B; Dai, Weiying; Alsop, David C

    2013-11-15

    Restricted or hindered motion of water across axonal membranes as characterized with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging may be a potential marker of axonal damage in white matter (WM) injury due to trauma, neurodegeneration, or other causes. This study sought to determine whether high b-value DW imaging with a stimulated echo (STEAM) sequence could improve the spatially resolved assessment of tissue architecture in the human spinal cord in vivo. Diffusion times from 76 ms to 1000 ms and b-values of up to 14,750 s/mm(2) were used to acquire axial DW images in six healthy volunteers, and four additional healthy volunteers were studied with a protocol focused on high b-value, higher-resolution imaging. Mono-exponential, diffusional kurtosis, and mono-exponential with an additive constant (MEC) models were fit individually to diffusion decay curves obtained at different diffusion times. Diffusion restriction, characterized with the diffusional kurtosis and MEC models, was measured more precisely using higher b-value ranges. DW images at high b-value and fitting parameters using the large range of b-values available at the diffusion time of 1000 ms demonstrated signal and restriction differences between gray and white matter and even across white matter regions. These white matter differences may reflect variations in axonal density, diameter, or alignment. We conclude that high b-value DW imaging with a STEAM sequence on a conventional clinical scanner can provide accurate measures of diffusion hindrance and restriction in human spinal cord in vivo.

  16. Distinct changes in cortical and spinal excitability following high-frequency repetitive TMS to the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Quartarone, Angelo; Bagnato, Sergio; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Morgante, Francesca; Sant'angelo, Antonio; Battaglia, Fortunato; Messina, Corrado; Siebner, Hartwig Roman; Girlanda, Paolo

    2005-02-01

    It has been shown that high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the human primary motor hand area (M1-HAND) can induce a lasting increase in corticospinal excitability. Here we recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the right first dorsal interosseus muscle to investigate how sub-threshold high-frequency rTMS to the M1-HAND modulates cortical and spinal excitability. In a first experiment, we gave 1500 stimuli of 5 Hz rTMS. At an intensity of 90% of active motor threshold, rTMS produced no effect on MEP amplitude at rest. Increasing the intensity to 90% of resting motor threshold (RMT), rTMS produced an increase in MEP amplitude. This facilitatory effect gradually built up during the course of rTMS, reaching significance after the administration of 900 stimuli. In a second experiment, MEPs were elicited during tonic contraction using weak anodal electrical or magnetic test stimuli. 1500 (but not 600) conditioning stimuli at 90% of RMT induced a facilitation of MEPs in the contracting FDI muscle. In a third experiment, 600 conditioning stimuli were given at 90% of RMT to the M1-HAND. Using two well-established conditioning-test paradigms, we found a decrease in short-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI), and a facilitation of the first peak of facilitatory I-waves interaction (SICF). There was no correlation between the relative changes in SICI and SICF. These results demonstrate that subthreshold 5 Hz rTMS can induce lasting changes in specific neuronal subpopulations in the human corticospinal motor system, depending on the intensity and duration of rTMS. Short 5 Hz rTMS (600 stimuli) at 90% of RMT can selectively shape the excitability of distinct intracortical circuits, whereas prolonged 5 Hz rTMS (> or =900 stimuli) provokes an overall increase in excitability of the corticospinal output system, including spinal motoneurones.

  17. A Minimal Dose of Electrically Induced Muscle Activity Regulates Distinct Gene Signaling Pathways in Humans with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Michael A.; Suneja, Manish; Faidley, Elizabeth; Shields, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Paralysis after a spinal cord injury (SCI) induces physiological adaptations that compromise the musculoskeletal and metabolic systems. Unlike non-SCI individuals, people with spinal cord injury experience minimal muscle activity which compromises optimal glucose utilization and metabolic control. Acute or chronic muscle activity, induced through electrical stimulation, may regulate key genes that enhance oxidative metabolism in paralyzed muscle. We investigated the short and long term effects of electrically induced exercise on mRNA expression of human paralyzed muscle. We developed an exercise dose that activated the muscle for only 0.6% of the day. The short term effects were assessed 3 hours after a single dose of exercise, while the long term effects were assessed after training 5 days per week for at least one year (adherence 81%). We found a single dose of exercise regulated 117 biological pathways as compared to 35 pathways after one year of training. A single dose of electrical stimulation increased the mRNA expression of transcriptional, translational, and enzyme regulators of metabolism important to shift muscle toward an oxidative phenotype (PGC-1α, NR4A3, IFRD1, ABRA, PDK4). However, chronic training increased the mRNA expression of specific metabolic pathway genes (BRP44, BRP44L, SDHB, ACADVL), mitochondrial fission and fusion genes (MFF, MFN1, MFN2), and slow muscle fiber genes (MYH6, MYH7, MYL3, MYL2). These findings support that a dose of electrical stimulation (∼10 minutes/day) regulates metabolic gene signaling pathways in human paralyzed muscle. Regulating these pathways early after SCI may contribute to reducing diabetes in people with longstanding paralysis from SCI. PMID:25531450

  18. Changes in spinal alignment.

    PubMed

    Veintemillas Aráiz, M T; Beltrán Salazar, V P; Rivera Valladares, L; Marín Aznar, A; Melloni Ribas, P; Valls Pascual, R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal misalignments are a common reason for consultation at primary care centers and specialized departments. Misalignment has diverse causes and is influenced by multiple factors: in adolescence, the most frequent misalignment is scoliosis, which is idiopathic in 80% of cases and normally asymptomatic. In adults, the most common cause is degenerative. It is important to know the natural history and to detect factors that might predict progression. The correct diagnosis of spinal deformities requires specific imaging studies. The degree of deformity determines the type of treatment. The aim is to prevent progression of the deformity and to recover the flexibility and balance of the body.

  19. [Multipotency of adult stem cells derived from human amnion].

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingxia; Li, Weijia; Li, Bingzong; Li, Jing; Zhao, Chunhua

    2009-05-01

    Adult stem cells are drawing more and more attention due to the potential application in degenerative medicine without posing any moral problem. There is growing evidence showing that the human amnion contains various types of adult stem cell. Since amniotic tissue is readily available, it has the potential to be an important source of regenerative medicine material. In this study we tried to find multipotent adult stem cells in human amnion. We isolated stem cells from amniotic mesenchymal cells by limiting dilution assay. Similar to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, these cells displayed a fibroblast like appearance. They were positive for CD105, CD29, CD44, negative for haematopoietic (GlyA, CD31, CD34, CD45) and epithelial cell (pan-CK) markers. These stem cells had the potential to differentiate not only into osteogenic, adipogenic and endothelial lineages, but also hepatocyte-like cells and neural cells at the single-cell level depending on the culture conditions. They had the capacity for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation even after being expanded for more than 30 population doublings in vitro. So they may be an ideal stem cell source for inherited or degenerative diseases treatment.

  20. How long have adult humans been consuming milk?

    PubMed

    Gerbault, Pascale; Roffet-Salque, Mélanie; Evershed, Richard P; Thomas, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down the milk sugar lactose, and in most mammals, including most humans, lactase activity is down-regulated after the weaning period is completed. However, in about 35% of adults worldwide, lactase continues to be expressed throughout adulthood, a feature termed lactase persistence (LP). Genetic evidence indicates that LP is a recent human adaptation, and its current geographic distribution correlates with the relative historical importance of dairying in different human populations. Investigating archaeological evidence for fresh milk consumption has proved crucial in building an account of the joint evolution of LP and dairying. A powerful technique for investigating food processing, including milk processing, in ancient populations is lipid residue analysis on archaeological pottery. We review here the archaeological and genetic evidence available that have contributed to a better understanding of the gene-culture co-evolution of LP and dairying. PMID:24339181

  1. How long have adult humans been consuming milk?

    PubMed

    Gerbault, Pascale; Roffet-Salque, Mélanie; Evershed, Richard P; Thomas, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Lactase is the enzyme that breaks down the milk sugar lactose, and in most mammals, including most humans, lactase activity is down-regulated after the weaning period is completed. However, in about 35% of adults worldwide, lactase continues to be expressed throughout adulthood, a feature termed lactase persistence (LP). Genetic evidence indicates that LP is a recent human adaptation, and its current geographic distribution correlates with the relative historical importance of dairying in different human populations. Investigating archaeological evidence for fresh milk consumption has proved crucial in building an account of the joint evolution of LP and dairying. A powerful technique for investigating food processing, including milk processing, in ancient populations is lipid residue analysis on archaeological pottery. We review here the archaeological and genetic evidence available that have contributed to a better understanding of the gene-culture co-evolution of LP and dairying.

  2. High dose compressive loads attenuate bone mineral loss in humans with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dudley-Javoroski, S.; Saha, P. K.; Liang, G.; Li, C.; Gao, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Summary People with spinal cord injury (SCI) lose bone and muscle integrity after their injury. Early doses of stress, applied through electrically induced muscle contractions, preserved bone density at high-risk sites. Appropriately prescribed stress early after the injury may be an important consideration to prevent bone loss after SCI. Introduction Skeletal muscle force can deliver high compressive loads to bones of people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The effective osteogenic dose of load for the distal femur, a chief site of fracture, is unknown. The purpose of this study is to compare three doses of bone compressive loads at the distal femur in individuals with complete SCI who receive a novel stand training intervention. Methods Seven participants performed unilateral quadriceps stimulation in supported stance [150% body weight (BW) compressive load—“High Dose” while opposite leg received 40% BW—“Low Dose”]. Five participants stood passively without applying quadriceps electrical stimulation to either leg (40% BW load—“Low Dose”). Fifteen participants performed no standing (0% BW load—“Untrained”) and 14 individuals without SCI provided normative data. Participants underwent bone mineral density (BMD) assessment between one and six times over a 3-year training protocol. Results BMD for the High Dose group significantly exceeded BMD for both the Low Dose and the Untrained groups (p<0.05). No significant difference existed between the Low Dose and Untrained groups (p>0.05), indicating that BMD for participants performing passive stance did not differ from individuals who performed no standing. High-resolution CT imaging of one High Dose participant revealed 86% higher BMD and 67% higher trabecular width in the High Dose limb. Conclusion Over 3 years of training, 150% BW compressive load in upright stance significantly attenuated BMD decline when compared to passive standing or to no standing. High-resolution CT indicated that

  3. Anatomical study of blood supply to the cervical spinal cord in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Mazensky, David; Danko, Jan; Petrovova, Eva; Flesarova, Slavka; Supuka, Peter; Supukova, Anna; Luptakova, Lenka; Purzyc, Halina

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the arterial arrangement of the cervical spinal cord in the guinea pig. The study was carried out on 20 adult English self guinea pigs using corrosion and dissection technique. Batson's corrosion casting kit no. 17(©) was used as a casting medium. The origin of the ventral spinal artery from the left vertebral artery was found on average in 35% of the cases and from the right vertebral artery on average in 40% of the cases. The ventral spinal artery with origin from the anastomosis of two medial branches was found on average in 25% of the cases. The presence of ventral radicular branches of rami spinales entering the ventral spinal artery in the cervical region was observed in 42% of the cases on the right side and in 58% of the cases on the left side. The presence of dorsal radicular branches of rami spinales that reached the spinal cord was observed in 63% of the cases on the left side and in 37% of the cases on the right side. The number of radicular branches supplying the spinal cord is greater in guinea pig than in humans.

  4. L-Dopa effect on frequency-dependent depression of the H-reflex in adult rats with complete spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Skinner, Robert D; Arfaj, Ahmad; Yates, Charlotte; Reese, Nancy B; Williams, Keith; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2010-10-30

    This study investigated whether l-dopa (DOPA), locomotor-like passive exercise (Ex) using a motorized bicycle exercise trainer (MBET), or their combination in adult rats with complete spinal cord transection (Tx) preserves and restores low frequency-dependent depression (FDD) of the H-reflex. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n=56) transected at T8-9 had one of five treatments beginning 7 days after transection: Tx (transection only), Tx+Ex, Tx+DOPA, Tx+Ex+DOPA, and control (Ctl, no treatment) groups. After 30 days of treatment, FDD of the H-reflex was tested. Stimulation of the tibial nerve at 0.2, 1, 5, and 10Hz evoked an H-reflex that was recorded from plantar muscles of the hind paw. No significant differences were found at the stimulation rate of 1Hz. However, at 5Hz, FDD of the H-reflex in the Tx+Ex, Tx+DOPA and Ctl groups was significantly different from the Tx group (p<0.01). At 10Hz, all of the treatment groups were significantly different from the Tx group (p<0.01). No significant difference was identified between the Ctl and any of the treatment groups. These results suggest that DOPA significantly preserved and restored FDD after transection as effectively as exercise alone or exercise in combination with DOPA. Thus, there was no additive benefit when DOPA was combined with exercise.

  5. Neurons in the White Matter of the Adult Human Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Solá, M. Luisa; González-Delgado, Francisco J.; Pueyo-Morlans, Mercedes; Medina-Bolívar, O. Carolina; Hernández-Acosta, N. Carolina; González-Gómez, Miriam; Meyer, Gundela

    2009-01-01

    The white matter (WM) of the adult human neocortex contains the so-called “interstitial neurons”. They are most numerous in the superficial WM underlying the cortical gyri, and decrease in density toward the deep WM. They are morphologically heterogeneous. A subgroup of interstitial neurons display pyramidal-cell like morphologies, characterized by a polarized dendritic tree with a dominant apical dendrite, and covered with a variable number of dendritic spines. In addition, a large contingent of interstitial neurons can be classified as interneurons based on their neurochemical profile as well as on morphological criteria. WM- interneurons have multipolar or bipolar shapes and express GABA and a variety of other neuronal markers, such as calbindin and calretinin, the extracellular matrix protein reelin, or neuropeptide Y, somatostatin, and nitric oxide synthase. The heterogeneity of interstitial neurons may be relevant for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and schizophrenia. Interstitial neurons are most prominent in human brain, and only rudimentary in the brain of non-primate mammals. These evolutionary differences have precluded adequate experimental work on this cell population, which is usually considered as a relict of the subplate, a transient compartment proper of development and without a known function in the adult brain. The primate-specific prominence of the subplate in late fetal stages points to an important role in the establishment of interstitial neurons. Neurons in the adult WM may be actively involved in coordinating inter-areal connectivity and regulation of blood flow. Further studies in primates will be needed to elucidate the developmental history, adult components and activities of this large neuronal system. PMID:19543540

  6. TRP Channels Involved in Spontaneous l-Glutamate Release Enhancement in the Adult Rat Spinal Substantia Gelatinosa

    PubMed Central

    Kumamoto, Eiichi; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, Chang-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) plays a pivotal role in modulating nociceptive transmission through dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from the periphery. TRP channels such as TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels expressed in the SG are involved in the regulation of the nociceptive transmission. On the other hand, the TRP channels located in the peripheral terminals of the DRG neurons are activated by nociceptive stimuli given to the periphery and also by plant-derived chemicals, which generates a membrane depolarization. The chemicals also activate the TRP channels in the SG. In this review, we introduce how synaptic transmissions in the SG neurons are affected by various plant-derived chemicals and suggest that the peripheral and central TRP channels may differ in property from each other. PMID:24785347

  7. Enhancing physical activity guidelines: a needs survey of adults with spinal cord injury and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Foulon, Brianne L; Lemay, Valérie; Ainsworth, Victoria; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine preferences of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and health care professionals (HCP) regarding the content and format of a SCI physical activity guide to support recently released SCI physical activity guidelines. Seventy-eight people with SCI and 80 HCP completed a survey questionnaire. Participants with SCI identified desired content items and their preferences for format. HCP rated the helpfulness of content items to prescribe physical activity. All content items were rated favorably by participants with SCI and useful by HCP. The risks and benefits of activity and inactivity, and strategies for becoming more active, were rated high by both samples. Photographs and separate information for those with paraplegia versus tetraplegia were strongly endorsed. These data were used to guide the development of an SCI physical activity guide to enhance the uptake of physical activity guidelines for people with SCI. The guide was publically released November 11, 2011.

  8. Transplantation dose alters the dynamics of human neural stem cell engraftment, proliferation and migration after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Piltti, Katja M.; Avakian, Sabrina N.; Funes, Gabriella M.; Hu, Antoinette; Uchida, Nobuko; Anderson, Aileen J.; Cummings, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of transplantation dose on the spatiotemporal dynamics of human neural stem cell engraftment has not been quantitatively evaluated in the central nervous system. We investigated changes over time in engraftment/survival, proliferation, and migration of multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns) transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 to 500,000 cells in spinal cord injured immunodeficient mice. Transplant dose was inversely correlated with measures of donor cell proliferation at 2 weeks post-transplant (WPT) and dose-normalized engraftment at 16 WPT. Critically, mice receiving the highest cell dose exhibited an engraftment plateau, in which the total number of engrafted human cells never exceeded the initial dose. These data suggest that donor cell expansion was inversely regulated by target niche parameters and/or transplantation density. Investigation of the response of donor cells to the host microenvironment should be a key variable in defining target cell dose in pre-clinical models of CNS disease and injury. PMID:26298025

  9. Chitosan scaffolds induce human dental pulp stem cells to neural differentiation: potential roles for spinal cord injury therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinlong; Lu, Xiaohui; Feng, Guijuan; Gu, Zhifeng; Sun, Yuyu; Bao, Guofeng; Xu, Guanhua; Lu, Yuanzhou; Chen, Jiajia; Xu, Lingfeng; Feng, Xingmei; Cui, Zhiming

    2016-10-01

    Cell-based transplantation strategies hold great potential for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair. Chitosan scaffolds have therapeutic benefits for spinal cord regeneration. Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are abundant available stem cells with low immunological incompatibility and can be considered for cell replacement therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of chitosan scaffolds in the neural differentiation of DPSCs in vitro and to assess the supportive effects of chitosan scaffolds in an animal model of SCI. DPSCs were incubated with chitosan scaffolds. Cell viability and the secretion of neurotrophic factors were analyzed. DPSCs incubated with chitosan scaffolds were treated with neural differentiation medium for 14 days and then neural genes and protein markers were analyzed by Western blot and reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction. Our study revealed a higher cell viability and neural differentiation in the DPSC/chitosan-scaffold group. Compared with the control group, the levels of BDNF, GDNF, b-NGF, and NT-3 were significantly increased in the DPSC/chitosan-scaffold group. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway played a key role in the neural differentiation of DPSCs combined with chitosan scaffolds. Transplantation of DPSCs together with chitosan scaffolds into an SCI rat model resulted in the marked recovery of hind limb locomotor functions. Thus, chitosan scaffolds were non-cytotoxic and provided a conducive and favorable microenvironment for the survival and neural differentiation of DPSCs. Transplantation of DPSCs might therefore be a suitable candidate for treating SCI and other neuronal degenerative diseases. PMID:27147262

  10. Effects of human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with polymer on functional recovery following spinal cord hemisection in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Soo; Leem, Joong Woo; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Jung, Se Jung; Kim, Un Jeng; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2012-12-01

    The spontaneous axon regeneration of damaged neurons is limited after spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation was proposed as a potential approach for enhancing nerve regeneration that avoids the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cell transplantation. As SCI is a complex pathological entity, the treatment of SCI requires a multipronged approach. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the functional recovery and therapeutic potential of human MSCs (hMSCs) and polymer in a spinal cord hemisection injury model. Rats were subjected to hemisection injuries and then divided into three groups. Two groups of rats underwent partial thoracic hemisection injury followed by implantation of either polymer only or polymer with hMSCs. Another hemisection-only group was used as a control. Behavioral, electrophysiological and immunohistochemical studies were performed on all rats. The functional recovery was significantly improved in the polymer with hMSC-transplanted group as compared with control at five weeks after transplantation. The results of electrophysiologic study demonstrated that the latency of somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) in the polymer with hMSC-transplanted group was significantly shorter than in the hemisection-only control group. In the results of immunohistochemical study, β-gal-positive cells were observed in the injured and adjacent sites after hMSC transplantation. Surviving hMSCs differentiated into various cell types such as neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. These data suggest that hMSC transplantation with polymer may play an important role in functional recovery and axonal regeneration after SCI, and may be a potential therapeutic strategy for SCI. PMID:23269903

  11. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness ( r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores ( r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness.

  12. Pediatric spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Wagner, Matthias W; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Tekes, Aylin; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric spinal trauma is unique. The developing pediatric spinal column and spinal cord deal with direct impact and indirect acceleration/deceleration or shear forces very different compared to adult patients. In addition children are exposed to different kind of traumas. Moreover, each age group has its unique patterns of injury. Familiarity with the normal developing spinal anatomy and kind of traumas is essential to correctly diagnose injury. Various imaging modalities can be used. Ultrasound is limited to the neonatal time period; plain radiography and computer tomography are typically used in the acute work-up and give highly detailed information about the osseous lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for disco-ligamentous and spinal cord injuries. Depending on the clinical presentation and timing of trauma the various imaging modalities will be employed. In the current review article, a summary of the epidemiology and distribution of posttraumatic lesions is discussed in the context of the normal anatomical variations due to progressing development of the child. PMID:25512255

  13. Multipotent progenitor cells isolated from adult human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I; Nair, I; Ferreri, K; Rawson, J; Kuroda, A; Pascual, M; Omori, K; Valiente, L; Orr, C; Al-Abdullah, I; Riggs, A; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2005-10-01

    The supply of islet cells is a limiting factor for the widespread application of islet transplantation of type-1 diabetes. Islets constitute 1% to 2% of pancreatic tissue, leaving approximately 98% as discard after islet isolation and purification. In this report we present our data on the isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from discarded adult human pancreatic tissue. The collected cells from discarded nonislet fractions, after enzymatic digestion and gradient purification of islets, were dissociated for suspension culture in a serum-free medium. The cell clusters grown to a size of 100 to 150 mum contained cells staining for stage-specific embryonic antigens, but not insulin or C-peptide. To direct cell differentiation toward islets, clusters were recultured in a pancreatic differentiation medium. Insulin and C-peptide-positive cells by immunocytochemistry appeared within a week, reaching over 10% of the cell population. Glucagon and somatostatin-positive cells were also detected. The cell clusters were found to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Cells from the same clusters also had the capacity for differentiation into neural cells, as documented by staining for neural and glial cell markers when cultured as monolayers in media containing neurotrophic factors. These data suggest that multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells exist within the human pancreatic tissue that is typically discarded during islet isolation procedures. These adult progenitor cells can be successfully differentiated into insulin-producing cells, and thus they have the potential for treatment of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:16298614

  14. Single pellet grasping following cervical spinal cord injury in adult rat using an automated full-time training robot.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; May, Zacincte; Torres-Espín, Abel; Forero, Juan; Bennett, David J; Fouad, Karim

    2016-02-15

    Task specific motor training is a common form of rehabilitation therapy in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The single pellet grasping (SPG) task is a skilled forelimb motor task used to evaluate recovery of forelimb function in rodent models of SCI. The task requires animals to obtain food pellets located on a shelf beyond a slit at the front of an enclosure. Manually training and testing rats in the SPG task requires extensive time and often yields results with high outcome variability and small therapeutic windows (i.e., the difference between pre- and post-SCI success rates). Recent advances in automated SPG training using automated pellet presentation (APP) systems allow rats to train ad libitum 24h a day, 7 days a week. APP trained rats have improved success rates, require less researcher time, and have lower outcome variability compared to manually trained rats. However, it is unclear whether APP trained rats can perform the SPG task using the APP system after SCI. Here we show that rats with cervical SCI can successfully perform the SPG task using the APP system. We found that SCI rats with APP training performed significantly more attempts, had slightly lower and less variable final score success rates, and larger therapeutic windows than SCI rats with manual training. These results demonstrate that APP training has clear advantages over manual training for evaluating reaching performance of SCI rats and represents a new tool for investigating rehabilitative motor training following CNS injury.

  15. Single pellet grasping following cervical spinal cord injury in adult rat using an automated full-time training robot.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; May, Zacincte; Torres-Espín, Abel; Forero, Juan; Bennett, David J; Fouad, Karim

    2016-02-15

    Task specific motor training is a common form of rehabilitation therapy in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The single pellet grasping (SPG) task is a skilled forelimb motor task used to evaluate recovery of forelimb function in rodent models of SCI. The task requires animals to obtain food pellets located on a shelf beyond a slit at the front of an enclosure. Manually training and testing rats in the SPG task requires extensive time and often yields results with high outcome variability and small therapeutic windows (i.e., the difference between pre- and post-SCI success rates). Recent advances in automated SPG training using automated pellet presentation (APP) systems allow rats to train ad libitum 24h a day, 7 days a week. APP trained rats have improved success rates, require less researcher time, and have lower outcome variability compared to manually trained rats. However, it is unclear whether APP trained rats can perform the SPG task using the APP system after SCI. Here we show that rats with cervical SCI can successfully perform the SPG task using the APP system. We found that SCI rats with APP training performed significantly more attempts, had slightly lower and less variable final score success rates, and larger therapeutic windows than SCI rats with manual training. These results demonstrate that APP training has clear advantages over manual training for evaluating reaching performance of SCI rats and represents a new tool for investigating rehabilitative motor training following CNS injury. PMID:26611563

  16. Chronic ibuprofen administration reduces neuropathic pain but does not exert neuroprotection after spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Castro, Elena; Navarro, Xavier

    2014-02-01

    Ibuprofen is commonly used as an anti-inflammatory analgesic drug, although it is not amongst the first-line treatments for neuropathic pain. Its main effects are mediated by non-specific inhibition of COX enzymes, but it also exerts some COX-independent effects, such as the inhibition of RhoA signaling and the modulation of glial activity. These effects have boosted the use of ibuprofen as a tool to promote axonal regeneration and to increase functional recovery after neural injuries, although with controversial results showing positive and negative outcomes of ibuprofen treatment in several experimental models. We have evaluated the effects of ibuprofen administered at 60 mg/kg twice a day to rats subjected to a mild spinal cord contusion. Our results indicate that ibuprofen ameliorates mechanical hyperalgesia in rats by reducing central hyperexcitability, but failed to produce improvements in the recovery of locomotion. Despite an early effect on reducing microglial reactivity, the ibuprofen treatment did not provide histological evidence of neuroprotection; indeed the volume of cord tissue spared rostral to the lesion was decreased in ibuprofen treated rats. In summary, the early modulation of neuroinflammation produced by the administration of ibuprofen seems to eventually lead to a worse resolution of detrimental events occurring in the secondary injury phase, but also to reduce the development of neuropathic pain.

  17. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a key factor in the homing of transplanted human MSCs to sites of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yang, Jinhua; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Tao; Xu, Jianwei; Fan, Zhihai; Shen, Yixin; Li, Wenjie; Zhang, Huanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used to treat many diseases, including spinal cord injury (SCI). Treatment relies mostly on the precise navigation of cells to the injury site for rebuilding the damaged spinal cord. However, the key factors guiding MSCs to the epicenter of SCI remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neural peptide synthesized in spinal cord, can dramatically aid the homing of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) in spinal cord-transected SCI rats. First, HUMSCs exhibited chemotactic responses in vitro to CGRP. By time-lapse video analysis, increased chemotactic index (CMI), forward migration index (FMI) and speed contributed to this observed migration. Then, through enzyme immunoassay, higher CGRP concentrations at the lesion site were observed after injury. The release of CGRP directed HUMSCs to the injury site, which was suppressed by CGRP 8-37, a CGRP antagonist. We also verified that the PI3K/Akt and p38MAPK signaling pathways played a critical role in the CGRP-induced chemotactic migration of HUMSCs. Collectively, our data reveal that CGRP is a key chemokine that helps HUMSCs migrate to the lesion site and thereby can be used as a model molecule to study MSCs homing after SCI. PMID:27296555

  18. Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a key factor in the homing of transplanted human MSCs to sites of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Yang, Jinhua; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Tao; Xu, Jianwei; Fan, Zhihai; Shen, Yixin; Li, Wenjie; Zhang, Huanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used to treat many diseases, including spinal cord injury (SCI). Treatment relies mostly on the precise navigation of cells to the injury site for rebuilding the damaged spinal cord. However, the key factors guiding MSCs to the epicenter of SCI remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neural peptide synthesized in spinal cord, can dramatically aid the homing of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) in spinal cord-transected SCI rats. First, HUMSCs exhibited chemotactic responses in vitro to CGRP. By time-lapse video analysis, increased chemotactic index (CMI), forward migration index (FMI) and speed contributed to this observed migration. Then, through enzyme immunoassay, higher CGRP concentrations at the lesion site were observed after injury. The release of CGRP directed HUMSCs to the injury site, which was suppressed by CGRP 8–37, a CGRP antagonist. We also verified that the PI3K/Akt and p38MAPK signaling pathways played a critical role in the CGRP-induced chemotactic migration of HUMSCs. Collectively, our data reveal that CGRP is a key chemokine that helps HUMSCs migrate to the lesion site and thereby can be used as a model molecule to study MSCs homing after SCI. PMID:27296555

  19. Ephrin-B3 decreases the survival of adult rat spinal cord-derived neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro and after transplantation into the injured rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xin Yan Susan; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2013-02-01

    Although transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPC) encourages regeneration and repair after spinal cord injury (SCI), the survival of transplanted NSPC is limited. Ephrin-B3 has been shown to reduce the death of endogenous NSPC in the subventricular zone of the mouse brain without inducing uncontrolled proliferation. Due to similarities in the environment of the brain and spinal cord, we hypothesized that ephrin-B3 might reduce the death of both transplanted and endogenous spinal cord-derived NSPC. Both normal and injured (26 g clip compression) spinal cords were examined. Ephrin-B3-Fc was tested, and Fc fragments and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were used as controls. We found that EphA4 receptors were expressed by spinal cord-derived NSPC and expressed in the normal and injured rat spinal cord (higher expression in the latter). In vitro, ephrin-B3-Fc did not significantly reduce the survival of NSPC except at 1 μg/mL (P<0.05), but Fc fragments alone reduced NSPC survival at all doses in a dose-dependent fashion. In vivo, intrathecal infusion of ephrin-B3-Fc increased the proliferation of endogenous ependymal cells and the proportion of proliferating cells that expressed the glial fibrillary acidic protein astrocytic marker in the injured spinal cord compared with the infusion of PBS (P<0.05). However, in the injured spinal cord, the infusion of either ephrin-B3-Fc or Fc fragments alone caused a 20-fold reduction in the survival of transplanted NSPC (P<0.001). Thus, after SCI, ephrin-B3-Fc and Fc fragments are toxic to transplanted NSPC.

  20. Treadmill training induced lumbar motoneuron dendritic plasticity and behavior recovery in adult rats after a thoracic contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxing; Liu, Nai-Kui; Zhang, Yi Ping; Deng, Lingxiao; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shields, Christopher B; Walker, Melissa J; Li, Jianan; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is devastating, causing sensorimotor impairments and paralysis. Persisting functional limitations on physical activity negatively affect overall health in individuals with SCI. Physical training may improve motor function by affecting cellular and molecular responses of motor pathways in the central nervous system (CNS) after SCI. Although motoneurons form the final common path for motor output from the CNS, little is known concerning the effect of exercise training on spared motoneurons below the level of injury. Here we examined the effect of treadmill training on morphological, trophic, and synaptic changes in the lumbar motoneuron pool and on behavior recovery after a moderate contusive SCI inflicted at the 9th thoracic vertebral level (T9) using an Infinite Horizon (IH, 200 kDyne) impactor. We found that treadmill training significantly improved locomotor function, assessed by Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, and reduced foot drops, assessed by grid walking performance, as compared with non-training. Additionally, treadmill training significantly increased the total neurite length per lumbar motoneuron innervating the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles of the hindlimbs as compared to non-training. Moreover, treadmill training significantly increased the expression of a neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the lumbar motoneurons as compared to non-training. Finally, treadmill training significantly increased synaptic density, identified by synaptophysin immunoreactivity, in the lumbar motoneuron pool as compared to non-training. However, the density of serotonergic terminals in the same regions did not show a significant difference between treadmill training and non-training. Thus, our study provides a biological basis for exercise training as an effective medical practice to improve recovery after SCI. Such an effect may be mediated by synaptic plasticity, and neurotrophic modification in the

  1. Physical activity benefits bone density and bone-related hormones in adult men with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Chain, Amina; Koury, Josely C; Bezerra, Flávia Fioruci

    2012-09-01

    Severe bone loss is a recognized complication of chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Physical exercise contributes to bone health; however, its influence on bone mass of cervical SCI individuals has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of physical activity on bone mass, bone metabolism, and vitamin D status in quadriplegics. Total, lumbar spine (L1-L4), femur and radius bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed in active (n = 15) and sedentary (n = 10) quadriplegic men by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], PTH, IGF1, osteocalcin and NTx were measured in serum. After adjustments for duration of injury, total body mass, and habitual calcium intake, bone indices were similar between groups, except for L1-L4 BMD Z score that was higher in the sedentary group (P < 0.05). Hours of physical exercise per week correlated positively with 25(OH)D (r = 0.59; P < 0.05) and negatively with PTH (r = -0.50; P < 0.05). Femur BMD was negatively associated with the number of months elapsed between the injury and the onset of physical activity (r = -0.60; P < 0.05). Moreover, in the active subjects, both L1-L4 BMD Z score (r = 0.72; P < 0.01) and radius BMD (r = 0.59; P < 0.05) were positively associated with calcium intake. In this cross-sectional study, both the onset of physical activity after injury and the number of hours dedicated to exercise were able to influence bone density and bone-related hormones in quadriplegic men. Our results also suggest a positive combined effect of exercise and calcium intake on bone health of quadriplegic individuals.

  2. Treadmill training induced lumbar motoneuron dendritic plasticity and behavior recovery in adult rats after a thoracic contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxing; Liu, Nai-Kui; Zhang, Yi Ping; Deng, Lingxiao; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shields, Christopher B; Walker, Melissa J; Li, Jianan; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is devastating, causing sensorimotor impairments and paralysis. Persisting functional limitations on physical activity negatively affect overall health in individuals with SCI. Physical training may improve motor function by affecting cellular and molecular responses of motor pathways in the central nervous system (CNS) after SCI. Although motoneurons form the final common path for motor output from the CNS, little is known concerning the effect of exercise training on spared motoneurons below the level of injury. Here we examined the effect of treadmill training on morphological, trophic, and synaptic changes in the lumbar motoneuron pool and on behavior recovery after a moderate contusive SCI inflicted at the 9th thoracic vertebral level (T9) using an Infinite Horizon (IH, 200 kDyne) impactor. We found that treadmill training significantly improved locomotor function, assessed by Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, and reduced foot drops, assessed by grid walking performance, as compared with non-training. Additionally, treadmill training significantly increased the total neurite length per lumbar motoneuron innervating the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles of the hindlimbs as compared to non-training. Moreover, treadmill training significantly increased the expression of a neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the lumbar motoneurons as compared to non-training. Finally, treadmill training significantly increased synaptic density, identified by synaptophysin immunoreactivity, in the lumbar motoneuron pool as compared to non-training. However, the density of serotonergic terminals in the same regions did not show a significant difference between treadmill training and non-training. Thus, our study provides a biological basis for exercise training as an effective medical practice to improve recovery after SCI. Such an effect may be mediated by synaptic plasticity, and neurotrophic modification in the

  3. PTEN inhibitor bisperoxovanadium protects oligodendrocytes and myelin and prevents neuronal atrophy in adult rats following cervical hemicontusive spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Chandler L.; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) damages axons and motor neurons responsible for ipsilateral forelimb function and causes demyelination and oligodendrocyte death. Inhibition of the phosphatase and tensin homologue, PTEN, promotes neural cell survival, neuroprotection and regeneration in vivo and in vitro. PTEN inhibition can also promote oligodendrocyte-mediated myelination of axons in vitro likely through Akt activation. We recently demonstrated that acute treatment with phosphatase PTEN inhibitor, bisperoxovanadium (bpV)-pic reduced tissue damage, neuron death, and promoted functional recovery after cervical hemi-contusion SCI. Evidence suggests bpV can promote myelin stability; however, bpV effects on myelination and oligodendrocytes in contusive SCI models are unclear. We hypothesized that bpV could increase myelin around the injury site through sparing or remyelination, and that bpV treatment may promote increased numbers of oligodendrocytes. Using histological and immunofluorescence labeling, we found that bpV treatment promoted significant spared white matter (30%; p < 0.01) and Luxol Fast Blue (LFB)+ myelin area rostral (Veh: 0.56 ± 0.01 vs. bpV: 0.64 ± 0.02; p < 0.05) and at the epicenter (Veh: 0.4175 ± 0.03 vs. bpV: 0.5400 ± 0.03; p < 0.05). VLF oligodendrocytes were also significantly greater with bpV therapy (109 ± 5.3 vs. Veh: 77 ± 2.7/mm2; p < 0.01). In addition, bpV increased mean motor neuron soma area versus vehicle-treatment (1.0 ± 0.02 vs. Veh: 0.77 ± 0.02) relative to Sham neuron size. This study provides key insight into additional cell and tissue effects that could contribute to bpV-mediated functional recovery observed after contusive cervical SCI. PMID:24582904

  4. Capillary electrophoresis combined with microdialysis in the human spinal cord: a new tool for monitoring rapid peroperative changes in amino acid neurotransmitters within the dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Xavier, Jean-Michel; Chavagnac, Delphine; Mouly-Badina, Laurence; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Mertens, Patrick; Renaud, Bernard

    2004-06-01

    A method originally developed for the separation of the three neurotransmitters gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu) and L-aspartate (L-Asp) in microdialysis samples from rat brain (Sauvinet et al., Electrophoresis 2003, 24, 3187-3196) was applied to human spinal dialysates obtained during peroperative microdialysis from patients undergoing surgery against chronic pain. Molecules were tagged on their primary amine function with the fluorogene agent, naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA), and, after separation by capillary electrophoresis (CE, 75 mmol/L borate buffer, pH 9.2, containing 70 mmol/L sodium dodecyl sulfate and 10 mmol/L hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin, + 25 kV voltage), were detected by laser-induced fluorescence detection (LIFD) using a 442 nm helium-cadmium laser. The complete method, including microdialysis sampling and analysis by CE-LIFD, has been validated for the analysis of human spinal microdialysates. The analytical detection limits were 1, 3.7 and 17 nmol/L for GABA, Glu and L-Asp respectively. This method allows an accurate measurement of the three amino acid neurotransmitters during an in vivo monitoring performed as rapidly as every minute in the human spinal dorsal horn. In addition, the effect of a brief peroperative electrical stimulation of the dorsal rootlets was investigated. The results obtained illustrate the advantages of combining microdialysis with CE-LIFD for studying neurotransmitters with such a high sampling rate.

  5. Neuropeptide Y in the adult and fetal human pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Badiu, Corin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y was isolated from the porcine brain in 1982 and shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals. The peptide has been demonstrated to be present in sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the pineal gland in many mammalian species. In this investigation, we show by use of immunohistochemistry that neuropeptide Y is present in nerve fibers of the adult human pineal gland. The fibers are classical neuropeptidergic fibers endowed with large boutons en passage and primarily located in a perifollicular position with some fibers entering the pineal parenchyma inside the follicle. The distance from the immunoreactive terminals to the pinealocytes indicates a modulatory function of neuropeptide Y for pineal physiology. Some of the immunoreactive fibers might originate from neurons located in the brain and be a part of the central innervation of the pineal gland. In a series of human fetuses, neuropeptide Y-containing nerve fibers was present and could be detected as early as in the pineal of four- to five-month-old fetuses. This early innervation of the human pineal is different from most rodents, where the innervation starts postnatally.

  6. A new three dimensional biomimetic hydrogel to deliver factors secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Caron, Ilaria; Rossi, Filippo; Papa, Simonetta; Aloe, Rossella; Sculco, Marika; Mauri, Emanuele; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Erba, Eugenio; Panini, Nicolò; Parazzi, Valentina; Barilani, Mario; Forloni, Gianluigi; Perale, Giuseppe; Lazzari, Lorenza; Veglianese, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) represents a promising strategy in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, both systemic and parenchymal hMSCs administrations show significant drawbacks as a limited number and viability of stem cells in situ. Biomaterials able to encapsulate and sustain hMSCs represent a viable approach to overcome these limitations potentially improving the stem cell therapy. In this study, we evaluate a new agarose/carbomer based hydrogel which combines different strategies to optimize hMSCs viability, density and delivery of paracrine factors. Specifically, we evaluate a new loading procedure on a lyophilized scaffold (soaked up effect) that reduces mechanical stress in encapsulating hMSCs into the hydrogel. In addition, we combine arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide and 3D extracellular matrix deposition to increase the capacity to attach and maintain healthy hMSCs within the hydrogel over time. Furthermore, the fluidic diffusion from the hydrogel toward the injury site is improved by using a cling film that oriented efficaciously the delivery of paracrine factors in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that an improved combination as here proposed of hMSCs and biomimetic hydrogel is able to immunomodulate significantly the pro-inflammatory environment in a SCI mouse model, increasing M2 macrophagic population and promoting a pro-regenerative environment in situ.

  7. Sensory neurons do not induce motor neuron loss in a human stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Andrew J; Ebert, Allison D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to paralysis and early death due to reduced SMN protein. It is unclear why there is such a profound motor neuron loss, but recent evidence from fly and mouse studies indicate that cells comprising the whole sensory-motor circuit may contribute to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. Here, we used induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SMA patients to test whether sensory neurons directly contribute to motor neuron loss. We generated sensory neurons from SMA induced pluripotent stem cells and found no difference in neuron generation or survival, although there was a reduced calcium response to depolarizing stimuli. Using co-culture of SMA induced pluripotent stem cell derived sensory neurons with control induced pluripotent stem cell derived motor neurons, we found no significant reduction in motor neuron number or glutamate transporter boutons on motor neuron cell bodies or neurites. We conclude that SMA sensory neurons do not overtly contribute to motor neuron loss in this human stem cell system.

  8. A new three dimensional biomimetic hydrogel to deliver factors secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Caron, Ilaria; Rossi, Filippo; Papa, Simonetta; Aloe, Rossella; Sculco, Marika; Mauri, Emanuele; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Erba, Eugenio; Panini, Nicolò; Parazzi, Valentina; Barilani, Mario; Forloni, Gianluigi; Perale, Giuseppe; Lazzari, Lorenza; Veglianese, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) represents a promising strategy in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, both systemic and parenchymal hMSCs administrations show significant drawbacks as a limited number and viability of stem cells in situ. Biomaterials able to encapsulate and sustain hMSCs represent a viable approach to overcome these limitations potentially improving the stem cell therapy. In this study, we evaluate a new agarose/carbomer based hydrogel which combines different strategies to optimize hMSCs viability, density and delivery of paracrine factors. Specifically, we evaluate a new loading procedure on a lyophilized scaffold (soaked up effect) that reduces mechanical stress in encapsulating hMSCs into the hydrogel. In addition, we combine arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide and 3D extracellular matrix deposition to increase the capacity to attach and maintain healthy hMSCs within the hydrogel over time. Furthermore, the fluidic diffusion from the hydrogel toward the injury site is improved by using a cling film that oriented efficaciously the delivery of paracrine factors in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that an improved combination as here proposed of hMSCs and biomimetic hydrogel is able to immunomodulate significantly the pro-inflammatory environment in a SCI mouse model, increasing M2 macrophagic population and promoting a pro-regenerative environment in situ. PMID:26497428

  9. Spinal muscular atrophy phenotype is ameliorated in human motor neurons by SMN increase via different novel RNA therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Dametti, Sara; Salani, Sabrina; Ulzi, Gianna; Pagliarani, Serena; Rizzo, Federica; Frattini, Emanuele; Pagani, Franco; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo; Corti, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a primary genetic cause of infant mortality due to mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) 1 gene. No cure is available. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) aimed at increasing SMN levels from the paralogous SMN2 gene represent a possible therapeutic strategy. Here, we tested in SMA human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and iPSC-differentiated motor neurons, three different RNA approaches based on morpholino antisense targeting of the ISSN-1, exon-specific U1 small nuclear RNA (ExSpeU1), and Transcription Activator-Like Effector-Transcription Factor (TALE-TF). All strategies act modulating SMN2 RNA: ASO affects exon 7 splicing, TALE-TF increase SMN2 RNA acting on the promoter, while ExSpeU1 improves pre-mRNA processing. These approaches induced up-regulation of full-length SMN mRNA and differentially affected the Delta-7 isoform: ASO reduced this isoform, while ExSpeU1 and TALE-TF increased it. All approaches upregulate the SMN protein and significantly improve the in vitro SMA motor neurons survival. Thus, these findings demonstrate that therapeutic tools that act on SMN2 RNA are able to rescue the SMA disease phenotype. Our data confirm the feasibility of SMA iPSCs as in vitro disease models and we propose novel RNA approaches as potential therapeutic strategies for treating SMA and other genetic neurological disorders. PMID:26123042

  10. Expression of microRNAs in human post-mortem amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cords provides insight into disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Romero, Claudia; Hur, Junguk; Lunn, J Simon; Paez-Colasante, Ximena; Bender, Diane E; Yung, Raymond; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a late-onset and terminal neurodegenerative disease. The majority of cases are sporadic with unknown causes and only a small number of cases are genetically linked. Recent evidence suggests that post-transcriptional regulation and epigenetic mechanisms, such as microRNAs, underlie the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders; therefore, altered microRNA expression may result in the dysregulation of key genes and biological pathways that contribute to the development of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Using systems biology analyses on postmortem human spinal cord tissue, we identified dysregulated mature microRNAs and their potential targets previously implicated in functional process and pathways associated with the pathogenesis of ALS. Furthermore, we report a global reduction of mature microRNAs, alterations in microRNA processing, and support for a role of the nucleotide binding protein, TAR DNA binding protein 43, in regulating sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated microRNAs, thereby offering a potential underlying mechanism for sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  11. Gustatory reaction time to various sweeteners in human adults.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Kato, T; Matsuo, R; Kawamura, Y; Yoshida, M

    1985-09-01

    Reaction times to recognize the sweet taste of 12 sweeteners at various concentrations were measured in 48 human adults. The reaction time (T) decreased with increasing concentration (C) of each sweetener applied to the anterior dorsal tongue. The relationships between T and C, and T and logC were well described by a rectangular hyperbola formula for each of the 12 sweeteners. Reaction times to discriminate sweet taste quality between pairs of sweeteners were measured, then a similarity index was calculated. Factor analysis based on correlation coefficients between pairs of sweeteners which were obtained by the similarity indices has indicated classification of the sweeteners. Sucrose, fructose, glucose, maltose, sorbitol and aspartame tend to group together. Na-cyclamate and Na-saccharin form another group. DL-alanine, stevioside and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone are rather independent and do not belong to any group.

  12. Comparison of human adipose-derived stem cells and chondroitinase ABC transplantation on locomotor recovery in the contusion model of spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sarveazad, Arash; Bakhtiari, Mehrdad; Babahajian, Asrin; Janzade, Atusa; Fallah, Ali; Moradi, Fateme; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Younesi, Mohammadreza; Goudarzi, Farjam; Mohammad Taghi Joghataei

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most serious clinical diseases and its treatment has been a subject of interest to researchers. There are two important therapeutic strategies in the treatment of SCI: replacing lost tissue cells through cells implantation and scar elimination. Therefore, in this study we used human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) implantation and injection of Chondroitinase ABC. Aim of present study was to answer to this question: which one is more efficient for Improvement of locomotor recovery after SCI in rat? Transplantation of hADSCs or injection of ChABC. Materials and Methods: The spinal cord of rats was injured by contusion using a weight-drop at the level of T8-9, the hADSCs and Chondroitinase ABC were infused in to the spinal cord tissue after injury. BBB test was performed and recorded for each animal weekly for 8 weeks. After the 8th weeks, Serial cross-sections were stained with cresyl violet and examined under a light microscope and area of cavity in the spinal cord was measured. Results: At 8th weeks after injection, hADSCs and ChABC significantly promote locomotor function (P<0.01) and spinal cords of hADSCs and ChABC group had cavities much smaller than those of the control group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Results of the present study shows dealing with inappropriate neuro-inhibitory environment and glial scar by ChABC have equal role compare to cell therapy (with hADSCs) for improving motor function after SCI and this result in adoption of proper therapeutic strategies for SCI intervention is important. PMID:25691946

  13. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  14. Extracellular matrix-regulated neural differentiation of human multipotent marrow progenitor cells enhances functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Win-Ping; Yang, Chi-Chiang; Yang, Liang-Yo; Chen, Chun-Wei D.; Chen, Wei-Hong; Yang, Charn-Bing; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Lai, Wen-Fu T.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Recent advanced studies have demonstrated that cytokines and extracellular matrix (ECM) could trigger various types of neural differentiation. However, the efficacy of differentiation and in vivo transplantation has not yet thoroughly been investigated. PURPOSE To highlight the current understanding of the effects of ECM on neural differentiation of human bone marrow-derived multipotent progenitor cells (MPCs), regarding state-of-art cure for the animal with acute spinal cord injury (SCI), and explore future treatments aimed at neural repair. STUDY DESIGN A selective overview of the literature pertaining to the neural differentiation of the MSCs and experimental animals aimed at improved repair of SCI. METHODS Extracellular matrix proteins, tenascin-cytotactin (TN-C), tenascin-restrictin (TN-R), and chondroitin sulfate (CS), with the cytokines, nerve growth factor (NGF)/brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/retinoic acid (RA) (NBR), were incorporated to induce transdifferentiation of human MPCs. Cells were treated with NBR for 7 days, and then TN-C, TN-R, or CS was added for 2 days. The medium was changed every 2 days. Twenty-four animals were randomly assigned to four groups with six animals in each group: one experimental and three controls. Animals received two (bilateral) injections of vehicle, MPCs, NBR-induced MPCs, or NBR/TN-C-induced MPCs into the lesion sites after SCI. Functional assessment was measured using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating score. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance followed by Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK) post hoc tests. RESULTS Results showed that MPCs with the transdifferentiation of human MPCs to neurons were associated with increased messenger-RNA (mRNA) expression of neuronal markers including nestin, microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 2, glial fibrillary acidic protein, βIII tubulin, and NGF. Greater amounts of neuronal morphology appeared in cultures incorporated with TN-C and TN

  15. Proposal of human spinal cord reirradiation dose based on collection of data from 40 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nieder, Carsten . E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com; Grosu, Anca L.; Andratschke, Nicolaus H.; Molls, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: Driven by numerous reports on recovery of occult radiation injury, reirradiation of the spinal cord today is considered a realistic option. In rodents, long-term recovery was observed to start at approximately 8 weeks. However, prospective clinical studies are lacking. Therefore, a combined analysis of all published clinical data might provide a valuable basis for future trials. Methods and materials: We collected data from 40 individual patients published in eight different reports after a comprehensive MEDLINE search. These represent all patients with data available for dose per fraction and total dose of each of both treatment courses. We recalculated the biologically effective dose (BED) according to the linear-quadratic model using an {alpha}/{beta} value of 2 Gy for the cervical and thoracic cord and 4 Gy for the lumbar cord. In this model, a dose of 50 Gy given in single daily fractions of 2 Gy is equivalent to a BED of 100 Gy{sub 2} or 75 Gy{sub 4}. For treatment with two daily fractions, a correction term was introduced to take incomplete repair of sublethal damage into account. Results: The cumulative doses ranged from 108 to 205 Gy{sub 2} (median dose, 135 Gy{sub 2}). The median interval between both series was 20 months. Three patients were treated to the lumbar segments only. The median follow-up was 17 months for patients without myelopathy. Eleven patients developed myelopathy after 4-25 months (median, 11 months). Myelopathy was seen only in patients who had received one course to a dose of {>=}102 Gy{sub 2} (n = 9) or were retreated after 2 months (n = 2). In the absence of these two risk factors, no myelopathy developed in 19 patients treated with {<=}135.5 Gy{sub 2} or 7 patients treated with 136-150 Gy{sub 2}. A risk score based on the cumulative BED, the greatest BED for all treatment series in a particular individual, and interval was developed. Low-risk patients remained free of myelopathy and 33% of intermediate-risk patients and 90

  16. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    DOE PAGES

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection.more » Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.« less

  17. Comprehensive cellular‐resolution atlas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Royall, Joshua J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A.C.; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet‐Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A.; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A.; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L.; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A.; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W.; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H. Ronald; Hohmann, John G.; Jones, Allan R.; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole‐brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high‐resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion‐weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large‐format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto‐ and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127–3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27418273

  18. Comprehensive cellular-resolution atlas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Song-Lin; Royall, Joshua J; Sunkin, Susan M; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A C; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H Ronald; Hohmann, John G; Jones, Allan R; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Hof, Patrick R; Fischl, Bruce; Lein, Ed S

    2016-11-01

    Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole-brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high-resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large-format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto- and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127-3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27418273

  19. Comprehensive cellular-resolution atlas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Song-Lin; Royall, Joshua J; Sunkin, Susan M; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A C; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H Ronald; Hohmann, John G; Jones, Allan R; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Hof, Patrick R; Fischl, Bruce; Lein, Ed S

    2016-11-01

    Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole-brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high-resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large-format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto- and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127-3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Giussani, Augusto

    2015-04-10

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope 99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood.

  1. Short term treatment versus long term management of neck and back disability in older adults utilizing spinal manipulative therapy and supervised exercise: a parallel-group randomized clinical trial evaluating relative effectiveness and harms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Back and neck disability are frequent in older adults resulting in loss of function and independence. Exercise therapy and manual therapy, like spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), have evidence of short and intermediate term effectiveness for spinal disability in the general population and growing evidence in older adults. For older populations experiencing chronic spinal conditions, long term management may be more appropriate to maintain improvement and minimize the impact of future exacerbations. Research is limited comparing short courses of treatment to long term management of spinal disability. The primary aim is to compare the relative effectiveness of 12 weeks versus 36 weeks of SMT and supervised rehabilitative exercise (SRE) in older adults with back and neck disability. Methods/Design Randomized, mixed-methods, comparative effectiveness trial conducted at a university-affiliated research clinic in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota metropolitan area. Participants Independently ambulatory community dwelling adults ≥ 65 years of age with back and neck disability of minimum 12 weeks duration (n = 200). Interventions 12 weeks SMT + SRE or 36 weeks SMT + SRE. Randomization Blocked 1:1 allocation; computer generated scheme, concealed in sequentially numbered, opaque, sealed envelopes. Blinding Functional outcome examiners are blinded to treatment allocation; physical nature of the treatments prevents blinding of participants and providers to treatment assignment. Primary endpoint 36 weeks post-randomization. Data collection Self-report questionnaires administered at 2 baseline visits and 4, 12, 24, 36, 52, and 78 weeks post-randomization. Primary outcomes include back and neck disability, measured by the Oswestry Disability Index and Neck Disability Index. Secondary outcomes include pain, general health status, improvement, self-efficacy, kinesiophobia, satisfaction, and medication use. Functional outcome assessment occurs

  2. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis involving posterior elements of the dorsal spine: An unusual cause of extradural spinal mass in an adult.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Devendra K; Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Savant, Hemant V

    2011-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells occurring as an isolated lesion or as part of a systemic proliferation. It is commoner in children younger than 10 years of age with sparing of the posterior elements in more than 95% of cases. We describe a case of LCH in an adult female presenting with paraplegia. MRI revealed a well-defined extradural contrast enhancing mass at D2-D4 vertebral level involving the posterior elements of spine. D2-5 laminectomy with excision of lesion was performed which lead to marked improvement of patients neurological status. Histopathology was suggestive of eosinophilic granuloma. We describe the case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare tumor presentation.

  3. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell from spinal muscular atrophy patient.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pingyuan; Zhou, Hao; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Du, Juan; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    We established a human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line chHES-427 from the abnormal embryo carrying homozygous deletion of exon 7 of survival motor neuron gene (SMN). This cell line maintained a normal karyotype 46, XX during long-term culture. Further characteristic analysis suggested that the cells expressed the pluripotency-related markers and had the capacity to differentiate into the derivatives from the three germ layers in vitro. PMID:27345972

  4. The validity of anthropometric leg muscle volume estimation across a wide spectrum: from able-bodied adults to individuals with a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Layec, Gwenael; Venturelli, Massimo; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of muscle volume, and changes over time, have significant clinical and research-related implications. Methods to assess muscle volume vary from simple and inexpensive to complex and expensive. Therefore this study sought to examine the validity of muscle volume estimated simply by anthropometry compared with the more complex proton magnetic resonance imaging ((1)H-MRI) across a wide spectrum of individuals including those with a spinal cord injury (SCI), a group recognized to exhibit significant muscle atrophy. Accordingly, muscle volume of the thigh and lower leg of eight subjects with a SCI and eight able-bodied subjects (controls) was determined by anthropometry and (1)H-MRI. With either method, muscle volumes were significantly lower in the SCI compared with the controls (P < 0.05) and, using pooled data from both groups, anthropometric measurements of muscle volume were strongly correlated to the values assessed by (1)H-MRI in both the thigh (r(2) = 0.89; P < 0.05) and lower leg (r(2) = 0.98; P < 0.05). However, the anthropometric approach systematically overestimated muscle volume compared with (1)H-MRI in both the thigh (mean bias = 2407cm(3)) and the lower (mean bias = 170 cm(3)) leg. Thus with an appropriate correction for this systemic overestimation, muscle volume estimated from anthropometric measurements is a valid approach and provides acceptable accuracy across a spectrum of adults with normal muscle mass to a SCI and severe muscle atrophy. In practical terms this study provides the formulas that add validity to the already simple and inexpensive anthropometric approach to assess muscle volume in clinical and research settings.

  5. Populations of inhibitory and excitatory interneurons in lamina II of the adult rat spinal dorsal horn revealed by a combined electrophysiological and anatomical approach

    PubMed Central

    Yasaka, Toshiharu; Tiong, Sheena Y.X.; Hughes, David I.; Riddell, John S.; Todd, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Lamina II contains a large number of interneurons involved in modulation and transmission of somatosensory (including nociceptive) information. However, its neuronal circuitry is poorly understood due to the difficulty of identifying functional populations of interneurons. This information is important for understanding nociceptive processing and for identifying changes that underlie chronic pain. In this study, we compared morphology, neurotransmitter content, electrophysiological and pharmacological properties for 61 lamina II neurons recorded in slices from adult rat spinal cord. Morphology was related to transmitter content, since islet cells were GABAergic, while radial and most vertical cells were glutamatergic. However, there was considerable diversity among the remaining cells, some of which could not be classified morphologically. Transmitter phenotype was related to firing pattern, since most (18/22) excitatory cells, but few (2/23) inhibitory cells had delayed, gap or reluctant patterns, which are associated with A-type potassium (IA) currents. Somatostatin was identified in axons of 14/24 excitatory neurons. These had variable morphology, but most of those tested showed delayed-firing. Excitatory interneurons are therefore likely to contribute to pain states associated with synaptic plasticity involving IA currents. Although noradrenaline and serotonin evoked outward currents in both inhibitory and excitatory cells, somatostatin produced these currents only in inhibitory neurons, suggesting that its pro-nociceptive effects are mediated by disinhibition. Our results demonstrate that certain distinctive populations of inhibitory and excitatory interneuron can be recognised in lamina II. Combining this approach with identification of other neurochemical markers should allow further clarification of neuronal circuitry in the superficial dorsal horn. PMID:20817353

  6. The Adult Learner. The Definitive Classic in Adult Education and Human Resource Development. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Malcolm S.; Holton, Elwood F., III; Swanson, Richard A.

    This book examines the core principles of adult learning and the roots of andragogy, advances in adult learning, and practice in adult learning. The following are among the topics discussed in the book's 17 chapters: importance of learning theory; theories of learning (concept of part and whole models of development, theories based on elemental…

  7. Human astrocytes derived from glial restricted progenitors support regeneration of the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Haas, Christopher; Fischer, Itzhak

    2013-06-15

    Cellular transplantation using neural stem cells and progenitors is a promising therapeutic strategy that has the potential to replace lost cells, modulate the injury environment, and create a permissive environment for the regeneration of injured host axons. Our research has focused on the use of human glial restricted progenitors (hGRP) and derived astrocytes. In the current study, we examined the morphological and phenotypic properties of hGRP prepared from the fetal central nervous system by clinically-approved protocols, compared with astrocytes derived from hGRP prepared by treatment with ciliary neurotrophic factor or bone morphogenetic protein 4. These differentiation protocols generated astrocytes that showed morphological differences and could be classified along an immature to mature spectrum, respectively. Despite these differences, the cells retained morphological and phenotypic plasticity upon a challenge with an alternate differentiation protocol. Importantly, when hGRP and derived astrocytes were transplanted acutely into a cervical dorsal column lesion, they survived and promoted regeneration of long ascending host sensory axons into the graft/lesion site, with no differences among the groups. Further, hGRP taken directly from frozen stocks behaved similarly and also supported regeneration of host axons into the lesion. Our results underscore the dynamic and permissive properties of human fetal astrocytes to promote axonal regeneration. They also suggest that a time-consuming process of pre-differentiation may not be necessary for therapeutic efficacy, and that the banking of large quantities of readily available hGRP can be an appropriate source of permissive cells for transplantation.

  8. Cell size and geometry of spinal cord motoneurons in the adult cat following the intramuscular injection of adriamycin: comparison with data from aged cats.

    PubMed

    Liu, R H; Yamuy, J; Engelhardt, J K; Xi, M C; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1996-10-28

    of neurons on the control side. We conclude that significant geometrical changes were induced in lumbar motoneurons of adult cats after ADM was injected to their muscles. In old cats, spinal cord motoneurons exhibit similar patterns of changes in their electrophysiological characteristics which have also been suggested to be correlated with changes in cell geometry. The question then arises as to whether the response of motoneurons to ADM and the aging process reflects a stereotypic reaction of motoneurons to a variety of insults or whether the response to ADM mirrors specific aspects of the aging process. PMID:8949934

  9. Adult somatic stem cells in the human parasite, Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J.; Wang, Bo; Lambrus, Bramwell G.; Tharp, Marla; Iyer, Harini; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Schistosomiasis is among the most prevalent human parasitic diseases, affecting more than 200 million people worldwide1. The etiological agents of this disease are trematode flatworms (Schistosoma) that live and lay eggs within the vasculature of the host. These eggs lodge in host tissues, causing inflammatory responses that are the primary cause of morbidity. Because these parasites can live and reproduce within human hosts for decades2, elucidating the mechanisms that promote their longevity is of fundamental importance. Although adult pluripotent stem cells, called neoblasts, drive long-term homeostatic tissue maintenance in long-lived free-living flatworms3,4 (e.g., planarians), and neoblast-like cells have been described in some parasitic tapeworms5, little is known about whether similar cell types exist in any trematode species. Here, we describe a population of neoblast-like cells in the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. These cells resemble planarian neoblasts morphologically and share their ability to proliferate and differentiate into derivatives of multiple germ layers. Capitalizing on available genomic resources6,7 and RNAseq-based gene expression profiling, we find that these schistosome neoblast-like cells express a fibroblast growth factor receptor ortholog. Using RNA interference we demonstrate that this gene is required for the maintenance of these neoblast-like cells. Our observations suggest that adaptation of developmental strategies shared by free-living ancestors to modern-day schistosomes likely contributed to the success of these animals as long-lived obligate parasites. We expect that future studies deciphering the function of these neoblast-like cells will have important implications for understanding the biology of these devastating parasites. PMID:23426263

  10. Efficient differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into oligodendrocyte progenitors for application in a rat contusion model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Candace L; Letzen, Brian S; Hill, Christine M; Agrawal, Gracee; Thakor, Nitish V; Sterneckert, Jared L; Gearhart, John D; All, Angelo H

    2010-04-01

    This study utilized a contusion model of spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats using the standardized NYU-MASCIS impactor, after which oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cell (ESC) were transplanted into the spinal cord to study their survival and migration route toward the areas of injury. One critical aspect of successful cell-based SCI therapy is the time of injection following injury. OPCs were injected at two clinically relevant times when most damage occurs to the surrounding tissue, 3 and 24 hours following injury. Migration and survivability after eight days was measured postmortem. In-vitro immunofluorescence revealed that most ESC-derived OPCs expressed oligodendrocyte markers, including CNPase, GalC, Olig1, O4, and O1. Results showed that OPCs survived when injected at the center of injury and migrated away from the injection sites after one week. Histological sections revealed integration of ESC-derived OPCs into the spinal cord with contusion injury without disruption to the parenchyma. Cells survived for a minimum of eight days after injury, without tumor or cyst formation. The extent of injury and effect of early cell transplant was measured using behavioral and electrophysiological assessments which demonstrated increased neurological responses in rats transplanted with OPCs compared to controls. PMID:20374080

  11. Effects of magnetic nanoparticle-incorporated human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells exposed to pulsed electromagnetic fields on injured rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunjin; Choi, Yun-Kyong; Lee, Dong Heon; Park, Hee Jung; Seo, Young-Kwon; Jung, Hyun; Kim, Soo-Chan; Kim, Sung-Min; Park, Jung-Keug

    2013-01-01

    Transplanting mesenchymal stem cells into injured lesions is currently under study as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord injury. In this study, the effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on injured rat spinal cord were investigated in magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-incorporated human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). A histological analysis revealed significant differences in MNP-incorporated cell distribution near the injured site under the PEMF in comparison with that in the control group. We confirmed that MNP-incorporated cells were widely distributed in the lesions under PEMF. The results suggest that MNP-incorporated hBM-MSCs were guided by the PEMF near the injured site, and that PEMF exposure for 8 H per day over 4 weeks promoted behavioral recovery in spinal cord injured rats. The results show that rats with MNP-incorporated hBM-MSCs under a PEMF were more effective on the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan behavioral test and suggest that the PEMF enhanced the action of transplanted cells for recovery of the injured lesion.

  12. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Leggett, R; Giussani, A

    2015-06-01

    This paper reviews biokinetic data for technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans. The development of parameter values focuses on data for pertechnetate TcO(-)(4) the most commonly encountered form of technetium and the form expected to be present in body fluids. The model is intended as a default model for occupational or environmental intake of technetium, i.e. applicable in the absence of form- or site-specific information. Tissues depicted explicitly in the model include thyroid, salivary glands, stomach wall, right colon wall, liver, kidneys, and bone. Compared with the ICRP's current biokinetic model for occupational or environmental intake of technetium (ICRP 1993, 1994), the proposed model provides a more detailed and biologically realistic description of the systemic behaviour of technetium and is based on a broader set of experimental and medical data. For acute input of (99m)Tc (T(1/2) = 6.02 h) to blood, the ratios of cumulative (time-integrated) activity predicted by the current ICRP model to that predicted by the proposed model range from 0.4-7 for systemic regions addressed explicitly in both models. For acute input of (99)Tc (T(1/2) = 2.1 × 10(5) year) to blood, the corresponding ratios range from 0.2-30.

  13. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  14. Bone-forming capacity of adult human nasal chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pippenger, Benjamin E; Ventura, Manuela; Pelttari, Karoliina; Feliciano, Sandra; Jaquiery, Claude; Scherberich, Arnaud; Walboomers, X Frank; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Nasal chondrocytes (NC) derive from the same multipotent embryological segment that gives rise to the majority of the maxillofacial bone and have been reported to differentiate into osteoblast-like cells in vitro. In this study, we assessed the capacity of adult human NC, appropriately primed towards hypertrophic or osteoblastic differentiation, to form bone tissue in vivo. Hypertrophic induction of NC-based micromass pellets formed mineralized cartilaginous tissues rich in type X collagen, but upon implantation into subcutaneous pockets of nude mice remained avascular and reverted to stable hyaline-cartilage. In the same ectopic environment, NC embedded into ceramic scaffolds and primed with osteogenic medium only sporadically formed intramembranous bone tissue. A clonal study could not demonstrate that the low bone formation efficiency was related to a possibly small proportion of cells competent to become fully functional osteoblasts. We next tested whether the cues present in an orthotopic environment could induce a more efficient direct osteoblastic transformation of NC. Using a nude rat calvarial defect model, we demonstrated that (i) NC directly participated in frank bone formation and (ii) the efficiency of survival and bone formation by NC was significantly higher than that of reference osteogenic cells, namely bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. This study provides a proof-of-principle that NC have the plasticity to convert into bone cells and thereby represent an easily available cell source to be further investigated for craniofacial bone regeneration. PMID:25689393

  15. Adult Education and the Human Environment: Transactions of a Celebration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones-Quartey, K. A. B., Ed.; And Others

    The document comprises a collection of speeches and seminar reports arising from the 25th anniversary celebration of the Institute of Adult Education at the University of Ghana. The theme of the celebration, introduced in the first chapter, was Adult Education and Man's Environment--the Next Quarter-Century. The second chapter comprises the…

  16. Pressure measurements in the spinal canal of post-mortem human subjects during rear-end impact and correlation of results to the neck injury criterion.

    PubMed

    Eichberger, A; Darok, M; Steffan, H; Leinzinger, P E; Boström, O; Svensson, M Y

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study is to validate the pressure effect theory on human beings during a realistic rear-end impact and to correlate the neck injury criterion to pressure in the spinal canal. Sled experiments were performed using a test setup similar to real rear-end collisions. Test conditions were chosen based on accident statistics and recordings of real accidents. In particular, velocity change and acceleration level were reproduced similar to actual collisions. The head restraint as well as the seat back were adjusted to different positions. Two small pressure transducer were implemented to the spinal canal of postmortem human subjects and pressure measurement similar to the pig experiments (using exactly the same equipment) were performed. A total set of 21 experiments with four different subjects were performed. The subjects were additionally instrumented with triaxial accelerometers that allowed for calculation of the NIC criterion. Results showed that NIC and pressure amplitudes of the CSF correlate well and therefore NIC seems to be able to predict these amplitudes also for human beings. Conclusions whether these pressure effects induce soft tissue neck injuries or not could not be drawn and should be investigated in further research.

  17. Transcriptional profiling of adult neural stem-like cells from the human brain.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Behnan, Jinan; Helseth, Eirik; Langmoen, Iver A

    2014-01-01

    There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33-60). Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate). We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6), foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1) and human brain tissues (n = 12). The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular fate.

  18. Transcriptional Profiling of Adult Neural Stem-Like Cells from the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Vik-Mo, Einar O.; Behnan, Jinan; Helseth, Eirik; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2014-01-01

    There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33–60). Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate). We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6), foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1) and human brain tissues (n = 12). The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular fate. PMID

  19. Plasmid-based genetic modification of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells: analysis of cell survival and transgene expression after transplantation in rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Ronsyn, Mark W; Daans, Jasmijn; Spaepen, Gie; Chatterjee, Shyama; Vermeulen, Katrien; D'Haese, Patrick; Van Tendeloo, Viggo FI; Van Marck, Eric; Ysebaert, Dirk; Berneman, Zwi N; Jorens, Philippe G; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background Bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSC) are attractive targets for ex vivo cell and gene therapy. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of a plasmid-based strategy for genetic modification of human (h)MSC with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and neurotrophin (NT)3. Three genetically modified hMSC lines (EGFP, NT3, NT3-EGFP) were established and used to study cell survival and transgene expression following transplantation in rat spinal cord. Results First, we demonstrate long-term survival of transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells in rat spinal cord under, but not without, appropriate immune suppression. Next, we examined the stability of EGFP or NT3 transgene expression following transplantation of hMSC-EGFP, hMSC-NT3 and hMSC-NT3-EGFP in rat spinal cord. While in vivo EGFP mRNA and protein expression by transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells was readily detectable at different time points post-transplantation, in vivo NT3 mRNA expression by hMSC-NT3 cells and in vivo EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells was, respectively, undetectable or declined rapidly between day 1 and 7 post-transplantation. Further investigation revealed that the observed in vivo decline of EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells: (i) was associated with a decrease in transgenic NT3-EGFP mRNA expression as suggested following laser capture micro-dissection analysis of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell transplants at day 1 and day 7 post-transplantation, (ii) did not occur when hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells were transplanted subcutaneously, and (iii) was reversed upon re-establishment of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell cultures at 2 weeks post-transplantation. Finally, because we observed a slowly progressing tumour growth following transplantation of all our hMSC cell transplants, we here demonstrate that omitting immune suppressive therapy is sufficient to prevent further tumour growth and to eradicate malignant xenogeneic cell transplants. Conclusion In this study, we demonstrate that genetically

  20. Germline stem cells and neo-oogenesis in the adult human ovary.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yifei; Wu, Chao; Lyu, Qifeng; Yang, Dongzi; Albertini, David F; Keefe, David L; Liu, Lin

    2007-06-01

    It remains unclear whether neo-oogenesis occurs in postnatal ovaries of mammals, based on studies in mice. We thought to test whether adult human ovaries contain germline stem cells (GSCs) and undergo neo-oogenesis. Rather than using genetic manipulation which is unethical in humans, we took the approach of analyzing the expression of meiotic marker genes and genes for germ cell proliferation, which are required for neo-oogenesis, in adult human ovaries covering an age range from 28 to 53 years old, compared to testis and fetal ovaries served as positive controls. We show that active meiosis, neo-oogenesis and GSCs are unlikely to exist in normal, adult, human ovaries. No early meiotic-specific or oogenesis-associated mRNAs for SPO11, PRDM9, SCP1, TERT and NOBOX were detectable in adult human ovaries using RT-PCR, compared to fetal ovary and adult testis controls. These findings are further corroborated by the absence of early meiocytes and proliferating germ cells in adult human ovarian cortex probed with markers for meiosis (SCP3), oogonium (OCT3/4, c-KIT), and cell cycle progression (Ki-67, PCNA), in contrast to fetal ovary controls. If postnatal oogenesis is confirmed in mice, then this species would represent an exception to the rule that neo-oogenesis does not occur in adults.

  1. Effectiveness of preoperative autologous blood donation for protection against allogeneic blood exposure in adult spinal deformity surgeries: a propensity-matched cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Zebala, Lukas P.; Kim, Han Jo; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Smith, Justin S.; Shaffrey, Christopher I.; Bess, Shay; Klineberg, Eric; Mundis, Gregory; Burton, Douglas; Hart, Robert; Soroceanu, Alex; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT The goal of this study was to examine the effectiveness of preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD) in adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. METHODS Patients undergoing single-stay ASD reconstructions were identified in a multicenter database. Patients were divided into groups according to PABD (either PABD or NoPABD). Propensity weighting was used to create matched cohorts of PABD and NoPABD patients. Allogeneic (ALLO) exposure, autologous (AUTO) wastage (unused AUTO), and complication rates were compared between groups. RESULTS Four hundred twenty-eight patients were identified as meeting eligibility criteria. Sixty patients were treated with PABD, of whom 50 were matched to 50 patients who were not treated with PABD (NoPABD). Nearly one-third of patients in the PABD group (18/60, 30%) did not receive any autologous transfusion and donated blood was wasted. In 6 of these cases (6/60, 10%), patients received ALLO blood transfusions without AUTO. In 9 cases (9/60, 15%), patients received ALLO and AUTO blood transfusions. Overall rates of transfusion of any type were similar between groups (PABD 70% [42/60], NoPABD 75% [275/368], p = 0.438). Major and minor in-hospital complications were similar between groups (Major PABD 10% [6/60], NoPABD 12% [43/368], p = 0.537; Minor PABD 30% [18/60], NoPABD 24% [87/368], p = 0.499). When controlling for potential confounders, PABD patients were more likely to receive some transfusion (OR 15.1, 95% CI 2.1–106.7). No relationship between PABD and ALLO blood exposure was observed, however, refuting the concept that PABD is protective against ALLO blood exposure. In the matched cohorts, PABD patients were more likely to sustain a major perioperative cardiac complication (PABD 8/50 [16%], NoPABD 1/50 [2%], p = 0.046). No differences in rates of infection or wound-healing complications were observed between cohorts. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative autologous blood donation was associated with a higher probability of

  2. A comparison of erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase activity from human foetuses and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Strange, R C; Johnston, J D; Coghill, D R; Hume, R

    1980-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity was measured in partially purified haemolysates of erythrocytes from human foetuses and adults. Enzyme activity was present in erythrocytes obtained between 12 and 40 weeks of gestation. The catalytic properties of the enzyme from foetal cells were similar to those of the enzyme from adult erythrocytes, indicating that probably only one form of the erythrocytes enzyme exists throughout foetal and adult life. PMID:7396875

  3. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  4. Adult Continuing Education and Human Resource Development: Present Competitors, Potential Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    Adult Continuing Education (ACE) and Human Resource Development (HRD) have grown tremendously in the last quarter century. ACE experienced tremendous growth in the 60s and 70s, with over 17 million attending colleges and universities, and local school and community adult education programs by the end of the 1970s. More ACE programs were started…

  5. Reaching beyond the United States: Adventures in International Adult Education and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henschke, John A.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his experience of how travel and adult education merged, for him, into a major emphasis in international adult education (AE) and human resource development (HRD). International ventures have been some of the most exciting and learning-filled aspects of the author's career in AE and HRD. His involvement in…

  6. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pulse wave rising from pulsations of both the spinal cord and the brain in humans.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Urayama, K; Hoshino, Y

    1997-11-01

    There are two theories regarding the origin of the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pulse wave (L-CSFPW): that it arises from the arteries supplying the spinal cord, and that it is due to the pulsations of the brain transmitted through the subarachnoid space of the spine. We investigated L-CSFPW of 11 myelopathic patients with a complete (five patients, CB-group) or an incomplete spinal block (six, ICB-group) on myelography to determine the origin of L-CSFPW. Since arterial pressure amplitude (APA), the energy source of L-CSFPW, is not the same between individuals or between before and after operation, not only L-CSFPW itself but also the transfer function between the arterial pressure wave and the L-CSFPW calculated by the system analysis method was analyzed to eliminate the influence of hemodynamic fluctuations. In the system analysis, the arterial pressure wave, L-CSFPW and transfer function were decomposed into five harmonic waves (HW). In the CB group, L-CSFPW was observed to be 0.72 mmHg on average (range, 0.25-1.00) in spite of blocking pulsations of the brain, showing that there was a contribution to L-CSFPW unrelated to the brain, that is, the spinal cord. In the CB group, however, the preoperative transfer function value of HW1 (mean, 0.056; range, 0.012-0.170) was lower than that in the ICB group (mean, 0.137; range, 0.061-0.236) (P < 0.05), indicating that the brain pulsation also contributed to L-CSFPW. In the ICB group, there was significant reduction of HW1 (P < 0.01) and HW2 (P < 0.05) transfer function after posterior decompression surgery in spite of improvement in the subarachnoid space narrowing: preoperative HW1, mean, 0.137, range, 0.061-0.236; postoperative HW1, mean, 0.065, range, 0.021-0.153; preoperative HW2, mean, 0.092, range, 0.011-0.148; postoperative HW2, mean, 0.044, range, 0.030-0.066. It has been reported that the spinal cord blood flow is decreased 20% or more by laminectomy, therefore, L-CSFPW measurement may be sensitive enough to

  7. Histological and Functional Benefit Following Transplantation of Motor Neuron Progenitors to the Injured Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Tanya; Yin, Hong Zhen; Poole, Aleksandra J.; Weiss, John H.; Gardener, Matthew J.; Dijkstra, Sipke; Fischer, David F.; Keirstead, Hans S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Motor neuron loss is characteristic of cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) and contributes to functional deficit. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the amenability of the injured adult spinal cord to motor neuron differentiation, we transplanted spinal cord injured animals with a high purity population of human motor neuron progenitors (hMNP) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). In vitro, hMNPs displayed characteristic motor neuron-specific markers, a typical electrophysiological profile, functionally innervated human or rodent muscle, and secreted physiologically active growth factors that caused neurite branching and neuronal survival. hMNP transplantation into cervical SCI sites in adult rats resulted in suppression of intracellular signaling pathways associated with SCI pathogenesis, which correlated with greater endogenous neuronal survival and neurite branching. These neurotrophic effects were accompanied by significantly enhanced performance on all parameters of the balance beam task, as compared to controls. Interestingly, hMNP transplantation resulted in survival, differentiation, and site-specific integration of hMNPs distal to the SCI site within ventral horns, but hMNPs near the SCI site reverted to a neuronal progenitor state, suggesting an environmental deficiency for neuronal maturation associated with SCI. Conclusions/Significance These findings underscore the barriers imposed on neuronal differentiation of transplanted cells by the gliogenic nature of the injured spinal cord, and the physiological relevance of transplant-derived neurotrophic support to functional recovery. PMID:20686613

  8. Analysis of Host-Mediated Repair Mechanisms after Human CNS-Stem Cell Transplantation for Spinal Cord Injury: Correlation of Engraftment with Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hooshmand, Mitra J.; Sontag, Christopher J.; Uchida, Nobuko; Tamaki, Stan

    2009-01-01

    Background Human central nervous system-stem cells grown as neurospheres (hCNS-SCns) self-renew, are multipotent, and have potential therapeutic applications following trauma to the spinal cord. We have previously shown locomotor recovery in immunodeficient mice that received a moderate contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) and hCNS-SCns transplantation 9 days post-injury (dpi). Engrafted hCNS-SCns exhibited terminal differentiation to myelinating oligodendrocytes and synapse-forming neurons. Further, selective ablation of human cells using Diphtheria toxin (DT) abolished locomotor recovery in this paradigm, suggesting integration of human cells within the mouse host as a possible mechanism for the locomotor improvement. However, the hypothesis that hCNS-SCns could alter the host microenvironment as an additional or alternative mechanism of recovery remained unexplored; we tested that hypothesis in the present study. Methods and Findings Stereological quantification of human cells using a human-specific cytoplasmic marker demonstrated successful cell engraftment, survival, migration and limited proliferation in all hCNS-SCns transplanted animals. DT administration at 16 weeks post-transplant ablated 80.5% of hCNS-SCns. Stereological quantification for lesion volume, tissue sparing, descending serotonergic host fiber sprouting, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan deposition, glial scarring, and angiogenesis demonstrated no evidence of host modification within the mouse spinal cord as a result of hCNS-SCns transplantation. Biochemical analyses supplemented stereological data supporting the absence of neural stem-cell mediated host repair. However, linear regression analysis of the number of engrafted hCNS-SCns vs. the number of errors on a horizontal ladder beam task revealed a strong correlation between these variables (r = −0.78, p<0.05), suggesting that survival and engraftment were directly related to a quantitative measure of recovery. Conclusions Altogether

  9. Glutamate Increases In Vitro Survival and Proliferation and Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death in Adult Spinal Cord-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells via Non-NMDA Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Laureen D; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a cascade of secondary chemical insults, including oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity, which damage host neurons and glia. Transplantation of exogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has shown promise in enhancing regeneration after SCI, although survival of transplanted cells remains poor. Understanding the response of NSPCs to the chemical mediators of secondary injury is essential in finding therapies to enhance survival. We examined the in vitro effects of glutamate and glutamate receptor agonists on adult rat spinal cord-derived NSPCs. NSPCs isolated from the periventricular region of the adult rat spinal cord were exposed to various concentrations of glutamate for 96 h. We found that glutamate treatment (500 μM) for 96 h significantly increased live cell numbers, reduced cell death, and increased proliferation, but did not significantly alter cell phenotype. Concurrent glutamate treatment (500 μM) in the setting of H2O2 exposure (500 μM) for 10 h increased NSPC survival compared to H2O2 exposure alone. The effects of glutamate on NSPCs were blocked by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist GYKI-52466, but not by the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist MK-801 or DL-AP5, or the mGluR3 antagonist LY-341495. Furthermore, treatment of NSPCs with AMPA, kainic acid, or the kainate receptor-specific agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid mimicked the responses seen with glutamate both alone and in the setting of oxidative stress. These findings offer important insights into potential mechanisms to enhance NSPC survival and implicate a potential role for glutamate in promoting NSPC survival and proliferation after traumatic SCI.

  10. Effect of locomotor training in completely spinalized cats previously submitted to a spinal hemisection.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marina; Delivet-Mongrain, Hugo; Leblond, Hugues; Rossignol, Serge

    2012-08-01

    After a spinal hemisection in cats, locomotor plasticity occurring at the spinal level can be revealed by performing, several weeks later, a complete spinalization below the first hemisection. Using this paradigm, we recently demonstrated that the hemisection induces durable changes in the symmetry of locomotor kinematics that persist after spinalization. Can this asymmetry be changed again in the spinal state by interventions such as treadmill locomotor training started within a few days after the spinalization? We performed, in 9 adult cats, a spinal hemisection at thoracic level 10 and then a complete spinalization at T13, 3 weeks later. Cats were not treadmill trained during the hemispinal period. After spinalization, 5 of 9 cats were not trained and served as control while 4 of 9 cats were trained on the treadmill for 20 min, 5 d a week for 3 weeks. Using detailed kinematic analyses, we showed that, without training, the asymmetrical state of locomotion induced by the hemisection was retained durably after the subsequent spinalization. By contrast, training cats after spinalization induced a reversal of the left/right asymmetries, suggesting that new plastic changes occurred within the spinal cord through locomotor training. Moreover, training was shown to improve the kinematic parameters and the performance of the hindlimb on the previously hemisected side. These results indicate that spinal locomotor circuits, previously modified by past experience such as required for adaptation to the hemisection, can remarkably respond to subsequent locomotor training and improve bilateral locomotor kinematics, clearly showing the benefits of locomotor training in the spinal state.

  11. Spinal Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Katonis, P.; Datsis, G.; Karantanas, A.; Kampouroglou, A.; Lianoudakis, S.; Licoudis, S.; Papoutsopoulou, E.; Alpantaki, K.

    2013-01-01

    Although osteosarcoma represents the second most common primary bone tumor, spinal involvement is rare, accounting for 3%–5% of all osteosarcomas. The most frequent symptom of osteosarcoma is pain, which appears in almost all patients, whereas more than 70% exhibit neurologic deficit. At a molecular level, it is a tumor of great genetic complexity and several genetic disorders have been associated with its appearance. Early diagnosis and careful surgical staging are the most important factors in accomplishing sufficient management. Even though overall prognosis remains poor, en-block tumor removal combined with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is currently the treatment of choice. This paper outlines histopathological classification, epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and current concepts of management of spinal osteosarcoma. PMID:24179411

  12. Spinal Bracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Dr. Arthur Copes of the Copes Foundation, Baton Rouge, LA, says that 35 percent of the 50 technical reports he received from the NASA/Southern University Industrial Applications Center in Baton Rouge and the Central Industrial Applications Center, Durant, OK, were vital to the development of his Copes Scoliosis Braces, which are custom designed and feature a novel pneumatic bladder that exerts constant corrective pressure to the torso to slowly reduce or eliminate the spinal curve.

  13. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  14. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Infarction Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Spinal Cord Infarction? Spinal cord infarction is a stroke either ...

  15. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  17. Spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, Spyros

    2013-09-01

    In the last decade there have been significant improvements in all the fields of management of patients with spinal dysraphism, which have increased dramatically the quality of life of these children. Prevention of spina bifida with food fortification is becoming increasingly practiced worldwide. As result, in many parts of the world the frequency of myelomeningocele has decreased. Intrauterine closure of myelomeningocele has been attempted in many institutions with variable results. While it is still at the sphere of experimental therapy, it is reasonable to anticipate progress in this field in the next decade. Antenatal MR imaging is already providing very high level of detail even before the child is born. This creates new ethical dilemmas and requires additional care, but has improved significantly the overall management of patients and their families. Further improvements are anticipated in this field. Management of neuropathic bladder has improved significantly in the last decade and is anticipated to play an increasing role in the long term follow up. Surgery for spinal cord tethering in all its forms has improved in the last decade, with far more chances of complete untethering now in comparison to 10-15 years ago, with the use of micro-neurosurgical techniques and intraoperative monitoring. It is reasonable to expect that in the next decade, intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during spinal cord surgery will become mandatory. In the 2013 Annual Special Issue we have assembled a team of authors distinguished in their fields, who bring us up to date with all the latest developments. PMID:24013314

  18. Modulation of the soleus H-reflex during pedalling in normal humans and in patients with spinal spasticity.

    PubMed Central

    Boorman, G; Becker, W J; Morrice, B L; Lee, R G

    1992-01-01

    Soleus H-reflexes were recorded in 10 normal subjects and seven patients with spasticity caused by incomplete spinal cord injury while they pedalled on a stationary bicycle which had been modified to trigger electrical stimuli to the tibial nerve at eight precise points in the pedal cycle. Stimulus strength was adjusted to yield M-waves of constant amplitude at each pedal position. During active pedalling, all normal subjects showed modulation of the H-reflex with the amplitude being increased during the downstroke portion of the pedal cycle and the reflex suppressed or absent during the upstroke. This modulation was not present during passive pedalling, with the experimenter cranking the pedals by hand, or when the pedals were locked at each of the eight positions. In five of the seven patients with spasticity, there was reduced or absent modulation of the H-reflex during active pedalling and the reflex remained large during pedal upstroke. It is concluded that descending motor commands that produce patterned voluntary activity during pedalling normally cause cyclical gating of spinal reflexes by either presynaptic or postsynaptic inhibitory mechanisms. Loss of supraspinal control over these spinal inhibitory systems could result in failure to produce appropriate suppression of reflexes during patterned voluntary movements such as pedalling or walking, and may be an important factor contributing to the functional disability in spasticity. PMID:1479394

  19. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  20. Newborn human skin fibroblasts senesce in vitro without acquiring adult growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cultures of human fibroblasts were prepared from chest skin obtained either from newborns (less than 3 months old) or adults (more than 35 years old) and maintained in vitro until they senesced. Adult cells grew logarithmically in medium supplemented with whole blood serum but not with platelet-poor plasma. Early passage cells obtained from newborns grew equally well in either plasma- or serum-supplemented medium. The difference in growth factor requirements between adult and newborn cells persisted through the lifespan of the cells; i.e., newborn cells did not develop adult hormonal requirements when maintained in culture. Thus, in vitro cellular aging can be distinguished from some types of differentiation.

  1. Structural and functional reorganization of propriospinal connections promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Filli, Linard; Schwab, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Axonal regeneration and fiber regrowth is limited in the adult central nervous system, but research over the last decades has revealed a high intrinsic capacity of brain and spinal cord circuits to adapt and reorganize after smaller injuries or denervation. Short-distance fiber growth and synaptic rewiring was found in cortex, brain stem and spinal cord and could be associated with restoration of sensorimotor functions that were impaired by the injury. Such processes of structural plasticity were initially observed in the corticospinal system following spinal cord injury or stroke, but recent studies showed an equally high potential for structural and functional reorganization in reticulospinal, rubrospinal or propriospinal projections. Here we review the lesion-induced plastic changes in the propriospinal pathways, and we argue that they represent a key mechanism triggering sensorimotor recovery upon incomplete spinal cord injury. The formation or strengthening of spinal detour pathways bypassing supraspinal commands around the lesion site to the denervated spinal cord were identified as prominent neural substrate inducing substantial motor recovery in different species from mice to primates. Indications for the existence of propriospinal bypasses were also found in humans after cortical stroke. It is mandatory for current research to dissect the biological mechanisms underlying spinal circuit remodeling and to investigate how these processes can be stimulated in an optimal way by therapeutic interventions (e.g., fiber-growth enhancing interventions, rehabilitation). This knowledge will clear the way for the development of novel strategies targeting the remarkable plastic potential of propriospinal circuits to maximize functional recovery after spinal cord injury. PMID:26170799

  2. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Park, David Jaehyun; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  3. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  4. Investigation of genes important in neurodevelopment disorders in adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Maussion, Gilles; Diallo, Alpha B; Gigek, Carolina O; Chen, Elizabeth S; Crapper, Liam; Théroux, Jean-Francois; Chen, Gary G; Vasuta, Cristina; Ernst, Carl

    2015-10-01

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are caused by mutations in genes expressed in fetal brain, but little is known about these same genes in adult human brain. Here, we test the hypothesis that genes associated with NDDs continue to have a role in adult human brain to explore the idea that NDD symptoms may be partially a result of their adult function rather than just their neurodevelopmental function. To demonstrate adult brain function, we performed expression analyses and ChIPseq in human neural stem cell(NSC) lines at different developmental stages and adult human brain, targeting two genes associated with NDDs, SATB2 and EHMT1, and the WNT signaling gene TCF7L2, which has not been associated with NDDs. Analysis of DNA interaction sites in neural stem cells reveals high (40-50 %) overlap between proliferating and differentiating cells for each gene in temporal space. Studies in adult brain demonstrate that consensus sites are similar to NSCs but occur at different genomic locations. We also performed expression analyses using BrainSpan data for NDD-associated genes SATB2, EHMT1, FMR1, MECP2, MBD5, CTNND2, RAI1, CHD8, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, TCF4, SCN2A, and DYRK1A and find high expression of these genes in adult brain, at least comparable to developing human brain, confirming that genes associated with NDDs likely have a role in adult tissue. Adult function of genes associated with NDDs might be important in clinical disease presentation and may be suitable targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26194112

  5. Investigation of genes important in neurodevelopment disorders in adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Maussion, Gilles; Diallo, Alpha B; Gigek, Carolina O; Chen, Elizabeth S; Crapper, Liam; Théroux, Jean-Francois; Chen, Gary G; Vasuta, Cristina; Ernst, Carl

    2015-10-01

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are caused by mutations in genes expressed in fetal brain, but little is known about these same genes in adult human brain. Here, we test the hypothesis that genes associated with NDDs continue to have a role in adult human brain to explore the idea that NDD symptoms may be partially a result of their adult function rather than just their neurodevelopmental function. To demonstrate adult brain function, we performed expression analyses and ChIPseq in human neural stem cell(NSC) lines at different developmental stages and adult human brain, targeting two genes associated with NDDs, SATB2 and EHMT1, and the WNT signaling gene TCF7L2, which has not been associated with NDDs. Analysis of DNA interaction sites in neural stem cells reveals high (40-50 %) overlap between proliferating and differentiating cells for each gene in temporal space. Studies in adult brain demonstrate that consensus sites are similar to NSCs but occur at different genomic locations. We also performed expression analyses using BrainSpan data for NDD-associated genes SATB2, EHMT1, FMR1, MECP2, MBD5, CTNND2, RAI1, CHD8, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, TCF4, SCN2A, and DYRK1A and find high expression of these genes in adult brain, at least comparable to developing human brain, confirming that genes associated with NDDs likely have a role in adult tissue. Adult function of genes associated with NDDs might be important in clinical disease presentation and may be suitable targets for therapeutic intervention.

  6. The Human Function Compunction: Teleological Explanation in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelemen, Deborah; Rosset, Evelyn

    2009-01-01

    Research has found that children possess a broad bias in favor of teleological--or purpose-based--explanations of natural phenomena. The current two experiments explored whether adults implicitly possess a similar bias. In Study 1, undergraduates judged a series of statements as "good" (i.e., correct) or "bad" (i.e., incorrect) explanations for…

  7. Clinical Trial of Human Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cell Transplantation in Patients with Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoo, Jeehyun; Kim, Il-Sun; Yun, Seokhwan; Lee, Hyejin; Jung, Kwangsoo; Hwang, Kyujin; Kim, Miri; Lee, Il-Shin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Kook In

    2015-01-01

    In a phase I/IIa open-label and nonrandomized controlled clinical trial, we sought to assess the safety and neurological effects of human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSPCs) transplanted into the injured cord after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Of 19 treated subjects, 17 were sensorimotor complete and 2 were motor complete and sensory incomplete. hNSPCs derived from the fetal telencephalon were grown as neurospheres and transplanted into the cord. In the control group, who did not receive cell implantation but were otherwise closely matched with the transplantation group, 15 patients with traumatic cervical SCI were included. At 1 year after cell transplantation, there was no evidence of cord damage, syrinx or tumor formation, neurological deterioration, and exacerbating neuropathic pain or spasticity. The American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade improved in 5 of 19 transplanted patients, 2 (A → C), 1 (A → B), and 2 (B → D), whereas only one patient in the control group showed improvement (A → B). Improvements included increased motor scores, recovery of motor levels, and responses to electrophysiological studies in the transplantation group. Therefore, the transplantation of hNSPCs into cervical SCI is safe and well-tolerated and is of modest neurological benefit up to 1 year after transplants. This trial is registered with Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS), Registration Number: KCT0000879. PMID:26568892

  8. Exclusion of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene and the human achaete-scute homologue 1 gene as candidate loci for spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Twells, R.; Xu, W. |; Ball, D.

    1994-09-01

    The autosomal dominant ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by progressive degeneration of the cerebellum, pons and inferior olives, as well as the spinal cord. We previously mapped the spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 locus (SCA2) to chromosome 12q23-24.1 in a large Cuban founder population, flanked by the markers D12S58 and PLA2. Anticipation is a common feature of this disorder and therefore we have examined genes in this region which contain trinucleotide repeat motifs as candidate loci for SCA2. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS) has recently been assigned to chromosome 12q24.2-24.3 by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Neuronal NOS is responsible for the production of nitric oxide, a neurotransmitter expressed in high levels in the cerebellum as well as other regions of the nervous system. We report here the identification and analysis of an (AAT){sub n} repeat motif in an intronic region of the neuronal NOS gene, genetic mapping data and its exclusion from being involved in SCA2. We also report the exclusion of the human achaete-scute homologue 1 gene (HASH1), instrumental in neurosensory development in mouse, from being involved in SCA2 by the analysis of a proximal (CAG){sub n} repeat motif in the Cuban pedigrees, and its genetic location on chromosome 12q.

  9. Clinical Trial of Human Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cell Transplantation in Patients with Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoo, Jeehyun; Kim, Il-Sun; Yun, Seokhwan; Lee, Hyejin; Jung, Kwangsoo; Hwang, Kyujin; Kim, Miri; Lee, Il-Shin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Kook In

    2015-01-01

    In a phase I/IIa open-label and nonrandomized controlled clinical trial, we sought to assess the safety and neurological effects of human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSPCs) transplanted into the injured cord after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Of 19 treated subjects, 17 were sensorimotor complete and 2 were motor complete and sensory incomplete. hNSPCs derived from the fetal telencephalon were grown as neurospheres and transplanted into the cord. In the control group, who did not receive cell implantation but were otherwise closely matched with the transplantation group, 15 patients with traumatic cervical SCI were included. At 1 year after cell transplantation, there was no evidence of cord damage, syrinx or tumor formation, neurological deterioration, and exacerbating neuropathic pain or spasticity. The American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade improved in 5 of 19 transplanted patients, 2 (A → C), 1 (A → B), and 2 (B → D), whereas only one patient in the control group showed improvement (A → B). Improvements included increased motor scores, recovery of motor levels, and responses to electrophysiological studies in the transplantation group. Therefore, the transplantation of hNSPCs into cervical SCI is safe and well-tolerated and is of modest neurological benefit up to 1 year after transplants. This trial is registered with Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS), Registration Number: KCT0000879.

  10. Teaching Adults with Learning Disabilities. Professional Practices in Adult Education and Human Resource Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Dale R.

    This book is designed to show teachers how to reach out to adults and adolescents with learning disabilities and employ specific strategies for helping them to compensate for the disabilities and acquire literacy skills. The ways in which specific differences in brain structure inhibit the mastery of reading, spelling, handwriting, phonics, and…

  11. Somatosympathetic Vasoconstrictor Reflexes in Human Spinal Cord Injury: Responses to Innocuous and Noxious Sensory Stimulation below Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, Vaughan G.; Burton, Alexander R.; Brown, Rachael

    2012-01-01

    It is known that the sudden increases in blood pressure associated with autonomic dysreflexia in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) are due to a spinally mediated reflex activation of sympathetic vasoconstrictor neurons supplying skeletal muscle and the gut. Apart from visceral inputs, such as those originating from a distended bladder, there is a prevailing opinion that autonomic dysreflexia can be triggered by noxious stimulation below the lesion. However, do noxious inputs really cause an increase in blood pressure in SCI? Using microelectrodes inserted into a peripheral nerve to record sympathetic nerve activity we had previously shown that selective stimulation of small-diameter afferents in muscle or skin, induced by bolus injection of hypertonic saline into the tibialis anterior muscle or the overlying skin, evokes a sustained increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure and a transient increase in skin sympathetic nerve activity and decrease in skin blood flow in able-bodied subjects. We postulated that these sympathetic responses would be exaggerated in SCI, with a purely noxious stimulus causing long-lasting increases in blood pressure and long-lasting decreases in skin blood flow. Surprisingly, though, we found that intramuscular or subcutaneous injection of hypertonic saline into the leg caused negligible changes in these parameters. Conversely, weak electrical stimulation over the abdominal wall, which in able-bodied subjects is not painful and activates large-diameter cutaneous afferents, caused a marked increase in blood pressure in SCI but not in able-bodied subjects. This suggests that it is activation of large-diameter somatic afferents, not small-diameter afferents, that triggers increases in sympathetic outflow in SCI. Whether the responses to activation of large-diameter afferents reflect plastic changes in the spinal cord in SCI is unknown. PMID:22737131

  12. Microsurgical resection of intramedullary spinal cord ependymoma.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2014-09-01

    Ependymomas are the most commonly occurring intramedullary spinal cord tumor in adults. With few exceptions these tumors are histologically benign, although they exhibit some biologic variability with respect to growth rate. While unencapsulated, spinal ependymomas are non-infiltrative and present a clear margin of demarcation from the surrounding spinal cord that serves as an effective dissection plane. This video demonstrates the technique of microsurgical resection of an intramedullary ependymoma through a posterior midline myelotomy. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/lcHhymSvSqU. PMID:25175587

  13. Human psychophysics and rodent spinal neurones exhibit peripheral and central mechanisms of inflammatory pain in the UVB and UVB heat rekindling models.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Jessica; Sikandar, Shafaq; McMahon, Stephen B; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Translational research is key to bridging the gaps between preclinical findings and the patients, and a translational model of inflammatory pain will ideally induce both peripheral and central sensitisation, more effectively mimicking clinical pathophysiology in some chronic inflammatory conditions. We conducted a parallel investigation of two models of inflammatory pain, using ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation alone and UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. We used rodent electrophysiology and human quantitative sensory testing to characterise nociceptive processing in the peripheral and central nervous systems in both models. In both species, UVB irradiation produces peripheral sensitisation measured as augmented evoked activity of rat dorsal horn neurones and increased perceptual responses of human subjects to mechanical and thermal stimuli. In both species, UVB with heat rekindling produces central sensitisation. UVB irradiation alone and UVB with heat rekindling are translational models of inflammation that produce peripheral and central sensitisation, respectively. The predictive value of laboratory models for human pain processing is crucial for improving translational research. The discrepancy between peripheral and central mechanisms of pain is an important consideration for drug targets, and here we describe two models of inflammatory pain that involve ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, which can employ peripheral and central sensitisation to produce mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats and humans. We use electrophysiology in rats to measure the mechanically- and thermally-evoked activity of rat spinal neurones and quantitative sensory testing to assess human psychophysical responses to mechanical and thermal stimulation in a model of UVB irradiation and in a model of UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. Our results demonstrate peripheral sensitisation in both species driven by UVB irradiation, with a clear mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of

  14. Human psychophysics and rodent spinal neurones exhibit peripheral and central mechanisms of inflammatory pain in the UVB and UVB heat rekindling models.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Jessica; Sikandar, Shafaq; McMahon, Stephen B; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Translational research is key to bridging the gaps between preclinical findings and the patients, and a translational model of inflammatory pain will ideally induce both peripheral and central sensitisation, more effectively mimicking clinical pathophysiology in some chronic inflammatory conditions. We conducted a parallel investigation of two models of inflammatory pain, using ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation alone and UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. We used rodent electrophysiology and human quantitative sensory testing to characterise nociceptive processing in the peripheral and central nervous systems in both models. In both species, UVB irradiation produces peripheral sensitisation measured as augmented evoked activity of rat dorsal horn neurones and increased perceptual responses of human subjects to mechanical and thermal stimuli. In both species, UVB with heat rekindling produces central sensitisation. UVB irradiation alone and UVB with heat rekindling are translational models of inflammation that produce peripheral and central sensitisation, respectively. The predictive value of laboratory models for human pain processing is crucial for improving translational research. The discrepancy between peripheral and central mechanisms of pain is an important consideration for drug targets, and here we describe two models of inflammatory pain that involve ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, which can employ peripheral and central sensitisation to produce mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats and humans. We use electrophysiology in rats to measure the mechanically- and thermally-evoked activity of rat spinal neurones and quantitative sensory testing to assess human psychophysical responses to mechanical and thermal stimulation in a model of UVB irradiation and in a model of UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. Our results demonstrate peripheral sensitisation in both species driven by UVB irradiation, with a clear mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of

  15. The human function compunction: teleological explanation in adults.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Deborah; Rosset, Evelyn

    2009-04-01

    Research has found that children possess a broad bias in favor of teleological--or purpose-based--explanations of natural phenomena. The current two experiments explored whether adults implicitly possess a similar bias. In Study 1, undergraduates judged a series of statements as "good" (i.e., correct) or "bad" (i.e., incorrect) explanations for why different phenomena occur. Judgments occurred in one of three conditions: fast speeded, moderately speeded, or unspeeded. Participants in speeded conditions judged significantly more scientifically unwarranted teleological explanations as correct (e.g., "the sun radiates heat because warmth nurtures life"), but were not more error-prone on control items (e.g., unwarranted physical explanations such as "hills form because floodwater freezes"). Study 2 extended these findings by examining the relationship between different aspects of adults' "promiscuous teleology" and other variables such as scientific knowledge, religious beliefs, and inhibitory control. Implications of these findings for scientific literacy are discussed. PMID:19200537

  16. Spinal instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Spivak, J M; Balderston, R A

    1994-03-01

    The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the availability of spinal instrumentation devices, enabling surgeons to treat a variety of spinal disorders with improved results and lower morbidity. In each anatomic region new fixation systems exist. Improvement in fusion rates with supplemental plate fixation following anterior cervical diskectomies and reconstructions has been demonstrated; these devices can now be applied more safely than ever before. Posterior occipitocervical plating to the C-2 pedicle and C3-6 lateral masses can provide stable fixation despite incompetent posterior arch bony structures. Newer, more rigid anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation allows for correction of thoracolumbar and lumbar scoliosis along fewer levels and with better maintenance of lordosis and is also useful following anterior decompression for tumor and trauma. Segmental hook fixation of the posterior thoracolumbar spine has allowed for improved correction of deformity without increased morbidity or the need for postoperative bracing in many cases. Finally, the use of transpedicular screw fixation of the lumbosacral spine allows for excellent segmental fixation without intact posterior elements, including facet joints, and has significantly improved the fusion rate in lumbosacral fusions. PMID:8024965

  17. The Adult Learning Disabled Employee: The Organization's Hidden Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macomber, Janet A.

    This paper describes an experiment with background material designed to promote problem (learning disabled) employees as human resources rather than rejects. The material is presented in the form of the transcript of a fictional advisory committee meeting attended by the human resources manager, assistant corporate counsel, training director, line…

  18. Adult Education and Human Capital: Leadership from the Fortune 500.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Teresa M.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 333 Fortune 500 firms received 81 replies indicating that (1) two-thirds formally recognized the value of human resources; (2) most had changed corporate policy regarding human capital; and (3) most training was provided in the ares of new employee orientation, current job needs, customer relations, personal development, and…

  19. Alternative Sources of Adult Stem Cells: Human Amniotic Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbank, Susanne; van Griensven, Martijn; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Peterbauer-Scherb, Anja

    Human amniotic membrane is a highly promising cell source for tissue engineering. The cells thereof, human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) and human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSC), may be immunoprivileged, they represent an early developmental status, and their application is ethically uncontroversial. Cell banking strategies may use freshly isolated cells or involve in vitro expansion to increase cell numbers. Therefore, we have thoroughly characterized the effect of in vitro cultivation on both phenotype and differentiation potential of hAEC. Moreover, we present different strategies to improve expansion including replacement of animal-derived supplements by human platelet products or the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase to extend the in vitro lifespan of amniotic cells. Characterization of the resulting cultures includes phenotype, growth characteristics, and differentiation potential, as well as immunogenic and immunomodulatory properties.

  20. Pathophysiology of primary spinal syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, John D.; Snyder, Kendall; Peterson, Matthew M.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Butman, John A.; Smith, René K.; DeVroom, Hetty L.; Sansur, Charles A.; Eskioglu, Eric; Kammerer, William A.; Oldfield, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Object The pathogenesis of syringomyelia in patients with an associated spinal lesion is incompletely understood. The authors hypothesized that in primary spinal syringomyelia, a subarachnoid block effectively shortens the length of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), reducing compliance and the ability of the spinal theca to dampen the subarachnoid CSF pressure waves produced by brain expansion during cardiac systole. This creates exaggerated spinal subarachnoid pressure waves during every heartbeat that act on the spinal cord above the block to drive CSF into the spinal cord and create a syrinx. After a syrinx is formed, enlarged subarachnoid pressure waves compress the external surface of the spinal cord, propel the syrinx fluid, and promote syrinx progression. Methods To elucidate the pathophysiology, the authors prospectively studied 36 adult patients with spinal lesions obstructing the spinal SAS. Testing before surgery included clinical examination; evaluation of anatomy on T1-weighted MRI; measurement of lumbar and cervical subarachnoid mean and pulse pressures at rest, during Valsalva maneuver, during jugular compression, and after removal of CSF (CSF compliance measurement); and evaluation with CT myelography. During surgery, pressure measurements from the SAS above the level of the lesion and the lumbar intrathecal space below the lesion were obtained, and cardiac-gated ultrasonography was performed. One week after surgery, CT myelography was repeated. Three months after surgery, clinical examination, T1-weighted MRI, and CSF pressure recordings (cervical and lumbar) were repeated. Clinical examination and MRI studies were repeated annually thereafter. Findings in patients were compared with those obtained in a group of 18 healthy individuals who had already undergone T1-weighted MRI, cine MRI, and cervical and lumbar subarachnoid pressure testing. Results In syringomyelia patients compared with healthy volunteers, cervical subarachnoid pulse pressure

  1. Synergistic effects of transplanted adult neural stem/progenitor cells, chondroitinase, and growth factors promote functional repair and plasticity of the chronically injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Wang, Jian; Schut, Desiree; Fehlings, Michael G

    2010-02-01

    The transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury (SCI). However, to date NPC transplantation has exhibited only limited success in the treatment of chronic SCI. Here, we show that chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in the glial scar around the site of chronic SCI negatively influence the long-term survival and integration of transplanted NPCs and their therapeutic potential for promoting functional repair and plasticity. We targeted CSPGs in the chronically injured spinal cord by sustained infusion of chondroitinase ABC (ChABC). One week later, the same rats were treated with transplants of NPCs and transient infusion of growth factors, EGF, bFGF, and PDGF-AA. We demonstrate that perturbing CSPGs dramatically optimizes NPC transplantation in chronic SCI. Engrafted NPCs successfully integrate and extensively migrate within the host spinal cord and principally differentiate into oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, this combined strategy promoted the axonal integrity and plasticity of the corticospinal tract and enhanced the plasticity of descending serotonergic pathways. These neuroanatomical changes were also associated with significantly improved neurobehavioral recovery after chronic SCI. Importantly, this strategy did not enhance the aberrant synaptic connectivity of pain afferents, nor did it exacerbate posttraumatic neuropathic pain. For the first time, we demonstrate key biological and functional benefits for the combined use of ChABC, growth factors, and NPCs to repair the chronically injured spinal cord. These findings could potentially bring us closer to the application of NPCs for patients suffering from chronic SCI or other conditions characterized by the formation of a glial scar.

  2. A combination therapy of neural and glial restricted precursor cells and chronic quipazine treatment paired with passive cycling promotes quipazine-induced stepping in adult spinalized rats

    PubMed Central

    Shumsky, Jed S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In order to develop optimal treatments to promote recovery from complete spinal cord injury (SCI), we examined the combination of: (1) a cellular graft of neural and glial restricted precursor (NRP/GRP) cells, (2) passive exercise, and (3) chronic quipazine treatment on behavioral outcomes and compared them with the individual treatment elements. NRP/GRP cells were transplanted at the time of spinalization. Methods Daily passive exercise began 1 week after injury to give sufficient time for the animals to recover. Chronic quipazine administration began 2 weeks after spinalization to allow for sufficient receptor upregulation permitting the expression of its behavioral effects. Behavioral measures consisted of the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor score and percent of weight-supported steps and hops on a treadmill. Results Rats displayed an increased response to quipazine (BBB ≥ 9) beginning at 8 weeks post-injury in all the animals that received the combination therapy. This increase in BBB score was persistent through the end of the study (12 weeks post-injury). Conclusion Unlike the individual treatment groups which never achieved weight support, the combination therapy animals were able to perform uncoordinated weight-supported stepping without a body weight support system while on a moving treadmill (6.5 m per minute) and were capable of supporting their own weight in stance during open field locomotion testing. No regeneration of descending serotonergic projections into and through the lesion cavity was observed. Furthermore, these results are a testament to the capacity of the lumbar spinal cord, when properly stimulated, to sustain functioning locomotor circuitry following complete SCI. PMID:25329574

  3. Neutralization of inhibitory molecule NG2 improves synaptic transmission, retrograde transport, and locomotor function after spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Hunanyan, Arsen S; Alessi, Valentina; Schnell, Lisa; Levine, Joel; Arvanian, Victor L

    2013-02-27

    NG2 belongs to the family of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that are upregulated after spinal cord injury (SCI) and are major inhibitory factors restricting the growth of fibers after SCI. Neutralization of NG2's inhibitory effect on axon growth by anti-NG2 monoclonal antibodies (NG2-Ab) has been reported. In addition, recent studies show that exogenous NG2 induces a block of axonal conduction. In this study, we demonstrate that acute intraspinal injections of NG2-Ab prevented an acute block of conduction by NG2. Chronic intrathecal infusion of NG2-Ab improved the following deficits induced by chronic midthoracic lateral hemisection (HX) injury: (1) synaptic transmission to lumbar motoneurons, (2) retrograde transport of fluororuby anatomical tracer from L5 to L1, and (3) locomotor function assessed by automated CatWalk gait analysis. We collected data in an attempt to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the NG2-Ab-induced improvement of synaptic transmission in HX-injured spinal cord. These data showed the following: (1) that chronic NG2-Ab infusion improved conduction and axonal excitability in chronically HX-injured rats, (2) that antibody treatment increased the density of serotonergic axons with ventral regions of spinal segments L1-L5, (3) and that NG2-positive processes contact nodes of Ranvier within the nodal gap at the location of nodal Na(+) channels, which are known to be critical for propagation of action potentials along axons. Together, these results demonstrate that treatment with NG2-Ab partially improves both synaptic and anatomical plasticity in damaged spinal cord and promotes functional recovery after HX SCI. Neutralizing antibodies against NG2 may be an excellent way to promote axonal conduction after SCI. PMID:23447612

  4. Quantification of 10 elements in human cerebrospinal fluid from chronic pain patients with and without spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Korvela, Marcus; Lind, Anne-Li; Wetterhall, Magnus; Gordh, Torsten; Andersson, Marit; Pettersson, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Neuropathic pain affects 1-10% of the general population and is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS), a method where implanted electrodes stimulate the spinal cord, has been successfully used to treat drug-resistant neuropathic pain, but the mechanism of action is largely unknown. Studies show that SCS changes the protein levels in CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) of pain patients. Several neurological conditions have been shown to alter the elemental composition of CSF. Therefore changes in the levels of ions and trace elements in the CSF may correspond to SCS use. This study used ICP-MS (Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy) to quantify 10 elements in CSF from chronic neuropathic pain patients using SCS. The element concentrations in CSF from patients with SCS treatment on/off, were measured. No effect on the element concentrations in CSF from treatment with SCS could be detected. Also, the elemental concentrations in pooled CSF from patients without chronic neuropathic pain was determined and compared to the patients using SCS. The concentration of the elements Ca, Sr, Na, K, P, Mg and Ti were, significantly higher in patients compared to the CSF-control. PMID:27473826

  5. Short-term effect of electrical nerve stimulation on spinal reciprocal inhibition during robot-assisted passive stepping in humans.

    PubMed

    Obata, Hiroki; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Taku; Masugi, Yohei; Takahashi, Miho; Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of electrical stimulation to the common peroneal nerve (CPN) on the spinal reflex and reciprocal inhibition (RI) during robot-assisted passive ground stepping (PGS) in healthy subjects. Five interventions were applied for 30 min in healthy subjects: PGS alone; strong CPN stimulation [50% of the maximal tibialis anterior (TA) M-wave, functional electrical stimulation (FES)] alone; weak CPN stimulation [just above the MT for the TA muscle, therapeutic electrical stimulation (TES)] alone; PGS with FES; and PGS with TES. FES and TES were applied intermittently to the CPN at 25 Hz. The soleus (Sol) H-reflex and RI, which was assessed by conditioning the Sol H-reflex with CPN stimulation, were investigated before (baseline), and 5, 15 and 30 min after each intervention. The amplitudes of the Sol H-reflex were not significantly different after each intervention as compared with the baseline values. The amounts of RI were significantly decreased 5 min after PGS with FES as compared with the baseline values, whereas they were significantly increased 5 and 15 min after PGS with TES. The other interventions did not affect the amount of RI. These results suggest that interventions that combined PGS with CPN stimulation changed the spinal RI in an intensity-dependent manner. PMID:26108136

  6. Short-term effect of electrical nerve stimulation on spinal reciprocal inhibition during robot-assisted passive stepping in humans.

    PubMed

    Obata, Hiroki; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Taku; Masugi, Yohei; Takahashi, Miho; Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of electrical stimulation to the common peroneal nerve (CPN) on the spinal reflex and reciprocal inhibition (RI) during robot-assisted passive ground stepping (PGS) in healthy subjects. Five interventions were applied for 30 min in healthy subjects: PGS alone; strong CPN stimulation [50% of the maximal tibialis anterior (TA) M-wave, functional electrical stimulation (FES)] alone; weak CPN stimulation [just above the MT for the TA muscle, therapeutic electrical stimulation (TES)] alone; PGS with FES; and PGS with TES. FES and TES were applied intermittently to the CPN at 25 Hz. The soleus (Sol) H-reflex and RI, which was assessed by conditioning the Sol H-reflex with CPN stimulation, were investigated before (baseline), and 5, 15 and 30 min after each intervention. The amplitudes of the Sol H-reflex were not significantly different after each intervention as compared with the baseline values. The amounts of RI were significantly decreased 5 min after PGS with FES as compared with the baseline values, whereas they were significantly increased 5 and 15 min after PGS with TES. The other interventions did not affect the amount of RI. These results suggest that interventions that combined PGS with CPN stimulation changed the spinal RI in an intensity-dependent manner.

  7. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Harimurti, Kuntjoro; Saldi, Siti R F; Dewiasty, Esthika; Khoeri, Miftahuddin M; Yunihastuti, Evi; Putri, Tiara; Tafroji, Wisnu; Safari, Dodi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the distribution of serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae carried by adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Jakarta, Indonesia. Specimens of nasopharyngeal swab were collected from 200 HIV infected adults aged 21 to 63 years. Identification of S. pneumoniae was done by optochin susceptibility test and PCR for the presence of psaA and lytA genes. Serotyping was performed with sequential multiplex PCR and antibiotic susceptibility with the disk diffusion method. S. pneumoniae strains were carried by 10% adults with serotype 6A/B 20% was common serotype among cultured strains in 20 adults. Most of isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol (80%) followed by clindamycin (75%), erythromycin (75%), penicillin (55%), and tetracycline (50%). This study found resistance to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was most common with only 15% of strains being susceptible. High non-susceptibility to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim was observed in S. pneumoniae strains carried by HIV infected adults in Jakarta, Indonesia.

  8. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Song, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and brain tumors. PMID:27375363

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Song, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and brain tumors. PMID:27375363

  10. [Dietary phytoestrogen and its potential benefits in adult human health].

    PubMed

    Garrido, Argelia; de la Maza, María Pía; Valladares, Luis

    2003-11-01

    Human diet contains a series of bioactive vegetal compounds that can improve human health. Among these, there has been a special interest for phytoestrogens. This article reviews the evidence about the potential benefits of phytoestrogens for human health. Forty eight manuscripts were selected for their study design and relevance to human health. The cell growth inhibitory effects of phytoestrogens and their implication in breast cancer are reviewed. Also the effects of these compounds on serum lipid levels and the effectiveness of a phytoestrogen derivate, ipriflavone, on the prevention of osteoporosis are analyzed. Although these compounds have a great potential for improving health, there is still not enough evidence to recommend the routine use of phytoestrogens.

  11. Cold Preservation of Human Adult Hepatocytes for Liver Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Duret, Cedric; Moreno, Daniel; Balasiddaiah, Anangi; Roux, Solene; Briolotti, Phillipe; Raulet, Edith; Herrero, Astrid; Ramet, Helene; Biron-Andreani, Christine; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine; Ramos, Jeanne; Navarro, Francis; Hardwigsen, Jean; Maurel, Patrick; Aldabe, Rafael; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation is a promising alternative therapy for the treatment of hepatic failure, hepatocellular deficiency, and genetic metabolic disorders. Hypothermic preservation of isolated human hepatocytes is potentially a simple and convenient strategy to provide on-demand hepatocytes in sufficient quantity and of the quality required for biotherapy. In this study, first we assessed how cold storage in three clinically safe preservative solutions (UW, HTS-FRS, and IGL-1) affects the viability and in vitro functionality of human hepatocytes. Then we evaluated whether such cold-preserved human hepatocytes could engraft and repopulate damaged livers in a mouse model of liver failure. Human hepatocytes showed comparable viabilities after cold preservation in the three solutions. The ability of fresh and cold-stored hepatocytes to attach to a collagen substratum and to synthesize and secrete albumin, coagulation factor VII, and urea in the medium after 3 days in culture was also equally preserved. Cold-stored hepatocytes were then transplanted in the spleen of immunodeficient mice previously infected with adenoviruses containing a thymidine kinase construct and treated with a single dose of ganciclovir to induce liver injury. Engraftment and liver repopulation were monitored over time by measuring the blood level of human albumin and by assessing the expression of specific human hepatic mRNAs and proteins in the recipient livers by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Our findings show that cold-stored human hepatocytes in IGL-1 and HTS-FRS preservative solutions can survive, engraft, and proliferate in a damaged mouse liver. These results demonstrate the usefulness of human hepatocyte hypothermic preservation for cell transplantation. PMID:25622096

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to a rat nestin fusion protein recognize a 220-kDa polypeptide in subsets of fetal and adult human central nervous system neurons and in primitive neuroectodermal tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tohyama, T.; Lee, V. M.; Rorke, L. B.; Marvin, M.; McKay, R. D.; Trojanowski, J. Q.

    1993-01-01

    Nestin is the major intermediate filament protein of embryonic central nervous system (CNS) progenitor cells. To identify proteins involved in early stages of lineage commitment in the developing human CNS we generated monoclonal antibodies to a TrpE-rat nestin fusion protein. This resulted in a monoclonal antibody (designated NST11) that did not recognize authentic human nestin, but did recognize a novel neuron-specific human polypeptide expressed in a subset of embryonic and adult CNS neurons as well as in medulloblastomas. NST11 immunoreactivity was abundant in developing spinal cord motor neurons, but was extinguished in these neurons by 17 weeks gestation. NST11 also labeled Purkinje cells at 17 weeks gestation, but Purkinje cells continued to express the NST11 antigen throughout gestation as well as in the adult cerebellum, and NST11 immunoreactivity was more abundant in Purkinje cells than in any other human CNS neurons. No NST11 immunoreactivity was detected in cells of the adult human peripheral nervous system or in a variety of adult non-neural human tissues. Further, NST11 almost exclusively stained cerebellar medulloblastomas. In Western blots of immature and mature human cerebral and cerebellar extracts, NST11 did not bind human nestin, but did detect an immunoband with a molecular weight of 220 kd. A similar immunoband was detected in medulloblastoma-derived cell lines with a neuron-like phenotype. These findings suggest that the NST11 monoclonal antibody recognizes a novel protein expressed by a subpopulation of immature and mature human CNS neurons, medulloblastomas, and medulloblastoma-derived cell lines. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7686344

  13. A century of trends in adult human height.

    PubMed

    2016-07-26

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5-22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3-19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8-144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries.

  14. A century of trends in adult human height

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13410.001 PMID:27458798

  15. Resident aerobic microbiota of the adult human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, T T; Kirkeby, L P; Poulsen, K; Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M

    2000-10-01

    Recent evidence strongly suggests that the microbiota of the nasal cavity plays a crucial role in determining the reaction patterns of the mucosal and systemic immune system. However, little is known about the normal microbiota of the nasal cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine the microbiota in different parts of the nasal cavity and to develop and evaluate methods for this purpose. Samples were collected from 10 healthy adults by nasal washes and by swabbing of the mucosa through a sterile introduction device. Both methods gave results that were quantitatively and qualitatively reproducible, and revealed significant differences in the density of the nasal microbiota between individuals. The study revealed absence of gram-negative bacteria that are regular members of the commensal microbiota of the pharynx. Likewise, viridans type streptococci were sparsely represented. The nasal microbiota was dominated by species of the genera Corynebacterium, Aureobacterium, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus, including S. epidermis, S. capitis, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis and S. warneri. These studies show that the microbiota of the nasal cavity of adults is strikingly different from that of the pharynx, and that the nasal cavity is a primary habitat for several species of diphtheroids recognized as opportunistic pathogens. Under special circumstances, single species, including IgA1 protease-producing bacteria, may become predominant in a restricted area of the nasal mucosa. PMID:11200821

  16. A century of trends in adult human height.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5-22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3-19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8-144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. PMID:27458798

  17. Hesperetin induces melanin production in adult human epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Usach, Iris; Taléns-Visconti, Raquel; Magraner-Pardo, Lorena; Peris, José-Esteban

    2015-06-01

    One of the major sources of flavonoids for humans are citrus fruits, hesperidin being the predominant flavonoid. Hesperetin (HSP), the aglycon of hesperidin, has been reported to provide health benefits such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. However, the effect of HSP on skin pigmentation is not clear. Some authors have found that HSP induces melanogenesis in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells, which, if extrapolated to in vivo conditions, might protect skin against photodamage. Since the effect of HSP on normal melanocytes could be different to that observed on melanoma cells, the described effect of HSP on murine melanoma cells has been compared to the effect obtained using normal human melanocytes. HSP concentrations of 25 and 50 µM induced melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in human melanocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to control melanocytes, 25 µM HSP increased melanin production and tyrosinase activity 1.4-fold (p < 0.01) and 1.1-fold (p < 0.01), respectively, and the corresponding increases in the case of 50 µM HSP were 1.9-fold (p < 0.001) and 1.3-fold (p < 0.001). Therefore, HSP could be considered a valuable photoprotective substance if its capacity to increase melanin production in human melanocyte cultures could be reproduced on human skin.

  18. Validation of the cat as a model for the human lumbar spine during simulated high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ianuzzi, Allyson; Pickar, Joel G; Khalsa, Partap S

    2010-07-01

    High-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is an efficacious treatment for low back pain, although the physiological mechanisms underlying its effects remain elusive. The lumbar facet joint capsule (FJC) is innervated with mechanically sensitive neurons and it has been theorized that the neurophysiological benefits of HVLA-SM are partially induced by stimulation of FJC neurons. Biomechanical aspects of this theory have been investigated in humans while neurophysiological aspects have been investigated using cat models. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between human and cat lumbar spines during HVLA-SM. Cat lumbar spine specimens were mechanically tested, using a displacement-controlled apparatus, during simulated HVLA-SM applied at L5, L6, and L7 that produced preload forces of approximately 25% bodyweight for 0.5 s and peak forces that rose to 50-100% bodyweight within approximately 125 ms, similar to that delivered clinically. Joint kinematics and FJC strain were measured optically. Human FJC strain and kinematics data were taken from a prior study. Regression models were established for FJC strain magnitudes as functions of factors species, manipulation site, and interactions thereof. During simulated HVLA-SM, joint kinematics in cat spines were greater in magnitude compared with humans. Similar to human spines, site-specific HVLA-SM produced regional cat FJC strains at distant motion segments. Joint motions and FJC strain magnitudes for cat spines were larger than those for human spine specimens. Regression relationships demonstrated that species, HVLA-SM site, and interactions thereof were significantly and moderately well correlated for HVLA-SM that generated tensile strain in the FJC. The relationships established in the current study can be used in future neurophysiological studies conducted in cats to extrapolate how human FJC afferents might respond to HVLA-SM. The data from the current study warrant further

  19. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Seibold, Max A.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  20. ALS disrupts spinal motor neuron maturation and aging pathways within gene co-expression networks.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ritchie; Sances, Samuel; Gowing, Genevieve; Amoroso, Mackenzie Weygandt; O'Rourke, Jacqueline G; Sahabian, Anais; Wichterle, Hynek; Baloh, Robert H; Sareen, Dhruv; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-09-01

    Modeling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) aims to reenact embryogenesis, maturation and aging of spinal motor neurons (spMNs) in vitro. As the maturity of spMNs grown in vitro compared to spMNs in vivo remains largely unaddressed, it is unclear to what extent this in vitro system captures critical aspects of spMN development and molecular signatures associated with ALS. Here, we compared transcriptomes among iPSC-derived spMNs, fetal spinal tissues and adult spinal tissues. This approach produced a maturation scale revealing that iPSC-derived spMNs were more similar to fetal spinal tissue than to adult spMNs. Additionally, we resolved gene networks and pathways associated with spMN maturation and aging. These networks enriched for pathogenic familial ALS genetic variants and were disrupted in sporadic ALS spMNs. Altogether, our findings suggest that developing strategies to further mature and age iPSC-derived spMNs will provide more effective iPSC models of ALS pathology. PMID:27428653

  1. Fictive motor patterns in chronic spinal cats.

    PubMed

    Pearson, K G; Rossignol, S

    1991-12-01

    1. Fictive motor patterns were recorded in hind leg nerves of 10 adult chronic spinal cats (spinalized at T13). Four of these animals had been trained to step with their hind legs on a treadmill (late-spinal animals), whereas the remainder received no training and were examined a short time after spinalization (early-spinal animals). 2. A fictive pattern resembling the locomotor pattern for stepping was evoked in all animals in response to stimulation of the skin of the perineal region. (2-[2,6-Dichloroaniline]-2-imidazoline) hydrochloride (Clonidine) at doses ranging from 100 to 500 micrograms/kg iv facilitated the production of this pattern, particularly in early-spinal animals. 3. The fictive locomotor pattern in late-spinal animals was more complex than that occurring in early-spinal animals. In the latter the pattern consisted of an alternation of activity in flexor and extensor nerves, and changing leg position did not qualitatively alter the pattern, whereas in late-spinal animals the relative durations of the bursts in different flexors were usually not the same, and the pattern of flexor activity was dependent on leg position. 4. Moving the legs from extension to flexion progressively decreased the duration of flexor bursts, increased the cycle period, and decreased the ease with which the pattern could be evoked in both early- and late-spinal animals. 5. 1-beta-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)/Isonocotinic acid 2-[(2-benzylcarbamoyl)ethyl]hydrazide (Nialamide) treatment following Clonidine in early-spinal animals increased the complexity of flexor burst activity. This, and other observations, indicates that DOPA and Clonidine do not have strictly identical actions on the locomotor pattern generator. 6. Stimulation of the paws in late-spinal animals produced two patterns of activity distinctly different from the locomotor pattern. of activity distinctly different from the locomotor pattern. One was a short sequence of high-frequency rhythmic activity (at

  2. Corticospinal and Reticulospinal Contacts on Cervical Commissural and Long Descending Propriospinal Neurons in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord; Evidence for Powerful Reticulospinal Connections

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Emma J.; McCallum, Sarah; Dewar, Deborah; Maxwell, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Descending systems have a crucial role in the selection of motor output patterns by influencing the activity of interneuronal networks in the spinal cord. Commissural interneurons that project to the contralateral grey matter are key components of such networks as they coordinate left-right motor activity of fore and hind-limbs. The aim of this study was to determine if corticospinal (CST) and reticulospinal (RST) neurons make significant numbers of axonal contacts with cervical commissural interneurons. Two classes of commissural neurons were analysed: 1) local commissural interneurons (LCINs) in segments C4-5; 2) long descending propriospinal neurons (LDPNs) projecting from C4 to the rostral lumbar cord. Commissural interneurons were labelled with Fluorogold and CST and RST axons were labelled by injecting the b subunit of cholera toxin in the forelimb area of the primary somatosensory cortex or the medial longitudinal fasciculus respectively. The results show that LCINs and LDPNs receive few contacts from CST terminals but large numbers of contacts are formed by RST terminals. Use of vesicular glutamate and vesicular GABA transporters revealed that both types of cell received about 80% excitatory and 20% inhibitory RST contacts. Therefore the CST appears to have a minimal influence on LCINs and LDPNs but the RST has a powerful influence. This suggests that left-right activity in the rat spinal cord is not influenced directly via CST systems but is strongly controlled by the RST pathway. Many RST neurons have monosynaptic input from corticobulbar pathways therefore this pathway may provide an indirect route from the cortex to commissural systems. The cortico-reticulospinal-commissural system may also contribute to functional recovery following damage to the CST as it has the capacity to deliver information from the cortex to the spinal cord in the absence of direct CST input. PMID:26999665

  3. Pediatric spinal cord injury: a review by organ system.

    PubMed

    Powell, Aaron; Davidson, Loren

    2015-02-01

    In this article, an overview is provided of pediatric spinal cord injury, organized by effects of this injury on various organ systems. Specific management differences between children and adults with spinal cord injury are highlighted. A detailed management approach is offered for particularly complex topics, such as spasticity and upper extremity reconstruction. PMID:25479784

  4. Primary osseous tumors of the pediatric spinal column: review of pathology and surgical decision making.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Eli, Ilyas M; Schmidt, Meic H; Brockmeyer, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    Spinal column tumors are rare in children and young adults, accounting for only 1% of all spine and spinal cord tumors combined. They often present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. In this article, the authors review the current management of primary osseous tumors of the pediatric spinal column and highlight diagnosis, management, and surgical decision making. PMID:27476845

  5. Primary osseous tumors of the pediatric spinal column: review of pathology and surgical decision making.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Eli, Ilyas M; Schmidt, Meic H; Brockmeyer, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    Spinal column tumors are rare in children and young adults, accounting for only 1% of all spine and spinal cord tumors combined. They often present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. In this article, the authors review the current management of primary osseous tumors of the pediatric spinal column and highlight diagnosis, management, and surgical decision making.

  6. A comparison of commercially available demineralized bone matrices with and without human mesenchymal stem cells in a rodent spinal fusion model.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tetsuo; Lord, Elizabeth L; Suzuki, Akinobu; Takahashi, Shinji; Scott, Trevor P; Phan, Kevin; Tian, Haijun; Daubs, Michael D; Shiba, Keiichiro; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The efficacy of some demineralized bone matrix (DBM) substances has been demonstrated in the spinal fusion of rats; however, no previous comparative study has reported the efficacy of DBM with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). There is an added cost to the products with stem cells, which should be justified by improved osteogenic potential. The purpose of this study is to prospectively compare the fusion rates of 3 different commercially available DBM substances, both with and without hMSCs. METHODS Posterolateral fusion was performed in 32 mature athymic nude rats. Three groups of 8 rats were implanted with 1 of 3 DBMs: Trinity Evolution (DBM with stem cells), Grafton (DBM without stem cells), or DBX (DBM without stem cells). A fourth group with no implanted material was used as a control group. Radiographs were obtained at 2, 4, and 8 weeks. The rats were euthanized at 8 weeks. Overall fusion was determined by manual palpation and micro-CT. RESULTS The fusion rates at 8 weeks on the radiographs for Trinity Evolution, Grafton, and DBX were 8 of 8 rats, 3 of 8 rats, and 5 of 8 rats, respectively. A significant difference was found between Trinity Evolution and Grafton (p = 0.01). The overall fusion rates as determined by micro-CT and manual palpation for Trinity Evolution, Grafton, and DBX were 4 of 8 rats, 3 of 8 rats, and 3 of 8 rats, respectively. The Trinity Evolution substance had the highest overall fusion rate, however no significant difference was found between groups. CONCLUSIONS The efficacies of these DBM substances are demonstrated; however, the advantage of DBM with hMSCs could not be found in terms of posterolateral fusion. When evaluating spinal fusion using DBM substances, CT analysis is necessary in order to not overestimate fusion.

  7. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high‐dose hormone application in adult female‐to‐male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel‐based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting‐state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone‐dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language‐specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738–1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  8. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus. PMID:26553817

  9. Ergonomics and biology of spinal rotation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shrawan

    2004-03-15

    Spinal rotation, though being a very common motion of the body, is poorly understood. Furthermore, this motion and the extent of its development is unique to the human. Beyond the extent of its need in common activities, spinal rotation is a destabilizating motion for an inherently unstable structure. Spinal rotation has been argued to be an essential feature for an efficient bipedal gait. Also, it provides leverage to the upper extremities in delivering a forceful impact. An artificial restriction/elimination of spinal rotation resulted in significantly shorter stride length, slower walking velocity, and higher energy consumption in walking (p < 0.05). Spinal rotation also decreases the amount of force the spinal muscles can generate (to 25% of spinal extension). However, its extensive employment in industrial activities has been associated with 60.4% of back injuries. It is further stated that the amount of scientific information currently available is inadequate to biomechanically model the spinal response in a working environment. For example, when the spine is pre-rotated, a further rotation in the direction of pre-rotation decreases the force production significantly (p < 0.01) and increases the EMG activity significantly (p < 0.01) but the pattern changes with effort in the opposite direction. This and other properties (described in the paper) render biomechanical models inadequate. Muscle activation pattern and neuromotor behaviour of spinal muscles in flexion/extension and rotation of the spine are significantly different from each other (p < 0.01). The localized fatigue in different spinal muscles in the same contraction is significantly different and has been called differential fatigue. Finally, the trunk rotation, being pivotal for bipedal locomotion has brought many back problems to the human race.

  10. Mean Arterial Blood Pressure Correlates with Neurological Recovery after Human Spinal Cord Injury: Analysis of High Frequency Physiologic Data.

    PubMed

    Hawryluk, Gregory; Whetstone, William; Saigal, Rajiv; Ferguson, Adam; Talbott, Jason; Bresnahan, Jacqueline; Dhall, Sanjay; Pan, Jonathan; Beattie, Michael; Manley, Geoffrey

    2015-12-15

    Current guidelines for the care of patients with acute spinal cord injuries (SCIs) recommend maintaining mean arterial pressure (MAP) values of 85-90 mm Hg for 7 days after an acute SCI however, little evidence supports this recommendation. We sought to better inform the relationship between MAP values and neurological recovery. A computer system automatically collected and stored q1 min physiological data from intensive care unit monitors on patients with SCI over a 6-year period. Data for 100 patients with acute SCI were collected. 74 of these patients had American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades determined by physical examination on admission and at time of hospital discharge. Average MAP values as well as the proportion of MAP values below thresholds were explored for values from 120 mm Hg to 40 mm Hg in 1 mm Hg increments; the relationship between these measures and outcome was explored at various time points up to 30 days from the time of injury. A total of 994,875 q1 min arterial line blood pressure measurements were recorded for the included patients amid 1,688,194 min of recorded intensive care observations. A large proportion of measures were below 85 mm Hg despite generally acceptable average MAP values. Higher average MAP values correlated with improved recovery in the first 2-3 days after SCI while the proportion of MAP values below the accepted threshold of 85 mm Hg seemed a stronger correlate, decreasing in strength over the first 5-7 days after injury. This study provides strong evidence supporting a correlation between MAP values and neurological recovery. It does not, however, provide evidence of a causal relationship. Duration of hypotension may be more important than average MAP. It provides support for the notion of MAP thresholds in SCI recovery, and the highest MAP values correlated with the greatest degree of neurological recovery. The results are concordant with current guidelines in suggesting that MAP thresholds

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jake; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell

    2016-08-01

    Improved survival with combination antiretroviral therapy has led to a dramatic increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals 50 years of age or older such that by 2020 more than 50% of HIV-infected persons in the United States will be above this age. Recent studies confirm that antiretroviral therapy should be offered to all HIV-infected patients regardless of age, symptoms, CD4+ cell count, or HIV viral load. However, when compared with HIV-uninfected populations, even with suppression of measurable HIV replication, older individuals are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, malignancies, liver disease, and other comorbidities.

  12. Adult human adipose tissue contains several types of multipotent cells.

    PubMed

    Tallone, Tiziano; Realini, Claudio; Böhmler, Andreas; Kornfeld, Christopher; Vassalli, Giuseppe; Moccetti, Tiziano; Bardelli, Silvana; Soldati, Gianni

    2011-04-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cells that can be easily isolated from various tissues and expanded in vitro. Many reports on their pluripotency and possible clinical applications have raised hopes and interest in MSCs. In an attempt to unify the terminology and the criteria to label a cell as MSC, in 2006 the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) proposed a standard set of rules to define the identity of these cells. However, MSCs are still extracted from different tissues, by diverse isolation protocols, are cultured and expanded in different media and conditions. All these variables may have profound effects on the selection of cell types and the composition of heterogeneous subpopulations, on the selective expansion of specific cell populations with totally different potentials and ergo, on the long-term fate of the cells upon in vitro culture. Therefore, specific molecular and cellular markers that identify MSCs subsets as well as standardization of expansion protocols for these cells are urgently needed. Here, we briefly discuss new useful markers and recent data supporting the rapidly emerging concept that many different types of progenitor cells are found in close association with blood vessels. This knowledge may promote the necessary technical improvements required to reduce variability and promote higher efficacy and safety when isolating and expanding these cells for therapeutic use. In the light of the discussed data, particularly the identification of new markers, and advances in the understanding of fundamental MSC biology, we also suggest a revision of the 2006 ISCT criteria.

  13. Human germ cell differentiation from fetal- and adult-derived induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Panula, Sarita; Medrano, Jose V.; Kee, Kehkooi; Bergström, Rosita; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Byers, Blake; Wilson, Kitchener D.; Wu, Joseph C.; Simon, Carlos; Hovatta, Outi; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, our understanding of molecular genetic aspects of human germ cell development has been limited, at least in part due to inaccessibility of early stages of human development to experimentation. However, the derivation of pluripotent stem cells may provide the necessary human genetic system to study germ cell development. In this study, we compared the potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), derived from adult and fetal somatic cells to form primordial and meiotic germ cells, relative to human embryonic stem cells. We found that ∼5% of human iPSCs differentiated to primordial germ cells (PGCs) following induction with bone morphogenetic proteins. Furthermore, we observed that PGCs expressed green fluorescent protein from a germ cell-specific reporter and were enriched for the expression of endogenous germ cell-specific proteins and mRNAs. In response to the overexpression of intrinsic regulators, we also observed that iPSCs formed meiotic cells with extensive synaptonemal complexes and post-meiotic haploid cells with a similar pattern of ACROSIN staining as observed in human spermatids. These results indicate that human iPSCs derived from reprogramming of adult somatic cells can form germline cells. This system may provide a useful model for molecular genetic studies of human germline formation and pathology and a novel platform for clinical studies and potential therapeutical applications. PMID:21131292

  14. Treatment of Human-Caused Trauma: Attrition in the Adult Outcomes Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthieu, Monica; Ivanoff, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Attrition or dropout is the failure of a participant to complete, comply, or the prematurely discontinuation or discharge from treatment, resulting in lost data and affecting outcomes. This review of 10 years of adult posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment outcome literature specific to Criterion A events of human origin examines how…

  15. Adult attachment style is associated with cerebral μ-opioid receptor availability in humans.

    PubMed

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Manninen, Sandra; Tuominen, Lauri; Hirvonen, Jussi; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Nuutila, Pirjo; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Hari, Riitta; Dunbar, Robin I M; Sams, Mikko

    2015-09-01

    Human attachment behavior mediates establishment and maintenance of social relationships. Adult attachment characteristically varies on anxiety and avoidance dimensions, reflecting the tendencies to worry about the partner breaking the social bond (anxiety) and feeling uncomfortable about depending on others (avoidance). In primates and other mammals, the endogenous μ-opioid system is linked to long-term social bonding, but evidence of its role in human adult attachment remains more limited. We used in vivo positron emission tomography to reveal how variability in μ-opioid receptor (MOR) availability is associated with adult attachment in humans. We scanned 49 healthy subjects using a MOR-specific ligand [(11) C]carfentanil and measured their attachment avoidance and anxiety with the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised scale. The avoidance dimension of attachment correlated negatively with MOR availability in the thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex, as well as the frontal cortex, amygdala, and insula. No associations were observed between MOR availability and the anxiety dimension of attachment. Our results suggest that the endogenous opioid system may underlie interindividual differences in avoidant attachment style in human adults, and that differences in MOR availability are associated with the individuals' social relationships and psychosocial well-being. PMID:26046928

  16. Perspectives on Adult Education, Human Resource Development, and the Emergence of Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a perspective on the relationship between adult education and human resource development of the past two decades and the subsequent emergence of workforce development. The lesson taken from the article should be more than simply a recounting of events related to these fields of study. Instead, the more general lesson may be…

  17. Concept Maps: Practice Applications in Adult Education and Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Concept maps can be used as both a cognitive and constructivist learning strategy in teaching and learning in adult education and human resource development. The maps can be used to understand course readings, analyze case studies, develop reflective thinking and enhance research skills. The creation of concept maps can also be supported by the…

  18. Emotions and Human Concern: Adult Education and the Philosophical Thought of Martha Nussbaum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Donovan

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that philosopher Martha Nussbaum's reflections on the role of the emotions in human flourishing can contribute in important ways to our understanding of the emotions in adult education contexts. The article summarises Nussbaum's exploration of the contributions of classical philosophers like Socrates, Aristotle, and…

  19. Evaluation of Serum Creatinine Changes With Integrase Inhibitor Use in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Tara A.; Duggan, Joan M.; Sahloff, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective chart review evaluated changes in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance (CrCl) after initiation of an integrase inhibitor (INSTI)-based regimen as initial treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults. Serum creatinine and CrCl changes were similar to those seen in clinical trials for INSTIs. No renal-related serious adverse events or discontinuations occurred. PMID:27092314

  20. NIRS Measurement of Venous Oxygen Saturation in the Adult Human Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Derek W.; Haensse, Daniel; Bauschatz, Andrea; Wolf, Martin

    Provided that both the breathing frequency remains constant and that the temporal resolution of the instrument is sufficiently high, NIRS spiroximetry enables measurement of cerebral SvO2 in healthy human adults. Furthermore, simultaneous measurements of StO2, SaO2, and SvO2 enable calculation of both OEF and the compartmental distribution of cerebral blood volume.

  1. Equality and Human Capital: Conflicting Concepts within State-Funded Adult Education in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a critique of the concept of equality as it informs the White Paper on Adult Education: Learning for Life (2000). It also outlines the extent to which human capital theory can be seen to have effectively colonised lifelong learning from the outset of its adoption by the European Union with highly constraining implications for…

  2. Severe Infections with Human Adenovirus 7d in 2 Adults in Family, Illinois, USA, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus 7d, a genomic variant with no reported circulation in the United States, was isolated from 2 adults with severe respiratory infections in Illinois. Molecular typing identified a close relationship with strains of the same genome type isolated from cases of respiratory disease in several provinces of China since 2009. PMID:26982199

  3. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part One, Assumptions, Definitions, and Critiques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2006-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995).…

  4. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part Two, the Critical Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2006-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995). The…

  5. An Assessemnt of Graduate Adult Education and Human Resource Development Programs: A U.S. Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akdere, Mesut; Conceicao, Simone C. O.

    2009-01-01

    Due to recent changes in the workplace, the workforce and higher education have driven academic programs of adult education (AE) and human resource development (HRD) in the U.S. to become more integrated as part of the mission of institutions of higher education. In this exploratory study, existing graduate programs in AE and HRD in the U.S. were…

  6. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part Two, the Critical Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2014-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995). The…

  7. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part One, Assumptions, Definitions, and Critiques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2013-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995).…

  8. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human Brainstem and Cervical Spinal Cord during Cognitive Modulation of Pain.

    PubMed

    Leung, Roxanne H; Stroman, Patrick W

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a complex sensory experience, and cognitive factors such as attention can influence its perception. Modulation of pain involves a network of subcortical structures; however, the role and relationship of these regions in cognitive modulation of pain are not well understood. The aims of this research were to evaluate the behavioral effect of cognitive modulation of pain and investigate the neural correlates of this mechanism in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord (SC), using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and structural equation modeling (SEM). We applied noxious thermal stimulation on the C6 dermatome to 12 healthy female participants while they performed the n-Back task. Our findings demonstrate a significant attenuation in pain perception across the group as a result of the task, along with high intersubject variability in the degree of modulation. Using fMRI, our studies characterize neural responses in subcortical regions that are involved in the modulation of pain. SEM analysis reveals connectivity between the brainstem and SC at the group and individual levels, depending on cognitive load and degree of pain modulation, respectively. All together, our research demonstrates the behavioral effect of cognitive modulation on pain and provides insight into the subcortical neural response to the process. PMID:27652451

  9. The posture-related interaction between Ia-afferent and descending input on the spinal reflex excitability in humans.

    PubMed

    Bove, Marco; Trompetto, Carlo; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Schieppati, Marco

    2006-04-24

    The separate and combined depressive effects induced by vibration and standing on the soleus H-reflex have been studied by administering Achilles' tendon vibration in prone position and during stance. Without vibration, H-reflex amplitude was larger under prone than standing condition. Vibration reduced the reflex both in prone position and even more during stance. When vibration was superimposed to inclined stance (greater EMG background), the reflex was reduced of the same absolute amount as when it was superimposed to normal stance. When vibration was superimposed on stance with minimal or no background EMG, the reflex disappeared. These results confirm that both upright posture and vibration have a strong depressive effect on the H-reflex. They also show that muscle activity during stance is enough for overcoming the reflex depression. These findings provide information about the origin of the disfacilitatory effects on the monosynaptic reflex pathway, contribute to the understanding of the posture-related mechanisms responsible for the modulation of the spinal reflex excitability, and allow arguing in favour of a minor but adaptable role for the short latency stretch reflex in the control of quiet unperturbed stance.

  10. Assessment of spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Braun, J; Baraliakos, X; Regel, A; Kiltz, U

    2014-12-01

    Spinal pain or back pain is a very common symptom that can have many reasons. The most studied location is low back pain, and it is considered to be nonspecific in the majority of cases. Only a small proportion of patients have axial inflammation as the major cause of their back complaints with chronic inflammatory back pain (IBP) as the most prominent clinical feature of spondyloarthritis (SpA). The recognition of IBP and patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is challenging in primary care, and it is important to further facilitate the early diagnosis of SpA. Proposals for improving the referral of patients with a possible diagnosis of axSpA include clinical parameters, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B27, and imaging parameters. Imaging is crucial for the visualization, objective validation, and understanding of back pain. Numerous diseases such as degenerative disk disease, degenerative changes in the intervertebral (facet) joints and the associated ligaments, spinal instability, herniation of the intervertebral disk, and spinal stenosis have to be differentiated in interpreting imaging of the spine. The sacroiliac joints and the spine are of major importance for the diagnosis and classification of axSpA. Conventional radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most important imaging technologies for visualization of structural changes such as syndesmophytes and axial inflammation such as sacroiliitis and spondylitis. The pathogenesis of axSpA is largely genetically determined. HLA B27 has the strongest contribution to the total genetic burden, but other major contributors such as endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase (ERAP)-1 and interleukin (IL)-23R have also been identified. PMID:26096091

  11. A Novel Computational Strategy to Identify A-to-I RNA Editing Sites by RNA-Seq Data: De Novo Detection in Human Spinal Cord Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Ernesto; Gallo, Angela; Galeano, Federica; Tomaselli, Sara; Pesole, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process occurring in a wide range of organisms. In human brain, the A-to-I RNA editing, in which individual adenosine (A) bases in pre-mRNA are modified to yield inosine (I), is the most frequent event. Modulating gene expression, RNA editing is essential for cellular homeostasis. Indeed, its deregulation has been linked to several neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. To date, many RNA editing sites have been identified by next generation sequencing technologies employing massive transcriptome sequencing together with whole genome or exome sequencing. While genome and transcriptome reads are not always available for single individuals, RNA-Seq data are widespread through public databases and represent a relevant source of yet unexplored RNA editing sites. In this context, we propose a simple computational strategy to identify genomic positions enriched in novel hypothetical RNA editing events by means of a new two-steps mapping procedure requiring only RNA-Seq data and no a priori knowledge of RNA editing characteristics and genomic reads. We assessed the suitability of our procedure by confirming A-to-I candidates using conventional Sanger sequencing and performing RNA-Seq as well as whole exome sequencing of human spinal cord tissue from a single individual. PMID:22957051

  12. Spinal cord trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the bones or disks have been weakened Fragments of bone (such as from broken vertebrae, which are the ... presses on the spinal cord (decompression laminectomy ) Remove bone fragments, disk fragments, or foreign objects Fuse broken spinal ...

  13. 40 CFR 26.1704 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted before April 7, 2006. 26.1704 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted...

  14. 40 CFR 26.1705 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted after April 7, 2006. 26.1705 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted...

  15. 40 CFR 26.1705 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults initiated after April 7, 2006. 26.1705 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults initiated...

  16. 40 CFR 26.1705 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults initiated after April 7, 2006. 26.1705 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults initiated...

  17. 40 CFR 26.1704 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted before April 7, 2006. 26.1704 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted...

  18. 40 CFR 26.1704 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted before April 7, 2006. 26.1704 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted...

  19. 40 CFR 26.1705 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted after April 7, 2006. 26.1705 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted...

  20. 40 CFR 26.1705 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted after April 7, 2006. 26.1705 Section 26... Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted...

  1. Self-Control and Impulsiveness in Nondieting Adult Human Females: Effects of Visual Food Cues and Food Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forzano, Lori-Ann B.; Chelonis, John J.; Casey, Caitlin; Forward, Marion; Stachowiak, Jacqueline A.; Wood, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Self-control can be defined as the choice of a larger, more delayed reinforcer over a smaller, less delayed reinforcer, and impulsiveness as the opposite. Previous research suggests that exposure to visual food cues affects adult humans' self-control. Previous research also suggests that food deprivation decreases adult humans' self-control. The…

  2. Predictions of ozone absorption in human lungs from newborn to adult

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H.; Graham, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Dosimetry models for gases mainly have been used to predict absorption in adult humans and laboratory animals. The lack of lower respiratory tract (LRT) lung models for children has discouraged the application of theoretical gaseous dosimetry to this important sub-population. To fill this gap the authors have used several sources of data on age dependent LRT volumes, age dependent airway dimensions, a model of an adult tracheobronchial region, and a model of the adult acinus to construct theoretical LRT lung models for humans from birth to adult. An ozone (O{sub 3}) dosimetry model was then used to estimate the regional and local uptake of O{sub 3} in the (theoretical) LRTs of children and adults. For sedentary breathing, the LRT distribution of absorbed O{sub 3}, the percent uptake (76 to 85%), and the centriacinar O{sub 3} tissue dose are not very sensitive to age. For maximal work during exercise, predicted uptakes range from 83 to 91%, and the regional percent uptakes are more dependent on age than during quiet breathing. In general, total O{sub 3} absorption per minute increases with age. Regardless of age and state of breathing, the largest tissue dose of O{sub 3} is predicted to occur in the centriacinar region, where many animal studies show the maximal morphological damage due to O{sub 3}.

  3. Larval food quantity affects the capacity of adult mosquitoes to transmit human malaria

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Lillian L. M.; Murdock, Courtney C.; Jacobs, Gregory R.; Thomas, Rachel J.; Thomas, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Adult traits of holometabolous insects are shaped by conditions experienced during larval development, which might impact interactions between adult insect hosts and parasites. However, the ecology of larval insects that vector disease remains poorly understood. Here, we used Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes and the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, to investigate whether larval conditions affect the capacity of adult mosquitoes to transmit malaria. We reared larvae in two groups; one group received a standard laboratory rearing diet, whereas the other received a reduced diet. Emerging adult females were then provided an infectious blood meal. We assessed mosquito longevity, parasite development rate and prevalence of infectious mosquitoes over time. Reduced larval food led to increased adult mortality and caused a delay in parasite development and a slowing in the rate at which parasites invaded the mosquito salivary glands, extending the time it took for mosquitoes to become infectious. Together, these effects increased transmission potential of mosquitoes in the high food regime by 260–330%. Such effects have not, to our knowledge, been shown previously for human malaria and highlight the importance of improving knowledge of larval ecology to better understand vector-borne disease transmission dynamics. PMID:27412284

  4. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and its imposters: three case studies

    PubMed Central

    Ammendolia, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis causing neurogenic claudicaton is a common condition impacting walking ability in older adults. There are other highly prevalent conditions in this patient population that have similar signs and symptoms and cause limited walking ability. The purpose of this study is to highlight the diagnostic challenges using three case studies of older adults who present with limited walking ability who have imaging evidence of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:25202160

  5. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200,000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity